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Sample records for contraception status correlation

  1. Hormonal contraception. Current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Holinka, C F

    1994-09-30

    Hormonal contraception was pioneered by Gregory Pincus in the 1950s. Today, hormonal contraception is accepted as having a highly favorable benefit/risk profile. There is, however, a need for the development of new contraceptive methods to broaden the range of choices and enhance motivation and compliance in users. With the staggering rate of increase in the world's population, the number of contraceptive users in developing countries is expected to increase from 381 million in 1990 to 567 million in the year 2000. This will require substantial supplies of inexpensive contraceptives and the development of new and improved methods. The use of contraceptives is an asset to women's health, which can be jeopardized by the risks of pregnancy, as well as to the psychological and social well-being of mother and child. Oral contraceptives also have noncontraceptive health benefits such as protecting against endometrial cancer, uterine fibroids, menorrhagia, benign breast disease, anemia, ovarian cancer, functional ovarian cysts, dysmenorrhea, ectopic pregnancy, salpingitis, and bone loss. The new low-dose formulations are considered to be very safe for most healthy, nonsmoking women of reproductive age. Therefore, current research efforts are focused on new delivery methods, such as vaginal rings, rather than on the development of new hormonally active steroids. Nonoral contraceptive methods which avoid first-pass effects on the liver are being developed or improved. These include implants, vaginal rings, vaginally applied pills, and progestogen-containing IUDs. Contraceptive research is also focusing on immunologic interference with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in both men and women. This may spawn as yet unforseen methods of molecular modulation of sperm-ovum interactions which would result in the inhibition of implantation.

  2. [Contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Jimenez Vargas, J

    1974-01-01

    Contraceptives are defined as any means of avoiding pregnancy and not as therapy. Importance is generally placed on the mechanism of action and efficiency when selection is made. Anovulatory and postcoital contraceptives (morning-after pill) are said to be linked with abortion, as are all contraceptives since a transition from using contraceptives to having abortions has often been noted in countries allowing the latter. The author in fact ascribes a general depreciation for human life to increased use of contraceptives. Detailed explanations of the female reproductive cycle and the effects of oral contraceptives on it and on the woman in general are included. Fetal development is also traced.

  3. The legal status of emergency contraception in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Hevia, Martín

    2012-01-01

    Timely access to emergency contraception (EC) can contribute to reducing the number of unwanted pregnancies, and ultimately, the number of unsafe abortions and maternal fatalities. In Latin America, where all countries are parties to international human rights treaties that recognize the rights to autonomy, privacy, and health, and recognize sexual and reproductive rights including the right to family planning, the legal status of EC has been discussed in the courts. This article focuses on the analysis of the principal arguments voiced in the courts: the difference between contraceptives and abortifacients, the scientific status of available research on EC, and the age at which people develop a legal right to make decisions about their personal health. The conclusion is that Latin American countries whose laws or regulations ban access to EC in the public and/or the private sector fail to fulfill their obligations under international human rights law. PMID:22088410

  4. Rural-urban differential in contraceptive use status in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Uddin, M M; Kabir, M; Choudhury, S R; Ahmed, T; Bhuyan, M R

    1985-01-01

    less a U-shaped pattern was observed between the level of education and the ever use rate. Differentials by employment status show that those who were not employed had the highest use rate compared to those employed with or without cash. The average number of methods ever used was 2.0 by urban women and 1.7 by rural women. This difference may be explained in terms of accessibility and availability of family planning methods. The rate of current users of any methods was estimated to be 29.2% in the urban and 17.5% in the rural areas. The analysis shows that contraceptive use was substantially higher in urban than in rural areas. The rural-urban differences could be due in part to differences in educational attainment of the women in the 2 areas. Ever user rates have increased considerably in both areas compared to the 1979 CPS.

  5. Contraception.

    PubMed

    Lane, C; Barnes, A B

    1981-03-01

    The number of women using contraception is increasing. There are today several methods of contraception available. Behavioral methods of contraception include coitus interruptus, not ideal for psychological reasons, the rhythm method, and the cervical mucus method; they all involve periodic sexual abstinence and need extended patient education. Barrier methods include the condom, the vaginal diaphragm, the cervical cap, and all types of spermicidal agents used locally; barrier contraception can be 97% effective when properly used. Effectiveness of the IUD is 90-99%; many women experience excessive bleeding and/or expulsion of the device. IUDs are not indicated for women with vaginal infections and must be removed if pregnancy occurrs. IUDs are indicated in multiparous, healthy women. Oral contraception is the most effective way to control fertility despite the well documented side effects. Contraceptive pills contain different doses of estrogen and progesterone, and must be prescribed only after careful medical examination. Postcoital contraception can be obtained either with ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel or with diethylstilbestrol; side effects are numerous. In 1976, sexual sterilization was the 3rd most frequent surgical procedure in the U.S. The procedure must be considered a permanent one despite the increasing number of reversal successes; psychological side effects are possible but rare. Induced abortion is used as contraception and is safest when performed during the earlier stages of pregnancy. Risk of maternal death is about the same as for delivery, or 12/100,100. Methods of abortion vary according to the length of gestation. It has been suggested that barrier methods of birth control and using abortion for failures is currently the safest approach to contraception. The choice of the best contraceptive method must be made by a doctor in accordance with the clinical history and the life style of the patient, and especially taking into consideration age

  6. Current contraceptive status among women aged 15-44: United States, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Kimberly; Daugherty, Jill; Jones, Jo

    2014-12-01

    Nearly all women use contraception at some point in their lifetimes, although at any given time they may not be using contraception for reasons such as seeking pregnancy, being pregnant, or not being sexually active. Using data from the 2011-2013 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) on contraceptive use in the month of the interview, this report provides a snapshot of current contraceptive status among women aged 15-44 in the United States. In addition to describing use of any method by age, Hispanic origin and race, and educational attainment, patterns of use are described for the four most commonly used contraceptive methods: the oral contraceptive pill, female sterilization, the male condom, and long-acting reversible contraceptives, which include contraceptive implants and intrauterine devices.

  7. Vitamin nutritional status of women using oral contraceptive pills.

    PubMed

    Murthy, N K; Vijaya, S

    1980-03-01

    A comparative study was conducted to assess the biochemical effects of a low-estrogen combined OC (oral contraceptive). The focus of the study was on possible biochemical effects indicative of altered nutritional status. Both low and high income women on pills were compared with others not on pills. The groups were further divided according to the duration of OC usage. Blood hemoglobin, serum Vitamin A, plasma ascorbic acid, folic acid, riboflavin, and aspartate transaminase levels were measured. Higher income women had better measures on all the indices than the low income women, indicating a better initial nutritional status. Deficiencies increased with duration of use. Results of the study show that OCs reduce the vitamin nutritional level in women. For poor women on OCs, special nutrition intervention programs should be instituted.

  8. The Current Status of Oral Contraceptives: Progress and Recent Innovations.

    PubMed

    Golobof, Alexandra; Kiley, Jessica

    2016-05-01

    Millions of women in the United States and abroad use oral contraceptive pills. These popular contraceptives are the most common reversible birth control method in the United States, and a wide variety of pills are available for prescription. Oral contraceptives provide safe and effective protection against pregnancy and offer several noncontraceptive benefits. Over the years, advances in the laboratory and knowledge gained through epidemiologic data promoted the development of new contraceptive preparations. Generations of oral contraceptives emerged over time, containing lower doses of estrogens and new and novel progestins. The current review discusses the clinical characteristics of oral contraceptives, with emphasis on basic pharmacology and the evolution of various contraceptive formulations and regimens. PMID:26960906

  9. State Variations in Women’s Socioeconomic Status and Use of Modern Contraceptives in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Lamidi, Esther O.

    2015-01-01

    Background According to the 2014 World Population Data Sheet, Nigeria has one of the highest fertility and lowest contraceptive prevalence rates around the world. However, research suggests that national contraceptive prevalence rate overshadows enormous spatial variations in reproductive behavior in the country. Objective I examined the variations in women’s socioeconomic status and modern contraceptive use across states in Nigeria. Methods Using the 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey data (n = 18,910), I estimated the odds of modern contraceptive use among sexually active married and cohabiting women in a series of multilevel logistic regression models. Results The share of sexually active, married and cohabiting women using modern contraceptives widely varied, from less than one percent in Kano, Yobe, and Jigawa states, to 40 percent in Osun state. Most of the states with low contraceptive prevalence rates also ranked low on women’s socioeconomic attributes. Results of multilevel logistic regression analyses showed that women residing in states with greater shares of women with secondary or higher education, higher female labor force participation rates, and more women with health care decision-making power, had significantly higher odds of using modern contraceptives. Differences in women’s participation in health care decisions across states remained significantly associated with modern contraceptive use, net of individual-level socioeconomic status and other covariates of modern contraceptive use. Conclusion Understanding of state variations in contraceptive use is crucial to the design and implementation of family planning programs. The findings reinforce the need for state-specific family planning programs in Nigeria. PMID:26258578

  10. Religious Correlates of Male Sexual Behavior and Contraceptive Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Michael

    1985-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether religious beliefs could distinguish between older adolescent males of differing sexual experience and to determine whether such beliefs could distinguish between older adolescent males differing in frequency of contraceptive use. Results are discussed and implications for health educators are set forth. (MT)

  11. The correlation between family planning program inputs and contraceptive use in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Lerman, C; Molyneaux, J W; Moeljodihardjo, S; Pandjaitan, S

    1989-01-01

    Using 1980 Census and 1986 service statistics program inputs, this paper evaluates the net correlation of socioeconomic, region, and program variables with 1987 contraceptive prevalence and method-specific use rates for Indonesian regencies and municipalities. The region variables--primarily, though not exclusively, reflecting program design and maturity--correlate most strongly with the contraceptive prevalence rates. Field-worker activities, field-worker supervisor activities, and community-based distributors also have a correlation with these rates. Pill use is highest in the areas that are predominantly Islamic and least developed, whereas the pattern is reversed for use of the IUD, condom, and other modern methods (mainly female sterilization). The findings are assessed in terms of their implications for policymaking.

  12. Sexual Behavior and Contraceptive Use Among 18 to 19 year old Adolescent Women By Weight Status: A Longitudinal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tammy; Davis, Matthew M.; Kusunoki, Yasamin; Ela, Elizabeth J.; Hall, Kelli S.; Barber, Jennifer S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the association between weight status and sexual practices among 18-19 year-old women. Study design We analyzed a population-based longitudinal study of 18-19 year-old women residing in a Michigan county at cohort inception. Weekly journal surveys measured sexual practices, including contraceptive behaviors. Outcomes included proportion of weeks with a partner, proportion of weeks with sexual intercourse, number of partners, average length of relationships, proportion of weeks with contraception use, and proportion of weeks where contraception was used consistently. We examined 26,545 journal surveys from 900 women over the first study year. Ordinary least squares regression models for each outcome examined differences by weight status, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. Results The mean proportion of weeks in which adolescents reported sexual intercourse was 52%; there was no difference by weight status. Among weeks in which adolescents reported sexual activity, obese adolescents had a lower proportion of weeks where any contraception was used compared with normal-weight adolescents (84% vs 91%, p=0.011). Among weeks in which adolescents reported sexual activity and contraceptive use, obese adolescents had a lower proportion of weeks with consistent contraceptive use (68% vs 78%, p=0.016) and oral contraceptive pill use (27% vs 45%, p=0.001) compared with normal-weight adolescents. All other relationships by weight status were not statistically significant. Conclusions In this longitudinal study, obese adolescent women were less likely to use contraception, and less likely to use it consistently when compared with normal-weight peers. Findings suggest obesity may be an important factor associated with adolescent women’s sexual behavior. PMID:26143383

  13. Husband-wife roles as a correlate of contraceptive and fertility behaviour.

    PubMed

    Zafar, M I

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative techniques are used to explore respondents' views on contraceptive and fertility behavior in an attempt to determine the extent to which socioeconomic, cultural, and attitudinal variables influence the fertility decision-making process. 1100 female contraceptive users and non-users were sampled from Lahore and Faisalabad. The women were age 25 years and older, with at least 2 living children, and living with their husbands. Pregnant women were not included in the study. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) is used to identify meaningful underlying variables and reduce the multidimensionality of variables, while the chi-square test is used to explore the relationships between the predictor and dependent variables. Multiple linear regression is also used to establish the relative importance of each predictor variable. The comprehensive analysis found that preferences for smaller families and contraceptive use were consistently associated with modern attitudes and behavior with regard to the husband-wife relationship. Family income, husband's occupation, child mortality, and age at marriage did not help to explain reproductive behavior. Cultural setting and tradition influence to an important extent reproductive behavior independent of development in economic realities. Women's status needs to be improved in order to attain demographic-developmental goals. PMID:12321255

  14. Contraceptive Equity

    PubMed Central

    Temkin, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The Equity in Prescription Insurance and Contraceptive Coverage Act, introduced in Congress in 1997 and still unpassed, seeks to redress health insurers’ failure to pay for birth control as they pay for other prescription drugs, most paradoxically Viagra. In 1936 the International Workers Order (IWO), a fraternal society, became the first insurer to include contraception in its benefits package. A forerunner in the movement for prepaid medical care, the IWO offered its members primary care and contraceptive services for annual flat fees. Founded at a time when the legal status of contraception was in flux, the IWO’s Birth Control Center was the only such clinic to operate on an insurance system. Recent state laws and judicial actions have revived the IWO’s groundbreaking view of contraception as a basic preventive service deserving of insurance coverage. PMID:17761562

  15. Women at Risk for STDs: Correlates of Intercourse without Barrier Contraception

    PubMed Central

    PEIPERT, Jeffrey F.; L.LAPANE, Kate; ALLSWORTH, Jenifer E.; REDDING, Colleen A.; BLUME, Jeffrey L.; LOZOWSKI, Faye; STEIN, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate correlates of vaginal intercourse without barrier contraception (unprotected intercourse). Study Design Baseline data from a randomized trial were analyzed to evaluate factors associated with intercourse without barrier method use among women under 35 years old. Logistic regression models provided estimates of the association of demographic, reproductive, and sexual history variables with unprotected intercourse. Results Intercourse without barrier contraception was common: 65% of participants had two or more episodes of intercourse without barrier contraception use in the past month. Factors associated with increased odds of unprotected intercourse included: number of coital episodes, partner’s unwillingness to use condoms (Odds Ratio (OR)adj 4.1, 95%Confidence Interval (CI) 2.3–6.9), and among women under 20 years, low condom use self-efficacy score (ORadj 1.6, 95%CI 1.0–2.9). Conclusion Risk factors for unprotected intercourse included coital frequency and the male partner’s unwillingness to use condoms. Self-efficacy for condom use was especially important for women under 20 years of age. PMID:17714677

  16. Women's preferences for vaginal antimicrobial contraceptives. II. Preferred characteristics according to women's age and socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Hardy, E; de Pádua, K S; Jiménez, A L; Zaneveld, L J

    1998-10-01

    A study was carried out to identify characteristics that women would want for an idealized vaginal contraceptive, and the possible association of these characteristics with age and socioeconomic status. The study was done in Campinas, São Paulo State, Brazil. A total of 635 women were selected by age and socioeconomic status, using the "social network" technique. Almost half were adolescents (15-19 years old) and the rest were adults (20-45 years old). Half were of low socioeconomic status and the rest of medium-high status. The data were analyzed with SPSS-PC and EPI-INFO 6.0. Logistic regression and chi 2 were used for the analysis. Despite some differences found between age and socioeconomic status in regard to the characteristics desired for the idealized method, most of the participants expressed the same preferences. The results indicate that women would like the idealized method to be a cream, rather than a suppository, with no odor or flavor, to be colorless, to be placed in the vagina with an applicator well before coitus, and to offer protection against sexually transmitted diseases including AIDS. PMID:9866006

  17. Husband-wife communication and status of women as a determinant of contraceptive use in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Kabir, M; Moslehuddin, M; Howlader, A A

    1988-03-01

    The study provides the socioeconomic status of women and factors which affect their choice of contraception using data collected from 423 working women in the Savan Upazila, Bangladesh. 72% of the sample included women under 30 years old, and 53% of the sample and attended primary school and were equal to their husbands educationally. 46.1% were employed in the garment industry, 13.8% in construction, 14/45% in services, and 17% in farm or hand craft activities. 80% lived in rural areas and did not own land. 600% were from a nuclear family. The average husband's income was Taka 1501. 18% had an affiliation with some organization. 42% were using contraceptives, and 58% discussed use of family planning (FP). 66% shared decision making with their husbands about their children's education and marriage. Logistic analysis is used to determine the probability of contraceptive use on the following independent variables: age, wife's education, membership in a society, contract with FP workers, participation in income-generating activities, visit of FP workers, visit of health workers, family type, husband's education and monthly income, and ownership of electricity. The results indicate that women working outside the house have improved their status in the family and the community, and this more equal status and the presence of good husband and wife communication are intervening variables through which economic and demographic factors effect fertility. Contract with FP workers was very closely related to use of contraceptives.

  18. Socio-economic correlates of contraceptive knowledge among women in Kuala Lumpur and Petaling Jaya, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Salleh, N M; Peng, T N; Arshat, H

    1986-12-01

    Knowledge about contraception was examined in relation to selected socioeconomic variables. A total of 2567 currently married women aged 15-49 years residing in Kuala Lumpur and Petaling Jaya were interviewed. The majority of the women knew of at least 1 contraceptive method. An index termed Contraceptive Knowledge Score (CKS) was used to measure the level of knowledge about contraception. The CKS achieved differed significantly by age, area of residence and ethnic group. The other socioeconomic variables significantly associated with CKS are schooling, occupation, income, childhood residence and age at marriage. These relationships persisted even after adjusting for differences in age, ethnicity and area of residence. Overall the CKS attained have a wide range and there is no significant difference of the mean CKS attained, between users and non-users of contraceptives.

  19. Correlates of and couples' concordance in reports of recent sexual behavior and contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    Koffi, Alain K; Adjiwanou, Visseho D; Becker, Stan; Olaolorun, Funmilola; Tsui, Amy O

    2012-03-01

    This study uses couple-level data to measure couples' concordance of self-reported time since last coitus and of condom and other contraceptive use at last sexual intercourse among monogamous couples in Liberia (N = 1,673), Madagascar (N = 4,138), and Namibia (N = 588). The study also examines the characteristics associated with sexual behavior and contraceptive use occurring in the 28 days prior to the interviews among couples whose reports are concordant. Overall, our study finds less than 75 percent concordance in reporting of time since last coitus. Use of condoms and other contraceptives yielded fair (0.27) to substantial (0.67) agreement on the kappa index. Factors predicting a shorter time since last coitus among concordant couples in at least two of the countries included wealth, spousal age difference, education, and both partners wanting another child. The discordant reports of recent sexual behavior and contraceptive use suggest that caution should be exercised when inferring couples' behavior from the report of one spouse, that concordant reports should be examined when possible, that methodological changes to improve the validity of spousal reports should be pursued, and that family planning and HIV-prevention programs should target those groups found to be using condoms and other contraceptives less frequently, particularly poorer couples.

  20. Emergency contraception

    MedlinePlus

    Morning-after pill; Postcoital contraception; Birth control - emergency; Plan B; Family planning - emergency contraception ... Emergency contraception most likely prevents pregnancy in the same way as regular birth control pills: By preventing or delaying ...

  1. Emergency Contraception

    MedlinePlus

    ... contraception are available: emergency contraceptive pills and the copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD). Emergency contraceptive pills include ... for emergency use, talk to your doctor. The copper-containing IUD (brand name: Paragard) is a small, ...

  2. Emergency Contraception

    MedlinePlus

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ114 CONTRACEPTION Emergency Contraception • What is emergency contraception (EC)? • How does EC work? • What are the different types of EC? • What is the most ...

  3. MHC-correlated odour preferences in humans and the use of oral contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, S. Craig; Gosling, L. Morris; Carter, Vaughan; Petrie, Marion

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies in animals and humans show that genes in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) influence individual odours and that females often prefer odour of MHC-dissimilar males, perhaps to increase offspring heterozygosity or reduce inbreeding. Women using oral hormonal contraceptives have been reported to have the opposite preference, raising the possibility that oral contraceptives alter female preference towards MHC similarity, with possible fertility costs. Here we test directly whether contraceptive pill use alters odour preferences using a longitudinal design in which women were tested before and after initiating pill use; a control group of non-users were tested with a comparable interval between test sessions. In contrast to some previous studies, there was no significant difference in ratings between odours of MHC-dissimilar and MHC-similar men among women during the follicular cycle phase. However, single women preferred odours of MHC-similar men, while women in relationships preferred odours of MHC-dissimilar men, a result consistent with studies in other species, suggesting that paired females may seek to improve offspring quality through extra-pair partnerships. Across tests, we found a significant preference shift towards MHC similarity associated with pill use, which was not evident in the control group. If odour plays a role in human mate choice, our results suggest that contraceptive pill use could disrupt disassortative mate preferences. PMID:18700206

  4. Male contraception

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Vivek; Bantwal, Ganapathi

    2012-01-01

    Contraception is an accepted route for the control of population explosion in the world. Traditionally hormonal contraceptive methods have focused on women. Male contraception by means of hormonal and non hormonal methods is an attractive alternative. Hormonal methods of contraception using testosterone have shown good results. Non hormonal reversible methods of male contraception like reversible inhibition of sperm under guidanceare very promising. In this article we have reviewed the current available options for male contraception. PMID:23226635

  5. Forgettable contraception.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David A

    2009-12-01

    The term "forgettable contraception" has received less attention in family planning than has "long-acting reversible contraception." Defined here as a method requiring attention no more often than every 3 years, forgettable contraception includes sterilization (female or male), intrauterine devices, and implants. Five principal factors determine contraceptive effectiveness: efficacy, compliance, continuation, fecundity, and the timing of coitus. Of these, compliance and continuation dominate; the key determinants of contraceptive effectiveness are human, not pharmacological. Human nature undermines methods with high theoretical efficacy, such as oral contraceptives and injectable contraceptives. By obviating the need to think about contraception for long intervals, forgettable contraception can help overcome our human fallibility. As a result, all forgettable contraception methods provide first-tier effectiveness (contraceptives today with exclusively first-tier effectiveness is the one that can be started -- and then forgotten for years.

  6. Contraception in the perimenopause.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, M

    1992-12-01

    Most clinicians advise women to continue using contraception for 12 months after menstruation has ceased. Some recommend that women less than 45 years old continue contraception for 2 years after menstruation has ceased. A fertility specialist says that women can stop taking nonhormonal methods after 6 months of amenorrhea if women experience hot flushes. If there are no classic menopausal symptoms, however, they should wait for 12 months before stopping contraception use. Hormonal methods may mask menopausal signs. If a woman has no contraindications, she can use them safely until age 50, however. Women should still use contraception after menopause because irregular ovulation may occur. In older women, the most useful measure of ovarian history is perhaps a good menstrual history rather than a high level of follicle stimulating hormone. A woman needs to consider her age, health status, menstrual history, sexuality, risk of sexually transmitted diseases, past contraception use, lifestyle, obstetric history, and attitude toward abortion when choosing a contraceptive method during the perimenopausal years. Options may include male or female sterilization, combined oral contraceptives, the progestogen-only pill, Depo-Provera, IUD, female barrier methods (diaphragm, cervical cap, contraceptive sponge, and female condom), condoms, spermicides, and postcoital contraception. Assuming the mucus signs can be reliably determined, natural family planning is an alternative for some older women. Depending on coitus interruptus can be stressful for older women because it is not easy to distinguish between a possible pregnancy and an irregular menses.

  7. Emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    Despite significant declines over the past 2 decades, the United States continues to have teen birth rates that are significantly higher than other industrialized nations. Use of emergency contraception can reduce the risk of pregnancy if used up to 120 hours after unprotected intercourse or contraceptive failure and is most effective if used in the first 24 hours. Indications for the use of emergency contraception include sexual assault, unprotected intercourse, condom breakage or slippage, and missed or late doses of hormonal contraceptives, including the oral contraceptive pill, contraceptive patch, contraceptive ring (ie, improper placement or loss/expulsion), and injectable contraception. Adolescents younger than 17 years must obtain a prescription from a physician to access emergency contraception in most states. In all states, both males and females 17 years or older can obtain emergency contraception without a prescription. Adolescents are more likely to use emergency contraception if it has been prescribed in advance of need. The aim of this updated policy statement is to (1) educate pediatricians and other physicians on available emergency contraceptive methods; (2) provide current data on safety, efficacy, and use of emergency contraception in teenagers; and (3) encourage routine counseling and advance emergency-contraception prescription as 1 part of a public health strategy to reduce teen pregnancy. This policy focuses on pharmacologic methods of emergency contraception used within 120 hours of unprotected or underprotected coitus for the prevention of unintended pregnancy. Emergency contraceptive medications include products labeled and dedicated for use as emergency contraception by the US Food and Drug Administration (levonorgestrel and ulipristal) and the "off-label" use of combination oral contraceptives.

  8. Contraceptive Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troen, Philip; And Others

    This report provides an overview of research activities and needs in the area of contraceptive development. In a review of the present state, discussions are offered on the effectiveness and drawbacks of oral contraceptives, intrauterine devices, barrier methods, natural family planning, and sterilization. Methods of contraception that are in the…

  9. Postpartum contraception.

    PubMed

    Sober, Stephanie; Schreiber, Courtney A

    2014-12-01

    As birth spacing has demonstrated health benefits for a woman and her children, contraception after childbirth is recognized as an important health issue. The potential risk of pregnancy soon after delivery underscores the importance of initiating postpartum contraception in a timely manner. The contraceptive method initiated in the postpartum period depends upon a number of factors including medical history, anatomic and hormonal factors, patient preference, and whether or not the woman is breastfeeding. When electing a contraceptive method, informed choice is paramount. The availability of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods immediately postpartum provides a strategy to achieve reductions in unintended pregnancy. PMID:25264698

  10. Contraceptive Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulka, Barbara S.; And Others

    The objective of research in contraceptive evaluation is to improve the ability of individuals to choose contraceptive methods best suited to their needs and circumstances and to provide information that will lead to the development of safer and more effective methods. There are usually three considerations in judging the importance of a method of…

  11. Emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David A; Raymond, Elizabeth G

    2002-08-01

    Emergency contraception is used to prevent pregnancy after a coital act not adequately protected by a regular method of contraception. In contrast to early medical abortion, emergency contraception prevents a pregnancy from starting and does not disrupt an established pregnancy. The most commonly used approaches consist of two oral doses of contraceptive steroids. The levonorgestrel-only regimen (levonorgestrel, 0.75 mg, repeated in 12 hours) appears to be more effective and better tolerated than the Yuzpe regimen (ethinyl estradiol, 100 microg, and levonorgestrel, 0.5 mg, repeated in 12 hours). In the largest randomized, controlled trial to date, levonorgestrel prevented about 85% of pregnancies that would have occurred without its use. Hormonal emergency contraception has no known medical contraindications, although it is not indicated for suspected or confirmed pregnancy. However, if hormonal emergency contraception is inadvertently taken in early pregnancy, neither the woman nor the fetus will be harmed. Nausea and vomiting associated with the Yuzpe regimen can be reduced by prophylactic use of meclizine. A strong medical and legal case exists for making hormonal emergency contraception available over the counter, as has happened in countries other than the United States. Easier access to and wider use of emergency contraception could dramatically lower the high rates of unintended pregnancy and induced abortion in the United States. PMID:12160366

  12. Intrauterine contraception.

    PubMed

    Whaley, Natalie S; Burke, Anne E

    2015-11-01

    Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are effective, reversible forms of contraception with high patient satisfaction and continuation. IUDs can be safely used by most women and should be considered the first-line method of contraception for all women. This descriptive review will discuss the clinical issues associated with IUDs - including management of side effects, noncontraceptive uses and insertion and removal. When the burdens of cost are removed, women are more likely to select and IUDs. Health policy changes that increase insurance coverage for contraception will improve access to IUDs. IUDs remain an underutilized form of contraception in USA and efforts to improve availability and access to long-acting reversible contraception methods is needed to optimize their use.

  13. Contraceptive implants.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding.

  14. Contraception-21.

    PubMed

    Fathalla, M F

    1999-12-01

    A Contraception-21 strategy was adopted by the Rockefeller Foundation in 1993. The objective of the strategy is to mobilize and lift up the whole field of contraceptive research, to develop novel contraceptive approaches for the next century. The premise of the strategy is that, in spite of technological advances in the past few decades, current contraceptive choices are still inadequate to meet present and rapidly expanding future needs, particularly in developing countries. The central theme of the strategy is that it should be driven by the unmet needs of women, and not by a demographic imperative or by scientific opportunity alone. Two essential requirements are: mobilization of the science, particularly the new advances in cell and molecular biology, to provide the needed tools; and mobilization of industry to provide the needed resources.

  15. A correlational approach to predicting operator status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shingledecker, Clark A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses a research approach for identifying and validating candidate physiological and behavioral parameters which can be used to predict the performance capabilities of aircrew and other system operators. In this methodology, concurrent and advance correlations are computed between predictor values and criterion performance measures. Continuous performance and sleep loss are used as stressors to promote performance variation. Preliminary data are presented which suggest dependence of prediction capability on the resource allocation policy of the operator.

  16. [Oral contraception].

    PubMed

    Guillat, J C

    1980-04-20

    OC (oral contraception) includes the combined and sequential methods, postcoital and progestin only contraception, mini pills, and macro pills. The mechanism of action of OC modifies the hypothalamo-hypophysary secretion, the uterine mucosa, and the cervical mucus. Effectiveness of OC is nearly 100%; prescription of OC requires a complete clinical and biological evaluation of the patient. Contraindications to OC are any form of cancer, hypertension, vascular or thrombotic antecedents, obesity, tabagism, diabetes. OC users must be checked at least every 6 months, and treatment can last, if there are no evident signs of side effects, until about age 40. The most commonly known side effects of OC are menstruation disorders, cardio- and cerebrovascular effects, hepatic and metabolic effects; there is no evidence that OC can cause carcinogenic effects, but it can increase teratogenic risk. The association of OC with such drugs as Rifampicine, anticonvulsants and/or tranquillizers, can nullify contraceptive effectiveness. PMID:6900393

  17. Male contraception.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jing; Page, Stephanie T; Anderson, Richard A

    2014-08-01

    Clear evidence shows that many men and women would welcome new male methods of contraception, but none have become available. The hormonal approach is based on suppression of gonadotropins and thus of testicular function and spermatogenesis, and has been investigated for several decades. This approach can achieve sufficient suppression of spermatogenesis for effective contraception in most men, but not all; the basis for these men responding insufficiently is unclear. Alternatively, the non-hormonal approach is based on identifying specific processes in sperm development, maturation and function. A range of targets has been identified in animal models, and targeted effectively. This approach, however, remains in the pre-clinical domain at present. There are, therefore, grounds for considering that safe, effective and reversible methods of contraception for men can be developed. PMID:24947599

  18. Male contraception

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jing; Page, Stephanie T.; Anderson, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Clear evidence shows that many men and women would welcome new male methods of contraception, but none have become available. The hormonal approach is based on suppression of gonadotropins and thus of testicular function and spermatogenesis, and has been investigated for several decades. This approach can achieve sufficient suppression of spermatogenesis for effective contraception in most men, but not all; the basis for these men responding insufficiently is unclear. Alternatively, the nonhormonal approach is based on identifying specific processes in sperm development, maturation and function. A range of targets has been identified in animal models, and targeted effectively. This approach, however, remains in the pre-clinical domain at present. There are, therefore, grounds for considering that safe, effective and reversible methods of contraception for men can be developed. PMID:24947599

  19. Intrauterine Contraception.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Jennifer K; Creinin, Mitchell D

    2016-05-01

    Currently, there are only two basic types of intrauterine devices (IUDs): copper and hormonal. However, other types of IUDs are under development, some of which are in clinical trials around the world. Continued development has focused on increasing efficacy, longer duration of use, and noncontraceptive benefits. This review discusses currently available intrauterine contraceptives, such as the Cu380A IUD and levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine systems; novel intrauterine contraceptives that are available in select parts of the world including the intrauterine ball, low-dose copper products, frameless devices, and intrauterine delivery systems impregnated with noncontraceptive medication; and novel products currently in development. PMID:26947701

  20. Frequency and Correlates of Overweight Status in Adolescent Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Natalie Walders; Wamboldt, Frederick S.; Mansell, Anthony L.; Carter, Rick; Federico, Monica J.; Wamboldt, Marianne Z.

    2009-01-01

    Background Debate exists within the literature concerning whether asthma and obesity are linked as comorbid conditions. Further study is required to understand the relationship between asthma and overweight status, and developmental considerations are an important priority area. Objective The present study addressed gaps in the existing literature by comparing rates of overweight status among a matched sample of adolescents with and without asthma and by examining correlates of overweight status among youth with asthma. Methods Rates and correlates of overweight status were compared among a matched cohort of 103 adolescents with asthma, 75 adolescents with asthma characterized by history of a severe acute event, and 92 normal controls. Results Significantly higher rates of overweight status were found among the asthma groups compared to the control group and to population estimates. Significant correlates for overweight status included younger age and earlier age at asthma diagnosis, suggesting that receiving an asthma diagnoses in early childhood may increase the propensity for weight gain. Conclusion Asthma and obesity are problematic comorbid conditions, and specialized obesity prevention programs may be particularly necessary at the onset of a new asthma diagnosis. Clinical Implications Identifying and addressing the factors that may contribute to the potential for obesity among youth with asthma are key research and clinical practice priorities. PMID:18350405

  1. Contraceptive development and better family planning.

    PubMed

    Segal, S J

    1996-01-01

    Contraception helps many people achieve their desired fertility. Pharmacological or mechanical contraceptive methods by themselves do not lead to successful contraception. Once empowered through education or improved socioeconomic status to realize their ability to limit their family size, women's options are abstinence (including delaying the marriage age), contraception (including surgical sterilization and natural family planning methods), or abortion. Most people in the US trying to avoid pregnancy use surgical sterilization. The reversible methods most used, in order of frequency, are the pill, the condom, and the diaphragm. The 10% of couples who use no method make up slightly more than 50% of unplanned pregnancies, while the 90% of those who use contraception make up the remaining 50% (i.e., contraceptive failures). If used properly, modern contraceptives are very effective. Methods with low failure rates (IUDs, implants, and injectables) are used by only 2% or fewer of US contraceptive users but are more widely used elsewhere. More than 50% of pregnancies in the US are unplanned. Most adolescent pregnancies are unplanned. Contraceptive users account for about 50% of induced abortions. Reducing unwanted pregnancies has helped people achieve their desired fertility and greatly reduces the induced abortion rate. The US has the highest adolescent pregnancy rate in the Western world, partly due to the time lag between initiating sexual activity and initiating contraceptive use. Reasons for unplanned pregnancies among youth include lack of counseling and contraceptive failure. Contraceptive development should focus on improving use-effectiveness. The implant is the newest contraceptive method. A variety of male and female contraceptive methods are currently under study (e.g., immunological methods, postcoital pills, skin methods [patches, creams, and gels], improved IUDs, and improved male condoms). Leaders should consider unplanned pregnancy as a serious public

  2. Emergency contraception

    PubMed Central

    Langille, Donald B.; Allen, Michael; Whelan, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the extent to which Nova Scotian FPs prescribe and provide emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) and to explore their knowledge of and attitudes toward ECPs. Design Survey of Nova Scotian FPs using a modified Dillman method. Setting All regions of Nova Scotia. Participants Family physicians registered with Dalhousie University’s Division of Continuing Medical Education. Main outcome measures Sex differences in the provision of ECPs and knowledge and attitudes about the ECP Plan B. Results Of 913 eligible FPs, 155 (17.0%) participated in the survey. Respondents resembled the sampling frame closely. Most physicians (64.0%) had prescribed ECPs in the previous year (mean number of prescriptions, 4.92); only 12.9% provided ECPs in advance of need. Knowledge about Plan B was quite good, except for knowledge of the time frame for potential effectiveness; only 29.2% of respondents answered that question correctly. Respondents generally supported nonprescription availability of ECPs, but 25.0% of FPs were concerned that this could lead to less use of more effective methods of contraception, and 39.2% believed that it would encourage repeat use. Younger FPs provided ECPs more often than their older colleagues, while female respondents had better knowledge about Plan B. In multivariate analysis being younger than 40 years was marginally associated with prescribing Plan B and with prescribing any form of ECP. Conclusion Most Nova Scotian FPs provided ECPs and had generally good knowledge about and attitudes toward providing such contraception without prescription. However, FPs were poorly informed about the length of time that Plan B can be effective, which could potentially affect use when patients consult several days after unprotected sex. There were some concerns about nonprescription availability of ECPs, which could have implications for recommending it to patients. Rarely were ECPs prescribed for advance use, which might represent a lost

  3. Emergency Contraception.

    PubMed

    Batur, Pelin; Kransdorf, Lisa N; Casey, Petra M

    2016-06-01

    Emergency contraception (EC) may help prevent pregnancy in various circumstances, such as contraceptive method failure, unprotected sexual intercourse, or sexual assault, yet it remains underused. There are 4 approved EC options in the United States. Although ulipristal acetate requires a provider's prescription, oral levonorgestrel (LNG) is available over the counter for women of all ages. The most effective method of EC is the copper intrauterine device, which can be left in place for up to 10 years for efficacious, cost-effective, hormone-free, and convenient long-term primary contraception. Ulipristal acetate tends to be more efficacious in pregnancy prevention than is LNG, especially when taken later than 72 hours postcoitus. The mechanism of action of oral EC is delay of ovulation, and current evidence reveals that it is ineffective postovulation. Women who weigh more than 75 kg or have a body mass index greater than 25 kg/m(2) may have a higher risk of unintended pregnancy when using oral LNG EC; therefore, ulipristal acetate or copper intrauterine devices are preferable in this setting. Providers are often unaware of the range of EC options or are unsure of how to counsel patients regarding the access and use of EC. This article critically reviews current EC literature, summarizes recommendations, and provides guidance for counseling women about EC. Useful tips for health care providers are provided, with a focus on special populations, including breast-feeding women and those transitioning to long-term contraception after EC use. When treating women of reproductive age, clinicians should be prepared to counsel them about EC options, provide EC appropriately, and, if needed, refer for EC in a timely manner. PMID:27261868

  4. [Correlation of psychoemotional status and adaptation to complete dentures].

    PubMed

    Barkan, I Yu; Stafeev, A A; Repin, V S

    2015-01-01

    Patients with full adentia are characterized by the formation of specific psycho-emotional status. Rational psychotherapeutic support of these patients largely determines the efficiency of dental prosthetic treatment. At the same time, the definition of mental and emotional status is not included in the diagnostic examination protocol. Considering the above the purpose of the study was to evaluate mental and emotional status of patients receiving complete dentures. Prosthetic rehabilitation of 30 patients with complete teeth loss was performed and clinical evaluation and evaluation of mental and emotional status were carried out before and after treatment. Patients with negative experiences of prosthetics showed a higher level of personal and situational anxiety. There was correlation of adaptation to removable dentures and the patient's personality traits. It is determined that emotional instability during treatment tends to decrease affecting the timing of adaptation to complete dentures. It is noted that patients with repeated prosthetics have earlier recovery of coordination ability of the masticatory muscles. PMID:26953428

  5. Contraceptive practices.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, J E; Rao, P S

    1976-08-01

    A family life education program (FLEP) providing contraceptive services within a comprehensive health care organization for low-income, inner-city adolescents is described. Each female patient attending in the July 1-September 30, 1974, period was included in a study undertaken to identify and serve the unmet needs of the teen-age population in the community of East Harlem. Of the 334 females interviewed, almost 1/2 were black, 37% were Hispanic, 12% were white, and 2% were Oriental, totals representative of the surrounding community. The questionnaire included information on demographic and social background, sexual history, reproductive history, and contraceptive experience. Comparisons are made on the answers between groups. Personal contacts and school outreach were the 2 main sources of referral to the clinic. Sexual history was found to be associated with social background rather than physiological factors. More than 1/2 the teen-agers had never used contraception prior to their 1st clinic visit and another 1/4 of the girls were using unreliable methods. The study indicated that teen-agers will use good programs which are designed to meet their needs. For teen-agers, a free-standing clinic offering comprehensive health care is the ideal situation. PMID:1066531

  6. [Choosing contraception].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Velez, A C

    1998-06-01

    The development of contraception has allowed women to think about and experience motherhood not as their destiny but as an option. Humans have always been interested in controlling their fertility. Writings unearthed in the 18th century demonstrated the interest of the ancient Egyptians and Greeks in fertility control. The oral contraceptive (OC) pill, developed in the 1950s by Pincus and Rock, has allowed millions of women to avoid unwanted pregnancy. Since 1960, when the oral contraceptive Enovid was first marketed in the US, over 200 million women throughout the world have used OCs. Modern formulations have low hormone doses, which has minimized side effects. OCs now have an effectiveness of 98%. The method is controlled by the woman, permitting autonomous decisions about pregnancy. Currently, in Colombia, 12.9% of women in union use OCs, 25.7% are sterilized, 11.1% each use IUDs and traditional methods, 4.3% use condoms, 2.5% use injectables, 1.4% use vaginal tablets, 0.7% each use Norplant and vasectomy, and 1.8% use other methods. 27.8% use no method. OCs can be used as an emergency method in case of rape, an unexpected sexual encounter, or failure of another method. When used as a postcoital method, OCs must be taken within 72 hours of unprotected sexual intercourse.

  7. Emergency Contraception Website

    MedlinePlus

    Text Only Full media Version Get Emergency Contraception NOW INFO about Emergency Contraception Q&A about Emergency Contraception Español | Arabic Find a Morning After Pill Provider Near You This website is ...

  8. [Male contraception].

    PubMed

    Demoulin, A

    1984-04-01

    Among the reasons why male hormonal contraception has lagged behind female methods are the necessity of preserving virility, the fact that spermatogenesis is a continuous process, the need to control secondary effects and toxicity, and the requirement that modes of administration be acceptable to both partners. Among currently available reversible mehtods, withdrawal is undoubtedly the most ancient. It is still widespread but cannot be recommended because of its limited effectiveness. The condom is used by about 10% of couples worldwide as a principal or temporary method, but its inter-ference with sensation has limited its acceptance. Condoms are nevertheless highly effective when used with a spermicide. Various androgens are currently under investigation. High doses of testosterone can induce azoospermia without affecting libido but their side effects may be serious. The use of combinations of steroids permits doses to be reduced and offers promise for the future. The combination of oral medroxyprogesterone acetate and percutaneous testosterone is one of the better approaches; the combination is effective and nontoxic but has the disadvantage of percutaneous administration. Gossypol, a pigment extracted from the cotton plant, has been used as a contraceptive in China with a reported efficacy of 99.89%, recovery of fertility within 3 months, and no effect on future fertility. However, its toxicity appears to be significant in the animal and its reversibility is uncertain. A search is on for analogs which would preserve the contraceptive effects while eliminating toxic effects. Several gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs under investigation for their interference with spermatogenesis have given promising results. Several chemicals tested for contraceptive effects have had unacceptably high toxicity. Chinese investigators have reported good results with various physical methods of interfering with sperm production, but their reversibility and innocuity

  9. Contraceptive counseling for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Potter, Julia; Santelli, John S

    2015-11-01

    The majority of adolescents become sexually active during their teenage years, making contraceptive counseling an important aspect of routine adolescent healthcare. However, many healthcare providers express discomfort when it comes to counseling adolescents about contraceptive options. This Special Report highlights the evidence supporting age-appropriate contraceptive counseling for adolescents and focuses on best practices for addressing adolescents' questions and concerns about contraceptive methods.

  10. Does knowledge about antiretroviral therapy and mother-to-child transmission affect the relationships between HIV status and fertility preferences and contraceptive use? New evidence from Nigeria and Zambia.

    PubMed

    Bankole, Akinrinola; Biddlecom, Ann E; Dzekedzeke, Kumbutso; Akinyemi, Joshua O; Awolude, Olutosin; Adewole, Isaac F

    2014-09-01

    The increasing availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and drug regimens to prevent mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) has probably changed the context of childbearing for people living with HIV. Using data from 2009-2010 community-based surveys in Nigeria and Zambia, this study explores whether women's knowledge about ART and PMTCT influences the relationship between HIV status and fertility preferences and contraceptive behaviour. The findings show that women living with HIV are more likely to want more children in Nigeria and to want to limit childbearing in Zambia compared with HIV-negative women. While there is no significant difference in contraceptive use by women's HIV status in the two countries, women who did not know their HIV status are less likely to use contraceptives relative to women who are HIV-negative. Knowledge about ART reduces the childbearing desires of HIV-positive women in Nigeria and knowledge about PMTCT increases desire for more children among HIV-positive women in Zambia, as well as contraceptive use among women who do not know their HIV status. The findings indicate that knowledge about HIV prevention and treatment services changes how living with HIV affects childbearing desires and, at least in Zambia, pregnancy prevention, and highlight the importance of access to accurate knowledge about ART and PMTCT services to assist women and men to make informed childbearing decisions. Knowledge about ART and PMTCT should be promoted not only through HIV treatment and maternal and newborn care facilities but also through family planning centres and the mass media.

  11. Contraception: a social revolution.

    PubMed

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; Bastianelli, Carlo; Farris, Manuela

    2007-03-01

    Modern contraceptive technology is more than a technical advance: it has brought about a true social revolution, the 'first reproductive revolution' in the history of mankind. This latter was followed in rapid succession by other major changes in human reproductive strategies. In the human species, sexual activity began to lose its exclusive reproductive meaning at an early stage of its evolution. Human beings must have practiced non-conceptive sex from the outset and therefore must have had a need to avoid, rather than to seek conception during intercourse from time immemorial. The search for methods to control fertility went on for millennia, but a valid solution was only found during the twentieth century, when the population explosion had forever changed the shape of humanity: in only one century the total population of the planet had grown from some 1.6 billion to more than 6 billion. That increase will remain unique in the history of Homo sapiens. At the global level, contraception provided a tool to deal with overpopulation and, in only 50 years, went a long way towards its resolution. However, to solve the problem, national and international family planning initiatives were required. For individuals, contraception also meant a revolution. It allowed sexual intercourse without reproduction. Only 25 years later, in vitro fertilisation permitted childbearing without sexual intercourse. Other advances followed and now cloning, that is, reproduction without the two gametes, looms on the horizon. Such a series of rapid, major changes in human reproductive strategies has confused many. For this reason, a constructive dialogue between sociology and biology is mandatory. Contraception is a powerful tool to promote equity between sexes; it improves women's status in the family and in the community. Avoiding pregnancy during the teens increases opportunities for a young woman's education, training and employment. By controlling their fertility, women get a chance to

  12. Underage contraception.

    PubMed

    Southgate, L

    1985-12-01

    This article discusses the ethical and legal dilemmas confronting general practitioners in regard to contraceptive advice for adolescents. When a teenage girl comes to a physician for advice, she alone is the patient and the physician has an obligation to her. However, this obligation must be reconociled with the obligation to her parents. A UK parent, Victoria Gillick, sought declarations in the High Court against a National Health Service Notice concerning family planning services for adolescents. She argued: 1) that physicians who give family planning advice to girls under 16 years of age witout parental consent are guilty of causing or encouraging unlawful sexual intercourse; and 2) the doctor's actions interfere with the rights of the child's parents and undermine their ability to carry out their duties of supervising the physical and moral welfare of their children. If Gillick's position is adopted by society, no minor will be able to consult a physician without the parent being present. In practice, many physicians consulted by teenagers under 16 attempt to determine whether the girl has reached a stage in her development where she is capable of behaving as an autonomous agent, with the rights and responsibilities this entails. In the US, the concept of the mature minor doctrine has been developed. This approach recognizes that some teenagers mature more rapidly than others, and leaves it to the judgment of the physician to determine whether a given adolescent has reached a stage at which she can be considered competent to make decisions about her health care. Moreover, it is noted that when young teenagers ask for contraception, they are likely to be already sexually active and at risk for pregnancy. Given the difficult issues involved, physicians who want to respect an adolescent's autonomy yet consider her parents' feelings must be clear about the ethical basis on which they practice.

  13. Do changes in transcardiac impedance modulation correlate with haemodynamic status?

    PubMed

    Weiss, S M; Einstein, R; Matthews, R J; Leer, T W; Cincunegui, J L; McCulloch, R

    1992-06-01

    Implantable cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators have the ability to revert a variety of arrhythmias to normal sinus rhythm. For correct operation, such devices require accurate arrhythmia classification. Arrhythmia classification by these devices could be improved with the addition of a suitable haemodynamic sensor. This study investigated the use of transcardiac impedance for haemodynamic sensing. Ventricular fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, electro-mechanical dissociation and five rates of ventricular pacing, each having a different associated level of haemodynamic compromise, were induced in each of seven mongrel dogs. The amplitude responses of the modulations of transcardiac impedance were compared with those of arterial pulse pressure (an established measure of haemodynamic status), and changes in cycle length. The correlation coefficient for changes in transcardiac impedance modulation amplitude and arterial pulse pressure was found to be 0.89. For transcardiac impedance modulation amplitude and cycle length, the correlation coefficient was 0.77, and for arterial pulse pressure and cycle length, the correlation coefficient was 0.85. In the acute anaesthetised dog, changes in the amplitude of transcardiac impedance modulations were shown to reflect different levels of haemodynamic status. PMID:1642572

  14. Contraceptive use, amenorrhea, and breastfeeding in postpartum women.

    PubMed

    Laukaran, V H; Winikoff, B

    1985-01-01

    Data from a 1981-1982 survey of infant feeding practices in four developing countries are used to analyze the relationship of amenorrhea, lactation, and time since childbirth with contraceptive use. The relationship was first explored using contingency table analysis. Logistic regression analysis was then performed to control for the effects of background variables. Models were tested separately for oral contraceptive users and users of other methods. Analysis showed a strong, independent, and consistent negative relationship between amenorrhea and contraceptive use. Women who were less than four months postpartum were also less likely to use contraceptives. The strength of the association with amenorrhea outweighed all other variables, including demographic correlates of contraceptive use. A negative relationship between breastfeeding and contraceptive use was found only for users of oral contraceptives. It is possible that women in the immediate postpartum period, especially those who are lactating and amenorrheic, are not as highly motivated to use contraception as had been supposed.

  15. Oral Contraceptives and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... oral contraceptives are available in the United States today? How could oral contraceptives influence cancer risk? How ... oral contraceptives are available in the United States today? Two types of oral contraceptives (birth control pills) ...

  16. Providing Contraception to Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Raidoo, Shandhini; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents have high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique reproductive health challenges. Providing confidential contraceptive services to adolescents is important in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy. Long-acting contraception such as the intrauterine device and contraceptive implant are recommended as first-line contraceptives for adolescents because they are highly effective with few side effects. The use of barrier methods to prevent sexually transmitted infections should be encouraged. Adolescents have limited knowledge of reproductive health and contraceptive options, and their sources of information are often unreliable. Access to contraception is available through a variety of resources that continue to expand.

  17. Injectable contraception.

    PubMed

    Kaunitz, A M

    1989-06-01

    The most effective, convenient, reversible method of birth control is considered to be long-acting progestogen injections. Used by over 90 countries, Depot medroxy-progesterone acetate (DMPA, Depo-Provera, Upjohn) has yet to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The reluctance of the FDA to approve DMPA and much of the controversy surrounding this method revolve around the results of testing done on animals who were given large doses of the progestogen over a long period of time and developed tumors. However, the large body of research and records on this method that have been compiled over the past 30 years is positive. The injectable method works like oral contraceptives, inhibiting ovulation. Changes in menstruation have been the chief complaint of women who use this method; however, the duration and frequency of spotting and bleeding diminish over time. Other side effects of DMPA and Norethindrone enanthate (NET EN, Noristerat, Schering) are discussed. Also discussed is the history of development and testing for the 2 methods and subdermal implants, specifically Norplant.

  18. Abortion and contraceptive practices in eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Kovács, L

    1997-07-01

    In countries of the CCEE region (Countries of Central and Eastern Europe) the very high incidence of pregnancy termination is characteristic of family planning and the notion 'contraception instead of abortion' has not yet been achieved. The causes and consequences of this unfortunate situation will be reviewed: the reproductive health indicators in the area; the status of contraceptive use and of abortion; the impact of legislation in the different countries; and the efforts to achieve changes. The conclusions of the 'Szeged Declaration' which led to an increase in contraceptive prevalence will be discussed.

  19. Postpartum Care and Contraception in Obese Women.

    PubMed

    Maclean, Courtney C; Thompson, Ivana S

    2016-03-01

    Postpartum obese women have an increased risk of breastfeeding difficulties and depression. Retaining the pregnancy weight at 6 months postpartum predicts long-term obesity. Risks for weight retention include excessive gestational weight gain, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, diet, exercise, depression, and duration of breastfeeding. Exercise and reducing total caloric intake promote postpartum weight loss. Intrauterine devices and contraceptive implants are the most effective contraceptives for obese women. Contraceptive pills, patches, and vaginal rings are effective options; however, obese women should be made aware of a potential increased risk of venous thromboembolism. Vasectomy and hysteroscopic sterilization carry the least surgical risk for obese women. PMID:26694498

  20. Menstrual Cycle and Hormonal Contraceptive-Dependent Changes in Intrinsic Connectivity of Resting-State Brain Networks Correspond to Behavioral Changes Due to Hormonal Status.

    PubMed

    Pletzer, Belinda; Crone, Julia Sophia; Kronbichler, Martin; Kerschbaum, Hubert

    2016-09-01

    Menstrual cycle-dependent changes have been reported for a variety of functions, including cognition, attention, emotion, inhibition, and perception. For several of these functions, an effect of hormonal contraceptives has also been discussed. Cognitive, attentional, emotional, inhibitory, and perceptual functions have been linked to distinct intrinsic connectivity networks during the resting state. However, changes in resting-state connectivity across the menstrual cycle phase and due to hormonal contraceptive use have only been investigated in two selected networks and without controlling for the type of hormonal contraceptives. In the present study, we demonstrate menstrual cycle and hormonal contraceptive-dependent changes in several intrinsic connectivity networks, including networks that have been related to emotion processing, olfaction, audition, vision, coordination, and two lateralized frontoparietal networks related to a variety of cognitive functions. These changes parallel behavioral changes in the functions associated with these networks. Changes in connectivity and changes in behavior occur during the same cycle phases. Furthermore, hormonal contraceptive-dependent effects were observed in the same networks and same target sites as menstrual cycle-related changes and were dependent on the androgenicity of the progestin component contained in the hormonal contraceptive.

  1. Contraception and irregular menses.

    PubMed

    Hopayian, K; Houston, A; Cooke, I

    1989-03-22

    A fictitious patient with obesity, hirsutism and polycystic ovary syndrome is discussed by 3 British general practitioners to illuminate management of this type of case. The patient is 24 years old, expects to marry next year, has irregular menses averaging 6 weeks apart, and is requesting an explanation for her irregular periods as well as oral contraception. The 1st physician would exclude hypothyroidism, then evaluate polycystic ovary syndrome by assaying testosterone, LH, FSH and prolactin, next find out the significance of the patient's questions in her mind and finally prescribe a triphasic pill. The 2nd doctor would withhold the pill on the grounds that it might compromise future fertility if she has a primary endocrine imbalance. She would check rubella status, assay progesterone, LH, FSH, prolactin and testosterone on Day 19 of the cycle, and probably prescribe Marvelon oral contraceptives. The 3rd doctor would use a hirsutism score, investigate the polycystic ovary syndrome by ultrasound and an essay of sex hormone binding globulin and the LH:FSH and prolactin, next find out the significance of the patient's questions in her mind and finally prescribe a triphasic pill. The 2nd doctor would withhold the pill on the ground that it might compromise future fertility if she has a primary endocrine imbalance. She would check rubella status, assay progesterone, LH, FSH, prolactin and testosterone on Day 19 of the cycle, and probably prescribe Marvelon oral contraceptives. The 3rd doctor would use a hirsutism score, investigate the polycystic ovary syndrome by ultrasound and an assay of sex hormone binding globulin and the LH:FSH ration between Days 2-6 of the cycle, and rule out congenital adrenal hyperplasia with an assay for 17-alpha-OH-progesterone. Since the patient might be anovulatory because of obesity, major long-term weight lose is a priority. Prescription of pills would depend on family history, smoking, and the degree of hirsutism and endocrine status

  2. Access to modern contraception.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Michael J; Stanback, John; Shelton, James

    2006-06-01

    Access to modern contraception has become a recognized human right, improving the health and well-being of women, families and societies worldwide. However, contraceptive access remains uneven. Irregular contraceptive supply, limited numbers of service delivery points and specific geographic, economic, informational, psychosocial and administrative barriers (including medical barriers) undermine access in many settings. Widening the range of providers enabled to offer contraception can improve contraceptive access, particularly where resources are most scarce. International efforts to remove medical barriers include the World Health Organization's Medical Eligibility Criteria. Based on the best available evidence, these criteria provide guidance for weighing the risks and benefits of contraceptive choice among women with specific clinical conditions. Clinical job aids can also improve access. More research is needed to further elucidate the pathways for expanding contraceptive access. Further progress in removing medical barriers will depend on systems for improving provider education and promoting evidence-based contraceptive service delivery. PMID:16443395

  3. Contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    Contraception is a pillar in reducing adolescent pregnancy rates. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that pediatricians develop a working knowledge of contraception to help adolescents reduce risks of and negative health consequences related to unintended pregnancy. Over the past 10 years, a number of new contraceptive methods have become available to adolescents, newer guidance has been issued on existing contraceptive methods, and the evidence base for contraception for special populations (adolescents who have disabilities, are obese, are recipients of solid organ transplants, or are HIV infected) has expanded. The Academy has addressed contraception since 1980, and this policy statement updates the 2007 statement on contraception and adolescents. It provides the pediatrician with a description and rationale for best practices in counseling and prescribing contraception for adolescents. It is supported by an accompanying technical report.

