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Sample records for continuum state cellular

  1. Continuum representations of cellular solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, M. K.

    1993-09-01

    Cellular materials consist of interconnected struts or plates which form cells. The struts or plates are constructed from a variety of metals, polymers, ceramics, and wood products. Cellular materials are often used in impact limiters for shipping containers to protect the contents from accidental impact events. These materials exhibit a variety of complex behavior when subjected to crushing loads. This research focuses on the development of continuum representations of cellular solids that can be used in the finite element analysis of shipping container accidents. A significant portion of this work is the development of a new methodology to relate localized deformations to appropriate constitutive descriptions. This methodology provides the insight needed to select constitutive descriptions for cellular solids that capture the localized deformations that are observed experimentally. Constitutive relations are developed for two different cellular materials, aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. These constitutive relations are based on plasticity and continuum damage theories. Plasticity is used to describe the permanent deformation exhibited by both aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. Continuum damage is needed to capture the change in elastic parameters due to cracking of the polyurethane cell wall materials. The new constitutive description of polyurethane foam is implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes, and analytical and numerical predictions are compared with available experimental data.

  2. Continuum representations of cellular solids

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, M.K.

    1993-09-01

    Cellular materials consist of interconnected struts or plates which form cells. The struts or plates are constructed from a variety of metals, polymers, ceramics and wood products. Cellular materials are often used in impact limiters for shipping containers to protect the contents from accidental impact events. These materials exhibit a variety of complex behavior when subjected to crushing loads. This research focuses on the development of continuum representations of cellular solids that can be used in the finite element analysis of shipping container accidents. A significant portion of this work is the development of a new methodology to relate localized deformations to appropriate constitutive descriptions. This methodology provides the insight needed to select constitutive descriptions for cellular solids that capture the localized deformations that are observed experimentally. Constitutive relations are developed for two different cellular materials, aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. These constitutive relations are based on plasticity and continuum damage theories. Plasticity is used to describe the permanent deformation exhibited by both aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. Continuum damage is needed to capture the change in elastic parameters due to cracking of the polyurethane cell wall materials. The new constitutive description of polyurethane foam is implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes, and analytical and numerical predictions are compared with available experimental data.

  3. Electron transfer to continuum states

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, J.H. |

    1994-12-31

    Gene Rudd`s analysis of doubly differential cross sections for the ionization of He atoms by proton impact suggested that electrons were being carried along by the proton for a short period of time after being ejected from the target region. Normally, this would represent an electron capture event in which an excited state of atomic hydrogen is formed. Because the electron ends up ionized it was recognized that these states of the proton must be continuum states. This insight was confirmed by observations of the continuum electron capture (CEC) cusp when the electron velocity equals the proton velocity in the final state. The impact of this idea upon the theory of ionization at high energies is reviewed.

  4. Bound states in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Stone, A. Douglas; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-09-01

    Bound states in the continuum (BICs) are waves that remain localized even though they coexist with a continuous spectrum of radiating waves that can carry energy away. Their very existence defies conventional wisdom. Although BICs were first proposed in quantum mechanics, they are a general wave phenomenon and have since been identified in electromagnetic waves, acoustic waves in air, water waves and elastic waves in solids. These states have been studied in a wide range of material systems, such as piezoelectric materials, dielectric photonic crystals, optical waveguides and fibres, quantum dots, graphene and topological insulators. In this Review, we describe recent developments in this field with an emphasis on the physical mechanisms that lead to BICs across seemingly very different materials and types of waves. We also discuss experimental realizations, existing applications and directions for future work.

  5. Analysis of thermodiffusive cellular instabilities in continuum combustion fronts.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Hossein; Gurevich, Sebastian; Provatas, Nikolas

    2017-01-01

    We explore numerically the morphological patterns of thermodiffusive instabilities in combustion fronts with a continuum fuel source, within a range of Lewis numbers and ignition temperatures, focusing on the cellular regime. For this purpose, we generalize the recent model of Brailovsky et al. to include distinct process kinetics and reactant heterogeneity. The generalized model is derived analytically and validated with other established models in the limit of infinite Lewis number for zero-order and first-order kinetics. Cellular and dendritic instabilities are found at low Lewis numbers. These are studied using a dynamic adaptive mesh refinement technique that allows very large computational domains, thus allowing us to reduce finite-size effects that can affect or even preclude the emergence of these patterns. Our numerical linear stability analysis is consistent with the analytical results of Brailovsky et al. The distinct types of dynamics found in the vicinity of the critical Lewis number, ranging from steady-state cells to continued tip splitting and cell merging, are well described within the framework of thermodiffusive instabilities and are consistent with previous numerical studies. These types of dynamics are classified as "quasilinear" and characterized by low-amplitude cells that may be strongly affected by the mode selection mechanism and growth prescribed by the linear theory. Below this range of Lewis number, highly nonlinear effects become prominent and large-amplitude, complex cellular and seaweed dendritic morphologies emerge.

  6. Analysis of thermodiffusive cellular instabilities in continuum combustion fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Hossein; Gurevich, Sebastian; Provatas, Nikolas

    2017-01-01

    We explore numerically the morphological patterns of thermodiffusive instabilities in combustion fronts with a continuum fuel source, within a range of Lewis numbers and ignition temperatures, focusing on the cellular regime. For this purpose, we generalize the recent model of Brailovsky et al. to include distinct process kinetics and reactant heterogeneity. The generalized model is derived analytically and validated with other established models in the limit of infinite Lewis number for zero-order and first-order kinetics. Cellular and dendritic instabilities are found at low Lewis numbers. These are studied using a dynamic adaptive mesh refinement technique that allows very large computational domains, thus allowing us to reduce finite-size effects that can affect or even preclude the emergence of these patterns. Our numerical linear stability analysis is consistent with the analytical results of Brailovsky et al. The distinct types of dynamics found in the vicinity of the critical Lewis number, ranging from steady-state cells to continued tip splitting and cell merging, are well described within the framework of thermodiffusive instabilities and are consistent with previous numerical studies. These types of dynamics are classified as "quasilinear" and characterized by low-amplitude cells that may be strongly affected by the mode selection mechanism and growth prescribed by the linear theory. Below this range of Lewis number, highly nonlinear effects become prominent and large-amplitude, complex cellular and seaweed dendritic morphologies emerge.

  7. Histidine in Continuum Electrostatics Protonation State Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Vernon; Stuchebruckhov, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    A modification to the standard continuum electrostatics approach to calculate protein pKas which allows for the decoupling of histidine tautomers within a two state model is presented. Histidine with four intrinsically coupled protonation states cannot be easily incorporated into a two state formalism because the interaction between the two protonatable sites of the imidazole ring is not purely electrostatic. The presented treatment, based on a single approximation of the interrelation between histidine’s charge states, allows for a natural separation of the two protonatable sites associated with the imidazole ring as well as the inclusion of all protonation states within the calculation. PMID:22072521

  8. Continuum-continuum transitions between resonant states using the RABITT technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, A.; Argenti, L.; Martín, F.

    2014-04-01

    We present a study of radiative continuum-continuum transitions in helium in the presence of doubly-excited states by using the attosecond RABITT technique beyond the Single Active Electron approximation. On the one hand, transition amplitudes between correlated continuum states are calculated both by direct numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation as well as with a two-photon perturbative model. The effect of autoionizing states on the sideband phaseshift is thus analyzed. On the other hand, we apply the soft-photon approximation to quantify the effects the IR probe intensity on the sideband non-resonant overtone components.

  9. Rabi-split states broadened by a continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Maialle, M. Z.; Degani, M. H.; Madureira, J. R.

    2013-12-04

    In this work we theoretically investigate a Λ-like three-level system. Our model consists of a onedimensional quantum well with a nearby continuum. The Λ level structure is formed by the ground state (a valence band state) and two excited states (both in conduction band), one being a localized and the other a quasi-bound state which is interacting with the continuum. An infrared (IR) field is used to drive the excited states into dressed states creating Autler-Townes doublets. We solve the semiconductor Bloch equation, in real space and in time domain, to follow the interband optical excitation dynamics. The optical absorption and the photocurrent spectra are calculated for different potential barriers separating the well and the continuum. We show how this affects the Autler-Townes doublets since this is a possible way of changing the relationship between the IR Rabi frequency and the dephasing rates.

  10. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the system spontaneously splitting into stable domains separated by static boundaries, some synchronously oscillating and the others incoherent. When the coupling range is local, nontrivial coherent structures with different periodicities are formed.

  11. Equation of State and Sound Velocities from Isotropic Continuum Mechanics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    of state and the shear and longitudinal velocity to fifth order elastic constants. The resulting expressions are implicit in terms of the pressure...The methods of finite elasticity in continuum mechanics of homogeneous isotropic materials are used to obtain the pressure dependence of the equation

  12. Bound States in the Continuum in double layer structures

    PubMed Central

    Li, LiangSheng; Yin, Hongcheng

    2016-01-01

    We have theoretically investigated the reflectivity spectrums of single- and double-layer photonic crystal slabs and the dielectric multilayer stack. It is shown that light can be perfectly confined in a single-layer photonic crystal slab at a given incident angle by changing the thickness, permittivity or hole radius of the structure. With a tunable double-layer photonic crystal slab, we demonstrate that the occurrence of tunable bound states in the continuum is dependent on the spacing between two slabs. Moreover, by analytically investigating the Drude lossless multilayer stack model, the spacing dependence of bound states in the continuum is characterized as the phase matching condition that illuminates these states can occur at any nonzero incident angles by adjusting the spacing. PMID:27245435

  13. Regulation of cellular chromatin state

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rakesh K; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2010-01-01

    The identity and functionality of eukaryotic cells is defined not just by their genomic sequence which remains constant between cell types, but by their gene expression profiles governed by epigenetic mechanisms. Epigenetic controls maintain and change the chromatin state throughout development, as exemplified by the setting up of cellular memory for the regulation and maintenance of homeotic genes in proliferating progenitors during embryonic development. Higher order chromatin structure in reversibly arrested adult stem cells also involves epigenetic regulation and in this review we highlight common trends governing chromatin states, focusing on quiescence and differentiation during myogenesis. Together, these diverse developmental modules reveal the dynamic nature of chromatin regulation providing fresh insights into the role of epigenetic mechanisms in potentiating development and differentiation. PMID:20592864

  14. Breakup channels for C12 triple-α continuum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diget, C. Aa.; Barker, F. C.; Borge, M. J. G.; Boutami, R.; Dendooven, P.; Eronen, T.; Fox, S. P.; Fulton, B. R.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Huikari, J.; Hyldegaard, S.; Jeppesen, H. B.; Jokinen, A.; Jonson, B.; Kankainen, A.; Moore, I.; Nieminen, A.; Nyman, G.; Penttilä, H.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Riisager, K.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Tengblad, O.; Wang, Y.; Wilhelmsen, K.; Äystö, J.

    2009-09-01

    The triple-α-particle breakup of states in the triple-α continuum of C12 has been investigated by way of coincident detection of all three α particles of the breakup. The states have been fed in the β decay of N12 and B12, and the α particles measured using a setup that covers all of the triple-α phase space. Contributions from the breakup through the Be8(0+) ground state as well as other channels—interpreted as breakup through excited energies in Be8—have been identified. Spins and parities of C12 triple-α continuum states are deduced from the measured phase-space distributions for breakup through Be8 above the ground state by comparison to a fully symmetrized sequential R-matrix description of the breakup. At around 10 MeV in C12, the breakup is found to be dominated by 0+ strength breaking up through the ghost of the Be8(0+) ground state with L=0 angular momentum between the first emitted α particle and the intermediate Be8 nucleus. For C12 energies above the 12.7 MeV 1+ state, however, L=2 breakup of a C12 2+ state through the Be8(2+) excited state dominates. Furthermore, the possibility of a 2+ excited state in the 9-12 MeV region of C12 is investigated.

  15. Tamm-Hubbard surface states in the continuum.

    PubMed

    Longhi, S; Della Valle, G

    2013-06-12

    In the framework of the Bose-Hubbard model, we show that two-particle surface bound states embedded in the continuum (BIC) can be sustained at the edge of a semi-infinite one-dimensional tight-binding lattice for any infinitesimally-small impurity potential V at the lattice boundary. Such thresholdless surface states, which can be referred to as Tamm-Hubbard BIC states, exist provided that the impurity potential V is attractive (repulsive) and the particle-particle Hubbard interaction U is repulsive (attractive), i.e. for UV < 0.

  16. A Continuum Damage Mechanics Model for the Static and Cyclic Fatigue of Cellular Composites

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Otto

    2017-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of a cellular composite with an epoxy matrix and glass foam granules is analyzed and modeled by means of continuum damage mechanics. The investigated cellular composite is a particular type of composite foam, and is very similar to syntactic foams. In contrast to conventional syntactic foams constituted by hollow spherical particles (balloons), cellular glass, mineral, or metal place holders are combined with the matrix material (metal or polymer) in the case of cellular composites. A microstructural investigation of the damage behavior is performed using scanning electron microscopy. For the modeling of the fatigue behavior, the damage is separated into pure static and pure cyclic damage and described in terms of the stiffness loss of the material using damage models for cyclic and creep damage. Both models incorporate nonlinear accumulation and interaction of damage. A cycle jumping procedure is developed, which allows for a fast and accurate calculation of the damage evolution for constant load frequencies. The damage model is applied to examine the mean stress effect for cyclic fatigue and to investigate the frequency effect and the influence of the signal form in the case of static and cyclic damage interaction. The calculated lifetimes are in very good agreement with experimental results. PMID:28809806

  17. Exploring continuum structures with a pseudo-state basis

    SciTech Connect

    Lay, J. A.; Moro, A. M.; Arias, J. M.; Gomez-Camacho, J.

    2010-08-15

    The ability of a recently developed square-integrable discrete basis to represent the properties of the continuum of a two-body system is investigated. The basis is obtained performing a simple analytic local scale transformation to the harmonic oscillator basis. Scattering phase-shifts and the electric transition probabilities B(E1) and B(E2) have been evaluated for several potentials using the proposed basis. Both quantities are found to be in excellent agreement with the exact values calculated from the true scattering states. The basis has been applied to describe the projectile continuum in the {sup 6}He scattering by {sup 12}C and {sup 208}Pb targets at 240 MeV/nucleon and the {sup 11}Be scattering by {sup 12}C at 67 MeV/nucleon. The calculated breakup differential cross sections are found to be in very good agreement with the available experimental data for these reactions.

  18. Evolution of states in a continuum migration model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratiev, Yuri; Kozitsky, Yuri

    2017-03-01

    The Markov evolution of states of a continuum migration model is studied. The model describes an infinite system of entities placed in R^d in which the constituents appear (immigrate) with rate b(x) and disappear, also due to competition. For this model, we prove the existence of the evolution of states μ _0 mapsto μ _t such that the moments μ _t(N_Λ ^n) , nin N, of the number of entities in compact Λ subset R^d remain bounded for all t>0 . Under an additional condition, we prove that the density of entities and the second correlation function remain point-wise bounded globally in time.

  19. Encrypting Majorana fermion qubits as bound states in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guessi, L. H.; Dessotti, F. A.; Marques, Y.; Ricco, L. S.; Pereira, G. M.; Menegasso, P.; de Souza, M.; Seridonio, A. C.

    2017-07-01

    We theoretically investigate a topological Kitaev chain connected to a double quantum-dot (QD) setup hybridized with metallic leads. In this system we observe the emergence of two striking phenomena: (i) a decrypted Majorana fermion (MF) qubit recorded over a single QD, which is detectable by means of conductance measurements due to the asymmetrical MF-qubit leaked state into the QDs; (ii) an encrypted qubit recorded in both QDs when the leakage is symmetrical. In such a regime, we have a cryptographylike manifestation, since the MF qubit becomes bound states in the continuum, which is not detectable in conductance experiments.

  20. Block versus continuum deformation in the Western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, G.; Oppenheimer, D.; Amelung, F.

    1994-01-01

    The relative role of block versus continuum deformation of continental lithosphere is a current subject of debate. Continuous deformation is suggested by distributed seismicity at continental plate margins and by cumulative seismic moment sums which yield slip estimates that are less than estimates from plate motion studies. In contrast, block models are favored by geologic studies of displacement in places like Asia. A problem in this debate is a lack of data from which unequivocal conclusions may be reached. In this paper we apply the techniques of study used in regions such as the Alpine-Himalayan belt to an area with a wealth of instrumental data-the Western United States. By comparing plate rates to seismic moment release rates and assuming a typical seismogenic layer thickness of 15 km it appears that since 1850 about 60% of the Pacific-North America motion across the plate boundary in California and Nevada has occurred seismically and 40% aseismically. The San Francisco Bay area shows similar partitioning between seismic and aseismic deformation, and it can be shown that within the seismogenic depth range aseismic deformation is concentrated near the surface and at depth. In some cases this deformation can be located on creeping surface faults, but elsewhere it is spread over a several kilometer wide zone adjacent to the fault. These superficial creeping deformation zones may be responsible for the palaeomagnetic rotations that have been ascribed elsewhere to the surface expression of continuum deformation in the lithosphere. Our results support the dominant role of non-continuum deformation processes with the implication that deformation localization by strain softening must occur in the lower crust and probably the upper mantle. Our conclusions apply only to the regions where the data are good, and even within the Western United States (i.e., the Basin and Range) deformation styles remain poorly resolved. Nonetheless, we maintain that block motion is the

  1. Observation of electron capture into continuum states of neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkadi, L.; Palinkas, J.; Koever, A.; Berenyi, D.; Vajnai, T.

    1989-01-30

    Energy spectra of electrons ejected in the forward direction from 75-keV/amu He/sup 0/-He,Ar collisions have been measured in coincidence with the charge-state--selected outgoing projectiles He/sup 0/, He/sup +/, and He/sup 2+/. The appearance of the cusp-shaped peak in the electron spectrum in coincidence with He/sup 0/ gives the first clear experimental evidence that electron capture into the continuum states (ECC) occurs in collisions where the projectile is a neutral atom. The ECC for He/sup 0/ impact is characterized by a considerably smaller width of the cusp peak than for He/sup +/ impact.

  2. Lasing action from photonic bound states in continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodigala, Ashok; Lepetit, Thomas; Gu, Qing; Bahari, Babak; Fainman, Yeshaiahu; Kanté, Boubacar

    2017-01-01

    In 1929, only three years after the advent of quantum mechanics, von Neumann and Wigner showed that Schrödinger’s equation can have bound states above the continuum threshold. These peculiar states, called bound states in the continuum (BICs), manifest themselves as resonances that do not decay. For several decades afterwards the idea lay dormant, regarded primarily as a mathematical curiosity. In 1977, Herrick and Stillinger revived interest in BICs when they suggested that BICs could be observed in semiconductor superlattices. BICs arise naturally from Feshbach’s quantum mechanical theory of resonances, as explained by Friedrich and Wintgen, and are thus more physical than initially realized. Recently, it was realized that BICs are intrinsically a wave phenomenon and are thus not restricted to the realm of quantum mechanics. They have since been shown to occur in many different fields of wave physics including acoustics, microwaves and nanophotonics. However, experimental observations of BICs have been limited to passive systems and the realization of BIC lasers has remained elusive. Here we report, at room temperature, lasing action from an optically pumped BIC cavity. Our results show that the lasing wavelength of the fabricated BIC cavities, each made of an array of cylindrical nanoresonators suspended in air, scales with the radii of the nanoresonators according to the theoretical prediction for the BIC mode. Moreover, lasing action from the designed BIC cavity persists even after scaling down the array to as few as 8-by-8 nanoresonators. BIC lasers open up new avenues in the study of light-matter interaction because they are intrinsically connected to topological charges and represent natural vector beam sources (that is, there are several possible beam shapes), which are highly sought after in the fields of optical trapping, biological sensing and quantum information.

  3. Continuum-state and bound-state β--decay rates of the neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, M.; Ivanov, A. N.; Ivanova, V. A.; Marton, J.; Pitschmann, M.; Serebrov, A. P.; Troitskaya, N. I.; Wellenzohn, M.

    2009-09-01

    For the β--decay of the neutron we analyze the continuum-state and bound-state decay modes. We calculate the decay rates, the electron energy spectrum for the continuum-state decay mode, and angular distributions of the decay probabilities for the continuum-state and bound-state decay modes. The theoretical results are obtained for the new value for the axial coupling constant gA=1.2750(9), obtained recently by H. Abele [Prog. Part. Nucl. Phys. 60, 1 (2008)] from the fit of the experimental data on the coefficient of the correlation of the neutron spin and the electron momentum of the electron energy spectrum of the continuum-state decay mode. We take into account the contribution of radiative corrections and the scalar and tensor weak couplings. The calculated angular distributions of the probabilities of the bound-state decay modes of the polarized neutron can be used for the experimental measurements of the bound-state β--decays into the hyperfine states with total angular momentum F=1 and scalar and tensor weak coupling constants.

  4. Strain-Induced Localized States Within the Matrix Continuum of Self-Assembled Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, V.; Bester, G.; Zunger, A.

    2009-07-01

    Quantum dot-based infrared detectors often involve transitions from confined states of the dot to states above the minimum of the conduction band continuum of the matrix. We discuss the existence of two types of resonant states within this continuum in self-assembled dots: (i) virtual bound states, which characterize square wells even without strain and (ii) strain-induced localized states. The latter emerge due to the appearance of 'potential wings' near the dot, related to the curvature of the dots. While states (i) do couple to the continuum, states (ii) are sheltered by the wings, giving rise to sharp absorption peaks.

  5. Construction of a state evolution for Kawasaki dynamics in continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berns, Christoph; Kondratiev, Yuri; Kutoviy, Oleksandr

    2013-06-01

    We consider conservative, non-equilibrium stochastic jump dynamics of interacting particles in continuum. These dynamics have a (grand canonical) Gibbs measure as invariant measure. The problem of existence of these dynamics is studied. The corresponding time evolution of correlation functions is constructed.

  6. Quantum secure direct communication of digital and analog signals using continuum coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Antônio Geovan de Araújo Holanda; Rios, Francisco Franklin Sousa; Ramos, Rubens Viana

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we present optical schemes for secure direct quantum communication of digital and analog signals using continuum coherent states and frequency-dependent phase modulation. The main advantages of the proposed schemes are that they do not use entangled states and they can be implemented with today technology. The theory of quantum interference of continuum coherent state is described, and the optical setups for secure direct communication are presented and their securities are discussed.

  7. Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg Physics with a Singular Continuum of States.

    PubMed

    Basko, D M

    2017-01-06

    This Letter addresses the dynamical quantum problem of a driven discrete energy level coupled to a semi-infinite continuum whose density of states has a square-root-type singularity, such as states of a free particle in one dimension or quasiparticle states in a BCS superconductor. The system dynamics is strongly affected by the quantum-mechanical repulsion between the discrete level and the singularity, which gives rise to a bound state, suppresses the decay into the continuum, and can produce Stueckelberg oscillations. This quantum coherence effect may limit the performance of mesoscopic superconducting devices, such as the quantum electron turnstile.

  8. Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg Physics with a Singular Continuum of States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basko, D. M.

    2017-01-01

    This Letter addresses the dynamical quantum problem of a driven discrete energy level coupled to a semi-infinite continuum whose density of states has a square-root-type singularity, such as states of a free particle in one dimension or quasiparticle states in a BCS superconductor. The system dynamics is strongly affected by the quantum-mechanical repulsion between the discrete level and the singularity, which gives rise to a bound state, suppresses the decay into the continuum, and can produce Stueckelberg oscillations. This quantum coherence effect may limit the performance of mesoscopic superconducting devices, such as the quantum electron turnstile.

  9. Bound states in the continuum in spin-orbit-coupled atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V.; Konotop, Vladimir V.; Torner, Lluis

    2017-09-01

    We show that the interplay between spin-orbit coupling and Zeeman splitting in atomic systems can lead to the existence of bound states in the continuum (BICs) supported by trapping potentials. Such states have energies falling well within the continuum spectrum, but nevertheless they are localized and fully radiationless. We report the existence of BICs, in some cases in exact analytical form, in systems with tunable spin-orbit coupling and show that the phenomenon is physically robust. We also found that BIC states may be excited in spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates, where under suitable conditions they may be metastable with remarkably long lifetimes.

  10. Uniqueness of continuum one-dimensional Gibbs states for slowly decaying interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, D.

    1986-04-01

    We consider one-dimensional grand-canonical continuum Gibbs states corresponding to slowly decaying, superstable, many-body interactions. Absence of phase transitions, in the sense of uniqueness of the tempered Gibbs state, is proved for interactions with an Nth body hardcore for arbitrarily large N.

  11. Accidental bound states in the continuum in an open Sinai billiard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipchuk, A. S.; Sadreev, A. F.

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental mechanism of the bound states in the continuum is the full destructive interference of two resonances when two eigenlevels of the closed system are crossing. There is, however, a wide class of quantum chaotic systems which display only avoided crossings of eigenlevels. As an example of such a system we consider the Sinai billiard coupled with two semi-infinite waveguides. We show that notwithstanding the absence of degeneracy bound states in the continuum occur due to accidental decoupling of the eigenstates of the billiard from the waveguides.

  12. Excited state absorption spectrum of chlorophyll a obtained with white-light continuum.

    PubMed

    De Boni, L; Correa, D S; Pavinatto, F J; dos Santos, D S; Mendonça, C R

    2007-04-28

    The study of excited state properties of chlorophyll a is a subject of foremost interest, given that it plays important roles in biological process and has also been proposed for applications in photonics. This work reports on the excited state absorption spectrum of chlorophyll a solution from 460 to 700 nm, obtained through the white-light continuum Z-scan technique. Saturation of absorption was observed due to the ground state depletion, induced by the white-light continuum region that is resonant with the Q band of chlorophyll a. The authors also observed reverse saturation of absorption related to the excitation from the first excited state to a higher energy level for wavelengths below 640 nm. An energy-level diagram, based on the electronic states of chlorophyll a, was employed to interpret their results, revealing that more states than the ones related to the Q and B bands participate in the excited state absorption of this molecule.

  13. Classical trajectories of the continuum states of the \\chem{\\cal{PT}} symmetric Scarf II potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Anjana

    2012-06-01

    We apply the factorization technique developed by Kuru et al. (Ann. Phys. (N.Y.), 323 (2008) 413) to obtain the exact analytical classical trajectories and momenta of the continuum states of the non-Hermitian but {\\cal {PT}} symmetric Scarf II potential. In particular, we observe that the strange behaviour of the quantum version at the spectral singularity has an interesting classical analogue.

  14. Fano resonances in photonic crystal slabs near optical bound states in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Cédric; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Sauvan, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Photonic crystal slabs are able to support optical bound states in the continuum. The latter are eigenmodes of the structure that are truly guided (no radiation leakage) despite the fact that they lie above the light cone within the continuum of radiation modes. Such peculiar states can be viewed as modes with an infinite quality factor Q . Therefore, the question of the behavior of Fano resonances, as optogeometrical parameters are tuned close to optical bound states in the continuum, is of importance for applications of photonic crystal slabs with ultrahigh Q factors. We study theoretically the reflection and transmission of a photonic crystal slab close to an optical bound state in the continuum with a phenomenological approach involving the poles and zeros of the scattering matrix. In particular, we derive a general relation valid for asymmetric structures that gives the position of a pole in the complex plane as a function of the positions of the zeros. We provide closed-form expressions for the reflection and transmission. The proposed phenomenological approach is validated through rigorous numerical calculations.

  15. Analytical perspective for bound states in the continuum in photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Peng, Chao; Liang, Yong; Li, Zhengbin; Noda, Susumu

    2014-07-18

    We investigate the formation of photonic bound states in the continuum (BICs) in photonic crystal slabs from an analytical perspective. Unlike the stationary at-Γ BICs which originate from the geometric symmetry, the tunable off-Γ BICs are due to the weighted destructive via the continuum interference in the vicinity of accidental symmetry when the majority of the radiation is precanceled. The symmetric compatible nature of the off-Γ BICs leads to a trapping of light that can be tuned through continuously varying the wave vector. With the analytical approach, we explain a reported experiment and predict the existence of a new BIC at an unrevealed symmetry.

  16. Quantum dynamics of Ne -Br2 vibrational predissociation: The role of continuum resonances as doorway states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Vela, A.; Janda, K. C.

    2006-01-01

    Wave-packet simulations of the Ne -Br2(B,υ') vibrational predissociation dynamics in the range υ'=16-29 are reported. The aim is to interpret recent time-dependent pump-probe experiments [Cabrera et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 054311 (2005)]. Good agreement is found between the calculated and the experimental lifetimes corresponding to decay of the Ne -Br2(B,υ') initial state and to appearance of Br2(B,υ<υ') products. The simulations show that up to υ'˜22 the dynamics is dominated by direct predissociation, while for higher υ' levels an indirect intramolecular vibrational relaxation mechanism of dissociation becomes increasingly important. Such a mechanism occurs via coupling of the initial state in the υ' vibrational manifold to nearly degenerate resonances embedded in the continuum of the lower υ <υ' manifolds, which act as intermediate doorway states to dissociation. The role of the intermediate resonances manifests itself in multiexponential behavior and oscillations in the time-dependent population curves associated with the initial complex state, the final product states, and the Ne -Br2(B,υ<υ') intermediate complexes. Analysis of the Ne -Br2(B,υ<υ') intermediate population shows that the continuum resonances are supported by centrifugal barriers involving excitation of the internal rotation of the complex. We find that the coupling between the intermediate state resonances and the continuum product state wave functions extend to Ne -Br2 distances greater than 15Å. In the light of the results, a structure of the spectrum of continuum resonances is suggested and discussed.

  17. Controlling Directionality and Dimensionality of Radiation by Perturbing Separable Bound States in the Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Nicholas; Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Buljan, Hrvoje; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-01-01

    A bound state in the continuum (BIC) is an unusual localized state that is embedded in a continuum of extended states. Here, we present the general condition for BICs to arise from wave equation separability. Then we show that by exploiting perturbations of certain symmetry such BICs can be turned into resonances that radiate with a tailorable directionality and dimensionality. Using this general framework, we construct new examples of separable BICs and resonances that can exist in optical potentials for ultracold atoms, photonic systems, and systems described by tight binding. Such resonances with easily reconfigurable radiation allow for applications such as the storage and release of waves at a controllable rate and direction, as well systems that switch between different dimensions of confinement. PMID:27641540

  18. Multi-scale continuum modeling of biological processes: from molecular electro-diffusion to sub-cellular signaling transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Kekenes-Huskey, P.; Hake, J. E.; Holst, M. J.; McCammon, J. A.; Michailova, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a brief review of multi-scale modeling at the molecular to cellular scale, with new results for heart muscle cells. A finite element-based simulation package (SMOL) was used to investigate the signaling transduction at molecular and sub-cellular scales (http://mccammon.ucsd.edu/smol/, http://FETK.org) by numerical solution of the time-dependent Smoluchowski equations and a reaction-diffusion system. At the molecular scale, SMOL has yielded experimentally validated estimates of the diffusion-limited association rates for the binding of acetylcholine to mouse acetylcholinesterase using crystallographic structural data. The predicted rate constants exhibit increasingly delayed steady-state times, with increasing ionic strength, and demonstrate the role of an enzyme's electrostatic potential in influencing ligand binding. At the sub-cellular scale, an extension of SMOL solves a nonlinear, reaction-diffusion system describing Ca2+ ligand buffering and diffusion in experimentally derived rodent ventricular myocyte geometries. Results reveal the important role of mobile and stationary Ca2+ buffers, including Ca2+ indicator dye. We found that alterations in Ca2+-binding and dissociation rates of troponin C (TnC) and total TnC concentration modulate sub-cellular Ca2+ signals. The model predicts that reduced off-rate in the whole troponin complex (TnC, TnI, TnT) versus reconstructed thin filaments (Tn, Tm, actin) alters cytosolic Ca2+ dynamics under control conditions or in disease-linked TnC mutations. The ultimate goal of these studies is to develop scalable methods and theories for the integration of molecular-scale information into simulations of cellular-scale systems.

  19. Optical bound states in the continuum in a single slab with zero refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, LiangSheng; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Chong; Zheng, Ning; Yin, Hongcheng

    2017-07-01

    We have investigated theoretically the reflectivity, quality factor, and eigenfrequency for a single slab with zero refractive index. We demonstrate that optical bound states in the continuum can be achieved by the various zero-refractive-index slabs made of epsilon-near-zero, impedance-machted zero-index, or mu-near-zero materials. Moreover, by analytically investigating the frequency of the resonant reflection and resonant transmission, when the quality factor becomes infinity, these two frequencies are precisely equal. For the mu-near-zero slab, the bound states in the continuum are observed at arbitrary incident angles by analyzing the behaviors of complex eigenfrequencies. Our findings may lead to unprecedented high-quality resonators in metamaterials.

  20. Building the Coverage Continuum: The Role of State Medicaid Directors and Insurance Commissioners.

    PubMed

    Ario, Joel; Bachrach, Deborah

    2017-02-01

    Issue: The Affordable Care Act has expanded coverage to 20 million newly insured individuals, split between state Medicaid programs and commercially insured marketplaces, with limited integration between the two. The seamless continuum of coverage envisioned by the law is central to achieving the full potential of the Affordable Care Act, but it remains an elusive promise. Goals: To examine the historical and cultural differences between state Medicaid agencies and insurance departments that contribute to this lack of coordination. Findings and Conclusions: Historical and cultural differences must be overcome to ensure continuing access to coverage and care. The authors present two opportunities for insurance and Medicaid officials to work together to advance the continuum of coverage: alignment of regulations for insurers participating in both markets and collaboration on efforts to reform the health care delivery system.

  1. Excited-state polarizabilities of solvated molecules using cubic response theory and the polarizable continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrighi, Lara; Frediani, Luca; Ruud, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The theory and an implementation of the solvent contribution to the cubic response function for the polarizable continuum model for multiconfigurational self-consistent field wave functions is presented. The excited-state polarizability of benzene, para-nitroaniline, and nitrobenzene has been obtained from the double residue of the cubic response function calculated in the presence of an acetonitrile and dioxane solvent. The calculated excited-state polarizabilities are compared to results obtained from the linear response function of the explicitly optimized excited states.

  2. Cellular Senescence, Neurological Function, and Redox State.

    PubMed

    Maciel-Barón, Luis Ángel; Moreno-Blas, Daniel; Morales-Rosales, Sandra Lizbeth; González-Puertos, Viridiana Yazmín; López-Díazguerrero, Norma Edith; Torres, Claudio; Castro-Obregón, Susana; Königsberg, Mina

    2017-06-08

    Cellular senescence, characterized by permanent cell cycle arrest, has been extensively studied in mitotic cells such as fibroblasts. However, senescent cells have also been observed in the brain. Even though it is recognized that cellular energetic metabolism and redox homeostasis are perturbed in the aged brain and neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs), it is still unknown which alterations in the overall physiology can stimulate cellular senescence induction and their relationship with the former events. Recent Advances: Recent findings have shown that during prolonged inflammatory and pathologic events, the blood-brain barrier could be compromised and immune cells might enter the brain; this fact along with the brain's high oxygen dependence might result in oxidative damage to macromolecules and therefore senescence induction. Thus, cellular senescence in different brain cell types is revised here. Most information related to cellular senescence in the brain has been obtained from research in glial cells since it has been assumed that the senescent phenotype is a feature exclusive to mitotic cells. Nevertheless, neurons with senescence hallmarks have been observed in old mouse brains. Therefore, although this is a controversial topic in the field, here we summarize and integrate the observations from several studies and propose that neurons indeed senesce. It is still unknown which alterations in the overall metabolism can stimulate senescence induction in the aged brain, what are the mechanisms and signaling pathways, and what is their relationship to NDD development. The understanding of these processes will expose new targets to intervene age-associated pathologies.-Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  3. Bound states in the continuum in open quantum billiards with a variable shape

    SciTech Connect

    Sadreev, Almas F.; Bulgakov, Evgeny N.; Rotter, Ingrid

    2006-06-15

    We show the existence of bound states in the continuum (BICs) in quantum billiards (QBs) that are opened by attaching single-channel leads to them. They may be observed by varying an external parameter continuously, e.g., the shape of the QB. At some values of the parameter, resonance states with vanishing decay width (the BICs) occur. They are localized almost completely in the interior of the closed system. The phenomenon is shown analytically to exist in the simplest case of a two level QB and is complemented by numerical calculations for a real QB.

  4. The effect of the continuum states on the dynamic E2 mixing in antiprotonic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G. Q.; Green, A. M.; Wycech, S.

    1989-05-01

    The effect of the continuum atomic states on antiprotonic atoms is studied using a Green function method. A 4% effect is found in p¯- 174Yb for the case of the last observable transitions ifEL = En0 = 9, l0 = 8, j0 = frcase|15/2 → E(8, 7, frcase|13/2) andifEU = E(9, 8, frcase|17/2 → E8, 7, frcase|15/2. Thi for the E2 dynamic coupling in antiprotonic atoms, perturbation calculations with the lowest atomic level can produce >90% of the energy correction to the basic states.

  5. Shortcuts to adiabaticity in the presence of a continuum: Applications to itinerant quantum state transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksic, Alexandre; Belyansky, Ron; Ribeiro, Hugo; Clerk, Aashish A.

    2017-08-01

    We present a method for accelerating adiabatic protocols for systems involving a coupling to a continuum, one that cancels both nonadiabatic errors as well as errors due to dissipation. We focus on applications to a generic quantum state transfer problem, where the goal is to transfer a state between a single level or mode, and a propagating temporal mode in a waveguide or transmission line. Our approach enables perfect adiabatic transfer protocols in this setup, despite a finite protocol speed and a finite waveguide coupling. Our approach even works in highly constrained settings, where there is only a single time-dependent control field available.

  6. Effect of substrate on optical bound states in the continuum in 1D photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrieva, Z. F.; Sinev, I. S.; Samusev, A. K.; Iorsh, I. V.; Koshelev, K. L.; Takayama, O.; Malureanu, R.; Lavrinenko, A. V.; Bogdanov, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    Optical bound states in the continuum (BIC) are localized states with energy lying above the light line and having infinite lifetime. Any losses taking place in real systems result in transformation of the bound states into resonant states with finite lifetime. In this work, we analyze properties of BIC in CMOS-compatible one-dimensional photonic structure based on silicon-on-insulator wafer at telecommunication wavelengths, where the absorption of silicon is negligible. We reveal that a high-index substrate could destroy both off-Γ BIC and in-plane symmetry protected at-Γ BIC turning them into resonant states due to leakage into the diffraction channels opening in the substrate.

  7. Treatment of continuum in nuclear reactions involving weakly bound systems. A simple model to test different prescriptions describing the coupling to continuum states

    SciTech Connect

    Dasso, C. H.; Vitturi, A.

    2009-03-04

    We exploit a model describing the break-up of weakly-bound nuclei that can be used as a laboratory for testing different prescriptions that have been advanced in the literature to take into account the near-by presence of continuum states. In the model we follow the evolution of a single particle wave function in one dimension, initially bound by a Woods-Saxon type potential and then perturbed by a time- and position-dependent external field. Proper choices of this potential can simulate the effect of the interaction between reaction partners in a nuclear collision. These processes generate inelastic excitation probabilities that--distributed over the bound and continuum states of the system--lead to either a partial or a total fragmentation of the final wave function. The comparison with the exact calculations shows that standard coupled channel descriptions based on discretization of the continuum can be accurate only when a proper choice is made of the number of discrete states, of the energy mesh and of the energy cutoff. This may imply, even in simplified cases, the use of a rather large (and unpracticable) number of channels. The use of a more restricted number of channels may lead to misleading results.

  8. Comment on 'Bound-state eigenenergy outside and inside the continuum for unstable multilevel systems'

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgakov, E. N.; Sadreev, A. F.; Rotter, I.

    2007-06-15

    We discuss the solution of the basic equations of the N-level Friedrichs model by using the Feshbach projection operator (FPO) technique and consider the relation between bound states in the continuum (BICs) and form factors. In the FPO formalism, the BICs are eigenstates of a non-Hermitian Hamilton operator with vanishing decay width. The wave function of a BIC is localized inside the system. On the basis of the FPO solutions we discuss the mechanism to yield a BIC at every coupling strength between system and environment. We relate our results to those given by Miyamoto [Phys. Rev. A 72, 063405 (2005)].

  9. In-situ measurement of bound states in the continuum in photonic crystal slabs (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchmair, Stefan; Gansch, Roman; Genevet, Patrice; Zederbauer, Tobias; MacFarland, Donald; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried; Capasso, Federico; Loncar, Marko

    2016-04-01

    Photonic crystal slabs have been subject to research for more than a decade, yet the existence of bound states in the radiation continuum (BICs) in photonic crystals has been reported only recently [1]. A BIC is formed when the radiation from all possible channels interferes destructively, causing the overall radiation to vanish. In photonic crystals, BICs are the result of accidental phase matching between incident, reflected and in-plane waves at seemingly random wave vectors [2]. While BICs in photonic crystals have been discussed previously using reflection measurements, we reports for the first time in-situ measurements of the bound states in the continuum in photonic crystal slabs. By embedding a photodetector into a photonic crystal slab we were able to directly observe optical BICs. The photonic crystal slabs are processed from a GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells heterostructure, providing intersubband absorption in the mid-infrared wavelength range. The generated photocurrent is collected via doped contact layers on top and bottom of the suspended photonic crystal slab. We were mapping out the photonic band structure by rotating the device and by acquiring photocurrent spectra every 5°. Our measured photonic bandstructure revealed several BICs, which was confirmed with a rigorously coupled-wave analysis simulation. Since coupling to external fields is suppressed, the photocurrent measured by the photodetector vanishes at the BIC wave vector. To confirm the relation between the measured photocurrent and the Q-factor we used temporal coupled mode theory, which yielded an inverse proportional relation between the photocurrent and the out-coupling loss from the photonic crystal. Implementing a plane wave expansion simulation allowed us to identify the corresponding photonic crystal modes. The ability to directly measure the field intensity inside the photonic crystal presents an important milestone towards integrated opto-electronic BIC devices. Potential

  10. Critical field enhancement of asymptotic optical bound states in the continuum

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jae Woong; Song, Seok Ho; Magnusson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We study spectral singularities and critical field enhancement factors associated with embedded photonic bound states in subwavelength periodic Si films. Ultrahigh-Q resonances supporting field enhancement factor exceeding 108 are obtained in the spectral vicinity of exact embedded eigenvalues in spite of deep surface modulation and vertical asymmetry of the given structure. Treating relations between the partial resonance Q and field enhancement factors with an analytical coupled-mode model, we derive a general strategy to maximize the field enhancement associated with these photonic bound states in the presence of material dissipation. The analytical expression for the field enhancement quantitatively agrees with rigorous numerical calculations. Therefore, our results provide a general knowledge for designing practical resonance elements based on optical bound states in the continuum in various applications. PMID:26673548

  11. Distinct cellular states determine calcium signaling response.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jason; Pilko, Anna; Wollman, Roy

    2016-12-15

    The heterogeneity in mammalian cells signaling response is largely a result of pre-existing cell-to-cell variability. It is unknown whether cell-to-cell variability rises from biochemical stochastic fluctuations or distinct cellular states. Here, we utilize calcium response to adenosine trisphosphate as a model for investigating the structure of heterogeneity within a population of cells and analyze whether distinct cellular response states coexist. We use a functional definition of cellular state that is based on a mechanistic dynamical systems model of calcium signaling. Using Bayesian parameter inference, we obtain high confidence parameter value distributions for several hundred cells, each fitted individually. Clustering the inferred parameter distributions revealed three major distinct cellular states within the population. The existence of distinct cellular states raises the possibility that the observed variability in response is a result of structured heterogeneity between cells. The inferred parameter distribution predicts, and experiments confirm that variability in IP3R response explains the majority of calcium heterogeneity. Our work shows how mechanistic models and single-cell parameter fitting can uncover hidden population structure and demonstrate the need for parameter inference at the single-cell level. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  12. Formation mechanism of guided resonances and bound states in the continuum in photonic crystal slabs

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Xingwei; Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; ...

    2016-08-25

    We develop a formalism, based on the mode expansion method, to describe the guided resonances and bound states in the continuum (BICs) in photonic crystal slabs with one-dimensional periodicity. This approach provides analytic insights to the formation mechanisms of these states: the guided resonances arise from the transverse Fabry–Pérot condition, and the divergence of the resonance lifetimes at the BICs is explained by a destructive interference of radiation from different propagating components inside the slab. As a result, we show BICs at the center and on the edge of the Brillouin zone protected by symmetry, BICs at generic wave vectorsmore » not protected by symmetry, and the annihilation of BICs at low-symmetry wave vectors.« less

  13. Formation mechanism of guided resonances and bound states in the continuum in photonic crystal slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xingwei; Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Lin, Xiao; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-08-25

    We develop a formalism, based on the mode expansion method, to describe the guided resonances and bound states in the continuum (BICs) in photonic crystal slabs with one-dimensional periodicity. This approach provides analytic insights to the formation mechanisms of these states: the guided resonances arise from the transverse Fabry–Pérot condition, and the divergence of the resonance lifetimes at the BICs is explained by a destructive interference of radiation from different propagating components inside the slab. As a result, we show BICs at the center and on the edge of the Brillouin zone protected by symmetry, BICs at generic wave vectors not protected by symmetry, and the annihilation of BICs at low-symmetry wave vectors.

  14. Formation mechanism of guided resonances and bound states in the continuum in photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xingwei; Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Lin, Xiao; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-08-25

    We develop a formalism, based on the mode expansion method, to describe the guided resonances and bound states in the continuum (BICs) in photonic crystal slabs with one-dimensional periodicity. This approach provides analytic insights to the formation mechanisms of these states: the guided resonances arise from the transverse Fabry-Pérot condition, and the divergence of the resonance lifetimes at the BICs is explained by a destructive interference of radiation from different propagating components inside the slab. We show BICs at the center and on the edge of the Brillouin zone protected by symmetry, BICs at generic wave vectors not protected by symmetry, and the annihilation of BICs at low-symmetry wave vectors.

  15. Formation mechanism of guided resonances and bound states in the continuum in photonic crystal slabs

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xingwei; Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Lin, Xiao; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    We develop a formalism, based on the mode expansion method, to describe the guided resonances and bound states in the continuum (BICs) in photonic crystal slabs with one-dimensional periodicity. This approach provides analytic insights to the formation mechanisms of these states: the guided resonances arise from the transverse Fabry–Pérot condition, and the divergence of the resonance lifetimes at the BICs is explained by a destructive interference of radiation from different propagating components inside the slab. We show BICs at the center and on the edge of the Brillouin zone protected by symmetry, BICs at generic wave vectors not protected by symmetry, and the annihilation of BICs at low-symmetry wave vectors. PMID:27557882

  16. Ultrasensitive optical absorption in graphene based on bound states in the continuum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingda; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    We have designed a sphere-graphene-slab structure so that the electromagnetic wave can be well confined in the graphene due to the formation of a bound state in a continuum (BIC) of radiation modes. Based on such a bound state, we have realized strong optical absorption in the monolayer graphene. Such a strong optical absorption exhibits many advantages. It is ultrasensitive to the wavelength because the Q factor of the absorption peak can be more than 2000. By taking suitable BICs, the selective absorption for S and P waves has not only been realized, but also all-angle absorption for the S and P waves at the same time has been demonstrated. We have also found that ultrasensitive strong absorptions can appear at any wavelength from mid-infrared to far-infrared band. These phenomena are very beneficial to biosensing, perfect filters and waveguides. PMID:25652437

  17. Bound states within the radiation continuum in diffraction gratings and the role of leaky modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monticone, Francesco; Alù, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    We discuss resonant states with diverging Q factor within the radiation continuum based on the anomalous interaction of leaky guided modes and diffracted waves in suitably designed reflection gratings. We show that these trapped optical states can be understood within the framework of leaky-wave theory, which unveils their generation process and dynamics. Our findings reveal an interesting mechanism to realize embedded eigenstates in periodic structures, shedding light on their electromagnetic properties, and offering the possibility to quantitatively predict their occurrence and systematically design optimal structures that support them. The realization of extraordinary optical trapping in open structures may be important for applications that require strongly confined and enhanced fields and high selectivity in angle and frequency.

  18. Ultrabroadband super-Planckian radiative heat transfer with artificial continuum cavity states in patterned hyperbolic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jin; Ding, Fei; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Yan, Min

    2017-06-01

    Localized cavity resonances due to nanostructures at material surfaces can greatly enhance radiative heat transfer (RHT) between two closely placed bodies owing to stretching of cavity states in momentum space beyond the light line. Based on such understanding, we numerically demonstrate the possibility of ultrabroadband super-Planckian RHT between two plates patterned with trapezoidal-shaped hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) arrays. The phenomenon is rooted not only in HMM's high effective index for creating subwavelength resonators but also its extremely anisotropic isofrequency contour. The two properties enable one to create photonic bands with a high spectral density to populate a desired thermal radiation window. At submicron gap sizes between such two plates, the artificial continuum states extend outside the light cone, tremendously increasing overall RHT. Our study reveals that structured HMM offers unprecedented potential in achieving a controllable super-Planckian radiative heat transfer for thermal management at nanoscale.

  19. Large enhancement of fully resonant sum-frequency generation through quantum control via continuum states

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A.K.; Kimberg, V.V.; George, Thomas F.

    2004-04-01

    A theory of quantum control of short-wavelength sum-frequency generation, which employs the continuum states, is developed. The proposed scheme employs all-resonant coupling and trade-off optimization of the accompanying constructive and destructive quantum interference effects in the lower-order and higher-order polarizations controlled by the overlap of two autoionizinglike laser-induced continuum structures. The scheme does not rely on adiabatic passage, coherent population trapping or maximum atomic coherence as a means to facilitate maximum output. The opportunities for manipulating transparency of the medium and refractive index for the fundamental and generated radiations, as well as nonlinear polarization in the multiple-resonant medium, are shown. This opens the feasibility of creating frequency-tunable narrowband filters, polarization rotators, and dispersive elements for vacuum ultraviolet radiation. The features specific for quantum interference in Doppler-broadened media are investigated. The feasibility of almost complete conversion of long-wavelength fundamental radiation into generated short-wavelength radiation, and of a dramatic decrease in the intensity of required fundamental radiations, is shown.

  20. Combined discrete particle and continuum model predicting solid-state fermentation in a drum fermentor.

    PubMed

    Schutyser, M A I; Briels, W J; Boom, R M; Rinzema, A

    2004-05-20

    The development of mathematical models facilitates industrial (large-scale) application of solid-state fermentation (SSF). In this study, a two-phase model of a drum fermentor is developed that consists of a discrete particle model (solid phase) and a continuum model (gas phase). The continuum model describes the distribution of air in the bed injected via an aeration pipe. The discrete particle model describes the solid phase. In previous work, mixing during SSF was predicted with the discrete particle model, although mixing simulations were not carried out in the current work. Heat and mass transfer between the two phases and biomass growth were implemented in the two-phase model. Validation experiments were conducted in a 28-dm3 drum fermentor. In this fermentor, sufficient aeration was provided to control the temperatures near the optimum value for growth during the first 45-50 hours. Several simulations were also conducted for different fermentor scales. Forced aeration via a single pipe in the drum fermentors did not provide homogeneous cooling in the substrate bed. Due to large temperature gradients, biomass yield decreased severely with increasing size of the fermentor. Improvement of air distribution would be required to avoid the need for frequent mixing events, during which growth is hampered. From these results, it was concluded that the two-phase model developed is a powerful tool to investigate design and scale-up of aerated (mixed) SSF fermentors.

  1. Quasi bound states in the continuum with few unit cells of photonic crystal slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghizadeh, Alireza; Chung, Il-Sug

    2017-07-01

    Bound states in the continuum (BICs) in photonic crystal slabs represent the resonances with an infinite quality (Q)-factor, occurring above the light line for an infinitely periodic structure. We show that a set of BICs can turn into quasi-BICs with a very high Q-factor even for two or three unit cell structures. They are explained by a viewpoint of BICs originating from the tight-binding of individual resonances of each unit cell as in semiconductors. Combined with a reciprocal-space matching technique, the microcavities based on quasi-BICs can achieve a Q-factor as high as defect-based PhC microcavities. These results may enable the experimental studies of BICs in a compact platform as well as realizing high-Q mirrorless microcavities.

  2. Modeling electron dynamics coupled to continuum states in finite volumes with absorbing boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Giovannini, Umberto; Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Rubio, Angel

    2015-03-01

    Absorbing boundaries are frequently employed in real-time propagation of the Schrödinger equation to remove spurious reflections and efficiently emulate outgoing boundary conditions. These conditions are a fundamental ingredient for the calculation of observables involving infinitely extended continuum states in finite volumes. In the literature, several boundary absorbers have been proposed. They mostly fall into three main families: mask function absorbers, complex absorbing potentials, and exterior complex-scaled potentials. To date none of the proposed absorbers is perfect, and all present a certain degree of reflections. Characterization of such reflections is thus a critical task with strong implications for time-dependent simulations of atoms and molecules. We introduce a method to evaluate the reflection properties of a given absorber and present a comparison of selected samples for each family of absorbers. Further, we discuss the connections between members of each family and show how the same reflection curves can be obtained with very different absorption schemes.

  3. Lifetime measurements of 17C excited states and three-body and continuum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Navrátil, P.; Roth, R.; Langhammer, J.; Bader, V. M.; Bazin, D.; Berryman, J. S.; Campbell, C. M.; Dohet-Eraly, J.; Fallon, P.; Gade, A.; Langer, C.; Lemasson, A.; Loelius, C.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Morse, C.; Parker, J.; Quaglioni, S.; Recchia, F.; Stroberg, S. R.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.; Wimmer, K.

    2015-12-01

    We studied transition rates for the lowest 1 /2+ and 5 /2+ excited states of 17C through lifetime measurements with the GRETINA array using the recoil-distance method. The present measurements provide a model-independent determination of transition strengths giving the values of B (M 1 ;1 /2+→3 /2g.s . +) =1 .04-0.12+0.03×10-2μN2 and B (M 1 ;5 /2+→3 /2g.s . +) =7 .12-0.96+1.27×10-2μN2 . The quenched M 1 transition strength for the 1 /2+→3 /2g.s . + transition, with respect to the 5 /2+→3 /2g.s . + transition, has been confirmed with greater precision. The current data are compared to importance-truncated no-core shell model calculations addressing effects due to continuum and three-body forces.

  4. Self-localized states for electron transfer in nonlocal continuum deformable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros-Ake, Luis A.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of electron transport in a deformable continuum medium subjected to an external harmonic substrate potential. We then consider the quasi-stationary state of the full problem to find a Gross-Pitaevskii type equation with a nonlocal external potential, which is solved by variational and numerical means (considered as the exact solution) to find the parameter conditions for the existence of self-localized solutions. The variational approach predicts a threshold on the on-site or nonlocality parameter where localized solutions cease to exist from the Non-Linear Schrödinger soliton limit. A numerical continuation of stationary state solutions in the corresponding discrete system is used to confirm the prediction of the turning value in the on-site term. We finally study the full stationary state and make use of an approximation, proposed by Briedis et al. [17], for the nonlocal term, corresponding to strong nonlocalities, to find analytic expressions for self-localized states in terms of the series solutions of a nonlinear modified Bessel equation.

  5. RNA: State Memory and Mediator of Cellular Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junhyong; Eberwine, James

    2010-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the genome is dynamic and exquisitely sensitive, changing expression patterns in response to age, environmental stimuli and pharmacological and physiological manipulations. Similarly, cellular phenotype, traditionally viewed as a stable end-state, should be viewed as versatile and changeable. The phenotype of a cell is better defined as a “homeostatic phenotype” implying plasticity resulting from a dynamically-changing yet characteristic pattern of gene/protein expression. A stable change in phenotype is the result of the movement of a cell between different multi-dimensional identity spaces. Here, we describe a key driver of this transition and the stabilizer of phenotype: the relative abundances of the cellular RNAs. We argue that the quantitative state of RNA can be likened to a state memory, that when transferred between cells, alters the phenotype in a predictable manner. PMID:20382532

  6. Enhanced fluorescence emission using bound states in continuum in a photonic crystal membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, S.; Zito, G.; Managò, S.; Penzo, E.; Dhuey, S.; De Luca, A. C.; Cabrini, S.; Mocella, V.

    2017-05-01

    Metasurfaces are two-dimensional structures, arrays of scatterers with subwavelength separation or optically thin planar films, allowing light manipulation and enabling specific changes of optical properties, as for example beam-steering, anomalous refraction and optical-wavefront shaping. Due to the fabrication simplicity, the metasurfaces offer an alternative to 3-D metamaterials and providing a novel method for optical elements miniaturization. It has been demonstrated that a metasurface can support Bound States in Continuum (BIC), that are resonant states by zero width, due to the interaction between trapped electromagnetic. Experimentally, this involves very narrow coupled resonances, with a high Q-factor and an extremely large field intensity enhancement, up to 6 orders of magnitude larger than the intensity of the incident beam. Here, we demonstrate that the field enhancement in proximity of the surface can be applied to boost fluorescence emission of probe molecules dispersed on the surface of a photonic crystal membrane fabricated in silicon nitride. Our results provide new solutions for light manipulation at the nanoscale, especially for sensing and nonlinear optics applications.

  7. Dynamic stress-strain states for metal foams using a 3D cellular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhijun; Wang, Changfeng; Yu, Jilin; Reid, Stephen R.; Harrigan, John J.

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic uniaxial impact behaviour of metal foams using a 3D cell-based finite element model is examined. At sufficiently high loading rates, these materials respond by forming ‘shock or consolidation waves' (Tan et al., 2005a, 2005b). However, the existing dynamic experimental methods have limitations in fully informing this behaviour, particularly for solving boundary/initial value problems. Recently, the problem of the shock-like response of an open-cell foam has been examined by Barnes et al. (2014) using the Hugoniot-curve representations. The present study is somewhat complementary to that approach and additionally aims to provide insight into the ‘rate sensitivity' mechanism applicable to cellular materials. To assist our understanding of the ‘loading rate sensitivity' behaviour of cellular materials, a virtual ‘test' method based on the direct impact technique is explored. Following a continuum representation of the response, the strain field calculation method is employed to determine the local strains ahead of and behind the resulting ‘shock front'. The dynamic stress-strain states in the densification stage are found to be different from the quasi-static ones. It is evident that the constitutive behaviour of the cellular material is deformation-mode dependent. The nature of the ‘rate sensitivity' revealed for cellular materials in this paper is different from the strain-rate sensitivity of dense metals. It is shown that the dynamic stress-strain states behind a shock front of the cellular material lie on a unique curve and each point on the curve corresponds to a particular ‘impact velocity', referred as the velocity upstream of the shock in this study. The dynamic stress-strain curve is related to a layer-wise collapse mode, whilst the equivalent quasi-static curve is related to a random shear band collapse mode. The findings herein are aimed at improving the experimental test techniques used to characterise the rate-sensitivity behaviour

  8. Theory and experimental consequences of generation of a pair of photon-dressed discrete states by external electromagnetic fields in the atomic or molecular continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lami, Alessandro; Rahman, Naseem K.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown theoretically that double resonance through the continuum can be utilized to produce two photon-dressed discrete states embedded in the continuum. The significance of creating such a pair of states is discussed, along with its experimental consequences. Especially important are quantum beats of population, which offer novel spectroscopic opportunities.

  9. Lifetime measurements of 17C excited states and three-body and continuum effects

    DOE PAGES

    Smalley, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Navratil, P.; ...

