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Sample records for continuum state cellular

  1. Continuum representations of cellular solids

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, M.K.

    1993-09-01

    Cellular materials consist of interconnected struts or plates which form cells. The struts or plates are constructed from a variety of metals, polymers, ceramics and wood products. Cellular materials are often used in impact limiters for shipping containers to protect the contents from accidental impact events. These materials exhibit a variety of complex behavior when subjected to crushing loads. This research focuses on the development of continuum representations of cellular solids that can be used in the finite element analysis of shipping container accidents. A significant portion of this work is the development of a new methodology to relate localized deformations to appropriate constitutive descriptions. This methodology provides the insight needed to select constitutive descriptions for cellular solids that capture the localized deformations that are observed experimentally. Constitutive relations are developed for two different cellular materials, aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. These constitutive relations are based on plasticity and continuum damage theories. Plasticity is used to describe the permanent deformation exhibited by both aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. Continuum damage is needed to capture the change in elastic parameters due to cracking of the polyurethane cell wall materials. The new constitutive description of polyurethane foam is implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes, and analytical and numerical predictions are compared with available experimental data.

  2. Bound states in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Stone, A. Douglas; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-09-01

    Bound states in the continuum (BICs) are waves that remain localized even though they coexist with a continuous spectrum of radiating waves that can carry energy away. Their very existence defies conventional wisdom. Although BICs were first proposed in quantum mechanics, they are a general wave phenomenon and have since been identified in electromagnetic waves, acoustic waves in air, water waves and elastic waves in solids. These states have been studied in a wide range of material systems, such as piezoelectric materials, dielectric photonic crystals, optical waveguides and fibres, quantum dots, graphene and topological insulators. In this Review, we describe recent developments in this field with an emphasis on the physical mechanisms that lead to BICs across seemingly very different materials and types of waves. We also discuss experimental realizations, existing applications and directions for future work.

  3. Floquet bound states in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Stefano; Della Valle, Giuseppe

    2013-07-01

    Quantum mechanics predicts that certain stationary potentials can sustain bound states with an energy buried in the continuous spectrum of scattered states, the so-called bound states in the continuum (BIC). Originally regarded as mathematical curiosities, BIC have found an increasing interest in recent years, particularly in quantum and classical transport of matter and optical waves in mesoscopic and photonic systems where the underlying potential can be judiciously tailored. Most of our knowledge of BIC is so far restricted to static potentials. Here we introduce a new kind of BIC, referred to as Floquet BIC, which corresponds to a normalizable Floquet state of a time-periodic Hamiltonian with a quasienergy embedded into the spectrum of Floquet scattered states. We discuss the appearance of Floquet BIC states in a tight-binding lattice model driven by an ac field in the proximity of the dynamic localization regime.

  4. Floquet bound states in the continuum

    PubMed Central

    Longhi, Stefano; Valle, Giuseppe Della

    2013-01-01

    Quantum mechanics predicts that certain stationary potentials can sustain bound states with an energy buried in the continuous spectrum of scattered states, the so-called bound states in the continuum (BIC). Originally regarded as mathematical curiosities, BIC have found an increasing interest in recent years, particularly in quantum and classical transport of matter and optical waves in mesoscopic and photonic systems where the underlying potential can be judiciously tailored. Most of our knowledge of BIC is so far restricted to static potentials. Here we introduce a new kind of BIC, referred to as Floquet BIC, which corresponds to a normalizable Floquet state of a time-periodic Hamiltonian with a quasienergy embedded into the spectrum of Floquet scattered states. We discuss the appearance of Floquet BIC states in a tight-binding lattice model driven by an ac field in the proximity of the dynamic localization regime. PMID:23860625

  5. Towards a continuum theory of movement in interacting cellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Timothy

    2003-10-01

    Interacting cellular systems form the basis of all higher organisms, and are fundamental to the understanding of embryogenesis, organ function, and neoplasms. I will describe a stochastic model of cell interactions which can be applied to these problems, and present some of our recent results on chemotactic response.

  6. Unusually strong attraction in the presence of continuum bound state

    SciTech Connect

    Delfino, A.; Adhikari, S.K.; Tomio, L.; Frederico, T. Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210 Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, 01405 Sao Paulo, SP School of Physical Sciences, The Flinders University of South Australia, Bedford Park, SA 5042 Instituto de Estudos Avancados, Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial, 12231 Sao Jose dos Campos, SP )

    1992-11-01

    The result of few-particle ground-state calculation employing a two-particle nonlocal potential supporting a continuum bound state in addition to a negative-energy bound state has occasionally revealed unusually strong attraction in producing a very strongly bound ground state. In the presence of the continuum bound state the difference of phase shift between zero and infinite energies has an extra jump of {pi} as in the presence of an additional bound state. The wave function of the continuum bound state is identical with that of a strongly bound negative-energy state, which leads us to postulate a pseudo bound state in the two-particle system in order to explain the unexpected attraction. The role of the Pauli forbidden states is expected to be similar to these pseudo states.

  7. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the system spontaneously splitting into stable domains separated by static boundaries, some synchronously oscillating and the others incoherent. When the coupling range is local, nontrivial coherent structures with different periodicities are formed.

  8. Quantum state transfer by time reversal in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, S.

    2016-03-01

    A method for high-fidelity quantum state transfer in a quantum network coupled to a continuum, based on time reversal in the continuum after decay, is theoretically suggested. Provided that the energy spectrum of the network is symmetric around a reference energy and symmetric energy states are coupled the same way to the common continuum, ideal perfect state transfer can be obtained after time reversal. In particular, it is shown that in a linear tight-binding chain a quantum state can be transformed into its mirror image with respect to the center of the chain after a controllable time. As compared to a quantum mirror image based on coherent transport in a static chain with properly tailored inhomogeneous hopping rates, our method does not require hopping rate engineering and is less sensitive to disorder for long transfer times.

  9. Bound States in the Continuum in double layer structures

    PubMed Central

    Li, LiangSheng; Yin, Hongcheng

    2016-01-01

    We have theoretically investigated the reflectivity spectrums of single- and double-layer photonic crystal slabs and the dielectric multilayer stack. It is shown that light can be perfectly confined in a single-layer photonic crystal slab at a given incident angle by changing the thickness, permittivity or hole radius of the structure. With a tunable double-layer photonic crystal slab, we demonstrate that the occurrence of tunable bound states in the continuum is dependent on the spacing between two slabs. Moreover, by analytically investigating the Drude lossless multilayer stack model, the spacing dependence of bound states in the continuum is characterized as the phase matching condition that illuminates these states can occur at any nonzero incident angles by adjusting the spacing. PMID:27245435

  10. Bound and continuum vibrational states of the bifluoride anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špirko, V.; Šindelka, M.; Shirsat, R. N.; Leszczynski, J.

    2003-07-01

    The energies of the bound vibrational states and energy density spectra of the continuum vibrational states of FHF - are calculated, 'exactly' and 'adiabatically', using a new ab initio (CCSD(T)) potential energy surface. Statistical properties of the bound states are probed in terms of the density of states and nearest neighbor level spacing distributions (NNSD). Importantly, the approximate 'adiabatic' densities coincide nearly quantitatively with their 'exact' counterparts. A quantitative fitting of the NNSDs is achieved with a new empirical modification of the Wigner distribution.

  11. Exploring continuum structures with a pseudo-state basis

    SciTech Connect

    Lay, J. A.; Moro, A. M.; Arias, J. M.; Gomez-Camacho, J.

    2010-08-15

    The ability of a recently developed square-integrable discrete basis to represent the properties of the continuum of a two-body system is investigated. The basis is obtained performing a simple analytic local scale transformation to the harmonic oscillator basis. Scattering phase-shifts and the electric transition probabilities B(E1) and B(E2) have been evaluated for several potentials using the proposed basis. Both quantities are found to be in excellent agreement with the exact values calculated from the true scattering states. The basis has been applied to describe the projectile continuum in the {sup 6}He scattering by {sup 12}C and {sup 208}Pb targets at 240 MeV/nucleon and the {sup 11}Be scattering by {sup 12}C at 67 MeV/nucleon. The calculated breakup differential cross sections are found to be in very good agreement with the available experimental data for these reactions.

  12. Mechanical bound state in the continuum for optomechanical microresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuan; Shen, Zhen; Xiong, Xiao; Dong, Chun-Hua; Zou, Chang-Ling; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-06-01

    Clamping loss limits the quality factor of mechanical mode in the optomechanical resonators supported with the supporting stem. Using the mechanical bound state in the continuum (BIC), we have found that the mechanical clamping loss can be avoided. The mechanical quality factor of a microsphere could be achieved up to 108 for a specific radius of the stem, which forms a mechanical BIC with the combination of the symmetry protected mechanism and the single resonance mechanism. Such a mechanism is proved to be universal for different geometries and materials, thus can also be generalized to design high quality mechanical resonators.

  13. Block versus continuum deformation in the Western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, G.; Oppenheimer, D.; Amelung, F.

    1994-01-01

    The relative role of block versus continuum deformation of continental lithosphere is a current subject of debate. Continuous deformation is suggested by distributed seismicity at continental plate margins and by cumulative seismic moment sums which yield slip estimates that are less than estimates from plate motion studies. In contrast, block models are favored by geologic studies of displacement in places like Asia. A problem in this debate is a lack of data from which unequivocal conclusions may be reached. In this paper we apply the techniques of study used in regions such as the Alpine-Himalayan belt to an area with a wealth of instrumental data-the Western United States. By comparing plate rates to seismic moment release rates and assuming a typical seismogenic layer thickness of 15 km it appears that since 1850 about 60% of the Pacific-North America motion across the plate boundary in California and Nevada has occurred seismically and 40% aseismically. The San Francisco Bay area shows similar partitioning between seismic and aseismic deformation, and it can be shown that within the seismogenic depth range aseismic deformation is concentrated near the surface and at depth. In some cases this deformation can be located on creeping surface faults, but elsewhere it is spread over a several kilometer wide zone adjacent to the fault. These superficial creeping deformation zones may be responsible for the palaeomagnetic rotations that have been ascribed elsewhere to the surface expression of continuum deformation in the lithosphere. Our results support the dominant role of non-continuum deformation processes with the implication that deformation localization by strain softening must occur in the lower crust and probably the upper mantle. Our conclusions apply only to the regions where the data are good, and even within the Western United States (i.e., the Basin and Range) deformation styles remain poorly resolved. Nonetheless, we maintain that block motion is the

  14. Strain-Induced Localized States Within the Matrix Continuum of Self-Assembled Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, V.; Bester, G.; Zunger, A.

    2009-07-01

    Quantum dot-based infrared detectors often involve transitions from confined states of the dot to states above the minimum of the conduction band continuum of the matrix. We discuss the existence of two types of resonant states within this continuum in self-assembled dots: (i) virtual bound states, which characterize square wells even without strain and (ii) strain-induced localized states. The latter emerge due to the appearance of 'potential wings' near the dot, related to the curvature of the dots. While states (i) do couple to the continuum, states (ii) are sheltered by the wings, giving rise to sharp absorption peaks.

  15. Quantum secure direct communication of digital and analog signals using continuum coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Antônio Geovan de Araújo Holanda; Rios, Francisco Franklin Sousa; Ramos, Rubens Viana

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present optical schemes for secure direct quantum communication of digital and analog signals using continuum coherent states and frequency-dependent phase modulation. The main advantages of the proposed schemes are that they do not use entangled states and they can be implemented with today technology. The theory of quantum interference of continuum coherent state is described, and the optical setups for secure direct communication are presented and their securities are discussed.

  16. Excited state absorption spectrum of chlorophyll a obtained with white-light continuum.

    PubMed

    De Boni, L; Correa, D S; Pavinatto, F J; dos Santos, D S; Mendonça, C R

    2007-04-28

    The study of excited state properties of chlorophyll a is a subject of foremost interest, given that it plays important roles in biological process and has also been proposed for applications in photonics. This work reports on the excited state absorption spectrum of chlorophyll a solution from 460 to 700 nm, obtained through the white-light continuum Z-scan technique. Saturation of absorption was observed due to the ground state depletion, induced by the white-light continuum region that is resonant with the Q band of chlorophyll a. The authors also observed reverse saturation of absorption related to the excitation from the first excited state to a higher energy level for wavelengths below 640 nm. An energy-level diagram, based on the electronic states of chlorophyll a, was employed to interpret their results, revealing that more states than the ones related to the Q and B bands participate in the excited state absorption of this molecule.

  17. Bound state in the continuum in the one-dimensional photonic crystal slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrieva, Z. F.; Bogdanov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work we developed a design of one-dimensional Si/SiO2 photonic crystal slab supporting so called optical bound states in the continuum - infinitely high-Q optical states with energies lying above the light line of the surrounding space. Such high-Q states are very perspective for many potential applications ranging from on-chip photonics and optical communications to biological sensing and photovoltaics.

  18. Fano resonances in photonic crystal slabs near optical bound states in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Cédric; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Sauvan, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Photonic crystal slabs are able to support optical bound states in the continuum. The latter are eigenmodes of the structure that are truly guided (no radiation leakage) despite the fact that they lie above the light cone within the continuum of radiation modes. Such peculiar states can be viewed as modes with an infinite quality factor Q . Therefore, the question of the behavior of Fano resonances, as optogeometrical parameters are tuned close to optical bound states in the continuum, is of importance for applications of photonic crystal slabs with ultrahigh Q factors. We study theoretically the reflection and transmission of a photonic crystal slab close to an optical bound state in the continuum with a phenomenological approach involving the poles and zeros of the scattering matrix. In particular, we derive a general relation valid for asymmetric structures that gives the position of a pole in the complex plane as a function of the positions of the zeros. We provide closed-form expressions for the reflection and transmission. The proposed phenomenological approach is validated through rigorous numerical calculations.

  19. Analytical perspective for bound states in the continuum in photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Peng, Chao; Liang, Yong; Li, Zhengbin; Noda, Susumu

    2014-07-18

    We investigate the formation of photonic bound states in the continuum (BICs) in photonic crystal slabs from an analytical perspective. Unlike the stationary at-Γ BICs which originate from the geometric symmetry, the tunable off-Γ BICs are due to the weighted destructive via the continuum interference in the vicinity of accidental symmetry when the majority of the radiation is precanceled. The symmetric compatible nature of the off-Γ BICs leads to a trapping of light that can be tuned through continuously varying the wave vector. With the analytical approach, we explain a reported experiment and predict the existence of a new BIC at an unrevealed symmetry.

  20. Continuum quantum systems as limits of discrete quantum systems: II. State functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Laurence

    2001-06-01

    In this second of four papers on the eponymous topic, pointwise convergence of a `discrete' state function to a `continuum' state function is shown to imply the algebraic criterion for convergence that was introduced in the prequel. As examples (and as a prerequisite for the sequels), the normal approximation theorem and the convergence of the Kravchuk functions to the Hermite-Gaussians are expressed in terms of the algebraic notion of convergence.

  1. Unified calculation of generalized oscillator strength of argon ranging from bound to continuum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Jin, Rui; Zeng, De-Ling; Han, Xiao-Ying; Yan, Jun; Li, Jia-Ming

    2015-11-01

    The electron and photon scattering data of an atom are crucial for many scientific fields, including plasma physics, astrophysics, and so on. For high enough but nonrelativistic incident energies, the first Born approximation is applicable for calculating these data, in which the key physics quantity is the generalized oscillator strength (GOS). In high-energy electron impact excitation processes, atoms will be excited into various excited states including strongly perturbed Rydberg and adjacent continuum states. How to calculate these quantities of a nontrivial many-electron atom rapidly and accurately is still a great challenge. Based on our eigenchannel R -matrix method R -eigen, we further extend it to calculate the GOS of a whole channel in an atom, which includes all Rydberg and adjacent continuum states. The Jπ=1- states of argon are chosen as an illustrating example. The calculation results are in good agreement with the available benchmark absolute experimental measurements. The calculated eigenchannel GOS matrix elements are smooth functions of the excitation energy and momentum transfer. From such smooth eigenchannel GOS matrix elements, we can obtain the GOS of any specific excited state through multichannel quantum defect theory, e.g., infinite Rydberg (including a strongly perturbed one), autoionization, and continuum states.

  2. Multi-scale continuum modeling of biological processes: from molecular electro-diffusion to sub-cellular signaling transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Kekenes-Huskey, P.; Hake, J. E.; Holst, M. J.; McCammon, J. A.; Michailova, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a brief review of multi-scale modeling at the molecular to cellular scale, with new results for heart muscle cells. A finite element-based simulation package (SMOL) was used to investigate the signaling transduction at molecular and sub-cellular scales (http://mccammon.ucsd.edu/smol/, http://FETK.org) by numerical solution of the time-dependent Smoluchowski equations and a reaction-diffusion system. At the molecular scale, SMOL has yielded experimentally validated estimates of the diffusion-limited association rates for the binding of acetylcholine to mouse acetylcholinesterase using crystallographic structural data. The predicted rate constants exhibit increasingly delayed steady-state times, with increasing ionic strength, and demonstrate the role of an enzyme's electrostatic potential in influencing ligand binding. At the sub-cellular scale, an extension of SMOL solves a nonlinear, reaction-diffusion system describing Ca2+ ligand buffering and diffusion in experimentally derived rodent ventricular myocyte geometries. Results reveal the important role of mobile and stationary Ca2+ buffers, including Ca2+ indicator dye. We found that alterations in Ca2+-binding and dissociation rates of troponin C (TnC) and total TnC concentration modulate sub-cellular Ca2+ signals. The model predicts that reduced off-rate in the whole troponin complex (TnC, TnI, TnT) versus reconstructed thin filaments (Tn, Tm, actin) alters cytosolic Ca2+ dynamics under control conditions or in disease-linked TnC mutations. The ultimate goal of these studies is to develop scalable methods and theories for the integration of molecular-scale information into simulations of cellular-scale systems.

  3. Efficient representations of continuum states for photoionization processes from atomic and molecular targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Frank L.

    The investigation of single and double photoionization effects in small atoms and molecules provides a means to probe fundamental quantum mechanical phenomena concerning electron correlation and interference effects. To consider these concepts accurately from first principles requires the construction of the exact final continuum states of a many body problem in atomic double photoionization and of the complicated continuum states in molecular single photoionization. Methods designed for incorporating exterior complex scaling (ECS) have proven very successful towards accomplishing these goals, providing a rigorous framework for describing continuum states involving any number of outgoing electrons with numerical exactness. Furthermore, such methods render solutions that can be interrogated to extract the full richness of information about the photoionization process from the wave function. This work aims to demonstrate the use of exterior complex scaling by first exactly solving the three-body breakup problem of the atomic hydride anion. H-- is the simplest atomic system and is most sensitive to electron correlation effects. The application of ECS with an efficient finite-element discrete variable representation proves quite capable and well-suited for this atomic Coulomb breakup problem. The evolution of this framework to treat molecular problems efficiently with exactness is furthered by the design of a hybrid basis method. The incorporation of analytic Gaussian basis sets ubiquitous in bound state molecular descriptions seems natural for considering molecular continuum states. The hybrid method is described in full detail and applied to completely describe photoionization of molecular H+2 and Li+2 . Photoionization of simple molecular systems offers significantly more complexity in the resulting angular distributions of the ejected electron as the target geometry becomes less atomic-like, i.e., as the internuclear separation increases. In this regard

  4. Controlling Directionality and Dimensionality of Radiation by Perturbing Separable Bound States in the Continuum.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Nicholas; Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Buljan, Hrvoje; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-01-01

    A bound state in the continuum (BIC) is an unusual localized state that is embedded in a continuum of extended states. Here, we present the general condition for BICs to arise from wave equation separability. Then we show that by exploiting perturbations of certain symmetry such BICs can be turned into resonances that radiate with a tailorable directionality and dimensionality. Using this general framework, we construct new examples of separable BICs and resonances that can exist in optical potentials for ultracold atoms, photonic systems, and systems described by tight binding. Such resonances with easily reconfigurable radiation allow for applications such as the storage and release of waves at a controllable rate and direction, as well systems that switch between different dimensions of confinement. PMID:27641540

  5. Controlling Directionality and Dimensionality of Radiation by Perturbing Separable Bound States in the Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Nicholas; Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Buljan, Hrvoje; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-09-01

    A bound state in the continuum (BIC) is an unusual localized state that is embedded in a continuum of extended states. Here, we present the general condition for BICs to arise from wave equation separability. Then we show that by exploiting perturbations of certain symmetry such BICs can be turned into resonances that radiate with a tailorable directionality and dimensionality. Using this general framework, we construct new examples of separable BICs and resonances that can exist in optical potentials for ultracold atoms, photonic systems, and systems described by tight binding. Such resonances with easily reconfigurable radiation allow for applications such as the storage and release of waves at a controllable rate and direction, as well systems that switch between different dimensions of confinement.

  6. Controlling Directionality and Dimensionality of Radiation by Perturbing Separable Bound States in the Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Nicholas; Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Buljan, Hrvoje; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-01-01

    A bound state in the continuum (BIC) is an unusual localized state that is embedded in a continuum of extended states. Here, we present the general condition for BICs to arise from wave equation separability. Then we show that by exploiting perturbations of certain symmetry such BICs can be turned into resonances that radiate with a tailorable directionality and dimensionality. Using this general framework, we construct new examples of separable BICs and resonances that can exist in optical potentials for ultracold atoms, photonic systems, and systems described by tight binding. Such resonances with easily reconfigurable radiation allow for applications such as the storage and release of waves at a controllable rate and direction, as well systems that switch between different dimensions of confinement. PMID:27641540

  7. Treatment of continuum in nuclear reactions involving weakly bound systems. A simple model to test different prescriptions describing the coupling to continuum states

    SciTech Connect

    Dasso, C. H.; Vitturi, A.

    2009-03-04

    We exploit a model describing the break-up of weakly-bound nuclei that can be used as a laboratory for testing different prescriptions that have been advanced in the literature to take into account the near-by presence of continuum states. In the model we follow the evolution of a single particle wave function in one dimension, initially bound by a Woods-Saxon type potential and then perturbed by a time- and position-dependent external field. Proper choices of this potential can simulate the effect of the interaction between reaction partners in a nuclear collision. These processes generate inelastic excitation probabilities that--distributed over the bound and continuum states of the system--lead to either a partial or a total fragmentation of the final wave function. The comparison with the exact calculations shows that standard coupled channel descriptions based on discretization of the continuum can be accurate only when a proper choice is made of the number of discrete states, of the energy mesh and of the energy cutoff. This may imply, even in simplified cases, the use of a rather large (and unpracticable) number of channels. The use of a more restricted number of channels may lead to misleading results.

  8. Bound states in the continuum in zigzag quantum wire enforced by a finger gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadreev, A. F.; Pilipchuk, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    We consider electron transport in a zigzag quantum wire by the effect of finger gate potential. Using a non-Hermitian effective Hamiltonian, we calculate resonance positions and widths to show that the resonance widths are easily governed by the gate potential. In particular, the resonance width can be enforced to be equal to zero, which leads to an electron localization with the Fermi energy embedded in the propagation band of the wire, i.e., the bound state in the continuum (BSC). We show that, for positive values of the potential, a zigzag wire becomes a Fabry-Perot resonator to give rise to BSC too.

  9. Mathematical analysis of steady-state solutions in compartment and continuum models of cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhenzhen; Chou, Ching-Shan; Yi, Tau-Mu; Nie, Qing

    2011-10-01

    Cell polarization, in which substances previously uniformly distributed become asymmetric due to external or/and internal stimulation, is a fundamental process underlying cell mobility, cell division, and other polarized functions. The yeast cell S. cerevisiae has been a model system to study cell polarization. During mating, yeast cells sense shallow external spatial gradients and respond by creating steeper internal gradients of protein aligned with the external cue. The complex spatial dynamics during yeast mating polarization consists of positive feedback, degradation, global negative feedback control, and cooperative effects in protein synthesis. Understanding such complex regulations and interactions is critical to studying many important characteristics in cell polarization including signal amplification, tracking dynamic signals, and potential trade-off between achieving both objectives in a robust fashion. In this paper, we study some of these questions by analyzing several models with different spatial complexity: two compartments, three compartments, and continuum in space. The step-wise approach allows detailed characterization of properties of the steady state of the system, providing more insights for biological regulations during cell polarization. For cases without membrane diffusion, our study reveals that increasing the number of spatial compartments results in an increase in the number of steady-state solutions, in particular, the number of stable steady-state solutions, with the continuum models possessing infinitely many steady-state solutions. Through both analysis and simulations, we find that stronger positive feedback, reduced diffusion, and a shallower ligand gradient all result in more steady-state solutions, although most of these are not optimally aligned with the gradient. We explore in the different settings the relationship between the number of steady-state solutions and the extent and accuracy of the polarization. Taken together

  10. In-situ measurement of bound states in the continuum in photonic crystal slabs (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchmair, Stefan; Gansch, Roman; Genevet, Patrice; Zederbauer, Tobias; MacFarland, Donald; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried; Capasso, Federico; Loncar, Marko

    2016-04-01

    Photonic crystal slabs have been subject to research for more than a decade, yet the existence of bound states in the radiation continuum (BICs) in photonic crystals has been reported only recently [1]. A BIC is formed when the radiation from all possible channels interferes destructively, causing the overall radiation to vanish. In photonic crystals, BICs are the result of accidental phase matching between incident, reflected and in-plane waves at seemingly random wave vectors [2]. While BICs in photonic crystals have been discussed previously using reflection measurements, we reports for the first time in-situ measurements of the bound states in the continuum in photonic crystal slabs. By embedding a photodetector into a photonic crystal slab we were able to directly observe optical BICs. The photonic crystal slabs are processed from a GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells heterostructure, providing intersubband absorption in the mid-infrared wavelength range. The generated photocurrent is collected via doped contact layers on top and bottom of the suspended photonic crystal slab. We were mapping out the photonic band structure by rotating the device and by acquiring photocurrent spectra every 5°. Our measured photonic bandstructure revealed several BICs, which was confirmed with a rigorously coupled-wave analysis simulation. Since coupling to external fields is suppressed, the photocurrent measured by the photodetector vanishes at the BIC wave vector. To confirm the relation between the measured photocurrent and the Q-factor we used temporal coupled mode theory, which yielded an inverse proportional relation between the photocurrent and the out-coupling loss from the photonic crystal. Implementing a plane wave expansion simulation allowed us to identify the corresponding photonic crystal modes. The ability to directly measure the field intensity inside the photonic crystal presents an important milestone towards integrated opto-electronic BIC devices. Potential

  11. Critical field enhancement of asymptotic optical bound states in the continuum.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jae Woong; Song, Seok Ho; Magnusson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We study spectral singularities and critical field enhancement factors associated with embedded photonic bound states in subwavelength periodic Si films. Ultrahigh-Q resonances supporting field enhancement factor exceeding 10(8) are obtained in the spectral vicinity of exact embedded eigenvalues in spite of deep surface modulation and vertical asymmetry of the given structure. Treating relations between the partial resonance Q and field enhancement factors with an analytical coupled-mode model, we derive a general strategy to maximize the field enhancement associated with these photonic bound states in the presence of material dissipation. The analytical expression for the field enhancement quantitatively agrees with rigorous numerical calculations. Therefore, our results provide a general knowledge for designing practical resonance elements based on optical bound states in the continuum in various applications. PMID:26673548

  12. Critical field enhancement of asymptotic optical bound states in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jae Woong; Song, Seok Ho; Magnusson, Robert

    2015-12-01

    We study spectral singularities and critical field enhancement factors associated with embedded photonic bound states in subwavelength periodic Si films. Ultrahigh-Q resonances supporting field enhancement factor exceeding 108 are obtained in the spectral vicinity of exact embedded eigenvalues in spite of deep surface modulation and vertical asymmetry of the given structure. Treating relations between the partial resonance Q and field enhancement factors with an analytical coupled-mode model, we derive a general strategy to maximize the field enhancement associated with these photonic bound states in the presence of material dissipation. The analytical expression for the field enhancement quantitatively agrees with rigorous numerical calculations. Therefore, our results provide a general knowledge for designing practical resonance elements based on optical bound states in the continuum in various applications.

  13. Critical field enhancement of asymptotic optical bound states in the continuum

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jae Woong; Song, Seok Ho; Magnusson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We study spectral singularities and critical field enhancement factors associated with embedded photonic bound states in subwavelength periodic Si films. Ultrahigh-Q resonances supporting field enhancement factor exceeding 108 are obtained in the spectral vicinity of exact embedded eigenvalues in spite of deep surface modulation and vertical asymmetry of the given structure. Treating relations between the partial resonance Q and field enhancement factors with an analytical coupled-mode model, we derive a general strategy to maximize the field enhancement associated with these photonic bound states in the presence of material dissipation. The analytical expression for the field enhancement quantitatively agrees with rigorous numerical calculations. Therefore, our results provide a general knowledge for designing practical resonance elements based on optical bound states in the continuum in various applications. PMID:26673548

  14. Imaging of continuum states of the He{sub 2}{sup 2+} quasimolecule

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, L. Ph. H.; Schoeffler, M. S.; Stiebing, K. E.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.; Doerner, R.; Afaneh, F.; Weber, Th.

    2007-07-15

    Using cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy (COLTRIMS) we have investigated the production of one free electron in slow He{sup 2+}+He(1s{sup 2}) collisions. At projectile velocities between 0.6 and 1.06 a.u. (9-28 keV/u), the fully differential cross section was measured state selective with respect to the second electron, which is bound either at the target or the projectile. We provide a comprehensive data set comprising state selective total cross section, scattering angle dependent single differential cross sections, and fully differential cross section. We show that the momentum distribution of the electron in the continuum image the relevant molecular orbitals for the reaction channel under consideration. By choosing the bound electron final state at the target or projectile and the impact parameter we can select these orbitals and manipulate their relative phase.

  15. Formation mechanism of guided resonances and bound states in the continuum in photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xingwei; Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Lin, Xiao; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    We develop a formalism, based on the mode expansion method, to describe the guided resonances and bound states in the continuum (BICs) in photonic crystal slabs with one-dimensional periodicity. This approach provides analytic insights to the formation mechanisms of these states: the guided resonances arise from the transverse Fabry-Pérot condition, and the divergence of the resonance lifetimes at the BICs is explained by a destructive interference of radiation from different propagating components inside the slab. We show BICs at the center and on the edge of the Brillouin zone protected by symmetry, BICs at generic wave vectors not protected by symmetry, and the annihilation of BICs at low-symmetry wave vectors. PMID:27557882

  16. Formation mechanism of guided resonances and bound states in the continuum in photonic crystal slabs

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Xingwei; Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Lin, Xiao; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-08-25

    We develop a formalism, based on the mode expansion method, to describe the guided resonances and bound states in the continuum (BICs) in photonic crystal slabs with one-dimensional periodicity. This approach provides analytic insights to the formation mechanisms of these states: the guided resonances arise from the transverse Fabry–Pérot condition, and the divergence of the resonance lifetimes at the BICs is explained by a destructive interference of radiation from different propagating components inside the slab. As a result, we show BICs at the center and on the edge of the Brillouin zone protected by symmetry, BICs at generic wave vectorsmore » not protected by symmetry, and the annihilation of BICs at low-symmetry wave vectors.« less

  17. Formation mechanism of guided resonances and bound states in the continuum in photonic crystal slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xingwei; Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Lin, Xiao; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-08-01

    We develop a formalism, based on the mode expansion method, to describe the guided resonances and bound states in the continuum (BICs) in photonic crystal slabs with one-dimensional periodicity. This approach provides analytic insights to the formation mechanisms of these states: the guided resonances arise from the transverse Fabry–Pérot condition, and the divergence of the resonance lifetimes at the BICs is explained by a destructive interference of radiation from different propagating components inside the slab. We show BICs at the center and on the edge of the Brillouin zone protected by symmetry, BICs at generic wave vectors not protected by symmetry, and the annihilation of BICs at low-symmetry wave vectors.

  18. Ultrasensitive optical absorption in graphene based on bound states in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mingda; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-02-01

    We have designed a sphere-graphene-slab structure so that the electromagnetic wave can be well confined in the graphene due to the formation of a bound state in a continuum (BIC) of radiation modes. Based on such a bound state, we have realized strong optical absorption in the monolayer graphene. Such a strong optical absorption exhibits many advantages. It is ultrasensitive to the wavelength because the Q factor of the absorption peak can be more than 2000. By taking suitable BICs, the selective absorption for S and P waves has not only been realized, but also all-angle absorption for the S and P waves at the same time has been demonstrated. We have also found that ultrasensitive strong absorptions can appear at any wavelength from mid-infrared to far-infrared band. These phenomena are very beneficial to biosensing, perfect filters and waveguides.

  19. Ultrasensitive optical absorption in graphene based on bound states in the continuum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingda; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    We have designed a sphere-graphene-slab structure so that the electromagnetic wave can be well confined in the graphene due to the formation of a bound state in a continuum (BIC) of radiation modes. Based on such a bound state, we have realized strong optical absorption in the monolayer graphene. Such a strong optical absorption exhibits many advantages. It is ultrasensitive to the wavelength because the Q factor of the absorption peak can be more than 2000. By taking suitable BICs, the selective absorption for S and P waves has not only been realized, but also all-angle absorption for the S and P waves at the same time has been demonstrated. We have also found that ultrasensitive strong absorptions can appear at any wavelength from mid-infrared to far-infrared band. These phenomena are very beneficial to biosensing, perfect filters and waveguides. PMID:25652437

  20. Formation mechanism of guided resonances and bound states in the continuum in photonic crystal slabs

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xingwei; Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Lin, Xiao; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    We develop a formalism, based on the mode expansion method, to describe the guided resonances and bound states in the continuum (BICs) in photonic crystal slabs with one-dimensional periodicity. This approach provides analytic insights to the formation mechanisms of these states: the guided resonances arise from the transverse Fabry–Pérot condition, and the divergence of the resonance lifetimes at the BICs is explained by a destructive interference of radiation from different propagating components inside the slab. We show BICs at the center and on the edge of the Brillouin zone protected by symmetry, BICs at generic wave vectors not protected by symmetry, and the annihilation of BICs at low-symmetry wave vectors. PMID:27557882

  1. Ultrasensitive optical absorption in graphene based on bound states in the continuum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingda; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    We have designed a sphere-graphene-slab structure so that the electromagnetic wave can be well confined in the graphene due to the formation of a bound state in a continuum (BIC) of radiation modes. Based on such a bound state, we have realized strong optical absorption in the monolayer graphene. Such a strong optical absorption exhibits many advantages. It is ultrasensitive to the wavelength because the Q factor of the absorption peak can be more than 2000. By taking suitable BICs, the selective absorption for S and P waves has not only been realized, but also all-angle absorption for the S and P waves at the same time has been demonstrated. We have also found that ultrasensitive strong absorptions can appear at any wavelength from mid-infrared to far-infrared band. These phenomena are very beneficial to biosensing, perfect filters and waveguides. PMID:25652437

  2. Bloch bound states in the radiation continuum in a periodic array of dielectric rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgakov, Evgeny N.; Sadreev, Almas F.

    2014-11-01

    We consider an infinite periodic array of dielectric rods in vacuum with the aim to demonstrate three types of Bloch bound states in the continuum (BSCs): symmetry protected with a zero Bloch vector, embedded in one diffraction channel with nonzero Bloch vector, and embedded in two and three diffraction channels. The first and second types of the BSC exist for a wide range of material parameters of the rods, while the third occurs only at a specific value of the radius of the rods. We show that the second type supports the power flux along the array. In order to find BSCs we put forward an approach based on the expansion over the Hankel functions. We show how the BSC reveals itself in the scattering function when the singular BSC point is approached along a specific path in the parametric space.

  3. Types or States? Cellular Dynamics and Regenerative Potential

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Carolyn E.; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many of our organs can maintain and repair themselves during homeostasis and injury, due to the action of tissue-specific, multipotent stem cells. However, recent evidence from mammalian systems suggests that injury stimulates dramatic plasticity, or transient changes in cell potential, in both stem cells and more differentiated cells. Planarian flatworms possess abundant stem cells, making them an exceptional model for understanding the cellular behavior underlying homeostasis and regeneration. Recent discoveries of cell lineages and regeneration-specific events provide an initial framework for unraveling the complex cellular contributions to regeneration. In this review we discuss the concept of cellular plasticity in the context of planarian regeneration, and consider the possibility that pluripotency may be a transient, probabilistic state exhibited by stem cells. PMID:26437587

  4. RNA: State Memory and Mediator of Cellular Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junhyong; Eberwine, James

    2010-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the genome is dynamic and exquisitely sensitive, changing expression patterns in response to age, environmental stimuli and pharmacological and physiological manipulations. Similarly, cellular phenotype, traditionally viewed as a stable end-state, should be viewed as versatile and changeable. The phenotype of a cell is better defined as a “homeostatic phenotype” implying plasticity resulting from a dynamically-changing yet characteristic pattern of gene/protein expression. A stable change in phenotype is the result of the movement of a cell between different multi-dimensional identity spaces. Here, we describe a key driver of this transition and the stabilizer of phenotype: the relative abundances of the cellular RNAs. We argue that the quantitative state of RNA can be likened to a state memory, that when transferred between cells, alters the phenotype in a predictable manner. PMID:20382532

  5. Self-localized states for electron transfer in nonlocal continuum deformable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros-Ake, Luis A.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of electron transport in a deformable continuum medium subjected to an external harmonic substrate potential. We then consider the quasi-stationary state of the full problem to find a Gross-Pitaevskii type equation with a nonlocal external potential, which is solved by variational and numerical means (considered as the exact solution) to find the parameter conditions for the existence of self-localized solutions. The variational approach predicts a threshold on the on-site or nonlocality parameter where localized solutions cease to exist from the Non-Linear Schrödinger soliton limit. A numerical continuation of stationary state solutions in the corresponding discrete system is used to confirm the prediction of the turning value in the on-site term. We finally study the full stationary state and make use of an approximation, proposed by Briedis et al. [17], for the nonlocal term, corresponding to strong nonlocalities, to find analytic expressions for self-localized states in terms of the series solutions of a nonlinear modified Bessel equation.

  6. Dynamic stress-strain states for metal foams using a 3D cellular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhijun; Wang, Changfeng; Yu, Jilin; Reid, Stephen R.; Harrigan, John J.

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic uniaxial impact behaviour of metal foams using a 3D cell-based finite element model is examined. At sufficiently high loading rates, these materials respond by forming ‘shock or consolidation waves' (Tan et al., 2005a, 2005b). However, the existing dynamic experimental methods have limitations in fully informing this behaviour, particularly for solving boundary/initial value problems. Recently, the problem of the shock-like response of an open-cell foam has been examined by Barnes et al. (2014) using the Hugoniot-curve representations. The present study is somewhat complementary to that approach and additionally aims to provide insight into the ‘rate sensitivity' mechanism applicable to cellular materials. To assist our understanding of the ‘loading rate sensitivity' behaviour of cellular materials, a virtual ‘test' method based on the direct impact technique is explored. Following a continuum representation of the response, the strain field calculation method is employed to determine the local strains ahead of and behind the resulting ‘shock front'. The dynamic stress-strain states in the densification stage are found to be different from the quasi-static ones. It is evident that the constitutive behaviour of the cellular material is deformation-mode dependent. The nature of the ‘rate sensitivity' revealed for cellular materials in this paper is different from the strain-rate sensitivity of dense metals. It is shown that the dynamic stress-strain states behind a shock front of the cellular material lie on a unique curve and each point on the curve corresponds to a particular ‘impact velocity', referred as the velocity upstream of the shock in this study. The dynamic stress-strain curve is related to a layer-wise collapse mode, whilst the equivalent quasi-static curve is related to a random shear band collapse mode. The findings herein are aimed at improving the experimental test techniques used to characterise the rate-sensitivity behaviour

  7. Excited States in Solution at Eom-Ccsd Level with the Polarizable Continuum Model of Solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricato, M.

    2011-06-01

    Electronic excited states are at the center of many research areas, and theoretical simulations are increasingly important. Although approximate methods based on time dependent density functional theory represent a useful tool, accurate wave function methods are still the most reliable approach. These methods, however, suffer from high computational cost that limits their range of applicability. This is particularly so when the system under study is in solution. In fact, the treatment of a large number of solvent molecules, even when modeled at a low level of theory (like molecular mechanics), is cumbersome due to the large number of conformations that needs to be considered. When the solvent is not directly involved in the process, its effect can be properly accounted for by using polarizable continuum models (PCMs) where the conformational average is implicit in the solvent dielectric constant. In this contribution, the treatment of electronic excited state energy and structure of molecules in solution at the EOM-CCSD/PCM level of theory is presented. This approach represents an effective compromise between computational cost and accurate treatment of the central part of the system while taking into account the non-negligible effect of the solvent.

  8. Quantum phase transition triggering magnetic bound states in the continuum in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guessi, L. H.; Marques, Y.; Machado, R. S.; Kristinsson, K.; Ricco, L. S.; Shelykh, I. A.; Figueira, M. S.; de Souza, M.; Seridonio, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Graphene hosting a pair of collinear adatoms in the phantom atom configuration has density of states vanishing in the vicinity of the Dirac point which can be described in terms of the pseudogap scaling as cube of the energy, Δ ∝|ɛ| 3 , which leads to the appearance of spin-degenerate bound states in the continuum (BICs) [Phys. Rev. B 92, 045409 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.045409]. In the case when adatoms are locally coupled to a single carbon atom the pseudogap scales linearly with energy, which prevents the formation of BICs. Here, we explore the effects of nonlocal coupling characterized by the Fano factor of interference q0, tunable by changing the slope of the Dirac cones in the graphene band structure. We demonstrate that three distinct regimes can be identified: (i) for q0qc 2 the cubic scaling of the pseudogap with energy Δ ∝|ɛ| 3 characteristic to the phantom atom configuration is restored and the phase with nonmagnetic BICs is recovered. The phase with magnetic BICs can be described in terms of an effective intrinsic exchange field of ferromagnetic nature between the adatoms mediated by graphene monolayer. We thus propose a new type of QPT resulting from the competition between two ground states, respectively characterized by spin-degenerate and magnetic BICs.

  9. Perchlorate in the feed-dairy continuum of the southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, C A; Blount, B C; Valentin-Blasini, L; Lesch, S M; Krieger, R I

    2008-07-01

    Perchlorate has the potential to cause thyroid dysfunction by inhibiting iodide uptake by the sodium iodide symporter. Perchlorate-contaminated waters may lead to human exposure through drinking water and food chain transfer in crops by way of irrigation water. Perchlorate has been found in dairy milk collected nationally and internationally. This study was conducted to evaluate perchlorate in the feed-dairy continuum in the southwestern United States. All feed products collected at dairies in this study had detectable levels of perchlorate as analyzed by ion chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The calculated total perchlorate intake across dairies ranged from 1.9 to 12.7 mg/cow per day. The variation in total perchlorate intake across dairies was largely associated with variation in forage and silage products. Alfalfa products were the single most important source of perchlorate intake variability among dairies. The estimated perchlorate intake from drinking water ranged from 0.01 mg per cow per day and was generally less than 2% of the total perchlorate intake. The perchlorate content of milk ranged from 0.9 to 10.3 microg/L and was similar to levels reported by the Food and Drug Administration's Total Diet Study. The perchlorate content of milk was significantly related to the presence of perchlorate in feed but the variation of perchlorate in milk could not be explained by feed intake alone.

  10. All-optical light storage in bound states in the continuum and release by demand.

    PubMed

    Bulgakov, E N; Pichugin, K N; Sadreev, A F

    2015-08-24

    In the framework of the temporal coupled mode theory we consider bound states embedded in the continuum (BSC) of photonic crystal waveguide as a capacity for light storage. A symmetry protected BSC occurs in two off-channel microresonators positioned symmetrically relative to the waveguide. We demonstrate that the symmetry protected BSC captures a fraction of a light pulse due to the Kerr effect as the pulse passes by the microresonators. However the amount of captured light is found to be strongly sensitive to the parameters of the gaussian light pulse such as basic frequency, duration and intensity. In contrast to the above case the BSC resulted from a full destructive interference of two eigenmodes of a single microresonator accumulates a fixed amount of light dependent on the material parameters of the microresonator but independent of the light pulse. The BSCs in the Fabry-Perot resonator show similar effects. We also show that the accumulated light can be released by a secondary pulse. These phenomena pave a way for all-optical storage and release of light.

  11. Lifetime measurements of 17C excited states and three-body and continuum effects

    DOE PAGES

    Smalley, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Navratil, P.; Roth, R.; Langhammer, J.; Bader, V. M.; Bazin, D.; Barryman, J. S.; Campbell, C. M.; Dohet-Eraly, J.; et al

    2015-12-18

    We studied transition rates for the lowest 1/2+ and 5/2+ excited states of 17C through lifetime measurements with the GRETINA array using the recoil-distance method. The present measurements provide a model-independent determination of transition strengths giving the values of B(M1;1/2+ → 3/2+g.s.) = 1.04+0.03–0.12 × 10–2μ2N and B(M1;5/2+ → 3/2+g.s.) = 7.12+1.27–0.96 × 10–2μ2N. The quenched M1 transition strength for the 1/2+ → 3/2+g.s. transition, with respect to the 5/2+ → 3/2+g.s. transition, has been confirmed with greater precision. Furthermore, the current data are compared to importance-truncated no-core shell model calculations addressing effects due to continuum and three-body forces.

  12. Continuum electrodynamics of type-II superconductors in the mixed state: The dc and ac response

    SciTech Connect

    Placais, B.; Mathieu, P.; Simon, Y.; Sonin, E.B.; Traito, K.B.

    1996-11-01

    The dc and ac response of the ideal type-II superconductor in the mixed state is analyzed in the frame of a continuum electrodynamics, in which all fields are averaged on a scale exceeding the intervortex distance. The results of previous calculations are brought together and compared, while paying special attention to the role of the vortex line tension and the normal current. The electromagnetic response is studied in the whole range of magnetic fields and frequencies. The possible effect of the normal current on vortex motion is discussed. We argue in this respect that existing theories, where the Lorentz force involves the normal current, are not consistent with Onsager relations. Due to vortex line tension the external fields penetrate into a superconductor as a superposition of two modes with different complex wave numbers (the two-mode electrodynamics). Obtained expressions for the surface impedance should permit one to determine the parameters of the theory from the experiment and to discriminate different models of vortex motion. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. Bridging continuum and statistical thermodynamics via equations of state and the density of states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gospodinov, Ivan D.; Escobedo, Fernando A.

    2004-06-01

    The connection between molecular force fields and equations of state (EoS) is typically established at the level of predicted quantities, e.g., by comparing simulation data and EoS data. In this paper we show how an EoS can be used to extract the density of states (Ω) of a system thus establishing a deeper connection between EoSs and statistical thermodynamics. We also show how such an EoS Ω can be used to aid molecular simulation methods designed to map out Ω (like the multicanonical approach). Central to the implementation of these ideas is the fact that the configurational Ω is related to thermodynamic properties accessible by an EoS via Boltzmann's equation. Sample calculations are presented for the Ωemph relevant to isothermal-isobaric and grand canonical ensemble simulations using the hard-sphere system and the Lennard-Jones system as model fluids, and the Carnahan-Starling EoS and a cubic EoS, respectively, as thermodynamic models.

  14. Addressing the challenges of the HIV continuum of care in high-prevalence cities in the United States.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Alan E; Purcell, David W; Gordon, Christopher M; Barasky, Rebecca J; del Rio, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    In summary, addressing the challenges of the HIV care continuum is critical so that the goals of the NHAS can be achieved. CDC is working closely with federal partners, public health departments, and communities throughout the United States on multiple surveillance, programmatic, and research initiatives to inform and improve outcomes along the HIV care continuum. Currently, a large number of research projects are being conducted to describe the care continuum in various populations, assess and model the impact of interventions, and monitor the quality of care. To contribute to this knowledge base, NIH is working with its academic partners to support research that will inform the optimization of HIV treatment and prevention programs. As part of this focus, the CFAR/APC HIV Continuum of Care Working Group was formed to encourage communication between academic investigators and their local DOHs and to support joint research initiatives that are both timely and relevant to their own cities and environments. Finally, the results presented in this supplement may have implications for jurisdictions beyond those in which the studies were conducted.

  15. Addressing the challenges of the HIV continuum of care in high-prevalence cities in the United States.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Alan E; Purcell, David W; Gordon, Christopher M; Barasky, Rebecca J; del Rio, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    In summary, addressing the challenges of the HIV care continuum is critical so that the goals of the NHAS can be achieved. CDC is working closely with federal partners, public health departments, and communities throughout the United States on multiple surveillance, programmatic, and research initiatives to inform and improve outcomes along the HIV care continuum. Currently, a large number of research projects are being conducted to describe the care continuum in various populations, assess and model the impact of interventions, and monitor the quality of care. To contribute to this knowledge base, NIH is working with its academic partners to support research that will inform the optimization of HIV treatment and prevention programs. As part of this focus, the CFAR/APC HIV Continuum of Care Working Group was formed to encourage communication between academic investigators and their local DOHs and to support joint research initiatives that are both timely and relevant to their own cities and environments. Finally, the results presented in this supplement may have implications for jurisdictions beyond those in which the studies were conducted. PMID:25867773

  16. Deciphering cellular states of innate tumor drug responses

    PubMed Central

    Graudens, Esther; Boulanger, Virginie; Mollard, Cindy; Mariage-Samson, Régine; Barlet, Xavier; Grémy, Guilaine; Couillault, Christine; Lajémi, Malika; Piatier-Tonneau, Dominique; Zaborski, Patrick; Eveno, Eric; Auffray, Charles; Imbeaud, Sandrine

    2006-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanisms underlying innate tumor drug resistance, a major obstacle to successful cancer therapy, remain poorly understood. In colorectal cancer (CRC), molecular studies have focused on drug-selected tumor cell lines or individual candidate genes using samples derived from patients already treated with drugs, so that very little data are available prior to drug treatment. Results Transcriptional profiles of clinical samples collected from CRC patients prior to their exposure to a combined chemotherapy of folinic acid, 5-fluorouracil and irinotecan were established using microarrays. Vigilant experimental design, power simulations and robust statistics were used to restrain the rates of false negative and false positive hybridizations, allowing successful discrimination between drug resistance and sensitivity states with restricted sampling. A list of 679 genes was established that intrinsically differentiates, for the first time prior to drug exposure, subsequently diagnosed chemo-sensitive and resistant patients. Independent biological validation performed through quantitative PCR confirmed the expression pattern on two additional patients. Careful annotation of interconnected functional networks provided a unique representation of the cellular states underlying drug responses. Conclusion Molecular interaction networks are described that provide a solid foundation on which to anchor working hypotheses about mechanisms underlying in vivo innate tumor drug responses. These broad-spectrum cellular signatures represent a starting point from which by-pass chemotherapy schemes, targeting simultaneously several of the molecular mechanisms involved, may be developed for critical therapeutic intervention in CRC patients. The demonstrated power of this research strategy makes it generally applicable to other physiological and pathological situations. PMID:16542501

  17. Continuum of depressive and manic mixed states in patients with bipolar disorder: quantitative measurement and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Swann, Alan C; Steinberg, Joel L; Lijffijt, Marijn; Moeller, Gerard F

    2009-10-01

    Bipolar mixed states combine depressive and manic features, presenting diagnostic and treatment challenges and reflecting a severe form of the illness. DSM-IV criteria for a mixed state require combined depressive and manic syndromes, but a range of mixed states has been described clinically. A unified definition of mixed states would be valuable in understanding their diagnosis, mechanism and treatment implications. We investigated the manner in which depressive and manic features combine to produce a continuum of mixed states. In 88 subjects with bipolar disorder (DSM-IV), we evaluated symptoms and clinical characteristics, and compared depression-based, mania-based, and other published definitions of mixed states. We developed an index of the extent to which symptoms were mixed (Mixed State Index, MSI) and characterized its relationship to clinical state. Predominately manic and depressive mixed states using criteria from recent literature, as well as Kraepelinian mixed states, had similar symptoms and MSI scores. Anxiety correlated significantly with depression scores in manic subjects and with mania scores in depressed subjects. Discriminant function analysis associated mixed states with symptoms of hyperactivity and negative cognitions, but not subjective depressive or elevated mood. High MSI scores were associated with severe course of illness. For depressive or manic episodes, characteristics of mixed states emerged with two symptoms of the opposite polarity. This was a cross-sectional study. Mixed states appear to be a continuum. An index of the degree to which depressive and manic symptoms combine appears useful in identifying and characterizing mixed states. We propose a depressive or manic episode with three or more symptoms of the opposite polarity as a parsimonious definition of a mixed state.

  18. Regulation of cell function by the cellular hydration state.

    PubMed

    Häussinger, D; Lang, F; Gerok, W

    1994-09-01

    Cellular hydration can change within minutes under the influence of hormones, nutrients, and oxidative stress. Such short-term modulation of cell volume within a narrow range acts per se as a potent signal which modifies cellular metabolism and gene expression. It appears that cell swelling and cell shrinkage lead to certain opposite patterns of cellular metabolic function. Apparently, hormones and amino acids can trigger those patterns simply by altering cell volume. Thus alterations of cellular hydration may represent another important mechanism for metabolic control and act as another second or third messenger linking cell function to hormonal and environmental alterations.

  19. Fano effect and bound state in continuum in electron transport through an armchair graphene nanoribbon with line defect

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Electron transport properties in an armchair graphene nanoribbon are theoretically investigated by considering the presence of line defect. It is found that the line defect causes the abundant Fano effects and bound state in continuum (BIC) in the electron transport process, which are tightly dependent on the width of the nanoribbon. By plotting the spectra of the density of electron states of the line defect, we see that the line defect induces some localized quantum states around the Dirac point and that the different localizations of these states lead to these two kinds of transport results. Next, the Fano effect and BIC phenomenon are detailedly described via the analysis about the influence of the structure parameters. According to the numerical results, we propose such a structure to be a promising candidate for graphene nanoswitch. PACS 81.05.Uw, 71.55.-i, 73.23.-b, 73.25.+i PMID:23870061

  20. Photoelectron circular dichroism of chiral molecules studied with a continuum-state-corrected strong-field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreissigacker, Ingo; Lein, Manfred

    2014-05-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on circular dichroism in the photoelectron momentum distributions from strong-field ionization of chiral molecules [C. Lux et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 51, 5001 (2012), 10.1002/anie.201109035; C. S. Lehmann et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 234307 (2013), 10.1063/1.4844295], we investigate the origin of this effect theoretically. We show that it is not possible to describe photoelectron circular dichroism with the commonly used strong-field approximation due to its plane-wave nature. We therefore apply the Born approximation to the scattering state and use this as a continuum-state correction in the strong-field approximation. We obtain electron distributions for the molecules camphor and fenchone. In order to gain physical insight into the process, we study the contributions of individual molecular orientations.

  1. Combining the GW formalism with the polarizable continuum model: A state-specific non-equilibrium approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchemin, Ivan; Jacquemin, Denis; Blase, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    We have implemented the polarizable continuum model within the framework of the many-body Green's function GW formalism for the calculation of electron addition and removal energies in solution. The present formalism includes both ground-state and non-equilibrium polarization effects. In addition, the polarization energies are state-specific, allowing to obtain the bath-induced renormalisation energy of all occupied and virtual energy levels. Our implementation is validated by comparisons with ΔSCF calculations performed at both the density functional theory and coupled-cluster single and double levels for solvated nucleobases. The present study opens the way to GW and Bethe-Salpeter calculations in disordered condensed phases of interest in organic optoelectronics, wet chemistry, and biology.

  2. Photoionization microscopy of the lithium atom: Wave-function imaging of quasibound and continuum Stark states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, S.; Harb, M. M.; Ollagnier, A.; Robicheaux, F.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Barillot, T.; Lépine, F.; Bordas, C.

    2016-07-01

    Photoionization of an atom in the presence of a uniform static electric field provides the unique opportunity to expand and visualize the atomic wave function at a macroscopic scale. In a number of seminal publications dating back to the 1980s, Fabrikant, Demkov, Kondratovich, and Ostrovsky showed that this goal could be achieved by projecting slow (meV) photoionized electrons onto a position-sensitive detector and underlined the distinction between continuum and resonant contributions. The uncovering of resonant signatures was achieved fairly recently in experiments on the nonhydrogenic lithium atoms [Cohen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 183001 (2013)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.183001. The purpose of the present article is the general description of these findings, with emphasis on the various manifestations of resonant character. From this point of view, lithium has been chosen as an illustrative example between the two limiting cases of hydrogen, where resonance effects are more easily identified, and heavy atoms like xenon, where resonant effects were not observed.

  3. Measuring the redox state of cellular peroxiredoxins by immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Cox, Andrew G; Winterbourn, Christine C; Hampton, Mark B

    2010-01-01

    The peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are a family of thiol peroxidases that scavenge hydroperoxides and peroxynitrite. The abundance and reactivity of these proteins makes them primary targets for cellular H(2)O(2). The catalytic cycle of typical 2-Cys Prxs involves formation of an intermolecular disulfide bond between peroxidatic and resolving cysteines on opposing subunits. Rapid alterations in the ratio of reduced monomer and oxidized dimer have been detected in the cytoplasm and mitochondria of cultured cells exposed to various exogenous and endogenous sources of oxidative stress. Here we describe immunoblot methods to monitor the interconversion of individual 2-Cys Prxs in cultured cells. We also outline an adaptation of this method to measure the extent to which individual 2-Cys Prxs become hyper oxidized in treated cells. Together, these methods enable the redox status of cellular Prxs to be assessed and quantified in a rapid and robust manner. PMID:20609904

  4. Spin polarized bound states in the continuum in open Aharonov-Bohm rings with the Rashba spin-orbit interaction.

    PubMed

    Bulgakov, Evgeny N; Sadreev, Almas F

    2016-07-01

    We consider the trapping of electrons with a definite spin polarization by bound states in the continuum (BSC) in the open Aharonov-Bohm rings in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI). Neglecting the Zeeman term we show the existence of BSCs in the one-dimensional ring when the eigenstates of the closed ring are doubly degenerate. With account of the Zeeman term BSCs occur only at the points of threefold degeneracy. The BSCs are found in the parametric space of flux and RSOI strength in close pairs with opposite spin polarization. Thereby the spin polarization of electrons transmitted through the ring can be altered by minor variation of magnetic or electric field at the vicinity of these pairs. Numerical simulations of the two-dimensional open ring show similar results for the BSCs. Encircling the BSC points in the parametric space of the flux and the RSOI constant gives rise to a geometric phase. PMID:27165662

  5. Spin polarized bound states in the continuum in open Aharonov-Bohm rings with the Rashba spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgakov, Evgeny N.; Sadreev, Almas F.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the trapping of electrons with a definite spin polarization by bound states in the continuum (BSC) in the open Aharonov-Bohm rings in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI). Neglecting the Zeeman term we show the existence of BSCs in the one-dimensional ring when the eigenstates of the closed ring are doubly degenerate. With account of the Zeeman term BSCs occur only at the points of threefold degeneracy. The BSCs are found in the parametric space of flux and RSOI strength in close pairs with opposite spin polarization. Thereby the spin polarization of electrons transmitted through the ring can be altered by minor variation of magnetic or electric field at the vicinity of these pairs. Numerical simulations of the two-dimensional open ring show similar results for the BSCs. Encircling the BSC points in the parametric space of the flux and the RSOI constant gives rise to a geometric phase.

  6. Channel dropping via bound states in the continuum in a system of two nonlinear cavities between two linear waveguides.