  4. Contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ott, Mary A; Sucato, Gina S

    2014-10-01

    A working knowledge of contraception will assist the pediatrician in both sexual health promotion as well as treatment of common adolescent gynecologic problems. Best practices in adolescent anticipatory guidance and screening include a sexual health history, screening for pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, counseling, and if indicated, providing access to contraceptives. Pediatricians' long-term relationships with adolescents and families allow them to help promote healthy sexual decision-making, including abstinence and contraceptive use. Additionally, medical indications for contraception, such as acne, dysmenorrhea, and heavy menstrual bleeding, are frequently uncovered during adolescent visits. This technical report provides an evidence base for the accompanying policy statement and addresses key aspects of adolescent contraceptive use, including the following: (1) sexual history taking, confidentiality, and counseling; (2) adolescent data on the use and side effects of newer contraceptive methods; (3) new data on older contraceptive methods; and (4) evidence supporting the use of contraceptives in adolescent patients with complex medical conditions. PMID:25266435

  5. Contraceptive revolution.

    PubMed

    Segal, S J

    1994-06-01

    Global population will increase by almost 1 billion people in the 1990s, the largest 10-year increase ever recorded. In 1994 alone, population will surpass 5.7 billion. The prospect of double-digit billions of people is worrisome, especially since these numbers may affect global warming, supplies of fresh water, destruction of rain forests, industrial pollution, and sustainable development. Yet, many indicators of quality of life show that people enjoy a better quality of life today than they did 100 years ago. Between India's independence and now, life expectancy increased by 20 years, infant mortality decreased 2-fold, literacy increased, and the food supply stabilized. Even though India's population has almost tripled since 1947, its economy increased rapidly and is 1 of the world's top 10 economies. University enrollment stands at 4.5 million. Agricultural production has exceeded demand. India represents the potential for human achievement through technological advancement and social organization. If the world's first national family planning program had been more successful when it began in 1952 in an India of 350 million people, India's population would be around 500 million instead of the expected 1 billion in 2000. All countries need to achieve a sustainable balance between human numbers and needs and natural resources. Family planning is an essential, cost-effective part of any development strategy. Family planning use has reduced fertility from 6 to 3.6 in developing countries. In 1965, only 8% used contraception, while more than 50% use it now. The most remarkable family planning/fertility reduction successes are Bangladesh, Brazil, Colombia, Indonesia, Mexico, and Thailand. Sufficient investment in family planning is needed if significant declines in fertility are to occur. More than 90% of the developing world's people are in countries with official family planning programs. Cost-effective assistance by donors and developing countries implementing

  6. Contraceptive revolution.

    PubMed

    Segal, S J

    1994-06-01

    Global population will increase by almost 1 billion people in the 1990s, the largest 10-year increase ever recorded. In 1994 alone, population will surpass 5.7 billion. The prospect of double-digit billions of people is worrisome, especially since these numbers may affect global warming, supplies of fresh water, destruction of rain forests, industrial pollution, and sustainable development. Yet, many indicators of quality of life show that people enjoy a better quality of life today than they did 100 years ago. Between India's independence and now, life expectancy increased by 20 years, infant mortality decreased 2-fold, literacy increased, and the food supply stabilized. Even though India's population has almost tripled since 1947, its economy increased rapidly and is 1 of the world's top 10 economies. University enrollment stands at 4.5 million. Agricultural production has exceeded demand. India represents the potential for human achievement through technological advancement and social organization. If the world's first national family planning program had been more successful when it began in 1952 in an India of 350 million people, India's population would be around 500 million instead of the expected 1 billion in 2000. All countries need to achieve a sustainable balance between human numbers and needs and natural resources. Family planning is an essential, cost-effective part of any development strategy. Family planning use has reduced fertility from 6 to 3.6 in developing countries. In 1965, only 8% used contraception, while more than 50% use it now. The most remarkable family planning/fertility reduction successes are Bangladesh, Brazil, Colombia, Indonesia, Mexico, and Thailand. Sufficient investment in family planning is needed if significant declines in fertility are to occur. More than 90% of the developing world's people are in countries with official family planning programs. Cost-effective assistance by donors and developing countries implementing

  7. [Advances in hormonal contraception].

    PubMed

    Villanueva Egan, Luis Alberto; Pichardo Cuevas, Mauricio

    2007-01-01

    This review provides an update regarding newer options in hormonal contraception that include the progestin-releasing intrauterine system, the contraceptive patch and ring, the single rod progestin-releasing implant, extended and emergency oral contraception and recent advances in hormonal male contraception. These methods represent a major advancement in this field, allowing for the development of more acceptable, safety and effective birth control regimens.

  8. Permanent contraception for women.

    PubMed

    Micks, Elizabeth A; Jensen, Jeffrey T

    2015-11-01

    Permanent methods of contraception are used by an estimated 220 million couples worldwide, and are often selected due to convenience, ease of use and lack of side effects. A variety of tubal occlusion techniques are available for female permanent contraception, and procedures can be performed using a transcervical or transabdominal approach. This article reviews currently available techniques for female permanent contraception and discusses considerations when helping patients choose a contraceptive method and tubal occlusion technique.

  9. Searching for Ideal Contraceptives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Djerassi, Carl

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the problem of adolescent pregnancy and focuses on improving contraception as a practical solution. Describes the advantages and disadvantages of existing methods (the condom, the pill, and the contraceptive sponge). Predicts that the development of a fundamentally new contraceptive, such as a monthly menses-inducer pill, will not occur…

  10. Contraceptives for teenagers.

    PubMed

    Bullough, B; Bullough, V

    1991-01-01

    The contraceptive options suitable for teenagers are presented and discussed. Condoms have the advantage of preventing the spread of sexually transmitted diseases, and oral contraceptives are probably the most effective in preventing pregnancy. Other options include the barrier contraceptives available to women, spermicides, sponges, intrauterine devices, periodic abstinence, and the morning after pill.

  11. Correlates of the health statuses of the faculty at midlife

    PubMed Central

    Galeon, Galvin Alaan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Between the school years of 2009-2012, the turnover record of the University of San Jose-Recoletos (USJ-R), Cebu City, Philippines showed that permanent faculty members who left the institution were all midlifers. Their reasons varied from health issues to greener pasture elsewhere. Materials and Methods: This study then sought to explore the health statuses of the faculty midlifers of the USJ-R. The data were collected through survey conducted among the 106 faculty midlifers of the university. This study applied multivariate analyses to the survey data using Pearson-moment of correlation to determine the relationship between the sociodemographic profile of the research participants and their health statuses. Results: This research revealed that faculty midlifers are generally well physically. They showed emotional maturity and have positive outlook toward midlife. More so, their health conditions are significantly related with their sex, age, years of teaching, educational attainment, and income. Conclusion: At midlife, the faculty members of USJ-R can still generally be considered physically well. Thus, if they are well-managed, they can become relevant and better contributors to the attainment of the basic goals and objectives of the educational institution and the educational system in general. PMID:27134476

  12. Contraception and Breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Pieh Holder, Kelly Lynne

    2015-12-01

    Postpartum contraception is important to lengthening birth intervals and improving the health of women and children. For breastfeeding women the choice and timing of contraception may influence breastfeeding and infant growth patterns. Nonhormonal methods of contraception are the preferred choice for breastfeeding women. Progestin-only methods comprise a viable next option. Combined hormonal methods of contraception containing estrogen and progestin may be considered as a third option for birth control in breastfeeding women. The objective of this chapter is to review the current literature and recommendations for the use of hormonal and nonhormonal methods of contraception while breastfeeding.

  13. Transdermal delivery of contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Friend, D R

    1990-01-01

    Contraceptive agents are administered to the body through a variety of routes. Research has recently been directed at examining the transdermal route for systemic delivery of contraceptive agents, including estrogens and progestins. The transdermal route has several potential advantages over the other routes of administration: (1) improved compliance, (2) once-weekly administration, (3) delivery is easily terminated, and (4) some side effects can be alleviated based on more constant delivery rates. This article reviews the permeability of skin toward contraceptive steroids and how skin permeability is evaluated. The metabolism of contraceptive steroids is also considered. Transdermal delivery systems used to deliver contraceptives are presented, followed by a detailed discussion of several delivery systems for specific contraceptive agents such as levonorgestrel and estradiol. The potential problem of skin irritation is presented as it relates to transdermal contraceptive delivery systems, all of which will be worn chronically. PMID:2272099

  14. Contraception and Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Afsana, Faria

    2016-09-01

    Contraception for women with diabetes mellitus is an important issue mainly as the pregnancy outcome depends on glycaemic control before conception among women with diabetes. Type of diabetes as type 1 or type 2 Diabetes, women with history of gestational diabetes and breast feeding diabetic mothers may be a consideration in selecting a contraceptive .On the other hand presence of diabetic complications is a significant determinant. Different methods of contraception as oral, injectable, implant, intrauterine devices are available. Patient\\'s choice and health issues both should be considered while prescribing a contraceptive to a woman with diabetes. Emergency contraception is sometimes required in situations where there is chance of contraceptive failure. This review article highlights different contraceptive methods, their use and limitations and will guide to make a rational choice for a woman with diabetes. PMID:27582166

  15. Pregnancy Test Taking Is a Correlate of Unsafe Sex, Contraceptive Nonadherence, Pregnancy, and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Adolescent and Young Adult Women

    PubMed Central

    Berenson, Abbey B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives This study was conducted to examine the hypotheses that adolescent and young adult pregnancy test takers are at increased risk for unsafe sex, oral contraception (OC) nonadherence, and higher pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection (STI) rates. Methods We conducted secondary analyses using data collected for a study on OC adherence among 1155 women 16–24 years of age. Data collected at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months were used for the analyses. Results At baseline, 33% of women reported having undergone ≥1 pregnancy test at home or a clinic during the past 3 months. Pregnancy test takers were more likely to have ≥3 sexual partners (odds ratio [OR] 2.12; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.49–3.02) in the past year, report unprotected oral (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.28–1.72) or anal sex (OR 1.78; 95% CI 1.32–2.39), be diagnosed with an STI (OR 1.76; 95% CI 1.23–2.51), become pregnant (hazards ratio 1.52; 95% CI 1.10–2.10), or not use any birth control method (OR 2.11; 95% CI 1.66–2.60). Moreover, they were less likely to continue using OC that was prescribed at baseline (OR 0.38; 95% CI 0.31–0.47) and to report being ambivalent about pregnancy (OR 0.73; 95% CI 0.60–0.90) compared to non–test takers. Conclusions Pregnancy test taking is an important correlate of high-risk sexual behaviors, OC nonadherence, and risk of subsequent pregnancy and STIs among adolescent and young adult women. Future interventions should target these women to decrease the risk of unintended pregnancies and STIs. PMID:23531050

  16. Correlation between maternal and infant cortisol varies by breastfeeding status

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin Neelon, Sara E.; Stroo, Marissa; Mayhew, Meghan; Maselko, Joanna; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to examine associations of mother and infant salivary cortisol, measured three times over the course of a day, and assess whether these varied by breastfeeding status. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of 54 mothers and their infants aged 4–11 months. Mothers collected their own saliva and that of their infants upon awakening, 30 min after waking and at bedtime. Breastfeeding status was reported by mothers and cortisol level was measured in saliva in μg/dl using standard techniques. We used generalized linear models to evaluate relationships between maternal and infant cortisol levels, and assessed whether the relationship differed by breastfeeding status: formula only compared to partial and full breastfeeding, adjusting for infant sex, race, age, maternal education, and family income. Results Thirty-four infants received formula only and 20 were either partially or fully breastfed. Breastfeeding was associated with higher household income, higher maternal education, and white race. Cortisol levels were higher among breastfed infants at all three time points. After adjustment, maternal cortisol levels were related with infant cortisol at bedtime only (regression estimate 0.06; 95% CI: 0.10, 1.1; p = 0.02). The adjusted association between bedtime maternal and infant cortisol was stronger among breastfeeding dyads than among formula-feeding dyads (regression estimate 1.0; 95% CI: 0.1, 2.0; p = 0.04 vs. 0.6; CI: −0.1,1.3; p = 0.10). In addition, we assessed the influence of maternal education and household income in our adjusted model; income strengthened the observed association, whereas maternal education did not change the estimate. Conclusions Breastfeeding mothers and infants had significant correlations for cortisol at bedtime, while formula-feeding dyads did not. These data suggest that several factors may contribute to cortisol synchrony observed in mother/infant dyads, including the transfer of

  17. Contraceptive prevalence in Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Morris, L; Anderson, J E; Monteith, R S; Kriskovich, R; Schoemaker, J; Frutos, O

    1978-01-01

    Contraceptive use, source of contraception, history of abortion, current pregnancy intention, and fertility rates are evaluated for a national sample of women using data from the Paraguay Contraceptive Prevalence Survey, conducted in 1977. The survey found that 15.5 percent of all women aged 15--44 and 23.6 percent of ever-married women were using effective contraceptive methods. The urban/rural difference in contraceptive use paralleled fertility differentials: over 40 percent of ever-married women were using contraception in Greater Asuncion and other urban areas compared with 15 percent in rural areas. Overall, the data indicate that high-parity rural women have the greatest need for family planning services in Paraguay.

  18. [Contraception and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Amate, P; Luton, D; Davitian, C

    2013-06-01

    The mean age of first sexual intercourse is still around 17 in France, but a lot of teenagers are concerned by contraception before, with approximately 25% of sexually active 15-year-old girls. The contraceptive method must take into consideration some typical features of this population, as sporadic and non-planned sexual activity, with several sexual partners in a short period of time. In 2004, the "Haute Autorité de santé" has recommended, as first-line method, combined oral contraceptive (COC) pills, in association with male condoms. Copper-containing intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCD) and etonogestrel-containing subcutaneous implant have been suggested but not recommended. However, oral contraceptive pill, as a user-based method, carries an important typical-use failure rate, because remembering taking a daily pill, and dealing with stop periods, may be challenging. Some easier-to-use method should be kept in mind, as 28-day COC packs, transdermal contraceptive patches, and vaginal contraceptive rings. Moreover, American studies have shown that long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC), i.e. IUCD and implant, have many advantages for teenagers: very effective, safe, invisible. They seem well-fitted for this population, with high satisfaction and continuation rates, as long as side effects are well explained. Thus, LARC methods should be proposed more widely to teenagers. Anyway, before prescribing a contraceptive method, it is important to determine the specific situation of every teenager, to let them choose the method that they consider as appropriate in their own case, and to think about the availability of the chosen method. It is necessary to explain how to handle mistakes or misses with user-based contraceptive methods, and emergency contraception can be anticipated and prescribed in advanced provision. The use of male condoms should be encouraged for adolescents, with another effective contraceptive method, in order to reduce the high risk

  19. What's wrong with contraception?

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    A "reader's exchange" question solicited information on how readers respond when asked what is wrong with contraception. One letter-writer maintained that the use of contraception prohibits true love, total commitment, and complete acceptance on the part of a married couple. Contraception attempts to create a utopia and obviates the pain and suffering which are necessary in order to find true love and true happiness.

  20. Oral Contraceptive Pill and PCOS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health PCOS: The Oral Contraceptive Pill Posted under Health Guides . ... of oral contraceptive pills for young women with PCOS? Regular and Lighter Periods: Oral contraceptive pills can ...

  1. Male Adolescent Contraceptive Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Madelon Lubin; Finkel, David J.

    1978-01-01

    The contraceptive utilization of a sample of sexually active, urban, high school males (Black, Hispanic, and White) was examined by anonymous questionnaire. Contraceptive use was haphazard, but White males tended to be more effective contraceptors than the other two groups. Reasons for nonuse were also studied. (Author/SJL)

  2. Social marketing of contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Schellstede, W P; Derr, B B

    1986-12-01

    Application of commercial marketing techniques has not only increased awareness, acceptability, and use of modern contraceptives in developing countries, but also overcome logistic problems in service delivery. The ability of contraceptive social marketing to reach large numbers and to treat contraceptives as common consumer products has helped to diminish social and religious constraints associated with family planning. Each contraceptive social marketing program is built around a theme tailored to meet specific cultural, social, and management requirements. The primary target populations are those who cannot afford regular commercial products and those who are not adequately reached by government programs. In countries such as Sri Lanka and Jamaica, profit is not a primary sales objective and retail prices are highly subsidized to make products affordable to low-income people. In contrast, the Colombian and Thai programs use contraceptive social marketing to help offset the operating costs of rural community-based programs and seek profits. The most impressive contraceptive social marketing sales performances have been recorded in Bangladesh, Colombia, Egypt, and Jamaica. The main reason contraceptive social marketing is more cost-efficient than other modes of contraceptive distribution is that the cost of product delivery is assumed by the commercial system. Although there has been some interest in making these programs self-sufficient financially, this step has tended to undermine the purpose of serving lower income groups. PMID:12341233

  3. Human cervical mucus. V. Oral contraceptives and mucus rheologic properties.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D P; Blasco, L; Khan, M A; Litt, M

    1979-08-01

    Mucus viscoelasticity on individual samples obtained from patients using combination oral contraceptives was quantitated by microrheometry. These results, in conjunction with mucus chemical characterization, indicate that combination oral contraceptive use eliminates the cyclic variations in mucus chemical, physicochemical, and rheologic properties associated with the ovulatory menstrual cycle. A correlation was demonstrated between the mucus elastic modulus and mucus nondialyzable dry weight, and the mucins produced during oral contraceptive therapy were shown to be similar to those recovered from ovulatory donors. Differences in mucus properties were noted when donors using estrogenic contraceptives were contrasted with those using androgenic contraceptives. On the basis of established relationships between sperm penetrability and mucus solids content, it was concluded that the use of contraceptives, as examined in this study, provided a secondary degree of fertility control at the cervical level.

  4. Contraceptive failure in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Duolao

    2002-09-01

    This study examines patterns and differentials of contraceptive failure rates by method and characteristics of users, using the Chinese Two-per-Thousand Fertility Survey data. The results show that contraceptive failure rates for modern methods including sterilization are some of the highest in the world. The first year failure rates are 4.2% for male sterilization, 0.7% for female sterilization, 10.3% for IUD, 14.5% for pill, and 19.0% for condom. There are also some differentials in contraceptive failure rates by users' sociodemographic and fertility characteristics. Contraceptive failure rate declines with women's age for all reversible methods. Rural women have higher sterilization, IUD, and condom contraceptive failure rates than urban women. Women with two or more children have a higher failure rate for sterilization methods but have lower failure rates for other methods.

  5. Contraception and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Cornette, Jerome; Sliwa, Karen; Pieper, Petronella G; Veldtman, Gruschen R; Johnson, Mark R

    2015-07-14

    Contraceptive counselling should begin early in females with heart disease, preferably directly after the start of menstruation. In coming to a decision about the method of contraception, the following issues should be considered: (i) the risk of pregnancy for the mother and the consequences of an unplanned pregnancy; (ii) the risks of the contraceptive method; (iii) failure rates; (iv) the non-contraceptive benefits; (v) the availability; (vi) the individual's preferences; (vii) protection against infection; and (viii) costs. In some women with heart disease, the issues may be complex and require the input of both a cardiologist and an obstetrician (or other feto-maternal expert) to identify the optimal approach. No studies have been performed in women with heart disease to investigate the relative risks and benefits of different contraceptive methods.

  6. Contraceptive product advertising.

    PubMed

    Kastor, A

    1985-07-01

    In the US, all national broadcast networks refuse to accept ads for contraceptive products. About 10 years ago, the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), a trade association, inserted a ban on contraceptive ads in its advertising code for member stations. The ban was voluntary, but all NAB stations adhered to it. When the NAB dropped its advertising code in 1982, for legal reasons unrelated to contraceptive advertising, individual networks established their own codes. These codes continued the ban on contraceptives along with bans on ads for cigarettes, X-rated movies, sex magazines, and astrology services. In recent years, a few local radio and television stations and cable networks began accepting contraceptive ads. The ads, which are tasteful and straightforward, met with little or no public disapproval. Given that the national television networks through their programming willingly expose viewers to an estimated 9230 sexual acts or references a year, it is hard to understand why they persist in refusing to air contraceptive ads or to allow any references to contraceptive use in their programming. There are some hopeful signs. A number of national organizations are now publicly urging the networks to drop their ban. These organizations include the American College of Nurse-Midwives, the American Jewish Congress, and the Society for Adolescent Medicine. The Center for Population Options recently organized a task force to promote contraceptive advertising. The task force is composed of representatives from a wide range of national organizations, including the American Public Health Association and the National Urban League. The task force developed guidelines for the production and selection of contraceptive ads. The guidelines state that ads must provide accurate and clear information on product effectiveness, present comparisons with other products fairly, advise users to read all instructions, and inform listeners if there is an effectiveness waiting

  7. [Community marketing of contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Urrutia, J M

    1987-09-01

    The 5-year-old community contraceptive distribution program developed by PROFAMILIA, Colombia's private family planning organization, has given excellent results, but several cost-effectiveness comparisons with social marketing programs have suggested that commercial distribution programs are superior. The community contraceptive distribution program has a high content of information and education activities, which produced significant increases in knowledge and use of contraception in the communities covered. It has been a fundamental support for the social marketing program, creating much of the demand for contraceptive products that the social marketing program has filled. The social marketing program has given good results in terms of volume of sales and in cost-effectiveness since 1976, prompting calls for replacement of the community contraceptive distribution program by the social marketing program in those sectors where knowledge and use of contraception have achieved acceptable levels. An experiment in the Department of Santander in 1984 and 1985 gave very favorable results, suggesting that community contraceptive distribution programs should be replaced by social marketing programs in all more developed markets. But economic problems in 1985 and the decision of manufacturers to decrease the profit margin for PROFAMILIA jeopardized the social marketing program. The community distribution program covered about 20% of the market. Reduced profits in the social marketing program threatened its continued expansion, at the same time that potential demand was growing because of increases in the fertile aged population and increased use of contraception. To meet the need, PROFAMILIA combined the community contraceptive distribution and social marketing programs into a new entity to be called community marketing. The strategy of the community marketing program will be to maintain PROFAMILIA's participation in the market and aid the growth of demand for

  8. Review of newer contraceptive agents.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, M; Attaran, M

    1999-06-01

    Advances in contraceptive technology have made birth control more effective, convenient, and safe. We review the newer products and some under development, including the latest oral contraceptives, injectable progesterone, subdermal progestin implants, progesterone-releasing IUDs, emergency contraception, and male contraception.

  9. Recent advances in hormonal contraception

    PubMed Central

    Li, HW Raymond

    2010-01-01

    This report reviews some of the new studies regarding new hormonal contraceptive formulations (e.g., Yaz, Qlaira®, extended-cycle or continuous combined contraceptives, subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, and ulipristal acetate as an emergency contraceptive). Recent data on the relationship between hormonal contraceptive use and bone health are also reviewed. PMID:21173872

  10. The 1998 Canadian Contraception Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, William A.; Boroditsky, Richard; Bridges, Martha L.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the 1998 Canadian Contraception Study, a mailed survey which asked women about contraceptive practices past, present, and future (including use of oral contraceptives, condoms, and sterilization); familiarity with and opinion about different contraception methods; and general sexual and reproductive health. The paper also examines…

  11. Neural Correlates of Socioeconomic Status in the Developing Human Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Kimberly G.; Houston, Suzanne M.; Kan, Eric; Sowell, Elizabeth R.

    2012-01-01

    Socioeconomic disparities in childhood are associated with remarkable differences in cognitive and socio-emotional development during a time when dramatic changes are occurring in the brain. Yet, the neurobiological pathways through which socioeconomic status (SES) shapes development remain poorly understood. Behavioral evidence suggests that…

  12. Evidence based contraceptive choices.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alison; Glasier, Anna

    2006-10-01

    People who attend for contraceptive advice have usually formulated an idea of the type of contraceptive that will suit them best. They may wish to use a method that is long, short or medium acting. These are defined as follows: Long-acting method requires renewal no more frequently than every 3 months (e.g. injectable or intrauterine). Short-acting method used daily or with every act of intercourse (e.g. pills, condoms) Medium-acting method requires renewal weekly or monthly (e.g. ring, patch). For men the choice is limited to condoms or vasectomy. Some women do not wish to use hormonal preparations or have an intrauterine device (IUD) or implant inserted. There may also be cultural influences making certain methods of contraception unacceptable. Each of these factors influences the final decision of which method of contraception is decided upon. In addition to taking a full medical and sexual history to identify any risks to the individual's health, which might be increased by a particular contraceptive, time must be spent discussing the options available. It is important to ensure that there is a full understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of each method. The most successful contraceptive method is likely to be the one that the woman (or man) chooses, rather than the one the clinician chooses for them. Access for women to contraception can be improved by having convenient clinic times and service developments such as nurse prescribing and Patient Group Directions.

  13. Contraception and headache.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, E Anne

    2013-02-01

    Most women have used at least 1 method of contraception during their reproductive years, with the majority favoring combined oral contraceptives. Women are often concerned about the safety of their method of choice and also ask about likely effects on their pre-existing headache or migraine and restrictions on using their headache medication. While there should be no restriction to the use of combined hormonal contraceptives by women with migraine without aura, the balance of risks vs benefits for women with aura are debatable. Migraine with aura, but not migraine without aura, is associated with a twofold increased risk of ischemic stroke, although the absolute risk is very low in healthy, nonsmoking women. Although ethinylestradiol has been associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke, the risk is dose-dependent. Low-dose pills currently used are considerably safer than pills containing higher doses of ethinylestradiol but they are not risk-free. This review examines the evidence available regarding the effect that different methods of contraception have on headache and migraine and identifies strategies available to minimize risk and to manage specific triggers such as estrogen "withdrawal" headache and migraine associated with combined hormonal contraceptives. The independent risks of ischemic stroke associated with migraine and with hormonal contraceptives are reviewed, and guidelines for use of contraception by women with migraine are discussed in light of the current evidence. PMID:23432442

  14. What's wrong with contraception?

    PubMed

    Rice, L; Rice, B

    1994-01-01

    A "reader's exchange" question solicited information on how readers respond when asked what is wrong with contraception. One correspondent couple wrote that their response is dependent upon their assessment of the questioner's perspective. Responses they use are 1) that the Catholic Church teaches that contraception is wrong and it is okay to accept this teaching in faith; 2) the Church teaches that every act of sexual intercourse must be open to life; 3) the God-given gift of intercourse involves pleasure and procreation, it is wrong to accept only part of the gift; 4) oral contraceptives have abortifacient properties; and 5) natural family planning involves temperance whereas contraception allows behavior which is similar to gluttony. A second correspondent wrote that the use of contraception makes humans behave like animals and allows them to be "takers" rather than "givers." A third letter-writer maintained that the use of contraception prohibits true love, total commitment, and complete acceptance on the part of a married couple. Contraception attempts to create a utopia and obviates the pain and suffering which are necessary in order to find true love and true happiness.

  15. [Contraception in the future].

    PubMed

    Hamzaoui, R; Boukhris, M

    1994-02-01

    In the last decade, global use of contraceptive methods has increased. About 50% of couples of childbearing age use a modern contraceptive method. This evolution and a positive change in attitude towards male contraception has encouraged research in fertility regulation to enlarge and to improve acceptance of the contraceptive mix. Current injectable contraceptives interfere with the menstrual cycle. Research is exploring ways to minimize such secondary effects by reducing the total hormone dose and by changing the way the active product is delivered (e.g., microspheres). An injectable prototype is an analogue of levonorgestrel (HRP 002). A new IUD is made of leather suspended by a nylon suture which has been inserted into the uterine muscle. RU-486, often used to interrupt early pregnancy, is being tested as an oral contraceptive (OC). It inhibits secretion of gonadotropins and ovulation. It holds promise as an OC with no estrogen component. Since it also inhibits endometrial development and thus prevents implantation, it may someday be used for emergency contraception (i.e., postcoital contraception). New contraceptive implants under study include Norplant RII (2 rods of levonorgestrel lasting for 3 years), Implanon (desogestrel), and Capranor (biodegradable implant lasting 2 years). The female condom consists of a flexible polyurethane sheath with a flexible ring at each end. It has the potential to protect against sexually transmitted diseases since it covers the labial lips and is impermeable to HIV. France and Switzerland have both approved its use. It will enter the UK market at the end of the year. Approval for marketing has been sought in the US.

  16. Male hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, E

    2010-01-01

    The principle of hormonal male contraception based on suppression of gonadotropins and spermatogenesis has been established over the last three decades. All hormonal male contraceptives use testosterone, but only in East Asian men can testosterone alone suppress spermatogenesis to a level compatible with contraceptive protection. In Caucasians, additional agents are required of which progestins are favored. Current clinical trials concentrate on testosterone combined with norethisterone, desogestrel, etonogestrel, DMPA, or nestorone. The first randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial performed by the pharmaceutical industry demonstrated the effectiveness of a combination of testosterone undecanoate and etonogestrel in suppressing spermatogenesis in volunteers. PMID:20839093

  17. Contraception and Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... health, age, frequency of sexual activity, number of sexual partners, desire to have children in the future, and family history of certain diseases. Individuals should consult their health care provider to ... methods of contraception include: Barrier —physically ...

  18. Post abortion contraception.

    PubMed

    Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Kopp, Helena Kallner

    2015-11-01

    A safe induced abortion has no impact on future fertility. Ovulation may resume as early as 8 days after the abortion. There is no difference in return to fertility after medical or surgical abortion. Most women resume sexual activity soon after an abortion. Contraceptive counseling and provision should therefore be an integrated part of the abortion services to help women avoid another unintended pregnancy and risk, in many cases an unsafe, abortion. Long-acting reversible contraceptive methods that includes implants and intrauterine contraception have been shown to be the most effective contraceptive methods to help women prevent unintended pregnancy following an abortion. However, starting any method is better than starting no method at all. This Special Report will give a short guide to available methods and when they can be started after an induced abortion.

  19. Post abortion contraception.

    PubMed

    Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Kopp, Helena Kallner

    2015-11-01

    A safe induced abortion has no impact on future fertility. Ovulation may resume as early as 8 days after the abortion. There is no difference in return to fertility after medical or surgical abortion. Most women resume sexual activity soon after an abortion. Contraceptive counseling and provision should therefore be an integrated part of the abortion services to help women avoid another unintended pregnancy and risk, in many cases an unsafe, abortion. Long-acting reversible contraceptive methods that includes implants and intrauterine contraception have been shown to be the most effective contraceptive methods to help women prevent unintended pregnancy following an abortion. However, starting any method is better than starting no method at all. This Special Report will give a short guide to available methods and when they can be started after an induced abortion. PMID:26619082

  20. Oral contraceptives and dysmenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Cholst, I N; Carlon, A T

    1987-01-01

    This artical examines the risks and benefits associated with use of the oral contraceptive pill (OCP) by adolescents and the various alternatives and methods of prescribing OCPs. Any adolescent who is either sexually active or contemplating sexual activity should be offered a contraceptive method that is appropriate to her individual needs. The contraceptive needs to be highly effective, safe and within the means and desires of the adolescent. For the majority of teenagers, the contraceptive of choice will be the OCP. The IUD should almost never be prescribed to the adolescent. Most OCPs marketed today are combination pills containing both an estrogen and a progestin in each pill. A variety of contraceptive actions combines to create a contraceptive method that is 99.3-99.9% effective. OCPs provide some protection against the development of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). Oral contraceptives also decrease the incidence of anemia by decreasing the amount and duration of menstrual flow. Ovarian cysts do not form in the ovaries of the OCP user. On the other hand, a serious risk of the use of OCPs is the increased danger of thromboembolic events including deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, and myocardial infarction. The increased risk of myocardial infarction in OCP users is additive with other risk factors including hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cigarette smoking, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and age. OCP use seems to provide some protection against development of endometrial or ovarian cancer. Oral contraceptives are associated with the development of benign hepatocellular adenomas. A variety of metabolic and hormonal alterations also occur in pill users. Most appropriate for the adolescent is a formulation containing a low dose of estrogen because of the decreased risk of thromboembolic complications. Dysmenorrhea effects more than 1/2 of female adolescents, and can best be treated with ibuprofen.

  1. History of oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Dhont, Marc

    2010-12-01

    On the 50th birthday of the pill, it is appropriate to recall the milestones which have led to its development and evolution during the last five decades. The main contraceptive effect of the pill being inhibition of ovulation, it may be called a small miracle that this drug was developed long before the complex regulation of ovulation and the menstrual cycle was elucidated. Another stumbling block on its way was the hostile climate with regard to contraception that prevailed at the time. Animal experiments on the effect of sex steroids on ovulation, and the synthesis of sex steroids and orally active analogues were the necessary preliminaries. We owe the development of oral contraceptives to a handful of persons: two determined feminists, Margaret Sanger and Katherine McCormick; a biologist, Gregory Pincus; and a gynaecologist, John Rock. Soon after the introduction of the first pills, some nasty and life-threatening side effects emerged, which were due to the high doses of sex steroids. This led to the development of new preparations with reduced oestrogen content, progestins with more specific action, and alternative administration routes. Almost every decade we have witnessed a breakthrough in oral contraception. Social and moral objections to birth control have gradually disappeared and, notwithstanding some pill scares, oral contraceptives are now one of the most used methods of contraception. Finally, all's well that ends well: recent reports have substantiated the multiple noncontraceptive health benefits paving the way for a bright future for this 50-year-old product. PMID:21091163

  2. History of oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Dhont, Marc

    2010-12-01

    On the 50th birthday of the pill, it is appropriate to recall the milestones which have led to its development and evolution during the last five decades. The main contraceptive effect of the pill being inhibition of ovulation, it may be called a small miracle that this drug was developed long before the complex regulation of ovulation and the menstrual cycle was elucidated. Another stumbling block on its way was the hostile climate with regard to contraception that prevailed at the time. Animal experiments on the effect of sex steroids on ovulation, and the synthesis of sex steroids and orally active analogues were the necessary preliminaries. We owe the development of oral contraceptives to a handful of persons: two determined feminists, Margaret Sanger and Katherine McCormick; a biologist, Gregory Pincus; and a gynaecologist, John Rock. Soon after the introduction of the first pills, some nasty and life-threatening side effects emerged, which were due to the high doses of sex steroids. This led to the development of new preparations with reduced oestrogen content, progestins with more specific action, and alternative administration routes. Almost every decade we have witnessed a breakthrough in oral contraception. Social and moral objections to birth control have gradually disappeared and, notwithstanding some pill scares, oral contraceptives are now one of the most used methods of contraception. Finally, all's well that ends well: recent reports have substantiated the multiple noncontraceptive health benefits paving the way for a bright future for this 50-year-old product.

  3. Barriers to modern contraceptive use in rural Peru.

    PubMed

    Tucker, G M

    1986-01-01

    This paper examines Quechua-speaking Indians' choice of contraceptive methods and discusses barriers to the use of modern contraceptives. A study conducted in a Peruvian highland community shows that contraceptive choice is strongly related to a couple's life experiences, their contact with urban centers, their economic status, and their emphasis on cultural values. Among contraceptive users, husbands are concerned with family size and encourage their wives to seek information about the use of modern contraceptives. A discrepancy in attitudes exists between spouses: the men's positive attitude toward modern contraception contrasts with the women's traditional desire for a large family. In this study population, modern contraception is a novelty that has reached only a few families. The majority of the couples practice natural and traditional family planning methods, which are not reliable. Villagers do not use modern contraceptives as a result of cultural barriers created by family planning services that do not take into account the lifestyle of these people, insufficient knowledge of human physiology, comments from dissatisfied users, and women's reliance on their reproductive role for self-esteem.

  4. Contraceptive product advertising.

    PubMed

    Kastor, A

    1985-07-01

    In the US, all national broadcast networks refuse to accept ads for contraceptive products. About 10 years ago, the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), a trade association, inserted a ban on contraceptive ads in its advertising code for member stations. The ban was voluntary, but all NAB stations adhered to it. When the NAB dropped its advertising code in 1982, for legal reasons unrelated to contraceptive advertising, individual networks established their own codes. These codes continued the ban on contraceptives along with bans on ads for cigarettes, X-rated movies, sex magazines, and astrology services. In recent years, a few local radio and television stations and cable networks began accepting contraceptive ads. The ads, which are tasteful and straightforward, met with little or no public disapproval. Given that the national television networks through their programming willingly expose viewers to an estimated 9230 sexual acts or references a year, it is hard to understand why they persist in refusing to air contraceptive ads or to allow any references to contraceptive use in their programming. There are some hopeful signs. A number of national organizations are now publicly urging the networks to drop their ban. These organizations include the American College of Nurse-Midwives, the American Jewish Congress, and the Society for Adolescent Medicine. The Center for Population Options recently organized a task force to promote contraceptive advertising. The task force is composed of representatives from a wide range of national organizations, including the American Public Health Association and the National Urban League. The task force developed guidelines for the production and selection of contraceptive ads. The guidelines state that ads must provide accurate and clear information on product effectiveness, present comparisons with other products fairly, advise users to read all instructions, and inform listeners if there is an effectiveness waiting

  5. Male contraception: history and development.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Paul; Wald, Moshe

    2014-02-01

    Although the twentieth century has seen great strides in the development of female contraception, not a single new agent has been introduced as an approved method for common use for male contraception. Condoms (considered uncomfortable by some) and vasectomy (a permanent invasive procedure) are the only options provided to men, leaving an undue burden on women to bear contraceptive responsibility. Significant developments have, however, been made with regard to hormonal and nonhormonal contraception, and minor, reversible, procedural contraception. This article reviews the currently available, soon to be available, and theoretically possible methods of male contraception.

  6. Contraceptive needs of the adolescent.

    PubMed

    Steyn, Petrus S; Goldstuck, Norman D

    2014-08-01

    The provision of contraception to adolescents requires specific attention. Adolescents require contraceptive methods which are safe, effective and simple to use. While long-acting reversible contraceptive methods are preferable, they should have a choice and not be forced or mandated especially in situations where this may compromise safety. After counselling they should have the ability to choose any method of contraception. Under the appropriate circumstances, each method of contraception may have a place. This chapter will be devoted to evaluating the most current scientific rationale for the indication for use of each method of contraception in adolescents.

  7. Recasting image of contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Rimon Jg; Kiragu, K

    1993-03-01

    Even though contraceptives are linked to sex which, along with sensuality and peer acceptance, is used to market consumer goods, contraceptives are promoted in a hygienic, clinical way. Glamorous images which divert from adverse health effects are used to sell unhealthy goods, e.g., alcohol and cigarettes, but technical and intimidating promotion techniques centering on risks are used to promote family planning (FP) products and services which actually save the lives of mothers and children and improve their health. Until recently, only the medical system provided FP products and services so consumers identified them with illness and a help-seeking behavior. The image of contraceptives must be remolded to gain people's attention. To avoid instilling mistrust of a method in consumers, even those who believe in birth spacing, it is important for images to be positive and to reflect accurate information. In Indonesia, the Dualima condom has been linked to responsible fatherhood thereby creating a positive image and removing the negative image of a condom being linked to illicit sex. In the US, condom adds show the user in control, especially in reference to AIDS. Prior to promotion of any contraceptive, complete, clear communication and marketing plans are needed to identify and to focus on consumers' perceived needs. A survey in Egypt shows that the most important attributes of a contraceptive are ease of use, healthiness, and effectiveness and that Egyptians considered IUDs to best fit these attributes. Images of contraceptive users often determine whether potential users do choose to use contraceptives. For example, in Cameroon and the Philippines, female users are considered to be smart, rich, educated, confident and in control of their lives. In the Philippines, male users are perceived to be loving, caring, and considerate husbands. The mass medias can improve providers' public image as was the case in Turkey and Egypt.

  8. Introducing new contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Segal, S J; Coutinho, E

    1986-12-01

    At this time, private research efforts to discover new contraceptives are threatened. Drug companies, particularly in the US, have reduced their interest in contraceptive development due to concern over the rising cost of product liability insurance, the cost of lawsuits in defense of liability claims, and the fear of extremely high awards by juries in product liability cases. The current form of private-public collaboration, now threatened by the liability crisis, works under a few simple principles of agreement. Private industry agrees to supply its patented chemical compounds for assessment as contraceptive agents, to be willing to enter into negotiations with public sector organizations to develop the contraceptive drugs if initial tests warrant it, and to release compounds to another company if the patent-holder declines to proceed with contraceptive development. The public-sector program agrees to fund the studies, keep the industry informed, and maintain confidentiality. When the technology is discovered by the public sector and is of potential interest to private industry, the collaboration involves other issues. The public agency agrees to supply manufacturing know-how and all biological and clinical information, to license under applicable patents, and to permit cross reference to regulatory agency filings. Private industry agrees to use its best efforts to bring the product to market, to manufacture the product at reduced cost for public sector use, or to provide know-how for others to do so. It also agrees to assume product liability and to grant the public sector agency licenses to any patented improvement in its product. Contraceptive research both within and outside the US is feeling the effects of the US litigious atmosphere. Companies from abroad now wish to steer clear of contraceptive research, even though these companies would be prepared to meet the requirements of the Food and Drug Administration. Contraceptives, considered to be high risk

  9. Brain size is correlated with endangerment status in mammals.

    PubMed

    Abelson, Eric S

    2016-02-24

    Increases in relative encephalization (RE), brain size after controlling for body size, comes at a great metabolic cost and is correlated with a host of cognitive traits, from the ability to count objects to higher rates of innovation. Despite many studies examining the implications and trade-offs accompanying increased RE, the relationship between mammalian extinction risk and RE is unknown. I examine whether mammals with larger levels of RE are more or less likely to be at risk of endangerment than less-encephalized species. I find that extant species with large levels of encephalization are at greater risk of endangerment, with this effect being strongest in species with small body sizes. These results suggest that RE could be a valuable asset in estimating extinction vulnerability. Additionally, these findings suggest that the cost-benefit trade-off of RE is different in large-bodied species when compared with small-bodied species. PMID:26888034

  10. Contraceptive options for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, A L

    1997-01-01

    Data on national trends of sex behavior indicate that adolescents in the US are initiating sexual activity at younger ages than in the past several decades. The 1996 Centers for Disease Control Youth Behavior Survey found that 36.9% of 9th graders and 66.4% of 12th graders had been sexually active. Of those, 37.9% were sexually active within the 3 months preceding the survey. 12.7% of the sexually active boys and 4.9% of the sexually active girls reported beginning sexual activity before age 13 years. 72% of individuals aged 15-17 years and 84% of those aged 18-19 report using some form of contraception. However, many use contraception inconsistently. The most popular and effective methods of contraception chosen by adolescents are condoms, oral contraception, and depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA). These methods are discussed. Before either oral contraceptive pill or DMPA use is initiated, a detailed health history should be taken and a complete physical examination conducted which includes a pelvic examination.

  11. Advances in Male Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Page, Stephanie T.; Amory, John K.; Bremner, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite significant advances in contraceptive options for women over the last 50 yr, world population continues to grow rapidly. Scientists and activists alike point to the devastating environmental impacts that population pressures have caused, including global warming from the developed world and hunger and disease in less developed areas. Moreover, almost half of all pregnancies are still unwanted or unplanned. Clearly, there is a need for expanded, reversible, contraceptive options. Multicultural surveys demonstrate the willingness of men to participate in contraception and their female partners to trust them to do so. Notwithstanding their paucity of options, male methods including vasectomy and condoms account for almost one third of contraceptive use in the United States and other countries. Recent international clinical research efforts have demonstrated high efficacy rates (90–95%) for hormonally based male contraceptives. Current barriers to expanded use include limited delivery methods and perceived regulatory obstacles, which stymie introduction to the marketplace. However, advances in oral and injectable androgen delivery are cause for optimism that these hurdles may be overcome. Nonhormonal methods, such as compounds that target sperm motility, are attractive in their theoretical promise of specificity for the reproductive tract. Gene and protein array technologies continue to identify potential targets for this approach. Such nonhormonal agents will likely reach clinical trials in the near future. Great strides have been made in understanding male reproductive physiology; the combined efforts of scientists, clinicians, industry and governmental funding agencies could make an effective, reversible, male contraceptive an option for family planning over the next decade. PMID:18436704

  12. Family and Community Influences on Health and Socioeconomic Status: Sibling Correlations Over the Life Course*

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, Bhashkar

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents new estimates of sibling correlations in health and socioeconomic outcomes over the life course in the U.S. Sibling correlations provide an omnibus measure of the importance of all family and community influences. I find that sibling correlations in a range of health and socioeconomic outcomes start quite high at birth and remain high over the life course. The sibling correlation in birth weight is estimated to be 0.5. Sibling correlations in test scores during childhood are as high as 0.6. Sibling correlations in adult men’s wages are also around 0.5. Decompositions provide suggestive evidence on which pathways may account for the gradients in health and SES by family background. For example, sibling correlations in cognitive skills and non-cognitive skills during childhood are lower controlling for family income. Similarly, parent education levels can account for a sizable portion of the correlation in adult health status among brothers. PMID:23412989

  13. [Contraception in adolescents].

    PubMed

    1992-12-01

    The proportion of women aged 15-19 in Colombia who are mothers declined from 14% in 1985 to 10% in 1990, but the actual number of cases increased due to population growth. Some 1,780,000 adolescents who have had children or are pregnant require family planning services. An additional, unknown number of adolescent pregnancies are terminated by abortion. It is estimated that 95% of adolescent pregnancies diagnosed or followed by PROFAMILIA's center for young people were unwanted. Reasons for making family planning services available to adolescents include the ever young age at initiation of sexual activity, the very low rates of contraceptive usage among sexually active adolescents, the lack of information of adolescents concerning reproduction and contraception, and their fear and guilt surrounding their sexual activity and contraceptive usage. Obstetrical services appear reluctant to furnish adolescent mothers with information on contraception, and the pharmacists and their employees who provide such information may not be aware of contraindications for this age group or whether adolescents are adequately instructed in use of the method. The rising age at marriage increases the span of time that adolescents are at risk of unwanted pregnancy. Adolescents who are well informed about sexuality and contraception and trained in decision making, self-esteem, and responsible parenthood are likely to postpone sexual activity. Information on contraception and family planning services needs to be made available to adolescents in a way that will actually motivate use. Information on sex and contraception should be made available at puberty and should include the form of use, contraindications, and advantages and disadvantages of all methods appropriate to adolescents. Orientation and assistance in selecting the best method should be individually tailored and should be provided in schools or other places accessible to young people, in a language they can understand. Rhythm and

  14. [Test your knowledge: contraceptives].

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    A brief self-administered quiz on contraceptive knowledge is presented. The 7 questions ask the reader to explain the mechanism of action of combined oral contraceptives, and why estrogens are used with progestins, and to indicate the main secondary effects of Depo-Provera and implants and the dosage of the "morning-after pill." A multiple-choice question concerns absolute contraindications to combined OC use. One clinical case involves selection of OCs for a woman with a family history of breast cancer and the other requires development of a strategy for reducing high-risk pregnancies and risk of AIDS.

  15. The expression status of TRX, AR, and cyclin D1 correlates with clinicopathological characteristics and ER status in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weisun; Nie, Weiwei; Zhang, Wenwen; Wang, Yanru; Zhu, Aiyu; Guan, Xiaoxiang

    2016-01-01

    Background The ER signaling pathway plays a critical role in breast cancer. ER signaling pathway-related proteins, such as TRX, AR, and cyclin D1, may have an important function in breast cancer. However, the ways that they influence breast cancer development and progression are still unclear. Patients and methods A total of 101 Chinese female patients diagnosed with invasive ductal breast adenocarcinoma were retrospectively enrolled in the study. The expression levels of TRX, AR, and cyclin D1 were detected by immunohistochemistry and analyzed via correlation with clinicopathological characteristics and the expression status of ER, PR, and HER2. Results The expression status of TRX, AR, and cyclin D1 was not associated with the patient’s age, menopausal status, tumor size, or histological differentiation (P>0.05), but was positively correlated with ER and PR (P<0.001, respectively). Most (66/76, 86.8) TRX-positive patients were also HER2-positive (P=0.003). Of AR- or cyclin D1-positive patients, most had relatively earlier I–II tumor stage (P=0.005 and P=0.047, respectively) and no metastatic lymph node involvement (P=0.008 and P=0.005, respectively). Conclusion TRX was found to be positively correlated with ER and PR expression, whereas it was negatively correlated with HER2 expression. In addition, we found that the positive expression of AR and cyclin D1 was correlated with lower TNM stage and fewer metastatic lymph nodes, and it was more common in ER-positive breast cancer than in the basal-like subtype. This may indicate that AR and cyclin D1 are good predictive and prognostic factors and closely interact with ER signaling pathway. Further studies will be necessary to investigate the response and clinical outcomes of treatment targeting TRX, AR, and cyclin D1. PMID:27499632

  16. Reproductive and Contraceptive Knowledge, Contraceptive Self-Efficacy, and Contraceptive Behavior among Teenage Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Ruth Andrea

    1995-01-01

    Investigates the relationships among teenage women's Contraceptive Self-Efficacy (CSE), reproductive and contraceptive knowledge (RCK), and contraceptive behavior. No significant relationships existed between RCK and behavior. However, CSE explained variance in RCK, while other measures uncovered common areas of misinformation that influence…

  17. Contraceptive Beach Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Edith B.; Miller, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    Abstinence-based sexuality education includes a discussion about the various types of contraception available today. This lesson addresses the knowledge and skills identified in the National Health Education Standards, and can be used with two different audiences-students and teachers. Included in the lesson are step-by-step procedures, a…

  18. Current contraceptive research.

    PubMed

    Benditt, J M

    1980-01-01

    No contraceptive panacea is near or likely. The most exciting prospect, man-made analogs of LHRH (a brain hormone) for both male and female use, could not be available before the late 1980s. Other potential methods in human trials face serious obstacles. PMID:6995149

  19. Male contraceptives under trial.

    PubMed

    1975-02-01

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation held its 4th biological workshop in New Delhi on October 17-19, 1974. The topic of this meeting was "Agents affecting fertility in the male." 10 internationally known experts in the field of male reproductive physiology attended and each presented an up-to-the-minute account of their work in the field, followed by a full discussion. Much basic work was described, and the results of the latest human trials of male contraceptives were reported. Dr. F. Neumann of the Schering Company, Berlin, reported on clinical trials of the drug cyproterone acetate. This drug has been in the news for some time as a possible male contraceptive. It is found that small doses prevent sperm from maturing in the epididymis. This drug is already on the British market as Androcur. In large doses it is useful for curbing libido, and in this format it is used to control "sexual offenders." In the small doses at which it is useful as a contraceptive, the effects on libido are negligible, and the drug is at present undergoing human trials as a contraceptive agent. However, much work has still be done on, for example, long-term side effects. Another approach described by Dr. J. Frick from Innsbruck, Austria, is that of giving men a progestagen combined with testosterone. Whereas the progestagen has the effect of inhibiting sperm production in the testis, the testosterone compensates for androgen loss and maintains libido and male characteristics. Dr. Frick reported studies using 15 progestagen combinations, including a new drug provisionally titled R2323. The overall conclusion of the meeting was that there are still many problems to be solved, and it will be some years before a male contraceptive will be commercially available. PMID:12333962

  20. Fertility and contraceptive adoption and discontinuation in rural Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, A G

    1992-01-01

    After a long period of slow progress, the recent uptake of contraceptive use in Kenya has been dramatic. This report describes adoption of a method and method switching and discontinuation among a cohort of married women aged 25-34 in two contrasting rural areas. A retrospective "fertility diary" completed by each woman provided information on spousal separation, reproductive status, and contraceptive use over a period of 46-48 months. Contraceptive prevalence rose rapidly over the period in both areas, with significant net adoption of injectables in both areas and of IUDs in one only. Method discontinuation was concentrated among users of pills, barrier methods, and "natural" methods, and only one-third of all discontinuations were voluntary. The wide differences between the two rural areas in contraceptive prevalence were not totally reflected in recent fertility levels, and the contribution of other proximate determinants of fertility, particularly postpartum amenorrhea and spousal separation, are discussed.

  1. Reduction in lung functions in type-2 diabetes in Indian population: correlation with glycemic status.

    PubMed

    Dharwadkar, Anand R; Dharwadkar, Asha A; Banu, Gouher; Bagali, Shrilaxmi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate pulmonary functions in patients with Type-2 diabetes mellitus and to determine their correlation with glycemic status of diabetes in Indian population. Forty Type-2 diabetic patients, aged 30-60 years, with diabetic duration of 1-20 years, were included in the study. FVC, FEV1, & FEV1% are recorded by Benedict's Roth spirometer. PEFR and MEP were recorded by Wright's Peak flow meter & Modified Black's apparatus. Glycemic status of subjects was determined by FBS & PPBS by Glucose oxidase & peroxidase methods. And results were analyzed by calculating Mean +/- SD, using Student's t test, and Pearson correlation. All the respiratory parameters are reduced in Type-2 diabetic patients compared to control of which FEV1, FEV1%, & MEP show very highly significant reduction (P=0.000). Lung functions are negatively correlated with glycemic status & duration of diabetes. (r = -0.390, & -0.342) Reduction in dynamic lung functions and its negative correlation to glycemic status might be due to respiratory muscle weakness as indicated by highly significant reduction in MEP. Hence strict glycemic control and breathing exercises to strengthen the respiratory muscles may improve lung function in diabetics. PMID:22319899

  2. Correlation between Food Schemes and Children Nutrient Status at the Toddler's Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratnaningsih, Tri; Lestari, Indah

    2016-01-01

    The nutrient in the meal is very important, especially for the children at the toddler's age. The aim of this research was to know the correlation between the food schemes with the children nutrient status at the toddler's age (1-3 years). The research design was cross sectional. The population for this research was all of the mothers and the…

  3. Parental Socio-Economic Status as Correlate of Child Labour in Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elegbeleye, O. S.; Olasupo, M. O.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between parental socio-economic status and child labour practices in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The study employed survey method to gather data from 200 parents which constituted the study population. Pearson Product Moment Correlation and t-test statistics were used for the data analyses. The outcome of the study…

  4. Correlates of AUDIT Risk Status for Male and Female College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMartini, Kelly S.; Carey, Kate B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The current study identified gender-specific correlates of hazardous drinker status as defined by the AUDIT. Participants: A total of 462 college student volunteers completed the study in 2006. The sample was predominantly Caucasian (75%) and female (55%). Methods: Participants completed a survey assessing demographics, alcohol use…

  5. Contraceptive advertising in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lebow, M A

    1994-01-01

    Despite the fact that most Americans support the advertising of family planning methods, the minority opposition has influenced the formulation of contraceptive advertising policies. This article attempts to clarify the current status of contraceptive advertising and to suggest a sensible public policy for the future. Opening with a review of opinion polls taken since 1985, the article points out that 70% of station managers reported their belief that contraceptive advertising would offend many people despite the fact that 87% of respondents in a public survey indicated no objection to such advertising. The policies that network television stations have adopted are traced from those instituted in the 1960s by the National Association of Broadcaster's Code Authority. These policies govern the airing of Public Service Announcements (PSAs) as well as advertisements. Magazines and newspapers also resist accepting contraceptive advertising, although they do not face the same regulations as the broadcast media. US Food and Drug Administration policies also act as a barrier to product-specific advertisements on network television despite the fact that the American Medical Association no longer opposes such advertising and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists offered to provide valid information about advertising claims to the media. A review of attempts to advertise contraceptives shows that opposition has dropped significantly in the past 10 years for advertisements in newspapers, on cable television, in magazines, on some commercial television stations, and on many radio stations. However, the major television networks still fail to accept such advertisements. Part of the change that is occurring can be attributable to the emergence of AIDS and the need to promote methods to prevent the disease. However, much AIDS-related advertising has been in the form of PSAs, which are less and less available. The major obstacles to contraceptive advertising today

  6. Contraception: traditional and religious attitudes.

    PubMed

    Schenker, J G; Rabenou, V

    1993-04-01

    Humans have tried to control fertility for centuries. Primitive, preliterate societies practiced infanticide and abortion. When primitive women understood the advantages of conception control, they tried, when possible, to use contraception. In the 4th century B.C., Plato and Aristotle advocated a one-child family. Greek medical literature reported a hollow tube inserted through the cervix into the uterus and a potion as contraceptives. Islamic physicians had much knowledge about conception control. The attitudes toward contraception. In the 5th century B.C., Saint Augustine condemned contraception, even among married couples. The condom emerged in the early modern period. Yet, they were usually worn to protect against disease, e.g., bilharzia in Egypt and syphilis in Europe. The cervical cap and the diaphragm are examples of occlusive pessaries. By 1880, contraceptives and spermicides were advertised. In 1928, the IUD joined the existing contraceptives. Today we have combined oral contraceptives. Judaic law requires husbands to fulfill their wives sexual needs, separate from their duty to procreate. It also calls men, not women, to procreate and forbids men from masturbating, thus Judaic law does not forbid women from practicing contraception. The Roman Catholic church forbids contraceptive use because it is a sin against nature. Some Protestant denominations have allowed contraceptive use. Islamic law states that children are gifts from Allah. Some Moslems believe that they must have many children, but Allah and the Prophet state that children have rights to education and future security. These rights allow couples to prevent pregnancy. Neither Hinduism nor Buddhism prohibit contraceptive use. Differences in husband-wife communication, sex roles, access to contraceptives, and traditional family values will have more of an effect on contraceptive use and fertility than theological barriers or the social class of religious groups.

  7. The effects of contraception on female poverty.

    PubMed

    Browne, Stephanie P; LaLumia, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Poverty rates are particularly high among households headed by single women, and childbirth is often the event preceding these households' poverty spells. This paper examines the relationship between legal access to the birth control pill and female poverty. We rely on exogenous cross-state variation in the year in which oral contraception became legally available to young, single women. Using census data from 1960 to 1990, we find that having legal access to the birth control pill by age 20 significantly reduces the probability that a woman is subsequently in poverty. We estimate that early legal access to oral contraception reduces female poverty by 0.5 percentage points, even when controlling for completed education, employment status, and household composition.

  8. Factors affecting the use and non use of contraception.

    PubMed

    Utomo, B; Alimoeso, S; Park, C B

    1983-12-01

    Data from the 1982 Jakarta Modular Survey were used to study the factors affecting the use and nonuse of contraception. Specific study objectives were: to present some characteristics of contraceptors and noncontraceptors; to identify the major factors affecting contraceptive use; to determine the causal structure between the factors and contraceptive use; and to understand the relationship among these factors. The data collected were organized into 4 modules: socioeconomic and migration module; contraceptive prevalence and fertility module; mortality, morbidity, nutrition, and health practice module; and contraceptive continuation module. The first 3 modules were used for collecting information from all currently married women aged 15-49 years. The last module was used for collecting information from women who used some contraceptive method through the services of a family planning clinic during the 1977-82 period. Data on 2727 women were analyzed. Users and nonusers distributed differently depending on their characteristics. The characteristics selected included age, respondent's education, husband's education, working status of the respondent, age at 1st marriage, number of living children, and experience of abortion. These variables were considered to be associated with use and nonuse of contraceptives. Compared to the nonusers, the current users were slightly older in age more educated (and had husbands who were more educated), were older when 1st married, had more living children, and had more experience in abortion. Log-linear analysis was performed on 2 groups of women. Group I included all currently married women aged 15-49 years; Group II included only "high risk" women, i.e., currently married women aged 15-34 years, not pregnant, not in menopausal stage, and have had at least 1 live birth. Contraceptive use rates were lower in Group I than in Group II. Within both groups, the users rates differed significantly according to age, age at marriage, number

  9. Postabortal and postpartum contraception.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Sharon

    2014-08-01

    Healthcare providers often underestimate a woman' need for immediate effective contraception after an abortion or childbirth. Yet, these are times when women may be highly motivated to avoid or delay another pregnancy. In addition, starting the most effective long-acting reversible methods (i.e. the intrauterine device, intrauterine system or implants) at these times, is safe, with low risk of complications. Good evidence shows that women choosing long-acting reversible contraceptives at the time of an abortion are at significantly lower risk of another abortion, compared with counterparts choosing other methods. Uptake of long-acting reversible methods postpartum can also prevent short inter-pregnancy intervals, which have negative consequences for maternal and child health. It is important, therefore, that providers of abortion and maternity care are trained and funded to be able to provide these methods for women immediately after an abortion or childbirth.