    2015-12-18

    We studied transition rates for the lowest 1/2+ and 5/2+ excited states of 17C through lifetime measurements with the GRETINA array using the recoil-distance method. The present measurements provide a model-independent determination of transition strengths giving the values of B(M1;1/2+ → 3/2+g.s.) = 1.04+0.03–0.12 × 10–2μ2N and B(M1;5/2+ → 3/2+g.s.) = 7.12+1.27–0.96 × 10–2μ2N. The quenched M1 transition strength for the 1/2+ → 3/2+g.s. transition, with respect to the 5/2+ → 3/2+g.s. transition, has been confirmed with greater precision. Furthermore, the current data are compared to importance-truncated no-core shell model calculations addressing effects due to continuum and three-body forces.

  10. Stress-free states of continuum dislocation fields: Rotations, grain boundaries, and the Nye dislocation density tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limkumnerd, Surachate; Sethna, James P.

    2007-06-01

    We derive general relations between grain boundaries, rotational deformations, and stress-free states for the mesoscale continuum Nye dislocation density tensor. Dislocations generally are associated with long-range stress fields. We provide the general form for dislocation density fields whose stress fields vanish. We explain that a grain boundary (a dislocation wall satisfying Frank’s formula) has vanishing stress in the continuum limit. We show that the general stress-free state can be written explicitly as a (perhaps continuous) superposition of flat Frank walls. We show that the stress-free states are also naturally interpreted as configurations generated by a general spatially dependent rotational deformation. Finally, we propose a least-squares definition for the spatially dependent rotation field of a general (stressful) dislocation density field.

  11. Aspects of conical intersections: Dynamics, bound states embedded in the continuum and short-lived electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cederbaum, Lorenz

    2007-03-01

    Conical intersections are omnipresent in polyatomic molecules and their presence gives rise to the most severe breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Several general aspects of conical intersections and of the dynamics through them will be addressed. Particular attention will be paid to the question what happens to the potential energy surfaces if the electronic states are metastable. In addition, it is shown that nuclear dynamics on coupled potential surface can lead to bound states embedded in the continuum. Non-Born-Oppenheimer effects are responsible for the binding of these states. Once the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is introduced, these states at best become resonances which decay via potential tunnelling. The tunnelling is completely suppressed by the coupling between the electronic states. Another important issue which will be touched upon is dynamics in the presence of conical intersections in macrosystems. Here, the number of modes is extremely large and, nevertheless, their impact close to the intersections cannot be neglected. It is shown that effective modes can be derived which reproduce exactly the short-time dynamics of the whole macrosystem at low cost. Numerical examples are given. References: H. K"oppel, W. Domcke and L.S. Cederbaum, Adv.Chem.Phys. 57, 59 (1984) G.A. Worth and L.S. Cederbaum, Annu-Rev.Phys.Chem. 55, 127 (2004) L.S. Cederbaum, R.S. Friedman, V.M Ryaboy and N. Moiseyev, Phys.Rev.Lett. 90, 013001 (2003) S. Feuerbacher, T. Sommerfeld and L.S. Cederbaum, J.Chem.Phys. 120, 3201 (2004) L.S. Cederbaum, E. Gindensperger and I. Burghardt, Phys.Rev.Lett. 94, 113003 (2005)

  12. Quantum state transfer through noisy quantum cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avalle, Michele; Genoni, Marco G.; Serafini, Alessio

    2015-05-01

    We model the transport of an unknown quantum state on one dimensional qubit lattices by means of a quantum cellular automata (QCA) evolution. We do this by first introducing a class of discrete noisy dynamics, in the first excitation sector, in which a wide group of classical stochastic dynamics is embedded within the more general formalism of quantum operations. We then extend the Hilbert space of the system to accommodate a global vacuum state, thus allowing for the transport of initial on-site coherences besides excitations, and determine the dynamical constraints that define the class of noisy QCA in this subspace. We then study the transport performance through numerical simulations, showing that for some instances of the dynamics perfect quantum state transfer is attainable. Our approach provides one with a natural description of both unitary and open quantum evolutions, where the homogeneity and locality of interactions allow one to take into account several forms of quantum noise in a plausible scenario.

  13. Towards an integrated primary and secondary HIV prevention continuum for the United States: a cyclical process model

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Tim; Sherwood, Jennifer; Remien, Robert H; Nash, Denis; Auerbach, Judith D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Every new HIV infection is preventable and every HIV-related death is avoidable. As many jurisdictions around the world endeavour to end HIV as an epidemic, missed HIV prevention and treatment opportunities must be regarded as public health emergencies, and efforts to quickly fill gaps in service provision for all people living with and vulnerable to HIV infection must be prioritized. Discussion We present a novel, comprehensive, primary and secondary HIV prevention continuum model for the United States as a conceptual framework to identify key steps in reducing HIV incidence and improving health outcomes among those vulnerable to, as well as those living with, HIV infection. We further discuss potential approaches to address gaps in data required for programme planning, implementation and evaluation across the elements of the HIV prevention continuum. Conclusions Our model conceptualizes opportunities to monitor and quantify primary HIV prevention efforts and, importantly, illustrates the interplay between an outcomes-oriented primary HIV prevention process and the HIV care continuum to move aggressively forward in reaching ambitious reductions in HIV incidence. To optimize the utility of this outcomes-oriented HIV prevention continuum, a key gap to be addressed includes the creation and increased coordination of data relevant to HIV prevention across sectors. PMID:27863535

  14. Immunotherapy in allergy and cellular tests: state of art.

    PubMed

    Chirumbolo, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    The basophil activation test (BAT) is an in vitro assay where the activation of basophils upon exposure to various IgE-challenging molecules is measured by flow cytometry. It is a cellular test able to investigate basophil behavior during allergy and allergy immunotherapy. A panoply of critical issues and suggestive advances have rendered this assay a promising yet puzzling tool to endeavor a full comprehension of innate immunity of allergy desensitization and manage allergen or monoclonal anti-IgE therapy. In this review a brief state of art of BAT in immunotherapy is described focusing onto the analytical issue pertaining BAT performance in allergy specific therapy.

  15. Continuum of depressive and manic mixed states in patients with bipolar disorder: quantitative measurement and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Swann, Alan C; Steinberg, Joel L; Lijffijt, Marijn; Moeller, Gerard F

    2009-10-01

    Bipolar mixed states combine depressive and manic features, presenting diagnostic and treatment challenges and reflecting a severe form of the illness. DSM-IV criteria for a mixed state require combined depressive and manic syndromes, but a range of mixed states has been described clinically. A unified definition of mixed states would be valuable in understanding their diagnosis, mechanism and treatment implications. We investigated the manner in which depressive and manic features combine to produce a continuum of mixed states. In 88 subjects with bipolar disorder (DSM-IV), we evaluated symptoms and clinical characteristics, and compared depression-based, mania-based, and other published definitions of mixed states. We developed an index of the extent to which symptoms were mixed (Mixed State Index, MSI) and characterized its relationship to clinical state. Predominately manic and depressive mixed states using criteria from recent literature, as well as Kraepelinian mixed states, had similar symptoms and MSI scores. Anxiety correlated significantly with depression scores in manic subjects and with mania scores in depressed subjects. Discriminant function analysis associated mixed states with symptoms of hyperactivity and negative cognitions, but not subjective depressive or elevated mood. High MSI scores were associated with severe course of illness. For depressive or manic episodes, characteristics of mixed states emerged with two symptoms of the opposite polarity. This was a cross-sectional study. Mixed states appear to be a continuum. An index of the degree to which depressive and manic symptoms combine appears useful in identifying and characterizing mixed states. We propose a depressive or manic episode with three or more symptoms of the opposite polarity as a parsimonious definition of a mixed state.

  16. Bound states emerging from below the continuum in a solvable PT -symmetric discrete Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Znojil, Miloslav

    2017-07-01

    The phenomenon of the birth of an isolated quantum bound state at the lower edge of the continuum is studied for a particle moving along a discrete real line of coordinates x ∈Z . The motion is controlled by a weakly nonlocal 2 J -parametric external potential V which is non-Hermitian but P T symmetric. The model is found exactly solvable. The bound states are interpreted as Sturmians. Their closed-form definitions are presented and discussed up to J =7 .

  17. Exploring the salt-cocrystal continuum with solid-state NMR using natural-abundance samples: implications for crystal engineering.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Lalit; Banik, Manas; Yarava, Jayasubba Reddy; Joseph, Sumy; Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2017-07-01

    There has been significant recent interest in differentiating multicomponent solid forms, such as salts and cocrystals, and, where appropriate, in determining the position of the proton in the X-H⋯A-YX(-)⋯H-A(+)-Y continuum in these systems, owing to the direct relationship of this property to the clinical, regulatory and legal requirements for an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In the present study, solid forms of simple cocrystals/salts were investigated by high-field (700 MHz) solid-state NMR (ssNMR) using samples with naturally abundant (15)N nuclei. Four model compounds in a series of prototypical salt/cocrystal/continuum systems exhibiting {PyN⋯H-O-}/{PyN(+)-H⋯O(-)} hydrogen bonds (Py is pyridine) were selected and prepared. The crystal structures were determined at both low and room temperature using X-ray diffraction. The H-atom positions were determined by measuring the (15)N-(1)H distances through (15)N-(1)H dipolar interactions using two-dimensional inversely proton-detected cross polarization with variable contact-time (invCP-VC) (1)H→(15)N→(1)H experiments at ultrafast (νR ≥ 60-70 kHz) magic angle spinning (MAS) frequency. It is observed that this method is sensitive enough to determine the proton position even in a continuum where an ambiguity of terminology for the solid form often arises. This work, while carried out on simple systems, has implications in the pharmaceutical industry where the salt/cocrystal/continuum condition of APIs is considered seriously.

  18. Fano effect and bound state in continuum in electron transport through an armchair graphene nanoribbon with line defect.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wei-Jiang; Sui, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Yan; Yu, Guo-Dong; Chen, Xiao-Hui

    2013-07-22

    : Electron transport properties in an armchair graphene nanoribbon are theoretically investigated by considering the presence of line defect. It is found that the line defect causes the abundant Fano effects and bound state in continuum (BIC) in the electron transport process, which are tightly dependent on the width of the nanoribbon. By plotting the spectra of the density of electron states of the line defect, we see that the line defect induces some localized quantum states around the Dirac point and that the different localizations of these states lead to these two kinds of transport results. Next, the Fano effect and BIC phenomenon are detailedly described via the analysis about the influence of the structure parameters. According to the numerical results, we propose such a structure to be a promising candidate for graphene nanoswitch. PACS: 81.05.Uw, 71.55.-i, 73.23.-b, 73.25.+i.

  19. Fano effect and bound state in continuum in electron transport through an armchair graphene nanoribbon with line defect

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Electron transport properties in an armchair graphene nanoribbon are theoretically investigated by considering the presence of line defect. It is found that the line defect causes the abundant Fano effects and bound state in continuum (BIC) in the electron transport process, which are tightly dependent on the width of the nanoribbon. By plotting the spectra of the density of electron states of the line defect, we see that the line defect induces some localized quantum states around the Dirac point and that the different localizations of these states lead to these two kinds of transport results. Next, the Fano effect and BIC phenomenon are detailedly described via the analysis about the influence of the structure parameters. According to the numerical results, we propose such a structure to be a promising candidate for graphene nanoswitch. PACS 81.05.Uw, 71.55.-i, 73.23.-b, 73.25.+i PMID:23870061

  20. Search for saddle-point electrons using the continuum-distorted-wave eikonal initial-state model

    SciTech Connect

    McCartney, M.

    1995-08-01

    The continuum-distorted-wave eikonal initial-state (CDWEIS) model is used to study the ionization of hydrogen by protons of energy 10--500 keV. Ejected electron spectra are presented and discussed in the context of the saddle-point mechanism. The behavior of the ejected electron spectrum as the charge of the incident projectile is varied is also considered. It is concluded that within its range of validity, CDWEIS does not provide any evidence of the existence of saddle-point electrons.

  1. Diverse continuum of CD4(+) T-cell states is determined by hierarchical additive integration of cytokine signals.

    PubMed

    Eizenberg-Magar, Inbal; Rimer, Jacob; Zaretsky, Irina; Lara-Astiaso, David; Reich-Zeliger, Shlomit; Friedman, Nir

    2017-08-01

    During cell differentiation, progenitor cells integrate signals from their environment that guide their development into specialized phenotypes. The ways by which cells respond to complex signal combinations remain difficult to analyze and model. To gain additional insight into signal integration, we systematically mapped the response of CD4(+) T cells to a large number of input cytokine combinations that drive their differentiation. We find that, in response to varied input combinations, cells differentiate into a continuum of cell fates as opposed to a limited number of discrete phenotypes. Input cytokines hierarchically influence the cell population, with TGFβ being most dominant followed by IL-6 and IL-4. Mathematical modeling explains these results using additive signal integration within hierarchical groups of input cytokine combinations and correctly predicts cell population response to new input conditions. These findings suggest that complex cellular responses can be effectively described using a segmented linear approach, providing a framework for prediction of cellular responses to new cytokine combinations and doses, with implications to fine-tuned immunotherapies.

  2. Bound state in the continuum by spatially separated ensembles of atoms in a coupled-cavity array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, P. T.; Law, C. K.

    2017-08-01

    We present an analytic solution of bound states in the continuum (BICs) for photons and atoms in a one-dimensional coupled-cavity array. These bound states are formed by two ensembles of two-level atoms confined in separated cavities of the array. We show that in the regime where the photon hopping rate between neighboring cavities is high compared with the collective Rabi frequency the BIC corresponds to a nonradiating collective atomic state in which the two ensembles of atoms are strongly entangled. On the other hand, in the low photon hopping rate regime, the BIC behaves as a quantum cavity in which photons can be trapped between the two ensembles of atoms.

  3. Exogenous antioxidants—Double-edged swords in cellular redox state

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    The balance between oxidation and antioxidation is believed to be critical in maintaining healthy biological systems. Under physiological conditions, the human antioxidative defense system including e.g., superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione (GSH) and others, allows the elimination of excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) including, among others superoxide anions (O2.-), hydroxyl radicals (OH.), alkoxyl radicals (RO.) and peroxyradicals (ROO.). However, our endogenous antioxidant defense systems are incomplete without exogenous originating reducing compounds such as vitamin C, vitamin E, carotenoids and polyphenols, playing an essential role in many antioxidant mechanisms in living organisms. Therefore, there is continuous demand for exogenous antioxidants in order to prevent oxidative stress, representing a disequilibrium redox state in favor of oxidation. However, high doses of isolated compounds may be toxic, owing to prooxidative effects at high concentrations or their potential to react with beneficial concentrations of ROS normally present at physiological conditions that are required for optimal cellular functioning. This review aims to examine the double-edged effects of dietary originating antioxidants with a focus on the most abundant compounds, especially polyphenols, vitamin C, vitamin E and carotenoids. Different approaches to enrich our body with exogenous antioxidants such as via synthetic antioxidants, diets rich in fruits and vegetables and taking supplements will be reviewed and experimental and epidemiological evidences discussed, highlighting that antioxidants at physiological doses are generally safe, exhibiting interesting health beneficial effects. PMID:20972369

  4. Boundary-corrected four-body continuum-intermediate-state method for charge exchange between hydrogenlike projectiles and atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milojević, Nenad; Mančev, Ivan; Belkić, Dževad

    2017-09-01

    Single-electron capture from one-electron and multielectron atoms colliding with hydrogenlike projectiles at intermediate and high incident energies is examined by using the post version of the boundary-corrected four-body continuum-intermediate-state (BCIS-4B) method. This method satisfies the correct boundary conditions in the entrance and exit channels. In the entrance configuration, the BCIS-4B method takes into account the ionization channel through the electronic continuum intermediate states described by the full Coulomb wave function centered on the screened nuclear charge of the projectile. The presented analytical calculation yields the transition amplitude in terms of an efficiently computed two-dimensional numerical quadrature over real variables. Total cross sections are computed for electron capture in the He+-H , He+-He , and Li2 +-He collisions at intermediate and high impact energies. Also, differential cross sections are obtained for the He+-He collisions. The present results from the BCIS-4B method are found to be in very good agreement with the available experimental data on differential and total cross sections.

  5. Decay of bound states in the continuum of Majorana fermions induced by vacuum fluctuations: Proposal of qubit technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricco, L. S.; Marques, Y.; Dessotti, F. A.; Machado, R. S.; de Souza, M.; Seridonio, A. C.

    2016-04-01

    We report on a theoretical investigation of the interplay between vacuum fluctuations, Majorana quasiparticles (MQPs), and bound states in the continuum (BICs) by proposing a new venue for qubit storage. BICs emerge due to quantum interference processes as the Fano effect and, since such a mechanism is unbalanced, these states decay as regular into the continuum. Such fingerprints identify BICs in graphene as we have discussed in detail in Phys. Rev. B 92, 245107 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.245107 and Phys. Rev. B, 92, 045409 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.045409. Here, by considering two semi-infinite Kitaev chains within the topological phase, coupled to a quantum dot (QD) hybridized with leads, we show the emergence of a novel type of BICs, in which MQPs are trapped. As the MQPs of these chains far apart build a delocalized fermion and qubit, we identify that the decay of these BICs is not connected to Fano and it occurs when finite fluctuations are observed in the vacuum composed by electron pairs for this qubit. From the experimental point of view, we also show that vacuum fluctuations can be induced just by changing the chain-dot couplings from symmetric to asymmetric. Hence, we show how to perform the qubit storage within two delocalized BICs of MQPs and to access it when the vacuum fluctuates by means of a complete controllable way in quantum transport experiments.

  6. Tuning the Continuum of Structural States in the Native Ensemble of a Regulatory Protein

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The mesoscale nature of proteins allows for an efficient coupling between environmental cues and conformational changes, enabling their function as molecular transducers. Delineating the precise structural origins of such a connection and the expected spectroscopic response has, however, been challenging. In this work, we perform a combination of urea–temperature double perturbation experiments and theoretical modeling to probe the conformational landscape of Cnu, a natural thermosensor protein. We observe unique ensemble signatures that point to a continuum of conformational substates in the native ensemble and that respond intricately to perturbations upon monitoring secondary and tertiary structures, distances between an intrinsic FRET pair, and hydrodynamic volumes. Binding assays further reveal a weakening of the Cnu functional complex with temperature, highlighting the molecular origins of signal transduction critical for pathogenic response in enterobacteriaceae. PMID:28345920

  7. Combining the GW formalism with the polarizable continuum model: A state-specific non-equilibrium approach.

    PubMed

    Duchemin, Ivan; Jacquemin, Denis; Blase, Xavier

    2016-04-28

    We have implemented the polarizable continuum model within the framework of the many-body Green's function GW formalism for the calculation of electron addition and removal energies in solution. The present formalism includes both ground-state and non-equilibrium polarization effects. In addition, the polarization energies are state-specific, allowing to obtain the bath-induced renormalisation energy of all occupied and virtual energy levels. Our implementation is validated by comparisons with ΔSCF calculations performed at both the density functional theory and coupled-cluster single and double levels for solvated nucleobases. The present study opens the way to GW and Bethe-Salpeter calculations in disordered condensed phases of interest in organic optoelectronics, wet chemistry, and biology.

  8. Photoelectron circular dichroism of chiral molecules studied with a continuum-state-corrected strong-field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreissigacker, Ingo; Lein, Manfred

    2014-05-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on circular dichroism in the photoelectron momentum distributions from strong-field ionization of chiral molecules [C. Lux et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 51, 5001 (2012), 10.1002/anie.201109035; C. S. Lehmann et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 234307 (2013), 10.1063/1.4844295], we investigate the origin of this effect theoretically. We show that it is not possible to describe photoelectron circular dichroism with the commonly used strong-field approximation due to its plane-wave nature. We therefore apply the Born approximation to the scattering state and use this as a continuum-state correction in the strong-field approximation. We obtain electron distributions for the molecules camphor and fenchone. In order to gain physical insight into the process, we study the contributions of individual molecular orientations.

  9. Photoionization microscopy of the lithium atom: Wave-function imaging of quasibound and continuum Stark states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, S.; Harb, M. M.; Ollagnier, A.; Robicheaux, F.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Barillot, T.; Lépine, F.; Bordas, C.

    2016-07-01

    Photoionization of an atom in the presence of a uniform static electric field provides the unique opportunity to expand and visualize the atomic wave function at a macroscopic scale. In a number of seminal publications dating back to the 1980s, Fabrikant, Demkov, Kondratovich, and Ostrovsky showed that this goal could be achieved by projecting slow (meV) photoionized electrons onto a position-sensitive detector and underlined the distinction between continuum and resonant contributions. The uncovering of resonant signatures was achieved fairly recently in experiments on the nonhydrogenic lithium atoms [Cohen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 183001 (2013)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.183001. The purpose of the present article is the general description of these findings, with emphasis on the various manifestations of resonant character. From this point of view, lithium has been chosen as an illustrative example between the two limiting cases of hydrogen, where resonance effects are more easily identified, and heavy atoms like xenon, where resonant effects were not observed.

  10. The solid-state continuum: a perspective on the interrelationships between different solid-state forms in drug substance and drug product.

    PubMed

    Elder, David P; Patterson, James E; Holm, René

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the review is to provide an overview of the nomenclature used in the solid-state continuum and relate these to the development of drug substances and drug products. The importance of a rational approach to solid-state form selection, including integrated decision making (ensuring equal weight is given to the needs of the drug substance and the drug product), is vital for the effective development of a drug candidate. For example, how do secondary processing considerations influence the selection of drug substance solid-state form and resulting formulation, and how can drug substance solid-state form be used to optimise secondary processing? Further, the potential use of 'crystal' engineering to optimise stability, purity and optical resolutions, and the linked regulatory requirements, will be discussed. The nomenclature used in the solid-state continuum, which contains a large number of different crystalline and non-crystalline forms, for example, amorphous systems, was reviewed. Further, the significant role of the drug substance within the solid oral dose form from a physicochemical perspective was covered. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  11. Spin polarized bound states in the continuum in open Aharonov-Bohm rings with the Rashba spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgakov, Evgeny N.; Sadreev, Almas F.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the trapping of electrons with a definite spin polarization by bound states in the continuum (BSC) in the open Aharonov-Bohm rings in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI). Neglecting the Zeeman term we show the existence of BSCs in the one-dimensional ring when the eigenstates of the closed ring are doubly degenerate. With account of the Zeeman term BSCs occur only at the points of threefold degeneracy. The BSCs are found in the parametric space of flux and RSOI strength in close pairs with opposite spin polarization. Thereby the spin polarization of electrons transmitted through the ring can be altered by minor variation of magnetic or electric field at the vicinity of these pairs. Numerical simulations of the two-dimensional open ring show similar results for the BSCs. Encircling the BSC points in the parametric space of the flux and the RSOI constant gives rise to a geometric phase.

  12. Spin polarized bound states in the continuum in open Aharonov-Bohm rings with the Rashba spin-orbit interaction.

    PubMed

    Bulgakov, Evgeny N; Sadreev, Almas F

    2016-07-06

    We consider the trapping of electrons with a definite spin polarization by bound states in the continuum (BSC) in the open Aharonov-Bohm rings in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI). Neglecting the Zeeman term we show the existence of BSCs in the one-dimensional ring when the eigenstates of the closed ring are doubly degenerate. With account of the Zeeman term BSCs occur only at the points of threefold degeneracy. The BSCs are found in the parametric space of flux and RSOI strength in close pairs with opposite spin polarization. Thereby the spin polarization of electrons transmitted through the ring can be altered by minor variation of magnetic or electric field at the vicinity of these pairs. Numerical simulations of the two-dimensional open ring show similar results for the BSCs. Encircling the BSC points in the parametric space of the flux and the RSOI constant gives rise to a geometric phase.

  13. Bound states in the continuum with high orbital angular momentum in a dielectric rod with periodically modulated permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgakov, Evgeny N.; Sadreev, Almas F.

    2017-07-01

    We report bound states in the radiation continuum (BICs) in a single infinitely long dielectric rod with periodically stepwise modulated permittivity alternating from ɛ1 to ɛ2. For ɛ2=1 in air the rod is equivalent to a stack of dielectric disks with permittivity ɛ1. Because of rotational and translational symmetries the BICs are classified by orbital angular momentum m and the Bloch wave vector β directed along the rod. For m =0 and β =0 the symmetry protected BICs have definite polarization and occur in a wide range of the radius of the rod and the dielectric permittivities. More involved BICs with m ≠0 ,β =0 exist only for a selected radius of the rod at a fixed dielectric constant. The existence of robust Bloch BICs with β ≠0 ,m =0 is demonstrated. Asymptotic limits to a homogeneous rod and to very thin disks are also considered.

  14. Continuum tensor network field states, path integral representations and spatial symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, David; Brockt, Christoph; Haegeman, Jutho; Osborne, Tobias J.; Verstraete, Frank

    2015-06-01

    A natural way to generalize tensor network variational classes to quantum field systems is via a continuous tensor contraction. This approach is first illustrated for the class of quantum field states known as continuous matrix-product states (cMPS). As a simple example of the path-integral representation we show that the state of a dynamically evolving quantum field admits a natural representation as a cMPS. A completeness argument is also provided that shows that all states in Fock space admit a cMPS representation when the number of variational parameters tends to infinity. Beyond this, we obtain a well-behaved field limit of projected entangled-pair states (PEPS) in two dimensions that provide an abstract class of quantum field states with natural symmetries. We demonstrate how symmetries of the physical field state are encoded within the dynamics of an auxiliary field system of one dimension less. In particular, the imposition of Euclidean symmetries on the physical system requires that the auxiliary system involved in the class’ definition must be Lorentz-invariant. The physical field states automatically inherit entropy area laws from the PEPS class, and are fully described by the dissipative dynamics of a lower dimensional virtual field system. Our results lie at the intersection many-body physics, quantum field theory and quantum information theory, and facilitate future exchanges of ideas and insights between these disciplines.

  15. Rydberg and continuum states of the HeH+ molecular ion: Variational R -matrix and multichannel quantum defect theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhali, I.; Bezzaouia, S.; Telmini, M.; Jungen, Ch.

    2016-08-01

    Variational ab initio R -matrix theory combined with generalized multichannel quantum defect theory is used to calculate singly excited Rydberg states of the hydrohelium molecular ion, HeH+, for Σ,3+1,Π,31,Δ,31,Φ,31, and Γ,31 symmetry. Bound levels are calculated for n values up to n ≈10 , and continuum states up to ≈3 eV above the HeH2 + threshold. The calculations span the range of internuclear distances R from 1 to 5 bohrs. The present work follows a preliminary study on the Δ,31 states of HeH+ [Bouhali, Bezzaouia, Telmini, and Jungen, EPJ Web Conf. 84, 04004 (2015), 10.1051/epjconf/20158404004] which was also based on R -matrix theory. Further—although limited to rather small R values—the present work extends the recent ab initio computations of Jungen and Jungen [Mol. Phys. 113, 2333 (2015), 10.1080/00268976.2015.1040094] to higher excitation energies which are not accessible to standard quantum-chemical methods. Where a comparison with the calculations of Jungen and Jungen and other older results can be made, namely for n ≤5 , very good agreement with previous ab initio results is obtained.

  16. The Teacher Development Continuum in the United States and China: Summary of a Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreras, Ana; Olson, Steve

    2010-01-01

    In 1999, Liping Ma published her book "Knowing and Teaching Elementary Mathematics: Teachers' Understanding of Fundamental Mathematics in the United States and China," which probed the kinds of knowledge that elementary school teachers need to convey mathematical concepts and procedures effectively to their students. Later that year,…

  17. Coherent-state path integrals in the continuum: The SU(2) case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordas, G.; Kalantzis, D.; Karanikas, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    We define the time-continuous spin coherent-state path integral in a way that is free from inconsistencies. The proposed definition is used to reproduce known exact results. Such a formalism opens new possibilities for applying approximations with improved accuracy and can be proven useful in a great variety of problems where spin Hamiltonians are used.

  18. A study of gamma ray burst continuum properties presnting evidence for two spectral states in bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Paciesas, William S.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Koshut, Tom M.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.; Harmon, B. A.; Lestrade, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the existence of two spectral states contributing simultaneously to the total spectrum observed in many gamma-ray bursts (GRB's). An ensemble of 120 GRB's measured by BATSE were studied, using 4 channel spectral data, to determine in which bursts the spectral states can be most effectively resolved. The technique of summing the low intensity spectra together to get an average spectrum allows for precise characterization of the average low intensity spectral behavior. The 4 and 16 channel spectra obtained by the BATSE Large Area Detectors (LAD's) are analyzed using a model-independent spectral inversion technique. The results of these analyses applied to an individual burst are discussed in detail.

  19. Lindblad-driven discretized leads for nonequilibrium steady-state transport in quantum impurity models: Recovering the continuum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, F.; Goldstein, M.; Dorda, A.; Arrigoni, E.; Weichselbaum, A.; von Delft, J.

    2016-10-01

    The description of interacting quantum impurity models in steady-state nonequilibrium is an open challenge for computational many-particle methods: the numerical requirement of using a finite number of lead levels and the physical requirement of describing a truly open quantum system are seemingly incompatible. One possibility to bridge this gap is the use of Lindblad-driven discretized leads (LDDL): one couples auxiliary continuous reservoirs to the discretized lead levels and represents these additional reservoirs by Lindblad terms in the Liouville equation. For quadratic models governed by Lindbladian dynamics, we present an elementary approach for obtaining correlation functions analytically. In a second part, we use this approach to explicitly discuss the conditions under which the continuum limit of the LDDL approach recovers the correct representation of thermal reservoirs. As an analytically solvable example, the nonequilibrium resonant level model is studied in greater detail. Lastly, we present ideas towards a numerical evaluation of the suggested Lindblad equation for interacting impurities based on matrix product states. In particular, we present a reformulation of the Lindblad equation, which has the useful property that the leads can be mapped onto a chain where both the Hamiltonian dynamics and the Lindblad driving are local at the same time. Moreover, we discuss the possibility to combine the Lindblad approach with a logarithmic discretization needed for the exploration of exponentially small energy scales.

  20. Steady-state analysis of a continuum model for super-infection.

    PubMed

    Ermentrout, Bard; Hastings, Stuart

    2009-09-01

    A large system of N strains of parasite and a single host is analyzed as a function of the degree of virulence in the strains when there is super-infection between hosts (more virulent strains can infect hosts that are already infected) and within-host transition between strains that is neutral. When this small amount of local switching is allowed, steady-state solutions converge to a continuous distribution as the number of strains increases. The resulting nonlinear-nonautonomous integro-differential equation is reduced to a fourth order boundary value problem (BVP) and the existence of positive solutions is proven. The methods here and associated BVP allow for a thorough exploration of parameter space for this class of models.

  1. Lifetime measurements of 17C excited states and three-body and continuum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Smalley, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Navratil, P.; Roth, R.; Langhammer, J.; Bader, V. M.; Bazin, D.; Barryman, J. S.; Campbell, C. M.; Dohet-Eraly, J.; Fallon, P.; Gade, A.; Langer, C.; Lemasson, A.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Morse, C.; Parker, J.; Quaglioni, S.; Recchia, F.; Stroberg, S. R.; Wiesshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.; Wimmer, K.; Brown, B. A.

    2015-12-18

    We studied transition rates for the lowest 1/2+ and 5/2+ excited states of 17C through lifetime measurements with the GRETINA array using the recoil-distance method. The present measurements provide a model-independent determination of transition strengths giving the values of B(M1;1/2+ → 3/2+g.s.) = 1.04+0.03–0.12 × 10–2μ2N and B(M1;5/2+ → 3/2+g.s.) = 7.12+1.27–0.96 × 10–2μ2N. The quenched M1 transition strength for the 1/2+ → 3/2+g.s. transition, with respect to the 5/2+ → 3/2+g.s. transition, has been confirmed with greater precision. Furthermore, the current data are compared to importance-truncated no-core shell model calculations addressing effects due to continuum and three-body forces.

  2. Effect of a pH Gradient on the Protonation States of Cytochrome c Oxidase: A Continuum Electrostatics Study.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Pedro R; Oliveira, A Sofia F; Campos, Sara R R; Soares, Cláudio M; Baptista, António M

    2017-02-27

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) couples the reduction of dioxygen to water with transmembrane proton pumping, which leads to the generation of an electrochemical gradient. In this study we analyze how one of the components of the electrochemical gradient, the difference in pH across the membrane, or ΔpH, influences the protonation states of residues in CcO. We modified our continuum electrostatics/Monte Carlo (CE/MC) method in order to include the ΔpH and applied it to the study of CcO, in what is, to our best knowledge, the first CE/MC study of CcO in the presence of a pH gradient. The inclusion of a transmembrane pH gradient allows for the identification of residues whose titration behavior depends on the pH on both sides of the membrane. Among the several residues with unusual titration profiles, three are well-known key residues in the proton transfer process of CcO: E286I, Y288I, and K362I. All three residues have been previously identified as being critical for the catalytic or proton pumping functions of CcO. Our results suggest that when the pH gradient increases, these residues may be part of a regulatory mechanism to stem the proton flow.

  3. State-selective metabolic labeling of cellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Ngo, John T; Babin, Brett M; Champion, Julie A; Schuman, Erin M; Tirrell, David A

    2012-08-17

    Transcriptional activity from a specified promoter can provide a useful marker for the physiological state of a cell. Here we introduce a method for selective tagging of proteins made in cells in which specified promoters are active. Tagged proteins can be modified with affinity reagents for enrichment or with fluorescent dyes for visualization. The method allows state-selective analysis of the proteome, whereby proteins synthesized in predetermined physiological states can be identified. The approach is demonstrated by proteome-wide labeling of bacterial proteins upon activation of the P(BAD) promoter and the SoxRS regulon and provides a basis for analysis of more complex systems including spatially heterogeneous microbial cultures and biofilms.

  4. On the accuracy of the general, state-specific polarizable-continuum model for the description of correlated ground- and excited states in solution.

    PubMed

    Mewes, Jan-Michael; Herbert, John M; Dreuw, Andreas

    2017-01-04

    Equilibrium and non-equilibrium formulations of the state-specific polarizable-continuum model (SS-PCM) are evaluated in combination with correlated ground- and excited-state densities provided by the algebraic-diagrammatic construction method (ADC) for the polarization propagator via the computationally efficient intermediate-state representation (ISR) formalism. Since the influence of the SS-PCM onto quantum-chemical method is naturally limited to the presence of the apparent surface charges in the one-electron Hamiltonian and hence fully contained in the polarized MOs, the herein presented solvent model can be combined with all implemented orders and variants of ADC. Employing ADC/SS-PCM, the symmetric, ionized dimers of neon, ethene and nitromethane are investigated. Their broken-symmetry wavefunctions exhibit a low-lying charge-transfer state that is symmetry-equivalent to the ground state. This curious though ultimately artificial feature is convenient as it allows for a direct comparison of ADC/SS-PCM for the CT state to the Møller-Plesset/PCM description of the ground state. The agreement down to 0.02 eV for a wide range of dielectric constants validates the ADC/SS-PCM approach. Eventually, the relaxed potential-energy surfaces of the ground and lowest excited states of 4-(N,N)-dimethylaminobenzonitrile in cyclohexane and acetonitrile are computed, and it is demonstrated that the ADC(2)/SS-PCM approach affords excellent agreement with experimental fluorescence data. Only at the ADC(3) level of theory, however, the experimentally observed solvent-dependent dual fluorescence can be explained.

  5. Numerical Study of Rarefied Hypersonic Flow Interacting with a Continuum Jet. Degree awarded by Pennsylvania State Univ., Aug. 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher E.

    2000-01-01

    An uncoupled Computational Fluid Dynamics-Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (CFD-DSMC) technique is developed and applied to provide solutions for continuum jets interacting with rarefied external flows. The technique is based on a correlation of the appropriate Bird breakdown parameter for a transitional-rarefied condition that defines a surface within which the continuum solution is unaffected by the external flow-jet interaction. The method is applied to two problems to assess and demonstrate its validity; one of a jet interaction in the transitional-rarefied flow regime and the other in the moderately rarefied regime. Results show that the appropriate Bird breakdown surface for uncoupling the continuum and non-continuum solutions is a function of a non-dimensional parameter relating the momentum flux and collisionality between the two interacting flows. The correlation is exploited for the simulation of a jet interaction modeled for an experimental condition in the transitional-rarefied flow regime and the validity of the correlation is demonstrated. The uncoupled technique is also applied to an aerobraking flight condition for the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with attitude control system jet interaction. Aerodynamic yawing moment coefficients for cases without and with jet interaction at various angles-of-attack were predicted, and results from the present method compare well with values published previously. The flow field and surface properties are analyzed in some detail to describe the mechanism by which the jet interaction affects the aerodynamics.

  6. 77 FR 45367 - Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application; Continuum of Care Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application; Continuum of Care Application... and renewal funding. State and local governments, public housing authorities and nonprofit...: Colette Pollard., Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development,...

  7. Cellular stress induces a protective sleep-like state in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Hill, Andrew J; Mansfield, Richard; Lopez, Jessie M N G; Raizen, David M; Van Buskirk, Cheryl

    2014-10-20

    Sleep is recognized to be ancient in origin, with vertebrates and invertebrates experiencing behaviorally quiescent states that are regulated by conserved genetic mechanisms. Despite its conservation throughout phylogeny, the function of sleep remains debated. Hypotheses for the purpose of sleep include nervous-system-specific functions such as modulation of synaptic strength and clearance of metabolites from the brain, as well as more generalized cellular functions such as energy conservation and macromolecule biosynthesis. These models are supported by the identification of synaptic and metabolic processes that are perturbed during prolonged wakefulness. It remains to be seen whether perturbations of cellular homeostasis in turn drive sleep. Here we show that under conditions of cellular stress, including noxious heat, cold, hypertonicity, and tissue damage, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans engages a behavioral quiescence program. The stress-induced quiescent state displays properties of sleep and is dependent on the ALA neuron, which mediates the conserved soporific effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligand overexpression. We characterize heat-induced quiescence in detail and show that it is indeed dependent on components of EGF signaling, providing physiological relevance to the behavioral effects of EGF family ligands. We find that after noxious heat exposure, quiescence-defective animals show elevated expression of cellular stress reporter genes and are impaired for survival, demonstrating the benefit of stress-induced behavioral quiescence. These data provide evidence that cellular stress can induce a protective sleep-like state in C. elegans and suggest that a deeply conserved function of sleep is to mitigate disruptions of cellular homeostasis.

  8. Unified ab initio approach to bound and unbound states: No-core shell model with continuum and its application to 7He

    DOE PAGES

    Baroni, Simone; Navratil, Petr; Quaglioni, Sofia

    2013-03-26

    In this study, we introduce a unified approach to nuclear bound and continuum states based on the coupling of the no-core shell model (NCSM), a bound-state technique, with the no-core shell model/resonating group method (NCSM/RGM), a nuclear scattering technique. This new ab initio method, no-core shell model with continuum (NCSMC), leads to convergence properties superior to either NCSM or NCSM/RGM while providing a balanced approach to different classes of states. In the NCSMC, the ansatz for the many-nucleon wave function includes (i) a square-integrable A-nucleon component expanded in a complete harmonic oscillator basis and (ii) a binary-cluster component with asymptoticmore » boundary conditions that can properly describe weakly bound states, resonances, and scattering. The Schrödinger equation is transformed into a system of coupled-channel integral-differential equations that we solve using a modified microscopic R-matrix formalism within a Lagrange mesh basis. We demonstrate the usefulness of the approach by investigating the unbound 7He nucleus.« less

  9. Continuum Nuclear Structure via

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templon, Jeffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear spectra are generally well-understood for excitation energies below the particle-emission threshold. Above this threshold, excited states decay preferentially by emission of nucleons or nucleon clusters. These resonant excitations are short-lived, producing continuum spectra of overlapping states accompanied by non-resonant, probe -dependent background processes. The resonant excitations' properties are difficult to deduce from these spectra. Many important advances in nuclear physics require understanding of such excitations. (e,e^' X) coincidence experiments have established the utility of angular correlation measurements of particle (X) emitted by decaying resonances for continuum studies. However, electron-induced reactions excite only a subset of the total nuclear response. Hadronic probes are necessary for a complete study. This dissertation describes a (p,p^' X) coincidence experiment, the first at intermediate energies where microscopic theories apply. The reaction's utility was investigated and applied to ^{12 }C. The experiment was performed using a 156 MeV polarized proton beam. A magnetic spectrometer was used to detect scattered protons. An array of eight silicon-detector telescopes was constructed and used to measure the angular correlation of charged particles (X). Inclusive (p,p ^') and exclusive (p,p ^' X) data were acquired simultaneously. The momentum transfer range (0.6<= q<= 1.2 fm^{-1}) was covered in three spectrometer angle settings. The excitation energy range spanned the region from sharp states to quasifree processes. Analyzing powers and cross sections were measured for both inclusive and exclusive data. A simple reaction model was developed which suggested a Legendre-polynomial series should describe the sigma(theta_{X}) data. The model relates the polynomial coefficients to nuclear structure information. A result of this work is that this series was found to satisfactorily describe the data and provided new information about

  10. Computation of steady-state probability distributions in stochastic models of cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Hallen, Mark; Li, Bochong; Tanouchi, Yu; Tan, Cheemeng; West, Mike; You, Lingchong

    2011-10-01

    Cellular processes are "noisy". In each cell, concentrations of molecules are subject to random fluctuations due to the small numbers of these molecules and to environmental perturbations. While noise varies with time, it is often measured at steady state, for example by flow cytometry. When interrogating aspects of a cellular network by such steady-state measurements of network components, a key need is to develop efficient methods to simulate and compute these distributions. We describe innovations in stochastic modeling coupled with approaches to this computational challenge: first, an approach to modeling intrinsic noise via solution of the chemical master equation, and second, a convolution technique to account for contributions of extrinsic noise. We show how these techniques can be combined in a streamlined procedure for evaluation of different sources of variability in a biochemical network. Evaluation and illustrations are given in analysis of two well-characterized synthetic gene circuits, as well as a signaling network underlying the mammalian cell cycle entry.

  11. Interpretation of the X(3872) as a charmonium state plus an extra component due to the coupling to the meson-meson continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, J.; Galatà, G.; Santopinto, E.

    2013-07-01

    We present a quark model calculation of the charmonium spectrum with self-energy corrections due to the coupling to the meson-meson continuum. The bare masses used in the calculation are computed within the relativized quark model by Godfrey and Isgur. The strong decay widths of 3S, 2P, 1D, and 2D cc¯ states are also calculated, to set the values of the 3P0 pair-creation model's parameters we use to compute the vertex functions of the loop integrals. Finally, the nature of the X(3872) resonance is analyzed and the main possibilities (cc¯ state or DD¯* molecule) are discussed. According to our results, the X(3872) is compatible with the meson χc1(2P), with JPC=1++, and is thus interpreted as a cc¯ core plus higher Fock components due to the coupling to the meson-meson continuum. These JPC=1++ quantum numbers are in agreement with the experimental results found by the LHCb collaboration. In our view, the X(3872)'s mass is lower than the quark model's predictions because of self-energy shifts.

  12. Assessment of Cellular Redox State Using NAD(P)H Fluorescence Intensity and Lifetime

    PubMed Central

    Blacker, Thomas S.; Berecz, Tunde; Duchen, Michael R.; Szabadkai, Gyorgy

    2017-01-01

    NADH and NADPH are redox cofactors, primarily involved in catabolic and anabolic metabolic processes respectively. In addition, NADPH plays an important role in cellular antioxidant defence. In live cells and tissues, the intensity of their spectrally-identical autofluorescence, termed NAD(P)H, can be used to probe the mitochondrial redox state, while their distinct enzyme-binding characteristics can be used to separate their relative contributions to the total NAD(P)H intensity using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). These protocols allow differences in metabolism to be detected between cell types and altered physiological and pathological states. PMID:28286806

  13. The transition between immune and disease states in a cellular automaton model of clonal immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezzi, Michele; Celada, Franco; Ruffo, Stefano; Seiden, Philip E.

    1997-02-01

    In this paper we extend the Celada-Seiden (CS) model of the humoral immune response to include infections virus and killer T cells (cellular response). The model represents molecules and cells with bitstrings. The response of the system to virus involves a competition between the ability of the virus to kill the host cells and the host's ability to eliminate the virus. We find two basins of attraction in the dynamics of this system, one is identified with disease and the other with the immune state. There is also an oscillating state that exists on the border of these two stable states. Fluctuations in the population of virus or antibody can end the oscillation and drive the system into one of the stable states. The introduction of mechanisms of cross-regulation between the two responses can bias the system towards one of them. We also study a mean field model, based on coupled maps, to investigate virus-like infections. This simple model reproduces the attractors for average populations observed in the cellular automaton. All the dynamical behavior connected to spatial extension is lost, as is the oscillating feature. Thus the mean field approximation introduced with coupled maps destroys oscillations.

  14. Reduced native state stability in crowded cellular environment due to protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Ryuhei; Tochio, Naoya; Kigawa, Takanori; Sugita, Yuji; Feig, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The effect of cellular crowding environments on protein structure and stability is a key issue in molecular and cellular biology. The classical view of crowding emphasizes the volume exclusion effect that generally favors compact, native states. Here, results from molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments show that protein crowders may destabilize native states via protein-protein interactions. In the model system considered here, mixtures of villin head piece and protein G at high concentrations, villin structures become increasingly destabilized upon increasing crowder concentrations. The denatured states observed in the simulation involve partial unfolding as well as more subtle conformational shifts. The unfolded states remain overall compact and only partially overlap with unfolded ensembles at high temperature and in the presence of urea. NMR measurements on the same systems confirm structural changes upon crowding based on changes of chemical shifts relative to dilute conditions. An analysis of protein-protein interactions and energetic aspects suggests the importance of enthalpic and solvation contributions to the crowding free energies that challenge an entropic-centered view of crowding effects. PMID:23402619

  15. Brain cancer incidence trends in relation to cellular telephone use in the United States.

    PubMed

    Inskip, Peter D; Hoover, Robert N; Devesa, Susan S

    2010-11-01

    The use of cellular telephones has grown explosively during the past two decades, and there are now more than 279 million wireless subscribers in the United States. If cellular phone use causes brain cancer, as some suggest, the potential public health implications could be considerable. One might expect the effects of such a prevalent exposure to be reflected in general population incidence rates, unless the induction period is very long or confined to very long-term users. To address this issue, we examined temporal trends in brain cancer incidence rates in the United States, using data collected by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Log-linear models were used to estimate the annual percent change in rates among whites. With the exception of the 20-29-year age group, the trends for 1992-2006 were downward or flat. Among those aged 20-29 years, there was a statistically significant increasing trend between 1992 and 2006 among females but not among males. The recent trend in 20-29-year-old women was driven by a rising incidence of frontal lobe cancers. No increases were apparent for temporal or parietal lobe cancers, or cancers of the cerebellum, which involve the parts of the brain that would be more highly exposed to radiofrequency radiation from cellular phones. Frontal lobe cancer rates also rose among 20-29-year-old males, but the increase began earlier than among females and before cell phone use was highly prevalent. Overall, these incidence data do not provide support to the view that cellular phone use causes brain cancer.

  16. Properties of bound, resonant, and regular continuum states of the excitation spectrum of symmetric liquid 4He films at T=0 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szybisz, Leszek

    1996-03-01

    Elementary excitations in rather thick symmetric films of liquid 4He at T=0 K are investigated. They are characterized by a momentum ħq parallel to the surface and may be described by bound or continuum states, which are obtained by solving a Bogoliubov-type equation formulated within the framework of the paired-phonon analysis and the hypernetted-chain approximation. Films of coverages nc=0.3 and 0.4 Å-2 confined by simple Gaussian potentials are studied. The excitation spectrum is numerically evaluated by discretizing the associated eigenvalue problem in a finite box. The evolution of the energy levels as a function of the box size is explored. Examples of the calculated energies and wave functions are displayed in a series of figures. Two differing sorts of continuum states may be distinguished. Depending on the behavior of their excitation energies as a function of the box size on the one hand, and the spatial distribution of their wave functions inside the film and in the asymptotic region far apart from the interface layer on the other, the continuum solutions can be separated into two classes of excitations: (a) the ``regular'' continuum states and (b) the ``resonant modes.'' The matrix elements of the particle-hole potential and the penetration factors of the most important states are examined. The lowest-lying branch of states is always bound and for q

  17. Decomposing Oncogenic Transcriptional Signatures to Generate Maps of Divergent Cellular States.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Wook; Abudayyeh, Omar O; Yeerna, Huwate; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang; Stewart, Michelle; Jenkins, Russell W; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Konieczkowski, David J; Medetgul-Ernar, Kate; Cavazos, Taylor; Mah, Clarence; Ting, Stephanie; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Cohen, Ofir; Mcdermott, John; Damato, Emily; Aguirre, Andrew J; Liang, Jonathan; Liberzon, Arthur; Alexe, Gabriella; Doench, John; Ghandi, Mahmoud; Vazquez, Francisca; Weir, Barbara A; Tsherniak, Aviad; Subramanian, Aravind; Meneses-Cime, Karina; Park, Jason; Clemons, Paul; Garraway, Levi A; Thomas, David; Boehm, Jesse S; Barbie, David A; Hahn, William C; Mesirov, Jill P; Tamayo, Pablo

    2017-08-23

    The systematic sequencing of the cancer genome has led to the identification of numerous genetic alterations in cancer. However, a deeper understanding of the functional consequences of these alterations is necessary to guide appropriate therapeutic strategies. Here, we describe Onco-GPS (OncoGenic Positioning System), a data-driven analysis framework to organize individual tumor samples with shared oncogenic alterations onto a reference map defined by their underlying cellular states. We applied the methodology to the RAS pathway and identified nine distinct components that reflect transcriptional activities downstream of RAS and defined several functional states associated with patterns of transcriptional component activation that associates with genomic hallmarks and response to genetic and pharmacological perturbations. These results show that the Onco-GPS is an effective approach to explore the complex landscape of oncogenic cellular states across cancers, and an analytic framework to summarize knowledge, establish relationships, and generate more effective disease models for research or as part of individualized precision medicine paradigms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The near-IR spectrum of NO(X̃(2)Π)-Ne detected through excitation into the Ã-state continuum: A joint experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Kłos, J; Zhang, S G; Meyer, H

    2016-03-21

    We present new measurements of the near IR spectrum of NO-Ne in the region of the first NO overtone transition. The IR absorption is detected by exciting the vibrationally excited complex to the Ã-state dissociation continuum. The resulting NO(A) fragment is subsequently ionized in the same laser pulse. Spectra of the two lowest bands, A and B, are recorded. The spectra are compared with calculated spectra based on bound states derived from a new set of high level ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs). For the calculation, the PESs are used with either fixed NO intermolecular distance or averaged for the vibrational states of NO (X̃, v = 0 or 2). Spectra based on the new PESs reproduce the experimental spectra better than theoretical spectra based on the older PESs of M. H. Alexander et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 5588 (2001)]. Especially, spectra based on the two different vibrationally averaged PESs show a marked improvement in comparison to the one based on the fixed internuclear NO-distance. A fitted set of spectroscopic constants allows to reproduce most of the finer details of the measured spectra. Monitoring simultaneously the NO fragment ion and the parent ion channels while scanning the UV wavelength through the NO A-X hot-band region enabled us to confirm the NO-Ne Ã-state dissociation limit of 44233 ± 5 cm(-1). These measurements also confirm the absence of a structured NO-Ne spectrum involving the Ã-state.

  19. The near-IR spectrum of NO(X˜ 2Π )-Ne detected through excitation into the Östate continuum: A joint experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłos, J.; Zhang, S. G.; Meyer, H.

    2016-03-01

    We present new measurements of the near IR spectrum of NO-Ne in the region of the first NO overtone transition. The IR absorption is detected by exciting the vibrationally excited complex to the A ˜ -state dissociation continuum. The resulting NO(A) fragment is subsequently ionized in the same laser pulse. Spectra of the two lowest bands, A and B, are recorded. The spectra are compared with calculated spectra based on bound states derived from a new set of high level ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs). For the calculation, the PESs are used with either fixed NO intermolecular distance or averaged for the vibrational states of NO (X ˜ , v = 0 or 2). Spectra based on the new PESs reproduce the experimental spectra better than theoretical spectra based on the older PESs of M. H. Alexander et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 5588 (2001)]. Especially, spectra based on the two different vibrationally averaged PESs show a marked improvement in comparison to the one based on the fixed internuclear NO-distance. A fitted set of spectroscopic constants allows to reproduce most of the finer details of the measured spectra. Monitoring simultaneously the NO fragment ion and the parent ion channels while scanning the UV wavelength through the NO A-X hot-band region enabled us to confirm the NO-Ne A ˜ -state dissociation limit of 44233 ± 5 cm-1. These measurements also confirm the absence of a structured NO-Ne spectrum involving the A ˜ -state.

  20. Comparison of human monocytes isolated by elutriation and adherence suggests that heterogeneity may reflect a continuum of maturation/activation states.

    PubMed Central

    Dransfield, I; Corcoran, D; Partridge, L J; Hogg, N; Burton, D R

    1988-01-01

    Monocytes are heterogeneous both in terms of physical properties and in their functional capacity. Isolation of monocytes from peripheral blood may perturb the observed heterogeneity for purified cell preparations. To explore this possibility we examined monocytes prepared by two techniques, counter-flow centrifugation elutriation (CCE) and fibronectin adherence, in terms of cell-surface molecule expression and several physical properties. Although such cells would be expected to represent dissimilar cross-sections of the total monocyte population, they were found to have similar cell-surface antigenic profiles. Observed differences in levels of expression of several molecules (CR1, CR3 and the antigen recognized by LP9 antibody) were found to be a temperature-related phenomenon. These results indicate that monocytes are not divisible into 'subpopulations' on the basis of cell-surface molecule expression and suggest that heterogeneity of monocytes may reflect the presence in the circulation of a continuum of maturational/activation states. PMID:3350583

  1. Optical Refractive Index Sensing Based on High-Q Bound States in the Continuum in Free-Space Coupled Photonic Crystal Slabs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yonghao; Zhou, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    High sensitivity (S) and high quality factor (Q) are desirable to achieve low detection limit in label-free optical sensors. In this paper, we theoretically demonstrate that single-layer and coupled bi-layer photonic crystal slabs (PCS) possess simultaneously high S and high Q near the bound states in the continuum (BIC). We theoretically achieved S > 800 nm/RIU and Q > 107 in refractive index sensing in the 1400–1600 nm telecom optical wavelength bands. We experimentally demonstrated an S of 94 nm/RIU and a Q of 1.2 × 104, with a detection limit of 6 × 10−5 refractive index unit. These sensor designs can find applications in biochemical sensing, environmental monitoring, and healthcare. PMID:28800108

  2. Optical Refractive Index Sensing Based on High-Q Bound States in the Continuum in Free-Space Coupled Photonic Crystal Slabs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yonghao; Zhou, Weidong; Sun, Yuze

    2017-08-11

    High sensitivity (S) and high quality factor (Q) are desirable to achieve low detection limit in label-free optical sensors. In this paper, we theoretically demonstrate that single-layer and coupled bi-layer photonic crystal slabs (PCS) possess simultaneously high S and high Q near the bound states in the continuum (BIC). We theoretically achieved S > 800 nm/RIU and Q > 10⁷ in refractive index sensing in the 1400-1600 nm telecom optical wavelength bands. We experimentally demonstrated an S of 94 nm/RIU and a Q of 1.2 × 10⁴, with a detection limit of 6 × 10(-5) refractive index unit. These sensor designs can find applications in biochemical sensing, environmental monitoring, and healthcare.

  3. In vitro chemical and cellular tests applied to uranium trioxide with different hydration states.

    PubMed Central

    Ansoborlo, E; Chalabreysse, J; Hengé-Napoli, M H; Pujol, E

    1992-01-01

    A simple and rapid in vitro chemical solubility test applicable to industrial uranium trioxide (UO3) was developed together with two in vitro cellular tests using rat alveolar macrophages maintained either in gas phase or in alginate beads at 37 degrees C. Industrial UO3 was characterized by particle size, X-ray, and IR spectra, and chemical transformation (e.g., aging and hydration of the dust) was also studied. Solvents used for the in vitro chemical solubility study included carbonates, citrates, phosphates, water, Eagle's basal medium, and Gamble's solution (simulated lung fluid), alone, with oxygen, or with superoxide ions. Results, expressed in terms of the half-time of dissolution, according to International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) classification (D,W,Y), varied for different hydration states of UO3, showing a lower solubility of hydrated UO3 in solvents compared to basic UO3 or UO3 heated at 450 degrees C. Two in vitro cellular tests on cultured rat alveolar macrophages (cells maintained in gas phase and cells immobilized in alginate beads) were used on the same UO3 samples and generally showed a lower solution transfer rate in the presence of macrophages than in the culture medium alone. The results of in vitro chemical and cellular tests were compared, with four main conclusions: a good reproducibility of the three tests in Eagle's basal medium the effect of hydration state on solubility, the classification of UO3 in terms of ICRP solubility criteria, and the ability of macrophages to decrease uranium solubility in medium. PMID:1396449

  4. Association of plasma adiponectin levels with cellular hydration state measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takahiro; Kanazawa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    It is widely recognized that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) includes a variety of extra pulmonary complications and comorbidities. Recently, adiponectin was shown to regulate cellular metabolism in humans. Cellular hydration state is affected by a variety of hormonal factors and regulates cellular metabolic state. Therefore, this study was designed to determine whether adiponectin is a possible factor involved in cellular hydration state in COPD. Thirty patients with COPD and 41 age-matched controls participated in the study. Plasma levels of total and high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin were measured and anthropometry and pulmonary function tests were conducted. Intracellular water (ICW), extracellular water (ECW), and ECW/ICW ratio, which are parameters of cellular hydration state, were measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Higher levels of total and HMW adiponectin in plasma were found in patients with COPD compared with levels in controls. A significant inverse correlation was observed between body mass index and plasma levels of total and HMW adiponectin in the control group. However, this significant correlation was not observed in patients with COPD. The plasma levels of total and HMW adiponectin were also not significantly correlated with any pulmonary function parameters in patients with COPD. Regarding the state of cellular hydration, the plasma levels of total adiponectin were inversely correlated with the ECW/ICW ratio and positively with ICW values in patients with COPD. Moreover, closer correlations were found between these parameters and plasma HMW adiponectin levels. The results of the present study suggest a novel association of the plasma adiponectin with cellular hydration state in patients with COPD. Accordingly, lower adiponectin levels may result in cellular shrinkage, leading to metabolic malfunction at a cellular level. Thus, our findings provide new insights regarding the preventive roles of adiponectin in the

  5. Continuum Level Density in Complex Scaling Method

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, R.; Myo, T.; Kato, K.

    2005-11-21

    A new calculational method of continuum level density (CLD) at unbound energies is studied in the complex scaling method (CSM). It is shown that the CLD can be calculated by employing the discretization of continuum states in the CSM without any smoothing technique.