    PubMed

    Bulgakov, Evgeny; Pichugin, Konstantin; Sadreev, Almas

    2013-10-01

    We show that two nonlinear resonant cavities aligned between two parallel waveguides can support self-induced bound states in the continuum (BSCs). These BSCs are symmetrical relative to an inversion of the waveguides and to inversion of the transport axis. Due to this BSCs can drop an incident wave from one waveguide to another with very high efficiency. We show also that the frequency of the efficient channel dropping can be tuned by injecting power. All these results are in good agreement with numerical solutions of the Maxwell equations in a two-dimensional photonic crystal of GaAs rods holding two parallel waveguides and two defects made of a Kerr medium.

  7. Continuum tensor network field states, path integral representations and spatial symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, David; Brockt, Christoph; Haegeman, Jutho; Osborne, Tobias J.; Verstraete, Frank

    2015-06-01

    A natural way to generalize tensor network variational classes to quantum field systems is via a continuous tensor contraction. This approach is first illustrated for the class of quantum field states known as continuous matrix-product states (cMPS). As a simple example of the path-integral representation we show that the state of a dynamically evolving quantum field admits a natural representation as a cMPS. A completeness argument is also provided that shows that all states in Fock space admit a cMPS representation when the number of variational parameters tends to infinity. Beyond this, we obtain a well-behaved field limit of projected entangled-pair states (PEPS) in two dimensions that provide an abstract class of quantum field states with natural symmetries. We demonstrate how symmetries of the physical field state are encoded within the dynamics of an auxiliary field system of one dimension less. In particular, the imposition of Euclidean symmetries on the physical system requires that the auxiliary system involved in the class’ definition must be Lorentz-invariant. The physical field states automatically inherit entropy area laws from the PEPS class, and are fully described by the dissipative dynamics of a lower dimensional virtual field system. Our results lie at the intersection many-body physics, quantum field theory and quantum information theory, and facilitate future exchanges of ideas and insights between these disciplines.

  8. Transfer of spin angular momentum of an incident wave into orbital angular momentum of the bound states in the continuum in an array of dielectric spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgakov, Evgeny N.; Sadreev, Almas F.

    2016-09-01

    We consider scattering of electromagnetic plane waves by a linear periodic array of dielectric spheres. For incident waves with circular polarization with frequency tuned to the bound states with orbital angular momentum in the radiation continuum, the spin angular momentum of the incident wave transfers into the orbital angular momentum. This, in turn, gives rise to giant vortical power currents rotating around the array. Incident wave with linear polarization with frequency tuned to the Bloch bound state in the continuum induces giant laminar power currents.

  9. Rydberg and continuum states of the HeH+ molecular ion: Variational R -matrix and multichannel quantum defect theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhali, I.; Bezzaouia, S.; Telmini, M.; Jungen, Ch.

    2016-08-01

    Variational ab initio R -matrix theory combined with generalized multichannel quantum defect theory is used to calculate singly excited Rydberg states of the hydrohelium molecular ion, HeH+, for Σ,3+1,Π,31,Δ,31,Φ,31, and Γ,31 symmetry. Bound levels are calculated for n values up to n ≈10 , and continuum states up to ≈3 eV above the HeH2 + threshold. The calculations span the range of internuclear distances R from 1 to 5 bohrs. The present work follows a preliminary study on the Δ,31 states of HeH+ [Bouhali, Bezzaouia, Telmini, and Jungen, EPJ Web Conf. 84, 04004 (2015), 10.1051/epjconf/20158404004] which was also based on R -matrix theory. Further—although limited to rather small R values—the present work extends the recent ab initio computations of Jungen and Jungen [Mol. Phys. 113, 2333 (2015), 10.1080/00268976.2015.1040094] to higher excitation energies which are not accessible to standard quantum-chemical methods. Where a comparison with the calculations of Jungen and Jungen and other older results can be made, namely for n ≤5 , very good agreement with previous ab initio results is obtained.

  10. Reciprocal Control of the Circadian Clock and Cellular Redox State - a Critical Appraisal.

    PubMed

    Putker, Marrit; O'Neill, John Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Redox signalling comprises the biology of molecular signal transduction mediated by reactive oxygen (or nitrogen) species. By specific and reversible oxidation of redox-sensitive cysteines, many biological processes sense and respond to signals from the intracellular redox environment. Redox signals are therefore important regulators of cellular homeostasis. Recently, it has become apparent that the cellular redox state oscillates in vivo and in vitro, with a period of about one day (circadian). Circadian time-keeping allows cells and organisms to adapt their biology to resonate with the 24-hour cycle of day/night. The importance of this innate biological time-keeping is illustrated by the association of clock disruption with the early onset of several diseases (e.g. type II diabetes, stroke and several forms of cancer). Circadian regulation of cellular redox balance suggests potentially two distinct roles for redox signalling in relation to the cellular clock: one where it is regulated by the clock, and one where it regulates the clock. Here, we introduce the concepts of redox signalling and cellular timekeeping, and then critically appraise the evidence for the reciprocal regulation between cellular redox state and the circadian clock. We conclude there is a substantial body of evidence supporting circadian regulation of cellular redox state, but that it would be premature to conclude that the converse is also true. We therefore propose some approaches that might yield more insight into redox control of cellular timekeeping.

  11. Reciprocal Control of the Circadian Clock and Cellular Redox State - a Critical Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Putker, Marrit; O’Neill, John Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Redox signalling comprises the biology of molecular signal transduction mediated by reactive oxygen (or nitrogen) species. By specific and reversible oxidation of redox-sensitive cysteines, many biological processes sense and respond to signals from the intracellular redox environment. Redox signals are therefore important regulators of cellular homeostasis. Recently, it has become apparent that the cellular redox state oscillates in vivo and in vitro, with a period of about one day (circadian). Circadian time-keeping allows cells and organisms to adapt their biology to resonate with the 24-hour cycle of day/night. The importance of this innate biological time-keeping is illustrated by the association of clock disruption with the early onset of several diseases (e.g. type II diabetes, stroke and several forms of cancer). Circadian regulation of cellular redox balance suggests potentially two distinct roles for redox signalling in relation to the cellular clock: one where it is regulated by the clock, and one where it regulates the clock. Here, we introduce the concepts of redox signalling and cellular timekeeping, and then critically appraise the evidence for the reciprocal regulation between cellular redox state and the circadian clock. We conclude there is a substantial body of evidence supporting circadian regulation of cellular redox state, but that it would be premature to conclude that the converse is also true. We therefore propose some approaches that might yield more insight into redox control of cellular timekeeping. PMID:26810072

  12. Coherent-state path integrals in the continuum: The SU(2) case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordas, G.; Kalantzis, D.; Karanikas, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    We define the time-continuous spin coherent-state path integral in a way that is free from inconsistencies. The proposed definition is used to reproduce known exact results. Such a formalism opens new possibilities for applying approximations with improved accuracy and can be proven useful in a great variety of problems where spin Hamiltonians are used.

  13. Stochastic simulations of steady state unsaturated flow in a three-layer, heterogeneous, dual continuum model of fractured rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illman, Walter A.; Hughson, Debra L.

    2005-06-01

    Unsaturated flow through fractured rocks is a concern in the siting and performance of waste disposal facilities such as the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We simulated a small two-dimensional cross-section of welded volcanic tuff, representative of Yucca Mountain stratigraphy, using spatially correlated, randomly heterogeneous fracture permeability fields and homogeneous matrix permeability continua representing various degrees of welding. Ten realizations each of fracture permeability fields for four different variances ( σ2=0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) were generated by the direct Fourier transform method (Robin, M.J.L., Gutjahr, A.L., Sudicky, E.A., Wilson, J.L., 1993. Cross-correlated random field generation with the direct Fourier transform method, Water Resour. Res. 29(7)2385-2398) independently for the welded Tiva Canyon Tuff (TCw), the non-welded Paintbrush Tuff (PTn), and the welded Topopah Spring Tuff (TSw), the latter being the proposed primary repository horizon. Numerical simulations were run for steady state flow at three different uniform water flux boundary conditions. Boundary conditions along the sides were impermeable and the base was open to gas and liquid flow. Numerical simulations were performed using the dual-continuum, two-phase flow simulator METRA, which represents matrix and fractures as dual overlapping continua, where liquid flux between continua can be restricted by a uniform factor. Fracture-matrix interaction was modeled as being less restricted in the PTn as compared to the TCw/TSw. Heterogeneous fracture permeability fields generated strong preferential flow in the TCw/TSw fracture continuum and significant preferential flow in the uniformly permeable, PTn matrix continuum. Flow focusing led to a local increase in saturation, which in turn increased relative permeability to water along the preferential pathways, causing water to flow faster. The development of the preferential pathways reduced the wetted

  14. Continuum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khristianovich, S. A.

    The volume contains a collection of papers dealing with various problems of continuum mechanics which were written by the author at different times during the period 1936-1974. Topics covered include supersonic gas flow, design of Laval nozzles, physical foundations of transonic aerodynamics, theory of short waves, cohesion modulus in the theory of cracks, and deformation of strain-hardening plastic materials.

  15. State-of-the-Art and Future Directions in Multilevel Interventions Across the Cancer Control Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Breslau, Erica S.; Dietrich, Allen J.; Glasgow, Russell E.

    2012-01-01

    We conducted literature searches and analyses to describe the current state of multilevel intervention (MLI) research and to identify opportunities to advance cancer control and prevention. We found single-level studies that considered other contextually important levels, and multilevel health-care systems research and community-wide studies. This literature is characterized by limited reporting of theoretical, contextual, temporal, and implementation factors. Most MLIs focus on prevention and screening, rather than diagnosis, treatment, or survivorship. Opportunities relate to 1) dynamic, adaptive emergent interventions and research designs that evolve over time by attending to contextual factors and interactions across levels; 2) analyses that include simulation modeling, or multimethod approaches that integrate quantitative and qualitative methods; and 3) translation and intervention approaches that locally reinvent MLIs in different contexts. MLIs have great potential to reduce cancer burden by using theory and integrating quantitative, qualitative, participatory, and transdisciplinary methods that continually seek alignment across intervention levels, pay attention to context, and adapt over time. PMID:22623592

  16. Continuum {gamma} rays feeding normal and superdeformed states in Gd nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, L.H.; Cinausero, M.; de Angelis, G.; De Poli, M.; Gadea, A.; Napoli, D.R.; Bazzacco, D.; Lunardi, S.; Viesti, G.; Petrache, C.M.; Rossi Alvarez, C.

    1997-03-01

    The feeding mechanism of the superdeformed bands in {sup 147}Gd and {sup 148}Gd has been studied via the {sup 124}Sn + {sup 29}Si reaction at a beam energy of 157 MeV. Using the BGO inner ball of the GASP array, high-energy {gamma} rays have been detected in coincidence with discrete transitions deexciting normal-deformed (ND) and superdeformed (SD) states in the final product nuclei. The slope of the measured high-energy {gamma}-ray spectra depends strongly on the number of emitted neutrons and is somewhat lower for spectra in coincidence with SD bands than for those in coincidence with ND structures. Both observations are qualitatively reproduced by statistical model Monte Carlo calculations, which point out the importance of angular momentum effects in the emission of energetic {gamma} rays. The present data exclude the enhanced population of SD bands when fed through high-energy E1 transitions. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Lifetime measurements of 17C excited states and three-body and continuum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Smalley, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Navratil, P.; Roth, R.; Langhammer, J.; Bader, V. M.; Bazin, D.; Barryman, J. S.; Campbell, C. M.; Dohet-Eraly, J.; Fallon, P.; Gade, A.; Langer, C.; Lemasson, A.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Morse, C.; Parker, J.; Quaglioni, S.; Recchia, F.; Stroberg, S. R.; Wiesshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.; Wimmer, K.; Brown, B. A.

    2015-12-18

    We studied transition rates for the lowest 1/2+ and 5/2+ excited states of 17C through lifetime measurements with the GRETINA array using the recoil-distance method. The present measurements provide a model-independent determination of transition strengths giving the values of B(M1;1/2+ → 3/2+g.s.) = 1.04+0.03–0.12 × 10–2μ2N and B(M1;5/2+ → 3/2+g.s.) = 7.12+1.27–0.96 × 10–2μ2N. The quenched M1 transition strength for the 1/2+ → 3/2+g.s. transition, with respect to the 5/2+ → 3/2+g.s. transition, has been confirmed with greater precision. Furthermore, the current data are compared to importance-truncated no-core shell model calculations addressing effects due to continuum and three-body forces.

  18. Speeding Up and Quantifying Approximation Error in Continuum Quantum Monte Carlo Solid-State Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, William David

    Quantum theory has successfully explained the mechanics of much of the microscopic world. However, Schrodinger's equations are difficult to solve for many-particle systems. Mean-field theories such as Hartree-Fock and density functional theory account for much of the total energy of electronic systems but fail on the crucial correlation energy that predicts solid cohesion and material properties. Monte Carlo methods solve differential and integral equations with error independent of the number of dimensions in the problem. Variational Monte Carlo (VMC) applies the variational principle to optimize the wave function used in the Monte Carlo integration of Schrodinger's time-independent equation. Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) represents the wave function by electron configurations diffusing stochastically in imaginary time to the ground state. Approximations in VMC and DMC make the problem tractable but introduce error in parameter-controlled and uncontrolled ways. The many-electron wave function consists of single-particle orbitals. The orbitals are combined in a functional form to account for electron exchange and correlation. Plane waves are a convenient basis for the orbitals. However, plane-wave orbitals grow in evaluation cost with basis-set completeness and system size. To speed up the calculation, polynomials approximate the plane-wave sum. Four polynomial methods tested are: Lagrange interpolation, pp-spline interpolation, B-spline interpolation and B-spline approximation. The polynomials all increase speed by an order of the number of particles. B-spline approximation most consistently maintains accuracy in the seven systems tested. However, polynomials increase the memory needed by a factor of two to eight. B-spline approximation with a separate approximation for the Laplacian of the orbitals increases the memory by a factor of four over plane waves. Polynomial-based orbitals enable larger calculations and careful examination of error introduced by

  19. Reassessment of fission fragment angular distributions from continuum states in the context of transition-state theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Louis C.; Alexander, John M.

    1983-07-01

    Fission angular distributions have been studied for years and have been treated as classic examples of trasitions-state theory. Early work involving composite nuclei of relatively low excitation energy E ∗ (⪅35 MeV) and spin I (⪅25ħ) gave support to theory and delimited interesting properties of the transitions-state nuclei. More recent research on fusion fission and sequential fission after deeply inelastic reactions involves composite nuclei of much higher energies (⪅200 MeV) and spins (⪅100ħ). Extension of the basic ideas developed for low-spin nuclei requires detailed consideration of the role of these high spins and, in particular, the “spin window” for fussion. We have made empirical correlations of cross sections for evaporation residues and fission in order to get a description of this spin window. A systematic reanalysis has been made for fusion fission induced by H, He and heavier ions. Empirical correlations of K 20 (K 20 = {IeffT }/{h̷2}) are presented along with comparisons of Ieff to moments of inertia for saddle-point nuclei from the rotating liquid drop model. This model gives an excellent guide for the intermidiate spin zone (30⪅ I ⪅65), while strong shell and/or pairing effects are evident for excitations less than ⪅35 MeV. Observations of strong anisotropies for very high-spin systems signal the demise of certain approximation commonly made in the theory, and suggestions are made toward this end.

  20. Lipid composition and physical state effects on cellular cholesteryl ester clearance.

    PubMed

    Adelman, S J; Glick, J M; Phillips, M C; Rothblat, G H

    1984-11-25

    The influence of lipid composition and physical state on the rate of cholesteryl ester clearance from cytoplasmic inclusions has been investigated. Our findings demonstrate that the increased rate of clearance correlates with an increased cellular triglyceride content and a more fluid cholesteryl ester physical state. Cultured rat hepatoma cells were induced to accumulate esterified cholesterol in a smectic liquid-crystalline state by exposure to free cholesterol-rich phospholipid dispersions. Addition of cis-unsaturated fatty acids to this loading medium (either oleate, linoleate, linolenate, or eicosadienoate) resulted in a substantial increase in cellular triglyceride content (greater than 7 times non-fatty acid-treated), cellular cholesteryl esters in a liquid state, and a rate of cholesteryl ester clearance twice that of control (approximately 34% versus 17% in 12 h). In studies with oleic acid, storage of cellular cholesteryl esters in a liquid state was found to be dependent on the presence of triglycerides, and the rate at which these cells hydrolyzed cholesteryl esters was proportional to triglyceride levels. Cells exposed to either linoleic or linolenic acid hydrolyzed cholesteryl esters at the faster rate, but in contrast to findings with oleate and eicosadienoate, the storage of cholesteryl esters in a liquid state may also be a consequence of the modified fatty acyl composition of the cholesteryl esters themselves. Addition of a saturated fatty acid (palmitate) or a fatty acid with a trans-double bond (elaidate) to the cholesterol loading media had little effect on cellular triglyceride content, cholesteryl ester physical state, or the rate of cholesteryl ester clearance.

  1. Numerical Study of Rarefied Hypersonic Flow Interacting with a Continuum Jet. Degree awarded by Pennsylvania State Univ., Aug. 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher E.

    2000-01-01

    An uncoupled Computational Fluid Dynamics-Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (CFD-DSMC) technique is developed and applied to provide solutions for continuum jets interacting with rarefied external flows. The technique is based on a correlation of the appropriate Bird breakdown parameter for a transitional-rarefied condition that defines a surface within which the continuum solution is unaffected by the external flow-jet interaction. The method is applied to two problems to assess and demonstrate its validity; one of a jet interaction in the transitional-rarefied flow regime and the other in the moderately rarefied regime. Results show that the appropriate Bird breakdown surface for uncoupling the continuum and non-continuum solutions is a function of a non-dimensional parameter relating the momentum flux and collisionality between the two interacting flows. The correlation is exploited for the simulation of a jet interaction modeled for an experimental condition in the transitional-rarefied flow regime and the validity of the correlation is demonstrated. The uncoupled technique is also applied to an aerobraking flight condition for the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with attitude control system jet interaction. Aerodynamic yawing moment coefficients for cases without and with jet interaction at various angles-of-attack were predicted, and results from the present method compare well with values published previously. The flow field and surface properties are analyzed in some detail to describe the mechanism by which the jet interaction affects the aerodynamics.

  2. 76 FR 17652 - Wireline Competition Bureau Seeks Comment on the Cellular South Licenses, Inc. and United States...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... COMMISSION Wireline Competition Bureau Seeks Comment on the Cellular South Licenses, Inc. and United States Cellular Corporation Joint Petition for Reconsideration of a High-Cost Universal Service Order AGENCY..., the Wireline Competition Bureau seeks comment on a joint petition filed by Cellular South...

  3. A Ubiquitiformal One-Dimensional Steady-State Conduction Model for a Cellular Material Rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guan-Ying; Ou, Zhuo-Cheng; Xie, Ran; Duan, Zhuo-Ping; Huang, Feng-Lei

    2016-04-01

    A ubiquitiformal model for the one-dimensional steady-state heat transfer of a cellular material rod is developed in this paper, and the explicit analytical expressions for both the temperature distribution and the equivalent thermal conductivity are obtained. The calculated results for two kinds of dry soil are found to be in good agreement with previous experimental data. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the ubiquitiformal model is more reasonable for describing such a cellular material than the fractal one, and hence a ubiquitiformal rather than a fractal model should be considered in practical applications whenever the integral dimensional measure of a real physical object must be taken into account.

  4. Aurora Borealis: stochastic cellular automata simulations of the excited-state dynamics of oxygen atoms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seybold, P. G.; Kier, L. B.; Cheng, C.-K.

    1999-12-01

    Emissions from the 1S and 1D excited states of atomic oxygen play a prominent role in creating the dramatic light displays (aurora borealis) seen in the skies over polar regions of the Northern Hemisphere. A probabilistic asynchronous cellular automaton model described previously has been applied to the excited-state dynamics of atomic oxygen. The model simulates the time-dependent variations in ground (3P) and excited-state populations that occur under user-defined probabilistic transition rules for both pulse and steady-state conditions. Although each trial simulation is itself an independent "experiment", deterministic values for the excited-state emission lifetimes and quantum yields emerge as limiting cases for large numbers of cells or large numbers of trials. Stochastic variations in the lifetimes and emission yields can be estimated from repeated trials.

  5. Multiple steady states with distinct cellular metabolism in continuous culture of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Europa, A F; Gambhir, A; Fu, P C; Hu, W S

    2000-01-01

    Mammalian cells have the ability to proliferate under different nutrient environments by utilizing different combinations of the nutrients, especially glucose and the amino acids. Under the conditions often used in in vitro cultivation, the cells consume glucose and amino acids in great excess of what is needed for making up biomass and products. They also produce large amounts of metabolites with lactate, ammonia, and some non-essential amino acids such as alanine as the most dominant ones. By controlling glucose and glutamine at low levels, cellular metabolism can be altered and can result in reduced glucose and glutamine consumption as well as in reduced metabolite formation. Using a fed-batch reactor to manipulate glucose at a low level (as compared to a typical batch culture), cell metabolism was altered to a state with substantially reduced lactate production. The culture was then switched to a continuous mode and allowed to reach a steady-state. At this steady-state, the concentrations of cells and antibody were substantially higher than a control culture that was initiated from a batch culture without first altering cellular metabolism. The lactate and other metabolite concentrations were also substantially reduced as compared to the control culture. This newly observed steady-state was achieved at the same dilution rate and feed medium as the control culture. The paths leading to the two steady-states, however, were different. These results demonstrate steady-state multiplicity. At this new steady-state, not only was glucose metabolism altered, but the metabolism of amino acids was altered as well. The amino acid metabolism in the new steady-state was more balanced, and the excretion of non-essential amino acids and ammonia was substantially lower. This approach of reaching a more desirable steady-state with higher concentrations of cells and product opens a new avenue for high-density- and high-productivity-cell culture.

  6. Raman study of the quantum interference of multiple discrete states and a continuum of states in the phonon energy region of semiconductors: examples of p-type Ga0.5In0.5P films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Hironori; Ma, Bei; Morita, Ken; Ishitani, Yoshihiro

    2016-09-01

    Although the Fano quantum interference of one longitudinal optical (LO) phonon mode and one electronic continuum of states due to inter-valence band transition has been investigated by the Raman spectra, there is no observation of the interference of multiple phonon modes despite its potential for electromagnetically induced transparency in the far infrared region. In this study, p-type Ga0.5In0.5P films with two main LO modes in the same plane of atomic vibration and one more mode due to CuPt-type ordering are investigated. Asymmetric line profiles, peak energy shifts and peak broadenings in the Raman spectra are analyzed, and the destructive quantum interference of these LO-continuum systems are observed. Discussion with the reference data of p-type GaAs and Si for the one-LO mode system reveals that the asymmetry parameter features the derivatives of the density of the continuum of states in the vicinity of the LO phonon energies and the degree of the electric polarization. It is found experimentally that the interaction between the two main LO modes through the interactions with the continuum states takes place. A 1(LO) mode due to the ordering affects the spectrum, however the interaction with the main two LO modes through the continuum is small. On the basis of the experimental result, the spectrum features for this alloy with greater hole density are estimated, where the various controls of the absorption spectrum in the phonon energy region are predicted.

  7. Raman study of the quantum interference of multiple discrete states and a continuum of states in the phonon energy region of semiconductors: examples of p-type Ga0.5In0.5P films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Hironori; Ma, Bei; Morita, Ken; Ishitani, Yoshihiro

    2016-09-01

    Although the Fano quantum interference of one longitudinal optical (LO) phonon mode and one electronic continuum of states due to inter-valence band transition has been investigated by the Raman spectra, there is no observation of the interference of multiple phonon modes despite its potential for electromagnetically induced transparency in the far infrared region. In this study, p-type Ga0.5In0.5P films with two main LO modes in the same plane of atomic vibration and one more mode due to CuPt-type ordering are investigated. Asymmetric line profiles, peak energy shifts and peak broadenings in the Raman spectra are analyzed, and the destructive quantum interference of these LO-continuum systems are observed. Discussion with the reference data of p-type GaAs and Si for the one-LO mode system reveals that the asymmetry parameter features the derivatives of the density of the continuum of states in the vicinity of the LO phonon energies and the degree of the electric polarization. It is found experimentally that the interaction between the two main LO modes through the interactions with the continuum states takes place. A1(LO) mode due to the ordering affects the spectrum, however the interaction with the main two LO modes through the continuum is small. On the basis of the experimental result, the spectrum features for this alloy with greater hole density are estimated, where the various controls of the absorption spectrum in the phonon energy region are predicted.

  8. Influence of higher-order dispersion coefficients on near-threshold bound and continuum states: Application to {sup 88}Sr{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Alexander; Mueller, Tim-Oliver; Friedrich, Harald

    2011-12-07

    We give a simple description of quantum states near the dissociation threshold of deep interatomic potentials. The influence of the potential tail is separated from effects due to the interaction at short distances. We present a general formalism which is valid for weakly bound and low-energy continuum states, both for vanishing and non-vanishing angular momentum. Its applicability is demonstrated for the example of the electronic ground state of the strontium dimer {sup 88}Sr{sub 2}. With an appropriate choice of the potential tail that includes higher-order dispersion coefficients, all short-range effects are incorporated via the threshold quantum number v{sub D} and one further parameter accounting for residual short-range effects.

  9. The transition between immune and disease states in a cellular automaton model of clonal immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezzi, Michele; Celada, Franco; Ruffo, Stefano; Seiden, Philip E.

    1997-02-01

    In this paper we extend the Celada-Seiden (CS) model of the humoral immune response to include infections virus and killer T cells (cellular response). The model represents molecules and cells with bitstrings. The response of the system to virus involves a competition between the ability of the virus to kill the host cells and the host's ability to eliminate the virus. We find two basins of attraction in the dynamics of this system, one is identified with disease and the other with the immune state. There is also an oscillating state that exists on the border of these two stable states. Fluctuations in the population of virus or antibody can end the oscillation and drive the system into one of the stable states. The introduction of mechanisms of cross-regulation between the two responses can bias the system towards one of them. We also study a mean field model, based on coupled maps, to investigate virus-like infections. This simple model reproduces the attractors for average populations observed in the cellular automaton. All the dynamical behavior connected to spatial extension is lost, as is the oscillating feature. Thus the mean field approximation introduced with coupled maps destroys oscillations.

  10. Reduced native state stability in crowded cellular environment due to protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Harada, Ryuhei; Tochio, Naoya; Kigawa, Takanori; Sugita, Yuji; Feig, Michael

    2013-03-01

    The effect of cellular crowding environments on protein structure and stability is a key issue in molecular and cellular biology. The classical view of crowding emphasizes the volume exclusion effect that generally favors compact, native states. Here, results from molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments show that protein crowders may destabilize native states via protein-protein interactions. In the model system considered here, mixtures of villin head piece and protein G at high concentrations, villin structures become increasingly destabilized upon increasing crowder concentrations. The denatured states observed in the simulation involve partial unfolding as well as more subtle conformational shifts. The unfolded states remain overall compact and only partially overlap with unfolded ensembles at high temperature and in the presence of urea. NMR measurements on the same systems confirm structural changes upon crowding based on changes of chemical shifts relative to dilute conditions. An analysis of protein-protein interactions and energetic aspects suggests the importance of enthalpic and solvation contributions to the crowding free energies that challenge an entropic-centered view of crowding effects.

  11. Damage Development in High Purity Copper Under Varying Dynamic Conditions and Microstructural States Using Continuum Damage Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, N.; Ruggiero, A.; Esposito, L.; Iannitti, G.

    2009-12-01

    In the framework of CDM, the evolution of the plastic strain, at which damage processes initiates, as a function of stress triaxiality, making the assumption of constant damage dissipated work is derived. Based on this, the CDM model proposed by Bonora (Eng. Frac. Mech., 58, 1-2, 1997) has been used to predict the occurrence of ductile failure at different stress triaxiality conditions, under both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. This solution allows the possibility to correctly predict the conditions for which ductile damage can initiate under uniaxial strain (such as that for the flyer plate impact test) and mixed conditions such as those in the Taylor impact test. The solution offers the possibility to correlate continuum damage model parameters to micro structural features such as grain size and purity grade.

  12. Variation character of stagnation point heat flux for hypersonic pointed bodies from continuum to rarefied flow states and its bridge function study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihui; Bao, Lin; Tong, Binggang

    2009-12-01

    This paper is a research on the variation character of stagnation point heat flux for hypersonic pointed bodies from continuum to rarefied flow states by using theoretical analysis and numerical simulation methods. The newly developed near space hypersonic cruise vehicles have sharp noses and wingtips, which desires exact and relatively simple methods to estimate the stagnation point heat flux. With the decrease of the curvature radius of the leading edge, the flow becomes rarefied gradually, and viscous interaction effects and rarefied gas effects come forth successively, which results in that the classical Fay-Riddell equation under continuum hypothesis will become invalid and the variation of stagnation point heat flux is characterized by a new trend. The heat flux approaches the free molecular flow limit instead of an infinite value when the curvature radius of the leading edge tends to 0. The physical mechanism behind this phenomenon remains in need of theoretical study. Firstly, due to the fact that the whole flow regime can be described by Boltzmann equation, the continuum and rarefied flow are analyzed under a uniform framework. A relationship is established between the molecular collision insufficiency in rarefied flow and the failure of Fourier’s heat conduction law along with the increasing significance of the nonlinear heat flux. Then based on an inspiration drew from Burnett approximation, control factors are grasped and a specific heat flux expression containing the nonlinear term is designed in the stagnation region of hypersonic leading edge. Together with flow pattern analysis, the ratio of nonlinear to linear heat flux W r is theoretically obtained as a parameter which reflects the influence of nonlinear factors, i.e. a criterion to classify the hypersonic rarefied flows. Ultimately, based on the characteristic parameter W r , a bridge function with physical background is constructed, which predicts comparative reasonable results in coincidence

  13. Generation of new spatial and temporal coherent light states using III-V semiconductor laser technology: VORTEX, continuum, dual frequency for THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnache, Arnaud; Seghilani, Mohamed; Paquet, Romain; Sellhai, Mohamed; Chomet, Baptiste; Myara, Mikhal; Blin, Stephane; Sagnes, Isabelle; Beaudoin, Gregoire; Legratiet, Luc; Lalanne, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    We take advantage of III-V VeCSEL technology integrating at-photonics for the generation of new coherent states, thanks to insertion of intracavity functions based on at photonics. These new kinds of coherent light states target many applications including optical tweezers, telecommunications, fundamental physics, sensors For this purpose, we extended the VeCSEL semiconductor technology, designing active sections, sub-wavelength metallic masks and photonic crystal, enabling to control the electrical field inside the cavity. This leads to the generation and control of highly coherent single high-order Laguerre- or Hermite-Gauss mode, VORTEX beam carrying controlled orbital-angular-momentum, as well as of coherent dual-frequency wave for THz, and of coherent continuum modeless source.

  14. On the evolution of the cellular automaton of rule 150 from some simple initial states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, A. J.

    2009-06-01

    The evolution Eα in discrete time t of the cellular automaton CA150 of Wolfram rule 150 is studied for certain initial states ψα. The values of the cell variables in any state ψα considered are all zero outside a principal sequence (PS) of length k within which they take on values 1a2a3⋯ak -2ak -11, where a2=1,0,…. Powerful algebraic methods are used to develop formulas for the weight, Ωα(t), i.e., the total number of cell variables with value equal to 1 at time t, of the state of Eα at time t ≥0, and of the sum Wα(N)=∑t =02N-1Ωα(t) of the weights of the first 2N states of the evolution of Eα in discrete time. The methods are described carefully. A selection of results, new here, is stated and proved for several initial states ψα with simple PSs of increasing lengths k >1. Many of them feature numbers in the Fibonacci, Lucas, and Jacobsthal sequences.

  15. In vitro chemical and cellular tests applied to uranium trioxide with different hydration states.

    PubMed Central

    Ansoborlo, E; Chalabreysse, J; Hengé-Napoli, M H; Pujol, E

    1992-01-01

    A simple and rapid in vitro chemical solubility test applicable to industrial uranium trioxide (UO3) was developed together with two in vitro cellular tests using rat alveolar macrophages maintained either in gas phase or in alginate beads at 37 degrees C. Industrial UO3 was characterized by particle size, X-ray, and IR spectra, and chemical transformation (e.g., aging and hydration of the dust) was also studied. Solvents used for the in vitro chemical solubility study included carbonates, citrates, phosphates, water, Eagle's basal medium, and Gamble's solution (simulated lung fluid), alone, with oxygen, or with superoxide ions. Results, expressed in terms of the half-time of dissolution, according to International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) classification (D,W,Y), varied for different hydration states of UO3, showing a lower solubility of hydrated UO3 in solvents compared to basic UO3 or UO3 heated at 450 degrees C. Two in vitro cellular tests on cultured rat alveolar macrophages (cells maintained in gas phase and cells immobilized in alginate beads) were used on the same UO3 samples and generally showed a lower solution transfer rate in the presence of macrophages than in the culture medium alone. The results of in vitro chemical and cellular tests were compared, with four main conclusions: a good reproducibility of the three tests in Eagle's basal medium the effect of hydration state on solubility, the classification of UO3 in terms of ICRP solubility criteria, and the ability of macrophages to decrease uranium solubility in medium. PMID:1396449

  16. [Motivation and Emotional States: Structural Systemic, Neurochemical, Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Bazyan, A S

    2016-01-01

    The structural, systemic, neurochemical, molecular and cellular mechanisms of organization and coding motivation and emotional states are describe. The GABA and glutamatergic synaptic systems of basal ganglia form a neural network and participate in the implementation of voluntary behavior. Neuropeptides, neurohormones and paracrine neuromodulators involved in the organization of motivation and emotional states, integrated with synaptic systems, controlled by neural networks and organizing goal-directed behavior. Structural centers for united and integrated of information in voluntary and goal-directed behavior are globus pallidus. Substantia nigra pars reticulata switches the information from corticobasal networks to thalamocortical networks, induces global dopaminergic (DA) signal and organize interaction of mesolimbic and nigostriatnoy DA systems controlled by prefrontal and motor cortex. Together with the motor cortex, substantia nigra displays information in the brainstem and spinal cord to implementation of behavior. Motivation states are formed in the interaction of neurohormonal and neuropeptide systems by monoaminergic systems of brain. Emotional states are formed by monoaminergic systems of the mid-brain, where the leading role belongs to the mesolimbic DA system. The emotional and motivation state of the encoded specific epigenetic molecular and chemical pattern of neuron. PMID:27149821

  17. [Motivation and Emotional States: Structural Systemic, Neurochemical, Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Bazyan, A S

    2016-01-01

    The structural, systemic, neurochemical, molecular and cellular mechanisms of organization and coding motivation and emotional states are describe. The GABA and glutamatergic synaptic systems of basal ganglia form a neural network and participate in the implementation of voluntary behavior. Neuropeptides, neurohormones and paracrine neuromodulators involved in the organization of motivation and emotional states, integrated with synaptic systems, controlled by neural networks and organizing goal-directed behavior. Structural centers for united and integrated of information in voluntary and goal-directed behavior are globus pallidus. Substantia nigra pars reticulata switches the information from corticobasal networks to thalamocortical networks, induces global dopaminergic (DA) signal and organize interaction of mesolimbic and nigostriatnoy DA systems controlled by prefrontal and motor cortex. Together with the motor cortex, substantia nigra displays information in the brainstem and spinal cord to implementation of behavior. Motivation states are formed in the interaction of neurohormonal and neuropeptide systems by monoaminergic systems of brain. Emotional states are formed by monoaminergic systems of the mid-brain, where the leading role belongs to the mesolimbic DA system. The emotional and motivation state of the encoded specific epigenetic molecular and chemical pattern of neuron.

  18. The near-IR spectrum of NO(X˜ 2Π )-Ne detected through excitation into the Östate continuum: A joint experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłos, J.; Zhang, S. G.; Meyer, H.

    2016-03-01

    We present new measurements of the near IR spectrum of NO-Ne in the region of the first NO overtone transition. The IR absorption is detected by exciting the vibrationally excited complex to the A ˜ -state dissociation continuum. The resulting NO(A) fragment is subsequently ionized in the same laser pulse. Spectra of the two lowest bands, A and B, are recorded. The spectra are compared with calculated spectra based on bound states derived from a new set of high level ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs). For the calculation, the PESs are used with either fixed NO intermolecular distance or averaged for the vibrational states of NO (X ˜ , v = 0 or 2). Spectra based on the new PESs reproduce the experimental spectra better than theoretical spectra based on the older PESs of M. H. Alexander et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 5588 (2001)]. Especially, spectra based on the two different vibrationally averaged PESs show a marked improvement in comparison to the one based on the fixed internuclear NO-distance. A fitted set of spectroscopic constants allows to reproduce most of the finer details of the measured spectra. Monitoring simultaneously the NO fragment ion and the parent ion channels while scanning the UV wavelength through the NO A-X hot-band region enabled us to confirm the NO-Ne A ˜ -state dissociation limit of 44233 ± 5 cm-1. These measurements also confirm the absence of a structured NO-Ne spectrum involving the A ˜ -state.

  19. Description of the Charge Transfer States at the Pentacene/C60 Interface: Combining Range-Separated Hybrid Functionals with the Polarizable Continuum Model.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zilong; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Coropceanu, Veaceslav

    2016-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) approaches based on range-separated hybrid functionals are currently methods of choice for the description of the charge-transfer (CT) states in organic donor/acceptor solar cells. However, these calculations are usually performed on small-size donor/acceptor complexes and as result do not account for electronic polarization effects. Here, using a pentacene/C60 complex as a model system, we discuss the ability of long-range corrected (LCR) hybrid functionals in combination with the polarizable continuum model (PCM) to determine the impact of the solid-state environment on the CT states. The CT energies are found to be insensitive to the interactions with the dielectric medium when a conventional time-dependent DFT/PCM (TDDFT/PCM) approach is used. However, a decrease in the energy of the CT state in the framework of LRC functionals can be obtained by using a smaller range-separated parameter when going from an isolated donor/acceptor complex to the solid-state case. PMID:27338105

  20. Cellular Solid-State NMR Investigation of a Membrane Protein Using Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Caporini, Marc A.; Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    While an increasing number of structural biology studies successfully demonstrate the power of high-resolution structures and dynamics of membrane proteins in fully understanding their function, there is considerable interest in developing NMR approaches to obtain such information in a cellular setting. As long as the proteins inside the living cell tumble rapidly in the NMR timescale, recently developed in-cell solution NMR approaches can be applied towards the determination of 3D structural information. However, there are numerous challenges that need to be overcome to study membrane proteins inside a cell. Research in our laboratory is focused on developing a combination of solid-state NMR and biological approaches to overcome these challenges with a specific emphasis on obtaining high-resolution structural insights into electron transfer biological processes mediated by membrane-bound proteins like mammalian cytochrome b5, cytochrome P450 and cytochrome P450 reductase. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of using the signal-enhancement rendered by dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy for in-cell studies on a membrane-anchored protein. Our experimental results obtained from 13C-labeled membrane-anchored cytochrome b5 in native Escherichia coli cells show a ~16-fold DNP signal enhancement (ε). Further, results obtained from a 2D 13C/13C chemical shift correlation MAS experiment demonstrates that it is highly possible to suppress the background signals from other cellular contents for high-resolution structural studies on membrane proteins. We believe that this study would pave new avenues for high-resolution 3D structural studies on a variety of membrane-associated proteins and their complexes in the cellular context to fully understand their functional roles in physiological processes. PMID:25017802

  1. Population transfer through the continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, T.; Elk, M.; Zhang, J.; Lambropoulos, P. Foundation of Research and Technology Hellas, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser and Department of Physics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 1527, Heraklion 711 10, Crete Department of Physics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0484 )

    1994-08-01

    We show that complete population transfer is not in general possible through continuum intermediate states. We present a formal theoretical argument and supporting numerical results. In addition, the behavior of the system is compared with the well-known [Lambda] system.

  2. Parameter identification in continuum models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Crowley, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Approximation techniques for use in numerical schemes for estimating spatially varying coefficients in continuum models such as those for Euler-Bernoulli beams are discussed. The techniques are based on quintic spline state approximations and cubic spline parameter approximations. Both theoretical and numerical results are presented. Previously announced in STAR as N83-28934

  3. Parameter identification in continuum models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Crowley, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Approximation techniques for use in numerical schemes for estimating spatially varying coefficients in continuum models such as those for Euler-Bernoulli beams are discussed. The techniques are based on quintic spline state approximations and cubic spline parameter approximations. Both theoretical and numerical results are presented.

  4. Ultrafast laser control of vibrational dynamics for a two-dimensional model of HONO 2 in the ground electronic state: separation of conformers, control of the bond length, selective preparation of the discrete and the continuum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppel, M.; Paramonov, G. K.

    1998-06-01

    Selective excitation of the vibrational bound and the continuum states, controlled by subpicosecond infrared (IR) laser pulses, is simulated within the Schrödinger wave function formalism for a two-dimensional model of the HONO 2 molecule in the ground electronic state. State-selective excitation of the OH bond is achieved by single optimal laser pulses, with the probability being 97% for the bound states and more than 91% for the resonances. Stable, long-living continuum states are prepared with more than 96% probability by two optimal laser pulses, with the expectation energy of the molecule being well above the dissociation threshold of the ON single bond, and its life-time being at least 100 ps. The length of the ON single bond can be controlled selectively: stretching and contraction by about 45% of its equilibrium length are demonstrated. Laser separation of spatial conformers of HONO 2 in inhomogeneous conditions occurring on an anisotropic surface or created by a direct current (DC) electric field is analysed. The relative yields of target conformers may be very high, ranging from 10 to 10 8, and the absolute yields of up to 40% and more are calculated.

  5. Modelling chronotaxicity of cellular energy metabolism to facilitate the identification of altered metabolic states.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Gemma; Suprunenko, Yevhen F; Jenkins, Kirsten; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular energy metabolism is a hallmark of many diseases, one notable example being cancer. Here, we focus on the identification of the transition from healthy to abnormal metabolic states. To do this, we study the dynamics of energy production in a cell. Due to the thermodynamic openness of a living cell, the inability to instantaneously match fluctuating supply and demand in energy metabolism results in nonautonomous time-varying oscillatory dynamics. However, such oscillatory dynamics is often neglected and treated as stochastic. Based on experimental evidence of metabolic oscillations, we show that changes in metabolic state can be described robustly by alterations in the chronotaxicity of the corresponding metabolic oscillations, i.e. the ability of an oscillator to resist external perturbations. We also present a method for the identification of chronotaxicity, applicable to general oscillatory signals and, importantly, apply this to real experimental data. Evidence of chronotaxicity was found in glycolytic oscillations in real yeast cells, verifying that chronotaxicity could be used to study transitions between metabolic states. PMID:27483987

  6. Modelling chronotaxicity of cellular energy metabolism to facilitate the identification of altered metabolic states.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Gemma; Suprunenko, Yevhen F; Jenkins, Kirsten; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2016-08-03

    Altered cellular energy metabolism is a hallmark of many diseases, one notable example being cancer. Here, we focus on the identification of the transition from healthy to abnormal metabolic states. To do this, we study the dynamics of energy production in a cell. Due to the thermodynamic openness of a living cell, the inability to instantaneously match fluctuating supply and demand in energy metabolism results in nonautonomous time-varying oscillatory dynamics. However, such oscillatory dynamics is often neglected and treated as stochastic. Based on experimental evidence of metabolic oscillations, we show that changes in metabolic state can be described robustly by alterations in the chronotaxicity of the corresponding metabolic oscillations, i.e. the ability of an oscillator to resist external perturbations. We also present a method for the identification of chronotaxicity, applicable to general oscillatory signals and, importantly, apply this to real experimental data. Evidence of chronotaxicity was found in glycolytic oscillations in real yeast cells, verifying that chronotaxicity could be used to study transitions between metabolic states.

  7. Modelling chronotaxicity of cellular energy metabolism to facilitate the identification of altered metabolic states

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Gemma; Suprunenko, Yevhen F.; Jenkins, Kirsten; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular energy metabolism is a hallmark of many diseases, one notable example being cancer. Here, we focus on the identification of the transition from healthy to abnormal metabolic states. To do this, we study the dynamics of energy production in a cell. Due to the thermodynamic openness of a living cell, the inability to instantaneously match fluctuating supply and demand in energy metabolism results in nonautonomous time-varying oscillatory dynamics. However, such oscillatory dynamics is often neglected and treated as stochastic. Based on experimental evidence of metabolic oscillations, we show that changes in metabolic state can be described robustly by alterations in the chronotaxicity of the corresponding metabolic oscillations, i.e. the ability of an oscillator to resist external perturbations. We also present a method for the identification of chronotaxicity, applicable to general oscillatory signals and, importantly, apply this to real experimental data. Evidence of chronotaxicity was found in glycolytic oscillations in real yeast cells, verifying that chronotaxicity could be used to study transitions between metabolic states. PMID:27483987

  8. Cellular Nonlinear Networks for the emergence of perceptual states: application to robot navigation control.

    PubMed

    Arena, Paolo; De Fiore, Sebastiano; Patané, Luca

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a new general purpose perceptual control architecture, based on nonlinear neural lattices, is presented and applied to solve robot navigation tasks. Insects show the ability to react to certain stimuli with simple reflexes, using direct sensory-motor pathways, which can be considered as basic behaviors, inherited and pre-wired. Relevant brain centres, known as Mushroom Bodies (MB) and Central Complex (CX) were recently identified in insects: though their functional details are not yet fully understood, it is known that they provide secondary pathways allowing the emergence of cognitive behaviors. These are gained through the coordination of the basic abilities to satisfy the insect's needs. Taking inspiration from this evidence, our architecture modulates, through a reinforcement learning, a set of competitive and concurrent basic behaviors in order to accomplish the task assigned through a reward function. The core of the architecture is constituted by the so-called Representation layer, used to create a concise picture of the current environment situation, fusing together different stimuli for the emergence of perceptual states. These perceptual states are steady state solutions of lattices of Reaction-Diffusion Cellular Nonlinear Networks (RD-CNN), designed to show Turing patterns. The exploitation of the dynamics of the multiple equilibria of the network is emphasized through the adaptive shaping of the basins of attraction for each emerged pattern. New experimental campaigns on standard robotic platforms are reported to demonstrate the potentiality and the effectiveness of the approach. PMID:19596552

  9. Cellular Nonlinear Networks for the emergence of perceptual states: application to robot navigation control.

    PubMed

    Arena, Paolo; De Fiore, Sebastiano; Patané, Luca

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a new general purpose perceptual control architecture, based on nonlinear neural lattices, is presented and applied to solve robot navigation tasks. Insects show the ability to react to certain stimuli with simple reflexes, using direct sensory-motor pathways, which can be considered as basic behaviors, inherited and pre-wired. Relevant brain centres, known as Mushroom Bodies (MB) and Central Complex (CX) were recently identified in insects: though their functional details are not yet fully understood, it is known that they provide secondary pathways allowing the emergence of cognitive behaviors. These are gained through the coordination of the basic abilities to satisfy the insect's needs. Taking inspiration from this evidence, our architecture modulates, through a reinforcement learning, a set of competitive and concurrent basic behaviors in order to accomplish the task assigned through a reward function. The core of the architecture is constituted by the so-called Representation layer, used to create a concise picture of the current environment situation, fusing together different stimuli for the emergence of perceptual states. These perceptual states are steady state solutions of lattices of Reaction-Diffusion Cellular Nonlinear Networks (RD-CNN), designed to show Turing patterns. The exploitation of the dynamics of the multiple equilibria of the network is emphasized through the adaptive shaping of the basins of attraction for each emerged pattern. New experimental campaigns on standard robotic platforms are reported to demonstrate the potentiality and the effectiveness of the approach.

  10. The near-IR spectrum of NO(X˜ 2Π )-He detected through excitation into the A ˜ -state continuum: A joint experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutner, V.; Zhang, S. G.; Meyer, H.; Kłos, J.

    2016-09-01

    We present the first measurement of a bound-state spectrum of the NO-He complex. The recorded spectrum is associated with the first overtone transition of the NO moiety. The IR absorption is detected by exciting the vibrationally excited complex to the A ˜ -state dissociation continuum. The resulting NO(A) fragment is subsequently ionized in the same laser pulse. We recorded two bands centered around the NO monomer rotational lines, Q11(0.5) and R11(0.5), consistent with an almost free rotation of the NO fragment within the complex. The origin of the spectrum is found at 3724.06 cm-1 blue shifted by 0.21 cm-1 from the corresponding NO monomer origin. The rotational structures of the spectrum are found to be in very good agreement with calculated spectra based on bound states derived from a set of high level ab initio potential energy surfaces [Kłos et al. J. Chem. Phys. 112, 2195 (2000)].

  11. Resonance and non-resonance effect of continuum states of 6Li on elastic scattering angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Camacho, A.

    2016-07-01

    CDCC calculations of elastic scattering angular distributions for reactions of the weakly bound projectile 6Li with targets 28Si and 58Ni at energies around the Coulomb barrier are presented. Special emphasis is given to account for the effect of couplings from 6Li resonance states l = 2, J π = 3+, 2+, 1+. Similarly, the effect produced by non-resonant state couplings is studied. The convergent calculations are carried out with global α-target and d-target interactions. The calculated elastic scattering angular distributions are in general in good agreement with the measurements for the systems considered in this work. It is found that the calculations with only resonance states are very similar to that with all couplings (resonance+non-resonance). So, the absence of these states have a strong effect on elastic scattering (non-resonance states calculation). It is shown that the effects increase as the collision energy increases. An interpretation of the strength of the different effects is given in terms of the polarization potentials that emerge from the different couplings.

  12. Connection of a topological surface state with the bulk continuum in Sb(2)Te(3)(0001).

    PubMed

    Seibel, Christoph; Bentmann, Hendrik; Braun, Jürgen; Minár, Jan; Maass, Henriette; Sakamoto, Kazuyuki; Arita, Masashi; Shimada, Kenya; Ebert, Hubert; Reinert, Friedrich

    2015-02-13

    The surface state of a Z(2) topological insulator connects with the conduction and valence band continua of the bulk, thereby bridging the band gap of the volume. We investigate this connection of the surface and bulk electronic structure for Sb(2)Te(3)(0001) by photoemission experiments and calculations. Upon crossing the topmost valence band the topological surface state (TSS) maintains a coherent spectral signature, a two-dimensional character, and a linear dispersion relation. Surface-bulk coupling manifests itself in the spectra through (i) a characteristic kink in the TSS dispersion as it crosses the topmost valence band and (ii) the appearance of hybridization gaps between the TSS and bulk-derived surface resonance states at higher binding energies. The findings provide a natural explanation for the unexpectedly weak surface-bulk mixing indicated by recent transport experiments on Sb(2)Te(3).

  13. The Early Childhood and Elementary Education Continuum: Constructing an Understanding of P-3 as State-Level Policy Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauerz, Kristie Anne

    2009-01-01

    State-level policy attention to young children's early learning opportunities burgeons; a sense of urgency exists to identify reform agendas that are both effective and sustainable. "P-3" often is used as the term for the first level of a seamless P-20 system that stretches from early childhood through post-secondary education. While it is…

  14. Spectrum of Slip Processes on the Subduction Interface in a Continuum Framework Resolved by Rate-and State Dependent Friction and Adaptive Time Stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrendoerfer, R.; van Dinther, Y.; Gerya, T.

    2015-12-01

    To explore the relationships between subduction dynamics and the megathrust earthquake potential, we have recently developed a numerical model that bridges the gap between processes on geodynamic and earthquake cycle time scales. In a self-consistent, continuum-based framework including a visco-elasto-plastic constitutive relationship, cycles of megathrust earthquake-like ruptures were simulated through a purely slip rate-dependent friction, albeit with very low slip rates (van Dinther et al., JGR, 2013). In addition to much faster earthquakes, a range of aseismic slip processes operate at different time scales in nature. These aseismic processes likely accommodate a considerable amount of the plate convergence and are thus relevant in order to estimate the long-term seismic coupling and related hazard in subduction zones. To simulate and resolve this wide spectrum of slip processes, we innovatively implemented rate-and state dependent friction (RSF) and an adaptive time-stepping into our continuum framework. The RSF formulation, in contrast to our previous friction formulation, takes the dependency of frictional strength on a state variable into account. It thereby allows for continuous plastic yielding inside rate-weakening regions, which leads to aseismic slip. In contrast to the conventional RSF formulation, we relate slip velocities to strain rates and use an invariant formulation. Thus we do not require the a priori definition of infinitely thin, planar faults in a homogeneous elastic medium. With this new implementation of RSF, we succeed to produce consistent cycles of frictional instabilities. By changing the frictional parameter a, b, and the characteristic slip distance, we observe a transition from stable sliding to stick-slip behaviour. This transition is in general agreement with predictions from theoretical estimates of the nucleation size, thereby to first order validating our implementation. By incorporating adaptive time-stepping based on a

  15. Steady-state kinetics of solitary batrachotoxin-treated sodium channels. Kinetics on a bounded continuum of polymer conformations.

    PubMed

    Rubinson, K A

    1992-02-01

    The underlying principles of the kinetics and equilibrium of a solitary sodium channel in the steady state are examined. Both the open and closed kinetics are postulated to result from round-trip excursions from a transition region that separates the openable and closed forms. Exponential behavior of the kinetics can have origins different from small-molecule systems. These differences suggest that the probability density functions (PDFs) that describe the time dependences of the open and closed forms arise from a distribution of rate constants. The distribution is likely to arise from a thermal modulation of the channel structure, and this provides a physical basis for the following three-variable equation: [formula; see text] Here, A0 is a scaling term, k is the mean rate constant, and sigma quantifies the Gaussian spread for the contributions of a range of effective rate constants. The maximum contribution is made by k, with rates faster and slower contributing less. (When sigma, the standard deviation of the spread, goes to zero, then p(f) = A0 e-kt.) The equation is applied to the single-channel steady-state probability density functions for batrachotoxin-treated sodium channels (1986. Keller et al. J. Gen. Physiol. 88: 1-23). The following characteristics are found: (a) The data for both open and closed forms of the channel are fit well with the above equation, which represents a Gaussian distribution of first-order rate processes. (b) The simple relationship [formula; see text] holds for the mean effective rat constants. Or, equivalently stated, the values of P open calculated from the k values closely agree with the P open values found directly from the PDF data. (c) In agreement with the known behavior of voltage-dependent rate constants, the voltage dependences of the mean effective rate constants for the opening and closing of the channel are equal and opposite over the voltage range studied. That is, [formula; see text] "Bursts" are related to the well

  16. Steady-state kinetics of solitary batrachotoxin-treated sodium channels. Kinetics on a bounded continuum of polymer conformations.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinson, K A

    1992-01-01

    The underlying principles of the kinetics and equilibrium of a solitary sodium channel in the steady state are examined. Both the open and closed kinetics are postulated to result from round-trip excursions from a transition region that separates the openable and closed forms. Exponential behavior of the kinetics can have origins different from small-molecule systems. These differences suggest that the probability density functions (PDFs) that describe the time dependences of the open and closed forms arise from a distribution of rate constants. The distribution is likely to arise from a thermal modulation of the channel structure, and this provides a physical basis for the following three-variable equation: [formula; see text] Here, A0 is a scaling term, k is the mean rate constant, and sigma quantifies the Gaussian spread for the contributions of a range of effective rate constants. The maximum contribution is made by k, with rates faster and slower contributing less. (When sigma, the standard deviation of the spread, goes to zero, then p(f) = A0 e-kt.) The equation is applied to the single-channel steady-state probability density functions for batrachotoxin-treated sodium channels (1986. Keller et al. J. Gen. Physiol. 88: 1-23). The following characteristics are found: (a) The data for both open and closed forms of the channel are fit well with the above equation, which represents a Gaussian distribution of first-order rate processes. (b) The simple relationship [formula; see text] holds for the mean effective rat constants. Or, equivalently stated, the values of P open calculated from the k values closely agree with the P open values found directly from the PDF data. (c) In agreement with the known behavior of voltage-dependent rate constants, the voltage dependences of the mean effective rate constants for the opening and closing of the channel are equal and opposite over the voltage range studied. That is, [formula; see text] "Bursts" are related to the well

  17. QCD equation of state at nonzero chemical potential: continuum results with physical quark masses at order μ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsányi, Sz.; Endrődi, G.; Fodor, Z.; Katz, S. D.; Krieg, S.; Ratti, C.; Szabó, K. K.

    2012-08-01

    We determine the equation of state of QCD for nonzero chemical potentials via a Taylor expansion of the pressure. The results are obtained for N f = 2 + 1 flavors of quarks with physical masses, on various lattice spacings. We present results for the pressure, interaction measure, energy density, entropy density, and the speed of sound for small chemical potentials. At low temperatures we compare our results with the Hadron Resonance Gas model. We also express our observables along trajectories of constant entropy over particle number. A simple parameterization is given (the Matlab/Octave script parameterization.m, submitted to the arXiv along with the paper), which can be used to reconstruct the observables as functions of T and μ, or as functions of T and S/N.

  18. Dictyostelid cellular slime molds associated with grasslands of the central and western United States.

    PubMed

    Rollins, Adam W; Landolt, John C; Stephenson, Steven L

    2010-01-01

    Dictyostelid cellular slime molds (dictyostelids) associated with grassland ecosystems of the central and western United States were investigated at nine sites that included examples of the three major ecological types of grasslands (tall grass, mixed grass and short grass) generally recognized for the region. Samples of soil/humus collected from each site were examined with the Cavender method of isolating dictyostelids. For each of those six sites with well developed gallery forests present, an additional set of forest soil/humus samples was collected. A more intensive sampling effort was carried out at one site (Konza LTER) to assess the possible effects of burning and grazing on dictyostelid diversity and density. Twelve species of dictyostelids were recovered from grassland sites, whereas gallery forest sites yielded only nine species. Four cosmopolitan species (Dictyostelium giganteum, D. mucoroides, D. sphaerocephalum and Polysphondylium pallidum) were represented by the greatest densities of clones, with D. sphaerocephalum particularly common. The general pattern across all sites was that both species richness and density of dictyostelids decreased with decreasing precipitation. Samples collected from ungrazed grassland plots yielded higher numbers of both species and clones as compared to grazed plots, and the general pattern was for both values to increase as the interval between fires increased. For numbers of clones this correlation was statistically significant. PMID:20943500

  19. Filament formation by metabolic enzymes is a specific adaptation to an advanced state of cellular starvation

    PubMed Central

    Petrovska, Ivana; Nüske, Elisabeth; Munder, Matthias C; Kulasegaran, Gayathrie; Malinovska, Liliana; Kroschwald, Sonja; Richter, Doris; Fahmy, Karim; Gibson, Kimberley; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Alberti, Simon

    2014-01-01

    One of the key questions in biology is how the metabolism of a cell responds to changes in the environment. In budding yeast, starvation causes a drop in intracellular pH, but the functional role of this pH change is not well understood. Here, we show that the enzyme glutamine synthetase (Gln1) forms filaments at low pH and that filament formation leads to enzymatic inactivation. Filament formation by Gln1 is a highly cooperative process, strongly dependent on macromolecular crowding, and involves back-to-back stacking of cylindrical homo-decamers into filaments that associate laterally to form higher order fibrils. Other metabolic enzymes also assemble into filaments at low pH. Hence, we propose that filament formation is a general mechanism to inactivate and store key metabolic enzymes during a state of advanced cellular starvation. These findings have broad implications for understanding the interplay between nutritional stress, the metabolism and the physical organization of a cell. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02409.001 PMID:24771766

  20. FANTOM5 transcriptome catalog of cellular states based on Semantic MediaWiki.

    PubMed

    Abugessaisa, Imad; Shimoji, Hisashi; Sahin, Serkan; Kondo, Atsushi; Harshbarger, Jayson; Lizio, Marina; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair; Kasukawa, Takeya; Kawaji, Hideya

    2016-01-01

    The Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome project (FANTOM5) mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) and measured their activities in a diverse range of biological samples. The FANTOM5 project generated a large data set; including detailed information about the profiled samples, the uncovered TSSs at high base-pair resolution on the genome, their transcriptional initiation activities, and further information of transcriptional regulation. Data sets to explore transcriptome in individual cellular states encoded in the mammalian genomes have been enriched by a series of additional analysis, based on the raw experimental data, along with the progress of the research activities. To make the heterogeneous data set accessible and useful for investigators, we developed a web-based database called Semantic catalog of Samples, Transcription initiation And Regulators (SSTAR). SSTAR utilizes the open source wiki software MediaWiki along with the Semantic MediaWiki (SMW) extension, which provides flexibility to model, store, and display a series of data sets produced during the course of the FANTOM5 project. Our use of SMW demonstrates the utility of the framework for dissemination of large-scale analysis results. SSTAR is a case study in handling biological data generated from a large-scale research project in terms of maintenance and growth alongside research activities.Database URL: http://fantom.gsc.riken.jp/5/sstar/.