  10. Contraceptive care for the adolescent.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Elizabeth

    2006-06-01

    Despite recent improvements in rates of teen pregnancy, abortion, birth,and contraceptive use, effective contraceptive counseling for adolescents should be a high priority for the primary care provider in the office setting. Adolescent psychosocial risk screening and appropriate counseling about sexual decision-making is necessary. Contraceptive services visits include, relevant history, limited physical examination, provision of information, anticipatory guidance about sexual behaviors, and the provision of contraceptive methods. Teens should always be encouraged to use a male condom during sex to reduce STI risk. A variety of barrier and hormonal contraceptive methods are available for the adolescent population. Education about and provision of EC is effective in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy and abortion in the United States. Contraceptive care for adolescents is a rewarding experience for primary care providers.

  11. Advances in male hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Antonietta; Gava, Giulia; Berra, Marta; Meriggiola Maria, Cristina

    2014-11-01

    Contraception is a basic human right for its role on health, quality of life and wellbeing of the woman and of the society as a whole. Since the introduction of female hormonal contraception the responsibility of family planning has always been with women. Currently there are only a few contraceptive methods available for men, but recently, men have become more interested in supporting their partners actively. Over the last few decades different trials have been performed providing important advances in the development of a safe and effective hormonal contraceptive for men. This paper summarizes some of the most recent trials. PMID:25673544

  12. Advances in male hormonal contraception

    PubMed Central

    Antonietta, Costantino; Giulia, Gava; Marta, Berra; Cristina, Meriggiola Maria

    2014-01-01

    Contraception is a basic human right for its role on health, quality of life and wellbeing of the woman and of the society as a whole. Since the introduction of female hormonal contraception the responsibility of family planning has always been with women. Currently there are only a few contraceptive methods available for men, but recently, men have become more interested in supporting their partners actively. Over the last few decades different trials have been performed providing important advances in the development of a safe and effective hormonal contraceptive for men. This paper summarizes some of the most recent trials. PMID:25673544

  13. Attitude of rural women towards contraceptive and its use.

    PubMed

    Jain, S; Singh, J V; Bhatnagar, M; Garg, S K; Chopra, H; Bajpai, S K

    1999-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the attitudes of rural women towards contraceptive use. 500 participants (each having a child under 2 years of age) were randomly selected from 50 villages. Information was collected through questionnaires. Results revealed that most of the mothers (78.8%) had knowledge of one or more modern methods of contraception. Knowledge levels were highest for condoms (55.6%), followed closely by sterilization methods (55.4%). Knowledge of oral pills and IUDs was found among 36.6% and 33.2% of the participants, respectively. As to current usage, condoms were the most commonly used method (10.8%), followed by IUDs (5.4%), oral pills (4.4%), and sterilization (3.6%). Obstacles to their adoption of contraceptive methods were hesitation (59.6%), nonavailability of a service provider (43.2%), fear of side effects (36.6%), and customs, disbelief, or external pressure (22%). This study revealed that the status of women in Indian villages, as reflected with their problems in adopting contraceptive methods, was quite low . Thus, the Indian government is encouraged to strengthen delivery services for contraceptive methods and to make women more aware of the realities of contraceptive use.

  14. Unmet contraceptive needs among refugees

    PubMed Central

    Aptekman, Marina; Rashid, Meb; Wright, Vanessa; Dunn, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe what women of reproductive age who received primary care at a refugee health clinic were using for contraception upon arrival to the clinic, and to quantify the unmet contraceptive needs within that population. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Crossroads Clinic in downtown Toronto, Ont. Participants Women of reproductive age (15 to 49 years) who first presented for care between December 1, 2011, and December 1, 2012. To be included, a woman had to have had 2 or more clinic visits or an annual health examination. Exclusion criteria for the contraception prevalence calculation were female sexual partner, menopause, hysterectomy, pregnancy, or trying to conceive. Main outcome measures Contraception use prevalence was measured, as was unmet contraceptive need, which was calculated using a modified version of the World Health Organization’s definition: the number of women with an unmet need was expressed as a percentage of women of reproductive age who were married or in a union, or who were sexually active. Results Overall, 52 women met the criteria for inclusion in the contraceptive prevalence calculation. Of these, 16 women (30.8%) did not use any form of contraception. Twelve women were pregnant at some point in the year and stated the pregnancy was unwanted or mistimed. An additional 14 women were not using contraception but had no intention of becoming pregnant within the next 2 years. There were no women with postpartum amenorrhea not using contraception and who had wanted to delay or prevent their previous pregnancy. In total, 97 women were married or in a union, or were sexually active. Unmet need was calculated as follows: (12 + 14 + 0)/97 = 26.8%. Conclusion There was a high unmet contraceptive need in the refugee population in our study. All women of reproductive age should be screened for contraceptive need when first seeking medical care in Canada. PMID:25642489

  15. Influence of combined oral contraceptives on the periodontal condition

    PubMed Central

    DOMINGUES, Roberta Santos; FERRAZ, Bruna Fidêncio Rahal; GREGHI, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; de REZENDE, Maria Lúcia Rubo; PASSANEZI, Euloir; SANT'ANA, Adriana Campos Passanezi

    2012-01-01

    Most studies investigating the impact of oral contraceptives have been performed some years ago, when the level of sexual hormones was greater than the actual formulations. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of current combined oral contraceptives (COC) on periodontal tissues, correlating the clinical parameters examined with the total duration of continuous oral contraceptive intake. Material and methods Twenty-five women (19-35 years old) taking combined oral contraceptives for at least 1 year were included in the test group. The control group was composed by 25 patients at the same age range reporting no use of hormone-based contraceptive methods. Clinical parameters investigated included pocket probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), sulcular bleeding index (SBI) and plaque index (Pl.I). Data were statistically evaluated by unpaired t test, Pearson's correlation test and Spearman's correlation test. Results The test group showed increased PD (2.228±0.011 x 2.154±0.012; p<0.0001) and SBI (0.229±0.006 x 0.148±0.005, p<0.0001) than controls. No significant differences between groups were found in CAL (0.435±0.01 x 0.412±0.01; p=0.11). The control group showed greater Pl.I than the test group (0.206±0.007 x 0.303±0.008; p<0.0001). No correlation between the duration of oral contraceptive intake, age and periodontal parameters was observed. Conclusions These findings suggest that the use of currently available combined oral contraceptives can influence the periodontal conditions of the patients, independently of the level of plaque accumulation or total duration of medication intake, resulting in increased gingival inflammation. PMID:22666846

  16. Effect of Oral and Vaginal Hormonal Contraceptives on Inflammatory Blood Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Divani, Afshin A.; Luo, Xianghua; Datta, Yvonne H.; Flaherty, James D.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The use of combined hormonal contraceptives has been reported to increase the level of C-reactive protein (CRP). We assessed the effect of hormonal contraceptive use on inflammatory cytokines including CRP, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, soluble tumor necrosis factor (sTNF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and soluble CD40 ligand. We used 79 female subjects (19 to 30 years old) who were combined oral contraceptives users (n = 29), combined vaginal contraceptive users (n = 20), and nonusers (n = 30) with CRP values of ≤1 (n = 46) or ≥3 (n = 33). Information on medical history, physical activities, and dietary and sleeping habits were collected. Both oral and vaginal contraceptive users had higher levels of CRP (P < 0.0001), compared to nonusers. Only oral contraceptive users exhibited elevated sCD40L (P < 0.01). When comparing the groups with CRP ≤ 1 and CRP ≥ 3, levels of IL-6 and sTNF-RI were positively correlated with CRP among oral contraceptive users. We did not observe the same elevation for other inflammatory biomarkers for the CRP ≥ 3 group among vaginal contraceptive users. The clear cause of elevation in CRP level due to the use of different hormonal contraceptive formulations and methods is not well understood. Longitudinal studies with larger sample size are required to better assess the true cause of CRP elevation among hormonal contraceptive users. PMID:25861161

  17. Estrogen and Progestin (Oral Contraceptives)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of serious side effects from oral contraceptives, including heart attacks, blood clots, and strokes. This risk is higher for women over 35 years of age and heavy smokers (15 or more cigarettes per day). If you take oral contraceptives, you should not smoke.

  18. [Hormonal contraception in autoimmpne diseases].

    PubMed

    Matyszkiewicz, Anna; Jach, Robert; Rajtar-Ciosek, Agnieszka; Basta, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The onset and the course of autoimmune diseases is influenced among other factors by the sex hormones. Hormonal contraception might affect the course of the autoimmune disease. The paper summarises the manner of save application of hormonal contraception in patients with autoimmune disease. PMID:27526427

  19. [Chronic illness and contraception].

    PubMed

    Saarikoski, S

    1987-01-01

    In recent years sterilization that can cause problems of the psyche and marital life has been recommended much less frequently with respect to chronic diseases. As regards heart and hypertensive diseases pregnancy is always contraindicated in case of 3rd and 4th disease categories and sterilization is recommended according to the New York Heart Association. As far as 1st and 2nd category patients are concerned if the load carrying capacity is normal pregnancy could be undertaken. Combination pills are not recommended for contraception because they can cause fluid retention or increase the risk of thrombosis. If the patient has a higher-than-normal risk of developing thrombosis or infection, for instance, those who wear pacemakers only tablets containing progesterone or subdermal capsule implants can be used. In those with blood pressure problems the additional use of the IUD is also advised. Among diseases of neurological and psychic origin the effect of hormonal contraceptives is weakened by antiepileptics, but even in such cases older combination pills of larger doses of active ingredients can be employed. Migraine is exacerbated in 1/3 of patients; here IUDs can be used. Even the contraceptive tablets themselves can induce depression. In psychosis methods requiring regular attention can be easily forgotten, therefore the IUD is the most suitable device. In diabetes progesterone and other progestogens reduce insulin response, harm carbohydrate metabolism; therefore in young people the IUD is preferred an in older women with children even sterilization can be employed. Hormonal tablets must not be used in hyperlipidemia and liver diseases. Caution must be exercised in hyperthyroidism and in endocrine disorders (e.g., Cushing's syndrome); if it is accompanied by blood pressure disorders appropriate treatment is required. In kidney diseases pregnancy is contraindicated if it is accompanied by blood pressure increase or a higher level of creatine. On the other hand

  20. [Young men's contraceptive habits].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, A H; Nielsen, B B; Hansen, K; Johansen, J B; Nielsen, M B

    1992-10-01

    A total of 379 men from the greater Copenhagen area were invited to fill out a questionnaire about sexual habits and use of contraception in connection with conscription for military duty. A total of 334 (88%) answered the questionnaire. In the autumn of 1988, a total of 27 men answered the test questionnaire, while in the spring of 1989, when the real study was conducted, 307 men answered it. The median age of 334 participants was 18 years (range of 17-29 years). 33% of the group stated that they had used condoms during first intercourse, while 47% had not. 1 person reported to be exclusively attracted sexually to men, 5 persons were attracted both to men and women, but 97% were exclusively attracted to women. 82% had had intercourse or other sexual experience with women. 1.8% had had intercourse or other sexual experience with men. 8% had no sexual experience, and 8% did not answer the question. Oral contraceptives were used by 60% and the condom by 56%. 10% had used coitus interruptus at one time or another; 15% had used no contraception; 5% used the IUD; and 5% used the diaphragm. Some gave several answers. 1% used spermicidal lotion. 60% thought that it was the responsibility of both men and women to be concerned about contraception, 12% opined that it was exclusively men's duty, and 2% that it was exclusively women's, while 26% did not answer. 68% wanted to use the condom in the future for protection, 24% did not know, but 8% did not want to use it more extensively. 64% did not think that the fear of AIDS would affect their sexual life, but 36% thought it would. Several of the subjects indicated that they would be more careful about choosing a partner, and every 10th suggested that they would use the condom with a new partner. One person (0.3%) was a drug addict, 89% had never injected drugs, but about 11% did not answer about drugs. 97% and 95%, respectively, indicated that the condom provided good protection against pregnancy and venereal diseases.

  1. The adolescent and contraception.

    PubMed

    Bonar, R W; Mcculla, D

    1981-08-01

    Coital activity is often initiated during adolescence, and adolescents, like many adults, do not behave in purely rational ways and frequently fail to protect themselves against undesired pregnancy. Public attention is focused on adolescent pregnancies because of their increasing number and because the consequences are usually catastrophic. Unplanned pregnancies can have physical, psychosocial, and prenatal effects. It is important from both the individual and societal perspective that high priority be given to the task of preventing adolescent pregnancy. The health care provider, to gain the trust of the adolescent, must be open, honest, and willing to consider the young person's feelings and motivations. In addition to historical data and physical examination, the choice of a contraceptive method is based on individual preferences involving personal, familial, religious, and societal beliefs as well as sexual practice. A decision involving birth control for the adolescent can be complicated by parental influence and involvement. The teenage years are frequently a time of embarrassment about the physical maturation and biological functioning of the body. Birth control methods which require a person to touch himself/herself or to be used at the time of sexual intercourse may be unacceptable to the teenager. Fertility awareness techniques, such as basal body temperature, rhythm, and cervical mucus methods are inexpensive but call for a high degree of personal motivation. The use of a diaphragm requires an office visit and a pelvic examination for fitting and prescription. Contraceptive foam, suppositories, and condoms can be easily obtained over-the-counter for a minimal cost, and a moderate degree of personal motivation is needed for their effective use. Though effective, abortions should not be recommended indiscriminately. Permanent contraceptive methods are not recommended for the adolescent. The IUD and oral contraceptives (OCs) are recommended for adolescents

  2. [Morality and contraception].

    PubMed

    Gakwaya, D

    1988-08-01

    The conflict of morality and natural law come into focus when contraception and procreation are examined despite the religious pronouncements of Charles de Koninck. Man, having mastered nature, confronts interminable new problems in the pursuit of physical, economic, moral, and material happiness. The population explosion in Rwanda make it indispensable that the prevention of undesired pregnancy is the right of a man and a women choosing the appropriate method. Man's morality allows the violation of natural law in order to pursue one's own goal of survival using counterbalancing means whenever under- or overpopulation may threaten its existence or portend extinction. Natural law could be the guiding principle in man's moral development.

  3. Demand for contraception to delay first pregnancy among young married women in India.

    PubMed

    Jejeebhoy, Shireen J; Santhya, K G; Zavier, A J Francis

    2014-06-01

    In India, evidence is sparse regarding the demand for contraception to delay first pregnancy among married young people. Using data drawn from a study conducted in six Indian states among 9,572 women aged 15-24 who were married for five or fewer years, we explore the scope of this demand, the extent to which it has been satisfied, and, using logistic regression analyses, the factors correlated with contraceptive use to delay first pregnancy among those reporting demand. Findings confirm considerable demand for contraception to postpone first pregnancy (51 percent). Of those with demand, only 10 percent had practiced contraception. Contraception was more likely to have been practiced by educated women, those aware of family planning methods before they were married, those exposed to quality sexuality education, and those who participated in marriage-related decision making. Women who reported feeling pressure to prove their fertility were less likely to have practiced contraception. PMID:24931075

  4. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions between antiretrovirals and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Tittle, Victoria; Bull, Lauren; Boffito, Marta; Nwokolo, Nneka

    2015-01-01

    More than 50 % of women living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries are of reproductive age, but there are limitations to the administration of oral contraception for HIV-infected women receiving antiretroviral therapy due to drug-drug interactions caused by metabolism via the cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and glucuronidation. However, with the development of newer antiretrovirals that use alternative metabolic pathways, options for contraception in HIV-positive women are increasing. This paper aims to review the literature on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral hormonal contraceptives when given with antiretroviral agents, including those currently used in developed countries, older ones that might still be used in salvage regimens, or those used in resource-limited settings, as well as newer drugs. Nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), the usual backbone to most combined antiretroviral treatments (cARTs) are characterised by a low potential for drug-drug interactions with oral contraceptives. On the other hand non-NRTIs (NNRTIs) and protease inhibitors (PIs) may interact with oral contraceptives. Of the NNRTIs, efavirenz and nevirapine have been demonstrated to cause drug-drug interactions; however, etravirine and rilpivirine appear safe to use without dose adjustment. PIs boosted with ritonavir are not recommended to be used with oral contraceptives, with the exception of boosted atazanavir which should be used with doses of at least 35 µg of estrogen. Maraviroc, an entry inhibitor, is safe for co-administration with oral contraceptives, as are the integrase inhibitors (INIs) raltegravir and dolutegravir. However, the INI elvitegravir, which is given in combination with cobicistat, requires a dose of estrogen of at least 30 µg. Despite the growing evidence in this field, data are still lacking in terms of large cohort studies, randomised trials and correlations to real clinical outcomes, such as pregnancy rates, in women

  5. Medicinal plants: conception / contraception.

    PubMed

    Chaing, H S; Merino-chavez, G; Yang, L L; Wang, F N; Hafez, E S

    1994-01-01

    Researchers have conducted considerable experiments on the effectiveness and therapeutic values of Chinese herbs and parts of plants. We should not ignore the significance of natural medicine. The Chinese have been perfecting medicinal therapy based on the raw ingredients of plants/herbs and their derivatives for thousands of years. Chinese practitioners of traditional medicine prescribe medicines based on yin and yang. Traditional medicine is communicated in a verb or written form. Natural resources used in traditional medicine to treat diseases are not limited to just medicinal plants but also include animals, shell fish, and minerals. Parts of plants used in traditional medicine are leaves, stems, flowers, bark, and root. Chinese medicine is the world's oldest continuous surviving tradition. The Chinese experimented with local plants, often resulting in mild to violent reactions. This process allowed them to become familiar with poisonous plants and those that could relieve pain or successfully treat illness. Current allopathic medicines are composed of synthetic compounds copied from natural chemical derivatives, which tend to be more potent than the original compound. Some medicinal plants used to effect conception/contraception include Striga astiatica (contraceptive); Eurycoma longifolia (male virility); and a mixture of lengkuas, mengkudu masak, black pepper seeds, ginger, salt, and 2 eggs (increase libido). Women in Malaysia take jamu to preserve their body shape and to provide nutrition during pregnancy. Praneem causes local cell-mediated immunity in the uterus. Clinical trials of Praneem with or without the hCG vaccine are planned.

  6. Contraceptive Characteristics of Women Living with HIV in the Kumasi Metropolis, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Gyimah, Akosua A.; Nakua, Emmanuel K.; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Otupiri, Easmon

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Contraceptive use among women living with HIV is important to prevent the transmission of the infection to their partners, prevent unintended pregnancies and prevent the mother-to-child transmission of the infection. The study sought to determine the contraceptive characteristics of women living with HIV in the Kumasi metropolis. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from July to August 2012 at two HIV/AIDS clinics in the Kumasi Metropolis in the Ashanti Region, Ghana. Interviewer- administered questionnaires were used to collect data from two hundred and ninety five women. Data from one hundred and eighty three women living with HIV and who were sexually active were analyzed. Factors associated with contraceptive use were examined using logistic regression. Results: The overall contraceptive use was high; 84.7% were using a modern contraceptive method. The male condom was the commonest contraceptive method (77.0%) used and this was the main contraceptive method promoted at the HIV/AIDS clinic. Dual method usage was low (4.4%). Multivariate analysis showed that the significant predictor of contraceptive use was HIV status disclosure to partner (AOR = 0.25; 95% CI = 0.07-0.87; p = 0.03). Conclusions and Public Health Implications: The integration of family planning and HIV/AIDS services could stress dual method use and encourage HIV status disclosure to partner.

  7. European society of contraception statement on contraception in obese women.

    PubMed

    Merki-Feld, Gabriele S; Skouby, Sven; Serfaty, David; Lech, Medard; Bitzer, Johannes; Crosignani, Pier Giorgio; Cagnacci, Angelo; Sitruk-Ware, Regine

    2015-02-01

    The obesity 'epidemic' continues to increase, mostly but not only in developed countries. As overweight and obese women are at an increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) at baseline and at a much higher risk during pregnancy, it is essential to help these women to plan pregnancies carefully and to use contraceptives with a positive ratio of benefits versus risks. The Expert Group on hormonal and molecular contraception of the European Society of Contraception convened to review the existing evidence and propose recommendations to the prescribers in line with most recent studies and with the Medical Eligibility Criteria of the World Health Organisation.

  8. Prevalence of and Barriers to Dual-Contraceptive Methods Use among Married Men and Women Living with HIV in India

    PubMed Central

    Chakrapani, Venkatesan; Kershaw, Trace; Shunmugam, Murali; Newman, Peter A.; Cornman, Deborah H.; Dubrow, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To describe the prevalence and correlates of dual-contraceptive methods use (condoms and an effective pregnancy prevention method) and barriers to their use among married persons living with HIV (PLHIV) in India. Methods. We conducted a quantitative survey (93 men, 97 women), 25 in-depth interviews, seven focus groups, and five key informant interviews. Results. Prevalence of dual- contraceptive method use increased from 5% before HIV diagnosis to 23% after diagnosis (P < 0.001). Condoms were the most common contraceptive method, with prevalence increasing from 13% before diagnosis to 92% after diagnosis (P < 0.001). Barriers to using noncondom contraceptives were lack of discussion about noncondom contraceptives by health care providers, lack of acceptability of noncondom contraceptives among PLHIV, and lack of involvement of husbands in family planning counseling. Conclusion. There is a need for interventions, including training of health care providers, to increase dual-contraceptive methods use among married PLHIV. PMID:22013377

  9. Correlation of MGMT promoter methylation status with gene and protein expression levels in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Miyuki; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli Mieko; Camargo, Anamaria Aranha; Moura, Ricardo Pereira; de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Cabrera, Hector Navarro; Begnami, Marcos; Rosemberg, Sérgio; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: 1) To correlate the methylation status of the O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter to its gene and protein expression levels in glioblastoma and 2) to determine the most reliable method for using MGMT to predict the response to adjuvant therapy in patients with glioblastoma. BACKGROUND: The MGMT gene is epigenetically silenced by promoter hypermethylation in gliomas, and this modification has emerged as a relevant predictor of therapeutic response. METHODS: Fifty-one cases of glioblastoma were analyzed for MGMT promoter methylation by methylation-specific PCR and pyrosequencing, gene expression by real time polymerase chain reaction, and protein expression by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: MGMT promoter methylation was found in 43.1% of glioblastoma by methylation-specific PCR and 38.8% by pyrosequencing. A low level of MGMT gene expression was correlated with positive MGMT promoter methylation (p = 0.001). However, no correlation was found between promoter methylation and MGMT protein expression (p = 0.297). The mean survival time of glioblastoma patients submitted to adjuvant therapy was significantly higher among patients with MGMT promoter methylation (log rank = 0.025 by methylation-specific PCR and 0.004 by pyrosequencing), and methylation was an independent predictive factor that was associated with improved prognosis by multivariate analysis. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: MGMT promoter methylation status was a more reliable predictor of susceptibility to adjuvant therapy and prognosis of glioblastoma than were MGMT protein or gene expression levels. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing methods were both sensitive methods for determining MGMT promoter methylation status using DNA extracted from frozen tissue. PMID:22012047

  10. [Barrier methods of contraception].

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, A; Edelman, D A

    1982-01-01

    Vaginal methods of contraception were the earliest types used and some references to them date back to antiquity. Most of the vaginal contraceptive agents identified by the ancient Greeks, Indians, Japanese, and Chinese have been found in modern laboratory tests to have spermicidal properties, but it is doubtful that the methods were fully reliable or were used by many people. During the 19th century the condom, vaginal spermicides, and diaphragm became available. The development of nonoxynol-9 and other nonirritating but effective spermicidal agents improved vaginal contraceptives greatly by the 1950s, but starting in the 1960s newer methods began to replace the vaginal methods. Interest in barrier methods has been reawakened somewhat by concern about the health effects of hormonal methods. At present all barrier methods leave something to be desired. Failure rates of 3-30% for barrier methods in general have been estimated, but the higher rates are believed due to incorrect or inconsistent use. Theoretical failure rates of condoms and diaphragms have been estimated at 3/100 women-years, but in actual use failure rates may reach 15 for condoms and 13 for diaphragms used with spermicides. Use-effectiveness rates are greatly influenced by motivation. For a variety of reasons, the acceptability of barrier methods is low, especially in developing countries. New developments in spermicidal agents include sperm inhibitors, which impede the fertilizing capacity of sperm rather than attempting a spermicidal effect; a number of such agents have been studied and have proven more effective in animal tests than conventional spermicides. Neosampoon, a new spermicidal foam, has attracted an increasing number of users, especially in developing countries. A new condom, made of thin polymers and containing a standard dose of nonoxynol-9, has been designed to dissolve in the vaginal fluid. Further studies are needed of its acceptability, efficacy, and side effects before it becomes

  11. [Pregnancy contraception (Current Care Guideline)].

    PubMed

    Halttunen-Nieminen, Mervi; Piltonen, Terhi; Alenius, Heidi; Apukka, Laura; Kosunen, Elise; Pietilä, Kirsi; Sihvo, Sinikka; Vuorela, Piia; Väänänen, Eija; Yli-Kivistö, Tiina

    2016-01-01

    There are no age limits for the start or use of contraception. Prior gynecological examination or cervical smear is not needed. Condom is the only method that protects from sexually transmitted diseases. An increase in the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated only with combined contraceptives. However, the risk is remarkably higher with pregnancy, puerperium or with smoking. The most effective reversible methods are intrauterine devices (IUD) and implants, as these do not depend on daily memory. Natural family planning methods are not reliable, and effective contraception should be easily available for all at all times. PMID:27382829

  12. New contraceptive choices across reproductive life.

    PubMed

    Foran, Therese M

    2003-06-16

    The range of contraceptive options and consumer awareness of new contraceptive methods have both increased significantly over the past 10 years. New methods available in Australia include lower-dose oral contraceptive pills, new oral progestogens, progestogen implants, a progestogen-bearing intrauterine device and polyurethane female condoms. Contraceptive options which may soon be introduced in Australia include novel methods of administering combined (oestrogen-progestogen) contraception, such as dermal patches and vaginal rings.

  13. Emergency contraception: Focus on the facts.

    PubMed

    Najera, Deanna Bridge

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress on contraception, and in particular emergency contraception, has been made in the past decade. Emergency contraception was first introduced as a stand-alone prescription in 1998, and the interaction of politics and medicine meant a tumultuous course to the drug becoming available over the counter. This article reviews how emergency contraception works, the effectiveness of different methods, pros and cons, and the history of emergency contraception. PMID:26656383

  14. [FIRST CONSULTATION IN TEENAGERS FOR CONTRACEPTION PRESCRIPTION].

    PubMed

    Béliard, A

    2016-01-01

    Adequate contraception prescription is mandatory for teenagers to avoid any unwanted pregnancy. Counselling and description of side effect improve compliance. Use of condom is important to avoid sexually transmitted infections. Combined estroprogestin contraception has multiple non-contraceptive benefits, e.g. dysmenorrhea improvement. Familial and personal history is needed before contraception prescription. Further consultation 3 months later has to be planned to evaluate compliance, side effects and to adapt contraception if needed.

  15. Survival analysis of time to uptake of modern contraceptives among sexually active women of reproductive age in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adebowale, Ayo Stephen; Morhason-Bello, ImranOludare

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the timing of modern contraceptive uptake among married and never-married women in Nigeria. Design A retrospective cross-sectional study. Data and method We used nationally representative 2013 Demographic and Health Survey data in Nigeria. Modern contraceptive uptake time was measured as the period between first sexual intercourse and first use of a modern contraceptive. Non-users of modern contraceptives were censored on the date of the survey. Kaplan–Meier survival curves were used to determine the rate of uptake. A Cox proportional-hazards model was used to determine variables influencing the uptake at 5% significance level. Participants A total of 33 223 sexually active women of reproductive age. Outcome measure Time of uptake of a modern contraceptive after first sexual intercourse. Results The median modern contraceptive uptake time was 4 years in never-married and 14 years among ever-married women. Significant differences in modern contraceptive uptake existed in respondents’ age, location, education and wealth status. Never-married women were about three times more likely to use a modern contraceptive than ever-married women (aHR=3.24 (95% CI 2.82 to 3.65)). Women with higher education were six times more likely to use a modern contraceptive than those without education (aHR=6.18 (95% CI 5.15 to 7.42)). Conclusions The rate of modern contraceptive uptake is low, and timing of contraceptive uptake during or after first sexual intercourse differed according to marital status. Age and number of children ever born influenced modern contraceptive uptake among the never-married women, but religion and place of residence were associated with the probability of modern contraceptive uptake among ever-married women. PMID:26671948

  16. [Contraception and society].

    PubMed

    Miyahara, S

    1988-01-01

    Dramatic decreases in the birth rate between 1947 and 1955 in Japan is due to legalized abortion and wide-spread practice of contraception but is also to some socio-economic changes. In 1947, the birth rate in Japan reached its highest, 34.3/1000 but dramatically decreased by 50% over the next 8 years. The birth rate, which went down to 17.2/1000 in 1955, increased again gradually till 1974 but has been decreasing. Total fertility rate is 1.8 as of now. Eugenic Law was passed in 1948 in Japan. 30% had the experience of contraception in 1950; 52% in 1955; 63% in 1959; 72% in 1965. 15% experienced abortion in 1952; 27%, in 1955; 41% in 1961. A post war baby boom occurred amid shortage of food, shelter and employment, and the experience of poverty prompted people to limit the size of family. Post-war Japan no longer was obsessed with producing an heir. Neither was there a need to produce many children because of improved infant mortality rates. Due to the fast paced industrialization of Japan between 1950 and 1960 a potentially high fertility population migrated from rural to urban areas, where big families were not advantageous. Although the socio economic life of Japanese people greatly improved after 1960, the birth rate has not increased very much. Money is now used more for material comforts in daily life, leisure, and education of small number of children. There is also a trend among some part of population not to have children because of environmental deterioration. PMID:12283950

  17. Sociodemographic determinants of contraceptive method choice in Sri Lanka: 1975-82.

    PubMed

    Kahn, J R; Thapa, S; Gaminiratne, K H

    1989-01-01

    The determinants of contraceptive method choice in Sri Lanka are examined during a period in which contraceptive prevalence increased by over 60% and involved substantial use of sterilization and traditional methods. Data are from the 1975 World Fertility and 1982 Contraceptive Prevalence Surveys. Polytomous logistic regression is used to model four current contraceptive choices: non-use, use of a traditional method, use of a modern temporary method and use of sterilization. The analysis shows, in 1975 and 1982, strong socioeconomic as well as demographic effects on whether any method is used. However, in both years the type of method chosen is primarily a function of demographic considerations related to the couple's family-building stage rather than social status, implying that in Sri Lanka there are few socioeconomic barriers limiting access to different contraceptive methods. The family planning programme, however, has emphasized sterilization rather than birth spacing methods.

  18. Emerging Options for Emergency Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Atsuko; Hagopian, Laura; Linden, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Emergency post-coital contraception (EC) is an effective method of preventing pregnancy when used appropriately. EC has been available since the 1970s, and its availability and use have become widespread. Options for EC are broad and include the copper intrauterine device (IUD) and emergency contraceptive pills such as levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate, combined oral contraceptive pills (Yuzpe method), and less commonly, mifepristone. Some options are available over-the-counter, while others require provider prescription or placement. There are no absolute contraindications to the use of emergency contraceptive pills, with the exception of ulipristal acetate and mifepristone. This article reviews the mechanisms of action, efficacy, safety, side effects, clinical considerations, and patient preferences with respect to EC usage. The decision of which regimen to use is influenced by local availability, cost, and patient preference. PMID:24453516

  19. How Effective Is Male Contraception?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Resources and Publications How effective is male contraception? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... health care providers to determine which method of birth control is best for them. For men, methods of ...

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing molecules correlate with clinical status in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Barr, Helen L; Halliday, Nigel; Cámara, Miguel; Barrett, David A; Williams, Paul; Forrester, Douglas L; Simms, Rebecca; Smyth, Alan R; Honeybourne, David; Whitehouse, Joanna L; Nash, Edward F; Dewar, Jane; Clayton, Andrew; Knox, Alan J; Fogarty, Andrew W

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces quorum sensing signal molecules that are potential biomarkers for infection.A prospective study of 60 cystic fibrosis patients with chronic P. aeruginosa, who required intravenous antibiotics for pulmonary exacerbations, was undertaken. Clinical measurements and biological samples were obtained at the start and end of the treatment period. Additional data were available for 29 of these patients when they were clinically stable.Cross-sectionally, quorum sensing signal molecules were detectable in the sputum, plasma and urine of 86%, 75% and 83% patients, respectively. They were positively correlated between the three biofluids. Positive correlations were observed for most quorum sensing signal molecules in sputum, plasma and urine, with quantitative measures of pulmonary P. aeruginosa load at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation. Plasma concentrations of 2-nonyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline (NHQ) were significantly higher at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation compared to clinical stability (p<0.01). Following the administration of systemic antibiotics, plasma 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (p=0.02) and NHQ concentrations (p<0.01) decreased significantly.In conclusion, quorum sensing signal molecules are detectable in cystic fibrosis patients with pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection and are positively correlated with quantitative measures of P. aeruginosa. NHQ correlates with clinical status and has potential as a novel biomarker for P. aeruginosa infection.

  1. Safety of modern contraceptive technology. Current status.

    PubMed

    Khoo, S K

    1980-02-01

    The introduction of the oral steroid pill and the intrauterine device represents an improved, effective and acceptable means of regulating fertility, but this has been tempered by concern over their safety. Although the Pill frequently is associated with minor side effects, serious complications are rare. The issues of greatest concern are the relationship to carcinogenesis, for which there is no evidence of greater risk in general, and that to the circulatory system diseases, with evidence to indicate an increased risk, albeit relatively small, but more particularly in older women who smoke. The device, although frequently not tolerated because of pain and bleeding, very rarely carries the risk of serious consequences, and its relationship to infection, both in early pregnancy and in the oviduct, is yet to be resolved. The benefits derived from these methods should not go unnoticed, through providing the woman with a freedom from fear of pregnancy previously not possible.

  2. The contraception needs of the perimenopausal woman.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Sarah M R; Gebbie, Ailsa E

    2014-08-01

    Perimenopausal women have low fertility but must still be advised to use contraception until natural sterility is reached if they are sexually active. Patterns of contraceptive use vary in different countries worldwide. Long-acting reversible contraceptive methods offer reliable contraception that may be an alternative to sterilisation. Hormonal methods confer significant non-contraceptive benefits, and each individual woman should weigh up the benefits and risks of a particular method. No method of contraception is contraindicated by age alone, although combined hormonal contraception and injectable progestogens are not recommended for women over the age of 50 years. The intrauterine system has particular advantages as a low-dose method of effective hormonal contraception, which also offers control of menstrual dysfunction and endometrial protection in women requiring oestrogen replacement. Condoms are recommended for personal protection against sexually transmitted infections in new relationships. Standard hormone replacement therapy is not a method of contraception.

  3. Contraceptive challenges in adolescents living with or at risk of HIV.

    PubMed

    Kancheva Landolt, Nadia; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Chaithongwongwatthana, Surasith

    2016-01-01

    Many adolescents living with or without HIV are sexually active and in need of continuous free access to a variety of contraceptive methods. Dual contraception, condom use together with reversible effective contraception (hormonal contraception [HC] or intrauterine device), seems to be the most effective option for female adolescents for protection from unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. When counselling on specific contraceptive choice, healthcare providers should be aware about possible interactions of some types of HC with the immune system, with possible changes in infectivity, as well as about drug interactions between mainly efavirenz and some types of progestins. Adding HC to HIV-positive status and antiretroviral therapy could have additive effects on metabolism. At the same time, the possible disadvantages of using HC in women living with HIV should be balanced against the advantages of very reliable methods of preventing unintended pregnancies. To reach and deliver a contraceptive service to more young women, it has proven effective to organise adolescent-friendly clinics and/or integrate them with HIV services. Diverse approaches, including community-based contraceptive service provision and the use of modern technologies, can complement the effort of providing contraceptive services to this target group of female adolescents living with HIV or at risk of HIV. PMID:27482440

  4. Impact of Contraceptive Education on Contraceptive Knowledge and Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Pazol, Karen; Zapata, Lauren B.; Tregear, Stephen J.; Mautone-Smith, Nancy; Gavin, Loretta E.

    2015-01-01

    Context Educational interventions can help increase knowledge of available contraceptive methods, enabling individuals to make informed decisions and use contraception more effectively. This systematic review evaluated contraceptive education interventions to guide national recommendations on quality family planning services. Evidence acquisition Three databases (CINAHL, PubMed, and PsycINFO) were searched from 1985 through 2012 for peer-reviewed articles on educational interventions, with supplemental searches conducted through 2015. Primary outcomes were knowledge, participation in and comfort with decision making, and attitudes toward contraception. Secondary outcomes included contraceptive use behaviors and unintended pregnancy. Evidence synthesis Database searches in 2011 identified 5,830 articles; 17 met inclusion criteria and were abstracted into evidence tables. Searches in 2012 and 2015 identified four additional studies. Studies used a wide range of tools (decision aids, written materials, audio/videotapes, and interactive games), with and without input from a healthcare provider or educator. Of 15 studies that examined the impact of educational interventions on knowledge, 14 found significant improvement using a range of tools, with and without input from a healthcare provider or educator. Fewer studies evaluated outcomes related to decision making, attitudes toward contraception, contraceptive use behaviors, or unintended pregnancy. Conclusions Results from this systematic review are consistent with evidence from the broader healthcare field suggesting that a range of educational interventions can increase knowledge. Future studies should assess what aspects of educational interventions are most effective, the extent to which it is necessary to include a healthcare provider or educator, and the extent to which educational interventions can impact behaviors. PMID:26190846

  5. Television and contraception.

    PubMed

    Klein, L

    1986-01-01

    This article consists of excerpts from a speach made on October 19th at the 1986 annual meeting of the Association of Planned Parenthood Professionals by Dr. Luella Klein, President of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) between 1984-85. The speaker described the reaction of US television network to the ACOG's request that the networks air a public service announcement encouraging responsible sexual behavior among the nation's young people. In 1984 the ACOG initiated a public information program aimed at reducing the high number of unwanted births among young people. The ACOG with the help of an advertising agency developed a 27-second public service announcement stressing responsible parenthood and informing young people that they could write or call for further information. A booklet, entitled "Facts," was prepared for distribution to those who inquired. It advised young people to consider postponing sexual intercourse but to use the most effective methods of contraception if they decided to be sexually active. Oral contraceptives for females and condoms for males were recommended as the most effective methods. When the 3 major television networks, i.e., the American Broadcasting Company (ABC), the National Broadcasting Company (NBC), and the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS), were requested to carry the announcement, all 3 networks claimed the announcement was too controversial to air. These same networks do not hesitate to show blatant, irresponsible sexual behavior repeatedly during their entertainment programming, and commercials with sexual innuendos are routinely accepted for airing by the networks. In July, 1986, the ACOG called a news conference in New York City to inform the news media about the rejection of the announcement by the networks. The conference stimulated considerable interest, and the story was carried by many newspapers and by radio and television news programs. Many of the news accounts of the story contained

  6. Recent advances in contraception.

    PubMed

    Erkkola, R

    2006-08-01

    The world population is expected to increase by 2.6 billion to 9.1 billion in 2050. This will occur, if fertility decreases from today's 2.6 children to about 2 children per woman. If fertility were to remain at the present level, 34 million persons would be added annually by mid-century and thus the world population would reach 10.6 billion by 2050. The most notable increase in the world population will occur in third world countries. Therefore immense investments are being made to develop safe, reliable and easily used contraceptive methods. It has not proven easy. Further, acceptance of the methods has been called into question. And even their distribution would be very difficult although Population Council and organizations like it have put a lot of effort into that matter also. In addition, the methods should preferably be such that they could to some extent prevent the rapid spread of sexually transmitted infections. So, the task is not easy, but every effort must be made on this question also at governmental and international political levels. It is noteworthy that this kind of approach has been given more currency since the beginning of this millennium.

  7. Contraceptive research and development.

    PubMed

    Aitken, R J

    1979-05-01

    Contraceptive research and development is primarily performed at universities and research councils due to the cost and time involved for industry and philanthropic organizations to bring drugs to market. Promising fundamental research includes immunization of women against chorionic gonadotrophin in order to disrupt the embryo in early pregnancy. Post-coital drugs, such as Anordrin, are also being developed for situations involving low-coital frequency. Once-a-month formulas are being developed to 1) exert a direct luteolytic effect on the corpus luteum; 2) interfere with the luteotrophic action of the implanting blastocyst; 3) inhibit the progestational development of the endometrium during the luteal phase of the cycle; or 4) exert a specific toxic effect on the early embryo. Methods for detecting ovulation incuding urine and saliva tests as well as electronic devices to measure the blood flow or temperature associated with ovulation are also being explored. Reversible fertility control for men which suppress the pituitary function is under investigation. Applied research includes the design and assessment of alternate delivery systems such as intranasal sprays, intracervical devices, paper pills, vaginal rings, and biodegradable subdermal implants. In addition, long-acting injectable progestins, improved IUDs, and improved sterilization techniques are all being tested. With future funds, the comparative safety, efficacy, and acceptability of various fertility methods can be established. PMID:387168

  8. Balancing the present and the future: a study of contraceptive use in Calcutta's slums.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Mousumi; Husain, Zakir

    2011-01-01

    Calcutta, an important metropolitan city in eastern India, has a large slum population. Despite the poor economic status of this population, analysis of DHS data (2004-2005) reveals that contraceptive use levels in Calcutta slums is quite high, with a large proportion preferring terminal methods. Econometric analysis reveals that cultural factors are important determinants of contraceptive use. Results also indicate that respondents attempt to balance current needs (by trying to limit family size through use of contraceptives) but also try to provide for the future (by having at least one son before adopting family planning methods). PMID:21677526

  9. Urban adolescent females' views on the implant and contraceptive decision-making: a double paradox.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, H; Miller, S; Martinez, E; Loeb, L; Darney, P

    1997-01-01

    Focus groups and in-depth interviews were used to explore the decline in popularity of the contraceptive implant in a clinic-based sample of 41 ethnically diverse, urban, sexually active adolescents. While these teenagers' socioeconomic status and patterns of inconsistent contraceptive use made them potentially ideal implant recipients, they were unlikely to select this method. Negative media reports about the method were less influential than social conditions such as peer perspectives and gender relations. Oral networks that propagated misinformation went unchallenged because of the silence of satisfied users. Personal factors such as future orientation, autonomous decision-making and value of control also influenced contraceptive decision-making.

  10. Contraceptive practices among women seeking termination of pregnancy in one public hospital in Eastern Cape, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Oluwole, Ebenezer O.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is significantly high contraceptive knowledge in South Africa, but the uptake of contraceptives is average to low with resultant soaring of unplanned pregnancy and rising statistics of termination of pregnancy (TOP) services. This study aimed to establish the contraceptive practices among women in the South African population seeking TOP in one public hospital in Eastern Cape, South Africa. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among women seeking TOP in a women’s clinic. Self-administered questionnaires were used as data collection tool, and the data collected were entered into SPSS software for analysis, using descriptive statistics to calculate frequencies and percentages while chi-square test was used to determine the associations between the socio-demography and contraceptive practices of the participants. Results Majority of the women were aged between 20 and 29 years, had secondary education, unemployed, single and resided in townships. Contraceptive uptake prior to termination of pregnancy (CTOP) among them was 44.1%, but 85.8% had good contraceptives knowledge. Their contraceptive practices are determined by partner’s opinion, source and availability of contraceptives, previous CTOP, side effect of contraceptives and having children. Age group, educational level and employment status were found to be related to the contraceptive practices of the participants but were not statistically significant. Conclusion To reduce unplanned pregnancies and subsequent number of women seeking CTOP, the socio-economic factors associated with contraceptive practices as well as the programmes, policies and guidelines of contraceptives need to be improved on for any improvement on the factors determining contraceptive practices. PMID:27608676

  11. Vitamin D Status Is Negatively Correlated with Insulin Resistance in Chinese Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Ye, Jianhong; Guo, Gang; Lan, Zhenhao; Li, Xing; Pan, Zhiming; Rao, Xianming; Zheng, Zongji; Luo, Fangtao; Lin, Luping; Lin, Zhihua; Xue, Yaoming

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Vitamin D deficiency plays a role in insulin resistance and the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Little information is available about the association between vitamin D status and insulin resistance in the Chinese population. Currently, vitamin D status is evaluated by the concentrations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]. This study explores the relationship between insulin resistance and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Subjects and Methods. This study included 117 patients with type 2 diabetes. The following variables were measured: 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting blood glucose (FBS), fasting blood insulin (FINS), fasting blood C-peptide, serum creatinine (SCr), glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), body mass index (BMI), and homeostatic model estimates of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Results. The cases were divided into three groups: Group 1 (G1) with 25(OH)D ≤ 20 ng/mL [≤50 nmol/L], Group 2 (G2) with 25(OH)D values from 20 ng/mL [50 nmol/L] to 30 ng/mL [75 nmol/L], and Group 3 (G3) with 25(OH)D ≥ 30 ng/mL [≥75 nmol/L], with 52.6%, 26.3%, and 21.1% of subjects in Groups 1-3, respectively. There was a negative correlation between 25(OH)D and HOMA-IR (β = -0.314, p = 0.001) adjusted by age, BMI, and eGFR. Conclusion. Better vitamin D status may be protective of glucose homeostasis since 25(OH)D was negatively associated with insulin resistance in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27413370

  12. Vitamin D Status Is Negatively Correlated with Insulin Resistance in Chinese Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Ye, Jianhong; Guo, Gang; Lan, Zhenhao; Li, Xing; Pan, Zhiming; Rao, Xianming; Luo, Fangtao; Lin, Luping; Lin, Zhihua; Xue, Yaoming

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Vitamin D deficiency plays a role in insulin resistance and the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Little information is available about the association between vitamin D status and insulin resistance in the Chinese population. Currently, vitamin D status is evaluated by the concentrations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]. This study explores the relationship between insulin resistance and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Subjects and Methods. This study included 117 patients with type 2 diabetes. The following variables were measured: 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting blood glucose (FBS), fasting blood insulin (FINS), fasting blood C-peptide, serum creatinine (SCr), glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), body mass index (BMI), and homeostatic model estimates of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Results. The cases were divided into three groups: Group 1 (G1) with 25(OH)D ≤ 20 ng/mL [≤50 nmol/L], Group 2 (G2) with 25(OH)D values from 20 ng/mL [50 nmol/L] to 30 ng/mL [75 nmol/L], and Group 3 (G3) with 25(OH)D ≥ 30 ng/mL [≥75 nmol/L], with 52.6%, 26.3%, and 21.1% of subjects in Groups 1–3, respectively. There was a negative correlation between 25(OH)D and HOMA-IR (β = −0.314, p = 0.001) adjusted by age, BMI, and eGFR. Conclusion. Better vitamin D status may be protective of glucose homeostasis since 25(OH)D was negatively associated with insulin resistance in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27413370

  13. A balanced JA/ABA status may correlate with adaptation to osmotic stress in Vitis cells.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ahmed; Seo, Mitsunori; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kamiya, Yuji; Nick, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Water-related stress is considered a major type of plant stress. Osmotic stress, in particular, represents the common part of all water-related stresses. Therefore, plants have evolved different adaptive mechanisms to cope with osmotic-related disturbances. In the current work, two grapevine cell lines that differ in their osmotic adaptability, Vitis rupestris and Vitis riparia, were investigated under mannitol-induced osmotic stress. To dissect signals that lead to adaptability from those related to sensitivity, osmotic-triggered responses with respect to jasmonic acid (JA) and its active form JA-Ile, abscisic acid (ABA), and stilbene compounds, as well as the expression of their related genes were observed. In addition, the transcript levels of the cellular homeostasis gene NHX1 were examined. The data are discussed with a hypothesis suggesting that a balance of JA and ABA status might correlate with cellular responses, either guiding cells to sensitivity or to progress toward adaptation. PMID:26277753

  14. Serum inflammatory mediators correlate with disease activity in electrical status epilepticus in sleep (ESES) syndrome.

    PubMed

    van den Munckhof, Bart; de Vries, Evelien E; Braun, Kees P J; Boss, H Myrthe; Willemsen, Michèl A; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; de Jager, Wilco; Jansen, Floor E

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to study serum cytokine levels in 11 electrical status epilepticus in sleep (ESES) patients and 20 healthy control children. Patients showed significantly higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-6, IL-10, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)2 and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)8/IL-8 than controls, while macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and CCL3 were significantly lower. Follow-up analyses in five patients revealed a significant decrease of IL-6 levels after immunomodulating treatment. IL-6 changes were accompanied by clear improvement of electroencephalography (EEG) patterns and neuropsychological evaluation. We hypothesize that IL-6 correlates with disease activity and immunomodulating treatment efficacy.

  15. Serum inflammatory mediators correlate with disease activity in electrical status epilepticus in sleep (ESES) syndrome.

    PubMed

    van den Munckhof, Bart; de Vries, Evelien E; Braun, Kees P J; Boss, H Myrthe; Willemsen, Michèl A; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; de Jager, Wilco; Jansen, Floor E

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to study serum cytokine levels in 11 electrical status epilepticus in sleep (ESES) patients and 20 healthy control children. Patients showed significantly higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-6, IL-10, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)2 and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)8/IL-8 than controls, while macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and CCL3 were significantly lower. Follow-up analyses in five patients revealed a significant decrease of IL-6 levels after immunomodulating treatment. IL-6 changes were accompanied by clear improvement of electroencephalography (EEG) patterns and neuropsychological evaluation. We hypothesize that IL-6 correlates with disease activity and immunomodulating treatment efficacy. PMID:26666401

  16. Socio-economic status by rapid appraisal is highly correlated with mortality risks in rural Africa.

    PubMed

    van Bodegom, David; May, Linda; Kuningas, Maris; Kaptijn, Ralf; Thomése, Fleur; Meij, Hans J; Amankwa, J; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2009-08-01

    Socio-economic status is an important determinant of health and survival in rural Africa and necessitates a practical and valid instrument to implement in health studies. Our objective was to investigate the validity of the rapid appraisal method to assess socio-economic status and its ability to identify individuals at risk. Among 1573 households in rural northern Ghana, we calculated the Demographic Health Survey (DHS) wealth index and conducted two rapid appraisal methods: self-reported wealth and interviewer-reported wealth. In addition we followed the 25,184 participants from these households for survival with a mean follow-up of 3.9 years, during which 885 participants died. The DHS wealth index was moderately correlated to self-reported wealth (Spearman's rho 0.59, P<0.001) and interviewer-reported wealth (Spearman's rho 0.75, P<0.001). Mortality risks were significantly higher for people with lower than average self-reported wealth [hazard ratio (HR) 1.30 (95% CI 1.11-1.51)] and lower interviewer-reported wealth [HR 1.40 (95% CI 1.21-1.62)]. Mortality risks were lower for people with higher self-reported wealth [HR 0.81 (95% CI 0.32-2.03)] and higher interviewer-reported wealth [HR 0.84 (95% CI 0.58-1.21)]. Similar discriminative mortality risks were assessed when using tertiles of the DHS wealth index (Ptrend<0.001).

  17. Effects of Contraceptive Education on Adolescent Male Contraceptive Behavior and Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Mary E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between contraceptive education and teenage male contraceptive behavior was investigated. Findings indicated that brief or moderately in-depth contraceptive education had little effect on contraceptive behavior. The teenage pregnancy and other sex-related problems may make parents and schools more amenable to comprehensive…

  18. The future of oral contraceptives: research priorities.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, W O

    1996-04-01

    The author believes that currently-marketed oral contraceptives are among the most safe and effective methods of fertility control. The data on oral contraceptives and myocardial infarction are consistent with a protective, death-sparing role for third-generation oral contraceptives. Moreover, the benefit-risk profile of second-generation pills is evaluated and approved by national and international regulatory bodies. Researchers, however, should still keep working to try to provide women with the best possible contraceptive methods. Specifically, the search for safer oral contraceptives should continue, clinical research should address unanswered questions about better oral contraceptive fits for women with distinctive clinical requirements, more research is needed into the benefits of oral contraceptive use, epidemiologists and biostatisticians must develop and improve methods which permit disentangling the effect from bias in observational research, and World Health Organization and Transnational European Project data on oral contraceptives and myocardial infarction need to be meta-analyzed.

  19. Contraception in women with special medical needs.

    PubMed

    Neinstein, L

    1998-05-01

    Over 10% of women of reproductive age have experienced a serious chronic physical disorder. Reproductive health issues including contraception are frequently ignored in these individuals. Clinicians should have available current knowledge regarding interactions between contraception and these conditions. PMID:9626481

  20. Family size, sex composition of children and contraceptive use: a case study of Kerala.

    PubMed

    Suchindran, C M; Ramakumar, R; Sathi Devi, K

    1993-01-01

    With the sudden decline of fertility it was particularly interesting to examine the situation in Kerala, regarding parental sex preference in formulating family planning policies for the rest of India with high fertility and son preference. The 1980 Kerala Fertility Survey included nearly 3000 households with about 2700 ever married women in reproductive age. Maternity history and fertility regulation data were collected. Data from 2500 currently married women were used, cross-classified by the number of male and female living children and contraceptive use status. A multiplicative model was used to study various interaction effects and to construct standardized rates of contraceptive use. Measures adjusted for both male and female composition and differential use of contraceptives among male-female combinations were obtained by the model to avoid arbitrariness in choosing rates and to preclude objections raised in previous research on Arnold's index. The model was generalized to facilitate simultaneous effects of the number of male and female children and family size on contraceptive use. Initial analysis showed that the effect of sex preference on contraceptive acceptance was rather negligible. However, there was a significant male-female interaction effect on contraceptive use. Contraception was high when the family size was large, with children of the same sex. With the effect of family size removed, the contraceptive use rate seemed to be in the inverse direction of the number of male or female children. This was possibly the result of two factors: 1) high contraception rate with large families of the same sex, and 2) low use of contraception among large families with a high number of children of both sexes. The Kerala situation partly supports McClelland's theory that couples already having proportionally more daughters may terminate fertility earlier. In Kerala such termination also occurs when couples have proportionally more sons, and family size also

  1. Contraceptive Method Selection by Women with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: A Cross-sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Gawron, Lori M.; Gawron, Andrew J.; Kasper, Amanda; Hammond, Cassing; Keefer, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Objective Women with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) utilize contraception at a lower rate than the general population. We sought to identify factors associated with contraceptive use and selection of more effective methods in IBD patients at risk for unintended pregnancy. Study Design An online survey was distributed to women with IBD in January 2013. Contraceptive methods were categorized by effectiveness and associations with use explored by demographics, disease characteristics, and reproductive goals. Results 162 respondents were analyzed: 62% had Crohn’s disease and 38% ulcerative colitis. Mean age was 31 (range 20–45), 97% identified as White, and 53% were nulliparas. 74% were currently using IBD medications. A quarter of participants (23%) used no contraception, 17% used highly effective methods, 41% used short-term hormonal methods, and 19% chose barrier/behavioral methods. Prior IBD-related surgery, biologic therapy use, and low education attainment were associated with no contraception use. Of contraceptive users, age, parity, insurance status, IBD surgery and prior immunomodulator use were associated with highly effective method selection. Conclusions A quarter of women with IBD at-risk for pregnancy in this study population reported no contraceptive method use. Higher levels of IBD activity influence contraceptive use and method selection, which could guide future patient and provider educational interventions. Implications Pregnancy planning is important for women with inflammatory bowel diseases to avoid adverse outcomes in a disease-poor state. Use of contraception assists in avoidance of unintended pregnancy. IBD characteristics are targets for educational interventions to improve uptake of highly effective contraceptive methods. PMID:24486008

  2. Developments in male contraception.

    PubMed

    Bialy, G; Alexander, N J

    1992-01-01

    Relevant research efforts in male contraception involve: 1) hormonal approaches to block sperm production by inhibiting the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, 2) disruption of sperm production by drugs that act directly on the testes, 3) interruption of sperm transport, and 4) alteration of secretions of the accessory sex glands and their subsequent effect on the spermatozoa. Both agonistic and antagonistic synthetic analogs of the hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) factor cost too much and lack an effective mode of administration. Recent studies indicate that over 90% of Chinese and Indonesian men can develop complete azoospermia following either a testosterone or a progestin and an androgen combination treatment. Vaccines that utilize GnRH and follicle stimulating hormone as the active antigens have been introduced in clinical studies in the US and India. Drugs such as sulfasalazine, pyrimethamine, nitrofurane, and bis(di-chloracytal) diamines reduce male fertility but side effects make them unacceptable. Dinitropyrroles, halopropanedils, chlorosugars, and indazole carboxylic acids have been tried in laboratory animals. Gossypol rendered men infertile in large-scale clinical studies conducted in China but synthesis of safer analogs has not succeeded. Extracts of another plant, tripterigium wilfordii, are used in China as a popular herbal medicine. Vasectomy has improved with no-scalpel vasectomy and by the novel technique of blocking the vas with cured in situ polymeric plugs. Preliminary data suggest that men prefer condoms made from polyurethane as opposed to latex rubber increasingly used to protect against AIDs and sexually transmitted diseases. The antifungal agents, imidazoles, have spermicidal activity and synthetic variants may reduce undesirable side effects. Research on male-oriented methods has intensified during the last 10-15 years, but a new product is not likely to appear in the next 5-10 years.