  6. Computation of Steady-State Probability Distributions in Stochastic Models of Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hallen, Mark; Li, Bochong; Tanouchi, Yu; Tan, Cheemeng; West, Mike; You, Lingchong

    2011-01-01

    Cellular processes are “noisy”. In each cell, concentrations of molecules are subject to random fluctuations due to the small numbers of these molecules and to environmental perturbations. While noise varies with time, it is often measured at steady state, for example by flow cytometry. When interrogating aspects of a cellular network by such steady-state measurements of network components, a key need is to develop efficient methods to simulate and compute these distributions. We describe innovations in stochastic modeling coupled with approaches to this computational challenge: first, an approach to modeling intrinsic noise via solution of the chemical master equation, and second, a convolution technique to account for contributions of extrinsic noise. We show how these techniques can be combined in a streamlined procedure for evaluation of different sources of variability in a biochemical network. Evaluation and illustrations are given in analysis of two well-characterized synthetic gene circuits, as well as a signaling network underlying the mammalian cell cycle entry. PMID:22022252

  7. Stabilization from chaotic to periodical states in a model of cellular automaton for oxidation of CO.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, A; Lemos, M C; Jiménez-Morales, F

    2006-07-01

    The chaotic behavior of a chemical reaction can be controlled perturbing periodically some of the parameters externally governing the reaction. Based on the resonance phenomenon, the method of external forcing can convert chaotic behavior into a periodical one through the application of a sinusoidal modulation. In this paper we analyze the effect of a periodical perturbation on room temperature in a model of cellular automaton that studies catalytic oxidation of CO. This model considers the reaction of carbon monoxide and oxygen adsorbed on a surface allowing the variation of the surface temperature and analyzing the time oscillations in the reaction. The results of simulations of this model show quasiperiodical and chaotic behaviors. Then the strategy of control through periodical forcing is able to remove the chaotic dynamics by means of the stabilization of periodical solutions, there being enough of a perturbing harmonic function with only one frequency to transform a chaotic state of the system into a periodical state with periodicity 1.

  8. [Motivation and Emotional States: Structural Systemic, Neurochemical, Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Bazyan, A S

    2016-01-01

    The structural, systemic, neurochemical, molecular and cellular mechanisms of organization and coding motivation and emotional states are describe. The GABA and glutamatergic synaptic systems of basal ganglia form a neural network and participate in the implementation of voluntary behavior. Neuropeptides, neurohormones and paracrine neuromodulators involved in the organization of motivation and emotional states, integrated with synaptic systems, controlled by neural networks and organizing goal-directed behavior. Structural centers for united and integrated of information in voluntary and goal-directed behavior are globus pallidus. Substantia nigra pars reticulata switches the information from corticobasal networks to thalamocortical networks, induces global dopaminergic (DA) signal and organize interaction of mesolimbic and nigostriatnoy DA systems controlled by prefrontal and motor cortex. Together with the motor cortex, substantia nigra displays information in the brainstem and spinal cord to implementation of behavior. Motivation states are formed in the interaction of neurohormonal and neuropeptide systems by monoaminergic systems of brain. Emotional states are formed by monoaminergic systems of the mid-brain, where the leading role belongs to the mesolimbic DA system. The emotional and motivation state of the encoded specific epigenetic molecular and chemical pattern of neuron.

  9. Continuum effects in transfer reactions induced by heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, H.D.; Donangelo, R.; Fernandez Niello, J.O.; Pacheco, A.J.

    2006-02-15

    In the usual treatment of transfer nuclear reactions, the continuum states of the transferred particle are neglected. Here we perform a semiclassical calculation that treats the continuum in an exact way. For comparison purposes, we perform a second calculation in which the continuum is completely disregarded. The results of these two calculations indicates that the influence of the continuum states may be very important in systems with weakly bound reactants.

  10. The near-IR spectrum of NO(X̃(2)Π)-He detected through excitation into the Ã-state continuum: A joint experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Beutner, V; Zhang, S G; Meyer, H; Kłos, J

    2016-09-28

    We present the first measurement of a bound-state spectrum of the NO-He complex. The recorded spectrum is associated with the first overtone transition of the NO moiety. The IR absorption is detected by exciting the vibrationally excited complex to the Ã-state dissociation continuum. The resulting NO(A) fragment is subsequently ionized in the same laser pulse. We recorded two bands centered around the NO monomer rotational lines, Q11(0.5) and R11(0.5), consistent with an almost free rotation of the NO fragment within the complex. The origin of the spectrum is found at 3724.06 cm(-1) blue shifted by 0.21 cm(-1) from the corresponding NO monomer origin. The rotational structures of the spectrum are found to be in very good agreement with calculated spectra based on bound states derived from a set of high level ab initio potential energy surfaces [Kłos et al. J. Chem. Phys. 112, 2195 (2000)].

  11. The near-IR spectrum of NO(X˜ 2Π )-He detected through excitation into the A ˜ -state continuum: A joint experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutner, V.; Zhang, S. G.; Meyer, H.; Kłos, J.

    2016-09-01

    We present the first measurement of a bound-state spectrum of the NO-He complex. The recorded spectrum is associated with the first overtone transition of the NO moiety. The IR absorption is detected by exciting the vibrationally excited complex to the A ˜ -state dissociation continuum. The resulting NO(A) fragment is subsequently ionized in the same laser pulse. We recorded two bands centered around the NO monomer rotational lines, Q11(0.5) and R11(0.5), consistent with an almost free rotation of the NO fragment within the complex. The origin of the spectrum is found at 3724.06 cm-1 blue shifted by 0.21 cm-1 from the corresponding NO monomer origin. The rotational structures of the spectrum are found to be in very good agreement with calculated spectra based on bound states derived from a set of high level ab initio potential energy surfaces [Kłos et al. J. Chem. Phys. 112, 2195 (2000)].

  12. Quasi-bound states and continuum absorption background of polar Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N/GaN quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Elmaghraoui, D. Triki, M.; Jaziri, S.; Leroux, M.; Brault, J.

    2014-07-07

    A theoretical interpretation of the photoluminescence excitation spectra of self-organized polar GaN/(Al,Ga)N quantum dots is presented. A numerical method assuming a realistic shape of the dots and including the built-in electric field effects is developed to calculate their energy structure and hence their optical absorption. The electron and hole spectra show the existence of a set of quasi-bound states that does not originate from the wetting layer and plays a crucial role in the observed absorption spectrum of the GaN/(Al,Ga)N dots. Transitions involving these quasi-bound states and wetting layer states give a sufficient explanation for the observed continuum absorption background. The properties of this absorption band, especially its extension, depend strongly on the dot's size. Our simulation provides a natural explanation of the experimental luminescence excitation spectra of ensembles of dots of different heights. Our theoretical model can be convenient for future optical studies including systems with more complicated potentials.

  13. The Early Childhood and Elementary Education Continuum: Constructing an Understanding of P-3 as State-Level Policy Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauerz, Kristie Anne

    2009-01-01

    State-level policy attention to young children's early learning opportunities burgeons; a sense of urgency exists to identify reform agendas that are both effective and sustainable. "P-3" often is used as the term for the first level of a seamless P-20 system that stretches from early childhood through post-secondary education. While it…

  14. Cross-talk between the cellular redox state and the circadian system in Neurospora.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yusuke; Iigusa, Hideo; Wang, Niyan; Hasunuma, Kohji

    2011-01-01

    The circadian system is composed of a number of feedback loops, and multiple feedback loops in the form of oscillators help to maintain stable rhythms. The filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa exhibits a circadian rhythm during asexual spore formation (conidiation banding) and has a major feedback loop that includes the FREQUENCY (FRQ)/WHITE COLLAR (WC) -1 and -2 oscillator (FWO). A mutation in superoxide dismutase (sod)-1, an antioxidant gene, causes a robust and stable circadian rhythm compared with that of wild-type (Wt). However, the mechanisms underlying the functions of reactive oxygen species (ROS) remain unknown. Here, we show that cellular ROS concentrations change in a circadian manner (ROS oscillation), and the amplitudes of ROS oscillation increase with each cycle and then become steady (ROS homeostasis). The ROS oscillation and homeostasis are produced by the ROS-destroying catalases (CATs) and ROS-generating NADPH oxidase (NOX). cat-1 is also induced by illumination, and it reduces ROS levels. Although ROS oscillation persists in the absence of frq, wc-1 or wc-2, its homeostasis is altered. Furthermore, genetic and biochemical evidence reveals that ROS concentration regulates the transcriptional function of WCC and a higher ROS concentration enhances conidiation banding. These findings suggest that the circadian system engages in cross-talk with the cellular redox state via ROS-regulatory factors.

  15. Emergence of oscillations and spatio-temporal coherence states in a continuum-model of excitatory and inhibitory neurons.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Silvio P; Solari, Fabio; Secchi, Luca

    2005-01-01

    A neural field model of the reaction-diffusion type for the emergence of oscillatory phenomena in visual cortices is proposed. To investigate the joint spatio-temporal oscillatory dynamics in a continuous distribution of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, the coupling among oscillators is modelled as a diffusion process, combined with non-linear point interactions. The model exhibits cooperative activation properties in both time and space, by reacting to volleys of activations at multiple cortical sites with ordered spatio-temporal oscillatory states, similar to those found in the physiological experiments on slow-wave field potentials. The possible use of the resulting spatial distributions of coherent states, as a flexible medium to establish feature association, is discussed.

  16. Traffic states and fundamental diagram in cellular automaton model of vehicular traffic controlled by signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2009-04-01

    We present a cellular automaton (CA) model for vehicular traffic controlled by traffic lights. The CA model is not described by a set of rules, but is given by a simple difference equation. The vehicular motion varies highly with both signals’ characteristics and vehicular density. The dependence of tour time on both cycle time and vehicular density is clarified. In the dilute limit of vehicles, the vehicular motion is compared with that by the nonlinear-map model. The fundamental diagrams are derived numerically. It is shown that the fundamental diagram depends highly on the signals’ characteristics. The traffic states are shown for various values of cycle time in the fundamental diagram. We also study the effect of a slow vehicle on the traffic flow.

  17. The Suicide Prevention Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Dawn

    2010-01-01

    The suicide prevention continuum illustrates a practical approach to the complex issue of suicide prevention. The continuum evolved from discussions with two Aboriginal communities in Atlantic Canada about suicide and the different types of interventions available. The continuum offers a framework and reference tool to differentiate between the different stages of suicide risk. It illustrates where the Aboriginal Community Youth Resilience Network (ACYRN) fits into suicide prevention and how it contributes to prevention knowledge, capacity building, and policy development. PMID:20835376

  18. Modelling chronotaxicity of cellular energy metabolism to facilitate the identification of altered metabolic states

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Gemma; Suprunenko, Yevhen F.; Jenkins, Kirsten; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular energy metabolism is a hallmark of many diseases, one notable example being cancer. Here, we focus on the identification of the transition from healthy to abnormal metabolic states. To do this, we study the dynamics of energy production in a cell. Due to the thermodynamic openness of a living cell, the inability to instantaneously match fluctuating supply and demand in energy metabolism results in nonautonomous time-varying oscillatory dynamics. However, such oscillatory dynamics is often neglected and treated as stochastic. Based on experimental evidence of metabolic oscillations, we show that changes in metabolic state can be described robustly by alterations in the chronotaxicity of the corresponding metabolic oscillations, i.e. the ability of an oscillator to resist external perturbations. We also present a method for the identification of chronotaxicity, applicable to general oscillatory signals and, importantly, apply this to real experimental data. Evidence of chronotaxicity was found in glycolytic oscillations in real yeast cells, verifying that chronotaxicity could be used to study transitions between metabolic states. PMID:27483987

  19. Modelling chronotaxicity of cellular energy metabolism to facilitate the identification of altered metabolic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Gemma; Suprunenko, Yevhen F.; Jenkins, Kirsten; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2016-08-01

    Altered cellular energy metabolism is a hallmark of many diseases, one notable example being cancer. Here, we focus on the identification of the transition from healthy to abnormal metabolic states. To do this, we study the dynamics of energy production in a cell. Due to the thermodynamic openness of a living cell, the inability to instantaneously match fluctuating supply and demand in energy metabolism results in nonautonomous time-varying oscillatory dynamics. However, such oscillatory dynamics is often neglected and treated as stochastic. Based on experimental evidence of metabolic oscillations, we show that changes in metabolic state can be described robustly by alterations in the chronotaxicity of the corresponding metabolic oscillations, i.e. the ability of an oscillator to resist external perturbations. We also present a method for the identification of chronotaxicity, applicable to general oscillatory signals and, importantly, apply this to real experimental data. Evidence of chronotaxicity was found in glycolytic oscillations in real yeast cells, verifying that chronotaxicity could be used to study transitions between metabolic states.

  20. Open boundaries in a cellular automaton model for traffic flow with metastable states.

    PubMed

    Barlovic, Robert; Huisinga, Torsten; Schadschneider, Andreas; Schreckenberg, Michael

    2002-10-01

    The effects of open boundaries in the velocity-dependent randomization (VDR) model, a modified version of the well-known Nagel-Schreckenberg (NaSch) cellular automaton model for traffic flow, are investigated. In contrast to the NaSch model, the VDR model exhibits metastable states and phase separation in a certain density regime. A proper insertion strategy allows us to investigate the whole spectrum of possible system states and the structure of the phase diagram by Monte Carlo simulations. We observe an interesting microscopic structure of the jammed phases, which is different from the one of the NaSch model. For finite systems, the existence of high flow states in a certain parameter regime leads to a special structure of the fundamental diagram measured in the open system. Apart from that, the results are in agreement with an extremal principle for the flow, which has been introduced for models with a unique flow-density relation. Finally, we discuss the application of our findings for a systematic flow optimization. Here some surprising results are obtained, e.g., a restriction of the inflow can lead to an improvement of the total flow through a bottleneck.

  1. Steady-state kinetics of solitary batrachotoxin-treated sodium channels. Kinetics on a bounded continuum of polymer conformations.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinson, K A

    1992-01-01

    The underlying principles of the kinetics and equilibrium of a solitary sodium channel in the steady state are examined. Both the open and closed kinetics are postulated to result from round-trip excursions from a transition region that separates the openable and closed forms. Exponential behavior of the kinetics can have origins different from small-molecule systems. These differences suggest that the probability density functions (PDFs) that describe the time dependences of the open and closed forms arise from a distribution of rate constants. The distribution is likely to arise from a thermal modulation of the channel structure, and this provides a physical basis for the following three-variable equation: [formula; see text] Here, A0 is a scaling term, k is the mean rate constant, and sigma quantifies the Gaussian spread for the contributions of a range of effective rate constants. The maximum contribution is made by k, with rates faster and slower contributing less. (When sigma, the standard deviation of the spread, goes to zero, then p(f) = A0 e-kt.) The equation is applied to the single-channel steady-state probability density functions for batrachotoxin-treated sodium channels (1986. Keller et al. J. Gen. Physiol. 88: 1-23). The following characteristics are found: (a) The data for both open and closed forms of the channel are fit well with the above equation, which represents a Gaussian distribution of first-order rate processes. (b) The simple relationship [formula; see text] holds for the mean effective rat constants. Or, equivalently stated, the values of P open calculated from the k values closely agree with the P open values found directly from the PDF data. (c) In agreement with the known behavior of voltage-dependent rate constants, the voltage dependences of the mean effective rate constants for the opening and closing of the channel are equal and opposite over the voltage range studied. That is, [formula; see text] "Bursts" are related to the well

  2. Probe spectroscopy in an operating magneto-optical trap: The role of Raman transitions between discrete and continuum atomic states

    SciTech Connect

    Brzozowski, Tomasz M.; Brzozowska, Maria; Zachorowski, Jerzy; Zawada, Michal; Gawlik, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    We report on cw measurements of probe beam absorption and four-wave-mixing spectra in a {sup 85}Rb magneto-optical trap taken while the trap is in operation. The trapping beams are used as pump light. We concentrate on the central feature of the spectra at small pump-probe detuning and attribute its narrow resonant structures to the superposition of Raman transitions between light-shifted sublevels of the ground atomic state and to atomic recoil processes. These two contributions have different dependencies on trap parameters and we show that the former is inhomogeneously broadened. The strong dependence of the spectra on the probe-beam polarization indicates the existence of large optical anisotropy of the cold-atom sample, which is attributed to the recoil effects. We point out that the recoil-induced resonances can be isolated from other contributions, making pump-probe spectroscopy a highly sensitive diagnostic tool for atoms in a working magneto-optical trap.

  3. Application of pseudo-Hermitian quantum mechanics to a PT-symmetric Hamiltonian with a continuum of scattering states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafazadeh, Ali

    2005-10-01

    We extend the application of the techniques developed within the framework of the pseudo-Hermitian quantum mechanics to study a unitary quantum system described by an imaginary PT-symmetric potential v(x ) having a continuous real spectrum. For this potential that has recently been used, in the context of optical potentials, for modeling the propagation of electromagnetic waves traveling in a waveguide half and half filled with gain and absorbing media, we give a perturbative construction of the physical Hilbert space, observables, localized states, and the equivalent Hermitian Hamiltonian. Ignoring terms of order three or higher in the non-Hermiticity parameter ζ, we show that the equivalent Hermitian Hamiltonian has the form p2/2m+(ζ2/2)∑n =0∞{αn(x),p2n} with αn(x) vanishing outside an interval that is three times larger than the support of v(x ), i.e., in 2/3 of the physical interaction region the potential v(x ) vanishes identically. We provide a physical interpretation for this unusual behavior and comment on the classical limit of the system.

  4. Cellular Mechanisms Underlying Behavioral State-Dependent Bidirectional Modulation of Motor Cortex Output

    PubMed Central

    Schiemann, Julia; Puggioni, Paolo; Dacre, Joshua; Pelko, Miha; Domanski, Aleksander; van Rossum, Mark C.W.; Duguid, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Summary Neuronal activity in primary motor cortex (M1) correlates with behavioral state, but the cellular mechanisms underpinning behavioral state-dependent modulation of M1 output remain largely unresolved. Here, we performed in vivo patch-clamp recordings from layer 5B (L5B) pyramidal neurons in awake mice during quiet wakefulness and self-paced, voluntary movement. We show that L5B output neurons display bidirectional (i.e., enhanced or suppressed) firing rate changes during movement, mediated via two opposing subthreshold mechanisms: (1) a global decrease in membrane potential variability that reduced L5B firing rates (L5Bsuppressed neurons), and (2) a coincident noradrenaline-mediated increase in excitatory drive to a subpopulation of L5B neurons (L5Benhanced neurons) that elevated firing rates. Blocking noradrenergic receptors in forelimb M1 abolished the bidirectional modulation of M1 output during movement and selectively impaired contralateral forelimb motor coordination. Together, our results provide a mechanism for how noradrenergic neuromodulation and network-driven input changes bidirectionally modulate M1 output during motor behavior. PMID:25981037

  5. The Neutrino Energy Loss of Nuclides by K-shell Continuum State Electron Capture at the Late Stage of Stellar Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. J.; Lin, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the Weinberg-Salam theory and taken into consideration of the Coulomb effect on electron gas, the neutrino energy loss rates by K-shell continuum state electron capture are discussed for ^{12}C, ^{16}O, ^{20}Ne, ^{24}Mg, ^{28}Si and ^{56}Fe under the condition of complete ionization and at the late stage of stellar evolution. Our results are compared with those of Beaudet, Petrosian and Salpeter (BPS). It is shown that at relatively high temperatures (e.g., {T_9 = 0.1} and {T_9 = 1}, T_9 represents the temperature in units of 10^9 K), our results agree well with BPS's. However, at relatively low temperatures (e.g., {T_9 = 0.01} and {T_9 = 0.001}), the neutrino energy loss rates of BPS for ^{16}O, ^{20}Ne, ^{24}Mg and ^{28}Si are higher than our results by 10˜ 70 times, and even by 2 orders of magnitude for nuclide ^{12}C. Our results may be of great importance in the research of late stellar evolution, especially for the cooling mechanism of white dwarf, during which the nucleus collapsed to the stage with a relatively low temperature and intermediate density.

  6. HIV primary care by the infectious disease physician in the United States - extending the continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Seetha; Beekmann, Susan E; Polgreen, Philip M; Rodriguez, Allan; Alcaide, Maria L

    2017-10-09

    Models of care for people living with HIV (PLWH) have varied over time due to long term survival, development of HIV-associated non-AIDS conditions, and HIV specific primary care guidelines that differ from those of the general population. The objectives of this study are to assess how often infectious disease (ID) physicians provide primary care for PLWH, assess their practice patterns and barriers in the provision of primary care. We used a 6-item survey electronically distributed to ID physician members of Emerging Infections Network (EIN). Of the 1248 active EIN members, 644 (52%) responded to the survey. Among the 644 respondents, 431 (67%) treated PLWH. Of these 431 responders, 326 (75%) acted as their primary care physicians. Responders who reported always/mostly performing a screening assessment as recommended per guidelines were: (1) Screening specific to HIV (tuberculosis 95%, genital chlamydia/gonorrhoea 77%, hepatitis C 67%, extra genital chlamydia/gonorrhoea 47%, baseline anal PAP smear for women 36% and men 34%); (2) Primary care related screening (fasting lipids 95%, colonoscopy 95%, mammogram 90%, cervical PAP smears 88%, depression 57%, osteoporosis in postmenopausal women 55% and men >50 yrs 33%). Respondents who worked in university hospitals, had <5 years of ID experience, and those who cared for more PLWH were most likely to provide primary care to all or most of their patients. Common barriers reported include: refusal by patient (72%), non-adherence to HIV medications (43%), other health priorities (44%), time constraints during clinic visit (43%) and financial/insurance limitations (40%). Most ID physicians act as primary care providers for their HIV infected patients especially if they are recent ID graduates and work in university hospitals. Current screening rates are suboptimal. Interventions to increase screening practices and to decrease barriers are urgently needed to address the needs of the aging HIV population in the United States.

  7. Studies of yrast and continuum states in A=140-160 nuclei. Progress report, January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980. [Purdue Univ. , 1/1/80-12/31/80

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    The structure of nuclei in the A approx. 150 region was investigated by in-beam ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy using heavy-ion beams, mostly from the Argonne Tandem-Linac. Results for the nuclei /sup 148/Dy, /sup 149/Dy, /sup 153/Dy, /sup 154/Dy, /sup 149/Ho, and /sup 150/Ho are summarized. The feeding of yrast states in these nuclei and the link between the highest known yrast states and the continuum region were also studied. 6 figures.

  8. L-Alanyl-L-alanine in the zwitterionic state: structures determined in the presence of explicit water molecules and with continuum models using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp-Mohammady, M.; Jalkanen, K. J.; Nardi, F.; Wade, R. C.; Suhai, S.

    1999-01-01

    The structures and relative energies for L-alanyl-L-alanine (LALA) in the presence of explicit water molecules have been determined by using the density functional theory (DFT) Becke3-Lee-Yang-Parr functional and the 6-31G * basis set (B3LYP/6-31G *). In aqueous solution the dominant state of LALA is the zwitterionic form, while its neutral form is dominant in vacuo. Attempts to locate or determine a gas-phase zwitterionic species failed. That is, on the B3LYP/6-31G * potential energy surface, there is no barrier to proton transfer from the positively charged ammonium group to the negatively charged carboxylate group, or from the ammonium group to the adjacent carbonyl oxygen and from the amide nitrogen to the carboxylate group. To stabilize the zwitterion, we modelled the system by adding explicit water molecules and by placing the zwitterion within a sphere surrounded by a medium with a dielectric constant of 78.5, that is, within the Onsager continuum model, where the recommended cavity radius is obtained from a solute volume calculation. The zwitterionic species is only stable in the presence of water at the B3LYP/6-31G * level. This makes it imperative to include water molecules to model the zwitterionic species of LALA, peptides and amino acids at the B3LYP/6-31G * level. Finally, the zwitterionic structure stabilized by explicit water molecules has also been modelled within the Onsager theory. Here the Onsager model represents the effects due to the bulk water and the explicit water molecules stand for the effect due to direct H-bonding between the zwitterion and the solvent, that is, the first solvation shell. We used molecular dynamics simulations utilizing the CHARMm force field to produce structural input for the subsequent quantum-mechanical simulations. The structures determined using various methods to model the LALA zwitterionic form in aqueous solution were compared. We were able to find additional stable structures for LALA by adding water

  9. Oral Language Continuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fresno County Dept. of Education, Fresno, CA.

    An oral language continuum designed to help elementary students develop techniques for a variety of speech situations, learn to listen, and learn to be aware of the responsibility of the speaker is presented. The continuum is divided into four sections. Student needs, implications for teaching, and suggested activities are arranged sequentially.…

  10. Continuum radiation at Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, W.S.; Gurnett, D.A. ); Desch, M.D. )

    1990-02-01

    Uranus has proven to be a radio source of remarkable complexity with as many as six distinctly different types of emission. One Uranian radio emission which has thus far escaped attention is an analog of continuum radiation at Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn. The emission is found to be propagating in the ordinary mode in the range of one to a few kHz on the inbound leg of the Voyager 2 encounter, shortly after the magnetopause crossing. The continuum radiation spectrum at Uranus also includes bands with frequencies as high as 12 kHz or greater on both the inbound and outbound legs. The Uranian continuum radiation is notably weak, making it more like that detected at Saturn than the extremely intense Jovian continuum radiation. The Uranian emission shows some evidence for narrow-band components lying in the same frequency regime as the continuum, completing the analogy with the other planets, which also show narrow-band components superimposed on the continuum spectrum. The authors argue that the low intensity of the Uranian continuum is most likely related to the lack of a density cavity within the Uranian magnetosphere that is deep relative to the solar wind plasma density.

  11. Filament formation by metabolic enzymes is a specific adaptation to an advanced state of cellular starvation

    PubMed Central

    Petrovska, Ivana; Nüske, Elisabeth; Munder, Matthias C; Kulasegaran, Gayathrie; Malinovska, Liliana; Kroschwald, Sonja; Richter, Doris; Fahmy, Karim; Gibson, Kimberley; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Alberti, Simon

    2014-01-01

    One of the key questions in biology is how the metabolism of a cell responds to changes in the environment. In budding yeast, starvation causes a drop in intracellular pH, but the functional role of this pH change is not well understood. Here, we show that the enzyme glutamine synthetase (Gln1) forms filaments at low pH and that filament formation leads to enzymatic inactivation. Filament formation by Gln1 is a highly cooperative process, strongly dependent on macromolecular crowding, and involves back-to-back stacking of cylindrical homo-decamers into filaments that associate laterally to form higher order fibrils. Other metabolic enzymes also assemble into filaments at low pH. Hence, we propose that filament formation is a general mechanism to inactivate and store key metabolic enzymes during a state of advanced cellular starvation. These findings have broad implications for understanding the interplay between nutritional stress, the metabolism and the physical organization of a cell. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02409.001 PMID:24771766

  12. FANTOM5 transcriptome catalog of cellular states based on Semantic MediaWiki.

    PubMed

    Abugessaisa, Imad; Shimoji, Hisashi; Sahin, Serkan; Kondo, Atsushi; Harshbarger, Jayson; Lizio, Marina; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair; Kasukawa, Takeya; Kawaji, Hideya

    2016-01-01

    The Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome project (FANTOM5) mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) and measured their activities in a diverse range of biological samples. The FANTOM5 project generated a large data set; including detailed information about the profiled samples, the uncovered TSSs at high base-pair resolution on the genome, their transcriptional initiation activities, and further information of transcriptional regulation. Data sets to explore transcriptome in individual cellular states encoded in the mammalian genomes have been enriched by a series of additional analysis, based on the raw experimental data, along with the progress of the research activities. To make the heterogeneous data set accessible and useful for investigators, we developed a web-based database called Semantic catalog of Samples, Transcription initiation And Regulators (SSTAR). SSTAR utilizes the open source wiki software MediaWiki along with the Semantic MediaWiki (SMW) extension, which provides flexibility to model, store, and display a series of data sets produced during the course of the FANTOM5 project. Our use of SMW demonstrates the utility of the framework for dissemination of large-scale analysis results. SSTAR is a case study in handling biological data generated from a large-scale research project in terms of maintenance and growth alongside research activities.Database URL: http://fantom.gsc.riken.jp/5/sstar/. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. FANTOM5 transcriptome catalog of cellular states based on Semantic MediaWiki

    PubMed Central

    Abugessaisa, Imad; Shimoji, Hisashi; Sahin, Serkan; Kondo, Atsushi; Harshbarger, Jayson; Lizio, Marina; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair; Kasukawa, Takeya; Kawaji, Hideya

    2016-01-01

    The Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome project (FANTOM5) mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) and measured their activities in a diverse range of biological samples. The FANTOM5 project generated a large data set; including detailed information about the profiled samples, the uncovered TSSs at high base-pair resolution on the genome, their transcriptional initiation activities, and further information of transcriptional regulation. Data sets to explore transcriptome in individual cellular states encoded in the mammalian genomes have been enriched by a series of additional analysis, based on the raw experimental data, along with the progress of the research activities. To make the heterogeneous data set accessible and useful for investigators, we developed a web-based database called Semantic catalog of Samples, Transcription initiation And Regulators (SSTAR). SSTAR utilizes the open source wiki software MediaWiki along with the Semantic MediaWiki (SMW) extension, which provides flexibility to model, store, and display a series of data sets produced during the course of the FANTOM5 project. Our use of SMW demonstrates the utility of the framework for dissemination of large-scale analysis results. SSTAR is a case study in handling biological data generated from a large-scale research project in terms of maintenance and growth alongside research activities. Database URL: http://fantom.gsc.riken.jp/5/sstar/ PMID:27402679

  14. [Cellular immunity state assessed in bronchial and alveolar lavage for experimental animals exposed to the rubber dust].

    PubMed

    Zhumabekova, B K; Karabalin, S K; Bakirova, R E

    2004-01-01

    Experiments on 21 rats helped to study influence of mechanical rubber dust on cellular immunity state in bronchial and alveolar lavage, efficiency of Ruvimine for prophylaxis. Findings are that mechanical rubber dust is strongly cytotoxic. Ruvimine administration during the whole experiment demonstrates therapeutic and prophylactic effect and normalizes local pulmonary phagocytosis.

  15. The plastic cellular states of liver cells: Are EpCAM and Lgr5 fit for purpose?

    PubMed

    Huch, Meritxell; Dollé, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    Adult liver cells have been considered restricted regarding their fate and lineage potential. That is, hepatocytes have been thought able only to generate hepatocytes and duct cells, only duct cells. While this may be the case for the majority of scenarios in a state of quiescence or homeostasis, evidence suggests that liver cells are capable of interconverting between cellular states of distinct phenotypic traits. This interconversion or plasticity had been suggested by classical studies using cellular markers, but recently lineage tracing approaches have proven that cells are highly plastic and retain an extraordinary ability to respond differently to normal tissue homeostasis, to tissue repair, or when challenged to expand ex vivo or to differentiate upon transplantation. Stemness, as "self-renewal and multipotency," seems not to be limited to a particular cell type but rather to a cellular state in which cells exhibit a high degree of plasticity and can move back and forth in different phenotypic states. For instance, upon damage cells can dedifferentiate to acquire stem cell potential that allows them to self-renew, repopulate a damaged tissue, and then undergo differentiation. In this review, we will discuss the evidence on cellular plasticity in the liver, focusing our attention on two markers, epithelial cell adhesion molecule and leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5, which identify cells with stem cell potential. (Hepatology 2016;64:652-662).

  16. Boundary-corrected four-body continuum-intermediate-state method: Single-electron capture from heliumlike atomic systems by fast nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mančev, Ivan; Milojević, Nenad; Belkić, Dževad

    2015-06-01

    Single charge exchange in collisions between bare projectiles and heliumlike atomic systems at intermediate and high incident energies is examined by using the four-body formalism of the first- and second-order theories. The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the relative importance of the intermediate ionization continua of the captured electron compared to the usual direct path of the single electron transfer from a target to a projectile. In order to achieve this goal, comprehensive comparisons are made between the four-body boundary-corrected continuum-intermediate-states (BCIS-4B) method and the four-body boundary-corrected first Born (CB1-4B) method. The perturbation potential is the same in the CB1-4B and BCIS-4B methods. Both methods satisfy the correct boundary conditions in the entrance and exit channels. However, unlike the CB1-4B method, the second-order BCIS-4B method takes into account the electronic Coulomb continuum-intermediate states in either the entrance or the exit channel depending on whether the post or the prior version of the transition amplitude is used. Hence, by comparing the results from these two theories, the relative importance of the intermediate ionization electronic continua can be assessed within the four-body formalism of scattering theory. The BCIS-4B method predicts the usual second-order effect through double scattering of the captured electron on two nuclei as a quantum-mechanical counterpart of the Thomas classical two-step, billiard-type collision. The physical mechanism for this effect in the BCIS-4B method is also comprised of two steps such that ionization occurs first. This is followed by capture of the electron by the projectile with both processes taking place on the energy shell. Moreover, the role of the second, noncaptured electron in a heliumlike target is revisited. To this end, the BCIS-4B method describes the effect of capture of one electron by the interaction of the projectile nucleus with

  17. Nuclear rotation in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossez, K.; Nazarewicz, W.; Jaganathen, Y.; Michel, N.; Płoszajczak, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atomic nuclei often exhibit collective rotational-like behavior in highly excited states, well above the particle emission threshold. What determines the existence of collective motion in the continuum region is not fully understood. Purpose: In this work, by studying the collective rotation of the positive-parity deformed configurations of the one-neutron halo nucleus 11Be, we assess different mechanisms that stabilize collective behavior beyond the limits of particle stability. Method: To solve a particle-plus-core problem, we employ a nonadiabatic coupled-channel formalism and the Berggren single-particle ensemble, which explicitly contains bound states, narrow resonances, and the scattering continuum. We study the valence-neutron density in the intrinsic rotor frame to assess the validity of the adiabatic approach as the excitation energy increases. Results: We demonstrate that collective rotation of the ground band of 11Be is stabilized by (i) the fact that the ℓ =0 one-neutron decay channel is closed, and (ii) the angular momentum alignment, which increases the parentage of high-ℓ components at high spins; both effects act in concert to decrease decay widths of ground-state band members. This is not the case for higher-lying states of 11Be, where the ℓ =0 neutron-decay channel is open and often dominates. Conclusion: We demonstrate that long-lived collective states can exist at high excitation energy in weakly bound neutron drip-line nuclei such as 11Be.

  18. Latinos in the United States on the HIV/AIDS care continuum by birth country/region: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Diana M; Trepka, Mary Jo; Dillon, Frank R

    2015-01-01

    Twenty percent of Latinos with HIV in the US are unaware of their HIV status, 33% are linked to care late, and 74% do not reach viral suppression. Disparities along this HIV/AIDS care continuum may be present between various ethnic groups historically categorised as Latino. To identify differences along the HIV/AIDS care continuum between US Latinos of varying birth countries/regions a systematic review of articles published in English between 2002 and 2013 was conducted using MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Web of Science. Studies that reported on one or more steps of the HIV/AIDS care continuum and reported results by birth country/region for Latinos were included. Latinos born in Mexico and Central America were found to be at increased risk of late diagnosis compared with US-born Latinos. No studies were found that reported on linkage to HIV care or viral load suppression by country/region of birth. Lower survival was found among Latinos born in Puerto Rico compared with Latinos born in mainland US. Inconsistent differences in survival were found among Latinos born in Mexico, Cuba, and Central America. Socio/cultural context, immigration factors, and documentation status are discussed as partial explanations for disparities along the HIV/AIDS care continuum.

  19. Solar radio continuum storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Radio noise continuum emission observed in metric and decametric wave frequencies is discussed. The radio noise is associated with actively varying sunspot groups accompanied by the S-component of microwave radio emissions. It is shown that the S-component emission in microwave frequencies generally occurs several days before the emission of the noise continuum storms of lower frequencies. It is likely that energetic electrons, 10 to 100 Kev, accelerated in association with the variation of sunspot magnetic fields, are the sources of the radio emissions. A model is considered to explain the relation of burst storms on radio noise. An analysis of the role of energetic electrons on the emissions of both noise continuum and type III burst storms is presented. It is shown that instabilities associated with the electrons and their relation to their own stabilizing effects are important in interpreting both of these storms.

  20. A study of high-temperature heat pipes with multiple heat sources and sinks. I - Experimental methodology and frozen startup profiles. II - Analysis of continuum transient and steady-state experimental data with numerical predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faghri, A.; Cao, Y.; Buchko, M.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental profiles for heat pipe startup from the frozen state were obtained, using a high-temperature sodium/stainless steel pipe with multiple heat sources and sinks to investigate the startup behavior of the heat pipe for various heat loads and input locations, with both low and high heat rejection rates at the condensor. The experimental results of the performance characteristics for the continuum transient and steady-state operation of the heat pipe were analyzed, and the performance limits for operation with varying heat fluxes and location are determined.

  1. A study of high-temperature heat pipes with multiple heat sources and sinks. I - Experimental methodology and frozen startup profiles. II - Analysis of continuum transient and steady-state experimental data with numerical predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faghri, A.; Cao, Y.; Buchko, M.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental profiles for heat pipe startup from the frozen state were obtained, using a high-temperature sodium/stainless steel pipe with multiple heat sources and sinks to investigate the startup behavior of the heat pipe for various heat loads and input locations, with both low and high heat rejection rates at the condensor. The experimental results of the performance characteristics for the continuum transient and steady-state operation of the heat pipe were analyzed, and the performance limits for operation with varying heat fluxes and location are determined.

  2. Examining the Psychosis Continuum

    PubMed Central

    DeRosse, Pamela; Karlsgodt, Katherine H.

    2015-01-01

    The notion that psychosis may exist on a continuum with normal experience has been proposed in multiple forms throughout the history of psychiatry. However, in recent years there has been an exponential increase in efforts aimed at elucidating what has been termed the ‘psychosis continuum’. The present review seeks to summarize some of the more basic characteristics of this continuum and to present some of the recent findings that provide support for its validity. While there is still considerable work to be done, the emerging data holds considerable promise for advancing our understanding of both risk and resilience to psychiatric disorders characterized by psychosis. PMID:26052479

  3. The Continuum of Listening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rud, A. G.; Garrison, Jim

    2007-01-01

    The distinction between "apophatic" and "cataphatic" listening is defined and analyzed. "Apophatic" listening is more or less devoid of cognitivist claims, whereas "cataphatic" listening involves cognition and questioning. Many of the papers in this volume are discussed along the continuum determined by these two types of listening.…

  4. The Creativity Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R.

    2009-01-01

    Children are innately creative, and the youngest often are the most original because they have yet to be influenced by the creativity of others. One way to think of creative expression is as a continuum. At one end is originality, or the creation of something wholly new, "original." At the other end is replication, or the re-creation of something…

  5. The Creativity Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R.

    2009-01-01

    Children are innately creative, and the youngest often are the most original because they have yet to be influenced by the creativity of others. One way to think of creative expression is as a continuum. At one end is originality, or the creation of something wholly new, "original." At the other end is replication, or the re-creation of something…

  6. Modeling angiogenesis: A discrete to continuum description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillay, Samara; Byrne, Helen M.; Maini, Philip K.

    2017-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the process by which new blood vessels develop from existing vasculature. During angiogenesis, endothelial tip cells migrate via diffusion and chemotaxis, loops form via tip-to-tip and tip-to-sprout anastomosis, new tip cells are produced via branching, and a vessel network forms as endothelial cells follow the paths of tip cells. The latter process is known as the snail trail. We use a mean-field approximation to systematically derive a continuum model from a two-dimensional lattice-based cellular automaton model of angiogenesis in the corneal assay, based on the snail-trail process. From the two-dimensional continuum model, we derive a one-dimensional model which represents angiogenesis in two dimensions. By comparing the discrete and one-dimensional continuum models, we determine how individual cell behavior manifests at the macroscale. In contrast to the phenomenological continuum models in the literature, we find that endothelial cell creation due to tip cell movement (vessel formation via the snail trail) manifests as a source term of tip cells on the macroscale. Further, we find that phenomenological continuum models, which assume that endothelial cell creation is proportional to the flux of tip cells in the direction of increasing chemoattractant concentration, qualitatively capture vessel formation in two dimensions, but must be modified to accurately represent vessel formation. Additionally, we find that anastomosis imposes restrictions on cell density, which, if violated, leads to ill-posedness in our continuum model. We also deduce that self-loops should be excluded when tip-to-sprout anastomosis is active in the discrete model to ensure propagation of the vascular front.

  7. Unified ab initio approach to bound and unbound states: No-core shell model with continuum and its application to 7He

    SciTech Connect

    Baroni, Simone; Navratil, Petr; Quaglioni, Sofia

    2013-03-26

    In this study, we introduce a unified approach to nuclear bound and continuum states based on the coupling of the no-core shell model (NCSM), a bound-state technique, with the no-core shell model/resonating group method (NCSM/RGM), a nuclear scattering technique. This new ab initio method, no-core shell model with continuum (NCSMC), leads to convergence properties superior to either NCSM or NCSM/RGM while providing a balanced approach to different classes of states. In the NCSMC, the ansatz for the many-nucleon wave function includes (i) a square-integrable A-nucleon component expanded in a complete harmonic oscillator basis and (ii) a binary-cluster component with asymptotic boundary conditions that can properly describe weakly bound states, resonances, and scattering. The Schrödinger equation is transformed into a system of coupled-channel integral-differential equations that we solve using a modified microscopic R-matrix formalism within a Lagrange mesh basis. We demonstrate the usefulness of the approach by investigating the unbound 7He nucleus.

  8. Rapid induction and persistence of paracrine-induced cellular antiviral states arrest viral infection spread in A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Emily A; Swick, Adam; Yin, John

    2016-01-01

    The virus/host interaction is a complex interplay between pro- and anti-viral factors that ultimately determines the spread or halt of virus infections in tissues. This interplay develops over multiple rounds of infection. The purpose of this study was to determine how cellular-level processes combine to impact the spatial spread of infection. We measured the kinetics of virus replication (VSV), antiviral paracrine signal upregulation and secretion, spatial spread of virus and paracrine antiviral signaling, and inhibition of virus production in antiviral-exposed A549 human lung epithelial cells. We found that initially infected cells released antiviral signals 4-to-7 hours following production of virus. However, the subsequent rapid dissemination of signal and fast induction of a robust and persistent antiviral state ultimately led to a suppression of infection spread. This work shows how cellular responses to infection and activation of antiviral responses can integrate to ultimately control infection spread across host cell populations. PMID:27254596

  9. Hormesis, cellular stress response and neuroinflammation in schizophrenia: Early onset versus late onset state.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Vittorio; Giordano, James; Crupi, Rosalia; Di Paola, Rosanna; Ruggieri, Martino; Bianchini, Rio; Ontario, Maria Laura; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Calabrese, Edward J

    2017-05-01

    Abnormal redox homeostasis and oxidative stress have been proposed to play a role in the etiology of several neuropsychiatric spectrum disorders. Emerging interest has recently focused on markers of oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in schizophrenic spectrum disorders, at least in particular subgroups of patients. Altered expression of genes related to oxidative stress, oxidative damage to DNA, protein and lipids, as well as reduced glutathione levels in central and peripheral tissues could act synergistically, and contribute to the course of the disease.  Herein, we discuss cellular mechanisms that may be operative in neuroinflammation and contributory to schizophrenia. We address modulation of endogenous cellular defense mechanisms as a potentially innovative approach to therapeutics for schizophrenia, and other neuropsychiatric conditions that are associated with neuroinflammation. Specifically, we discuss the emerging role of heme oxygenase as prominent member of neuroprotective network in redox stress responsive mechanisms, as well as the importance of glutathione relevant in schizophrenia pathophysiology. Finally we introduce the hormetic dose response concept as relevant and important to neuroprotection, and review hormetic mechanisms as possible approaches to manipulation of neuroinflammatory targets that may be viable for treating schizophrenia spectrum disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cellular redox state and endothelial dysfunction in mildly hyperhomocysteinemic cystathionine beta-synthase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Norbert; Heydrick, Stanley; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Bierl, Charlene; Cap, André; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Previous in vitro experiments have shown that hyperhomocysteinemia leads to oxidative inactivation of nitric oxide, in part by inhibiting the expression of cellular glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1). To elucidate the role of intracellular redox status on homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction and oxidant stress, heterozygous cystathionine beta-synthase-deficient (CBS(-/+)) and wild-type (CBS(+/+)) mice were treated with the cysteine donor L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (OTC). CBS(-/+) mice had significantly lower GPx-1 activity compared with their CBS(+/+) littermates, and OTC treatment led to a modest increase in tissue GPx-1 activity and significant increases in total thiols and in reduced glutathione levels in both CBS(+/+) and CBS(-/+) mice. Superfusion of the mesentery with beta-methacholine or bradykinin produced dose-dependent vasodilation of mesenteric arterioles in CBS(+/+) mice and in CBS(+/+) mice treated with OTC. In contrast, mesenteric arterioles from CBS(-/+) mice manifested dose-dependent vasoconstriction in response to both agonists. OTC treatment of CBS(-/+) mice restored normal microvascular vasodilator reactivity to beta-methacholine and bradykinin. These findings demonstrate that mild hyperhomocysteinemia leads to endothelial dysfunction in association with decreased bioavailable nitric oxide. Increasing the cellular thiol and reduced glutathione pools and increasing GPx-1 activity restores endothelial function. These findings emphasize the importance of intracellular redox balance for nitric oxide bioactivity and endothelial function.

  11. Inhibition of catalase by tea catechins in free and cellular state: a biophysical approach.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sandip; Dey, Subrata Kumar; Saha, Chabita

    2014-01-01

    Tea flavonoids bind to variety of enzymes and inhibit their activities. In the present study, binding and inhibition of catalase activity by catechins with respect to their structure-affinity relationship has been elucidated. Fluorimetrically determined binding constants for (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG) with catalase were observed to be 2.27×106 M(-1) and 1.66×106 M(-1), respectively. Thermodynamic parameters evidence exothermic and spontaneous interaction between catechins and catalase. Major forces of interaction are suggested to be through hydrogen bonding along with electrostatic contributions and conformational changes. Distinct loss of α-helical structure of catalase by interaction with EGCG was captured in circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Gallated catechins demonstrated higher binding constants and inhibition efficacy than non-gallated catechins. EGCG exhibited maximum inhibition of pure catalase. It also inhibited cellular catalase in K562 cancer cells with significant increase in cellular ROS and suppression of cell viability (IC50 54.5 µM). These results decipher the molecular mechanism by which tea catechins interact with catalase and highlight the potential of gallated catechin like EGCG as an anticancer drug. EGCG may have other non-specific targets in the cell, but its anticancer property is mainly defined by ROS accumulation due to catalase inhibition.

  12. Diversification of importin-α isoforms in cellular trafficking and disease states

    PubMed Central

    Pumroy, Ruth A.; Cingolani, Gino

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes seven isoforms of importin α which are grouped into three subfamilies known as α1, α2 and α3. All isoforms share a fundamentally conserved architecture that consists of an N-terminal, autoinhibitory, importin-β-binding (IBB) domain and a C-terminal Arm (Armadillo)-core that associates with nuclear localization signal (NLS) cargoes. Despite striking similarity in amino acid sequence and 3D structure, importin-α isoforms display remarkable substrate specificity in vivo. In the present review, we look at key differences among importin-α isoforms and provide a comprehensive inventory of known viral and cellular cargoes that have been shown to associate preferentially with specific isoforms. We illustrate how the diversification of the adaptor importin α into seven isoforms expands the dynamic range and regulatory control of nucleocytoplasmic transport, offering unexpected opportunities for pharmacological intervention. The emerging view of importin α is that of a key signalling molecule, with isoforms that confer preferential nuclear entry and spatiotemporal specificity on viral and cellular cargoes directly linked to human diseases. PMID:25656054

  13. Inhibition of Catalase by Tea Catechins in Free and Cellular State: A Biophysical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sandip; Dey, Subrata Kumar; Saha, Chabita

    2014-01-01

    Tea flavonoids bind to variety of enzymes and inhibit their activities. In the present study, binding and inhibition of catalase activity by catechins with respect to their structure-affinity relationship has been elucidated. Fluorimetrically determined binding constants for (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and (−)-epicatechin gallate (ECG) with catalase were observed to be 2.27×106 M−1 and 1.66×106 M−1, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters evidence exothermic and spontaneous interaction between catechins and catalase. Major forces of interaction are suggested to be through hydrogen bonding along with electrostatic contributions and conformational changes. Distinct loss of α-helical structure of catalase by interaction with EGCG was captured in circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Gallated catechins demonstrated higher binding constants and inhibition efficacy than non-gallated catechins. EGCG exhibited maximum inhibition of pure catalase. It also inhibited cellular catalase in K562 cancer cells with significant increase in cellular ROS and suppression of cell viability (IC50 54.5 µM). These results decipher the molecular mechanism by which tea catechins interact with catalase and highlight the potential of gallated catechin like EGCG as an anticancer drug. EGCG may have other non-specific targets in the cell, but its anticancer property is mainly defined by ROS accumulation due to catalase inhibition. PMID:25025898

  14. Isostaticity in Cosserat Continuum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Isostaticity, Cosserat, Granular, Force chains Antoinette ...TELEPHONE NUMBER Antoinette Tordesillas 038-344-9685 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Standard Form 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18...Cosserat continuum Antoinette Tordesillas · Jingyu Shi · John F. Peters Received: 29 August 2011 / Published online: 16 March 2012 © Springer-Verlag 2012

  15. Solar radio continuum storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reviews the current status of research on solar radio continuum emissions from metric to hectometric wave frequencies, emphasizing the role of energetic electrons in the 10-100 keV range in these emissions. It is seen that keV-energy electrons generated in active sunspot groups must be the sources of radio continuum storm emissions for wide frequency bands. These electrons excite plasma oscillations in the medium, which in turn are converted to electromagnetic radiation. The radio noise continuum sources are usually associated with type III burst activity observed above these sources. Although the mechanism for the release of the energetic electrons is not known, it seems they are ejected from storm source regions in association with rapid variation of associated sunspot magnetic fields due to their growth into complex types. To explain some of the observed characteristics, the importance of two-stream instability and the scattering of ambient plasma ions on energetic electron streams is pointed out.

  16. Cellular mechanisms of cardioprotection by calorie restriction: state of the science and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Marzetti, Emanuele; Wohlgemuth, Stephanie E.; Anton, Stephen D.; Bernabei, Roberto; Carter, Christy S.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Evidence from animal models and preliminary studies in humans indicate that calorie restriction (CR) delays cardiac aging and can prevent cardiovascular disease. These effects are mediated by a wide spectrum of biochemical and cellular adaptations, including redox homeostasis, mitochondrial function, inflammation, apoptosis and autophagy. Despite the beneficial effects of CR, its large-scale implementation is challenged by applicability issues as well as health concerns. However, preclinical studies indicate that specific compounds, such as resveratrol, may mimic many of the effects of CR, thus potentially obviating the need for drastic food intake reductions. Results from ongoing clinical trials will reveal whether the intriguing alternative of CR mimetics represents a safe and effective strategy to promote cardiovascular health and delay cardiac aging in humans. PMID:19944269

  17. Disordered cellular automaton traffic flow model: phase separated state, density waves and self organized criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourrate, K.; Loulidi, M.

    2006-01-01

    We suggest a disordered traffic flow model that captures many features of traffic flow. It is an extension of the Nagel-Schreckenberg (NaSch) stochastic cellular automata for single line vehicular traffic model. It incorporates random acceleration and deceleration terms that may be greater than one unit. Our model leads under its intrinsic dynamics, for high values of braking probability pr, to a constant flow at intermediate densities without introducing any spatial inhomogeneities. For a system of fast drivers pr→0, the model exhibits a density wave behavior that was observed in car following models with optimal velocity. The gap of the disordered model we present exhibits, for high values of pr and random deceleration, at a critical density, a power law distribution which is a hall mark of a self organized criticality phenomena.

  18. A continuum model of transcriptional bursting

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Adam M; Tunnacliffe, Edward; Cannon, Danielle; Chubb, Jonathan R

    2016-01-01

    Transcription occurs in stochastic bursts. Early models based upon RNA hybridisation studies suggest bursting dynamics arise from alternating inactive and permissive states. Here we investigate bursting mechanism in live cells by quantitative imaging of actin gene transcription, combined with molecular genetics, stochastic simulation and probabilistic modelling. In contrast to early models, our data indicate a continuum of transcriptional states, with a slowly fluctuating initiation rate converting the gene between different levels of activity, interspersed with extended periods of inactivity. We place an upper limit of 40 s on the lifetime of fluctuations in elongation rate, with initiation rate variations persisting an order of magnitude longer. TATA mutations reduce the accessibility of high activity states, leaving the lifetime of on- and off-states unchanged. A continuum or spectrum of gene states potentially enables a wide dynamic range for cell responses to stimuli. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13051.001 PMID:26896676

  19. Stiffness Control of Surgical Continuum Manipulators.

    PubMed

    Mahvash, Mohsen; Dupont, Pierre E

    2011-04-01

    This paper introduces the first stiffness controller for continuum robots. The control law is based on an accurate approximation of a continuum robot's coupled kinematic and static force model. To implement a desired tip stiffness, the controller drives the actuators to positions corresponding to a deflected robot configuration that produces the required tip force for the measured tip position. This approach provides several important advantages. First, it enables the use of robot deflection sensing as a means to both sense and control tip forces. Second, it enables stiffness control to be implemented by modification of existing continuum robot position controllers. The proposed controller is demonstrated experimentally in the context of a concentric tube robot. Results show that the stiffness controller achieves the desired stiffness in steady state, provides good dynamic performance, and exhibits stability during contact transitions.

  20. Stiffness Control of Surgical Continuum Manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Mahvash, Mohsen; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces the first stiffness controller for continuum robots. The control law is based on an accurate approximation of a continuum robot’s coupled kinematic and static force model. To implement a desired tip stiffness, the controller drives the actuators to positions corresponding to a deflected robot configuration that produces the required tip force for the measured tip position. This approach provides several important advantages. First, it enables the use of robot deflection sensing as a means to both sense and control tip forces. Second, it enables stiffness control to be implemented by modification of existing continuum robot position controllers. The proposed controller is demonstrated experimentally in the context of a concentric tube robot. Results show that the stiffness controller achieves the desired stiffness in steady state, provides good dynamic performance, and exhibits stability during contact transitions. PMID:24273466

  1. Chemical tagging and customizing of cellular chromatin states using ultrafast trans-splicing inteins.

    PubMed

    David, Yael; Vila-Perelló, Miquel; Verma, Shivam; Muir, Tom W

    2015-05-01

    Post-translational modification of the histone proteins in chromatin plays a central role in the epigenetic control of DNA-templated processes in eukaryotic cells. Developing methods that enable the structure of histones to be manipulated is, therefore, essential to understand the biochemical mechanisms that underlie genomic regulation. Here we present a synthetic biology method to engineer histones that bear site-specific modifications on cellular chromatin using protein trans-splicing (PTS). We genetically fused the N-terminal fragment of ultrafast split intein to the C terminus of histone H2B, which, on reaction with a complementary synthetic C intein, generated labelled histone. Using this approach, we incorporated various non-native chemical modifications into chromatin in vivo with temporal control. Furthermore, the time and concentration dependence of PTS performed in nucleo enabled us to examine differences in the accessibility of the euchromatin and heterochromatin regions of the epigenome. Finally, we used PTS to semisynthesize a native histone modification, H2BK120 ubiquitination, in isolated nuclei and showed that this can trigger downstream epigenetic crosstalk of H3K79 methylation.

  2. State of the art. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of alveolar destruction in emphysema: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Tuder, Rubin M; Yoshida, Toshinori; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata; Petrache, Irina

    2006-08-01

    Emphysema consists of a unique pattern of alveolar destruction, resulting in marked airspace enlargement with reduction of alveolar capillary exchange area. Classical concepts of the pathogenesis of emphysema have relied on the paradigm set by the inflammation and protease/antiprotease imbalance. We propose herein that cigarette smoke constitutes an environmental hazard that causes alveolar destruction by the interaction of apoptosis, oxidative stress, and protease/antiprotease imbalance. We draw a parallel between organismal aging, organ structural maintenance, and the damage resulting from chronic cigarette smoke inhalation. The stochastic interaction between environmental hazards and the effort of an organism or a particular organ to fend off these hazards results in the accumulation of cellular damage and features characteristic of aging. Inflammation follows as the result of the multiplication of injuries. We highlight the importance of understanding the biology of the interaction of alveolar cells in homeostasis and in alveolar destruction, and the potential role of novel processes related to senescence and stress response. An evolutionary perspective of emphysema that incorporates mechanisms related to aging may lead to important advances in the understanding and therapeutic targeting of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  3. Functional Assessment of Magno, Parvo and Konio-Cellular Pathways; Current State and Future Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yoonessi, Ali; Yoonessi, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    The information generated by cone photoreceptors in the retina is compressed and transferred to higher processing centers through three distinct types of ganglion cells known as magno, parvo and konio cells. These ganglion cells, which travel from the retina to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and then to the primary visual cortex, have different structural and functional characteristics, and are organized in distinct layers in the LGN and the primary visual cortex. Magno cells are large, have thick axons and usually collect input from many retinal cells. Parvo cells are smaller, with fine axons and less myelin than mango cells. Konio cells are diverse small cells with wide fields of input consisting of different cells types. The three cellular pathways also differ in function. Magno cells respond rapidly to changing stimuli, while parvo cells need time to respond. The distinct patterns of structure and function in these cells have provided an opportunity for clinical assessment of their function. Functional assessment of these cells is currently used in the field of ophthalmology where frequency-doubling technology perimetry selectively assesses the function of magno cells. Evidence has accrued that the three pathways show characteristic patterns of malfunctions in multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases, and several other disorders. The combination of behavioral assessment with other techniques, such as event related potentials and functional magnetic resonance imaging, seems to bear promising future clinical applications. PMID:22454721

  4. Multiplexed mass cytometry profiling of cellular states perturbed by small-molecule regulators

    PubMed Central

    Bodenmiller, Bernd; Zunder, Eli R.; Finck, Rachel; Chen, Tiffany J.; Savig, Erica S.; Bruggner, Robert V.; Simonds, Erin F.; Bendall, Sean C.; Sachs, Karen; Krutzik, Peter O.; Nolan, Garry P.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to comprehensively explore the impact of bio-active molecules on human samples at the single-cell level can provide great insight for biomedical research. Mass cytometry enables quantitative single-cell analysis with deep dimensionality, but currently lacks high-throughput capability. Here we report a method termed mass-tag cellular barcoding (MCB) that increases mass cytometry throughput by sample multiplexing. 96-well format MCB was used to characterize human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) signaling dynamics, cell-to-cell communication, the signaling variability between 8 donors, and to define the impact of 27 inhibitors on this system. For each compound, 14 phosphorylation sites were measured in 14 PBMC types, resulting in 18,816 quantified phosphorylation levels from each multiplexed sample. This high-dimensional systems-level inquiry allowed analysis across cell-type and signaling space, reclassified inhibitors, and revealed off-target effects. MCB enables high-content, high-throughput screening, with potential applications for drug discovery, pre-clinical testing, and mechanistic investigation of human disease. PMID:22902532

  5. Cellular differentiation state modulates the mRNA export activity of SR proteins.

    PubMed

    Botti, Valentina; McNicoll, François; Steiner, Michaela C; Richter, Florian M; Solovyeva, Anfisa; Wegener, Marius; Schwich, Oliver D; Poser, Ina; Zarnack, Kathi; Wittig, Ilka; Neugebauer, Karla M; Müller-McNicoll, Michaela

    2017-07-03

    SR proteins function in nuclear pre-mRNA processing, mRNA export, and translation. To investigate their cellular dynamics, we developed a quantitative assay, which detects differences in nucleocytoplasmic shuttling among seven canonical SR protein family members. As expected, SRSF2 and SRSF5 shuttle poorly in HeLa cells but surprisingly display considerable shuttling in pluripotent murine P19 cells. Combining individual-resolution cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) and mass spectrometry, we show that elevated arginine methylation of SRSF5 and lower phosphorylation levels of cobound SRSF2 enhance shuttling of SRSF5 in P19 cells by modulating protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions. Moreover, SRSF5 is bound to pluripotency-specific transcripts such as Lin28a and Pou5f1/Oct4 in the cytoplasm. SRSF5 depletion reduces and overexpression increases their cytoplasmic mRNA levels, suggesting that enhanced mRNA export by SRSF5 is required for the expression of pluripotency factors. Remarkably, neural differentiation of P19 cells leads to dramatically reduced SRSF5 shuttling. Our findings indicate that posttranslational modification of SR proteins underlies the regulation of their mRNA export activities and distinguishes pluripotent from differentiated cells. © 2017 Botti et al.