  1. FANTOM5 transcriptome catalog of cellular states based on Semantic MediaWiki

    PubMed Central

    Abugessaisa, Imad; Shimoji, Hisashi; Sahin, Serkan; Kondo, Atsushi; Harshbarger, Jayson; Lizio, Marina; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair; Kasukawa, Takeya; Kawaji, Hideya

    2016-01-01

    The Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome project (FANTOM5) mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) and measured their activities in a diverse range of biological samples. The FANTOM5 project generated a large data set; including detailed information about the profiled samples, the uncovered TSSs at high base-pair resolution on the genome, their transcriptional initiation activities, and further information of transcriptional regulation. Data sets to explore transcriptome in individual cellular states encoded in the mammalian genomes have been enriched by a series of additional analysis, based on the raw experimental data, along with the progress of the research activities. To make the heterogeneous data set accessible and useful for investigators, we developed a web-based database called Semantic catalog of Samples, Transcription initiation And Regulators (SSTAR). SSTAR utilizes the open source wiki software MediaWiki along with the Semantic MediaWiki (SMW) extension, which provides flexibility to model, store, and display a series of data sets produced during the course of the FANTOM5 project. Our use of SMW demonstrates the utility of the framework for dissemination of large-scale analysis results. SSTAR is a case study in handling biological data generated from a large-scale research project in terms of maintenance and growth alongside research activities. Database URL: http://fantom.gsc.riken.jp/5/sstar/ PMID:27402679

  2. FANTOM5 transcriptome catalog of cellular states based on Semantic MediaWiki.

    PubMed

    Abugessaisa, Imad; Shimoji, Hisashi; Sahin, Serkan; Kondo, Atsushi; Harshbarger, Jayson; Lizio, Marina; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair; Kasukawa, Takeya; Kawaji, Hideya

    2016-01-01

    The Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome project (FANTOM5) mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) and measured their activities in a diverse range of biological samples. The FANTOM5 project generated a large data set; including detailed information about the profiled samples, the uncovered TSSs at high base-pair resolution on the genome, their transcriptional initiation activities, and further information of transcriptional regulation. Data sets to explore transcriptome in individual cellular states encoded in the mammalian genomes have been enriched by a series of additional analysis, based on the raw experimental data, along with the progress of the research activities. To make the heterogeneous data set accessible and useful for investigators, we developed a web-based database called Semantic catalog of Samples, Transcription initiation And Regulators (SSTAR). SSTAR utilizes the open source wiki software MediaWiki along with the Semantic MediaWiki (SMW) extension, which provides flexibility to model, store, and display a series of data sets produced during the course of the FANTOM5 project. Our use of SMW demonstrates the utility of the framework for dissemination of large-scale analysis results. SSTAR is a case study in handling biological data generated from a large-scale research project in terms of maintenance and growth alongside research activities.Database URL: http://fantom.gsc.riken.jp/5/sstar/. PMID:27402679

  3. Studies of yrast and continuum states in A=140-160 nuclei. Progress report, January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980. [Purdue Univ. , 1/1/80-12/31/80

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    The structure of nuclei in the A approx. 150 region was investigated by in-beam ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy using heavy-ion beams, mostly from the Argonne Tandem-Linac. Results for the nuclei /sup 148/Dy, /sup 149/Dy, /sup 153/Dy, /sup 154/Dy, /sup 149/Ho, and /sup 150/Ho are summarized. The feeding of yrast states in these nuclei and the link between the highest known yrast states and the continuum region were also studied. 6 figures.

  4. [Cellular immunity state assessed in bronchial and alveolar lavage for experimental animals exposed to the rubber dust].

    PubMed

    Zhumabekova, B K; Karabalin, S K; Bakirova, R E

    2004-01-01

    Experiments on 21 rats helped to study influence of mechanical rubber dust on cellular immunity state in bronchial and alveolar lavage, efficiency of Ruvimine for prophylaxis. Findings are that mechanical rubber dust is strongly cytotoxic. Ruvimine administration during the whole experiment demonstrates therapeutic and prophylactic effect and normalizes local pulmonary phagocytosis.

  5. Continuum radiation at Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, W.S.; Gurnett, D.A. ); Desch, M.D. )

    1990-02-01

    Uranus has proven to be a radio source of remarkable complexity with as many as six distinctly different types of emission. One Uranian radio emission which has thus far escaped attention is an analog of continuum radiation at Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn. The emission is found to be propagating in the ordinary mode in the range of one to a few kHz on the inbound leg of the Voyager 2 encounter, shortly after the magnetopause crossing. The continuum radiation spectrum at Uranus also includes bands with frequencies as high as 12 kHz or greater on both the inbound and outbound legs. The Uranian continuum radiation is notably weak, making it more like that detected at Saturn than the extremely intense Jovian continuum radiation. The Uranian emission shows some evidence for narrow-band components lying in the same frequency regime as the continuum, completing the analogy with the other planets, which also show narrow-band components superimposed on the continuum spectrum. The authors argue that the low intensity of the Uranian continuum is most likely related to the lack of a density cavity within the Uranian magnetosphere that is deep relative to the solar wind plasma density.

  6. Boundary-corrected four-body continuum-intermediate-state method: Single-electron capture from heliumlike atomic systems by fast nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mančev, Ivan; Milojević, Nenad; Belkić, Dževad

    2015-06-01

    Single charge exchange in collisions between bare projectiles and heliumlike atomic systems at intermediate and high incident energies is examined by using the four-body formalism of the first- and second-order theories. The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the relative importance of the intermediate ionization continua of the captured electron compared to the usual direct path of the single electron transfer from a target to a projectile. In order to achieve this goal, comprehensive comparisons are made between the four-body boundary-corrected continuum-intermediate-states (BCIS-4B) method and the four-body boundary-corrected first Born (CB1-4B) method. The perturbation potential is the same in the CB1-4B and BCIS-4B methods. Both methods satisfy the correct boundary conditions in the entrance and exit channels. However, unlike the CB1-4B method, the second-order BCIS-4B method takes into account the electronic Coulomb continuum-intermediate states in either the entrance or the exit channel depending on whether the post or the prior version of the transition amplitude is used. Hence, by comparing the results from these two theories, the relative importance of the intermediate ionization electronic continua can be assessed within the four-body formalism of scattering theory. The BCIS-4B method predicts the usual second-order effect through double scattering of the captured electron on two nuclei as a quantum-mechanical counterpart of the Thomas classical two-step, billiard-type collision. The physical mechanism for this effect in the BCIS-4B method is also comprised of two steps such that ionization occurs first. This is followed by capture of the electron by the projectile with both processes taking place on the energy shell. Moreover, the role of the second, noncaptured electron in a heliumlike target is revisited. To this end, the BCIS-4B method describes the effect of capture of one electron by the interaction of the projectile nucleus with

  7. The Aquatic Systems Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, T. C.

    2004-12-01

    The Aquatic Systems Continuum is a proposed framework for interrelating the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of aquatic ecosystems. The continuum can be represented by a three-dimensional matrix that relates aquatic ecosystems to their position within hydrologic flow paths (x-axis, a spatial dimension) and their response to climate variability (y-axis). The z-axis describes the structure of biological communities as they relate to the hydrological conditions defined by the x and y axes. The concept is an extension of the Wetland Continuum that was derived from field studies of a prairie pothole wetland complex in North Dakota. At that site, the hydrologic continuum in space is defined by ground-water flow systems. The wetlands are surface-water expressions of larger ground-water watersheds, in which wetlands serve recharge, flow-through, and discharge functions with respect to ground water. The water balance of the wetlands is dominated by precipitation and evaporation. However, the interaction of the wetlands with ground water, although a small part of their water budget, provides the primary control on delivery of major solutes to and from the wetlands. Having monitored these wetlands for more than 25 years, during which time the site had a complete range of climate conditions from drought to deluge, the response of the aquatic communities to a wide variety of climate conditions has been well documented. The Aquatic Systems Continuum extends the model provided by the Wetland Continuum to include rivers and their interaction with ground water. As a result, both ground water and surface water are used to describe terrestrial water flows for all types of aquatic ecosystems. By using the Aquatic Systems Continuum to describe the hydrologic flow paths in all types of terrain, including exchange with atmospheric water, it is possible to design studies, monitoring programs, and management plans for nearly any type of aquatic ecosystem.

  8. Nuclear rotation in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossez, K.; Nazarewicz, W.; Jaganathen, Y.; Michel, N.; Płoszajczak, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atomic nuclei often exhibit collective rotational-like behavior in highly excited states, well above the particle emission threshold. What determines the existence of collective motion in the continuum region is not fully understood. Purpose: In this work, by studying the collective rotation of the positive-parity deformed configurations of the one-neutron halo nucleus 11Be, we assess different mechanisms that stabilize collective behavior beyond the limits of particle stability. Method: To solve a particle-plus-core problem, we employ a nonadiabatic coupled-channel formalism and the Berggren single-particle ensemble, which explicitly contains bound states, narrow resonances, and the scattering continuum. We study the valence-neutron density in the intrinsic rotor frame to assess the validity of the adiabatic approach as the excitation energy increases. Results: We demonstrate that collective rotation of the ground band of 11Be is stabilized by (i) the fact that the ℓ =0 one-neutron decay channel is closed, and (ii) the angular momentum alignment, which increases the parentage of high-ℓ components at high spins; both effects act in concert to decrease decay widths of ground-state band members. This is not the case for higher-lying states of 11Be, where the ℓ =0 neutron-decay channel is open and often dominates. Conclusion: We demonstrate that long-lived collective states can exist at high excitation energy in weakly bound neutron drip-line nuclei such as 11Be.

  9. Latinos in the United States on the HIV/AIDS care continuum by birth country/region: A systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Diana M.; Trepka, Mary Jo; Dillon, Frank R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Twenty percent of Latinos in the U.S. with HIV are unaware of their HIV status, 33% are linked to care late, and 74% do not reach viral suppression. Disparities along this HIV/AIDS care continuum may be present between various ethnic groups historically categorized as Latino. Objective To identify differences along the HIV/AIDS care continuum between U.S. Latinos of varying birth countries/regions. Methods A systematic review of articles published in English between 2002–2013 was conducted using MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Web of Science. Studies that reported on one or more steps of the HIV/AIDS care continuum and reported results by birth country/region for Latinos were included. Results Latinos born in Mexico and Central America were found to be at increased risk of late diagnosis compared with U.S.-born Latinos. No studies were found that reported on linkage to HIV care or viral load suppression by country/region of birth. Lower survival was found among Latinos born in Puerto Rico compared with Latinos born in mainland U.S. Inconsistent differences in survival were found among Latinos born in Mexico, Cuba and Central America. Discussion Socio/cultural context, immigration factors and documentation status are discussed as partial explanations for disparities along the HIV/AIDS care continuum. PMID:24810215

  10. A study of high-temperature heat pipes with multiple heat sources and sinks. I - Experimental methodology and frozen startup profiles. II - Analysis of continuum transient and steady-state experimental data with numerical predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faghri, A.; Cao, Y.; Buchko, M.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental profiles for heat pipe startup from the frozen state were obtained, using a high-temperature sodium/stainless steel pipe with multiple heat sources and sinks to investigate the startup behavior of the heat pipe for various heat loads and input locations, with both low and high heat rejection rates at the condensor. The experimental results of the performance characteristics for the continuum transient and steady-state operation of the heat pipe were analyzed, and the performance limits for operation with varying heat fluxes and location are determined.

  11. [Evaluation of the state of systemic and local cellular immunity using loading tests].

    PubMed

    Stefani, A V; Mikhu, I Ia; Khavkin, A I

    1993-01-01

    Local and systemic cellular immunity parameters of the blood and gastrointestinal mucosa were studied in 165 children suffering from chronic gastritis, duodenitis, celiac, secondary malabsorption syndrome, and phosphate diabetes by spontaneous E-RFC method with a number of loading tests in vitro. Thymalin, theophylline, cold incubation were used. Three types of T lymphocyte response were distinguished: the hypoergic, resistant, and hyperergic. To make the interpretation of the findings easier, coefficients were calculated for each type of response of the blood and gastrointestinal mucosa immunocompetent cells.

  12. Teacher Education: A Continuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Momentum, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This document is a theme issue of the journal "Momentum", devoted to the topic "Teacher Education: A Continuum." It contains 15 articles in the central section and 7 articles in a special section subtitled "The Multicultural Challenge." The following articles on the central theme are presented: (1) "Closing the Gap" concerns fusing the college and…

  13. Extragalactic continuum sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtaoja, E.

    1989-09-01

    As with most other high-frequency radio telescopes, continuum work occupies only a small fraction - currently about 5% - of SEST's total time. The importance of these observations in increasing our understanding of quasars and other extragalactic sources is, however, large.

  14. The Continuum of Listening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rud, A. G.; Garrison, Jim

    2007-01-01

    The distinction between "apophatic" and "cataphatic" listening is defined and analyzed. "Apophatic" listening is more or less devoid of cognitivist claims, whereas "cataphatic" listening involves cognition and questioning. Many of the papers in this volume are discussed along the continuum determined by these two types of listening.…

  15. Inhibition of catalase by tea catechins in free and cellular state: a biophysical approach.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sandip; Dey, Subrata Kumar; Saha, Chabita

    2014-01-01

    Tea flavonoids bind to variety of enzymes and inhibit their activities. In the present study, binding and inhibition of catalase activity by catechins with respect to their structure-affinity relationship has been elucidated. Fluorimetrically determined binding constants for (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG) with catalase were observed to be 2.27×106 M(-1) and 1.66×106 M(-1), respectively. Thermodynamic parameters evidence exothermic and spontaneous interaction between catechins and catalase. Major forces of interaction are suggested to be through hydrogen bonding along with electrostatic contributions and conformational changes. Distinct loss of α-helical structure of catalase by interaction with EGCG was captured in circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Gallated catechins demonstrated higher binding constants and inhibition efficacy than non-gallated catechins. EGCG exhibited maximum inhibition of pure catalase. It also inhibited cellular catalase in K562 cancer cells with significant increase in cellular ROS and suppression of cell viability (IC50 54.5 µM). These results decipher the molecular mechanism by which tea catechins interact with catalase and highlight the potential of gallated catechin like EGCG as an anticancer drug. EGCG may have other non-specific targets in the cell, but its anticancer property is mainly defined by ROS accumulation due to catalase inhibition.

  16. A cellular automaton model of the steady-state free'' growth of a non-isothermal dendrite

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.G.R.; Williams, T.; Spittle, J.A. . Dept. of Materials Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    A 2D cellular automaton model has been developed to study the steady-state free'' growth of a non-isothermal dendrite. The model incorporates rules to account for heat diffusion, the influence of curvature on the equilibrium freezing temperature and latent heat evolution. The model predicts a V [proportional to] [Delta]T[sup b] growth rate-undercooling relationship for the various dendrite tip growth temperatures selected. The prediction of the values of b accords reasonably with analytical models and reported experimental observations.

  17. Unified ab initio approach to bound and unbound states: No-core shell model with continuum and its application to 7He

    SciTech Connect

    Baroni, Simone; Navratil, Petr; Quaglioni, Sofia

    2013-03-26

    In this study, we introduce a unified approach to nuclear bound and continuum states based on the coupling of the no-core shell model (NCSM), a bound-state technique, with the no-core shell model/resonating group method (NCSM/RGM), a nuclear scattering technique. This new ab initio method, no-core shell model with continuum (NCSMC), leads to convergence properties superior to either NCSM or NCSM/RGM while providing a balanced approach to different classes of states. In the NCSMC, the ansatz for the many-nucleon wave function includes (i) a square-integrable A-nucleon component expanded in a complete harmonic oscillator basis and (ii) a binary-cluster component with asymptotic boundary conditions that can properly describe weakly bound states, resonances, and scattering. The Schrödinger equation is transformed into a system of coupled-channel integral-differential equations that we solve using a modified microscopic R-matrix formalism within a Lagrange mesh basis. We demonstrate the usefulness of the approach by investigating the unbound 7He nucleus.

  18. Cellular mechanisms of cardioprotection by calorie restriction: state of the science and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Marzetti, Emanuele; Wohlgemuth, Stephanie E.; Anton, Stephen D.; Bernabei, Roberto; Carter, Christy S.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Evidence from animal models and preliminary studies in humans indicate that calorie restriction (CR) delays cardiac aging and can prevent cardiovascular disease. These effects are mediated by a wide spectrum of biochemical and cellular adaptations, including redox homeostasis, mitochondrial function, inflammation, apoptosis and autophagy. Despite the beneficial effects of CR, its large-scale implementation is challenged by applicability issues as well as health concerns. However, preclinical studies indicate that specific compounds, such as resveratrol, may mimic many of the effects of CR, thus potentially obviating the need for drastic food intake reductions. Results from ongoing clinical trials will reveal whether the intriguing alternative of CR mimetics represents a safe and effective strategy to promote cardiovascular health and delay cardiac aging in humans. PMID:19944269

  19. Disordered cellular automaton traffic flow model: phase separated state, density waves and self organized criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourrate, K.; Loulidi, M.

    2006-01-01

    We suggest a disordered traffic flow model that captures many features of traffic flow. It is an extension of the Nagel-Schreckenberg (NaSch) stochastic cellular automata for single line vehicular traffic model. It incorporates random acceleration and deceleration terms that may be greater than one unit. Our model leads under its intrinsic dynamics, for high values of braking probability pr, to a constant flow at intermediate densities without introducing any spatial inhomogeneities. For a system of fast drivers pr→0, the model exhibits a density wave behavior that was observed in car following models with optimal velocity. The gap of the disordered model we present exhibits, for high values of pr and random deceleration, at a critical density, a power law distribution which is a hall mark of a self organized criticality phenomena.

  20. Approaching clinical proteomics: current state and future fields of application in cellular proteomics.

    PubMed

    Apweiler, Rolf; Aslanidis, Charalampos; Deufel, Thomas; Gerstner, Andreas; Hansen, Jens; Hochstrasser, Dennis; Kellner, Roland; Kubicek, Markus; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Maser, Edmund; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Meyer, Helmut E; Müllner, Stefan; Mutter, Wolfgang; Neumaier, Michael; Nollau, Peter; Nothwang, Hans G; Ponten, Fredrik; Radbruch, Andreas; Reinert, Knut; Rothe, Gregor; Stockinger, Hannes; Tárnok, Attila; Taussig, Mike J; Thiel, Andreas; Thiery, Joachim; Ueffing, Marius; Valet, Günther; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Wagener, Christoph; Wagner, Oswald; Schmitz, Gerd

    2009-10-01

    Recent developments in proteomics technology offer new opportunities for clinical applications in hospital or specialized laboratories including the identification of novel biomarkers, monitoring of disease, detecting adverse effects of drugs, and environmental hazards. Advanced spectrometry technologies and the development of new protein array formats have brought these analyses to a standard, which now has the potential to be used in clinical diagnostics. Besides standardization of methodologies and distribution of proteomic data into public databases, the nature of the human body fluid proteome with its high dynamic range in protein concentrations, its quantitation problems, and its extreme complexity present enormous challenges. Molecular cell biology (cytomics) with its link to proteomics is a new fast moving scientific field, which addresses functional cell analysis and bioinformatic approaches to search for novel cellular proteomic biomarkers or their release products into body fluids that provide better insight into the enormous biocomplexity of disease processes and are suitable for patient stratification, therapeutic monitoring, and prediction of prognosis. Experience from studies of in vitro diagnostics and especially in clinical chemistry showed that the majority of errors occurs in the preanalytical phase and the setup of the diagnostic strategy. This is also true for clinical proteomics where similar preanalytical variables such as inter- and intra-assay variability due to biological variations or proteolytical activities in the sample will most likely also influence the results of proteomics studies. However, before complex proteomic analysis can be introduced at a broader level into the clinic, standardization of the preanalytical phase including patient preparation, sample collection, sample preparation, sample storage, measurement, and data analysis is another issue which has to be improved. In this report, we discuss the recent advances and

  1. Solar radio continuum storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reviews the current status of research on solar radio continuum emissions from metric to hectometric wave frequencies, emphasizing the role of energetic electrons in the 10-100 keV range in these emissions. It is seen that keV-energy electrons generated in active sunspot groups must be the sources of radio continuum storm emissions for wide frequency bands. These electrons excite plasma oscillations in the medium, which in turn are converted to electromagnetic radiation. The radio noise continuum sources are usually associated with type III burst activity observed above these sources. Although the mechanism for the release of the energetic electrons is not known, it seems they are ejected from storm source regions in association with rapid variation of associated sunspot magnetic fields due to their growth into complex types. To explain some of the observed characteristics, the importance of two-stream instability and the scattering of ambient plasma ions on energetic electron streams is pointed out.

  2. Multiplexed mass cytometry profiling of cellular states perturbed by small-molecule regulators

    PubMed Central

    Bodenmiller, Bernd; Zunder, Eli R.; Finck, Rachel; Chen, Tiffany J.; Savig, Erica S.; Bruggner, Robert V.; Simonds, Erin F.; Bendall, Sean C.; Sachs, Karen; Krutzik, Peter O.; Nolan, Garry P.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to comprehensively explore the impact of bio-active molecules on human samples at the single-cell level can provide great insight for biomedical research. Mass cytometry enables quantitative single-cell analysis with deep dimensionality, but currently lacks high-throughput capability. Here we report a method termed mass-tag cellular barcoding (MCB) that increases mass cytometry throughput by sample multiplexing. 96-well format MCB was used to characterize human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) signaling dynamics, cell-to-cell communication, the signaling variability between 8 donors, and to define the impact of 27 inhibitors on this system. For each compound, 14 phosphorylation sites were measured in 14 PBMC types, resulting in 18,816 quantified phosphorylation levels from each multiplexed sample. This high-dimensional systems-level inquiry allowed analysis across cell-type and signaling space, reclassified inhibitors, and revealed off-target effects. MCB enables high-content, high-throughput screening, with potential applications for drug discovery, pre-clinical testing, and mechanistic investigation of human disease. PMID:22902532

  3. Chemical tagging and customizing of cellular chromatin states using ultrafast trans-splicing inteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Yael; Vila-Perelló, Miquel; Verma, Shivam; Muir, Tom W.

    2015-05-01

    Post-translational modification of the histone proteins in chromatin plays a central role in the epigenetic control of DNA-templated processes in eukaryotic cells. Developing methods that enable the structure of histones to be manipulated is, therefore, essential to understand the biochemical mechanisms that underlie genomic regulation. Here we present a synthetic biology method to engineer histones that bear site-specific modifications on cellular chromatin using protein trans-splicing (PTS). We genetically fused the N-terminal fragment of ultrafast split intein to the C terminus of histone H2B, which, on reaction with a complementary synthetic C intein, generated labelled histone. Using this approach, we incorporated various non-native chemical modifications into chromatin in vivo with temporal control. Furthermore, the time and concentration dependence of PTS performed in nucleo enabled us to examine differences in the accessibility of the euchromatin and heterochromatin regions of the epigenome. Finally, we used PTS to semisynthesize a native histone modification, H2BK120 ubiquitination, in isolated nuclei and showed that this can trigger downstream epigenetic crosstalk of H3K79 methylation.

  4. Cellular and biochemical mechanisms, risk factors and management of preterm birth: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Vitale, S G; Marilli, I; Rapisarda, A M; Rossetti, D; Belluomo, G; Iapichino, V; Stancanelli, F; Cianci, A

    2014-12-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is usually defined as a delivery before 37 completed weeks or 259 days of gestation. World Health Organization estimates a worldwide incidence of PTB of 9.6%. Infants born preterm are at higher risks than infants born at term for mortality, and acute and chronic morbidity. Major causes of PTB are the following: spontaneous preterm labor with intact membranes (50%), labor induction or caesarean delivery for maternal or fetal indications (30%), and preterm premature rupture of membranes or PPROM (20%). The aim of this review is to analyze this medical condition, focusing on cellular and biochemical mechanisms, maternal risk factors and role of inflammation and infections in preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) and PTB. Moreover we will discuss about the proper therapeutic strategies for its management. Although different methods have been introduced to predict the advent of preterm labour in asymptomatic women, possibilities for real primary prevention are rare. An early estimation of potential risk factors is pivotal in the secondary prevention of PTB. Finally most efforts so far have been tertiary interventions. These measures have reduced perinatal morbidity and mortality. Advances in primary and secondary care will be needed to prevent prematurity-related illness in infants and children.

  5. Correlating two-photon excited fluorescence imaging of breast cancer cellular redox state with seahorse flux analysis of normalized cellular oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jue; Wright, Heather J.; Chan, Nicole; Tran, Richard; Razorenova, Olga V.; Potma, Eric O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-06-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of the cellular cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide is widely used to measure cellular metabolism, both in normal and pathological cells and tissues. When dual-wavelength excitation is used, ratiometric TPEF imaging of the intrinsic cofactor fluorescence provides a metabolic index of cells-the "optical redox ratio" (ORR). With increased interest in understanding and controlling cellular metabolism in cancer, there is a need to evaluate the performance of ORR in malignant cells. We compare TPEF metabolic imaging with seahorse flux analysis of cellular oxygen consumption in two different breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). We monitor metabolic index in living cells under both normal culture conditions and, for MCF-7, in response to cell respiration inhibitors and uncouplers. We observe a significant correlation between the TPEF-derived ORR and the flux analyzer measurements (R=0.7901, p<0.001). Our results confirm that the ORR is a valid dynamic index of cell metabolism under a range of oxygen consumption conditions relevant for cancer imaging.

  6. A continuum model of transcriptional bursting

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Adam M; Tunnacliffe, Edward; Cannon, Danielle; Chubb, Jonathan R

    2016-01-01

    Transcription occurs in stochastic bursts. Early models based upon RNA hybridisation studies suggest bursting dynamics arise from alternating inactive and permissive states. Here we investigate bursting mechanism in live cells by quantitative imaging of actin gene transcription, combined with molecular genetics, stochastic simulation and probabilistic modelling. In contrast to early models, our data indicate a continuum of transcriptional states, with a slowly fluctuating initiation rate converting the gene between different levels of activity, interspersed with extended periods of inactivity. We place an upper limit of 40 s on the lifetime of fluctuations in elongation rate, with initiation rate variations persisting an order of magnitude longer. TATA mutations reduce the accessibility of high activity states, leaving the lifetime of on- and off-states unchanged. A continuum or spectrum of gene states potentially enables a wide dynamic range for cell responses to stimuli. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13051.001 PMID:26896676

  7. Cellular systems biology profiling applied to cellular models of disease.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Kenneth A; Premkumar, Daniel R; Strock, Christopher J; Johnston, Patricia; Taylor, Lansing

    2009-11-01

    Building cellular models of disease based on the approach of Cellular Systems Biology (CSB) has the potential to improve the process of creating drugs as part of the continuum from early drug discovery through drug development and clinical trials and diagnostics. This paper focuses on the application of CSB to early drug discovery. We discuss the integration of protein-protein interaction biosensors with other multiplexed, functional biomarkers as an example in using CSB to optimize the identification of quality lead series compounds.

  8. [Toxicological assessment of nanostructured silica. III. Microecological, hematological indices, state of cellular immunity].

    PubMed

    Shumakova, A A; Efimochkina, N R; Minaeva, L P; Bykova, I B; Batishchava, S Yu; Markova, Yu M; Trushina, E N; Mustafina, O K; Sharanova, N E; Gmoshinsky, I V; Khanferyan, R A; Khotimchenko, S A; Sheveleva, S A; Tutelyan, V A

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the third in a series of publications on the experimental study of subacute oral toxicity of nanostructured silicon dioxide (SiO2). We used commercial nanostructured SiO2, obtained by hydrolysis of tetrachlorosilane in the gaseous phase, with the size of the primary nanoparticles (NPs) of 5-30 nm. The aqueous dispersion of SiO2 after treatment with ultrasound was administered to rats with initial weight of 80 +/- 5 g for the first 30 days by intragastric gavage and further for 60 days with diets in doses of 0.1; 1.0; 10 and 100 mg/kg body weight per day. Animals of the control group were treated with deionized water. The amount of basic and transient populations of gut microbiocenosis, hematological indexes were measured using standard methods. Specific content of the B-lymphocytes (CD45RA+), total T-lymphocytes (CD3+), T-helper cells (CD4+), T-cytotoxic cells (CD8+), NK-cells (CD161a+) in general population of lymphocytes was evaluated byflow cytometry; serum cytokine levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-10 were determined by ELISA. No significant changes in the qualitative and quantitative composition of the intestinal microbiota populations regardless of the dose of administered nanomaterial have been found. This gave reason to believe that the postulated mechanism of the toxic effects of the NPs of SiO2, mediated by modification of the composition of the intestinal microflora and the corresponding changes in its functional activity, apparently, is not realized. The main target of nanostructured SiO2 was the T-cellular system of the immune system of animals, that was manifested in the significant decrease of the number of leukocytes (33%), number of T-helper cells (13%), CD4/CD8 ratio (27%) and increasing the number of cytotoxic lymphocytes (19%) and the level of TNF-alpha (590%). The value of the maximum dose (NOAEL) of nanostructured SiO2, has no effect on T-cell immunity was not more than 100 mg/kg body weight per day.

  9. [Toxicological assessment of nanostructured silica. III. Microecological, hematological indices, state of cellular immunity].

    PubMed

    Shumakova, A A; Efimochkina, N R; Minaeva, L P; Bykova, I B; Batishchava, S Yu; Markova, Yu M; Trushina, E N; Mustafina, O K; Sharanova, N E; Gmoshinsky, I V; Khanferyan, R A; Khotimchenko, S A; Sheveleva, S A; Tutelyan, V A

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the third in a series of publications on the experimental study of subacute oral toxicity of nanostructured silicon dioxide (SiO2). We used commercial nanostructured SiO2, obtained by hydrolysis of tetrachlorosilane in the gaseous phase, with the size of the primary nanoparticles (NPs) of 5-30 nm. The aqueous dispersion of SiO2 after treatment with ultrasound was administered to rats with initial weight of 80 +/- 5 g for the first 30 days by intragastric gavage and further for 60 days with diets in doses of 0.1; 1.0; 10 and 100 mg/kg body weight per day. Animals of the control group were treated with deionized water. The amount of basic and transient populations of gut microbiocenosis, hematological indexes were measured using standard methods. Specific content of the B-lymphocytes (CD45RA+), total T-lymphocytes (CD3+), T-helper cells (CD4+), T-cytotoxic cells (CD8+), NK-cells (CD161a+) in general population of lymphocytes was evaluated byflow cytometry; serum cytokine levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-10 were determined by ELISA. No significant changes in the qualitative and quantitative composition of the intestinal microbiota populations regardless of the dose of administered nanomaterial have been found. This gave reason to believe that the postulated mechanism of the toxic effects of the NPs of SiO2, mediated by modification of the composition of the intestinal microflora and the corresponding changes in its functional activity, apparently, is not realized. The main target of nanostructured SiO2 was the T-cellular system of the immune system of animals, that was manifested in the significant decrease of the number of leukocytes (33%), number of T-helper cells (13%), CD4/CD8 ratio (27%) and increasing the number of cytotoxic lymphocytes (19%) and the level of TNF-alpha (590%). The value of the maximum dose (NOAEL) of nanostructured SiO2, has no effect on T-cell immunity was not more than 100 mg/kg body weight per day. PMID:26852532

  10. Delayed effects of low-dose radiation on cellular immunity in atomic bomb survivors residing in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bloom, E T; Akiyama, M; Kusunoki, Y; Makinodan, T

    1987-05-01

    Several parameters of cellular immune function were assessed among persons who survived the 1945 atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki but who now reside in the United States. The subjects in this study were exposed to various low doses (T65D) of radiation at the time of the bomb. More than half received an estimated 0 Gy (S0 group). Of those exposed to more radiation (S+ group), nearly 90% received less than 0.50 Gy (50 rad). Lymphocytes were isolated from the peripheral blood of these individuals and were assessed for the following parameters of cellular immunity: mitogenic response to phytohemagglutinin, mitogenic response to allogeneic lymphocytes, natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC), and interferon production. In every case, the response of the S+ group was greater than that of the S0 group, although only the difference for NCMC was statistically significant. Results of studies presently being performed on A-bomb survivors residing in Hiroshima do not confirm this difference. Therefore, it is difficult to say whether the increase in natural cytotoxicity observed among the American and not the Japanese A-bomb survivors exposed to very low doses of radiation is a hormetic effect which was modulated by post-radiation environmental conditions or a result of selective migration.

  11. Conway's game of life is a near-critical metastable state in the multiverse of cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reia, Sandro M.; Kinouchi, Osame

    2014-05-01

    Conway's cellular automaton Game of Life has been conjectured to be a critical (or quasicritical) dynamical system. This criticality is generally seen as a continuous order-disorder transition in cellular automata (CA) rule space. Life's mean-field return map predicts an absorbing vacuum phase (ρ =0) and an active phase density, with ρ =0.37, which contrasts with Life's absorbing states in a square lattice, which have a stationary density of ρ2D≈0.03. Here, we study and classify mean-field maps for 6144 outer-totalistic CA and compare them with the corresponding behavior found in the square lattice. We show that the single-site mean-field approach gives qualitative (and even quantitative) predictions for most of them. The transition region in rule space seems to correspond to a nonequilibrium discontinuous absorbing phase transition instead of a continuous order-disorder one. We claim that Life is a quasicritical nucleation process where vacuum phase domains invade the alive phase. Therefore, Life is not at the "border of chaos," but thrives on the "border of extinction."

  12. Conway's Game of Life is a near-critical metastable state in the multiverse of cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Reia, Sandro M; Kinouchi, Osame

    2014-05-01

    Conway's cellular automaton Game of Life has been conjectured to be a critical (or quasicritical) dynamical system. This criticality is generally seen as a continuous order-disorder transition in cellular automata (CA) rule space. Life's mean-field return map predicts an absorbing vacuum phase (ρ = 0) and an active phase density, with ρ = 0.37, which contrasts with Life's absorbing states in a square lattice, which have a stationary density of ρ(2D) ≈ 0.03. Here, we study and classify mean-field maps for 6144 outer-totalistic CA and compare them with the corresponding behavior found in the square lattice. We show that the single-site mean-field approach gives qualitative (and even quantitative) predictions for most of them. The transition region in rule space seems to correspond to a nonequilibrium discontinuous absorbing phase transition instead of a continuous order-disorder one. We claim that Life is a quasicritical nucleation process where vacuum phase domains invade the alive phase. Therefore, Life is not at the "border of chaos," but thrives on the "border of extinction."

  13. Conway's Game of Life is a near-critical metastable state in the multiverse of cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Reia, Sandro M; Kinouchi, Osame

    2014-05-01

    Conway's cellular automaton Game of Life has been conjectured to be a critical (or quasicritical) dynamical system. This criticality is generally seen as a continuous order-disorder transition in cellular automata (CA) rule space. Life's mean-field return map predicts an absorbing vacuum phase (ρ = 0) and an active phase density, with ρ = 0.37, which contrasts with Life's absorbing states in a square lattice, which have a stationary density of ρ(2D) ≈ 0.03. Here, we study and classify mean-field maps for 6144 outer-totalistic CA and compare them with the corresponding behavior found in the square lattice. We show that the single-site mean-field approach gives qualitative (and even quantitative) predictions for most of them. The transition region in rule space seems to correspond to a nonequilibrium discontinuous absorbing phase transition instead of a continuous order-disorder one. We claim that Life is a quasicritical nucleation process where vacuum phase domains invade the alive phase. Therefore, Life is not at the "border of chaos," but thrives on the "border of extinction." PMID:25353755

  14. The Response Continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Caltagirone, Sergio; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2005-06-17

    Active response is a sequence of actions per- formed speci¯cally to mitigate a detected threat. Response decisions always follow detection: a decision to take `no ac- tion' remains a response decision. However, active response is a complex subject that has received insu±cient formal attention. To facilitate discussion, this paper provides a framework that proposes a common de¯nition, describes the role of response and the major issues surrounding response choices, and ¯nally, provides a model for the process of re- sponse. This provides a common starting point for discus- sion of the full response continuum as an integral part of contemporary computer security.

  15. Micropolar continuum in spatial description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Elena A.; Vilchevskaya, Elena N.

    2016-11-01

    Within the spatial description, it is customary to refer thermodynamic state quantities to an elementary volume fixed in space containing an ensemble of particles. During its evolution, the elementary volume is occupied by different particles, each having its own mass, tensor of inertia, angular and linear velocities. The aim of the present paper is to answer the question of how to determine the inertial and kinematic characteristics of the elementary volume. In order to model structural transformations due to the consolidation or defragmentation of particles or anisotropic changes, one should consider the fact that the tensor of inertia of the elementary volume may change. This means that an additional constitutive equation must be formulated. The paper suggests kinetic equations for the tensor of inertia of the elementary volume. It also discusses the specificity of the inelastic polar continuum description within the framework of the spatial description.

  16. Kilometric Continuum Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James L.; Boardsen, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Kilometric continuum (KC) is the high frequency component (approximately 100 kHz to approximately 800 kHz) of nonthermal continuum (NTC). Unlike the lower frequency portion of NTC (approximately 5 kHz to approximately 100 kHz) whose source is around the dawn sector, the source of KC occurs at all magnetic local times. The latitudinal beaming of KC as observed by GEOTAIL is, for most events, restricted to plus or minus 15 degrees magnetic latitude. KC has been observed during periods of both low and strong geomagnetic activity, with no significant correlation of wave intensity with K(sub p), index. However statistically the maximum observed frequency of KC emission tends to increase with K(sub p) index, the effect is more pronounced around solar maximum, but is also detected near solar minimum. There is strong evidence that the source region of KC is from the equatorial plasmapause during periods when a portion of the plasmapause moves significantly inwards from its nominal position. Case studies have shown that KC emissions are nearly always associated with plasmaspheric notches, shoulders, and tails. There is a recent focus on trying to understand the banded frequency structure of this emission and its relationship to plasmaspheric density ducts and irregularities in the source region.

  17. Continuum lowering - A new perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, B. J. B.

    2014-12-01

    What is meant by continuum lowering and ionization potential depression (IPD) in a Coulomb system depends very much upon precisely what question is being asked. It is shown that equilibrium (equation of state) phenomena and non-equilibrium dynamical processes like photoionization are characterized by different values of the IPD. In the former, the ionization potential of an atom embedded in matter is the difference in the free energy of the many-body system between states of thermodynamic equilibrium differing by the ionization state of just one atom. Typically, this energy is less than that required to ionize the same atom in vacuo. Probably, the best known example of this is the IPD given by Stewart and Pyatt (SP). However, it is a common misconception that this formula should apply directly to the energy of a photon causing photoionization, since this is a local adiabatic process that occurs in the absence of a response from the surrounding plasma. To achieve the prescribed final equilibrium state, in general, additional energy, in the form of heat and work, is transferred between the atom and its surroundings. This additional relaxation energy is sufficient to explain the discrepancy between recent spectroscopic measurements of IPD in dense plasmas and the predictions of the SP formula. This paper provides a detailed account of an analytical approach, based on SP, to calculating thermodynamic and spectroscopic (adiabatic) IPDs in multicomponent Coulomb systems of arbitrary coupling strength with Te ≠ Ti. The ramifications for equilibrium Coulomb systems are examined in order to elucidate the roles of the various forms of the IPD and any possible connection with the plasma microfield. The formulation embodies an analytical equation of state (EoS) that is thermodynamically self-consistent, provided that the bound and free electrons are dynamically separable, meaning that the system is not undergoing pressure ionization. Apart from this restriction, the model is

  18. Differential heme release from various hemoglobin redox states and the upregulation of cellular heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Kassa, Tigist; Jana, Sirsendu; Meng, Fantao; Alayash, Abdu I

    2016-09-01

    Despite advances in our understanding of the oxidative pathways mediated by free hemoglobin (Hb), the precise contribution of its highly reactive redox forms to tissue and organ toxicities remains ambiguous. Heme, a key degradation byproduct of Hb oxidation, has recently been recognized as a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule, able to trigger inflammatory responses. Equally damaging is the interaction of the highly redox active forms of Hb with other biological molecules. We determined the kinetics of heme loss from individual Hb redox states-ferrous (Fe(2+)), ferric (Fe(3+)), and ferryl (Fe(4+))-using two different heme receptor proteins: hemopexin (Hxp), a naturally occurring heme scavenger in plasma, and a double mutant (H64Y/V86F), apomyoglobin (ApoMb), which avidly binds heme released from Hb. We show for the first time that ferric Hb (Fe(3+)) loses heme at rates substantially higher than that of ferryl Hb (Fe(4+)). This was also supported by a higher expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) when ferric Hb was added to cultured lung alveolar epithelial cells (E10). The reported cytotoxicity of Hb may therefore be attributed to a combination of accelerated heme loss from the ferric form and protein radical formation associated with ferryl Hb. Targeted therapeutic interventions can therefore be designed to curb specific oxidative pathways of Hb in hemolytic anemias and when Hb is used as an oxygen-carrying therapeutic. PMID:27642551

  19. Ionization states, cellular toxicity and molecular modeling studies of midazolam complexed with trimethyl-β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Shityakov, Sergey; Sohajda, Tamás; Puskás, István; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola; Broscheit, Jens-Albert

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the ionization profiles for open-ring (OR) and closed-ring (CR) forms of midazolam and drug-binding modes with heptakis-(2,3,6-tri-O-methyl)-β-cyclodextrin (trimethyl-β-cyclodextrin; TRIMEB) using molecular modeling techniques and quantum mechanics methods. The results indicated that the total net charges for different molecular forms of midazolam tend to be cationic for OR and neutral for CR at physiological pH levels. The thermodynamic calculations demonstrated that CR is less water-soluble than OR, mainly due to the maximal solvation energy (ΔG(CR)(solv = -9.98 kcal·mol ⁻¹), which has a minimal ΔG(OR)(solv) of -67.01 kcal·mol⁻¹. A cell viability assay did not detect any signs of TRIMEB and OR/CR-TRIMEB complex toxicity on the cEND cells after 24 h of incubation in either Dulbecco's Modified Eagles Medium or in heat-inactivated human serum. The molecular docking studies identified the more flexible OR form of midazolam as being a better binder to TRIMEB with the fluorophenyl ring introduced inside the amphiphilic cavity of the host molecule. The OR binding affinity was confirmed by a minimal Gibbs free energy of binding (ΔG(bind)) value of -5.57 ± 0.02 kcal·mol⁻¹, an equilibrium binding constant (K(b)) of 79.89 ± 2.706 μM, and a ligand efficiency index (LE(lig)) of -0.21 ± 0.001. Our current data suggest that in order to improve the clinical applications of midazolam via its complexation with trimethyl-β-cyclodextrin to increase drug's overall aqueous solubility, it is important to concern the different forms and ionization states of this anesthetic. All mean values are indicated with their standard deviations. PMID:25338177

  20. The Cellular State Determines the Effect of Melatonin on the Survival of Mixed Cerebellar Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Daiane Gil; Markus, Regina P.

    2014-01-01

    The constitutive activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), a key transcription factor involved in neuroinflammation, is essential for the survival of neurons in situ and of cerebellar granule cells in culture. Melatonin is known to inhibit the activation of NF-κB and has a cytoprotective function. In this study, we evaluated whether the cytoprotective effect of melatonin depends on the state of activation of a mixed cerebellar culture that is composed predominantly of granule cells; we tested the effect of melatonin on cultured rat cerebellar cells stimulated or not with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The addition of melatonin (0.1 nM–1 µM) reduced the survival of naïve cells while inhibiting LPS-induced cell death. Melatonin (100 nM) transiently (15 min) inhibited the nuclear translocation of both NF-κB dimers (p50/p50, p50/RelA) and, after 60 min, increased the activation of p50/RelA. Melatonin-induced p50/RelA activity in naïve cells resulted in the transcription of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the production of NO. Otherwise, in cultures treated with LPS, melatonin blocked the LPS-induced activation of p50/RelA and the reduction in p50/p50 levels and inhibited iNOS expression and NO synthesis. Therefore, melatonin in vehicle-treated cells induces cell death, while it protects against LPS-induced cytotoxicity. In summary, we confirmed that melatonin is a neuroprotective drug when cerebellar cells are challenged; however, melatonin can also lead to cell death when the normal balance of the NF-κB pathway is disturbed. Our data provide a mechanistic basis for understanding the influence of cell context on the final output response of melatonin. PMID:25184316

  1. Internal photopumping of Nd3+ (2H9/2, 4F5/2) states in yttrium aluminum garnet by excitation transfer from oxygen deficiency centers and Fe3+ continuum emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, J. D.; Spinka, T. M.; Senin, A. A.; Eden, J. G.

    2011-07-01

    Photoexcitation of Nd3+ (2H9/2, 4F5/2) states by the broad (˜70 nm FWHM), near-infrared continuum provided by Fe3+ has been observed at 300 K in bulk yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) crystals doped with trace concentrations (<50 ppm) of Fe, Cr, and Eu. Irradiation of YAG at 248 nm with a KrF laser, which excites the oxygen deficiency center (ODC) in YAG having peak absorption at ˜240 nm, culminates in ODC→Fe3+ excitation transfer and subsequent Fe3+ emission. This internal optical pumping mechanism for rare earth ions is unencumbered by the requirement for donor-acceptor proximity that constrains conventional Förster-Dexter excitation transfer in co-doped crystals.

  2. Analyses of Conformational States of the Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP) Protein in a Native Cellular Membrane Environment*

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jie; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Raghavan, Malini

    2013-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) plays a critical role in the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. TAP translocates cellular peptides across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane in an ATP hydrolysis-dependent manner. We used FRET spectroscopy in permeabilized cells to delineate different conformational states of TAP in a native subcellular membrane environment. For these studies, we tagged the TAP1 and TAP2 subunits with enhanced cyan fluorescent protein and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein, respectively, C-terminally to their nucleotide binding domains (NBDs), and measured FRET efficiencies under different conditions. Our data indicate that both ATP and ADP enhance the FRET efficiencies but that neither induces a maximally closed NBD conformation. Additionally, peptide binding induces a large and significant increase in NBD proximity with a concentration dependence that is reflective of individual peptide affinities for TAP, revealing the underlying mechanism of peptide-stimulated ATPase activity of TAP. Maximal NBD closure is induced by the combination of peptide and non-hydrolysable ATP analogs. Thus, TAP1-TAP2 NBD dimers are not fully stabilized by nucleotides alone, and substrate binding plays a key role in inducing the transition state conformations of the NBD. Taken together, these findings show that at least three steps are involved in the transport of peptides across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane for antigen presentation, corresponding to three dynamically and structurally distinct conformational states of TAP. Our studies elucidate structural changes in the TAP NBD in response to nucleotides and substrate, providing new insights into the mechanism of ATP-binding cassette transporter function. PMID:24196954

  3. Defining the Molecular-Cellular-Field Continuum of Mercury Detoxification

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Susan M.

    2014-09-04

    Hg is of special interest to DOE due to past use at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Its facile redox [Hg2+/0] chemistry, bonding to carbon [e.g. MeHg+] and unique physical properties [e.g., Hg0 volatility] underlie a complex global Hg cycle involving biotic and abiotic chemical and physical transport and transformations in soils, sediments, waterways and the atmosphere. Facultative and anaerobic bacteria make MeHg+, which is neurotoxic to wildlife and humans. Sustainable stewardship requires eliminating both MeHg+ and even more toxic Hg2+, which is also the substrate for methylation. The proteins encoded by the mer locus in aerobic and facultative mercury resistant (HgR) bacteria convert soil or waterborne Hg2+ or MeHg+ to less toxic, gaseous Hg0. HgR microbes live in highly Hg-contaminated sites and depress MeHg+ formation >500-fold in such zones. So, enhancing the capacity of natural HgR microbes to remove Hg2+/MeHg+ from wetlands and waterways is a logical component of contaminated site stewardship. To apply enhancement in the field requires knowing how the HgR pathway works including the metabolic demands it makes on the cell, i.e., the entire cell is the relevant catalytic unit. HgR loci occur in metabolically diverse bacteria and unique mer-host co-evolution has been found. In this project we extended our previous studies of mer enzymes in γ-proteobacteria, which are abundant in high Hg areas of the ORR to include studies of mer enzymes from HgR α-proteobacteria and HgR actinobacteria, which also increase in the high Hg regions of the ORR. Specifically, we (1) examined interactions between structural compoenents of MerA and MerB enzymes from γ-proteobacteria, (2) investigated effects of mutations on kinetic efficiency of Hg2+ reduction by γ-proteobacterial MerA, (3) cloned and performed initital characterization of MerA and MerB enzymes from Streptomyces lividans, an actinobacterium, (4) cloned and performed initial characterization of a fused MerB-MerA protein from Ochrobactrum anthropi, an α-proteobacterium, (5) investigate the extent of Hg isotope fractionation that occurs with purified γ-proteobacterial MerA.

  4. Relativistic Continuum Shell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grineviciute, Janina; Halderson, Dean

    2011-04-01

    The R-matrix formalism of Lane and Thomas has been extended to the relativistic case so that the many-coupled channels problem may be solved for systems in which binary breakup channels satisfy a relative Dirac equation. The formalism was previously applied to the relativistic impulse approximation RIA and now we applied it to Quantum Hadrodynamics QHD in the continuum Tamm-Dancoff approximation TDA with the classical meson fields replaced by one-meson exchange potentials. None of the published QHD parameters provide a decent fit to the 15 N + p elastic cross section. The deficiency is also evident in inability of the QHD parameters with the one meson exchange potentials to reproduce the QHD single particle energies. Results with alternate parameters sets are presented. A. M. Lane and R. G. Thomas, R-Matrix Theory of Nuclear Reactions, Reviews of Modern Physics, 30 (1958) 257

  5. Electron-ion continuum-continuum mixing in dissociative recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1993-01-01

    In recent calculations on the dissociative recombination (DR) of the v=1 vibrational level of the ground state of N2(+), N2(+)(v=1) + e(-) yields N + N, we have observed an important continuun-continuum mixing process involving the open channels on both sides of N2(+)(v=1) + e(-) yields N2(+)(v=0) + e(-). In vibrational relaxation by electron impact (immediately above) the magnitude of the cross section depends upon the strength of the interaction between these continua. In DR of the v=1 ion level, these continua can also interact in the entrance channel, and the mixing can have a profound effect upon the DR cross section from v=1, as we illustrate in this paper. In our theoretical calculations of N2(+) DR using multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT), the reactants and products in the two above equations are described simultaneously. This allows us to calculate vibrational relaxation and excitation cross sections as well as DR cross sections. In order to understand the mixing described above, we first present a brief review of the prior results for DR of the v=0 level of N2(+).

  6. Inhomogeneous ordered states and translational nature of the gauge group in the Landau continuum theory: II. Applications of the general theory

    SciTech Connect

    Braginsky, A. Ya.

    2007-07-15

    A group theory approach to description of phase transitions to an inhomogeneous ordered state, proposed in the preceding paper, is applied to two problems. First, a theory of the state of a liquid-crystalline smectic type-A phase under the action of uniaxial pressure is developed. Second, a model of strengthening in quasicrystals is constructed. According to the proposed approach, the so-called elastic dislocations always appear during the phase transitions in an inhomogeneous deformed state in addition to static dislocations, which are caused by peculiarities of the crystal growth or by other features in the prehistory of a sample. The density of static dislocations weakly depends on the external factors, whereas the density of elastic dislocations depends on the state. An analogy between the proposed theory of the inhomogeneous ordered state and the quantum-field theory of interaction between material fields is considered. On this basis, the phenomenological Ginzburg-Landau equation for the superconducting state is derived using the principle of locality of the transformation properties of the superconducting order parameter with respect to temporal translations.

  7. The Paranoid-Depressive Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Betty J.

    1977-01-01

    Few investigators have attempted to lay a conceptual base for comparative studies of paranoia and depression within a single general framework. The paranoid-depressive continuum is an attempt to develop such a framework. (Author)

  8. Uses of continuum radiation in the AXAF calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziejczak, J. J.; Austin, R. A.; Elsner, R. F.; O'Dell, S. L.; Sulkanen, M. E.; Swartz, D. A.; Tennant, A. F.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Zirnstein, G.; McDermott, W. C.

    1997-01-01

    X-ray calibration of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) observatory at the MSFC X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) made novel use of the x-ray continuum from a conventional electron-impact source. Taking advantage of the good spectral resolution of solid-state detectors, continuum measurements proved advantageous in calibrating the effective area of AXAF's High-Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) and in verifying its alignment to the XRCF's optical axis.

  9. The Intraprofessional Continuum and Cleft.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Clyde B

    2016-08-01

    The continuum cleft is a costly and precarious gap that divides professions on the health professions' continuum. It is an interprofessional phenomenon that is encouraged because health care professions protect their members in professional silos and isolate competing professions in professional cysts. This article uses case studies of the allopathic, osteopathic, naturopathic, and chiropractic professions to contemplate the existence, consequences, and possible mitigation of intraprofessional silos, cysts, and clefts. PMID:27574493

  10. Radiation from charges in the continuum limit

    SciTech Connect

    Ianconescu, Reuven

    2013-06-15

    It is known that an accelerating charge radiates according to Larmor formula. On the other hand, any DC current following a curvilinear path, consists of accelerating charges, but in such case the radiated power is 0. The scope of this paper is to analyze and quantify how a system of charges goes from a radiating state to a non radiating state when the charges distribution goes to the continuum limit. Understanding this is important from the theoretical point of view and the results of this work are applicable to particle accelerator, cyclotron and other high energy devices.

  11. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked to experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.

  12. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    DOE PAGES

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked tomore » experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.« less

  13. Quantitative X-ray - UV Line and Continuum Spectroscopy with Application to AGN: State-Specific Hydrogenic Recombination Cooling Coefficients for a Wide Range of Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMothe, J.; Ferland, Gary J.

    2002-01-01

    Recombination cooling, in which a free electron emits light while being captured to an ion, is an important cooling process in photoionized clouds that are optically thick or have low metallicity. State specific rather than total recombination cooling rates are needed since the hydrogen atom tends to become optically thick in high-density regimes such as Active Galactic Nuclei. This paper builds upon previous work to derive the cooling rate over the full temperature range where the process can be a significant contributor in a photoionized plasma. We exploit the fact that the recombination and cooling rates are given by intrinsically similar formulae to express the cooling rate in terms of the closely related radiative recombination rate. We give an especially simple but accurate approximation that works for any high hydrogenic level and can be conveniently employed in large-scale numerical simulations.

  14. Stem cell-like ALDHbright cellular states in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Joven, Jorge; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Barrajón-Catalán, Enrique; Micol, Vicente; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Menendez, Javier A

    2013-01-01

    The enrichment of cancer stem cell (CSC)-like cellular states has not previously been considered to be a causative mechanism in the generalized progression of EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) after an initial response to the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib. To explore this possibility, we utilized a pre-clinical model of acquired erlotinib resistance established by growing NSCLC cells containing a TKI-sensitizing EGFR exon 19 deletion (ΔE746-A750) in the continuous presence of high doses of erlotinib. Genome-wide analyses using Agilent 44K Whole Human Genome Arrays were evaluated via bioinformatics analyses through GSEA-based screening of the KEGG pathway database to identify the molecular circuitries that were over-represented in the transcriptomic signatures of erlotinib-refractory cells. The genomic spaces related to erlotinib resistance included a preponderance of cell cycle genes (E2F1, -2, CDC2, -6) and DNA replication-related genes (MCM4, -5, -6, -7), most of which are associated with early lung development and poor prognosis. In addition, metabolic genes such as ALDH1A3 (a candidate marker for lung cancer cells with CSC-like properties) were identified. Thus, we measured the proportion of erlotinib-resistant cells expressing very high levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity attributed to ALDH1/3 isoforms. Using flow cytometry and the ALDEFLUOR® reagent, we confirmed that erlotinib-refractory cell populations contained drastically higher percentages (>4500%) of ALDHbright cells than the parental erlotinib-responsive cells. Notably, strong decreases in the percentages of ALDHbright cells were observed following incubation with silibinin, a bioactive flavonolignan that can circumvent erlotinib resistance in vivo. The number of lung cancer spheres was drastically suppressed by silibinin in a dose-dependent manner, thus confirming the ability of this agent to inhibit the self-renewal of erlotinib-refractory CSC-like cells

  15. Mortality by neoplasia and cellular telephone base stations in the Belo Horizonte municipality, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dode, Adilza C; Leão, Mônica M D; Tejo, Francisco de A F; Gomes, Antônio C R; Dode, Daiana C; Dode, Michael C; Moreira, Cristina W; Condessa, Vânia A; Albinatti, Cláudia; Caiaffa, Waleska T

    2011-09-01

    Pollution caused by the electromagnetic fields (EMFs) of radio frequencies (RF) generated by the telecommunication system is one of the greatest environmental problems of the twentieth century. The purpose of this research was to verify the existence of a spatial correlation between base station (BS) clusters and cases of deaths by neoplasia in the Belo Horizonte municipality, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, from 1996 to 2006 and to measure the human exposure levels to EMF where there is a major concentration of cellular telephone transmitter antennas. A descriptive spatial analysis of the BSs and the cases of death by neoplasia identified in the municipality was performed through an ecological-epidemiological approach, using georeferencing. The database employed in the survey was composed of three data banks: 1. death by neoplasia documented by the Health Municipal Department; 2. BSs documented in ANATEL ("Agência Nacional de Telecomunicações": 'Telecommunications National Agency'); and 3. census and demographic city population data obtained from official archives provided by IBGE ("Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística": 'Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics'). The results show that approximately 856 BSs were installed through December 2006. Most (39.60%) of the BSs were located in the "Centro-Sul" ('Central-Southern') region of the municipality. Between 1996 and 2006, 7191 deaths by neoplasia occurred and within an area of 500 m from the BS, the mortality rate was 34.76 per 10,000 inhabitants. Outside of this area, a decrease in the number of deaths by neoplasia occurred. The greatest accumulated incidence was 5.83 per 1000 in the Central-Southern region and the lowest incidence was 2.05 per 1000 in the Barreiro region. During the environmental monitoring, the largest accumulated electric field measured was 12.4 V/m and the smallest was 0.4 V/m. The largest density power was 40.78 μW/cm(2), and the smallest was 0.04 μW/cm(2).