  3. Behavioral Correlates of Primates Conservation Status: Intrinsic Vulnerability to Anthropogenic Threats.

    PubMed

    Lootvoet, Amélie Christelle; Philippon, Justine; Bessa-Gomes, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral traits are likely to influence species vulnerability to anthropogenic threats and in consequence, their risk of extinction. Several studies have addressed this question and have highlighted a correlation between reproductive strategies and different viability proxies, such as introduction success and local extinction risk. Yet, very few studies have investigated the effective impact of social behaviour, and evidence regarding global extinction risk remains scant. Here we examined the effects of three main behavioral factors: the group size, the social and reproductive system, and the strength of sexual selection on global extinction risk. Using Primates as biological model, we performed comparative analysis on 93 species. The conservation status as described by the IUCN Red List was considered as a proxy for extinction risk. In addition, we added previously identified intrinsic factors of vulnerability to extinction, and a measure of the strength of the human impact for each species, described by the human footprint. Our analysis highlighted a significant effect of two of the three studied behavioral traits, group size and social and reproductive system. Extinction risk is negatively correlated with mean group size, which may be due to an Allee effect resulting from the difficulties for solitary and monogamous species to find a partner at low densities. Our results also indicate that species with a flexible mating system are less vulnerable. Taking into account these behavioral variables is thus of high importance when establishing conservation plans, particularly when assessing species relative vulnerability. PMID:26444966

  4. Behavioral Correlates of Primates Conservation Status: Intrinsic Vulnerability to Anthropogenic Threats

    PubMed Central

    Lootvoet, Amélie Christelle; Philippon, Justine; Bessa-Gomes, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral traits are likely to influence species vulnerability to anthropogenic threats and in consequence, their risk of extinction. Several studies have addressed this question and have highlighted a correlation between reproductive strategies and different viability proxies, such as introduction success and local extinction risk. Yet, very few studies have investigated the effective impact of social behaviour, and evidence regarding global extinction risk remains scant. Here we examined the effects of three main behavioral factors: the group size, the social and reproductive system, and the strength of sexual selection on global extinction risk. Using Primates as biological model, we performed comparative analysis on 93 species. The conservation status as described by the IUCN Red List was considered as a proxy for extinction risk. In addition, we added previously identified intrinsic factors of vulnerability to extinction, and a measure of the strength of the human impact for each species, described by the human footprint. Our analysis highlighted a significant effect of two of the three studied behavioral traits, group size and social and reproductive system. Extinction risk is negatively correlated with mean group size, which may be due to an Allee effect resulting from the difficulties for solitary and monogamous species to find a partner at low densities. Our results also indicate that species with a flexible mating system are less vulnerable. Taking into account these behavioral variables is thus of high importance when establishing conservation plans, particularly when assessing species relative vulnerability. PMID:26444966

  5. Behavioral Correlates of Primates Conservation Status: Intrinsic Vulnerability to Anthropogenic Threats.

    PubMed

    Lootvoet, Amélie Christelle; Philippon, Justine; Bessa-Gomes, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral traits are likely to influence species vulnerability to anthropogenic threats and in consequence, their risk of extinction. Several studies have addressed this question and have highlighted a correlation between reproductive strategies and different viability proxies, such as introduction success and local extinction risk. Yet, very few studies have investigated the effective impact of social behaviour, and evidence regarding global extinction risk remains scant. Here we examined the effects of three main behavioral factors: the group size, the social and reproductive system, and the strength of sexual selection on global extinction risk. Using Primates as biological model, we performed comparative analysis on 93 species. The conservation status as described by the IUCN Red List was considered as a proxy for extinction risk. In addition, we added previously identified intrinsic factors of vulnerability to extinction, and a measure of the strength of the human impact for each species, described by the human footprint. Our analysis highlighted a significant effect of two of the three studied behavioral traits, group size and social and reproductive system. Extinction risk is negatively correlated with mean group size, which may be due to an Allee effect resulting from the difficulties for solitary and monogamous species to find a partner at low densities. Our results also indicate that species with a flexible mating system are less vulnerable. Taking into account these behavioral variables is thus of high importance when establishing conservation plans, particularly when assessing species relative vulnerability.

  6. Correlation between urinary nicotine, cotinine and self-reported smoking status among educated young adults.

    PubMed

    Man, Che Nin; Fathelrahman, Ahmed Ibrahim; Harn, Gam Lay; Lajis, Razak; Samin, Ahmad Shalihin Mohd; Omar, Maizurah; Awang, Rahmat; Bayanuddin, Nurulain Abdullah

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this study was to correlate, differentiate and validate the self-reported smoking status of educated young adults with urinary biomarkers (i.e. nicotine and cotinine). Freshmen students were recruited on voluntary basis. They filled-up self-administered questionnaire and their urine samples were collected for analysis. The urinary nicotine (UN) and cotinine (UC) were measured by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry. Smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers were found to be both significantly correlated and different in their UN and UC levels. UC level of 25ng/ml was the optimal cut-off to differentiate smokers from non-smokers. Using this cut-off value, the prevalence of smoking among the students was found to be higher (15.4%) than the self-reported data (14.3%). UC is useful in validating individual recent smoking history and the cut-off could serve as a marker for assessing the clinical impact of smoking and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure on human health.

  7. 'They think it's all up to the girls': gender, risk and responsibility for contraception.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Much research suggests that attitudes towards responsibility for use of contraception amongst young people are strongly gendered. However, decision making, if 'decisions' happen at all, is bound up with notions of hegemonic masculine and feminine roles as well as factors concerning relationship status. Data from two earlier qualitative studies were re-analysed with an emphasis on findings related to gender and responsibility for use of contraception. The first study investigated unintended conceptions amongst 16-20-year-old women. Interviews focused on knowledge and views about contraception, sex education and sexual health services. The second study involved focus groups with two groups of 14-18-year-old men to explore their views on sex education, sexual health and contraception. Almost all the young women said that young men viewed contraception as 'not their job'. In contrast, the young men thought that responsibility should be shared. The key issue, however, related to relationship status, with decision-making being shared in long-term relationships. There are some gender differences in accounting for decisions about use of contraception, however the key issue revolves around relationship status.

  8. 'They think it's all up to the girls': gender, risk and responsibility for contraception.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Much research suggests that attitudes towards responsibility for use of contraception amongst young people are strongly gendered. However, decision making, if 'decisions' happen at all, is bound up with notions of hegemonic masculine and feminine roles as well as factors concerning relationship status. Data from two earlier qualitative studies were re-analysed with an emphasis on findings related to gender and responsibility for use of contraception. The first study investigated unintended conceptions amongst 16-20-year-old women. Interviews focused on knowledge and views about contraception, sex education and sexual health services. The second study involved focus groups with two groups of 14-18-year-old men to explore their views on sex education, sexual health and contraception. Almost all the young women said that young men viewed contraception as 'not their job'. In contrast, the young men thought that responsibility should be shared. The key issue, however, related to relationship status, with decision-making being shared in long-term relationships. There are some gender differences in accounting for decisions about use of contraception, however the key issue revolves around relationship status. PMID:25270238

  9. [Post-abortion contraception: effects of contraception services and reproductive intention].

    PubMed

    Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela

    2016-02-01

    Contraceptive counseling and the supply of contraceptive methods are part of post-abortion care and positively influence the subsequent use of contraceptive methods. Studies showing such evidence have been conducted predominantly in countries with no legal restrictions on abortion and with adequate care for women that terminate a pregnancy. However, little is known about contraceptive practices in contexts where abortion is illegal, as in Brazil, in which post-abortion contraceptive care is inadequate. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of contraceptive care on male condom use and oral and injectable contraceptives in the six months post-abortion, considering reproductive intention. The results showed that contraceptive care only has a positive effect on the use of oral contraceptives in the first six months post-abortion, as long as the woman had a medical consultation in the same month in which she received information on contraception. One or the other intervention alone had no significant impact.

  10. New contraceptive methods: update 2003.

    PubMed

    Pettinato, Andrea; Emans, S Jean

    2003-08-01

    The decline in adolescent pregnancy rates noted in the 1990s has been attributed to more teenagers choosing abstinence, the availability of long-acting contraceptive options, and the increased use of condoms. Many adolescents remain at risk of unplanned pregnancy, however, because of method failure, inconsistent or incorrect use, or discontinuation of a method without choosing another method. Practitioners who care for adolescents and young women have access to several new methods in 2003. Recent additions include a contraceptive transdermal patch, a hormone-releasing intravaginal ring, new formulations of pills, and a new intrauterine device. Additionally, the World Health Organization has updated its guidelines to provide the practitioner with evidence-based recommendations to assist in selecting the most appropriate contraceptive method for each patient.

  11. Progress with contraceptives and abortifacients.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, A

    1992-10-01

    In Canada and most other comparatively rich countries, the total fertility rate (TFR) declined from approximately 2.5 in 1970 to 1.6-1.9 in 1990. The reduction was even greater in some countries such as China, Korea, Singapore, Mauritius, Barbados, Cuba, Guadeloupe, and Puerto Rico. TFR, however, has fallen little, if at all, in many poor countries; it remains at 8.1 in Kenya and has increased from already previously high levels in Somalia, Benin, Malawi, and Rwanda. The use of contraception has been instrumental in reducing fertility. An estimated 70% of married women in rich countries use contraceptives, and a larger proportion in Eastern Asia, but only less than 15% in Africa. Education for women generally increases the level of contraceptive use. Rates, however, depend upon the degree of both acceptance and availability. An estimated 20% of births in developing countries are unwanted, so it would seem that greater availability and variety of contraceptives could lead to reductions in fertility. Research into better contraceptive technology is frustrated by paternalism, most organized religions, concern over possible future legal liability, and fear of adverse health side effects, especially in North America. Depo-Provera and RU-486, for example, have yet to be licensed in Canada for use as contraceptive agents. Research nonetheless moves forward. A vaccine against pregnancy is reportedly being developed which may be available before the turn of the century. Clinical trials have been held, and the vaccine has been found to be effective in most women, lacking in side effects, and reversible. The prototype requires a series of injections. Elsewhere, the Alza Corporation of California is working on a transdermal patch to control fertility, while some success has been reported in trials of testosterone, alone or combined with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone, to suppress sperm production in men.

  12. Teen Council urges improved contraceptive accessibility.

    PubMed

    1988-01-01

    The Center for Population Option's (CPO) Teen Council conducted a survey of contraceptive accessibility in 45 pharmacies and 15 convenience stores in the Washington D.C. area. The survey focussed on where nonprescription contraceptives are located in the stores, whether condoms and spermicidal contraceptives are displayed on the same shelf, how clerks treat teenagers when buying contraceptives, the price of condoms, and whether signs indicate where contraceptives are located. Besides learning that finding contraceptives is difficult for teenagers, the survey revealed that teenagers often experience negative behavior from clerks, especially female teenagers when confronted with male clerks. Based on the results of the survey, the CPO Teen Council met with regional representatives of drug and convenience store chains to suggest ways to make contraceptives more accessible to teens. Since only 13% of the stores surveyed had signs clearly marking where contraceptives are, the Council recommended that all stores clearly mark the aisles where contraceptives are. Additionally, it suggested placing all contraceptives on the same shelf. According to the survey 35% of the pharmacies and 32% of the convenience stores had condoms behind the counter. Since teenagers are often reluctant to ask for them because of the fear of being judged by clerks, the Council suggested placing contraceptives where teens can buy them without having to ask for them. In addition, it recommended that clerks treat teens with the same respect as older customers when purchasing contraceptives. The Council also suggested that pamphlets and information on sexually transmitted diseases be available. PMID:12282042

  13. Individuals with hematological malignancies before undergoing chemotherapy present oxidative stress parameters and acute phase proteins correlated with nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Carolina de Quadros; Borges, Dayanne da Silva; de Oliveira, Paula Fernanda; Chagas, Thayz Rodrigues; Del Moral, Joanita Angela Gonzaga; Durigon, Giovanna Steffanello; Dias, Bruno Vieira; Vieira, André Guedes; Gaspareto, Patrick; Trindade, Erasmo Benício Santos de Moraes; Nunes, Everson Araújo

    2015-01-01

    Hematological malignancies present abnormal blood cells that may have altered functions. This study aimed to evaluate nutritional status, acute phase proteins, parameters of cell's functionality, and oxidative stress of patients with hematological malignancies, providing a representation of these variables at diagnosis, comparisons between leukemias and lymphomas and establishing correlations. Nutritional status, C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin, phagocytic capacity and superoxide anion production of mononuclear cells, lipid peroxidation and catalase activity in plasma were evaluated in 16 untreated subjects. Main diagnosis was acute leukemia (n = 9) and median body mass index (BMI) indicated overweight (25.6 kg/m(2)). Median albumin was below (3.2 g/dL) and CRP above (37.45 mg/L) the reference values. Albumin was inversely correlated with BMI (r = -0.53). Most patients were overweight before the beginning of treatment and had a high CRP/albumin ratio, which may indicate a nutrition inflammatory risk. BMI values correlated positively with lipid peroxidation and catalase activity. A strong correlation between catalase activity and lipid peroxidation was found (r = 0.75). Besides the elevated BMI, these patients also have elevated CRP values and unexpected relations between nutritional status and albumin, reinforcing the need for nutritional counseling during the course of chemotherapy, especially considering the correlations between oxidative stress parameters and nutritional status evidenced here.

  14. Percentage tumor necrosis following chemotherapy in neuroblastoma correlates with MYCN status but not survival.

    PubMed

    Bomken, Simon; Davies, Beverley; Chong, Leeai; Cole, Michael; Wood, Katrina M; McDermott, Michael; Tweddle, Deborah A

    2011-03-01

    The percentage of chemotherapy-induced necrosis in primary tumors corresponds with outcome in several childhood malignancies, including high-risk metastatic diseases. In this retrospective pilot study, the authors assessed the importance of postchemotherapy necrosis in high-risk neuroblastoma with a histological and case notes review of surgically resected specimens. The authors reviewed all available histology of 31 high-risk neuroblastoma cases treated with COJEC (dose intensive etoposide and vincristine with either cyclophosphamide, cisplatin or carboplatin) or OPEC/OJEC (etoposide, vincristine and cyclophosphamide with alternating cisplatin [OPEC] or carboplatin [OJEC]) induction chemotherapy in 2 Children's Cancer & Leukaemia Group (CCLG) pediatric oncology centers. The percentage of postchemotherapy necrosis was assessed and compared with MYCN amplification status and overall survival. The median percentage of postchemotherapy tumor necrosis was 60%. MYCN status was available for 28 cases, of which 12 were amplified (43%). Survival in cases with ≥ 60% necrosis or ≥ 90% necrosis was not better than those with less necrosis, nor was percentage necrosis associated with survival using Cox regression. However, MYCN-amplified tumors showed a higher percentage of necrosis than non-MYCN-amplified tumors, 71.3% versus 37.2% (P = .006). This effect was not related to prechemotherapy necrosis and did not confer improved overall survival. Postchemotherapy tumor necrosis is higher in patients with MYCN amplification. In this study, postchemotherapy necrosis did not correlate with overall survival and should not lead to modification of postoperative treatment. However, these findings need to be confirmed in a larger prospective study of children with high-risk neuroblastoma. PMID:21214410

  15. Validity of contraceptive histories in a rural community in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Maggwa, B N; Mati, J K; Mbugua, S; Hunter, D J

    1993-08-01

    To determine the validity of self-reported contraceptive histories obtained from rural Kenyan women, we interviewed 122 women participants in a long-term study during which their contraceptive use had been recorded regularly at clinics. Interview information was compared with each woman's clinic record. In all 71 women (58%) reported ever use of oral contraceptives, while 76 (62%) of the clinic records documented ever use. The agreement between the records and interview was reasonable (Kappa = 0.54, P < 0.001). The sensitivity of self-report of use compared to clinic records was 79%, specificity was 76%, positive and negative predictive values were 85% and 69% respectively. Ever use of injectable contraceptives (Depo-Provera) was reported by 78 (63%) women while the records showed use by 80 (65%) women (Kappa = 0.87, P < 0.001). The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 94%, 93%, 96%, and 89% respectively. For the intrauterine contraceptive device, ever use was reported by 18 (14.8%) women while the records showed 19 (15.6%) (Kappa = 0.90, P < 0.001). The associated sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 90%, 99%, 94% and 98% respectively. The validity of reported duration of use of each method showed a similar pattern to that of the history of ever use. The Spearman's rank correlations for the duration of use calculated from interview compared with the clinic records were for oral contraceptives r = 0.68 (P < 0.001), injectables r = 0.81 (P < 0.001) and intrauterine devices r = 0.82 (P < 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Key barriers to the use of modern contraceptives among women in Albania: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Kragelund Nielsen, Karoline; Nielsen, Siff Malue; Butler, Robb; Lazarus, Jeffrey V

    2012-12-01

    In spite of a number of communication campaigns since 1999 promoting modern contraceptives in Albania, their use remains low. In this paper we identify and analyse key barriers to the use of modern contraception among women in Albania. Semi-structured interviews with 11 stakeholders from organisations involved in promoting modern contraception, and four focus group discussions with 40 women from Tirana and a rural village in the periphery of Tirana, divided according to age and residence, were also conducted. Content analysis was used to analyse both the interviews and focus group discussions. Barriers identified included socio-cultural issues such as status of the relationship with partners and the importance of virginity, problems talking about sexual issues and contraception being taboo, health care issues--especially cost and availability--and individual issues such as unfavourable social attitudes towards contraceptives and a lack of knowledge about the use and benefits of modern contraception. To promote contraceptive use in the future, campaigns should address these barriers and expand from a focus on women of reproductive age only to target youth, men, health care providers, parents and schoolteachers as well.

  17. Contraceptive Coverage and the Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Tschann, Mary; Soon, Reni

    2015-12-01

    A major goal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is reducing healthcare spending by shifting the focus of healthcare toward preventive care. Preventive services, including all FDA-approved contraception, must be provided to patients without cost-sharing under the ACA. No-cost contraception has been shown to increase uptake of highly effective birth control methods and reduce unintended pregnancy and abortion; however, some institutions and corporations argue that providing contraceptive coverage infringes on their religious beliefs. The contraceptive coverage mandate is evolving due to legal challenges, but it has already demonstrated success in reducing costs and improving access to contraception. PMID:26598303

  18. Contraceptive Coverage and the Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Tschann, Mary; Soon, Reni

    2015-12-01

    A major goal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is reducing healthcare spending by shifting the focus of healthcare toward preventive care. Preventive services, including all FDA-approved contraception, must be provided to patients without cost-sharing under the ACA. No-cost contraception has been shown to increase uptake of highly effective birth control methods and reduce unintended pregnancy and abortion; however, some institutions and corporations argue that providing contraceptive coverage infringes on their religious beliefs. The contraceptive coverage mandate is evolving due to legal challenges, but it has already demonstrated success in reducing costs and improving access to contraception.

  19. Sperm protamine-status correlates to the fertility of breeding bulls.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Sule; Vargovic, Peter; Oliveira, Rodrigo; Belser, Lauren E; Kaya, Abdullah; Moura, Arlindo; Sutovsky, Peter; Parrish, John; Topper, Einko; Memili, Erdoğan

    2015-04-01

    During fertilization, spermatozoa make essential contributions to embryo development by providing oocyte activating factors, centrosomal components, and paternal chromosomes. Protamines are essential for proper packaging of sperm DNA; however, in contrast to the studies of oocyte-related female infertility, the influence of sperm chromatin structure on male infertility has not been evaluated extensively. The objective of this study was to determine the sperm chromatin content of bull spermatozoa by evaluating DNA fragmentation, chromatin maturity/protamination, PRM1 protein status, and nuclear shape in spermatozoa from bulls with different fertility. Relationships between protamine 1 (PRM1) and the chromatin integrity were ascertained in spermatozoa from Holstein bulls with varied (high vs. low) but acceptable fertility. Sperm DNA fragmentation and chromatin maturity (protamination) were tested using Halomax assay and toluidine blue staining, respectively. The PRM1 content was assayed using Western blotting and in-gel densitometry, flow cytometry, and immunocytochemistry. Fragmentation of DNA was increased and chromatin maturity significantly reduced in spermatozoa from low-fertility bulls compared to those from high-fertility bulls. Field fertility scores of the bulls were negatively correlated with the percentage of spermatozoa displaying reduced protamination and fragmented DNA using toluidine blue and Halomax, respectively. Bull fertility was also positively correlated with PRM1 content by Western blotting and flow cytometry. However, detection of PRM1 content by Western blotting alone was not predictive of bull fertility. In immunocytochemistry, abnormal spermatozoa showed either a lack of PRM1 or scattered localization in the apical/acrosomal region of the nuclei. The nuclear shape was distorted in spermatozoa from low-fertility bulls. In conclusion, we showed that inadequate amount and localization of PRM1 were associated with defects in sperm chromatin

  20. Progestin-Only Oral Contraceptives

    MedlinePlus

    ... on another day, use a backup method of birth control (such as a condom and/or a spermicide) for the next 48 hours. If you have had a miscarriage or an abortion, you can start taking progestin-only oral contraceptives ...

  1. Contraception in the prepill era.

    PubMed

    Connell, E B

    1999-01-01

    Although medical history has documented the desire to control fertility since ancient times, safe and effective contraception did not exist until this century and has not been equally available to all people. Strong moral sentiments, economic and social class factors, religious beliefs, familial and gender relations, and political as well as legal constraints have often limited the ability of physicians in favor of contraception to provide advice and methods of birth control to their patients. By the early 1900s, a constellation of factors--in particular, the large influx of poor immigrants, and feminist groups advocating women's rights--helped to move forward a birth-control movement in this country and abroad. In the early 20th century, Margaret Sanger became one of the most avid proponents of contraception in the United States. By 1950, she and Katharine McCormick had contracted with biologist Gregory Pincus to develop an effective birth control pill. A collaborative effort by Pincus and other researchers led to trials of the pill in Puerto Rico, Haiti, and Mexico between 1956 and 1957, which provided the basis for an application to the Food and Drug Administration for approval of the first oral contraceptive.

  2. Contraception and the Adolescent Diabetic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fennoy, Ilene

    1989-01-01

    Data from a study of 11 teenage diabetics suggests that pregnancy among adolescent diabetics is more frequent than among the general population, at a time when diabetic control is poor because of psychosocial factors associated with adolescence. Current recommendations regarding contraception for diabetic women, focusing on barrier methods, are…

  3. FastStats: Contraceptive Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Growth [PDF - 723 KB] Use of Emergency Contraception Among Women Aged 15–44: United States, 2006–2010 Related Links National Survey of Family Growth CDC Division of Reproductive Health National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Get Email Updates To receive email updates ...

  4. Emergency contraception: increasing public awareness.

    PubMed

    2003-02-01

    This article begins by addressing misperceptions that emergency contraception is something new and untested or inherently unsafe, and that it is comparable to an abortion. It then describes efforts that are underway to increase awareness among consumers and health care providers alike.

  5. Breast-feeding: nature's contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Short, R V

    1985-01-01

    Our ancestors achieved the lowest rate of reproduction of any living mammal by the postponement of puberty until well into the 2nd decade of life, a maximal probability of conception of only about 24% per menstrual cycle even when ovulation had commenced, a 4-year birth interval as a result of the contraceptive effects of breastfeeding, and sharply declining fertility during the 4th decade of life, leading to complete sterility at the menopause. This pattern of reproduction was ideally suited to the prevailing lifestyle of the nomadic hunter-gatherer. The postponement of puberty resulted in a prolonged period of childhood dependency, thus enabling parents to transmit their acquired experience to their offspring. Long birth intervals were essential for a woman who had to wander 1000 or more miles each year in search of food, because she could not manage to carry more than 1 child with her at a time. The lifestyle of comparatively recent times of a settled agricultural economy made possible subsequent rural and urban development, but this transition from nomad to city dweller also stimulated fertility. The cultivation of crops and the domestication of animals led to the development of permanent housing, where the mother could leave her baby in a safe place while she worked in the field. The resultant reduction in mother-infant contact coupled with the availability of early weaning foods reduced the suckling frequency, thereby eroding the contraceptive effect of breastfeeding and decreasing the birth interval. The model conquest of disease eventually led to rapid rates of population growth. In the developed countries of Europe and North America, reproduction was subsequently held in check by the use of artificial forms of contraception, but this has yet to take place in the developing countries of Asia, Africa, and South America. For a developing country, contraceptives are expensive, may be culturally unacceptable, and carry health risks. Breastfeeding is 1 form of

  6. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-telomere association correlates with redox status in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Pariona-Llanos, Ricardo; Pavani, Raphael Souza; Reis, Marcelo; Noël, Vincent; Silber, Ariel Mariano; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a classical metabolic enzyme involved in energy production and plays a role in additional nuclear functions, including transcriptional control, recognition of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA and maintenance of telomere structure. Here, we show that the recombinant protein T. cruzi GAPDH (rTcGAPDH) binds single-stranded telomeric DNA. We demonstrate that the binding of GAPDH to telomeric DNA correlates with the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+/NADH). We observed that GAPDH-telomere association and NAD+/NADH balance changed throughout the T. cruzi life cycle. For example, in replicative epimastigote forms of T. cruzi, which show similar intracellular concentrations of NAD+ and NADH, GAPDH binds to telomeric DNA in vivo and this binding activity is inhibited by exogenous NAD+. In contrast, in the T. cruzi non-proliferative trypomastigote forms, which show higher NAD+ concentration, GAPDH was absent from telomeres. In addition, NAD+ abolishes physical interaction between recombinant GAPDH and synthetic telomere oligonucleotide in a cell free system, mimicking exogenous NAD+ that reduces GAPDH-telomere interaction in vivo. We propose that the balance in the NAD+/NADH ratio during T. cruzi life cycle homeostatically regulates GAPDH telomere association, suggesting that in trypanosomes redox status locally modulates GAPDH association with telomeric DNA. PMID:25775131

  7. Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase-Telomere Association Correlates with Redox Status in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Pariona-Llanos, Ricardo; Pavani, Raphael Souza; Reis, Marcelo; Noël, Vincent; Silber, Ariel Mariano; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a classical metabolic enzyme involved in energy production and plays a role in additional nuclear functions, including transcriptional control, recognition of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA and maintenance of telomere structure. Here, we show that the recombinant protein T. cruzi GAPDH (rTcGAPDH) binds single-stranded telomeric DNA. We demonstrate that the binding of GAPDH to telomeric DNA correlates with the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+/NADH). We observed that GAPDH-telomere association and NAD+/NADH balance changed throughout the T. cruzi life cycle. For example, in replicative epimastigote forms of T. cruzi, which show similar intracellular concentrations of NAD+ and NADH, GAPDH binds to telomeric DNA in vivo and this binding activity is inhibited by exogenous NAD+. In contrast, in the T. cruzi non-proliferative trypomastigote forms, which show higher NAD+ concentration, GAPDH was absent from telomeres. In addition, NAD+ abolishes physical interaction between recombinant GAPDH and synthetic telomere oligonucleotide in a cell free system, mimicking exogenous NAD+ that reduces GAPDH-telomere interaction in vivo. We propose that the balance in the NAD+/NADH ratio during T. cruzi life cycle homeostatically regulates GAPDH telomere association, suggesting that in trypanosomes redox status locally modulates GAPDH association with telomeric DNA. PMID:25775131

  8. Emotional and Sexual Correlates of Child Sexual Abuse as a Function of Self-Definition Status.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt-Morel, Marie-Pier; Godbout, Natacha; Bédard, Maryline Germain; Charest, Émilie; Briere, John; Sabourin, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    Among individuals defined as having been sexually abused based on legal criteria, some will self-report having been abused and some will not. Yet, the empirical correlates of self-definition status are not well studied. Different definitions of abuse may lead to varying prevalence rates and contradictory findings regarding psychological outcomes. The present study examined whether, among legally defined sexual abuse survivors, identifying oneself as having experienced childhood sexual abuse (CSA) was associated with more severe abuse, negative emotional reactions toward the abuse, and current sexual reactions. A convenience sample of 1,021 French-speaking Canadians completed self-report questionnaires online. The prevalence of legally defined CSA was 21.3% in women and 19.6% in men, as compared to 7.1% in women and 3.8% in men for self-defined CSA. Among legally defined sexual abuse survivors, those who identified themselves as CSA survivors had been abused more frequently, were more likely to report a male aggressor, and more often described abuse by a parental figure than those who did not self-identify as abused. Further, self-defined CSA was associated with more negative postabuse reactions and sexual avoidance, whereas those not identifying as sexually abused were more likely to report sexual compulsion.

  9. Emotional and Sexual Correlates of Child Sexual Abuse as a Function of Self-Definition Status.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt-Morel, Marie-Pier; Godbout, Natacha; Bédard, Maryline Germain; Charest, Émilie; Briere, John; Sabourin, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    Among individuals defined as having been sexually abused based on legal criteria, some will self-report having been abused and some will not. Yet, the empirical correlates of self-definition status are not well studied. Different definitions of abuse may lead to varying prevalence rates and contradictory findings regarding psychological outcomes. The present study examined whether, among legally defined sexual abuse survivors, identifying oneself as having experienced childhood sexual abuse (CSA) was associated with more severe abuse, negative emotional reactions toward the abuse, and current sexual reactions. A convenience sample of 1,021 French-speaking Canadians completed self-report questionnaires online. The prevalence of legally defined CSA was 21.3% in women and 19.6% in men, as compared to 7.1% in women and 3.8% in men for self-defined CSA. Among legally defined sexual abuse survivors, those who identified themselves as CSA survivors had been abused more frequently, were more likely to report a male aggressor, and more often described abuse by a parental figure than those who did not self-identify as abused. Further, self-defined CSA was associated with more negative postabuse reactions and sexual avoidance, whereas those not identifying as sexually abused were more likely to report sexual compulsion. PMID:27364540

  10. Electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve. I. Correlation of physiological responses with cochlear status.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, R K; Javel, E

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate evoked potential and single fibre responses to biphasic current pulses in animals with varying degrees of cochlear pathology, and to correlate any differences in the physiological response with status of the auditory nerve. Six cats, whose cochleae ranged from normal to a severe neural loss (< 5% spiral ganglion survival), were used. Morphology of the electrically evoked auditory brainstem response (EABR) was similar across all animals, although electrophonic responses were only observed from the normal animal. In animals with extensive neural pathology, EABR thresholds were elevated and response amplitudes throughout the dynamic range were moderately reduced. Analysis of single VIIIth nerve fibre responses were based on 207 neurons. Spontaneous discharge rates among fibres depended on hearing status, with the majority of fibres recorded from deafened animals exhibiting little or no spontaneous activity. Electrical stimulation produced a monotonic increase in discharge rate, and a systematic reduction in response latency and temporal jitter as a function of stimulus intensity for all fibres examined. Short-duration current pulses elicited a highly synchronous response (latency < 0.7 ms), with a less well synchronized response sometimes present (0.7-1.1 ms). There were, however, a number of significant differences between responses from normal and deafened cochleae. Electrophonic activity was only present in recordings from the normal animal, while mean threshold, dynamic range and latency of the direct electrical response varied with cochlear pathology. Differences in the ability of fibres to follow high stimulation rates were also observed; while neurons from the normal cochlea were capable of 100% entrainment at high rates (600-800 pulses per second (pps)), fibres recorded from deafened animals were often not capable of such entrainment at rates above 400 pps. Finally, a number of fibres in deafened animals showed

  11. Fertility after contraception or abortion.

    PubMed

    Huggins, G R; Cullins, V E

    1990-10-01

    There is a very small correlation, if any, between the prior use of OCs and congenital malformations, including Down's syndrome. There are few, if any, recent reports on masculinization of a female fetus born to a mother who took an OC containing 1 mg of a progestogen during early pregnancy. However, patients suspected of being pregnant and who are desirous of continuing that pregnancy should not continue to take OCs, nor should progestogen withdrawal pregnancy tests be used. Concern still exists regarding the occurrence of congenital abnormalities in babies born to such women. The incidence of postoperative infection after first trimester therapeutic abortion in this country is low. However, increasing numbers of women are undergoing repeated pregnancy terminations, and their risk for subsequent pelvic infections may be multiplied with each succeeding abortion. The incidence of prematurity due to cervical incompetence or surgical infertility after first trimester pregnancy terminations is not increased significantly. Asherman's syndrome may occur after septic therapeutic abortion. The pregnancy rate after treatment of this syndrome is low. The return of menses and the achievement of a pregnancy may be slightly delayed after OCs are discontinued, but the fertility rate is within the normal range by 1 year. The incidence of postpill amenorrhea of greater than 6 months' duration is probably less than 1%. The occurrence of the syndrome does not seem to be related to length of use or type of pill. Patients with prior normal menses as well as those with menstrual abnormalities before use of OCs may develop this syndrome. Patients with normal estrogen and gonadotropin levels usually respond with return of menses and ovulation when treated with clomiphene. The rate for achievement of pregnancy is much lower than that for patients with spontaneous return of menses. The criteria for defining PID or for categorizing its severity are diverse. The incidence of PID is higher

  12. Emergency contraception - Potential for women's health

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Suneeta

    2014-01-01

    Emergency contraception (EC) is a safe and effective method which is used to prevent unwanted pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse. Many of the unwanted pregnancies end in unsafe abortions. The search for an ideal contraceptive, which does not interfere with spontaneity or pleasure of the sexual act, yet effectively controls the fertility, is still continuing. Numerous contraceptive techniques are available, yet contraceptive coverage continues to be poor in India. Thus, even when not planning for a pregnancy, exposure to unprotected sex takes place often, necessitating the use of emergency contraception. This need may also arise due to failure of contraceptive method being used (condom rupture, diaphragm slippage, forgotten oral pills) or following sexual assault. Emergency contraception is an intervention that can prevent a large number of unwanted pregnancies resulting from failure of regular contraception or unplanned sexual activity, which in turn helps in reducing the maternal mortality and morbidity due to unsafe abortions. However, a concern has been expressed regarding repeated and indiscriminate usage of e-pill, currently the rational use of emergency contraception is being promoted as it is expected to make a significant dent in reducing the number of unwanted pregnancies and unsafe abortions. In fact, since the introduction of emergency contraception, the contribution of unsafe abortion towards maternal mortality has declined from 13 to 8 per cent. PMID:25673542

  13. Emergency contraception - potential for women's health.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Suneeta

    2014-11-01

    Emergency contraception (EC) is a safe and effective method which is used to prevent unwanted pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse. Many of the unwanted pregnancies end in unsafe abortions. The search for an ideal contraceptive, which does not interfere with spontaneity or pleasure of the sexual act, yet effectively controls the fertility, is still continuing. Numerous contraceptive techniques are available, yet contraceptive coverage continues to be poor in India. Thus, even when not planning for a pregnancy, exposure to unprotected sex takes place often, necessitating the use of emergency contraception. This need may also arise due to failure of contraceptive method being used (condom rupture, diaphragm slippage, forgotten oral pills) or following sexual assault. Emergency contraception is an intervention that can prevent a large number of unwanted pregnancies resulting from failure of regular contraception or unplanned sexual activity, which in turn helps in reducing the maternal mortality and morbidity due to unsafe abortions. However, a concern has been expressed regarding repeated and indiscriminate usage of e-pill, currently the rational use of emergency contraception is being promoted as it is expected to make a significant dent in reducing the number of unwanted pregnancies and unsafe abortions. In fact, since the introduction of emergency contraception, the contribution of unsafe abortion towards maternal mortality has declined from 13 to 8 per cent. PMID:25673542

  14. Regulation of BDNF chromatin status and promoter accessibility in a neural correlate of associative learning

    PubMed Central

    Ambigapathy, Ganesh; Zheng, Zhaoqing; Keifer, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression critically controls learning and its aberrant regulation is implicated in Alzheimer's disease and a host of neurodevelopmental disorders. The BDNF gene is target of known DNA regulatory mechanisms but details of its activity-dependent regulation are not fully characterized. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the epigenetic regulation of the turtle BDNF gene (tBDNF) during a neural correlate of associative learning using an in vitro model of eye blink classical conditioning. Shortly after conditioning onset, the results from ChIP-qPCR show conditioning-dependent increases in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) and repressor basic helix-loop-helix binding protein 2 (BHLHB2) binding to tBDNF promoter II that corresponds with transcriptional repression. In contrast, enhanced binding of ten-eleven translocation protein 1 (Tet1), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) to promoter III corresponds with transcriptional activation. These actions are accompanied by rapid modifications in histone methylation and phosphorylation status of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). Significantly, these remarkably coordinated changes in epigenetic factors for two alternatively regulated tBDNF promoters during conditioning are controlled by Tet1 and ERK1/2. Our findings indicate that Tet1 and ERK1/2 are critical partners that, through complementary functions, control learning-dependent tBDNF promoter accessibility required for rapid transcription and acquisition of classical conditioning. PMID:26336984

  15. Correlation of serum lead levels with inflammation, nutritional status, and clinical complications in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Pouresmaeil, Rahmat; Razeghi, Effat; Ahmadi, Farokhlagha

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine blood lead level (BLL) in hemodialysis (HD) patients and their relation with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and albumin which are inflammatory and nutritional biomarkers, respectively, and clinical complications. A total of 93 patients, who were dialyzed at least for 3 months, were included in the study. Blood samples were collected before HD and BLL was measured and categorized as three equal groups: low normal (BLL < 8 μg/dL), middle normal (BLL = 8-10.6 μg/dL), and high normal (BLL > 10.6 μg/dL). All patients had normal BLL, 9.7 ± 3.4 g/dL. Patients with abnormal hsCRP level (>3 mg/L) had higher BLL than other patients (16.4 ± 0.8 vs. 11.5 ± 2.7 mg/L, p = 0.003). Patients with BLL > 10.6 μg/dL had significantly lower hemoglobin, ferritin, iron, and albumin levels and higher hsCRP and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels than the patients with BLL < 8 μg/dL. In addition, BLL revealed a significant positive correlation with duration of dialysis. We concluded that BLL associated to inflammation, malnutritional status, iron-deficiency condition, and high iPTH level in HD patients.

  16. Psychological and Behavioral Correlates of Excess Weight: Misperception of Obese Status among Persons with Class II Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Megan; Grilo, Carlos M.; Masheb, Robin M.; White, Marney A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study examined psychological and behavioral correlates of weight status perception in 173 class II obese adult community volunteers. Method Participants completed the EDE-Q, TFEQ, Beck Depression Inventory, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale online. Key items assessed dieting frequency, weight history, and perceived current weight status (normal weight, overweight, or obese). Actual weight status was determined using NIDDK/CDC classification schemes. Results Among class II obese participants, 50.9% incorrectly classified their weight as overweight versus obese, while 49.1% accurately perceived their weight status as obese. Inaccurate participants reported significantly less binge eating and less eating disorder psychopathology. Despite similar BMI, inaccurate participants reported less distress regarding overeating and loss of control over eating. Discussion Our findings suggest that obesity status under-estimation is associated with less eating disorder psychopathology. Under-estimation of obesity status may exacerbate risk for negative health consequences due to a failure to recognize and respond to excess weight. PMID:19718673

  17. Correlation of Prepulse Inhibition and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test in Schizophrenia and Controls: Effects of Smoking Status

    PubMed Central

    Rabin, Rachel A.; Sacco, Kristi A.; George, Tony P.

    2009-01-01

    Background In schizophrenia, neurocognitive deficits associated with the illness are modulated by tobacco smoking. However, little is known about how smoking status modulates the relationships between neurocognitive measures in schizophrenia and healthy control subjects. Objective The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between sensorimotor gating assessed by prepulse inhibition (PPI) and executive cognitive function using the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) in schizophrenia and controls as a function of smoking status. Method We studied PPI and neuropsychological function in four groups (N=50); smokers with schizophrenia (SS; n=15), control smokers (CS; n=13), non-smokers with schizophrenia (SNS; n=11) and control non-smokers (CNS; n=11). Results SNS demonstrated the poorest PPI, while SS showed comparably high levels of PPI to CNS. Non-psychiatric controls outperformed patients on WCST outcomes irrespective of smoking status. Several prefrontal outcome measures on the WCST (categories completed, percentage perseverative and non-perseverative errors) correlated significantly with PPI at the 60 and 120 msec prepulse intervals. In contrast, there were no significant correlations between PPI and any WCST outcomes in SNS, CS or CNS, and few significant correlations between PPI and other neuropsychological measures. Discussion Our preliminary data suggests that the correlation between sensorimotor gating (PPI) and prefrontal executive cognitive functioning (WCST) is enhanced by acute cigarette smoking in schizophrenia. PMID:19656658

  18. Noncontraceptive use of contraceptive agents.

    PubMed

    Nickles, Monique Collier; Alderman, Elizabeth

    2014-06-01

    • On the basis of strong research evidence, there are many noncontraceptive advantages to use of hormonal contraceptive agents in adolescent girls. (3) (4)(5)(7)(10)(11)(12)(13)(14). • On the basis of research evidence and consensus, most of these agents are safe with minor adverse effects. (2)(3)(4)(5)(7)(10)(11)(12)(13)(14). • On the basis of research evidence and consensus, through application of evidence-based approaches and proper counseling, pediatricians can use various contraceptive agents to treat several medical conditions and to help alleviate many of the undesired symptoms and complications associated with menstrual periods. (2)(3)(4)(5)(7)(10)(11)(12)(13) (14). • On the basis of research evidence and consensus, these agents may be used in sexually active adolescents to simultaneously help prevent unintended adolescent pregnancies. (2)(3)(4)(5)(7)(10)(11)(12)(13)(14).

  19. [Contraception in Mauritius (Author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Elia, D

    1980-07-01

    Contraception was introduced in Mauritius in 1958 by the private Planning Association, followed in 1962 by the catholic organization Family Action, which sponsored the temperature method only. In 1972 both associations were absorbed by the government controlled Maternal Infant Protection, which allocated 8% of the national budget. Results were formidable. Almost 60% of the population (both men and women) now use contraception. 54% of women of fertile age use the pill. 9% use the temperature method. 18% use the condom. 6% of the women utilize injections of depo Provera. 3% use the IUD. Parity went from 5.2 in 1962, to 2.6 in 1979. Sexual sterilization, however, is still illegal, and so is induced abortion, with the result that there are about 20,000 illegally induced abortions every year, of which 200 generate complications leading to hospitalization.

  20. Long-acting hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; Gabelnick, Henry; Brosens, Ivo

    2015-11-01

    Today, a new category of fertility-regulating agents has been created: long-acting, reversible hormonal contraceptives; they minimize compliance, while maximize effectiveness. They comprise subdermal implants and intrauterine devices. Other long-acting agents exist, such as Depo Provera and Noristerat. Use of Depo Provera and Noristerat carries great effectiveness, good clinical safety and usefulness in developing countries. They cause no significant increase in breast cancer risk, but they may carry an increased risk of HIV. Subcutaneous delivery systems have two common features: prolongation of effect is obtained by a drug reservoir and for most of their duration of action they provide a continuous, sustained release of the active hormone. Finally, the intrauterine system Mirena represents both a very effective contraceptive and a specific treatment for menorrhagia.

  1. Male contraception: an overview of the potential target events.

    PubMed

    Tulsiani, Daulat R P; Abou-Haila, Aïda

    2008-06-01

    The contraceptive options available to men have not changed in several decades and are still limited to the non-surgical methods of the use of a condom, a timely withdrawal, or a surgical procedure that removes a segment of the vas deferens (vasectomy). The first two approaches have relatively higher failure rates whereas the last approach is largely irreversible and may not be suitable for younger men. Thus, providing a safe, effective and readily available contraception for men has remained an unfulfilled goal. In this article, we intend to review the current status of the research and development on male contraceptives. It is apparent that the scientific community in the past few decades has witnessed impressive progress in understanding the basics of male physiology, the knowledge necessary for developing new contraceptive methods for men. We will highlight various new and improved strategies for the regulation of fertility in males. The diverse approaches that are at various stages of development and/or in clinical trials include: 1) administration of hormones, herbal extracts or chemicals to suppress/arrest sperm production in the testes (spermatogenesis); 2) interference with the delivery of spermatozoa during ejaculation by targeted blockage of vas deferens with plugs or chemicals (polymers) that prevent flow of sperm through the vas duct; 3) active or passive immunization of males with well characterized antigens/antibodies which are intended to block sperm function; and 4) administration of site-directed antagonists to block specific sperm function(s) necessary for normal fertilization. All these approaches do not involve surgery and are reversible. Our intention is to discuss the current status of various approaches which show promising results in clinical trials, particularly in China and India, the world's most populous nations.

  2. FPIA helps expand contraceptive services.

    PubMed

    Groot, H

    1984-01-01

    Since the beginning in 1971 of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America's international program, Family Planning International Assistance (FPIA), US$54 million has been contributed in direct financial support for the operation of over 300 family planning programs in 51 countries; over 3000 institutions in 115 countries have been supplied with family planning commodities, including over 600 million condoms, 120 cycles of oral contraceptives, and 4 million IUD; and about 1 million contraceptive clients were served by FPIA funded projects in 1982 aone. Since 1971, however, the world's population has increased from 3.7 billion to around 4.7 billion people. About 85 million people are added to the world each year. There is consensus that without organized family planning programs, today's world population would be even higher. FPIA measures its progress in terms of expanding the availability of contraceptive services in devloping countries. FPIA supported projects have helped make services available in areas previously lacking them, and has helped involve a wide variety of organizations, such as women's groups, youth organizations, and Red Cross Societies, in family planning services. A prime concern of FPIA, which has limited resources, is what happens to projects once FPIA support is terminated. FPIA has been paying attention to local income generation to help projects become more self-supporting and to increas staff members' management skills. The more successful income-generating schemes appear to be directly related to family planning, selling contraceptives and locally produced educational materials, and charging fees for family planning and related medical services and tuition for training courses. FPIA funded to projects use management by objectives (MBO) to help improve management skills. MBO helps grantees improve their ability to set objectives, plan, monitor, report, and do day-to-day project management.

  3. Alternatives to oral regimens of contraception.

    PubMed

    Simon, M; Shulman, L P

    2007-06-01

    Alternatives to oral contraceptives are an integral part of contraception used worldwide. In order to empower women to correctly use contraception for as long as they choose not to become pregnant, healthcare practitioners and their patients must be educated about these methods as well as the full spectrum of available birth control options. Effective counseling is a key factor in helping a woman effectively chose a method that is appropriate for her. In order for contraceptive counseling to be effective, information should be accurate and provided in an unbiased manner. This review will help provide healthcare practitioners with current information regarding the use of nonoral contraceptives so as to facilitate the counseling of women and allow them to make informed and appropriate contraceptive decisions.

  4. Contraception and sexual health in obese women.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Katharine B; Edelman, Alison B

    2015-05-01

    As the proportion of women with obesity increases worldwide, understanding the influence of body weight on sexual behavior, fertility, and contraceptive effectiveness is critical for health-care professionals and patients. Although many have theorized that obese women are different from normal-weight women regarding sexual health and behavior, current evidence for the most part disproves this. The exception is in adolescents where body image may play a role in riskier behavior, placing them at a greater risk of an unintended pregnancy. Given that most modern contraceptives were not originally evaluated in obese women, understanding how weight affects contraceptive pharmacokinetics and efficacy should be a focus of ongoing research. Evidence is reassuring that most modern contraceptive methods are safe and effective in obese women. This paper reviews what is known about sexual and contraceptive behavior, as well as the effectiveness and pharmacokinetics of modern contraceptives, for overweight and obese women. PMID:25498914

  5. Pharmacologic development of male hormonal contraceptive agents.

    PubMed

    Roth, M Y; Amory, J K

    2011-01-01

    The world population continues to increase dramatically despite the existence of contraceptive technology. The use of male hormonal contraception may help in preventing un intended pregnancies and managing future population growth. Male hormonal contraception relies on the administration of exogenous hormones to suppress spermatogenesis. Clinical trials have tested several regimens using testosterone, alone or in combination with a progestin. These regimens were shown to be >90% effective in preventing conception and were not associated with serious adverse events.

  6. [Chorea and the use of contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Despland, P A; Dufresne, J J; Regli, F

    1976-08-01

    A 20-year-old nullipara without previous history of chorea or rheumatic fever developed unilateral chorea 11 months after first taking oral contraceptives. All laboratory findings were normal except for considerable elevation of the triglycerides. Complete remission of the extrapyramidal disorder occurred within 4 months of discontinuing the contraceptive preparation. It is suggested that the contraceptive steroids may influence some metabolic events which produce vascular changes. PMID:1006233

  7. Contraception technology: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Nath, Anita; Mishell, Daniel R

    2013-03-01

    Steady progress in contraception research has been achieved over the past 50 years. Hormonal and nonhormonal modern contraceptives have improved women's lives by reducing different health conditions that contributed to considerable morbidity. However, the contraceptives available today are not suitable to all users, and the need to expand contraceptive choices still exists. Novel products such as new implants, contraceptive vaginal rings, transdermal patches and newer combinations of oral contraceptives have recently been introduced in family planning programs, and hormonal contraception is widely used for spacing and limiting births. Concerns over the adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives have led to research and development of new combinations with improved metabolic profile. Recent developments include use of natural compounds such as estradiol and estradiol valerate with the hope to decrease thrombotic risk, in combination with newer progestins derived from the progesterone structure or from spirolactone, in order to avoid the androgenic effects. Progesterone antagonists and progesterone receptor modulators are highly effective in blocking ovulation and preventing follicular rupture and are undergoing investigations in the form of oral pills and in semi-long-acting delivery systems. Future developments also include the combination of a contraceptive with an antiretroviral agent for dual contraception and protection against sexually transmitted diseases, to be used before intercourse or on demand, as well as for continuous use in dual-protection rings. Although clinical trials of male contraception have reflected promising results, limited involvement of industry in that area of research has decreased the likelihood of having a male method available in the current decade. Development of nonhormonal methods is still at an early stage of research, with the identification of specific targets within the reproductive system in ovaries and testes, as well as

  8. Communication about Contraception and Knowledge of Oral Contraceptives amongst Norwegian High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Thomas; Skjeldestad, Finn Egil

    2003-01-01

    Examines communication about contraception and specific knowledge of oral contraceptives (OCs) in a sample of Norwegian high school students. More females than males discussed contraception at least monthly. Discussions were predominantly held with peers and not adults. Females were far more knowledgeable about OCs than males. The most significant…

  9. Search for an Emergency Contraception Provider in the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... an Emergency Contraception (Plan B) Provider in the United States Looking for Emergency Contraception NOW? In the U.S., ... pharmacists in some states) near you in the United States who will write prescriptions for emergency contraception or ...

  10. Contraception in the Developing World: Special Considerations.

    PubMed

    Schivone, Gillian B; Blumenthal, Paul D

    2016-05-01

    The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) estimates that there are 225 million women and girls with unmet contraceptive need yearly. Unmet need for contraception is defined as women who desire a delay in childbearing and are not using a modern method of contraception. It is projected that providing contraception to these women would avert 36 million abortions, 70,000 maternal deaths, and 52 million unintended pregnancies overall. In the past 30 years, there has been an increase both in population and in contraception use in the developing world. As a result, it is estimated that in 2015 there were 500 million contraceptive users in developing countries, which is nearly double the prevalence in 2000. Unfortunately, women and girls in developing nations still face many obstacles in obtaining modern methods of contraception. Particular challenges in the developing world include lack of access due to inadequate number of trained providers, fewer method options, and "stock-outs" of contraceptive supplies. Innovative strategies for decreasing unmet need will have to address these challenges, and will necessarily involve programmatic solutions such as community-based distribution and social marketing campaigns. Additionally, increasing uptake of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods will be essential for achieving the goal of decreasing unmet need.

  11. DPC4 Gene Status of the Primary Carcinoma Correlates With Patterns of Failure in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Fu, Baojin; Yachida, Shinichi; Luo, Mingde; Abe, Hisashi; Henderson, Clark M.; Vilardell, Felip; Wang, Zheng; Keller, Jesse W.; Banerjee, Priya; Herman, Joseph M.; Cameron, John L.; Yeo, Charles J.; Halushka, Marc K.; Eshleman, James R.; Raben, Marian; Klein, Alison P.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Hidalgo, Manuel; Laheru, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Contrary to the extensive data accumulated regarding pancreatic carcinogenesis, the clinical and molecular features characteristic of advanced stage (stage III and IV) disease are unknown. A comprehensive study of pancreatic cancers from patients who have succumbed to their disease has the potential to greatly expand our understanding of the most lethal stage of this disease and identify novel areas for intervention. Materials and Methods Rapid autopsies were performed on 76 patients with documented pancreatic cancer. The histologic features of end stage disease were determined and correlated to the stage at initial diagnosis, patterns of failure (locally destructive v metastatic disease) and the status of the KRAS2, TP53, and DPC4 genes. Results At autopsy, 30% of patients died with locally destructive pancreatic cancer, and 70% died with widespread metastatic disease. These divergent patterns of failure found at autopsy (locally destructive v metastatic) were unrelated to clinical stage at initial presentation, treatment history, or histopathologic features. However, Dpc4 immunolabeling status of carcinoma tissues harvested at autopsy, a sensitive marker of DPC4 genetic status, was highly correlated with the presence of widespread metastasis but not with locally destructive tumors (P = .007). Conclusion Pancreatic cancers are represented by distinct genetic subtypes with significantly different patterns of failure. Determinations of DPC4 status at initial diagnosis may be of value in stratifying patients into treatment regimens related to local control versus systemic therapy. PMID:19273710

  12. Increased activity of osteocyte autophagy in ovariectomized rats and its correlation with oxidative stress status and bone loss

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yuehua Zheng, Xinfeng Li, Bo Jiang, Shengdan Jiang, Leisheng

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Examine autophagy level in the proximal tibia of ovariectomized rats. • Investigate whether autophagy level is associated with bone loss. • Investigate whether autophagy level is associated with oxidative stress status. - Abstract: Objectives: The objectives of the present study were to investigate ovariectomy on autophagy level in the bone and to examine whether autophagy level is associated with bone loss and oxidative stress status. Methods: 36 female Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-operated (Sham), and ovariectomized (OVX) rats treated either with vehicle or 17-β-estradiol. At the end of the six-week treatment, bone mineral density (BMD) and bone micro-architecture in proximal tibias were assessed by micro-CT. Serum 17β-estradiol (E2) level were measured. Total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, catalase (CAT) activity in proximal tibia was also determined. The osteocyte autophagy in proximal tibias was detected respectively by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), immunofluorescent histochemistry (IH), realtime-PCR and Western blot. In addition, the spearman correlation between bone mass, oxidative stress status, serum E2 and autophagy were analyzed. Results: Ovariectomy increased Atg5, LC3, and Beclin1 mRNA and proteins expressions while decreased p62 expression. Ovariectomy also declined the activities of T-AOC, CAT, and SOD. Treatment with E2 prevented the reduction in bone mass as well as restored the autophagy level. Furthermore, LC3-II expression was inversely correlated with T-AOC, CAT, and SOD activities. A significant inverse correlation between LC3-II expression and BV/TV, Tb.N, BMD in proximal tibias was found. Conclusions: Ovariectomy induced oxidative stress, autophagy and bone loss. Autophagy of osteocyte was inversely correlated with oxidative stress status and bone loss.

  13. The Sexual Acceptability of Contraception: Reviewing the Literature and Building a New Concept.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Jenny A; Smith, Nicole K

    2016-01-01

    How contraceptives affect women's sexual well-being is critically understudied. Fortunately, a growing literature focuses on sexual aspects of contraception, especially hormonal contraception's associations with libido. However, a more holistic approach to contraceptive sexual acceptability is needed to capture the full range of women's sexual experiences. We conducted a narrative literature review of this topic, working with an original sample of 3,001 citations published from 2005 to 2015. In Part 1, we draw from a subset of this literature (264 citations) to build a new conceptual model of sexual acceptability. Aspects include macro factors (gender, social inequality, culture, and structure), relationship factors (dyadic influences and partner preferences), and individual factors (sexual functioning, sexual preferences, such as dis/inhibition, spontaneity, pleasure, the sexual aspects of side effects, such as bleeding, mood changes, sexual identity and sexual minority status, and pregnancy intentions). In Part 2, we review the empirical literature on the sexual acceptability of individual methods (103 citations), applying the model as much as possible. Results suggest contraceptives can affect women's sexuality in a wide variety of positive and negative ways that extend beyond sexual functioning alone. More attention to sexual acceptability could promote both women's sexual well-being and more widespread, user-friendly contraceptive practices. PMID:26954608

  14. Smelling wrong: hormonal contraception in lemurs alters critical female odour cues.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jeremy Chase; Boulet, Marylène; Drea, Christine M

    2011-01-01

    Animals, including humans, use olfaction to assess potential social and sexual partners. Although hormones modulate olfactory cues, we know little about whether contraception affects semiochemical signals and, ultimately, mate choice. We examined the effects of a common contraceptive, medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), on the olfactory cues of female ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), and the behavioural response these cues generated in male conspecifics. The genital odorants of contracepted females were dramatically altered, falling well outside the range of normal female variation: MPA decreased the richness and modified the relative abundances of volatile chemicals expressed in labial secretions. Comparisons between treatment groups revealed several indicator compounds that could reliably signal female reproductive status to conspecifics. MPA also changed a female's individual chemical 'signature', while minimizing her chemical distinctiveness relative to other contracepted females. Most remarkably, MPA degraded the chemical patterns that encode honest information about genetic constitution, including individual diversity (heterozygosity) and pairwise relatedness to conspecifics. Lastly, males preferentially investigated the odorants of intact over contracepted females, clearly distinguishing those with immediate reproductive potential. By altering the olfactory cues that signal fertility, individuality, genetic quality and relatedness, contraceptives may disrupt intraspecific interactions in primates, including those relevant to kin recognition and mate choice. PMID:20667870

  15. Smelling wrong: hormonal contraception in lemurs alters critical female odour cues

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Jeremy Chase; Boulet, Marylène; Drea, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Animals, including humans, use olfaction to assess potential social and sexual partners. Although hormones modulate olfactory cues, we know little about whether contraception affects semiochemical signals and, ultimately, mate choice. We examined the effects of a common contraceptive, medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), on the olfactory cues of female ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), and the behavioural response these cues generated in male conspecifics. The genital odorants of contracepted females were dramatically altered, falling well outside the range of normal female variation: MPA decreased the richness and modified the relative abundances of volatile chemicals expressed in labial secretions. Comparisons between treatment groups revealed several indicator compounds that could reliably signal female reproductive status to conspecifics. MPA also changed a female's individual chemical ‘signature’, while minimizing her chemical distinctiveness relative to other contracepted females. Most remarkably, MPA degraded the chemical patterns that encode honest information about genetic constitution, including individual diversity (heterozygosity) and pairwise relatedness to conspecifics. Lastly, males preferentially investigated the odorants of intact over contracepted females, clearly distinguishing those with immediate reproductive potential. By altering the olfactory cues that signal fertility, individuality, genetic quality and relatedness, contraceptives may disrupt intraspecific interactions in primates, including those relevant to kin recognition and mate choice. PMID:20667870

  16. Correlation of clinical features and methylation status of MGMT gene promoter in glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Blanc, J L; Wager, M; Guilhot, J; Kusy, S; Bataille, B; Chantereau, T; Lapierre, F; Larsen, C J; Karayan-Tapon, L

    2004-07-01

    In an effort to extend the potential relationship between the methylation status of MGMT promoter and response to CENU therapy, we examined the methylation status of MGMT promoter in 44 patients with glioblastomas. Tumor specimens were obtained during surgery before adjuvant treatment, frozen and stored at -80 degrees C until for DNA extraction process. DNA methylation patterns in the CpG island of the MGMT gene were determined in every tumor by methylation specific PCR (MSP). These results were then related to overall survival and response to alkylating agents using statistical analysis. Methylation of the MGMT promoter was detected in 68% of tumors, and 96.7% of methylated tumors exhibited also an unmethylated status. There was no relationship between the methylation status of the MGMT promoter and overall survival and response to alkylating agents. Our observations do not lead us to consider promoter methylation of MGMT gene as a prognostic factor of responsiveness to alkylating agents in glioblastomas. PMID:15332332

  17. An “Imperfect” Contraceptive Society: Fertility and Contraception in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Gribaldo, Alessandra; Judd, Maya D.; Kertzer, David I.