  6. Chemical tagging and customizing of cellular chromatin states using ultrafast trans-splicing inteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Yael; Vila-Perelló, Miquel; Verma, Shivam; Muir, Tom W.

    2015-05-01

    Post-translational modification of the histone proteins in chromatin plays a central role in the epigenetic control of DNA-templated processes in eukaryotic cells. Developing methods that enable the structure of histones to be manipulated is, therefore, essential to understand the biochemical mechanisms that underlie genomic regulation. Here we present a synthetic biology method to engineer histones that bear site-specific modifications on cellular chromatin using protein trans-splicing (PTS). We genetically fused the N-terminal fragment of ultrafast split intein to the C terminus of histone H2B, which, on reaction with a complementary synthetic C intein, generated labelled histone. Using this approach, we incorporated various non-native chemical modifications into chromatin in vivo with temporal control. Furthermore, the time and concentration dependence of PTS performed in nucleo enabled us to examine differences in the accessibility of the euchromatin and heterochromatin regions of the epigenome. Finally, we used PTS to semisynthesize a native histone modification, H2BK120 ubiquitination, in isolated nuclei and showed that this can trigger downstream epigenetic crosstalk of H3K79 methylation.

  7. Chemical Fluxes in Cellular Steady States Measured by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hong; Elson, Elliot L.

    Genetically, identical cells adopt phenotypes that have different structures, functions, and metabolic properties. In multi-cellular organisms, for example, tissue-specific phenotypes distinguish muscle cells, liver cells, fibroblasts, and blood cells that differ in biochemical functions, geometric forms, and interactions with extracellular environments. Tissue-specific cells usually have different metabolic functions such as synthesis of distinct spectra of secreted proteins, e.g., by liver or pancreatic cells, or of structural proteins, e.g., muscle vs. epithelial cells. But more importantly, a phenotype should include a dynamic aspect: different phenotypes can have distinctly different dynamic functions such as contraction of muscle cells and locomotion of leukocytes. The phenotypes of differentiated tissue cells are typically stable, but they can respond to changes in external conditions, e.g., as in the hypertrophy of muscle cells in response to extra load [1] or the phenotypic shift of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts as part of the wound healing response [2]. Cells pass through sequences of phenotypes during development and also undergo malignant phenotypic transformations as occur in cancer and heart disease.

  8. The Response Continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Caltagirone, Sergio; Frincke, Deborah A.

    2005-06-17

    Active response is a sequence of actions per- formed speci¯cally to mitigate a detected threat. Response decisions always follow detection: a decision to take `no ac- tion' remains a response decision. However, active response is a complex subject that has received insu±cient formal attention. To facilitate discussion, this paper provides a framework that proposes a common de¯nition, describes the role of response and the major issues surrounding response choices, and ¯nally, provides a model for the process of re- sponse. This provides a common starting point for discus- sion of the full response continuum as an integral part of contemporary computer security.

  9. Micropolar continuum in spatial description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Elena A.; Vilchevskaya, Elena N.

    2016-11-01

    Within the spatial description, it is customary to refer thermodynamic state quantities to an elementary volume fixed in space containing an ensemble of particles. During its evolution, the elementary volume is occupied by different particles, each having its own mass, tensor of inertia, angular and linear velocities. The aim of the present paper is to answer the question of how to determine the inertial and kinematic characteristics of the elementary volume. In order to model structural transformations due to the consolidation or defragmentation of particles or anisotropic changes, one should consider the fact that the tensor of inertia of the elementary volume may change. This means that an additional constitutive equation must be formulated. The paper suggests kinetic equations for the tensor of inertia of the elementary volume. It also discusses the specificity of the inelastic polar continuum description within the framework of the spatial description.

  10. Computational Methods in Continuum Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-30

    ftruet11ft bwalch.Aq 0.4.oiqn 04ta tou.MtC’ gahimtc" n matod .nAfitang In@ data 01#04141. OAd co0noIDW~ng And tft@nq the ~OIWCI&Qn of 1,onjt~omt .nd~ml...AD-A27S 560 DTIC\\3\\Ul3 10 S ELECTE1 FEB 9 1994 I c I £ COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN CONTINUUM MECHANICS By Bolindra N . Borah N.C. A&T State University...PAGE 0me No 0.704-0158 io (reorovtnq burden ’Of .t..i e’iortion of Information is estimted to ’Adoraw 1O4 .0 e~o- * n th.n I~c ot.. "o.vw.n. q

  11. Correlating two-photon excited fluorescence imaging of breast cancer cellular redox state with seahorse flux analysis of normalized cellular oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jue; Wright, Heather J.; Chan, Nicole; Tran, Richard; Razorenova, Olga V.; Potma, Eric O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-06-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of the cellular cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide is widely used to measure cellular metabolism, both in normal and pathological cells and tissues. When dual-wavelength excitation is used, ratiometric TPEF imaging of the intrinsic cofactor fluorescence provides a metabolic index of cells-the "optical redox ratio" (ORR). With increased interest in understanding and controlling cellular metabolism in cancer, there is a need to evaluate the performance of ORR in malignant cells. We compare TPEF metabolic imaging with seahorse flux analysis of cellular oxygen consumption in two different breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). We monitor metabolic index in living cells under both normal culture conditions and, for MCF-7, in response to cell respiration inhibitors and uncouplers. We observe a significant correlation between the TPEF-derived ORR and the flux analyzer measurements (R=0.7901, p<0.001). Our results confirm that the ORR is a valid dynamic index of cell metabolism under a range of oxygen consumption conditions relevant for cancer imaging.

  12. Continuum lowering - A new perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, B. J. B.

    2014-12-01

    What is meant by continuum lowering and ionization potential depression (IPD) in a Coulomb system depends very much upon precisely what question is being asked. It is shown that equilibrium (equation of state) phenomena and non-equilibrium dynamical processes like photoionization are characterized by different values of the IPD. In the former, the ionization potential of an atom embedded in matter is the difference in the free energy of the many-body system between states of thermodynamic equilibrium differing by the ionization state of just one atom. Typically, this energy is less than that required to ionize the same atom in vacuo. Probably, the best known example of this is the IPD given by Stewart and Pyatt (SP). However, it is a common misconception that this formula should apply directly to the energy of a photon causing photoionization, since this is a local adiabatic process that occurs in the absence of a response from the surrounding plasma. To achieve the prescribed final equilibrium state, in general, additional energy, in the form of heat and work, is transferred between the atom and its surroundings. This additional relaxation energy is sufficient to explain the discrepancy between recent spectroscopic measurements of IPD in dense plasmas and the predictions of the SP formula. This paper provides a detailed account of an analytical approach, based on SP, to calculating thermodynamic and spectroscopic (adiabatic) IPDs in multicomponent Coulomb systems of arbitrary coupling strength with Te ≠ Ti. The ramifications for equilibrium Coulomb systems are examined in order to elucidate the roles of the various forms of the IPD and any possible connection with the plasma microfield. The formulation embodies an analytical equation of state (EoS) that is thermodynamically self-consistent, provided that the bound and free electrons are dynamically separable, meaning that the system is not undergoing pressure ionization. Apart from this restriction, the model is

  13. Kilometric Continuum Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James L.; Boardsen, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Kilometric continuum (KC) is the high frequency component (approximately 100 kHz to approximately 800 kHz) of nonthermal continuum (NTC). Unlike the lower frequency portion of NTC (approximately 5 kHz to approximately 100 kHz) whose source is around the dawn sector, the source of KC occurs at all magnetic local times. The latitudinal beaming of KC as observed by GEOTAIL is, for most events, restricted to plus or minus 15 degrees magnetic latitude. KC has been observed during periods of both low and strong geomagnetic activity, with no significant correlation of wave intensity with K(sub p), index. However statistically the maximum observed frequency of KC emission tends to increase with K(sub p) index, the effect is more pronounced around solar maximum, but is also detected near solar minimum. There is strong evidence that the source region of KC is from the equatorial plasmapause during periods when a portion of the plasmapause moves significantly inwards from its nominal position. Case studies have shown that KC emissions are nearly always associated with plasmaspheric notches, shoulders, and tails. There is a recent focus on trying to understand the banded frequency structure of this emission and its relationship to plasmaspheric density ducts and irregularities in the source region.

  14. Some Continuum Aspects of Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, Stephen E.; Menard, Richard

    1999-01-01

    A long-sought goal in data assimilation is to build more fully the time dimension into the data assimilation process. Truly four-dimensional data assimilation requires evolving second-moment information, namely the estimation error covariance, along with the state estimate itself. The continuum evolution equations for the estimation error covariance constitute a system of partial differential equations in six space dimensions, forced by a model error covariance and by the observations themselves. The high dimensionality of this system poses a difficult computational problem. Numerous methods have been proposed for approximate, discrete solution of this system of equations. Four-dimensional variational schemes solve these equations indirectly, while schemes based on Kalman filtering solve the equations more directly, usually on a small subspace of the full six-dimensional space. In both cases, most proposed solution methods are not derived from the continuum covariance evolution equations themselves. Instead, most methods simply inherit the discretization used for evolving the state estimate, either in the form of a discrete tangent linear model or, in the case of ensemble schemes, in the form of a fully nonlinear discrete model. In this lecture we show that solutions of the continuum covariance evolution equations possess simple properties that are not readily satisfied upon discretization of the equations. we give numerical examples illustrating that "inherited" discretizations sometimes fail to produce meaningfully accurate solutions. Finally, we suggest alternative discretization methods that may yield more faithful approximate solutions of the continuum problem.

  15. Conway's Game of Life is a near-critical metastable state in the multiverse of cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Reia, Sandro M; Kinouchi, Osame

    2014-05-01

    Conway's cellular automaton Game of Life has been conjectured to be a critical (or quasicritical) dynamical system. This criticality is generally seen as a continuous order-disorder transition in cellular automata (CA) rule space. Life's mean-field return map predicts an absorbing vacuum phase (ρ = 0) and an active phase density, with ρ = 0.37, which contrasts with Life's absorbing states in a square lattice, which have a stationary density of ρ(2D) ≈ 0.03. Here, we study and classify mean-field maps for 6144 outer-totalistic CA and compare them with the corresponding behavior found in the square lattice. We show that the single-site mean-field approach gives qualitative (and even quantitative) predictions for most of them. The transition region in rule space seems to correspond to a nonequilibrium discontinuous absorbing phase transition instead of a continuous order-disorder one. We claim that Life is a quasicritical nucleation process where vacuum phase domains invade the alive phase. Therefore, Life is not at the "border of chaos," but thrives on the "border of extinction."

  16. Conway's game of life is a near-critical metastable state in the multiverse of cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reia, Sandro M.; Kinouchi, Osame

    2014-05-01

    Conway's cellular automaton Game of Life has been conjectured to be a critical (or quasicritical) dynamical system. This criticality is generally seen as a continuous order-disorder transition in cellular automata (CA) rule space. Life's mean-field return map predicts an absorbing vacuum phase (ρ =0) and an active phase density, with ρ =0.37, which contrasts with Life's absorbing states in a square lattice, which have a stationary density of ρ2D≈0.03. Here, we study and classify mean-field maps for 6144 outer-totalistic CA and compare them with the corresponding behavior found in the square lattice. We show that the single-site mean-field approach gives qualitative (and even quantitative) predictions for most of them. The transition region in rule space seems to correspond to a nonequilibrium discontinuous absorbing phase transition instead of a continuous order-disorder one. We claim that Life is a quasicritical nucleation process where vacuum phase domains invade the alive phase. Therefore, Life is not at the "border of chaos," but thrives on the "border of extinction."

  17. The cellular energization state affects peripheral stalk stability of plant vacuolar H+-ATPase and impairs vacuolar acidification.

    PubMed

    Schnitzer, Daniel; Seidel, Thorsten; Sander, Tim; Golldack, Dortje; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2011-05-01

    The plant vacuolar H(+)-ATPase takes part in acidifying compartments of the endomembrane system including the secretory pathway and the vacuoles. The structural variability of the V-ATPase complex as well as its presence in different compartments and tissues involves multiple isoforms of V-ATPase subunits. Furthermore, a versatile regulation is essential to allow for organelle- and tissue-specific fine tuning. In this study, results from V-ATPase complex disassembly with a chaotropic reagent, immunodetection and in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analyses point to a regulatory mechanism in plants, which depends on energization and involves the stability of the peripheral stalks as well. Lowering of cellular ATP by feeding 2-deoxyglucose resulted in structural alterations within the V-ATPase, as monitored by changes in FRET efficiency between subunits VHA-E and VHA-C. Potassium iodide-mediated disassembly revealed a reduced stability of V-ATPase after 2-deoxyglucose treatment of the cells, but neither the complete V(1)-sector nor VHA-C was released from the membrane in response to 2-deoxyglucose treatment, precluding a reversible dissociation mechanism like in yeast. These data suggest the existence of a regulatory mechanism of plant V-ATPase by modification of the peripheral stator structure that is linked to the cellular energization state. This mechanism is distinct from reversible dissociation as reported for the yeast V-ATPase, but might represent an evolutionary precursor of reversible dissociation.

  18. Modeling Molecular Systems at Extreme Pressure by an Extension of the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) Based on the Symmetry-Adapted Cluster-Configuration Interaction (SAC-CI) Method: Confined Electronic Excited States of Furan as a Test Case.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ryoichi; Ehara, Masahiro; Cammi, Roberto

    2015-05-12

    Novel molecular photochemistry can be developed by combining high pressure and laser irradiation. For studying such high-pressure effects on the confined electronic ground and excited states, we extend the PCM (polarizable continuum model) SAC (symmetry-adapted cluster) and SAC-CI (SAC-configuration interaction) methods to the PCM-XP (extreme pressure) framework. By using the PCM-XP SAC/SAC-CI method, molecular systems in various electronic states can be confined by polarizable media in a smooth and flexible way. The PCM-XP SAC/SAC-CI method is applied to a furan (C4H4O) molecule in cyclohexane at high pressure (1-60 GPa). The relationship between the calculated free-energy and cavity volume can be approximately represented with the Murnaghan equation of state. The excitation energies of furan in cyclohexane show blueshifts with increasing pressure, and the extents of the blueshifts significantly depend on the character of the excitations. Particularly large confinement effects are found in the Rydberg states. The energy ordering of the lowest Rydberg and valence states alters under high-pressure. The pressure effects on the electronic structure may be classified into two contributions: a confinement of the molecular orbital and a suppression of the mixing between the valence and Rydberg configurations. The valence or Rydberg character in an excited state is, therefore, enhanced under high pressure.

  19. In vitro evaluation of opsonic and cellular granulocyte function by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence: utility in patients with severe neutropenia and cellular deficiency states.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, P; Winston, D J; Van Dyke, K

    1978-01-01

    Actively phagocytizing polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) emit light or chemiluminescence (CL) which has been shown to be linked to the oxidative activity of the PMN. The measurement of CL has been demonstrated to be a useful tool for the in vitro assessment of intracellular and opsonophagocytic function of PMN. We have increased the sensitivity of the CL measurement by the addition of luminol to the in vitro reaction of PMN, bacteria, and serum. The presence of luminol, which can be oxidized to emit light, amplifies the detection of CL and PMN cellular activity. This amplification effectively reduces the number of PMN that are necessary for assessment of PMN function from 1 x 10(7) to as low as 2 x 10(4) PMN/assay and permits the evaluation of PMN function in severely neutropenic patients (100 PMN/mm3) in whom cellular PMN function has been heretofore extremely difficult to assess by other methodology. When this luminol-dependent CL method was used, three of eight neutropenic leukemic patients with gram-negative septicemia were found to have deficient opsonic activity and/or increased or depressed cellular oxidative activity. Because the initial slope of CL is dependent on the amount of serum and heat-labile factors, this method can also be used effectively as a simple technique for the analysis of specific rates of opsonophagocytosis of various microorganisms. Additionally, this method can detect the cellular PMN abnormalities of chronic granulomatous disease and myeloperoxidase deficiency. The luminol-dependent CL method is a simple, sensitive, reproducible technique that provides useful information about PMN metabolic activity, particularly in studies in which the number of PMN is limited. PMID:215546

  20. Cellular automata coupled with steady-state nutrient solution permit simulation of large-scale growth of tumours.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sachin Man Bajimaya; Joldes, Grand Roman; Wittek, Adam; Miller, Karol

    2013-04-01

    We model complete growth of an avascular tumour by employing cellular automata for the growth of cells and steady-state equation to solve for nutrient concentrations. Our modelling and computer simulation results show that, in the case of a brain tumour, oxygen distribution in the tumour volume may be sufficiently described by a time-independent steady-state equation without losing the characteristics of a time-dependent diffusion equation. This makes the solution of oxygen concentration in the tumour volume computationally more efficient, thus enabling simulation of tumour growth on a large scale. We solve this steady-state equation using a central difference method. We take into account the composition of cells and intercellular adhesion in addition to processes involved in cell cycle--proliferation, quiescence, apoptosis, and necrosis--in the tumour model. More importantly, we consider cell mutation that gives rise to different phenotypes and therefore a tumour with heterogeneous population of cells. A new phenotype is probabilistically chosen and has the ability to survive at lower levels of nutrient concentration and reproduce faster. We show that heterogeneity of cells that compose a tumour leads to its irregular growth and that avascular growth is not supported for tumours of diameter above 18 mm. We compare results from our growth simulation with existing experimental data on Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and tumour spheroid cultures and show that our results are in good agreement with the experimental findings.

  1. Overexpression of plastid terminal oxidase in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 alters cellular redox state.

    PubMed

    Feilke, Kathleen; Ajlani, Ghada; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2017-09-26

    Cyanobacteria are the most ancient organisms performing oxygenic photosynthesis, and they are the ancestors of plant plastids. All plastids contain the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX), while only certain cyanobacteria contain PTOX. Many putative functions have been discussed for PTOX in higher plants including a photoprotective role during abiotic stresses like high light, salinity and extreme temperatures. Since PTOX oxidizes PQH2 and reduces oxygen to water, it is thought to protect against photo-oxidative damage by removing excess electrons from the plastoquinone (PQ) pool. To investigate the role of PTOX we overexpressed rice PTOX fused to the maltose-binding protein (MBP-OsPTOX) in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a model cyanobacterium that does not encode PTOX. The fusion was highly expressed and OsPTOX was active, as shown by chlorophyll fluorescence and P700 absorption measurements. The presence of PTOX led to a highly oxidized state of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) pool, as detected by NAD(P)H fluorescence. Moreover, in the PTOX overexpressor the electron transport capacity of PSI relative to PSII was higher, indicating an alteration of the photosystem I (PSI) to photosystem II (PSII) stoichiometry. We suggest that PTOX controls the expression of responsive genes of the photosynthetic apparatus in a different way from the PQ/PQH2 ratio.This article is part of the themed issue 'Enhancing photosynthesis in crop plants: targets for improvement'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Internal photopumping of Nd3+ (2H9/2, 4F5/2) states in yttrium aluminum garnet by excitation transfer from oxygen deficiency centers and Fe3+ continuum emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, J. D.; Spinka, T. M.; Senin, A. A.; Eden, J. G.

    2011-07-01

    Photoexcitation of Nd3+ (2H9/2, 4F5/2) states by the broad (˜70 nm FWHM), near-infrared continuum provided by Fe3+ has been observed at 300 K in bulk yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) crystals doped with trace concentrations (<50 ppm) of Fe, Cr, and Eu. Irradiation of YAG at 248 nm with a KrF laser, which excites the oxygen deficiency center (ODC) in YAG having peak absorption at ˜240 nm, culminates in ODC→Fe3+ excitation transfer and subsequent Fe3+ emission. This internal optical pumping mechanism for rare earth ions is unencumbered by the requirement for donor-acceptor proximity that constrains conventional Förster-Dexter excitation transfer in co-doped crystals.

  3. The Cellular State Determines the Effect of Melatonin on the Survival of Mixed Cerebellar Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Daiane Gil; Markus, Regina P.

    2014-01-01

    The constitutive activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), a key transcription factor involved in neuroinflammation, is essential for the survival of neurons in situ and of cerebellar granule cells in culture. Melatonin is known to inhibit the activation of NF-κB and has a cytoprotective function. In this study, we evaluated whether the cytoprotective effect of melatonin depends on the state of activation of a mixed cerebellar culture that is composed predominantly of granule cells; we tested the effect of melatonin on cultured rat cerebellar cells stimulated or not with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The addition of melatonin (0.1 nM–1 µM) reduced the survival of naïve cells while inhibiting LPS-induced cell death. Melatonin (100 nM) transiently (15 min) inhibited the nuclear translocation of both NF-κB dimers (p50/p50, p50/RelA) and, after 60 min, increased the activation of p50/RelA. Melatonin-induced p50/RelA activity in naïve cells resulted in the transcription of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the production of NO. Otherwise, in cultures treated with LPS, melatonin blocked the LPS-induced activation of p50/RelA and the reduction in p50/p50 levels and inhibited iNOS expression and NO synthesis. Therefore, melatonin in vehicle-treated cells induces cell death, while it protects against LPS-induced cytotoxicity. In summary, we confirmed that melatonin is a neuroprotective drug when cerebellar cells are challenged; however, melatonin can also lead to cell death when the normal balance of the NF-κB pathway is disturbed. Our data provide a mechanistic basis for understanding the influence of cell context on the final output response of melatonin. PMID:25184316

  4. Gating mechanism of mechanosensitive channel of large conductance: a coupled continuum mechanical-continuum solvation approach.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liangliang; Wu, Jiazhong; Liu, Ling; Liu, Yilun; Yan, Yuan; Cui, Qiang; Chen, Xi

    2016-12-01

    Gating transition of the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) represents a good example of important biological processes that are difficult to describe using atomistic simulations due to the large (submicron) length scale and long (millisecond) time scale. Here we develop a novel computational framework that tightly couples continuum mechanics with continuum solvation models to study the detailed gating behavior of E. coli-MscL. The components of protein molecules are modeled by continuum elements that properly describe their shape, material properties and physicochemical features (e.g., charge distribution). The lipid membrane is modeled as a three-layer material in which the lipid head group and tail regions are treated separately, taking into account the fact that fluidic lipid bilayers do not bear shear stress. Coupling between mechanical and chemical responses of the channel is realized by an iterative integration of continuum mechanics (CM) modeling and continuum solvation (CS) computation. Compared to previous continuum mechanics studies, the present model is capable of capturing the most essential features of the gating process in a much more realistic fashion: due mainly to the apolar solvation contribution, the membrane tension for full opening of MscL is reduced substantially to the experimental measured range. Moreover, the pore size stabilizes constantly during gating because of the intricate interactions of the multiple components of the system, implying the mechanism for sub-conducting states of MscL gating. A significant fraction ([Formula: see text]2/3) of the gating membrane strain is required to reach the first sub-conducting state of our model, which is featured with a relative conductance of 0.115 to the fully opened state. These trends agree well with experimental observations. We anticipate that the coupled CM/CS modeling framework is uniquely suited for the analysis of many biomolecules and their assemblies under external

  5. Continuum Modeling of Facet Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    Standard continuum models of surface dynamics are very useful for studying thin film evolution on the micron length scale. Unfortunately, they are inadequate below the roughening transition, since they do not appropriately describe faceting. Our goal is to propose a continuum approach which deals with facet dynamics in a physically accurate way. We studied in detail the dynamics of faceting in simple submicron surface structures [1], and proposed two approaches for the development of continuum models. First, we rigorously derived continuum kinetic models of the systems of interest, starting from step flow models. These models break down at singular points, which we identify as facet edges. The models are not applicable on facets, and the surface profile is obtained as a solution of the continuum model with boundary conditions at the singular points. Secondly, we showed [2] that if the existence of both steps and anti-steps in regions of small surface slope is taken into account, it is possible to construct continuum models that are valid even on facets. The solutions of both types of continuum models are in excellent agreement with step flow models. The resulting surface profiles are of relevance to experiments on decay of one dimensional periodic gratings. Our work points to a possible general continuum model for an accurate description of kinetics of crystalline surfaces below the roughening transition. [1] N. Israeli and D. Kandel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 3300 (1998); N. Israeli and D. Kandel, Phys. Rev. B 60, 5946 (1999). [2] N. Israeli and D. Kandel, preprint.

  6. Rotational bands in the continuum illustrated by 8Be results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, E.; Jensen, A. S.; Fedorov, D. V.

    2013-08-01

    We use the α-α cluster model to describe the properties of 8Be. The rotational energy sequence of the (0+,2+,4+) resonances are reproduced with the complex energy scaling technique for Ali-Bodmer and Buck potentials. However, both static and transition probabilities are far from the rotational values. We trace this observation to the prominent continuum properties of the 2+ and 4+ resonances. They resemble free continuum solutions although still exhibit strong collective rotational character. We compare with cluster models and discuss concepts of rotations in the continuum in connection with such central quantities as transition probabilities, inelastic cross sections, and resonance widths. We compute the 6+ and 8+ S-matrix poles and discuss properties of this possible continuation of the band beyond the known 4+ state. Regularization of diverging quantities is discussed to extract observable continuum properties. We formulate the division of electromagnetic transition probabilities into interfering contributions from resonance-resonance, continuum-resonance, resonance-continuum, and continuum-continuum transitions.

  7. Continuum limbed robots for locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutlu, Alper

    This thesis focuses on continuum robots based on pneumatic muscle technology. We introduce a novel approach to use these muscles as limbs of lightweight legged robots. The flexibility of the continuum legs of these robots offers the potential to perform some duties that are not possible with classical rigid-link robots. Potential applications are as space robots in low gravity, and as cave explorer robots. The thesis covers the fabrication process of continuum pneumatic muscles and limbs. It also provides some new experimental data on this technology. Afterwards, the designs of two different novel continuum robots - one tripod, one quadruped - are introduced. Experimental data from tests using the robots is provided. The experimental results are the first published example of locomotion with tripod and quadruped continuum legged robots. Finally, discussion of the results and how far this technology can go forward is presented.

  8. Relativistic Continuum Shell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grineviciute, Janina; Halderson, Dean

    2011-04-01

    The R-matrix formalism of Lane and Thomas has been extended to the relativistic case so that the many-coupled channels problem may be solved for systems in which binary breakup channels satisfy a relative Dirac equation. The formalism was previously applied to the relativistic impulse approximation RIA and now we applied it to Quantum Hadrodynamics QHD in the continuum Tamm-Dancoff approximation TDA with the classical meson fields replaced by one-meson exchange potentials. None of the published QHD parameters provide a decent fit to the 15 N + p elastic cross section. The deficiency is also evident in inability of the QHD parameters with the one meson exchange potentials to reproduce the QHD single particle energies. Results with alternate parameters sets are presented. A. M. Lane and R. G. Thomas, R-Matrix Theory of Nuclear Reactions, Reviews of Modern Physics, 30 (1958) 257

  9. Electron-ion continuum-continuum mixing in dissociative recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1993-01-01

    In recent calculations on the dissociative recombination (DR) of the v=1 vibrational level of the ground state of N2(+), N2(+)(v=1) + e(-) yields N + N, we have observed an important continuun-continuum mixing process involving the open channels on both sides of N2(+)(v=1) + e(-) yields N2(+)(v=0) + e(-). In vibrational relaxation by electron impact (immediately above) the magnitude of the cross section depends upon the strength of the interaction between these continua. In DR of the v=1 ion level, these continua can also interact in the entrance channel, and the mixing can have a profound effect upon the DR cross section from v=1, as we illustrate in this paper. In our theoretical calculations of N2(+) DR using multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT), the reactants and products in the two above equations are described simultaneously. This allows us to calculate vibrational relaxation and excitation cross sections as well as DR cross sections. In order to understand the mixing described above, we first present a brief review of the prior results for DR of the v=0 level of N2(+).

  10. Defining the Molecular-Cellular-Field Continuum of Mercury Detoxification

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Susan M.

    2014-09-04

    Hg is of special interest to DOE due to past use at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Its facile redox [Hg2+/0] chemistry, bonding to carbon [e.g. MeHg+] and unique physical properties [e.g., Hg0 volatility] underlie a complex global Hg cycle involving biotic and abiotic chemical and physical transport and transformations in soils, sediments, waterways and the atmosphere. Facultative and anaerobic bacteria make MeHg+, which is neurotoxic to wildlife and humans. Sustainable stewardship requires eliminating both MeHg+ and even more toxic Hg2+, which is also the substrate for methylation. The proteins encoded by the mer locus in aerobic and facultative mercury resistant (HgR) bacteria convert soil or waterborne Hg2+ or MeHg+ to less toxic, gaseous Hg0. HgR microbes live in highly Hg-contaminated sites and depress MeHg+ formation >500-fold in such zones. So, enhancing the capacity of natural HgR microbes to remove Hg2+/MeHg+ from wetlands and waterways is a logical component of contaminated site stewardship. To apply enhancement in the field requires knowing how the HgR pathway works including the metabolic demands it makes on the cell, i.e., the entire cell is the relevant catalytic unit. HgR loci occur in metabolically diverse bacteria and unique mer-host co-evolution has been found. In this project we extended our previous studies of mer enzymes in γ-proteobacteria, which are abundant in high Hg areas of the ORR to include studies of mer enzymes from HgR α-proteobacteria and HgR actinobacteria, which also increase in the high Hg regions of the ORR. Specifically, we (1) examined interactions between structural compoenents of MerA and MerB enzymes from γ-proteobacteria, (2) investigated effects of mutations on kinetic efficiency of Hg2+ reduction by γ-proteobacterial MerA, (3) cloned and performed initital characterization of MerA and MerB enzymes from Streptomyces lividans, an actinobacterium, (4) cloned and performed initial characterization of a fused MerB-MerA protein from Ochrobactrum anthropi, an α-proteobacterium, (5) investigate the extent of Hg isotope fractionation that occurs with purified γ-proteobacterial MerA.

  11. Defining the Molecular-Cellular-Field Continuum of Mercury Detoxification

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Anne O.

    2016-04-25

    Hg is of special interest to DOE due to past intensive use in manufacture of nuclear weapons at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Because of its facile oxidation/reduction [Hg(II)/Hg(0)] chemistry, ability to bond to carbon [as in highly toxic methylmercury: MeHg(I)] and its unique physical properties [e.g., volatility of Hg(0)], Hg has a complex environmental cycle involving soils, sediments, waterways and the atmosphere and including biotic and abiotic chemical and physical transport and transformations.1 Understanding such processes well enough to design stewardship plans that minimize negative impacts in diverse ecological settings requires rich knowledge of the contributing abiotic and biotic processes. Prokaryotes are major players in the global Hg cycle. Facultative and anaerobic bacteria can form MeHg(I) with consequent intoxication of wildlife and humans. Sustainable stewardship of Hg-contaminated sites requires eliminating not only MeHg(I) but also the Hg(II) substrate for methylation. Fortunately, a variety of mercury resistant (HgR) aerobic and facultative bacteria and archaea can do both things. Prokaryotes harboring narrow or broad Hg resistance (mer) loci detoxify Hg(II) or RHg(I), respectively, to relatively inert, less toxic, volatile Hg(0). HgR microbes are enriched in highly contaminated sites and extensive field data show they depress levels of MeHg >500-fold in such zones2. So, enhancing the natural capacity of indigenous HgR microbes to remove Hg(II) and RHg(I) from soils, sediments and waterways is a logical component of a comprehensive plan for clean up and stewardship of contaminated sites.

  12. Sparsity as cellular objective to infer directed metabolic networks from steady-state metabolome data: a theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Öksüz, Melik; Sadıkoğlu, Hasan; Çakır, Tunahan

    2013-01-01

    Since metabolome data are derived from the underlying metabolic network, reverse engineering of such data to recover the network topology is of wide interest. Lyapunov equation puts a constraint to the link between data and network by coupling the covariance of data with the strength of interactions (Jacobian matrix). This equation, when expressed as a linear set of equations at steady state, constitutes a basis to infer the network structure given the covariance matrix of data. The sparse structure of metabolic networks points to reactions which are active based on minimal enzyme production, hinting at sparsity as a cellular objective. Therefore, for a given covariance matrix, we solved Lyapunov equation to calculate Jacobian matrix by a simultaneous use of minimization of Euclidean norm of residuals and maximization of sparsity (the number of zeros in Jacobian matrix) as objective functions to infer directed small-scale networks from three kingdoms of life (bacteria, fungi, mammalian). The inference performance of the approach was found to be promising, with zero False Positive Rate, and almost one True positive Rate. The effect of missing data on results was additionally analyzed, revealing superiority over similarity-based approaches which infer undirected networks. Our findings suggest that the covariance of metabolome data implies an underlying network with sparsest pattern. The theoretical analysis forms a framework for further investigation of sparsity-based inference of metabolic networks from real metabolome data.

  13. The Paranoid-Depressive Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Betty J.

    1977-01-01

    Few investigators have attempted to lay a conceptual base for comparative studies of paranoia and depression within a single general framework. The paranoid-depressive continuum is an attempt to develop such a framework. (Author)

  14. The Paranoid-Depressive Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Betty J.

    1977-01-01

    Few investigators have attempted to lay a conceptual base for comparative studies of paranoia and depression within a single general framework. The paranoid-depressive continuum is an attempt to develop such a framework. (Author)

  15. Effects of pent-4-enoate on cellular redox state, glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation in isolated perfused rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Hiltunen, J. Kalervo; Jauhonen, V. Pekka; Savolainen, Markku J.; Hassinen, Ilmo E.

    1978-01-01

    The metabolic effects of pent-4-enoate were studied in beating and potassium-arrested perfused rat hearts. The addition of 0.8mm-pent-4-enoate to the fluid used to perfuse a potassium-arrested heart resulted in a 70% increase in the O2 consumption and a 66% decrease in the glycolytic flux as measured in terms of the de-tritiation of [3-3H]glucose, although the proportion of the O2 consumption attributable to glucose oxidation decreased from an initial 30% to 10%. The pent-4-enoate-induced increase in O2 consumption was only 15% in the beating heart. In the potassium-arrested heart, pent-4-enoate stimulated palmitate oxidation by more than 100% when measured in terms of the production of 14CO2 from [1-14C]palmitate, but in the beating heart palmitate oxidation was inhibited. Perfusion of the heart with pent-4-enoate had no effect on the proportion of pyruvate dehydrogenase found in the active form, in spite of large changes in the CoASH and acetyl-CoA concentrations and changes in their concentration ratios. The effects of pent-4-enoate on the cellular redox state were dependent on the ATP consumption of the heart. In the beating heart, pent-4-enoate caused a rapid mitochondrial NAD+ reduction that subsequently faded out, so that the final state was more oxidized than the initial state. The arrested heart, however, remained in a more reduced state than initially, even after the partial re-oxidation that followed the initial rapid NAD+ reduction. The ability of pent-4-enoate to increase or decrease fatty acid oxidation can be explained on the basis of the differential effects of pent-4-enoate on the concentration of citric acid-cycle intermediates under conditions of high or low ATP consumption of the myocardial cell. The proportion of the fatty acids in the fuel consumed by the heart is probably primarily determined by the regulatory mechanisms of glycolysis. When pent-4-enoate causes an increase in the citric acid-cycle intermediates, feedback inhibition of

  16. Assessing the concordance between illicit drug laws on the books and drug law enforcement: Comparison of three states on the continuum from "decriminalised" to "punitive".

    PubMed

    Belackova, Vendula; Ritter, Alison; Shanahan, Marian; Hughes, Caitlin E

    2017-03-01

    Variations in drug laws, as well as variations in enforcement practice, exist across jurisdictions. This study explored the feasibility of categorising drug laws "on the books" in terms of their punitiveness, and the extent of their concordance with "laws in practice" in a cross-national comparison. "Law on the books", classified with respect to both cannabis and other drug offences in the Czech Republic, NSW (AU) and Florida (USA) were analysed in order to establish an ordinal relationship between the three states. Indicators to assess the "laws in practice" covered both police (arrests) and court (sentencing) activity between 2002 and 2013. Parametric and non-parametric tests of equality of means, tests of stationarity and correlation analysis were used to examine the concordance between the ordinal categorisation of "laws on the books" and "laws in practice", as well as trends over time. The Czech Republic had the most lenient drug laws; Florida had the most punitive and NSW was in-between. Examining the indicators of "laws in practice", we found that the population adjusted number of individuals sentenced to prison ranked across the three states was concordant with categorisation of "laws on the books", but the average sentence length and percentage of court cases sentenced to prison were not. Also, the de jure decriminalisation of drug possession in the Czech Republic yielded a far greater share of administrative offenses than the de facto decriminalisation of cannabis use / possession in NSW. Finally, the mean value of most "laws in practice" indicators changed significantly over time although the "laws on the books" didn't change. While some indicators of "laws in practice" were concordant with the ordinal categorisation of drug laws, several indicators of "laws in practice" appeared to operate independently from the drug laws as stated. This has significant implications for drug policy analysis and means that research should not assume they are

  17. Quantitative X-ray - UV Line and Continuum Spectroscopy with Application to AGN: State-Specific Hydrogenic Recombination Cooling Coefficients for a Wide Range of Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMothe, J.; Ferland, Gary J.

    2002-01-01

    Recombination cooling, in which a free electron emits light while being captured to an ion, is an important cooling process in photoionized clouds that are optically thick or have low metallicity. State specific rather than total recombination cooling rates are needed since the hydrogen atom tends to become optically thick in high-density regimes such as Active Galactic Nuclei. This paper builds upon previous work to derive the cooling rate over the full temperature range where the process can be a significant contributor in a photoionized plasma. We exploit the fact that the recombination and cooling rates are given by intrinsically similar formulae to express the cooling rate in terms of the closely related radiative recombination rate. We give an especially simple but accurate approximation that works for any high hydrogenic level and can be conveniently employed in large-scale numerical simulations.

  18. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked to experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.

  19. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    DOE PAGES

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked tomore » experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.« less

  20. A Novel Agonist of the TRIF Pathway Induces a Cellular State Refractory to Replication of Zika, Chikungunya, and Dengue Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Pryke, Kara M.; Abraham, Jinu; Sali, Tina M.; Gall, Bryan J.; Archer, Iris; Liu, Andrew; Bambina, Shelly; Baird, Jason; Gough, Michael; Chakhtoura, Marita; Haddad, Elias K.; Kirby, Ilsa T.; Nilsen, Aaron; Streblow, Daniel N.; Hirsch, Alec J.; Smith, Jessica L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ongoing concurrent outbreaks of Zika, Chikungunya, and dengue viruses in Latin America and the Caribbean highlight the need for development of broad-spectrum antiviral treatments. The type I interferon (IFN) system has evolved in vertebrates to generate tissue responses that actively block replication of multiple known and potentially zoonotic viruses. As such, its control and activation through pharmacological agents may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for simultaneously impairing growth of multiple virus types and rendering host populations resistant to virus spread. In light of this strategy’s potential, we undertook a screen to identify novel interferon-activating small molecules. Here, we describe 1-(2-fluorophenyl)-2-(5-isopropyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)-1,2-dihydrochromeno[2,3-c]pyrrole-3,9-dione, which we termed AV-C. Treatment of human cells with AV-C activates innate and interferon-associated responses that strongly inhibit replication of Zika, Chikungunya, and dengue viruses. By utilizing genome editing, we investigated the host proteins essential to AV-C-induced cellular states. This showed that the compound requires a TRIF-dependent signaling cascade that culminates in IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3)-dependent expression and secretion of type I interferon to elicit antiviral responses. The other canonical IRF3-terminal adaptor proteins STING and IPS-1/MAVS were dispensable for AV-C-induced phenotypes. However, our work revealed an important inhibitory role for IPS-1/MAVS, but not TRIF, in flavivirus replication, implying that TRIF-directed viral evasion may not occur. Additionally, we show that in response to AV-C, primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells secrete proinflammatory cytokines that are linked with establishment of adaptive immunity to viral pathogens. Ultimately, synthetic innate immune activators such as AV-C may serve multiple therapeutic purposes, including direct antimicrobial responses and facilitation of

  1. Four-body continuum-discretized coupled-channels calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Gallardo, M.; Arias, J. M.; Moro, A. M.; Gomez-Camacho, J.; Thompson, I. J.; Tostevin, J. A.

    2009-11-15

    The development of a continuum-bin scheme of discretization for three-body projectiles is necessary for studies of reactions of Borromean nuclei such as {sup 6}He within the continuum-discretized coupled-channels approach. Such a procedure, for constructing bin states on selected continuum energy intervals, is formulated and applied for the first time to reactions of a three-body projectile. The continuum representation uses the eigenchannel expansion of the three-body S matrix. The method is applied to the challenging case of the {sup 6}He+{sup 208}Pb reaction at 22 MeV, where an accurate treatment of both the Coulomb and the nuclear interactions with the target is necessary.

  2. Variation in Networks and Forms of Support for Care-Seeking Across the HIV Care Continuum in the Rural Southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Hill, Miranda; Huff, Amber; Chumbler, Neale

    2017-03-14

    In spite of progress in understanding the importance of social support for health outcomes in Persons Living with HIV (PLWH), more remains to be known about mechanisms of support most beneficial at each stage of HIV treatment. In this study, we use a qualitative analytic approach to investigate the forms and sources of social support deemed most integral to the diagnosis, care engagement, and medication adherence behaviors of a diverse sample of PLWH in a mostly rural health district in the Southeastern United States. In-depth interviews (N = 18) were collected during the qualitative phase of a larger mixed methods needs assessment for the Northeast Georgia Health District. A deductive-inductive analysis of participant narratives revealed variation in the perceived importance of particular forms and sources of social support during the initial versus advanced stages of HIV care. PLWH identified the emotional, informational, and appraisal support provided by family as especially critical for emotional stability, coping, and care linkage during the initial stages of diagnosis and treatment. However, once in care, PLWH emphasized informational and instrumental forms of support from care providers and appraisal support from peers as key influences in care engagement and retention behaviors. Increased understanding of the social support mechanisms that contribute to the HIV treatment behaviors of PLWH can fill knowledge gaps in research and inform the efforts of health care providers seeking to leverage various aspects of the social support toward improving the care retention, health, and wellness outcomes of PLWH. © 2017 National Rural Health Association.

  3. Continuum modeling of deformation and aggregation of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Daegeun; You, Donghyun

    2016-07-26

    In order to gain better understanding for rheology of an isolated red blood cell (RBC) and a group of multiple RBCs, new continuum models for describing mechanical properties of cellular structures of an RBC and inter-cellular interactions among multiple RBCs are developed. The viscous property of an RBC membrane, which characterizes dynamic behaviors of an RBC under stress loading and unloading processes, is determined using a generalized Maxwell model. The present model is capable of predicting stress relaxation and stress-strain hysteresis, of which prediction is not possible using the commonly used Kelvin-Voigt model. Nonlinear elasticity of an RBC is determined using the Yeoh hyperelastic material model in a framework of continuum mechanics using finite-element approximation. A novel method to model inter-cellular interactions among multiple adjacent RBCs is also developed. Unlike the previous modeling approaches for aggregation of RBCs, where interaction energy for aggregation is curve-fitted using a Morse-type potential function, the interaction energy is analytically determined. The present aggregation model, therefore, allows us to predict various effects of physical parameters such as the osmotic pressure, the thickness of a glycocalyx layer, the penetration depth, and the permittivity, on the depletion and electrostatic energy among RBCs. Simulations for elongation and recovery deformation of an RBC and for aggregation of multiple RBCs are conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the present continuum modeling methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Submillimeter Continuum Observations of Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this proposal was to study the submillimeter continuum emission from comets. The study was based mainly on the exploitation of the world's leading submillimeter telescope, the JCMT (James Clerk Maxwell Telescope) on Mauna Kea. Submillimeter wavelengths provide a unique view of cometary physics for one main reason. The cometary size distribution is such that the scattering cross-section is dominated by small dust grains, while the mass is dominated by the largest particles. Submillimeter continuum radiation samples cometary particles much larger than those sampled by more common observations at shorter (optical and infrared) wavelengths and therefore provides a nearly direct measure of the cometary dust mass.

  5. Lagrangian continuum dynamics in ALEGRA.

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Michael K. W.; Love, Edward

    2007-12-01

    Alegra is an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) multi-material finite element code that emphasizes large deformations and strong shock physics. The Lagrangian continuum dynamics package in Alegra uses a Galerkin finite element spatial discretization and an explicit central-difference stepping method in time. The goal of this report is to describe in detail the characteristics of this algorithm, including the conservation and stability properties. The details provided should help both researchers and analysts understand the underlying theory and numerical implementation of the Alegra continuum hydrodynamics algorithm.

  6. Direct non-productive HIV-1 infection in a T-cell line is driven by cellular activation state and NFκB

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular latency allows HIV-1 to persist in resting memory CD4+ T-cells as transcriptionally silent provirus integrated into host chromosomal DNA. Multiple transcriptional regulatory mechanisms for HIV-1 latency have been described in the context of progressive epigenetic silencing and maintenance. However, our understanding of the determinants critical for the establishment of latency in newly infected cells is limited. Results In this study, we used a recently described, doubly fluorescent HIV-1 latency model to dissect the role of proviral integration sites and cellular activation state on direct non-productive infections at the single cell level. Proviral integration site mapping of infected Jurkat T-cells revealed that productively and non-productively infected cells are indistinguishable in terms of genomic landmarks, surrounding epigenetic landscapes, and proviral orientation relative to host genes. However, direct non-productive infections were inversely correlated with both cellular activation state and NFκB activity. Furthermore, modulating NFκB with either small molecules or by conditional overexpression of NFκB subunits was sufficient to alter the propensity of HIV-1 to directly enter a non-productive latent state in newly infected cells. Importantly, this modulatory effect was limited to a short time window post-infection. Conclusions Taken together, our data suggest that cellular activation state and NFκB activity during the time of infection, but not the site of proviral integration, are important regulators of direct HIV-1 non-productive infections. PMID:24502247

  7. Direct non-productive HIV-1 infection in a T-cell line is driven by cellular activation state and NFκB.

    PubMed

    Dahabieh, Matthew S; Ooms, Marcel; Brumme, Chanson; Taylor, Jeremy; Harrigan, P Richard; Simon, Viviana; Sadowski, Ivan

    2014-02-07

    Molecular latency allows HIV-1 to persist in resting memory CD4+ T-cells as transcriptionally silent provirus integrated into host chromosomal DNA. Multiple transcriptional regulatory mechanisms for HIV-1 latency have been described in the context of progressive epigenetic silencing and maintenance. However, our understanding of the determinants critical for the establishment of latency in newly infected cells is limited. In this study, we used a recently described, doubly fluorescent HIV-1 latency model to dissect the role of proviral integration sites and cellular activation state on direct non-productive infections at the single cell level. Proviral integration site mapping of infected Jurkat T-cells revealed that productively and non-productively infected cells are indistinguishable in terms of genomic landmarks, surrounding epigenetic landscapes, and proviral orientation relative to host genes. However, direct non-productive infections were inversely correlated with both cellular activation state and NFκB activity. Furthermore, modulating NFκB with either small molecules or by conditional overexpression of NFκB subunits was sufficient to alter the propensity of HIV-1 to directly enter a non-productive latent state in newly infected cells. Importantly, this modulatory effect was limited to a short time window post-infection. Taken together, our data suggest that cellular activation state and NFκB activity during the time of infection, but not the site of proviral integration, are important regulators of direct HIV-1 non-productive infections.

  8. Quasiparticle-continuum level repulsion in a quantum magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Plumb, K. W.; Hwang, Kyusung; Qiu, Y.; Harriger, Leland W.; Granroth, G.  E.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Shu, G. J.; Chou, F. C.; Rüegg, Ch.; Kim, Yong Baek; Kim, Young-June

    2015-11-30

    When the energy eigenvalues of two coupled quantum states approach each other in a certain parameter space, their energy levels repel each other and level crossing is avoided. Such level repulsion, or avoided level crossing, is commonly used to describe the dispersion relation of quasiparticles in solids. But, little is known about the level repulsion when more than two quasiparticles are present; for example, in a strongly interacting quantum system where a quasiparticle can spontaneously decay into a many-particle continuum. Here we show that even in this case level repulsion exists between a long-lived quasiparticle state and a continuum. Here, we observe a renormalization of the quasiparticle dispersion relation due to the presence of the continuum of multi-quasiparticle states, in our fine-resolution neutron spectroscopy study of magnetic quasiparticles in the frustrated quantum magnet BiCu2PO6.

  9. Resonance and continuum Gamow shell model with realistic nuclear forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z. H.; Wu, Q.; Zhao, Z. H.; Hu, B. S.; Dai, S. J.; Xu, F. R.

    2017-06-01

    Starting from realistic nuclear forces, we have developed a core Gamow shell model which can describe resonance and continuum properties of loosely-bound or unbound nuclear systems. To describe properly resonance and continuum, the Berggren representation has been employed, which treats bound, resonant and continuum states on equal footing in a complex-momentum (complex-k) plane. To derive the model-space effective interaction based on realistic forces, the full Q ˆ -box folded-diagram renormalization has been, for the first time, extended to the nondegenerate complex-k space. The CD-Bonn potential is softened by using the Vlow-k method. Choosing 16O as the inert core, we have calculated sd-shell neutron-rich oxygen isotopes, giving good descriptions of both bound and resonant states. The isotopes 25,26O are calculated to be resonant even in their ground states.

  10. Quasiparticle-continuum level repulsion in a quantum magnet

    DOE PAGES

    Plumb, K. W.; Hwang, Kyusung; Qiu, Y.; ...

    2015-11-30

    When the energy eigenvalues of two coupled quantum states approach each other in a certain parameter space, their energy levels repel each other and level crossing is avoided. Such level repulsion, or avoided level crossing, is commonly used to describe the dispersion relation of quasiparticles in solids. But, little is known about the level repulsion when more than two quasiparticles are present; for example, in a strongly interacting quantum system where a quasiparticle can spontaneously decay into a many-particle continuum. Here we show that even in this case level repulsion exists between a long-lived quasiparticle state and a continuum. Here,more » we observe a renormalization of the quasiparticle dispersion relation due to the presence of the continuum of multi-quasiparticle states, in our fine-resolution neutron spectroscopy study of magnetic quasiparticles in the frustrated quantum magnet BiCu2PO6.« less

  11. Analysis of Different Approaches to Modeling of the Nozzle Flows in the Near Continuum Regime

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-21

    the Near Continuum Regime (Postprint) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) E.V. Titov & D.A. Levin (Pennsylvania State...of Nozzle Flows in the Near Continuum Regime E.V. Titov ∗ and D.A. Levin† Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 N.E. Gimelshein‡ and

  12. Mortality by neoplasia and cellular telephone base stations in the Belo Horizonte municipality, Minas Gerais state, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dode, Adilza C; Leão, Mônica M D; Tejo, Francisco de A F; Gomes, Antônio C R; Dode, Daiana C; Dode, Michael C; Moreira, Cristina W; Condessa, Vânia A; Albinatti, Cláudia; Caiaffa, Waleska T

    2011-09-01

    Pollution caused by the electromagnetic fields (EMFs) of radio frequencies (RF) generated by the telecommunication system is one of the greatest environmental problems of the twentieth century. The purpose of this research was to verify the existence of a spatial correlation between base station (BS) clusters and cases of deaths by neoplasia in the Belo Horizonte municipality, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, from 1996 to 2006 and to measure the human exposure levels to EMF where there is a major concentration of cellular telephone transmitter antennas. A descriptive spatial analysis of the BSs and the cases of death by neoplasia identified in the municipality was performed through an ecological-epidemiological approach, using georeferencing. The database employed in the survey was composed of three data banks: 1. death by neoplasia documented by the Health Municipal Department; 2. BSs documented in ANATEL ("Agência Nacional de Telecomunicações": 'Telecommunications National Agency'); and 3. census and demographic city population data obtained from official archives provided by IBGE ("Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística": 'Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics'). The results show that approximately 856 BSs were installed through December 2006. Most (39.60%) of the BSs were located in the "Centro-Sul" ('Central-Southern') region of the municipality. Between 1996 and 2006, 7191 deaths by neoplasia occurred and within an area of 500 m from the BS, the mortality rate was 34.76 per 10,000 inhabitants. Outside of this area, a decrease in the number of deaths by neoplasia occurred. The greatest accumulated incidence was 5.83 per 1000 in the Central-Southern region and the lowest incidence was 2.05 per 1000 in the Barreiro region. During the environmental monitoring, the largest accumulated electric field measured was 12.4 V/m and the smallest was 0.4 V/m. The largest density power was 40.78 μW/cm(2), and the smallest was 0.04 μW/cm(2). Copyright

  13. Multiscale modeling of cellular epigenetic states: stochasticity in molecular networks, chromatin folding in cell nuclei, and tissue pattern formation of cells

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jie; Cao, Youfang; Gürsoy, Gamze; Naveed, Hammad; Terebus, Anna; Zhao, Jieling

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequences provide the overall genetic blueprint of cells, but cells possessing the same genome can exhibit diverse phenotypes. There is a multitude of mechanisms controlling cellular epigenetic states and that dictate the behavior of cells. Among these, networks of interacting molecules, often under stochastic control, depending on the specific wirings of molecular components and the physiological conditions, can have a different landscape of cellular states. In addition, chromosome folding in three-dimensional space provides another important control mechanism for selective activation and repression of gene expression. Fully differentiated cells with different properties grow, divide, and interact through mechanical forces and communicate through signal transduction, resulting in the formation of complex tissue patterns. Developing quantitative models to study these multi-scale phenomena and to identify opportunities for improving human health requires development of theoretical models, algorithms, and computational tools. Here we review recent progress made in these important directions. PMID:27480462

  14. Shell model states in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokov, A. M.; Mazur, A. I.; Mazur, I. A.; Vary, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    We suggest a method for calculating scattering phase shifts and energies and widths of resonances which utilizes only eigenenergies obtained in variational calculations with oscillator basis and their dependence on oscillator basis spacing ℏ Ω . We make use of simple expressions for the S matrix at eigenstates of a finite (truncated) Hamiltonian matrix in the oscillator basis obtained in the HORSE (J -matrix) formalism of quantum scattering theory. The validity of the suggested approach is verified in calculations with model Woods-Saxon potentials and applied to calculations of n α resonances and nonresonant scattering using the no-core shell model.

  15. A nonlocal continuum model for biological aggregation.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Chad M; Bertozzi, Andrea L; Lewis, Mark A

    2006-10-01

    We construct a continuum model for biological aggregations in which individuals experience long-range social attraction and short-range dispersal. For the case of one spatial dimension, we study the steady states analytically and numerically. There exist strongly nonlinear states with compact support and steep edges that correspond to localized biological aggregations, or clumps. These steady-state clumps are reached through a dynamic coarsening process. In the limit of large population size, the clumps approach a constant density swarm with abrupt edges. We use energy arguments to understand the nonlinear selection of clump solutions, and to predict the internal density in the large population limit. The energy result holds in higher dimensions as well, and is demonstrated via numerical simulations in two dimensions.

  16. Homogenization of a Cauchy continuum towards a micromorphic continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hütter, Geralf

    2017-02-01

    The micromorphic theory of Eringen and Mindlin, including special cases like strain gradient theory or Cosserat theory, is widely used to model size effects and localization phenomena. The heuristic construction of such theories based on thermodynamic considerations is well-established. However, the identification of corresponding constitutive laws and of the large number of respective constitutive parameters limits the practical application of such theories. In the present contribution, a closed procedure for the homogenization of a Cauchy continuum at the microscale towards a fully micromorphic continuum is derived including explicit definitions of all involved generalized macroscopic stress and deformation measures. The boundary value problem to be solved on the microscale is formulated either for using static or kinematic boundary conditions. The procedure is demonstrated with an example.

  17. The climate continuum revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emile-Geay, J.; Wang, J.; Partin, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    A grand challenge of climate science is to quantify the extent of natural variability on adaptation-relevant timescales (10-100y). Since the instrumental record is too short to adequately estimate the spectra of climate measures, this information must be derived from paleoclimate proxies, which may harbor a many-to-one, non-linear (e.g. thresholded) and non-stationary relationship to climate. In this talk, I will touch upon the estimation of climate scaling behavior from climate proxies. Two case studies will be presented: an investigation of scaling behavior in a reconstruction of global surface temperature using state-of- the-art data [PAGES2K Consortium, in prep] and methods [Guillot et al., 2015]. Estimating the scaling exponent β in spectra derived from this reconstruction, we find that 0 < β < 1 in most regions, suggesting long-term memory. Overall, the reconstruction-based spectra are steeper than the ones based on an instrumental dataset [HadCRUT4.2, Morice et al., 2012], and those estimated from PMIP3/CMIP5 models, suggesting the climate system is more energetic at multidecadal to centennial timescales than can be inferred from the short instrumental record or from the models developed to reproduce it [Laepple and Huybers, 2014]. an investigation of scaling behavior in speleothems records of tropical hydroclimate. We will make use of recent advances in proxy system modeling [Dee et al., 2015] and investigate how various aspects of the speleothem system (karst dynamics, age uncertainties) may conspire to bias the estimate of scaling behavior from speleothem timeseries. The results suggest that ignoring such complications leads to erroneous inferences about hydroclimate scaling. References Dee, S. G., J. Emile-Geay, M. N. Evans, Allam, A., D. M. Thompson, and E. J. Steig (2015), J. Adv. Mod. Earth Sys., 07, doi:10.1002/2015MS000447. Guillot, D., B. Rajaratnam, and J. Emile-Geay (2015), Ann. Applied. Statist., pp. 324-352, doi:10.1214/14-AOAS794. Laepple, T

  18. Continuum Lowering in Ultrashort Laser-Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nantel, M.; Buma, T.; Gu, S.; Workman, J.; Maksimchuk, A.; Umstadter, D.

    1997-04-01

    Electrons in a plasma are generally described as either bound or free. The bound electrons occupy the available discrete energy levels in ions, while the free (ionized) electrons lie in the continuum, above the highest available bound state. As the plasma density increases, the ions shed their available bound-state levels from the highest on down and the continuum lowers. As a result, it becomes easier to ionize them and the ionization balance of the plasma is affected. Continuum lowering is a fundamental concept of the atomic physics of high-density plasmas and is of particular importance for work in X-ray lasers, inertial confinement fusion, astrophysics and plasma simulations. We present measurements of continuum lowering in plasmas produced with 100-fs laser pulses focussed on boron wire targets. We used space- and time-resolved XUV spectroscopy to observe the suppression of emission lines originating from high-lying He-like excited levels, and compare this to the theoretically predicted continuum lowering. Electron temperature and electron density diagnostics are obtained with spectroscopic line ratios using the FLY atomic physics package and hydrodynamics simulations.

  19. Continuum effects in nuclear transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, H. D.; Donangelo, R.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Pacheco, A. J.