  16. Four-body continuum-discretized coupled-channels calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Gallardo, M.; Arias, J. M.; Moro, A. M.; Gomez-Camacho, J.; Thompson, I. J.; Tostevin, J. A.

    2009-11-15

    The development of a continuum-bin scheme of discretization for three-body projectiles is necessary for studies of reactions of Borromean nuclei such as {sup 6}He within the continuum-discretized coupled-channels approach. Such a procedure, for constructing bin states on selected continuum energy intervals, is formulated and applied for the first time to reactions of a three-body projectile. The continuum representation uses the eigenchannel expansion of the three-body S matrix. The method is applied to the challenging case of the {sup 6}He+{sup 208}Pb reaction at 22 MeV, where an accurate treatment of both the Coulomb and the nuclear interactions with the target is necessary.

  17. Multiscale modeling of cellular epigenetic states: stochasticity in molecular networks, chromatin folding in cell nuclei, and tissue pattern formation of cells

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jie; Cao, Youfang; Gürsoy, Gamze; Naveed, Hammad; Terebus, Anna; Zhao, Jieling

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequences provide the overall genetic blueprint of cells, but cells possessing the same genome can exhibit diverse phenotypes. There is a multitude of mechanisms controlling cellular epigenetic states and that dictate the behavior of cells. Among these, networks of interacting molecules, often under stochastic control, depending on the specific wirings of molecular components and the physiological conditions, can have a different landscape of cellular states. In addition, chromosome folding in three-dimensional space provides another important control mechanism for selective activation and repression of gene expression. Fully differentiated cells with different properties grow, divide, and interact through mechanical forces and communicate through signal transduction, resulting in the formation of complex tissue patterns. Developing quantitative models to study these multi-scale phenomena and to identify opportunities for improving human health requires development of theoretical models, algorithms, and computational tools. Here we review recent progress made in these important directions. PMID:27480462

  18. Multiscale Modeling of Cellular Epigenetic States: Stochasticity in Molecular Networks, Chromatin Folding in Cell Nuclei, and Tissue Pattern Formation of Cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jie; Cao, Youfang; Gursoy, Gamze; Naveed, Hammad; Terebus, Anna; Zhao, Jieling

    2015-01-01

    Genome sequences provide the overall genetic blueprint of cells, but cells possessing the same genome can exhibit diverse phenotypes. There is a multitude of mechanisms controlling cellular epigenetic states and that dictate the behavior of cells. Among these, networks of interacting molecules, often under stochastic control, depending on the specific wirings of molecular components and the physiological conditions, can have a different landscape of cellular states. In addition, chromosome folding in three-dimensional space provides another important control mechanism for selective activation and repression of gene expression. Fully differentiated cells with different properties grow, divide, and interact through mechanical forces and communicate through signal transduction, resulting in the formation of complex tissue patterns. Developing quantitative models to study these multi-scale phenomena and to identify opportunities for improving human health requires development of theoretical models, algorithms, and computational tools. Here we review recent progress made in these important directions.

  19. Submillimeter Continuum Observations of Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this proposal was to study the submillimeter continuum emission from comets. The study was based mainly on the exploitation of the world's leading submillimeter telescope, the JCMT (James Clerk Maxwell Telescope) on Mauna Kea. Submillimeter wavelengths provide a unique view of cometary physics for one main reason. The cometary size distribution is such that the scattering cross-section is dominated by small dust grains, while the mass is dominated by the largest particles. Submillimeter continuum radiation samples cometary particles much larger than those sampled by more common observations at shorter (optical and infrared) wavelengths and therefore provides a nearly direct measure of the cometary dust mass.

  20. Lagrangian continuum dynamics in ALEGRA.

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Michael K. W.; Love, Edward

    2007-12-01

    Alegra is an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) multi-material finite element code that emphasizes large deformations and strong shock physics. The Lagrangian continuum dynamics package in Alegra uses a Galerkin finite element spatial discretization and an explicit central-difference stepping method in time. The goal of this report is to describe in detail the characteristics of this algorithm, including the conservation and stability properties. The details provided should help both researchers and analysts understand the underlying theory and numerical implementation of the Alegra continuum hydrodynamics algorithm.

  1. Quasiparticle-continuum level repulsion in a quantum magnet

    DOE PAGES

    Plumb, K. W.; Hwang, Kyusung; Qiu, Y.; Harriger, Leland W.; Granroth, G.  E.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Shu, G. J.; Chou, F. C.; Rüegg, Ch.; Kim, Yong Baek; et al

    2015-11-30

    When the energy eigenvalues of two coupled quantum states approach each other in a certain parameter space, their energy levels repel each other and level crossing is avoided. Such level repulsion, or avoided level crossing, is commonly used to describe the dispersion relation of quasiparticles in solids. But, little is known about the level repulsion when more than two quasiparticles are present; for example, in a strongly interacting quantum system where a quasiparticle can spontaneously decay into a many-particle continuum. Here we show that even in this case level repulsion exists between a long-lived quasiparticle state and a continuum. Here,more » we observe a renormalization of the quasiparticle dispersion relation due to the presence of the continuum of multi-quasiparticle states, in our fine-resolution neutron spectroscopy study of magnetic quasiparticles in the frustrated quantum magnet BiCu2PO6.« less

  2. Quasiparticle-continuum level repulsion in a quantum magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Plumb, K. W.; Hwang, Kyusung; Qiu, Y.; Harriger, Leland W.; Granroth, G.  E.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Shu, G. J.; Chou, F. C.; Rüegg, Ch.; Kim, Yong Baek; Kim, Young-June

    2015-11-30

    When the energy eigenvalues of two coupled quantum states approach each other in a certain parameter space, their energy levels repel each other and level crossing is avoided. Such level repulsion, or avoided level crossing, is commonly used to describe the dispersion relation of quasiparticles in solids. But, little is known about the level repulsion when more than two quasiparticles are present; for example, in a strongly interacting quantum system where a quasiparticle can spontaneously decay into a many-particle continuum. Here we show that even in this case level repulsion exists between a long-lived quasiparticle state and a continuum. Here, we observe a renormalization of the quasiparticle dispersion relation due to the presence of the continuum of multi-quasiparticle states, in our fine-resolution neutron spectroscopy study of magnetic quasiparticles in the frustrated quantum magnet BiCu2PO6.

  3. Quasiparticle-continuum level repulsion in a quantum magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, K. W.; Hwang, Kyusung; Qiu, Y.; Harriger, Leland W.; Granroth, G. E.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Shu, G. J.; Chou, F. C.; Rüegg, Ch.; Kim, Yong Baek; Kim, Young-June

    2016-03-01

    When the energy eigenvalues of two coupled quantum states approach each other in a certain parameter space, their energy levels repel each other and level crossing is avoided. Such level repulsion, or avoided level crossing, is commonly used to describe the dispersion relation of quasiparticles in solids. However, little is known about the level repulsion when more than two quasiparticles are present; for example, in a strongly interacting quantum system where a quasiparticle can spontaneously decay into a many-particle continuum. Here we show that even in this case level repulsion exists between a long-lived quasiparticle state and a continuum. In our fine-resolution neutron spectroscopy study of magnetic quasiparticles in the frustrated quantum magnet BiCu2PO6, we observe a renormalization of the quasiparticle dispersion relation due to the presence of the continuum of multi-quasiparticle states.

  4. Map of fluid flow in fractal porous medium into fractal continuum flow.

    PubMed

    Balankin, Alexander S; Elizarraraz, Benjamin Espinoza

    2012-05-01

    This paper is devoted to fractal continuum hydrodynamics and its application to model fluid flows in fractally permeable reservoirs. Hydrodynamics of fractal continuum flow is developed on the basis of a self-consistent model of fractal continuum employing vector local fractional differential operators allied with the Hausdorff derivative. The generalized forms of Green-Gauss and Kelvin-Stokes theorems for fractional calculus are proved. The Hausdorff material derivative is defined and the form of Reynolds transport theorem for fractal continuum flow is obtained. The fundamental conservation laws for a fractal continuum flow are established. The Stokes law and the analog of Darcy's law for fractal continuum flow are suggested. The pressure-transient equation accounting the fractal metric of fractal continuum flow is derived. The generalization of the pressure-transient equation accounting the fractal topology of fractal continuum flow is proposed. The mapping of fluid flow in a fractally permeable medium into a fractal continuum flow is discussed. It is stated that the spectral dimension of the fractal continuum flow d(s) is equal to its mass fractal dimension D, even when the spectral dimension of the fractally porous or fissured medium is less than D. A comparison of the fractal continuum flow approach with other models of fluid flow in fractally permeable media and the experimental field data for reservoir tests are provided.

  5. Optical lattices with exceptional points in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Stefano; Della Valle, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    The spectral, dynamical, and topological properties of physical systems described by non-Hermitian (including PT-symmetric) Hamiltonians are deeply modified by the appearance of exceptional points and spectral singularities. Here we show that exceptional points in the continuum can arise in non-Hermitian (yet admitting an entirely real-valued energy spectrum) optical lattices with engineered defects. At an exceptional point, the lattice sustains a bound state with an energy embedded in the spectrum of scattered states, similar to the von Neumann-Wigner bound states in the continuum of Hermitian lattices. However, the dynamical and scattering properties of the bound state at an exceptional point are deeply different from those of ordinary von Neumann-Wigner bound states in a Hermitian system. In particular, the bound state in the continuum at an exceptional point is an unstable state that can secularly grow by an infinitesimal perturbation. Such properties are discussed in details for transport of discretized light in a PT-symmetric array of coupled optical waveguides, which could provide an experimentally accessible system to observe exceptional points in the continuum.

  6. A continuum of care model.

    PubMed

    Godchaux, C W; Travioli, J; Hughes, L A

    1997-11-01

    An interdisciplinary documentation tool provides a composite of all of the planning activities that occur relative to each individual patient and his/her family before discharge. In response to the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization's mandate, this tool evolved into a "Continuum of Care" model. Now, all disciplines maintain a patient's continuity of care. PMID:9385163

  7. A nonlocal continuum model for biological aggregation.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Chad M; Bertozzi, Andrea L; Lewis, Mark A

    2006-10-01

    We construct a continuum model for biological aggregations in which individuals experience long-range social attraction and short-range dispersal. For the case of one spatial dimension, we study the steady states analytically and numerically. There exist strongly nonlinear states with compact support and steep edges that correspond to localized biological aggregations, or clumps. These steady-state clumps are reached through a dynamic coarsening process. In the limit of large population size, the clumps approach a constant density swarm with abrupt edges. We use energy arguments to understand the nonlinear selection of clump solutions, and to predict the internal density in the large population limit. The energy result holds in higher dimensions as well, and is demonstrated via numerical simulations in two dimensions.

  8. The climate continuum revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emile-Geay, J.; Wang, J.; Partin, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    A grand challenge of climate science is to quantify the extent of natural variability on adaptation-relevant timescales (10-100y). Since the instrumental record is too short to adequately estimate the spectra of climate measures, this information must be derived from paleoclimate proxies, which may harbor a many-to-one, non-linear (e.g. thresholded) and non-stationary relationship to climate. In this talk, I will touch upon the estimation of climate scaling behavior from climate proxies. Two case studies will be presented: an investigation of scaling behavior in a reconstruction of global surface temperature using state-of- the-art data [PAGES2K Consortium, in prep] and methods [Guillot et al., 2015]. Estimating the scaling exponent β in spectra derived from this reconstruction, we find that 0 < β < 1 in most regions, suggesting long-term memory. Overall, the reconstruction-based spectra are steeper than the ones based on an instrumental dataset [HadCRUT4.2, Morice et al., 2012], and those estimated from PMIP3/CMIP5 models, suggesting the climate system is more energetic at multidecadal to centennial timescales than can be inferred from the short instrumental record or from the models developed to reproduce it [Laepple and Huybers, 2014]. an investigation of scaling behavior in speleothems records of tropical hydroclimate. We will make use of recent advances in proxy system modeling [Dee et al., 2015] and investigate how various aspects of the speleothem system (karst dynamics, age uncertainties) may conspire to bias the estimate of scaling behavior from speleothem timeseries. The results suggest that ignoring such complications leads to erroneous inferences about hydroclimate scaling. References Dee, S. G., J. Emile-Geay, M. N. Evans, Allam, A., D. M. Thompson, and E. J. Steig (2015), J. Adv. Mod. Earth Sys., 07, doi:10.1002/2015MS000447. Guillot, D., B. Rajaratnam, and J. Emile-Geay (2015), Ann. Applied. Statist., pp. 324-352, doi:10.1214/14-AOAS794. Laepple, T

  9. Applying a cellular automaton model to describing the anomalous relaxation of the metastable states in the disordered porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borman, V. D.; Mikheev, A. N.; Tronin, V. N.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a numerical model of outflow of the nonwetting liquid from previously completely filled nanoporous media based on cellular automata theory. It was shown that the relaxation of this system has an avalanche-like behaviour, which is inherent to phenomenon of self-organized criticality (SOC). Avalanche size and energy distributions were obtained. It was found that spectra have a typical for SOC theory power-law dependence N(s) ∼ s-β with β = 2.73, and N(E) ∼ E-βen with βen = 2.25.

  10. Differential Complexes in Continuum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angoshtari, Arzhang; Yavari, Arash

    2015-04-01

    We study some differential complexes in continuum mechanics that involve both symmetric and non-symmetric second-order tensors. In particular, we show that the tensorial analogue of the standard grad-curl-div complex can simultaneously describe the kinematics and the kinetics of motion of a continuum. The relation between this complex and the de Rham complex allows one to readily derive the necessary and sufficient conditions for the compatibility of displacement gradient and the existence of stress functions on non-contractible bodies.We also derive the local compatibility equations in terms of the Green deformation tensor for motions of 2D and 3D bodies, and shells in curved ambient spaces with constant curvatures.

  11. A continuum of misidentification symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sno, H N

    1994-01-01

    A case study of a schizophrenic patient with differing forms of experiences of inappropriate familiarity is described. Reduplicative paramnesia is redefined as a delusion of familiarity related to a reduplication of time, place or person. The author proposes the concept of a continuum of positive and negative misidentification symptoms. The positive pole of the continuum ranges from the minor form of déjà vu experience to reduplicative paramnesia. The negative pole ranges from depersonalisation to nihilistic delusions. Differentiation is based on the severity of the disturbance of reality testing. The argumentation is based on the fact that both déjà vu experiences and depersonalisation occurring in pathological as well as non-pathological conditions are phenomenologically uniform.

  12. Continuum modelling of granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staron, L.; Lagrée, P.-Y.

    2011-10-01

    The continuum modelling of transient granular flows is of primary importance in the context of predicting the behaviour of many natural systems involving granular matter. In this perspective, the granular column collapse experiment provides an interesting benchmark due to its challenging complexity (Lajeunesse et al 2004, Lube et al 2004), and form a trying test for candidate rheological models. In this contribution, we present 2D continuum simulations of granular column collapse using Navier-Stokes solver Gerris (Popinet 2003). The rheology implemented to model the granular media is the so-called μ(I)-rheology, relating the frictional properties and the viscosity of the material to the pressure and shear rate. In addition, discrete simulations using the Contact Dynamics method are performed for systematic comparison between the granular flow dynamics and its continuum counterpart (Staron & Hinch 2005). We find a good agreement, recovering the shape of the flow in the course of time as well as experimental scaling laws for the run-out. A systematic underestimation of the latter is nevertheless observed, and discussed in terms of physical and numerical modeling.

  13. Continuum radiation in planetary magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.

    1991-01-01

    With the completion of the Voyager tour of the outer planets, radio and plasma wave instruments have executed the first survey of the wave spectra of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. One of the most notable conclusions of this survey is that there is a great deal of qualitative similarity in both the plasma wave and radio wave spectra from one magnetosphere to the next. In particular, in spite of detailed differences, most of the radio emissions at each of the planets have been tentatively classified into two primary categories. First, the most intense emissions are generally associated with the cyclotron maser instability. Second, a class of weaker emissions can be found at each of the magnetospheres which appears to be the result of conversion from intense electrostatic emissions at the upper hybrid resonance frequency into (primarily) ordinary mode radio emission. It is this second category, often referred to as nonthermal continuum radiation, which we will discuss in this review. We review the characteristics of the continuum spectrum at each of the planets, discuss the source region and direct observations of the generation of the emissions where available, and briefly describe the theories for the generation of the emissions. Over the past few years evidence has increased that the linear mode conversion of electrostatic waves into the ordinary mode can account for at least some of the continuum radiation observed. There is no definitive evidence which precludes the possibility that a nonlinear mechanism may also be important.

  14. 77 FR 45367 - Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application; Continuum of Care Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application; Continuum of Care Application... subject proposal. Pre-established communities, called Continuums of Care (CoC), will complete the Exhibit 1 of the Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance application which collects data about the...

  15. Some (not so) Recent Results From Continuum Decay Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, L. G.

    2010-11-24

    Recent technical advances have allowed for high-order multiparticle correlation experiments to be done. The first round of experiments done by our collaboration has lead to the highest quality data on the decay of {sup 6}Be(into an alpha particle and 2 protons), detailed how the continuum states of {sup 10}C decay (into 2 alphas and 2 protons) and lead to finding several previously unknown states in light nuclei and casting doubt on some states found by others.

  16. The Continuum and Current Controversies in the USA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Steven J.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews policy developments in deinstitutionalization and community inclusion in North America, specifically the United States. It begins with a critique of the continuum concept and the associated principle of the least restrictive environment. Past and current controversies surrounding deinstitutionalization are then examined.…

  17. [Main Cellular Redox Couples].

    PubMed

    Bilan, D S; Shokhina, A G; Lukyanov, S A; Belousov, V V

    2015-01-01

    Most of the living cells maintain the continuous flow of electrons, which provides them by energy. Many of the compounds are presented in a cell at the same time in the oxidized and reduced states, forming the active redox couples. Some of the redox couples, such as NAD+/NADH, NADP+/NADPH, oxidized/reduced glutathione (GSSG/GSH), are universal, as they participate in adjusting of many cellular reactions. Ratios of the oxidized and reduced forms of these compounds are important cellular redox parameters. Modern research approaches allow setting the new functions of the main redox couples in the complex organization of cellular processes. The following information is about the main cellular redox couples and their participation in various biological processes.

  18. The importance of antioxidants which play the role in cellular response against oxidative/nitrosative stress: current state.

    PubMed

    Kurutas, Ergul Belge

    2016-01-01

    Remarkable interest has risen in the idea that oxidative/nitrosative stress is mediated in the etiology of numerous human diseases. Oxidative/Nitrosative stress is the result of an disequilibrium in oxidant/antioxidant which reveals from continuous increase of Reactive Oxygen and Reactive Nitrogen Species production. The aim of this review is to emphasize with current information the importance of antioxidants which play the role in cellular responce against oxidative/nitrosative stress, which would be helpful in enhancing the knowledge of any biochemist, pathophysiologist, or medical personnel regarding this important issue. Products of lipid peroxidation have commonly been used as biomarkers of oxidative/nitrosative stress damage. Lipid peroxidation generates a variety of relatively stable decomposition end products, mainly α, β-unsaturated reactive aldehydes, such as malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, 2-propenal (acrolein) and isoprostanes, which can be measured in plasma and urine as an indirect index of oxidative/nitrosative stress. Antioxidants are exogenous or endogenous molecules that mitigate any form of oxidative/nitrosative stress or its consequences. They may act from directly scavenging free radicals to increasing antioxidative defences. Antioxidant deficiencies can develop as a result of decreased antioxidant intake, synthesis of endogenous enzymes or increased antioxidant utilization. Antioxidant supplementation has become an increasingly popular practice to maintain optimal body function. However, antoxidants exhibit pro-oxidant activity depending on the specific set of conditions. Of particular importance are their dosage and redox conditions in the cell.

  19. The importance of antioxidants which play the role in cellular response against oxidative/nitrosative stress: current state.

    PubMed

    Kurutas, Ergul Belge

    2016-01-01

    Remarkable interest has risen in the idea that oxidative/nitrosative stress is mediated in the etiology of numerous human diseases. Oxidative/Nitrosative stress is the result of an disequilibrium in oxidant/antioxidant which reveals from continuous increase of Reactive Oxygen and Reactive Nitrogen Species production. The aim of this review is to emphasize with current information the importance of antioxidants which play the role in cellular responce against oxidative/nitrosative stress, which would be helpful in enhancing the knowledge of any biochemist, pathophysiologist, or medical personnel regarding this important issue. Products of lipid peroxidation have commonly been used as biomarkers of oxidative/nitrosative stress damage. Lipid peroxidation generates a variety of relatively stable decomposition end products, mainly α, β-unsaturated reactive aldehydes, such as malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, 2-propenal (acrolein) and isoprostanes, which can be measured in plasma and urine as an indirect index of oxidative/nitrosative stress. Antioxidants are exogenous or endogenous molecules that mitigate any form of oxidative/nitrosative stress or its consequences. They may act from directly scavenging free radicals to increasing antioxidative defences. Antioxidant deficiencies can develop as a result of decreased antioxidant intake, synthesis of endogenous enzymes or increased antioxidant utilization. Antioxidant supplementation has become an increasingly popular practice to maintain optimal body function. However, antoxidants exhibit pro-oxidant activity depending on the specific set of conditions. Of particular importance are their dosage and redox conditions in the cell. PMID:27456681

  20. Modeling continuum of epithelial mesenchymal transition plasticity.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Mousumi; Ghosh, Biswajoy; Anura, Anji; Mitra, Pabitra; Pathak, Tanmaya; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2016-02-01

    Living systems respond to ambient pathophysiological changes by altering their phenotype, a phenomenon called 'phenotypic plasticity'. This program contains information about adaptive biological dynamism. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is one such process found to be crucial in development, wound healing, and cancer wherein the epithelial cells with restricted migratory potential develop motile functions by acquiring mesenchymal characteristics. In the present study, phase contrast microscopy images of EMT induced HaCaT cells were acquired at 24 h intervals for 96 h. The expression study of relevant pivotal molecules viz. F-actin, vimentin, fibronectin and N-cadherin was carried out to confirm the EMT process. Cells were intuitively categorized into five distinct morphological phenotypes. A population of 500 cells for each temporal point was selected to quantify their frequency of occurrence. The plastic interplay of cell phenotypes from the observations was described as a Markovian process. A model was formulated empirically using simple linear algebra, to depict the possible mechanisms of cellular transformation among the five phenotypes. This work employed qualitative, semi-quantitative and quantitative tools towards illustration and establishment of the EMT continuum. Thus, it provides a newer perspective to understand the embedded plasticity across the EMT spectrum. PMID:26762753

  1. Reconstructing and analysing cellular states, space and time from gene expression profiles of many cells and single cells.

    PubMed

    Francesconi, Mirko; Lehner, Ben

    2015-10-01

    Genome-wide gene expression profiling is a fast, cheap and standardised analysis that provides a high dimensional measurement of the state of a biological sample. In this review we describe computational methods that can be applied to identify and interpret sources of variance in gene expression in whole organisms, organs, tissues or single cells. This allows the identification of constituent cell types and states in complex mixtures, the reconstruction of temporal trajectories of development, differentiation and progression, and the reconstruction of spatial patterning. When applied to genetically variable samples, these methods allow the efficient investigation of how genetic variation influences gene expression and biological processes in space and time.

  2. Continuum Theory of Retroviral Capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. T.; Bruinsma, R. F.; Gelbart, W. M.

    2006-02-01

    We present a self-assembly phase diagram for the shape of retroviral capsids, based on continuum elasticity theory. The spontaneous curvature of the capsid proteins drives a weakly first-order transition from spherical to spherocylindrical shapes. The conical capsid shape which characterizes the HIV-1 retrovirus is never stable under unconstrained energy minimization. Only under conditions of fixed volume and/or fixed spanning length can the conical shape be a minimum energy structure. Our results indicate that, unlike the capsids of small viruses, retrovirus capsids are not uniquely determined by the molecular structure of the constituent proteins but depend in an essential way on physical constraints present during assembly.

  3. Continuum theory of contractile fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, K.; Zumdieck, A.; Jülicher, F.

    2003-12-01

    The generation of contractile forces by living cells often involves linear arrangements of actively interacting polar filaments. We develop a physical description of the dynamics of active fibers based on a general expression for the tension in terms of the filament density and the bundle polarisation. We discuss the long-time behaviour of oriented and of nonpolar fibres, discuss effects of polymerization and depolymerization, and relate this continuum theory to nonlocal descriptions of filament-motor systems. We show that a nonpolar arrangement of filaments suppresses oscillatory instabilities which could be relevant for muscle fibers.

  4. Divergent cellular responses during asymptomatic subclinical and clinical states of disease in cows naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of the host with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) results in a chronic and progressive enteritis that traverses both subclinical and clinical stages. The mechanism(s) for the shift from asymptomatic subclinical disease state to advanced clinical disease are not fully under...

  5. Human Mobility in a Continuum Approach

    PubMed Central

    Simini, Filippo; Maritan, Amos; Néda, Zoltán

    2013-01-01

    Human mobility is investigated using a continuum approach that allows to calculate the probability to observe a trip to any arbitrary region, and the fluxes between any two regions. The considered description offers a general and unified framework, in which previously proposed mobility models like the gravity model, the intervening opportunities model, and the recently introduced radiation model are naturally resulting as special cases. A new form of radiation model is derived and its validity is investigated using observational data offered by commuting trips obtained from the United States census data set, and the mobility fluxes extracted from mobile phone data collected in a western European country. The new modeling paradigm offered by this description suggests that the complex topological features observed in large mobility and transportation networks may be the result of a simple stochastic process taking place on an inhomogeneous landscape. PMID:23555885

  6. Space-time as a deformable continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, A.; Radicella, N.

    2010-04-01

    Space-time may be thought of as a physical continuum endowed with properties similar to the ones of material threedimensional continua. In this view a non-trivial metric tensor can be considered to be the sum of the Minkowski metric plus an appropriate strain tensor. The global symmetry of the universe can be seen as the effect of a spontaneous strained state due to the presence of a texture defect. Consistently with this approach the Lagrangian of space time is obtained adding to the scalar curvature, acting as a kinetic term, a potential term depending on the strain and modeled on the one of the elasticity theory, extended to four dimensions. The theory is applied to the fit of the luminosity dependence of type Ia supernovae on the redshift. A result is obtained slightly better than the one of the ΛCDM theory.

  7. Cellular aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hornsby, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Aging is manifest in a variety of changes over time, including changes at the cellular level. Cellular aging acts primarily as a tumor suppressor mechanism, but also may enhance cancer development under certain circumstances. One important process of cellular aging is oncogene-induced senescence, which acts as an important anti-cancer mechanism. Cellular senescence resulting from damage caused by activated oncogenes prevents the growth or potentially neoplastic cells. Moreover, cells that have entered senescence appear to be targets for elimination by the innnate immune system. In another aspect of cellular aging, the absence of telomerase activity in normal tissues results in such cells lacking a telomere maintenance mechanism. One consequence is that in aging there is an increase in cells with shortened telomeres. In the presence of active oncogenes that cause expansion of a neoplastic clone, shortening of telomeres leading to telomere dysfunction prevents the indefinite expansion of the clone because the cells enter crisis. Crisis results from fusions and other defects caused by dysfunctional telomeres and is a terminal state of the neoplastic clone. In this way the absence of telomerase in human cells, while one cause of cellular aging, also acts as an anti-cancer mechanism. PMID:20705476

  8. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  9. Hybrid discrete/continuum algorithms for stochastic reaction networks

    SciTech Connect

    Safta, Cosmin Sargsyan, Khachik Debusschere, Bert Najm, Habib N.

    2015-01-15

    Direct solutions of the Chemical Master Equation (CME) governing Stochastic Reaction Networks (SRNs) are generally prohibitively expensive due to excessive numbers of possible discrete states in such systems. To enhance computational efficiency we develop a hybrid approach where the evolution of states with low molecule counts is treated with the discrete CME model while that of states with large molecule counts is modeled by the continuum Fokker–Planck equation. The Fokker–Planck equation is discretized using a 2nd order finite volume approach with appropriate treatment of flux components. The numerical construction at the interface between the discrete and continuum regions implements the transfer of probability reaction by reaction according to the stoichiometry of the system. The performance of this novel hybrid approach is explored for a two-species circadian model with computational efficiency gains of about one order of magnitude.

  10. Hybrid discrete/continuum algorithms for stochastic reaction networks

    DOE PAGES

    Safta, Cosmin; Sargsyan, Khachik; Debusschere, Bert; Najm, Habib N.

    2014-10-22

    Direct solutions of the Chemical Master Equation (CME) governing Stochastic Reaction Networks (SRNs) are generally prohibitively expensive due to excessive numbers of possible discrete states in such systems. To enhance computational efficiency we develop a hybrid approach where the evolution of states with low molecule counts is treated with the discrete CME model while that of states with large molecule counts is modeled by the continuum Fokker-Planck equation. The Fokker-Planck equation is discretized using a 2nd order finite volume approach with appropriate treatment of flux components to avoid negative probability values. The numerical construction at the interface between the discretemore » and continuum regions implements the transfer of probability reaction by reaction according to the stoichiometry of the system. As a result, the performance of this novel hybrid approach is explored for a two-species circadian model with computational efficiency gains of about one order of magnitude.« less

  11. Hybrid discrete/continuum algorithms for stochastic reaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safta, Cosmin; Sargsyan, Khachik; Debusschere, Bert; Najm, Habib N.

    2015-01-01

    Direct solutions of the Chemical Master Equation (CME) governing Stochastic Reaction Networks (SRNs) are generally prohibitively expensive due to excessive numbers of possible discrete states in such systems. To enhance computational efficiency we develop a hybrid approach where the evolution of states with low molecule counts is treated with the discrete CME model while that of states with large molecule counts is modeled by the continuum Fokker-Planck equation. The Fokker-Planck equation is discretized using a 2nd order finite volume approach with appropriate treatment of flux components. The numerical construction at the interface between the discrete and continuum regions implements the transfer of probability reaction by reaction according to the stoichiometry of the system. The performance of this novel hybrid approach is explored for a two-species circadian model with computational efficiency gains of about one order of magnitude.

  12. Hybrid discrete/continuum algorithms for stochastic reaction networks

    SciTech Connect

    Safta, Cosmin; Sargsyan, Khachik; Debusschere, Bert; Najm, Habib N.

    2014-10-22

    Direct solutions of the Chemical Master Equation (CME) governing Stochastic Reaction Networks (SRNs) are generally prohibitively expensive due to excessive numbers of possible discrete states in such systems. To enhance computational efficiency we develop a hybrid approach where the evolution of states with low molecule counts is treated with the discrete CME model while that of states with large molecule counts is modeled by the continuum Fokker-Planck equation. The Fokker-Planck equation is discretized using a 2nd order finite volume approach with appropriate treatment of flux components to avoid negative probability values. The numerical construction at the interface between the discrete and continuum regions implements the transfer of probability reaction by reaction according to the stoichiometry of the system. As a result, the performance of this novel hybrid approach is explored for a two-species circadian model with computational efficiency gains of about one order of magnitude.

  13. A tessellated continuum approach to thermal analysis: discontinuity networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Davey, K.; Prosser, R.

    2016-08-01

    Tessellated continuum mechanics is an approach for the representation of thermo-mechanical behaviour of porous media on tessellated continua. It involves the application of iteration function schemes using affine contraction and expansion maps, respectively, for the creation of porous fractal materials and associated tessellated continua. Highly complex geometries can be produced using a modest number of contraction mappings. The associated tessellations form the mesh in a numerical procedure. This paper tests the hypothesis that thermal analysis of porous structures can be achieved using a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method on a tessellation. Discontinuous behaviour is identified at a discontinuity network in a tessellation; its use is shown to provide a good representation of the physics relating to cellular heat exchanger designs. Results for different cellular designs (with corresponding tessellations) are contrasted against those obtained from direct analysis and very high accuracy is observed.

  14. Continuum Fitting HST QSO Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytler, David; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method which we are using to fit and describe QSO spectra relies upon the fact that QSO continuum are generally very smooth and simple except for emission and absorption lines. To see this we need high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of QSOs at low redshift which have relatively few absorption lines in the Lyman-a forest. We need a large number of such spectra to use as the basis set for the PCA analysis which will find the set of principal component spectra which describe the QSO family as a whole. We have found that too few HST spectra have the required S/N and hence we need to supplement them with ground based spectra of QSOs at higher redshift. We have many such spectra and we have been working to make them suitable for this analysis. We have concentrated on this topic since 12/15/01.

  15. Dementia: Continuum or Distinct Entity?

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Glenn D.

    2009-01-01

    The latent structure of dementia was examined in a group of 10,775 older adults with indicators derived from a neuropsychological test battery. Subjecting these data to taxometric analysis using mean above minus below a cut (MAMBAC), maximum covariance (MAXCOV), and latent mode factor analysis (L-Mode) produced results more consistent with dementia as a dimensional (lying along a continuum) than categorical (representing a distinct entity) construct. A second study conducted on a group of 2375 21-to-64-year olds produced similar results. These findings denote that dementia, as measured by deficits in episodic memory, attention/concentration, executive function, and language, differs quantitatively rather than qualitatively from the cognitive status of non-demented adults. The implications of these results for classification, assessment, etiology, and prevention are discussed. PMID:20677881

  16. Epimedium koreanum Nakai displays broad spectrum of antiviral activity in vitro and in vivo by inducing cellular antiviral state.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won-Kyung; Weeratunga, Prasanna; Lee, Byeong-Hoon; Park, Jun-Seol; Kim, Chul-Joong; Ma, Jin Yeul; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2015-01-20

    Epimedium koreanum Nakai has been extensively used in traditional Korean and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of diseases. Despite the plant's known immune modulatory potential and chemical make-up, scientific information on its antiviral properties and mode of action have not been completely investigated. In this study, the broad antiviral spectrum and mode of action of an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai was evaluated in vitro, and moreover, the protective effect against divergent influenza A subtypes was determined in BALB/c mice. An effective dose of Epimedium koreanum Nakai markedly reduced the replication of Influenza A Virus (PR8), Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) and Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) in RAW264.7 and HEK293T cells. Mechanically, we found that an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai induced the secretion of type I IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokines and the subsequent stimulation of the antiviral state in cells. Among various components present in the extract, quercetin was confirmed to have striking antiviral properties. The oral administration of Epimedium koreanum Nakai exhibited preventive effects on BALB/c mice against lethal doses of highly pathogenic influenza A subtypes (H1N1, H5N2, H7N3 and H9N2). Therefore, an extract of Epimedium koreanum Nakai and its components play roles as immunomodulators in the innate immune response, and may be potential candidates for prophylactic or therapeutic treatments against diverse viruses in animal and humans.

  17. Epimedium koreanum Nakai Displays Broad Spectrum of Antiviral Activity in Vitro and in Vivo by Inducing Cellular Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won-Kyung; Weeratunga, Prasanna; Lee, Byeong-Hoon; Park, Jun-Seol; Kim, Chul-Joong; Ma, Jin Yeul; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Epimedium koreanum Nakai has been extensively used in traditional Korean and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of diseases. Despite the plant’s known immune modulatory potential and chemical make-up, scientific information on its antiviral properties and mode of action have not been completely investigated. In this study, the broad antiviral spectrum and mode of action of an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai was evaluated in vitro, and moreover, the protective effect against divergent influenza A subtypes was determined in BALB/c mice. An effective dose of Epimedium koreanum Nakaimarkedly reduced the replication of Influenza A Virus (PR8), Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) and Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) in RAW264.7 and HEK293T cells. Mechanically, we found that an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai induced the secretion of type I IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokines and the subsequent stimulation of the antiviral state in cells. Among various components present in the extract, quercetin was confirmed to have striking antiviral properties. The oral administration of Epimedium koreanum Nakai exhibited preventive effects on BALB/c mice against lethal doses of highly pathogenic influenza A subtypes (H1N1, H5N2, H7N3 and H9N2). Therefore, an extract of Epimedium koreanum Nakai and its components play roles as immunomodulators in the innate immune response, and may be potential candidates for prophylactic or therapeutic treatments against diverse viruses in animal and humans. PMID:25609307

  18. Fractional-period excitations in continuum periodic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nistazakis, H. E.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; Porter, Mason A.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Nicolin, A.; Chin, J. K.

    2006-12-15

    We investigate the generation of fractional-period states in continuum periodic systems. As an example, we consider a Bose-Einstein condensate confined in an optical-lattice potential. We show that when the potential is turned on nonadiabatically, the system explores a number of transient states whose periodicity is a fraction of that of the lattice. We illustrate the origin of fractional-period states analytically by treating them as resonant states of a parametrically forced Duffing oscillator and discuss their transient nature and potential observability.

  19. Single attosecond pulse generation via continuum wave packet interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shengpeng; Yang, Yujun; Ding, Dajun

    2016-07-01

    A single attosecond pulse generation via continuum-continuum interference is investigated theoretically by exposing a single-electron atom in a femtosecond laser field with the intensity in over-the-barrier ionization regime. We show that the ground state of the atom is depleted in such intense laser field and the high-order harmonics (HHG) via continuum to continuum coherence are generated. In a few-cycle monochromatic laser field (5 fs/800 nm, 1.2×1016 W cm-2), a single attosecond pulse with duration of 49 as is obtained from the HHG. With a two-color laser field combined by 1200 nm (8 fs/7.5×1015 W cm-2) and 800 nm (5 fs/1.0×1016 W cm-2), a shorter single pulse with duration of 29 as can further be produced by changing the relative carrier envelope phase of two laser pulses as a result of controlling the electronic quantum path in the intense electric field. Our results also show that a short single attosecond pulse can be generated in a wide range of the relative carrier envelope phase of the two laser pulses.

  20. Quantum features of natural cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elze, Hans-Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Cellular automata can show well known features of quantum mechanics, such as a linear rule according to which they evolve and which resembles a discretized version of the Schrödinger equation. This includes corresponding conservation laws. The class of “natural” Hamiltonian cellular automata is based exclusively on integer-valued variables and couplings and their dynamics derives from an Action Principle. They can be mapped reversibly to continuum models by applying Sampling Theory. Thus, “deformed” quantum mechanical models with a finite discreteness scale l are obtained, which for l → 0 reproduce familiar continuum results. We have recently demonstrated that such automata can form “multipartite” systems consistently with the tensor product structures of nonrelativistic many-body quantum mechanics, while interacting and maintaining the linear evolution. Consequently, the Superposition Principle fully applies for such primitive discrete deterministic automata and their composites and can produce the essential quantum effects of interference and entanglement.

  1. Turbulent fluid motion 3: Basic continuum equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G.

    1991-01-01

    A derivation of the continuum equations used for the analysis of turbulence is given. These equations include the continuity equation, the Navier-Stokes equations, and the heat transfer or energy equation. An experimental justification for using a continuum approach for the study of turbulence is given.

  2. Cellular Contraction and Polarization Drive Collective Cellular Motion.

    PubMed

    Notbohm, Jacob; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Utuje, Kazage J C; Gweon, Bomi; Jang, Hwanseok; Park, Yongdoo; Shin, Jennifer; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2016-06-21

    Coordinated motions of close-packed multicellular systems typically generate cooperative packs, swirls, and clusters. These cooperative motions are driven by active cellular forces, but the physical nature of these forces and how they generate collective cellular motion remain poorly understood. Here, we study forces and motions in a confined epithelial monolayer and make two experimental observations: 1) the direction of local cellular motion deviates systematically from the direction of the local traction exerted by each cell upon its substrate; and 2) oscillating waves of cellular motion arise spontaneously. Based on these observations, we propose a theory that connects forces and motions using two internal state variables, one of which generates an effective cellular polarization, and the other, through contractile forces, an effective cellular inertia. In agreement with theoretical predictions, drugs that inhibit contractility reduce both the cellular effective elastic modulus and the frequency of oscillations. Together, theory and experiment provide evidence suggesting that collective cellular motion is driven by at least two internal variables that serve to sustain waves and to polarize local cellular traction in a direction that deviates systematically from local cellular velocity. PMID:27332131

  3. Glucagon mediated Ca/sup 2 +/-mobilization in the isolated perfused rat liver is dependent on cellular oxidation-reduction state

    SciTech Connect

    Rashed, H.M.; Patel, T.B.

    1987-05-01

    Alterations in the efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ from non-recirculating isolated perfused rat livers during glucagon (G) or phenylephrine (Ph) infusion was employed as a monitor of Ca/sup 2 +/-mobilization in the intact organ. The effect of altering cellular redox state with infusion of either pyruvate (P) alone, or lactate (L) alone, or a mixture of P and L on Ca/sup 2 +/-mobilization by G was investigated. As a control in all experiments, the ability of Ph (1 x 10/sup -5/M) to alter /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux was also monitored. Under all experimental conditions Ph infusion in liver resulted in a stimulation of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux. In livers of 24h-fasted rats perfused in the absence of any substrate, or in the presence of P alone, or L alone, infusion of 1 x 10/sup -8/M G resulted in a small increase in the rate of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux while 1 x 10/sup -9/M G was ineffective. However, when livers derived from 24h-fasted rats were perfused with a mixture of L and P such that the concentration of L + P was fixed at 2.0 mM and the ratio of L/P was either 4 or 8, infusion of 1 x 10/sup -9/M G resulted in a substantial increase in the rate of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux. These data indicate that cellular redox potential may facilitate or potentiate the ability of G to mobilize Ca/sup 2 +/ in the isolated perfused liver.

  4. An hypothesis on the role of cellular colloid osmotic pressure in determining behavior of cells in vitro including anchorage dependency and maintenance of the differentiated state.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, C

    1984-12-21

    The osmotic problems involved when cells are isolated from tissues are analyzed. Evidence is considered which indicates that in vivo the Na pump is operating at maximal or near maximal rates and that this depends on low leak rates for salts and water due to various aspects of the tissues structure. Dispersion of the tissue results in breakdown of these barriers on free diffusion and the isolated cell is subjected to an enormous increase in passive influx due to colloid osmotic pressure without being able to increase its pumping rate to the extent needed to maintain volume control. It is proposed that the primary problem the cell faces in vitro is to compensate for the effective increase in its colloid pressure, e.g. the colloid osmotic pressure excess, emerging with the breakdown of the tissue structure. The finding that most normal cells have to adhere to a surface in order to grow or "anchorage dependency" is analyzed in terms of the way adhesion and spreading result in changes in ion and water movements into cells enabling them to achieve fluid balance in the face of the colloid pressure excess. It is also proposed that the differentiated state is more dependent on colloid osmotic balance than proliferation. The failure of conditions used in tissue culture to compensate adequately for the colloid pressure excess results in limiting the amount of protein which can be synthesized, dissipation of cellular energy, and changes in orientation of cellular components which contribute directly to the loss of differentiation which occurs during growth in vitro.

  5. A perspective on new immune adjuvant principles: Reprogramming inflammatory states to permit clearance of cancer cells and other age-associated cellular pathologies.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, George C; Metz, Richard

    2012-09-01

    Aging entails the accumulation of neoantigens comprised of aggregated, oxidized, mutated and misfolded biomolecules, including advanced-glycation end projects (AGEs). There is evidence that the immune system can recognize and clear cells fouled by these molecular debris, which contribute to the emergence of cancer and other major age-associated diseases such as atherogenic and neurodegenerative disorders. However, this process may become increasingly inefficient with aging, perhaps in part because of an insufficiency of adjuvant signals normally associated with infection that can program productive inflammatory states and properly orient the immune system toward regenerative healing. Here we propose conceptual foundations for exploring a small set of infection-associated molecules as potential immune adjuvants to reprogram non-productive inflammatory states in aging tissues, and to improve the clearance of cellular pathologies that engender age-associated disease. The proposed adjuvant classes include a subset of D-amino acids used by bacteria to disrupt biofilms; nucleoside derivatives of N6-methyladenine, which functions at the core of bacterial dam restriction systems; and derivatives of the galactosyl trisaccharide α-Gal, which invokes the hyperacute response in primates. These foreign amino acids, nucleosides and sugar molecules are generally rare or absent in humans, except in association with infections by bacteria, protists or nematodes. A rationale for exploration of these candidate adjuvant principles and their chemical derivatives is discussed in terms of their use in generalized strategies to improve the prevention or treatment of cancer and other age-associated diseases, as negative modifiers of aging.

  6. Electron-pair excitations and the molecular Coulomb continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Colgan, James

    2009-01-01

    Electron-pair excitations in the molecular hydrogen continuum are described by quantizing rotations of the momentum plane of the electron pair about by the pair's relative momentum. A helium-like description of the molecular pi.Joto double ionization is thus extended to higher angular momenta of the electron pair. A simple three-state superposition is found to account surprisingly well for recent observations of noncoplanar electron-pair, molecular-axis angular distributions.

  7. Lattice continuum and diffusional creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesarovic, Sinisa Dj.

    2016-04-01

    Diffusional creep is characterized by growth/disappearance of lattice planes at the crystal boundaries that serve as sources/sinks of vacancies, and by diffusion of vacancies. The lattice continuum theory developed here represents a natural and intuitive framework for the analysis of diffusion in crystals and lattice growth/loss at the boundaries. The formulation includes the definition of the Lagrangian reference configuration for the newly created lattice, the transport theorem and the definition of the creep rate tensor for a polycrystal as a piecewise uniform, discontinuous field. The values associated with each crystalline grain are related to the normal diffusional flux at grain boundaries. The governing equations for Nabarro-Herring creep are derived with coupled diffusion and elasticity with compositional eigenstrain. Both, bulk diffusional dissipation and boundary dissipation accompanying vacancy nucleation and absorption, are considered, but the latter is found to be negligible. For periodic arrangements of grains, diffusion formally decouples from elasticity but at the cost of a complicated boundary condition. The equilibrium of deviatorically stressed polycrystals is impossible without inclusion of interface energies. The secondary creep rate estimates correspond to the standard Nabarro-Herring model, and the volumetric creep is small. The initial (primary) creep rate is estimated to be much larger than the secondary creep rate.

  8. A Health Services Research Agenda for Cellular, Molecular and Genomic Technologies in Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Wideroff, Louise; Phillips, Kathryn A.; Randhawa, Gurvaneet; Ambs, Anita; Armstrong, Katrina; Bennett, Charles L.; Brown, Martin L.; Donaldson, Molla S.; Follen, Michele; Goldie, Sue J.; Hiatt, Robert A.; Khoury, Muin J.; Lewis, Graham; McLeod, Howard L.; Piper, Margaret; Powell, Isaac; Schrag, Deborah; Schulman, Kevin A.; Scott, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Background In recent decades, extensive resources have been invested to develop cellular, molecular and genomic technologies with clinical applications that span the continuum of cancer care. Methods In December 2006, the National Cancer Institute sponsored the first workshop to uniquely examine the state of health services research on cancer-related cellular, molecular and genomic technologies and identify challenges and priorities for expanding the evidence base on their effectiveness in routine care. Results This article summarizes the workshop outcomes, which included development of a comprehensive research agenda that incorporates health and safety endpoints, utilization patterns, patient and provider preferences, quality of care and access, disparities, economics and decision modeling, trends in cancer outcomes, and health-related quality of life among target populations. Conclusions Ultimately, the successful adoption of useful technologies will depend on understanding and influencing the patient, provider, health care system and societal factors that contribute to their uptake and effectiveness in ‘real-world’ settings. PMID:19367091

  9. Analysis of an optimization-based atomistic-to-continuum coupling method for point defects

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Derek; Shapeev, Alexander V.; Bochev, Pavel B.; Luskin, Mitchell

    2015-11-16

    Here, we formulate and analyze an optimization-based Atomistic-to-Continuum (AtC) coupling method for problems with point defects. Application of a potential-based atomistic model near the defect core enables accurate simulation of the defect. Away from the core, where site energies become nearly independent of the lattice position, the method switches to a more efficient continuum model. The two models are merged by minimizing the mismatch of their states on an overlap region, subject to the atomistic and continuum force balance equations acting independently in their domains. We prove that the optimization problem is well-posed and establish error estimates.

  10. Continuum methods in lattice perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, Thomas G

    2002-11-15

    We show how methods of continuum perturbation theory can be used to simplify perturbative lattice calculations. We use the technique of asymptotic expansions to expand lattice loop integrals around the continuum limit. After the expansion, all nontrivial dependence on momenta and masses is encoded in continuum loop integrals and the only genuine lattice integrals left are tadpole integrals. Using integration-by-parts relations all of these can be expressed in terms of a small number of master integrals. Four master integrals are needed for bosonic one loop integrals, sixteen in QCD with Wilson or staggered fermions.

  11. Modelling mammalian cellular quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Guang

    2014-01-01

    Cellular quiescence is a reversible non-proliferating state. The reactivation of ‘sleep-like’ quiescent cells (e.g. fibroblasts, lymphocytes and stem cells) into proliferation is crucial for tissue repair and regeneration and a key to the growth, development and health of higher multicellular organisms, such as mammals. Quiescence has been a primarily phenotypic description (i.e. non-permanent cell cycle arrest) and poorly studied. However, contrary to the earlier thinking that quiescence is simply a passive and dormant state lacking proliferating activities, recent studies have revealed that cellular quiescence is actively maintained in the cell and that it corresponds to a collection of heterogeneous states. Recent modelling and experimental work have suggested that an Rb-E2F bistable switch plays a pivotal role in controlling the quiescence–proliferation balance and the heterogeneous quiescent states. Other quiescence regulatory activities may crosstalk with and impinge upon the Rb-E2F bistable switch, forming a gene network that controls the cells’ quiescent states and their dynamic transitions to proliferation in response to noisy environmental signals. Elucidating the dynamic control mechanisms underlying quiescence may lead to novel therapeutic strategies that re-establish normal quiescent states, in a variety of hyper- and hypo-proliferative diseases, including cancer and ageing. PMID:24904737

  12. Cellular Morphogenesis In Silico

    PubMed Central

    Shinbrot, Troy; Chun, Young; Caicedo-Carvajal, Carlos; Foty, Ramsey

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We describe a model that simulates spherical cells of different types that can migrate and interact either attractively or repulsively. We find that both expected morphologies and previously unreported patterns spontaneously self-assemble. Among the newly discovered patterns are a segmented state of alternating discs, and a “shish-kebab” state, in which one cell type forms a ring around a second type. We show that these unique states result from cellular attraction that increases with distance (e.g., as membranes stretch viscoelastically), and would not be seen in traditional, e.g., molecular, potentials that diminish with distance. Most of the states found computationally have been observed in vitro, and it remains to be established what role these self-assembled states may play in in vivo morphogenesis. PMID:19686642

  13. A continuum three-zone model for swarms.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jennifer M; Kolpas, Allison; Juchem Neto, Joao Plinio; Rossi, Louis F

    2012-03-01

    We present a progression of three distinct three-zone, continuum models for swarm behavior based on social interactions with neighbors in order to explain simple coherent structures in popular biological models of aggregations. In continuum models, individuals are replaced with density and velocity functions. Individual behavior is modeled with convolutions acting within three interaction zones corresponding to repulsion, orientation, and attraction, respectively. We begin with a variable-speed first-order model in which the velocity depends directly on the interactions. Next, we present a variable-speed second-order model. Finally, we present a constant-speed second-order model that is coordinated with popular individual-based models. For all three models, linear stability analysis shows that the growth or decay of perturbations in an infinite, uniform swarm depends on the strength of attraction relative to repulsion and orientation. We verify that the continuum models predict the behavior of a swarm of individuals by comparing the linear stability results with an individual-based model that uses the same social interaction kernels. In some unstable regimes, we observe that the uniform state will evolve toward a radially symmetric attractor with a variable density. In other unstable regimes, we observe an incoherent swarming state.

  14. Periodic amplitude variations in Jovian continuum radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of periodic variations in the amplitude of continuum radiation near 3 kHz trapped in the Jovian magnetosphere shows structure with periods near both five and ten hours. Contrary to a plausible initial idea, the continuum amplitudes are not organized by position of the observer relative to the dense plasma sheet. Instead, there seem to be preferred orientations of system III longitude with respect to the direction to the sun which account for the peaks. This implies a clock-like modulation of the continuum radiation intensity as opposed to a searchlight effect. The importance of the dipole longitude-solar wind alignment to the amplitude of the continuum radiation implies the source region of the radiation is near the magnetopause and may indirectly tie the generation of the radio waves to the clocklike modulation of energetic electron fluxes from Jupiter.

  15. Characterization of Continuum Coma features in Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Beatrice E. A.; Samarasinha, Nalin H.; Hergenrother, Carl W.

    2016-10-01

    We will present the results of an analysis of continuum coma features of comets belonging to different dynamical classes at geocentric distances less than 1.5 AU. Our analysis focusses on groundbased visible observations of over a dozen comets. The position angles of the continuum features close to the nucleus, the curvatures, and extents of radial features will be determined, and the dynamics of dust grains will be investigated. We will also use the change in position angles (if relevant) to place constraints on the periodicity of the repeatability of the features. The prevalence of the features in the sunward direction compared to other orientations will be investigated. We will further compare continuum features with CN features when available. This investigation will eventually lead to the discrimination between hemispherical and localized outgassing for the sunward continuum features seen in comets.We acknowledge support from the NASA SSW and PAST programs.

  16. Geometric continuum regularization of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-11-08

    An overview of the continuum regularization program is given. The program is traced from its roots in stochastic quantization, with emphasis on the examples of regularized gauge theory, the regularized general nonlinear sigma model and regularized quantum gravity. In its coordinate-invariant form, the regularization is seen as entirely geometric: only the supermetric on field deformations is regularized, and the prescription provides universal nonperturbative invariant continuum regularization across all quantum field theory. 54 refs.

  17. Angular correlation in the two-electron continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheifets, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2006-02-01

    Following absorption of a single photon, angles of simultaneous emission of two electrons from a He(nS1) atom become more correlated with increasing n . We find that the strength of this correlation is due to the two-electron continuum of the electron-impact ionization of the He+(ns) ion. The strength is determined by the width of the momentum profile of the ionic ns state but not the strength of the electron correlation in the He initial state. This can explain the increasing (over He) angular correlation strength found in double photoionization of targets such as Be, Ne, and H2 .

  18. Angular correlation in the two-electron continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2006-02-15

    Following absorption of a single photon, angles of simultaneous emission of two electrons from a He(n {sup 1}S) atom become more correlated with increasing n. We find that the strength of this correlation is due to the two-electron continuum of the electron-impact ionization of the He{sup +}(ns) ion. The strength is determined by the width of the momentum profile of the ionic ns state but not the strength of the electron correlation in the He initial state. This can explain the increasing (over He) angular correlation strength found in double photoionization of targets such as Be, Ne, and H{sub 2}.

  19. Zeno's paradox in quantum cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grössing, Gerhard; Zeilinger, Anton

    1991-07-01

    The effect of Zeno's paradox in quantum theory is demonstrated with the aid of quantum mechanical cellular automata. It is shown that the degree of non-unitarity of the cellular automaton evolution and the frequency of consecutive measurements of cellular automaton states are operationally indistinguishable.

  20. Continuum physics: Correlation and fluctuation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Herskind, B.

    1993-10-01

    It is well known that the main flow of the {gamma}-decay from high spin states passes through the regions of high level density several MeV above the yrast line. Nevertheless, only very limited information about the nuclear structure in this region is available, due to the extremely high complexity of the decay patterns. The new highly efficient {gamma}-spectrometer arrays, GASP, EUROGAM and GAMMASPHERE coming into operation these years, with several orders of magnitude higher selectivity for studying weakly populated states, offers new exiting possibilities also for a much more detailed study of the high spin quasi-continuum. It is of special interest to study the phase transition from the region of discrete regular rotational band structures found close to the yrast line, into the region of damped rotational motion at higher excitation energies and investigate the interactions responsible for the damping phenomena. Some of the first large data-sets to be analyzed are made on residues around e.g. {sup 152}Dy and {sup 168}Yb produced with EUROGAM in Daresbury, UK, in addition to {sup 143}Eu and {sup 182}Pt produced with GASP in Legnaro, Italy. These data-sets will for the first time contain enough counts to allow for a fluctuation analysis of 3-fold coincidence matrixes. The high spatial resolution in a cube of triples make it possible to select transitions from specific configurations using 2 of the detectors and measure the fluctuations caused by the simplicity of feeding the selected configuration by the 3. detector. Thus, weakly mixed structures in the damped region as e.g. superdeformed- or high-K bands are expected to show large fluctuations. Results from these experiments will be discussed.

  1. 34 CFR 300.115 - Continuum of alternative placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Continuum of alternative placements. 300.115 Section... Continuum of alternative placements. (a) Each public agency must ensure that a continuum of alternative... services. (b) The continuum required in paragraph (a) of this section must— (1) Include the...

  2. 34 CFR 300.115 - Continuum of alternative placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Continuum of alternative placements. 300.115 Section... Continuum of alternative placements. (a) Each public agency must ensure that a continuum of alternative... services. (b) The continuum required in paragraph (a) of this section must— (1) Include the...

  3. Sacrifice Along the Energy Continuum: A Call for Energy Justice

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The confluence of energy supply- and demand-side dynamics links vulnerable communities along the spectrum of energy production and consumption. The disproportionate burden borne by vulnerable communities along the energy continuum are seldom examined simultaneously. Yet, from a justice perspective there are important parallels that merit further exploration in the United States and beyond. A first step is to understand links to vulnerability and justice along the energy continuum by way of theoretical constructs and practical applications. The present article posits energy as a social and environmental justice issue and advances our current understanding of the links between energy and vulnerability, particularly in the U.S. context. Drawing on several emerging concepts including, “energy sacrifice zones,” “energy insecurity” and “energy justice,” this article lays a foundation for examining critical sacrifices along the energy continuum. To conclude, four basic rights are proposed as a starting point to achieve recognition and equity for vulnerable populations in the realm of energy. PMID:27053980

  4. Numerical Modelling and Damage Assessment of Rotary Wing Aircraft Cabin Door Using Continuum Damage Mechanics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyina, Gangadhara Rao T.; Rayavarapu, Vijaya Kumar; Subba Rao, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    The prediction of ultimate strength remains the main challenge in the simulation of the mechanical response of composite structures. This paper examines continuum damage model to predict the strength and size effects for deformation and failure response of polymer composite laminates when subjected to complex state of stress. The paper also considers how the overall results of the exercise can be applied in design applications. The continuum damage model is described and the resulting prediction of size effects are compared against the standard benchmark solutions. The stress analysis for strength prediction of rotary wing aircraft cabin door is carried out. The goal of this study is to extend the proposed continuum damage model such that it can be accurately predict the failure around stress concentration regions. The finite element-based continuum damage mechanics model can be applied to the structures and components of arbitrary configurations where analytical solutions could not be developed.