    2013-01-01

    Italy represents an unexpected and in some ways paradoxical outcome in terms of fertility control: a drop to one of the lowest birth rates in the world has been accompanied by the preponderant use of “traditional” methods despite the availability of “modern” contraception. Using data from 349 interviews conducted in 2005–2006 in four Italian cities, we argue that Italian women achieve “unplanned” AND desired conceptions through the use of withdrawal and natural methods. While data from other countries reveal similar notions of ambivalence surrounding pregnancy intentions and contraceptive use, Italy stands out for the surprising correlation between highly “managing” the conditions under which children are born and the socially commended approach of “letting births happen”. Such results suggest the need to rethink theoretical understandings of low fertility. Through the use of non-technological methods individuals manipulate culturally produced norms and beliefs about the appropriate moment to have a child; simultaneously, their actions are embedded in larger cultural, economic, and political processes. PMID:25045191

  18. The potential impact of improvements in contraception on fertility and abortion in Western countries.

    PubMed

    Westoff, C F; Hammerslough, C R; Paul, L

    1987-11-01

    Survey information on fertility intentions, patterns of contraceptive use, contraceptive failures, and abortions is used to develop estimates of unwanted births and of unplanned pregnancies for 7 countries -- Finland, France, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, UK, and the US, by contraceptive method. European fertility is the primary focus, and the data were derived from 6 European fertility surveys selected primarily because of the inclusion of data such as fertility intentions and contraceptive-exposure status and the availability of abortion data from other sources. The US was included both for comparative purposes and to provide some of the needed information not available from the European surveys. The 1st objective was to estimate the unwanted birthrates to women who want no more births; the 2nd objective involved estimating the unplanned pregnancy rates for all women. In regard to the 1st objective, the ultimate reduction in general fertility that can be achieved by reduction of contraceptive failure is minimal, i.e., under 10%. The reductions in unwanted pregnancy rates can be realized primarily by substantial increases in the proportion of couples contraceptively sterilized and by a reduction in the nonuse of contraception. The main effect of improvements in contraceptive practice will be to reduce high abortion rates, rather than to reduce fertility. Most abortions are to women who ultimately want to have (more) children, suggesting a considerable potential for the reduction of abortions through the improvements of contraceptive practice. Reductions of 1/3 to 1/5 of abortions in the countries studied seem possible, even without new technology. The main source of such reductions lies in the adoption of any contraceptive method on the part of nonusers. For example, if all nonusers in the UK simply shifted to the least effective category -- other methods, which includes withdrawal, rhythm, and the diaphragm, with all else remaining constant, the implied reductions

  19. Family and ability correlates of academic grades: social status group differences.

    PubMed

    García Bacete, Francisco-Juan; Oliver Rodríguez, Juan Carlos

    2004-08-01

    In a continuation of work by Marjoribanks (2003), using a sample of 150 seventh grade students, relationships among Parent Involvement as defined by factor scores of four measures of parents' involvement completed by teachers: teacher-parent contacts, teacher-parent communication, parents' involvement at home, and parents' participation in school, Intellectual Ability as defined by Verbal Intelligence using the Yuste's Differential and General Aptitudes Battery-M, and Academic Grades as defined by the average grade for all subject matter were examined. Analysis showed different predictive models for children's academic achievement as a function of social status. For children of low and middle social status, Intellectual Ability was the single predictor. For children of high social status the predictors were Parents' Involvement and the interaction of Parents' Involvement and Intellectual Ability.

  20. IMAP statement on contraceptive counselling.

    PubMed

    1994-06-01

    Decisions regarding sexual and reproductive behavior involve biomedical, cultural, socioeconomic, and ethical considerations, and have a major impact upon personal and family life over both the long and short terms. Family planning service providers should therefore help their clients assess such issues, especially when permanent or long-term decisions are of issue. Contraceptive counselling is a two-way process of communication characterized by an exchange of information and views, discussion, and deliberation. Research demonstrates that contraceptive use improves when service delivery personnel listen and respond to clients' worries and concerns. Considerations should be given to the following issues when counseling clients on the use of contraception: the technical competence of the counselor and the quality of interaction with clients; tailoring counseling to meet clients' characteristics and needs, with priority given to discussing any issues the clients choose; encouraging useful discussion without overwhelming the client with information; gaining clients' confidence to help them voice personal concerns, yet not infringing upon their privacy; providing counseling in privacy; avoiding misunderstandings and the omission of important information or instructions; and not expecting clients to learn everything in one counseling session. Counseling should instead be supplemented by other means of education and information such as group sessions, posters, leaflets, and videos. Training in counseling, and counseling in special situations such with adolescents, perimenopausal women, postpartum and post abortion women, and women with medical disorders are discussed. A supplement to the statement focuses upon the social and health problems which arise when family planning services and sex education for adolescents are limited or absent.

  1. Understanding Adolescent Contraceptive Choice: An Empirical Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Nancy E.; And Others

    Research using expectancy models has shown contraceptive choice among adults to be a rational process in that intentions and behaviors reflect an individual's beliefs, values, attitudes, and perceptions of social norms. This study examined whether such an approach could accurately represent adolescents' contraceptive decision-making. It used the…

  2. Adolescent Contraceptive Use: Models, Research, and Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitley, Bernard E., Jr.; Schofield, Janet Ward

    Both the career model and the decision model have been proposed to explain patterns of contraceptive use in teenagers. The career model views contraceptive use as a symbol of a woman's sexuality and implies a clear decision to be sexually active. The decision model is based on the subjective expected utility (SEU) theory which holds that people…

  3. Contraceptive use for planned parenthood patients.

    PubMed

    Savel, L E

    1990-06-01

    Three hundred consecutive new patients coming to Planned Parenthood clinics were reviewed. Of these patients, 68.3 percent were not using contraception and 67.8 percent had never used contraception. Also, 35.1 percent had experienced one or more pregnancies, and 52 percent had first coitus before 16 years of age.

  4. Barriers to contraceptive use among Pakistani couples.

    PubMed

    Harel, K

    1997-01-01

    Despite the existence of a family planning program in Pakistan since 1965 and widespread knowledge among Pakistanis about contraception, there is a high level of unmet need for family planning. One recent survey found that while 53% of married women express the desire to avoid pregnancy, less than 20% use contraception. A recent Population Council study conducted in urban and rural areas of Punjab province investigated personal beliefs, family circumstances, social norms, and gender relations among 1310 married women and 554 of their husbands. The unmet need for contraception was highest among women over age 30 years, those with more living children, less educated women, and women living in rural areas. The study found that while most Pakistanis approve of family planning, obstacles to contraceptive use exist in most marriages. 97% of respondents who wanted another child wished for a boy. That preference for sons influences contraceptive use behavior. The fear of social disapproval of contraceptive use, perceived opposition from in-laws and husbands, and fear of health side effects and divine punishment were major reasons identified against contraceptive use. Female contraceptive users were more autonomous and likely to make domestic decisions without consulting their husbands, while husbands defer to social and cultural norms. PMID:12292988

  5. Contraception in women with medical problems

    PubMed Central

    Dhanjal, Mandish K

    2008-01-01

    Women with medical disease have a higher incidence of maternal mortality compared with healthy women, with cardiac disease now being the most common cause of maternal death in the UK. A handful of medical conditions exist where pregnancy is not recommended due to mortality rates approaching 50%. It is imperative that such women have the most reliable methods of contraception available. Contraceptive agents may themselves affect medical disease, or may interact with medications used by such women. There may be a range of contraceptive agents suitable for each medical condition. The contraceptive selected should be tailored to suit the individual. The following points should be considered when deciding on the most appropriate contraceptive agent: efficacy, thrombotic risk (oestrogen containing contraceptives), arterial risks (oestrogen containing contraceptives), infective risk (e.g. insertion of intrauterine device [IUD]), vagal stimulation (e.g. insertion of IUD, ESSURE®), bleeding risks with patients on anticoagulants, interaction with concomitant drugs, effects of anaesthesia and ease of use. This review aims to cover the different contraceptive agents available and the best ones to use for certain medical illnesses. PMID:27582790

  6. Advance Provision of Emergency Contraception for Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamji, Jehan-Marie; Swartwout, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Emergency contraception is most effective at preventing unintended pregnancy when taken as early as possible following unprotected sexual intercourse. Advance provision of this medication supports more timely and effective use. In the midst of rising teen pregnancy rates, current policies often limit access to emergency contraception for…

  7. Model for Effective Contraceptive Counseling on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachmann, Gloria A.

    1981-01-01

    A study compared the effective v ineffective use of contraceptives at a major university by comparing college women who had experienced birth control failure with those who had not. Factors related to a woman's use of a contraceptive device include: satisfaction with its aesthetic properties; trust in its effectiveness; a feeling of comfort…

  8. La contraception de l'adolescente

    PubMed Central

    Pinsonneault, Odette

    1991-01-01

    Approximately one-half of all female adolescents are sexually active. Family physicians whose patients include female adolescents must be able to provide them with information and advice about contraception. In this article, adolescent contraception is examined in detail and a number of strategies for achieving optimum compliance are presented. PMID:21229024

  9. Adolescent Peers as Facilitators of Contraceptive Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuehlke, Martha E.; Rogel, Mary J.

    This paper describes the Young Adult and Adolescent Decision Making About Contraception program, an ongoing clinical research project designed to address the problem of unplanned adolescent pregnancy from a biopsychosocial perspective. The program is described as a peer-led intervention to promote the use of contraception by teenage girls at high…

  10. International standardization of mechanical contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Mellstam, S

    1983-06-01

    At least 12 countries have regulations for condoms, and because of the complicated regulations relating to condoms the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) was asked to create a committee for contraceptives. Its objective is to promote the development of standards throughout the world to help the international exchange of goods and services. Following discussions between the World Health Organization (WHO) and ISO it was decided in 1974 to establish a technical ISO committee that would deal with international standards for mechanical contraceptives, comprising condoms, diaphragms, and IUDs. It was also decided that spermicides and oral contraceptives (OCs) should be excluded from the ISO effort, but that they should fall within the responsibility of WHO. The committee, entitled ISO/TC 157 Mechanical Contraceptives, was represented by 35 member countries in 1982. The object of standardizing condoms is to obtain a satisfactory quality that can be accepted throughout the world. To achieve that purpose, acceptable test methods and associated limit requirements and values must be determined, along with rules for storage, packaging, and labeling. The most important factors in determining condom quality are the need to reach agreement on an acceptable number of holes in the condom and the ability to establish limit values for the mechanical properties of the condom. Specific requirements regarding dimensions, resistance to storage, packaging, labeling, and appropriate storage are also important. Up to 1982 the work of ISO for condoms resulted in 8 published international standards, of which 6 deal with test methods, 1 with packaging and labeling, and 1 with storage. Agreement has also been reached within the ISO committee on an additional 3 draft standards. Due to the comparatively small use of diaphragms, standardization efforts in this area do not have the highest priority. ISO/TC 157 has formulated 10 drafts which are being prepared for distribution to

  11. Use of Contraception and Attitudes towards Contraceptive Use in Swedish Women - A Nationwide Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kopp Kallner, Helena; Thunell, Louise; Brynhildsen, Jan; Lindeberg, Mia; Gemzell Danielsson, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe contraceptive use and attitudes towards contraceptive use in Sweden which has the highest abortion rate in Western Europe. Secondary objectives were to investigate knowledge of contraceptive methods and outcomes of unplanned and unwanted pregnancies. Design Telephone survey. Setting National survey of women living in Sweden. Population Women between 16 and 49 years. Methods The survey contained 22 questions with free text and multi choice answers on demographics, contraceptive use, knowledge of and attitudes towards contraception, the importance of monthly bleeding and experience of unintended pregnancy. Main Outcome Measures Distribution of use of contraceptive methods and non-use of contraception among Swedish women. Prevalence and outcome of unintended pregnancies. Results A total of 1001 women participated in the survey. Of all women, 721/1001 (72.1%) currently used contraception whereas 268/1001 (26.8%) women did not. Long acting reversible contraception, (LARC; implant and intra uterine contraception) was used by 24.3% of women. The unmet need of contraception in Sweden was estimated at 8.9% (89/1001 women). A total of 781 (78%) women had never experienced an unintended pregnancy whereas 220 (22%) women had had at least one unintended pregnancy. Users and non-users alike stated that one of the most important characteristics of a contraceptive method is its effectiveness. Conclusions Sweden has a large unmet need for contraception. Furthermore, a large proportion of women have experienced at least one unintended pregnancy. Increasing contraceptive use and promotion of LARC is a possible way forward in the effort to reduce the rates of unwanted pregnancies. PMID:25992901

  12. Contraception and planned parenthood in a private practice.

    PubMed

    Dewees, L; Beebe, G W

    1940-01-01

    The frequency and ease with which planned conception occurred in a private practice are reported. Over the 1925 36 period, 884 white patients from the upper middle class were advised in contraceptive technique. At the time of the 1937 analysis, 662 patients. The incidence of planned conception was higher for premarital patients than for women advised after marriage, and also increased with the length of the follow-up interval. The planned fertility of premarital patients was compared with that of women of comparable age in a population approximately at reproductive equilibrium. By this test their planned fertility was far below the requirements of population replacement. This was also characteristic of the fertility of a control sample of similar socioeconomic status and not selected for contraceptive interest. This result is taken as some evidence for the view that controlled reproduction need not mean voluntary sterility and that the physician's role is less to provide contraception where there is none than to prescribe methods better suited to the needs of his/her patients than ghose otherwise available to them. The physician's advice may have no great effect upon the number of children born to patients and yet make it possible to space those children more advantageously. About half of the planned conceptions were alleged to have been conceived in 1 month and about 3/4 within 3 months after contraceptive precautions had been stopped. Within the age range of 20-41 there was no association between age and months required for planned conception. There was also no relationship between prior gravidity and months to conceive, although the value of this finding was limited by the narrow range of prior gravidity.

  13. Emergency contraception: a reasonable personal choice or a destructive societal influence?

    PubMed

    Greene, M F

    2008-01-01

    A 2003 petition to the US Food and Drug Administration by the manufacturer to move levonorgestrel emergency contraception from prescription status to over-the-counter sale embroiled the Agency in politics and remains controversial in some circles. This essay addresses the current remaining main points of contoversy about the medication and the Agency's decision. PMID:18165824

  14. Evaluation of Humoral Immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific Antigens for Correlation with Clinical Status and Effective Vaccine Development.

    PubMed

    Niki, Mamiko; Suzukawa, Maho; Akashi, Shunsuke; Nagai, Hideaki; Ohta, Ken; Inoue, Manabu; Niki, Makoto; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Morimoto, Kozo; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Kitada, Seigo; Matsumoto, Sohkichi; Suzuki, Koichi; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Although tuberculosis remains a major global health problem, Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only available vaccine. However, BCG has limited applications, and a more effective vaccine is needed. Cellular mediated immunity (CMI) is thought to be the most important immune response for protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, the recent failure of a clinical trial for a booster BCG vaccine and increasing evidence of antibody-mediated immunity prompted us to evaluate humoral immunity to Mtb-specific antigens. Using Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot and Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assays, we observed less correlation of both CMI and IgG titers with patient clinical status, including serum concentration of C reactive protein. However, IgA titers against Mtb were significantly correlated with clinical status, suggesting that specific IgA antibodies protect against Mtb proliferation. In addition, in some cases, IgA antibody titers were significantly associated with the serum concentration of total albumin, which supports the idea that humoral immunity can be influenced by the nutritional status. Based on these observations, we propose that the induction of humoral immunity should be included as an option in TB vaccine development strategies. PMID:26568961

  15. Evaluation of Humoral Immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific Antigens for Correlation with Clinical Status and Effective Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Niki, Mamiko; Suzukawa, Maho; Akashi, Shunsuke; Nagai, Hideaki; Ohta, Ken; Inoue, Manabu; Niki, Makoto; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Morimoto, Kozo; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Kitada, Seigo; Matsumoto, Sohkichi; Suzuki, Koichi; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Although tuberculosis remains a major global health problem, Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only available vaccine. However, BCG has limited applications, and a more effective vaccine is needed. Cellular mediated immunity (CMI) is thought to be the most important immune response for protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, the recent failure of a clinical trial for a booster BCG vaccine and increasing evidence of antibody-mediated immunity prompted us to evaluate humoral immunity to Mtb-specific antigens. Using Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot and Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assays, we observed less correlation of both CMI and IgG titers with patient clinical status, including serum concentration of C reactive protein. However, IgA titers against Mtb were significantly correlated with clinical status, suggesting that specific IgA antibodies protect against Mtb proliferation. In addition, in some cases, IgA antibody titers were significantly associated with the serum concentration of total albumin, which supports the idea that humoral immunity can be influenced by the nutritional status. Based on these observations, we propose that the induction of humoral immunity should be included as an option in TB vaccine development strategies. PMID:26568961

  16. The Correlates of Tracking Policy: Opportunity Hoarding, Status Competition, or a Technical-Functional Explanation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Sean; Price, Heather

    2011-01-01

    In this analysis, the authors explore the relationship between the social context of high schools and school-to-school variation in tracking policies. The authors consider three explanations for the implementation of highly elaborated tracking systems: opportunity hoarding, status competition, and a technical-functional explanation. Building on…

  17. Correlates of the Economic Status of Widowed and Divorced Elderly Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Namkee G.

    1992-01-01

    Performed ordinary least squares regression analysis on data from National Beneficiary Survey concerning elderly divorced and widowed women. Found that women's economic status was commonly associated with such factors as level of education, work history, and Social Security primary insurance amount. Also analyzed differences between widows and…

  18. Dimensions of Adolescent Subjective Social Status within the School Community: Description and Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeting, Helen; West, Patrick; Young, Robert; Kelly, Shona

    2011-01-01

    School pupils strive to meet both school-defined and social goals, and the structure of adolescent self-concept is multidimensional, including both academic and non-academic self-perceptions. However, subjective social status within the school community has been represented as a single dimension. Scottish 15-year olds participating in a…

  19. [Contraception and abortion: an update in 2015].

    PubMed

    Chung, D; Ferro Luzzi, E; Bettoli Musy, L; Narring, F

    2015-09-23

    Family doctors can play an important role in preventing unplanned pregnancies. This article addresses the different contraceptives methods available in Switzerland, which are classified in 2 groups and recommends using the GATHER approach (Greet, Ask, Tell, Help, Explain, Return) to promote compliance. LARC (long acting reversible contraceptives) can be recommended to any woman who needs a reliable birth control method. These contraceptives require minimum effort for high efficiency. Further explanation regarding the use of an emergency contraception must be provided when short action contraceptives are chosen. Switzerland's abortion rate is one of the lowest in the world. Medical abortion tends to be more and more prominent. Under certain circumstances, it can be self-administered at home.

  20. Venous thromboembolism in women taking hormonal contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Molina, Angeles; Monreal, Manuel

    2010-02-01

    Hormonal contraceptives are a popular method of contraception, but their use has been associated with an increased risk for venous thromboembolism. In order to reduce such risk, these compounds have been changed in their dosage, chemical composition and route of administration. The absolute risk of death from pulmonary embolism in contraceptive users has been estimated to be 10.5 (95% CI: 6.2-16.6) per million woman-years. The safest option is an oral contraceptive containing levonorgestrel combined with a low dose of estrogen. Identifying women at increased risk for venous thromboembolism is difficult, and greater use of thromboprophylaxis during immobility or minor surgery should be warranted. Several authors have called for all women to be screened for thrombophilia before prescription of hormonal contraceptives, but its cost-effectiveness remains uncertain.

  1. Contraceptive practices before conception and after the birth of a child with a chronic health problem.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, S; Quillin, S I; Feetham, S

    1994-01-01

    Sexual and marital relations as well as family functioning may be altered by the birth of a child with a chronic health problem. After the birth of a child with a health problem, mothers have varied responses from an urgent desire to have another baby to a firm desire to avoid pregnancy. Mothers of healthy infants and mothers of infants who had been placed on apnea monitors for at least 5 months were surveyed on their contraceptive practices, family functioning, their marital satisfaction and sexual satisfaction, as well as their desire to have or not have another child. Surveys were conducted at 6 months and 12 months after delivery. The type of contraception used varied significantly between the two groups of mothers. There was an increase in the use of oral contraception after birth for the women whose infants were on apnea monitors. Frequency in the use of contraception varied between the two groups, with the mothers of healthy infants reporting more consistent use prior to the pregnancy, which was also more frequently planned than in the apnea group. Correlation matrices demonstrated a significant relationship between type of contraception and marital satisfaction, employment, and spousal support. The findings reinforce the need for health professionals to assist families in identifying how the birth of a child with chronic health problems has affected the family. Contraception counseling as well as marital counseling may be needed for some families.

  2. Adolescent women's contraceptive decision making.

    PubMed

    Weisman, C S; Plichta, S; Nathanson, C A; Chase, G A; Ensminger, M E; Robinson, J C

    1991-06-01

    A modified rational decision model incorporating salient events and social influences (particularly from sexual partners) is used to analyze adolescent women's consistent use of oral contraceptives (OCs) over a six-month period. Data are taken from a panel study of 308 clients of an inner-city family planning clinic. Expected OC use was computed for each subject on the basis of subjective expected utility (SEU) theory, and is found in multivariate analyses to be a significant predictor of actual OC use. In addition, variables representing baseline and follow-up partner influences, the salience of pregnancy for the subject, and positive side effects of OCs during the first months of use are found to predict OC use. Partner's support of OC use during follow-up and positive side effects of OCs are found to predict OC use among subjects for whom OC use was not the expected decision according to baseline SEU. Implications of the findings for models of adolescents' contraceptive behavior and for clinicians are discussed. PMID:1861049

  3. Australian scientists develop male contraceptive.

    PubMed

    1974-05-20

    The Australian Information Service in Canberra reports that Australian scientists have formulated a contraceptive pill to temporarily stop spermatogenesis in man, thus producing infertility. The research was done by a team consisting of Dr. Henry Burger, director of the Medical Reserach Center at Prince Henry's Hospital in Melbourne, Dr. Bryan Hudson, Principal Research Fellow at the Howard Florey Institute of Experimental Medicine at the Univeristy of Melbourne, and Dr. David de Kretser, senior lecturer in Monash University's Department of Medicine at Prince Henry's Hospital. The contraceptive pill consists of progestagen (d-norgestrel) with androgen (methyltestosterone), a combination that suppresses the production of the sperm but conserves libido and potency. The testing program has yet to be undertaken in human volunteers. There will be three phases to the drug trial: pretreatment, during which the health of the volunteers and the safety of the drug will be established; the treatment phase, lasting six months, during which the volunteers will be given daily oral dose of the drugs; and the recovery phase, lasting at least three months, during which the restoration of normal spermatogenesis will be observed. PMID:12333267

  4. Adolescent women's contraceptive decision making.

    PubMed

    Weisman, C S; Plichta, S; Nathanson, C A; Chase, G A; Ensminger, M E; Robinson, J C

    1991-06-01

    A modified rational decision model incorporating salient events and social influences (particularly from sexual partners) is used to analyze adolescent women's consistent use of oral contraceptives (OCs) over a six-month period. Data are taken from a panel study of 308 clients of an inner-city family planning clinic. Expected OC use was computed for each subject on the basis of subjective expected utility (SEU) theory, and is found in multivariate analyses to be a significant predictor of actual OC use. In addition, variables representing baseline and follow-up partner influences, the salience of pregnancy for the subject, and positive side effects of OCs during the first months of use are found to predict OC use. Partner's support of OC use during follow-up and positive side effects of OCs are found to predict OC use among subjects for whom OC use was not the expected decision according to baseline SEU. Implications of the findings for models of adolescents' contraceptive behavior and for clinicians are discussed.

  5. Elevated Plasma Soluble CD14 Levels Correlate with the Monocyte Response Status During Hantaan Virus Infection in Humans.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kang; Zhang, Chunmei; Zhang, Yusi; Zhang, Yun; Zhuang, Ran; Jin, Boquan; Ma, Ying

    2015-10-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) infection can cause severe hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in humans. CD14, a pattern recognition receptor recognizing lipopolysaccharide, is highly expressed on monocytes and can be shed as soluble CD14 (sCD14) upon monocyte activation. To understand the role of sCD14 in HFRS, the sCD14 plasma concentrations from 45 HFRS patients were quantified, and the relationships between the plasma sCD14 level and the monocyte response status and clinical parameters were analyzed. The plasma sCD14 levels were significantly higher in the HFRS patients and they correlated with monocyte expansion and activation, which were characterized by increased blood monocyte counts, the proportion of CD14(++)CD16(+) intermediate monocytes, as well as elevated plasma tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and soluble CD163 (sCD163) levels. Additionally, the high plasma sCD14 levels positively correlated with white blood cell counts and blood urea nitrogen levels and negatively correlated with platelet counts in the HFRS patients. Taken together, our data indicate that elevated plasma sCD14 levels are associated with the monocyte response status during HTNV infection in humans.

  6. [Resistance and compliance to contraception in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Pichot, F; Dayan-lintzer, M

    1985-10-01

    Although inadequate information on sex and contraception is frequently believed to account for contraceptive failure in adolescents, other factors including resistence to contraception or poor compliance with method requirements have been invoked to explain contraceptive failures in well-informed adolescents. Sexual relations are beginning at ever-younger ages in France; a 1980 survey indicated that 50% had their 1st sexual relations before age 17. Sexual activity is sporadic and irregular but usually occurs with the same partner. At least 50% of 1st sexual relations are unprotected by contraception, and half of adolescent pregnancies occur in the 1st 6th months of sexual activity. 6-12 months pass on average before sexually active adolescents begin to use contraception. Rates of pregnancy and abortion have increased especially among adolescents under 16, and in 1979 almost 20% of all abortions were in women under 20 years old. In 1980, only 20% of adolescents used contraception, with 17.3% using oral contraceptives. Few statistics exist on the complex phenomenon of conscious or subconscious contraceptive resistence in adolescence, and clinical experience serves as a better guide. A frequent attitude among adolescents is that sexual relations should be spontaneous and romantic, traits viewed as incompatible with contraception. "Magical thinking", failure to appreciate the real risk of pregnancy, and dissociation of sex and pregnancy are common. Adolescents who doubt their fecundity may engage in unprotected relations to reassure themselves, while some seeking to assert their femininity may use pills although they have no need for contraception. Guilt and ambivalence may be unconscious motivations for poor contraceptive use. Young girls in cold, uncaring, neglectful, or conflict-ridden homes may seek affection from a sexual partner and wish to have a baby to demonstrate their attachment. Such situations often lead to well-accepted pregnancies and may also

  7. Chair-Side Quantitative Oral-Microflora Screening for Assessing Familial Correlation of Periodontal Status and Caries Prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yung-Kai; Lee, Wei-Fang; Wang, Meng-Jiy; Chang, Yus-Han Sophie; Tchaou, Wen-Shiun; Chang, Wei-Jen; Lee, Sheng-Yang; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Teng, Nai-Chia

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Our goal was to investigate the relationship between clinical status and the presence of carious or periodontal pathogens among parent-child familial pairs. Clinical practices of risk assessment with consideration of familial pathogen interaction might reduce the need for therapy, improve patient outcomes, and ultimately reduce oral disease burden. Materials and Methods: In this study, we enrolled 30 parent-child pairs, with the children exhibiting complete deciduous dentition or mixed dentition with only permanent first molars. Clinical statuses were evaluated using caries and periodontal disease indicators, including the sum of decay and the number of missing or filled teeth (DMFT) for adults, decay, extraction caused by dental disease, and filled teeth (deft), for children, probing depth, and plaque control record (PCR). Supra- and sub-gingival bacteria were determined based on semi-quantitative measurements of microbial infection by using data from the Dentocult® SM test (caries-related organisms) and the PerioCheck® test (periodontal disease-related organisms). Results: No statistically significant relationship was detected between the prevalence of periodontal pathogens and that of cariogenic pathogens in the oral cavity. However, the clinical status of caries (DMFT) was negatively correlated with the clinical status of periodontal disease (pocket depth) in parents who were infected with dominant periodontal pathogens (r = −0.59, p<0.01). Parents’ DMFT scores were positively correlated with children’s deft and PCR scores. PCR and deft scores of children appeared to decrease significantly with the parent’s pocket depth. Conclusion: The study showed that the quantity of caries pathogens were not significant related to periodontal pathogens, but the caries clinical outcome is negative related with periodontal clinical outcome between familial pairs. PMID:24498022

  8. Prescription contraceptives: countering the risks.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, R J

    1985-09-01

    Drug companies have been at work throughout the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s trying to reduce the steroid content of their oral contraceptives (OCs). Researchers have been successful in reducing steroid content while maintaining effectiveness, thereby making OCs safer. In the 1st half of the natural menstrual cycle, a woman secretes estrogen as the dominant steroid product. In the 2nd half, estrogen is the principal reproductive hormone. Estrogens inhibit ovulation, possibly by inhibiting implantation, altering ovum transplant, or in some way preventing corpus luteum function, which is necessary to maintain early pregnancies and the endometrium. There are still only 2 estrogens and 6 progestins on the market today. They are probably the most thoroughly studied chemical ever seen in the history of pharmacy or medicine. 1 of the estrogens, mestranol, is really a drug of the past. In the body, mestranol is converted to ethinyl estradiol, the other estrogen on the market. Consequently, there is no reason to use mestranol itself. Within the dose range of 50-100 mcg, there's little difference in contraceptive effect. Progestins are the other active ingredient in the combination OC. Their principal action is the thickening of the cervical mucus, which prevents sperm penetration. Also, with sufficient progesterone, ovulation is inhibited, but this happens in only 40% of those patients taking, for instance, the "mini-pill" (which consists of progesterone only). The progestins and the estrogens work in concert to make OCs a highly effective contraceptive method. Recent surveys conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and National Cancer Institute looked into the relative effectiveness of OCs. Nordette had a use effectiveness failure rate of 3.5; Ovral, 3.6. Loestrin 1/20 -- norethindrone acetate, 1 mg, and estinyl estradiol, 20 mcg -- shows a failure rate of 4.5. This indicates that the threshold for an effective dose of estinyl estradiol in OCs is 30 mcg. For 1 mini

  9. Correlates of functional status among OEF/OIF veterans with a history of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ettenhofer, Mark L; Melrose, Rebecca J; Delawalla, Zainab; Castellon, Steven A; Okonek, Anna

    2012-11-01

    This study was conducted to identify factors related to functional status within a clinical sample of Veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Medical chart review was conducted for a consecutive group of OEF/OIF Veterans who were referred for neuropsychological evaluation within a Veterans Affairs Medical Center Polytrauma Program related to history of TBI (n = 57). Level of involvement in occupational and academic activity, presence or absence of housing insecurity, and clinician ratings of overall functioning served as indicators of functional status. Reduced functional status was most strongly related to poorer cognitive function, particularly motor function, processing speed, and executive function. Lower levels of functioning were also related to increased severity of postconcussive symptoms, lower levels of education, and ongoing medication treatment for sleep or psychiatric symptoms. Comprehensive evaluation of cognitive, affective, and behavioral functioning among OEF/OIF Veterans with a history of TBI is likely to provide valuable information to inform rehabilitation strategies and identify potential warning signs for poor postdeployment reintegration. Increased awareness of these factors may aid clinicians in identifying patients at risk for poor outcomes and in more effectively targeting symptoms for intervention.

  10. DNA Copy Number Aberrations, and Human Papillomavirus Status in Penile Carcinoma. Clinico-Pathological Correlations and Potential Driver Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lambros, Maryou; Stankiewicz, Elzbieta; Ng, Charlotte K. Y.; Weigelt, Britta; Rajab, Ramzi; Tinwell, Brendan; Corbishley, Cathy; Watkin, Nick; Berney, Dan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.

    2016-01-01

    Penile squamous cell carcinoma is a rare disease, in which somatic genetic aberrations have yet to be characterized. We hypothesized that gene copy aberrations might correlate with human papillomavirus status and clinico-pathological features. We sought to determine the spectrum of gene copy number aberrations in a large series of PSCCs and to define their correlations with human papillomavirus, histopathological subtype, and tumor grade, stage and lymph node status. Seventy formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded penile squamous cell carcinomas were centrally reviewed by expert uropathologists. DNA was extracted from micro-dissected samples, subjected to PCR-based human papillomavirus assessment and genotyping (INNO-LiPA human papillomavirus Genotyping Extra Assay) and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization using a 32K Bacterial Artificial Chromosome array platform. Sixty-four samples yielded interpretable results. Recurrent gains were observed in chromosomes 1p13.3-q44 (88%), 3p12.3-q29 (86%), 5p15.33-p11 (67%) and 8p12-q24.3 (84%). Amplifications of 5p15.33-p11 and 11p14.1-p12 were found in seven (11%) and four (6%) cases, respectively. Losses were observed in chromosomes 2q33-q37.3 (86%), 3p26.3-q11.1 (83%) and 11q12.2-q25 (81%). Although many losses and gains were similar throughout the cohort, there were small significant differences observed at specific loci, between human papillomavirus positive and negative tumors, between tumor types, and tumor grade and nodal status. These results demonstrate that despite the diversity of genetic aberrations in penile squamous cell carcinomas, there are significant correlations between the clinico-pathological data and the genetic changes that may play a role in disease natural history and progression and highlight potential driver genes, which may feature in molecular pathways for existing therapeutic agents. PMID:26901676

  11. Correlation between the BRAF V600E mutation status and the clinicopathologic features of papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shi, C L; Sun, Y; Ding, C; Lv, Y C; Qin, H D

    2015-07-03

    This study sought to investigate the correlations of V-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) gene mutations with the clinicopathologic features of papillary thyroid carcinoma and central lymph node metastasis. We retrospectively analyzed the 2-year medical records of patients who underwent surgery for papillary thyroid carcinoma. After screening, the records of 126 patients who met the study requirements were used to assess the characteristics associated with the BRAF V600E gene mutation. The BRAF mutation incidence rate among patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma was 69.0% (87/126). Univariate analysis revealed that the BRAF mutation status was correlated significantly with both tumor size and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed a significant correlation between lymph node metastasis and BRAF mutation status (P < 0.05). When the tumor diameter was ≤10 mm, the BRAF mutation status had no effect on lymph node metastasis (P > 0.05). When the tumor diameter was >10 mm, the incidence of lymph node metastasis was significantly higher among BRAF mutation-positive patients than among BRAF mutation-negative patients (P < 0.05). BRAF gene mutations independently predicted central lymph node metastasis in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma. For patients preoperatively diagnosed to be BRAF mutation-positive, the importance of central lymph node dissection should be emphasized because the tumor diameter increases; regional lymphatic and adipose tissue dissection should be routinely conducted. However, in mutation-negative patients with tumor diameters of ≤5 mm, the need for central lymph node dissection should be re-examined.

  12. Profile and correlates of functional status in elderly patients presenting at a primary care clinic in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adebusoye, Lawrence A.; Ogunbode, Adetola M.; Akinyemi, Joshua O.; Adebayo, Ayodeji M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Assessing the functional status of elderly patients is central in measuring their health outcome. Little is known about the functional status of elderly patients attending our primary care clinic in Nigeria. Objective To assess the correlates of functional status in elderly patients presenting at the General Outpatient Clinic of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Method A cross-sectional study of 360 randomly selected patients aged 60 years and above was undertaken to assess their functional status by scoring their basic activities of daily living (BADL) using the Modified Bathel Index. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to obtain the socio-demographic data, anthropometric measurements and morbidities of each patient. Results The mean age was 69.1 ± 6.6 years with a female-to-male ratio of 1.9: 1. The prevalence of overall functional disability (defined as when assistance was sought in the performance of at least one of the components of BADL) was 88.3%. The highest prevalence of functional disability was experienced in the area of personal hygiene and grooming (95.3%) and transferring from bed to chair (95.3%). Overall functional disability significantly increased with increasing age (χ2 for trend=14.004, p < 0.0001), living in a polygamous family unit (p = 0.025), and lack of formal education (p = 0.020). Conclusion Functional disability was high amongst the elderly in this setting. Age, education, and living in a polygamous type of family unit had significant influence on the functional status. High premium should, therefore, be placed on considering these factors in reducing functional disability in the elderly. PMID:26245617

  13. Males and Morals: Teenage Contraceptive Behavior Amid the Double Standard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scales, Peter

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews literature on teenage contraceptive behavior and teenage contraceptive decision making. The paper describes the persistence of a sexual double standard in terms of moral motivation to use contraception and in terms of the relative lack of communication about contraception among young partners. (Author)

  14. The Male Role in Contraception: Implications for Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chng, Chwee Lye

    1983-01-01

    Many males still perceive contraception as a woman's responsibility. This paper describes male contraceptives and their effectiveness and draws implications for school and community health education professionals. More equitable sharing of the responsibility for contraception might result in more effective contraception. (PP)

  15. Name that Contraceptive! A Game for the Human Sexuality Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Martha S.

    2010-01-01

    There are many contraceptive choices available to people today. Learning about them can be dry, but the game "Name that Contraceptive!" can be a fun and interactive way to review, remember, and retain the details about contraceptive options. Name that Contraceptive is a card game in which students "bid" on the number of clues it will take them to…

  16. The Contraceptive Needs for STD Protection among Women in Jail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswalt, Krista; Hale, Galen J.; Cropsey, Karen L.; Villalobos, Gabriella C.; Ivey, Sara E.; Matthews, Catherine A.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the contraceptive needs of women in jails and their sexually transmitted disease (STD) history and risk to determine effective contraceptive methods for this population. A survey of demographics, sexual health, contraceptive use, and preferred method of contraception was completed by participants recruited at jails in a medium-sized…

  17. Controversies in contraception for women with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sanjeev V

    2015-01-01

    Contraception is an important choice that offers autonomy to women with regard to prevention of unintended pregnancies. There is wide variation in the contraceptive practices between continents, countries, and societies. The medical eligibility for contraception for sexually active women with epilepsy (WWE) is determined by the type of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) that they use. Enzyme inducing AEDs such as phenobarbitone, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and oxcarbazepine increase the metabolism of orally administered estrogen (and progesterone to a lesser extent). Estrogen can increase the metabolism of certain AEDs, such as lamotrigine, leading to cyclical variation in its blood level with resultant adverse effect profile or seizure dyscontrol. AEDs and sex hormones can increase the risk of osteoporosis and fracture in WWE. The potential interactions between AEDs and hormonal contraception need to be discussed with all women in reproductive age-group. The alternate options of oral contraception such as intrauterine copper device, intrauterine levonorgestrel release system, and supplementary protection with barriers need to be presented to them. World Health Organization has recommended to avoid combination contraceptive pills containing estrogen and progesteron in women who desire contraception and in breastfeeding mothers. Care providers need to consider the option of non-enzyme-inducing AEDs while initiating long-term treatment in adolescent and young WWE. PMID:26425002

  18. Controversies in contraception for women with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sanjeev V.

    2015-01-01

    Contraception is an important choice that offers autonomy to women with regard to prevention of unintended pregnancies. There is wide variation in the contraceptive practices between continents, countries, and societies. The medical eligibility for contraception for sexually active women with epilepsy (WWE) is determined by the type of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) that they use. Enzyme inducing AEDs such as phenobarbitone, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and oxcarbazepine increase the metabolism of orally administered estrogen (and progesterone to a lesser extent). Estrogen can increase the metabolism of certain AEDs, such as lamotrigine, leading to cyclical variation in its blood level with resultant adverse effect profile or seizure dyscontrol. AEDs and sex hormones can increase the risk of osteoporosis and fracture in WWE. The potential interactions between AEDs and hormonal contraception need to be discussed with all women in reproductive age-group. The alternate options of oral contraception such as intrauterine copper device, intrauterine levonorgestrel release system, and supplementary protection with barriers need to be presented to them. World Health Organization has recommended to avoid combination contraceptive pills containing estrogen and progesteron in women who desire contraception and in breastfeeding mothers. Care providers need to consider the option of non-enzyme-inducing AEDs while initiating long-term treatment in adolescent and young WWE. PMID:26425002

  19. The current state of male hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jing H; Page, Stephanie T

    2016-07-01

    World population continues to grow at an unprecedented rate, doubling in a mere 50years to surpass the 7-billion milestone in 2011. This steep population growth exerts enormous pressure on the global environment. Despite the availability of numerous contraceptive choices for women, approximately half of all pregnancies are unintended and at least half of those are unwanted. Such statistics suggest that there is still a gap in contraceptive options for couples, particularly effective reversible contraceptives for men, who have few contraceptive choices. Male hormonal contraception has been an active area of research for almost 50years. The fundamental concept involves the use of exogenous hormones to suppress endogenous production of gonadotropins, testosterone, and downstream spermatogenesis. Testosterone-alone regimens are effective in many men but high dosing requirements and sub-optimal gonadotropin suppression in 10-30% of men limit their use. A number of novel combinations of testosterone and progestins have been shown to be more efficacious but still require further refinement in delivery systems and a clearer understanding of the potential short- and long-term side effects. Recently, synthetic androgens with both androgenic and progestogenic activity have been developed. These agents have the potential to be single-agent male hormonal contraceptives. Early studies of these compounds are encouraging and there is reason for optimism that these may provide safe, reversible, and reliable contraception for men in the near future. PMID:27016468

  20. Power in college students' contraceptive decisions.

    PubMed

    McCormick, N B; Gaeddert, W

    1989-02-01

    Excluding Hollerbach (1980), previous fertility researchers have paid little attention to contraceptive power bases, relationships that become the source of changes in birth control values and behavior. Eight contraceptive power bases, each evaluated as a direct or obvious strategy, were identified in a pilot study involving 25 college students as participants and 10 undergraduate raters. Two-hundred college students completed a questionnaire which included the Bem Sex Role Inventory, inquired into their sexual and contraceptive behavior, and asked about contraceptive power bases. There were highly significant main effects for both students' personal experiences with contraceptive power bases and for their opinions about the comfort and effectiveness of same. Coercion was the most popular and legitimate power was the least popular power base. Women were more likely than men to be the targets of contraceptive power bases, the majority of which were stereotyped as feminine by women in particular. Sex role identification was unrelated to students' experiences with contraceptive power bases. The implications of these findings for family-planning researchers and practioners are addressed.

  1. Adolescent contraception: review and guidance for pediatric clinicians.

    PubMed

    Potter, J; Santelli, J S

    2015-02-01

    The majority of adolescents initiate sexual activity during their teenage years, making contraception an important aspect of routine adolescent health care. Despite common misperceptions, all available methods of reversible contraception are appropriate for adolescent use. Contraceptive side effects profiles and barriers to use of certain methods should be considered when providing contraceptives to adolescents. In particular, ease of use, confidentiality, and menstrual effects are main concerns of adolescents. Contraceptive counseling with adolescents should describe method efficacy, discuss user preferences, explore barriers to use, counsel regarding sexually transmitted infection prevention, and consider what to do if contraception fails. Emergency contraception should be widely discussed with adolescents, as it is appropriate for use during gaps in other contraceptive use, method failure, and adolescents who are not using another form of contraception. Dual method use (condom plus a highly effective method of contraception) is the gold standard for prevention of both pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections.

  2. Hormonal correlates of social status and courtship display in the cooperatively lekking lance-tailed manakin.

    PubMed

    DuVal, Emily H; Goymann, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Though cooperative behavior has long been a focus of evolutionary biology, the proximate hormonal mechanisms underlying cooperative interactions remain poorly understood. Lance-tailed manakins (Chiroxiphia lanceolata) are tropical passerines that form long-term male-male partnerships and cooperate in paired male courtship displays. To elucidate patterns of natural hormonal variation in relation to cooperation and reproductive behavior, we examined circulating androgen levels of male lance-tailed manakins in relation to social status, display behavior, and time of year. We found significantly higher circulating androgen levels in alpha-ranked (breeding) males compared to non-alpha adult males in the population. Beta males, which participated in courtship displays but did not copulate, had androgen levels indistinguishable from those of unpaired adult males that never displayed for females, suggesting that an elevated concentration of plasma testosterone in tropical lekking birds may be associated primarily with copulatory behavior or other status-specific traits, and not the performance of courtship display. Androgens decreased throughout the breeding season for males of all status categories. Interestingly, alphas that displayed for females in the observation session prior to sampling had lower androgen levels than alphas that did not display for females. This pattern may result from female discrimination against alpha males at display areas with high levels of social conflict among males, as social disruption is linked to elevated testosterone in many species. However, recent change of a display partner was not related to alpha androgen levels. We discuss alternative explanations and the possible implications of these results, and generate several testable predictions for future investigations. PMID:20950621

  3. ALK status testing in non-small cell lung carcinoma: correlation between ultrasensitive IHC and FISH.

    PubMed

    Minca, Eugen C; Portier, Bryce P; Wang, Zhen; Lanigan, Christopher; Farver, Carol F; Feng, Yan; Ma, Patrick C; Arrossi, Valeria A; Pennell, Nathan A; Tubbs, Raymond R

    2013-05-01

    ALK gene rearrangements in advanced non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) are an indication for targeted therapy with crizotinib. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a recently approved companion in vitro diagnostic class FISH system commonly assesses ALK status. More accessible IHC is challenged by low expression of ALK-fusion transcripts in NSCLC. We compared ultrasensitive automated IHC with FISH for detecting ALK status on 318 FFPE and 40 matched ThinPrep specimens from 296 patients with advanced NSCLC. IHC was concordant with FFPE-FISH on 229 of 231 dual-informative samples (31 positive and 198 negative) and with ThinPrep-FISH on 34 of 34 samples (5 positive and 29 negative). Two cases with negative IHC and borderline-positive FFPE-FISH (15% and 18%, respectively) were reclassified as concordant based on negative matched ThinPrep-FISH and clinical data consistent with ALK-negative status. Overall, after including ThinPrep-FISH and amending the false-positive FFPE-FISH results, IHC demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity (95% CI, 0.86 to 1.00 and 0.97 to 1.00, respectively) for ALK detection on 249 dual-informative NSCLC samples. IHC was informative on significantly more samples than FFPE-FISH, revealing additional ALK-positive cases. The high concordance with FISH warrants IHC's routine use as the initial component of an algorithmic approach to clinical ALK testing in NSCLC, followed by reflex FISH confirmation of IHC-positive cases. PMID:23499337

  4. Surprising results: HIV testing and changes in contraceptive practices among young women in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Sennott, Christie; Yeatman, Sara

    2015-01-01

    This study uses eight waves of data from the population-based Tsogolo la Thanzi study (2009–2011) in rural Malawi to examine changes in young women’s contraceptive practices, including the use of condoms, non-barrier contraceptive methods, and abstinence, following positive and negative HIV tests. The analysis factors in women’s prior perceptions of their HIV status that may already be shaping their behaviour and separates surprise HIV test results from those that merely confirm what was already believed. Fixed effects logistic regression models show that HIV testing frequently affects the contraceptive practices of young Malawian women, particularly when the test yields an unexpected result. Specifically, women who are surprised to test HIV positive increase their condom use and are more likely to use condoms consistently. Following an HIV negative test (whether a surprise or expected), women increase their use of condoms and decrease their use of non-barrier contraceptives; the latter may be due to an increase in abstinence following a surprise negative result. Changes in condom use following HIV testing are robust to the inclusion of potential explanatory mechanisms including fertility preferences, relationship status, and the perception that a partner is HIV positive. The results demonstrate that both positive and negative tests can influence women’s sexual and reproductive behaviours, and emphasise the importance of conceptualizing of HIV testing as offering new information only insofar as results deviate from prior perceptions of HIV status. PMID:26160156

  5. Correlation of diffusion tensor imaging parameters with neural status in Pott’s spine

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nikhil; Saini, Namita Singh; Kumar, Sudhir; Rajagopalan, Mukunth; Chakraborti, Kanti Lal; Jain, Anil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been used in cervical trauma and spondylotic myelopathy, and it has been found to correlate with neural deficit and prognosticate neural recovery. Such a correlation has not been studied in Pott’s spine with paraplegia. Hence, this prospective study has been used to find correlation of DTI parameters with neural deficit in these patients. Methods: Thirty-four patients of spinal TB were enrolled and DTI was performed before the start of treatment and after six months. Fractional anisotropy (FA), Mean diffusivity (MD), and Tractography were studied. Neurological deficit was graded by the Jain and Sinha scoring. Changes in FA and MD at and below the site of lesion (SOL) were compared to above the SOL (control) using the unpaired t-test. Pre-treatment and post-treatment values were also compared using the paired t-test. Correlation of DTI parameters with neurological score was done by Pearson’s correlation. Subjective assessment of Tractography images was done. Results: Mean average FA was not significantly decreased at the SOL in patients with paraplegia as compared to control. After six months of treatment, a significant decrease (p = 0.02) in mean average FA at the SOL compared to pre-treatment was seen. Moderate positive correlation (r = 0.49) between mean average FA and neural score after six months of treatment was found. Tractography images were not consistent with severity of paraplegia. Conclusion: Unlike spondylotic myelopathy and trauma, epidural collection and its organized inflammatory tissue in Pott’s spine precludes accurate assessment of diffusion characteristics of the compressed cord. PMID:27163110

  6. The mechanism of action of hormonal contraceptives and intrauterine contraceptive devices.

    PubMed

    Rivera, R; Yacobson, I; Grimes, D

    1999-11-01

    Modern hormonal contraceptives and intrauterine contraceptive devices have multiple biologic effects. Some of them may be the primary mechanism of contraceptive action, whereas others are secondary. For combined oral contraceptives and progestin-only methods, the main mechanisms are ovulation inhibition and changes in the cervical mucus that inhibit sperm penetration. The hormonal methods, particularly the low-dose progestin-only products and emergency contraceptive pills, have effects on the endometrium that, theoretically, could affect implantation. However, no scientific evidence indicates that prevention of implantation actually results from the use of these methods. Once pregnancy begins, none of these methods has an abortifacient action. The precise mechanism of intrauterine contraceptive devices is unclear. Current evidence indicates they exert their primary effect before fertilization, reducing the opportunity of sperm to fertilize an ovum.

  7. Contraceptive failure in the United States.

    PubMed

    Trussell, James

    2011-05-01

    This review provides an update of previous estimates of first-year probabilities of contraceptive failure for all methods of contraception available in the United States. Estimates are provided of probabilities of failure during typical use (which includes both incorrect and inconsistent use) and during perfect use (correct and consistent use). The difference between these two probabilities reveals the consequences of imperfect use; it depends both on how unforgiving of imperfect use a method is and on how hard it is to use that method perfectly. These revisions reflect new research on contraceptive failure both during perfect use and during typical use.

  8. Feminism and the Moral Imperative for Contraception.

    PubMed

    Espey, Eve

    2015-08-01

    This commentary is adapted from the Irvin M. Cushner Memorial Lecture, "Feminism and the Moral Imperative for Contraception," given at 2014 Annual Clinical Meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in Chicago. It provides a brief and simplified historical review of the feminist movement, primarily in the United States, focusing on feminism's association with contraception. This commentary reflects the perspective and opinions of the author. Contraception is fundamental to a woman's ability to achieve equality and realize her full social, economic, and intellectual potential. PMID:26241431

  9. Political and economic factors influencing contraceptive uptake.

    PubMed

    Sai, F T

    1993-01-01

    International, national and local level politics influence the uptake of contraception through consensuses, laws, financial and moral support or the creation of an enabling atmosphere. Opposition to contraception generally comes from some churches and groups opposed to particular technologies. Socio-economic factors, particularly education, the health care system and the perceived or actual cost of fertility regulation as compared to benefits expected from children also powerfully influence contraceptive use. For many poor women in developing countries their powerlessness in relation to their male partners is an important obstacle.

  10. Contraceptive failure in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Trussell, James

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an update of previous estimates of first-year probabilities of contraceptive failure for all methods of contraception available in the United States. Estimates are provided of probabilities of failure during typical use (which includes both incorrect and inconsistent use) and during perfect use (correct and consistent use). The difference between these two probabilities reveals the consequences of imperfect use; it depends both on how unforgiving of imperfect use a method is and on how hard it is to use that method perfectly. These revisions reflect new research on contraceptive failure both during perfect use and during typical use. PMID:21477680

  11. [Contraception - where ultrasound is of significant support].

    PubMed

    Bajka, Michael

    2013-06-01

    The use of ultrasound is already routine in contraceptive procedures. One of the best examples is the transvaginal assessment of the IUD position. But ultrasound may improve safety and comfort to contraceptive procedures too, e. g. transabdominally guided IUD insertion may not only help avoiding perforation but also painful moments. In case of lost threads transabdominally guided IUD extraction might be completed successfully without any kind of anesthesia. Furthermore, a subcutaneous contraceptive implant, if not palpable, might be localized and extracted by transcutaneous ultrasound guidance during local anesthesia.

  12. Feminism and the Moral Imperative for Contraception.

    PubMed

    Espey, Eve

    2015-08-01

    This commentary is adapted from the Irvin M. Cushner Memorial Lecture, "Feminism and the Moral Imperative for Contraception," given at 2014 Annual Clinical Meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in Chicago. It provides a brief and simplified historical review of the feminist movement, primarily in the United States, focusing on feminism's association with contraception. This commentary reflects the perspective and opinions of the author. Contraception is fundamental to a woman's ability to achieve equality and realize her full social, economic, and intellectual potential.

  13. CONTRACEPTION TECHNOLOGY: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

    PubMed Central

    Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Nath, Anita; Mishell, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Steady progress in contraception research has been achieved over the past 50 years. Hormonal and non-hormonal modern contraceptives have improved women’s lives by reducing different health conditions that contributed to considerable morbidity. However the contraceptives available today are not suitable to all users and the need to expand contraceptive choices still exists. Novel products such as new implants, contraceptive vaginal rings, transdermal patches and newer combinations of oral contraceptives have recently been introduced in family planning programs and hormonal contraception is widely used for spacing and limiting births. Concerns over the adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives have led to research and development of new combinations with improved metabolic profile. Recent developments include use of natural compounds such as estradiol (E2) and estradiol valerate (E2V) with the hope to decrease thrombotic risk, in combination with newer progestins derived from the progesterone structure or from spirolactone, in order to avoid the androgenic effects. Progesterone antagonists and progesterone receptor modulators are highly effective in blocking ovulation and preventing follicular rupture and are undergoing investigations in the form of oral pills and in semi long-acting delivery systems. Future developments also include the combination of a contraceptive with an antiretroviral agent for dual contraception and protection against sexually transmitted diseases, to be used before intercourse or on demand, as well as for continuous use in dual-protection rings. Alhough clinical trials of male contraception have reflected promising results, limited involvement of industry in that area of research has decreased the likelihood of having a male method available in the current decade. Development of non-hormonal methods are still at an early stage of research, with the identification of specific targets within the reproductive system in ovaries and testes, as

  14. A survey of contraception in five west European countries.

    PubMed

    Riphagen, F E; Lehert, P

    1989-01-01

    In 1984 and 1985, a survey was conducted of 7696 women aged 15-44 living in Italy, France, Great Britain, Spain and the Federal Republic of Germany. The aim of the study was to examine the use of contraceptive methods, the differences in contraceptive use, knowledge of fertility, communication about contraception, motives for choice and the perceptions held by women regarding contraceptive methods, particularly oral contraception. The results show important differences between the countries studied.

  15. Lack of correlation between BRCA1 carrier status and HER-2/neu (ERBB2) gene amplification in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, J.S.; Giraldez, R.A.; Flom, K.

    1994-09-01

    We examined 4{mu}m paraffin-embedded tissue sections from twenty female breast tumors for the presence of HER-2/neu (ERBB2) gene amplification. The study population consisted of ten BRCA1 carriers and ten non-BRCA1 carriers. Carrier status was assessed through linkage analysis. Detection of HER-2/neu gene amplification was performed blinded with respect to BRCA1 status. Forty cells representing at least two different areas of each tumor were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a HER-2/neu cosmid probe. We did not find any cases which showed the typical HER-2/neu gene amplification profile (homogeneous distribution of cells with > 4 signals per cell). In half of the cases, small foci that appeared amplified were identified as clusters of cells with > 4 signals. Modifying our analysis to compensate for this, cases were considered to be amplified if nine or more cells out of forty contained over four HER-2/neu signals. For the 10 BRCA1 carrier positive samples, 5 were HER-2/neu amplified and 5 were not. Similarly, of the 10 BRCA1 carrier negative samples, 5 were HER-2/neu amplified and 5 were not. Therefore, we found no statistical correlation between BRCA1 carrier status and amplification of the HER-2/neu gene in the tumors studied.