    2007-02-12

    We develop a semiclassical calculation for nuclear transfer reactions where the continuum is treated in an exact way, and compare the results with those of a treatment in which the continuum is neglected. We conclude that the influence of the continuum is very important for weakly bound reactants.

  20. Pattern formation in a reaction-advection model with delay: a continuum approach to myxobacterial rippling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, U.; Bär, M.

    2004-07-01

    Standing wave oscillations of the cell density (rippling) are observed in premature aggregates of developing myxobacteria. Recently the underlying pattern formation mechanism was shown to be based on the interplay between active cell motion and local interactions triggering reversals in the cells' direction of motion. The propagation of information through the system is mediated by the internal state of moving cells rather than by diffusible chemical signals. Discrete cellular automata and coupled-map lattices have been investigated earlier and indicate the importance of a minimum refractory period between subsequent reversals of a cell. In this paper we consider the continuum limit of the process, that yields a set of hyperbolic partial differential equations with a a single discrete time delay. The time delay corresponds to the duration of the mentioned refractory period of the cells. According to linear stability analysis a minimal time delay is required for a wave instability to occur. The results of the continuum model are in reasonable agreement with the findings in the discrete models adding credibility to the earlier studies.

  1. Finsler-Geometric Continuum Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    continuum mechanics/ physics of deformable bodies) is emphasized in the present report. In this context, fields describing the motion of material particles ...to physical problems of tensile fracture, shear localization, and cavitation in solid bodies. The pseudo-Finsler approach is demonstrated to be more...Weyl-type transformation of the fundamental tensor, analytical and numerical solutions of representative example problems offer new physical insight

  2. Continuum description for jointed media

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.K.

    1982-04-01

    A general three-dimensional continuum description is presented for a material containing regularly spaced and approximately parallel jointing planes within a representative elementary volume. Constitutive relationships are introduced for linear behavior of the base material and nonlinear normal and shear behavior across jointing planes. Furthermore, a fracture permeability tensor is calculated so that deformation induced alterations to the in-situ values can be measured. Examples for several strain-controlled loading paths are presented.

  3. Some (not so) Recent Results From Continuum Decay Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sobotka, L. G.

    2010-11-24

    Recent technical advances have allowed for high-order multiparticle correlation experiments to be done. The first round of experiments done by our collaboration has lead to the highest quality data on the decay of {sup 6}Be(into an alpha particle and 2 protons), detailed how the continuum states of {sup 10}C decay (into 2 alphas and 2 protons) and lead to finding several previously unknown states in light nuclei and casting doubt on some states found by others.

  4. Continuum radiation in planetary magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.

    1991-01-01

    With the completion of the Voyager tour of the outer planets, radio and plasma wave instruments have executed the first survey of the wave spectra of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. One of the most notable conclusions of this survey is that there is a great deal of qualitative similarity in both the plasma wave and radio wave spectra from one magnetosphere to the next. In particular, in spite of detailed differences, most of the radio emissions at each of the planets have been tentatively classified into two primary categories. First, the most intense emissions are generally associated with the cyclotron maser instability. Second, a class of weaker emissions can be found at each of the magnetospheres which appears to be the result of conversion from intense electrostatic emissions at the upper hybrid resonance frequency into (primarily) ordinary mode radio emission. It is this second category, often referred to as nonthermal continuum radiation, which we will discuss in this review. We review the characteristics of the continuum spectrum at each of the planets, discuss the source region and direct observations of the generation of the emissions where available, and briefly describe the theories for the generation of the emissions. Over the past few years evidence has increased that the linear mode conversion of electrostatic waves into the ordinary mode can account for at least some of the continuum radiation observed. There is no definitive evidence which precludes the possibility that a nonlinear mechanism may also be important.

  5. Continuum radiation in planetary magnetospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, W.S.

    1991-12-01

    With the completion of the Voyager tour of the outer planets, radio and plasma wave instruments have executed the first survey of the wave spectra of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. One of the most notable conclusions of this survey is that there is a great deal of qualitative similarity in both the plasma wave and radio wave spectra from one magnetosphere to the next. In particular, in spite of detailed differences, most of the radio emissions at each of the planets have been tentatively classified into two primary categories. First, the most intense emissions are generally associated with the cyclotron maser instability. Second, a class of weaker emissions can be found at each of the magnetospheres which appears to be the result of conversion from intense electrostatic emissions at the upper hybrid resonance frequency into (primarily) ordinary mode radio emission. It is this second category, often referred to as nonthermal continuum radiation, which we will discuss in this review. We review the characteristics of the continuum spectrum at each of the planets, discuss the source region and direct observations of the generation of the emissions where available, and briefly describe the theories for the generation of the emissions. Over the past few years evidence has increased that the linear mode conversion of electrostatic waves into the ordinary mode can account for at least some of the continuum radiation observed. There is no definitive evidence which precludes the possibility that a nonlinear mechanism may also be important.

  6. 34 CFR 300.115 - Continuum of alternative placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility Least Restrictive Environment (lre) § 300.115... placements is available to meet the needs of children with disabilities for special education and related... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Continuum of alternative placements. 300.115...

  7. 34 CFR 300.115 - Continuum of alternative placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Continuum of alternative placements. 300.115 Section 300.115 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION...

  8. 34 CFR 300.115 - Continuum of alternative placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility Least Restrictive Environment (lre) § 300.115... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Continuum of alternative placements. 300.115 Section 300.115 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE...

  9. 34 CFR 300.115 - Continuum of alternative placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Continuum of alternative placements. 300.115 Section 300.115 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION...

  10. 34 CFR 300.115 - Continuum of alternative placements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES State Eligibility Least Restrictive Environment (lre) § 300.115... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Continuum of alternative placements. 300.115 Section 300.115 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE...

  11. The Influence of Metal Stress on the Availability and Redox State of Ascorbate, and Possible Interference with Its Cellular Functions

    PubMed Central

    Bielen, An; Remans, Tony; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Cuypers, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, metals have been distributed to excessive levels in the environment due to industrial and agricultural activities. Plants growing on soils contaminated with excess levels of metals experience a disturbance of the cellular redox balance, which leads to an augmentation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Even though the increased ROS levels can cause cellular damage, controlled levels play an important role in modulating signaling networks that control physiological processes and stress responses. Plants control ROS levels using their antioxidative defense system both under non-stress conditions, as well as under stress conditions such as exposure to excess metals. Ascorbate (AsA) is a well-known and important component of the plant’s antioxidative system. As primary antioxidant, it can reduce ROS directly and indirectly via ascorbate peroxidase in the ascorbate–glutathione cycle. Furthermore, AsA fulfills an essential role in physiological processes, some of which are disturbed by excess metals. In this review, known direct effects of excess metals on AsA biosynthesis and functioning will be discussed, as well as the possible interference of metals with the role of AsA in physiological and biochemical processes. PMID:23519107

  12. Inside-out Signaling Promotes Dynamic Changes in the Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (CEACAM1) Oligomeric State to Control Its Cell Adhesion Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Prerna C.; Lee, Hannah S. W.; Ming, Aaron Y. K.; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M.; Yip, Christopher M.; Rocheleau, Jonathan V.; Gray-Owen, Scott D.

    2013-01-01

    Cell-cell contacts are fundamental to multicellular organisms and are subject to exquisite levels of control. The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) can engage in both cis-homophilic (parallel) oligomerization and trans-homophilic (anti-parallel) binding. In this study, we establish that the CEACAM1 transmembrane domain has a propensity to form cis-dimers via the transmembrane-embedded 432GXXXG436 motif and that this basal state is overcome when activated calmodulin binds to the CEACAM1 cytoplasmic domain. Although mutation of the 432GXXXG436 motif reduced CEACAM1 oligomerization, it did not affect surface localization of the receptor or influence CEACAM1-dependent cellular invasion by the pathogenic Neisseria. The mutation did, however, have a striking effect on CEACAM1-dependent cellular aggregation, increasing both the kinetics of cell-cell association and the size of cellular aggregates formed. CEACAM1 association with tyrosine kinase c-Src and tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 was not affected by the 432GXXXG436 mutation, consistent with their association with the monomeric form of wild type CEACAM1. Collectively, our results establish that a dynamic oligomer-to-monomer shift in surface-expressed CEACAM1 facilitates trans-homophilic binding and downstream effector signaling. PMID:24005674

  13. Steady-state and time-resolved two-photon fluorescence microscopy: a versatile tool for probing cellular environment and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denicke, Stefan; Ehlers, Jan-Eric; Niesner, Raluca; Quentmeier, Stefan; Gericke, Karl-Heinz

    2007-09-01

    In the last decade, the two-photon fluorescence laser-scanning microscopy (TPLSM) has become an indispensable tool for the bioscientific and biomedical research. TPLSM techniques as well as their applications are currently experiencing a dramatic evolution and represent the focus of many biophysical research projects. In this work, we compare in detail two steady-state TPLSM techniques, i.e. single-beam scanning microscopy combined with point-detection (SB-PMT) and multi-beam scanning microscopy combined with synchronous detection (MB-CCD), as far as their technical characteristics relevant for the bioscientific research are concerned, i.e. optical performance and imaging speed. We demonstrate that the SB-PMT technique is more adequate for deep-tissue imaging (few 100 μm depth) than the MB-CCD technique, whereas only the MB-CCD technique enables high-speed imaging for characterizing the dynamics of fast biological phenomena. Novel applications of these techniques are additionally discussed. Moreover, we employ a time-resolved TPLSM technique, i.e. biexponential fluorescence lifetime imaging based on the cellular fluorescence of the nicotinamide pyridine dinucleotides NADH and NADPH, which allows us to probe for the first time the redox cellular metabolism of MIN6 cells (mutated insulin producing pancreatic β-cells) as well as to show the potential of this method for the specific and dynamic investigation of NADH- and NADPH-dependent cellular processes.

  14. Analogies between continuum dislocation theory, continuum mechanics and fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbermann, C. B.; Ihlemann, J.

    2017-03-01

    Continuum Dislocation Theory (CDT) relates gradients of plastic deformation in crystals with the presence of geometrically necessary dislocations. Interestingly, CDT shows striking analogies to other branches of continuum mechanics. The present contribution demonstrates this on two essential kinematical quantities which reflect tensorial dislocation properties: the (resultant) Burgers vector and the dislocation density tensor. First, the limiting process for the (resultant) Burgers vector from an integral to a local quantity is performed analogously to the limiting process from the force vector to the traction vector. By evaluating the balance of forces on a tetrahedral volume element, Cauchy found his famous formula relating traction vector and stress tensor. It is shown how this procedure may be adopted to a continuously dislocated tetrahedron. Here, the conservation of Burger’s vector implicates the introduction of the dislocation density tensor. Second, analogies between the plastic flow of a continuously dislocated solid and the liquid flow of a fluid are highlighted: the resultant Burgers vector of a dislocation ensemble plays a similar role as the (resultant) circulation of a vortex tube. Moreover, both vortices within flowing fluids and dislocations within deforming solids induce discontinuities in the velocity field and the plastic distortion field, respectively. Beyond the analogies, some peculiar properties of the dislocation density tensor are presented as well.

  15. A continuum model of protrusion of pseudopod in leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, C; Skalak, R

    1988-01-01

    The morphology of human leukocytes, the biochemistry of actin polymerization, and the theory of continuum mechanics are used to model the pseudopod protrusion process of leukocytes. In the proposed model, the pseudopod is considered as a porous solid of F-actin network, the pores of which are full of aqueous solution. G-actin is considered as a "solute" transported by convection and diffusion in the fluid phase. The pseudopod grows as actin filaments elongate at their barbed ends at the tip of the pseudopod. The driving force of extension is hypothesized as being provided by the actin polymerization. It is assumed that elongation of actin filaments, powered by chemical energy liberated from the polymerization reaction, does mechanical work against opposing pressure on the membrane. This also gives rise to a pressure drop in the fluid phase at the tip of the pseudopod, which is formulated by an equation relating the work done by actin polymerization to the local state of pressure. The pressure gradient along the pseudopod drives the fluid filtration through the porous pseudopod according to Darcy's Law, which in turn brings more actin monomers to the growing tip. The main cell body serves as a reservoir of G-actin. A modified first-order equation is used to describe the kinetics of polymerization. The rate of pseudopod growth is modulated by regulatory proteins. A one-dimensional moving boundary problem based on the proposed mechanism has been constructed and approximate solutions have been obtained. Comparison of the solutions with experimental data shows that the model is compatible with available observations. The model is also applicable to growth of other cellular systems such as elongation of acrosomal process in sperm cells. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 PMID:3233268

  16. Continuum Theory of Retroviral Capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. T.; Bruinsma, R. F.; Gelbart, W. M.

    2006-02-01

    We present a self-assembly phase diagram for the shape of retroviral capsids, based on continuum elasticity theory. The spontaneous curvature of the capsid proteins drives a weakly first-order transition from spherical to spherocylindrical shapes. The conical capsid shape which characterizes the HIV-1 retrovirus is never stable under unconstrained energy minimization. Only under conditions of fixed volume and/or fixed spanning length can the conical shape be a minimum energy structure. Our results indicate that, unlike the capsids of small viruses, retrovirus capsids are not uniquely determined by the molecular structure of the constituent proteins but depend in an essential way on physical constraints present during assembly.

  17. Continuum modeling of myxobacteria clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Cameron W.; Alber, Mark; Tsimring, Lev S.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we develop a continuum theory of clustering in ensembles of self-propelled inelastically colliding rods with applications to collective dynamics of common gliding bacteria Myxococcus xanthus. A multi-phase hydrodynamic model that couples densities of oriented and isotropic phases is described. This model is used for the analysis of an instability that leads to spontaneous formation of directionally moving dense clusters within initially dilute isotropic ‘gas’ of myxobacteria. Numerical simulations of this model confirm the existence of stationary dense moving clusters and also elucidate the properties of their collisions. The results are shown to be in a qualitative agreement with experiments.

  18. Disease management: a continuum approach.

    PubMed

    Harvey, N; DePue, D M

    1997-06-01

    Disease management is a comprehensive, integrated approach to managing the health of populations through the use of disease-specific standards and protocols and population segmentation. It has been increasing in popularity among integrated delivery systems (IDSs) and payers alike as a way to respond to competitive pressures and to shift care delivery from inpatient to alternative care sites. To successfully implement disease-management programs, IDSs must develop an organizational mind-set that stresses information-driven, evidence-based standards of care that are adhered to across a tightly integrated continuum of care.

  19. Collective excitations in the continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Dussel, G. G.; Betan, R. Id; Liotta, R. J.; Vertse, T.

    2009-12-15

    Pairing (particle-particle) giant resonances are analyzed within a shell-model formalism in the complex energy plane with the aim of understanding why they have not been observed so far. A comparison is made with the equivalent particle-hole mode by applying the formalism to the analysis of the well-understood particle-hole giant resonance. It is found that because of the proper treatment of the continuum intrinsic to the formalism, giant pairing resonances lie much higher than previously predicted and that some of them may be too wide to be observed, whereas others are meaningful excitations. For these, new experimental searches are proposed.

  20. Nonlocal models in continuum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.L.; Phan-Thien, N.

    1993-09-01

    The recent appearance of nonlocal methods is examined in the light of traditional continuum mechanics. A comparison of nonlocal approaches in the fields of solid and fluid mechanics reveals that no consistent definition of a nonlocal theory has been used. We suggest a definition based on the violation of the principle of local action in continuum mechanics. From the consideration of the implications of a nonlocal theory based on this definition, we conclude that constitutive relations with nonlocal terms can confuse the traditional separation of the roles between conservation laws and constitutive relations. The diversity of motivations for the nonlocal approaches are presented, resulting primarily from deficiencies in numerical solutions to practical problems. To illustrate these concepts, the history of nonlocal terms in the field of viscoelastic fluids is reviewed. A specific example of a viscoelastic constitutive relation that contains a stress diffusion term is applied to a simple shear flow and found not to be a physical description of any known fluid. We conclude by listing questions that should be asked of nonlocal approaches.

  1. Divergent cellular responses during asymptomatic subclinical and clinical states of disease in cows naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infection of the host with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) results in a chronic and progressive enteritis that traverses both subclinical and clinical stages. The mechanism(s) for the shift from asymptomatic subclinical disease state to advanced clinical disease are not fully under...

  2. Hybrid discrete/continuum algorithms for stochastic reaction networks

    DOE PAGES

    Safta, Cosmin; Sargsyan, Khachik; Debusschere, Bert; ...

    2014-10-22

    Direct solutions of the Chemical Master Equation (CME) governing Stochastic Reaction Networks (SRNs) are generally prohibitively expensive due to excessive numbers of possible discrete states in such systems. To enhance computational efficiency we develop a hybrid approach where the evolution of states with low molecule counts is treated with the discrete CME model while that of states with large molecule counts is modeled by the continuum Fokker-Planck equation. The Fokker-Planck equation is discretized using a 2nd order finite volume approach with appropriate treatment of flux components to avoid negative probability values. The numerical construction at the interface between the discretemore » and continuum regions implements the transfer of probability reaction by reaction according to the stoichiometry of the system. As a result, the performance of this novel hybrid approach is explored for a two-species circadian model with computational efficiency gains of about one order of magnitude.« less

  3. Hybrid discrete/continuum algorithms for stochastic reaction networks

    SciTech Connect

    Safta, Cosmin Sargsyan, Khachik Debusschere, Bert Najm, Habib N.

    2015-01-15

    Direct solutions of the Chemical Master Equation (CME) governing Stochastic Reaction Networks (SRNs) are generally prohibitively expensive due to excessive numbers of possible discrete states in such systems. To enhance computational efficiency we develop a hybrid approach where the evolution of states with low molecule counts is treated with the discrete CME model while that of states with large molecule counts is modeled by the continuum Fokker–Planck equation. The Fokker–Planck equation is discretized using a 2nd order finite volume approach with appropriate treatment of flux components. The numerical construction at the interface between the discrete and continuum regions implements the transfer of probability reaction by reaction according to the stoichiometry of the system. The performance of this novel hybrid approach is explored for a two-species circadian model with computational efficiency gains of about one order of magnitude.

  4. Hybrid discrete/continuum algorithms for stochastic reaction networks

    SciTech Connect

    Safta, Cosmin; Sargsyan, Khachik; Debusschere, Bert; Najm, Habib N.

    2014-10-22

    Direct solutions of the Chemical Master Equation (CME) governing Stochastic Reaction Networks (SRNs) are generally prohibitively expensive due to excessive numbers of possible discrete states in such systems. To enhance computational efficiency we develop a hybrid approach where the evolution of states with low molecule counts is treated with the discrete CME model while that of states with large molecule counts is modeled by the continuum Fokker-Planck equation. The Fokker-Planck equation is discretized using a 2nd order finite volume approach with appropriate treatment of flux components to avoid negative probability values. The numerical construction at the interface between the discrete and continuum regions implements the transfer of probability reaction by reaction according to the stoichiometry of the system. As a result, the performance of this novel hybrid approach is explored for a two-species circadian model with computational efficiency gains of about one order of magnitude.

  5. A continuum theory of edge dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdichevsky, V. L.

    2017-09-01

    Continuum theory of dislocation aims to describe the behavior of large ensembles of dislocations. This task is far from completion, and, most likely, does not have a ;universal solution;, which is applicable to any dislocation ensemble. In this regards it is important to have guiding lines set by benchmark cases, where the transition from a discrete set of dislocations to a continuum description is made rigorously. Two such cases have been considered recently: equilibrium of dislocation walls and screw dislocations in beams. In this paper one more case is studied, equilibrium of a large set of 2D edge dislocations placed randomly in a 2D bounded region. The major characteristic of interest is energy of dislocation ensemble, because it determines the structure of continuum equations. The homogenized energy functional is obtained for the periodic dislocation ensembles with a random contents of the periodic cell. Parameters of the periodic structure can change slowly on distances of order of the size of periodic cells. The energy functional is obtained by the variational-asymptotic method. Equilibrium positions are local minima of energy. It is confirmed the earlier assertion that energy density of the system is the sum of elastic energy of averaged elastic strains and microstructure energy, which is elastic energy of the neutralized dislocation system, i.e. the dislocation system placed in a constant dislocation density field making the averaged dislocation density zero. The computation of energy is reduced to solution of a variational cell problem. This problem is solved analytically. The solution is used to investigate stability of simple dislocation arrays, i.e. arrays with one dislocation in the periodic cell. The relations obtained yield two outcomes: First, there is a state parameter of the system, dislocation polarization; averaged stresses affect only dislocation polarization and cannot change other characteristics of the system. Second, the structure of

  6. Continuum Fitting HST QSO Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytler, David; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method which we are using to fit and describe QSO spectra relies upon the fact that QSO continuum are generally very smooth and simple except for emission and absorption lines. To see this we need high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of QSOs at low redshift which have relatively few absorption lines in the Lyman-a forest. We need a large number of such spectra to use as the basis set for the PCA analysis which will find the set of principal component spectra which describe the QSO family as a whole. We have found that too few HST spectra have the required S/N and hence we need to supplement them with ground based spectra of QSOs at higher redshift. We have many such spectra and we have been working to make them suitable for this analysis. We have concentrated on this topic since 12/15/01.

  7. Conductivity of continuum percolating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenull, Olaf; Janssen, Hans-Karl

    2001-11-01

    We study the conductivity of a class of disordered continuum systems represented by the Swiss-cheese model, where the conducting medium is the space between randomly placed spherical holes, near the percolation threshold. This model can be mapped onto a bond percolation model where the conductance σ of randomly occupied bonds is drawn from a probability distribution of the form σ-a. Employing the methods of renormalized field theory we show to arbitrary order in ɛ expansion that the critical conductivity exponent of the Swiss-cheese model is given by tSC(a)=(d-2)ν+max[φ,(1-a)-1], where d is the spatial dimension and ν and φ denote the critical exponents for the percolation correlation length and resistance, respectively. Our result confirms a conjecture that is based on the ``nodes, links, and blobs'' picture of percolation clusters.

  8. Dementia: Continuum or Distinct Entity?

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Glenn D.

    2009-01-01

    The latent structure of dementia was examined in a group of 10,775 older adults with indicators derived from a neuropsychological test battery. Subjecting these data to taxometric analysis using mean above minus below a cut (MAMBAC), maximum covariance (MAXCOV), and latent mode factor analysis (L-Mode) produced results more consistent with dementia as a dimensional (lying along a continuum) than categorical (representing a distinct entity) construct. A second study conducted on a group of 2375 21-to-64-year olds produced similar results. These findings denote that dementia, as measured by deficits in episodic memory, attention/concentration, executive function, and language, differs quantitatively rather than qualitatively from the cognitive status of non-demented adults. The implications of these results for classification, assessment, etiology, and prevention are discussed. PMID:20677881

  9. Fractional-period excitations in continuum periodic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nistazakis, H. E.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; Porter, Mason A.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Nicolin, A.; Chin, J. K.

    2006-12-15

    We investigate the generation of fractional-period states in continuum periodic systems. As an example, we consider a Bose-Einstein condensate confined in an optical-lattice potential. We show that when the potential is turned on nonadiabatically, the system explores a number of transient states whose periodicity is a fraction of that of the lattice. We illustrate the origin of fractional-period states analytically by treating them as resonant states of a parametrically forced Duffing oscillator and discuss their transient nature and potential observability.

  10. A tessellated continuum approach to thermal analysis: discontinuity networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Davey, K.; Prosser, R.

    2017-01-01

    Tessellated continuum mechanics is an approach for the representation of thermo-mechanical behaviour of porous media on tessellated continua. It involves the application of iteration function schemes using affine contraction and expansion maps, respectively, for the creation of porous fractal materials and associated tessellated continua. Highly complex geometries can be produced using a modest number of contraction mappings. The associated tessellations form the mesh in a numerical procedure. This paper tests the hypothesis that thermal analysis of porous structures can be achieved using a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method on a tessellation. Discontinuous behaviour is identified at a discontinuity network in a tessellation; its use is shown to provide a good representation of the physics relating to cellular heat exchanger designs. Results for different cellular designs (with corresponding tessellations) are contrasted against those obtained from direct analysis and very high accuracy is observed.

  11. Mitochondrial H2O2 emission and cellular redox state link excess fat intake to insulin resistance in both rodents and humans

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ethan J.; Lustig, Mary E.; Boyle, Kristen E.; Woodlief, Tracey L.; Kane, Daniel A.; Lin, Chien-Te; Price, Jesse W.; Kang, Li; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Szeto, Hazel H.; Houmard, Joseph A.; Cortright, Ronald N.; Wasserman, David H.; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2009-01-01

    High dietary fat intake leads to insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, and this represents a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress have been implicated in the disease process, but the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. Here we show that in skeletal muscle of both rodents and humans, a diet high in fat increases the H2O2-emitting potential of mitochondria, shifts the cellular redox environment to a more oxidized state, and decreases the redox-buffering capacity in the absence of any change in mitochondrial respiratory function. Furthermore, we show that attenuating mitochondrial H2O2 emission, either by treating rats with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant or by genetically engineering the overexpression of catalase in mitochondria of muscle in mice, completely preserves insulin sensitivity despite a high-fat diet. These findings place the etiology of insulin resistance in the context of mitochondrial bioenergetics by demonstrating that mitochondrial H2O2 emission serves as both a gauge of energy balance and a regulator of cellular redox environment, linking intracellular metabolic balance to the control of insulin sensitivity. PMID:19188683

  12. Mitochondrial H2O2 emission and cellular redox state link excess fat intake to insulin resistance in both rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ethan J; Lustig, Mary E; Boyle, Kristen E; Woodlief, Tracey L; Kane, Daniel A; Lin, Chien-Te; Price, Jesse W; Kang, Li; Rabinovitch, Peter S; Szeto, Hazel H; Houmard, Joseph A; Cortright, Ronald N; Wasserman, David H; Neufer, P Darrell

    2009-03-01

    High dietary fat intake leads to insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, and this represents a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress have been implicated in the disease process, but the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. Here we show that in skeletal muscle of both rodents and humans, a diet high in fat increases the H(2)O(2)-emitting potential of mitochondria, shifts the cellular redox environment to a more oxidized state, and decreases the redox-buffering capacity in the absence of any change in mitochondrial respiratory function. Furthermore, we show that attenuating mitochondrial H(2)O(2) emission, either by treating rats with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant or by genetically engineering the overexpression of catalase in mitochondria of muscle in mice, completely preserves insulin sensitivity despite a high-fat diet. These findings place the etiology of insulin resistance in the context of mitochondrial bioenergetics by demonstrating that mitochondrial H(2)O(2) emission serves as both a gauge of energy balance and a regulator of cellular redox environment, linking intracellular metabolic balance to the control of insulin sensitivity.

  13. Continuum channel coupling of shape resonances in N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poliakoff, E. D.; Kakar, Sandeep; Rosenberg, R. A.

    1992-02-01

    We have measured vibrational branching ratios for 2σ-1u photoionization of N2 in an effort to elucidate fundamental aspects of continuum channel coupling. Calculations have shown that photoejection of a 2σu electron from N2 should be influenced by a shape resonance in the 3σg →ɛσu photoionization channel and that this continuum channel coupling can result in deviations from Franck-Condon behavior for the resulting N+2(B 2Σ+u) ion. In the present study, the N2 molecules are ionized by monochromatic synchrotron radiation (25state. The observed branching ratios are enhanced at hν≊30 eV and we attribute this Franck-Condon breakdown to continuum coupling between the 2σ-1u and 3σ-1g ionization channels. However, our results exhibit significant discrepancies with theory. The areas of agreement and disagreement suggest useful avenues of further study to clarify the nature of continuum channel coupling in molecular photoionization.

  14. Turbulent fluid motion 3: Basic continuum equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G.

    1991-01-01

    A derivation of the continuum equations used for the analysis of turbulence is given. These equations include the continuity equation, the Navier-Stokes equations, and the heat transfer or energy equation. An experimental justification for using a continuum approach for the study of turbulence is given.

  15. A continuum model for interconnected lattice trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A. V.

    1992-01-01

    A continuum model for interconnected lattice trusses based on the 1D Timoshenko beam approximation is developed using the NASA-LRC Phase Zero Evolutionary Model. The continuum model dynamics is presented in the canonical wave-equation form in a Hilbert space.

  16. Novel Continuum Modeling of Crystal Surface Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Daniel

    2003-03-01

    Below the roughening temperature the evolution of crystal surfaces proceeds by the nucleation, flow and annihilation of discrete atomic steps. The appropriate mathematical model of the evolution of such surfaces is discrete in nature, and consists of coupled equations for the motion, nucelation and annihilation of steps. It is useful, however, to describe surface evolution in terms of continuum models. Such models are more amenable to analytical treatments and have enormous computational advantages over their discrete counterparts. Standard continuum models successfully describe the evolution of surfaces with smooth morphology, but completely fail when the surface has singularities such as facets. It is an interesting and important challenge to develop continuum descriptions of surfaces with singularities, since in many cases the singularities drive the evolution of the whole system. In the talk I will present a conceptually new approach to continuum modeling of surface evolution, termed Configurational Continuum [1], which is valid even in singular regions. The approach consists of a new definition of the continuum limit. It is equivalent to standard continuum for very smooth morphology, but is radically different from it in singular regions, where it becomes equivalent to the discrete models. The validity of configurational continuum will be demonstrated on several simple systems. [1] N. Israeli and D. Kandel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 116103 (2002).

  17. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  18. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  19. Cellular aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hornsby, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Aging is manifest in a variety of changes over time, including changes at the cellular level. Cellular aging acts primarily as a tumor suppressor mechanism, but also may enhance cancer development under certain circumstances. One important process of cellular aging is oncogene-induced senescence, which acts as an important anti-cancer mechanism. Cellular senescence resulting from damage caused by activated oncogenes prevents the growth or potentially neoplastic cells. Moreover, cells that have entered senescence appear to be targets for elimination by the innnate immune system. In another aspect of cellular aging, the absence of telomerase activity in normal tissues results in such cells lacking a telomere maintenance mechanism. One consequence is that in aging there is an increase in cells with shortened telomeres. In the presence of active oncogenes that cause expansion of a neoplastic clone, shortening of telomeres leading to telomere dysfunction prevents the indefinite expansion of the clone because the cells enter crisis. Crisis results from fusions and other defects caused by dysfunctional telomeres and is a terminal state of the neoplastic clone. In this way the absence of telomerase in human cells, while one cause of cellular aging, also acts as an anti-cancer mechanism. PMID:20705476

  20. Epimedium koreanum Nakai Displays Broad Spectrum of Antiviral Activity in Vitro and in Vivo by Inducing Cellular Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won-Kyung; Weeratunga, Prasanna; Lee, Byeong-Hoon; Park, Jun-Seol; Kim, Chul-Joong; Ma, Jin Yeul; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Epimedium koreanum Nakai has been extensively used in traditional Korean and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of diseases. Despite the plant’s known immune modulatory potential and chemical make-up, scientific information on its antiviral properties and mode of action have not been completely investigated. In this study, the broad antiviral spectrum and mode of action of an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai was evaluated in vitro, and moreover, the protective effect against divergent influenza A subtypes was determined in BALB/c mice. An effective dose of Epimedium koreanum Nakaimarkedly reduced the replication of Influenza A Virus (PR8), Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) and Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) in RAW264.7 and HEK293T cells. Mechanically, we found that an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai induced the secretion of type I IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokines and the subsequent stimulation of the antiviral state in cells. Among various components present in the extract, quercetin was confirmed to have striking antiviral properties. The oral administration of Epimedium koreanum Nakai exhibited preventive effects on BALB/c mice against lethal doses of highly pathogenic influenza A subtypes (H1N1, H5N2, H7N3 and H9N2). Therefore, an extract of Epimedium koreanum Nakai and its components play roles as immunomodulators in the innate immune response, and may be potential candidates for prophylactic or therapeutic treatments against diverse viruses in animal and humans. PMID:25609307

  1. On the derivation of approximations to cellular automata models and the assumption of independence.

    PubMed

    Davies, K J; Green, J E F; Bean, N G; Binder, B J; Ross, J V

    2014-07-01

    Cellular automata are discrete agent-based models, generally used in cell-based applications. There is much interest in obtaining continuum models that describe the mean behaviour of the agents in these models. Previously, continuum models have been derived for agents undergoing motility and proliferation processes, however, these models only hold under restricted conditions. In order to narrow down the reason for these restrictions, we explore three possible sources of error in deriving the model. These sources are the choice of limiting arguments, the use of a discrete-time model as opposed to a continuous-time model and the assumption of independence between the state of sites. We present a rigorous analysis in order to gain a greater understanding of the significance of these three issues. By finding a limiting regime that accurately approximates the conservation equation for the cellular automata, we are able to conclude that the inaccuracy between our approximation and the cellular automata is completely based on the assumption of independence.

  2. Lattice continuum and diffusional creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesarovic, Sinisa Dj.

    2016-04-01

    Diffusional creep is characterized by growth/disappearance of lattice planes at the crystal boundaries that serve as sources/sinks of vacancies, and by diffusion of vacancies. The lattice continuum theory developed here represents a natural and intuitive framework for the analysis of diffusion in crystals and lattice growth/loss at the boundaries. The formulation includes the definition of the Lagrangian reference configuration for the newly created lattice, the transport theorem and the definition of the creep rate tensor for a polycrystal as a piecewise uniform, discontinuous field. The values associated with each crystalline grain are related to the normal diffusional flux at grain boundaries. The governing equations for Nabarro-Herring creep are derived with coupled diffusion and elasticity with compositional eigenstrain. Both, bulk diffusional dissipation and boundary dissipation accompanying vacancy nucleation and absorption, are considered, but the latter is found to be negligible. For periodic arrangements of grains, diffusion formally decouples from elasticity but at the cost of a complicated boundary condition. The equilibrium of deviatorically stressed polycrystals is impossible without inclusion of interface energies. The secondary creep rate estimates correspond to the standard Nabarro-Herring model, and the volumetric creep is small. The initial (primary) creep rate is estimated to be much larger than the secondary creep rate.

  3. Lattice continuum and diffusional creep

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diffusional creep is characterized by growth/disappearance of lattice planes at the crystal boundaries that serve as sources/sinks of vacancies, and by diffusion of vacancies. The lattice continuum theory developed here represents a natural and intuitive framework for the analysis of diffusion in crystals and lattice growth/loss at the boundaries. The formulation includes the definition of the Lagrangian reference configuration for the newly created lattice, the transport theorem and the definition of the creep rate tensor for a polycrystal as a piecewise uniform, discontinuous field. The values associated with each crystalline grain are related to the normal diffusional flux at grain boundaries. The governing equations for Nabarro–Herring creep are derived with coupled diffusion and elasticity with compositional eigenstrain. Both, bulk diffusional dissipation and boundary dissipation accompanying vacancy nucleation and absorption, are considered, but the latter is found to be negligible. For periodic arrangements of grains, diffusion formally decouples from elasticity but at the cost of a complicated boundary condition. The equilibrium of deviatorically stressed polycrystals is impossible without inclusion of interface energies. The secondary creep rate estimates correspond to the standard Nabarro–Herring model, and the volumetric creep is small. The initial (primary) creep rate is estimated to be much larger than the secondary creep rate. PMID:27274696

  4. Lattice continuum and diffusional creep.

    PubMed

    Mesarovic, Sinisa Dj

    2016-04-01

    Diffusional creep is characterized by growth/disappearance of lattice planes at the crystal boundaries that serve as sources/sinks of vacancies, and by diffusion of vacancies. The lattice continuum theory developed here represents a natural and intuitive framework for the analysis of diffusion in crystals and lattice growth/loss at the boundaries. The formulation includes the definition of the Lagrangian reference configuration for the newly created lattice, the transport theorem and the definition of the creep rate tensor for a polycrystal as a piecewise uniform, discontinuous field. The values associated with each crystalline grain are related to the normal diffusional flux at grain boundaries. The governing equations for Nabarro-Herring creep are derived with coupled diffusion and elasticity with compositional eigenstrain. Both, bulk diffusional dissipation and boundary dissipation accompanying vacancy nucleation and absorption, are considered, but the latter is found to be negligible. For periodic arrangements of grains, diffusion formally decouples from elasticity but at the cost of a complicated boundary condition. The equilibrium of deviatorically stressed polycrystals is impossible without inclusion of interface energies. The secondary creep rate estimates correspond to the standard Nabarro-Herring model, and the volumetric creep is small. The initial (primary) creep rate is estimated to be much larger than the secondary creep rate.

  5. Kinematic coupling in continuum atomic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, Michael Jay

    1999-12-01

    I present here a new three-body wavefunction which is a product of five Kinematically Coupled Coulomb waves. The KC5C wavefunction is valid through second order in all scattering regions and satisfies all asymptotic boundary conditions of the Schrödinger equation. The Brauner, Briggs and Klar (BBK) and Alt and Mukhanedzhanov (AM) continuum state wavefunction models are developed here within a unified notation. The new, Kinematic Coupling model incorporates aspects of both of these previous models and combines the reduced charge potential, discussed in the AM model, with the kinetic energy and allows me to retain the exact three-body Hamiltonian by introducing an exact interaction potential. With this, I assert a triple product form for the wavefunction, which incorporates the known continuum Coulomb eigenstates of the asymptotic Hamiltonian in the region Ωα and a third unknown function. This ansatz is then substituted into the exact Schrödinger equation and I find solutions that match smoothly with the Redmond-Merkuriev 3C wavefunction in region ΩO, where all of the particles are far apart. I also find that a symmetric and complete description of the local momenta arises naturally. Unlike the local momenta of the AM model however, these depend on the conjugate coordinates and yield both distortion and coupling effects. The strength of the Kinematic Coupling model is then illustrated by showing that it contains the appropriate two-body coalescence, and reproduces and improves upon the results of the BBK and AM models in the region Ωα, where two of the particles remain close. Moreover, because the distortion terms are vanishingly small at large radial separations and all energies, and identically zero along curves that are determined by the TDCS scattering angles, the KC5C wavefunction may be extended into the interior region. While the Kinematic Coupling framework indicates why the paradigm 3C wavefunction is so successful at describing both electron

  6. Analysis of an optimization-based atomistic-to-continuum coupling method for point defects

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Derek; Shapeev, Alexander V.; Bochev, Pavel B.; ...

    2015-11-16

    Here, we formulate and analyze an optimization-based Atomistic-to-Continuum (AtC) coupling method for problems with point defects. Application of a potential-based atomistic model near the defect core enables accurate simulation of the defect. Away from the core, where site energies become nearly independent of the lattice position, the method switches to a more efficient continuum model. The two models are merged by minimizing the mismatch of their states on an overlap region, subject to the atomistic and continuum force balance equations acting independently in their domains. We prove that the optimization problem is well-posed and establish error estimates.

  7. Analysis of an optimization-based atomistic-to-continuum coupling method for point defects

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Derek; Shapeev, Alexander V.; Bochev, Pavel B.; Luskin, Mitchell

    2015-11-16

    Here, we formulate and analyze an optimization-based Atomistic-to-Continuum (AtC) coupling method for problems with point defects. Application of a potential-based atomistic model near the defect core enables accurate simulation of the defect. Away from the core, where site energies become nearly independent of the lattice position, the method switches to a more efficient continuum model. The two models are merged by minimizing the mismatch of their states on an overlap region, subject to the atomistic and continuum force balance equations acting independently in their domains. We prove that the optimization problem is well-posed and establish error estimates.

  8. Glucagon mediated Ca/sup 2 +/-mobilization in the isolated perfused rat liver is dependent on cellular oxidation-reduction state

    SciTech Connect

    Rashed, H.M.; Patel, T.B.

    1987-05-01

    Alterations in the efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ from non-recirculating isolated perfused rat livers during glucagon (G) or phenylephrine (Ph) infusion was employed as a monitor of Ca/sup 2 +/-mobilization in the intact organ. The effect of altering cellular redox state with infusion of either pyruvate (P) alone, or lactate (L) alone, or a mixture of P and L on Ca/sup 2 +/-mobilization by G was investigated. As a control in all experiments, the ability of Ph (1 x 10/sup -5/M) to alter /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux was also monitored. Under all experimental conditions Ph infusion in liver resulted in a stimulation of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux. In livers of 24h-fasted rats perfused in the absence of any substrate, or in the presence of P alone, or L alone, infusion of 1 x 10/sup -8/M G resulted in a small increase in the rate of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux while 1 x 10/sup -9/M G was ineffective. However, when livers derived from 24h-fasted rats were perfused with a mixture of L and P such that the concentration of L + P was fixed at 2.0 mM and the ratio of L/P was either 4 or 8, infusion of 1 x 10/sup -9/M G resulted in a substantial increase in the rate of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux. These data indicate that cellular redox potential may facilitate or potentiate the ability of G to mobilize Ca/sup 2 +/ in the isolated perfused liver.

  9. An hypothesis on the role of cellular colloid osmotic pressure in determining behavior of cells in vitro including anchorage dependency and maintenance of the differentiated state.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, C

    1984-12-21

    The osmotic problems involved when cells are isolated from tissues are analyzed. Evidence is considered which indicates that in vivo the Na pump is operating at maximal or near maximal rates and that this depends on low leak rates for salts and water due to various aspects of the tissues structure. Dispersion of the tissue results in breakdown of these barriers on free diffusion and the isolated cell is subjected to an enormous increase in passive influx due to colloid osmotic pressure without being able to increase its pumping rate to the extent needed to maintain volume control. It is proposed that the primary problem the cell faces in vitro is to compensate for the effective increase in its colloid pressure, e.g. the colloid osmotic pressure excess, emerging with the breakdown of the tissue structure. The finding that most normal cells have to adhere to a surface in order to grow or "anchorage dependency" is analyzed in terms of the way adhesion and spreading result in changes in ion and water movements into cells enabling them to achieve fluid balance in the face of the colloid pressure excess. It is also proposed that the differentiated state is more dependent on colloid osmotic balance than proliferation. The failure of conditions used in tissue culture to compensate adequately for the colloid pressure excess results in limiting the amount of protein which can be synthesized, dissipation of cellular energy, and changes in orientation of cellular components which contribute directly to the loss of differentiation which occurs during growth in vitro.

  10. Irregular Cellular Learning Automata.

    PubMed

    Esnaashari, Mehdi; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-08-01

    Cellular learning automaton (CLA) is a recently introduced model that combines cellular automaton (CA) and learning automaton (LA). The basic idea of CLA is to use LA to adjust the state transition probability of stochastic CA. This model has been used to solve problems in areas such as channel assignment in cellular networks, call admission control, image processing, and very large scale integration placement. In this paper, an extension of CLA called irregular CLA (ICLA) is introduced. This extension is obtained by removing the structure regularity assumption in CLA. Irregularity in the structure of ICLA is needed in some applications, such as computer networks, web mining, and grid computing. The concept of expediency has been introduced for ICLA and then, conditions under which an ICLA becomes expedient are analytically found.

  11. Continuum methods in lattice perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, Thomas G

    2002-11-15

    We show how methods of continuum perturbation theory can be used to simplify perturbative lattice calculations. We use the technique of asymptotic expansions to expand lattice loop integrals around the continuum limit. After the expansion, all nontrivial dependence on momenta and masses is encoded in continuum loop integrals and the only genuine lattice integrals left are tadpole integrals. Using integration-by-parts relations all of these can be expressed in terms of a small number of master integrals. Four master integrals are needed for bosonic one loop integrals, sixteen in QCD with Wilson or staggered fermions.

  12. A continuum three-zone model for swarms.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jennifer M; Kolpas, Allison; Juchem Neto, Joao Plinio; Rossi, Louis F

    2012-03-01

    We present a progression of three distinct three-zone, continuum models for swarm behavior based on social interactions with neighbors in order to explain simple coherent structures in popular biological models of aggregations. In continuum models, individuals are replaced with density and velocity functions. Individual behavior is modeled with convolutions acting within three interaction zones corresponding to repulsion, orientation, and attraction, respectively. We begin with a variable-speed first-order model in which the velocity depends directly on the interactions. Next, we present a variable-speed second-order model. Finally, we present a constant-speed second-order model that is coordinated with popular individual-based models. For all three models, linear stability analysis shows that the growth or decay of perturbations in an infinite, uniform swarm depends on the strength of attraction relative to repulsion and orientation. We verify that the continuum models predict the behavior of a swarm of individuals by comparing the linear stability results with an individual-based model that uses the same social interaction kernels. In some unstable regimes, we observe that the uniform state will evolve toward a radially symmetric attractor with a variable density. In other unstable regimes, we observe an incoherent swarming state.

  13. Diagnostic Reasoning across the Medical Education Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C. Scott; Hill, William; Francovich, Chris; Morris, Magdalena; Robbins, Bruce; Robins, Lynne; Turner, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to study linguistic and non-linguistic elements of diagnostic reasoning across the continuum of medical education. We performed semi-structured interviews of premedical students, first year medical students, third year medical students, second year internal medicine residents, and experienced faculty (ten each) as they diagnosed three common causes of dyspnea. A second observer recorded emotional tone. All interviews were digitally recorded and blinded transcripts were created. Propositional analysis and concept mapping were performed. Grounded theory was used to identify salient categories and transcripts were scored with these categories. Transcripts were then unblinded. Systematic differences in propositional structure, number of concept connections, distribution of grounded theory categories, episodic and semantic memories, and emotional tone were identified. Summary concept maps were created and grounded theory concepts were explored for each learning level. We identified three major findings: (1) The “apprentice effect” in novices (high stress and low narrative competence); (2) logistic concept growth in intermediates; and (3) a cognitive state transition (between analytical and intuitive approaches) in experts. These findings warrant further study and comparison. PMID:27429275

  14. Four-body continuum effects in 11Be + d scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descouvemont, P.

    2017-09-01

    We present a new reaction model, which permits the description of reactions where both colliding nuclei present a low threshold to breakup. The method corresponds to a four-body extension of the Continuum Discretized Coupled Channel (CDCC) model. We first discuss the theoretical formalism, and then apply the method to 11Be + d scattering at E c . m . = 45.5 MeV. The 11Be nucleus and the deuteron are described by 10Be + n and p + n structures, respectively. The model involves very large bases, but we show that an accurate description of elastic-scattering data may be achieved only when continuum states of 11Be and of the deuteron are introduced simultaneously. We also discuss breakup calculations, and show that the cross section is larger for 11Be than for the deuteron. The present theory provides reliable wave functions that may be used in the analysis of (d , p) or (d , n) experiments involving radioactive beams.

  15. Periodic amplitude variations in Jovian continuum radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of periodic variations in the amplitude of continuum radiation near 3 kHz trapped in the Jovian magnetosphere shows structure with periods near both five and ten hours. Contrary to a plausible initial idea, the continuum amplitudes are not organized by position of the observer relative to the dense plasma sheet. Instead, there seem to be preferred orientations of system III longitude with respect to the direction to the sun which account for the peaks. This implies a clock-like modulation of the continuum radiation intensity as opposed to a searchlight effect. The importance of the dipole longitude-solar wind alignment to the amplitude of the continuum radiation implies the source region of the radiation is near the magnetopause and may indirectly tie the generation of the radio waves to the clocklike modulation of energetic electron fluxes from Jupiter.

  16. A continuum model of nanocrystalline metals under shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jérusalem, Antoine; Radovitzky, Raúl

    2009-03-01

    Recent atomistic simulations have shown that grain boundary sliding in nanocrystals is altered under shock loading conditions. It is found that the high state of compression inhibits grain boundary sliding and reactivates intragrain dislocation activity. This leads to higher material strength and postpones the transition between these two deformation mechanisms to smaller grain size. We present here a continuum model aimed at extending the model proposed by Jérusalem et al for quasi-static and high rates (2007 Phil. Mag. 87 2541-59) to shock loading. To this end, the shock response of nanocrystals is investigated by accounting specifically for additional frictional deformation-inhibiting effects. The model is based on a numerical finite element discretization of the polycrystal, considered as a continuum, with embedded surfaces of discontinuity accounting for the grain boundary response. Interface elements are formulated to account for the special kinematics of grain boundaries, i.e. to describe grain boundary frictional sliding and other accommodation mechanisms. The response of grain interiors is modeled with a high rate equation of state for the volumetric response and a simple plasticity model to describe their deviatoric response. A large-scale parallel computing framework is finally developed to calibrate and investigate the specificities of the deformation mechanisms under shock loading conditions, and the results are compared in detail with atomistic results. As a conclusion, this extended three-dimensional continuum model constitutes a promising first step for the characterization of large-scale nanocrystalline deformation under the most complete range of loading rates yet proposed in continuum simulations, namely, from quasi-static to shock loading.

  17. Noise scaling in continuum percolating films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfunkel, G. A.; Weissman, M. B.

    1985-07-01

    Measurements of the scaling of 1/f noise magnitude versus resistance were made in metal films as the metal was removed by sandblasting. This procedure gives an approximate experimental realization of a Swiss-cheese continuum-percolation model, for which theory indicates some scaling properties very different from lattice percolation. The ratio of the resistance and noise exponents was in strong disagreement with lattice-percolation predictions and agreed approximately with simple continuum predictions.

  18. Geometric continuum regularization of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.B. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-11-08

    An overview of the continuum regularization program is given. The program is traced from its roots in stochastic quantization, with emphasis on the examples of regularized gauge theory, the regularized general nonlinear sigma model and regularized quantum gravity. In its coordinate-invariant form, the regularization is seen as entirely geometric: only the supermetric on field deformations is regularized, and the prescription provides universal nonperturbative invariant continuum regularization across all quantum field theory. 54 refs.

  19. Cassini observation of Jovian anomalous continuum radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Sheng-Yi; Gurnett, D. A.; Menietti, J. D.; Kurth, W. S.; Fischer, G.; Schippers, P.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2012-04-01

    Jovian anomalous continuum is a narrowband electromagnetic radiation near 10 kHz that can escape from Jupiter's magnetosphere to interplanetary space. One possible source mechanism is the magnetosheath re-radiation of the Jovian low frequency radio emissions such as the quasiperiodic (QP) radio emissions, broadband kilometric radiation (bKOM) and non-thermal continuum. Jovian anomalous continuum was consistently observed by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument from 2000 to 2004, right before the Saturn orbit insertion, which means the radiation can be detected as far as 8 AU away from Jupiter. An analysis of intensity versus radial distance shows that the Jovian anomalous continuum has a line source rather than a point source, consistent with the theory that the emission is radiated by the whole length of the magnetotail. The emissions are modulated at the system III period of Jupiter and are unpolarized. Since the lower cutoff frequency of the anomalous continuum is related to the plasma frequency in the magnetosheath of Jupiter, which is a function of solar wind density, the recurrent variations of the lower cutoff frequency can be used as a remote diagnostic of the solar wind condition at Jupiter. We propose that the frequency dispersion, a unique characteristic of the anomalous continuum, is likely a comprehensive effect of both the slow group velocity near the local plasma frequency and the refraction/scattering of the waves by density structures as they propagate in the magnetosheath.

  20. Cellular Morphogenesis In Silico

    PubMed Central

    Shinbrot, Troy; Chun, Young; Caicedo-Carvajal, Carlos; Foty, Ramsey

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We describe a model that simulates spherical cells of different types that can migrate and interact either attractively or repulsively. We find that both expected morphologies and previously unreported patterns spontaneously self-assemble. Among the newly discovered patterns are a segmented state of alternating discs, and a “shish-kebab” state, in which one cell type forms a ring around a second type. We show that these unique states result from cellular attraction that increases with distance (e.g., as membranes stretch viscoelastically), and would not be seen in traditional, e.g., molecular, potentials that diminish with distance. Most of the states found computationally have been observed in vitro, and it remains to be established what role these self-assembled states may play in in vivo morphogenesis. PMID:19686642

  1. Experimental micro mechanics methods for conventional and negative Poisson's ratio cellular solids as Cosserat continua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakes, R.

    1991-01-01

    Continuum representations of micromechanical phenomena in structured materials are described, with emphasis on cellular solids. These phenomena are interpreted in light of Cosserat elasticity, a generalized continuum theory which admits degrees of freedom not present in classical elasticity. These are the rotation of points in the material, and a couple per unit area or couple stress. Experimental work in this area is reviewed, and other interpretation schemes are discussed. The applicability of Cosserat elasticity to cellular solids and fibrous composite materials is considered as is the application of related generalized continuum theories. New experimental results are presented for foam materials with negative Poisson's ratios.

  2. Experimental micro mechanics methods for conventional and negative Poisson's ratio cellular solids as Cosserat continua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakes, R.

    1991-01-01

    Continuum representations of micromechanical phenomena in structured materials are described, with emphasis on cellular solids. These phenomena are interpreted in light of Cosserat elasticity, a generalized continuum theory which admits degrees of freedom not present in classical elasticity. These are the rotation of points in the material, and a couple per unit area or couple stress. Experimental work in this area is reviewed, and other interpretation schemes are discussed. The applicability of Cosserat elasticity to cellular solids and fibrous composite materials is considered as is the application of related generalized continuum theories. New experimental results are presented for foam materials with negative Poisson's ratios.

  3. Cancer communication and informatics research across the cancer continuum.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Bradford W; Beckjord, Ellen; Rutten, Lila J Finney; Fagerlin, Angela; Cameron, Linda D

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, dramatic changes brought about by a rapid diffusion of Internet technologies, cellular telephones, mobile devices, personal digital assistants, electronic health records, and data visualization have helped to create a revolution in health communication. To understand the implications of this communication revolution for cancer care, the National Cancer Institute launched an ambitious set of research priorities under its "extraordinary opportunities" program. We present an overview of some of the relevant behavioral research being conducted within the perspective of this extraordinary opportunity in cancer communication research. We begin by tracing the implications of this research for behavioral scientists across the continuum of cancer care from primary prevention (e.g., tobacco control, diet, exercise, sun protection, and immunization against human papilloma virus), to secondary prevention (e.g., screening for polyps, lesions, and early stage neoplasms), to diagnosis and treatment, posttreatment survivorship, and end of life. Along each point of the continuum, we describe a natural evolution of knowledge from studies on the traditional role of media to research on the changing role of new media and informatics, and we carefully highlight the role that psychological research has played in improving communication- and health-related outcomes along the way. We conclude with an appeal to psychologists of many different backgrounds to join with biomedical researchers, engineers, clinical practitioners, and others to accelerate progress against cancer.

  4. Typology of nonlinear activity waves in a layered neural continuum.

    PubMed

    Koch, Paul; Leisman, Gerry

    2006-04-01

    Neural tissue, a medium containing electro-chemical energy, can amplify small increments in cellular activity. The growing disturbance, measured as the fraction of active cells, manifests as propagating waves. In a layered geometry with a time delay in synaptic signals between the layers, the delay is instrumental in determining the amplified wavelengths. The growth of the waves is limited by the finite number of neural cells in a given region of the continuum. As wave growth saturates, the resulting activity patterns in space and time show a variety of forms, ranging from regular monochromatic waves to highly irregular mixtures of different spatial frequencies. The type of wave configuration is determined by a number of parameters, including alertness and synaptic conditioning as well as delay. For all cases studied, using numerical solution of the nonlinear Wilson-Cowan (1973) equations, there is an interval in delay in which the wave mixing occurs. As delay increases through this interval, during a series of consecutive waves propagating through a continuum region, the activity within that region changes from a single-frequency to a multiple-frequency pattern and back again. The diverse spatio-temporal patterns give a more concrete form to several metaphors advanced over the years to attempt an explanation of cognitive phenomena: Activity waves embody the "holographic memory" (Pribram, 1991); wave mixing provides a plausible cause of the competition called "neural Darwinism" (Edelman, 1988); finally the consecutive generation of growing neural waves can explain the discontinuousness of "psychological time" (Stroud, 1955).

  5. Sacrifice Along the Energy Continuum: A Call for Energy Justice

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The confluence of energy supply- and demand-side dynamics links vulnerable communities along the spectrum of energy production and consumption. The disproportionate burden borne by vulnerable communities along the energy continuum are seldom examined simultaneously. Yet, from a justice perspective there are important parallels that merit further exploration in the United States and beyond. A first step is to understand links to vulnerability and justice along the energy continuum by way of theoretical constructs and practical applications. The present article posits energy as a social and environmental justice issue and advances our current understanding of the links between energy and vulnerability, particularly in the U.S. context. Drawing on several emerging concepts including, “energy sacrifice zones,” “energy insecurity” and “energy justice,” this article lays a foundation for examining critical sacrifices along the energy continuum. To conclude, four basic rights are proposed as a starting point to achieve recognition and equity for vulnerable populations in the realm of energy. PMID:27053980

  6. Ensuring congruency in multiscale modeling: towards linking agent based and continuum biomechanical models of arterial adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hayenga, Heather N; Thorne, Bryan C; Peirce, Shayn M; Humphrey, Jay D

    2011-11-01

    There is a need to develop multiscale models of vascular adaptations to understand tissue-level manifestations of cellular level mechanisms. Continuum-based biomechanical models are well suited for relating blood pressures and flows to stress-mediated changes in geometry and properties, but less so for describing underlying mechanobiological processes. Discrete stochastic agent-based models are well suited for representing biological processes at a cellular level, but not for describing tissue-level mechanical changes. We present here a conceptually new approach to facilitate the coupling of continuum and agent-based models. Because of ubiquitous limitations in both the tissue- and cell-level data from which one derives constitutive relations for continuum models and rule-sets for agent-based models, we suggest that model verification should enforce congruency across scales. That is, multiscale model parameters initially determined from data sets representing different scales should be refined, when possible, to ensure that common outputs are consistent. Potential advantages of this approach are illustrated by comparing simulated aortic responses to a sustained increase in blood pressure predicted by continuum and agent-based models both before and after instituting a genetic algorithm to refine 16 objectively bounded model parameters. We show that congruency-based parameter refinement not only yielded increased consistency across scales, it also yielded predictions that are closer to in vivo observations.

  7. Mirrored continuum and molecular scale simulations of the ignition of gamma phase RDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Scott; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Joshi, Kaushik; Lee, Kibaek

    2017-01-01

    We describe the ignition of an explosive crystal of gamma-phase RDX due to a thermal hot spot with reactive molecular dynamics (RMD), with first-principles trained, reactive force field based molecular potentials that represents an extremely complex reaction network. The RMD simulation is analyzed by sorting molecular product fragments into high and low molecular weight groups, to represent identifiable components that can be interpreted by a continuum model. A continuum model based on a Gibbs formulation has a single temperature and stress state for the mixture. The continuum simulation that mirrors the atomistic simulation allows us to study the atomistic simulation in the familiar physical chemistry framework and provides an essential, continuum/atomistic link.

  8. Control of density fluctuations in atomistic-continuum simulations of dense liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsalis, E. M.; Walther, J. H.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2007-07-01

    We present a control algorithm to eliminate spurious density fluctuations associated with the coupling of atomistic and continuum descriptions for dense liquids. A Schwartz domain decomposition algorithm is employed to couple molecular dynamics for the simulation of the atomistic system with a continuum solver for the simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The lack of periodic boundary conditions in the molecular dynamics simulations hinders the proper accounting for the virial pressure leading to spurious density fluctuations at the continuum-atomistic interface. An ad hoc boundary force is usually employed to remedy this situation. We propose the calculation of this boundary force using a control algorithm that explicitly cancels the density fluctuations. The results demonstrate that the present approach outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms. The conceptual and algorithmic simplicity of the method makes it suitable for any type of coupling between atomistic and continuum descriptions of dense fluids.