  5. Nuclear reprogramming of luminal-like breast cancer cells generates Sox2-overexpressing cancer stem-like cellular states harboring transcriptional activation of the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cufí, Sílvia; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Cuyàs, Elisabet; López-Bonet, Eugeni; Lupu, Ruth; Alarcón, Tomás; Vellon, Luciano; Iglesias, Juan Manuel; Leis, Olatz; Martín, Ángel G; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Menendez, Javier A

    2013-09-15

    Energy metabolism plasticity enables stemness programs during the reprogramming of somatic cells to an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) state. This relationship may introduce a new era in the understanding of Warburg's theory on the metabolic origin of cancer at the level of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here, we used Yamanaka's stem cell technology in an attempt to create stable CSC research lines in which to dissect the transcriptional control of mTOR--the master switch of cellular catabolism and anabolism--in CSC-like states. The rare colonies with iPSC-like morphology, obtained following the viral transduction of the Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc (OSKM) stemness factors into MCF-7 luminal-like breast cancer cells (MCF-7/Rep), demonstrated an intermediate state between cancer cells and bona fide iPSCs. MCF-7/Rep cells notably overexpressed SOX2 and stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4 proteins; however, other stemness-related markers (OCT4, NANOG, SSEA-1, TRA-1-60, and TRA-1-81) were found at low to moderate levels. The transcriptional analyses of OSKM factors confirmed the strong but unique reactivation of the endogenous Sox2 stemness gene accompanied by the silencing of the exogenous Sox2 transgene in MCF-7/Rep cells. Some but not all MCF-7/Rep cells acquired strong alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity compared with MCF-7 parental cells. SOX2-overexpressing MCF-7/Rep cells contained drastically higher percentages of CD44(+) and ALDEFLUOR-stained ALDH(bright) cells than MCF-7 parental cells. The overlap between differentially expressed mTOR signaling-related genes in 3 different SOX2-overexpressing CSC-like cell lines revealed a notable downregulation of 3 genes, PRKAA1 (which codes for the catalytic α 1 subunit of AMPK), DDIT4/REDD1 (a stress response gene that operates as a negative regulator of mTOR), and DEPTOR (a naturally occurring endogenous inhibitor of mTOR activity). The insulin-receptor gene (INSR) was differentially upregulated in MCF-7/Rep cells

  6. Nuclear reprogramming of luminal-like breast cancer cells generates Sox2-overexpressing cancer stem-like cellular states harboring transcriptional activation of the mTOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cufí, Sílvia; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Cuyàs, Elisabet; López-Bonet, Eugeni; Lupu, Ruth; Alarcón, Tomás; Vellon, Luciano; Iglesias, Juan Manuel; Leis, Olatz; Martín, Ángel G; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Menendez, Javier A

    2013-01-01

    Energy metabolism plasticity enables stemness programs during the reprogramming of somatic cells to an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) state. This relationship may introduce a new era in the understanding of Warburg’s theory on the metabolic origin of cancer at the level of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here, we used Yamanaka’s stem cell technology in an attempt to create stable CSC research lines in which to dissect the transcriptional control of mTOR—the master switch of cellular catabolism and anabolism—in CSC-like states. The rare colonies with iPSC-like morphology, obtained following the viral transduction of the Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc (OSKM) stemness factors into MCF-7 luminal-like breast cancer cells (MCF-7/Rep), demonstrated an intermediate state between cancer cells and bona fide iPSCs. MCF-7/Rep cells notably overexpressed SOX2 and stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4 proteins; however, other stemness-related markers (OCT4, NANOG, SSEA-1, TRA-1–60, and TRA-1–81) were found at low to moderate levels. The transcriptional analyses of OSKM factors confirmed the strong but unique reactivation of the endogenous Sox2 stemness gene accompanied by the silencing of the exogenous Sox2 transgene in MCF-7/Rep cells. Some but not all MCF-7/Rep cells acquired strong alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity compared with MCF-7 parental cells. SOX2-overexpressing MCF-7/Rep cells contained drastically higher percentages of CD44+ and ALDEFLUOR-stained ALDHbright cells than MCF-7 parental cells. The overlap between differentially expressed mTOR signaling-related genes in 3 different SOX2-overexpressing CSC-like cell lines revealed a notable downregulation of 3 genes, PRKAA1 (which codes for the catalytic α 1 subunit of AMPK), DDIT4/REDD1 (a stress response gene that operates as a negative regulator of mTOR), and DEPTOR (a naturally occurring endogenous inhibitor of mTOR activity). The insulin-receptor gene (INSR) was differentially upregulated in MCF-7/Rep

  7. Observations of continuum depression in warm dense matter with x-ray Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, L B; Kritcher, A L; Pak, A; Ma, T; Döppner, T; Fortmann, C; Divol, L; Jones, O S; Landen, O L; Scott, H A; Vorberger, J; Chapman, D A; Gericke, D O; Mattern, B A; Seidler, G T; Gregori, G; Falcone, R W; Glenzer, S H

    2014-04-11

    Detailed measurements of the electron densities, temperatures, and ionization states of compressed CH shells approaching pressures of 50 Mbar are achieved with spectrally resolved x-ray scattering. Laser-produced 9 keV x-rays probe the plasma during the transient state of three-shock coalescence. High signal-to-noise x-ray scattering spectra show direct evidence of continuum depression in highly degenerate warm dense matter states with electron densities ne>1024  cm-3. The measured densities and temperatures agree well with radiation-hydrodynamic modeling when accounting for continuum lowering in calculations that employ detailed configuration accounting.

  8. Multipartite cellular automata and the superposition principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elze, Hans-Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Cellular automata (CA) can show well known features of quantum mechanics (QM), such as a linear updating rule that resembles a discretized form of the Schrödinger equation together with its conservation laws. Surprisingly, a whole class of “natural” Hamiltonian CA, which are based entirely on integer-valued variables and couplings and derived from an action principle, can be mapped reversibly to continuum models with the help of sampling theory. This results in “deformed” quantum mechanical models with a finite discreteness scale l, which for l→0 reproduce the familiar continuum limit. Presently, we show, in particular, how such automata can form “multipartite” systems consistently with the tensor product structures of non-relativistic many-body QM, while maintaining the linearity of dynamics. Consequently, the superposition principle is fully operative already on the level of these primordial discrete deterministic automata, including the essential quantum effects of interference and entanglement.

  9. Continuum Absorption Coefficient of Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armaly, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of heat transfer to the heat shield of a Jupiter probe has been estimated to be one order of magnitude higher than any previously experienced in an outer space exploration program. More than one-third of this heat load is due to an emission of continuum radiation from atoms and ions. The existing computer code for calculating the continuum contribution to the total load utilizes a modified version of Biberman's approximate method. The continuum radiation absorption cross sections of a C - H - O - N ablation system were examined in detail. The present computer code was evaluated and updated by being compared with available exact and approximate calculations and correlations of experimental data. A detailed calculation procedure, which can be applied to other atomic species, is presented. The approximate correlations can be made to agree with the available exact and experimental data.

  10. Hadron resonances with a quark core embedded in the continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Kiyotaka; Takeuchi, Sachiko; Takizawa, Makoto

    2011-05-06

    We investigate the excited baryons and mesons which cannot be described in terms of a simple constituent quark model, such as {Lambda}(1405) and X(3872) as a resonance in a coupled channel hadron-hadron (baryon-meson or meson-meson) scattering with a 'bound state embedded in the continuum' (BSEC). For this purpose, we solve the Lippmann-Schwinger equation including a BSEC in the momentum space. This BSEC is introduced by hand, as a state not originated from a simple baryon-meson or meson-meson system. We assume it comes from the three-quark state or quark-anti quark state and show such a picture can describe the {Lambda}(1405) and X(3872) resonances.

  11. Hydrologic ramifications of an increased role of wildland fire across the rangeland-dry forest continuum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increased role of wildland fire across the rangeland-dry forest continuum in the western United States (US) presents landscape-scale consequences relative runoff and erosion. Much of the Intermountain West now exists in a state in which rangeland and woodland wildfires stimulated by invasive che...

  12. Decay of a nonlinear impurity in a structured continuum from a nonlinear Fano-Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Longhi, Stefano

    2007-05-01

    The decay dynamics of a nonlinear impurity mode embedded in a linear structured continuum is theoretically investigated in the framework of a nonlinear Fano-Anderson model. A gradient flow dynamics for the survival probability is derived in the Van Hove ({lambda}{sup 2}t) limit by a multiple-scale asymptotic analysis, and the role of nonlinearity on the decay law is discussed. In particular, it is shown that the existence of bound states embedded in the continuum acts as transient trapping states which slow down the decay. The dynamical behavior predicted in the {lambda}{sup 2}t limit is studied in detail for a simple tight-binding one-dimensional lattice model, which may describe electron or photon transport in condensed matter or photonic systems. Numerical simulations of the underlying equations confirm, in particular, the trapping effect in the decay process due to bound states embedded in the continuum.

  13. A continuum of compass spin models on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Haiyuan; Liu, Bo; Zhao, Erhai; Liu, W. Vincent

    2016-05-01

    Quantum spin models with spatially dependent interactions, known as compass models, play an important role in the study of frustrated quantum magnetism. One example is the Kitaev model on the honeycomb lattice with spin-liquid ground states. Another example is the geometrically frustrated quantum 120° model whose ground state has not been unambiguously established. To generalize the Kitaev model beyond the exactly solvable limit and connect it with other models, we propose a new model, dubbed ``the tripod model,'' which contains a continuum of compass-type models. It not only unifies paradigmatic spin models, but also enables the study of their quantum phase transitions. We obtain the phase diagram of the tripod model numerically by tensor networks in the thermodynamic limit. We show that the ground state of the quantum 120° model has long-range dimer order. Moreover, we find an extended spin-disordered (spin-liquid) phase between the dimer phase and an antiferromagnetic phase. The unification and solution of a continuum of frustrated spin models as outline here may be useful to exploring new domains of other quantum spin or orbital models.

  14. A continuum of compass spin models on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Haiyuan; Liu, Bo; Zhao, Erhai; Liu, W. Vincent

    2016-05-01

    Quantum spin models with spatially dependent interactions, known as compass models, play an important role in the study of frustrated quantum magnetism. One example is the Kitaev model on the honeycomb lattice with spin-liquid (SL) ground states and anyonic excitations. Another example is the geometrically frustrated quantum 120° model on the same lattice whose ground state has not been unambiguously established. To generalize the Kitaev model beyond the exactly solvable limit and connect it with other compass models, we propose a new model, dubbed ‘the tripod model’, which contains a continuum of compass-type models. It smoothly interpolates the Ising model, the Kitaev model, and the quantum 120° model by tuning a single parameter {θ }\\prime , the angle between the three legs of a tripod in the spin space. Hence it not only unifies three paradigmatic spin models, but also enables the study of their quantum phase transitions. We obtain the phase diagram of the tripod model numerically by tensor networks in the thermodynamic limit. We show that the ground state of the quantum 120° model has long-range dimer order. Moreover, we find an extended spin-disordered (SL) phase between the dimer phase and an antiferromagnetic phase. The unification and solution of a continuum of frustrated spin models as outline here may be useful to exploring new domains of other quantum spin or orbital models.

  15. Vibrationally-resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Model GFP Chromophore Anion Revealing the Photoexcited S-1 State being both Vertically and Adiabatically Bound against the Photodetached D-0 Continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Shihu; Kong, Xiangyu; Zhang, GuanXin; Yang, Yan; Zheng, Weijun; Sun, Zhenrong; Zhang, De-Qing; Wang, Xue B.

    2014-06-19

    The first excited state of the model green fluorescence protein (GFP) chromophore anion (S1) and its energy level against the electron-detached neutral radical, D0 state are crucial in determining the photophysics and the photo-induced dynamics of GFP. Extensive experimental and theoretical studies, particularly several very recent gas phase investigations concluded that S1 is a bound state in the Franck-Condon vertical region with respect to D0. However, what remains unknown and challenging is if S1 is bound adiabatically, primarily due to lack of accurate experimental measurements, as well as due to close proximity in energy for these two states that even sophisticated high-level ab initio calculations can’t reliably predict. Here, we report a negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy study on the model GFP chromophore anion, the deprotonated p-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone anion (HBDI–). Despite the considerable size and low symmetry of the molecule, well resolved vibrational structures were obtained with the 0–0 transition being the most intense peak. The adiabatic (ADE) and vertical detachment energy (VDE) therefore are determined, both to be 2.73 ± 0.01 eV, indicating the detached D0 state is 0.16 eV higher in energy than the photon excited S1 state. The accurate ADE and VDE values and the well-resolved photoelectron spectra reported here provide much needed, robust benchmarks for future theoretical investigations.

  16. Cellular: Toward personal communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, Stuart

    1991-09-01

    The cellular industry is one of the fastest growing segment of the telecommunications industry. With an estimated penetration rate of 20 percent in the near future, cellular is becoming an ubiquitous telecommunications service in the U.S. In this paper we will examine the major advancements in the cellular industry: customer equipment, cellular networks, engineering tools, customer support, and nationwide seamless service.

  17. Modal kinematics for multisection continuum arms.

    PubMed

    Godage, Isuru S; Medrano-Cerda, Gustavo A; Branson, David T; Guglielmino, Emanuele; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2015-05-13

    This paper presents a novel spatial kinematic model for multisection continuum arms based on mode shape functions (MSF). Modal methods have been used in many disciplines from finite element methods to structural analysis to approximate complex and nonlinear parametric variations with simple mathematical functions. Given certain constraints and required accuracy, this helps to simplify complex phenomena with numerically efficient implementations leading to fast computations. A successful application of the modal approximation techniques to develop a new modal kinematic model for general variable length multisection continuum arms is discussed. The proposed method solves the limitations associated with previous models and introduces a new approach for readily deriving exact, singularity-free and unique MSF's that simplifies the approach and avoids mode switching. The model is able to simulate spatial bending as well as straight arm motions (i.e., pure elongation/contraction), and introduces inverse position and orientation kinematics for multisection continuum arms. A kinematic decoupling feature, splitting position and orientation inverse kinematics is introduced. This type of decoupling has not been presented for these types of robotic arms before. The model also carefully accounts for physical constraints in the joint space to provide enhanced insight into practical mechanics and impose actuator mechanical limitations onto the kinematics thus generating fully realizable results. The proposed method is easily applicable to a broad spectrum of continuum arm designs.

  18. Modal kinematics for multisection continuum arms.

    PubMed

    Godage, Isuru S; Medrano-Cerda, Gustavo A; Branson, David T; Guglielmino, Emanuele; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a novel spatial kinematic model for multisection continuum arms based on mode shape functions (MSF). Modal methods have been used in many disciplines from finite element methods to structural analysis to approximate complex and nonlinear parametric variations with simple mathematical functions. Given certain constraints and required accuracy, this helps to simplify complex phenomena with numerically efficient implementations leading to fast computations. A successful application of the modal approximation techniques to develop a new modal kinematic model for general variable length multisection continuum arms is discussed. The proposed method solves the limitations associated with previous models and introduces a new approach for readily deriving exact, singularity-free and unique MSF's that simplifies the approach and avoids mode switching. The model is able to simulate spatial bending as well as straight arm motions (i.e., pure elongation/contraction), and introduces inverse position and orientation kinematics for multisection continuum arms. A kinematic decoupling feature, splitting position and orientation inverse kinematics is introduced. This type of decoupling has not been presented for these types of robotic arms before. The model also carefully accounts for physical constraints in the joint space to provide enhanced insight into practical mechanics and impose actuator mechanical limitations onto the kinematics thus generating fully realizable results. The proposed method is easily applicable to a broad spectrum of continuum arm designs. PMID:25969947

  19. Aims, Modes, and the Continuum of Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beale, Walter H.

    A framework for the study of discourse, based on the analysis of three superordinate features of discourse (asymmetry, hierarchy, and continuum), is proposed in this paper. The paper begins by noting the confusion in terminology that exists in the world of composition pedagogy and theory; pointing to the need for a framework for testing,…

  20. Radio continuum from FU Orionis stars

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, L.F.; Hartmann, L.W.; Chavira, E. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Puebla )

    1990-12-01

    Using the very large array a sensitive search is conducted for 3.6-cm continuum emission toward four FU Orionis objects: FU Ori, V1515 Cyg, V1057 Cyg, and Elias 1-12. V1057 Cyg and Elias 1-12 at the level of about 0.1 mJy is detected. The association of radio continuum emission with these FU Ori objects strengthens a possible relation between FU Ori stars and objects like L 1551 IRS 5 and Z CMa that are also sources of radio continuum emission and have been proposed as post-FU Ori objects. Whether the radio continuum emission is caused by free-free emission from ionized ejecta or if it is optically thin emission from a dusty disk is discussed. It was determined that, in the archives of the Tonantzintla Observatory, a plate taken in 1957 does not show Elias 1-12. This result significantly narrows the time range for the epoch of the outburst of this source to between 1957 and 1965. 38 refs.

  1. Parental Involvement to Parental Engagement: A Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodall, Janet; Montgomery, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Based on the literature of the field, this article traces a continuum between parental involvement with schools, and parental engagement with children's learning. The article seeks to shed light on an area of confusion; previous research has shown that different stakeholder groups understand "parental engagement" in different ways.…

  2. 3D holography: from discretum to continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonzom, Valentin; Dittrich, Bianca

    2016-03-01

    We study the one-loop partition function of 3D gravity without cosmological constant on the solid torus with arbitrary metric fluctuations on the boundary. To this end we employ the discrete approach of (quantum) Regge calculus. In contrast with similar calculations performed directly in the continuum, we work with a boundary at finite distance from the torus axis. We show that after taking the continuum limit on the boundary — but still keeping finite distance from the torus axis — the one-loop correction is the same as the one recently found in the continuum in Barnich et al. for an asymptotically flat boundary. The discrete approach taken here allows to identify the boundary degrees of freedom which are responsible for the non-trivial structure of the one-loop correction. We therefore calculate also the Hamilton-Jacobi function to quadratic order in the boundary fluctuations both in the discrete set-up and directly in the continuum theory. We identify a dual boundary field theory with a Liouville type coupling to the boundary metric. The discrete set-up allows again to identify the dual field with degrees of freedom associated to radial bulk edges attached to the boundary. Integrating out this dual field reproduces the (boundary diffeomorphism invariant part of the) quadratic order of the Hamilton-Jacobi functional. The considerations here show that bulk boundary dualities might also emerge at finite boundaries and moreover that discrete approaches are helpful in identifying such dualities.

  3. Clinical Integration Managing across the care continuum.

    PubMed

    Karash, Julius A; Larson, Laurie

    2016-06-01

    In the changing world of health care, the traditional boundaries are vanishing and hospitals and others must integrate care within their own organizations, as well as externally, across the care continuum. Here are three approaches to accomplishing just that. PMID:27468454

  4. Mentorship: The Education-Research Continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, D

    2008-05-29

    recommendation for learning science stated: 'The Nature of Science includes the scientific world view, scientific methods of inquiry, and the nature of the scientific enterprise'. All three elements of the 'Nature of Science' are pivotal aspects of a research internship under the mentorship of an experienced and trusted advisor. In addition to internships for undergraduates, an important ingredient in realizing 'Science for All' is collaboration involving educators and scientists as they engage science students and the public at large to promote science literacy and to develop the next generation of STEM professionals. The DOE National Laboratories, individually and collectively, form an ideal nexus for nurturing these complementary collaborations. My 'Science for All' experiences at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) over the last 30 years have spanned pre-college, college, and postdoctoral activities, including mentoring of undergraduate students. Early in my mentoring career, I became aware that undergraduates in particular needed help in answering the question 'what path (or paths) will lead to a challenging and rewarding STEM career'? For many, a successful path included a research internship that would result in expanded skills and training in addition to those received from their academic education. These internship skills were helpful whether the student's next Education-Research Continuum decision was graduate school or STEM employment. My experience at LLNL mirrors that of my colleagues at other DOE National Laboratories--internships with a dedicated mentor provide undergraduates with a unique set of skills that can underpin their future options and serve to improve the number, quality, and successful outcomes of students who enter STEM careers. 'Science for All' can also be found in the goals of 'The America COMPETES Act', which call for renewed efforts to increase investments in scientific research and development, strengthen education, and encourage

  5. Continuum modeling of large lattice structures: Status and projections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The status and some recent developments of continuum modeling for large repetitive lattice structures are summarized. Discussion focuses on a number of aspects including definition of an effective substitute continuum; characterization of the continuum model; and the different approaches for generating the properties of the continuum, namely, the constitutive matrix, the matrix of mass densities, and the matrix of thermal coefficients. Also, a simple approach is presented for generating the continuum properties. The approach can be used to generate analytic and/or numerical values of the continuum properties.

  6. WNK protein kinases modulate cellular Cl- flux by altering the phosphorylation state of the Na-K-Cl and K-Cl cotransporters.

    PubMed

    Kahle, Kristopher T; Rinehart, Jesse; Ring, Aaron; Gimenez, Ignacio; Gamba, Gerardo; Hebert, Steven C; Lifton, Richard P

    2006-10-01

    Precise control of cellular Cl(-) transport is necessary for many fundamental physiological processes. For example, the intracellular concentration of Cl(-), fine-tuned through the coordinated action of cellular Cl(-) influx and efflux mechanisms, determines whether a neuron's response to GABA is excitatory or inhibitory. In epithelia, synchrony between apical and basolateral Cl(-) flux, and transcellular and paracellular Cl(-) transport, is necessary for efficient transepithelial Cl(-) reabsorption or secretion. In cells throughout the body, coordination of Cl(-) entry and exit mechanisms help defend against changes in cell volume. The Na-K-Cl and K-Cl cotransporters of the SLC12 gene family are important molecular determinants of Cl(-) entry and exit, respectively, in these systems. The WNK serine-threonine kinase family, members of which are mutated in an inherited form of human hypertension, are components of a signaling pathway that coordinates Cl(-) influx and efflux through SLC12 cotransporters to dynamically regulate intracellular Cl(-) activity. PMID:16990453

  7. Orbital hemangiopericytoma and solitary fibrous tumor: a morphologic continuum.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J D; van de Rijn, M; Syed, N

    2001-10-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFT) and hemangiopericytomas (HPC) are soft tissue tumors with known histologic and immunohistochemical overlap. A series of these tumors located in the orbit were analyzed in order to determine whether they could be re-classified based on currently recognized histologic criteria. Ten orbital spindle cell lesions, all of which were positive for CD34 antigen, were examined. Diagnostic criteria for SFT included a cytologically bland spindle cell lesion with variable cellularity and focal dense collagenization with diffuse, strong CD34 reactivity, while the criteria for HPC required a more monotonous cellular proliferation without significant variability in cellularity, a "staghorn" vascular pattern, minimal collagenization, and focal or absent CD34 staining. Tumors with typical histologic and immunohistochemical features of HPC or SFT were diagnosed as HPC and SFT, respectively. Those tumors with histologic or antigenic profiles not classic for HPC or SFT were defined as 'indeterminate.' Three lesions were classified as SFT and 1 tumor was diagnosed as HPC through use of the above-cited histologic criteria. All lesions showed positive staining of tumor cells with CD34 antigen in varying amounts and were negative for cytokeratin AE1-3, epithelial membrane antigen, CD68, and Factor XIIIa. One solitary fibrous tumor focally stained for S-100 protein and 1 hemangiopericytoma was focally positive for HHF-35. Of the 10 analyzed tumors, 6 were classified as 'indeterminate.' Furthermore, 1 lesion whose primary histology was that of an SFT recurred 9 years later with an appearance consistent with an 'indeterminate' lesion. Our results call into question the present histologic separation of HPC and SFT in the orbit. As in other sites, including deep soft tissue, these data suggest that SFT and HPC are 2 lesions whose morphologic features are best interpreted to exist along a continuum, rather than 2 lesions with distinctly defined histopathology.

  8. Mirrored continuum and molecular scale simulations of the ignition of gamma phase RDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Scott; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Joshi, Kaushik; Lee, Kiabek

    2015-06-01

    We consider the ignition of a high-pressure gamma-phase of an explosive crystal of RDX which forms during overdriven shock initiation. Molecular dynamics (MD), with first-principles based or reactive force field based molecular potentials, provides a description of the chemistry as an extremely complex reaction network. The results of the molecular simulation is analyzed by sorting molecular product fragments into high and low molecular groups, to represent identifiable components that can be interpreted by a continuum model. A continuum model based on a Gibbs formulation, that has a single temperature and stress state for the mixture is used to represent the same RDX material and its chemistry. Each component in the continuum model has a corresponding Gibbs continuum potential, that are in turn inferred from molecular MD informed equation of state libraries such as CHEETAH, or are directly simulated by Monte Carlo MD simulations. Information about transport, kinetic rates and diffusion are derived from the MD simulation and the growth of a reactive hot spot in the RDX is studied with both simulations that mirror the other results to provide an essential, continuum/atomistic link. Supported by N000014-12-1-0555, subaward-36561937 (ONR).

  9. 34 CFR 300.115 - Continuum of alternative placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Continuum of alternative placements. 300.115 Section 300... alternative placements. (a) Each public agency must ensure that a continuum of alternative placements is...) The continuum required in paragraph (a) of this section must— (1) Include the alternative...

  10. Continuum of Collaboration: Little Steps for Little Feet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Gwynn M.

    2013-01-01

    This mini-article outlines a continuum of collaboration for faculty within a department of the same discipline. The goal of illustrating this continuum is showcase different stages of collaboration so that faculty members can assess where they are as a collective and consider steps to collaborate more. The separate points along a continuum of…

  11. Continuum Statistics of the Airy2 Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corwin, Ivan; Quastel, Jeremy; Remenik, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We develop an exact determinantal formula for the probability that the Airy_2 process is bounded by a function g on a finite interval. As an application, we provide a direct proof that {sup({A}2(x)-x^2)} is distributed as a GOE random variable. Both the continuum formula and the GOE result have applications in the study of the end point of an unconstrained directed polymer in a disordered environment. We explain Johansson's (Commun. Math. Phys. 242(1-2):277-329, 2003) observation that the GOE result follows from this polymer interpretation and exact results within that field. In a companion paper (Moreno Flores et al. in Commun. Math. Phys. 2012) these continuum statistics are used to compute the distribution of the endpoint of directed polymers.

  12. Models of Uranium continuum radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romig, Joseph H.; Evans, David R.; Sawyer, Constance B.; Schweitzer, Andrea E.; Warwick, James W.

    1987-01-01

    Uranium continuum radio emission detected by the Voyager 2 Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment during the January 1986 encounter is considered. The continuum emissions comprised four components (equatorial emissions, anomaly emissions, strong nightside emissions, and weak nightside emissions) associated with different sources. The equatorial emissions appeared most prominently during the days before closest approach and extended from 40 kHz or below to about 120 kHz. The anomaly emissions were seen about 12 hours before closest approach and extended to about 250 kHz. The agreement found between Miranda's phase and strong radio emission at 20.4 kHz, just after closest approach, suggests intense dynamic activity on the Miranda L shell.

  13. Reduced-representation Phosphosignatures Measured by Quantitative Targeted MS Capture Cellular States and Enable Large-scale Comparison of Drug-induced Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Abelin, Jennifer G; Patel, Jinal; Lu, Xiaodong; Feeney, Caitlin M; Fagbami, Lola; Creech, Amanda L; Hu, Roger; Lam, Daniel; Davison, Desiree; Pino, Lindsay; Qiao, Jana W; Kuhn, Eric; Officer, Adam; Li, Jianxue; Abbatiello, Susan; Subramanian, Aravind; Sidman, Richard; Snyder, Evan; Carr, Steven A; Jaffe, Jacob D

    2016-05-01

    Profiling post-translational modifications represents an alternative dimension to gene expression data in characterizing cellular processes. Many cellular responses to drugs are mediated by changes in cellular phosphosignaling. We sought to develop a common platform on which phosphosignaling responses could be profiled across thousands of samples, and created a targeted MS assay that profiles a reduced-representation set of phosphopeptides that we show to be strong indicators of responses to chemical perturbagens.To develop the assay, we investigated the coordinate regulation of phosphosites in samples derived from three cell lines treated with 26 different bioactive small molecules. Phosphopeptide analytes were selected from these discovery studies by clustering and picking 1 to 2 proxy members from each cluster. A quantitative, targeted parallel reaction monitoring assay was developed to directly measure 96 reduced-representation probes. Sample processing for proteolytic digestion, protein quantification, peptide desalting, and phosphopeptide enrichment have been fully automated, making possible the simultaneous processing of 96 samples in only 3 days, with a plate phosphopeptide enrichment variance of 12%. This highly reproducible process allowed ∼95% of the reduced-representation phosphopeptide probes to be detected in ∼200 samples.The performance of the assay was evaluated by measuring the probes in new samples generated under treatment conditions from discovery experiments, recapitulating the observations of deeper experiments using a fraction of the analytical effort. We measured these probes in new experiments varying the treatments, cell types, and timepoints to demonstrate generalizability. We demonstrated that the assay is sensitive to disruptions in common signaling pathways (e.g. MAPK, PI3K/mTOR, and CDK). The high-throughput, reduced-representation phosphoproteomics assay provides a platform for the comparison of perturbations across a range of

  14. Spatiotemporal dynamics of continuum neural fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    We survey recent analytical approaches to studying the spatiotemporal dynamics of continuum neural fields. Neural fields model the large-scale dynamics of spatially structured biological neural networks in terms of nonlinear integrodifferential equations whose associated integral kernels represent the spatial distribution of neuronal synaptic connections. They provide an important example of spatially extended excitable systems with nonlocal interactions and exhibit a wide range of spatially coherent dynamics including traveling waves oscillations and Turing-like patterns.

  15. Steering continuum electron dynamics by low-energy attosecond streaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Ji-Wei; Xiong, Wei-Hao; Xiao, Xiang-Ru; Gong, Qihuang; Peng, Liang-You

    2016-08-01

    A semiclassical model is developed to understand the electronic dynamics in the low-energy attosecond streaking. Under a relatively strong infrared (IR) pulse, the low-energy part of photoelectrons initialized by a single attosecond pulse (SAP) can either rescatter with the ionic core and induce interferences structures in the momentum spectra of the ionized electrons or be recaptured into the Rydberg states. The Coulomb potential plays essential roles in both the electron rescattering and recapturing processes. We find that by changing the time delay between the SAP and the IR pulse, the photoelectrons yield or the population of the Rydberg states can be effectively controlled. The present study demonstrates a fascinating way to steer the electron motion in the continuum.

  16. Fractionalized spin-wave continuum in kagome spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Jia-Wei; Wen, Xiao-Gang

    Motivated by spin-wave continuum (SWC) observed in recent neutron scattering experiments in Herbertsmithite, we use Gutzwiller-projected wave functions to study dynamic spin structure factor S (q , ω) of spin liquid states on the kagome lattice. Spin-1 excited states in spin liquids are represented by Gutzwiller-projected two-spinon excited wave functions. We investigate three different spin liquid candidates, spinon Fermi-surface spin liquid (FSL), Dirac spin liquid (DSL) and random-flux spin liquid (RSL). FSL and RSL have low energy peaks in S (q , ω) at K points in the extended magnetic Brillouin zone, in contrast to experiments where low energy peaks are found at M points. There is no obviuos contradiction between DSL and neutron scattering measurements. Besides a fractionalized spin (i.e. spin-1/2), spinons in DSL carry a fractionalized crystal momentum which is potentially detectable in SWC in the neutron scattering measurements.

  17. Continuum and line emission of flares on red dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morchenko, E.; Bychkov, K.; Livshits, M.

    2015-06-01

    The emission spectrum has been calculated of a homogeneous pure hydrogen layer, which parameters are typical for a flare on a red dwarf. The ionization and excitation states were determined by the solution of steady-state equations taking into account the continuum and all discrete hydrogen levels. We consider the following elementary processes: electron-impact transitions, spontaneous and induced radiative transitions, and ionization by the bremsstrahlung and recombination radiation of the layer itself. The Biberman-Holstein approximation was used to calculate the scattering of line radiation. Asymptotic formulae for the escape probability are obtained for a symmetric line profile taking into account the Stark and Doppler effects. The approximation for the core of the H- α line by a Gaussian curve has been substantiated.

  18. Bipotential continuum models for granular mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Joe

    2014-03-01

    Most currently popular continuum models for granular media are special cases of a generalized Maxwell fluid model, which describes the evolution of stress and internal variables such as granular particle fraction and fabric,in terms of imposed strain rate. It is shown how such models can be obtained from two scalar potentials, a standard elastic free energy and a ``dissipation potential'' given rigorously by the mathematical theory of Edelen. This allows for a relatively easy derivation of properly invariant continuum models for granular media and fluid-particle suspensions within a thermodynamically consistent framework. The resulting continuum models encompass all the prominent regimes of granular flow, ranging from the quasi-static to rapidly sheared, and are readily extended to include higher-gradient or Cosserat effects. Models involving stress diffusion, such as that proposed recently by Kamrin and Koval (PRL 108 178301), provide an alternative approach that is mentioned in passing. This paper provides a brief overview of a forthcoming review articles by the speaker (The Princeton Companion to Applied Mathematics, and Appl. Mech. Rev.,in the press, 2013).

  19. A Continuum Theory of Thermal Transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielenberg, James; Brenner, Howard

    2003-11-01

    A rational, continuum mechanical description is given for the pressure drop that develops in a closed capillary tube subject to an imposed temperature gradient. This phenomenon, termed thermal transpiration, has been experimentally demonstrated in systems at vanishing Knudsen numbers, yet no purely continuum mechanical description has, until now, been given. Previous hybrid solutions (dating back to Maxwell in 1879) have utilized the classical, incompressible flow equations along with molecularly derived slip boundary conditions. This solution approach will be briefly discussed and shown to be dynamically consistent yet energetically flawed. Subsequently, we will apply a novel reformulation of continuum-mechanics and -thermodynamics, which clearly distinguishes between the Lagrangian (tracer) and the barycentric velocities, to generate a solution for the thermal pressure drop developed in a closed system. Explicitly, the phenomena at hand will be shown to be entirely analogous to Poiseuille flow in tube, albeit with the tacit recognition that the ``flow'' we are speaking of is defined in a dynamic sense rather than in the more traditional, kinematic mass-flux based sense. This solution will be show to be free of ad hoc parameters, consistent with experimental results, and in accordance with classical macroscopic thermodynamics. Beyond its purely scientific importance, this phenomenon may find applications in the emerging area of micro-fluidic pumping.

  20. Polymer Fluid Dynamics: Continuum and Molecular Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bird, R B; Giacomin, A J

    2016-06-01

    To solve problems in polymer fluid dynamics, one needs the equations of continuity, motion, and energy. The last two equations contain the stress tensor and the heat-flux vector for the material. There are two ways to formulate the stress tensor: (a) One can write a continuum expression for the stress tensor in terms of kinematic tensors, or (b) one can select a molecular model that represents the polymer molecule and then develop an expression for the stress tensor from kinetic theory. The advantage of the kinetic theory approach is that one gets information about the relation between the molecular structure of the polymers and the rheological properties. We restrict the discussion primarily to the simplest stress tensor expressions or constitutive equations containing from two to four adjustable parameters, although we do indicate how these formulations may be extended to give more complicated expressions. We also explore how these simplest expressions are recovered as special cases of a more general framework, the Oldroyd 8-constant model. Studying the simplest models allows us to discover which types of empiricisms or molecular models seem to be worth investigating further. We also explore equivalences between continuum and molecular approaches. We restrict the discussion to several types of simple flows, such as shearing flows and extensional flows, which are of greatest importance in industrial operations. Furthermore, if these simple flows cannot be well described by continuum or molecular models, then it is not necessary to lavish time and energy to apply them to more complex flow problems. PMID:27276553

  1. Line and continuum variability in active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashed, Y. E.; Eckart, A.; Valencia-S., M.; García-Marín, M.; Busch, G.; Zuther, J.; Horrobin, M.; Zhou, H.

    2015-12-01

    We compared optical spectroscopic and photometric data for 18 active galactic nuclei (AGN) galaxies over two to three epochs, with time intervals of typically 5 to 10 yr. We used the multi-object double spectrograph (MODS) at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) and compared the spectra with data taken from the SDSS data base and the literature. We found variations in the forbidden oxygen lines as well as in the hydrogen recombination lines of these sources. For four of the sources we found that, within the calibration uncertainties, the variations in continuum and line spectra of the sources are very small. We argue that it is mainly the difference in black hole mass between the samples that is responsible for the different degree of continuum variability. In addition, we found that for an otherwise constant accretion rate the total line variability (dominated by the narrow line contributions) reverberates in a similar way to the continuum variability with a dependence ΔLline ∝ (ΔLcont)3/2. Because this dependence is predominantly expressed in the narrow line emission, the implication is that the part of the source that dominates the luminosity in the narrow line region must be very compact, with a diameter of the order of at least 10 light-years. A comparison with data from the literature shows that these findings describe the variability characteristics of a total of 61 broad and narrow line sources.

  2. Cellular Phone Towers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the call. How are people exposed to the energy from cellular phone towers? As people use cell ... where people can be exposed to them. The energy from a cellular phone tower antenna, like that ...

  3. Graduate Medical Education: Its Role in Achieving a True Medical Education Continuum.

    PubMed

    Aschenbrener, Carol A; Ast, Cori; Kirch, Darrell G

    2015-09-01

    Nearly half a century ago, Lowell T. Coggeshall recommended, through what has come to be known as the Coggeshall Report, that physician education-medical school (or undergraduate medical education [UME]), residency training (or graduate medical education [GME]), and continuing medical education (CME)-be "planned and provided as a continuum." While the dream of a true continuum remains unfulfilled, recent innovations focused on defining and assessing meaningful outcomes at last offer the anchor for the creation of a seamless, flexible, and ongoing pathway for the preparation of physicians. Recent innovations, including a widely accepted competency framework and entrustable professional activities (EPAs), provide key tools for creating a continuum. The competency framework is being leveraged in UME, GME, and CME and is serving as the foundation for the continuum. Learners and those who assess them are increasingly relying on observable behaviors (e.g., EPAs) to determine progress. The GME community in the United States and Canada has played-and continues to play-a leading role in the creation of these tools and a true medical education continuum. Despite some systemic challenges to implementation (e.g., premedical learner formation, time-in-step requirements), the GME community is already operationalizing these tools as a basis for other innovations that are improving transitions across the continuum (e.g., competency-based progression of residents). The medical education community's greatest responsibility in the years ahead will be to build on these efforts in GME-joining together to learn from one another and develop a continuum that serves the public and the profession. PMID:26177531

  4. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-12-31

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young`s modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  5. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young's modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  6. Electrophilic, Ambiphilic, and Nucleophilic C-H bond Activation. Understanding the electronic continuum of C-H bond activation through transition-state and reaction pathway interaction energy decompositions

    SciTech Connect

    Ess, Daniel H.; Goddard, William A.; Periana, Roy A.

    2010-10-29

    The potential energy and interaction energy profiles for metal- and metal-ligand-mediated alkane C-H bond activation were explored using B3LYP density functional theory (DFT) and the absolutely localized molecular orbital energy decomposition analysis (ALMO-EDA). The set of complexes explored range from late transition metal group 10 (Pt and Pd) and group 11 (Au) metal centers to group 7-9 (Ir, Rh, Ru, and W) metal centers as well as a group 3 Sc complex. The coordination geometries, electron metal count (d8, d6, d4, and d0), and ligands (N-heterocycles, O-donor, phosphine, and Cp*) are also diverse. Quantitative analysis using ALMO-EDA of both directions of charge-transfer stabilization (occupied to unoccupied orbital stabilization) energies between the metal-ligand fragment and the coordinated C-H bond in the transition state for cleavage of the C-H bond allows classification of C-H activation reactions as electrophilic, ambiphilic, or nucleophilic on the basis of the net direction of charge-transfer energy stabilization. This bonding pattern transcends any specific mechanistic or bonding paradigm, such as oxidative addition, σ-bond metathesis, or substitution. Late transition metals such as Au(III), Pt(II), Pd(II), and Rh(III) metal centers with N-heterocycle, halide, or O-donor ligands show electrophilically dominated reaction profiles with forward charge-transfer from the C-H bond to the metal, leading to more stabilization than reverse charge transfer from the metal to the C-H bond. Transition states and reaction profiles for d6 Ru(II) and Ir(III) metals with Tp and acac ligands were found to have nearly equal forward and reverse charge-transfer energy stabilization. This ambiphilic region also includes the classically labeled electrophilic cationic species Cp*(PMe3)Ir(Me). Nucleophilic character, where the metal to C-H bond charge-transfer interaction is most stabilizing, was found in

  7. Rural Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of Their Role in the Breast Cancer Care Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayman, Kathleen M.; Edwards, Joellen

    2010-01-01

    Context: Rural women in the United States experience disparity in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment when compared to their urban counterparts. Given the 11% chance of lifetime occurrence of breast cancer for women overall, the continuum of breast cancer screening, diagnosis, treatment, and recovery are of legitimate concern to rural women and…

  8. A Continuum Approach for Developing School Leaders in an Urban District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Normore, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    This study examined a four-staged leadership development continuum for school leaders in a large urban school district in the southeastern United States. The program under examination included: LEAD Program; Interim Assistant Principal Program; Intern Principal Program, and; First Year Principal Support/Interim Principal Program. Qualitative…

  9. Continuum-mediated dark matter-baryon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Andrey; Reece, Matthew; Sajjad, Aqil

    2016-06-01

    Many models of dark matter scattering with baryons may be treated either as a simple contact interaction or as the exchange of a light mediator particle. We study an alternative, in which a continuum of light mediator states may be exchanged. This could arise, for instance, from coupling to a sector which is approximately conformal at the relevant momentum transfer scale. In the non-relativistic effective theory of dark matter-baryon scattering, which is useful for parametrizing direct detection signals, the effect of such continuum mediators is to multiply the amplitude by a function of the momentum transfer q, which in the simplest case is just a power law. We develop the basic framework and study two examples: the case where the mediator is a scalar operator coupling to the Higgs portal (which turns out to be highly constrained) and the case of an antisymmetric tensor operator Oμν that mixes with the hypercharge field strength and couples to dark matter tensor currents, which has an interesting viable parameter space. We describe the effect of such mediators on the cross sections and recoil energy spectra that could be observed in direct detection.

  10. Minimal continuum theories of structure formation in dense active fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Heidenreich, Sebastian; Bär, Markus; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-04-01

    Self-sustained dynamical phases of living matter can exhibit remarkable similarities over a wide range of scales, from mesoscopic vortex structures in microbial suspensions and motility assays of biopolymers to turbulent large-scale instabilities in flocks of birds or schools of fish. Here, we argue that, in many cases, the phenomenology of such active states can be efficiently described in terms of fourth- and higher-order partial differential equations. Structural transitions in these models can be interpreted as Landau-type kinematic transitions in Fourier (wavenumber) space, suggesting that microscopically different biological systems can share universal long-wavelength features. This general idea is illustrated through numerical simulations for two classes of continuum models for incompressible active fluids: a Swift-Hohenberg-type scalar field theory, and a minimal vector model that extends the classical Toner-Tu theory and appears to be a promising candidate for the quantitative description of dense bacterial suspensions. We discuss how microscopic symmetry-breaking mechanisms can enter macroscopic continuum descriptions of collective microbial motion near surfaces, and conclude by outlining future applications.

  11. Recent studies of the high-spin quasi-continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herskind, B.; Døssing, T.; Leoni, S.; Matsuo, M.; Vigezzi, E.

    Two new methods, the Rotational Plane Mapping, and the Fluctuation Analysis Method are reviewed, and applied to the study of high spin quasi-continuum states in 167,168Yb and 163Tm nuclei. New results are given for the rotational damping width Г rot and the number of different 2-step-paths below and above U0, defined to be the energy of the borderline between undamped regular rotational motion for bands along the yrast line and the region of heated nuclei with damped rotational motion. The results indicate that at least 30 bands with regular rotational structure exist in the I = 40 region before damping becomes dominating. The fundamental concept of rotational damping may be questioned, and has never been verified experimentally. The analysis support the damping picture, giving evidence for a strong branching of the E2 decay, showing 10 times as many 2-step-paths through the continuum than expected if only regular rotational E2 decay, and E1 statistical branching were the decay modes.

  12. The laminations of a crystal near an anti-continuum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knibbeler, Vincent; Mramor, Blaz; Rink, Bob

    2014-05-01

    The anti-continuum limit of a monotone variational recurrence relation consists of a lattice of uncoupled particles in a periodic background. This limit supports many trivial equilibrium states that persist as solutions of the model with small coupling. We investigate when a persisting solution generates a so-called lamination and prove that near the anti-continuum limit the collection of laminations of solutions is homeomorphic to the (N - 1)-dimensional simplex, with N the number of distinct local minima of the background potential. This generalizes a result by Baesens and MacKay on twist maps near an anti-integrable limit.

  13. Covariance Propagation and Partial Eigendecomposition Filtering on the Continuum: The Cases of Advective Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, S.

    2002-01-01

    As a motivation for this lecture, we begin by stating a paradox that challenges our fundamental understanding of covariance evolution (at least it challenged my own). Attempting to resolve this 'divergence paradox' leads us to introduce the continuum fundamental solution operator for the dynamics under consideration, which will be advection dynamics in this lecture. This operator is the object that is approximated by the discrete 'tangent linear model. We then show how the fundamental solution operator can be used to describe the solution of the continuum covariance evolution equation. This description is complete enough to resolve fully the divergence paradox.

  14. A robust, coupled approach for atomistic-continuum simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Aubry, Sylvie; Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III; Wagner, Gregory John; Klein, Patrick A.; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Bammann, Douglas J.; Hoyt, Jeffrey John; Kimmer, Christopher J.

    2004-09-01

    This report is a collection of documents written by the group members of the Engineering Sciences Research Foundation (ESRF), Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project titled 'A Robust, Coupled Approach to Atomistic-Continuum Simulation'. Presented in this document is the development of a formulation for performing quasistatic, coupled, atomistic-continuum simulation that includes cross terms in the equilibrium equations that arise due to kinematic coupling and corrections used for the calculation of system potential energy to account for continuum elements that overlap regions containing atomic bonds, evaluations of thermo-mechanical continuum quantities calculated within atomistic simulations including measures of stress, temperature and heat flux, calculation used to determine the appropriate spatial and time averaging necessary to enable these atomistically-defined expressions to have the same physical meaning as their continuum counterparts, and a formulation to quantify a continuum 'temperature field', the first step towards constructing a coupled atomistic-continuum approach capable of finite temperature and dynamic analyses.

  15. Relaxation of a steep density gradient in a simple fluid: Comparison between atomistic and continuum modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pourali, Meisam; Maghari, Ali; Meloni, Simone; Magaletti, Francesco; Casciola, Carlo Massimo; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2014-10-21

    We compare dynamical nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and continuum simulations of the dynamics of relaxation of a fluid system characterized by a non-uniform density profile. Results match quite well as long as the lengthscale of density nonuniformities are greater than the molecular scale (∼10 times the molecular size). In presence of molecular scale features some of the continuum fields (e.g., density and momentum) are in good agreement with atomistic counterparts, but are smoother. On the contrary, other fields, such as the temperature field, present very large difference with respect to reference (atomistic) ones. This is due to the limited accuracy of some of the empirical relations used in continuum models, the equation of state of the fluid in the present example.

  16. Nature of "memory" in T-cell mediated antibacterial immunity: cellular parameters that distinguish between the active immune response and a state of "memory".

    PubMed Central

    North, R J; Deissler, J F

    1975-01-01

    Immunizing infection in mice with Listeria monocytogenes resulted in the generation of two distinct states of immunological reactivity. There was generated (i) a short-lived state of active immunity that functioned to urgently eliminate the infection organism from the tissues and (ii) a long-lives state of increased immunological potential that enabled the host to respond to seconday infection in an accelerated manner. Short-lived active immunity was mediated by replicating T cells and expressed by activated macrophages, and it ended when these cell types disappeared from the tissue soon after complete elimination of the parasite. Long-lived immunological protential was associated with a persistent level of delayed sensitivity and with the presence of a small number of nonreplicating protective T cells. It is suggested that the state of delayed sensitivity represents a state of immunological T-cell memory of the cell-mediated type. PMID:811559

  17. Interpreting angina: symptoms along a gender continuum

    PubMed Central

    Crea-Arsenio, Mary; Shannon, Harry S; Velianou, James L; Giacomini, Mita

    2016-01-01

    Background ‘Typical’ angina is often used to describe symptoms common among men, while ‘atypical’ angina is used to describe symptoms common among women, despite a higher prevalence of angina among women. This discrepancy is a source of controversy in cardiac care among women. Objectives To redefine angina by (1) qualitatively comparing angina symptoms and experiences in women and men and (2) to propose a more meaningful construct of angina that integrates a more gender-centred approach. Methods Patients were recruited between July and December 2010 from a tertiary cardiac care centre and interviewed immediately prior to their first angiogram. Symptoms were explored through in-depth semi-structured interviews, transcribed verbatim and analysed concurrently using a modified grounded theory approach. Angiographically significant disease was assessed at ≥70% stenosis of a major epicardial vessel. Results Among 31 total patients, 13 men and 14 women had angiograpically significant CAD. Patients describe angina symptoms according to 6 symptomatic subthemes that array along a ‘gender continuum’. Gender-specific symptoms are anchored at each end of the continuum. At the centre of the continuum, are a remarkably large number of symptoms commonly expressed by both men and women. Conclusions The ‘gender continuum’ offers new insights into angina experiences of angiography candidates. Notably, there is more overlap of shared experiences between men and women than conventionally thought. The gender continuum can help researchers and clinicians contextualise patient symptom reports, avoiding the conventional ‘typical’ versus ‘atypical’ distinction that can misrepresent gendered angina experiences. PMID:27158523

  18. Modeling yarn slip in woven fabric at the continuum level: Simulations of ballistic impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Ethan M.; King, Michael J.; Socrate, Simona

    2013-01-01

    Woven fabric is used in a wide variety of military and commercial products—both in neat form and as the reinforcement phase of composites. In many applications, yarn slip, the relative sliding of the yarns composing the weave, is an important mode of deformation or failure. Yarn slip can significantly change the energy absorption capacity and yarn density of the fabric and also cause yarns to unravel from the weave. Virtually all existing models for woven fabric that allow yarn slip are discrete in nature. They simulate every yarn in the weave and are therefore computationally expensive and difficult to integrate with other material models. A promising alternative to discrete models is the mesostructure-based continuum technique. With this technique, homogenized continuum properties are determined from a deforming analytic model of the fabric mesostructure at each material point. Yarn-level mechanisms of deformation are thus captured without the computational cost of simulating every yarn in the fabric. However, existing mesostructure-based continuum models treat the yarns as pinned together at the cross-over points of the weave, and an operative model that allows yarn slip has not been published. Here, we introduce a mesostructure-based continuum model that permits yarn slip and use the model to simulate the ballistic impact of woven fabric. In our approach, the weave is the continuum substrate on which the model is anchored, and slip of the yarns occurs relative to the weave continuum. The cross-over points of the weave act as the material points of the continuum, and the evolution of the local weave mesostructure at each point of the continuum is represented by state variables. At the same time, slip velocity fields simulate the slip of each yarn family relative to the weave continuum and therefore control the evolution of the yarn pitch. We found that simulating yarn slip significantly improves finite element predictions of the ballistic impact of a Kevlar

  19. Continuum elastic modeling of graphene resonators.

    PubMed

    Atalaya, Juan; Isacsson, Andreas; Kinaret, Jari M

    2008-12-01

    Starting from an atomistic approach, we have derived a hierarchy of successively more simplified continuum elasticity descriptions for modeling the mechanical properties of suspended graphene sheets. We find that already for deflections of the order of 0.5 A a theory that correctly accounts for nonlinearities is necessary and that for many purposes a set of coupled Duffing-type equations may be used to accurately describe the dynamics of graphene membranes. The descriptions are validated by applying them to square graphene-based resonators with clamped edges and studying numerically their mechanical responses. Both static and dynamic responses are treated, and we find good agreement with recent experimental findings. PMID:19367927

  20. Continuum regularization of gauge theory with fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, H.S.

    1987-03-01

    The continuum regularization program is discussed in the case of d-dimensional gauge theory coupled to fermions in an arbitrary representation. Two physically equivalent formulations are given. First, a Grassmann formulation is presented, which is based on the two-noise Langevin equations of Sakita, Ishikawa and Alfaro and Gavela. Second, a non-Grassmann formulation is obtained by regularized integration of the matter fields within the regularized Grassmann system. Explicit perturbation expansions are studied in both formulations, and considerable simplification is found in the integrated non-Grassmann formalism.

  1. Continuum description of avalanches in granular media.

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I. S.; Tsimring, L. S.

    2000-12-05

    A continuum theory of partially fluidized granular flows is proposed. The theory is based on a combination of the mass and momentum conservation equations with the order parameter equation which describes the transition between flowing and static components of the granular system. We apply this model to the dynamics of avalanches in chutes. The theory provides a quantitative description of recent observations of granular flows on rough inclined planes (Daerr and Douady 1999): layer bistability, and the transition from triangular avalanches propagating downhill at small inclination angles to balloon-shaped avalanches also propagating uphill for larger angles.

  2. Continuum modeling of clustering of myxobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Cameron W.; Alber, Mark; Tsimring, Lev S.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we develop a continuum theory of clustering in ensembles of self-propelled inelastically colliding rods with applications to collective dynamics of common gliding bacteria Myxococcus Xanthus. A multiphase hydrodynamic model that couples densities of oriented and isotropic phases is described. This model is used for the analysis of an instability that leads to spontaneous formation of directionally moving dense clusters within initially dilute isotropic “gas” of myxobacteria. Numerical simulations of this model confirm the existence of stationary dense moving clusters and also elucidate the properties of their collisions. The results are shown to be in a qualitative agreement with experiments. PMID:23712128

  3. Continuum eigenmodes in some linear stellar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winfield, Christopher J.

    2016-10-01

    We apply parallel approaches in the study of continuous spectra to adiabatic stellar models. We seek continuum eigenmodes for the LAWE formulated as both finite difference and linear differential equations. In particular, we apply methods of Jacobi matrices and methods of subordinancy theory in these respective formulations. We find certain pressure-density conditions which admit positive-measured sets of continuous oscillation spectra under plausible conditions on density and pressure. We arrive at results of unbounded oscillations and computational or, perhaps, dynamic instability.

  4. Perspective: Polarizable continuum models for quantum-mechanical descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipparini, Filippo; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2016-04-01

    Polarizable continuum solvation models are nowadays the most popular approach to describe solvent effects in the context of quantum mechanical calculations. Unexpectedly, despite their widespread use in all branches of quantum chemistry and beyond, important aspects of both their theoretical formulation and numerical implementation are still not completely understood. In particular, in this perspective we focus on the numerical issues of their implementation when applied to large systems and on the theoretical framework needed to treat time dependent problems and excited states or to deal with electronic correlation. Possible extensions beyond a purely electrostatic model and generalizations to environments beyond common solvents are also critically presented and discussed. Finally, some possible new theoretical approaches and numerical strategies are suggested to overcome the obstacles which still prevent a full exploitation of these models.

  5. Pairing resonances and the continuum spectroscopy of 10Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrigo, S. E. A.; Lenske, H.

    2009-06-01

    Pairing across the particle emission threshold and the properties of corresponding quasiparticle strength functions are discussed in an extended mean-field approach. This particular type of dynamical correlations gives rise to a unique class of sharp low-lying resonances close to the particle emission threshold. Spectral functions for particle and hole states are discussed. They are explored theoretically by single-nucleon transfer reactions, populating the low energy continuum with respect to a core nucleus. The cross sections of the reaction d(9Li, 10Li)p at Tlab = 2.36 AMeV, recently measured at REX-ISOLDE, are well reproduced by our calculations including a pairing resonance in the 3 /2- partial wave of purely coupled channels nature.

  6. Overview of cellular CDMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, William C. Y.

    1991-05-01

    A general description of code division multiple access (CDMA) is presented. This overview of CDMA highlights the potential of increasing capacity in future cellular communications. The author describes the mobile radio environment and its impact on narrowband and wideband propagation. The advantage of having CDMA in cellular systems is discussed, and the concept of radio capacity in cellular is introduced. The power control schemes in CDMA are analyzed in detail.

  7. Continuum robot arms inspired by cephalopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Ian D.; Dawson, Darren M.; Flash, Tamar; Grasso, Frank W.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Hochner, Binyamin; Kier, William M.; Pagano, Christopher C.; Rahn, Christopher D.; Zhang, Qiming M.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we describe our recent results in the development of a new class of soft, continuous backbone ("continuum") robot manipulators. Our work is strongly motivated by the dexterous appendages found in cephalopods, particularly the arms and suckers of octopus, and the arms and tentacles of squid. Our ongoing investigation of these animals reveals interesting and unexpected functional aspects of their structure and behavior. The arrangement and dynamic operation of muscles and connective tissue observed in the arms of a variety of octopus species motivate the underlying design approach for our soft manipulators. These artificial manipulators feature biomimetic actuators, including artificial muscles based on both electro-active polymers (EAP) and pneumatic (McKibben) muscles. They feature a "clean" continuous backbone design, redundant degrees of freedom, and exhibit significant compliance that provides novel operational capacities during environmental interaction and object manipulation. The unusual compliance and redundant degrees of freedom provide strong potential for application to delicate tasks in cluttered and/or unstructured environments. Our aim is to endow these compliant robotic mechanisms with the diverse and dexterous grasping behavior observed in octopuses. To this end, we are conducting fundamental research into the manipulation tactics, sensory biology, and neural control of octopuses. This work in turn leads to novel approaches to motion planning and operator interfaces for the robots. The paper describes the above efforts, along with the results of our development of a series of continuum tentacle-like robots, demonstrating the unique abilities of biologically-inspired design.

  8. Measurements of Continuum Flux in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrč, P.; Heinzel, P.; Procházka, O.

    2016-04-01

    A broad-band diagnostics of chromospheric flare plasma needs to analyze spectra covering many spectral lines and various continuum features. The flare spectra are well detected on the background of the solar disk, but the detection of flare line emission from the Sun-as-a-star in optical is much more difficult due to a strong background radiation. When the flare/background radiation contrast is strong enough to be detected, we need a device for measuring the flux from a selected part of the flaring region. Here we present technical demands for such an instrument and its brief description. This device denoted as Image Selector is a post-focus instrument installed at the horizontal solar telescope HSFA2 of the Ondřejov observatory, described by Kotrč (2009). Its core consists of a system of diaphragms, imaging Hα telescope and a fast spectrometer with dispersion of 3 px per Å but with cadency reaching up to 50 frames per second. The first solar flares observed recently by this novel technique provide quite interesting results. Our analysis of the data proves that the described device is sufficiently sensitive to detect variations in the Balmer continuum during solar flares.

  9. Accurate Molecular Polarizabilities Based on Continuum Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Truchon, Jean-François; Nicholls, Anthony; Iftimie, Radu I.; Roux, Benoît; Bayly, Christopher I.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach for representing the intramolecular polarizability as a continuum dielectric is introduced to account for molecular electronic polarization. It is shown, using a finite-difference solution to the Poisson equation, that the Electronic Polarization from Internal Continuum (EPIC) model yields accurate gas-phase molecular polarizability tensors for a test set of 98 challenging molecules composed of heteroaromatics, alkanes and diatomics. The electronic polarization originates from a high intramolecular dielectric that produces polarizabilities consistent with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and experimental values when surrounded by vacuum dielectric. In contrast to other approaches to model electronic polarization, this simple model avoids the polarizability catastrophe and accurately calculates molecular anisotropy with the use of very few fitted parameters and without resorting to auxiliary sites or anisotropic atomic centers. On average, the unsigned error in the average polarizability and anisotropy compared to B3LYP are 2% and 5%, respectively. The correlation between the polarizability components from B3LYP and this approach lead to a R2 of 0.990 and a slope of 0.999. Even the F2 anisotropy, shown to be a difficult case for existing polarizability models, can be reproduced within 2% error. In addition to providing new parameters for a rapid method directly applicable to the calculation of polarizabilities, this work extends the widely used Poisson equation to areas where accurate molecular polarizabilities matter. PMID:23646034

  10. Polarized Continuum Radiation from Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, J. Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Continuum scattering by free electrons can be significant in early type stars, while in late type stars Rayleigh scattering by hydrogen atoms or molecules may be important. Computer programs used to construct models of stellar atmospheres generally treat the scattering of the continuum radiation as isotropic and unpolarized, but this scattering has a dipole angular dependence and will produce polarization. We review an accurate method for evaluating the polarization and limb darkening of the radiation from model stellar atmospheres. We use this method to obtain results for: (i) Late type stars, based on the MARCS code models (Gustafsson et al. 2008), and (ii) Early type stars, based on the NLTE code TLUSTY (Lanz and Hubeny 2003). These results are tabulated at http://www.astro.umd.edu/~jph/Stellar_Polarization.html. While the net polarization vanishes for an unresolved spherical star, this symmetry is broken by rapid rotation or by the masking of part of the star by a binary companion or during the transit of an exoplanet. We give some numerical results for these last cases.