  16. Changes in Use of Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptive Methods Among U.S. Women, 2009–2012

    PubMed Central

    Kavanaugh, Megan L.; Jerman, Jenna; Finer, Lawrence B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine current levels, current correlates of, and changes in long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) use, including intrauterine devices and implants, among females aged 15–44 years using contraception between 2008–2010 and 2011–2013 with specific attention to associations between race, income, and age and their LARC use. METHODS We analyzed data from two rounds of the National Survey of Family Growth, nationally representative samples of females aged 15–44 years, consisting of 6,428 females in 2008–2010 and 5,601 females in 2011–2013. We conducted simple and multivariable logistic regression analyses with adjustments for the sampling design to identify demographic characteristics predictive of LARC use and changes in these patterns between the two time periods. In this cross-sectional, descriptive study, our primary outcome of interest was current prevalence of LARC use among all contraceptive users at the time of the interview. RESULTS The prevalence of LARC use among contracepting U.S. females increased from 8.5% in 2009 to 11.6% in 2012 (P<.01). The most significant increases occurred among Hispanic females (from 8.5% to 15.1%), those with private insurance (7.1–11.1%), those with fewer than two sexual partners in the previous year (9.2–12.4%), and those who were nulliparous (2.1–5.9%) (all P<.01). In multivariable analyses adjusting for key demographic characteristics, the strongest associations with LARC use in 2012 were parity (adjusted odds ratios [ORs] 4.3–5.5) and having a history of stopping non-LARC hormonal use (adjusted OR 1.9). Women aged 35–44 years (adjusted OR 0.3) were less likely to be LARC users than their counterparts (all P<.001). Poverty status was not associated with LARC use. There were no differences in discontinuation of LARC methods resulting from dissatisfaction between minority women and non-Hispanic white women. CONCLUSION During the most recent time period surveyed, use of LARC methods

  17. Socio-Demographic and Economic Correlates of Overweight Status in Chinese Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, Bin; Chou, Chih-Ping; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Reynolds, Kim; Clark, Florence; Palmer, Paula H.; Gallaher, Peggy; Sun, Ping; Guo, Qian; Johnson, C. Anderson

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate overweight prevalence and socio-demographic and economic correlates in Chinese adolescents. Methods: Weight, height, waist circumference, and socio-demographic and economic variables of 6863 middle and high school students were measured. Results: 10% of girls and 17% of boys were overweight. Waist circumference and…

  18. Dopamine correlates of neurological and psychological status in untreated Parkinsonism1

    PubMed Central

    Hoehn, Margaret M.; Crowley, T. J.; Rutledge, C. O.

    1976-01-01

    Thirty-seven untreated Parkinsonism patients showed significant positive correlations among decreased excretion of free dopamine, MMPI scores indicative of schizophrenic-like looseness of thinking, and the severity of all Parkinsonism signs except tremor. The data could indicate that abnormalities of dopamine metabolism may underlie both the motor and mental abnormalities of Parkinsonism. PMID:1003240

  19. Select Parent and Family System Correlates of Adolescent Current Weight Status: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Lisa M.; Burnham, Joy J.; Richey, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    In this exploratory, correlational study, the researchers examined the extent to which select family systems theory constructs were associated with self-reported current weight among a sample of 77 primarily non-Hispanic Black adolescents. We also explored the extent to which select parental and familial constructs (family cohesion, family…

  20. What do Women Want? Experiences of Low-Income Women with Postpartum Contraception and Contraceptive Counseling

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Lynn M; Farner, Katherine C; King, Erin; Simon, Melissa A

    2016-01-01

    Background Contraceptive counseling can increase postpartum contraception use, yet the optimal method and timing for counseling are unknown. The objective was to investigate preferences of underserved pregnant and postpartum women regarding contraception use and counseling. Method Surveys regarding contraception experiences and perceptions of contraceptive counseling were conducted with 57 women age 18 and older who were postpartum or antepartum with a previous delivery within 5 years and receiving Medicaid-funded care at an academic medical center. Health literacy was assessed using REALM-7. Responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results A majority of women reported unplanned pregnancies (78%). Women using contraception at the time of conception reported “not sure” (30%) and “taken wrong” (30%) as primary reasons for failure. Most subjects had at least a high school level of health literacy (88%), desired to use a postpartum contraceptive method (92%) and had a high self-reported understanding of that method (94%). Most women reported receiving counseling (91%) and stated that the best time for counseling was both before and after childbirth (84%). However, only 60% of subjects intended to use the method they were prescribed at discharge; reasons for changing included side effects (37%), desire for different contraception (23%) and too complicated of a method prescribed (17%). Conclusion Women perceived the best timing of contraceptive education to be both antepartum and postpartum. Despite a high frequency of prior contraceptive failure, self-reported understanding of the chosen postpartum contraceptive method was high. Contraception counseling should be tailored to a woman’s perceived needs, with such education occurring frequently and within the context of her health literacy. PMID:27294202

  1. [Adolescence and choice of contraceptive].

    PubMed

    Theunissen, L

    1986-11-01

    The majority of books, studies, and publications on adolescence are written by adults, whose frequent focus on unbridled adolescent sexuality, adolescents in crisis, or immature adolescents does not seem to correspond to the self-image of adolescents. All authors agree that adolescence is the period between childhood and adulthood beginning at puberty, but opinions differ as to the termination of adolescence and entrance into adulthood. The most significant consensus about adolescence is its tendency to become prolonged. The majority of authors regard adolescence as a preparation for adult life and hence as a natural phase necessary and indispensable to human existence. Ethnographic studies of societies that do not acknowledge adolescence demonstrate, however, that it is not a natural phase. It is also evident that comparatively few roles in modern society require lengthy periods of preparation such as adolescence. It is therefore difficult to regard adolescence as a time of preparation for adult life. From a historic perspective, adolescence emerged with the socioeconomic transformations of industrialization. Mechanization and automation excluded numerous types of workers, especially young workers, from the labor force. Adolescence represents marginalization of young people in response to socioeconomic exigencies rather than a period of preparation for a better adult life. The marginalization is internalized in the consciousness of adults and youth alike and in their hierarchical relations. The marginalization of young people is expressed in the domain of sexuality by the fact that, although physiologically mature, adolescents are not viewed as psychologically mature enough to have children. Adolescents have sexual relations at increasingly young ages, but unlike adults they are not permitted by society the choice of having a child. Contraception, an option for adults, becomes obligatory for sexually active adolescents. The refusal of contraception or failure to

  2. The Sexual Acceptability of Contraception: Reviewing the Literature and Building a New Concept

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Jenny A.; Smith, Nicole K.

    2016-01-01

    How contraceptives affect women’s sexual well-being is critically understudied. Fortunately, a growing literature focuses on sexual aspects of contraception, especially hormonal contraception’s associations with libido. However, a more holistic approach to contraceptive sexual acceptability is needed to capture the full range of women’s sexual experiences. We conducted a narrative literature review of this topic, working with an original sample of 3,001 citations published from 2005 to 2015. In Part 1, we draw from a subset of this literature (264 citations) to build a new conceptual model of sexual acceptability. Aspects include macro factors (gender, social inequality, culture, and structure), relationship factors (dyadic influences and partner preferences), and individual factors (sexual functioning, sexual preferences, such as dis/inhibition, spontaneity, pleasure, the sexual aspects of side effects, such as bleeding, mood changes, sexual identity and sexual minority status, and pregnancy intentions). In Part 2, we review the empirical literature on the sexual acceptability of individual methods (103 citations), applying the model as much as possible. Results suggest contraceptives can affect women’s sexuality in a wide variety of positive and negative ways that extend beyond sexual functioning alone. More attention to sexual acceptability could promote both women’s sexual well-being and more widespread, user-friendly contraceptive practices. PMID:26954608

  3. Emergency contraception over-the-counter: the medical and legal imperatives.

    PubMed

    Grimes, D A; Raymond, E G; Scott Jones, B

    2001-07-01

    Requiring a physician's prescription for hormonal emergency contraceptive pills makes no sense. Unintended pregnancies remain endemic in the United States, and wider use of emergency contraceptive pills could substantially help. However, the prescription requirement poses an unnecessary barrier to prompt, effective use of this preventive therapy. According to the Durham-Humphrey Amendment of 1951, the default option for all new drugs is, in principle, over-the-counter, unless a drug is addictive or dangerous when self-administered. Clearly, hormonal emergency contraception is neither of these. Emergency contraceptive pills meet all the customary criteria for over-the-counter use: low toxicity, no potential for overdose or addiction, no teratogenicity, no need for medical screening, self-identification of the need, uniform dosage, and no important drug interactions. The Food and Drug Administration is authorized, and, by its own regulations, should be required to switch hormonal emergency contraception to over-the-counter status without delay. The current prescription requirement is not only gratuitous but also harmful to women's health because it impedes access to this important therapy. PMID:11430974

  4. Intimate Partner Violence: Associated Factors and Acceptability of Contraception Among the Women

    PubMed Central

    Mundhra, Rajlaxmi; Singh, Nilanchali; Kaushik, Somya; Mendiratta, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of various types of domestic violence and to find out the impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) on adoption of contraceptive measures among the women who are victim to this. Materials and Methods: This questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of obstetrics and gynecology of a tertiary care hospital in Delhi. Four hundred and one postpartum females were randomly selected over a period of 5 months and were questioned about their age, parity, educational status, occupation, husband's education, monthly family income, and, if present, IPV in detail. These study participants were enquired about their contraceptive knowledge and use. Results: Sexual violence was seen in 38.4% of the cases, physical violence in 22.4% of the cases, and verbal abuse was seen in nearly 32.7% of the cases. In response to any of the three violence faced, only 23 women (11.79%) reacted by discussing with parents and friends. In 4.61% of the cases, the violence was so severe that she had to inform police. This study showed that higher percentage of women without IPV accepted immediate postpartum contraception methods as compared to those with IPV (35.9% vs. 25%, P = 0.023), but the overall frequency of using contraceptive methods was higher in those with IPV as compared to those without IPV (49% vs. 47%, P = 0.690). Conclusion: IPV is associated with increased contraceptive adoption. PMID:27385873

  5. Contraceptive Counseling: Best Practices to Ensure Quality Communication and Enable Effective Contraceptive Use

    PubMed Central

    Dehlendorf, Christine; Krajewski, Colleen; Borrero, Sonya

    2014-01-01

    Improving the quality of contraceptive counseling is one strategy to prevent unintended pregnancy. We identify aspects of relational and task-oriented communication in family planning care that can assist providers in meeting their patients’ needs. Approaches to optimizing women's experiences of contraceptive counseling include working to develop a close, trusting relationship with patients and using a shared decision-making approach that focuses on eliciting and responding to patient preferences. Providing counseling about side effects and using strategies to promote contraceptive continuation and adherence can also help optimize women's use of contraception. PMID:25264697

  6. Breast cancer proteomics reveals correlation between estrogen receptor status and differential phosphorylation of PGRMC1

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Hans; Clare, Susan E; Wozny, Wojciech; Schwall, Gerhard P; Poznanović, Slobodan; Stegmann, Werner; Vogel, Ulrich; Sotlar, Karl; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Kurek, Raffael; Fehm, Tanja; Cahill, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Breast tumors lacking the estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) have increased incidence of resistance to therapy and poorer clinical prognosis. Methods Whole tissue sections from 16 cryopreserved breast cancer tumors that were either positive or negative for the ER (eight ER positive and eight ER negative) were differentially analyzed by multiplex imaging of two-dimensional PAGE gels using 54 cm isoelectric focusing. Differentially detected spots of Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 (PGRMC1) were shown to differ in phosphorylation status by differential two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of phosphatase-treated tumor proteins. Site directed mutagenesis was used to create putative phosphorylation site point mutants in PGRMC1. Stable transfectants of these mutants in MCF7 cells were assayed for their survival after oxidative stress, and for AKT kinase phosphorylation. Immune fluorescence using anti-PGRMC1 monoclonal antibody 5G7 was performed on breast cancer tissue microarrays. Results Proteins significantly differentially abundant between estrogen receptor negative and estrogen receptor positive tumors at the 0.1% level were consistent with published profiles, suggesting an altered keratin pool, and increased inflammation and wound responses in estrogen receptor negative tumors. Two of three spots of PGRMC1 were more abundant in estrogen receptor negative tumors. Phosphatase treatment of breast tumor proteins indicated that the PGRMC1 isoforms differed in their phosphorylation status. Simultaneous mutation of PGRMC1 serine-56 and serine-181 fully abrogated the sensitivity of stably transfected MCF7 breast cancer cells to peroxide-induced cell death. Immune fluorescence revealed that PGRMC1 was primarily expressed in ER-negative basal epithelial cells of mammary ductules. Even in advanced tumors, high levels of ER or PGRMC1 were almost mutually exclusive in individual cells. In five out of five examined ductal in situ breast cancers of

  7. The Combined Use of Correlative and Mechanistic Species Distribution Models Benefits Low Conservation Status Species

    PubMed Central

    Rougier, Thibaud; Lassalle, Géraldine; Drouineau, Hilaire; Dumoulin, Nicolas; Faure, Thierry; Deffuant, Guillaume; Rochard, Eric; Lambert, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Species can respond to climate change by tracking appropriate environmental conditions in space, resulting in a range shift. Species Distribution Models (SDMs) can help forecast such range shift responses. For few species, both correlative and mechanistic SDMs were built, but allis shad (Alosa alosa), an endangered anadromous fish species, is one of them. The main purpose of this study was to provide a framework for joint analyses of correlative and mechanistic SDMs projections in order to strengthen conservation measures for species of conservation concern. Guidelines for joint representation and subsequent interpretation of models outputs were defined and applied. The present joint analysis was based on the novel mechanistic model GR3D (Global Repositioning Dynamics of Diadromous fish Distribution) which was parameterized on allis shad and then used to predict its future distribution along the European Atlantic coast under different climate change scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5). We then used a correlative SDM for this species to forecast its distribution across the same geographic area and under the same climate change scenarios. First, projections from correlative and mechanistic models provided congruent trends in probability of habitat suitability and population dynamics. This agreement was preferentially interpreted as referring to the species vulnerability to climate change. Climate change could not be accordingly listed as a major threat for allis shad. The congruence in predicted range limits between SDMs projections was the next point of interest. The difference, when noticed, required to deepen our understanding of the niche modelled by each approach. In this respect, the relative position of the northern range limit between the two methods strongly suggested here that a key biological process related to intraspecific variability was potentially lacking in the mechanistic SDM. Based on our knowledge, we hypothesized that local adaptations to cold

  8. Maternal Health Status Correlates with Nest Success of Leatherback Sea Turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) from Florida

    PubMed Central

    Perrault, Justin R.; Miller, Debra L.; Eads, Erica; Johnson, Chris; Merrill, Anita; Thompson, Larry J.; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2012-01-01

    Of the seven sea turtle species, the critically endangered leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) exhibits the lowest and most variable nest success (i.e., hatching success and emergence success) for reasons that remain largely unknown. In an attempt to identify or rule out causes of low reproductive success in this species, we established the largest sample size (n = 60–70 for most values) of baseline blood parameters (protein electrophoresis, hematology, plasma biochemistry) for this species to date. Hematologic, protein electrophoretic and biochemical values are important tools that can provide information regarding the physiological condition of an individual and population health as a whole. It has been proposed that the health of nesting individuals affects their reproductive output. In order to establish correlations with low reproductive success in leatherback sea turtles from Florida, we compared maternal health indices to hatching success and emergence success of their nests. As expected, hatching success (median = 57.4%) and emergence success (median = 49.1%) in Floridian leatherbacks were low during the study period (2007–2008 nesting seasons), a trend common in most nesting leatherback populations (average global hatching success = ∼50%). One protein electrophoretic value (gamma globulin protein) and one hematologic value (red blood cell count) significantly correlated with hatching success and emergence success. Several maternal biochemical parameters correlated with hatching success and/or emergence success including alkaline phosphatase activity, blood urea nitrogen, calcium, calcium∶phosphorus ratio, carbon dioxide, cholesterol, creatinine, and phosphorus. Our results suggest that in leatherbacks, physiological parameters correlate with hatching success and emergence success of their nests. We conclude that long-term and comparative studies are needed to determine if certain individuals produce nests with lower

  9. The Combined Use of Correlative and Mechanistic Species Distribution Models Benefits Low Conservation Status Species.

    PubMed

    Rougier, Thibaud; Lassalle, Géraldine; Drouineau, Hilaire; Dumoulin, Nicolas; Faure, Thierry; Deffuant, Guillaume; Rochard, Eric; Lambert, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Species can respond to climate change by tracking appropriate environmental conditions in space, resulting in a range shift. Species Distribution Models (SDMs) can help forecast such range shift responses. For few species, both correlative and mechanistic SDMs were built, but allis shad (Alosa alosa), an endangered anadromous fish species, is one of them. The main purpose of this study was to provide a framework for joint analyses of correlative and mechanistic SDMs projections in order to strengthen conservation measures for species of conservation concern. Guidelines for joint representation and subsequent interpretation of models outputs were defined and applied. The present joint analysis was based on the novel mechanistic model GR3D (Global Repositioning Dynamics of Diadromous fish Distribution) which was parameterized on allis shad and then used to predict its future distribution along the European Atlantic coast under different climate change scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5). We then used a correlative SDM for this species to forecast its distribution across the same geographic area and under the same climate change scenarios. First, projections from correlative and mechanistic models provided congruent trends in probability of habitat suitability and population dynamics. This agreement was preferentially interpreted as referring to the species vulnerability to climate change. Climate change could not be accordingly listed as a major threat for allis shad. The congruence in predicted range limits between SDMs projections was the next point of interest. The difference, when noticed, required to deepen our understanding of the niche modelled by each approach. In this respect, the relative position of the northern range limit between the two methods strongly suggested here that a key biological process related to intraspecific variability was potentially lacking in the mechanistic SDM. Based on our knowledge, we hypothesized that local adaptations to cold

  10. Maternal health status correlates with nest success of leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) from Florida.

    PubMed

    Perrault, Justin R; Miller, Debra L; Eads, Erica; Johnson, Chris; Merrill, Anita; Thompson, Larry J; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2012-01-01

    Of the seven sea turtle species, the critically endangered leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) exhibits the lowest and most variable nest success (i.e., hatching success and emergence success) for reasons that remain largely unknown. In an attempt to identify or rule out causes of low reproductive success in this species, we established the largest sample size (n = 60-70 for most values) of baseline blood parameters (protein electrophoresis, hematology, plasma biochemistry) for this species to date. Hematologic, protein electrophoretic and biochemical values are important tools that can provide information regarding the physiological condition of an individual and population health as a whole. It has been proposed that the health of nesting individuals affects their reproductive output. In order to establish correlations with low reproductive success in leatherback sea turtles from Florida, we compared maternal health indices to hatching success and emergence success of their nests. As expected, hatching success (median = 57.4%) and emergence success (median = 49.1%) in Floridian leatherbacks were low during the study period (2007-2008 nesting seasons), a trend common in most nesting leatherback populations (average global hatching success = ∼50%). One protein electrophoretic value (gamma globulin protein) and one hematologic value (red blood cell count) significantly correlated with hatching success and emergence success. Several maternal biochemical parameters correlated with hatching success and/or emergence success including alkaline phosphatase activity, blood urea nitrogen, calcium, calcium:phosphorus ratio, carbon dioxide, cholesterol, creatinine, and phosphorus. Our results suggest that in leatherbacks, physiological parameters correlate with hatching success and emergence success of their nests. We conclude that long-term and comparative studies are needed to determine if certain individuals produce nests with lower hatching

  11. Postcoital Contraception: Student Choices and Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Lee H.

    1984-01-01

    Information was gathered from college students to observe choice of postcoital contraception (PCC) and the effectiveness of the choice. Results indicate that PCC is an effective second chance to prevent unintended pregnancy. Research methodology is presented. (Author/DF)

  12. The natural way. A tropical contraceptive.

    PubMed

    1994-05-18

    It's not news for the women of the Indian subcontinent. For generations, they've been well aware that papaya and pregnancy don't mix. But now researchers at Britain's University of Sussex have proven the contraceptive qualities of the tropical fruit. "Women in Sri Lanka use papaya fruit as contraceptives because they are cheap and natural," says Tharmalingam Senthilomohan. "If they want to become pregnant, they simply avoid eating them." His findings: abortion can be induced by eating unripe papaya for three consecutive days. And daily consumption of ripe fruit can be an effective contraceptive. Senthilomohan has two theories on what gives papaya its contraceptive qualities. The tropical fruit contains an enzyme called papain which suppresses progesterone, a sex hormone needed to prepare the uterus for conception and to maintain the pregnancy. Another possibility is that papain, which can be used to tenderize meat, may break down a membrane vital to the development of the fetus. PMID:12288101

  13. What Are the Different Types of Contraception?

    MedlinePlus

    ... single use. Female condoms. These are thin, flexible plastic pouches. A portion of the condom is inserted ... blood clots. Contraceptive patch. This is a thin, plastic patch that sticks to the skin and releases ...

  14. A new way to distribute contraceptives.

    PubMed

    1994-12-01

    In Beijing the Lotus Restaurant has shifted from providing toothpicks and fans as souvenirs to contraceptives and the message of "Special Love for Joyful Families." The State Minister of Family Planning has commended this practice. The restaurant has decorated the walls and ceiling with banners stating that one should never forget family planning when enjoying oneself. Table decorations include all types of contraceptives and pamphlets about healthier childbirth and child rearing. The general manager is responsible for this change. The restaurant is a joint venture of the Huajin Development Corporation of the International Economic Commission of the Western District of Beijing and the China Population Counseling Service Center and the Thai Association for Population and Social Development. The restaurant has provided over 6000 packs of contraceptives to adults since its initiation. Services are also available for counseling on contraceptives, healthier births, improved child rearing and education of children, and sex education.

  15. Relationship between Weight and Bone Mineral Density in Adolescents on Hormonal Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Bonny, Andrea E.; Secic, Michelle; Cromer, Barbara A.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objective Since bone loss has been observed among adolescents on depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), a clinical population that commonly experiences weight gain, we were interested in examining the direct relationship between body weight and bone mineral density (BMD) in adolescents on DMPA as compared to those on oral contraceptive pills (OC) or on no hormonal contraception (control). Design Prospective, Longitudinal study. Setting Four urban adolescent health clinics in a large metropolitan area. Participants Post-menarcheal girls, age 12 – 18 years, selecting DMPA, OC or no hormonal contraception. Interventions At baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, all study participants underwent measurement of weight and BMD of the hip and spine. Main Outcome Measures The correlation between weight and BMD, and the correlation between change in weight and change in BMD were assessed at each time point. Results Body weight was significantly (p < .05) positively correlated with femoral neck BMD and spine BMD at each time point regardless of contraceptive method. Change in body weight at 12 and 24 months was highly correlated with change in femoral neck BMD (p < .0001) for all treatment groups. No statistically significant correlation between change in weight and change in spine BMD was seen in the DMPA, OC or control subjects at 12 or 24 months. Conclusion Weight gain on DMPA may mitigate loss of BMD among adolescent users. PMID:20709582

  16. The quest for a herbal contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, R R

    1993-01-01

    An oral herbal contraceptive would allow couples control their fertility without consulting a health worker, which in turn would likely markedly increase the number of couples practicing family planning. Other advantages of such a contraceptive would include the familiarity rural people have with herbal medicines, the fewer side effects associated with herbal preparations, their ready availability from local sources, and protection of privacy. There are many references to plants in India with antifertility properties. Since 1966, the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) has been conducting research to identify a herbal contraceptive, as have other organizations. Plants that have exhibited antifertility activity in clinical trials include Hibiscus rosasinensis (benzene extract of the flower petals suppresses implantation); Rudrapushpaka (extract of the flower petals prevents pregnancy); Embelia ribes (pregnancy prevention); Davcus carota, Butea monosperma, and Sapindus trifoliatis (seeds have an anti-implantation effect); and Mentha arvensis (leaves have anti-implantation effect). The Central Drug Research Institute in Lucknow, India, in collaboration with the US National Institutes of Health, the World Health Organization, and the ICMR confirm anti-implantation activity in Ferula jaeschkeana, Bupleurum marginatum, Lepidium capitatum, Caesalpinia sepiaria, Lonicera japonica, Juniperus communis, Lotus corniculatus, Lamium allum, and Acacia farnesiana. In China, scientists have evaluated the cotton-seed extract gossypol as a male contraceptive. They are now studying the possible antifertility effect on men of the plant Tripterygium wilfordii. From all the aforementioned plants as well as others under investigation, three possible types of contraceptives could be developed: an anti-ovulatory contraceptive; a postcoital contraceptive; and a male contraceptive. Some obstacles to their development include difficulties in obtaining adequate quantities of the herbs, a

  17. Men's Attitudes Towards Contraception in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Bietsch, Kristin E

    2015-09-01

    This paper examines male attitudes towards family planning in Sub-Saharan Africa. Studying attitudes is ideal as they can be calculated for all men, at any point in their lives, regardless of marital status, sexual activity, or fertility desires. We find that positive attitudes towards family planning have increased across Sub-Saharan Africa in the last two decades. We analyze both the association of positive attitudes with a variety of demographic characteristics (age, marital status, education, and religion) and the relationships with multiple forms of discussion about family planning (radio, television, friends, and partners). We find higher approval at older ages and higher levels of education, and lower levels of approval among Muslims compared to Christians. Interactions between characteristics and discussion of family planning. demonstrate that hearing or talking about contraception has different associations for different groups. This paper offers a new way to explore fertility and reproductive health in Sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26897912

  18. Correlation of Paraoxonase Status with Disease Activity Score and Systemic Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Usha Dudeja; Siddiqui, Merajul Haque; Sharma, Dilutpal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite, various preventive efforts on conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, the incidence of CVD in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients increases continuously. To solve this conundrum one needs more investigations. Aim The present study was conducted to evaluate the plasma paraoxonase (PON) activity along with the markers of systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and disease activity score-28 (DAS28) in RA patients and clarify their role in determining the probability of RA patients to develop future CVD risk. Materials and Methods Plasma PON, total antioxidant activity (TAA), C-reactive protein (CRP), synovial interleukin-6 (IL-6) and erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were estimated in 40 RA patients aged 40-55 years aged and 40 age-matched healthy controls. The data obtained were compared statistically by using Student’s t-test and Pearson correlation test. Results Besides dyslipidaemia, marked reduction in plasma PON and TAA (p< 0.05) were observed in RA patients as compared with that of healthy controls. Erythrocyte MDA, plasma CRP and synovial IL-6 levels were increased significantly (p<0.05) in RA patients. PON was negatively correlated with MDA (r = - 0.672; p < 0.001), CRP (r = -0.458; p<0.05), IL-6 (r = -0.426; p<0.05) and DAS28 (r = -0.598; p < 0.001), and positively correlated with HDL cholesterol (r = 0.648; p<0.001) and TAA (r = 0.608; p< 0.001) levels in RA patients. Conclusion Alteration in PON activity might contribute to the progression of future CVD risk in RA patients, which may result from interplay of several confounding factors, such as inflammation, oxidative stress and dyslipidaemia. Furthermore, plasma PON activity, CRP and TAA levels could be considered as non-traditional factors to predict CVD risk. Thus, it is suggested that future drugs could be developed to target the non-traditional risk factors in RA patients. PMID:27134854

  19. Correlation of modified Shimada classification with MYCN and 1p36 status detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Altungoz, Oguz; Aygun, Nevim; Tumer, Sait; Ozer, Erdener; Olgun, Nur; Sakizli, Meral

    2007-01-15

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a childhood cancer derived from neural crest cells, with a highly variable clinical course and biologic behavior. NB cells harbor complex genetic changes. Also, MYCN amplification is a well-known molecular marker for aggressive progression, and deletion of the short arm of chromosome 1 is frequently observed in NB. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between genetic markers and prognostic morphological parameters to address the biology and underlying the clinical complexity of NB. Therefore, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of chromosome band 1p36 and MYCN in a series of tumors from 43 cases classified according to the recommendation of International Neuroblastoma Pathology Committee (modification of Shimada classification). The correlations of MYCN amplification status and two distinct types of 1p36 alterations (deletion and imbalance) with Shimada classification and histologic prognostic factors were statistically analyzed. Amplification of MYCN and 1p36 deletion was present in 14 (32.6%) and 18 (41.9%) cases, respectively. Sixteen cases (37.2%) displayed a favorable histology, while 27 (62.8%) had an unfavorable histology. The 1p36 deletion was found to be an independent predictor of unfavorable histology by multivariate analysis (logistic regression test, P = 0.03), but the 1p36 imbalance did not show any significance. Both 1p36 deletion and MYCN amplification showed significant correlation with undifferentiated tumors (chi-square test, P = 0.002 and 0.03, respectively). Highly significant correlation was found between the higher mitotic karyorrhectic index (MKI) and MYCN amplification (chi-square test, P < 0.001), whereas neither 1p36 deletion nor 1p36 imbalance significantly correlated with a higher MKI (chi-square test, P > 0.05). We conclude that 1p36 deletion may be a reliable parameter in determining unfavorable histology and predicting prognosis in NB. Further studies with prognostic data

  20. Sequential, solid-phase assay for biotin in physiologic fluids that correlates with expected biotin status

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, D.M.; DuBois, D.B.

    1986-03-01

    Interest in accurate measurement of biotin concentrations in plasma and urine has been stimulated by recent advances in the understanding of biotin-responsive inborn errors of metabolism and by several reports describing acquired biotin deficiency during parenteral alimentation. This paper presents a biotin assay utilizing radiolabeled avidin in a sequential, solid-phase method; the assay has increased sensitivity compared to previous methods (greater than or equal to 10 fmol/tube), correlates with expected trends in biotin concentrations in blood and urine in a rat model of biotin deficiency, and can utilize commercially available radiolabeled avidin.

  1. Contraceptive practice in China: 1970-2004.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuntong

    2015-03-01

    Using large-scale data from the national conventional statistics and nationally representative sample surveys, the current study aims to assess the level, mode, and determinants of modern contraceptive use from 1970 to 2004 among married couples aged 20 to 49 years in China. A relatively stable Chinese mode of contraception has been established and maintained since the 1980s, characterized by prominent, long-acting contraceptive use and the highest overall prevalence in the world during the past 3 decades. In recent years, the composition of contraceptive use has changed, characterized by the increasing use of the intrauterine device and short-acting methods and a drastic decrease in male and female sterilization. However, the dominance of the long-acting methods has not undergone substantial change. The results from a multinomial logit model employed in this study indicate that family planning policy and socioeconomic and demographic factors jointly influence contraceptive choice. In particular, contraceptive choice is closely associated with the strength of family planning policy in China.

  2. Making good use of nature's contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Short, R

    1992-10-01

    Some new recommendation on how to use breast feeding scientifically and a contraceptive method are suggested. We know that breastfeeding is the most important determinant of fertility in societies that do not have modern contraception. Breast milk has other benefits, such as immune protection against gastrointestinal diseases, reduced incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis, food allergies and diabetes, and possibly increasing the child's IQ. Breastfeeding can contribute to birth spacing, which can double the child's chance of survival relative to children born less than 2 years apart. Lactation can be up to 98% effective as a contraceptive during the 1st 6 months postpartum. It is suggested that the mother use her infant's development as a cue for beginning artificial contraception. When the child's teeth start erupting, it is time to start supplementing with other foods, and to start contraception. If she begins menstruating, the woman should, of course, begin contracepting at once. Another recommendation is to supplement the woman's diet with milk biscuits, throughout pregnancy and lactation rather than give cow's milk to infants in formula. Later on the biscuits could be given to babies for teething.

  3. [Selected aspects of oral contraception side effects].

    PubMed

    Wolski, Hubert

    2014-12-01

    The first hormonal pill was approved in the 60s of the twentieth century Since that time, oral contraception has been used worldwide by dozens of women due to its high availability as well as relative ease and safety of taking. The main side effects of oral contraception include elevated risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Estrogens increase the probability of VTE development, depending on the dose in medication, and third-generation progestins increase the risk of VTE development more than older-generation progestins. Also, the coexistence of hereditary thrombophilia increases the risk of VTE development in women using oral contraceptives. Other side effects include changes in the carbohydrate and lipid economy Progestins in oral contraceptives decrease HDL cholesterol levels but increase LDL cholesterol and total cholesterol levels. Additionally estrogens are a recognized mitogenic factor for the epithelium of the mammary gland, acting proliferative on the glandular tissue and in the same way influence on the increased risk of breast cancer development. Patients sometimes complain about some subjective side symptoms such as headache, mood changes, nausea, back pain, breast pain and swelling, as well as decreased libido. Some patients discontinue oral contraception due to fear of side effects or temporary ailments before con- sulting their doctor what may result in unintended pregnancy The aim of the following paper was to present most frequent side effects of oral contraception, ways of their moni- toring and diagnosis. PMID:25669065

  4. Acceptability of contraception for men: a review.

    PubMed

    Glasier, Anna

    2010-11-01

    Methods of contraception for use by men include condoms, withdrawal and vasectomy. Prevalence of use of a method and continuation rates are indirect measures of acceptability. Worldwide, none of these "male methods" accounts for more than 7% of contraceptive use although uptake varies considerably between countries. Acceptability can be assessed directly by asking about intended (hypothetical) use and assessing satisfaction during/after use. Since they have been around for a very long time, there are very few data of this nature on condoms (as contraceptives rather than for prevention of infection), withdrawal or vasectomy. There are direct data on the acceptability of hormonal methods for men but from relatively small clinical trials which undoubtedly do not represent the real world. Surveys undertaken among the male general public demonstrate that, whatever the setting, at least 25% of men - and in most countries substantially more - would consider using hormonal contraception. Although probably an overestimate of the number of potential users when such a method becomes available, it would appear that hormonal contraceptives for men may have an important place on the contraceptive menu. Despite commonly expressed views to the contrary, most women would trust their male partner to use a hormonal method.

  5. ERICA: sexual initiation and contraception in Brazilian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela; Fujimori, Elizabeth; Kuschnir, Maria Cristina Caetano; Chofakian, Christiane Borges do Nascimento; de Moraes, Ana Júlia Pantoja; Azevedo, George Dantas; dos Santos, Karine Ferreira; de Vasconcellos, Mauricio Teixeira Leite

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of sexual initiation and contraceptive use at the last sexual intercourse of Brazilian adolescents, according to sociodemographic features. METHODS The data were obtained from the Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA), a national school-based cross-sectional study. We included 74,589 adolescents from 32 geographic strata (27 capitals and five sets of municipalities with more than 100,000 inhabitants of each of the five macro-regions of the Country). Information on sexual initiation and contraceptive use at the last sexual intercourse (male condom and oral contraceptive pill) has been used. We have estimated prevalence and confidence intervals (95%CI) considering sample weights according to sex, age, type of school, residence status, macro-region and capitals. RESULTS We observed that 28.1% (95%CI 27.0-29.2) of the adolescents had already initiated sexual life, with higher prevalence among those aged 17 years (56.4%, 95%CI 53.9-58.9), males (33.5%, 95%CI 31.8-35.2), studying at public schools (29.9%, 95%CI 28.5-31.4), and from the Northern region (33.9%, 95%CI 32.3-35.4), mainly from Macapa, Manaus, and Rio Branco. Among those who had started their sexual life, 82.3% (95%CI 81.1-83.4) reported the use of contraceptive methods at the last intercourse, and the prevalence of use was higher among adolescents aged 17 years (85.3%, 95%CI 82.7-87.6), females (85.2%, 95%CI 83.8-86.5) and those living in the Southern region (85.9%, 95%CI 82.9-88.5). Male condom was used by 68.8% (95%CI 66.9-70.7), with no difference by type of school or macro-regions; the contraceptive pill was used by 13.4% (CI95% 12.2-14.6), and more frequently used among women (24.7%, 95%CI 22.5-27,0) and 17-year-old adolescents (20.8%, 95%CI 18.2-23.6) from urban settings(13.7%, 95%CI 12.5-14.9) and from the Southern region (22.6%, 95%CI 19.0-26.8), and less often in the Northern region. CONCLUSIONS ERICA's data analysis on sexuality and contraception

  6. ERICA: sexual initiation and contraception in Brazilian adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela; Fujimori, Elizabeth; Kuschnir, Maria Cristina Caetano; Chofakian, Christiane Borges do Nascimento; de Moraes, Ana Júlia Pantoja; Azevedo, George Dantas; dos Santos, Karine Ferreira; de Vasconcellos, Mauricio Teixeira Leite

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of sexual initiation and contraceptive use at the last sexual intercourse of Brazilian adolescents, according to sociodemographic features. METHODS The data were obtained from the Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA), a national school-based cross-sectional study. We included 74,589 adolescents from 32 geographic strata (27 capitals and five sets of municipalities with more than 100,000 inhabitants of each of the five macro-regions of the Country). Information on sexual initiation and contraceptive use at the last sexual intercourse (male condom and oral contraceptive pill) has been used. We have estimated prevalence and confidence intervals (95%CI) considering sample weights according to sex, age, type of school, residence status, macro-region and capitals. RESULTS We observed that 28.1% (95%CI 27.0-29.2) of the adolescents had already initiated sexual life, with higher prevalence among those aged 17 years (56.4%, 95%CI 53.9-58.9), males (33.5%, 95%CI 31.8-35.2), studying at public schools (29.9%, 95%CI 28.5-31.4), and from the Northern region (33.9%, 95%CI 32.3-35.4), mainly from Macapa, Manaus, and Rio Branco. Among those who had started their sexual life, 82.3% (95%CI 81.1-83.4) reported the use of contraceptive methods at the last intercourse, and the prevalence of use was higher among adolescents aged 17 years (85.3%, 95%CI 82.7-87.6), females (85.2%, 95%CI 83.8-86.5) and those living in the Southern region (85.9%, 95%CI 82.9-88.5). Male condom was used by 68.8% (95%CI 66.9-70.7), with no difference by type of school or macro-regions; the contraceptive pill was used by 13.4% (CI95% 12.2-14.6), and more frequently used among women (24.7%, 95%CI 22.5-27,0) and 17-year-old adolescents (20.8%, 95%CI 18.2-23.6) from urban settings(13.7%, 95%CI 12.5-14.9) and from the Southern region (22.6%, 95%CI 19.0-26.8), and less often in the Northern region. CONCLUSIONS ERICA’s data analysis on sexuality and

  7. Biliary lipids, bile acids, and gallbladder function in the human female:effects of contraceptive steroids

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, F., Jr.; Everson, G.T.; DeMark, B.; McKinley, C.; Showalter, R.; Braverman, D.Z.; Szczepanik-Van Leeuwen, P.; Klein, P.D.

    1982-06-01

    Reported are biliary lipid composition and secretion, bile acid composition and kinetics, and gallbladder function in a group of healthy, nonobese women taking a contraceptive steroid preparation. A comparable group of healthy women served as controls. Biliary lipid secretion rate was measured by the marker perfusion technique. Bile acid distribution was determined by gas-lipid chromatography. The pool size, FTR, and synthesis rate of each bile acid were measured by using CA and CDCA labeled with the stable isotope of carbon, /sup 13/C. In some of the subjects gallbladder storage and emptying were measured during the kinetic study, by real-time ultrasonography. Contraceptive steroid use was associated with a significant increase in biliary cholesterol saturation and in the lithogenic index of bile. The rate of cholesterol secretion in the contraceptive steroid group was 50% greater than in the control (p << 0.001) and the rate of bile acid secretion was reduced (p < 0.02). The total bile acid pool size was significantly increased by contraceptive steroids. The major increase occurred in the CA pool (p < 0.04). The daily rate of enterohepatic cycles of the bile acid pool was decreased by contraceptive steroids from 6.6 to 4.3 (p < 0.01). The only effect of contraceptive steroids on gallbladder function was a slower emptying rate in response to intraduodenal amino acid infusion. No index of gallbladder function correlated significantly with any parameter of bile acid kinetics in this small group of subjects. The findings confirm the lithogenic effect of contraceptive steroids and indicate that its causes are an increase in cholesterol secretion and a decrease in bile acid secretion.

  8. Childhood Sexual Violence and Consistent, Effective Contraception Use among Young, Sexually Active Urban Women

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Deborah B.; Lepore, Stephen J.; Mastrogiannis, Dimitrios S.

    2015-01-01

    Unintended pregnancy (UP) is a significant public health problem. The consistent use of effective contraception is the primary method to prevent UP. We examined the role of childhood sexual and physical violence and current interpersonal violence on the risk of unintended pregnancy among young, urban, sexually active women. In particular, we were interested in examining the role of childhood violence and interpersonal violence while recognizing the psychological correlates of experiencing violence (i.e., high depressive symptoms and low self-esteem) and consistent use of contraception. For this assessment, 315 sexually active women living in Philadelphia PA were recruited from family planning clinics in 2013. A self-administered, computer-assisted interview was used to collect data on method of contraception use in the past month, consistency of use, experiences with violence, levels of depressive symptoms, self-esteem and sexual self-efficacy, substance use and health services utilization. Fifty percent of young sexually active women reported inconsistent or no contraception use in the past month. Inconsistent users were significantly more likely to report at least one prior episode of childhood sexual violence and were significantly less likely to have received a prescription for contraception from a health care provider. Inconsistent contraception users also reported significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms and significantly lower levels of self-esteem. The relation between childhood sexual violence and UP remained unchanged in the multivariate models adjusting for self-esteem or depressive symptoms. These findings highlight the long-term consequences of childhood sexual violence, independent of current depressive symptoms and low self-esteem, on consistent use of contraception. PMID:26010318

  9. Socioeconomic correlates of iodine status among school children in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Wah-Yun Low; Siti Norazah Zulkifli; Rajeswari Karuppiah

    2002-01-01

    Iodine deficiency is recognized as a public health problem. This paper assesses iodine status by socioeconomic factors in school children in Sarawak, East Malaysia. Kuching, Bau and Simunjan districts were chosen based on advice from the Sarawak's Medical and Health Authority. 803 school children, aged eight years, were selected from 19 schools via proportionate systematic sampling. About half the proportion of the school children were from Kuching, 24% from Simunjan and 22% from Bau. Almost all were equally distributed by sex. By mother's race, almost half were Malays, followed by Bidayuh, Iban, Chinese and other races. Mean urinary iodine concentration was 3.36 microg/ 100ml, mean creatinine level was 111.10 mg/100ml and mean creatinine/iodine ratio was 39.45 microg/ gram. Four female children (0.5%) were found to have enlarged thyroid. Urinary iodine levels were significantly different by district, mother's race and household income. It was highest in Kuching, among children with Malay mothers, and with household incomes more than RM500 per month. Conversely, it was lowest in Bau, among children of Iban/Dayak and Chinese mothers, and incomes of RM500 or less per month. Based on the WHO/UNICEF/ICCIDD classification, the Sarawak school children in the present study fall into the moderate IDD category. The low prevalence of goitre is a positive finding indicating that iodine deficiency is corrected over time. PMID:12862416

  10. Neural Correlates of Math Gains Vary Depending on Parental Socioeconomic Status (SES)

    PubMed Central

    Demir-Lira, Özlem Ece; Prado, Jérôme; Booth, James R.

    2016-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the neural predictors of math development, and asked whether these predictors vary as a function of parental socioeconomic status (SES) in children ranging in age from 8 to 13 years. We independently localized brain regions subserving verbal versus spatial processing in order to characterize relations between activation in these regions during an arithmetic task and long-term change in math skill (up to 3 years). Neural predictors of math gains encompassed brain regions subserving both verbal and spatial processing, but the relation between relative reliance on these regions and math skill growth varied depending on parental SES. Activity in an area of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) identified by the verbal localizer was related to greater growth in math skill at the higher end of the SES continuum, but lesser improvements at the lower end. Activity in an area of the right superior parietal cortex identified by the spatial localizer was related to greater growth in math skill at the lower end of the SES continuum, but lesser improvements at the higher end. Results highlight early neural mechanisms as possible neuromarkers of long-term arithmetic learning and suggest that neural predictors of math gains vary with parental SES. PMID:27378987

  11. Cyberbullying among male adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: prevalence, correlates, and association with poor mental health status.

    PubMed

    Yen, Cheng-Fang; Chou, Wen-Jiun; Liu, Tai-Ling; Ko, Chih-Hung; Yang, Pinchen; Hu, Huei-Fan

    2014-12-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence rates and multilevel correlates of cyberbullying victims and perpetrators among male adolescents diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in Taiwan. The relationships between cyberbullying involvement and depression, anxiety, and suicidality were also examined. The experiences of cyberbullying victimization and perpetration in 251 male adolescents with ADHD were assessed. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the correlates of cyberbullying victims and perpetrators. The relationships between cyberbullying involvement and depression, anxiety, and suicidality were examined using multiple regression analysis. A total of 48 (19.1%) and 36 (14.3%) participants reported that they were cyberbullying victims or perpetrators, respectively. Those who had increased age and a higher parental occupational socioeconomic status, and reported more severe traditional passive bullying victimization were more likely to be cyberbullying victims. Those who had increased age and combined-type ADHD, and reported lower BAS reward responsiveness, more severe Internet addiction and more severe traditional passive bullying perpetration were more likely to be cyberbullying perpetrators. Cyberbullying victims reported more severe depression and suicidality than those who were not cyberbullying victims. A high proportion of male adolescents with ADHD are involved in cyberbullying. Clinicians, educational professionals, and parents of adolescents should monitor the possibility of cyberbullying involvement among male adolescents with ADHD who exhibit the cyberbullying correlates identified in this study. PMID:25241113

  12. Cyberbullying among male adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: prevalence, correlates, and association with poor mental health status.

    PubMed

    Yen, Cheng-Fang; Chou, Wen-Jiun; Liu, Tai-Ling; Ko, Chih-Hung; Yang, Pinchen; Hu, Huei-Fan

    2014-12-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence rates and multilevel correlates of cyberbullying victims and perpetrators among male adolescents diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in Taiwan. The relationships between cyberbullying involvement and depression, anxiety, and suicidality were also examined. The experiences of cyberbullying victimization and perpetration in 251 male adolescents with ADHD were assessed. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the correlates of cyberbullying victims and perpetrators. The relationships between cyberbullying involvement and depression, anxiety, and suicidality were examined using multiple regression analysis. A total of 48 (19.1%) and 36 (14.3%) participants reported that they were cyberbullying victims or perpetrators, respectively. Those who had increased age and a higher parental occupational socioeconomic status, and reported more severe traditional passive bullying victimization were more likely to be cyberbullying victims. Those who had increased age and combined-type ADHD, and reported lower BAS reward responsiveness, more severe Internet addiction and more severe traditional passive bullying perpetration were more likely to be cyberbullying perpetrators. Cyberbullying victims reported more severe depression and suicidality than those who were not cyberbullying victims. A high proportion of male adolescents with ADHD are involved in cyberbullying. Clinicians, educational professionals, and parents of adolescents should monitor the possibility of cyberbullying involvement among male adolescents with ADHD who exhibit the cyberbullying correlates identified in this study.

  13. Enzymatic correlates of energy status in wild yellow perch inhabiting clean and contaminated environments.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Charles; Campbell, Peter G C; Couture, Patrice

    2011-09-01

    Enzymes representing a variety of metabolic pathways were examined in yellow perch (Perca flavescens) collected from a metal-contaminated region (Rouyn-Noranda, Québec, Canada) to determine which were most closely related to fish condition factor, pyloric caeca weight, and visceral lipid accumulation, as well to seek a better understanding of the influence of metal contamination on the physiology and biometrics of perch. Compared to laboratory fish, wild perch were under important energy restrictions. The condition factor of wild fish was correlated with indicators of aerobic metabolism (citrate synthase, cytochrome C oxidase), protein anabolism (nucleoside diphosphokinase), and indicators of lipid accumulation (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, visceral lipid index). Pyloric caeca weights were well correlated with indicators of protein anabolism, but only when both seasons were examined together, possibly indicating a lag in the response of enzymes to changes in diet. The addition of contaminant stress to existing energy restrictions led to changes in the relationships between enzymes and biometrics, reducing the predictive power of the models for perch in contaminated lakes. The present study broadens our knowledge of the impact of metal contamination on energy accumulation and tissue metabolic capacities in wild perch.

  14. Status of correlation of Quaternary stratigraphic units in the western conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birkeland, P.W.; Crandell, D.R.; Richmond, G.M.

    1971-01-01

    Deposits of Quaternary age from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Coast in the western conterminous United States represent a great variety of environments. The deposits include those of continental and alpine glaciers, glacial meltwater streams, nonglacial streams, pluvial lakes, marine environments, eolian environments, and masswasting environments. On two charts we have attempted to correlate representative sequences of deposits of many of these environments, based on published sources and recent unpublished investigations. Evidence for correlation is based mainly on stratigraphic sequence, soil characteristics, the amount of subsequent erosion and interlayered volcanic ash beds identifiable as to source. Chronologic control is based on numerous radiocarbon dates, U-series dates on marine fossils, and K-Ar dates on volcanic rocks. The Bishop volcanic ash bed and one of the Pearlette-like volcanic ash beds appear to represent significant regional key horizons, respectively about 700,000 and 600,000 years old. Rock magnetism is shown to suggest the paleomagnetic polarity at the time of rock deposition. Assigned land-mammal ages of included fossils help to put limits on the age of some units. ?? 1971.

  15. Contraception choices in women with underlying medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Bonnema, Rachel A; McNamara, Megan C; Spencer, Abby L

    2010-09-15

    Primary care physicians often prescribe contraceptives to women of reproductive age with comorbidities. Novel delivery systems (e.g., contraceptive patch, contraceptive ring, single-rod implantable device) may change traditional risk and benefit profiles in women with comorbidities. Effective contraceptive counseling requires an understanding of a woman's preferences and medical history, as well as the risks, benefits, adverse effects, and contraindications of each method. Noncontraceptive benefits of combined hormonal contraceptives, such as oral contraceptive pills, include regulated menses, decreased dysmenorrhea, and diminished premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Oral contraceptive pills may be used safely in women with a range of medical conditions, including well-controlled hypertension, uncomplicated diabetes mellitus, depression, and uncomplicated valvular heart disease. However, women older than 35 years who smoke should avoid oral contraceptive pills. Contraceptives containing estrogen, which can increase thrombotic risk, should be avoided in women with a history of venous thromboembolism, stroke, cardiovascular disease, or peripheral vascular disease. Progestin-only contraceptives are recommended for women with contraindications to estrogen. Depo-Provera, a long-acting injectable contraceptive, may be preferred in women with sickle cell disease because it reduces the frequency of painful crises. Because of the interaction between antiepileptics and oral contraceptive pills, Depo-Provera may also be considered in women with epilepsy. Implanon, the single-rod implantable contraceptive device, may reduce symptoms of dysmenorrhea. Mirena, the levonorgestrel-containing intrauterine contraceptive system, is an option for women with menorrhagia, endometriosis, or chronic pelvic pain. PMID:20842989

  16. Contraception choices in women with underlying medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Bonnema, Rachel A; McNamara, Megan C; Spencer, Abby L

    2010-09-15

    Primary care physicians often prescribe contraceptives to women of reproductive age with comorbidities. Novel delivery systems (e.g., contraceptive patch, contraceptive ring, single-rod implantable device) may change traditional risk and benefit profiles in women with comorbidities. Effective contraceptive counseling requires an understanding of a woman's preferences and medical history, as well as the risks, benefits, adverse effects, and contraindications of each method. Noncontraceptive benefits of combined hormonal contraceptives, such as oral contraceptive pills, include regulated menses, decreased dysmenorrhea, and diminished premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Oral contraceptive pills may be used safely in women with a range of medical conditions, including well-controlled hypertension, uncomplicated diabetes mellitus, depression, and uncomplicated valvular heart disease. However, women older than 35 years who smoke should avoid oral contraceptive pills. Contraceptives containing estrogen, which can increase thrombotic risk, should be avoided in women with a history of venous thromboembolism, stroke, cardiovascular disease, or peripheral vascular disease. Progestin-only contraceptives are recommended for women with contraindications to estrogen. Depo-Provera, a long-acting injectable contraceptive, may be preferred in women with sickle cell disease because it reduces the frequency of painful crises. Because of the interaction between antiepileptics and oral contraceptive pills, Depo-Provera may also be considered in women with epilepsy. Implanon, the single-rod implantable contraceptive device, may reduce symptoms of dysmenorrhea. Mirena, the levonorgestrel-containing intrauterine contraceptive system, is an option for women with menorrhagia, endometriosis, or chronic pelvic pain.

  17. Synchrotron radiation analysis of possible correlations between metal status in human cementum and periodontal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.R.; Naftel, S.J.; Nelson, A.J.; Edwards, M.; Mithoowani, H.; Stakiw, J.

    2010-03-16

    Periodontitis is a serious disease that affects up to 50% of an adult population. It is a chronic condition involving inflammation of the periodontal ligament and associated tissues leading to eventual tooth loss. Some evidence suggests that trace metals, especially zinc and copper, may be involved in the onset and severity of periodontitis. Thus we have used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging on cross sections of diseased and healthy teeth using a microbeam to explore the distribution of trace metals in cementum and adhering plaque. The comparison between diseased and healthy teeth indicates that there are elevated levels of zinc, copper and nickel in diseased teeth as opposed to healthy teeth. This preliminary correlation between elevated levels of trace metals in the cementum and plaque of diseased teeth suggests that metals may play a role in the progress of periodontitis.

  18. Molybdate uptake by Agrobacterium tumefaciens correlates with the cellular molybdenum cofactor status.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Ali, Koral; Sonnenschein, Marleen; Robrahn, Laura; Strauss, Daria; Narberhaus, Franz; Masepohl, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    Many enzymes require the molybdenum cofactor, Moco. Under Mo-limiting conditions, the high-affinity ABC transporter ModABC permits molybdate uptake and Moco biosynthesis in bacteria. Under Mo-replete conditions, Escherichia coli represses modABC transcription by the one-component regulator, ModE, consisting of a DNA-binding and a molybdate-sensing domain. Instead of a full-length ModE protein, many bacteria have a shorter ModE protein, ModE(S) , consisting of a DNA-binding domain only. Here, we asked how such proteins sense the intracellular molybdenum status. We show that the Agrobacterium tumefaciens ModE(S) protein Atu2564 is essential for modABC repression. ModE(S) binds two Mo-boxes in the modA promoter as shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Northern analysis revealed cotranscription of modE(S) with the upstream gene, atu2565, which was dispensable for ModE(S) activity. To identify genes controlling ModE(S) function, we performed transposon mutagenesis. Tn5 insertions resulting in derepressed modA transcription mapped to the atu2565-modE(S) operon and several Moco biosynthesis genes. We conclude that A. tumefaciens ModE(S) activity responds to Moco availability rather than to molybdate concentration directly, as is the case for E. coli ModE. Similar results in Sinorhizobium meliloti suggest that Moco dependence is a common feature of ModE(S) regulators.

  19. Molybdate uptake by Agrobacterium tumefaciens correlates with the cellular molybdenum cofactor status.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Ali, Koral; Sonnenschein, Marleen; Robrahn, Laura; Strauss, Daria; Narberhaus, Franz; Masepohl, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    Many enzymes require the molybdenum cofactor, Moco. Under Mo-limiting conditions, the high-affinity ABC transporter ModABC permits molybdate uptake and Moco biosynthesis in bacteria. Under Mo-replete conditions, Escherichia coli represses modABC transcription by the one-component regulator, ModE, consisting of a DNA-binding and a molybdate-sensing domain. Instead of a full-length ModE protein, many bacteria have a shorter ModE protein, ModE(S) , consisting of a DNA-binding domain only. Here, we asked how such proteins sense the intracellular molybdenum status. We show that the Agrobacterium tumefaciens ModE(S) protein Atu2564 is essential for modABC repression. ModE(S) binds two Mo-boxes in the modA promoter as shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Northern analysis revealed cotranscription of modE(S) with the upstream gene, atu2565, which was dispensable for ModE(S) activity. To identify genes controlling ModE(S) function, we performed transposon mutagenesis. Tn5 insertions resulting in derepressed modA transcription mapped to the atu2565-modE(S) operon and several Moco biosynthesis genes. We conclude that A. tumefaciens ModE(S) activity responds to Moco availability rather than to molybdate concentration directly, as is the case for E. coli ModE. Similar results in Sinorhizobium meliloti suggest that Moco dependence is a common feature of ModE(S) regulators. PMID:27196733

  20. [Disease and contraception. Recent aspects].

    PubMed

    Rozenbaum, H

    1985-01-01

    This article reviews several different articles which have contributed to an understanding of the harmful or beneficial effects of oral contraceptives (OCs) on various diseases. The Royal College of General Practitioners study found that current OC users compared to women who had never used OCs had relative risks of .52 for menorrhagia, .37 for dysmenorrhea, .65 for irregular cycles, .72 for intermenstrual bleeding, and .71 for premenstrual syndrome. Several studies found combined OCs to offer protection against ovarian cysts. Microdose progestin only pills did not ameliorate most menstrual problems and aggravated ovarian cysts. Despite some theoretical grounds for suspecting an association between pituitary prolactinomas and OC use, recent studies have failed to find an increased relative risk for prolactinomas in women using OCs for contraceptive purposes, although 1 study found an increased risk in women using OCs for cycle control. 1 study reported 11 pregnancies in 30 diabetic women in 15 months of IUD use; the high rate was attributed to abnormal patterns of mineral deposit on the IUD surface. The 11 pregnancies occurred with 5 Gravigardes, 5 Saf-T-Coils, and 1 Dalkon Shield. Other studies on the contrary have noted no difference in pregnancy rates among 103 diabetic women using Copper Ts or 118 diabetic women using Lippes loops. Combined OCs appear to reduce the incidence of rheumatoid arthritis by 1/2 among current OC users and to protect former users as well. Combined OCs aggravate lupus erythmatous but synthetic progestins alone are effective without aggravating the condition. It has recently been argued that low dose OCs are not contraindicated in cases of sickle cell disease and may even offer protection against thromboembolic vascular accidents for women with sickle cell anemia. Estimates of relative risk of pelvic infection among IUD users vary from 1.5 to 6.5, with the risk apparently greatest for women under 25. Recent studies have indicated that

  1. [Contraceptive development for the future].