  9. Control of density fluctuations in atomistic-continuum simulations of dense liquids.

    PubMed

    Kotsalis, E M; Walther, J H; Koumoutsakos, P

    2007-07-01

    We present a control algorithm to eliminate spurious density fluctuations associated with the coupling of atomistic and continuum descriptions for dense liquids. A Schwartz domain decomposition algorithm is employed to couple molecular dynamics for the simulation of the atomistic system with a continuum solver for the simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The lack of periodic boundary conditions in the molecular dynamics simulations hinders the proper accounting for the virial pressure leading to spurious density fluctuations at the continuum-atomistic interface. An ad hoc boundary force is usually employed to remedy this situation. We propose the calculation of this boundary force using a control algorithm that explicitly cancels the density fluctuations. The results demonstrate that the present approach outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms. The conceptual and algorithmic simplicity of the method makes it suitable for any type of coupling between atomistic and continuum descriptions of dense fluids.

  10. Numerical Modelling and Damage Assessment of Rotary Wing Aircraft Cabin Door Using Continuum Damage Mechanics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyina, Gangadhara Rao T.; Rayavarapu, Vijaya Kumar; V. V., Subba Rao

    2017-02-01

    The prediction of ultimate strength remains the main challenge in the simulation of the mechanical response of composite structures. This paper examines continuum damage model to predict the strength and size effects for deformation and failure response of polymer composite laminates when subjected to complex state of stress. The paper also considers how the overall results of the exercise can be applied in design applications. The continuum damage model is described and the resulting prediction of size effects are compared against the standard benchmark solutions. The stress analysis for strength prediction of rotary wing aircraft cabin door is carried out. The goal of this study is to extend the proposed continuum damage model such that it can be accurately predict the failure around stress concentration regions. The finite element-based continuum damage mechanics model can be applied to the structures and components of arbitrary configurations where analytical solutions could not be developed.

  11. Observations of Continuum Depression in Warm Dense Matter with X-Ray Thomson Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, L. B.; Kritcher, A. L.; Pak, A.; Ma, T.; Döppner, T.; Fortmann, C.; Divol, L.; Jones, O. S.; Landen, O. L.; Scott, H. A.; Vorberger, J.; Chapman, D. A.; Gericke, D. O.; Mattern, B. A.; Seidler, G. T.; Gregori, G.; Falcone, R. W.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2014-04-01

    Detailed measurements of the electron densities, temperatures, and ionization states of compressed CH shells approaching pressures of 50 Mbar are achieved with spectrally resolved x-ray scattering. Laser-produced 9 keV x-rays probe the plasma during the transient state of three-shock coalescence. High signal-to-noise x-ray scattering spectra show direct evidence of continuum depression in highly degenerate warm dense matter states with electron densities ne>1024 cm-3. The measured densities and temperatures agree well with radiation-hydrodynamic modeling when accounting for continuum lowering in calculations that employ detailed configuration accounting.

  12. A continuum approach to phoretic motions: Thermophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Howard; Bielenberg, James R.

    2005-09-01

    A purely continuum theory for the thermophoretic velocity of aerosol and hydrosol particles in the zero Knudsen number, near continuum limit, Kn=0+, valid for both gases and liquids, is proposed. This theoretical result is based upon a fundamentally modified version of the traditional equations governing continuum fluid motion, one which accounts for an intrinsic difference in a fluid's barycentric (mass-based) velocity and its kinematic velocity of volume, this difference arising during molecular transport processes in fluids within which a mass density gradient exists. Our continuum-scale approach contains no free parameters, nor does it rely upon any sub-continuum, molecular concepts, such as Maxwell's thermally-induced velocity-slip condition. The resulting expression for the thermophoretic velocity of a non-Brownian, spherical particle agrees both constitutively and phenomenologically with available correlations of such velocity data in gases, as well as with the more limited data for liquids. Furthermore, the effect of shape and orientation is discussed for the case of non-spherical particles, with specific results furnished for effectively non-conducting particles. Agreement of the theory with the data furnishes explicit experimental support of the non-traditional fluid-mechanical equations utilized herein.

  13. Continuum effects in neutron-drip-line oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossez, K.; Rotureau, J.; Michel, N.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2017-08-01

    The binding-energy pattern along the neutron-rich oxygen chain, governed by an interplay between shell effects and many-body correlations impacted by strong couplings to one- and two-neutron continua, make these isotopes a unique testing ground for nuclear models. In this work, we investigate ground states and low-lying excited states of O-2823 using the complex-energy Gamow shell model and density matrix renormalization group method with a finite-range two-body interaction optimized to the bound states and resonances of O-2623, assuming a core of 22O. Our results suggest that the ground state of 28O has a threshold character, i.e., is very weakly bound or slightly unbound. We also predict narrow excited resonances in 25O and 27O. The inclusion of the large continuum space significantly impacts predicted binding energies of O-2826. This implies that the careful treatment of a neutron continuum is necessary prior to assessing the spectroscopic quality of effective interactions in this region.

  14. Continuum Approaches for Describing Solid-Gas and Solid-Liquid Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    architecture, cellular automata , etc.) as they become available. These computer simulations can be used to evaluate the rheological properties and, hence, be...avalanches and sand- dune formation, in addition to its relevance for solid transport e.g., circulating fluidized beds. Simple kinetic theories of particle...Real flowing sand forms sandpiles (or sand dunes ) stabilized by sliding friction as the velocity becomes small, yet a continuum fluid model of the

  15. Continuum Absorption Coefficient of Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armaly, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of heat transfer to the heat shield of a Jupiter probe has been estimated to be one order of magnitude higher than any previously experienced in an outer space exploration program. More than one-third of this heat load is due to an emission of continuum radiation from atoms and ions. The existing computer code for calculating the continuum contribution to the total load utilizes a modified version of Biberman's approximate method. The continuum radiation absorption cross sections of a C - H - O - N ablation system were examined in detail. The present computer code was evaluated and updated by being compared with available exact and approximate calculations and correlations of experimental data. A detailed calculation procedure, which can be applied to other atomic species, is presented. The approximate correlations can be made to agree with the available exact and experimental data.

  16. Continuum modeling of two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Bataille, J.; Kestin, J.

    1981-12-01

    Continuum modeling of two-phase flows can essentially be achieved in two ways. The first approach, the so-called continuum theory of mixtures, ignores the details of the flow occurring on the microscopic level, while the second one is the result of some averaging procedure. Although they both lead, as expected, to the same set of basic equations, they differ strongly in their spirit when closure equations have to be found. In the present report, we have attempted to give a brief critical review of both approaches, to compare them and to discuss some of the major difficulties which arise. It is shown that the application of the continuum theory of mixtures is, in most cases, questionable and that the only appropriate way of finding closure equations, besides correlating experimental results, consists in a useful investigation of the microscopic flow pattern associated with an adequate averaging technique.

  17. Defining and testing a granular continuum element

    SciTech Connect

    Rycroft, Chris H.; Kamrin, Ken; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2007-12-03

    Continuum mechanics relies on the fundamental notion of amesoscopic volume "element" in which properties averaged over discreteparticles obey deterministic relationships. Recent work on granularmaterials suggests a continuum law may be inapplicable, revealinginhomogeneities at the particle level, such as force chains and slow cagebreaking. Here, we analyze large-scale Discrete-Element Method (DEM)simulations of different granular flows and show that a "granularelement" can indeed be defined at the scale of dynamical correlations,roughly three to five particle diameters. Its rheology is rather subtle,combining liquid-like dependence on deformation rate and solid-likedependence on strain. Our results confirm some aspects of classicalplasticity theory (e.g., coaxiality of stress and deformation rate),while contradicting others (i.e., incipient yield), and can guide thedevelopment of more realistic continuum models.

  18. Hadron resonances with a quark core embedded in the continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Kiyotaka; Takeuchi, Sachiko; Takizawa, Makoto

    2011-05-06

    We investigate the excited baryons and mesons which cannot be described in terms of a simple constituent quark model, such as {Lambda}(1405) and X(3872) as a resonance in a coupled channel hadron-hadron (baryon-meson or meson-meson) scattering with a 'bound state embedded in the continuum' (BSEC). For this purpose, we solve the Lippmann-Schwinger equation including a BSEC in the momentum space. This BSEC is introduced by hand, as a state not originated from a simple baryon-meson or meson-meson system. We assume it comes from the three-quark state or quark-anti quark state and show such a picture can describe the {Lambda}(1405) and X(3872) resonances.

  19. Cellular Seismology Analysis of the Western United States: Comparing and Contrasting the San Andreas Transform Zone, the Cascadia Subduction Zone, and the Western Intraplate Hinterland Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Maxwell N.

    The western United States (WUS) is an area of high seismic activity. The Juan de Fuca, Pacific, and North American plates all meet in this area, resulting in zones of subduction and strike-slip faulting, as well as other styles of faulting, all of which make it prone to frequent, as well as large magnitude earthquakes. In this study the WUS encompasses the area between 30° to 52°N and 110° to 131°W. The diverse seismicity and tectonics of the area makes the study of seismo-tectonic processes in the WUS important not only in terms of basic geoscience, but also in terms of earthquake hazards. Understanding earthquake processes in this region is critical because of the potential for devastating earthquakes to occur along the Pacific-Juan de Fuca-North American plate boundary system. Large WUS earthquakes do not, however, only occur along these plate boundaries. They can also happen in intraplate environments within the WUS. The WUS includes three distinct tectonic regions for which this study compares and contrasts characteristics of seismic activity: the Cascadia subduction region, the San Andreas strike-slip region, and a continental extension/intraplate region to the east of the major plate boundaries referred to here as the "Western Intraplate Hinterland Region". To help make these comparisons, the method of "Cellular Seismology" (CS; Kafka, 2002, 2007), is used here to investigate similarities and differences in the extent to which past earthquakes delineate zones where future earthquakes are likely to occur in the WUS and its various tectonic sub-regions. The results of this study show that while there seems to be a "signal" of CS predictability being dependent on tectonic region, that signal is subtle in most cases, meaning that there is not a significant difference in the level of CS predictability between the regions stated here. This means we can apply CS predictability studies widely across different regions, however, it also counterintuitively suggests

  20. Hydrologic ramifications of an increased role of wildland fire across the rangeland-dry forest continuum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The increased role of wildland fire across the rangeland-dry forest continuum in the western United States (US) presents landscape-scale consequences relative runoff and erosion. Much of the Intermountain West now exists in a state in which rangeland and woodland wildfires stimulated by invasive che...

  1. A Continuum Damage Model for Viscoelastic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    CLASSIFICATION AUTHORITY 3b. DECLASSIFICATION/OOWNGRAOING SCHEDULE 4. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER(S) MM- 4762 -87-17 e«. NAME OF PERFORMING...ENGINEERING SCIENCES DIRECTORATE CONTACT N00014-82-K-0562 M M- 4762 -87-17, / NOVEMEBER 1987 A CONTINUUM DAMAGE MODEL FOR VISCOELASTIC MATERIALS by Y...Contract F33615-67-C-1412), In "Workshop on a Continuum Mechanics Approach to Damage and Life Prediction" NSF-Solid Mechanics Program, 119. ASTM STP

  2. Decay of a nonlinear impurity in a structured continuum from a nonlinear Fano-Anderson model

    SciTech Connect

    Longhi, Stefano

    2007-05-01

    The decay dynamics of a nonlinear impurity mode embedded in a linear structured continuum is theoretically investigated in the framework of a nonlinear Fano-Anderson model. A gradient flow dynamics for the survival probability is derived in the Van Hove ({lambda}{sup 2}t) limit by a multiple-scale asymptotic analysis, and the role of nonlinearity on the decay law is discussed. In particular, it is shown that the existence of bound states embedded in the continuum acts as transient trapping states which slow down the decay. The dynamical behavior predicted in the {lambda}{sup 2}t limit is studied in detail for a simple tight-binding one-dimensional lattice model, which may describe electron or photon transport in condensed matter or photonic systems. Numerical simulations of the underlying equations confirm, in particular, the trapping effect in the decay process due to bound states embedded in the continuum.

  3. Core excitations in (d,p) reactions including transitions to continuum levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makoto, Tanifuji; Osamu, Mikoshiba; Tokuo, Terasawa

    1982-11-01

    Effects of core excitations in (d, p) reactions are investigated for 12C(d, p) 13C ∗ reactions in the CCBA framework, where couplings of channels are considered for the ground and first-excited levels of 12C in the initial state and for the bound {1}/{2}+and{5}/{2}+ levels and low-lying continuum levels of 13C in the final state, where a discretization is introduced for the continuum region. In the transitions to the continuum levels, matrix elements are calculated by the use of scattering-state wave functions for the final neutron. Theoretical cross sections and vector analyzing powers are compared with experimental data, where significant contributions of core-excitation processes are identified, particularly in the transition to the {5}/{2}+II level of 13C. Spectra of emitted protons are calculated and compared with the measured ones. Adequate agreement between theory and experiment is found throughout the present investigation.

  4. Geometry of the Shannon mutual information in continuum QFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junior, David R.; Oxman, Luis E.

    2017-06-01

    We analyze geometric terms and scaling properties of the Shannon mutual information in the continuum. This is done for a free massless scalar field theory in d -dimensions, in a coherent state reduced with respect to a general differentiable manifold. As a by-product, we find an expression for the reduced probability density of finding a certain field on a ball. We will also introduce and compute the Fisher information that this probability carries about the location of the observation region. This is an interesting information measure that refers to points in physical space, although in relativistic quantum field theory they are labels and not fluctuating quantum observables.

  5. Cellular automatons applied to gas dynamic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Lyle N.; Coopersmith, Robert M.; Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper compares the results of a relatively new computational fluid dynamics method, cellular automatons, with experimental data and analytical results. This technique has been shown to qualitatively predict fluidlike behavior; however, there have been few published comparisons with experiment or other theories. Comparisons are made for a one-dimensional supersonic piston problem, Stokes first problem, and the flow past a normal flat plate. These comparisons are used to assess the ability of the method to accurately model fluid dynamic behavior and to point out its limitations. Reasonable results were obtained for all three test cases, but the fundamental limitations of cellular automatons are numerous. It may be misleading, at this time, to say that cellular automatons are a computationally efficient technique. Other methods, based on continuum or kinetic theory, would also be very efficient if as little of the physics were included.

  6. Fluctuation relation based continuum model for thermoviscoplasticity in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Chowdhury, Shubhankar; Roy, Debasish; Reddy, J. N.; Srinivasa, Arun

    2016-11-01

    A continuum plasticity model for metals is presented from considerations of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Of specific interest is the application of a fluctuation relation that subsumes the second law of thermodynamics en route to deriving the evolution equations for the internal state variables. The modelling itself is accomplished in a two-temperature framework that appears naturally by considering the thermodynamic system to be composed of two weakly interacting subsystems, viz. a kinetic vibrational subsystem corresponding to the atomic lattice vibrations and a configurational subsystem of the slower degrees of freedom describing the motion of defects in a plastically deforming metal. An apparently physical nature of the present model derives upon considering the dislocation density, which characterizes the configurational subsystem, as a state variable. Unlike the usual constitutive modelling aided by the second law of thermodynamics that merely provides a guideline to select the admissible (though possibly non-unique) processes, the present formalism strictly determines the process or the evolution equations for the thermodynamic states while including the effect of fluctuations. The continuum model accommodates finite deformation and describes plastic deformation in a yield-free setup. The theory here is essentially limited to face-centered cubic metals modelled with a single dislocation density as the internal variable. Limited numerical simulations are presented with validation against relevant experimental data.

  7. A continuum of compass spin models on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Haiyuan; Liu, Bo; Zhao, Erhai; Liu, W. Vincent

    2016-05-01

    Quantum spin models with spatially dependent interactions, known as compass models, play an important role in the study of frustrated quantum magnetism. One example is the Kitaev model on the honeycomb lattice with spin-liquid ground states. Another example is the geometrically frustrated quantum 120° model whose ground state has not been unambiguously established. To generalize the Kitaev model beyond the exactly solvable limit and connect it with other models, we propose a new model, dubbed ``the tripod model,'' which contains a continuum of compass-type models. It not only unifies paradigmatic spin models, but also enables the study of their quantum phase transitions. We obtain the phase diagram of the tripod model numerically by tensor networks in the thermodynamic limit. We show that the ground state of the quantum 120° model has long-range dimer order. Moreover, we find an extended spin-disordered (spin-liquid) phase between the dimer phase and an antiferromagnetic phase. The unification and solution of a continuum of frustrated spin models as outline here may be useful to exploring new domains of other quantum spin or orbital models.

  8. A continuum of compass spin models on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Haiyuan; Liu, Bo; Zhao, Erhai; Liu, W. Vincent

    2016-05-01

    Quantum spin models with spatially dependent interactions, known as compass models, play an important role in the study of frustrated quantum magnetism. One example is the Kitaev model on the honeycomb lattice with spin-liquid (SL) ground states and anyonic excitations. Another example is the geometrically frustrated quantum 120° model on the same lattice whose ground state has not been unambiguously established. To generalize the Kitaev model beyond the exactly solvable limit and connect it with other compass models, we propose a new model, dubbed ‘the tripod model’, which contains a continuum of compass-type models. It smoothly interpolates the Ising model, the Kitaev model, and the quantum 120° model by tuning a single parameter {θ }\\prime , the angle between the three legs of a tripod in the spin space. Hence it not only unifies three paradigmatic spin models, but also enables the study of their quantum phase transitions. We obtain the phase diagram of the tripod model numerically by tensor networks in the thermodynamic limit. We show that the ground state of the quantum 120° model has long-range dimer order. Moreover, we find an extended spin-disordered (SL) phase between the dimer phase and an antiferromagnetic phase. The unification and solution of a continuum of frustrated spin models as outline here may be useful to exploring new domains of other quantum spin or orbital models.

  9. The HIV treatment cascade and care continuum: updates, goals, and recommendations for the future.

    PubMed

    Kay, Emma Sophia; Batey, D Scott; Mugavero, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    The HIV care continuum is a framework that models the dynamic stages of HIV care. The continuum consists of five main steps, which, at the population level, are depicted cross-sectionally as the HIV treatment cascade. These steps include diagnosis, linkage to care (LTC), retention in care (RiC), adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), and viral suppression. Although the HIV treatment cascade is represented as a linear, unidirectional framework, persons living with HIV (PLWH) often experience the care continuum in a less streamlined fashion, skip steps altogether, or even exit the continuum for a period of time and regress to an earlier stage. The proportion of PLWH decreases at each successive step of the cascade, beginning with an estimated 86% who are diagnosed and dropping dramatically to approximately 30% of PLWH who are virally suppressed in the United States (US). In this current issues review, we describe each step in the cascade, discuss targeted interventions that address weak points in the continuum, review domestic and international policies that help shape and direct HIV care strategies, and conclude with recommendations and future directions for HIV providers and policymakers. While we primarily examine issues related to domestic HIV care in the US, we also discuss international applications of the continuum in order to provide broader context.

  10. Efficient white-light continuum generation in transparent solid media using ˜250 fs, 1053 nm laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, T.; Figueira, G.

    2010-04-01

    We report white-light continuum generation in solid-state media (fused silica and sapphire) using seed pulses centered at 1053 nm and at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. We have investigated the influence of different parameters, such as changing the focal position and the energy of the incident pulse within the medium to obtain optimal white-light continuum. Preliminary results indicate that for intense laser pulses, waist position inside the media and input energy are crucial for high efficiency white-light continuum generation over the wavelength range 400-1100 nm. It was also found that pulses centered at 1053 nm generate a flatter spectrum, with higher white-light continuum efficiency. Such a flat response over a broad bandwidth in the continuum has the potential to be efficiently compressed to shorter durations.

  11. Radio continuum from FU Orionis stars

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, L.F.; Hartmann, L.W.; Chavira, E. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Puebla )

    1990-12-01

    Using the very large array a sensitive search is conducted for 3.6-cm continuum emission toward four FU Orionis objects: FU Ori, V1515 Cyg, V1057 Cyg, and Elias 1-12. V1057 Cyg and Elias 1-12 at the level of about 0.1 mJy is detected. The association of radio continuum emission with these FU Ori objects strengthens a possible relation between FU Ori stars and objects like L 1551 IRS 5 and Z CMa that are also sources of radio continuum emission and have been proposed as post-FU Ori objects. Whether the radio continuum emission is caused by free-free emission from ionized ejecta or if it is optically thin emission from a dusty disk is discussed. It was determined that, in the archives of the Tonantzintla Observatory, a plate taken in 1957 does not show Elias 1-12. This result significantly narrows the time range for the epoch of the outburst of this source to between 1957 and 1965. 38 refs.

  12. Aims, Modes, and the Continuum of Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beale, Walter H.

    A framework for the study of discourse, based on the analysis of three superordinate features of discourse (asymmetry, hierarchy, and continuum), is proposed in this paper. The paper begins by noting the confusion in terminology that exists in the world of composition pedagogy and theory; pointing to the need for a framework for testing,…

  13. Continuum treatment of electronic polarization effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yu-Hong; Luo, Ray

    2007-03-01

    A continuum treatment of electronic polarization has been explored for in molecular mechanics simulations in implicit solvents. The dielectric constant for molecule interior is the only parameter in the continuum polarizable model. A value of 4 is found to yield optimal agreement with high-level ab initio quantum mechanical calculations for the tested molecular systems. Interestingly, its performance is not sensitive to the definition of molecular volume, in which the continuum electronic polarization is defined. In this model, quantum mechanical electrostatic field in different dielectric environments from vacuum, low-dielectric organic solvent, and water can be used simultaneously in atomic charge fitting to achieve consistent treatment of electrostatic interactions. The tests show that a single set of atomic charges can be used consistently in different dielectric environments and different molecular conformations, and the atomic charges transfer well from training monomers to tested dimers. The preliminary study gives us the hope of developing a continuum polarizable force field for more consistent simulations of proteins and nucleic acids in implicit solvents.

  14. Edmonton's Developing Continuum of Residential Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinkaide, Perry S.

    1977-01-01

    Available from: Canadian Association for the Mentally Retarded, Kinsmen National Institute on Mental Retardation Building, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Downsview, Ontario M3J 1P3, Canada. Described is a continuum of services developing in Edmonton, Canada for mentally handicapped persons and their parents who prefer community placement to…

  15. Questioning the continuum: specialization in rock climbing

    Treesearch

    Sean Nelb; Rudy M. Schuster

    2008-01-01

    Recreation specialization was originally conceived as a behavioral continuum ranging from general to more particular behaviors within an activity. It was assumed that an individual progressed from one subactivity to another in a hierarchical order. In recent years the practicality of such ordering has come under doubt; it may be possible to specialize in individual...

  16. Language Attitudes in a Creole Continuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickford, John R.

    The standard view of language attitudes in a creole continuum is that the creole is considered bad and the standard language is considered good. This standard view fits with the theory of decreolization by which such continua are thought to have come about. A study was carried out in Guyana in an effort to overcome the perceived limitations of the…

  17. A Multiscale Morphing Continuum Description for Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, James; Wonnell, Louis

    2015-11-01

    Turbulence is a flow physics phenomena invlolving multiple length scales. The popular Navier- Stokes equations only possess one length/time scale. Therefore, extremely fine mesh is needed for DNS attempting to resolve the small scale motion, which comes with a burden of excessive computational cost. For practical application with complex geometries, the research society rely on RANS and LES, which requre turbulence model or subgrid scale (SGS) model for closure problems. Different models not only lead to different results but usually are invalidated on solid physical grounds, such as objectivity and entropy principle.The Morphing Continuum Theory (MCT) is a high-order continuum theory formulated under the framework of thermalmechanics for physics phenomena involving microstructure. In this study, a theoretical perspective for the multiscale nature of the Morphing Continuum Theory is connected with the multiscale nature of turbulence physics. The kinematics, balance laws, constitutive equations and a Morphing Continuum description of turbulence are introduced. The equations were numerically implemented for a zero pressure gradient flat plate. The simulations are compate with the laminar, transitional and turbulence cases.

  18. Parental Involvement to Parental Engagement: A Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodall, Janet; Montgomery, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Based on the literature of the field, this article traces a continuum between parental involvement with schools, and parental engagement with children's learning. The article seeks to shed light on an area of confusion; previous research has shown that different stakeholder groups understand "parental engagement" in different ways.…

  19. Mentorship: The Education-Research Continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, D

    2008-05-29

    recommendation for learning science stated: 'The Nature of Science includes the scientific world view, scientific methods of inquiry, and the nature of the scientific enterprise'. All three elements of the 'Nature of Science' are pivotal aspects of a research internship under the mentorship of an experienced and trusted advisor. In addition to internships for undergraduates, an important ingredient in realizing 'Science for All' is collaboration involving educators and scientists as they engage science students and the public at large to promote science literacy and to develop the next generation of STEM professionals. The DOE National Laboratories, individually and collectively, form an ideal nexus for nurturing these complementary collaborations. My 'Science for All' experiences at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) over the last 30 years have spanned pre-college, college, and postdoctoral activities, including mentoring of undergraduate students. Early in my mentoring career, I became aware that undergraduates in particular needed help in answering the question 'what path (or paths) will lead to a challenging and rewarding STEM career'? For many, a successful path included a research internship that would result in expanded skills and training in addition to those received from their academic education. These internship skills were helpful whether the student's next Education-Research Continuum decision was graduate school or STEM employment. My experience at LLNL mirrors that of my colleagues at other DOE National Laboratories--internships with a dedicated mentor provide undergraduates with a unique set of skills that can underpin their future options and serve to improve the number, quality, and successful outcomes of students who enter STEM careers. 'Science for All' can also be found in the goals of 'The America COMPETES Act', which call for renewed efforts to increase investments in scientific research and development, strengthen education, and encourage

  20. Continuum modeling of large lattice structures: Status and projections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The status and some recent developments of continuum modeling for large repetitive lattice structures are summarized. Discussion focuses on a number of aspects including definition of an effective substitute continuum; characterization of the continuum model; and the different approaches for generating the properties of the continuum, namely, the constitutive matrix, the matrix of mass densities, and the matrix of thermal coefficients. Also, a simple approach is presented for generating the continuum properties. The approach can be used to generate analytic and/or numerical values of the continuum properties.

  1. Low-energy continuum-electron emission at O{degrees} from O{sup q+} + He collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.; Haar, R.R.; Schneider, D.; Clark, M.W.; Prior, M.H.; Dubois, R.D.; Randall, K.

    1992-12-31

    Low-energy continuum-electron emission along the beam direction, i.e., at 0{degree}, has been investigated for 1.1--6.2 keV/u 0{sup 8+} and 2.6 keV/u o{sup q+} (q = 3, 6, and 8) colliding with He. Spectra were obtained for continuum electrons associated with bound-state capture and with no projectile charge change, respectively. As for previous measurements for 3.75 keV/u 0{sup 6+} + He, continuum electrons at 0{degree} were observed only when accompanied by bound-state capture. Cross sections for these continuum electrons are found to be increasing functions of both the projectile energy and the charge state over the ranges investigated.

  2. PT-symmetry breaking with divergent potentials: Lattice and continuum cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Yogesh N.; Scott, Derek D.; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the parity- and time-reversal (PT-) symmetry breaking in lattice models in the presence of long-ranged, non-Hermitian, PT-symmetric potentials that remain finite or become divergent in the continuum limit. By scaling analysis of the fragile PT threshold for an open finite lattice, we show that continuum loss-gain potentials Vα(x)∝i|x|αsgn(x) have a positive PT-breaking threshold for α >-2, and a zero threshold for α ≤-2. When α <0 localized states with complex (conjugate) energies in the continuum energy band occur at higher loss-gain strengths. We investigate the signatures of PT-symmetry breaking in coupled waveguides, and show that the emergence of localized states dramatically shortens the relevant time scale in the PT-symmetry broken region.

  3. Continuum visible spectra from InBr discharge excited in a microwave resonant cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuming; Chen, Dahua

    2007-10-01

    Emissions from InBr radiation have been investigated in a microwave resonant cavity system. We demonstrate that with proper operation the emission spectra of InBr can be a continuum in the visible range and can be suitable for lighting applications. The continuum spectra are stronger with an increase in input microwave power. In our system, a high color rendering index of 97 can be obtained from the bulb with 25mg InBr and 800W input microwave power. The spectral lines 410.1 and 451.1nm from In >I play an important role to balance the spectral distribution for lighting requirements. The continuum spectra may be due to the transition of Rydberg states to the C state of InBr molecules.

  4. Self-rated health: biological continuum or social discontinuity?

    PubMed

    Smith, A M; Shelley, J M; Dennerstein, L

    1994-07-01

    Correlates of self-rated health among a randomly selected sample of 1863 Australian-born women 45-55 years of age were examined in two logistic regression analyses: one comparing a self-rated health of worse than one's peers with a self-rated health the same as one's peers; and, one comparing a self-rated health of better than one's peers with a self-rated health the same as one's peers. The final model for worse health was largely a reflection of the physical experience of ill health while that for better health was a more complex construct including not only the absence of illness but also markers of sociodemographic advantage and self-image. The two models had only three variables in common. Notably, the relationship between the outcome measures and one common variable, body mass index, differed markedly. It is suggested that previous analyses of self-rated health have had their power to adequately describe correlates and determinants of health status constrained. By assuming that the various self-rated health states are part of a continuum and employing statistical methods consistent with that assumption, previous studies have been unable to demonstrate the discontinuity among such states. In particular, it is suggested that self-rated health is at least in part a reflection of social role and as there is no basis for assuming that such roles form a continuum as the use of correlation-based analyses imply, then such analyses are inappropriate.

  5. Multiscale gas-kinetic simulation for continuum and near-continuum flows.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kun; Liu, Hongwei

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that for increasingly rarefied flow fields, predictions from continuum formulations, such as the Navier-Stokes equations, lose accuracy. The inclusion of higher-order terms, such as Burnett or high-order moment equations, could improve the predictive capabilities of such continuum formulations, but there has been only limited success. Here, we present a multiscale model. On the macroscopic level, the flow variables are updated based on the mass, momentum, and energy conservation through the fluxes. On the other hand, the fluxes are constructed on the microscopic level based on the gas-kinetic equation, which is valid in both continuum and near-continuum flow regimes. Based on this model, the nonequilibrium shock structure, Poiseuille flow, nonlinear heat conduction problems, and unsteady Rayleigh problem will be studied. In the near-continuum flow regime, the current gas-kinetic simulation is more efficient than microscopic methods, such as the direction Boltzmann solver and direct-simulation Monte Carlo method. In the continuum flow limit, the current formulation will go back to the gas-kinetic Navier-Stokes flow solver automatically.

  6. Mirrored continuum and molecular scale simulations of the ignition of gamma phase RDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Scott; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Joshi, Kaushik; Lee, Kiabek

    2015-06-01

    We consider the ignition of a high-pressure gamma-phase of an explosive crystal of RDX which forms during overdriven shock initiation. Molecular dynamics (MD), with first-principles based or reactive force field based molecular potentials, provides a description of the chemistry as an extremely complex reaction network. The results of the molecular simulation is analyzed by sorting molecular product fragments into high and low molecular groups, to represent identifiable components that can be interpreted by a continuum model. A continuum model based on a Gibbs formulation, that has a single temperature and stress state for the mixture is used to represent the same RDX material and its chemistry. Each component in the continuum model has a corresponding Gibbs continuum potential, that are in turn inferred from molecular MD informed equation of state libraries such as CHEETAH, or are directly simulated by Monte Carlo MD simulations. Information about transport, kinetic rates and diffusion are derived from the MD simulation and the growth of a reactive hot spot in the RDX is studied with both simulations that mirror the other results to provide an essential, continuum/atomistic link. Supported by N000014-12-1-0555, subaward-36561937 (ONR).

  7. Validity of the Cauchy-Born rule applied to discrete cellular-scale models of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davit, Y.; Osborne, J. M.; Byrne, H. M.; Gavaghan, D.; Pitt-Francis, J.

    2013-04-01

    The development of new models of biological tissues that consider cells in a discrete manner is becoming increasingly popular as an alternative to continuum methods based on partial differential equations, although formal relationships between the discrete and continuum frameworks remain to be established. For crystal mechanics, the discrete-to-continuum bridge is often made by assuming that local atom displacements can be mapped homogeneously from the mesoscale deformation gradient, an assumption known as the Cauchy-Born rule (CBR). Although the CBR does not hold exactly for noncrystalline materials, it may still be used as a first-order approximation for analytic calculations of effective stresses or strain energies. In this work, our goal is to investigate numerically the applicability of the CBR to two-dimensional cellular-scale models by assessing the mechanical behavior of model biological tissues, including crystalline (honeycomb) and noncrystalline reference states. The numerical procedure involves applying an affine deformation to the boundary cells and computing the quasistatic position of internal cells. The position of internal cells is then compared with the prediction of the CBR and an average deviation is calculated in the strain domain. For center-based cell models, we show that the CBR holds exactly when the deformation gradient is relatively small and the reference stress-free configuration is defined by a honeycomb lattice. We show further that the CBR may be used approximately when the reference state is perturbed from the honeycomb configuration. By contrast, for vertex-based cell models, a similar analysis reveals that the CBR does not provide a good representation of the tissue mechanics, even when the reference configuration is defined by a honeycomb lattice. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications of these results for concurrent discrete and continuous modeling, adaptation of atom-to-continuum techniques to biological

  8. Validity of the Cauchy-Born rule applied to discrete cellular-scale models of biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Davit, Y; Osborne, J M; Byrne, H M; Gavaghan, D; Pitt-Francis, J

    2013-04-01

    The development of new models of biological tissues that consider cells in a discrete manner is becoming increasingly popular as an alternative to continuum methods based on partial differential equations, although formal relationships between the discrete and continuum frameworks remain to be established. For crystal mechanics, the discrete-to-continuum bridge is often made by assuming that local atom displacements can be mapped homogeneously from the mesoscale deformation gradient, an assumption known as the Cauchy-Born rule (CBR). Although the CBR does not hold exactly for noncrystalline materials, it may still be used as a first-order approximation for analytic calculations of effective stresses or strain energies. In this work, our goal is to investigate numerically the applicability of the CBR to two-dimensional cellular-scale models by assessing the mechanical behavior of model biological tissues, including crystalline (honeycomb) and noncrystalline reference states. The numerical procedure involves applying an affine deformation to the boundary cells and computing the quasistatic position of internal cells. The position of internal cells is then compared with the prediction of the CBR and an average deviation is calculated in the strain domain. For center-based cell models, we show that the CBR holds exactly when the deformation gradient is relatively small and the reference stress-free configuration is defined by a honeycomb lattice. We show further that the CBR may be used approximately when the reference state is perturbed from the honeycomb configuration. By contrast, for vertex-based cell models, a similar analysis reveals that the CBR does not provide a good representation of the tissue mechanics, even when the reference configuration is defined by a honeycomb lattice. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications of these results for concurrent discrete and continuous modeling, adaptation of atom-to-continuum techniques to biological

  9. Cellular automata for traffic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Dietrich E.

    1999-02-01

    Traffic phenomena such as the transition from free to congested flow, lane inversion and platoon formation can be accurately reproduced using cellular automata. Being computationally extremely efficient, they simulate large traffic systems many times faster than real time so that predictions become feasible. A riview of recent results is given. The presence of metastable states at the jamming transition is discussed in detail. A simple new cellular automation is introduced, in which the interaction between cars is Galilei-invariant. It is shown that this type of interaction accounts for metastable states in a very natural way.

  10. Origami interleaved tube cellular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Kenneth C.; Tachi, Tomohiro; Calisch, Sam; Miura, Koryo

    2014-09-01

    A novel origami cellular material based on a deployable cellular origami structure is described. The structure is bi-directionally flat-foldable in two orthogonal (x and y) directions and is relatively stiff in the third orthogonal (z) direction. While such mechanical orthotropicity is well known in cellular materials with extruded two dimensional geometry, the interleaved tube geometry presented here consists of two orthogonal axes of interleaved tubes with high interfacial surface area and relative volume that changes with fold-state. In addition, the foldability still allows for fabrication by a flat lamination process, similar to methods used for conventional expanded two dimensional cellular materials. This article presents the geometric characteristics of the structure together with corresponding kinematic and mechanical modeling, explaining the orthotropic elastic behavior of the structure with classical dimensional scaling analysis.

  11. Characteristic dynamics near two coalescing eigenvalues incorporating continuum threshold effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmon, Savannah; Ordonez, Gonzalo

    2017-06-01

    It has been reported in the literature that the survival probability P(t) near an exceptional point where two eigenstates coalesce should generally exhibit an evolution P (t ) ˜t2e-Γ t, in which Γ is the decay rate of the coalesced eigenstate; this has been verified in a microwave billiard experiment [B. Dietz et al., Phys. Rev. E 75, 027201 (2007)]. However, the heuristic effective Hamiltonian that is usually employed to obtain this result ignores the possible influence of the continuum threshold on the dynamics. By contrast, in this work we employ an analytical approach starting from the microscopic Hamiltonian representing two simple models in order to show that the continuum threshold has a strong influence on the dynamics near exceptional points in a variety of circumstances. To report our results, we divide the exceptional points in Hermitian open quantum systems into two cases: at an EP2A two virtual bound states coalesce before forming a resonance, anti-resonance pair with complex conjugate eigenvalues, while at an EP2B two resonances coalesce before forming two different resonances. For the EP2B, which is the case studied in the microwave billiard experiment, we verify that the survival probability exhibits the previously reported modified exponential decay on intermediate time scales, but this is replaced with an inverse power law on very long time scales. Meanwhile, for the EP2A the influence from the continuum threshold is so strong that the evolution is non-exponential on all time scales and the heuristic approach fails completely. When the EP2A appears very near the threshold, we obtain the novel evolution P (t ) ˜1 -C1√{t } on intermediate time scales, while further away the parabolic decay (Zeno dynamics) on short time scales is enhanced.

  12. Lattice Boltzmann equation method for multiple immiscible continuum fluids.

    PubMed

    Spencer, T J; Halliday, I; Care, C M

    2010-12-01

    This paper generalizes the two-component algorithm of Sec. , extending it, in Sec. , to describe N>2 mutually immiscible fluids in the isothermal continuum regime. Each fluid has an independent interfacial tension. While retaining all its computational advantages, we remove entirely the empiricism associated with contact behavior in our previous multiple immiscible fluid models [M. M. Dupin, Phys. Rev. E 73, 055701(R) (2006); Med. Eng. Phys. 28, 13 (2006)] while solidifying the physical foundations. Moreover, the model relies upon a fluid-fluid segregation which is simpler, computationally faster, more free of artifacts (i.e., the interfacial microcurrent), and upon an interface-inducing force distribution which is analytic. The method is completely symmetric between any numbers of immiscible fluids and stable over a wide range of directly input interfacial tension. We present data on the steady-state properties of multiple interface model, which are in good agreement with theory [R. E. Johnson and S. S. Sadhal, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 17, 289 (1985)], specifically on the shapes of multidrop systems. Section is an analysis of the kinetic and continuum-scale descriptions of the underlying two-component lattice Boltzmann model for immiscible fluids, extendable to more than two immiscible fluids. This extension requires (i) the use of a more local kinetic equation perturbation which is (ii) free from a reliance on measured interfacial curvature. It should be noted that viewed simply as a two-component method, the continuum algorithm is inferior to our previous methods, reported by Lishchuk [Phys. Rev. E 67, 036701 (2003)] and Halliday [Phys. Rev. E 76, 026708 (2007)]. Greater stability and parameter range is achieved in multiple drop simulations by using the forced multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method developed, along with (for completeness) a forced exactly incompressible Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook lattice Boltzmann model, in the Appendix. These appended schemes

  13. The South Carolina rural-urban HIV continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Edun, Babatunde; Iyer, Medha; Albrecht, Helmut; Weissman, Sharon

    2016-12-16

    The HIV continuum of care model is widely used by various agencies to describe the HIV epidemic in stages from diagnosis through to virologic suppression. It identifies the various points at which persons living with HIV (PLWHIV) within a population fail to reach their next step in HIV care. The rural population in the Southern United States is disproportionally affected by the HIV epidemic. The purpose of this study was to examine these rural-urban disparities using the HIV care continuum model and determine at what stages these differences become apparent. PLWHIV aged 13 years and older in South Carolina (SC) were identified using data from the enhanced HIV/AIDS Reporting System. The percentages of PLWHIV linked to care, retained in care, and virologically suppressed were determined. Rural versus urban residence was determined using the Office of Management and Budget classification. There were 14,523 PLWHIV in SC at the end of 2012; 11,193 (77%) of whom were categorized as urban and 3305 (22%) as rural. There was no difference between urban and rural for those who had received any care: 64% versus 64% (p = .61); retention in care 53% versus 53% (p = .71); and virologic suppression 49% versus 48% (p = .35), respectively. The SC rural-urban HIV cascade represents the first published cascade of care model using rural versus urban residence. Although significant health care disparities exist between rural and urban residents, there were no major differences between rural and urban residents at the various stages of engagement in HIV care using the HIV continuum of care model.

  14. The continuum of HIV care in a Veterans' Affairs clinic.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Jed P; Rimland, David; Marconi, Vincent C

    2014-05-01

    The cascade of HIV care in the United States has become a focus for interventions aimed at improving the success of HIV treatment. The Atlanta VA Medical Center (AVAMC) Infectious Disease Clinic (IDC) is an urban clinic that provides care for over 1,400 people living with HIV (PLHIV) annually. Using data from the HIV Atlanta VA Cohort Study (HAVACS), we modeled the continuum of care in the AVAMC IDC and explored similarities and differences with national models. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 1,474 individuals receiving care in the AVAMC IDC. We estimated total PLHIV and defined several categories within the spectrum of HIV care. We then developed the continuum of care using two methodologies. The first required each stage to be a dependent subset of the immediate upstream stage. The second allowed each stage to be independent of upstream stages. Dependent stage categorization estimated that 95.3% of individuals were diagnosed with HIV, 89.8% of individuals were linked to care, 73.0% of individuals were retained in care, 65.9% of individuals were eligible for antiretroviral treatment (ART), 62.8% were prescribed ART, and 52.4% had a suppressed viral load (VL). Independent stage categorization estimated that 83.9% of individuals were prescribed ART and 61.5% had a suppressed VL. Our analyses showed that the AVAMC IDC estimates were significantly better than national estimates at every stage. This may reflect the benefits of a universal healthcare system. We propose the use of independent stages for the continuum as this more accurately represents healthcare utilization.

  15. Metallic powder-bed based 3D printing of cellular scaffolds for orthopaedic implants: A state-of-the-art review on manufacturing, topological design, mechanical properties and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Tan, X P; Tan, Y J; Chow, C S L; Tor, S B; Yeong, W Y

    2017-07-01

    Metallic cellular scaffold is one of the best choices for orthopaedic implants as a replacement of human body parts, which could improve life quality and increase longevity for the people needed. Unlike conventional methods of making cellular scaffolds, three-dimensional (3D) printing or additive manufacturing opens up new possibilities to fabricate those customisable intricate designs with highly interconnected pores. In the past decade, metallic powder-bed based 3D printing methods emerged and the techniques are becoming increasingly mature recently, where selective laser melting (SLM) and selective electron beam melting (SEBM) are the two representatives. Due to the advantages of good dimensional accuracy, high build resolution, clean build environment, saving materials, high customisability, etc., SLM and SEBM show huge potential in direct customisable manufacturing of metallic cellular scaffolds for orthopaedic implants. Ti-6Al-4V to date is still considered to be the optimal materials for producing orthopaedic implants due to its best combination of biocompatibility, corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. This paper presents a state-of-the-art overview mainly on manufacturing, topological design, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of cellular Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds via SLM and SEBM methods. Current manufacturing limitations, topological shortcomings, uncertainty of biocompatible test were sufficiently discussed herein. Future perspectives and recommendations were given at the end. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Continuum of Collaboration: Little Steps for Little Feet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Gwynn M.

    2013-01-01

    This mini-article outlines a continuum of collaboration for faculty within a department of the same discipline. The goal of illustrating this continuum is showcase different stages of collaboration so that faculty members can assess where they are as a collective and consider steps to collaborate more. The separate points along a continuum of…

  17. Continuum of Collaboration: Little Steps for Little Feet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Gwynn M.

    2013-01-01

    This mini-article outlines a continuum of collaboration for faculty within a department of the same discipline. The goal of illustrating this continuum is showcase different stages of collaboration so that faculty members can assess where they are as a collective and consider steps to collaborate more. The separate points along a continuum of…

  18. Are continuum predictions of clustering chaotic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullmer, William D.; Hrenya, Christine M.

    2017-03-01

    Gas-solid multiphase flows are prone to develop an instability known as clustering. Two-fluid models, which treat the particulate phase as a continuum, are known to reproduce the qualitative features of this instability, producing highly-dynamic, spatiotemporal patterns. However, it is unknown whether such simulations are truly aperiodic or a type of complex periodic behavior. By showing that the system possesses a sensitive dependence on initial conditions and a positive largest Lyapunov exponent, λ1≈1 /τ , we provide a tentative answer: continuum predictions of clustering are chaotic. We further demonstrate that the chaotic behavior is dimensionally dependent, a conclusion which unifies previous results and strongly suggests that the chaotic behavior is not a direct consequence of the fundamental kinematic instability, but requires a secondary (inherently multidimensional) instability.

  19. Robot strings: Long, thin continuum robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, I. D.

    We describe and discuss the development of long, thin, continuous “ string-like” robots aimed at Space exploration missions. These continuous backbone “ continuum” robots are inspired by numerous biological structures, particularly vines, worms, and the tongues of animals such as the anteater. The key novelty is the high length-to-diameter ratio of the robots. This morphology offers penetration into, and exploration of, significantly narrower and deeper environments than accessible using current robot technology. In this paper, we introduce new design alternatives for long thin continuum robots, based on an analysis and extension of three core existing continuum robot design types. The designs are evaluated based on their mechanical feasibility, structural properties, kinematic simplicity, and degrees of freedom.

  20. Automatic continuum analysis of reflectance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Roger N.; King, Trude V. V.

    1987-01-01

    A continuum algorithm based on a Segmented Upper Hull method (SUH) is described. An upper hull is performed on segments of a spectrum defined by local minima and maxima. The segments making a complete spectrum are then combined. The definition of the upper hull allows the continuum to be both concave and/or convex, adapting to the shape of the spectrum. The method performs multiple passes on a spectrum by segmenting each local maximum to minimum and performing an upper hull. The algorithm naturally adapts to the widths of absorption features, so that all features are found, including the nature of doublets, triplets, etc. The algorithm is also reasonably fast on common minicomputers so that it might be applied to the large data sets from imaging spectrometers.

  1. Entropic formulation of relativistic continuum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-08-01

    An entropic formulation of relativistic continuum mechanics is developed in the Landau-Lifshitz frame. We introduce two spatial scales, one being the small scale representing the linear size of each material particle and the other the large scale representing the linear size of a large system which consists of material particles and is to linearly regress to the equilibrium. We propose a local functional which is expected to represent the total entropy of the larger system and require the entropy functional to be maximized in the process of linear regression. We show that Onsager's original idea on linear regression can then be realized explicitly as current conservations with dissipative currents in the desired form. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this formulation by showing that one can treat a wide class of relativistic continuum materials, including standard relativistic viscous fluids and relativistic viscoelastic materials.

  2. Models of Uranium continuum radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romig, Joseph H.; Evans, David R.; Sawyer, Constance B.; Schweitzer, Andrea E.; Warwick, James W.

    1987-01-01

    Uranium continuum radio emission detected by the Voyager 2 Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment during the January 1986 encounter is considered. The continuum emissions comprised four components (equatorial emissions, anomaly emissions, strong nightside emissions, and weak nightside emissions) associated with different sources. The equatorial emissions appeared most prominently during the days before closest approach and extended from 40 kHz or below to about 120 kHz. The anomaly emissions were seen about 12 hours before closest approach and extended to about 250 kHz. The agreement found between Miranda's phase and strong radio emission at 20.4 kHz, just after closest approach, suggests intense dynamic activity on the Miranda L shell.

  3. Mesoscopic and continuum modelling of angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Spill, F.; Guerrero, P.; Alarcon, T.; Maini, P. K.; Byrne, H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones in response to chemical signals secreted by, for example, a wound or a tumour. In this paper, we propose a mesoscopic lattice-based model of angiogenesis, in which processes that include proliferation and cell movement are considered as stochastic events. By studying the dependence of the model on the lattice spacing and the number of cells involved, we are able to derive the deterministic continuum limit of our equations and compare it to similar existing models of angiogenesis. We further identify conditions under which the use of continuum models is justified, and others for which stochastic or discrete effects dominate. We also compare different stochastic models for the movement of endothelial tip cells which have the same macroscopic, deterministic behaviour, but lead to markedly different behaviour in terms of production of new vessel cells. PMID:24615007

  4. Continuum Statistics of the Airy2 Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corwin, Ivan; Quastel, Jeremy; Remenik, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We develop an exact determinantal formula for the probability that the Airy_2 process is bounded by a function g on a finite interval. As an application, we provide a direct proof that {sup({A}2(x)-x^2)} is distributed as a GOE random variable. Both the continuum formula and the GOE result have applications in the study of the end point of an unconstrained directed polymer in a disordered environment. We explain Johansson's (Commun. Math. Phys. 242(1-2):277-329, 2003) observation that the GOE result follows from this polymer interpretation and exact results within that field. In a companion paper (Moreno Flores et al. in Commun. Math. Phys. 2012) these continuum statistics are used to compute the distribution of the endpoint of directed polymers.

  5. Steering continuum electron dynamics by low-energy attosecond streaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Ji-Wei; Xiong, Wei-Hao; Xiao, Xiang-Ru; Gong, Qihuang; Peng, Liang-You

    2016-08-01

    A semiclassical model is developed to understand the electronic dynamics in the low-energy attosecond streaking. Under a relatively strong infrared (IR) pulse, the low-energy part of photoelectrons initialized by a single attosecond pulse (SAP) can either rescatter with the ionic core and induce interferences structures in the momentum spectra of the ionized electrons or be recaptured into the Rydberg states. The Coulomb potential plays essential roles in both the electron rescattering and recapturing processes. We find that by changing the time delay between the SAP and the IR pulse, the photoelectrons yield or the population of the Rydberg states can be effectively controlled. The present study demonstrates a fascinating way to steer the electron motion in the continuum.

  6. Fractionalized spin-wave continuum in kagome spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Jia-Wei; Wen, Xiao-Gang

    Motivated by spin-wave continuum (SWC) observed in recent neutron scattering experiments in Herbertsmithite, we use Gutzwiller-projected wave functions to study dynamic spin structure factor S (q , ω) of spin liquid states on the kagome lattice. Spin-1 excited states in spin liquids are represented by Gutzwiller-projected two-spinon excited wave functions. We investigate three different spin liquid candidates, spinon Fermi-surface spin liquid (FSL), Dirac spin liquid (DSL) and random-flux spin liquid (RSL). FSL and RSL have low energy peaks in S (q , ω) at K points in the extended magnetic Brillouin zone, in contrast to experiments where low energy peaks are found at M points. There is no obviuos contradiction between DSL and neutron scattering measurements. Besides a fractionalized spin (i.e. spin-1/2), spinons in DSL carry a fractionalized crystal momentum which is potentially detectable in SWC in the neutron scattering measurements.

  7. Hot Magnetic Fibrils: The Slow Continuum Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, R.

    1996-09-01

    We investigate the importance of the slow continuum (from linear, ideal magnetohydrodynamics [MHD]) for hot, evacuated, and strongly magnetic fibrils with nonnegligible radial structure. The radial structure allows for both slow and Alfvén resonant absorption of acoustic power (in linear, visco-resistive MHD). When calculating how efficiently the acoustic power is absorbed by such "hot magnetic fibrils," embedded in a uniform compressible medium, as a function of the real driving frequency, it is found that the axisymmetric component of the acoustic excitation is absorbed quite strongly for frequencies within the range of the slow continuum. Additionally, for these one-dimensional hot magnetic fibrils, a sequence of absorption maxima accumulates in real driving frequency above the range of the slow continuum, still within the Alfvén continuum. The maximal absorption coefficients reach 80% and more. We identify the complex optimal driving frequencies and the associated complex leaky eigenmodes responsible for these absorption maxima. The leaky eigenmodes relate to the well-known tube speed modes of a uniform, hot, and evacuated flux tube. The complex eigenfrequencies of the leaky eigenmodes of the radially structured fibrils are calculated from the impedance criterion that these eigenfrequencies satisfy. We define the generally complex optimal driving frequencies to be those driving frequencies at which total (100%) absorption of the incoming wave field takes place. They also obey an impedance criterion, similar to the one that defines the eigenfrequencies. Both impedance criteria demonstrate clearly the connection between optimal driving frequencies and leaky eigenmodes. This also calls for a reevaluation of the results of Goossens & Hollweg, in which optimal and total resonant absorption for real driving frequencies and the complex leaky eigenmodes was discussed. For network and plage magnetic elements in the solar atmosphere, our results may be relevant for

  8. A continuum model of a multilayer nanosheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, N. F.; Tovstik, P. E.; Tovstik, T. P.

    2016-11-01

    A continuum model for describing the bending and free vibrations of a crystalline graphite sheet consisting of graphene layers is proposed. Graphene is modeled by a two-dimensional layer having a finite rigidity under extension and bending. The interval between graphene layers through which their Van-der-Waals interaction occurs is modeled by a fictitious layer with relatively low rigidity. In the solution, formulas describing the bending of a multilayer sheet with alternating rigid and soft layers are used.

  9. WNK protein kinases modulate cellular Cl- flux by altering the phosphorylation state of the Na-K-Cl and K-Cl cotransporters.

    PubMed

    Kahle, Kristopher T; Rinehart, Jesse; Ring, Aaron; Gimenez, Ignacio; Gamba, Gerardo; Hebert, Steven C; Lifton, Richard P

    2006-10-01

    Precise control of cellular Cl(-) transport is necessary for many fundamental physiological processes. For example, the intracellular concentration of Cl(-), fine-tuned through the coordinated action of cellular Cl(-) influx and efflux mechanisms, determines whether a neuron's response to GABA is excitatory or inhibitory. In epithelia, synchrony between apical and basolateral Cl(-) flux, and transcellular and paracellular Cl(-) transport, is necessary for efficient transepithelial Cl(-) reabsorption or secretion. In cells throughout the body, coordination of Cl(-) entry and exit mechanisms help defend against changes in cell volume. The Na-K-Cl and K-Cl cotransporters of the SLC12 gene family are important molecular determinants of Cl(-) entry and exit, respectively, in these systems. The WNK serine-threonine kinase family, members of which are mutated in an inherited form of human hypertension, are components of a signaling pathway that coordinates Cl(-) influx and efflux through SLC12 cotransporters to dynamically regulate intracellular Cl(-) activity.

  10. Lattice Boltzmann algorithm for continuum multicomponent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, I.; Hollis, A. P.; Care, C. M.

    2007-08-01

    We present a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann simulation for continuum fluid mechanics, paying particular attention to the component segregation part of the underlying algorithm. In the principal result of this paper, the dynamics of a component index, or phase field, is obtained for a segregation method after U. D’Ortona [Phys. Rev. E 51, 3718 (1995)], due to Latva-Kokko and Rothman [Phys. Rev. E 71 056702 (2005)]. The said dynamics accord with a simulation designed to address multicomponent flow in the continuum approximation and underwrite improved simulation performance in two main ways: (i) by reducing the interfacial microcurrent activity considerably and (ii) by facilitating simulational access to regimes of flow with a low capillary number and drop Reynolds number [I. Halliday, R. Law, C. M. Care, and A. Hollis, Phys. Rev. E 73, 056708 (2006)]. The component segregation method studied, used in conjunction with Lishchuk’s method [S. V. Lishchuk, C. M. Care, and I. Halliday, Phys. Rev. E 67, 036701 (2003)], produces an interface, which is distributed in terms of its component index; however, the hydrodynamic boundary conditions which emerge are shown to support the notion of a sharp, unstructured, continuum interface.

  11. The thermal infrared continuum in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Lyndsay; Simoes, Paulo; Kerr, Graham Stewart; Hudson, Hugh S.; Gimenez de Castro, C. Guillermo; Penn, Matthew J.

    2017-08-01

    Observations of the Sun with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array have now started, and the thermal infrared will regularly be accessible from the NSF’s Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope. Motivated by the prospect of these new observations, and by recent flare detections in the mid infrared, we set out here to model and understand the source of the infrared continuum in flares, and to explore its diagnostic capability for the physical conditions in the flare atmosphere. We use the 1D radiation hydrodynamics code RADYN to calculate mid-infrared continuum emission from model atmospheres undergoing sudden deposition of energy by non-thermal electrons. We identify and characterise the main continuum thermal emission processes relevant to flare intensity enhancement in the mid- to far-infrared (2-200 micron) spectral range as free-free emission on neutrals and ions. We find that the infrared intensity evolution tracks the energy input to within a second, albeit with a lingering intensity enhancement, and provides a very direct indication of the evolution of the atmospheric ionization. The prediction of highly impulsive emission means that, on these timescales, the atmospheric hydrodynamics need not be considered in analysing the mid-IR signatures.

  12. Polymer Fluid Dynamics: Continuum and Molecular Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bird, R B; Giacomin, A J

    2016-06-07

    To solve problems in polymer fluid dynamics, one needs the equations of continuity, motion, and energy. The last two equations contain the stress tensor and the heat-flux vector for the material. There are two ways to formulate the stress tensor: (a) One can write a continuum expression for the stress tensor in terms of kinematic tensors, or (b) one can select a molecular model that represents the polymer molecule and then develop an expression for the stress tensor from kinetic theory. The advantage of the kinetic theory approach is that one gets information about the relation between the molecular structure of the polymers and the rheological properties. We restrict the discussion primarily to the simplest stress tensor expressions or constitutive equations containing from two to four adjustable parameters, although we do indicate how these formulations may be extended to give more complicated expressions. We also explore how these simplest expressions are recovered as special cases of a more general framework, the Oldroyd 8-constant model. Studying the simplest models allows us to discover which types of empiricisms or molecular models seem to be worth investigating further. We also explore equivalences between continuum and molecular approaches. We restrict the discussion to several types of simple flows, such as shearing flows and extensional flows, which are of greatest importance in industrial operations. Furthermore, if these simple flows cannot be well described by continuum or molecular models, then it is not necessary to lavish time and energy to apply them to more complex flow problems.

  13. Improvements in continuum modeling for biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qiao; Ben-Zhuo, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of biomolecular systems plays an essential role in understanding biological processes, such as ionic flow across channels, protein modification or interaction, and cell signaling. The continuum model described by the Poisson- Boltzmann (PB)/Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations has made great contributions towards simulation of these processes. However, the model has shortcomings in its commonly used form and cannot capture (or cannot accurately capture) some important physical properties of the biological systems. Considerable efforts have been made to improve the continuum model to account for discrete particle interactions and to make progress in numerical methods to provide accurate and efficient simulations. This review will summarize recent main improvements in continuum modeling for biomolecular systems, with focus on the size-modified models, the coupling of the classical density functional theory and the PNP equations, the coupling of polar and nonpolar interactions, and numerical progress. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91230106) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences Program for Cross & Cooperative Team of the Science & Technology Innovation.