  11. Mid-IR super-continuum generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammed N.; Xia, Chenan; Freeman, Mike J.; Mauricio, Jeremiah; Zakel, Andy; Ke, Kevin; Xu, Zhao; Terry, Fred L., Jr.

    2009-02-01

    A Mid-InfraRed FIber Laser (MIRFIL) has been developed that generates super-continuum covering the spectral range from 0.8 to 4.5 microns with a time-averaged power as high as 10.5W. The MIRFIL is an all-fiber integrated laser with no moving parts and no mode-locked lasers that uses commercial off-the-shelf parts and leverages the mature telecom/fiber optics platform. The MIRFIL power can be easily scaled by changing the repetition rate and modifying the erbium-doped fiber amplifier. Some of the applications using the super-continuum laser will be described in defense, homeland security and healthcare. For example, the MIRFIL is being applied to a catheter-based medical diagnostic system to detect vulnerable plaque, which is responsible for most heart attacks resulting from hardening-of-the-arteries or atherosclerosis. More generally, the MIRFIL can be a platform for selective ablation of lipids without damaging normal protein or smooth muscle tissue.

  12. The Urban Watershed Continuum: Biogeochemistry of Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, S.; Belt, K.; Smith, C.; Newcomb, K.; Newcomer, T. A.; Smith, R.; Duan, S.; Findlay, S.; Groffman, P. M.; Mayer, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    Urban ecosystems are constantly evolving, and they are expected to change in both space and time. We explore the relationship between infrastructure and ecosystem function relevant to the inorganic and organic carbon cycle along urban watersheds across spatial and temporal dimensions. We provide examples from watersheds of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study Long-Term Ecological (LTER) and Washington D.C. Urban Long-Term Research Area (ULTRA EX) sites with varying land use and contrasting sanitary sewer systems. At a stream and river network scale, there are distinct longitudinal patterns in dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, and particulate carbon concentrations from suburban headwaters to progressively urbanized receiving waters. There are also distinct changes in stable isotopic signatures of organic carbon and inorganic carbon suggesting shifts in carbon sources and processing throughout urban stream and river networks. Longitudinal patterns appear to be related to in-stream transformations, as suggested by high frequency sensor measurements, mass balances, and diurnal sampling. We suggest that stream and river networks act as "transformers" of watershed nitrogen and phosphorus pollution to increasingly generate carbon throughout the urban watershed continuum via biological processes. Additionally, sources and quality of carbon may vary with watershed inputs from suburban headwaters to progressively urbanized downstream reaches. The role of the urban watershed continuum as a "transporter" and "transformer" of organic matter has important implications for anticipating changes in the forms and reactivity of carbon delivered to receiving waters and coastal zones.

  13. Xtoys: Cellular automata on xwindows

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1995-08-15

    Xtoys is a collection of xwindow programs for demonstrating simulations of various statistical models. Included are xising, for the two dimensional Ising model, xpotts, for the q-state Potts model, xautomalab, for a fairly general class of totalistic cellular automata, xsand, for the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfield model of self organized criticality, and xfires, a simple forest fire simulation. The programs should compile on any machine supporting xwindows.

  14. Ash Dispersal in Planetary Atmospheres: Continuum vs. Non-continuum Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagents, S. A.; Baloga, S. M.; Glaze, L. S.

    2013-12-01

    The dispersal of ash from a volcanic vent on any given planet is dictated by particle properties (density, shape, and size distribution), the intensity of the eruptive source, and the characteristics of the planetary environment (atmospheric structure, wind field, and gravity) into which the ash is erupted. Relating observations of potential pyroclastic deposits to source locations and eruption conditions requires a detailed quantitative understanding of the settling rates of individual particles under changing ambient conditions. For atmospheres that are well described by continuum mechanics, the conventional Newtonian description of particle motion allows particle settling velocities to be related to particle characteristics via a drag coefficient. However, under rarefied atmospheric conditions (i.e., on Mars and at high altitude on Earth), non-continuum effects become important for ash-sized particles, and an equation of motion based on statistical mechanics is required for calculating particle motion. We have developed a rigorous new treatment of particle settling under variable atmospheric conditions and applied it to Earth and Mars. When non-continuum effects are important (as dictated by the mean free path of atmospheric gas relative to the particle size), fall velocities are greater than those calculated by continuum mechanics. When continuum conditions (i.e., higher atmospheric densities) are reached during descent, our model switches to a conventional formulation that determines the appropriate drag coefficient as the particle transits varying atmospheric properties. The variation of settling velocity with altitude allows computation of particle trajectories, fall durations and downwind dispersal. Our theoretical and numerical analyses show that several key, competing factors strongly influence the downwind trajectories of ash particles and the extents of the resulting deposits. These factors include: the shape of the particles (non-spherical particles

  15. Wave functions for continuum states of charged fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, S. J.; Macek, J. H.

    1994-02-01

    Briggs's representation [Phys. Rev. A 41, 539 (1990)] of the Mo/ller wave operator for multiparticle wave functions is applied to charged fragments using a limiting procedure to correctly account for the slow decrease of Coulomb interactions with distance. Approximate wave functions used to model (e,2e) angular correlation measurments are obtained. Computed and measured angular correlations are compared to clarify the region of applicability of two approximations.

  16. Non-coherent continuum scattering as a line polarization mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Del Pino Alemán, T.; Manso Sainz, R.; Trujillo Bueno, J. E-mail: rsainz@iac.es

    2014-03-20

    Line scattering polarization can be strongly affected by Rayleigh scattering at neutral hydrogen and Thomson scattering at free electrons. Often a depolarization of the continuum results, but the Doppler redistribution produced by the continuum scatterers, which are light (hence, fast), induces more complex interactions between the polarization in spectral lines and in the continuum. Here we formulate and solve the radiative transfer problem of scattering line polarization with non-coherent continuum scattering consistently. The problem is formulated within the spherical tensor representation of atomic and light polarization. The numerical method of solution is a generalization of the Accelerated Lambda Iteration that is applied to both the atomic system and the radiation field. We show that the redistribution of the spectral line radiation due to the non-coherence of the continuum scattering may modify the shape of the emergent fractional linear polarization patterns significantly, even yielding polarization signals above the continuum level in intrinsically unpolarizable lines.

  17. Oxidative Stress in Mammalian Cells Impinges on the Cysteines Redox State of Human XRCC3 Protein and on Its Cellular Localization

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Pierre-Marie; Graindorge, Dany; Smirnova, Violetta; Rigolet, Pascal; Francesconi, Stefania; Scanlon, Susan; Sage, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    In vertebrates, XRCC3 is one of the five Rad51 paralogs that plays a central role in homologous recombination (HR), a key pathway for maintaining genomic stability. While investigating the potential role of human XRCC3 (hXRCC3) in the inhibition of DNA replication induced by UVA radiation, we discovered that hXRCC3 cysteine residues are oxidized following photosensitization by UVA. Our in silico prediction of the hXRCC3 structure suggests that 6 out of 8 cysteines are potentially accessible to the solvent and therefore potentially exposed to ROS attack. By non-reducing SDS-PAGE we show that many different oxidants induce hXRCC3 oxidation that is monitored in Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO) cells by increased electrophoretic mobility of the protein and in human cells by a slight decrease of its immunodetection. In both cell types, hXRCC3 oxidation was reversed in few minutes by cellular reducing systems. Depletion of intracellular glutathione prevents hXRCC3 oxidation only after UVA exposure though depending on the type of photosensitizer. In addition, we show that hXRCC3 expressed in CHO cells localizes both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Mutating all hXRCC3 cysteines to serines (XR3/S protein) does not affect the subcellular localization of the protein even after exposure to camptothecin (CPT), which typically induces DNA damages that require HR to be repaired. However, cells expressing mutated XR3/S protein are sensitive to CPT, thus highlighting a defect of the mutant protein in HR. In marked contrast to CPT treatment, oxidative stress induces relocalization at the chromatin fraction of both wild-type and mutated protein, even though survival is not affected. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the DNA repair protein hXRCC3 is a target of ROS induced by environmental factors and raise the possibility that the redox environment might participate in regulating the HR pathway. PMID:24116071

  18. Continuum capture in the three-body problem

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I A

    1980-01-01

    The three-body problem, especially the problem of electron capture to the continuum in heavy particle collisions is reviewed. Major topics covered include: second born-induced asymmetry in electron capture to the continuum; historical context, links to other tests of atomic scattering theory; experiments characterizing the velocity distribution of ECC electrons; other atomic physics tests of high velocity Born expansions; atom capture; capture by positrons; and pion capture to the continuum. (GHT)

  19. Cellular manufacturing for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Jonathan; Klassen, Henry; Bauer, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Rapid progress has been made in the development of novel cell-based approaches for the potential treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. As a result, one must consider carefully the conditions under which these therapeutics are manufactured if they are to be used in clinical studies or, ultimately, be approved as licensed cellular therapeutics. Here, we describe the principles behind the manufacturing of clinical-grade cellular products, as well as potential methods for large-scale expansion and processing according to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) standards sets by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Standards for personnel, materials, procedures, and facilities required for such manufacturing processes are reviewed. We also discuss current and future scale-up methods for the manufacturing of large doses of cellular therapeutics under GMP conditions and compare the use of conventional culture methods such as tissue culture flasks and multi-layered cell factories with novel systems such as closed system hollow-fiber bioreactors. Incorporation of these novel bioreactor systems into GMP facilities may enable us to provide adequate cell numbers for multi-center clinical trials and paves the way for development of cellular therapeutics with the potential to treat very large numbers of patients.

  20. Continuum and line emission in Cygnus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, Alan; Ridgway, Susan E.; Lilly, Simon J.

    1994-08-01

    We present the results from (1) imaging observations of Cygnus A in five essentially line-free continuum bands with central wavelengths ranging from 0.34 to 2.1 microns. (2) imaging observations in five narrowband filters centered on the emission lines H beta(O III) lambda5007, H alpha(N II) lambda6583, and (S II) lambda lambda6716, 6731, and (3) deep spectroscopy covering the entire central region of Cyg A. We confirm that the featureless spectrum component is to be identified with the prominent double morphology at the center of Cyg A, but uncertainties in the distribution of the dust in this region tend to limit the accuracy with which we can determine its morphology and spectral-energy distribution (SED). From regions that appear to be least affected by obscuration, we find fv is approximately v-0.1 for this component. This SED could be consistent with free-free emission, a population of young stars, or a quasar continuum scattered by electrons, but probably not with a quasar continuum scattered by dust, which would be bluer. Our spectroscopy places an upper limit on the equivalent width of broad H beta that is well below that of typical quasars, showing that this flat-spectrum component (FSC) is almost certainly not dominated by scattered quasar radiation. Appeals to scattering by hot electrons to smear the scattered broad lines into invisibility appear to fail because the large density scale height of the electrons and the inefficiency of electron scattering should result in smoother and more extensive structure than we observe. Although the relative SED is consistent with free-free emission, the required amount of hot gas violates other observational constraints. At high angular resolution, the apparent morphology of the FSC is spiral-like. Although this impression may be partly due to obscuration, the distribution of the dust itself only serves to reinforce the spiral-like nature of the material with which it is associated. We conclude that the FSC is most

  1. Hijacking cellular garbage cans.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Sonja; Locker, Jacomine Krijnse

    2010-06-25

    Viruses are perfect opportunists that have evolved to modify numerous cellular processes in order to complete their replication cycle in the host cell. An article by Reggiori and coworkers in this issue of Cell Host & Microbe reveals how coronaviruses can divert a cellular quality control pathway that normally functions in degradation of mis-folded proteins to replicate the viral genome. PMID:20542246

  2. Significance of decay mechanism into continuum in dynamical Wannier-Stark ladder

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, Yuya; Maeshima, Nobuya; Hino, Ken-ichi

    2013-12-04

    We examine the resonance structure of photodressed electron states of laser-driven Wannier-Stark ladder, namely, dynamic Wannier-Stark ladder, in terms of the excess density of states (DOS) closely related to a lifetime of the state of concern. It is revealed that the resonance structure in the strong laser-field region shows clear dependence on the ratio, η, of a Bloch-frequency to a laser frequency. As the laser strength increases, for η = 1, the excess DOS becomes involved with a lot of newly-growing resonance peaks. This result would be understood from the viewpoint of a Fano-like decay-mechanism caused by a multichannel continuum effect, in marked contrast to the cases of larger η’s; for η = 3, the excess DOS just is found to show a pronounced red-shift of a single dominant peak caused by a single-channel continuum effect.

  3. Broadly continuously tunable slot waveguide quantum cascade lasers based on a continuum-to-continuum active region design

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Bo; Zeng, Yong Quan; Liang, Guozhen; Hu, Xiao Nan; Rodriguez, Etienne; Wang, Qi Jie

    2015-09-14

    We report our progress in the development of broadly tunable single-mode slot waveguide quantum cascade lasers based on a continuum-to-continuum active region design. The electroluminescence spectrum of the continuum-to-continuum active region design has a full width at half maximum of 440 cm{sup −1} at center wavelength ∼10 μm at room temperature (300 K). Devices using the optimized slot waveguide structure and the continuum-to-continuum design can be tuned continuously with a lasing emission over 42 cm{sup −1}, from 9.74 to 10.16 μm, at room temperature by using only current tuning scheme, together with a side mode suppression ratio of above 15 dB within the whole tuning range.

  4. The hurricane-flood-landslide continuum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Negri, A.J.; Burkardt, N.; Golden, J.H.; Halverson, J.B.; Huffman, G.J.; Larsen, M.C.; McGinley, J.A.; Updike, R.G.; Verdin, J.P.; Wieczorek, G.F.

    2005-01-01

    In August 2004, representatives from NOAA, NASA, the US Geological Survey (USGS), as well as other government agencies and academic institutions convened in San Juan, Puerto Rico, at a workshop to discuss a proposed research project called the Hurricane-Flood-Landslide Continuum (HFLC). The purpose of the HFLC is to develop and integrate the multidisciplinary tools needed to issue regional guidance products for floods and landslide associated with major tropical rain systems with sufficient lead time that local emergency managers can notify vulnerable populations and protect infrastructure. The workshop sought to initiate discussion among these agencies about their highly complementary capabilities, and to establish a framework to leverage the strengths of each agency. Once a prototype system is developed, it could be adapted for use in regions that have a high frequency of tropical disturbances.

  5. Continuum dynamics of elastocapillary coalescence and arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Z.; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-04-01

    The surface-tension-driven coalescence of wet hair, nano-pillars and supported lamellae immersed in an evaporating liquid is eventually arrested elastically. To characterize this at a continuum level, we start from a discrete microscopic model of the process and derive a mesoscopic theory that couples the inhomogeneous dynamics of drying to the capillary forcing and elastic bending of the lamellae. Numerical simulations of the resulting partial differential equation capture the primary unstable mode seen in experiments, and the dynamic coalescence of the lamellae into dimers and quadrimers. Our theory also predicts the elastic arrest of the pattern or the separation of lamellar bundles into their constituents as a function of the amount of liquid left at the end of the process.

  6. Continuum mechanics, stresses, currents and electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Segev, Reuven

    2016-04-28

    The Eulerian approach to continuum mechanics does not make use of a body manifold. Rather, all fields considered are defined on the space, or the space-time, manifolds. Sections of some vector bundle represent generalized velocities which need not be associated with the motion of material points. Using the theories of de Rham currents and generalized sections of vector bundles, we formulate a weak theory of forces and stresses represented by vector-valued currents. Considering generalized velocities represented by differential forms and interpreting such a form as a generalized potential field, we present a weak formulation of pre-metric, p-form electrodynamics as a natural example of the foregoing theory. Finally, it is shown that the assumptions leading to p-form electrodynamics may be replaced by the condition that the force functional is continuous with respect to the flat topology of forms.

  7. The evolution of the quasar continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, M.

    1992-01-01

    We now have in hand a large data base of Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT), optical, and IR complementary data. We are in the process of obtaining a large amount of the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) data for the same quasar sample. For our complementary sample at high redshifts, where the UV was redshifted into the optical, we have just had approved large amounts of observing time to cover the quasar continuum in the near-IR using the new Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) array spectrographs. Ten micron, optical, and VLA radio, data also have approved time. An ISO US key program was approved to extend this work into the far-IR, and the launch of ASTRO-D (early in 1993) promises to extend it to higher energy X-rays.

  8. Polymer quantum mechanics and its continuum limit

    SciTech Connect

    Corichi, Alejandro; Vukasinac, Tatjana; Zapata, Jose A.

    2007-08-15

    A rather nonstandard quantum representation of the canonical commutation relations of quantum mechanics systems, known as the polymer representation, has gained some attention in recent years, due to its possible relation with Planck scale physics. In particular, this approach has been followed in a symmetric sector of loop quantum gravity known as loop quantum cosmology. Here we explore different aspects of the relation between the ordinary Schroedinger theory and the polymer description. The paper has two parts. In the first one, we derive the polymer quantum mechanics starting from the ordinary Schroedinger theory and show that the polymer description arises as an appropriate limit. In the second part we consider the continuum limit of this theory, namely, the reverse process in which one starts from the discrete theory and tries to recover back the ordinary Schroedinger quantum mechanics. We consider several examples of interest, including the harmonic oscillator, the free particle, and a simple cosmological model.

  9. Developments and trends in continuum plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Richard

    2002-05-01

    Multiscale modeling applied to meso and macro scale continuum calculations is a broad field with a long history. It encompasses hardening relations based on dislocation density, porosity related ductile failure models, crystal plasticity, composite media and numerous other general topics dating back more than half a century. There are also a myriad of more recent activities that can be grouped under this subject heading. Emphasis will be placed on efforts described at the Bodega Bay workshop aimed at bridging length scales rather than focusing on model developments at any particular length scale. Also, areas will be highlighted where additional connections should be possible with available tools; methods exist but need to be exercised; and critical experiments are needed for validation.

  10. Continuum mechanics, stresses, currents and electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Segev, Reuven

    2016-04-28

    The Eulerian approach to continuum mechanics does not make use of a body manifold. Rather, all fields considered are defined on the space, or the space-time, manifolds. Sections of some vector bundle represent generalized velocities which need not be associated with the motion of material points. Using the theories of de Rham currents and generalized sections of vector bundles, we formulate a weak theory of forces and stresses represented by vector-valued currents. Considering generalized velocities represented by differential forms and interpreting such a form as a generalized potential field, we present a weak formulation of pre-metric, p-form electrodynamics as a natural example of the foregoing theory. Finally, it is shown that the assumptions leading to p-form electrodynamics may be replaced by the condition that the force functional is continuous with respect to the flat topology of forms. PMID:27002071

  11. A Threshold Continuum for Aeolian Sand Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, C.; Ewing, R. C.; Sherman, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport marks the initial entrainment of sand particles by the force of the wind. This is typically defined and modeled as a singular wind speed for a given grain size and is based on field and laboratory experimental data. However, the definition of threshold varies significantly between these empirical models, largely because the definition is based on visual-observations of initial grain movement. For example, in his seminal experiments, Bagnold defined threshold of motion when he observed that 100% of the bed was in motion. Others have used 50% and lesser values. Differences in threshold models, in turn, result is large errors in predicting the fluxes associated with sand and dust transport. Here we use a wind tunnel and novel sediment trap to capture the fractions of sand in creep, reptation and saltation at Earth and Mars pressures and show that the threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport is best defined as a continuum in which grains progress through stages defined by the proportion of grains in creep and saltation. We propose the use of scale dependent thresholds modeled by distinct probability distribution functions that differentiate the threshold based on micro to macro scale applications. For example, a geologic timescale application corresponds to a threshold when 100% of the bed in motion whereas a sub-second application corresponds to a threshold when a single particle is set in motion. We provide quantitative measurements (number and mode of particle movement) corresponding to visual observations, percent of bed in motion and degrees of transport intermittency for Earth and Mars. Understanding transport as a continuum provides a basis for revaluating sand transport thresholds on Earth, Mars and Titan.

  12. In vivo monitoring of cellular energy metabolism using SoNar, a highly responsive sensor for NAD(+)/NADH redox state.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuzheng; Wang, Aoxue; Zou, Yejun; Su, Ni; Loscalzo, Joseph; Yang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    NADH and its oxidized form NAD(+) have a central role in energy metabolism, and their concentrations are often considered to be among the most important readouts of metabolic state. Here, we present a detailed protocol to image and monitor NAD(+)/NADH redox state in living cells and in vivo using a highly responsive, genetically encoded fluorescent sensor known as SoNar (sensor of NAD(H) redox). The chimeric SoNar protein was initially developed by inserting circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein (cpYFP) into the NADH-binding domain of Rex protein from Thermus aquaticus (T-Rex). It functions by binding to either NAD(+) or NADH, thus inducing protein conformational changes that affect its fluorescent properties. We first describe steps for how to establish SoNar-expressing cells, and then discuss how to use the system to quantify the intracellular redox state. This approach is sensitive, accurate, simple and able to report subtle perturbations of various pathways of energy metabolism in real time. We also detail the application of SoNar to high-throughput chemical screening of candidate compounds targeting cell metabolism in a microplate-reader-based assay, along with in vivo fluorescence imaging of tumor xenografts expressing SoNar in mice. Typically, the approximate time frame for fluorescence imaging of SoNar is 30 min for living cells and 60 min for living mice. For high-throughput chemical screening in a 384-well-plate assay, the whole procedure generally takes no longer than 60 min to assess the effects of 380 compounds on cell metabolism. PMID:27362337

  13. In vivo monitoring of cellular energy metabolism using SoNar, a highly responsive sensor for NAD(+)/NADH redox state.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuzheng; Wang, Aoxue; Zou, Yejun; Su, Ni; Loscalzo, Joseph; Yang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    NADH and its oxidized form NAD(+) have a central role in energy metabolism, and their concentrations are often considered to be among the most important readouts of metabolic state. Here, we present a detailed protocol to image and monitor NAD(+)/NADH redox state in living cells and in vivo using a highly responsive, genetically encoded fluorescent sensor known as SoNar (sensor of NAD(H) redox). The chimeric SoNar protein was initially developed by inserting circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein (cpYFP) into the NADH-binding domain of Rex protein from Thermus aquaticus (T-Rex). It functions by binding to either NAD(+) or NADH, thus inducing protein conformational changes that affect its fluorescent properties. We first describe steps for how to establish SoNar-expressing cells, and then discuss how to use the system to quantify the intracellular redox state. This approach is sensitive, accurate, simple and able to report subtle perturbations of various pathways of energy metabolism in real time. We also detail the application of SoNar to high-throughput chemical screening of candidate compounds targeting cell metabolism in a microplate-reader-based assay, along with in vivo fluorescence imaging of tumor xenografts expressing SoNar in mice. Typically, the approximate time frame for fluorescence imaging of SoNar is 30 min for living cells and 60 min for living mice. For high-throughput chemical screening in a 384-well-plate assay, the whole procedure generally takes no longer than 60 min to assess the effects of 380 compounds on cell metabolism.

  14. Continuum beliefs about psychotic symptoms are a valid, unidimensional construct: Construction and validation of a revised continuum beliefs questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Schlier, Björn; Scheunemann, Jakob; Lincoln, Tania M

    2016-07-30

    Growing evidence supports a continuum model of psychosis, with mild psychotic symptoms being frequently experienced by the general population. Moreover, believing in the continuum model correlates with less stigmatization of schizophrenia. This study explores whether continuum beliefs are a valid construct and develops a continuum beliefs scale. First, expert-generated items were reduced to a candidate scale (study 1, n=95). One-dimensionality was tested using confirmatory factor analysis (study 2, n=363). Convergent validity was tested with a previous continuum beliefs scale, essentialist beliefs, and stigmatization (study 2), while self-reported psychotic experiences (i.e. frequency and conviction) served to test discriminant validity (study 3, n=229). A nine item questionnaire that assesses continuum beliefs about schizophrenia symptoms showed acceptable to good psychometric values, high correlations with a previous continuum beliefs scale and small correlations with essentialist beliefs, stereotypes, and desired social distance. No correlations with psychotic experiences were found. Thus, continuum beliefs can be considered a valid construct. The construed CBQ-R asks about symptoms rather than the abstract category "schizophrenia", which may increase understandability of the scale. Validation confirms previous studies and highlights the difference between continuum beliefs and personal psychotic experiences. PMID:27175910

  15. State-of-the-art on basic and applied stem cell therapy; Stem Cell Research Italy-International Society for Cellular Therapy Europe, Joint Meeting, Montesilvano (PE)-Italy, June 10-12, 2011.

    PubMed

    Siniscalco, Dario; Pandolfi, Assunta; Galderisi, Umberto

    2012-03-20

    Over 160 stem cell-based therapeutic products are undergoing development for the treatment of several diseases, ranging from cardiac and artery diseases to immune and neurodegenerative pathologies, including diabetes, spinal cord injury. Therefore, stem cell therapy plays a key role for developing new cell-based drugs for the future molecular and regenerative medicine. The second meeting organized by Stem Cell Research Italy (SCR Italy) and by the International Society for Cellular Therapy-Europe (ISCT) in Montesilvano/Città S. Angelo (Pescara)-Italy, on June 10th-12th, 2011, focused on the state-of-the-art of stem cell therapy and associated novel findings on stem cell research ( www.stemcellitaly.org ).

  16. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  17. A geohydrologic continuum theory for the spatial and temporal evolution of marsh-estuarine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dame, R.; Childers, D.; Koepfler, E.

    Using ecosystem development theory and the River Continuum Concept as starting points, we present a new holistic theory to explain the spatial and temporal behaviour of marsh-estuarine ecosystems Along the marine-estuarine-freshwater gradient in response to sea-level rise. In this theory, a geohydrologic continuum represented by tidal channel provides a predictable physical model of how the marsh-estuarine ecosystem adapts until there is a change of state. North Inlet, South Carolina is used as an example of this marsh-estuarine continuum. Mature creeks are at the ocean-estuary interface and are strongly influenced by marine factors. Further into the estuary, less and less mature creeks are encountered which are dominated by smaller scale spatial and temporal controls such as oyster reefs. Immature or ephemeral creeks import both particulate and dissolved materials, while mature creeks export both forms of nutrients. Mid-aged creeks appear to take up particulate materials and release dissolved constituents. Ultimately, the continuum reaches the fresh-saltwater interface where a very young estuarine ecosystem invades a more mature type, under the influence of disturbance. Our new explanation satisfies most criteria for a good theory by being internally consistent to the location specified, generating testable hypothesis, not blindly adapting existing theories, agreeing with known properties of the ecosystem described and by generating new invigorating discussion within the scientific community.

  18. Dissipation consistent fabric tensor definition from DEM to continuum for granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. S.; Dafalias, Y. F.

    2015-05-01

    In elastoplastic soil models aimed at capturing the impact of fabric anisotropy, a necessary ingredient is a measure of anisotropic fabric in the form of an evolving tensor. While it is possible to formulate such a fabric tensor based on indirect phenomenological observations at the continuum level, it is more effective and insightful to have the tensor defined first based on direct particle level microstructural observations and subsequently deduce a corresponding continuum definition. A practical means able to provide such observations, at least in the context of fabric evolution mechanisms, is the discrete element method (DEM). Some DEM defined fabric tensors such as the one based on the statistics of interparticle contact normals have already gained widespread acceptance as a quantitative measure of fabric anisotropy among researchers of granular material behavior. On the other hand, a fabric tensor in continuum elastoplastic modeling has been treated as a tensor-valued internal variable whose evolution must be properly linked to physical dissipation. Accordingly, the adaptation of a DEM fabric tensor definition to a continuum constitutive modeling theory must be thermodynamically consistent in regards to dissipation mechanisms. The present paper addresses this issue in detail, brings up possible pitfalls if such consistency is violated and proposes remedies and guidelines for such adaptation within a recently developed Anisotropic Critical State Theory (ACST) for granular materials.

  19. Continuum Thinking and the Contexts of Personal Information Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huvila, Isto; Eriksen, Jon; Häusner, Eva-Maria; Jansson, Ina-Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Recent personal information management literature has underlined the significance of the contextuality of personal information and its use. The present article discusses the applicability of the records continuum model and its generalisation, continuum thinking, as a theoretical framework for explicating the overlap and evolution of…

  20. PATHWAYS: A Continuum of Reading and Writing Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, Ollie M.

    Developed for use with the PATHWAYS ABE (Adult Basic Education) and Pre-GED (General Educational Development) Curriculum, a scope and sequence of reading and writing skills, or continuum, was designed with tasks of both educator and Indian Adult learner in mind. The continuum introduces individual skills at students' entry proficiency levels and…

  1. Teaching Continuum Mechanics in a Mechanical Engineering Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yucheng

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a graduate course, continuum mechanics, which is designed for and taught to graduate students in a Mechanical Engineering (ME) program. The significance of continuum mechanics in engineering education is demonstrated and the course structure is described. Methods used in teaching this course such as topics, class…

  2. Curriculum Building for the Continuum in Social Welfare Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Michael J., Ed.; And Others

    During 1970 Florida's University and Community College Systems held a workshop to discuss the idea of a curriculum continuum that would begin at the community college level and extend through the upper levels of graduate work. It was acknowledged that any continuum involving more than 1 level of education should include flexible opportunities for…

  3. Continuum of Counseling Goals: A Framework for Differentiating Counseling Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Paul

    1984-01-01

    Presents counseling goals in a developmental continuum similar in concept to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Discusses ego development goals, socialization goals, developmental goals, self-esteem goals, and self-realization goals and describes characteristics and implications of the continuum. (JAC)

  4. A Behavioral Continuum: A Look at Personality Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, George; Kirk, Nancy A.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests that narcissistic, borderline, and antisocial personality disorders are not discrete diagnostic categories, but that they lie along a continuum and have in common the dimensions of degree of self-centeredness and degree of differentiation. Presents evidence supporting existence of continuum of behavior rather than discrete diagnostic…

  5. Detection of nonthermal continuum radiation in Saturn's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kuth, W.S.; Scarf, F.L.; Sullivan, J.D.; Gurnett, D.A.

    1982-08-01

    A detailed analysis of high resolution wideband data from the Voyager 1 and 2 plasma wave receivers has revealed the presence of heretofore undiscovered nonthermal continuum radiation trapped within the Saturnian magnetosphere. The discovery of Saturnian trapped continuum radiation fills a disturbing void in the Saturnian radio spectrum. On the basis of observations at both the Earth and Jupiter it was expected that continuum radiation should be a pervasive signature of planetary magnetospheres in general. Special processing of the Voyager 1 plasma wave data at Saturn has now confirmed the existence of weak emissions that have a spectrum characteristic of trapped continuum radiation. Similar radiation was also detected by Voyager 2; however, in this case it is not certain that Saturn was the only source. Considerable evidence exists which suggests that Saturn may have been immersed in the Jovian tail during the Voyager 2 encounter, so that Jupiter may provide an additional source of the continuum radiation detected by Voyager 2.

  6. An Optimization-based Atomistic-to-Continuum Coupling Method

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Derek; Bochev, Pavel B.; Luskin, Mitchell; Shapeev, Alexander V.

    2014-08-21

    In this paper, we present a new optimization-based method for atomistic-to-continuum (AtC) coupling. The main idea is to cast the latter as a constrained optimization problem with virtual Dirichlet controls on the interfaces between the atomistic and continuum subdomains. The optimization objective is to minimize the error between the atomistic and continuum solutions on the overlap between the two subdomains, while the atomistic and continuum force balance equations provide the constraints. Separation, rather then blending of the atomistic and continuum problems, and their subsequent use as constraints in the optimization problem distinguishes our approach from the existing AtC formulations. Finally, we present and analyze the method in the context of a one-dimensional chain of atoms modeled using a linearized two-body potential with next-nearest neighbor interactions.

  7. An Optimization-based Atomistic-to-Continuum Coupling Method

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Derek; Bochev, Pavel B.; Luskin, Mitchell; Shapeev, Alexander V.

    2014-08-21

    In this paper, we present a new optimization-based method for atomistic-to-continuum (AtC) coupling. The main idea is to cast the latter as a constrained optimization problem with virtual Dirichlet controls on the interfaces between the atomistic and continuum subdomains. The optimization objective is to minimize the error between the atomistic and continuum solutions on the overlap between the two subdomains, while the atomistic and continuum force balance equations provide the constraints. Separation, rather then blending of the atomistic and continuum problems, and their subsequent use as constraints in the optimization problem distinguishes our approach from the existing AtC formulations. Finally,more » we present and analyze the method in the context of a one-dimensional chain of atoms modeled using a linearized two-body potential with next-nearest neighbor interactions.« less

  8. Altering the Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Synthesis (mtFASII) Pathway Modulates Cellular Metabolic States and Bioactive Lipid Profiles as Revealed by Metabolomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Hayley B.; Parl, Angelika K.; Mitchell, Sabrina L.; Singh, Larry; Bell, Lauren N.; Murdock, Deborah G.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the presence of a cytosolic fatty acid synthesis pathway, mitochondria have retained their own means of creating fatty acids via the mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (mtFASII) pathway. The reason for its conservation has not yet been elucidated. Therefore, to better understand the role of mtFASII in the cell, we used thin layer chromatography to characterize the contribution of the mtFASII pathway to the fatty acid composition of selected mitochondrial lipids. Next, we performed metabolomic analysis on HeLa cells in which the mtFASII pathway was either hypofunctional (through knockdown of mitochondrial acyl carrier protein, ACP) or hyperfunctional (through overexpression of mitochondrial enoyl-CoA reductase, MECR). Our results indicate that the mtFASII pathway contributes little to the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial lipid species examined. Additionally, loss of mtFASII function results in changes in biochemical pathways suggesting alterations in glucose utilization and redox state. Interestingly, levels of bioactive lipids, including lysophospholipids and sphingolipids, directly correlate with mtFASII function, indicating that mtFASII may be involved in the regulation of bioactive lipid levels. Regulation of bioactive lipid levels by mtFASII implicates the pathway as a mediator of intracellular signaling. PMID:26963735

  9. Nanostructured cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, P; Taylor, M D R; Brust, M

    2002-12-01

    Au nanocrystals spin-coated onto silicon from toluene form cellular networks. A quantitative statistical crystallography analysis shows that intercellular correlations drive the networks far from statistical equilibrium. Spin-coating from hexane does not produce cellular structure, yet a strong correlation is retained in the positions of nanocrystal aggregates. Mechanisms based on Marangoni convection alone cannot account for the variety of patterns observed, and we argue that spinodal decomposition plays an important role in foam formation.

  10. Continuum and molecular-dynamics simulation of nanodroplet collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardia, Raunak; Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2016-05-01

    The extent to which the continuum treatment holds in binary droplet collisions is examined in the present work by using a continuum-based implicit surface capturing strategy (volume-of-fluid coupled to Navier-Stokes) and a molecular dynamics methodology. The droplet pairs are arranged in a head-on-collision configuration with an initial separation distance of 5.3 nm and a velocity of 3 ms-1. The size of droplets ranges from 10-50 nm. Inspecting the results, the collision process can be described as consisting of two periods: a preimpact phase that ends with the initial contact of both droplets, and a postimpact phase characterized by the merging, deformation, and coalescence of the droplets. The largest difference between the continuum and molecular dynamics (MD) predictions is observed in the preimpact period, where the continuum-based viscous and pressure drag forces significantly overestimate the MD predictions. Due to large value of Knudsen number in the gas (Kngas=1.972 ), this behavior is expected. Besides the differences between continuum and MD, it is also observed that the continuum simulations do not converge for the set of grid sizes considered. This is shown to be directly related to the initial velocity profile and the minute size of the nanodroplets. For instance, for micrometer-size droplets, this numerical sensitivity is not an issue. During the postimpact period, both MD and continuum-based simulations are strikingly similar, with only a moderate difference in the peak kinetic energy recorded during the collision process. With values for the Knudsen number in the liquid (Knliquid=0.01 for D =36 nm ) much closer to the continuum regime, this behavior is expected. The 50 nm droplet case is sufficiently large to be predicted reasonably well with the continuum treatment. However, for droplets smaller than approximately 36 nm, the departure from continuum behavior becomes noticeably pronounced, and becomes drastically different for the 10 nm droplets.

  11. MIRO Continuum Calibration for Asteroid Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon

    2011-01-01

    MIRO (Microwave Instrument for the Rosetta Orbiter) is a lightweight, uncooled, dual-frequency heterodyne radiometer. The MIRO encountered asteroid Steins in 2008, and during the flyby, MIRO used the Asteroid Mode to measure the emission spectrum of Steins. The Asteroid Mode is one of the seven modes of the MIRO operation, and is designed to increase the length of time that a spectral line is in the MIRO pass-band during a flyby of an object. This software is used to calibrate the continuum measurement of Steins emission power during the asteroid flyby. The MIRO raw measurement data need to be calibrated in order to obtain physically meaningful data. This software calibrates the MIRO raw measurements in digital units to the brightness temperature in Kelvin. The software uses two calibration sequences that are included in the Asteroid Mode. One sequence is at the beginning of the mode, and the other at the end. The first six frames contain the measurement of a cold calibration target, while the last six frames measure a warm calibration target. The targets have known temperatures and are used to provide reference power and gain, which can be used to convert MIRO measurements into brightness temperature. The software was developed to calibrate MIRO continuum measurements from Asteroid Mode. The software determines the relationship between the raw digital unit measured by MIRO and the equivalent brightness temperature by analyzing data from calibration frames. The found relationship is applied to non-calibration frames, which are the measurements of an object of interest such as asteroids and other planetary objects that MIRO encounters during its operation. This software characterizes the gain fluctuations statistically and determines which method to estimate gain between calibration frames. For example, if the fluctuation is lower than a statistically significant level, the averaging method is used to estimate the gain between the calibration frames. If the

  12. Continuum Thermodynamics - Part II: Applications and Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Bettina; Wilmanski, Krzysztof

    The intention by writing Part II of the book on continuum thermodynamics was the deepening of some issues covered in Part I as well as a development of certain skills in dealing with practical problems of oscopic processes. However, the main motivation for this part is the presentation of main facets of thermodynamics which appear when interdisciplinary problems are considered. There are many monographs on the subjects of solid mechanics and thermomechanics, on fluid mechanics and on coupled fields but most of them cover only special problems in great details which are characteristic for the chosen field. It is rather seldom that relations between these fields are discussed. This concerns, for instance, large deformations of the skeleton of porous materials with diffusion (e.g. lungs), couplings of deformable particles with the fluid motion in suspensions, couplings of adsorption processes and chemical reactions in immiscible mixtures with diffusion, various multi-component aspects of the motion, e.g. of avalanches, such as segregation processes, etc...

  13. A continuum model of retinal electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joarder, Saiful A.; Abramian, Miganoosh; Suaning, Gregg J.; Lovell, Nigel H.; Dokos, Socrates

    2011-10-01

    A continuum mathematical model of retinal electrical stimulation is described. The model is represented by a passive vitreous domain, a thin layer of active retinal ganglion cell (RGC) tissue adjacent to deeper passive neural layers of the retina, the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and choroid thus ending at the sclera. To validate the model, in vitro epiretinal responses to stimuli from 50 µm disk electrodes, arranged in a hexagonal mosaic, were recorded from rabbit retinas. 100 µs/phase anodic-first biphasic current pulses were delivered to the retinal surface in both the mathematical model and experiments. RGC responses were simulated and recorded using extracellular microelectrodes. The model's epiretinal thresholds compared favorably with the in vitro data. In addition, simulations showed that single-return bipolar electrodes recruited a larger area of the retina than twin-return or six-return electrodes arranged in a hexagonal layout in which a central stimulating electrode is surrounded by six, eqi-spaced returns. Simulations were also undertaken to investigate the patterns of RGC activation in an anatomically-accurate model of the retina, as well as RGC activation patterns for subretinal and suprachoroidal bipolar stimulation. This paper was originally submitted for the special issue containing contributions from the Sixth Biennial Research Congress of The Eye and the Chip.

  14. Compact continuum brain model for human electroencephalogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. W.; Shin, H.-B.; Robinson, P. A.

    2007-12-01

    A low-dimensional, compact brain model has recently been developed based on physiologically based mean-field continuum formulation of electric activity of the brain. The essential feature of the new compact model is a second order time-delayed differential equation that has physiologically plausible terms, such as rapid corticocortical feedback and delayed feedback via extracortical pathways. Due to its compact form, the model facilitates insight into complex brain dynamics via standard linear and nonlinear techniques. The model successfully reproduces many features of previous models and experiments. For example, experimentally observed typical rhythms of electroencephalogram (EEG) signals are reproduced in a physiologically plausible parameter region. In the nonlinear regime, onsets of seizures, which often develop into limit cycles, are illustrated by modulating model parameters. It is also shown that a hysteresis can occur when the system has multiple attractors. As a further illustration of this approach, power spectra of the model are fitted to those of sleep EEGs of two subjects (one with apnea, the other with narcolepsy). The model parameters obtained from the fittings show good matches with previous literature. Our results suggest that the compact model can provide a theoretical basis for analyzing complex EEG signals.

  15. Continuum regularization of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Z.

    1986-04-01

    Possible nonperturbative continuum regularization schemes for quantum field theory are discussed which are based upon the Langevin equation of Parisi and Wu. Breit, Gupta and Zaks made the first proposal for new gauge invariant nonperturbative regularization. The scheme is based on smearing in the ''fifth-time'' of the Langevin equation. An analysis of their stochastic regularization scheme for the case of scalar electrodynamics with the standard covariant gauge fixing is given. Their scheme is shown to preserve the masslessness of the photon and the tensor structure of the photon vacuum polarization at the one-loop level. Although stochastic regularization is viable in one-loop electrodynamics, two difficulties arise which, in general, ruins the scheme. One problem is that the superficial quadratic divergences force a bottomless action for the noise. Another difficulty is that stochastic regularization by fifth-time smearing is incompatible with Zwanziger's gauge fixing, which is the only known nonperturbaive covariant gauge fixing for nonabelian gauge theories. Finally, a successful covariant derivative scheme is discussed which avoids the difficulties encountered with the earlier stochastic regularization by fifth-time smearing. For QCD the regularized formulation is manifestly Lorentz invariant, gauge invariant, ghost free and finite to all orders. A vanishing gluon mass is explicitly verified at one loop. The method is designed to respect relevant symmetries, and is expected to provide suitable regularization for any theory of interest. Hopefully, the scheme will lend itself to nonperturbative analysis. 44 refs., 16 figs.

  16. Continuum percolation of congruent overlapping spherocylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenxiang; Su, Xianglong; Jiao, Yang

    2016-09-01

    Continuum percolation of randomly orientated congruent overlapping spherocylinders (composed of cylinder of height H with semispheres of diameter D at the ends) with aspect ratio α =H /D in [0 ,∞ ) is studied. The percolation threshold ϕc, percolation transition width Δ, and correlation-length critical exponent ν for spherocylinders with α in [0, 200] are determined with a high degree of accuracy via extensive finite-size scaling analysis. A generalized excluded-volume approximation for percolation threshold with an exponent explicitly depending on both aspect ratio and excluded volume for arbitrary α values in [0 ,∞ ) is proposed and shown to yield accurate predictions of ϕc for an extremely wide range of α in [0, 2000] based on available numerical and experimental data. We find ϕc is a universal monotonic decreasing function of α and is independent of the effective particle size. Our study has implications in percolation theory for nonspherical particles and composite material design.

  17. Second law violations, continuum mechanics, and permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The violations of the second law are relevant as the length and/or time scales become very small. The second law then needs to be replaced by the fluctuation theorem and mathematically, the irreversible entropy is a submartingale. First, we discuss the consequences of these results for the axioms of continuum mechanics, arguing in favor of a framework relying on stochastic functionals of energy and entropy. We next determine a Lyapunov function for diffusion-type problems governed by stochastic rather than deterministic functionals of internal energy and entropy, where the random field coefficients of diffusion are not required to satisfy the positive definiteness everywhere. Next, a formulation of micropolar fluid mechanics is developed, accounting for the lack of symmetry of stress tensor on molecular scales. This framework is then applied to employed to show that spontaneous random fluctuations of the microrotation field will arise in Couette—and Poiseuille-type flows in the absence of random (turbulence-like) fluctuations of the classical velocity field. Finally, while the permeability is classically modeled by the Darcy law or its modifications, besides considering the violations of the second law, one also needs to account for the spatial randomness of the channel network, implying a modification of the hierarchy of scale-dependent bounds on the macroscopic property of the network.

  18. Radio continuum properties of young planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerrigone, L.; Umana, G.; Trigilio, C.; Leto, P.; Buemi, C. S.; Hora, J. L.

    2008-10-01

    We have selected a small sample of post-AGB (Asymptotic Giant Branch) stars in transition towards the planetary nebula and present new Very Large Array multi-frequency high-angular resolution radio observations of them. The multi-frequency data are used to create and model the targets' radio continuum spectra, proving that these stars started their evolution as very young planetary nebulae. In the optically thin range, the slopes are compatible with the expected spectral index (-0.1). Two targets (IRAS 18062+2410 and 17423-1755) seem to be optically thick even at high frequency, as observed in a handful of other post-AGB stars in the literature, while a third one (IRAS 20462+3416) shows a possible contribution from cold dust. In IRAS 18062+2410, where we have three observations spanning a period of four years, we detect an increase in its flux density, similar to that observed in CRL 618. High-angular resolution imaging shows bipolar structures that may be due to circumstellar tori, although a different hypothesis (i.e. jets) could also explain the observations. Further observations and monitoring of these sources will enable us to test the current evolutionary models of planetary nebulae.

  19. Continuum Edge Gyrokinetic Theory and Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X Q; Xiong, Z; Dorr, M R; Hittinger, J A; Bodi, K; Candy, J; Cohen, B I; Cohen, R H; Colella, P; Kerbel, G D; Krasheninnikov, S; Nevins, W M; Qin, H; Rognlien, T D; Snyder, P B; Umansky, M V

    2007-01-09

    The following results are presented from the development and application of TEMPEST, a fully nonlinear (full-f) five dimensional (3d2v) gyrokinetic continuum edge-plasma code. (1) As a test of the interaction of collisions and parallel streaming, TEMPEST is compared with published analytic and numerical results for endloss of particles confined by combined electrostatic and magnetic wells. Good agreement is found over a wide range of collisionality, confining potential, and mirror ratio; and the required velocity space resolution is modest. (2) In a large-aspect-ratio circular geometry, excellent agreement is found for a neoclassical equilibrium with parallel ion flow in the banana regime with zero temperature gradient and radial electric field. (3) The four-dimensional (2d2v) version of the code produces the first self-consistent simulation results of collisionless damping of geodesic acoustic modes and zonal flow (Rosenbluth-Hinton residual) with Boltzmann electrons using a full-f code. The electric field is also found to agree with the standard neoclassical expression for steep density and ion temperature gradients in the banana regime. In divertor geometry, it is found that the endloss of particles and energy induces parallel flow stronger than the core neoclassical predictions in the SOL. (5) Our 5D gyrokinetic formulation yields a set of nonlinear electrostatic gyrokinetic equations that are for both neoclassical and turbulence simulations.

  20. Edge gyrokinetic theory and continuum simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. Q.; Xiong, Z.; Dorr, M. R.; Hittinger, J. A.; Bodi, K.; Candy, J.; Cohen, B. I.; Cohen, R. H.; Colella, P.; Kerbel, G. D.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Nevins, W. M.; Qin, H.; Rognlien, T. D.; Snyder, P. B.; Umansky, M. V.

    2007-08-01

    The following results are presented from the development and application of TEMPEST, a fully nonlinear (full-f) five-dimensional (3d2v) gyrokinetic continuum edge-plasma code. (1) As a test of the interaction of collisions and parallel streaming, TEMPEST is compared with published analytic and numerical results for endloss of particles confined by combined electrostatic and magnetic wells. Good agreement is found over a wide range of collisionality, confining potential and mirror ratio, and the required velocity space resolution is modest. (2) In a large-aspect-ratio circular geometry, excellent agreement is found for a neoclassical equilibrium with parallel ion flow in the banana regime with zero temperature gradient and radial electric field. (3) The four-dimensional (2d2v) version of the code produces the first self-consistent simulation results of collisionless damping of geodesic acoustic modes and zonal flow (Rosenbluth-Hinton residual) with Boltzmann electrons using a full-f code. The electric field is also found to agree with the standard neoclassical expression for steep density and ion temperature gradients in the plateau regime. In divertor geometry, it is found that the endloss of particles and energy induces parallel flow stronger than the core neoclassical predictions in the SOL.

  1. Continuum elastic theory of adsorbate vibrational relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Steven P.; Pykhtin, M. V.; Mele, E. J.; Rappe, Andrew M.

    1998-01-01

    An analytical theory is presented for the damping of low-frequency adsorbate vibrations via resonant coupling to the substrate phonons. The system is treated classically, with the substrate modeled as a semi-infinite elastic continuum and the adsorbate overlayer modeled as an array of point masses connected to the surface by harmonic springs. The theory provides a simple expression for the relaxation rate in terms of fundamental parameters of the system: γ=mω¯02/AcρcT, where m is the adsorbate mass, ω¯0 is the measured frequency, Ac is the overlayer unit-cell area, and ρ and cT are the substrate mass density and transverse speed of sound, respectively. This expression is strongly coverage dependent, and predicts relaxation rates in excellent quantitative agreement with available experiments. For a half-monolayer of carbon monoxide on the copper (100) surface, the predicted damping rate of in-plane frustrated translations is 0.50×1012s-1, as compared to the experimental value of (0.43±0.07)×1012s-1. Furthermore it is shown that, for all coverages presently accessible to experiment, adsorbate motions exhibit collective effects which cannot be treated as stemming from isolated oscillators.

  2. Optical continuum generation on a silicon chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Bahram; Boyraz, Ozdal; Koonath, Prakash; Raghunathan, Varun; Indukuri, Tejaswi; Dimitropoulos, Dimitri

    2005-08-01

    Although the Raman effect is nearly two orders of magnitude stronger than the electronic Kerr nonlinearity in silicon, under pulsed operation regime where the pulse width is shorter than the phonon response time, Raman effect is suppressed and Kerr nonlinearity dominates. Continuum generation, made possible by the non-resonant Kerr nonlinearity, offers a technologically and economically appealing path to WDM communication at the inter-chip or intra-chip levels. We have studied this phenomenon experimentally and theoretically. Experimentally, a 2 fold spectral broadening is obtained by launching ~4ps optical pulses with 2.2GW/cm2 peak power into a conventional silicon waveguide. Theoretical calculations, that include the effect of two-photon-absorption, free carrier absorption and refractive index change indicate that up to >30 times spectral broadening is achievable in an optimized device. The broadening is due to self phase modulation and saturates due to two photon absorption. Additionally, we find that free carrier dynamics also contributes to the spectral broadening and cause the overall spectrum to be asymmetric with respect to the pump wavelength.

  3. Heterosexuality/homosexuality: dichotomy or continuum.

    PubMed

    McConaghy, N

    1987-10-01

    A recent reanalysis of Kinsey's data rejected his conclusion that heterosexuality and homosexuality were a continuum. A number of studies have been published over the past decade reporting that 5% or less of adolescents were aware of homosexual feelings, a finding also inconsistent with Kinsey's data. These studies have rejected prenatal hormones and rearing by homosexual parents as influencing sexual orientation. If Kinsey's data are correct and 40% or more of adolescents are aware of homosexual feeling the findings of these studies are invalid. Two replications of an initial study with representative samples of medical students found over 40% of both males and females currently aware of some homosexual feelings, consistent with Kinsey's conclusion. The ratio of reported homosexual to heterosexual feelings correlated with opposite sex-linked behaviors in the male, supporting the validity of the subjects' reports. If subjects representative of other subgroups of the population are investigated with this easily implemented method and report similar data, this theoretically and sociologically significant divergence of belief concerning the incidence of the heterosexual/homosexual balance would be resolved.

  4. Cellular Functions of Tissue Transglutaminase

    PubMed Central

    Nurminskaya, Maria V.; Belkin, Alexey M.

    2013-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2 or tissue transglutaminase) is a highly complex multifunctional protein that acts as transglutaminase, GTPase/ATPase, protein disulfide isomerase, and protein kinase. Moreover, TG2 has many well-documented nonenzymatic functions that are based on its noncovalent interactions with multiple cellular proteins. A vast array of biochemical activities of TG2 accounts for its involvement in a variety of cellular processes, including adhesion, migration, growth, survival, apoptosis, differentiation, and extracellular matrix organization. In turn, the impact of TG2 on these processes implicates this protein in various physiological responses and pathological states, contributing to wound healing, inflammation, autoimmunity, neurodegeneration, vascular remodeling, tumor growth and metastasis, and tissue fibrosis. TG2 is ubiquitously expressed and is particularly abundant in endothelial cells, fibroblasts, osteoblasts, monocytes/macrophages, and smooth muscle cells. The protein is localized in multiple cellular compartments, including the nucleus, cytosol, mitochondria, endolysosomes, plasma membrane, and cell surface and extracellular matrix, where Ca2+, nucleotides, nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, membrane lipids, and distinct protein–protein interactions in the local microenvironment jointly regulate its activities. In this review, we discuss the complex biochemical activities and molecular interactions of TG2 in the context of diverse subcellular compartments and evaluate its wide ranging and cell type-specific biological functions and their regulation. PMID:22364871

  5. Determining decision thresholds and evaluating indicators when conservation status is measured as a continuum.

    PubMed

    Connors, B M; Cooper, A B

    2014-12-01

    Categorization of the status of populations, species, and ecosystems underpins most conservation activities. Status is often based on how a system's current indicator value (e.g., change in abundance) relates to some threshold of conservation concern. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves can be used to quantify the statistical reliability of indicators of conservation status and evaluate trade-offs between correct (true positive) and incorrect (false positive) classifications across a range of decision thresholds. However, ROC curves assume a discrete, binary relationship between an indicator and the conservation status it is meant to track, which is a simplification of the more realistic continuum of conservation status, and may limit the applicability of ROC curves in conservation science. We describe a modified ROC curve that treats conservation status as a continuum rather than a discrete state. We explored the influence of this continuum and typical sources of variation in abundance that can lead to classification errors (i.e., random variation and measurement error) on the true and false positive rates corresponding to varying decision thresholds and the reliability of change in abundance as an indicator of conservation status, respectively. We applied our modified ROC approach to an indicator of endangerment in Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) (i.e., percent decline in geometric mean abundance) and an indicator of marine ecosystem structure and function (i.e., detritivore biomass). Failure to treat conservation status as a continuum when choosing thresholds for indicators resulted in the misidentification of trade-offs between true and false positive rates and the overestimation of an indicator's reliability. We argue for treating conservation status as a continuum when ROC curves are used to evaluate decision thresholds in indicators for the assessment of conservation status.

  6. Determining decision thresholds and evaluating indicators when conservation status is measured as a continuum.

    PubMed

    Connors, B M; Cooper, A B

    2014-12-01

    Categorization of the status of populations, species, and ecosystems underpins most conservation activities. Status is often based on how a system's current indicator value (e.g., change in abundance) relates to some threshold of conservation concern. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves can be used to quantify the statistical reliability of indicators of conservation status and evaluate trade-offs between correct (true positive) and incorrect (false positive) classifications across a range of decision thresholds. However, ROC curves assume a discrete, binary relationship between an indicator and the conservation status it is meant to track, which is a simplification of the more realistic continuum of conservation status, and may limit the applicability of ROC curves in conservation science. We describe a modified ROC curve that treats conservation status as a continuum rather than a discrete state. We explored the influence of this continuum and typical sources of variation in abundance that can lead to classification errors (i.e., random variation and measurement error) on the true and false positive rates corresponding to varying decision thresholds and the reliability of change in abundance as an indicator of conservation status, respectively. We applied our modified ROC approach to an indicator of endangerment in Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) (i.e., percent decline in geometric mean abundance) and an indicator of marine ecosystem structure and function (i.e., detritivore biomass). Failure to treat conservation status as a continuum when choosing thresholds for indicators resulted in the misidentification of trade-offs between true and false positive rates and the overestimation of an indicator's reliability. We argue for treating conservation status as a continuum when ROC curves are used to evaluate decision thresholds in indicators for the assessment of conservation status. PMID:25155174

  7. CONTINUUM CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE SDO/AIA PASSBANDS DURING SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, Ryan O.; McElroy, Sarah A.

    2013-11-01

    Data from the Multiple EUV Grating Spectrograph component of the Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) were used to quantify the contribution of continuum emission to each of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), also on SDO, during an X-class solar flare that occurred on 2011 February 15. Both the pre-flare-subtracted EVE spectra and fits to the associated free-free continuum were convolved with the AIA response functions of the seven EUV passbands at 10 s cadence throughout the course of the flare. It was found that 10%-25% of the total emission in the 94 Å, 131 Å, 193 Å, and 335 Å passbands throughout the main phase of the flare was due to free-free emission. Reliable measurements could not be made for the 171 Å channel, while the continuum contribution to the 304 Å channel was negligible due to the presence of the strong He II emission line. Up to 50% of the emission in the 211 Å channel was found to be due to free-free emission around the peak of the flare, while an additional 20% was due to the recombination continuum of He II. The analysis was extended to a number of M- and X-class flares and it was found that the level of free-free emission contributing to both the 171 Å and 211 Å passbands increased with increasing GOES class. These results suggest that the amount of continuum emission that contributes to AIA observations during flares is more significant than stated in previous studies which used synthetic, rather than observed, spectra. These findings highlight the importance of spectroscopic observations carried out in conjunction with those from imaging instruments so that the data are interpreted correctly.

  8. Hybrid continuum-atomistic approach to model electrokinetics in nanofluidics.

    PubMed

    Amani, Ehsan; Movahed, Saeid

    2016-06-01

    In this study, for the first time, a hybrid continuum-atomistic based model is proposed for electrokinetics, electroosmosis and electrophoresis, through nanochannels. Although continuum based methods are accurate enough to model fluid flow and electric potential in nanofluidics (in dimensions larger than 4 nm), ionic concentration is too low in nanochannels for the continuum assumption to be valid. On the other hand, the non-continuum based approaches are too time-consuming and therefore is limited to simple geometries, in practice. Here, to propose an efficient hybrid continuum-atomistic method of modelling the electrokinetics in nanochannels; the fluid flow and electric potential are computed based on continuum hypothesis coupled with an atomistic Lagrangian approach for the ionic transport. The results of the model are compared to and validated by the results of the molecular dynamics technique for a couple of case studies. Then, the influences of bulk ionic concentration, external electric field, size of nanochannel, and surface electric charge on the electrokinetic flow and ionic mass transfer are investigated, carefully. The hybrid continuum-atomistic method is a promising approach to model more complicated geometries and investigate more details of the electrokinetics in nanofluidics. PMID:27155300

  9. Equivalent-Continuum Modeling With Application to Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Gates, Thomas S.; Nicholson, Lee M.; Wise, Kristopher E.