    PubMed

    Zatuchni, G I

    1984-06-01

    This article provides background on worldwide contraceptive usage as an introduction to its main topic, new methods of fertility regulation now under development in terms of their intervention in specific reproductive processes. A large number of chemical compounds and steroidal or nonsteroidal pharmacologic agents have been shown to interfere directly of indirectly with the processes of spermatogenesis, but most are associated with undesirable side effects. Nitrofuranes, alpha-chlorohydrine and othr chlorinated sugars, cyproterone acetate, estrogen, progestins, testosterone alone or in combination with other hormonal agents, and the cotton seed derivative gossypol have all been tested. Although research on some of them continues, questions questions of side effects, toxicity, and reversibility have arisen. Luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogs and especially antagonists offer promise as a male contraceptive use in conjunction with testosterone, but further research on efficacy and reversibility is needed. Percutaneous vas occlusion using chemical substances including a mixture of ethannol and formaldehyde, and occlusion of the vas by electrocautery are norsurgical techniques of vas occlusion that are expected to be more acceptable to men than current surgical techniques. Various removable devices for vas occlusion have been studies, such as silicone or nylon threads, valves of different kinds, polymers, and threads of metal, especially copper, but thus far all have posed serious technical problems. Methods under development which block sperm transport in the female genital tract include enzyme sperm inhibitors and long-acting steroids, spermicides, improved vaginal sponges, disposable diaphragms impregnated with spermicide, vaginal rings, water soluble spermicidal condoms, a latex cervical cap kept in place by suction, an intracervical device that would liberate progesterone, transcervical approaches to sterilization by occlusion of the salpingo

  2. Sexual Partners and Contraceptive Use: A 16-Year Prospective Study Predicting Abstinence and Risk Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siebenbruner, Jessica; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J.; Egeland, Byron

    2007-01-01

    Antecedents and correlates of sexual behavior among 167 (46 female) adolescents were examined in this multi-informant longitudinal study. Data were collected at birth through middle adolescence. Data on number of sexual partners and contraception use at age 16 defined sexual abstinence (SAs, n = 73), high-risk sexual behavior (HRTs, n = 45) and…

  3. Knowledge, Perceptions, and Motivations for Contraception: Influence on Teens' Contraceptive Consistency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Suzanne; Franzetta, Kerry; Manlove, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, the authors examine the association between contraceptive use patterns in teens' first sexual relationships and their knowledge of, perceptions of, and motivations for contraception and pregnancy prevention. Results from logistic regression analyses show that knowledge,…

  4. Factors associated with contraceptive use and intention to use contraceptives among married women in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tiruneh, Fentanesh Nibret; Chuang, Kun-Yang; Ntenda, Peter A M; Chuang, Ying-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Family planning has improved the well-being of families by preventing high-risk pregnancies and abortions and reducing unplanned pregnancies. However, the effectiveness of family planning efforts has not been consistent across countries. This study examined factors associated with contraceptive use among married women in Ethiopia. Data were from the 2011 Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey. The sample comprised 10,204 married women (aged 15-49 years). Logistic regression models were used to analyze the data. Among married women in Ethiopia, 29.2% used contraceptive methods. About 44.1% of women who were not current users of contraceptives reported that they intended to use contraceptives in the future. Age at first marriage, being educated, number of living children, exposure to mass media, being employed, having educated partners, and having been informed about contraceptive use at health facilities were positively associated with current contraceptive use. By contrast, older age, a rural resident, or Muslim; belonging to the Afar or Somali ethnic groups; desiring numerous children; having husbands who desired additional children; and abortion experience were negatively associated with current contraceptive use. Our findings indicated that improving education, providing employment opportunities for women, and providing training to family planning providers are essential to increasing contraceptive use. PMID:26212154

  5. Pretreatment Immune Status Correlates with Progression-Free Survival in Chemotherapy-Treated Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Tada, Kohei; Kitano, Shigehisa; Shoji, Hirokazu; Nishimura, Takashi; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Nagashima, Kengo; Aoki, Kazunori; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Honma, Yoshitaka; Iwasa, Satoru; Okita, Natsuko; Takashima, Atsuo; Kato, Ken; Yamada, Yasuhide; Katayama, Naoyuki; Boku, Narikazu; Heike, Yuji; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya

    2016-07-01

    It remains unclear whether the immunologic status of cells in peripheral blood can be used as a prognostic indicator of response to treatment for patients with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC). We therefore investigated the relationship between the pretreatment immunologic status of 40 patients with MCRC who planned to receive the first-line chemotherapy and their progression-free survival. Twenty-five immune cell subsets, including monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSC) and effector memory T cells (TEM), were measured by multicolor-flow cytometry. We divided patients into high and low (above and below the median, respectively) groups based on the median value for each immune cell subset and compared progression-free survival of the two groups. Patients with high M-MDSC, low CD4(+) TEM, or low CD8(+) TEM quantities had significantly shorter progression-free survival (P = 0.004, 0.005, and 0.002, respectively). Patients were classified into two prognostic groups based on numbers of adverse factors; having two or three adverse factors (n = 21, 52.5%) was correlated with significantly shorter progression-free survival compared with none or one (n = 19, 47.5%; P < 0.001). The presence of two or three adverse factors was an independent poor prognostic factor for progression-free survival (HR, 9.2; 95% confidence interval, 2.5-34.2; P < 0.001). These results provide evidence that pretreatment peripheral immune status can inform the outcome of patients with MCRC treated with first-line chemotherapy. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(7); 592-9. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197061

  6. Spatial variation in contraceptive use in Bangladesh: looking beyond the borders.

    PubMed

    Amin, Sajeda; Basu, Alaka Malwade; Stephenson, Rob

    2002-05-01

    This article promotes a more complete understanding of social change by analyzing spatial patterns of contraceptive use in Bangladesh and the contiguous state of West Bengal in India. Multilevel analyses that control for variations in individual- and household-level correlates show an important role for cross-border influences only in those districts that share a common language across the border. The districts that are positive outliers in contraception hug the Bangladesh-West Bengal border. A map of outliers shows that the positive outliers form a contiguous band in a manner suggestive of a role for contagion.

  7. Emergency Contraception: Do Your Patients Have a Plan B?

    PubMed

    Bullock, Holly; Salcedo, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    Emergency contraception is used after unprotected sex, inadequately protected sex, or sexual assault to reduce the risk of pregnancy. Of emergency contraceptive methods available in the United States, the copper intrauterine device has the highest efficacy, followed by ulipristal acetate, levonorgestrel-containing emergency contraceptive pills, and the Yuzpe method. However, access to the most effective methods is limited. Although advanced prescription of emergency contraceptive pills and counseling on emergency contraception to all reproductive-aged women is recommended, women should be advised to contact their health care providers after taking emergency contraceptive pills to discuss possible copper intrauterine device placement and other follow-up.

  8. Non-hormonal male contraception: A review and development of an Eppin based contraceptive.

    PubMed

    O'Rand, Michael G; Silva, Erick J R; Hamil, Katherine G

    2016-01-01

    Developing a non-hormonal male contraceptive requires identifying and characterizing an appropriate target and demonstrating its essential role in reproduction. Here we review the development of male contraceptive targets and the current therapeutic agents under consideration. In addition, the development of EPPIN as a target for contraception is reviewed. EPPIN is a well characterized surface protein on human spermatozoa that has an essential function in primate reproduction. EPPIN is discussed as an example of target development, testing in non-human primates, and the search for small organic compounds that mimic contraceptive antibodies; binding EPPIN and blocking sperm motility. Although many hurdles remain before the success of a non-hormonal male contraceptive, continued persistence should yield a marketable product.

  9. [Contraception in immigrant women: influence of sociocultural aspects on the choice of contraceptive method].

    PubMed

    Paraíso Torras, B; Maldonado Del Valle, M D; López Muñoz, A; Cañete Palomo, M L

    2013-01-01

    There are currently 6 million immigrants living in Spain. Half of them are women, the majority of whom are of childbearing age. These women, who suffer high rates of induced abortion, form a special group who require a special approach to their reproductive health. In order to study the use of contraceptive methods in this population, a review was made of 1100 clinical histories from our Sexual Health and Reproduction Clinic. Latin American women were the most prevalent group who came to seek information about contraception, followed by Eastern Europeans and Moroccans. Fewer Asian and Sub-Saharan women sought these services. The contraceptives most frequently used were the intrauterine device (used mostly by Latin American and Eastern European women), and combined oral contraception, most used by Moroccan women. It is important to advise the immigrant women about contraceptive methods, taking into account their preferences, in order to improve adherence to the method. PMID:23583187

  10. [Contraception in immigrant women: influence of sociocultural aspects on the choice of contraceptive method].

    PubMed

    Paraíso Torras, B; Maldonado Del Valle, M D; López Muñoz, A; Cañete Palomo, M L

    2013-01-01

    There are currently 6 million immigrants living in Spain. Half of them are women, the majority of whom are of childbearing age. These women, who suffer high rates of induced abortion, form a special group who require a special approach to their reproductive health. In order to study the use of contraceptive methods in this population, a review was made of 1100 clinical histories from our Sexual Health and Reproduction Clinic. Latin American women were the most prevalent group who came to seek information about contraception, followed by Eastern Europeans and Moroccans. Fewer Asian and Sub-Saharan women sought these services. The contraceptives most frequently used were the intrauterine device (used mostly by Latin American and Eastern European women), and combined oral contraception, most used by Moroccan women. It is important to advise the immigrant women about contraceptive methods, taking into account their preferences, in order to improve adherence to the method.

  11. Reasons for contraceptive nonuse among women having unmet need for contraception in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Sedgh, Gilda; Hussain, Rubina

    2014-06-01

    The level of unmet need for contraception-an important motivator of international family planning programs and policies-has declined only slightly in recent decades. This study draws upon data from 51 surveys conducted between 2006 and 2013 in Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean to provide an updated review of the reasons why many married women having unmet need are not practicing contraception. We examine the reasons for contraceptive nonuse and how these reasons vary across countries and according to national levels of unmet need and contraceptive use. We present specific findings regarding the most widespread reasons for nonuse, particularly infrequent sex and concerns regarding side effects or health risks. Our findings suggest that access to services that provide a range of methods from which to choose, and information and counseling to help women select and effectively use an appropriate method, can be critical in helping women having unmet need overcome obstacles to contraceptive use.

  12. [Correlation between social status, empowerment processes and the development of psychological health].

    PubMed

    Sperlich, S

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to deepen our knowledge about empirical evidence of empowerment on the basis of follow-up data from mother-child rehabilitation centres. The study focusses on three questions: i) to what extent can psychological health in different socioeconomic groups be improved by the intervention?, ii) Is there an impact of social position on the success of empowerment and iii) Is there any relevance of empowerment for sustainable improvement of psychological health? The study is based on data from 6 095 patients of 39 mother-child rehabilitation centres in Germany, collected up to one year after intervention. Empowerment was assessed by two self-defined scales, measuring positive changes i) in living circumstances, such as partnership or household ('Verhältnis-Empowerment') and ii) in health-related behaviours and competencies, such as better coping with problems and higher health awareness ('Verhaltens-Empowerment'). Health status was assessed by psychological symptoms and measured by SCL-K-9, a short form of the SCL-90-R. The socioeconomic position was determined by cluster analysis, the influence of social position and empowerment for psychological health was computed by analysis of regression. Before intervention mothers from the lower class showed higher degrees of psychological symptoms. After intervention they reached higher short-term effects, but six months later psychological symptoms increased again. In particular improvement of health-related behaviours and competencies was associated with better psychological health. The highest impact on health was found among mothers from the middle and lower class. These mothers, however, showed less success in optimising health-related behaviours and competencies. Twelve months after treatment the health-related impact of empowerment decreased. The theoretical evidence of empowerment could be empirically confirmed. However, decreasing health effects of empowerment after twelve months show that

  13. Chain breaking antioxidant status in rheumatoid arthritis: clinical and laboratory correlates.

    PubMed Central

    Situnayake, R D; Thurnham, D I; Kootathep, S; Chirico, S; Lunec, J; Davis, M; McConkey, B

    1991-01-01

    The ability of fresh sera to resist attack by peroxyl radicals (TRAP) was found to be significantly lower in 20 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) than in 20 healthy controls, consistent with the existence of a redox stress in RA imposed by inflammation. TRAP values in RA varied inversely with a combination of visual analogue pain scale, duration of early morning stiffness, grip strength, and articular index (reflecting inflammatory activity) using multiple linear regression analysis. The concentration of the antioxidant vitamin ascorbic acid was lower in RA plasma and the oxidation-reduction equilibrium of ascorbic acid was disturbed, giving further support to the existence of a redox stress. The major determinant of TRAP in vitro was found to be serum uric acid in RA and serum vitamin E in controls. Serum urate concentration in RA correlated inversely with oxidative changes in serum albumin and IgG. It is suggested that serum urate might have an antioxidant role under certain conditions by limiting free radical induced oxidative changes to protein during inflammation. PMID:1998395

  14. Neuropilin 1 expression correlates with differentiation status of epidermal cells and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Shahrabi-Farahani, Shokoufeh; Wang, Lili; Zwaans, Bernadette M. M.; Santana, Jeans M.; Shimizu, Akio; Takashima, Seiji; Kreuter, Michael; Coultas, Leigh; D'Amore, Patricia A.; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.; Akslen, Lars A.; Bielenberg, Diane R.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropilins (NRP) are cell surface receptors for VEGF and SEMA3 family members. The role of NRP in neurons and endothelial cells has been investigated, but the expression and role of NRP in epithelial cells is much less clear. Herein, the expression and localization of neuropilin 1 (NRP1) was investigated in human and mouse skin and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Results indicated that NRP1 mRNA and protein was expressed in the suprabasal epithelial layers of skin sections. NRP1 staining did not overlap with that of keratin 14 (K14) or proliferating cell nuclear antigen, but did colocalize with staining for keratin 1, indicating that differentiated keratinocytes express NRP1. Similar to the expression of NRP1, VEGF-A was expressed in suprabasal epithelial cells, whereas Nrp2 and VEGFR2 were not detectable in the epidermis. The expression of NRP1 correlated with a high degree of differentiation in human SCC specimens, human SCC xenografts, and mouse K14-HPV16 transgenic SCC. UVB irradiation of mouse skin induced Nrp1 upregulation. In vitro, Nrp1 was upregulated in primary keratinocytes in response to differentiating media or EGF-family growth factors. In conclusion, the expression of NRP1 is regulated in the skin and is selectively produced in differentiated epithelial cells. NRP1 may function as a reservoir to sequester VEGF ligand within the epithelial compartment, thereby modulating its bioactivity. PMID:24791743

  15. Correlation between male social status, testosterone levels, and parasitism in a dimorphic polygynous mammal.

    PubMed

    Negro, Sandra S; Caudron, Abigail K; Dubois, Michel; Delahaut, Philippe; Gemmell, Neil J

    2010-01-01

    Life history trade-offs have often been assumed to be the consequence of restrictions in the availability of critical resources such as energy and nutrients, which necessitate the differential allocation of resources to costly traits. Here, we examined endocrine (testosterone) and health (parasite burdens) parameters in territorial and non-territorial New Zealand fur seal males. We documented intra-sexual differences in sexual behaviours, testosterone levels, and parasitism that suggest a trade-off exists between reproductive success and physical health, particularly susceptibility to helminths and acanthocephalans, in males displaying different mating tactics (i.e., territorial and non-territorial tactics). Levels of testosterone were higher in territorial males and correlated positively with reproductive effort (i.e., intra- and inter-sexual interactions). However, these territorial males also exhibited high levels of parasitic infection, which may impair survival in the long-term. Our study, while limited in sample size, provides preliminary evidence for a link between male mating tactics, testosterone levels and parasite loads, and potential effects on reproductive success and life history that should be explored further. PMID:20856933

  16. Oral contraceptives and birth defects.

    PubMed

    Smithells, R W

    1981-06-01

    Although OCs (oral contraceptives) are not designed to be taken during pregnancy, in Europe and the U.S. they are taken by 2-5% of women in early pregnancy and by 1/4-1/3 of women 3-4 months prior to conception. The effects of OCs on folic acid and other vitamin metabolism are well known and provide a theoretical basis for possible teratogenicity, even when stopped prior to conception. Both hormone support therapy for threatened abortions and hormonal pregnancy tests have been abandoned in recent years, the first because it proved inefficacious, the second because there are better alternatives available. In neither of these cases were sex hormones shown to be teratogenic. Most cohort (prospective) and many case-control (retrospective) studies have shown no association between OC use and birth defects. Case-control methodology can be criticized because of recall bias and because of the difficulty of choosing entirely matched controls. Several studies have shown OC users to have characteristics slightly different from the general population, e.g., they are younger, more often unmarried, and are more likely to smoke during pregnancy. Any of these characteristics might influence the occurrence of teratogenicity. It is impossible to prove that OCs constitute a low-level teratogen. The author considers them nonteratogenic.

  17. [Chen Muhua holds meeting on contraceptives].

    PubMed

    1981-02-26

    On February 19, Chen Muhua, vice premier of the State Council and head of the family planning leading group, held a discussion with responsible comrades of the State Council's Family Planning Office, the State Pharmaceutical Administration, the Ministry of Chemical Industry, the State Planning Commission, the Ministry of Finance and other departments concerned with the production and supply of contraceptive drugs and devices. Vice Premier Chen Muhua pointed out: Contraceptive drugs and devices are the material guarantees for the practice of family planning. Doing a good job in the production and supply of contraceptives is a political task. It is hoped that from now on all departments concerned will pay still greater attention to it. Vice Premier Chen Muhua put forward 4 points: 1. To control population, the stress should be placed on contraception. This is the basic way. 2. It is necessary to popularize in an all-round way methods of using contraceptive drugs and devices. 3. Supply channels should be kept open for the convenience of the masses and to guarantee supplies. 4. It is necessary to strengthen scientific research. The quality and packing of presently available drugs and devices should be improved. At the same time, it is necessary to develop new contraceptive drugs and devices welcomed by the masses. Special efforts should be made in research in the field of Chinese herbal medicine. At the meeting the State Council Family Planning Office and the State Pharmaceutical Administration were instructed to conduct a joint investigation on present production arrangements and supply channels of contraceptive drugs and devices and to adopt effective measures to solve existing problems.

  18. Latin America's contributions to contraceptive development.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, E M

    1993-08-01

    The contributions of Latin Americans to contraceptive research began in 1951 when the Mexican chemist, Miramontes, invented norethisterone (norethindrone). Early studies on the use of this drug with ethinyl estradiol in an oral contraceptive (OC) pill were conducted in Puerto Rico. Publication of these studies was the second milestone in contraceptive development. While the leaders of this work, Pincus and Rock, were widely acknowledged, the many doctors who carried out the trials and reported their observations have been forgotten. The next milestone was the introduction of the estrogen-free OC by Martinez-Manautou and his collaborators in 1966. That same year Coutinho, de Souza, and Csapo reported on the contraceptive effect of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) based on work done in Brazil. Also from Brazil came the proposal to use MPA in combination with estrogen in a monthly contraceptive injectable. The development of Depo-Provera and other injectables also took place mostly in Latin America. The first norgestrel-containing pill was also developed in Brazil, and successful efforts to reduce the dosage to a half tablet prefigured the development of low-dose OCs. Norplant was developed in Brazil, with the first clinical trails taking place in Chile. Other proposals followed during the late 1970s, including efforts to develop a male contraceptive. The first clinical trials with gossypol outside of China took place in Brazil. A Latino, Zipper, also proposed the use of copper in IUDs which increased the acceptability of this method. In addition to the researchers cited here, many others have contributed decisively to contraceptive development. The fact that they are not receiving the recognition they deserve is disappointing since the only real reward for their dedicated work would be recognition of their results.

  19. Correlation between nutritional status and comprehensive physical performance measures among older adults with undernourishment in residential institutions

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Devinder KA; Manaf, Zahara A; Yusoff, Noor Aini M; Muhammad, Nur A; Phan, Mei Fang; Shahar, Suzana

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The consequences of combined undernourishment and decreased physical performance in older adults are debilitating and increases cost of care. To date, the information regarding the association between nutritional status and physical performance does not provide a complete picture. Most studies used limited or self-reported measures to evaluate physical performance. The objective of this study was to examine the correlation between nutritional status and comprehensive physical performance measures among undernourished older adults who reside in residential institutions. Methods Forty-seven older adults (26 males, 21 females) aged ≥60 (69.23±8.63) years who were identified as undernourished from two residential institutions participated in this study. A battery of physical performance tests (10 m gait speed test, dominant hand grip strength test, timed five-repetition sit-to-stand test, ten step test, arm curl test, scratch test, and respiratory muscle strength test), biochemical profiles (serum albumin, hemoglobin, serum ferritin, and prealbumin levels), and falls risk using the short-form Physiological Profile Approach were performed. The Functional Ability Questionnaire and Geriatric Depression Scale were also administered. Results The results demonstrated that generally older adults with undernourishment scored poorly on the physical performance tests, had depression, and a high risk of falls. Biochemical results demonstrated that 10.9% of the participants were anemic, 63% had hypoalbuminemia (<3.5 g/dL), and 21.7% were at risk of protein energy malnutrition with prealbumin level (100–170 mg/L). A significant correlation (P<0.05) was demonstrated between hand grip strength and ferritin, between self-reported mobility dependence and prealbumin levels, and between self-reported mobility tiredness and body mass index. Conclusion These results confirm that older adults with undernutrition have poor physical function, higher falls risk, and depression

  20. The ecological proportion of indigenous bacterial populations in saliva is correlated with oral health status.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Toru; Nakano, Yoshio; Kumagai, Takashi; Yasui, Masaki; Kamio, Noriaki; Shibata, Yukie; Shiota, Susumu; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2009-01-01

    To obtain deeper insights into the etiology of oral disease, an understanding of the composition of the surrounding bacterial environments that lead to health or disease is required, which is attracting increasing attention. In this study, the bacterial compositions in the saliva of 200 subjects aged 15-40 years were depicted as peak patterns by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA genes. The subjects were classified into three clusters by partitioning around medoids clustering based on their T-RFLP profiles, and the clinical oral health parameters of the clusters were compared. The clustering of the T-RFLP profiles in this study was mainly based on differences in the abundance distribution of the dominant terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) detected in most of the subjects. Predicted from the sizes of the TRFs, the characteristically more predominant members of each were Prevotella and Veillonella species in cluster I; Streptococcus species in cluster II and Neisseria, Haemophilus or Aggregatibacter species and Porphyromonas species in cluster III. The parameters associated with periodontal disease were significantly different among the clusters. Clusters I and II had a higher percentage of sites of periodontal pockets greater than 4 mm than cluster III, and cluster I contained sites exhibiting bleeding on probing more often than cluster II or III; no significant differences were observed in other parameters. These results suggest that the abundance distribution of commensal bacteria in saliva is correlated with periodontal health, and might be involved in the susceptibility of an individual to periodontal disease. PMID:18830275

  1. Zinc presence in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and its correlation with oestrogen receptor status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, M. J.; Al-Ebraheem, A.; Geraki, K.; Leek, R.; Jubb, A.; Harris, A. L.

    2009-07-01

    Zinc is known to play an important role in many cellular processes, and the levels of zinc are controlled by specific transporters from the ZIP (SLC39A) influx transporter group and the ZnT (SLC30A) efflux transporter group. The distribution of zinc was measured in 59 samples of invasive ductal carcinoma of breast using synchrotron radiation micro probe x-ray fluorescence facilities. The samples were formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue micro arrays (TMAs) enabling a high throughput of samples and allowing us to correlate the distribution of trace metals with tumour cell distribution and, for the first time, important biological variables. The samples were divided into two classes, 34 oestrogen receptor positive (ER+ve) and 25 oestrogen receptor negative (ER-ve) based on quantitative immunohistochemistry assessment. The overall levels of zinc (i.e. in tumour and surrounding tissue) in the ER+ve samples were on average 60% higher than those in the ER-ve samples. The zinc levels were higher in the ER+ve tumour areas compared to the ER-ve tumour areas with the mean levels in the ER+ve samples being approximately 80% higher than the mean ER-ve levels. However, the non-tumour tissue regions of the samples contained on average the same levels of zinc in both types of breast cancers. The relative levels of zinc in tumour areas of the tissue were compared with levels in areas of non-tumour surrounding tissue. There was a significant increase in zinc in the tumour regions of the ER+ve samples compared to the surrounding regions (P < 0.001) and a non-significant increase in the ER-ve samples. When comparing the increase in zinc in the tumour regions expressed as a percentage of the surrounding non-tumour tissue zinc level in the same sample, a significant difference between the ER+ve and ER-ve samples was found (P < 0.01).

  2. Canadian Contraception Consensus (Part 2 of 4).

    PubMed

    Black, Amanda; Guilbert, Edith; Costescu, Dustin; Dunn, Sheila; Fisher, William; Kives, Sari; Mirosh, Melissa; Norman, Wendy V; Pymar, Helen; Reid, Robert; Roy, Geneviève; Varto, Hannah; Waddington, Ashley; Wagner, Marie-Soleil; Whelan, Anne Marie; Ferguson, Carrie; Fortin, Claude; Kielly, Maria; Mansouri, Shireen; Todd, Nicole

    2015-11-01

    Objectif : Fournir des lignes directrices aux fournisseurs de soins quant à l’utilisation de modes de contraception pour la prévention de la grossesse et quant à la promotion d’une sexualité saine. Issues : Orientation des praticiens canadiens en ce qui concerne l’efficacité globale, le mécanisme d’action, les indications, les contre-indications, les avantages n’étant pas liés à la contraception, les effets indésirables, les risques et le protocole de mise en œuvre des modes de contraception abordés; planification familiale dans le contexte de la santé sexuelle et du bien-être général; méthodes de counseling en matière de contraception; et accessibilité et disponibilité des modes de contraception abordés au Canada. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans MEDLINE et The Cochrane Library entre janvier 1994 et janvier 2015 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (p. ex. contraception, sexuality, sexual health) et de mots clés (p. ex. contraception, family planning, hormonal contraception, emergency contraception) appropriés. Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux études observationnelles et aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs publiés en anglais entre janvier 1994 et janvier 2015. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en juin 2015. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Valeurs : La qualité des résultats a été évaluée au moyen des critères décrits dans

  3. Canadian Contraception Consensus (Part 1 of 4).

    PubMed

    Black, Amanda; Guilbert, Edith; Costescu, Dustin; Dunn, Sheila; Fisher, William; Kives, Sari; Mirosh, Melissa; Norman, Wendy V; Pymar, Helen; Reid, Robert; Roy, Geneviève; Varto, Hannah; Waddington, Ashley; Wagner, Marie-Soleil; Whelan, Anne Marie; Ferguson, Carrie; Fortin, Claude; Kielly, Maria; Mansouri, Shireen; Todd, Nicole

    2015-10-01

    Objectif : Fournir des lignes directrices aux fournisseurs de soins quant à l’utilisation de modes de contraception pour la prévention de la grossesse et quant à la promotion d’une sexualité saine. Issues : Orientation des praticiens canadiens en ce qui concerne l’efficacité globale, le mécanisme d’action, les indications, les contre-indications, les avantages n’étant pas liés à la contraception, les effets indésirables, les risques et le protocole de mise en œuvre des modes de contraception abordés; planification familiale dans le contexte de la santé sexuelle et du bien-être général; méthodes de counseling en matière de contraception; et accessibilité et disponibilité des modes de contraception abordés au Canada. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans MEDLINE et The Cochrane Library entre janvier 1994 et janvier 2015 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (p. ex. contraception, sexuality, sexual health) et de mots clés (p. ex. contraception, family planning, hormonal contraception, emergency contraception) appropriés. Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux études observationnelles et aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs publiés en anglais entre janvier 1994 et janvier 2015. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en juin 2015. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Valeurs : La qualité des résultats a été évaluée au moyen des critères décrits dans

  4. Adolescent sexuality, contraceptive health and STD.

    PubMed

    Irmak, Y; Jainudeen, M R; Irvin, R P

    1986-10-01

    Major topics addressed by this article on adolescent sexuality include adolescent festivals, adolescent reproductive psychophysiology, contraception for adolescents, the World Federation of Contraception and Health, sexually transmitted diseases, and recommendations for research. The purpose of adolescent festivals is to increase communication between young people and their parents on subjects such as sexuality. Of particular concern is the traumatic emotional, physical, and financial impact of adolescent pregnancy, both in developed and developing countries. Contraceptive methods considered to be most appropriate for use in developing countries are injectable Depo-Provera and the Norplant contraceptive implant system. To reduce the problem of adolescent pregnancy, television programs need to portray responsible sexuality, family responsibility and involvement must be strengthended, funds for education and prevention programs should be increased, and there must be more intraprofessional collaboration. The World Federation of Contraception and Health, a nonprofit multicenter institution, has been created to make recommendations on how current resources can be utilized to address problems of adolescent sexuality. Adolescent clubs are being set up to provide adolescents and their families with computer support and information. Another concern is the spread of sexually transmitted diseases that cause infections in the genitourinary tract and threaten to impair future fertility. The incidence of diseases such as chlamydia trachomatis and nongonococcal urethritis is especially high in teenagers. Needed in the future are more multicenter studies conducted by microbiologists, pathophysiologists, family planning experts, epidemiologists, venereologists, gynecologists, obstetricians, and dermatologists on the many aspects of adolescent sexuality.

  5. Correlation of oral health status of socially handicapped children with their oral heath knowledge, attitude, and practices from India

    PubMed Central

    Shanbhog, Raghavendra; Raju, Veena; Nandlal, Bhojraj

    2014-01-01

    Background: Information on oral health knowledge and practice in orphanage house children is essential for healthcare policy makers to promote oral health resources and address oral health needs of this unprivileged group of society. Objectives: To assess the source of information, level of knowledge, attitude, and practice toward oral hygiene and oral health among socially handicapped children from city of Mysore, Karnataka state, India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 488 children of 12-14 years of age living in five different orphanage houses of Mysore district. Data regarding knowledge and practice were collected through structured questionnaire and oral health status by type III clinical oral examinations by two trained examiners. Decayed, Missing, Filled, Teeth (DMFT) and OH I-S was then correlated with the above information. Spearman's correlation test was used to measure the correlation. Results: The final data analysis included 488 children, of which 216 (44.26%) were boys and 272 (55.74%) were girls. A total of 88.5% children showed one or more decayed teeth in their oral cavity, with an overall mean DMFT of 3.55. Among DMF, component D showed maximum value with mean 3.42, followed by components F and M. Correlation between source of information, knowledge, and attitude for oral health to oral hygiene index (OHI-S; P < 0.05) and gingival index (P < 0.001) showed highly significant negative values. Correlation between oral hygiene practice to OHI-S, DMFT, and gingival index (P < 0.001) showed highly significant (P < 0.001) negative values. Conclusions: Although children of orphanage have positive attitude toward oral health, knowledge and practice among children are still below the satisfactory level. The children did not receive appropriate information or, if informed, were not re-evaluated or reinforced for its practical application by the concerned authority. The findings of this study suggest that awareness on the

  6. Oral contraceptives did not affect biochemical folate indexes and homocysteine concentrations in adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Green, T J; Houghton, L A; Donovan, U; Gibson, R S; O'Connor, D L

    1998-01-01

    The impact of oral contraceptive (OC) use, smoking, and alcohol drinking on biochemical indexes of folate and vitamin B-12 was investigated in 229 adolescents 14-20 years old recruited from advertisements in Ontario, Canada. Subjects completed a life-style questionnaire and a 3-day, weighed food record, followed by overnight fasting and the collection of blood samples. Of the 48 participants (21%) who were OC users, 30 had used the pill for more than 12 months. Only 37 adolescents (16%) smoked, but 94 (60%) had consumed alcohol in the month preceding the study. Median daily intake of folate and vitamin B-12 (including intake from supplements) was 215 mcg and 1.9 mcg, respectively. OC use, smoking, and alcohol consumption were not significantly associated with lower serum or red blood cell folate levels, after controlling for folate intake. Serum homocysteine levels were not correlated with smoking or OC use, but were 13% higher among alcohol drinkers than nondrinkers. Finally, although smoking and alcohol use were not associated with serum B-12 levels, OC use was linked with an estimated 33% lower serum B-12 level than was nonuse. These findings fail to validate concerns that OC use has a negative impact on the folate status of adolescent females, but suggest a need to improve the dietary folate intake of young women who smoke.

  7. Evidence from peninsular Malaysia of breastfeeding as a contraceptive method.

    PubMed

    Rao, S R

    1992-01-01

    This report examines Malaysian women's perceptions of the contraceptive effect of breastfeeding, the determinants of their perceptions, and any effect these perceptions might have on nursing duration and contraceptive use. The report also considers whether women are consciously replacing breastfeeding with modern contraceptive methods. Data from the 1976 Malaysian Family Life Survey are analyzed, and the author concludes that Malaysian women do perceive that breastfeeding has a contraceptive effect, but that this perception is not universal. Ethnicity and desire for a particular family size are the most significant determinants of this perception. Finally, Malaysian women's recognition of the contraceptive effect of nursing does not influence either the duration of their breastfeeding or their adoption of contraception. Malaysian women may not be abandoning breastfeeding to adopt contraception. More probably, breastfeeding declines and contraceptive prevalence increases with modernization. PMID:1293861

  8. [Clinical study results with the vaginal contraceptive preparation, traceptin].

    PubMed

    Chachava, K V; Chumburidze, B I; Bakradze, M M

    1980-03-01

    This article presents the results of a clinical study which used traceptin vaginally for contraception. Traceptin is a safe and convenient application agent with a contraceptive effectiveness rate of 94%. (Authors' modified) PMID:6990808

  9. Menstrual cycle, contraception, and performance.

    PubMed

    Frankovich, R J; Lebrun, C M

    2000-04-01

    Although understanding of the unique physiology of the female athlete has increased, there are still many questions to be answered. Endogenous and exogenous female sex steroids have been shown to influence various cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic parameters, but these changes probably have minimal impact on the ability of most recreational athletes to participate in and enjoy their sport. Statistically significant data may or may not have clinical or performance relevance. By the same token, a statistically nonsignificant change may mean the difference between first and second place to an elite athlete. For an athlete concerned about maximizing performance, individual variability in menstrual cycle changes to various performance parameters must be considered. It is difficult to predict how accurately controlled laboratory findings from a study population apply to an individual competitor on the playing field. Athletes taking OCs for contraception or for menstrual cycle control may be able to minimize any potential side effects and performance influences by taking the lower dose triphasic pills and the newer progestins. For women with menstrual dysfunction, OCs may provide a predictable hormonal milieu for training and competition. Further scientific study is needed using large-scale, prospective, randomized clinical trials on trained athletes and accurate hormonal measurements to determine the phase of the menstrual cycle to determine short- and long-term effects of cycle phase and OCs in exercising women. As more questions continue to be answered, physicians and sport scientists will be better able to guide women not only to maximize their performance but to ensure lifelong good health.

  10. Contraceptive implants: long acting and provider dependent contraception raises concerns about freedom of choice.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    David Bromham's editorial on contraceptive implants ignores the wider issues to voice concern that trial by media could limit contraceptive choice by jeopardising research into new methods. However, it is more beneficial to the public for points of conflict to be debated openly. Furthermore, the impetus for research into new contraceptive technology is driven by profit and political motives and is only marginally affected by the media. Implanted contraceptives may increase the choice of contraceptive methods, but they put control of fertility increasingly into the hands of the medical profession. Herein lies their greatest problem: their potential to increase providers' control over clients' choice. There is the danger that certain groups of women may be targeted for their use: in the United States the coercive use of Norplant for mothers receiving welfare benefit has been suggested. Long acting contraceptives are a contraceptive of choice only when they are available without pressure, as part of a wider menu; when instant removal on request is guaranteed; and when there is an open and free flow of information and opinions between users, health professionals, and special interest groups. Images p1394-a PMID:8956712

  11. Study of characteristics of condom-acceptors using condom as first choice and alternative method of contraception in 1981-1987 at the NPFDB, GHKL.

    PubMed

    Low Boon Song

    1990-06-01

    Factors influencing condom acceptance were studied and compared in 2 groups of condom-acceptors--those using condoms as a 1st method of contraception and those using condoms as an alternative method of contraception. Data was obtained by reviewing the condom-acceptor cards during 1981-1987 at the General Hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 208 cards for the 1st group and 230 for the 2nd group were included in the study. Statistical analysis was conducted to determine characteristics influencing condom-use. AGe of wife, duration of marriage, number of living children, wife's level of education and socioeconomic status were identified as factors influencing condom acceptance. No significant difference was observed between the 2 group concerning their purpose of contraception. Age of wife had a significant influence on the use of condoms as contraception. Age of wife had a significant influence on the use of condoms as contraception; 74.5% of group 1 users were 31 years and 56.5% of group 2 users were 30 years. A very significant relationship also exist between condom use and duration of marriage and number of living children; condom-acceptors using condoms as the 1st method of contraception did so within 9 years of marriage (85.6%) and practiced condom use when they had 2 of children (73.6%) while those who used condoms subsequently were married 10 years (46.5%) and did so after having 3 or children (57.8%). Significant differences were observed between groups in higher socioeconomic status and higher level of education. With 7 or more years of education, a significant proportion of condom-acceptors used condoms as a 1st method of contraception as compared with those who used it as a subsequent method of contraception. For the higher socioeconomic, a significant number of acceptors used condoms as a 1st method of contraception.

  12. Preventing Unintended Pregnancy and HIV Transmission: Effects of the HIV Treatment Cascade on Contraceptive Use and Choice in Rural KwaZulu-Natal

    PubMed Central

    Raifman, Julia; Chetty, Terusha; Tanser, Frank; Mutevedzi, Tinofa; Matthews, Philippa; Herbst, Kobus; Pillay, Deenan

    2014-01-01

    Background: For women living with HIV, contraception using condoms is recommended because it prevents not only unintended pregnancy but also acquisition of other sexually transmitted infections and onward transmission of HIV. Dual-method dual-protection contraception (condoms with other contraceptive methods) is preferable over single-method dual-protection contraception (condoms alone) because of its higher contraceptive effectiveness. We estimate the effect of progression through the HIV treatment cascade on contraceptive use and choice among HIV-infected women in rural South Africa. Methods: We linked population-based surveillance data on contraception collected by the Wellcome Trust Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies to data from the local antiretroviral treatment (ART) program in Hlabisa subdistrict, KwaZulu-Natal. In bivariate probit regression, we estimated the effects of progressing through the cascade on contraceptive choice among HIV-infected sexually active women aged 15–49 years (N = 3169), controlling for a wide range of potential confounders. Findings: Contraception use increased across the cascade from <40% among HIV-infected women who did not know their status to >70% among women who have been on ART for 4–7 years. Holding other factors equal (1) awareness of HIV status, (2) ART initiation, and (3) being on ART for 4–7 years increased the likelihood of single-method/dual-method dual protection by the following percentage points (pp), compared with women who were unaware of their HIV status: (1) 4.6 pp (P = 0.030)/3.5 pp (P = 0.001), (2) 10.3 pp (P = 0.003)/5.2 pp (P = 0.007), and (3) 21.6 pp (P < 0.001)/11.2 pp (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Progression through the HIV treatment cascade significantly increased the likelihood of contraception in general and contraception with condoms in particular. ART programs are likely to contribute to HIV prevention through the behavioral pathway of changing contraception use and choice. PMID

  13. Densitometric analysis of Western blot (immunoblot) assays for human immunodeficiency virus antibodies and correlation with clinical status.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, G; Amiraian, K; Frey, H; Stevens, R W; Berns, D S

    1987-01-01

    Western blot assays for antibodies directed against components of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were examined with a densitometer and integrator. Antibody responses to seven HIV proteins were determined from the areas under the peaks of bands on blots from 430 seropositive individuals. Antibody responses corresponded qualitatively and quantitatively with clinical status. The Western blot assays examined were done on single specimens from individuals in one of four clinical states: asymptomatic with no risk factor identified, asymptomatic with risk factor(s) identified, AIDS-related complex, and AIDS. The ratios of gp41 antibody to p24 antibody and of gp41 antibody to total HIV antibodies increased, and the number of total HIV antibodies decreased progressively in these populations. Parameters were assigned to characterize the typical response found in AIDS: gp41 antibody/p24 antibody ratio, greater than or equal to 2.0; gp41 antibody/total HIV antibodies ratio, greater than or equal to 0.30; and number of total HIV antibodies, less than or equal to 25.0 signal units. Parameter match increased with progression of clinical status. These parameters were applied in a brief follow-up study of 34 HIV-infected asymptomatic individuals who developed AIDS-related complex or AIDS. Initial specimens showed a stronger correlation than our population data base had predicted, suggesting that the parameters have prognostic value. Densitometric analysis of antibody responses on Western blot assays of single or serial specimens should prove useful to physicians in staging and monitoring HIV-infected individuals and in predicting which individuals will progress to AIDS. Images PMID:2444624

  14. The correlation between EGFR mutation status and the risk of brain metastasis in patients with lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Sun, Suo-Zhu; Yang, Ming; Shi, Jian-Ling; Xu, Wei; Wang, Xi-Fan; Song, Mao-Min; Chen, Huo-Ming

    2015-08-01

    To explore the correlation between epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status and the risk of brain metastasis (BM) in patients with lung adenocarcinoma, the clinical data of 100 patients with pathologically confirmed lung adenocarcinoma and known EGFR mutation status at exon 18, 19, 20, or 21 were analyzed retrospectively. The incidence of BM was similar between patients with wild-type EGFR and those with EGFR mutations (p = 0.48). However, among patients with EGFR mutations, the incidence of BM was significantly higher in patients with mutation at exon 19 than in patients with mutation at other sites (p = 0.007). Besides, among patients with heterochronous BM, 66.7 % had EGFR mutations. Regarding brain-metastasis-free survival (BMFS), patients with EGFR sensitive mutations (mutation at exon 19/21/and dual mutation) had significantly shorter BMFS compared with patients with wild-type EGFR (p = 0.018). For patients treated only with chemotherapy, BM was an unfavorable prognostic factor. Patients with BM had worse overall survival compared with those without BM (p = 0.035). However, in patients with BM and EGFR sensitive mutations, those treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) had significantly longer overall survival compared with those treated with chemotherapy only (p = 0.0081). In conclusion, among patients with EGFR mutations, those mutated at exon 19 had the highest incidence of BM. Furthermore, patients with EGFR mutations are more likely to develop heterochronous BM. The BMFS was significantly shorter in patients with EGFR sensitive mutations. TKIs improved the survival of patients with lung adenocarcinoma and BM who harbored EGFR sensitive mutations.

  15. Statistical approach for evaluation of contraceptive data.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Vriyesh

    2008-04-01

    This article will define how best to analyse data collected from a longitudinal follow up on contraceptive use and discontinuation, with special consideration to the needs of developing countries. Accessibility and acceptability of contraceptives at the ground level remains low and it is an overlooked area of research. The author presents a set of propositions that are closer in spirit to practical recommendations than to formal theorems. We will comment specifically on issues of model validation of model through bootstrapping techniques. The paper makes a presentation of a multivariate model to assess the rate of discontinuation of contraception, while accounting for the possibility that there may be factors that influence both a couple's choice of provider and their probability of discontinuation.

  16. Statistical approach for evaluation of contraceptive data.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Vriyesh

    2008-04-01

    This article will define how best to analyse data collected from a longitudinal follow up on contraceptive use and discontinuation, with special consideration to the needs of developing countries. Accessibility and acceptability of contraceptives at the ground level remains low and it is an overlooked area of research. The author presents a set of propositions that are closer in spirit to practical recommendations than to formal theorems. We will comment specifically on issues of model validation of model through bootstrapping techniques. The paper makes a presentation of a multivariate model to assess the rate of discontinuation of contraception, while accounting for the possibility that there may be factors that influence both a couple's choice of provider and their probability of discontinuation. PMID:20695150

  17. The use of contraception among abortion applicants.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoni, D; Jain, S C

    1985-01-01

    Applicants for therapeutic abortion at an outpatient unit of a general hospital in the capital city of Newfoundland were interviewed, and the contraception related findings are presented. The total number of therapeutic abortions performed in 1977 in the province was 493, of which 416 (84%) were performed in Grace General Hospital, where the study was conducted. The 416 women ranged in age from 14-45 years. 72% were under age 24. 41% had achieved only elementary school education. 65% came from the capital city and from the surrounding areas, within a radius of 100 miles. The rest of the women had traveled up to 700 miles or more to procure the service. Of the total of 416, 10, or 2%, claimed that they had no knowledge that there are ways to prevent conception. The 2nd group of 170 women (41%) knew that contraceptive methods did exist but for various reasons had never used any method at any time in their lives. The 3rd group of 236 (57%) consisted of those who had used some form of contraception. This group was further divided: 181 women (44%) had used birth control methods within the last 6 months or earlier but not at the time of conception; the rest had been consistent contraceptors but the method had failed. Of the 10 women who claimed they had absolutely no knowledge of contraception, 6 were below age 17, 7 were unmarried, and 5 were Roman Catholics. Approximately 1/3 of the 170 women who knew of contraceptive methods but did not use them were under age 16 and would have required parental consent to receive contraceptive counseling and/or prescriptions. For approximately 2/3 of this group, birth control methods were available and accessible since they were above the age of 17 and could have sought contraceptive counseling. The reasons this group of women gave for not using contraceptives fell under 3 main headings. 1/3 attributed it to ignorance and/or carelessness. Another 1/3 consisted of those who had not planned on having sexual intercourse. The rest

  18. Contraceptive equity bills continue to gain.

    PubMed

    2000-02-01

    Contraceptive equity legislation could reduce the number of unintended pregnancies and the need for abortion by providing affordable and reliable contraception for women. However, businesses are not keen on the idea of covering contraception in health plans. They argue that the role of health insurance is to treat illness and provide a safety net between health disasters and destitution, thus excluding pregnancy since it is not an illness or a disaster. If this were the case, then erectile dysfunction would not qualify any more than pregnancy, yet health plans nationwide are agreeing to cover the drug Viagra. Moreover, they say that a change in policy would cause an immediate increase in reimbursement expenses, as well as stop small business from providing health coverage due to its cost. Helping women plan their pregnancies is cost-effective, and helping female employees prevent unintended pregnancies will save far more money than skimping on prescription coverage. PMID:12295743

  19. Internet opens access to contraceptive methods.

    PubMed

    1998-09-01

    US women are able to import contraceptive agents not available in the US from two Canadian companies who advertise their products on the World Wide Web. US regulations permit importation of small quantities of drugs for personal use even if the drugs have not received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. Most US women order the Protectaid contraceptive sponge, which is sold over-the-counter in Canada, because contraceptive sponges are no longer available in the US. One of the companies also exports the levonorgestrel-releasing IUD, but, in this case, the company only ships the product to physicians. The legal liabilities of inserting an IUD that has not received FDA approval are the same as for any sanctioned product. While manufacturers of a product not distributed in the US may have protection from liability, the distributor may be liable. PMID:12348705

  20. Preferences for new and existing contraceptive products.

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Denzil G; Knox, Stephanie; Viney, Rosalie; Haas, Marion; Street, Deborah J

    2011-09-01

    New contraceptive methods provide greater choice in terms of effectiveness, management of side-effects, convenience and frequency of administration and flexibility, but make the decisions about contraception more complex. There are limited data on the factors that determine women's choices among these alternatives, to inform providers about the factors which are most important to women, or to predict uptake of new products. This paper reports on a choice experiment designed to elicit women's preferences in relation to prescribed contraception and to forecast the impact of the introduction of two new products into the Australian market. A generalised multinomial logit model is estimated and used in the simulation exercise. The model forecasts that the hormonal patch would be well received among women, achieving a greater market share than current non-pill products, but the vaginal ring would have limited appeal.

  1. A male pill? Gender discrepancies in contraceptive commitment.

    PubMed

    Laird, J

    1994-01-01

    The limited number of male contraceptive methods is often assumed to comprise the major obstacle to greater male responsibility for fertility control. To assess male commitment to pregnancy prevention, 83 male and 120 female students at the University of California, Santa Barbara, were questioned about their attitudes toward an oral contraceptive (OC) intended for their gender. The male respondents were presented with a description of a hypothetical male pill as similar to the female pill as possible. 60% of female respondents had taken the pill, and 62% of men had been sexually involved with an OC user. 71% of women, compared to only 20% of men, indicated they were either likely or very likely to take an OC. Men consistently rated a male OC as more against nature, more of a bother, more harmful, and more against their beliefs than a female OC. 50.8% of women, versus 71.6% of males, indicated they had no hesitancy about their sexual partner taking OCs. The variable with the strongest correlation with hesitancy toward partner OC use was, among women, the notion that the pill is too much of a bother, and, among men, concerns the female pill is harmful. Overall, the study findings indicated that even educated, middle-class men are unwilling to assume the risks and inconveniences associated with effective contraception, yet expect their female partners to do so. Thus, the development of more male birth control methods will not be sufficient to increase male involvement in pregnancy prevention given the salience of gender power relationships.

  2. Increasing access to modern contraceptives: the potential role of community solidarity through altruistic contributions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need for universal access to modern contraceptives in Nigeria, to facilitate the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals and other national goals. This study provides information on the potential role of community solidarity in increasing access to contraceptives for the most-poor people through exploration of the role of altruism by determining level of altruistic willingness to pay (WTP) for modern contraceptives across different geographic contexts in Nigeria. Methods It was a cross-sectional national survey which took place in six states spread across the six-geopolitical zones of the country. In each state, an urban and a rural area were selected for the study, giving a total of 6 urban and 6 rural sites. A pre-tested interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect information from at least 720 randomly selected householders from each state. The targeted respondent in a household was a female primary care giver of child bearing age (usually the wives), or in her absence, another female household member of child bearing age. A scenario on altruistic WTP was presented before the value was elicited using a binary with open-ended follow-up question format. Test of validity of elicited altruistic WTP was undertaken using Tobit regression. Findings More than 50 % of the respondents across all the states were willing to contribute some money so that the very poor would be provided with modern contraceptives. The average amount of money that people were willing to contribute annually was 650 Naira (US$4.5). Mean altruistic WTP differed across SES quintiles and urban-rural divide (p < .01). Multiple regression analysis showed that age was negatively related to altruistic WTP (p < 0.05). However, years of schooling, being employed by government or being a big business person, prior experience of paying for contraceptives and socioeconomic status had statistically significant effects on altruistic WTP (p < 0

  3. Dilemmas of public sector contraceptive development.

    PubMed

    Zeidenstein, G

    1993-02-01

    The International Symposium on Recent Advances in Female Reproductive Health Care was organized in Helsinki, Finland. The symposium focused attention on female reproductive health care as a central element in the provision of services for moderating unwanted fertility. The most relevant aspects to biomedical scientists engaged in developing contraceptives intended primarily for use in publicly financed delivery programs include efficacy, cost and marginal utility, logistics, and abuse. At present the most effective methods are the NORPLANT contraceptive subdermal implant system and the Copper T 380A intrauterine device. NORPLANT has proved to be as effective as sterilization, and the TCu 380A is almost that effective. Researchers have suggested that the additional effectiveness of modern methods influences fertility only marginally as compared with the enormous impact from using any method at all. This translates into 18 births for no contraceptive use; 3 births for abstinence or withdrawal; 2 for condoms; 1 for oral contraceptives (OCs); and none for the IUD. In developing the Copper T IUDs and the NORPLANT system, the Population Council and those who participated in its development of contraceptives were concerned about the ultimate price to the public sector and produced prices of about US $1 for the TCu 380A and US $23 for the NORPLANT system when they are provided to developing country family planning programs. The corresponding private sector prices in the USA are about US $150 for the TCu 380A and US $300 for NORPLANT. The NORPLANT system is viewed by some US officials as a short-cut to solutions of larger social problems. When a woman was convicted of incorrigible child abuse, a judge suggested that she accept the NORPLANT system as an alternative to time in prison. The serious arguments leveled against IUDs, implants, OCs, and injectables have to be considered when trying to provide women with more effective and safer contraceptives.

  4. Shy / silent users of contraceptives in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, S S

    1996-01-01

    This study examines the hypothesis that shy, silent users of contraceptives in Pakistan underreport contraceptive usage. Data were obtained from the 1984-85 and 1994-95 Contraceptive Prevalence Surveys, the 1990-91 Demographic and Health Survey, and a Punjab 1993 survey. The data were reorganized to indicate the number of women who were fecund but did not have a birth within the preceding 5 years before the surveys. 698,864 women in 1984-85 did not have children and did not report contraceptive use, or 5.9% of total respondents. If these women were added to the contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR), it would rise from 7.6% to 13.5%. The higher CPR is consistent with the observed total fertility rate of 5.95. Shy or silent users were 11.9% in 1990-91 and 11.3% in 1994-95. The revised CPRs are 23.7% and 29.1%, respectively. In 1993, a follow-up survey among non-users in Punjab province showed that CPR increased from 13% in 1990-91 to 18% in 1993. Withdrawal was the most widely used method, followed by the condom and female sterilization. The increase in CPR is attributed to more open reporting among shy or silent users. Revised CPRs that include shy or silent users were consistent with total fertility rates in all 3 nationally representative surveys. Typically shy or silent users were older by about 2.3 years than current users, but had similarly aged husbands. Shy or silent users had longer duration of marriage, greater illiteracy, and less contraceptive knowledge about methods and sources. Shy or silent women had lower children ever born rates than current users. PMID:12294611

  5. Contraceptive problems unique to the United States.

    PubMed

    Tyrer, L B; Salas, J E

    1989-06-01

    An overview of the distinctive milieu regarding contraceptive methods available in the U.S. considers declining method options, future prospects, reasons for the poor current climate, factors affecting future options, global ramifications, and proposed reforms that may improve the U.S. situation. In the last 3 years, the U.S. lost 3 safe IUDs, and lawsuits now threaten the existence of both spermicides and their associated barrier methods. Meanwhile 2 new IUDs and the cervical cap have been introduced. Future possible methods include Norplant, transdermal patches and a disposable spermicide-releasing diaphragm. The chief reason for loss of contraceptives is the legal system in the U.S. which permits peer juries to evaluate a method's side effects relative to the claimant's former health, rather than actual risk- benefit ratios or medical data. Adverse legal decisions have escalated or eliminated liability insurance. The public is ignorant of the benefits of contraceptives, but misinformed by prominent coverage in the media of preliminary adverse findings. Even the F.D.A., for unstated political reasons, has failed on 2 occasions to approve Depo-Provera, used safely in over 80 countries and approved by the drug agencies of most western nations. Other political factors have cut government funding for contraceptive development steadily for 15 years. Apathy for contraceptive research extends from congress to donor support to numbers of new Ph.D.s entering the field. Ramifications include the highest unplanned pregnancy rate, abortion rate and adolescent pregnancy rate in the developed world in the U.S., and a suspicious stance on the part of developed countries toward U.S. contraceptives, especially those not approved here. Proposed ways of reversing the legal and insurance blocks include reform of tort law and no-fault compensation decided by arbitration.

  6. Male contraception: a clinically-oriented review.

    PubMed

    Kanakis, George A; Goulis, Dimitrios G

    2015-01-01

    Despite the variety of available female contraceptive methods, many pregnancies (~50%) are still undesired. Many men (>60%) want to participate equally with their partner in family planning; however, male contraceptive methods (MCMs) account for only 14% of those used worldwide and no pharmaceutical MCM is available so far. The only two MCMs currently available are condoms, which despite protecting against sexually transmitted diseases have high failure rates (~19%), and vasectomy, which though very efficient (99%) is poorly reversible (<50%). Among MCMs under investigation, male hormonal contraceptives (MHCs) are those that have come closest to commercialization. The action of MHCs relies on the disruption of spermatogenesis that exogenous androgen administration evokes by suppressing the hypophyseal-gonadal axis. Various regimens of androgens as monotherapy or in combination with progestins have been tested in clinical trials achieving a Pearl Index <1.0 (equal to that of the female oral contraceptive pill); however, concerns regarding the variable response rates observed (non-responders: 5-20%), the impracticality of parenteral administration and long-term prostate-associated or cardiovascular morbidity have deflected the interest of the pharmaceutical industry from further research. Non-hormonal contraception methods may be, at least theoretically, more specific by selectively disrupting spermatogenesis and sperm transport or fertilizing ability. Nevertheless, only a few have been tested in clinical trials (Reversible Inhibition of Sperm Under Guidance, RISUG, and Intra Vas Plugs); most of them are still in pre-clinical development or have been abandoned due to toxicity (gossypol). Consequently, until a reliable, safe and practical MCM is developed, women will continue to bear most of the contraception burden. PMID:26732151

  7. Contraception, punishment and women who use drugs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In light of the recent debate on the use of financial incentives to promote long-acting contraception and sterilisation among women who use illicit drugs we discuss attitudes to contraception, pregnancy and parenting among Australian women who inject drugs. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 90 women of reproductive age about contraceptive use, preferences, reproductive histories, attitudes to and experiences of parenting. All women were either currently, or had previously injected drugs. The in-depth, semi-structured interviews were compared and contrasted for themes relating to drug use, contraception, pregnancy and parenting. Results Participants aspired to control their fertility, expressed individual contraceptive preferences and concerns for their children (both born and unborn). Most had tried a number of contraceptive methods interspersed by periods of non-use related to experiences of side-effects, being single or abstinent, believing that they were infertile and trying to conceive. Attitudes varied from woman to woman and in the same individual over their life course. Some believed that they were not likely to be capable, but most aspired to be successful mothers. Conclusions Women’s drug use should not automatically be associated with an inability to make informed health care choices or to care for children. Evidence suggests that women who use drugs do not need to be paid to limit or end their fertility. Rather, programs that aim to reduce barriers to obtaining free, non-discriminating reproductive advice and parenting assistance would better utilise women’s agency to improve their own reproductive health. PMID:24405890

  8. Factors affecting contraceptive use in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, N; Ringheim, K

    1996-01-01

    This study postulates that contraceptive use in Pakistan is affected by the usual demographic factors as well as husband-wife communication, female autonomy, son preference, religious beliefs, and family planning service supply. Analysis is based on data obtained from the Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey of 1990-91. Findings indicate that 74% of women never talked in the past year with their husbands about family planning. Almost 60% believed that family size was "up to God." About 47% knew where to obtain contraception; only 20.4% had easy access to a source of supplies. Current use was 14% and ever use was 22.4%. Analysis is based on three basic models. Model 1 includes the control variables and son preference. Model 2 includes husband-wife communication, religious attitudes, and female autonomy. Model 3 includes the addition of family planning to model 2 variables. Urban residence increases the odds of contraceptive use considerably only in Model 1. The influence of urban residence in the other models is reduced. Husband's education is significant only in Models 1 and 2 and insignificant in Model 3 when the family planning variable is included. Increased women's age is also insignificant in Model 3. Of the supply factors in Model 3, knowledge of a source and easy access to a source were highly significant, while mass media exposure was not important. Knowledge of a source was the most important predictor. Model 3 explained 90% of use. Among urban women, lack of husband-wife communication and fatalistic beliefs reduce the log-odds of contraceptive use. For rural women, age and women's secondary education were key predictors. Findings confirm that demographic and socio-cultural factors affect contraceptive use in Pakistan. All the theorized variables exerted a strong influence on contraceptive use, which can be counteracted by improved supply and service strategies.