  14. Bipotential continuum models for granular mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Joe

    2014-03-01

    Most currently popular continuum models for granular media are special cases of a generalized Maxwell fluid model, which describes the evolution of stress and internal variables such as granular particle fraction and fabric,in terms of imposed strain rate. It is shown how such models can be obtained from two scalar potentials, a standard elastic free energy and a ``dissipation potential'' given rigorously by the mathematical theory of Edelen. This allows for a relatively easy derivation of properly invariant continuum models for granular media and fluid-particle suspensions within a thermodynamically consistent framework. The resulting continuum models encompass all the prominent regimes of granular flow, ranging from the quasi-static to rapidly sheared, and are readily extended to include higher-gradient or Cosserat effects. Models involving stress diffusion, such as that proposed recently by Kamrin and Koval (PRL 108 178301), provide an alternative approach that is mentioned in passing. This paper provides a brief overview of a forthcoming review articles by the speaker (The Princeton Companion to Applied Mathematics, and Appl. Mech. Rev.,in the press, 2013).

  15. Hydrodynamic fluctuations in a particle-continuum hybrid for complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Alejandro L.; Donev, Aleksandar; Bell, John B.; Alder, Berni J.

    2011-05-01

    A previously-developed hybrid particle-continuum method [J. B. Bell, A. Garcia and S. A. Williams, SIAM Multiscale Modeling and Simulation, 6:1256-1280, 2008] is generalized to dense fluids and two and three dimensional flows. The scheme couples an explicit fluctuating compressible Navier-Stokes solver with the Isotropic Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) particle method [A. Donev and A. L. Garcia and B. J. Alder, J. Stat. Mech., 2009(11):P11008, 2009]. To achieve bidirectional dynamic coupling between the particle (microscale) and continuum (macroscale) regions, the continuum solver provides state-based boundary conditions to the particle subdomain, while the particle solver provides flux-based boundary conditions for the continuum subdomain; see [A. Donev, J.B. Bell, A. Garcia, and B. Alder, SIAM Multiscale Modeling and Simulation, 8:871-911, 2010.] for details. This paper summarizes two important numerical tests: First, the equilibrium diffusive (Brownian) motion of a large spherical bead suspended in a particle fluid is examined, demonstrating that the hybrid method correctly reproduces the velocity autocorrelation function of the bead but only if thermal fluctuations are included in the continuum solver. Second, the new scheme is applied to the well-known adiabatic piston problem and we find that it correctly reproduces the slow non-equilibrium relaxation of the piston toward thermodynamic equilibrium but, again, only if the continuum solver includes stochastic (white-noise) flux terms. These two fundamental examples clearly demonstrate the need to include fluctuations in continuum solvers employed in hybrid multiscale methods.

  16. Graduate Medical Education: Its Role in Achieving a True Medical Education Continuum.

    PubMed

    Aschenbrener, Carol A; Ast, Cori; Kirch, Darrell G

    2015-09-01

    Nearly half a century ago, Lowell T. Coggeshall recommended, through what has come to be known as the Coggeshall Report, that physician education-medical school (or undergraduate medical education [UME]), residency training (or graduate medical education [GME]), and continuing medical education (CME)-be "planned and provided as a continuum." While the dream of a true continuum remains unfulfilled, recent innovations focused on defining and assessing meaningful outcomes at last offer the anchor for the creation of a seamless, flexible, and ongoing pathway for the preparation of physicians. Recent innovations, including a widely accepted competency framework and entrustable professional activities (EPAs), provide key tools for creating a continuum. The competency framework is being leveraged in UME, GME, and CME and is serving as the foundation for the continuum. Learners and those who assess them are increasingly relying on observable behaviors (e.g., EPAs) to determine progress. The GME community in the United States and Canada has played-and continues to play-a leading role in the creation of these tools and a true medical education continuum. Despite some systemic challenges to implementation (e.g., premedical learner formation, time-in-step requirements), the GME community is already operationalizing these tools as a basis for other innovations that are improving transitions across the continuum (e.g., competency-based progression of residents). The medical education community's greatest responsibility in the years ahead will be to build on these efforts in GME-joining together to learn from one another and develop a continuum that serves the public and the profession.

  17. Rural Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of Their Role in the Breast Cancer Care Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayman, Kathleen M.; Edwards, Joellen

    2010-01-01

    Context: Rural women in the United States experience disparity in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment when compared to their urban counterparts. Given the 11% chance of lifetime occurrence of breast cancer for women overall, the continuum of breast cancer screening, diagnosis, treatment, and recovery are of legitimate concern to rural women and…

  18. Rural Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of Their Role in the Breast Cancer Care Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayman, Kathleen M.; Edwards, Joellen

    2010-01-01

    Context: Rural women in the United States experience disparity in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment when compared to their urban counterparts. Given the 11% chance of lifetime occurrence of breast cancer for women overall, the continuum of breast cancer screening, diagnosis, treatment, and recovery are of legitimate concern to rural women and…

  19. A Continuum Description of Nonlinear Elasticity, Slip and Twinning, With Application to Sapphire

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    2009. 14. ABSTRACT A model is developed for elasticity, plasticity and twinning in anisotropic single crystals subjected to large deformations...described via scalar internal state variables. Concepts from continuum crystal plasticity are invoked, with shearing rates on discrete glide and...predicted to be small in crystals deformed via basal glide on a single system. 15. SUBJECT TERMS ceramic, plasticity , defects, modeling, alumina

  20. Asteroid-comet continuum objects in the solar system.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Henry H

    2017-07-13

    In this review presented at the Royal Society meeting, 'Cometary science after Rosetta', I present an overview of studies of small solar system objects that exhibit properties of both asteroids and comets (with a focus on so-called active asteroids). Sometimes referred to as 'transition objects', these bodies are perhaps more appropriately described as 'continuum objects', to reflect the notion that rather than necessarily representing actual transitional evolutionary states between asteroids and comets, they simply belong to the general population of small solar system bodies that happen to exhibit a continuous range of observational, physical and dynamical properties. Continuum objects are intriguing because they possess many of the properties that make classical comets interesting to study (e.g. relatively primitive compositions, ejection of surface and subsurface material into space where it can be more easily studied, and orbital properties that allow us to sample material from distant parts of the solar system that would otherwise be inaccessible), while allowing us to study regions of the solar system that are not sampled by classical comets.This article is part of the themed issue 'Cometary science after Rosetta'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Dyson-Schwinger equations : density, temperature and continuum strong QCD.

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C. D.; Schmidt, S. M.; Physics

    2000-01-01

    Continuum strong QCD is the application of models and continuum quantum field theory to the study of phenomena in hadronic physics, which includes; e.g., the spectrum of QCD bound states and their interactions; and the transition to, and properties of, a quark gluon plasma. We provide a contemporary perspective, couched primarily in terms of the Dyson-Schwinger equations but also making comparisons with other approaches and models. Our discourse provides a practitioners' guide to features of the Dyson-Schwinger equations [such as confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking] and canvasses phenomenological applications to light meson and baryon properties in cold, sparse QCD. These provide the foundation for an extension to hot, dense QCD, which is probed via the introduction of the intensive thermodynamic variables: chemical potential and temperature. We describe order parameters whose evolution signals deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration, and chronicle their use in demarcating the quark gluon plasma phase boundary and characterizing the plasma's properties. Hadron traits change in an equilibrated plasma. We exemplify this and discuss putative signals of the effects. Finally, since plasma formation is not an equilibrium process, we discuss recent developments in kinetic theory and its application to describing the evolution from a relativistic heavy ion collision to an equilibrated quark gluon plasma.

  2. Tobacco-Related Health Disparities Across the Cancer Care Continuum.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Vani Nath; Pineiro, Barbara; Hooper, Monica Webb; Gray, Jhanelle E; Brandon, Thomas H

    2016-10-01

    Use of tobacco is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States. Racial/ethnic minorities and individuals of low socioeconomic status disproportionately experience tobacco-related disease and illness. Unique challenges and circumstances exist at each point in the cancer care continuum that may contribute to the greater cancer burden experienced by these groups. We reviewed tobacco-related disparities from cancer prevention to cancer survivorship. We also describe research that seeks to reduce tobacco-related disparities. Racial/ethnic minorities and low-income individuals experience unique social and environmental contextual challenges such as greater environmental cues to smoke and greater levels of perceived stress and social discrimination. Clinical practice guidelines support the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy and behavioral counseling for racial and ethnic minorities, yet smoking cessation rates are lower in this group when compared with non-Hispanic whites. Superior efficacy for culturally adapted interventions has not yet been established. To reduce health disparities in this population, a comprehensive strategy is needed with efforts directed at each point along the cancer care continuum. Strategies are needed to reduce the impact of contextual factors such as targeted tobacco marketing and social discrimination on smoking initiation and maintenance. Future efforts should focus on increasing the use of evidence-based cessation treatment methods and studying its effectiveness in these populations. Attention must also be focused on improving treatment outcomes by reducing smoking in diverse racial and ethnic patient populations.

  3. Minimal continuum theories of structure formation in dense active fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Heidenreich, Sebastian; Bär, Markus; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-04-01

    Self-sustained dynamical phases of living matter can exhibit remarkable similarities over a wide range of scales, from mesoscopic vortex structures in microbial suspensions and motility assays of biopolymers to turbulent large-scale instabilities in flocks of birds or schools of fish. Here, we argue that, in many cases, the phenomenology of such active states can be efficiently described in terms of fourth- and higher-order partial differential equations. Structural transitions in these models can be interpreted as Landau-type kinematic transitions in Fourier (wavenumber) space, suggesting that microscopically different biological systems can share universal long-wavelength features. This general idea is illustrated through numerical simulations for two classes of continuum models for incompressible active fluids: a Swift-Hohenberg-type scalar field theory, and a minimal vector model that extends the classical Toner-Tu theory and appears to be a promising candidate for the quantitative description of dense bacterial suspensions. We discuss how microscopic symmetry-breaking mechanisms can enter macroscopic continuum descriptions of collective microbial motion near surfaces, and conclude by outlining future applications.

  4. Electrophilic, Ambiphilic, and Nucleophilic C-H bond Activation. Understanding the electronic continuum of C-H bond activation through transition-state and reaction pathway interaction energy decompositions

    SciTech Connect

    Ess, Daniel H.; Goddard, William A.; Periana, Roy A.

    2010-10-29

    The potential energy and interaction energy profiles for metal- and metal-ligand-mediated alkane C-H bond activation were explored using B3LYP density functional theory (DFT) and the absolutely localized molecular orbital energy decomposition analysis (ALMO-EDA). The set of complexes explored range from late transition metal group 10 (Pt and Pd) and group 11 (Au) metal centers to group 7-9 (Ir, Rh, Ru, and W) metal centers as well as a group 3 Sc complex. The coordination geometries, electron metal count (d8, d6, d4, and d0), and ligands (N-heterocycles, O-donor, phosphine, and Cp*) are also diverse. Quantitative analysis using ALMO-EDA of both directions of charge-transfer stabilization (occupied to unoccupied orbital stabilization) energies between the metal-ligand fragment and the coordinated C-H bond in the transition state for cleavage of the C-H bond allows classification of C-H activation reactions as electrophilic, ambiphilic, or nucleophilic on the basis of the net direction of charge-transfer energy stabilization. This bonding pattern transcends any specific mechanistic or bonding paradigm, such as oxidative addition, σ-bond metathesis, or substitution. Late transition metals such as Au(III), Pt(II), Pd(II), and Rh(III) metal centers with N-heterocycle, halide, or O-donor ligands show electrophilically dominated reaction profiles with forward charge-transfer from the C-H bond to the metal, leading to more stabilization than reverse charge transfer from the metal to the C-H bond. Transition states and reaction profiles for d6 Ru(II) and Ir(III) metals with Tp and acac ligands were found to have nearly equal forward and reverse charge-transfer energy stabilization. This ambiphilic region also includes the classically labeled electrophilic cationic species Cp*(PMe3)Ir(Me). Nucleophilic character, where the metal to C-H bond charge-transfer interaction is most stabilizing, was found in

  5. Sexual Orientation: Categories or Continuum? Commentary on Bailey et al. (2016).

    PubMed

    Savin-Williams, Ritch C

    2016-09-01

    Bailey et al. (2016) have provided an excellent, state-of-the-art overview that is a major contribution to our understanding of sexual orientation. However, whereas Bailey and his coauthors have examined the physiological, behavioral, and self-report data of sexual orientation and see categories, I see a sexual and romantic continuum. After noting several objections concerning the limitations of the review and methodological shortcomings characteristic of sexual-orientation research in general, I present evidence from research investigating in-between sexualities to support an alternative, continuum-based perspective regarding the nature of sexual orientation for both women and men. A continuum conceptualization has potential implications for investigating the prevalence of nonheterosexuals, sexual-orientation differences in gender nonconformity, causes of sexual orientation, and political issues.

  6. Relaxation of a steep density gradient in a simple fluid: Comparison between atomistic and continuum modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pourali, Meisam; Maghari, Ali; Meloni, Simone; Magaletti, Francesco; Casciola, Carlo Massimo; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2014-10-21

    We compare dynamical nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and continuum simulations of the dynamics of relaxation of a fluid system characterized by a non-uniform density profile. Results match quite well as long as the lengthscale of density nonuniformities are greater than the molecular scale (∼10 times the molecular size). In presence of molecular scale features some of the continuum fields (e.g., density and momentum) are in good agreement with atomistic counterparts, but are smoother. On the contrary, other fields, such as the temperature field, present very large difference with respect to reference (atomistic) ones. This is due to the limited accuracy of some of the empirical relations used in continuum models, the equation of state of the fluid in the present example.

  7. Relaxation of a steep density gradient in a simple fluid: comparison between atomistic and continuum modeling.

    PubMed

    Pourali, Meisam; Meloni, Simone; Magaletti, Francesco; Maghari, Ali; Casciola, Carlo Massimo; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2014-10-21

    We compare dynamical nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and continuum simulations of the dynamics of relaxation of a fluid system characterized by a non-uniform density profile. Results match quite well as long as the lengthscale of density nonuniformities are greater than the molecular scale (~10 times the molecular size). In presence of molecular scale features some of the continuum fields (e.g., density and momentum) are in good agreement with atomistic counterparts, but are smoother. On the contrary, other fields, such as the temperature field, present very large difference with respect to reference (atomistic) ones. This is due to the limited accuracy of some of the empirical relations used in continuum models, the equation of state of the fluid in the present example.

  8. A robust, coupled approach for atomistic-continuum simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Aubry, Sylvie; Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III; Wagner, Gregory John; Klein, Patrick A.; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Bammann, Douglas J.; Hoyt, Jeffrey John; Kimmer, Christopher J.

    2004-09-01

    This report is a collection of documents written by the group members of the Engineering Sciences Research Foundation (ESRF), Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project titled 'A Robust, Coupled Approach to Atomistic-Continuum Simulation'. Presented in this document is the development of a formulation for performing quasistatic, coupled, atomistic-continuum simulation that includes cross terms in the equilibrium equations that arise due to kinematic coupling and corrections used for the calculation of system potential energy to account for continuum elements that overlap regions containing atomic bonds, evaluations of thermo-mechanical continuum quantities calculated within atomistic simulations including measures of stress, temperature and heat flux, calculation used to determine the appropriate spatial and time averaging necessary to enable these atomistically-defined expressions to have the same physical meaning as their continuum counterparts, and a formulation to quantify a continuum 'temperature field', the first step towards constructing a coupled atomistic-continuum approach capable of finite temperature and dynamic analyses.

  9. Modeling yarn slip in woven fabric at the continuum level: Simulations of ballistic impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Ethan M.; King, Michael J.; Socrate, Simona

    2013-01-01

    Woven fabric is used in a wide variety of military and commercial products—both in neat form and as the reinforcement phase of composites. In many applications, yarn slip, the relative sliding of the yarns composing the weave, is an important mode of deformation or failure. Yarn slip can significantly change the energy absorption capacity and yarn density of the fabric and also cause yarns to unravel from the weave. Virtually all existing models for woven fabric that allow yarn slip are discrete in nature. They simulate every yarn in the weave and are therefore computationally expensive and difficult to integrate with other material models. A promising alternative to discrete models is the mesostructure-based continuum technique. With this technique, homogenized continuum properties are determined from a deforming analytic model of the fabric mesostructure at each material point. Yarn-level mechanisms of deformation are thus captured without the computational cost of simulating every yarn in the fabric. However, existing mesostructure-based continuum models treat the yarns as pinned together at the cross-over points of the weave, and an operative model that allows yarn slip has not been published. Here, we introduce a mesostructure-based continuum model that permits yarn slip and use the model to simulate the ballistic impact of woven fabric. In our approach, the weave is the continuum substrate on which the model is anchored, and slip of the yarns occurs relative to the weave continuum. The cross-over points of the weave act as the material points of the continuum, and the evolution of the local weave mesostructure at each point of the continuum is represented by state variables. At the same time, slip velocity fields simulate the slip of each yarn family relative to the weave continuum and therefore control the evolution of the yarn pitch. We found that simulating yarn slip significantly improves finite element predictions of the ballistic impact of a Kevlar

  10. Critique of dual continuum formulations of multicomponent reactive transport in fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtner, Peter C.

    Subsurface flow processes may take place at many different scales. The different scales refer to rock pore structure, microfractures, distinct fracture networks (ranging from small to large fracture spacing), and even faults. Presently, there is no satisfactory methodology for quantitatively describing flow and reactive transport in multiscale media. Approaches commonly applied to model fractured systems include single continuum models (SCM), equivalent continuum models (ECM), discrete fracture models (DFM), and various forms of dual continuum models (DCM). The SCM describes flow in the fracture network only and is valid in the absence of fracture-matrix interaction. The ECM, on the other hand, requires pervasive interaction between fracture and matrix and is based on averaging their properties. The ECM is characterized by equal fracture and matrix solute concentrations, but generally different mineral concentrations. The DFM is perhaps the most rigorous, but would require inordinate computational resources for a highly fractured rock mass. The DCM represents a fractured porous medium as two interacting continuums with one continuum corresponding to the fracture network and the other the matrix. A coupling term provides mass transfer between the two continuums. Values for mineral and solute concentrations and other properties such as liquid saturation state may be assigned individually to fracture and matrix. Two forms of the DCM are considered, characterized by connected and disconnected matrix blocks. The former is referred to as the dual continuum connected matrix (DCCM) model and the latter as the dual continuum disconnected matrix (DCDM) model. In contrast to the DCCM model, in which concentration gradients in the matrix are allowed only parallel to the fracture, the DFM provides for matrix concentration gradients perpendicular to the fracture. The DFM and DCCM models can agree with each other only in the case where both reduce to the ECM. The DCCM model

  11. Modeling biological tissue growth: discrete to continuum representations.

    PubMed

    Hywood, Jack D; Hackett-Jones, Emily J; Landman, Kerry A

    2013-09-01

    There is much interest in building deterministic continuum models from discrete agent-based models governed by local stochastic rules where an agent represents a biological cell. In developmental biology, cells are able to move and undergo cell division on and within growing tissues. A growing tissue is itself made up of cells which undergo cell division, thereby providing a significant transport mechanism for other cells within it. We develop a discrete agent-based model where domain agents represent tissue cells. Each agent has the ability to undergo a proliferation event whereby an additional domain agent is incorporated into the lattice. If a probability distribution describes the waiting times between proliferation events for an individual agent, then the total length of the domain is a random variable. The average behavior of these stochastically proliferating agents defining the growing lattice is determined in terms of a Fokker-Planck equation, with an advection and diffusion term. The diffusion term differs from the one obtained Landman and Binder [J. Theor. Biol. 259, 541 (2009)] when the rate of growth of the domain is specified, but the choice of agents is random. This discrepancy is reconciled by determining a discrete-time master equation for this process and an associated asymmetric nonexclusion random walk, together with consideration of synchronous and asynchronous updating schemes. All theoretical results are confirmed with numerical simulations. This study furthers our understanding of the relationship between agent-based rules, their implementation, and their associated partial differential equations. Since tissue growth is a significant cellular transport mechanism during embryonic growth, it is important to use the correct partial differential equation description when combining with other cellular functions.

  12. Continuum models for epitaxial growth with elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yang

    In heteroepitaxial growth, the mismatch between the lattice constants in the film and the substrate causes misfit strain in the film, making a flat surface unstable to small perturbations. This morphological instability is called Asaro-Tiller-Grinfeld (ATG) instability, which can drive the film to self-organize into nanostructures such as quantum wires or quantum dots. At low temperature, the surface consists of steps and facets, when the misfit strain causes step bunching, traditional continuum models for ATG instability does not apply directly. In the first part of this thesis, we derive a PDE model for step bunching by taking the continuum limit of the discrete models proposed by Tersoff et al and Duport et al. We study the linear instability of a uniform step train with small perturbations and compare our results with those of discrete models and continuum models for traditional ATG instability. We numerically study the nonlinear evolution of this instability and compare our results with those of discrete models. We also study the equilibrium shapes of step bunches and explain their coalescence. In the second part of this thesis, we derive a nonlinear approximate PDE for the ATG instability. In the ATG instability, the misfit strain is coupled with surface morphology and an elasticity problem must be solved numerically. Linear approximation is made in some cases such as when computing the equilibrium island shapes. Using the exact solution for a cycloid surface obtained by Chiu and Gao, we find that our nonlinear approximation has a wider range of applicability than linear approximation. Numerical simulation using our nonlinear PDE model predicts formation of a cusp-like surface morphology from initially small perturbations of flat surfaces, which agrees well with the result obtained by Spencer and Meiron by solving the elasticity problem numerically.

  13. Interpreting angina: symptoms along a gender continuum

    PubMed Central

    Crea-Arsenio, Mary; Shannon, Harry S; Velianou, James L; Giacomini, Mita

    2016-01-01

    Background ‘Typical’ angina is often used to describe symptoms common among men, while ‘atypical’ angina is used to describe symptoms common among women, despite a higher prevalence of angina among women. This discrepancy is a source of controversy in cardiac care among women. Objectives To redefine angina by (1) qualitatively comparing angina symptoms and experiences in women and men and (2) to propose a more meaningful construct of angina that integrates a more gender-centred approach. Methods Patients were recruited between July and December 2010 from a tertiary cardiac care centre and interviewed immediately prior to their first angiogram. Symptoms were explored through in-depth semi-structured interviews, transcribed verbatim and analysed concurrently using a modified grounded theory approach. Angiographically significant disease was assessed at ≥70% stenosis of a major epicardial vessel. Results Among 31 total patients, 13 men and 14 women had angiograpically significant CAD. Patients describe angina symptoms according to 6 symptomatic subthemes that array along a ‘gender continuum’. Gender-specific symptoms are anchored at each end of the continuum. At the centre of the continuum, are a remarkably large number of symptoms commonly expressed by both men and women. Conclusions The ‘gender continuum’ offers new insights into angina experiences of angiography candidates. Notably, there is more overlap of shared experiences between men and women than conventionally thought. The gender continuum can help researchers and clinicians contextualise patient symptom reports, avoiding the conventional ‘typical’ versus ‘atypical’ distinction that can misrepresent gendered angina experiences. PMID:27158523

  14. Continuum description of avalanches in granular media.

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I. S.; Tsimring, L. S.

    2000-12-05

    A continuum theory of partially fluidized granular flows is proposed. The theory is based on a combination of the mass and momentum conservation equations with the order parameter equation which describes the transition between flowing and static components of the granular system. We apply this model to the dynamics of avalanches in chutes. The theory provides a quantitative description of recent observations of granular flows on rough inclined planes (Daerr and Douady 1999): layer bistability, and the transition from triangular avalanches propagating downhill at small inclination angles to balloon-shaped avalanches also propagating uphill for larger angles.

  15. Cytoskeleton Dynamics: A Continuum Cooperative Hydrolysis Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian-Wei; Cheng, Bo; Feng, Yu-Yu; Wang, Zi-Qing; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2015-05-01

    Cytoskeleton is a network of filamentous proteins, such as actin filaments and microtubules. We propose a continuum cooperative hydrolysis model which possesses exactly analytical solution to describe the dynamics of filament. The results show that the cooperativity leads to non negative-exponential distribution of T (ATP or GTP) subunits. As an application, we investigate the treadmilling phenomenon using our model. It is shown that the cooperativity remarkably affects the length of filament. Supported by Chinese Universities Scientific Fund under Grant No. 2014YB029 and National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11205123

  16. Three-body Coulomb continuum problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berakdar, J.; Briggs, J. S.

    1994-06-01

    A symmetric representation of the three-body Coulomb continuum wave function as a product of three two-body Coulomb wave functions is modified to allow for three-body effects whereby the Sommerfeld parameter describing the strength of interaction of any two particles is affected by the presence of the third particle. This approach gives excellent agreement with near-threshold absolute (e,2e) ionization cross sections. In particular a recently observed deep minimum in noncoplanar geometry is reproduced for the first time.

  17. Dust continuum spectra from model HII regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aannestad, P. A.; Emery, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    The infrared spectrum emitted by nebular dust, heated by the ionizing stars in H II blisters and spherical H II regions, is calculated for various model parameters. Absorption of the non-ionizing radiation in a neutral layer is included. Heating by the Lyman alpha photon field is taken into account. The dust is composed of silicate and graphite grains, and evaporation of the grains in the inner region is considered. The models are presented with a view to interpretation of infrared observations of dusty H II regions and can be applied directly to the infrared astronomy satellite survey data. The continuum emission is compared with calculated fine structure line emission.

  18. Parallel Processing for Computational Continuum Dynamics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-10

    F49620-84-C-0111In I PARALLEL PROCESSING FOR COMPUTATIONAL CONTINUUM DYNAMICS: A FINAL REPORT Accession For Joseph F. McGrath DTIc TAB KMS Fusion, Inc...Uiarmouncod 0P . . B O X 1 5 6 7 J u s t tic a t io - --- - - Ann Arbor, MI 48106 A v ar_ _ la b il it¥ C o d e a 10 May 1985 nF , Final Report ... REPORT (Yr., Mo. a) 15 PAGE COUNT * Final IFROM 5S4i..4r.5 .. Mar. 10 May 1985 42 * 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION 17. COSATI CODES IB. SUBJECT TERMS

  19. Continuum regularization of gauge theory with fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, H.S.

    1987-03-01

    The continuum regularization program is discussed in the case of d-dimensional gauge theory coupled to fermions in an arbitrary representation. Two physically equivalent formulations are given. First, a Grassmann formulation is presented, which is based on the two-noise Langevin equations of Sakita, Ishikawa and Alfaro and Gavela. Second, a non-Grassmann formulation is obtained by regularized integration of the matter fields within the regularized Grassmann system. Explicit perturbation expansions are studied in both formulations, and considerable simplification is found in the integrated non-Grassmann formalism.

  20. Millimeter Continuum Observations Of Disk Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Sean

    2016-07-01

    I will offer a condensed overview of some key issues in protoplanetary disk research that makes use interferometric measurements of the millimeter-wavelength continuum emitted by their solid particles. Several lines of evidence now qualitatively support theoretical models for the growth and migration of disk solids, but also advertise a quantitative tension with the traditional efficiency of that evolution. New observations of small-scale substructures in disks might both reconcile the conflict and shift our focus in the mechanics of planet formation.

  1. Dust continuum spectra from model HII regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aannestad, P. A.; Emery, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    The infrared spectrum emitted by nebular dust, heated by the ionizing stars in H II blisters and spherical H II regions, is calculated for various model parameters. Absorption of the non-ionizing radiation in a neutral layer is included. Heating by the Lyman alpha photon field is taken into account. The dust is composed of silicate and graphite grains, and evaporation of the grains in the inner region is considered. The models are presented with a view to interpretation of infrared observations of dusty H II regions and can be applied directly to the infrared astronomy satellite survey data. The continuum emission is compared with calculated fine structure line emission.

  2. Simulations of plasma sheaths using continuum kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Hakim, Ammar

    2015-11-01

    Understanding plasma sheath physics is important for the performance of devices such as Hall thrusters due to the effect of energetic particles on electrode erosion. Plasma sheath physics is studied using kinetic and multi-fluid models with relevance to secondary electron emissions and plasma-surface interactions. Continuum kinetic models are developed to directly solve the Vlasov-Poisson equation using the discontinuous Galerkin method for each of the ion and electron species. A steady-state sheath is simulated by including a simple model for a neutral fluid. Multi-fluid simulations for the plasma sheath are also performed using the discontinuous Galerkin method to solve a complete set of fluid equations for each of the ion and electron species. The kinetic plasma sheath is compared to a multi-fluid plasma sheath. Supported by Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  3. Formative pluripotency: the executive phase in a developmental continuum.

    PubMed

    Smith, Austin

    2017-02-01

    The regulative capability of single cells to give rise to all primary embryonic lineages is termed pluripotency. Observations of fluctuating gene expression and phenotypic heterogeneity in vitro have fostered a conception of pluripotency as an intrinsically metastable and precarious state. However, in the embryo and in defined culture environments the properties of pluripotent cells change in an orderly sequence. Two phases of pluripotency, called naïve and primed, have previously been described. In this Hypothesis article, a third phase, called formative pluripotency, is proposed to exist as part of a developmental continuum between the naïve and primed phases. The formative phase is hypothesised to be enabling for the execution of pluripotency, entailing remodelling of transcriptional, epigenetic, signalling and metabolic networks to constitute multi-lineage competence and responsiveness to specification cues.

  4. Cellular Phone Towers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the call. How are people exposed to the energy from cellular phone towers? As people use cell ... where people can be exposed to them. The energy from a cellular phone tower antenna, like that ...

  5. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-12-31

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young`s modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  6. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young's modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  7. Fast convergence to equilibrium for long-chain polymer melts using a MD/continuum hybrid method.

    PubMed

    Senda, Yasuhiro; Fujio, Miyuki; Shimamura, Shuji; Blomqvist, Janne; Nieminen, Risto M

    2012-10-21

    Effective and fast convergence toward an equilibrium state for long-chain polymer melts is realized by a hybrid method coupling molecular dynamics and the elastic continuum. The required simulation time to achieve the equilibrium state is reduced compared with conventional equilibration methods. The polymers move on a wide range phase space due to large-scale fluctuation generated by the elastic continuum. A variety of chain structures is generated in the polymer melt which results in the fast convergence to the equilibrium state.

  8. Mid-IR super-continuum generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammed N.; Xia, Chenan; Freeman, Mike J.; Mauricio, Jeremiah; Zakel, Andy; Ke, Kevin; Xu, Zhao; Terry, Fred L., Jr.

    2009-02-01

    A Mid-InfraRed FIber Laser (MIRFIL) has been developed that generates super-continuum covering the spectral range from 0.8 to 4.5 microns with a time-averaged power as high as 10.5W. The MIRFIL is an all-fiber integrated laser with no moving parts and no mode-locked lasers that uses commercial off-the-shelf parts and leverages the mature telecom/fiber optics platform. The MIRFIL power can be easily scaled by changing the repetition rate and modifying the erbium-doped fiber amplifier. Some of the applications using the super-continuum laser will be described in defense, homeland security and healthcare. For example, the MIRFIL is being applied to a catheter-based medical diagnostic system to detect vulnerable plaque, which is responsible for most heart attacks resulting from hardening-of-the-arteries or atherosclerosis. More generally, the MIRFIL can be a platform for selective ablation of lipids without damaging normal protein or smooth muscle tissue.

  9. Continuum robot arms inspired by cephalopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Ian D.; Dawson, Darren M.; Flash, Tamar; Grasso, Frank W.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Hochner, Binyamin; Kier, William M.; Pagano, Christopher C.; Rahn, Christopher D.; Zhang, Qiming M.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we describe our recent results in the development of a new class of soft, continuous backbone ("continuum") robot manipulators. Our work is strongly motivated by the dexterous appendages found in cephalopods, particularly the arms and suckers of octopus, and the arms and tentacles of squid. Our ongoing investigation of these animals reveals interesting and unexpected functional aspects of their structure and behavior. The arrangement and dynamic operation of muscles and connective tissue observed in the arms of a variety of octopus species motivate the underlying design approach for our soft manipulators. These artificial manipulators feature biomimetic actuators, including artificial muscles based on both electro-active polymers (EAP) and pneumatic (McKibben) muscles. They feature a "clean" continuous backbone design, redundant degrees of freedom, and exhibit significant compliance that provides novel operational capacities during environmental interaction and object manipulation. The unusual compliance and redundant degrees of freedom provide strong potential for application to delicate tasks in cluttered and/or unstructured environments. Our aim is to endow these compliant robotic mechanisms with the diverse and dexterous grasping behavior observed in octopuses. To this end, we are conducting fundamental research into the manipulation tactics, sensory biology, and neural control of octopuses. This work in turn leads to novel approaches to motion planning and operator interfaces for the robots. The paper describes the above efforts, along with the results of our development of a series of continuum tentacle-like robots, demonstrating the unique abilities of biologically-inspired design.

  10. The Urban Watershed Continuum: Biogeochemistry of Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, S.; Belt, K.; Smith, C.; Newcomb, K.; Newcomer, T. A.; Smith, R.; Duan, S.; Findlay, S.; Groffman, P. M.; Mayer, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    Urban ecosystems are constantly evolving, and they are expected to change in both space and time. We explore the relationship between infrastructure and ecosystem function relevant to the inorganic and organic carbon cycle along urban watersheds across spatial and temporal dimensions. We provide examples from watersheds of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study Long-Term Ecological (LTER) and Washington D.C. Urban Long-Term Research Area (ULTRA EX) sites with varying land use and contrasting sanitary sewer systems. At a stream and river network scale, there are distinct longitudinal patterns in dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, and particulate carbon concentrations from suburban headwaters to progressively urbanized receiving waters. There are also distinct changes in stable isotopic signatures of organic carbon and inorganic carbon suggesting shifts in carbon sources and processing throughout urban stream and river networks. Longitudinal patterns appear to be related to in-stream transformations, as suggested by high frequency sensor measurements, mass balances, and diurnal sampling. We suggest that stream and river networks act as "transformers" of watershed nitrogen and phosphorus pollution to increasingly generate carbon throughout the urban watershed continuum via biological processes. Additionally, sources and quality of carbon may vary with watershed inputs from suburban headwaters to progressively urbanized downstream reaches. The role of the urban watershed continuum as a "transporter" and "transformer" of organic matter has important implications for anticipating changes in the forms and reactivity of carbon delivered to receiving waters and coastal zones.

  11. Polarized Continuum Radiation from Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, J. Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Continuum scattering by free electrons can be significant in early type stars, while in late type stars Rayleigh scattering by hydrogen atoms or molecules may be important. Computer programs used to construct models of stellar atmospheres generally treat the scattering of the continuum radiation as isotropic and unpolarized, but this scattering has a dipole angular dependence and will produce polarization. We review an accurate method for evaluating the polarization and limb darkening of the radiation from model stellar atmospheres. We use this method to obtain results for: (i) Late type stars, based on the MARCS code models (Gustafsson et al. 2008), and (ii) Early type stars, based on the NLTE code TLUSTY (Lanz and Hubeny 2003). These results are tabulated at http://www.astro.umd.edu/~jph/Stellar_Polarization.html. While the net polarization vanishes for an unresolved spherical star, this symmetry is broken by rapid rotation or by the masking of part of the star by a binary companion or during the transit of an exoplanet. We give some numerical results for these last cases.

  12. Ash Dispersal in Planetary Atmospheres: Continuum vs. Non-continuum Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagents, S. A.; Baloga, S. M.; Glaze, L. S.

    2013-12-01

    The dispersal of ash from a volcanic vent on any given planet is dictated by particle properties (density, shape, and size distribution), the intensity of the eruptive source, and the characteristics of the planetary environment (atmospheric structure, wind field, and gravity) into which the ash is erupted. Relating observations of potential pyroclastic deposits to source locations and eruption conditions requires a detailed quantitative understanding of the settling rates of individual particles under changing ambient conditions. For atmospheres that are well described by continuum mechanics, the conventional Newtonian description of particle motion allows particle settling velocities to be related to particle characteristics via a drag coefficient. However, under rarefied atmospheric conditions (i.e., on Mars and at high altitude on Earth), non-continuum effects become important for ash-sized particles, and an equation of motion based on statistical mechanics is required for calculating particle motion. We have developed a rigorous new treatment of particle settling under variable atmospheric conditions and applied it to Earth and Mars. When non-continuum effects are important (as dictated by the mean free path of atmospheric gas relative to the particle size), fall velocities are greater than those calculated by continuum mechanics. When continuum conditions (i.e., higher atmospheric densities) are reached during descent, our model switches to a conventional formulation that determines the appropriate drag coefficient as the particle transits varying atmospheric properties. The variation of settling velocity with altitude allows computation of particle trajectories, fall durations and downwind dispersal. Our theoretical and numerical analyses show that several key, competing factors strongly influence the downwind trajectories of ash particles and the extents of the resulting deposits. These factors include: the shape of the particles (non-spherical particles

  13. Wave functions for continuum states of charged fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, S. J.; Macek, J. H.

    1994-02-01

    Briggs's representation [Phys. Rev. A 41, 539 (1990)] of the Mo/ller wave operator for multiparticle wave functions is applied to charged fragments using a limiting procedure to correctly account for the slow decrease of Coulomb interactions with distance. Approximate wave functions used to model (e,2e) angular correlation measurments are obtained. Computed and measured angular correlations are compared to clarify the region of applicability of two approximations.

  14. Non-coherent Continuum Scattering as a Line Polarization Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Pino Alemán, T.; Manso Sainz, R.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2014-03-01

    Line scattering polarization can be strongly affected by Rayleigh scattering at neutral hydrogen and Thomson scattering at free electrons. Often a depolarization of the continuum results, but the Doppler redistribution produced by the continuum scatterers, which are light (hence, fast), induces more complex interactions between the polarization in spectral lines and in the continuum. Here we formulate and solve the radiative transfer problem of scattering line polarization with non-coherent continuum scattering consistently. The problem is formulated within the spherical tensor representation of atomic and light polarization. The numerical method of solution is a generalization of the Accelerated Lambda Iteration that is applied to both the atomic system and the radiation field. We show that the redistribution of the spectral line radiation due to the non-coherence of the continuum scattering may modify the shape of the emergent fractional linear polarization patterns significantly, even yielding polarization signals above the continuum level in intrinsically unpolarizable lines.

  15. Non-coherent continuum scattering as a line polarization mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Del Pino Alemán, T.; Manso Sainz, R.; Trujillo Bueno, J. E-mail: rsainz@iac.es

    2014-03-20

    Line scattering polarization can be strongly affected by Rayleigh scattering at neutral hydrogen and Thomson scattering at free electrons. Often a depolarization of the continuum results, but the Doppler redistribution produced by the continuum scatterers, which are light (hence, fast), induces more complex interactions between the polarization in spectral lines and in the continuum. Here we formulate and solve the radiative transfer problem of scattering line polarization with non-coherent continuum scattering consistently. The problem is formulated within the spherical tensor representation of atomic and light polarization. The numerical method of solution is a generalization of the Accelerated Lambda Iteration that is applied to both the atomic system and the radiation field. We show that the redistribution of the spectral line radiation due to the non-coherence of the continuum scattering may modify the shape of the emergent fractional linear polarization patterns significantly, even yielding polarization signals above the continuum level in intrinsically unpolarizable lines.

  16. Discrete-to-continuum modeling of weakly interacting incommensurate chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Español, Malena I.; Golovaty, Dmitry; Wilber, J. Patrick

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we use a formal discrete-to-continuum procedure to derive a continuum variational model for two chains of atoms with slightly incommensurate lattices. The chains represent a cross section of a three-dimensional system consisting of a graphene sheet suspended over a substrate. The continuum model recovers both qualitatively and quantitatively the behavior observed in the corresponding discrete model. The numerical solutions for both models demonstrate the presence of large commensurate regions separated by localized incommensurate domain walls.

  17. Continuum capture in the three-body problem

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I A

    1980-01-01

    The three-body problem, especially the problem of electron capture to the continuum in heavy particle collisions is reviewed. Major topics covered include: second born-induced asymmetry in electron capture to the continuum; historical context, links to other tests of atomic scattering theory; experiments characterizing the velocity distribution of ECC electrons; other atomic physics tests of high velocity Born expansions; atom capture; capture by positrons; and pion capture to the continuum. (GHT)

  18. Self-Focusing and Continuum Generation in Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corkum, Paul B.; Rolland, Claude

    This book attests to the fact continuum generation has become both technically and conceptually important. Discovered in 1970 (Alfano and Shapiro, 1970a, 1970b), continuum generation is a ubiquitous response of transparent materials (liquids, solids, and gases) to high-power, ultrashort-pulse radiation. This chapter highlights some of these aspects while presenting the sometimes unique characteristics of continuum generation in gases. In addition, we introduce some related results that reflect on the light-atom interaction at high intensities.

  19. Significance of decay mechanism into continuum in dynamical Wannier-Stark ladder

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, Yuya; Maeshima, Nobuya; Hino, Ken-ichi

    2013-12-04

    We examine the resonance structure of photodressed electron states of laser-driven Wannier-Stark ladder, namely, dynamic Wannier-Stark ladder, in terms of the excess density of states (DOS) closely related to a lifetime of the state of concern. It is revealed that the resonance structure in the strong laser-field region shows clear dependence on the ratio, η, of a Bloch-frequency to a laser frequency. As the laser strength increases, for η = 1, the excess DOS becomes involved with a lot of newly-growing resonance peaks. This result would be understood from the viewpoint of a Fano-like decay-mechanism caused by a multichannel continuum effect, in marked contrast to the cases of larger η’s; for η = 3, the excess DOS just is found to show a pronounced red-shift of a single dominant peak caused by a single-channel continuum effect.

  20. Continuum Fatigue Damage Modeling for Use in Life Extending Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.

    1994-01-01

    This paper develops a simplified continuum (continuous wrp to time, stress, etc.) fatigue damage model for use in Life Extending Controls (LEC) studies. The work is based on zero mean stress local strain cyclic damage modeling. New nonlinear explicit equation forms of cyclic damage in terms of stress amplitude are derived to facilitate the continuum modeling. Stress based continuum models are derived. Extension to plastic strain-strain rate models are also presented. Application of these models to LEC applications is considered. Progress toward a nonzero mean stress based continuum model is presented. Also, new nonlinear explicit equation forms in terms of stress amplitude are also derived for this case.

  1. Lattice Boltzmann equation method for multiple immiscible continuum fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, T. J.; Halliday, I.; Care, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    This paper generalizes the two-component algorithm of Sec. , extending it, in Sec. , to describe N>2 mutually immiscible fluids in the isothermal continuum regime. Each fluid has an independent interfacial tension. While retaining all its computational advantages, we remove entirely the empiricism associated with contact behavior in our previous multiple immiscible fluid models [M. M. Dupin , Phys. Rev. E 73, 055701(R) (2006)10.1103/PhysRevE.73.055701; Med. Eng. Phys. 28, 13 (2006)10.1016/j.medengphy.2005.04.015] while solidifying the physical foundations. Moreover, the model relies upon a fluid-fluid segregation which is simpler, computationally faster, more free of artifacts (i.e., the interfacial microcurrent), and upon an interface-inducing force distribution which is analytic. The method is completely symmetric between any numbers of immiscible fluids and stable over a wide range of directly input interfacial tension. We present data on the steady-state properties of multiple interface model, which are in good agreement with theory [R. E. Johnson and S. S. Sadhal, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 17, 289 (1985)10.1146/annurev.fl.17.010185.001445], specifically on the shapes of multidrop systems. Section is an analysis of the kinetic and continuum-scale descriptions of the underlying two-component lattice Boltzmann model for immiscible fluids, extendable to more than two immiscible fluids. This extension requires (i) the use of a more local kinetic equation perturbation which is (ii) free from a reliance on measured interfacial curvature. It should be noted that viewed simply as a two-component method, the continuum algorithm is inferior to our previous methods, reported by Lishchuk [Phys. Rev. E 67, 036701 (2003)]10.1103/PhysRevE.76.036701 and Halliday [Phys. Rev. E 76, 026708 (2007)]10.1103/PhysRevE.76.026708. Greater stability and parameter range is achieved in multiple drop simulations by using the forced multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method developed

  2. Continuum and line emission in Cygnus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, Alan; Ridgway, Susan E.; Lilly, Simon J.

    1994-08-01

    We present the results from (1) imaging observations of Cygnus A in five essentially line-free continuum bands with central wavelengths ranging from 0.34 to 2.1 microns. (2) imaging observations in five narrowband filters centered on the emission lines H beta(O III) lambda5007, H alpha(N II) lambda6583, and (S II) lambda lambda6716, 6731, and (3) deep spectroscopy covering the entire central region of Cyg A. We confirm that the featureless spectrum component is to be identified with the prominent double morphology at the center of Cyg A, but uncertainties in the distribution of the dust in this region tend to limit the accuracy with which we can determine its morphology and spectral-energy distribution (SED). From regions that appear to be least affected by obscuration, we find fv is approximately v-0.1 for this component. This SED could be consistent with free-free emission, a population of young stars, or a quasar continuum scattered by electrons, but probably not with a quasar continuum scattered by dust, which would be bluer. Our spectroscopy places an upper limit on the equivalent width of broad H beta that is well below that of typical quasars, showing that this flat-spectrum component (FSC) is almost certainly not dominated by scattered quasar radiation. Appeals to scattering by hot electrons to smear the scattered broad lines into invisibility appear to fail because the large density scale height of the electrons and the inefficiency of electron scattering should result in smoother and more extensive structure than we observe. Although the relative SED is consistent with free-free emission, the required amount of hot gas violates other observational constraints. At high angular resolution, the apparent morphology of the FSC is spiral-like. Although this impression may be partly due to obscuration, the distribution of the dust itself only serves to reinforce the spiral-like nature of the material with which it is associated. We conclude that the FSC is most

  3. Discrete and Continuum Elastic Properties of Interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Elliott Solomon

    The microstructure of defects in solids, e.g. interfaces, is heterogeneous and, consequently, so are the elastic properties. The complete anisotropic fourth-order tensors of both the discrete and the effective elastic moduli are defined in the interfacial region. To examine the meaning of discrete elastic constants, (i) a piecewise-continuous medium is considered where individual phases occupy the Voronoi polyhedra and have the elastic moduli associated with individual atoms, and (ii) the relationship between natural vibrations of the discrete systems and continuum waves is explored. Questions of local energy changes and stability are addressed in terms of continuum properties of the moduli, particularly positive definiteness and strong ellipticity. Comparisons between the atomistic results (exact effective moduli) and those for the continuum analog (bounds) establish the validity of the definition of elastic properties for heterogeneous structures at atomic scales and lead to criteria to assess the stability of a given microstructure. Homogenization of interfacial properties gives heterogeneous transition zone (or interphase) model. Interface phenomena in macrosystems (composites) and microsystems (grain boundaries) is explained by inner layer conditions between homogeneous bulk regions. Dynamical membrane and spring models of the imperfect interfaces are shown to be limiting models (similar to Reuss and Voigt bounding approximations in multiphase composite mechanics) for asymptotic expansions of stress and strain fields, respectively. Asymptotic expansion of both fields (in terms of small parameter h -thickness of the layer) produces mixed-type, exact approximation of the first order in h. Derived models of imperfect interface are used for investigation of interface waves in anisotropic bicrystals and for comparison with corresponding acoustical modes in phonon spectra. Localized interface waves are explained as general inhomogeneous plane waves in subsonic

  4. Discrete and continuum elastic properties of interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Elliott Solomon

    1993-06-01

    The microstructure of defects in solids, e.g. interfaces, is heterogeneous and, consequently, so are the elastic properties. The complete anisotropic fourth-order tensors of both the discrete and the effective elastic moduli are defined in the interfacial region. To examine the meaning of discrete elastic constants, (1) a piecewise-continuous medium is considered where individual phases occupy the Voronoi polyhedra and have the elastic moduli associated with individual atoms, and (2) the relationship between natural vibrations of the discrete systems and continuum waves is explored. Questions of local energy changes and stability are addressed in terms of continuum properties of the moduli, particularly positive definiteness and strong ellipticity. Comparisons between the atomistic results (exact effective moduli) and those for the continuum analog (bounds) establish the validity of the definition of elastic properties for heterogeneous structures at atomic scales and lead to criteria to assess the stability of a given microstructure. Homogenization of interfacial properties gives heterogeneous transition zone (or interphase) model. Interface phenomena in macrosystems (composites) and microsystems (grain boundaries) is explained by inner layer conditions between homogeneous bulk regions. Dynamical membrane and spring models of the imperfect interfaces are shown to be limiting models (similar to Reuss and Voigt bounding approximations in multiphase composite mechanics) for asymptotic expansions of stress and strain fields, respectively. Asymptotic expansion of both fields (in terms of small parameter h-thickness of the layer) produces mixed-type, exact approximation of the first order in h. Derived models of imperfect interface are used for investigation of interface waves in anisotropic bicrystals and for comparison with corresponding acoustical modes in phonon spectra. Localized interface waves are explained as general inhomogeneous plane waves in subsonic

  5. Broadly continuously tunable slot waveguide quantum cascade lasers based on a continuum-to-continuum active region design

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Bo; Zeng, Yong Quan; Liang, Guozhen; Hu, Xiao Nan; Rodriguez, Etienne; Wang, Qi Jie

    2015-09-14

    We report our progress in the development of broadly tunable single-mode slot waveguide quantum cascade lasers based on a continuum-to-continuum active region design. The electroluminescence spectrum of the continuum-to-continuum active region design has a full width at half maximum of 440 cm{sup −1} at center wavelength ∼10 μm at room temperature (300 K). Devices using the optimized slot waveguide structure and the continuum-to-continuum design can be tuned continuously with a lasing emission over 42 cm{sup −1}, from 9.74 to 10.16 μm, at room temperature by using only current tuning scheme, together with a side mode suppression ratio of above 15 dB within the whole tuning range.

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Cellular Stress Response and Lipid Accumulation in Oleaginous Microorganisms: The State of the Art and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kun; Gao, Zhen; Shi, Tian-Qiong; Song, Ping; Ren, Lu-Jing; Huang, He; Ji, Xiao-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Microbial oils, which are mainly extracted from yeasts, molds, and algae, have been of considerable interest as food additives and biofuel resources due to their high lipid content. While these oleaginous microorganisms generally produce only small amounts of lipids under optimal growth conditions, their lipid accumulation machinery can be induced by environmental stresses, such as nutrient limitation and an inhospitable physical environmental. As common second messengers of many stress factors, reactive oxygen species (ROS) may act as a regulator of cellular responses to extracellular environmental signaling. Furthermore, increasing evidence indicates that ROS may act as a mediator of lipid accumulation, which is associated with dramatic changes in the transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome. However, the specific mechanisms of ROS involvement in the crosstalk between extracellular stress signaling and intracellular lipid synthesis require further investigation. Here, we summarize current knowledge on stress-induced lipid biosynthesis and the putative role of ROS in the control of lipid accumulation in oleaginous microorganisms. Understanding such links may provide guidance for the development of stress-based strategies to enhance microbial lipid production.

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Cellular Stress Response and Lipid Accumulation in Oleaginous Microorganisms: The State of the Art and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Kun; Gao, Zhen; Shi, Tian-Qiong; Song, Ping; Ren, Lu-Jing; Huang, He; Ji, Xiao-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Microbial oils, which are mainly extracted from yeasts, molds, and algae, have been of considerable interest as food additives and biofuel resources due to their high lipid content. While these oleaginous microorganisms generally produce only small amounts of lipids under optimal growth conditions, their lipid accumulation machinery can be induced by environmental stresses, such as nutrient limitation and an inhospitable physical environmental. As common second messengers of many stress factors, reactive oxygen species (ROS) may act as a regulator of cellular responses to extracellular environmental signaling. Furthermore, increasing evidence indicates that ROS may act as a mediator of lipid accumulation, which is associated with dramatic changes in the transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome. However, the specific mechanisms of ROS involvement in the crosstalk between extracellular stress signaling and intracellular lipid synthesis require further investigation. Here, we summarize current knowledge on stress-induced lipid biosynthesis and the putative role of ROS in the control of lipid accumulation in oleaginous microorganisms. Understanding such links may provide guidance for the development of stress-based strategies to enhance microbial lipid production. PMID:28507542

  8. Calculating Free Energy Changes in Continuum Solvation Models

    DOE PAGES

    Ho, Junming; Ertem, Mehmed Z.

    2016-02-27

    We recently showed for a large dataset of pKas and reduction potentials that free energies calculated directly within the SMD continuum model compares very well with corresponding thermodynamic cycle calculations in both aqueous and organic solvents (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2015, 17, 2859). In this paper, we significantly expand the scope of our study to examine the suitability of this approach for the calculation of general solution phase kinetics and thermodynamics, in conjunction with several commonly used solvation models (SMDM062X, SMD-HF, CPCM-UAKS, and CPCM-UAHF) for a broad range of systems and reaction types. This includes cluster-continuum schemes for pKa calculations,more » as well as various neutral, radical and ionic reactions such as enolization, cycloaddition, hydrogen and chlorine atom transfer, and bimolecular SN2 and E2 reactions. On the basis of this benchmarking study, we conclude that the accuracies of both approaches are generally very similar – the mean errors for Gibbs free energy changes of neutral and ionic reactions are approximately 5 kJ mol-1 and 25 kJ mol-1 respectively. In systems where there are significant structural changes due to solvation, as is the case for certain ionic transition states and amino acids, the direct approach generally afford free energy changes that are in better agreement with experiment. The results indicate that when appropriate combinations of electronic structure methods are employed, the direct approach provides a reliable alternative to the thermodynamic cycle calculations of solution phase kinetics and thermodynamics across a broad range of organic reactions.« less

  9. Calculating Free Energy Changes in Continuum Solvation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Junming; Ertem, Mehmed Z.

    2016-02-27

    We recently showed for a large dataset of pKas and reduction potentials that free energies calculated directly within the SMD continuum model compares very well with corresponding thermodynamic cycle calculations in both aqueous and organic solvents (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2015, 17, 2859). In this paper, we significantly expand the scope of our study to examine the suitability of this approach for the calculation of general solution phase kinetics and thermodynamics, in conjunction with several commonly used solvation models (SMDM062X, SMD-HF, CPCM-UAKS, and CPCM-UAHF) for a broad range of systems and reaction types. This includes cluster-continuum schemes for pKa calculations, as well as various neutral, radical and ionic reactions such as enolization, cycloaddition, hydrogen and chlorine atom transfer, and bimolecular SN2 and E2 reactions. On the basis of this benchmarking study, we conclude that the accuracies of both approaches are generally very similar – the mean errors for Gibbs free energy changes of neutral and ionic reactions are approximately 5 kJ mol-1 and 25 kJ mol-1 respectively. In systems where there are significant structural changes due to solvation, as is the case for certain ionic transition states and amino acids, the direct approach generally afford free energy changes that are in better agreement with experiment. The results indicate that when appropriate combinations of electronic structure methods are employed, the direct approach provides a reliable alternative to the thermodynamic cycle calculations of solution phase kinetics and thermodynamics across a broad range of organic reactions.

  10. Continuum modeling of cooperative traffic flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngoduy, D.; Hoogendoorn, S. P.; Liu, R.

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a continuum approach to model the dynamics of cooperative traffic flow. The cooperation is defined in our model in a way that the equipped vehicle can issue and receive a warning massage when there is downstream congestion. Upon receiving the warning massage, the (up-stream) equipped vehicle will adapt the current desired speed to the speed at the congested area in order to avoid sharp deceleration when approaching the congestion. To model the dynamics of such cooperative systems, a multi-class gas-kinetic theory is extended to capture the adaptation of the desired speed of the equipped vehicle to the speed at the downstream congested traffic. Numerical simulations are carried out to show the influence of the penetration rate of the equipped vehicles on traffic flow stability and capacity in a freeway.

  11. The evolution of the quasar continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, M.

    1992-01-01

    We now have in hand a large data base of Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT), optical, and IR complementary data. We are in the process of obtaining a large amount of the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) data for the same quasar sample. For our complementary sample at high redshifts, where the UV was redshifted into the optical, we have just had approved large amounts of observing time to cover the quasar continuum in the near-IR using the new Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) array spectrographs. Ten micron, optical, and VLA radio, data also have approved time. An ISO US key program was approved to extend this work into the far-IR, and the launch of ASTRO-D (early in 1993) promises to extend it to higher energy X-rays.

  12. Continuum-kinetic approach to sheath simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagas, Petr; Hakim, Ammar; Srinivasan, Bhuvana

    2016-10-01

    Simulations of sheaths are performed using a novel continuum-kinetic model with collisions including ionization/recombination. A discontinuous Galerkin method is used to directly solve the Boltzmann-Poisson system to obtain a particle distribution function. Direct discretization of the distribution function has advantages of being noise-free compared to particle-in-cell methods. The distribution function, which is available at each node of the configuration space, can be readily used to calculate the collision integrals in order to get ionization and recombination operators. Analytical models are used to obtain the cross-sections as a function of energy. Results will be presented incorporating surface physics with a classical sheath in Hall thruster-relevant geometry. This work was sponsored by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Grant Number FA9550-15-1-0193.

  13. Radio Continuum Emission from FS CMa Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, L. F.; Báez-Rubio, A.; Miroshnichenko, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    The FS CMa stars exhibit bright optical emission-line spectra and strong IR excesses. Very little is known of their radio characteristics. We analyzed archive Very Large Array data to search for radio continuum emission in a sample of them. There are good quality data for seven of the ~40 known FS CMa stars. Of these seven stars, five turn out to have associated radio emission. Two of these stars, CI Cam and MWC 300, have been previously reported in the literature as radio emitters. We present and briefly discuss the radio detection of the other three sources: FS CMa (the prototype of the class), AS 381, and MWC 922. The radio emission is most probably of a free-free nature but additional observations are required to better characterize it.

  14. Exercise therapy across the lung cancer continuum.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lee W; Eves, Neil D; Waner, Emily; Joy, Anil A

    2009-07-01

    A lung cancer diagnosis and associated therapeutic management are associated with unique and varying degrees of adverse physical/functional impairments that dramatically reduce patients' ability to tolerate exercise. Poor exercise capacity predisposes to increased susceptibility to other common age-related diseases, poor quality of life, and likely premature death. This article reviews the literature investigating the role of exercise as an adjunct therapy across the lung cancer continuum (ie, prevention to palliation). The current evidence suggests that exercise training is a safe and feasible adjunct therapy for patients with operable lung cancer both before and after pulmonary resection. Among patients with inoperable disease, feasibility and safety studies of carefully prescribed exercise training are warranted. Preliminary evidence in this area suggests that exercise therapy may be an important consideration in multidisciplinary management of patients diagnosed with lung cancer.

  15. Continuum mechanics, stresses, currents and electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Segev, Reuven

    2016-04-28

    The Eulerian approach to continuum mechanics does not make use of a body manifold. Rather, all fields considered are defined on the space, or the space-time, manifolds. Sections of some vector bundle represent generalized velocities which need not be associated with the motion of material points. Using the theories of de Rham currents and generalized sections of vector bundles, we formulate a weak theory of forces and stresses represented by vector-valued currents. Considering generalized velocities represented by differential forms and interpreting such a form as a generalized potential field, we present a weak formulation of pre-metric, p-form electrodynamics as a natural example of the foregoing theory. Finally, it is shown that the assumptions leading to p-form electrodynamics may be replaced by the condition that the force functional is continuous with respect to the flat topology of forms.