    2002-01-01

    A method has been proposed for developing structure-property relationships of nano-structured materials. This method serves as a link between computational chemistry and solid mechanics by substituting discrete molecular structures with equivalent-continuum models. It has been shown that this substitution may be accomplished by equating the vibrational potential energy of a nano-structured material with the strain energy of representative truss and continuum models. As important examples with direct application to the development and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes and the design of nanotube-based devices, the modeling technique has been applied to determine the effective-continuum geometry and bending rigidity of a graphene sheet. A representative volume element of the chemical structure of graphene has been substituted with equivalent-truss and equivalent continuum models. As a result, an effective thickness of the continuum model has been determined. This effective thickness has been shown to be significantly larger than the interatomic spacing of graphite. The effective thickness has been shown to be significantly larger than the inter-planar spacing of graphite. The effective bending rigidity of the equivalent-continuum model of a graphene sheet was determined by equating the vibrational potential energy of the molecular model of a graphene sheet subjected to cylindrical bending with the strain energy of an equivalent continuum plate subjected to cylindrical bending.

  10. 77 FR 44653 - Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application-Technical Submission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application-- Technical Submission AGENCY... the original Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application. DATES: Comments Due Date: August... lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance...

  11. 77 FR 23491 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Continuum of Care Homeless...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application--Continuum of Care Registration AGENCY: Office of the Chief... reporting burden associated with registration requirements that Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance...

  12. Contemporary continuum QCD approaches to excited hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bennich, Bruno; Rojas, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Amongst the bound states produced by the strong interaction, radially excited meson and nucleon states offer an important phenomenological window into the long-range behavior of the coupling constant in Quantum Chromodynamics. We here report on some technical details related to the computation of the bound state's eigenvalue spectrum in the framework of Bethe-Salpeter and Faddeev equations.

  13. Scalar generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation-quantified continuum generation in an all-normal dispersion photonic crystal fiber for broadband coherent optical sources

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Haohua; Liu, Yuan; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Sharma, Utkarsh; Siegel, Martin; Kopf, Daniel; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We quantitatively predict the observed continuum-like spectral broadening in a 90-mm weakly birefringent all-normal dispersion-flattened photonic crystal fiber pumped by 1041-nm 229-fs 76-MHz pulses from a solid-state Yb:KYW laser. The well-characterized continuum pulses span a bandwidth of up to 300 nm around the laser wavelength, allowing high spectral power density pulse shaping useful for various coherent control applications. We also identify the nonlinear polarization effect that limits the bandwidth of these continuum pulses, and therefore report the path toward a series of attractive alternative broadband coherent optical sources. PMID:21197060

  14. SEACAS Theory Manuals: Part II. Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Attaway, S.W.; Laursen, T.A.; Zadoks, R.I.

    1998-09-01

    This report summarizes the key continuum mechanics concepts required for the systematic prescription and numerical solution of finite deformation solid mechanics problems. Topics surveyed include measures of deformation appropriate for media undergoing large deformations, stress measures appropriate for such problems, balance laws and their role in nonlinear continuum mechanics, the role of frame indifference in description of large deformation response, and the extension of these theories to encompass two dimensional idealizations, structural idealizations, and rigid body behavior. There are three companion reports that describe the problem formulation, constitutive modeling, and finite element technology for nonlinear continuum mechanics systems.

  15. The submillimeter radio continuum of Comet P/Brorsen-Metcalf

    SciTech Connect

    Jewitt, D.; Luu, J. MIT, Cambridge, MA )

    1990-12-01

    Observations of Comet P/Brorsen-Metcalf in the submillimeter radio continuum are presented. The observations were taken using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, and include the first truly submillimeter detection of a comet, and the first submillimeter continuum spectrum. The submillimeter radiation is attributed to thermal emission from a transient population of large grains with a total mass of (1-10) x 10 to the 9th kg. The large grains may be produced by catastrophic failure of part of the refractory mantle on the surface of the cometary nucleus. Models of the submillimeter continuum are discussed. 49 refs.

  16. Multi-Scale Continuum Modeling of Biological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Y; Kekenes-Huskey, P; Hake, JE; Holst, MJ; McCammon, JA; Michailova, AP

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a brief review of multi-scale modeling at the molecular to cellular scale, with new results for heart muscle cells. A finite element-based simulation package (SMOL) was used to investigate the signaling transduction at molecular and sub-cellular scales (http://mccammon.ucsd.edu/smol/, http://FETK.org) by numerical solution of time-dependent Smoluchowski equations and a reaction-diffusion system. At the molecular scale, SMOL has yielded experimentally-validated estimates of the diffusion-limited association rates for the binding of acetylcholine to mouse acetylcholinesterase using crystallographic structural data. The predicted rate constants exhibit increasingly delayed steady-state times with increasing ionic strength and demonstrate the role of an enzyme’s electrostatic potential in influencing ligand binding. At the sub-cellular scale, an extension of SMOL solves a non-linear, reaction-diffusion system describing Ca2+ ligand buffering and diffusion in experimentally-derived rodent ventricular myocyte geometries. Results reveal the important role for mobile and stationary Ca2+ buffers, including Ca2+ indicator dye. We found that the alterations in Ca2+-binding and dissociation rates of troponin C (TnC) and total TnC concentration modulate subcellular Ca2+ signals. Model predicts that reduced off-rate in whole troponin complex (TnC, TnI, TnT) versus reconstructed thin filaments (Tn, Tm, actin) alters cytosolic Ca2+ dynamics under control conditions or in disease-linked TnC mutations. The ultimate goal of these studies is to develop scalable methods and theories for integration of molecular-scale information into simulations of cellular-scale systems. PMID:23505398

  17. Origins of cellular geometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cells are highly complex and orderly machines, with defined shapes and a startling variety of internal organizations. Complex geometry is a feature of both free-living unicellular organisms and cells inside multicellular animals. Where does the geometry of a cell come from? Many of the same questions that arise in developmental biology can also be asked of cells, but in most cases we do not know the answers. How much of cellular organization is dictated by global cell polarity cues as opposed to local interactions between cellular components? Does cellular structure persist across cell generations? What is the relationship between cell geometry and tissue organization? What ensures that intracellular structures are scaled to the overall size of the cell? Cell biology is only now beginning to come to grips with these questions. PMID:21880160

  18. Architected Cellular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  19. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well. PMID:27695375

  20. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  1. Microstructural and continuum evolution modeling of sintering.

    SciTech Connect

    Braginsky, Michael V.; Olevsky, Eugene A.; Johnson, D. Lynn; Tikare, Veena; Garino, Terry J.; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.

    2003-12-01

    All ceramics and powder metals, including the ceramics components that Sandia uses in critical weapons components such as PZT voltage bars and current stacks, multi-layer ceramic MET's, ahmindmolybdenum & alumina cermets, and ZnO varistors, are manufactured by sintering. Sintering is a critical, possibly the most important, processing step during manufacturing of ceramics. The microstructural evolution, the macroscopic shrinkage, and shape distortions during sintering will control the engineering performance of the resulting ceramic component. Yet, modeling and prediction of sintering behavior is in its infancy, lagging far behind the other manufacturing models, such as powder synthesis and powder compaction models, and behind models that predict engineering properties and reliability. In this project, we developed a model that was capable of simulating microstructural evolution during sintering, providing constitutive equations for macroscale simulation of shrinkage and distortion during sintering. And we developed macroscale sintering simulation capability in JAS3D. The mesoscale model can simulate microstructural evolution in a complex powder compact of hundreds or even thousands of particles of arbitrary shape and size by 1. curvature-driven grain growth, 2. pore migration and coalescence by surface diffusion, 3. vacancy formation, grain boundary diffusion and annihilation. This model was validated by comparing predictions of the simulation to analytical predictions for simple geometries. The model was then used to simulate sintering in complex powder compacts. Sintering stress and materials viscous module were obtained from the simulations. These constitutive equations were then used by macroscopic simulations for simulating shrinkage and shape changes in FEM simulations. The continuum theory of sintering embodied in the constitutive description of Skorohod and Olevsky was combined with results from microstructure evolution simulations to model shrinkage and

  2. The Hurricane-Flood-Landslide Continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negri, Andrew J.; Burkardt, Nina; Golden, Joseph H.; Halverson, Jeffrey B.; Huffman, George J.; Larsen, Matthew C.; McGinley, John A.; Updike, Randall G.; Verdin, James P.; Wieczorek, Gerald F.

    2005-01-01

    In August 2004, representatives from NOAA, NASA, the USGS, and other government agencies convened in San Juan, Puerto Rim for a workshop to discuss a proposed research project called the Hurricane-Flood-Landslide Continuum (HFLC). The essence of the HFLC is to develop and integrate tools across disciplines to enable the issuance of regional guidance products for floods and landslides associated with major tropical rain systems, with sufficient lead time that local emergency managers can protect vulnerable populations and infrastructure. All three lead agencies are independently developing precipitation-flood-debris flow forecasting technologies, and all have a history of work on natural hazards both domestically and overseas. NOM has the capability to provide tracking and prediction of storm rainfall, trajectory and landfall and is developing flood probability and magnTtude capabilities. The USGS has the capability to evaluate the ambient stability of natural and man-made landforms, to assess landslide susceptibilities for those landforms, and to establish probabilities for initiation of landslides and debris flows. Additionally, the USGS has well-developed operational capacity for real-time monitoring and reporting of streamflow across distributed networks of automated gaging stations (http://water.usgs.gov/waterwatch/). NASA has the capability to provide sophisticated algorithms for satellite remote sensing of precipitation, land use, and in the future, soil moisture. The Workshop sought to initiate discussion among three agencies regarding their specific and highly complimentary capabilities. The fundamental goal of the Workshop was to establish a framework that will leverage the strengths of each agency. Once a prototype system is developed for example, in relatively data-rich Puerto Rim, it could be adapted for use in data-poor, low-infrastructure regions such as the Dominican Republic or Haiti. This paper provides an overview of the Workshop s goals

  3. On the Continuum Representation of Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, A.; Botros, F.; Reeves, D. M.; Pohll, G.

    2006-12-01

    Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) and Stochastic Continuum (SC) are the two dominant modeling approaches used for simulating of fluid flow and solute transport in fractured media. While the SC approach has several variants, we focus on two methods introduced by Svensson [2001] and McKenna and Reeves [2002] where discrete fracture networks are directly mapped onto a finite-difference grid as grid cell conductivities. These methods combine the merits of each approach; a computationally efficient grid is utilized for the solution of fluid flow, and details of the fracture network are preserved by assigning a permeability contrast between the grid cells representing the rock matrix and fracture cells. In this paper, we focus on several outstanding issues that are associated with SC models: enhanced connectivity between fractures that would otherwise not be in connection in a DFN simulation, the formulation of grid cell conductivity for cells containing multiple fractures, and the influence of grid size. To addresses these issues, both DFN and SC models are used to solve for fluid flow through two-dimensional, randomly generated fracture networks. To minimize connectivity between fractures in the SC model, a percolation algorithm is used to define the hydraulic backbone before fractures are mapped onto a model grid. The effect of grid size is studied by using two different regularly-spaced grids with cell lengths of 1m and 10m. The resultant DFN flow solutions are used as a metric to evaluate different approaches used to assign grid cell conductivity. Results from this study are presented as guidelines for representing fracture networks as grid cell conductivities.

  4. Continuum and computational modeling of flexoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Sheng

    , stationary cracks, as well as structures with periodic structures, can be studied consistently with the continuum theory. We also generate predictions of experimental merit and reveal interesting flexoelectric phenomena with potential for application.

  5. Cosmological measurements with forthcoming radio continuum surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Bacon, David J.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Percival, Will J.; Norris, Ray P.; Röttgering, Huub; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Cress, Catherine M.; Kubwimana, Jean-Claude; Lindsay, Sam; Nichol, Robert C.; Santos, Mario G.; Schwarz, Dominik J.

    2012-08-01

    We present forecasts for constraints on cosmological models that can be obtained using the forthcoming radio continuum surveys: the wide surveys with the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) for radio astronomy, the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) and the Westerbork Observations of the Deep Apertif Northern Sky (WODAN). We use simulated catalogues that are appropriate to the planned surveys in order to predict measurements obtained with the source autocorrelation, the cross-correlation between radio sources and cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps (the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect), the cross-correlation of radio sources with foreground objects resulting from cosmic magnification, and a joint analysis together with the CMB power spectrum and supernovae (SNe). We show that near-future radio surveys will bring complementary measurements to other experiments, probing different cosmological volumes and having different systematics. Our results show that the unprecedented sky coverage of these surveys combined should provide the most significant measurement yet of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. In addition, we show that the use of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect will significantly tighten the constraints on modified gravity parameters, while the best measurements of dark energy models will come from galaxy autocorrelation function analyses. Using a combination of the Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) and WODAN to provide a full-sky survey, it will be possible to measure the dark energy parameters with an uncertainty of {σ(w0) = 0.05, σ(wa) = 0.12} and the modified gravity parameters {σ(η0) = 0.10, σ(μ0) = 0.05}, assuming Planck CMB+SN (current data) priors. Finally, we show that radio surveys would detect a primordial non-Gaussianity of fNL= 8 at 1σ, and we briefly discuss other promising probes.

  6. A continuum model of colloid-stabilized interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aland, Sebastian; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2011-06-01

    Colloids that are partially wetted by two immiscible fluids can become confined to fluid-fluid interfaces. At sufficiently high volume fractions, the colloids may jam and the interface may crystallize. Examples include bicontinuous interfacially jammed emulsion gels (bijels), which were proposed in this study by Stratford et al. [Science 309, 2198 (2005)] as a hypothetical new class of soft materials in which interpenetrating, continuous domains of two immiscible viscous fluids are maintained in a rigid state by a jammed layer of colloidal particles at their interface. We develop a continuum model for such a system that is capable of simulating the long-time evolution. A Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard model for the macroscopic two-phase flow system is combined with a surface phase-field-crystal model for the microscopic colloidal system along the interface. The presence of colloids introduces elastic forces at the interface between the two immiscible fluid phases. An adaptive finite element method is used to solve the model numerically. Using a variety of flow configurations in two dimensions, we demonstrate that as colloids jam on the interface and the interface crystallizes, the elastic force may be strong enough to make the interface sufficiently rigid to resist external forces, such as an applied shear flow, as well as surface tension induced coarsening in bicontinuous structures.

  7. A continuum model of colloid-stabilized interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowengrub, John

    2012-02-01

    Colloids that are partially wetted by two immiscible fluids can become confined to fluid-fluid interfaces. At sufficiently high volume fractions, the colloids may jam and the interface may crystallize. Examples include bicontinuous interfacially jammed emulsion gels (``bijels''), which were proposed in Stratford et al. (Science (2005) 309:2198) as a hypothetical new class of soft materials in which interpenetrating, continuous domains of two immiscible viscous fluids are maintained in a rigid state, by a jammed layer of colloidal particles at their interface. We develop a continuum model for such a system that is capable of simulating the long-time evolution. A Navier-Stokes- Cahn-Hilliard model for the macroscopic two-phase flow system is combined with a surface Phase- Field-Crystal model for the microscopic colloidal system along the interface. The presence of colloids introduces elastic forces at the interface between the two immiscible fluid phases. An adaptive finite element method is used to solve the model numerically. Using a variety of flow configurations, we demonstrate that as colloids jam on the interface and the interface crystallizes, the elastic force may be strong enough to make the interface sufficiently rigid to resist external forces, such as an applied shear flow, as well as surface tension induced coarsening in bicontinuous structures.

  8. A continuum theory of surface piezoelectricity for nanodielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, XiaHui; Yu, ShouWen; Feng, XiQiao

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, a phenomenological continuum theory of surface piezoelectricity accounting for the linear superficial interplay between electricity and elasticity is formulated primarily for elastic dielectric materials. This theory is inspired by the physical idea that once completely relaxed, an insulating free dielectric surface will sustain a nontrivial spontaneous surface polarization in the normal direction together with a tangential self-equilibrated residual surface stress field. Under external loadings, the surface Helmholtz free energy density is identified as the characteristic function of such surfaces, with the in-plane strain tensor of surface and the surface free charge density as the independent state variables. New boundary conditions governing the surface piezoelectricity are derived through the variational method. The resulting concepts of charge-dependent surface stress and deformation-dependent surface electric field reflect the linear electromechanical coupling behavior of nanodielectric surfaces. As an illustrative example, an infinite radially polarizable piezoelectric nanotube with both inner and outer surfaces grounded is investigated. The novel phenomenon of possible surface-induced polarity inversion is predicted for thin enough nanotubes.

  9. Perspective on Continuum Modeling of Mesoscale/ Macroscale Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bammann, D. J.

    The attempt to model or predict the inelastic response or permanent deformation and failure observed in metals dates back over 180 years. Various descriptions of the post elastic response of metals have been proposed from the fields of physics, materials science (metallurgy), engineering, mechanics, and applied mathematics. The communication between these fields has improved and many of the modeling efforts today involve concepts from most or all of these fields. Early engineering description of post yield response treated the material as perfectly plastic — the material continues to deform with zero additional increase in load. These models became the basis of the mathematical theory of plasticity and were extended to account for hardening, unloading, and directional hardening. In contradistinction, rheological models treated the finite deformation of a solid similar to the deformation of a viscous fluid. In many cases of large deformation, rheological models have provided both adequate and accurate information about the deformed shape of a metal during many manufacturing processes. The treatment of geometric defects in solid bodies initiated within the mathematical theory of elasticity, the dislocation, introduced as an incompatible "cut" in a continuum body. This resulted in a very large body of literature devoted to the linear elastic study of dislocations, dislocation structures, and their interactions, and has provided essential information in the understanding of the "state" of a deformed material.

  10. Design sensitivity analysis for nonlinear magnetostatic problems by continuum approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Il-Han; Coulomb, J. L.; Hahn, Song-Yop

    1992-11-01

    Using the material derivative concept of continuum mechanics and an adjoint variable method, in a 2-dimensional nonlinear magnetostatic system the sensitivity formula is derived in a line integral form along the shape modification interface. The sensitivity coefficients are numerically evaluated from the solutions of state and adjoint variables calculated by the existing standard finite element code. To verify this method, the pole shape design problem of a quadrupole is provided. En utilisant la notion de dérivée matérielle de la mécanique des milieux continus et une méthode de variable adjointe, pour des problèmes magnétiques non linéaires bidimensionnels, la formule de sensibilité est dérivée sous forme d'une intégrale de contour sur la surface de modification. Les coefficients de sensibilité sont numériquement évalués avec les variables d'état et adjointes calculées à partir du logiciel existant d'éléments finis. Pour vérifier cette méthode, le problème d'optimisation de forme d'un quadripôle est décrit.

  11. Translation Factors Specify Cellular Metabolic State.

    PubMed

    Mata, Juan

    2016-08-16

    In this issue of Cell Reports, Shah et al. present evidence that a subcomplex of the eIF3 translation initiation factor regulates translation of mRNAs encoding components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and glycolytic enzymes, thus linking translational control with energy metabolism. PMID:27533178

  12. Combining conformational flexibility and continuum electrostatics for calculating pK(a)s in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, Roxana E; Alexov, Emil G; Gunner, Marilyn R

    2002-01-01

    Protein stability and function relies on residues being in their appropriate ionization states at physiological pH. In situ residue pK(a)s also provides a sensitive measure of the local protein environment. Multiconformation continuum electrostatics (MCCE) combines continuum electrostatics and molecular mechanics force fields in Monte Carlo sampling to simultaneously calculate side chain ionization and conformation. The response of protein to charges is incorporated both in the protein dielectric constant (epsilon(prot)) of four and by explicit conformational changes. The pK(a) of 166 residues in 12 proteins was determined. The root mean square error is 0.83 pH units, and >90% have errors of <1 pH units whereas only 3% have errors >2 pH units. Similar results are found with crystal and solution structures, showing that the method's explicit conformational sampling reduces sensitivity to the initial structure. The outcome also changes little with protein dielectric constant (epsilon(prot) 4-20). Multiconformation continuum electrostatics titrations show coupling of conformational flexibility and changes in ionization state. Examples are provided where ionizable side chain position (protein G), Asn orientation (lysozyme), His tautomer distribution (RNase A), and phosphate ion binding (RNase A and H) change with pH. Disallowing these motions changes the calculated pK(a). PMID:12324397

  13. Signature of a strong coupling with the continuum in 11Be + 120Sn scattering at the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, L.; Álvarez, M. A. G.; Andrés, M. V.; Borge, M. J. G.; Cortés, M.; Espino, J. M.; Galaviz, D.; Gómez-Camacho, J.; Maira, A.; Martel, I.; Moro, A. M.; Mukha, I.; Pérez-Bernal, F.; Reillo, E.; Rodríguez, D.; Rusek, K.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Tengblad, O.

    2009-12-01

    The angular distribution for 11Be + 120Sn quasielastic scattering at E lab = 32 MeV was measured at REX-ISOLDE, CERN. The interpretation of the data in terms of coupled-channel calculations suggests a strong coupling with the p -states lying in the continuum.

  14. Vasculopathy of Aging and the Revised Cardiovascular Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-A; Park, Jeong Bae; O'Rourke, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    There have been attempts to explain the process of developments in overt cardiovascular disease, resulting in the presentation of the classic cardiovascular disease continuum and the aging cardiovascular continuum. Although the starting points of these two continua are different, they meet in the midstream of the cycle and reach a consensus at the end of the process. The announcement of the aging cardiovascular continuum made both continua complete, explaining the cardiovascular events in patients without atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease with aging. Impairment of the vascular structure by pulse wave and reflected wave is considered the cause of aortic damage, which influences the development of ischemic heart disease and the development of overt renal disease or cerebrovascular disease. The pathophysiology of vascular aging through pulse wave and its effect on other organs was discussed with Prof. Michael F. O'Rourke who devised the aging cardiovascular continuum. PMID:26587463

  15. Continuum discretised BCS approach for weakly bound nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, J. A.; Alonso, C. E.; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A.

    2016-08-01

    The Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) formalism is extended by including the single-particle continuum in order to analyse the evolution of pairing in an isotopic chain from stability up to the drip-line. We propose a continuum discretised generalised BCS based on single-particle pseudostates (PS). These PS are generated from the diagonalisation of the single-particle Hamiltonian within a transformed harmonic oscillator basis. The consistency of the results versus the size of the basis is studied. The method is applied to neutron rich oxygen and carbon isotopes and compared with similar previous works and available experimental data. We make use of the flexibility of the proposed model in order to study the evolution of the occupation of the low-energy continuum when the system becomes weakly bound. We find an increasing influence of the non-resonant continuum as long as the Fermi level approaches the neutron separation threshold.

  16. Equivalent-Continuum Modeling of Nano-Structured Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Gates, Thomas S.; Nicholson, Lee M.; Wise, Kristopher E.

    2001-01-01

    A method has been developed for modeling structure-property relationships of nano-structured materials. This method serves as a link between computational chemistry and solid mechanics by substituting discrete molecular structures with an equivalent-continuum model. It has been shown that this substitution may be accomplished by equating the vibrational potential energy of a nano-structured material with the strain energy of representative truss and continuum models. As an important example with direct application to the development and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes, the model has been applied to determine the effective continuum geometry of a graphene sheet. A representative volume element of the equivalent-continuum model has been developed with an effective thickness. This effective thickness has been shown to be similar to, but slightly smaller than, the interatomic spacing of graphite.

  17. Internal noise-driven generalized Langevin equation from a nonlocal continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Saikat; Chowdhury, Shubhankar Roy; Roy, Debasish; Vasu, Ram Mohan

    2015-08-01

    Starting with a micropolar formulation, known to account for nonlocal microstructural effects at the continuum level, a generalized Langevin equation (GLE) for a particle, describing the predominant motion of a localized region through a single displacement degree of freedom, is derived. The GLE features a memory-dependent multiplicative or internal noise, which appears upon recognizing that the microrotation variables possess randomness owing to an uncertainty principle. Unlike its classical version, the present GLE qualitatively reproduces the experimentally measured fluctuations in the steady-state mean square displacement of scattering centers in a polyvinyl alcohol slab. The origin of the fluctuations is traced to nonlocal spatial interactions within the continuum, a phenomenon that is ubiquitous across a broad class of response regimes in solids and fluids. This renders the proposed GLE a potentially useful model in such cases.

  18. Internal noise-driven generalized Langevin equation from a nonlocal continuum model.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Saikat; Chowdhury, Shubhankar Roy; Roy, Debasish; Vasu, Ram Mohan

    2015-08-01

    Starting with a micropolar formulation, known to account for nonlocal microstructural effects at the continuum level, a generalized Langevin equation (GLE) for a particle, describing the predominant motion of a localized region through a single displacement degree of freedom, is derived. The GLE features a memory-dependent multiplicative or internal noise, which appears upon recognizing that the microrotation variables possess randomness owing to an uncertainty principle. Unlike its classical version, the present GLE qualitatively reproduces the experimentally measured fluctuations in the steady-state mean square displacement of scattering centers in a polyvinyl alcohol slab. The origin of the fluctuations is traced to nonlocal spatial interactions within the continuum, a phenomenon that is ubiquitous across a broad class of response regimes in solids and fluids. This renders the proposed GLE a potentially useful model in such cases. PMID:26382386

  19. PowderSim: Lagrangian Discrete and Mesh-Free Continuum Simulation Code for Cohesive Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Scott; Walton, Otis; Settgast, Randolph

    2013-01-01

    PowderSim is a calculation tool that combines a discrete-element method (DEM) module, including calibrated interparticle-interaction relationships, with a mesh-free, continuum, SPH (smoothed-particle hydrodynamics) based module that utilizes enhanced, calibrated, constitutive models capable of mimicking both large deformations and the flow behavior of regolith simulants and lunar regolith under conditions anticipated during in situ resource utilization (ISRU) operations. The major innovation introduced in PowderSim is to use a mesh-free method (SPH-based) with a calibrated and slightly modified critical-state soil mechanics constitutive model to extend the ability of the simulation tool to also address full-scale engineering systems in the continuum sense. The PowderSim software maintains the ability to address particle-scale problems, like size segregation, in selected regions with a traditional DEM module, which has improved contact physics and electrostatic interaction models.

  20. Experiments on continuum electron capture in atomic hydrogen and collisional interaction of trapped ions. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I.A.; Elston, S.B.

    1981-01-01

    This section describes the background and scope of as well as progress made on experiments designed to test the present theory of charge exchange to continuum for the case of bare nuclei on atomic hydrogen. The charge transfer process is well known to be an essential ingredient of any attempt to understand the ionization of gaseous media traversed by highly-charged energetic ions. Surprisingly, a sometimes dominant contribution to such ionization remained undiscovered until the past decade. This process, known as charge transfer to the continuum, involves the ionization of electrons from the target species into unbound states closely matched in exit direction and speed to the charged particles which generate them. Subsequent measurements of the resultant forward electron production, performed by University of Tennessee searchers at Oak Ridge and Brookhaven National Laboratories, were unique in employing more highly charged projectiles than previously.

  1. Effect of Successive Observation on Quantum Cellular Automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio; Nakamura, Kazuya; Ide, Yusuke; Konno, Norio

    2007-08-01

    A quantum cellular automaton, which is extended from a classical cellular automaton with Wolfram’s rule 150, is studied. In contrast to the classical cellular automaton, all possible configurations exist in a quantum superposition before measurement. We show that measuring the state of only one qubit significantly aeffects the time evolution in the quantum cellular automaton. In particular, we demonstrate that, occasionally, repeating the measurement enhances the appearance of the configurations found in the classical cellular automaton. The occurrence of this enhancement is primarily determined by the results of the measurement in the early time steps, and it is sustained by a feedback mechanism.

  2. A hybrid particle/continuum approach for nonequilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Lan

    A hybrid particle-continuum computational framework is developed and presented for simulating nonequilibrium hypersonic flows, aimed to be more accurate than conventional continuum methods and faster than particle methods. The frame work consists of the direct simulation Monte Carlo-Information Preservation (DSMC-IP) method coupled with a Navier-Stokes solver. Since the DSMC-IP method provides the macroscopic information at each time step, determination of the continuum fluxes across the interface between the particle and continuum domains becomes straightforward. Buffer and reservoir calls are introduced in the continuum domain and work as an extension of the particle domain. At the end of the particle movement phase, particles in either particle or buffer cells are retained. All simulated particles in the reservoir cells are first deleted for each time, step and re-generated based on the local cell values. The microscopic velocities for the newly generated particles are initialized to the Chapman-Enskog distribution using an acceptance-rejection scheme. Continuum breakdown in a flow is defined as when the continuum solution departs from the particle solution to at least 5%. Numerical investigations show that a Knudsen-number-like parameter can best predict the continuum breakdown in the flows of interest. Numerical experiments of hypersonic flows over a simple blunted cone and a much more complex hollow cylinder/flare are conducted. The solutions for the two geometries considered from the hybrid framework are compared with experimental data and pure particle solutions. Generally speaking, it is concluded that the hybrid approach works quite well. In the blunted cone flow, numerical accuracy is improved when 10 layers of buffer cells are employed and the continuum breakdown cut-off value is set to be 0.03. In the hollow cylinder/flare hybrid simulation, the size of the separation zone near the conjunction of the cylinder and flare is improved from the initial

  3. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  4. An extended Coleman-Noll procedure for generalized continuum theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hütter, Geralf

    2016-11-01

    Within rational continuum mechanics, the Coleman-Noll procedure is established to derive requirements to constitutive equations. Aiming in particular at generalized continuum theories, the present contribution demonstrates how this procedure can be extended to yield additionally the underlying balance equations of stress-type quantities. This is demonstrated for micromorphic and strain gradient media as well as for the microforce theory. The relation between the extended Coleman-Noll procedure and the method of virtual powers is pointed out.

  5. High-energy continuum emission from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vestrand, W. Thomas

    1988-01-01

    The properties of solar flare continuum emission at energies of greater than 300 keV have been determined from observations obtained during the 21st solar maximum by gamma-ray detectors aboard the SMM and Hinotori satellites. The temporal structure of the high-energy continuum is modeled by two-step acceleration and particle trapping. The results suggest that the very high-energy emission noted must be a mixture of pion-decay radiation and primary electron bremsstrahlung.

  6. Airglow continuum emission in the visible wavelength regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unterguggenberger, S.; Noll, S.; Kausch, W.; Proxauf, B.; Kimeswenger, S.

    2015-03-01

    To probe dynamics and chemistry of the atmosphere at high altitudes ( 80-100 km), we need to understand airglow line and continuum emission. Accounting for the continuum emission is harder than for the emission lines. Gaining knowledge of the upper atmospheric continuum emission needs e.g. a proper subtraction of the other continuum components, and a very good subtraction of the other emission lines which requires a high spectral resolution. In this study, we want to focus on FeO continuum emission. FeO emits in the wavelength range from 0.5 to 0.72 m and probes an altitude of about 89 km. The altitude of the emission peak lies between those of OH (87 km) and NaD (92 km). Fe and Na are linked by their source, meteors, and their common reactant O3, which holds also for OH emission. Lidar and limb sounding studies provide measurements about the continuum contribution of the FeO and Fe density in the upper atmosphere, but for a more detailed analysis in terms of emission structure and variability a ground-based high resolution and high signal-to-noise spectrum would be preferable.

  7. Relativistic corrections and non-Gaussianity in radio continuum surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Maartens, Roy; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Bacon, David; Koyama, Kazuya; Raccanelli, Alvise E-mail: Gong-bo.Zhao@port.ac.uk E-mail: Kazuya.Koyama@port.ac.uk

    2013-02-01

    Forthcoming radio continuum surveys will cover large volumes of the observable Universe and will reach to high redshifts, making them potentially powerful probes of dark energy, modified gravity and non-Gaussianity. We consider the continuum surveys with LOFAR, WSRT and ASKAP, and examples of continuum surveys with the SKA. We extend recent work on these surveys by including redshift space distortions and lensing convergence in the radio source auto-correlation. In addition we compute the general relativistic (GR) corrections to the angular power spectrum. These GR corrections to the standard Newtonian analysis of the power spectrum become significant on scales near and beyond the Hubble scale at each redshift. We find that the GR corrections are at most percent-level in LOFAR, WODAN and EMU surveys, but they can produce O(10%) changes for high enough sensitivity SKA continuum surveys. The signal is however dominated by cosmic variance, and multiple-tracer techniques will be needed to overcome this problem. The GR corrections are suppressed in continuum surveys because of the integration over redshift — we expect that GR corrections will be enhanced for future SKA HI surveys in which the source redshifts will be known. We also provide predictions for the angular power spectra in the case where the primordial perturbations have local non-Gaussianity. We find that non-Gaussianity dominates over GR corrections, and rises above cosmic variance when f{sub NL}∼>5 for SKA continuum surveys.

  8. Relativistic corrections and non-Gaussianity in radio continuum surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maartens, Roy; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Bacon, David; Koyama, Kazuya; Raccanelli, Alvise

    2013-02-01

    Forthcoming radio continuum surveys will cover large volumes of the observable Universe and will reach to high redshifts, making them potentially powerful probes of dark energy, modified gravity and non-Gaussianity. We consider the continuum surveys with LOFAR, WSRT and ASKAP, and examples of continuum surveys with the SKA. We extend recent work on these surveys by including redshift space distortions and lensing convergence in the radio source auto-correlation. In addition we compute the general relativistic (GR) corrections to the angular power spectrum. These GR corrections to the standard Newtonian analysis of the power spectrum become significant on scales near and beyond the Hubble scale at each redshift. We find that the GR corrections are at most percent-level in LOFAR, WODAN and EMU surveys, but they can produce O(10%) changes for high enough sensitivity SKA continuum surveys. The signal is however dominated by cosmic variance, and multiple-tracer techniques will be needed to overcome this problem. The GR corrections are suppressed in continuum surveys because of the integration over redshift — we expect that GR corrections will be enhanced for future SKA HI surveys in which the source redshifts will be known. We also provide predictions for the angular power spectra in the case where the primordial perturbations have local non-Gaussianity. We find that non-Gaussianity dominates over GR corrections, and rises above cosmic variance when fNLgtrsim5 for SKA continuum surveys.

  9. Integrated radio continuum spectra of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Marvil, Joshua; Owen, Frazer; Eilek, Jean

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the spectral shape of the total continuum radiation, between 74 MHz and 5 GHz (400-6 cm in wavelength), for a large sample of bright galaxies. We take advantage of the overlapping survey coverage of the VLA Low-Frequency Sky Survey, the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey, the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, and the Green Bank 6 cm Survey to achieve significantly better resolution, sensitivity, and sample size compared to prior efforts of this nature. For our sample of 250 bright galaxies we measure a mean spectral index, α, of –0.69 between 1.4 and 4.85 GHz, –0.55 between 325 MHz and 1.4 GHz, and –0.45 between 74 and 325 MHz, which amounts to a detection of curvature in the mean spectrum. The magnitude of this curvature is approximately Δα = –0.2 per logarithmic frequency decade when fit with a generalized function having constant curvature. No trend in low-frequency spectral flattening versus galaxy inclination is evident in our data, suggesting that free-free absorption is not a satisfying explanation for the observed curvature. The ratio of thermal to non-thermal emission is estimated through two independent methods: (1) using the IRAS far-IR fluxes and (2) with the value of the total spectral index. Method (1) results in a distribution of 1.4 GHz thermal fractions of 9% ± 3%, which is consistent with previous studies, while method (2) produces a mean 1.4 GHz thermal fraction of 51% with dispersion 26%. The highly implausible values produced by method (2) indicate that the sum of typical power-law thermal and non-thermal components is not a viable model for the total spectral index between 325 and 1.4 GHz. An investigation into relationships between spectral index, infrared-derived quantities, and additional source properties reveals that galaxies with high radio luminosity in our sample are found to have, on average, a flatter radio spectral index, and early types tend to have excess radio emission when compared to the radio-infrared ratio of later

  10. Integrated Radio Continuum Spectra of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvil, Joshua; Owen, Frazer; Eilek, Jean

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the spectral shape of the total continuum radiation, between 74 MHz and 5 GHz (400-6 cm in wavelength), for a large sample of bright galaxies. We take advantage of the overlapping survey coverage of the VLA Low-Frequency Sky Survey, the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey, the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, and the Green Bank 6 cm Survey to achieve significantly better resolution, sensitivity, and sample size compared to prior efforts of this nature. For our sample of 250 bright galaxies we measure a mean spectral index, α, of -0.69 between 1.4 and 4.85 GHz, -0.55 between 325 MHz and 1.4 GHz, and -0.45 between 74 and 325 MHz, which amounts to a detection of curvature in the mean spectrum. The magnitude of this curvature is approximately Δα = -0.2 per logarithmic frequency decade when fit with a generalized function having constant curvature. No trend in low-frequency spectral flattening versus galaxy inclination is evident in our data, suggesting that free-free absorption is not a satisfying explanation for the observed curvature. The ratio of thermal to non-thermal emission is estimated through two independent methods: (1) using the IRAS far-IR fluxes and (2) with the value of the total spectral index. Method (1) results in a distribution of 1.4 GHz thermal fractions of 9% ± 3%, which is consistent with previous studies, while method (2) produces a mean 1.4 GHz thermal fraction of 51% with dispersion 26%. The highly implausible values produced by method (2) indicate that the sum of typical power-law thermal and non-thermal components is not a viable model for the total spectral index between 325 and 1.4 GHz. An investigation into relationships between spectral index, infrared-derived quantities, and additional source properties reveals that galaxies with high radio luminosity in our sample are found to have, on average, a flatter radio spectral index, and early types tend to have excess radio emission when compared to the radio-infrared ratio of later types

  11. A continuum damage model of fatigue-induced damage in laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Allen, David H.

    1988-01-01

    A model is presented which predicts the stress-strain behavior of continuous fiber reinforced laminated composites in the presence of microstructural damage. The model is based on the concept of continuum damage mechanics and uses internal state variables to characterize the various damage modes. The associated internal state variable growth laws are mathematical models of the loading history induced development of microstructural damage. The model is demonstrated by using it to predict the response of damaged AS-4/3502 graphite/epoxy laminate panels.

  12. Fabrication of cellular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prud'homme, Robert K.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Garg, Rajeev

    1996-02-01

    Nature uses cellular materials in applications requiring strength while, simultaneously, minimizing raw materials requirements. Minimizing raw materials is efficient both in terms of the energy expended by the organism to synthesize the structure and in terms of the strength- to-weight ratio of the structure. Wood is the most obvious example of cellular bio-materials, and it is the focus of other presentations in this symposium. The lightweight bone structure of birds is another excellent example where weight is a key criterion. The anchoring foot of the common muscle [Mytilus edulis] whereby it attaches itself to objects is a further example of a biological system that uses a foam to fill space and yet conserve on raw materials. In the case of the muscle the foam is water filled and the foot structure distributes stress over a larger area so that the strength of the byssal thread from which it is suspended is matched to the strength of interfacial attachment of the foot to a substrate. In these examples the synthesis and fabrication of the cellular material is directed by intercellular, genetically coded, biochemical reactions. The resulting cell sizes are microns in scale. Cellular materials at the next larger scale are created by organisms at the next higher level of integration. For example an African tree frog lays her eggs in a gas/fluid foam sack she builds on a branch overhanging a pond. The outside of the foam sack hardens in the sun and prevents water evaporation. The foam structure minimizes the amount of fluid that needs to be incorporated into the sack and minimizes its weight. However, as far as the developing eggs are concerned, they are in an aqueous medium, i.e. the continuous fluid phase of the foam. After precisely six days the eggs hatch, and the solidified outer wall re-liquefies and dumps the emerging tadpoles into the pond below. The bee honeycomb is an example of a cellular material with exquisite periodicity at millimeter length scales. The

  13. CRITIQUE OF DUAL CONTINUUM FORMULATIONS OF MULTICOMPONENT REACTIVE TRANSPORT IN FRACTURED POROUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtner, P.C.

    2000-02-01

    Subsurface flow processes may take place at many different scales. The different scales refer to rock pore structure, micro-fractures, distinct fracture networks ranging from small to large fracture spacing, and even faults. Presently, there is no satisfactory methodology for describing quantitatively flow and reactive transport in multi-scale media. Approaches commonly applied to model fractured systems include single continuum models (SCM), equivalent continuum models (ECM), discrete fracture models (DFM), and various forms of dual continuum models (DCM). The SCM describes flow in the fracture network only and is valid in the absence of fracture-matrix interaction. The ECM, on the other hand, requires pervasive interaction between fracture and matrix and is based on averaging their properties. The ECM is characterized by equal fracture and matrix solute concentrations, but generally different mineral concentrations. The DFM is perhaps the most rigorous, but would require inordinate computational resources for a highly fractured rock mass. The DCM represents a fractured porous medium as two interacting continua with one continuum corresponding to the fracture network and the other the matrix. A coupling term provides mass transfer between the two continua. Vidues for mineral and solute concentrations and other properties such as liquid saturation state maybe assigned individually to fracture and matrix. Two forms of the DCM are considered characterized by connected and disconnected matrix blocks. The former is referred to as the DCCM (dual continuum connected matrix) model and the latter as the DCDM (dual continuum disconnected matrix) model. In contrast to the DCCM model in which concentration gradients in the matrix are allowed only parallel to the fracture, the DFM provides for matrix concentration gradients perpendicular to the fracture. The DFM and DCCM models can agree with each other only in the case where both reduce to the ECM. The DCCM model exhibits the

  14. Continuum and molecular-dynamics simulation of nanodroplet collisions.

    PubMed

    Bardia, Raunak; Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel; Trujillo, Mario F

    2016-05-01

    The extent to which the continuum treatment holds in binary droplet collisions is examined in the present work by using a continuum-based implicit surface capturing strategy (volume-of-fluid coupled to Navier-Stokes) and a molecular dynamics methodology. The droplet pairs are arranged in a head-on-collision configuration with an initial separation distance of 5.3 nm and a velocity of 3 ms^{-1}. The size of droplets ranges from 10-50 nm. Inspecting the results, the collision process can be described as consisting of two periods: a preimpact phase that ends with the initial contact of both droplets, and a postimpact phase characterized by the merging, deformation, and coalescence of the droplets. The largest difference between the continuum and molecular dynamics (MD) predictions is observed in the preimpact period, where the continuum-based viscous and pressure drag forces significantly overestimate the MD predictions. Due to large value of Knudsen number in the gas (Kn_{gas}=1.972), this behavior is expected. Besides the differences between continuum and MD, it is also observed that the continuum simulations do not converge for the set of grid sizes considered. This is shown to be directly related to the initial velocity profile and the minute size of the nanodroplets. For instance, for micrometer-size droplets, this numerical sensitivity is not an issue. During the postimpact period, both MD and continuum-based simulations are strikingly similar, with only a moderate difference in the peak kinetic energy recorded during the collision process. With values for the Knudsen number in the liquid (Kn_{liquid}=0.01 for D=36nm) much closer to the continuum regime, this behavior is expected. The 50 nm droplet case is sufficiently large to be predicted reasonably well with the continuum treatment. However, for droplets smaller than approximately 36 nm, the departure from continuum behavior becomes noticeably pronounced, and becomes drastically different for the 10 nm

  15. Continuum approaches to understanding ion and peptide interactions with the membrane.

    PubMed

    Latorraca, Naomi R; Callenberg, Keith M; Boyle, Jon P; Grabe, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Experimental and computational studies have shown that cellular membranes deform to stabilize the inclusion of transmembrane (TM) proteins harboring charge. Recent analysis suggests that membrane bending helps to expose charged and polar residues to the aqueous environment and polar head groups. We previously used elasticity theory to identify membrane distortions that minimize the insertion of charged TM peptides into the membrane. Here, we extend our work by showing that it also provides a novel, computationally efficient method for exploring the energetics of ion and small peptide penetration into membranes. First, we show that the continuum method accurately reproduces energy profiles and membrane shapes generated from molecular simulations of bare ion permeation at a fraction of the computational cost. Next, we demonstrate that the dependence of the ion insertion energy on the membrane thickness arises primarily from the elastic properties of the membrane. Moreover, the continuum model readily provides a free energy decomposition into components not easily determined from molecular dynamics. Finally, we show that the energetics of membrane deformation strongly depend on membrane patch size both for ions and peptides. This dependence is particularly strong for peptides based on simulations of a known amphipathic, membrane binding peptide from the human pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. In total, we address shortcomings and advantages that arise from using a variety of computational methods in distinct biological contexts. PMID:24652510

  16. Continuum Approaches to Understanding Ion and Peptide Interactions with the Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Latorraca, Naomi R.; Callenberg, Keith M.; Boyle, Jon P.; Grabe, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and computational studies have shown that cellular membranes deform to stabilize the inclusion of transmembrane (TM) proteins harboring charge. Recent analysis suggests that membrane bending helps to expose charged and polar residues to the aqueous environment and polar head groups. We previously used elasticity theory to identify membrane distortions that minimize the insertion of charged TM peptides into the membrane. Here, we extend our work by showing that it also provides a novel, computationally efficient method for exploring the energetics of ion and small peptide penetration into membranes. First, we show that the continuum method accurately reproduces energy profiles and membrane shapes generated from molecular simulations of bare ion permeation at a fraction of the computational cost. Next, we demonstrate that the dependence of the ion insertion energy on the membrane thickness arises primarily from the elastic properties of the membrane. Moreover, the continuum model readily provides a free energy decomposition into components not easily determined from molecular dynamics. Finally, we show that the energetics of membrane deformation strongly depend on membrane patch size both for ions and peptides. This dependence is particularly strong for peptides based on simulations of a known amphipathic, membrane binding peptide from the human pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. In total, we address shortcomings and advantages that arise from using a variety of computational methods in distinct biological contexts. PMID:24652510

  17. Probabilistic Cellular Automata

    PubMed Central

    Agapie, Alexandru; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cellular automata are binary lattices used for modeling complex dynamical systems. The automaton evolves iteratively from one configuration to another, using some local transition rule based on the number of ones in the neighborhood of each cell. With respect to the number of cells allowed to change per iteration, we speak of either synchronous or asynchronous automata. If randomness is involved to some degree in the transition rule, we speak of probabilistic automata, otherwise they are called deterministic. With either type of cellular automaton we are dealing with, the main theoretical challenge stays the same: starting from an arbitrary initial configuration, predict (with highest accuracy) the end configuration. If the automaton is deterministic, the outcome simplifies to one of two configurations, all zeros or all ones. If the automaton is probabilistic, the whole process is modeled by a finite homogeneous Markov chain, and the outcome is the corresponding stationary distribution. Based on our previous results for the asynchronous case—connecting the probability of a configuration in the stationary distribution to its number of zero-one borders—the article offers both numerical and theoretical insight into the long-term behavior of synchronous cellular automata. PMID:24999557

  18. Cellular therapy in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Parida, Shreemanta K; Madansein, Rajhmun; Singh, Nalini; Padayatchi, Nesri; Master, Iqbal; Naidu, Kantharuben; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Cellular therapy now offer promise of potential adjunct therapeutic options for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). We review here the role of Mesenchymal stromal cells, (MSCs), as well as other immune effector cells in the therapy of infectious diseases with a focus on TB. MSCs represent a population of tissue-resident non-hematopoietic adult progenitor cells which home into injured tissues increase the proliferative potential of broncho-alveolar stem cells and restore lung epithelium. MSCs have been shown to be immune-modulatory and anti-inflammatory mediated via cell-cell contacts as well as soluble factors. We discuss the functional profile of MSCs and their potential use for adjunct cellular therapy of multi-drug resistant TB, with the aim of limiting tissue damage, and to convert unproductive inflammatory responses into effective anti-pathogen directed immune responses. Adjunct cellular therapy could potentially offer salvage therapy options for patients with drug-resistant TB, increase clinically relevant anti-M.tuberculosis directed immune responses and possibly shorten the duration of anti-TB therapy. PMID:25809753

  19. Genomic Study of Cardiovascular Continuum Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Makeeva, O. A.; Sleptsov, A. A.; Kulish, E. V.; Barbarash, O. L.; Mazur, A. M.; Prokhorchuk, E. B.; Chekanov, N. N.; Stepanov, V. A.; Puzyrev, V. P.

    2015-01-01

    Comorbidity or a combination of several diseases in the same individual is a common and widely investigated phenomenon. However, the genetic background for non–random disease combinations is not fully understood. Modern technologies and approaches to genomic data analysis enable the investigation of the genetic profile of patients burdened with several diseases (polypathia, disease conglomerates) and its comparison with the profiles of patients with single diseases. An association study featuring three groups of patients with various combinations of cardiovascular disorders and a control group of relatively healthy individuals was conducted. Patients were selected as follows: presence of only one disease, ischemic heart disease (IHD); a combination of two diseases, IHD and arterial hypertension (AH); and a combination of several diseases, including IHD, AH, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and hypercholesterolemia (HC). Genotyping was performed using the “My Gene” genomic service (www.i–gene.ru). An analysis of 1,400 polymorphic genetic variants and their associations with the studied phenotypes are presented. A total of 14 polymorphic variants were associated with the phenotype “IHD only,” including those in the APOB, CD226, NKX2–5, TLR2, DPP6, KLRB1, VDR, SCARB1, NEDD4L, and SREBF2 genes, and intragenic variants rs12487066, rs7807268, rs10896449, and rs944289. A total of 13 genetic markers were associated with the “IHD and AH” phenotype, including variants in the BTNL2, EGFR, CNTNAP2, SCARB1, and HNF1A genes, and intragenic polymorphisms rs801114, rs10499194, rs13207033, rs2398162, rs6501455, and rs1160312. A total of 14 genetic variants were associated with a combination of several diseases of cardiovascular continuum (CVC), including those in the TAS2R38, SEZ6L, APOA2, KLF7, CETP, ITGA4, RAD54B, LDLR, and MTAP genes, along with intragenic variants rs1333048, rs1333049, and rs6501455. One common genetic marker was identified for the

  20. A Description of the Continuum of Eating Disorders: Implications for Intervention and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarano, Gina M.; Kalodner-Martin, Cynthia R.

    1994-01-01

    Presents an eating disorders continuum. Describes groups on the continuum by highlighting behavioral, cognitive-attitudinal, and self-esteem differences. Discusses relationship between continuum and developmental course of eating disorders. Presents prevention, early intervention, and treatment programs for various continuum groups. Offers…

  1. On the Taylor test, Part 3: A continuum mechanics code analysis of steady plastic wave propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Maudlin, P.J.; Foster, J.C. Jr.; Jones, S.E.

    1994-11-01

    Simple conservation relationships (``Jump`` conditions) in conjunction with postulated material constitutive behavior are applied to steady plastic strain waves propagating in problems of uniaxial stress and Taylor Cylinder Impact. These problems are simulated with a two-dimensional Lagrangian continuum mechanics code for numerically validating the Jump relationships as an accurate analytical representation of plastic wave propagation. The constitutive behavior used in this effort assumes isotropy and models the thermodynamic response with a Mie-Grunisen Equation-of-State and the mechanical response with the rate-dependent Johnson-Cook and MTS flow stress models. The Jump relationships successfully replicate the results produced by continuum code simulations of plastic wave propagation and provide a methodology for constructing mechanical constitutive models from experimental plastic wave speed information. Comparisons are also presented between experimental speeds from Taylor Cylinder Impact tests with Jump relationships and continuum code predictions, indicating that the above mentioned flow stress models may not accurately capture plastic wave propagation speeds in annealed and hardened copper.

  2. On mesoscale methods to enhance full-stress continuum modeling of porous compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbold, Eric B.; Swift, Damian C.; Kraus, Richard G.; Homel, Michael; Lorenzana, Hector E.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamic compaction of initially porous material is typically treated in continuum dynamics simulations via adjustments to the scalar equation of state (EOS) of the bulk, porous material relative to that of the solid. However, the behavior during compaction is governed by inelastic processes, as the solid material deforms, largely by shearing, to fill the voids. The resulting response depends on the strain path, e.g. isotropic versus uniaxial loading. Adjustments to the EOS are therefore fundamentally unsuited to describing porous compaction, and it is desirable to consider porous effects through the stress and strain tensors. We have investigated porous modifications to continuum strength models, designed to reproduce elastic wave speeds in porous materials and the crush response observed experimentally during compaction. We have performed mesoscale simulations, resolving the microstructure explicitly, to guide the construction of continuum models. These simulations allow us to study the interplay between strength and EOS in the solid, the extent of dissipative flow versus non-dissipative displacement, and the evolution of porosity and micro-morphological features can be captured. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Physical modeling of traffic with stochastic cellular automata

    SciTech Connect

    Schreckenberg, M.; Nagel, K. |

    1995-09-01

    A new type of probabilistic cellular automaton for the physical description of single and multilane traffic is presented. In this model space, time and the velocity of the cars are represented by integer numbers (as usual in cellular automata) with local update rules for the velocity. The model is very efficient for both numerical simulations and analytical investigations. The numerical results from extensive simulations reproduce very well data taken from real traffic (e.g. fundamental diagrams). Several analytical results for the model are presented as well as new approximation schemes for stationary traffic. In addition the relation to continuum hydrodynamic theory (Lighthill-Whitham) and the follow-the-leader models is discussed. The model is part of an interdisciplinary research program in Northrhine-Westfalia (``NRW Forschungsverbund Verkehrssimulation``) for the construction of a large scale microsimulation model for network traffic, supported by the government of NRW.

  4. Mixed discrete-continuum models: A summary of experiences in test interpretation and model prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Jesus; Martinez-Landa, Lurdes

    A number of conceptual models have been proposed for simulating groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured systems. They span the range from continuum porous equivalents to discrete channel networks. The objective of this paper is to show the application of an intermediate approach (mixed discrete-continuum models) to three cases. The approach consists of identifying the dominant fractures (i.e., those carrying most of the flow) and modeling them explicitly as two-dimensional features embedded in a three-dimensional continuum representing the remaining fracture network. The method is based on the observation that most of the water flows through a few fractures, so that explicitly modeling them should help in properly accounting for a large portion of the total water flow. The applicability of the concept is tested in three cases. The first one refers to the Chalk River Block (Canada) in which a model calibrated against a long crosshole test successfully predicted the response to other tests performed in different fractures. The second case refers to hydraulic characterization of a large-scale (about 2 km) site at El Cabril (Spain). A model calibrated against long records (five years) of natural head fluctuations could be used to predict a one-month-long hydraulic test and heads variations after construction of a waste disposal site. The last case refers to hydraulic characterization performed at the Grimsel Test Site in the context of the Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment (FEBEX). Extensive borehole and geologic mapping data were used to build a model that was calibrated against five crosshole tests. The resulting large-scale model predicted steady-state heads and inflows into the test tunnel. The conclusion is that, in all cases, the difficulties associated with the mixed discrete-continuum approach could be overcome and that the resulting models displayed some predictive capabilities.

  5. Soft X-ray continuum radiation from low-energy pinch discharges of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, R.; Booker, R.; Lu, Y.; Lu

    2013-10-01

    Under a study contracted by GEN3 Partners, spectra of high current pinch discharges in pure hydrogen and helium were recorded in the extreme ultraviolet radiation region at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in an attempt to reproduce experimental results published by BlackLight Power, Inc. (BLP) showing predicted continuum radiation due to hydrogen in the 10-30 nm region (Mills, R. L. and Lu, Y. 2010 Hydrino continuum transitions with cutoffs at 22.8 nm and 10.1 nm. Int. J. Hydrog. Energy 35, 8446-8456, doi:10.1016?j.ijhydene.2010.05.098). Alternative explanations were considered to the claimed interpretation of the continuum radiation as being that emitted during transitions of H to lower-energy states (hydrinos). Continuum radiation was observed at CfA in the 10-30 nm region that matched BLP's results. Considering the low energy of 5.2 J per pulse, the observed radiation in the energy range of about 120-40 eV, reference experiments and analysis of plasma gases, cryofiltration to remove contaminants, and spectra of the electrode metal, no conventional explanation was found in the prior or present work to be plausible including contaminants, electrode metal emission, and Bremsstrahlung, ion recombination, molecular or molecular ion band radiation, and instrument artifacts involving radicals and energetic ions reacting at the charge-coupled device and H2 re-radiation at the detector chamber. Moreover, predicted selective extraordinarily high-kinetic energy H was observed by the corresponding Doppler broadening of the Balmer α line.

  6. Femtosecond continuum interferometer for transient phase and transmission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, E.; Terasaki, A.; Kobayashi, T.

    1996-03-01

    We measure difference phase spectra (DPS) over the whole visible spectrum by frequency-domain interferometry (FDI), using chirped femtosecond continuum pulses. The effects of the probe-pulse chirp on time-resolved dispersion relations are studied. Because of the correspondence between time and frequency in the chirp, temporal evolution of the optical Kerr response in CS2 is projected into DPS. In addition, it is found that the chirped continuum shows unexpected frequency shifts owing to induced phase modulation even when the continuum has a flat spectrum. The chirp character can be readily obtained from the projected traces, and the potential application to the single-shot pulse-shape measurement by FDI is discussed. It is shown that the delay-time-corrected spectra satisfy the Kramers-Kronig relations if the continuum has a flat spectrum and does not have higher chirp than the linear chirp but that the distortion caused by the induced modulation of the continuum remains unremoved in the corrected spectra.

  7. Measuring the continuum polarization with ESPaDOnS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyra, A.; Rodrigues, C. V.; Martioli, E.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Our goal is to test the feasibility of obtaining accurate measurements of the continuum polarization from high-resolution spectra using the spectropolarimetric mode of ESPaDOnS. Methods: We used the new pipeline OPERA to reduce recent and archived ESPaDOnS data. Several polarization standard stars and science objects were tested for the linear mode. In addition, the circular mode was tested using several objects from the archive with expected null polarization. Synthetic broad-band polarization was computed from the ESPaDOnS continuum polarization spectra and compared with published values (when available) to quantify the accuracy of the instrument. Results: The continuum linear polarization measured by ESPaDOnS is consistent with broad-band polarimetry measurements available in the literature. The accuracy in the degree of linear polarization is around 0.2-0.3% considering the full sample. The accuracy in polarization position angle using the most polarized objects is better than 5°. Consistent with this, the instrumental polarization computed for the circular continuum polarization is also between 0.2-0.3%. Our results suggest that measurements of the continuum polarization using ESPaDOnS are viable and can be used to study many astrophysical objects. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientique of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  8. Do subglacial bedforms comprise a size and shape continuum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Jeremy C.; Clark, Chris D.; Spagnolo, Matteo; Stokes, Chris R.; Greenwood, Sarah L.; Hughes, Anna L. C.; Dunlop, Paul; Hess, Dale

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the evolution of the ice-bed interface is fundamentally important for gaining insight into the dynamics of ice masses and how subglacial landforms are created. However, the formation of the suite of landforms generated at this boundary - subglacial bedforms - is a contentious issue that is yet to be fully resolved. Bedforms formed in aeolian, fluvial, and marine environments either belong to separate morphological populations or are thought to represent a continuum of forms generated by the same governing processes. For subglacial bedforms, a size and shape continuum has been hypothesised, yet it has not been fully tested. Here we analyse the largest data set of subglacial bedform size and shape measurements ever collated (96,900 bedforms). Our results show that flutes form a distinct population of narrow bedforms. However, no clear distinction was found between drumlins and megascale glacial lineations (MSGLs), which form a continuum of subglacial lineations. A continuum of subglacial ribs also exists, with no clear size or shape distinctions indicating separate populations. Furthermore, an underreported class of bedform with no clear orientation to ice flow (quasi-circular bedforms) overlaps with the ribbed and lineation continua and typically occurs in spatial transition zones between the two, potentially merging these three bedform types into a larger continuum.

  9. Suicide and the continuum of self-destructive behavior.

    PubMed

    Firestone, R W; Seiden, R H

    1990-03-01

    Suicide and self-destructive behavior are strongly influenced by a negative thought process, referred to here as the "voice." The voice process represents a well-integrated pattern of thoughts, attitudes, and beliefs, antithetical to self and hostile toward others, that is at the core of a patient's self-limitations and self-defeating actions. The voice varies along a continuum of intensity ranging from mild self-criticism to angry self-attacks and even suicidal thoughts. Self-destructive behavior similarly exists on a continuum ranging from self-denial to accident proneness, drug abuse, alcoholism, and other self-defeating behaviors, culminating in actual bodily harm. The two processes, cognitive and behavioral, parallel each other, and suicide represents the acting out of the extreme end of the continuum. The authors provide a chart depicting the levels of increasing suicidal intent along the continuum. The chart identifies specific negative thoughts and injunctions typically reported by persons who attempt suicide, neurotic patients, and "normal" subjects. Understanding where an individual can be placed on the continuum of self-destructive thoughts and actions can assist clinicians in their diagnoses and help pinpoint those students who are more at risk for suicide.

  10. ISO-SWS spectra of galaxies: Continuum and features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, E.; Lutz, D.; Tran, D.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Genzel, R.; Kunze, D.; Moorwood, A. F. M.; Thornley, M. D.

    2000-06-01

    We present an inventory of mid-infrared spectral features detected in high resolution (R ~ 1500) ISO-SWS 2.4-45mu m spectra of the galaxies M 82, NGC 253, Circinus, NGC 1068, and a position in the 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. We discuss their identifications and highlight possible relations between these features and the physical state of the interstellar medium in galaxies. The spectral features vary considerably from source to source in presence and relative strength. Emission features are largely absent in the intense radiation field close to an AGN. Compared to normal infrared-selected starbursts, they also seem to be weaker in a low metallicity, intensely star forming environment. The large number of features beyond 13mu m is remarkable. Some of the features have - to our knowledge - not been reported before in astronomical objects. In the 5-13mu m region, emission from unidentified infrared bands (UIBs), usually ascribed to aromatic molecules, and apparent silicate absorption dominate the spectrum. The density of features makes it difficult to determine the continuum, particularly in ground-based data of limited wavelength coverage. In fact the apparent depth of the 9.7mu m silicate absorption may be overestimated in the presence of UIB emission, as we demonstrate by comparing the spectrum of M 82 to the (absorption free) spectrum of the reflection nebula NGC 7023. No strong silicate absorption is present in M 82. The (very small grain) dust continuum under the UIB emission in our starburst templates can be modeled by a simple power law, starting at wavelengths between 8 and 9mu m. We find broad H_2O-ice absorption features at 3.0mu m in M 82 and NGC 253. Their optical depths (relative to the visual extinction) indicate that the lines of sight towards these galaxies have similar properties as the line of sight towards the Galactic Center. The active galaxy NGC 1068 exhibits a clearly different spectrum of absorption features, indicating

  11. Space Telescope and Optical Reverberation Mapping Project. III. Optical Continuum Emission and Broadband Time Delays in NGC 5548

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fausnaugh, M. M.; Denney, K. D.; Barth, A. J.; Bentz, M. C.; Bottorff, M. C.; Carini, M. T.; Croxall, K. V.; De Rosa, G.; Goad, M. R.; Horne, Keith; Joner, M. D.; Kaspi, S.; Kim, M.; Klimanov, S. A.; Kochanek, C. S.; Leonard, D. C.; Netzer, H.; Peterson, B. M.; Schnülle, K.; Sergeev, S. G.; Vestergaard, M.; Zheng, W.-K.; Zu, Y.; Anderson, M. D.; Arévalo, P.; Bazhaw, C.; Borman, G. A.; Boroson, T. A.; Brandt, W. N.; Breeveld, A. A.; Brewer, B. J.; Cackett, E. M.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Dalla Bontà, E.; De Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Dietrich, M.; Edelson, R.; Efimova, N. V.; Ely, J.; Evans, P. A.; Filippenko, A. V.; Flatland, K.; Gehrels, N.; Geier, S.; Gelbord, J. M.; Gonzalez, L.; Gorjian, V.; Grier, C. J.; Grupe, D.; Hall, P. B.; Hicks, S.; Horenstein, D.; Hutchison, T.; Im, M.; Jensen, J. J.; Jones, J.; Kaastra, J.; Kelly, B. C.; Kennea, J. A.; Kim, S. C.; Korista, K. T.; Kriss, G. A.; Lee, J. C.; Lira, P.; MacInnis, F.; Manne-Nicholas, E. R.; Mathur, S.; McHardy, I. M.; Montouri, C.; Musso, R.; Nazarov, S. V.; Norris, R. P.; Nousek, J. A.; Okhmat, D. N.; Pancoast, A.; Papadakis, I.; Parks, J. R.; Pei, L.; Pogge, R. W.; Pott, J.-U.; Rafter, S. E.; Rix, H.-W.; Saylor, D. A.; Schimoia, J. S.; Siegel, M.; Spencer, M.; Starkey, D.; Sung, H.-I.; Teems, K. G.; Treu, T.; Turner, C. S.; Uttley, P.; Villforth, C.; Weiss, Y.; Woo, J.-H.; Yan, H.; Young, S.

    2016-04-01

    We present ground-based optical photometric monitoring data for NGC 5548, part of an extended multiwavelength reverberation mapping campaign. The light curves have nearly daily cadence from 2014 January to July in nine filters (BVRI and ugriz). Combined with ultraviolet data from the Hubble Space Telescope and Swift, we confirm significant time delays between the continuum bands as a function of wavelength, extending the wavelength coverage from 1158 Å to the z band (~9160 Å). We find that the lags at wavelengths longer than the V band are equal to or greater than the lags of high-ionization-state emission lines (such as He ii λ 1640 and λ 4686), suggesting that the continuum-emitting source is of a physical size comparable to the inner broad-line region (BLR). The trend of lag with wavelength is broadly consistent with the prediction for continuum reprocessing by an accretion disk with τ \\propto {λ }4/3. However, the lags also imply a disk radius that is 3 times larger than the prediction from standard thin-disk theory, assuming that the bolometric luminosity is 10% of the Eddington luminosity (L=0.1{L}{{Edd}}). Using optical spectra from the Large Binocular Telescope, we estimate the bias of the interband continuum lags due to BLR emission observed in the filters. We find that the bias for filters with high levels of BLR contamination (~20%) can be important for the shortest continuum lags and likely has a significant impact on the u and U bands owing to Balmer continuum emission.

  12. Fundamental Limits to Cellular Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Becker, Nils B.; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Mugler, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    In recent years experiments have demonstrated that living cells can measure low chemical concentrations with high precision, and much progress has been made in understanding what sets the fundamental limit to the precision of chemical sensing. Chemical concentration measurements start with the binding of ligand molecules to receptor proteins, which is an inherently noisy process, especially at low concentrations. The signaling networks that transmit the information on the ligand concentration from the receptors into the cell have to filter this receptor input noise as much as possible. These networks, however, are also intrinsically stochastic in nature, which means that they will also add noise to the transmitted signal. In this review, we will first discuss how the diffusive transport and binding of ligand to the receptor sets the receptor correlation time, which is the timescale over which fluctuations in the state of the receptor, arising from the stochastic receptor-ligand binding, decay. We then describe how downstream signaling pathways integrate these receptor-state fluctuations, and how the number of receptors, the receptor correlation time, and the effective integration time set by the downstream network, together impose a fundamental limit on the precision of sensing. We then discuss how cells can remove the receptor input noise while simultaneously suppressing the intrinsic noise in the signaling network. We describe why this mechanism of time integration requires three classes (groups) of resources—receptors and their integration time, readout molecules, energy—and how each resource class sets a fundamental sensing limit. We also briefly discuss the scheme of maximum-likelihood estimation, the role of receptor cooperativity, and how cellular copy protocols differ from canonical copy protocols typically considered in the computational literature, explaining why cellular sensing systems can never reach the Landauer limit on the optimal trade

  13. Cellular mechanics and motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  14. Formin’ cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan, Sven; Schultz, Jörg; Grosshans, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Diaphanous (Dia) protein family are key regulators of fundamental actin driven cellular processes, which are conserved from yeast to humans. Researchers have uncovered diverse physiological roles in cell morphology, cell motility, cell polarity, and cell division, which are involved in shaping cells into tissues and organs. The identification of numerous binding partners led to substantial progress in our understanding of the differential functions of Dia proteins. Genetic approaches and new microscopy techniques allow important new insights into their localization, activity, and molecular principles of regulation. PMID:24719676

  15. A polarizable continuum model for molecules at spherical diffuse interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Remigio, Roberto; Mozgawa, Krzysztof; Cao, Hui; Weijo, Ville; Frediani, Luca

    2016-03-01

    We present an extension of the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) to simulate solvent effects at diffuse interfaces with spherical symmetry, such as nanodroplets and micelles. We derive the form of the Green's function for a spatially varying dielectric permittivity with spherical symmetry and exploit the integral equation formalism of the PCM for general dielectric environments to recast the solvation problem into a continuum solvation framework. This allows the investigation of the solvation of ions and molecules in nonuniform dielectric environments, such as liquid droplets, micelles or membranes, while maintaining the computationally appealing characteristics of continuum solvation models. We describe in detail our implementation, both for the calculation of the Green's function and for its subsequent use in the PCM electrostatic problem. The model is then applied on a few test systems, mainly to analyze the effect of interface curvature on solvation energetics.

  16. Continuum model of tendon pathology – where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    McCreesh, Karen; Lewis, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Chronic tendon pathology is a common and often disabling condition, the causes of which remain poorly understood. The continuum model of tendon pathology was proposed to provide a model for the staging of tendon pathology and to assist clinicians in managing this often complex condition (Br. J. Sports Med., 43, 2009, 409). The model presents clinical, histological and imaging evidence for the progression of tendon pathology as a three-stage continuum: reactive tendinopathy, tendon disrepair and degenerative tendinopathy. It also provides clinical information to assist in identifying the stage of pathology, in addition to proposed treatment approaches for each stage. The usefulness of such a model is determined by its ability to incorporate and inform new and emerging research. This review examines the degree to which recent research supports or refutes the continuum model and proposes future directions for clinical and research application of the model. PMID:23837792

  17. A polarizable continuum model for molecules at spherical diffuse interfaces.

    PubMed

    Di Remigio, Roberto; Mozgawa, Krzysztof; Cao, Hui; Weijo, Ville; Frediani, Luca

    2016-03-28

    We present an extension of the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) to simulate solvent effects at diffuse interfaces with spherical symmetry, such as nanodroplets and micelles. We derive the form of the Green's function for a spatially varying dielectric permittivity with spherical symmetry and exploit the integral equation formalism of the PCM for general dielectric environments to recast the solvation problem into a continuum solvation framework. This allows the investigation of the solvation of ions and molecules in nonuniform dielectric environments, such as liquid droplets, micelles or membranes, while maintaining the computationally appealing characteristics of continuum solvation models. We describe in detail our implementation, both for the calculation of the Green's function and for its subsequent use in the PCM electrostatic problem. The model is then applied on a few test systems, mainly to analyze the effect of interface curvature on solvation energetics. PMID:27036423

  18. Manipulability, force, and compliance analysis for planar continuum manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gravagne, Ian A.; Walker, Ian D.

    2002-01-01

    Continuum manipulators, inspired by the natural capabilities of elephant trunks and octopus tentacles, may find niche applications in areas like human-robot interaction, multiarm manipulation, and unknown environment exploration. However, their true capabilities will remain largely inaccessible without proper analytical tools to evaluate their unique properties. Ellipsoids have long served as one of the foremost analytical tools available to the robotics researcher, and the purpose of this paper is to first formulate, and then to examine, three types of ellipsoids for continuum robots: manipulability, force, and compliance.

  19. FUV Continuum in Flare Kernels Observed by IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daw, Adrian N.; Kowalski, Adam; Allred, Joel C.; Cauzzi, Gianna

    2016-05-01

    Fits to Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) spectra observed from bright kernels during the impulsive phase of solar flares are providing long-sought constraints on the UV/white-light continuum emission. Results of fits of continua plus numerous atomic and molecular emission lines to IRIS far ultraviolet (FUV) spectra of bright kernels are presented. Constraints on beam energy and cross sectional area are provided by cotemporaneous RHESSI, FERMI, ROSA/DST, IRIS slit-jaw and SDO/AIA observations, allowing for comparison of the observed IRIS continuum to calculations of non-thermal electron beam heating using the RADYN radiative-hydrodynamic loop model.

  20. Diffuse Galactic low energy gamma ray continuum emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skibo, J. G.; Ramaty, R.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the origin of diffuse low-energy Galactic gamma-ray continuum down to about 30 keV. We calculate gamma-ray emission via bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering by propagating an unbroken electron power law injection spectrum and employing a Galactic emmissivity model derived from COSB observations. To maintain the low energy electron population capable of producing the observed continuum via bremsstrahlung, a total power input of 4 x 10 exp 41 erg/s is required. This exceeds the total power supplied to the nuclear cosmic rays by about an order of magnitude.

  1. Improving the Capabilities of a Continuum Laser Plasma Interaction Code

    SciTech Connect

    Hittinger, J F; Dorr, M R

    2006-06-15

    The numerical simulation of plasmas is a critical tool for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). We have been working to improve the predictive capability of a continuum laser plasma interaction code pF3d, which couples a continuum hydrodynamic model of an unmagnetized plasma to paraxial wave equations modeling the laser light. Advanced numerical techniques such as local mesh refinement, multigrid, and multifluid Godunov methods have been adapted and applied to nonlinear heat conduction and to multifluid plasma models. We describe these algorithms and briefly demonstrate their capabilities.

  2. Resonance continuum coupling in high-permittivity dielectric metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepetit, Thomas; Akmansoy, Eric; Ganne, Jean-Pierre; Lourtioz, Jean-Michel

    2010-11-01

    A detailed investigation of resonance-continuum coupling is carried out both experimentally and theoretically in metamaterials based on high-permittivity dielectric subwavelength resonators. An original experimental scheme is designed at microwave frequencies, which mimics a periodic array of resonators. Fano resonances are discussed in the framework of temporal coupled mode theory for the cases where one or two resonator modes couples to the continuum. Fano lineshapes are unambiguously demonstrated experimentally for the single-mode case in agreement with theoretical modeling. Numerical evidence of resonance trapping is shown in the two-mode case when modes with the same symmetry coincide in frequency.

  3. Transformations of consciousness. A cartography, II. The perception-meditation continuum.

    PubMed

    Fischer, R

    1976-01-01

    The Japanese Zen and Indian Yoga meditation techniques of zazen, dhārnā, dhyān, savichār- and nirvichār-samādhi are cartographed on a perception-meditation continuum of increasing trophotropic arousal. Certain psychophysiological characteristics and experiential dimensions of these hypometabolic states are discussed and it is proposed that observer-observed interactions or trans-substantiation (commonly termed 'reality') may not be subject to Goedelian restrictions if they proceed in hyper- and hypoaroused states. The meaning of aroused, non-verbal and logically non-Aristotelean states cannot be conveyed to individuals in a non-aroused state. The converse is also true when the relationship of arousal levels is reversed.

  4. Cellular differentiation: the violin strikes up another tune.

    PubMed

    Cook, Michael A; Tyers, Mike

    2004-01-01

    A switch in cellular identity in budding yeast requires the ubiquitin-dependent elimination of pre-existing master regulators encoded by the MAT locus. Failure to disassemble the prior state not only impairs the cell type transition but imparts a hybrid cellular fate. This theme will undoubtedly arise in many developmental and disease contexts. PMID:14711426

  5. Pattern formation during vapor deposition of organic films on inorganic substrates-continuum modeling vs experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vree, C.; Mayr, S. G.

    2009-03-01

    The early stages during low temperature vapor deposition of organic materials onto inorganic substrates are frequently characterized by surface pattern formation on a characteristic length scale, accompanied by dramatic roughening, while these structures level at higher film thicknesses. Unexplainable by traditional liquid-state dewetting scenarios, we employ a combined experimental/modeling study to track down the underlying physics using poly(bisphenol A carbonate) (PC) on GaAs (100) as a model system. We present a minimum continuum model, which incorporates only material deposition and chemical potential driven surface diffusion as material processes, whose numerical solution is capable of reproducing key experimental features.

  6. Continuum Level Formulation and Implementation of a Multi-scale Model for Vanadium

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2009-08-17

    A multi-scale approach is used to construct a continuum strength model for vanadium. The model is formulated assuming plastic deformation by dislocation motion and strain hardening due to dislocation interactions. Dislocation density is adopted as the state variable in the model. Information from molecular statics, molecular dynamics and dislocation dynamics simulations is combined to create kinetic relations for dislocation motion, strain hardening relations and evolution equations for the dislocation density. Implicit time integration of the constitutive equations is described in the context of implementation in a finite element code. Results are provided illustrating the strain, strain rate, temperature and pressure dependence of the constitutive model.

  7. The nature of the continuum limit in strongly coupled quenched [ital QED

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, M.; Kogut, J.B. ); Kocic, A. ); Wang, K.C. )

    1992-02-05

    We review the results of large scale simulations of noncompact quenched [ital QED] which use spectrum and Equation of State calculations to determine the theory's phase diagram, critical indices, and continuum limit. The resulting anomalous dimensions are in good agreement with Schwinger-Dyson solutions of the ladder graphs of conventional [ital QED] and they satisfy the hyperscaling relations expected of a relativistic renormalizable field theory. The spectroscopy results satisfy the constraints of the Goldstone mechanism and PCAC, and may be indicative of Technicolor versions of the Standard Model which are strongly coupled at short distances.

  8. Coexistence and Coupling of Zero-Dimensional, Two-Dimensional and Continuum Resonances in Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, V.; Bester, G.; Zunger, A.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a matrix exhibit a coexistence of 'zero-dimensional' (0D) bound electron and hole states on the dot with 'three-dimensional' (3D) continuum states of the surrounding matrix. In epitaxial QDs one encounters also 'two-dimensional' (2D) states of a quantum well-like supporting structure (wetting layer). This coexistence of 0D, 2D, and 3D states leads to interesting electronic consequences explored here using multiband atomistic pseudopotential calculations. We distinguish strained dots (InAs in GaAs) and strain-free dots (InAs in GaSb) finding crucial differences: in the former case 'potential wings' appear in the electron confining potential in the vicinity of the dot. This results in the appearance of localized electronic states that lie above the threshold of the 3D continuum. Such resonances are 'strain-induced localized states' (SILSs) appearing in strained systems, whereas in strain-free systems the dot resonances in the continuum are the usual 'virtual bound states' (VBSs). The SILSs were found to occur regardless of the thickness of the wetting layer and even in interdiffused dots, provided that the interdiffusion length is small compared to the QD size. Thus, the SILSs are well isolated from the environment by the protective potential wings, whereas the VBSs are strongly interacting. These features are seen in our calculated intraband as well as interband absorption spectra. Furthermore, we show that the local barrier created around the dot by these potential wings suppresses the 0D-2D (dot-wetting layer) hybridization of the electron states. Consequently, in contrast to findings of simple model calculations of envelope function, 0D-to-2D 'crossed transitions' (bound hole-to-wetting layer electron) are practically absent because of their spatially indirect character. On the other hand, since no such barrier exists in the hole confining potential, a strong 0D-2D hybridization is present for the hole states. We show this to be the

  9. Baryon Properties from Continuum-QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Cloet, I. C.; Roberts, C. D.; Wilson, D. J.

    2011-10-21

    We provide an inkling of recent progress in hadron physics made using QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations, reviewing: the notion of in-hadron condensates and a putative solution of a gross problem with the cosmological constant; a symmetry-preserving computation that simultaneously correlates the masses of meson and baryon ground- and excited-states, and contributes to a resolution of the conundrum of the Roper resonance; and a prediction for the Q{sup 2}-dependence of u-and d-quark Dirac and Pauli form factors in the proton, which exposes the critical role played by diquark correlations within the nucleon.

  10. Doing Away with Occupation Probability: A New Way to Model Continuum Lowering at White Dwarf Photosphere Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Thomas A.; Winget, Donald E.; Montgomery, Michael H.; Kilcrease, Dave; Nagayama, Taisuke

    2016-01-01

    White dwarfs are interesting for a number of applications including studying equations of state, stellar pulsations, and determining the age of the universe.These interesting applications require accurate determination of surface conditions: temperatures and surface gravity (or mass).The most common technique to estimate the temperature and gravity is to find the model spectrun that best fits the observed spectra of a star (known as the spectroscopic method); however, this model rests on our ability to accurately model the hydrogen spectrum at high densities.There are currently disagreements between the spectroscopic method and other techniques to determine mass.We seek to resolve this issue by exploring the continuum lowering (or disappearance of states) of the hydrogen atom.The current formalism, called "occupation probability," defines some criteria for the isolated atom's bound state to be ionized, then extrapolates the continuous spectrum to the same energy threshold.The two are then combined to create the final cross-section.I introduce a new way of calculating the atomic spectrum by doing some averaging of the plasma interaction potential energy (previously used in the physics community) and directly integrating the Schrodinger equation.This technique is a major improvement over the Taylor expansion used to describe the ion-emitter interaction and removes the need of the occupation probability and treats continuum states and discrete states on the same footing in the spectrum calculation.The resulting energy spectrum is in fact many discrete states that when averaged over the electric field distribution in the plasma appears to be a continuum.In the low density limit, the two methods are in agreement, but show some differences at high densities (above 10$^{17} e/cc$) including line shifts near the ``continuum'' edge.

  11. Characterizing heterogeneous cellular responses to perturbations.

    PubMed

    Slack, Michael D; Martinez, Elisabeth D; Wu, Lani F; Altschuler, Steven J

    2008-12-01

    Cellular populations have been widely observed to respond heterogeneously to perturbation. However, interpreting the observed heterogeneity is an extremely challenging problem because of the complexity of possible cellular phenotypes, the large dimension of potential perturbations, and the lack of methods for separating meaningful biological information from noise. Here, we develop an image-based approach to characterize cellular phenotypes based on patterns of signaling marker colocalization. Heterogeneous cellular populations are characterized as mixtures of phenotypically distinct subpopulations, and responses to perturbations are summarized succinctly as probabilistic redistributions of these mixtures. We apply our method to characterize the heterogeneous responses of cancer cells to a panel of drugs. We find that cells treated with drugs of (dis-)similar mechanism exhibit (dis-)similar patterns of heterogeneity. Despite the observed phenotypic diversity of cells observed within our data, low-complexity models of heterogeneity were sufficient to distinguish most classes of drug mechanism. Our approach offers a computational framework for assessing the complexity of cellular heterogeneity, investigating the degree to which perturbations induce redistributions of a limited, but nontrivial, repertoire of underlying states and revealing functional significance contained within distinct patterns of heterogeneous responses.

  12. 24 CFR 91.110 - Consultation; states.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of homelessness, the State must consult with: (1) Each Continuum of Care within the state; (2) Public... systems of care that may discharge persons into homelessness (such as health-care facilities,...

  13. 24 CFR 91.110 - Consultation; States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of homelessness, the State must consult with: (1) Each Continuum of Care within the state; (2) Public... systems of care that may discharge persons into homelessness (such as health-care facilities,...

  14. 24 CFR 91.110 - Consultation; States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of homelessness, the State must consult with: (1) Each Continuum of Care within the state; (2) Public... systems of care that may discharge persons into homelessness (such as health-care facilities,...

  15. Return of the Quantum Cellular Automata: Episode VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Lincoln D.; Hillberry, Logan E.; Rall, Patrick; Halpern, Nicole Yunger; Bao, Ning; Montangero, Simone

    2016-05-01

    There are now over 150 quantum simulators or analog quantum computers worldwide. Although exploring quantum phase transitions, many-body localization, and the generalized Gibbs ensemble are exciting and worthwhile endeavors, there are totally untapped directions we have not yet pursued. One of these is quantum cellular automata. In the past a principal goal of quantum cellular automata was to reproduce continuum single particle quantum physics such as the Schrodinger or Dirac equation from simple rule sets. Now that we begin to really understand entanglement and many-body quantum physics at a deeper level, quantum cellular automata present new possibilities. We explore several time evolution schemes on simple spin chains leading to high degrees of quantum complexity and nontrivial quantum dynamics. We explain how the 256 known classical elementary cellular automata reduce to just a few exciting quantum cases. Our analysis tools include mutual information based complex networks as well as more familiar quantifiers like sound speed and diffusion rate. Funded by NSF and AFOSR.

  16. Continuum modelling of pedestrian flows - Part 2: Sensitivity analysis featuring crowd movement phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duives, Dorine C.; Daamen, Winnie; Hoogendoorn, Serge P.

    2016-04-01

    In recent years numerous pedestrian simulation tools have been developed that can support crowd managers and government officials in their tasks. New technologies to monitor pedestrian flows are in dire need of models that allow for rapid state-estimation. Many contemporary pedestrian simulation tools model the movements of pedestrians at a microscopic level, which does not provide an exact solution. Macroscopic models capture the fundamental characteristics of the traffic state at a more aggregate level, and generally have a closed form solution which is necessary for rapid state estimation for traffic management purposes. This contribution presents a next step in the calibration and validation of the macroscopic continuum model detailed in Hoogendoorn et al. (2014). The influence of global and local route choice on the development of crowd movement phenomena, such as dissipation, lane-formation and stripe-formation, is studied. This study shows that most self-organization phenomena and behavioural trends only develop under very specific conditions, and as such can only be simulated using specific parameter sets. Moreover, all crowd movement phenomena can be reproduced by means of the continuum model using one parameter set. This study concludes that the incorporation of local route choice behaviour and the balancing of the aptitude of pedestrians with respect to their own class and other classes are both essential in the correct prediction of crowd movement dynamics.

  17. Modeling the anxiety-depression continuum hypothesis in domestic fowl chicks.

    PubMed

    Sufka, Kenneth J; Feltenstein, Matthew W; Warnick, Jason E; Acevedo, Edmund O; Webb, Heather E; Cartwright, Courtney M

    2006-12-01

    Anxiety and depression are currently classified as separate clinical syndromes despite considerable similarities in their symptoms, pathophysiological substrates and response to treatment interventions. An alternative hypothesis views anxiety and depression along a temporal continuum, a construct that the current research attempts to model in a preclinical setting. In experiment 1, socially raised domestic fowl chicks separated from conspecifics demonstrated a pattern of distress vocalizations that sequentially models anxiety-like and depressive-like states. In addition, administration of the benzodiazepine anxiolytic chlordiazepoxide and the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine provided pharmacological validation for the model in that they were capable of dissociating the anxiety-like and depressive-like states. In experiment 2, corticosterone levels were quantified across the isolation test session to provide convergent validity to the model. These findings fit well with the human clinical literature on the anxiety-depression continuum perspective, and suggest the consideration of a nosology that emphasizes the inter-relatedness of these clinical states rather than their boundaries. PMID:17110794

  18. Inducing cellular senescence using defined genetic elements.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Opitz, Oliver G

    2007-01-01

    Cellular senescence is generally defined as an irreversible state of G1 cell cycle arrest in which cells are refractory to growth factor stimulation. Cellular senescence can be induced through several different mechanisms. Primary mammalian cells display a finite life span, suggesting a mechanism that counts cell divisions. Those cells initially proliferate but eventually enter a state of permanent growth arrest, called replicative senescence. Erosion of telomeric DNA has emerged as a key factor in replicative senescence, which is antagonized during cell immortalization. Nevertheless, besides telomere shortening, there are other mechanisms inducing a growth arrest similar to the replicative senescencent phenotype. Oncogenic or mitogenic signals as well as DNA damage can induce such a phenotype of cellular senescence. All forms of cellular senescence share common signaling pathways and morphological features. Thereby, p53 seems to be essential for the senescence response. Many of these senescence inducing mechanisms can be experimentally recapitulated by the introduction of defined genetic elements. Replicative senescence due to telomere shortening can, for example, be induced by a dominant negative version of telomerase, premature senescence by the overexpression of oncogenic ras, or p16. PMID:17634581

  19. Problem Drinking Continuum: A Tool for Treatment, Training and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worden, Mark; Rosellini, Gayle

    1980-01-01

    The problem drinking continuum was devised to illustrate different kinds of alcohol-related problems, without implying irreversibility, progression, or the presence of a unitary disease. It is one way of conceptualizing alcohol dependencies that has been fruitful in outpatient counseling, residential care, alcohol education, and training programs.…

  20. Isospin Mixing and the Continuum Coupling in Weakly Bound Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, N.; Nazarewicz, Witold; Ploszajczak, M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the near-threshold behavior of one-nucleon spectroscopic factors in mirror nuclei using the Gamow Shell Model, which simultaneously takes into account many-body correlations and continuum effects. We demonstrate that for weakly bound or unbound systems, the mirror symmetry-breaking effects are appreciable, and they manifest in large differences of spectroscopic factors in a mirror pair.

  1. The Eating Disorders Continuum, Self-Esteem, and Perfectionism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Lisa D.; Lightsey, Owen Richard

    2008-01-01

    Among 261 undergraduate women, increased severity of eating disorders along a continuum was associated with decreased self-esteem, increased perfectionism, and increased scores on 7 subscales of the Eating Disorders Inventory-2. Women with eating disorders differed from both symptomatic women and asymptomatic women on all variables, whereas…

  2. Characterizing the radio continuum emission from intense starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvin, T. J.; Seymour, N.; Filipović, M. D.; Tothill, N. F. H.; Marvil, J.; Drouart, G.; Symeonidis, M.; Huynh, M. T.

    2016-09-01

    The intrinsic thermal (free-free) and non-thermal (synchrotron) emission components that comprise the radio continuum of galaxies represent unique, dust-free measures of star formation rates (SFR). Such high SFR galaxies will dominate the deepest current and future radio surveys. We disentangle the thermal and non-thermal emission components of the radio continuum of six ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LFIR > 1012.5 L⊙) at redshifts of 0.2 ≤ z ≤ 0.5 and 22 IR selected galaxies. Radio data over a wide frequency range (0.8 < ν < 10 GHz) are fitted with a star-forming galaxy model comprising of thermal and non-thermal components. The luminosities of both radio continuum components are strongly correlated to the 60 μm luminosity across many orders of magnitude (consistent with the far-IR to radio correlation). We demonstrate that the spectral index of the radio continuum spectral energy distribution is a useful proxy for the thermal fraction. We also find that there is an increase in mean and scatter of the thermal fraction with FIR to radio luminosity ratio which could be influenced by different time-scales of the thermal and non-thermal emission mechanisms.

  3. Space shuttle Ram glow: Implication of NO2 recombination continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Clifton, S.

    1985-09-01

    The ram glow data gathered to data from imaging experiments on space shuttle suggest the glow is a continuum (within 34 angstrom resolution); the continuum shape is such that the peak is near 7000 angstroms decreasing to the blue and red, and the average molecular travel leading to emission after leaving the surface is 20 cm (assuming isotropic scattering from the surface). Emission continuum is rare in molecular systems but the measured spectrum does resemble the laboratory spectrum of NO2 (B) recombination continuum. The thickness of the observed emission is consistent with the NO2 hypothesis given an exit velocity of approx. 2.5 km/sec (1.3 eV) which leaves approx. 3.7 eV of ramming OI energy available for unbonding the recombined NO2 from the surface. The NO2 is formed in a 3-body recombination of OI + NO + m = NO2 + m where OI originates from the atmosphere and NO is chemically formed on the surface from atmospheric NI and OI. The spacecraft surface then acts as the n for the reaction: Evidence exists from orbital mass spectrometer data that the NO and NO2 chemistry described in this process does occur on surfaces of spectrometer orifices in orbit. Surface temperature effects are likely a factor in the NO sticking efficiency and, therefore, glow intensities.

  4. Written Language Developmental Continuum: Preschool-Second Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    The purpose of this "Written Language Developmental Continuum" brochure for preschool-second grade is to provide helpful information for parents, teachers, and other adults as they work with young children to advance and refine written language (writing) competence. The brochure is intended to be a useful tool for assessing children's development…

  5. Continuum modeling of dense granular flow down heaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henann, David; Liu, Daren

    Dense, dry granular flows display many manifestations of grain-size dependence, or nonlocality, in which the finite-size of grains has an observable impact on flow phenomenology. Such behaviors make the formulation of an accurate continuum model for dense granular flow particularly difficult, since local continuum models are not equipped to describe size-effects. One example of grain-size dependence is seen when avalanches occur on a granular heap - a situation which is frequently encountered in industry, as in rotating drums, as well as in nature, such as in landslides. In this case, flow separates into a thin, quickly flowing surface layer and a slowly creeping bulk. While existing local granular flow models are capable of capturing aspects of the flowing surface layer, they fail to even predict the existence of creeping flow beneath, much less being able to quantitatively describe the flow fields. Recently, we have proposed a new, scale-dependent continuum model - the nonlocal granular fluidity (NGF) model - that successfully predicted steady, slow granular flow fields, including grain-size-dependent shear-band widths in a variety of flow configurations. In this talk, we extend our model to the rapid flow regime and show that the model is capable of quantitatively predicting all aspects of gravity-driven heap flow. In particular, the model predicts the coexistence of a rapidly flowing, rate-dependent top surface layer and a rate-independent, slowly creeping bulk - a feature which is beyond local continuum approaches.

  6. Rape nitrogen nutrition diagnosis using continuum-removed hyperspectral reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuehong; Tian, Qingjiu

    2008-12-01

    The hyperspectral reflectance for rape fresh leaves and data of chlorophyll and total nitrogen content were acquired in primary growth stages under different nitrogen levels in order to monitor rape status and diagnose nitrogen using remote sensing method. A new method was developed for estimating the nitrogen nutrition of rape using continuum-removed method, which generally used in spectral analysis on rock and mineral. Based on the continuum-removed treatment and the correlation between absorption feature parameters and total nitrogen content of fresh leaves, results show that reflectance at the visible region decreased with increasing in the nitrogen fertilization, and continuum-removed operation can magnify the subtle difference in spectral absorption characteristics arose from the nitrogen stress on rape. During the seeding stage, bud-emerging stage and flowering stage of rape, total area of absorption peak, area left of the absorption peak and area right of the absorption peak in 550-750 nm region increased with increasing in the nitrogen fertilization, but it was opposite for the area-normalized maximal absorption depth. The correlation analysis indicated that it is at seeding stage that the relation between absorption characteristics parameters and leaf total nitrogen was best close. The research demonstrated that continuum-removed method is a feasible method for quantificational evaluation of rape nitrogen nutrition, and the seeding stage of rape is the best stage for assessment of rape nitrogen nutrition based on absorption characteristics of fresh leaves.

  7. Levels of Mental Health Continuum and Personality Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joshanloo, Mohsen; Nosratabadi, Masoud

    2009-01-01

    Empirically, mental health and mental illness are not opposite ends of a single measurement continuum. In view of this fact, Keyes ("J Health Soc Behav," 43:207-202, 2002) operationalizes mental health as a syndrome of symptoms of both positive feelings (emotional well-being) and positive functioning (psychological and social well-being) in life.…

  8. Pidgin and English in Melanesia: Is There a Continuum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    Examines the linguistic features of Tok Pisin (the Papua New Guinea variety of Melanesian Pidgin) resulting from decreolization and the linguistic features of Papua New Guinea English. Discusses code-switching and transference between Tok Pisin and English and concludes that an English-to-pidgin continuum does not exist in Papua New Guinea or in…

  9. Evaluation as a Process: The Formative-Summative Continuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caudle, Sharon L.

    Rather than automatically presuming explicit conditions exist when designing an evaluation to fit the summative or formative mold, evaluators should think of an evaluation design as fitting between endpoints on an evaluation process continuum. Evaluators can blend techniques from both the formative and summative evaluation, matching actual program…

  10. Continuum of Medical Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dohner, Charles W.; Hunter, Charles A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Over the past eight years the obstetric and gynecology specialty has applied a system model of instructional planning to the continuum of medical education. The systems model of needs identification, preassessment, instructional objectives, instructional materials, learning experiences; and evaluation techniques directly related to objectives was…

  11. Online Learning Interaction Continuum (OLIC): A Qualitative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashim, Mohamad Hisyam Mohd.; Hashim, Yusup; Esa, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to explore the use of Blackboard Learning System (BLS) in enhancing interaction in online teaching and learning enviornment. This paper discusses the conceptual framework of Online Learning Interaction Continuum (OLIC) which explains the five levels of interactions. The OLIC was conceptualized as a result of…

  12. Scaffolding the Inquiry Continuum and the Constitution of Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, Wayne; Bartley, Anthony; Fazio, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This article considers the impact of scaffolding on pre-service science teachers' constitution of identities as teachers of inquiry. This scaffolding has consisted of 2 major components, a unit on current electricity which encompasses the inquiry continuum and an open inquiry which is situated in context of classroom practice. Our analysis…

  13. 24 CFR 578.39 - Continuum of Care planning activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Continuum of Care planning activities. 578.39 Section 578.39 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT...

  14. 24 CFR 578.39 - Continuum of Care planning activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Continuum of Care planning activities. 578.39 Section 578.39 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT...

  15. Stimulated Raman scattering seeded by a fibre continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selker, M. D.; Lawandy, N. M.

    1990-01-01

    A broadband continuum generated in a germanosilicate optical fiber has been used as a coherent seed to initiate stimulated Raman scattering in gases. The technique used is described. The results show a fivefold increase in conversion efficiency and a similar reduction in the requisite pump power.

  16. Searching for the Center on the Mathematics-Science Continuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roebuck, Kay I.; Warden, Melissa A.

    1998-01-01

    The history of mathematics and science integration in American schools is a continuum which runs from math for math's sake to science for science's sake. While examples of the integration of process skills are common, integration of content is not. Presents two lessons developed around radioactive decay and efficiency. Suggests that changes in…

  17. The Continuum: A Teaching Strategy for Science and Society Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Jon R.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a decision-making lesson where students rank genetic defects and syndromes from least to most severe. Students are then asked to draw a line in the continuum where they would not feel obligated to support the life, or in the case of an in utero life, maintain the pregnancy. (PR)

  18. JCMT COADD: UKT14 continuum and photometry data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, David; Oliveira, Firmin J.; Tilanus, Remo P. J.; Jenness, Tim

    2014-11-01

    COADD was used to reduce photometry and continuum data from the UKT14 instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope in the 1990s. The software can co-add multiple observations and perform sigma clipping and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical analysis. Additional information on the software is available in the JCMT Spring 1993 newsletter (large PDF).

  19. JCMTDR: Applications for reducing JCMT continuum data in GSD format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightfoot, John F.; Harrison, Paul A.; Meyerdierks, Horst; Jenness, Tim

    2014-06-01

    JCMTDR reduces continuum on-the-fly mapping data obtained with UKT14 or the heterodyne instruments using the IFD on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. This program reduces archive data and heterodyne beam maps and was distributed as part of the Starlink software collection (ascl:1110.012).

  20. Space shuttle ram glow: Implication of NO2 recombination continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Clifton, S.

    1985-01-01

    The ram glow data gathered to data from imaging experiments on space shuttle suggest the glow is a continuum (within 34 angstrom resolution); the continuum shape is such that the peak is near 7000 angstroms decreasing to the blue and red, and the average molecular travel leading to emission after leaving the surface is 20 cm (assuming isotropic scattering from the surface). Emission continuum is rare in molecular systems but the measured spectrum does resemble the laboratory spectrum of NO2 (B) recombination continuum. The thickness of the observed emission is consistent with the NO2 hypothesis given an exit velocity of approx. 2.5 km/sec (1.3 eV) which leaves approx. 3.7 eV of ramming OI energy available for unbonding the recombined NO2 from the surface. The NO2 is formed in a 3-body recombination of OI + NO + m = NO2 + m where OI originates from the atmosphere and NO is chemically formed on the surface from atmospheric NI and OI. The spacecraft surface then acts as the n for the reaction: Evidence exists from orbital mass spectrometer data that the NO and NO2 chemistry described in this process does occur on surfaces of spectrometer orifices in orbit. Surface temperature effects are likely a factor in the NO sticking efficiency and, therefore, glow intensities.

  1. Comparison of Mesomechanical and Continuum Granular Flow Models for Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, D. R.

    2006-07-28

    Constitutive models for the shear strength of ceramics undergoing fracture are needed for modeling long rod and shaped-charge jet penetration events in ceramic armor. The ceramic material ahead of the penetrator has been observed to be finely comminuted material that flows around the nose of the eroding penetrator (Shockey et al.). The most-used continuum models are of the Drucker-Prager type with an upper cutoff, or of the Mohr-Coulomb type with strain rate dependence and strain softening. A disadvantage of such models is that they have an unclear connection to the actual microscopic processes of granular flow and comminution. An alternate approach is to use mesomechanical models that describe the dynamics of the granular flow, as well as containing a description of the granular comminution and resultant material softening. However, a disadvantage of the mesomechanical models is that they are computationally more burdensome to apply. In the present paper, we compare the behaviors of a mesomechanical model, FRAGBED2, with the Walker and Johnson-Holmquist continuum models, where the granular material is subjected to simple strain histories under various confining pressures and strain rates. We conclude that the mesomechanical model can provide valuable input to the continuum models, both in interpretation of the continuum models' parameters and in suggesting their range of applicability.

  2. Predicting Eating Disorder Continuum Groups: Hardiness and College Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon-Boyd, Gail D.; Bieschke, Kathleen J.

    This study examined relationships between hardiness, college adjustment (academic adjustment, social adjustment, personal-emotional adjustment, institutional attachment) and eating disorder (ED) continuum categories in 122 female and 20 male college students. Students who exhibited a higher level of personal-emotional adjustment (PEA) to college…

  3. Continuum Response and Reaction in Neutron-Rich Be Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Ueda, Manabu; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2004-02-27

    We study E1 resonances, breakup and fusion reactions for weakly bound Be nuclei. The absorbing-boundary condition (ABC) is used to describe both the outgoing and incoming boundary conditions. The neutron continuum plays important roles in response and reaction of neutron drip-line nuclei.

  4. The inquiry continuum: Science teaching practices and student performance on standardized tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jernnigan, Laura Jane

    Few research studies have been conducted related to inquiry-based scientific teaching methodologies and NCLB-required state testing. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the strategies used by seventh-grade science teachers in Illinois and student scores on the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to aid in determining best practices/strategies for teaching middle school science. The literature review defines scientific inquiry by placing teaching strategies on a continuum of scientific inquiry methodologies from No Inquiry (Direct Instruction) through Authentic Inquiry. Five major divisions of scientific inquiry: structured inquiry, guided inquiry, learning cycle inquiry, open inquiry, and authentic inquiry, have been identified and described. These five divisions contain eight sub-categories: demonstrations; simple or hands-on activities; discovery learning; variations of learning cycles; problem-based, event-based, and project-based; and student inquiry, science partnerships, and Schwab's enquiry. Quantitative data were collected from pre- and posttests and surveys given to the participants: five seventh grade science teachers in four Academic Excellence Award and Spotlight Award schools and their 531 students. Findings revealed that teachers reported higher inquiry scores for themselves than for their students; the two greatest reported factors limiting teachers' use of inquiry were not enough time and concern about discipline and large class size. Although the correlation between total inquiry and mean difference of pre- and posttest scores was not statistically significant, the survey instrument indicated how often teachers used inquiry in their classes, not the type of inquiry used. Implications arose from the findings that increase the methodology debate between direction instruction and inquiry-based teaching strategies; teachers are very knowledgeable about the Illinois state standards, and various inquiry-based methods

  5. 52. CONCRETE FORMWORK FOR THE VAL CELLULAR 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. CONCRETE FORMWORK FOR THE VAL CELLULAR 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE LOOKING SOUTH, Date unknown, circa December 1946. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. 51. CONCRETE FORMWORK FOR THE VAL CELLULAR 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. CONCRETE FORMWORK FOR THE VAL CELLULAR 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE LOOKING NORTHWEST, Date unknown, circa December 1946. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Folding and faulting of an elastic continuum

    PubMed Central

    Gourgiotis, Panos A.

    2016-01-01

    Folding is a process in which bending is localized at sharp edges separated by almost undeformed elements. This process is rarely encountered in Nature, although some exceptions can be found in unusual layered rock formations (called ‘chevrons’) and seashell patterns (for instance Lopha cristagalli). In mechanics, the bending of a three-dimensional elastic solid is common (for example, in bulk wave propagation), but folding is usually not achieved. In this article, the route leading to folding is shown for an elastic solid obeying the couple-stress theory with an extreme anisotropy. This result is obtained with a perturbation technique, which involves the derivation of new two-dimensional Green's functions for applied concentrated force and moment. While the former perturbation reveals folding, the latter shows that a material in an extreme anisotropic state is also prone to a faulting instability, in which a displacement step of finite size emerges. Another failure mechanism, namely the formation of dilation/compaction bands, is also highlighted. Finally, a geophysical application to the mechanics of chevron formation shows how the proposed approach may explain the formation of natural structures. PMID:27118925

  8. Spectroscopic investigation of the vibrational quasi-continuum arising from internal rotation of a methyl group

    SciTech Connect

    Hougen, J.T.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this project is to use spectroscopic techniques to investigate in detail phenomena involving the vibrational quasi-continuum in a simple physical system. Acetaldehyde was chosen for the study because: (i) methyl groups have been suggested to be important promotors of intramolecular vibrational relaxation, (ii) the internal rotation of a methyl group is an easily describle large-amplitude motion, which should retain its simple character even at high levels of excitation, and (iii) the aldehyde carbonyl group offers the possibility of both vibrational and electronic probing. The present investigation of the ground electronic state has three parts: (1) understanding the {open_quotes}isolated{close_quotes} internal-rotation motion below, at, and above the top of the torsional barrier, (2) understanding in detail traditional (bond stretching and bending) vibrational fundamental and overtone states, and (3) understanding interactions involving states with multiquantum excitations of at least one of these two kinds of motion.

  9. Cellular lifespan and senescence: a complex balance between multiple cellular pathways.

    PubMed

    Dolivo, David; Hernandez, Sarah; Dominko, Tanja

    2016-07-01

    The study of cellular senescence and proliferative lifespan is becoming increasingly important because of the promises of autologous cell therapy, the need for model systems for tissue disease and the implication of senescent cell phenotypes in organismal disease states such as sarcopenia, diabetes and various cancers, among others. Here, we explain the concepts of proliferative cellular lifespan and cellular senescence, and we present factors that have been shown to mediate cellular lifespan positively or negatively. We review much recent literature and present potential molecular mechanisms by which lifespan mediation occurs, drawing from the fields of telomere biology, metabolism, NAD(+) and sirtuin biology, growth factor signaling and oxygen and antioxidants. We conclude that cellular lifespan and senescence are complex concepts that are governed by multiple independent and interdependent pathways, and that greater understanding of these pathways, their interactions and their convergence upon specific cellular phenotypes may lead to viable therapies for tissue regeneration and treatment of age-related pathologies, which are caused by or exacerbated by senescent cells in vivo.

  10. Cellular lifespan and senescence: a complex balance between multiple cellular pathways.

    PubMed

    Dolivo, David; Hernandez, Sarah; Dominko, Tanja

    2016-07-01

    The study of cellular senescence and proliferative lifespan is becoming increasingly important because of the promises of autologous cell therapy, the need for model systems for tissue disease and the implication of senescent cell phenotypes in organismal disease states such as sarcopenia, diabetes and various cancers, among others. Here, we explain the concepts of proliferative cellular lifespan and cellular senescence, and we present factors that have been shown to mediate cellular lifespan positively or negatively. We review much recent literature and present potential molecular mechanisms by which lifespan mediation occurs, drawing from the fields of telomere biology, metabolism, NAD(+) and sirtuin biology, growth factor signaling and oxygen and antioxidants. We conclude that cellular lifespan and senescence are complex concepts that are governed by multiple independent and interdependent pathways, and that greater understanding of these pathways, their interactions and their convergence upon specific cellular phenotypes may lead to viable therapies for tissue regeneration and treatment of age-related pathologies, which are caused by or exacerbated by senescent cells in vivo. PMID:27417120

  11. X-ray line and continuum spectra of solar flares from 0.5 to 8.5 angstroms.

    PubMed

    Meekins, J F; Kreplin, R W; Chubb, T A; Friedman, H

    1968-11-22

    Two crystal spectrometers aboard the orbiting solar observatory OSO-4 cover the wavelength ranges 0.5 to 3.9 angstroms and 1.0 to 8.5 angstroms. Within this range, there appear emission lines from hydrogen-like and helium-like states of calcium, sulfur, silicon, magnesium, and aluminum. The Mg XII Lyman-alpha is present strongly in all x-ray flares. The most intense flares (such as class 3) produce strong Si XIV Lyman-alpha and often S XVI Lyman-alpha. Emission, in the form of Ka lines of highly ionized states of calcium, iron, aluminum, and silicon is usually present. The continuum from 1 to 10 angstroms always dominates the line emission by more than an order of magnitude. Electron temperatures derived from the slope of the continuum spectrum are in the range of 10(7) to 10(8) degrees K, considerably higher than theoretical ionization equilibrium temperatures.

  12. Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with the Method of Continuum-Discretized Coupled-Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, K.; Yahiro, M.; Hashimoto, S.; Iseri, Y.; Kan, M.; Kamimura, M.

    2010-05-12

    The method of continuum-discretized coupled-channels (CDCC) is applied to two nuclear astrophysics studies. One is the determination of the astrophysical factor S{sub 17}(0) for the {sup 7}Be(p,gamma){sup 8}B reaction from the analysis of {sup 8}B breakup by {sup 208}Pb at 52 A MeV. We obtain S{sub 17}(0) = 20.9{sub -1.9}{sup +2.0} eV b, which is significantly larger than the previous one, S{sub 17}(0) = 18.9+-1.8 eV b, determined from an analysis with the virtual photon theory. The difference between the two values is found to be due to the contributions from nuclear breakup and higher-order processes. The other application of CDCC is the re-evaluation of the triple-alpha reaction rate by directly solving the three-body Schroedinger equation. The resonant and nonresonant processes are treated on the same footing. An accurate description of the alpha-alpha nonresonant states significantly quenches the Coulomb barrier between the first two alpha-particles and the third alpha-particle. Consequently, the alpha-alpha nonresonant continuum states give a markedly larger contribution at low temperatures than that reported in previous studies. We find an increase in triple-alpha reaction rate by 26 orders of magnitude around 10{sup 7} K compared with the rate of NACRE.

  13. Comparison of shock structure solutions using independent continuum and kinetic theory approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiscko, Kurt A.; Chapman, Dean R.

    1988-01-01

    A vehicle traversing the atmosphere will experience flight regimes at high altitudes in which the thickness of a hypersonic shock wave is not small compared to the shock standoff distance from the hard body. When this occurs, it is essential to compute accurate flow field solutions within the shock structure. In this paper, one-dimensional shock structure is investigated for various monatomic gases from Mach 1.4 to Mach 35. Kinetic theory solutions are computed using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method. Steady-state solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations and of a slightly truncated form of the Burnett equations are determined by relaxation to a steady state of the time-dependent continuum equations. Monte Carlo results are in excellent agreement with published experimental data and are used as bases of comparison for continuum solutions. For a Maxwellian gas, the truncated Burnett equations are shown to produce far more accurate solutions of shock structure than the Navier-Stokes equations.

  14. Application of continuum- and hybrid models in karst spring catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehrl, Christoph; Birk, Steffen

    2010-05-01

    Flow in karst aquifers is concentrated along highly permeable solution conduits embedded in the much less permeable fissured system of the surrounding rock. This complex and heterogeneous flow regime can be conceptualized as dual flow systems composed of slow, laminar flow in the fractured porous matrix as opposed to rapid, often turbulent flow in solution conduits. Flow in the fractured porous rock can be treated as a continuous flow field (continuum model), whereas flow in the conduit system is spatially localized and can be modelled by a discrete pipe network model. Hybrid models couple both flow systems and have frequently been employed in basic research, e.g., to simulate and analyse the mechanism of speleogenesis. In many practical applications, however, continuum models are employed. In these models the two flow components are lumped together and the conduits are represented by highly permeable cells (smeared conduit approach). Standard groundwater models imply that conduit flow is represented by a Darcian approach, thus ignoring potential effects of turbulent flow. On this account the USGS has recently released a MODFLOW-2005 Conduit Flow Process (CFP), which makes it possible to account for turbulent flow in the continuum approach (CFP mode 2). Additionally a discrete pipe network model can be coupled to MODFLOW. This hybrid model (CFP mode 1) employs the Darcy-Weisbach equation to represent turbulent flow in the karst conduits. In this work, it is attempted to simulate the discharge hydrographs of a hypothetical karst spring catchment in which conduit systems are embedded in fissured porous rock using both the single-continuum approach (CFP mode 2) and the hybrid model (CFP mode 1). This study shows that the hydraulic response of the spring signal is influenced by the flow conditions in the conduit, i.e. the shape of the spring hydrograph predicted by a model that accounts for turbulent flow differs from that obtained with a laminar flow model. This

  15. Cellular bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Welsh, David K; Noguchi, Takako

    2012-08-01

    Bioluminescence imaging of live cells has recently been recognized as an important alternative to fluorescence imaging. Fluorescent probes are much brighter than bioluminescent probes (luciferase enzymes) and, therefore, provide much better spatial and temporal resolution and much better contrast for delineating cell structure. However, with bioluminescence imaging there is virtually no background or toxicity. As a result, bioluminescence can be superior to fluorescence for detecting and quantifying molecules and their interactions in living cells, particularly in long-term studies. Structurally diverse luciferases from beetle and marine species have been used for a wide variety of applications, including tracking cells in vivo, detecting protein-protein interactions, measuring levels of calcium and other signaling molecules, detecting protease activity, and reporting circadian clock gene expression. Such applications can be optimized by the use of brighter and variously colored luciferases, brighter microscope optics, and ultrasensitive, low-noise cameras. This article presents a review of how bioluminescence differs from fluorescence, its applications to cellular imaging, and available probes, optics, and detectors. It also gives practical suggestions for optimal bioluminescence imaging of single cells.

  16. Molecular and cellular targets.

    PubMed

    Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2006-06-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process consisting of initiation, promotion, and progression stages and each stage may be a possible target for chemopreventive agents. A significant outcome of these investigations on the elucidation of molecular and cellular mechanisms is the explication of signal transduction pathways induced by tumor promoters in cancer development. The current belief today is that cancer may be prevented or treated by targeting specific cancer genes, signaling proteins, and transcription factors. The molecular mechanisms explaining how normal cells undergo neoplastic transformation induced by tumor promoters are rapidly being clarified. Accumulating research evidence suggests that many of dietary factors, including tea compounds, may be used alone or in combination with traditional chemotherapeutic agents to prevent or treat cancer. The potential advantage of many natural or dietary compounds seems to focus on their potent anticancer activity combined with low toxicity and very few adverse side effects. This review summarizes some of our recent work regarding the effects of the various tea components on signal transduction pathways involved in neoplastic cell transformation and carcinogenesis. PMID:16688728

  17. Molecular and Cellular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang

    2008-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process consisting of initiation, promotion and progression stages and each stage may be a possible target for chemopreventive agents. A significant outcome of these investigations on the elucidation of molecular and cellular mechanisms is the explication of signal transduction pathways induced by tumor promoters in cancer development. The current belief today is that cancer may be prevented or treated by targeting specific cancer genes, signaling proteins and transcription factors. The molecular mechanisms explaining how normal cells undergo neoplastic transformation induced by tumor promoters are rapidly being clarified. Accumulating research evidence suggests that many of dietary factors, including tea compounds, may be used alone or in combination with traditional chemotherapeutic agents to prevent or treat cancer. The potential advantage of many natural or dietary compounds seems to focus on their potent anticancer activity combined with low toxicity and very few adverse side effects. This review summarizes some of our recent work regarding the effects of the various tea components on signal transduction pathways involved in neoplastic cell transformation and carcinogenesis. PMID:16688728

  18. Active Cellular Nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkaemper, Christoph; Garcia, Simon; Yevick, Hannah; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Biology inspired physics at mesoscales Team; Physical approach of biological problems Team

    We study the emergence of a nematic order in a two-dimensional tissue of apolar elongated fibroblast cells. Initially, these cells are very motile and the monolayer is characterized by giant density fluctuations, a signature of far-from-equilibrium systems. As the cell density increases because of proliferation, the cells align with each other forming large perfectly oriented domains while the cellular movements slow down and eventually freeze. Therefore topological defects characteristic of nematic phases remain trapped at long times, preventing the development of infinite domains. By analogy with classical non-active nematics, we have investigated the role of boundaries and we have shown that cells confined in stripes of width smaller than typically 500 µm are perfectly aligned in the stripe direction. Experiments performed in cross-shaped patterns show that both the number of cells and the degree of alignment impact the final orientation. Reference: Duclos G., Garcia S., Yevick H.G. and Silberzan P., ''Perfect nematic order in confined monolayers of spindle-shaped cells'', Soft Matter, 10, 14, 2014

  19. Cellular energy metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, M.

    1991-06-01

    Studies have been carried out on adenylate kinase which is an important enzyme in determining the concentrations of the adenine nucleotides. An efficient method has been developed to clone mutant adenylate kinase genes in E. coli. Site-specific mutagenesis of the wild type gene also has been used to obtain forms of adenylate kinase with altered amino acids. The wild type and mutant forms of adenylate kinase have been overexpressed and large quantities were readily isolated. The kinetic and fluorescence properties of the different forms of adenylate kinase were characterized. This has led to a new model for the location of the AMP and ATP bindings sites on the enzyme and a proposal for the mechanism of substrate inhibition. Crystals of the wild type enzyme were obtained that diffract to at least 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. Experiments were also initiated to determine the function of adenylate kinase in vivo. In one set of experiments, E. coli strains with mutations in adenylate kinase showed large changes in cellular nucleotides after reaching the stationary phase in a low phosphate medium. This was caused by selective proteolytic degradation of the mutant adenylate kinase caused by phosphate starvation.

  20. From a discrete to a continuum model of cell dynamics in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Murray, Philip J; Edwards, Carina M; Tindall, Marcus J; Maini, Philip K

    2009-09-01

    Multiscale modeling is emerging as one of the key challenges in mathematical biology. However, the recent rapid increase in the number of modeling methodologies being used to describe cell populations has raised a number of interesting questions. For example, at the cellular scale, how can the appropriate discrete cell-level model be identified in a given context? Additionally, how can the many phenomenological assumptions used in the derivation of models at the continuum scale be related to individual cell behavior? In order to begin to address such questions, we consider a discrete one-dimensional cell-based model in which cells are assumed to interact via linear springs. From the discrete equations of motion, the continuous Rouse [P. E. Rouse, J. Chem. Phys. 21, 1272 (1953)] model is obtained. This formalism readily allows the definition of a cell number density for which a nonlinear "fast" diffusion equation is derived. Excellent agreement is demonstrated between the continuum and discrete models. Subsequently, via the incorporation of cell division, we demonstrate that the derived nonlinear diffusion model is robust to the inclusion of more realistic biological detail. In the limit of stiff springs, where cells can be considered to be incompressible, we show that cell velocity can be directly related to cell production. This assumption is frequently made in the literature but our derivation places limits on its validity. Finally, the model is compared with a model of a similar form recently derived for a different discrete cell-based model and it is shown how the different diffusion coefficients can be understood in terms of the underlying assumptions about cell behavior in the respective discrete models.