  16. Defining Health Across the Cancer Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Audrey S; Everett, Ashlyn S; Dover, Laura; McDonald, Andrew; Kropp, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    Health is not defined by the absence of disease or suffering, but by response to a series of life events that can markedly alter the quality and quantity of life. Patients with cancer experience significant but dynamic physical, psychosocial, and financial challenges. With the increasing number of patients with early stage cancers transitioning to survivorship, there is a critical need to address health promotion and overall well-being. For those with advanced cancer, discussion about prognosis and early integration of palliative care can have a profound impact on the quality of life. Effective communication between healthcare providers and patients is important in aligning treatment recommendations with patient goals and preferences throughout cancer therapy. This review provides a dynamic definition of health and proposes actionable guidelines for health promotion at any point along the cancer continuum: survivorship after early cancer or when goals of care transition to improve quality at the end of life. PMID:28357161

  17. Polymer quantum mechanics and its continuum limit

    SciTech Connect

    Corichi, Alejandro; Vukasinac, Tatjana; Zapata, Jose A.

    2007-08-15

    A rather nonstandard quantum representation of the canonical commutation relations of quantum mechanics systems, known as the polymer representation, has gained some attention in recent years, due to its possible relation with Planck scale physics. In particular, this approach has been followed in a symmetric sector of loop quantum gravity known as loop quantum cosmology. Here we explore different aspects of the relation between the ordinary Schroedinger theory and the polymer description. The paper has two parts. In the first one, we derive the polymer quantum mechanics starting from the ordinary Schroedinger theory and show that the polymer description arises as an appropriate limit. In the second part we consider the continuum limit of this theory, namely, the reverse process in which one starts from the discrete theory and tries to recover back the ordinary Schroedinger quantum mechanics. We consider several examples of interest, including the harmonic oscillator, the free particle, and a simple cosmological model.

  18. A computational continuum model of poroelastic beds

    PubMed Central

    Zampogna, G. A.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of fluid flows interacting with porous and elastic materials, we lack a validated non-empirical macroscale method for characterizing the flow over and through a poroelastic medium. We propose a computational tool to describe such configurations by deriving and validating a continuum model for the poroelastic bed and its interface with the above free fluid. We show that, using stress continuity condition and slip velocity condition at the interface, the effective model captures the effects of small changes in the microstructure anisotropy correctly and predicts the overall behaviour in a physically consistent and controllable manner. Moreover, we show that the performance of the effective model is accurate by validating with fully microscopic resolved simulations. The proposed computational tool can be used in investigations in a wide range of fields, including mechanical engineering, bio-engineering and geophysics. PMID:28413355

  19. A computational continuum model of poroelastic beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lācis, U.; Zampogna, G. A.; Bagheri, S.

    2017-03-01

    Despite the ubiquity of fluid flows interacting with porous and elastic materials, we lack a validated non-empirical macroscale method for characterizing the flow over and through a poroelastic medium. We propose a computational tool to describe such configurations by deriving and validating a continuum model for the poroelastic bed and its interface with the above free fluid. We show that, using stress continuity condition and slip velocity condition at the interface, the effective model captures the effects of small changes in the microstructure anisotropy correctly and predicts the overall behaviour in a physically consistent and controllable manner. Moreover, we show that the performance of the effective model is accurate by validating with fully microscopic resolved simulations. The proposed computational tool can be used in investigations in a wide range of fields, including mechanical engineering, bio-engineering and geophysics.

  20. A computational continuum model of poroelastic beds.

    PubMed

    Lācis, U; Zampogna, G A; Bagheri, S

    2017-03-01

    Despite the ubiquity of fluid flows interacting with porous and elastic materials, we lack a validated non-empirical macroscale method for characterizing the flow over and through a poroelastic medium. We propose a computational tool to describe such configurations by deriving and validating a continuum model for the poroelastic bed and its interface with the above free fluid. We show that, using stress continuity condition and slip velocity condition at the interface, the effective model captures the effects of small changes in the microstructure anisotropy correctly and predicts the overall behaviour in a physically consistent and controllable manner. Moreover, we show that the performance of the effective model is accurate by validating with fully microscopic resolved simulations. The proposed computational tool can be used in investigations in a wide range of fields, including mechanical engineering, bio-engineering and geophysics.

  1. The hurricane-flood-landslide continuum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Negri, A.J.; Burkardt, N.; Golden, J.H.; Halverson, J.B.; Huffman, G.J.; Larsen, M.C.; McGinley, J.A.; Updike, R.G.; Verdin, J.P.; Wieczorek, G.F.

    2005-01-01

    In August 2004, representatives from NOAA, NASA, the US Geological Survey (USGS), as well as other government agencies and academic institutions convened in San Juan, Puerto Rico, at a workshop to discuss a proposed research project called the Hurricane-Flood-Landslide Continuum (HFLC). The purpose of the HFLC is to develop and integrate the multidisciplinary tools needed to issue regional guidance products for floods and landslide associated with major tropical rain systems with sufficient lead time that local emergency managers can notify vulnerable populations and protect infrastructure. The workshop sought to initiate discussion among these agencies about their highly complementary capabilities, and to establish a framework to leverage the strengths of each agency. Once a prototype system is developed, it could be adapted for use in regions that have a high frequency of tropical disturbances.

  2. A Threshold Continuum for Aeolian Sand Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, C.; Ewing, R. C.; Sherman, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport marks the initial entrainment of sand particles by the force of the wind. This is typically defined and modeled as a singular wind speed for a given grain size and is based on field and laboratory experimental data. However, the definition of threshold varies significantly between these empirical models, largely because the definition is based on visual-observations of initial grain movement. For example, in his seminal experiments, Bagnold defined threshold of motion when he observed that 100% of the bed was in motion. Others have used 50% and lesser values. Differences in threshold models, in turn, result is large errors in predicting the fluxes associated with sand and dust transport. Here we use a wind tunnel and novel sediment trap to capture the fractions of sand in creep, reptation and saltation at Earth and Mars pressures and show that the threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport is best defined as a continuum in which grains progress through stages defined by the proportion of grains in creep and saltation. We propose the use of scale dependent thresholds modeled by distinct probability distribution functions that differentiate the threshold based on micro to macro scale applications. For example, a geologic timescale application corresponds to a threshold when 100% of the bed in motion whereas a sub-second application corresponds to a threshold when a single particle is set in motion. We provide quantitative measurements (number and mode of particle movement) corresponding to visual observations, percent of bed in motion and degrees of transport intermittency for Earth and Mars. Understanding transport as a continuum provides a basis for revaluating sand transport thresholds on Earth, Mars and Titan.

  3. Energetic costs of cellular computation.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Pankaj; Schwab, David J

    2012-10-30

    Cells often perform computations in order to respond to environmental cues. A simple example is the classic problem, first considered by Berg and Purcell, of determining the concentration of a chemical ligand in the surrounding media. On general theoretical grounds, it is expected that such computations require cells to consume energy. In particular, Landauer's principle states that energy must be consumed in order to erase the memory of past observations. Here, we explicitly calculate the energetic cost of steady-state computation of ligand concentration for a simple two-component cellular network that implements a noisy version of the Berg-Purcell strategy. We show that learning about external concentrations necessitates the breaking of detailed balance and consumption of energy, with greater learning requiring more energy. Our calculations suggest that the energetic costs of cellular computation may be an important constraint on networks designed to function in resource poor environments, such as the spore germination networks of bacteria.

  4. Energetic costs of cellular computation

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Pankaj; Schwab, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Cells often perform computations in order to respond to environmental cues. A simple example is the classic problem, first considered by Berg and Purcell, of determining the concentration of a chemical ligand in the surrounding media. On general theoretical grounds, it is expected that such computations require cells to consume energy. In particular, Landauer’s principle states that energy must be consumed in order to erase the memory of past observations. Here, we explicitly calculate the energetic cost of steady-state computation of ligand concentration for a simple two-component cellular network that implements a noisy version of the Berg–Purcell strategy. We show that learning about external concentrations necessitates the breaking of detailed balance and consumption of energy, with greater learning requiring more energy. Our calculations suggest that the energetic costs of cellular computation may be an important constraint on networks designed to function in resource poor environments, such as the spore germination networks of bacteria. PMID:23045633

  5. Oxidative Stress in Mammalian Cells Impinges on the Cysteines Redox State of Human XRCC3 Protein and on Its Cellular Localization

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Pierre-Marie; Graindorge, Dany; Smirnova, Violetta; Rigolet, Pascal; Francesconi, Stefania; Scanlon, Susan; Sage, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    In vertebrates, XRCC3 is one of the five Rad51 paralogs that plays a central role in homologous recombination (HR), a key pathway for maintaining genomic stability. While investigating the potential role of human XRCC3 (hXRCC3) in the inhibition of DNA replication induced by UVA radiation, we discovered that hXRCC3 cysteine residues are oxidized following photosensitization by UVA. Our in silico prediction of the hXRCC3 structure suggests that 6 out of 8 cysteines are potentially accessible to the solvent and therefore potentially exposed to ROS attack. By non-reducing SDS-PAGE we show that many different oxidants induce hXRCC3 oxidation that is monitored in Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO) cells by increased electrophoretic mobility of the protein and in human cells by a slight decrease of its immunodetection. In both cell types, hXRCC3 oxidation was reversed in few minutes by cellular reducing systems. Depletion of intracellular glutathione prevents hXRCC3 oxidation only after UVA exposure though depending on the type of photosensitizer. In addition, we show that hXRCC3 expressed in CHO cells localizes both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Mutating all hXRCC3 cysteines to serines (XR3/S protein) does not affect the subcellular localization of the protein even after exposure to camptothecin (CPT), which typically induces DNA damages that require HR to be repaired. However, cells expressing mutated XR3/S protein are sensitive to CPT, thus highlighting a defect of the mutant protein in HR. In marked contrast to CPT treatment, oxidative stress induces relocalization at the chromatin fraction of both wild-type and mutated protein, even though survival is not affected. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the DNA repair protein hXRCC3 is a target of ROS induced by environmental factors and raise the possibility that the redox environment might participate in regulating the HR pathway. PMID:24116071

  6. Xtoys: Cellular automata on xwindows

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1995-08-15

    Xtoys is a collection of xwindow programs for demonstrating simulations of various statistical models. Included are xising, for the two dimensional Ising model, xpotts, for the q-state Potts model, xautomalab, for a fairly general class of totalistic cellular automata, xsand, for the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfield model of self organized criticality, and xfires, a simple forest fire simulation. The programs should compile on any machine supporting xwindows.

  7. A Cellular Biophysics Textbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder, Alan Joseph

    2011-12-01

    In the past two decades, great advances have been made in understanding of the biophysical mechanisms of the protein machines that carry out the fundamental processes of the cell. It is now known that all major eukaryotic cellular processes require a complicated assemblage of proteins acting via a series of concerted motions. In order to grasp current understanding of cellular mechanisms, the new generation of cell biologists needs to be trained in the general characteristics of these cellular properties and the methods with which to study them. This cellular biophysics textbook, to be used in conjunction with the cellular biophysics course (MCB143) at UC-Davis, provides a great tool in the instruction of the new generation of cellular biologists. It provides a hierarchical view of the cell, from atoms to protein machines and explains in depth the mechanisms of cytoskeletal force generators as an example of these principles.

  8. Testing Continuum and Non-Continuum Descriptions in High Speed Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-13

    fundamentally different in the two solution approaches. In the continuum approach the Navier-Stokes equations consist of source terms of reaction...model match those obtained from the direct solution of the Boltzmann equation [14]. For the case of the Mach 1.2 Argon shock structure, (figure not...study provides excellent match with the DSMC and direct solutions of the Boltzmann equation [14]. Fig. 2 shows the effect of the variation of the

  9. A geohydrologic continuum theory for the spatial and temporal evolution of marsh-estuarine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dame, R.; Childers, D.; Koepfler, E.

    Using ecosystem development theory and the River Continuum Concept as starting points, we present a new holistic theory to explain the spatial and temporal behaviour of marsh-estuarine ecosystems Along the marine-estuarine-freshwater gradient in response to sea-level rise. In this theory, a geohydrologic continuum represented by tidal channel provides a predictable physical model of how the marsh-estuarine ecosystem adapts until there is a change of state. North Inlet, South Carolina is used as an example of this marsh-estuarine continuum. Mature creeks are at the ocean-estuary interface and are strongly influenced by marine factors. Further into the estuary, less and less mature creeks are encountered which are dominated by smaller scale spatial and temporal controls such as oyster reefs. Immature or ephemeral creeks import both particulate and dissolved materials, while mature creeks export both forms of nutrients. Mid-aged creeks appear to take up particulate materials and release dissolved constituents. Ultimately, the continuum reaches the fresh-saltwater interface where a very young estuarine ecosystem invades a more mature type, under the influence of disturbance. Our new explanation satisfies most criteria for a good theory by being internally consistent to the location specified, generating testable hypothesis, not blindly adapting existing theories, agreeing with known properties of the ecosystem described and by generating new invigorating discussion within the scientific community.

  10. An efficient collision limiter Monte Carlo simulation for hypersonic near-continuum flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jie; Li, Zhihui; Li, Xuguo; Fang, Boqiang Du Ming

    2016-11-01

    The implementation of a collision limiter DSMC-based hybrid approach is presented to simulate hypersonic near-continuum flow. The continuum breakdown parameters based on gradient-length local Knudsen number are characterized different regions of the flowfield. The collision limiter is used in continuum inviscid regions with large time step and cell size. Local density gradient-based dynamic adaptation of collision and sampling cells refinement is employed in high gradient regions including strong shocks and boundary layer near surface. A variable time step scheme is adopted to make sure a more uniform distribution of model particles per collision cell throughout the computational domain, with a constant ratio of local time step interval to particle weights to avoid particles cloned or destroyed when crossing interface from cell to cell. The surface pressure and friction coefficients of hypersonic reentry flow for a blunt capsule are computed in different conditions and compared with benchmark case in transitional regime to examine the efficiency and accuracy. The aerodynamic characteristics of a wave rider shape with sharp leading edge are simulated in the test state for hypersonic near-continuum. The computed aerodynamic coefficients have good agreements with experimental data in low density wind tunnel of CARDC and have less computational expense.

  11. Arf and p53 act as guardians of a quiescent cellular state by protecting against immortalization of cells with stable genomes.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Tomoyuki; Atsumi, Yuko; Sugihara, Eiji; Saya, Hideyuki; Kanno, Masamoto; Tashiro, Fumio; Masutani, Mitsuko; Yoshioka, Ken-Ichi

    2013-03-01

    Normal cells undergo a growth-arrested status that is produced by p53-dependent down-regulation of histone H2AX. Immortality is developed after abrogation of the H2AX-diminished state, which is associated with genomic instability (often with tetraploidy) and the induction of mutations in either the Arf or p53 gene. However, the role of Arf in control of H2AX expression and genome stability is still unclear. Here, we show that both Arf and p53 are required for the down-regulation of H2AX and formation of the growth-arrested state. Wild-type (WT) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) subjected to tetraploidization with DNA lesions did not undergo mitotic catastrophe-associated cell death and stayed in a growth-arrested state, until immortality was attained with mutations in the Arf/p53 module and recovery of H2AX expression. Whereas tetraploidization was essential for immortalization of WT MEFs, this event was not required for immortalization of MEFs containing mutations in Arf/p53 and these cells still underwent mitotic catastrophe-associated cell death. Thus, WT MEFs are protected from immortalization with genome stability, which is abrogated with tetraploidization and mutation of either Arf or p53.

  12. Teaching Continuum Mechanics in a Mechanical Engineering Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yucheng

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a graduate course, continuum mechanics, which is designed for and taught to graduate students in a Mechanical Engineering (ME) program. The significance of continuum mechanics in engineering education is demonstrated and the course structure is described. Methods used in teaching this course such as topics, class…

  13. The urban watershed continuum: evolving spatial and temporal dimensions

    Treesearch

    Sujay S. Kaushal; Kenneth T. Belt

    2012-01-01

    Urban ecosystems are constantly evolving, and they are expected to change in both space and time with active management or degradation. An urban watershed continuum framework recognizes a continuum of engineered and natural hydrologic flowpaths that expands hydrologic networks in ways that are seldom considered. It recognizes that the nature of hydrologic connectivity...

  14. 48 CFR 15.101 - Best value continuum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Best value continuum. 15.101 Section 15.101 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING... Best value continuum. An agency can obtain best value in negotiated acquisitions by using any one or a...

  15. Stonefly (Plecoptera) Feeding Modes: Variation Along a California River Continuum

    Treesearch

    Richard L. Bottorff; Allen W. Knight

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of Plecoptera along a California river was used to test several predictions of the River Continuum Concept about how functional feeding groups should change along a stream's length. Stoneflies were collected from stream orders 1-6 (123 km) of the Cosumnes River continuum in the central Sierra Nevada. The 69 stonefly species collected were...

  16. Continuum Thinking and the Contexts of Personal Information Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huvila, Isto; Eriksen, Jon; Häusner, Eva-Maria; Jansson, Ina-Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Recent personal information management literature has underlined the significance of the contextuality of personal information and its use. The present article discusses the applicability of the records continuum model and its generalisation, continuum thinking, as a theoretical framework for explicating the overlap and evolution of…

  17. Teaching Continuum Mechanics in a Mechanical Engineering Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yucheng

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a graduate course, continuum mechanics, which is designed for and taught to graduate students in a Mechanical Engineering (ME) program. The significance of continuum mechanics in engineering education is demonstrated and the course structure is described. Methods used in teaching this course such as topics, class…

  18. Continuum of Counseling Goals: A Framework for Differentiating Counseling Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Paul

    1984-01-01

    Presents counseling goals in a developmental continuum similar in concept to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Discusses ego development goals, socialization goals, developmental goals, self-esteem goals, and self-realization goals and describes characteristics and implications of the continuum. (JAC)

  19. Continuum Mathematical Modeling of Slip Weakening in Geological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, C. D.; Borja, R. I.; Pollard, D. D.

    2005-12-01

    Slip weakening is a conceptual process used to describe strength degradation during the initial stage of slip instability. For an intact or relatively undamaged rock mass the strength may consist of frictional and cohesive components along potential faults, whereas for a previously faulted rock mass the strength may be predominantly frictional. In the former case a fault may initiate and propagate, whereas in the latter case an older fault may be reactivated. We describe a framework for mathematical modeling of slip weakening in an initially intact rock mass due to shear strain localization along any arbitrary slip plane. The modeling technique considered is based on continuum mechanics and may be cast directly into a standard nonlinear finite element algorithm for the analysis of pre- and post-failure responses of geological systems in a boundary-value problem. The pre-failure behavior is represented by a continuum constitutive model; the post-failure behavior is characterized by frictional yielding on a slip surface with state- and velocity-dependent coefficient of friction. In the context of finite element analysis, slip planes are represented by an embedded strong discontinuity introduced into an initially intact finite element to signal the beginning of post-failure behavior. These discontinuity surfaces may be inserted at an arbitrary orientation and location in the element, depending on the conditions at failure. Here we focus on the narrow time interval of slip weakening, from the moment the strong discontinuity has been embedded into a finite element until the slip has grown to a large enough value for the coefficient of friction to reach steady state. To this end, we formulate a linear slip weakening constitutive law in which the weakening component decays to zero at the same time that the frictional component increases to its value at residual state. Corresponding author. E-mail: borja@stanford.edu (R.I. Borja). Supported by U.S. Department of Energy

  20. An Optimization-based Atomistic-to-Continuum Coupling Method

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Derek; Bochev, Pavel B.; Luskin, Mitchell; ...

    2014-08-21

    In this paper, we present a new optimization-based method for atomistic-to-continuum (AtC) coupling. The main idea is to cast the latter as a constrained optimization problem with virtual Dirichlet controls on the interfaces between the atomistic and continuum subdomains. The optimization objective is to minimize the error between the atomistic and continuum solutions on the overlap between the two subdomains, while the atomistic and continuum force balance equations provide the constraints. Separation, rather then blending of the atomistic and continuum problems, and their subsequent use as constraints in the optimization problem distinguishes our approach from the existing AtC formulations. Finally,more » we present and analyze the method in the context of a one-dimensional chain of atoms modeled using a linearized two-body potential with next-nearest neighbor interactions.« less

  1. Solar radio continuum storms and a breathing magnetic field model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Radio noise continuum emissions observed in metric and decametric wave frequencies are, in general, associated with actively varying sunspot groups accompanied by the S-component of microwave radio emissions. These continuum emission sources, often called type I storm sources, are often associated with type III burst storm activity from metric to hectometric wave frequencies. This storm activity is, therefore, closely connected with the development of these continuum emission sources. It is shown that the S-component emission in microwave frequencies generally precedes, by several days, the emission of these noise continuum storms of lower frequencies. In order for these storms to develop, the growth of sunspot groups into complex types is very important in addition to the increase of the average magnetic field intensity and area of these groups. After giving a review on the theory of these noise continuum storm emissions, a model is briefly considered to explain the relation of the emissions to the storms.

  2. An Optimization-based Atomistic-to-Continuum Coupling Method

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Derek; Bochev, Pavel B.; Luskin, Mitchell; Shapeev, Alexander V.

    2014-08-21

    In this paper, we present a new optimization-based method for atomistic-to-continuum (AtC) coupling. The main idea is to cast the latter as a constrained optimization problem with virtual Dirichlet controls on the interfaces between the atomistic and continuum subdomains. The optimization objective is to minimize the error between the atomistic and continuum solutions on the overlap between the two subdomains, while the atomistic and continuum force balance equations provide the constraints. Separation, rather then blending of the atomistic and continuum problems, and their subsequent use as constraints in the optimization problem distinguishes our approach from the existing AtC formulations. Finally, we present and analyze the method in the context of a one-dimensional chain of atoms modeled using a linearized two-body potential with next-nearest neighbor interactions.

  3. On the role of self-adjointness in the continuum formulation of topological quantum phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanhayi Ahari, Mostafa; Ortiz, Gerardo; Seradjeh, Babak

    2016-11-01

    Topological quantum phases of matter are characterized by an intimate relationship between the Hamiltonian dynamics away from the edges and the appearance of bound states localized at the edges of the system. Elucidating this correspondence in the continuum formulation of topological phases, even in the simplest case of a one-dimensional system, touches upon fundamental concepts and methods in quantum mechanics that are not commonly discussed in textbooks, in particular the self-adjoint extensions of a Hermitian operator. We show how such topological bound states can be derived in a prototypical one-dimensional system. Along the way, we provide a pedagogical exposition of the self-adjoint extension method as well as the role of symmetries in correctly formulating the continuum, field-theory description of topological matter with boundaries. Moreover, we show that self-adjoint extensions can be characterized generally in terms of a conserved local current associated with the self-adjoint operator.

  4. In vivo monitoring of cellular energy metabolism using SoNar, a highly responsive sensor for NAD(+)/NADH redox state.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuzheng; Wang, Aoxue; Zou, Yejun; Su, Ni; Loscalzo, Joseph; Yang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    NADH and its oxidized form NAD(+) have a central role in energy metabolism, and their concentrations are often considered to be among the most important readouts of metabolic state. Here, we present a detailed protocol to image and monitor NAD(+)/NADH redox state in living cells and in vivo using a highly responsive, genetically encoded fluorescent sensor known as SoNar (sensor of NAD(H) redox). The chimeric SoNar protein was initially developed by inserting circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein (cpYFP) into the NADH-binding domain of Rex protein from Thermus aquaticus (T-Rex). It functions by binding to either NAD(+) or NADH, thus inducing protein conformational changes that affect its fluorescent properties. We first describe steps for how to establish SoNar-expressing cells, and then discuss how to use the system to quantify the intracellular redox state. This approach is sensitive, accurate, simple and able to report subtle perturbations of various pathways of energy metabolism in real time. We also detail the application of SoNar to high-throughput chemical screening of candidate compounds targeting cell metabolism in a microplate-reader-based assay, along with in vivo fluorescence imaging of tumor xenografts expressing SoNar in mice. Typically, the approximate time frame for fluorescence imaging of SoNar is 30 min for living cells and 60 min for living mice. For high-throughput chemical screening in a 384-well-plate assay, the whole procedure generally takes no longer than 60 min to assess the effects of 380 compounds on cell metabolism.

  5. Continuum and molecular-dynamics simulation of nanodroplet collisions.

    PubMed

    Bardia, Raunak; Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel; Trujillo, Mario F

    2016-05-01

    The extent to which the continuum treatment holds in binary droplet collisions is examined in the present work by using a continuum-based implicit surface capturing strategy (volume-of-fluid coupled to Navier-Stokes) and a molecular dynamics methodology. The droplet pairs are arranged in a head-on-collision configuration with an initial separation distance of 5.3 nm and a velocity of 3 ms^{-1}. The size of droplets ranges from 10-50 nm. Inspecting the results, the collision process can be described as consisting of two periods: a preimpact phase that ends with the initial contact of both droplets, and a postimpact phase characterized by the merging, deformation, and coalescence of the droplets. The largest difference between the continuum and molecular dynamics (MD) predictions is observed in the preimpact period, where the continuum-based viscous and pressure drag forces significantly overestimate the MD predictions. Due to large value of Knudsen number in the gas (Kn_{gas}=1.972), this behavior is expected. Besides the differences between continuum and MD, it is also observed that the continuum simulations do not converge for the set of grid sizes considered. This is shown to be directly related to the initial velocity profile and the minute size of the nanodroplets. For instance, for micrometer-size droplets, this numerical sensitivity is not an issue. During the postimpact period, both MD and continuum-based simulations are strikingly similar, with only a moderate difference in the peak kinetic energy recorded during the collision process. With values for the Knudsen number in the liquid (Kn_{liquid}=0.01 for D=36nm) much closer to the continuum regime, this behavior is expected. The 50 nm droplet case is sufficiently large to be predicted reasonably well with the continuum treatment. However, for droplets smaller than approximately 36 nm, the departure from continuum behavior becomes noticeably pronounced, and becomes drastically different for the 10 nm

  6. DUSP11 activity on triphosphorylated transcripts promotes Argonaute association with noncanonical viral microRNAs and regulates steady-state levels of cellular noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Burke, James M.; Kincaid, Rodney P.; Nottingham, Ryan M.; Lambowitz, Alan M.; Sullivan, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    RNA silencing is a conserved eukaryotic gene expression regulatory mechanism mediated by small RNAs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the accumulation of a distinct class of siRNAs synthesized by an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) requires the PIR-1 phosphatase. However, the function of PIR-1 in RNAi has remained unclear. Since mammals lack an analogous siRNA biogenesis pathway, an RNA silencing role for the mammalian PIR-1 homolog (dual specificity phosphatase 11 [DUSP11]) was unexpected. Here, we show that the RNA triphosphatase activity of DUSP11 promotes the RNA silencing activity of viral microRNAs (miRNAs) derived from RNA polymerase III (RNAP III) transcribed precursors. Our results demonstrate that DUSP11 converts the 5′ triphosphate of miRNA precursors to a 5′ monophosphate, promoting loading of derivative 5p miRNAs into Argonaute proteins via a Dicer-coupled 5′ monophosphate-dependent strand selection mechanism. This mechanistic insight supports a likely shared function for PIR-1 in C. elegans. Furthermore, we show that DUSP11 modulates the 5′ end phosphate group and/or steady-state level of several host RNAP III transcripts, including vault RNAs and Alu transcripts. This study shows that steady-state levels of select noncoding RNAs are regulated by DUSP11 and defines a previously unknown portal for small RNA-mediated silencing in mammals, revealing that DUSP11-dependent RNA silencing activities are shared among diverse metazoans. PMID:27798849

  7. Continuum mechanics for quantum many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignale, Giovanni; Tao, Jianmin; Gao, Xianlong; Tokatly, Ilya

    2010-03-01

    Continuum mechanics is a theory of the dynamics of classical liquids and solids in which the state of the body is described by a small set of collective, such as density and current. A similar description is possible for quantum many-body systems, and indeed its existence is guaranteed by the basic theorems of time-dependent current density functional theory. In this paper we show how the exact Heisenberg equation of motion for the current density of a many-body system can be closed by expressing the quantum stress tensor as a functional of the current density. Several approximation schemes for this functional are discussed. The simplest scheme allows us to bypass the solution of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation, resulting in an equation of motion for the current that requires only ground-state properties as an input. We illustrate the formalism by applying it to the calculation of excitation energies in simple one- and two-electron systems.

  8. MIRO Continuum Calibration for Asteroid Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon

    2011-01-01

    MIRO (Microwave Instrument for the Rosetta Orbiter) is a lightweight, uncooled, dual-frequency heterodyne radiometer. The MIRO encountered asteroid Steins in 2008, and during the flyby, MIRO used the Asteroid Mode to measure the emission spectrum of Steins. The Asteroid Mode is one of the seven modes of the MIRO operation, and is designed to increase the length of time that a spectral line is in the MIRO pass-band during a flyby of an object. This software is used to calibrate the continuum measurement of Steins emission power during the asteroid flyby. The MIRO raw measurement data need to be calibrated in order to obtain physically meaningful data. This software calibrates the MIRO raw measurements in digital units to the brightness temperature in Kelvin. The software uses two calibration sequences that are included in the Asteroid Mode. One sequence is at the beginning of the mode, and the other at the end. The first six frames contain the measurement of a cold calibration target, while the last six frames measure a warm calibration target. The targets have known temperatures and are used to provide reference power and gain, which can be used to convert MIRO measurements into brightness temperature. The software was developed to calibrate MIRO continuum measurements from Asteroid Mode. The software determines the relationship between the raw digital unit measured by MIRO and the equivalent brightness temperature by analyzing data from calibration frames. The found relationship is applied to non-calibration frames, which are the measurements of an object of interest such as asteroids and other planetary objects that MIRO encounters during its operation. This software characterizes the gain fluctuations statistically and determines which method to estimate gain between calibration frames. For example, if the fluctuation is lower than a statistically significant level, the averaging method is used to estimate the gain between the calibration frames. If the

  9. Modelling cellular behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endy, Drew; Brent, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Representations of cellular processes that can be used to compute their future behaviour would be of general scientific and practical value. But past attempts to construct such representations have been disappointing. This is now changing. Increases in biological understanding combined with advances in computational methods and in computer power make it possible to foresee construction of useful and predictive simulations of cellular processes.

  10. Electrodiffusion: a continuum modeling framework for biomolecular systems with realistic spatiotemporal resolution.

    PubMed

    Lu, Benzhuo; Zhou, Y C; Huber, Gary A; Bond, Stephen D; Holst, Michael J; McCammon, J Andrew

    2007-10-07

    A computational framework is presented for the continuum modeling of cellular biomolecular diffusion influenced by electrostatic driving forces. This framework is developed from a combination of state-of-the-art numerical methods, geometric meshing, and computer visualization tools. In particular, a hybrid of (adaptive) finite element and boundary element methods is adopted to solve the Smoluchowski equation (SE), the Poisson equation (PE), and the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equation (PNPE) in order to describe electrodiffusion processes. The finite element method is used because of its flexibility in modeling irregular geometries and complex boundary conditions. The boundary element method is used due to the convenience of treating the singularities in the source charge distribution and its accurate solution to electrostatic problems on molecular boundaries. Nonsteady-state diffusion can be studied using this framework, with the electric field computed using the densities of charged small molecules and mobile ions in the solvent. A solution for mesh generation for biomolecular systems is supplied, which is an essential component for the finite element and boundary element computations. The uncoupled Smoluchowski equation and Poisson-Boltzmann equation are considered as special cases of the PNPE in the numerical algorithm, and therefore can be solved in this framework as well. Two types of computations are reported in the results: stationary PNPE and time-dependent SE or Nernst-Planck equations solutions. A biological application of the first type is the ionic density distribution around a fragment of DNA determined by the equilibrium PNPE. The stationary PNPE with nonzero flux is also studied for a simple model system, and leads to an observation that the interference on electrostatic field of the substrate charges strongly affects the reaction rate coefficient. The second is a time-dependent diffusion process: the consumption of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine by

  11. Analysis of downregulation of cellular energy demand by 2D measurements of intracapillary HbO2, Hb, pO2, and redox state of cytochromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krug, Alfons; Kessler, Manfred D.; Hoeper, Jens; Zellner, S.; Sourdoulaud, Valerie

    1995-04-01

    Rapid microlightguide spectrometers (EMPHO IIa/b) and a multiwire pO2 electrode are applied for measurements of heterogeneous distribution of tissue oxygenation and redox state of respiratory enzymes in heart and rat liver. Optical and pO2 measurements are noninvasively performed by use of sensors placed on the surface of tissue. Measurements in isolated perfused rat and in dog heart in situ were performed in order to investigate the relation between myocardial oxygenation and function. The tissue monitoring in liver was initiated by optical and polarographic monitoring in the hemoglobin free perfused organ. Subsequently, erythrocytes were added to the perfusate in several steps. The experiments reveal clear evidence that a protective system of tissue is activated when critical pO2 values at the lethal corner of micro vessels fall off a critical threshold around 5 mmHg, thus causing a depletion of oxidative metabolism.

  12. Nonlinear Dynamics of Soft-Matter: Continuum Mechanics in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennin, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Recent efforts in soft-condensed matter physics has generated a renewed interest in the fundamental physics of continuum systems. There has been a recognition that a wide variety of systems, from glasses to foams to granular material, exhibit similar behavior with regard to their dynamics. Even under conditions of external driving, these systems are often ``jammed''. In other words, they exhibit a solid like response to the external driving. With sufficient driving force, there is a transition to a flowing state as the system ''unjams''. This flowing state is generally comprised of nonlinear rearrangements of particles within the system. The question has been raised as to whether or not this represents a general new state of matter, or if the details of each individual system is relevant. At the same time, the interest in the response of complex fluids, such as foams and granular matter, that are composed of mesoscopic, or even macrosopic, sized ``particles'' (such as sand grains), has raised interesting questions concerning the application of continuum mechanics to these systems. Both the nonlinear response of these materials and the application of continuum mechanics raise fundamental physics questions that are generally not covered in typical undergraduate (or even graduate) curricula. This talk will not only review some of the important questions in this field, but also present suggestions as to its integration into the undergraduate curriculum.

  13. Adiabatic passage and dissociation controlled by interference of two laser-induced continuum structures

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A. K.; Kimberg, V. V.; George, Thomas F.

    2003-09-01

    We have developed a theory of three-pulse coherent control of photochemical processes. It is based on adiabatic passage and quantum coherence and interference attributed to the lower-lying dissociation continuum and excited upper discrete states, which are otherwise not connected to the ground state by one-photon transitions. Opportunities offered by the proposed scheme are demonstrated through extensive numerical simulations with the aid of a model relevant to typical experiments. The opportunities for manipulating the distribution of the population among discrete and continuous states with any necessary ratio by the end of the pulses are demonstrated.

  14. CONTINUUM CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE SDO/AIA PASSBANDS DURING SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, Ryan O.; McElroy, Sarah A.

    2013-11-01

    Data from the Multiple EUV Grating Spectrograph component of the Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) were used to quantify the contribution of continuum emission to each of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), also on SDO, during an X-class solar flare that occurred on 2011 February 15. Both the pre-flare-subtracted EVE spectra and fits to the associated free-free continuum were convolved with the AIA response functions of the seven EUV passbands at 10 s cadence throughout the course of the flare. It was found that 10%-25% of the total emission in the 94 Å, 131 Å, 193 Å, and 335 Å passbands throughout the main phase of the flare was due to free-free emission. Reliable measurements could not be made for the 171 Å channel, while the continuum contribution to the 304 Å channel was negligible due to the presence of the strong He II emission line. Up to 50% of the emission in the 211 Å channel was found to be due to free-free emission around the peak of the flare, while an additional 20% was due to the recombination continuum of He II. The analysis was extended to a number of M- and X-class flares and it was found that the level of free-free emission contributing to both the 171 Å and 211 Å passbands increased with increasing GOES class. These results suggest that the amount of continuum emission that contributes to AIA observations during flares is more significant than stated in previous studies which used synthetic, rather than observed, spectra. These findings highlight the importance of spectroscopic observations carried out in conjunction with those from imaging instruments so that the data are interpreted correctly.

  15. Determining decision thresholds and evaluating indicators when conservation status is measured as a continuum.

    PubMed

    Connors, B M; Cooper, A B

    2014-12-01

    Categorization of the status of populations, species, and ecosystems underpins most conservation activities. Status is often based on how a system's current indicator value (e.g., change in abundance) relates to some threshold of conservation concern. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves can be used to quantify the statistical reliability of indicators of conservation status and evaluate trade-offs between correct (true positive) and incorrect (false positive) classifications across a range of decision thresholds. However, ROC curves assume a discrete, binary relationship between an indicator and the conservation status it is meant to track, which is a simplification of the more realistic continuum of conservation status, and may limit the applicability of ROC curves in conservation science. We describe a modified ROC curve that treats conservation status as a continuum rather than a discrete state. We explored the influence of this continuum and typical sources of variation in abundance that can lead to classification errors (i.e., random variation and measurement error) on the true and false positive rates corresponding to varying decision thresholds and the reliability of change in abundance as an indicator of conservation status, respectively. We applied our modified ROC approach to an indicator of endangerment in Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) (i.e., percent decline in geometric mean abundance) and an indicator of marine ecosystem structure and function (i.e., detritivore biomass). Failure to treat conservation status as a continuum when choosing thresholds for indicators resulted in the misidentification of trade-offs between true and false positive rates and the overestimation of an indicator's reliability. We argue for treating conservation status as a continuum when ROC curves are used to evaluate decision thresholds in indicators for the assessment of conservation status. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  16. Continuum percolation of congruent overlapping spherocylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenxiang; Su, Xianglong; Jiao, Yang

    2016-09-01

    Continuum percolation of randomly orientated congruent overlapping spherocylinders (composed of cylinder of height H with semispheres of diameter D at the ends) with aspect ratio α =H /D in [0 ,∞ ) is studied. The percolation threshold ϕc, percolation transition width Δ, and correlation-length critical exponent ν for spherocylinders with α in [0, 200] are determined with a high degree of accuracy via extensive finite-size scaling analysis. A generalized excluded-volume approximation for percolation threshold with an exponent explicitly depending on both aspect ratio and excluded volume for arbitrary α values in [0 ,∞ ) is proposed and shown to yield accurate predictions of ϕc for an extremely wide range of α in [0, 2000] based on available numerical and experimental data. We find ϕc is a universal monotonic decreasing function of α and is independent of the effective particle size. Our study has implications in percolation theory for nonspherical particles and composite material design.

  17. Continuum Edge Gyrokinetic Theory and Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X Q; Xiong, Z; Dorr, M R; Hittinger, J A; Bodi, K; Candy, J; Cohen, B I; Cohen, R H; Colella, P; Kerbel, G D; Krasheninnikov, S; Nevins, W M; Qin, H; Rognlien, T D; Snyder, P B; Umansky, M V

    2007-01-09

    The following results are presented from the development and application of TEMPEST, a fully nonlinear (full-f) five dimensional (3d2v) gyrokinetic continuum edge-plasma code. (1) As a test of the interaction of collisions and parallel streaming, TEMPEST is compared with published analytic and numerical results for endloss of particles confined by combined electrostatic and magnetic wells. Good agreement is found over a wide range of collisionality, confining potential, and mirror ratio; and the required velocity space resolution is modest. (2) In a large-aspect-ratio circular geometry, excellent agreement is found for a neoclassical equilibrium with parallel ion flow in the banana regime with zero temperature gradient and radial electric field. (3) The four-dimensional (2d2v) version of the code produces the first self-consistent simulation results of collisionless damping of geodesic acoustic modes and zonal flow (Rosenbluth-Hinton residual) with Boltzmann electrons using a full-f code. The electric field is also found to agree with the standard neoclassical expression for steep density and ion temperature gradients in the banana regime. In divertor geometry, it is found that the endloss of particles and energy induces parallel flow stronger than the core neoclassical predictions in the SOL. (5) Our 5D gyrokinetic formulation yields a set of nonlinear electrostatic gyrokinetic equations that are for both neoclassical and turbulence simulations.

  18. A continuum thermomechanical model for energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruderman, Gregory Allen

    Thermomechanical modeling of energetic materials, for example solid rocket motor propellants and explosives, is a complex problem due to the large number of behaviors such a material may exhibit. Experiments have shown that these materials are nonlinearly viscoelastic, and may also experience plastic flow (permanent deformation), phase changes (melting and vaporization processes), and combustion. In addition, these phenomena are often strongly coupled, making modeling very difficult. Compounding the difficulty further, reliable experimental data on the properties of these types of materials are quite scarce. Applying advanced tools of continuum thermomechanics, we have developed a fully three-dimensional framework which, in the most general form, is able to model all the mentioned behaviors of energetic materials. The concept of a balance of microforces, forces which drive changes in material microstructure, is employed to generate thermomechanically consistent equations of evolution for combustion and phase transitions. The model is then simplified to a set of three model problems: the constant-volume thermal explosion, one-dimensional shear loading, and one dimensional longitudinal loading. These model problems were solved numerically using essentially non-oscillatory and total variation diminishing methods. The solutions reveal extremely rich behavior, including complex wave phenomena, strain localization phenomena, and changes of material phase.

  19. Continuum of discrete trajectories in eternal inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanchurin, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    We discuss eternal inflation in the context of classical probability spaces defined by a triplet: sample space, σ -algebra, and probability measure. We show that the measure problem is caused by the countable additivity axiom applied to the maximal σ -algebra of countably infinite sample spaces. This is a serious problem if the bulk space-time is treated as a sample space which is thought to be effectively countably infinite due to local quantum uncertainties. However, in semiclassical description of eternal inflation the physical space expands exponentially which makes the sample space of infinite trajectories uncountable and the (future) boundary space effectively continuous. Then the measure problem can be solved by defining a probability measure on the continuum of trajectories or holographically on the future boundary. We argue that the probability measure which is invariant under the symmetries of the tree-like structure of eternal inflation can be generated from the Lebesgue measure on unit interval. According to Vitali theorem the Lebesgue measure leaves some sets without a measure which means that there are certain probabilistic questions in eternal inflation that cannot be answered.

  20. Compact continuum brain model for human electroencephalogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. W.; Shin, H.-B.; Robinson, P. A.

    2007-12-01

    A low-dimensional, compact brain model has recently been developed based on physiologically based mean-field continuum formulation of electric activity of the brain. The essential feature of the new compact model is a second order time-delayed differential equation that has physiologically plausible terms, such as rapid corticocortical feedback and delayed feedback via extracortical pathways. Due to its compact form, the model facilitates insight into complex brain dynamics via standard linear and nonlinear techniques. The model successfully reproduces many features of previous models and experiments. For example, experimentally observed typical rhythms of electroencephalogram (EEG) signals are reproduced in a physiologically plausible parameter region. In the nonlinear regime, onsets of seizures, which often develop into limit cycles, are illustrated by modulating model parameters. It is also shown that a hysteresis can occur when the system has multiple attractors. As a further illustration of this approach, power spectra of the model are fitted to those of sleep EEGs of two subjects (one with apnea, the other with narcolepsy). The model parameters obtained from the fittings show good matches with previous literature. Our results suggest that the compact model can provide a theoretical basis for analyzing complex EEG signals.

  1. Featured Image: The Q Continuum Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    Each frame in this image (click for the full view!) represents a different stage in the simulated evolution of our universe, ending at present day in the rightmost panel. In a recently-published paper, Katrin Heitmann (Argonne National Laboratory) and collaborators reveal the results from and challenges inherent in the largest cosmological simulation currently available: the Q Continuum simulation. Evolving a volume of (1300 Mpc)3, this massive N-body simulation tracks over half a trillion particles as they clump together as a result of their mutual gravity, imitating the evolution of our universe over the last 13.8 billion years. Cosmological simulations such as this one are important for understanding observations, testing analysis pipelines, investigating the capabilities of future observing missions, and much more. For more information and the original image (as well as several other awesome images!), see the paper below.Citation:Katrin Heitmann et al 2015 ApJS 219 34. doi:10.1088/0067-0049/219/2/34

  2. Continuum regularization of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Z.

    1986-04-01

    Possible nonperturbative continuum regularization schemes for quantum field theory are discussed which are based upon the Langevin equation of Parisi and Wu. Breit, Gupta and Zaks made the first proposal for new gauge invariant nonperturbative regularization. The scheme is based on smearing in the ''fifth-time'' of the Langevin equation. An analysis of their stochastic regularization scheme for the case of scalar electrodynamics with the standard covariant gauge fixing is given. Their scheme is shown to preserve the masslessness of the photon and the tensor structure of the photon vacuum polarization at the one-loop level. Although stochastic regularization is viable in one-loop electrodynamics, two difficulties arise which, in general, ruins the scheme. One problem is that the superficial quadratic divergences force a bottomless action for the noise. Another difficulty is that stochastic regularization by fifth-time smearing is incompatible with Zwanziger's gauge fixing, which is the only known nonperturbaive covariant gauge fixing for nonabelian gauge theories. Finally, a successful covariant derivative scheme is discussed which avoids the difficulties encountered with the earlier stochastic regularization by fifth-time smearing. For QCD the regularized formulation is manifestly Lorentz invariant, gauge invariant, ghost free and finite to all orders. A vanishing gluon mass is explicitly verified at one loop. The method is designed to respect relevant symmetries, and is expected to provide suitable regularization for any theory of interest. Hopefully, the scheme will lend itself to nonperturbative analysis. 44 refs., 16 figs.

  3. Wavelet formulation of the polarizable continuum model.

    PubMed

    Weijo, Ville; Randrianarivony, Maharavo; Harbrecht, Helmut; Frediani, Luca

    2010-05-01

    The first implementation of a wavelet discretization of the Integral Equation Formalism (IEF) for the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) is presented here. The method is based on the application of a general purpose wavelet solver on the cavity boundary to solve the integral equations of the IEF-PCM problem. Wavelet methods provide attractive properties for the solution of the electrostatic problem at the cavity boundary: the system matrix is highly sparse and iterative solution schemes can be applied efficiently; the accuracy of the solver can be increased systematically and arbitrarily; for a given system, discretization error accuracy is achieved at a computational expense that scales linearly with the number of unknowns. The scaling of the computational time with the number of atoms N is formally quadratic but a N(1.5) scaling has been observed in practice. The current bottleneck is the evaluation of the potential integrals at the cavity boundary which scales linearly with the system size. To reduce this overhead, interpolation of the potential integrals on the cavity surface has been successfully used.

  4. Dynamical Response of Continuum Regime Langmuir Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappaport, H. L.

    2009-11-01

    Probe dynamic response is sometimes used as a way to increase the amount of information obtained from Langmuir probes [1]. In this poster, the effects of frequency dependent probe capacitance and coupling of probe fields to damped Langmuir waves and damped ion acoustic waves are considered. In the continuum regime, with small Debye length to spherical probe radius ratio, the probe DC current vs. voltage characteristic displays a hard saturation at sufficiently large probe potential [2]. In this regime, the sheath thickness varies little with the applied voltage although the plasma response can still be measured. A goal of the present investigation is to show that the probe dynamical response is richer as a result of modulation of sheath thickness or shielding particularly in the larger Debye length to probe radius ratio regime. Inertia inhibits ion response at sufficiently high frequency and deviation from the DC characteristic is shown.[4pt] [1] D. N. Walker, R.F. Fernsler, D.D. Blackwell, and W.E. Amatucci, Phys. Plasmas 15, 123506 (2008).[0pt] [2] E. Baum and R.L. Chapkis, AIAA J. 8, 1073 (1970).

  5. A continuum model of retinal electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joarder, Saiful A.; Abramian, Miganoosh; Suaning, Gregg J.; Lovell, Nigel H.; Dokos, Socrates

    2011-10-01

    A continuum mathematical model of retinal electrical stimulation is described. The model is represented by a passive vitreous domain, a thin layer of active retinal ganglion cell (RGC) tissue adjacent to deeper passive neural layers of the retina, the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and choroid thus ending at the sclera. To validate the model, in vitro epiretinal responses to stimuli from 50 µm disk electrodes, arranged in a hexagonal mosaic, were recorded from rabbit retinas. 100 µs/phase anodic-first biphasic current pulses were delivered to the retinal surface in both the mathematical model and experiments. RGC responses were simulated and recorded using extracellular microelectrodes. The model's epiretinal thresholds compared favorably with the in vitro data. In addition, simulations showed that single-return bipolar electrodes recruited a larger area of the retina than twin-return or six-return electrodes arranged in a hexagonal layout in which a central stimulating electrode is surrounded by six, eqi-spaced returns. Simulations were also undertaken to investigate the patterns of RGC activation in an anatomically-accurate model of the retina, as well as RGC activation patterns for subretinal and suprachoroidal bipolar stimulation. This paper was originally submitted for the special issue containing contributions from the Sixth Biennial Research Congress of The Eye and the Chip.

  6. 77 FR 44653 - Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application-Technical Submission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application-- Technical Submission AGENCY... the original Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application. DATES: Comments Due Date: August... lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance...

  7. 77 FR 23491 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Continuum of Care Homeless...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Grant Application--Continuum of Care Registration AGENCY: Office of the Chief... reporting burden associated with registration requirements that Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance...

  8. Equivalent-Continuum Modeling With Application to Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Gates, Thomas S.; Nicholson, Lee M.; Wise, Kristopher E.

    2002-01-01

    A method has been proposed for developing structure-property relationships of nano-structured materials. This method serves as a link between computational chemistry and solid mechanics by substituting discrete molecular structures with equivalent-continuum models. It has been shown that this substitution may be accomplished by equating the vibrational potential energy of a nano-structured material with the strain energy of representative truss and continuum models. As important examples with direct application to the development and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes and the design of nanotube-based devices, the modeling technique has been applied to determine the effective-continuum geometry and bending rigidity of a graphene sheet. A representative volume element of the chemical structure of graphene has been substituted with equivalent-truss and equivalent continuum models. As a result, an effective thickness of the continuum model has been determined. This effective thickness has been shown to be significantly larger than the interatomic spacing of graphite. The effective thickness has been shown to be significantly larger than the inter-planar spacing of graphite. The effective bending rigidity of the equivalent-continuum model of a graphene sheet was determined by equating the vibrational potential energy of the molecular model of a graphene sheet subjected to cylindrical bending with the strain energy of an equivalent continuum plate subjected to cylindrical bending.

  9. Altering the Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Synthesis (mtFASII) Pathway Modulates Cellular Metabolic States and Bioactive Lipid Profiles as Revealed by Metabolomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Hayley B.; Parl, Angelika K.; Mitchell, Sabrina L.; Singh, Larry; Bell, Lauren N.; Murdock, Deborah G.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the presence of a cytosolic fatty acid synthesis pathway, mitochondria have retained their own means of creating fatty acids via the mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (mtFASII) pathway. The reason for its conservation has not yet been elucidated. Therefore, to better understand the role of mtFASII in the cell, we used thin layer chromatography to characterize the contribution of the mtFASII pathway to the fatty acid composition of selected mitochondrial lipids. Next, we performed metabolomic analysis on HeLa cells in which the mtFASII pathway was either hypofunctional (through knockdown of mitochondrial acyl carrier protein, ACP) or hyperfunctional (through overexpression of mitochondrial enoyl-CoA reductase, MECR). Our results indicate that the mtFASII pathway contributes little to the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial lipid species examined. Additionally, loss of mtFASII function results in changes in biochemical pathways suggesting alterations in glucose utilization and redox state. Interestingly, levels of bioactive lipids, including lysophospholipids and sphingolipids, directly correlate with mtFASII function, indicating that mtFASII may be involved in the regulation of bioactive lipid levels. Regulation of bioactive lipid levels by mtFASII implicates the pathway as a mediator of intracellular signaling. PMID:26963735

  10. Modal equations for cellular convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gough, D. O.; Spiegel, E. A.; Toomre, J.

    1975-01-01

    We expand the fluctuating flow variables of Boussinesq convection in the planform functions of linear theory. Our proposal is to consider a drastic truncation of this expansion as a possible useful approximation scheme for studying cellular convection. With just one term included, we obtain a fairly simple set of equations which reproduces some of the qualitative properties of cellular convection and whose steady-state form has already been derived by Roberts (1966). This set of 'modal equations' is analyzed at slightly supercritical and at very high Rayleigh numbers. In the latter regime the Nusselt number varies with Rayleigh number just as in the mean-field approximation with one horizontal scale when the boundaries are rigid. However, the Nusselt number now depends also on the Prandtl number in a way that seems compatible with experiment. The chief difficulty with the approach is the absence of a deductive scheme for deciding which planforms should be retained in the truncated expansion.

  11. Plasmonic Nanostructured Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhazraji, Emad; Ghalib, A.; Manzoor, K.; Alsunaidi, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we have investigated the scattering plasmonic resonance characteristics of silver nanospheres with a geometrical distribution that is modelled by Cellular Automata using time-domain numerical analysis. Cellular Automata are discrete mathematical structures that model different natural phenomena. Two binary one-dimensional Cellular Automata rules are considered to model the nanostructure, namely rule 30 and rule 33. The analysis produces three-dimensional scattering profiles of the entire plasmonic nanostructure. For the Cellular Automaton rule 33, the introduction of more Cellular Automata generations resulted only in slight red and blue shifts in the plasmonic modes with respect to the first generation. On the other hand, while rule 30 introduced significant red shifts in the resonance peaks at early generations, at later generations however, a peculiar effect is witnessed in the scattering profile as new peaks emerge as a feature of the overall Cellular Automata structure rather than the sum of the smaller parts that compose it. We strongly believe that these features that emerge as a result adopting the different 256 Cellular Automata rules as configuration models of nanostructures in different applications and systems might possess a great potential in enhancing their capability, sensitivity, efficiency, and power utilization.

  12. Scalar generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation-quantified continuum generation in an all-normal dispersion photonic crystal fiber for broadband coherent optical sources

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Haohua; Liu, Yuan; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Sharma, Utkarsh; Siegel, Martin; Kopf, Daniel; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    We quantitatively predict the observed continuum-like spectral broadening in a 90-mm weakly birefringent all-normal dispersion-flattened photonic crystal fiber pumped by 1041-nm 229-fs 76-MHz pulses from a solid-state Yb:KYW laser. The well-characterized continuum pulses span a bandwidth of up to 300 nm around the laser wavelength, allowing high spectral power density pulse shaping useful for various coherent control applications. We also identify the nonlinear polarization effect that limits the bandwidth of these continuum pulses, and therefore report the path toward a series of attractive alternative broadband coherent optical sources. PMID:21197060

  13. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  14. The submillimeter radio continuum of Comet P/Brorsen-Metcalf

    SciTech Connect

    Jewitt, D.; Luu, J. MIT, Cambridge, MA )

    1990-12-01

    Observations of Comet P/Brorsen-Metcalf in the submillimeter radio continuum are presented. The observations were taken using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, and include the first truly submillimeter detection of a comet, and the first submillimeter continuum spectrum. The submillimeter radiation is attributed to thermal emission from a transient population of large grains with a total mass of (1-10) x 10 to the 9th kg. The large grains may be produced by catastrophic failure of part of the refractory mantle on the surface of the cometary nucleus. Models of the submillimeter continuum are discussed. 49 refs.

  15. Area Regge calculus and continuum limit [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatsymovsky, V. M.

    2002-11-01

    Encountered in the literature generalisations of general relativity to independent area variables are considered, the discrete (generalised Regge calculus) and continuum ones. The generalised Regge calculus can be either with purely area variables or, as we suggest, with area tensor-connection variables. Just for the latter, in particular, we prove that in analogy with corresponding statement in ordinary Regge calculus (by Feinberg, Friedberg, Lee and Ren), passing to the (appropriately defined) continuum limit yields the generalised continuum area tensor-connection general relativity.

  16. [Psychiatric Rehabilitation - From the Linear Continuum Approach Towards Supported Inclusion].

    PubMed

    Richter, Dirk; Hertig, Res; Hoffmann, Holger

    2016-11-01

    Background: For many decades, psychiatric rehabilitation in the German-speaking countries is following a conventional linear continuum approach. Methods: Recent developments in important fields related to psychiatric rehabilitation (UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities, theory of rehabilitation, empirical research) are reviewed. Results: Common to all developments in the reviewed fields are the principles of choice, autonomy and social inclusion. These principles contradict the conventional linear continuum approach. Conclusions: The linear continuum approach of psychiatric rehabilitation should be replaced by the "supported inclusion"-approach.

  17. Channeled spectropolarimetry using a coherent white-light continuum.

    PubMed

    Somekawa, Toshihiro; Oka, Kazuhiko; Fujita, Masayuki

    2010-11-15

    We carry out polarization measurements using a coherent white-light continuum as a light source for channeled spectropolarimetry. The white-light continuum, whose spectrum ranges from the UV to the IR region, is generated in Kr gas by a terawatt femtosecond laser system. The complete set of Stokes parameters from 450-700 nm are reconstructed from one spectral measurement. Also, the effectiveness of channeled spectropolarimetry using a coherent white-light continuum is experimentally demonstrated with a highly attenuating sample whose transmittance is as low as 10(-6).

  18. Continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popadić, A.; Praprotnik, M.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Walther, J. H.

    2015-09-01

    We present continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules. The governing Navier-Stokes equations are complemented with the Navier slip boundary condition with a slip length that is extracted from related molecular dynamics simulations. We find that several quantities of interest as computed by the present model are in good agreement with results from atomistic and atomistic-continuum simulations at a fraction of the cost. We simulate the flow past a single fullerene and an array of fullerenes and demonstrate that such nanoscale flows can be computed efficiently by continuum flow solvers, allowing for investigations into spatiotemporal scales inaccessible to atomistic simulations.

  19. SEACAS Theory Manuals: Part II. Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Attaway, S.W.; Laursen, T.A.; Zadoks, R.I.

    1998-09-01

    This report summarizes the key continuum mechanics concepts required for the systematic prescription and numerical solution of finite deformation solid mechanics problems. Topics surveyed include measures of deformation appropriate for media undergoing large deformations, stress measures appropriate for such problems, balance laws and their role in nonlinear continuum mechanics, the role of frame indifference in description of large deformation response, and the extension of these theories to encompass two dimensional idealizations, structural idealizations, and rigid body behavior. There are three companion reports that describe the problem formulation, constitutive modeling, and finite element technology for nonlinear continuum mechanics systems.

  20. Microstructural and continuum evolution modeling of sintering.

    SciTech Connect

    Braginsky, Michael V.; Olevsky, Eugene A.; Johnson, D. Lynn; Tikare, Veena; Garino, Terry J.; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.

    2003-12-01

    All ceramics and powder metals, including the ceramics components that Sandia uses in critical weapons components such as PZT voltage bars and current stacks, multi-layer ceramic MET's, ahmindmolybdenum & alumina cermets, and ZnO varistors, are manufactured by sintering. Sintering is a critical, possibly the most important, processing step during manufacturing of ceramics. The microstructural evolution, the macroscopic shrinkage, and shape distortions during sintering will control the engineering performance of the resulting ceramic component. Yet, modeling and prediction of sintering behavior is in its infancy, lagging far behind the other manufacturing models, such as powder synthesis and powder compaction models, and behind models that predict engineering properties and reliability. In this project, we developed a model that was capable of simulating microstructural evolution during sintering, providing constitutive equations for macroscale simulation of shrinkage and distortion during sintering. And we developed macroscale sintering simulation capability in JAS3D. The mesoscale model can simulate microstructural evolution in a complex powder compact of hundreds or even thousands of particles of arbitrary shape and size by 1. curvature-driven grain growth, 2. pore migration and coalescence by surface diffusion, 3. vacancy formation, grain boundary diffusion and annihilation. This model was validated by comparing predictions of the simulation to analytical predictions for simple geometries. The model was then used to simulate sintering in complex powder compacts. Sintering stress and materials viscous module were obtained from the simulations. These constitutive equations were then used by macroscopic simulations for simulating shrinkage and shape changes in FEM simulations. The continuum theory of sintering embodied in the constitutive description of Skorohod and Olevsky was combined with results from microstructure evolution simulations to model shrinkage and