  9. 21 CFR 884.5350 - Contraceptive diaphragm and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Contraceptive diaphragm and accessories. 884.5350 Section 884.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Devices § 884.5350 Contraceptive diaphragm and accessories. (a) Identification. A contraceptive...

  10. 21 CFR 884.5350 - Contraceptive diaphragm and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Contraceptive diaphragm and accessories. 884.5350 Section 884.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Devices § 884.5350 Contraceptive diaphragm and accessories. (a) Identification. A contraceptive...

  11. 21 CFR 884.5350 - Contraceptive diaphragm and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Contraceptive diaphragm and accessories. 884.5350 Section 884.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Devices § 884.5350 Contraceptive diaphragm and accessories. (a) Identification. A contraceptive...

  12. 21 CFR 884.5350 - Contraceptive diaphragm and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Contraceptive diaphragm and accessories. 884.5350 Section 884.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Devices § 884.5350 Contraceptive diaphragm and accessories. (a) Identification. A contraceptive...

  13. 21 CFR 884.5350 - Contraceptive diaphragm and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Contraceptive diaphragm and accessories. 884.5350 Section 884.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Devices § 884.5350 Contraceptive diaphragm and accessories. (a) Identification. A contraceptive...

  14. Taking the Initiative: A Green Light for Contraceptive Responsibility?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillis, Diane E.; Allgeier, Elizabeth Rice

    One explanation for the lack of contraception use among adolescents is that young women may feel embarrassment or rejection by their partners if they initiate the use of contraception. To explore young adults' reactions to contraceptive use, 160 college students evaluated a description of an unmarried young couple which varied the length of time…

  15. Contraceptive development and testing in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Edelman, D A; Van Os, W A

    1990-01-01

    Contraceptive development, including the development of IUDs, is discussed in light of the changing regulatory role of the FDA. The paper considers how the FDA and the government affect contraceptive development. Events that led to the demise of IUD use in the United States probably will have long-lasting effects on all future contraceptive development by the pharmaceutical industry in the United States.

  16. Estimating Contraceptive Prevalence Using Logistics Data for Short-Acting Methods: Analysis Across 30 Countries

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Marc; Brown, Niquelle; Sacher, Suzy; Hatch, Benjamin; Inglis, Andrew; Aronovich, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) is a vital indicator used by country governments, international donors, and other stakeholders for measuring progress in family planning programs against country targets and global initiatives as well as for estimating health outcomes. Because of the need for more frequent CPR estimates than population-based surveys currently provide, alternative approaches for estimating CPRs are being explored, including using contraceptive logistics data. Methods: Using data from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) in 30 countries, population data from the United States Census Bureau International Database, and logistics data from the Procurement Planning and Monitoring Report (PPMR) and the Pipeline Monitoring and Procurement Planning System (PipeLine), we developed and evaluated 3 models to generate country-level, public-sector contraceptive prevalence estimates for injectable contraceptives, oral contraceptives, and male condoms. Models included: direct estimation through existing couple-years of protection (CYP) conversion factors, bivariate linear regression, and multivariate linear regression. Model evaluation consisted of comparing the referent DHS prevalence rates for each short-acting method with the model-generated prevalence rate using multiple metrics, including mean absolute error and proportion of countries where the modeled prevalence rate for each method was within 1, 2, or 5 percentage points of the DHS referent value. Results: For the methods studied, family planning use estimates from public-sector logistics data were correlated with those from the DHS, validating the quality and accuracy of current public-sector logistics data. Logistics data for oral and injectable contraceptives were significantly associated (P<.05) with the referent DHS values for both bivariate and multivariate models. For condoms, however, that association was only significant for the bivariate model. With the exception of the CYP

  17. Quantitative evaluation of oxidative stress, chronic inflammatory indices and leptin in cancer patients: correlation with stage and performance status.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Giovanni; Macciò, Antonio; Madeddu, Clelia; Mura, Loredana; Gramignano, Giulia; Lusso, Maria Rita; Mulas, Carlo; Mudu, Maria Caterina; Murgia, Viviana; Camboni, Paolo; Massa, Elena; Ferreli, Luca; Contu, Paolo; Rinaldi, Augusto; Sanjust, Enrico; Atzei, Davide; Elsener, Bernhard

    2002-03-01

    In advanced cancer patients, the oxidative stress could take place either at the onset of disease or as a function of disease progression. To test this hypothesis, the following parameters were investigated: the erythrocyte activity of the enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), the serum activity of glutathione reductase (GR) and the serum total antioxidant status (TAS). The total antioxidant capacity of plasma LMWA was evaluated by the cyclic voltammetry methodology. We further determined the serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNFalpha), IL-2, leptin and C-reactive protein (CRP). All of these parameters have been correlated with the most important clinical indices of patients such as Stage of disease, ECOG PS and clinical response. Eighty-two advanced stage cancer patients and 36 healthy individuals used as controls were included in the study. Our findings show that SOD activity was significantly higher in cancer patients than in controls and GPx activity was significantly lower in cancer patients than in controls. Serum values of IL-6, TNFalpha and CRP were significantly higher in patients than in controls. Serum leptin values of cancer patients were significantly lower than controls. SOD activity increased significantly from Stage II/ECOG 0-1 to Stage IV/ECOG 0-1, whereas it decreased significantly in Stage IV/ECOG 3. GPx activity decreased significantly in Stage IV/ECOG 2-3. An inverse correlation between ECOG PS and serum leptin levels was found. Serum levels of IL-2 decreased from Stage II/ECOG 0-1 to Stage IV/ECOG 2-3. A direct correlation between Stage/ECOG PS and serum levels of both IL-6 and CRP was observed. Cisplatin administration induced a significant increase of GPx after 24 hr. In conclusion, this is the first study that shows that several "biological" parameters of cancer patients such as antioxidant enzyme activity, cytokines, leptin and CRP strictly correlate with the most important clinical

  18. Aesthetic and incentive salience of cute infant faces: studies of observer sex, oral contraception and menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Sprengelmeyer, Reiner; Lewis, Jennifer; Hahn, Amanda; Perrett, David I

    2013-01-01

    Infant cuteness can influence adult-infant interaction and has been shown to activate reward centres in the brain. In a previous study, we found men and women to be differentially sensitive to small differences in infant facial cuteness, with reproductive hormone status as the potential underlying cause. It is unclear, however, whether reproductive hormone status impacts on the aesthetic and incentive salience of infant faces. To address this question, we conducted two interlinked studies. We used static images of the same smiling and neutral-looking infant faces in both a rating task, in which participants had to rate the cuteness of infant faces (aesthetic salience - 'liking'), and a key-press task, in which participants could prolong or shorten viewing time of infant faces by rapid alternating key-presses (incentive salience - 'wanting'). In a first study, we compared the performance of men, women who are taking oral contraceptives, and regularly cycling women. In this study, we found a significant correlation between cuteness ratings within and between groups, which implies that participants had the same concept of cuteness. Cuteness ratings and effort to look at faces was linked regardless of sex and reproductive hormone status, in that cute faces were looked at for longer than less cute faces. A happy facial expression contributed only marginally to the incentive salience of the face. To explore the potential impact of reproductive hormone status in more detail, we followed a subset of regularly cycling women during the menstrual, follicular and luteal phases of their cycle. The aesthetic and incentive salience of infant faces did not change across the menstrual cycle. Our findings suggest that reproductive hormone status does not modulate the aesthetic and incentive value of infant faces.

  19. Hormonal contraceptives and travel to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Linda E

    2015-03-01

    Women frequently ask about the safety and efficacy of using hormonal contraception (HC), either oral contraceptive pills (OC) or other forms, when traveling to high altitude locales. What are the risks and benefits of using HC at high altitude? Does HC affect acclimatization, exercise performance, or occurrence of acute mountain sickness? This article reviews current data regarding the risks and benefits of HC at high altitude, both demonstrated and theoretical, with the aim of helping health care providers to advise women traveling above 2500 meters. Most healthy women can safely use HC when traveling to high altitude, but should be aware of the potential risks and inconveniences.

  20. Postcoital contraception. Has its day come?

    PubMed

    Narrigan, D

    1994-01-01

    Although postcoital contraception might aid in reducing the occurrence of some unintended pregnancies, it is seldom used. This review summarizes the development of postcoital methods, focusing on the Yuzpe regimen, the most widely used emergency contraceptive in the United States. The article discusses its mechanism of action, safety, side effects, and effectiveness. Reasons for its limited use are discussed, as are recent findings that RU 486 may be a superior postcoital agent. Finally, a protocol for integrating the Yuzpe method into nurse-midwifery practice is presented. PMID:7830144

  1. Oral contraceptives in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Helvaci, N; Yildiz, B O

    2014-09-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder of women of reproductive age and combined oral contraceptives (OCs) are often the first-line treatment of the syndrome by improving hyperandrogenism and regulating menstrual cycles. Oral contraceptives have some cardiovascular and metabolic effects that varies among different formulations depending upon the dose and type of the both estrogen and progestin components. These cardiometabolic effects of OCs raise some concerns about their long-term use in PCOS, but available data suggest that the benefits outweigh the risks. More studies are needed to clarify the safety of long-term use of OCs in PCOS.

  2. Social marketing of contraceptives in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Schellstede, W P; Ciszewski, R L

    1984-01-01

    Since 1975 there has been a family planning program operating in Bangladesh which advertises and commercially distributes contraceptive products in both rural and urban areas throughout the country. The program, known as the Social Marketing Project (SMP) and managed by Population Services International (PSI), now serves almost 1 million acceptors per month at an annual cost per couple of less than US$6.50, including the cost of donated contraceptives. This paper looks at the evolution of the project and its growth through the years, and addresses some primary concerns of planners of social marketing programs.

  3. Hormonal contraceptives and travel to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Linda E

    2015-03-01

    Women frequently ask about the safety and efficacy of using hormonal contraception (HC), either oral contraceptive pills (OC) or other forms, when traveling to high altitude locales. What are the risks and benefits of using HC at high altitude? Does HC affect acclimatization, exercise performance, or occurrence of acute mountain sickness? This article reviews current data regarding the risks and benefits of HC at high altitude, both demonstrated and theoretical, with the aim of helping health care providers to advise women traveling above 2500 meters. Most healthy women can safely use HC when traveling to high altitude, but should be aware of the potential risks and inconveniences. PMID:25759908

  4. Social marketing of contraceptives in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Schellstede, W P; Ciszewski, R L

    1984-01-01

    Since 1975 there has been a family planning program operating in Bangladesh which advertises and commercially distributes contraceptive products in both rural and urban areas throughout the country. The program, known as the Social Marketing Project (SMP) and managed by Population Services International (PSI), now serves almost 1 million acceptors per month at an annual cost per couple of less than US$6.50, including the cost of donated contraceptives. This paper looks at the evolution of the project and its growth through the years, and addresses some primary concerns of planners of social marketing programs. PMID:6701953

  5. Adolescent males' sexual behavior and contraceptive use: implications for male responsibility.

    PubMed

    Pleck, J H; Sonenstein, F L; Swain, S O

    1988-01-01

    A recent US survey of single 17-21 year old men, indicated that 17.1% used a condom at 1st intercourse and 15.5% used a condom at the most recent intercourse. Withdrawal is also used: 10.0% and 7.4% respectively. Condom use was correlated with being older at 1st intercourse, having a higher educational level, closer association to partner, and sense of male contraceptive responsibility. The data used for this analysis was taken from a sub-sample of 624 sexually active males in 1979. The mean age at 1st intercourse was 14.8 years and mean age at most recent was 18.9 years. The pill was also used at 1st intercourse (8.8%) and a total of 43.5% used some method of contraception. In the most recent intercourse cases, 64.7% used some method of birth control and the pill was used 26.5% , condom 15.5%, and withdrawal 7.4%. Conclusions from this data indicate that male methods are important in teen contraception. Condom use at 1st and most recent intercourse was related to both positive and negative characteristics. It appears that males show some contraceptive responsibility initially but later give the responsibility to females. The declining use of condoms indicates it to be a transitional form of birth control. Programs should promote continued use of condoms since use of the pill is low and unwanted pregnancy risk is high. Communication on contraception should be encouraged, so both partners are aware if neither one is contracepting. With the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic, condom use takes on a whole new context in relation to the decline in use by adolescents. PMID:12342678

  6. Phosphorylation of Ser78 of Hsp27 correlated with HER-2/neu status and lymph node positivity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Daohai; Wong, Lee Lee; Koay, Evelyn SC

    2007-01-01

    Background Abnormal amplification/expression of HER-2/neu oncogene has been causally linked with tumorigenesis and metastasis in breast cancer and associated with shortened overall survival of patients. Recently, heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) was reported to be highly expressed in HER-2/neu positive tumors and cell lines. However, putative functional links between phosphorylation of Hsp27 with HER-2/neu status and other clinicopathological features remain to be elucidated. Results Comparative phosphoproteomic studies of HER-2/neu positive and -negative breast tumors revealed that Hsp27, one of the identified phosphoproteins, was highly phosphorylated in HER-2/neu positive tumors. The extent of Hsp27 phosphorylation at its Ser15, Ser78 and Ser82 residues were further evaluated with site-specific antibodies in tumor samples by tissue lysate array- and tissue microarray-based analyses, and in the BT474 breast cancer cell line treated with heregulin α1 (HRG α1) or the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580. The tissue lysate array study indicated that only the level of pSer78 in HER-2/neu positive tumors was more than 2-fold that in HER-2/neu negative tumors. Treatment of BT474 cells with HRG α1 and SB203580 indicated that Ser78 phosphorylation was mainly regulated by the HER-2/neu-p38 MAPK pathway. Immunohistochemical staining of sections from a tissue microarray with 97 breast tumors showed that positive staining of pSer78 significantly correlated with HER-2/neu (p = 0.004) and lymph node positivity (p = 0.026). Conclusion This investigation demonstrated the significant correlation of enhanced phosphorylation of the Ser78 residue of Hsp27 with HER-2/neu and lymph node positivity in breast cancer. PMID:17697330

  7. Commitment, intimacy, and women's perceptions of premarital sex and contraceptive readiness.

    PubMed

    Hynie, M; Lydon, J E; Taradash, A

    1997-01-01

    The influence of relationship commitment on women's perceptions of the social acceptability of premarital sex and contraceptive preparedness was investigated in a person-perception paradigm study involving 96 female Canadian university students (median age, 20 years). It was hypothesized that: 1) in an ongoing relationship, women will assume the presence of intimacy implies commitment; 2) if commitment is assumed to exist, intercourse will be deemed more acceptable; 3) women who are contraceptively prepared will be perceived as sexually experienced; and 4) women's contraceptive preparedness will convey a negative impression only in the context of an uncommitted relationship. Participants were presented with a hypothetical scenario of a couple's initial sexual encounter in which four levels of relationship status (passion; passion and intimacy, but explicit absence of commitment; passion and intimacy, but no mention of commitment; and passion, intimacy, and commitment) and two contraceptive preparedness behaviors (he provides condom; she provides condom) were manipulated. All four hypotheses were confirmed. Participants perceived the female character's sexual behavior as most acceptable when commitment (explicit or assumed) was present. The woman was perceived as less nice when she provided a condom in an uncommitted relationship than in a committed relationship. When the male partner provided the condom, commitment level did not influence personality ratings. Although these findings demonstrate the difficulties young women face in negotiating their sexuality, university students may have less restrictive norms than other subgroups in North America. PMID:12293172

  8. Evaluation of a volunteer community-based health worker program for providing contraceptive services in Madagascar☆

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Maria F.; Walldorf, Jenny; Kolesar, Robert; Agarwal, Aarti; Kourtis, Athena P.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Finlay, Alyssa

    2015-01-01

    Background Madagascar recently scaled up their volunteer community health worker (CHW) program in maternal health and family planning to reach remote and underserved communities. Study design We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation using a systematic sample of 100 CHWs trained to provide contraceptive counseling and short-acting contraceptive services at the community level. CHWs were interviewed on demographics, recruitment, training, supervision, commodity supply, and other measures of program functionality; tested on knowledge of injectable contraception; and observed by an expert while completing five simulated client encounters with uninstructed volunteers. We developed a CHW performance score (0–100%) based on the number of counseling activities adequately met during the client encounters and used multivariable linear regression to identify correlates of the score. Results CHWs had a mean performance score of 73.9% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 70.3–77.6%). More education, more weekly volunteer hours, and receiving a refresher training correlated with a higher performance score. We found no other associations between measures of the components previously identified as essential for effective CHW programs and performance score. Conclusions Although areas of deficiency were identified, CHWs proved capable of providing high-quality contraception services. PMID:23850074

  9. Correlates of HIV infection and being unaware of HIV status among soon-to-be-released Ukrainian prisoners

    PubMed Central

    Azbel, Lyuba; Wickersham, Jeffrey A; Grishaev, Yevgeny; Dvoryak, Sergey; Altice, Frederick L

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prisoners bear a disproportionate burden of Ukraine's volatile and transitional HIV epidemic, yet little is known in Eastern Europe about HIV testing, treatment and HIV-related risk among prisoners. Methods A nationally representative biobehavioural health survey linked with serological testing was conducted among soon-to-be released prisoners in 13 Ukrainian prisons from June to November 2011. Results Among 402 participants, 78 (19.4%) tested HIV seropositive of whom 38 (50.7%) were previously unaware of their HIV status. Independent correlates of HIV infection included drug injection (AOR=4.26; 95% CI: 2.23–8.15), female gender (AOR=2.00; 95% CI: 1.06–3.78), previous incarceration (AOR=1.99; 95% CI: 1.07–3.70) and being from Southern Ukraine (AOR=5.46; 95% CI: 2.21–13.46). Those aware of being HIV-positive reported significantly more pre-incarceration sex- and drug-related HIV risk behaviours than those who were unaware. Conclusions Routine rather than risk-based HIV testing and expansion of opioid substitution and antiretroviral therapy among prisoners is urgently needed to reduce HIV transmission in volatile transitional HIV epidemics. PMID:25216073

  10. Examination of adolescents' screen time and physical fitness as independent correlates of weight status and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Ullrich-French, Sarah C; Power, Thomas G; Daratha, Kenn B; Bindler, Ruth C; Steele, Michael M

    2010-09-01

    Physical fitness performance is an important health correlate yet is often unrelated to sedentary behaviour in early adolescence. In this study, we examined the association of sedentary behaviour (i.e. screen time) with weight-related health markers and blood pressure, after controlling for cardiorespiratory fitness performance. American middle school students (N = 153, 56% females) aged 11-15 years (mean 12.6 years, s = 0.5) completed assessments of cardiorespiratory fitness performance, screen time, weight status (BMI percentile, waist-to-height ratio), and blood pressure. Multivariate analysis of covariance, controlling for cardiorespiratory fitness performance, found those who met the daily recommendation of 2 h or less of screen time (n = 36, 23.5%) had significantly lower BMI (p < 0.05) and systolic blood pressure (p < 0.01) compared with those who exceeded this recommendation. Findings suggest specific intervention programmes may be designed to target both cardiorespiratory fitness and sedentary behaviours to maximize early adolescent health because these behaviours are likely to have unique and independent effects on youth health markers.

  11. The metabolic impact of oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M; Burkman, R T

    1992-10-01

    The hormonal components of oral contraceptives exert major effects on plasma lipoprotein metabolism. Estrogens may increase production of plasma triglycerides, leading to increased levels of very low-density lipoproteins, but they may also reduce levels of cholesterol-enriched and potentially atherogenic intermediate- and low-density lipoproteins. Furthermore, estrogens increase levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs), particularly the HDL2 subspecies, an effect linked to reduced mortality rates from cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women receiving hormone replacement therapy. All combination oral contraceptives in use in the United States tend to raise levels of plasma triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, and HDL3 to varying degrees. In contrast, changes in HDL and HDL2 reflect the combined effects of estrogen dose and relative androgenicity of the progestin component. Although in general, the lipoprotein changes are greater in magnitude with higher dose oral contraceptive preparations, they can be significant in lower dose preparations as well. Oral contraceptives also affect carbohydrate metabolism, primarily through the activity of progestin. Studies have demonstrated insulin resistance, rises in plasma insulin, and relative glucose intolerance by means of curve analysis of glucose tolerance tests. These effects are far less pronounced with lower dose preparations and with formulations using the newer progestins.

  12. [Male contraception - the current state of knowledge].

    PubMed

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmynt; Kasperska, Karolina; Lewandowska, Marta

    2016-08-01

    Contraception is important from a health, psychological and socioeconomic point of view. Due to the fact that male-based contraceptive methods are mostly represented by condoms and vasectomy, researchers are working on the new solutions, which could let the men be more involved in a conscious family planning. In this review we will present the current state of knowledge on this subject. There is a lot going on in the field of hormonal contraception. Studies including testosterone, progestins, synthetic androgens and other derivatives are on a different stages of clinical trials and mostly demonstrate high efficacy rates. Recent discovers of Izumo and Juno proteins, essential for the fertilization process, give hope for an easily reversible, non-hormonal method. Researchers are also trying to interfere with the process of spermatogenesis using BRDT inhibitor - JQ1, or neutralize the sperm by injecting styrene maleic anhydride (SMA) into the lumen of the vas deferens. The other studies explore processes involved in proper sperm motility. A vaccine which induces an immune response to the reproductive system is also an interesting method. The latest research use ultrasound waves and mechanical device which blocks the patency of vas deferens. The aim of the study current state of knowledge male contraception.

  13. Parental Involvement and Young Women's Contraceptive Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisco, Michelle L.

    2005-01-01

    Young adult women in the United States tend to delay family formation, pursue higher education and professional jobs, and become sexually active before marriage. Using effective contraception is the best way to ensure that nonmarital parenthood does not disrupt educational and career plans. Because parental involvement in education shapes…

  14. Contraception and Women with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Background: Contraception is widely prescribed to women with intellectual disabilities, yet little is known about what the women think and feel about this. One of the aims of the study was to explore what women understood and to what extent they were able to exercise choice and control. Method: Twenty-three women with mild and moderate…

  15. [Emergency oral contraception policy: the Peruvian experience].

    PubMed

    Pretell-Zárate, Eduardo A

    2013-07-01

    Emergency oral contraception is part of the sexual and reproductive rights of women. In 2001, this health policy was incorporated into the Rules of the National Family Planning Program of the Ministry of Health, primarily to prevent unwanted pregnancy and its serious consequences, induced abortion and the high associated maternal mortality rate, which are major public health problems. Scientific research has confirmed that the main mechanism of action of levonorgestrel, component of emergency oral contraception (EOC) is to inhibit or delay ovulation, preventing fertilization of the egg; additionally, it increases the thickening of the cervical mucus, making the sperm migration more difficult. No study has found endometrial abnormalities that may interfere with the implantation of the fertilized egg or embryo development of an implanted egg. However, despite the support of medical science and legal backing, the EOC is available only to users with economic resources, but its use has not been fully implemented in public sector services, due to obstacles created by groups opposed to contraception under claim of an alleged abortive effect that has already been ruled out scientifically. This article describes the administrative experience and legal confrontations between groups of power that prevent the proper implementation of an emergency contraception policy in Peru.

  16. [Abortifacient effect of hormonal contraceptives: a review].

    PubMed

    Agulles Simó, Pau

    2015-01-01

    Most of the scientific community, as well as in a sector of international Law, when referring to the unborn embryo, pregnancy must be defined as the period extending from implantation to natural birth. This implies some novelty, such as the redefinition of abortion as the elimination of the embryo only within this period, and the extension of contraception to any means that impedes the union of the gametes as a consequence of a sexual intercourse, or also that which eliminates the product of conception prior to its implantation. Therefore, the pharmaceutical industry markets, under the name of contraceptives, products that act also by means of an anti-implantation mechanism. This fact has great ethical implications regarding the respect for the embryo which require a reflection on the moral valuation of the prescription, dispensation and use of these means. One may ask: which of the contraceptive means actually present in the market include an anti-implantation effect? What mechanisms contribute to their pharmacological action and in what measure do they do this? This is what we have studied in this article, based on the available scientific bibliography. We have basically fulfilled a double objective: updating and completing the studies -few, partial or distant in time- that had this same subject matter; and offering a moral valuation on the use of hormonal contraceptives that may have an anti-implantation effect, from the point of view of the respect due to the embryonic life. PMID:26030015

  17. Emergency contraception use up -- new ECP arrives.

    PubMed

    1999-09-01

    The first progestin-only dedicated emergency contraceptive pill (ECP) is about to enter the US market. The arrival of Plan B, a levonorgestrel-only ECP produced by the Women's Capital Corporation (WCC) of Seattle, has been long awaited by providers in the US because of it is more effective and produces fewer side effects than does the combined regimen. The WCC is taking a different marketing and distributing approach to emergency contraception than its competitor, Gynetics, focusing on existing ECP provider/dispensers such as Planned Parenthood affiliates, major Title X programs, and college/university student health centers. The FDA has also approved a change in product labeling for Gynetics¿ ECU Preven. The change, marked by the disappearance of the "Black Box Warning," puts the benefits and risks of emergency contraception in perspective, according to a Gynetics executive. It further eliminates substantial restrictions on the company's ability to communicate directly to the consumer and to the medical professional. The FDA¿s decisions should help to accelerate the process of building awareness of emergency contraception and its availability in the US.

  18. An Oral Contraceptive Drug Interaction Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradstreet, Thomas E.; Panebianco, Deborah L.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on a two treatment, two period, two treatment sequence crossover drug interaction study of a new drug and a standard oral contraceptive therapy. Both normal theory and distribution-free statistical analyses are provided along with a notable amount of graphical insight into the dataset. For one of the variables, the decision on…

  19. [Male contraception - the current state of knowledge].

    PubMed

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmynt; Kasperska, Karolina; Lewandowska, Marta

    2016-07-01

    Contraception is important from a health, psychological and socioeconomic point of view. Due to the fact that male-based contraceptive methods are mostly represented by condoms and vasectomy, researchers are working on the new solutions, which could let the men be more involved in a conscious family planning. In this review we will present the current state of knowledge on this subject. There is a lot going on in the field of hormonal contraception. Studies including testosterone, progestins, synthetic androgens and other derivatives are on a different stages of clinical trials and mostly demonstrate high efficacy rates. Recent discovers of Izumo and Juno proteins, essential for the fertilization process, give hope for an easily reversible, non-hormonal method. Researchers are also trying to interfere with the process of spermatogenesis using BRDT inhibitor - JQ1, or neutralize the sperm by injecting styrene maleic anhydride (SMA) into the lumen of the vas deferens. The other studies explore processes involved in proper sperm motility. A vaccine which induces an immune response to the reproductive system is also an interesting method. The latest research use ultrasound waves and mechanical device which blocks the patency of vas deferens. The aim of the study current state of knowledge male contraception. PMID:27590656

  20. [Male contraception - the current state of knowledge].

    PubMed

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmynt; Kasperska, Karolina; Lewandowska, Marta

    2016-08-01

    Contraception is important from a health, psychological and socioeconomic point of view. Due to the fact that male-based contraceptive methods are mostly represented by condoms and vasectomy, researchers are working on the new solutions, which could let the men be more involved in a conscious family planning. In this review we will present the current state of knowledge on this subject. There is a lot going on in the field of hormonal contraception. Studies including testosterone, progestins, synthetic androgens and other derivatives are on a different stages of clinical trials and mostly demonstrate high efficacy rates. Recent discovers of Izumo and Juno proteins, essential for the fertilization process, give hope for an easily reversible, non-hormonal method. Researchers are also trying to interfere with the process of spermatogenesis using BRDT inhibitor - JQ1, or neutralize the sperm by injecting styrene maleic anhydride (SMA) into the lumen of the vas deferens. The other studies explore processes involved in proper sperm motility. A vaccine which induces an immune response to the reproductive system is also an interesting method. The latest research use ultrasound waves and mechanical device which blocks the patency of vas deferens. The aim of the study current state of knowledge male contraception. PMID:27591451

  1. Combined oral contraceptives: acceptability and effective use.

    PubMed

    Kubba, A; Guillebaud, J

    1993-01-01

    With over 60 million users of 'the pill' worldwide, safety and efficacy remain the two most relevant issues to both the consumer and the research scientist. Safety of combined oral contraception (COC) has advanced appreciably. Lessons learned from cohort and case-control studies have been applied to the practical management of oral contraception use, based on screening, selection and regular monitoring of users. Most health risks of COCs appear to be dependent on the dose and potency (or biological impact) of the constituent steroids. While many of the non-contraceptive benefits of COCs are maintained when modern low dose preparations are used, most, if not all, of the adverse effects have been reduced progressively. Moreover the range of modern hormonal contraceptives has widened with the introduction of a new generation of 'selective' progestogens (Desogestrel, Norgestimate and Gestodene), which have minimal androgenicity. User failure of COCs is still high in many countries. The cause is a combination of poor compliance and anxiety about perceived adverse effects. Compliance can be enhanced by improving the quality of instruction in pill use. Fears of adverse effects of COCs may be allayed through education of users and providers, and sympathetic management of side effects.

  2. To use or not to use a condom: A prospective cohort study comparing contraceptive practices among HIV-infected and HIV-negative youth in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Unwanted pregnancy and HIV infection are issues of significant concern to young people. Limited data exists on contraceptive decision-making and practices among HIV-infected and HIV-negative young people in low resource settings with generalized HIV epidemics. Methods From July 2007 until April 2009, we recruited, and followed up over a one year period, a cohort of 501 HIV-negative and 276 HIV-infected young women and men aged 15-24 years residing in Kampala and Wakiso districts. We compared contraceptive use among HIV-infected and HIV-negative young people and assessed factors associated with contraceptive decision-making and use, using multivariate logistic regression modelling to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Contraceptive use among sexually active HIV-infected young people was 34% while it was 59% among the HIV-negative group. The condom was the most frequently used method of contraception. Only 24% of the HIV-infected used condoms consistently compared to 38% among the negative group OR 0.56 (95% CI 0.38, 0.82). HIV-infected young people were more likely to discuss safe sex behaviour with health workers OR 1.70 (95% CI 1.13, 2.57), though its effect on fertility decision-making was not significant. Throughout the year's follow-up, only 24% among the HIV-negative and 18% among the HIV-infected continued to use contraception while 12% and 28% among the HIV-negative and infected respectively did not use contraception at all. At multivariate analysis, the HIV-infected young people were less likely to maintain contraceptive use. Other factors independently associated with sustained contraceptive use were age of the respondent, marital status and being a male. Conversely, HIV-infected young people were less likely to initiate use of contraception. Being married or in a relationship was associated with higher odds of initiating contraceptive use. Conclusion Compared to the HIV-negative group, sexually active HIV

  3. Sexual behaviour, contraceptive knowledge and use among female undergraduates’ students of Muhimbili and Dar es Salaam Universities, Tanzania: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    54.6% have had induced abortion. Marital status, age at first sex, ever had sex, ever been pregnant and unwanted pregnancies were associated with use of contraception. Conclusions Most of the student’s had knowledge of contraception. However, rate of contraception use is still low. Majority of the respondent were sexually active, with the majority started sexual activity at young age. This needs advocacy for adolescence reproductive health education to promote the use of the available contraceptive services amongst university students. PMID:25099502

  4. Postpartum and Post-Abortion Contraception: From Research to Programs.

    PubMed

    Shah, Iqbal H; Santhya, K G; Cleland, John

    2015-12-01

    Contraception following delivery or an induced abortion reduces the risk of an early unintended pregnancy and its associated adverse health consequences. Unmet need for contraception during the postpartum period and contraceptive counseling and services following abortion have been the focus of efforts for the last several decades. This article provides an introduction to the more focused contributions that follow in this special issue. We discuss the validity and measurement of the concept of unmet need for family planning during the postpartum period. We then present key findings on postpartum contraceptive protection, use dynamics, and method mix, followed by an assessment of interventions to improve postpartum family planning. The evidence on postabortion contraceptive uptake and continuation of use remains thin, although encouraging results are noted for implementation of comprehensive abortion care and for the impact of post-abortion contraceptive counseling and services. Drawing on these studies, we outline policy and program implications for improving postpartum and post-abortion contraceptive use.

  5. Oral contraceptives in the etiology of isolated hypospadias.

    PubMed

    Källén, B; Mastroiacovo, P; Lancaster, P A; Mutchinick, O; Kringelbach, M; Martínez-Frías, M L; Robert, E; Castilla, E E

    1991-08-01

    With the objective of identifying whether hypospadias in infants is associated with maternal use of oral contraceptives before pregnancy or in early pregnancy, 846 case-control pairs were collected from eight different malformation monitoring programs around the world and mothers were interviewed using structured questionnaires administered after the birth of the infants. There was no difference in the preconceptional use of oral contraceptives between cases and controls, neither with respect to the number of years of oral contraceptive usage nor the time between stopping oral contraceptives and the present pregnancy. To this material was added data on oral contraceptive usage in early pregnancy from two other sources: an ongoing case-control study in Spain (725 infants with hypospadias) and a population-based study in Sweden (631 infants with hypospadias). There was no statistically significant difference in oral contraceptive exposure in early pregnancy between cases and controls. There is no demonstrable association between oral contraceptive use and infant hypospadias.

  6. New strategies for providing hormonal contraception in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Townsend, John W; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Williams, Katherine; Askew, Ian; Brill, Klaus

    2011-05-01

    Even with progress in increasing access to effective contraception over the past decades, and the growing range of contraceptive methods available on the market, women in developing countries continue to report an unmet need for family planning. This constraint continues to challenge reproductive health policies and programs, while the momentum of population growth and the young age structure in developing countries leads to larger numbers of potential contraceptive users and increasing global demand in contraceptive markets. Of late, there is a renewed focus on increasing access to long-acting hormonal methods to effectively meet this need, establishing and effectively implementing new service delivery strategies. A number of processes have profoundly affected the procurement and use of hormonal contraceptive methods in developing countries: a supportive policy environment, evidence-based practices and an increasing diversity of delivery strategies play a significant part in increasing number of contraceptive users and the demand for hormonal contraception.

  7. New approaches to male non-hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Nya-Ngatchou, Jean-Jacques; Amory, John K

    2013-03-01

    A non-hormonal male contraceptive is a contraceptive that does not involve the administration of hormones or hormone blockers. This review will focus on the use of lonidamine derivatives and inhibitors of retinoic acid biosynthesis and function as approaches to male non-hormonal contraception. Two current lonidamine derivatives, adjudin and H2-gamendazole, are in development as male contraceptives. These potent anti-spermatogenic compounds impair the integrity of the apical ectoplasmic specialization, resulting in premature spermiation and infertility. Another approach to male contraceptive development is the inhibition of retinoic acid in the testes, as retinoic acid signaling is necessary for spermatogenesis. The administration of the retinoic acid receptor antagonist BMS-189453 reversibly inhibits spermatogenesis in mice. Similarly, oral dosing of WIN 18,446, which inhibits testicular retinoic acid biosynthesis, effectively contracepts rabbits. Hopefully, one of these approaches to non-hormonal male contraception will prove to be safe and effective in future clinical trials.

  8. [Contraception--with us and others].

    PubMed

    Hallgren, R

    1986-01-01

    The history of contraception practices back to the ancient Egyptians, Jews, Romans, and Greeks, the evolution of condom use, and the problems inherent in religious and secular attitudes concerning contraception are surveyed. Ancient Egyptians already made use of certain intravaginal pessary and tampon types in combination with douches and incense to prevent pregnancy. Passages in the Bible refer to the practice of "coitus interruptus" as a preventive method, and the Greeks and Romans used sponges immersed in copper salt solution, oil of cedar, and olive oil. Abortion was officially banned in Rome; however, it was still practiced among the upper classes. Various practices used by the Arabs, Africans, and Europeans in the Middle Ages included the utilization of various oils and salts, plant roots, beeswax slices, green soap, and abstinence. The earliest mention of condom use is by Fallopius in the 16th Century; this linen sheath was primarily used against syphilis, as was its more advanced version described by Daniel Turner around 1700. Marquis de Sade recommended its use in combination with an intravaginal sponge. The invention of vulcanized rubber in the 19th Cenury led to its widespread use around the world, and the present threat of AIDS has made its advantages obvious. Secular attitudes about contraception emphasize the impact of urbanization and industrialization and their corrosive effects on the masses caught up in them without the benefit of contraception. Religious views, however, oppose contraception because of the fiats of Buddhist, Islamic, and Christian teachings. The individual's dilemma of trying to reconcile these conflicting attitudes is further explored.

  9. Contraceptive Hormone Use and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shufelt, Chrisandra L.; Noel Bairey Merz, C.

    2009-01-01

    Contraceptive hormones, most commonly prescribed as oral contraceptives (OC), are a widely utilized method to prevent ovulation, implantation and therefore pregnancy. The Women’s Health Initiative demonstrated cardiovascular risk linked to menopausal hormone therapy among women without pre-existing cardiovascular disease, prompting review of the safety, efficacy and side effects of other forms of hormone therapy. A variety of basic science, animal and human data suggest that contraceptive hormones have anti-atheromatous effects, however relatively less is known regarding the impact on atherosclerosis, thrombosis, vasomotion and arrhythmogenesis. Newer generation OC formulations currently in use indicate no increased myocardial infarction (MI) risk for current users, but a persistent increased risk of venous thrombo-embolism (VTE). There are no cardiovascular data available for the newest generation contraceptive hormone formulations, including those that contain newer progestins that lower blood pressure, as well as the non-oral routes (topical and vaginal). Current guidelines indicate that, as with all medication, contraceptive hormones should be selected and initiated by weighing risks and benefits for the individual patient. Women 35 years and older should be assessed for cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, smoking, diabetes, nephropathy and other vascular diseases including migraines, prior to use. Existing data are mixed with regard to possible protection from OC for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events; longer-term cardiovascular follow-up of menopausal women with regard to prior OC use, including subgroup information regarding adequacy of ovulatory cycling, the presence of hyperandrogenic conditions, and the presence of prothrombotic genetic disorders is needed to address this important issue. PMID:19147038

  10. Steroid contraceptive use and pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Pardthaisong, T; Gray, R H; McDaniel, E B; Chandacham, A

    1988-07-01

    Contraceptive use in relation to pregnancy outcome was studied in 8,816 births in Chiang Mai, northern Thailand, by examination of newborn infants and interviews with their mothers. Four thousand twenty-three women used no contraception before the index pregnancy, 1,229 used the injectable contraceptive Depo Provera (DMPA), and 3,038 used oral contraceptives prior to or during pregnancy. No differences were observed between these groups with respect to still births, multiple pregnancies, and birthweight. Women who used oral contraceptives had unexpectedly low rates of major defects and may have been affected by self-selection bias, whereas the noncontraceptors had rates similar to other populations. There was a significantly increased association of polysyndactyly among infants of DMPA users relative to the other groups, which was most pronounced in offspring of women under age 30 years, and persisted after exclusion of subjects with a family history or infants with multiple abnormalities. However, in five out of the ten polysyndactyly cases, the last injection of DMPA occurred more than 9 months before conception, and only three cases had definite gestational exposure. The association of chromosomal anomalies was also significantly increased in infants of mothers who used DMPA. The unrelated nature of these defects, the lack of confirmation from other studies, the distant preconceptional exposure to DMPA in many cases, and chance effects due to multiple statistical comparisons make a causal association unlikely. Other birth defects that had been previously reported in some publications to be associated with progestational steroid exposure, such as neural tube defects, heart malformations, and limb reduction defects, were not found in this study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. When ancient meets modern: the relationship between postpartum non-susceptibility and contraception in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Brown, Mark

    2007-07-01

    Extended durations of postpartum non-susceptibility (PPNS) comprising lactational amenorrhoea and associated taboos on sex have been a central component of traditional reproductive regimes in sub-Saharan Africa. In situations of rising contraceptive prevalence this paper draws on data from the Demographic Health Surveys to consider the neglected interface between ancient and modern methods of regulation. The analysis reports striking contrasts between countries. At one extreme a woman's natural susceptibility status appears to have little bearing on the decision to use contraception in Zimbabwe, with widespread 'double-protection'. By contrast, contraceptive use in Kenya and Ghana builds directly onto underlying patterns of PPNS. Possible explanations for the differences and the implications for theory and policy are discussed.

  12. Contraceptive Use and Unintended Pregnancies Among HIV-Infected Women in Mumbai

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Beena; Velhal, Gajanan; Chauhan, Sanjay; Kulkarni, Ragini; Begum, Shahina; Nandanwar, Y. S.; Fonseca, Michelle; Baweja, Sujata; Turbadkar, Dilip; Ramchandran, Anita; Dalal, Asha; Shastri, Jayanti; Agrawal, Sachee; Panhale, Manisha; More, Vasundhara; Sanap, Pravin; Panchal, Renuka; Kanougiya, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Access to reproductive health services in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) programs can greatly enhance program's potential to limit the spread of disease, reduce unintended pregnancies and safeguard the health of infected people. Objectives: To assess (i) knowledge, attitude, and use regarding contraceptives; safe sex and dual protection; (ii) fertility desires and unintended pregnancies post HIV and (iii) symptoms of reproductive tract infection/sexually transmitted infection (RTI/STI) among women infected with HIV. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study among 300 currently married HIV-positive women who had not undergone permanent sterilization with no immediate desire for pregnancy. Study site was Integrated Counseling and Testing Centers (ICTC) in tertiary hospitals of Mumbai and women were interviewed using a semistructured questionnaire. Results: In spite of good awareness about modern methods, 42.7 felt that contraceptives other than condoms were harmful to use due to their HIV status. Knowledge on dual protection was limited to condom (75%). Condom use increased from 5.7% pre-HIV to 71.7% post-HIV, with 89.6% reporting regular use. Future fertility desire was expressed by 8.7% women. Induced abortions post-HIV was reported by16.6% women, as pregnancies were unintended. About 69% wished to use dual contraceptive methods for effective protection if it was not harmful to be used by people living with HIV (PLHIV). Conclusion: Data reveals a need to promote modern contraceptive methods along with regular condom use to prevent unintended pregnancies and improve health-seeking behavior for contraception. Health system models that converge or link HIV services with other reproductive health services need to be tested to provide comprehensive reproductive healthcare to infected women in India. PMID:26170540

  13. Residence time of carbon substrate for autotrophic respiration of a grassland ecosystem correlates with the carbohydrate status of its vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostler, Ulrike; Lehmeier, Christoph A.; Schleip, Inga; Schnyder, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Ecosystem respiration is composed of two component fluxes: (1) autotrophic respiration, which comprises respiratory activity of plants and plant-associated microbes that feed on products of recent photosynthetic activity and (2) heterotrophic respiration of microbes that decompose organic matter. The mechanistic link between the availability of carbon (C) substrate for ecosystem respiration and its respiratory activity is not well understood, particularly in grasslands. Here, we explore, how the kinetic features of the supply system feeding autotrophic ecosystem respiration in a temperate humid pasture are related to the content of water-soluble carbohydrates and remobilizable protein (as potential respiratory substrates) in vegetation biomass. During each September 2006, May 2007 and September 2007, we continuously labeled 0.8 m2 pasture plots with 13CO2/12CO2 and observed ecosystem respiration and its tracer content every night during the 14-16 day long labeling periods. We analyzed the tracer kinetics with a pool model, which allowed us to precisely partition ecosystem respiration into its autotrophic and heterotrophic flux components. At the end of a labeling campaign, we harvested aboveground and belowground plant biomass and analyzed its non-structural C contents. Approximately half of ecosystem respiration did not release any significant amount of tracer during the labeling period and was hence characterized as heterotrophic. The other half of ecosystem respiration was autotrophic, with a mean residence time of C in the respiratory substrate pool between 2 and 6 d. Both the rate of autotrophic respiration and the turnover of its substrate supply pool were correlated with plant carbohydrate content, but not with plant protein content. These findings are in agreement with studies in controlled environments that revealed water-soluble carbohydrates as the main substrate and proteins as a marginal substrate for plant respiration under favorable growth conditions

  14. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Florian; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rendl, Gundula; Rodrigues, Margarida; Pirich, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET) transcription in Hirschsprung's disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) (n = 26) or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4). Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p < 0.005; RET-mutated, r = 0.81, p < 0.01). E-cadherin showed weak correlation, whereas EGFR and TTF-1 showed no significant correlation with tumor proliferation. EGFR, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 showed weak correlation with proliferation of RET-mutated tumors. Correlation between TTF-1 and tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = -0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression. PMID:27409604

  15. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Florian; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rendl, Gundula; Rodrigues, Margarida; Pirich, Christian

    2016-07-09

    Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET) transcription in Hirschsprung's disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) (n = 26) or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4). Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p < 0.005; RET-mutated, r = 0.81, p < 0.01). E-cadherin showed weak correlation, whereas EGFR and TTF-1 showed no significant correlation with tumor proliferation. EGFR, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 showed weak correlation with proliferation of RET-mutated tumors. Correlation between TTF-1 and tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = -0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression.

  16. [Historical survey of modern reversible contraceptive methods].

    PubMed

    Mbabajende, V

    1986-04-01

    Because of contraception, pregnancy need not be viewed by women as punishment for sexual activity but as a planned and desired event. Most of the contraceptive methods used in developing countries at present were introduced during the 1960s, but use of contraception has a long history and some methods date back to antiquity. Contraceptive pills were already used around 2000 BC in the form of mercury and arsenic tablets. Their effectiveness was questionable. The role of hormones in human reproduction began to be understood only in the early 1900s. The discovery of progesterone in a Mexican iguana in the 1940s permitted production of progesterone on a large scale. Estrogens had been identified around 1930. Human trials of a contraceptive pill beginning in 1956 in Puerto Rico demonstrated that progestins could prevent pregnancy by suppressing ovulation. Later on, estrogen was added to reduce menstrual irregularities. The 1st generation of combined oral contraceptives contained very high levels of hormones associated with high rates of side effects. Numerous formulations with lower hormonal contents became available beginning around 1970 and constitute the principal formulations in use today. A number of long acting hormonal methods based on progestins have been developed, including injectables, some IUDs and vaginal rings, and implants. The 1st commercially available injectable, norethisterone enanthate, did not acquire the wide distribution of medroxyprogesterone acetate, sold as Depo Provera and used to treat various pathological conditions as well as for contraception. The 1st true IUDs were small stones placed within the uteri of camels by nomads to prevent pregnancy during long caravans. An IUD was developed in 1909 by Richter, and the 2 most widely used models before 1960 were the Grafenberg and Ota silver rings. Use of the 2 rings became rare for medical reasons after 1935 despite their efficacy. Safe plastic IUDs which appeared beginning in the early 1960s

  17. Awareness and Determinants of Contraceptive use among Nursing Mothers in Bellary, Karnataka

    PubMed Central

    Mathada, Veerendrakumar Chowdapur

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The nursing mothers, who have already delivered a child in recent period, may prefer to avoid or delay future pregnancy, or may not even have given a thought about it. Among those who prefer to delay next pregnancy, many are unaware of family planning practices. This is mainly influenced by the prevailing sociodemographic factors in their families. Aim To study the prevailing Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of contraception and the influence of sociodemographic factors on family planning practices among the healthy nursing mothers. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 2500 healthy breast feeding mothers who delivered at Medical College Hospital (MCH), Vijayanagara Institute of Medical Sciences(VIMS), Bellary during Dec 2011 to Nov 2013. They were interviewed using a pre structured questionnaire in the post natal wards on 2nd to 7th postpartum day. Later these mothers were educated and counseled regarding various suitable contraceptive methods. The data collected were analysed using percentage and chi- square test. Results The proportion of willingness for contraception is more among women in the age group 19-29 years, among literate husband and wife, among women belonging to nuclear families and with higher socioeconomic status. Muslim women were least receptive to contraceptive advice. Regarding awareness of contraceptive methods only 46% had knowledge regarding family planning methods. A total of 43% mothers opted to limit family size. Among 16% of mothers who did not want to limit family size, 70% had no male child. In most of the families, final decision regarding family planning method was taken by husband alone or by elders. The most important reason for lack of family planning practices was lack of awareness (57.2%). Conclusion Many of the nursing mothers are not aware of contraceptive practices. But these women are very receptive to contraceptive advice. Also, the decision of family planning depends not only on the

  18. Perceived Risks Associated with Contraceptive Method Use among Men and Women in Ibadan and Kaduna, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Schwandt, Hilary M; Skinner, Joanna; Hebert, Luciana E; Saad, Abdulmumin

    2015-12-01

    Research shows that side effects are often the most common reason for contraceptive non-use in Nigeria; however, research to date has not explored the underlying factors that influence risk and benefit perceptions associated with specific contraceptive methods in Nigeria. A qualitative study design using focus group discussions was used to explore social attitudes and beliefs about family planning methods in Ibadan and Kaduna, Nigeria. A total of 26 focus group discussions were held in 2010 with men and women of reproductive age, disaggregated by city, sex, age, marital status, neighborhood socioeconomic status, and--for women only--family planning experience. A discussion guide was used that included specific questions about the perceived risks and benefits associated with the use of six different family planning methods. A thematic content analytic approach guided the analysis. Participants identified a spectrum of risks encompassing perceived threats to health (both real and fictitious) and social concerns, as well as benefits associated with each method. By exploring Nigerian perspectives on the risks and benefits associated with specific family planning methods, programs aiming to increase contraceptive use in Nigeria can be better equipped to highlight recognized benefits, address specific concerns, and work to dispel misperceptions associated with each family planning method. PMID:27337851

  19. How a Married Woman`s Characteristics Affect her Contraceptive Behavior?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Rana Ejaz Ali; Khan, Tasnim

    In Pakistan, population growth rate is 2.2% and Total Fertility Rate (TFR) is as high as 5.4. It is the result of low Contraceptive Prevalence Rate (CPR) of only 28%. Due to low CPR, women have high rate of unwanted births in Pakistan. In this study using probit estimation on primary data, we have analyzed the woman=s characteristics responsible for low contraceptive prevalence among married women in urban areas of Punjab (Pakistan). For the purpose one thousand married women in the age group of 15-49 years, who were not currently pregnant were interviewed from urban areas of Bahawalpur and Lahore. The individual characteristics of married women were focused, although household characteristics, socio-economic conditions of the community where woman is living, religious and cultural factors are also important. It is found that age of woman, education of woman, woman`s status, her economic activity, income level and age at marriage were found major determinants of contraceptive prevalence in women. The policies towards the education of women, status of women, labor force participation of women and legal interventions towards the increase in marriage age are stressed to increase the CPR.

  20. Psychosocial Correlates of AUDIT-C Hazardous Drinking Risk Status: Implications for Screening and Brief Intervention in College Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahesh, Edward; Lewis, Todd F.

    2015-01-01

    The current study identified psychosocial variables associated with AUDIT-C hazardous drinking risk status for male and female college students. Logistic regression analysis revealed that AUDIT-C risk status was associated with alcohol-related negative consequences, injunctive norms, and descriptive norms for both male and female participants.…

  1. Recent advances in contraceptive vaccine development: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Naz, Rajesh K; Gupta, Satish K; Gupta, Jagdish C; Vyas, Hemant K; Talwar, And G P

    2005-12-01

    Contraceptive vaccines (CV) may provide viable and valuable alternatives to the presently available methods of contraception. The molecules that are being explored for CV development either target gamete production [luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH)/GnRH, FSH], gamete function [sperm antigens and oocyte zona pellucida (ZP)], and gamete outcome (HCG). CV targeting gamete production have shown varied degrees of efficacy; however, they either affect sex steroids causing impotency and/or show only a partial rather than a complete effect in inhibiting gametogenesis. However, vaccines based on LHRH/GnRH are being developed by several pharmaceutical companies as substitutes for castration of domestic pets, farm and wild animals, and for therapeutic anticancer purposes such as in prostatic hypertrophy and carcinoma. These vaccines may also find applications in clinical situations that require the inhibition of increased secretions of sex steroids, such as in uterine fibroids, polycystic ovary syndrome, endometriosis and precocious puberty. CV targeting molecules involved in gamete function such as sperm antigens and ZP proteins are exciting choices. Sperm constitute the most promising and exciting target for CV. Several sperm-specific antigens have been delineated in several laboratories and are being actively explored for CV development. Studies are focused on delineating appropriate sperm-specific epitopes, and increasing the immunogenicity (specifically in the local genital tract) and efficacy on the vaccines. Anti-sperm antibody (ASA)-mediated immunoinfertility provides a naturally occurring model to indicate how a vaccine might work in humans. Vaccines based on ZP proteins are quite efficacious in producing contraceptive effects, but may induce oophoritis, affecting sex steroids. They are being successfully tested to control feral populations of dogs, deer, horses and elephants, and populations of several species of zoo animals. The current research for

  2. Access to Emergency Contraception and its Impact on Fertility and Sexual Behavior.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Karen

    2016-04-01

    Half of all pregnancies in the USA are unintended, suggesting a high incidence of either improper or nonuse of contraceptives. Emergency birth control (EBC) provides individuals with additional insurance against unplanned pregnancy in the presence of contraception failure. This study is the first to estimate the impact of switching EBC from prescription to nonprescription status in the USA on abortions and risky sexual behavior as measured by STD rates. Utilizing state-level variation in access to EBC, we find that providing individuals with over-the-counter access to EBC leads to increase STD rates and has no effect on abortion rates. Moreover, individual-level analysis using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth indicates that risky sexual behavior such as engaging in unprotected sex and number of sexual encounters increases as a result of over-the-counter access to EBC, which is consistent with the state-level STD findings. PMID:25663392

  3. Contraception for Adolescents: Focusing on Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptives (LARC) to Improve Reproductive Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy rates in the U.S. have reached an all-time low from their peak in the 1980s and 1990s. However, the U.S. maintains the highest rate of teenage pregnancy among developed nations. Adolescents experience higher typical use failure rates for user-dependent contraceptives compared to their adult counterparts. Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), IUDs and implants, have failure rates that are both very low and independent of user age. In settings where the most effective methods are prioritized and access barriers are removed, the majority of adolescents initiate LARC. Use of LARC by adolescents significantly reduces rates of overall and repeat teen pregnancy. All methods of contraception are safe for use in teens, including IUDs and DMPA. Dual use of LARC and barrier methods to reduce risk of sexually transmitted infection, is the optimal contraceptive strategy for most adolescents. Adolescent access to evidence-based and confidential contraceptive services, provided in a manner that respects autonomy, is a vital public health goal.

  4. Contraception for Adolescents: Focusing on Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptives (LARC) to Improve Reproductive Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy rates in the U.S. have reached an all-time low from their peak in the 1980s and 1990s. However, the U.S. maintains the highest rate of teenage pregnancy among developed nations. Adolescents experience higher typical use failure rates for user-dependent contraceptives compared to their adult counterparts. Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), IUDs and implants, have failure rates that are both very low and independent of user age. In settings where the most effective methods are prioritized and access barriers are removed, the majority of adolescents initiate LARC. Use of LARC by adolescents significantly reduces rates of overall and repeat teen pregnancy. All methods of contraception are safe for use in teens, including IUDs and DMPA. Dual use of LARC and barrier methods to reduce risk of sexually transmitted infection, is the optimal contraceptive strategy for most adolescents. Adolescent access to evidence-based and confidential contraceptive services, provided in a manner that respects autonomy, is a vital public health goal. PMID:27635305

  5. Low Health System Performance, Indigenous Status and Antivenom Underdosage Correlate with Spider Envenoming Severity in the Remote Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio, Vanderson Souza; Gomes, André Alexandre; Silva, Iran Mendonça; Sachett, Jacqueline; Ferreira, Luiz Carlos Lima; Oliveira, Sâmella; Sabidò, Meritxell; Chalkidis, Hipócrates; Barbosa Guerra, Maria Graças Vale; Salinas, Jorge Luis; Wen, Fan Hui; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    .001)] were independently associated with a risk of severity. Living in a municipality located >300 km away from the state capital Manaus [OR = 1.53 (95%CI = 1.15–2.02; p = 0.003)] and living in a municipality with a MHSPI correlations shown here, envenomings occurring in remote rural areas, Indigenous status and living in a municipality located >300 km away from the state capital Manaus could be contributing factors to higher severity of spider envenomings in this area, as well as to antivenom underdosage. PMID:27227455

  6. Emergency contraception among refugees and the displaced.

    PubMed

    Goodyear, L; McGinn, T

    1998-01-01

    In 1994, the international relief community began to recognize and address the reproductive health needs of refugees and displaced populations. A minimum initial service package of reproductive health services for refugees and the displaced, which includes emergency contraception (EC), was developed and recommended for use in refugee settings. This paper describes the experience of one international relief organization, the International Rescue Committee (IRC), in introducing EC into its worldwide reproductive health program. A recent IRC survey found that EC is available in 4 out of 14 settings where it provides reproductive health services. A case study from Tanzania demonstrates the modes of delivery, the demand for EC by women who have experienced sexual violence, and the community responses to this method of contraception. More information, education, and communication directed at refugee communities; more donor support for supplies; and institutional commitment to train staff are needed to expand refugee access to EC. PMID:9859638

  7. Emergency Contraception for Adolescents: A Political Battle.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    The political debate for adolescents to have access to emergency contraception that is available over the counter has been going on for years. Since 1999, Levonorgestrel, Plan B One Step®, has been used in the United States as an emergency contraception but with a prescription at the time. The FDA has done years of research and testing with Barr Laboratories, the manufacture of Plan B One Step®, to make it safe for females of all ages. In 2003, the FDA recommended the over the counter use of Plan B One Step® for all ages, yet this did not occur. In pharmacies across our nation young women find it impossible to purchase this product whether they be of age or not. Politics is making the choices for our young females, not medical evidence. How long are we going to let this continue?

  8. Emergency contraception among refugees and the displaced.

    PubMed

    Goodyear, L; McGinn, T

    1998-01-01

    In 1994, the international relief community began to recognize and address the reproductive health needs of refugees and displaced populations. A minimum initial service package of reproductive health services for refugees and the displaced, which includes emergency contraception (EC), was developed and recommended for use in refugee settings. This paper describes the experience of one international relief organization, the International Rescue Committee (IRC), in introducing EC into its worldwide reproductive health program. A recent IRC survey found that EC is available in 4 out of 14 settings where it provides reproductive health services. A case study from Tanzania demonstrates the modes of delivery, the demand for EC by women who have experienced sexual violence, and the community responses to this method of contraception. More information, education, and communication directed at refugee communities; more donor support for supplies; and institutional commitment to train staff are needed to expand refugee access to EC.

  9. Women's Empowerment and Contraceptive Use: The Role of Independent versus Couples' Decision-Making, from a Lower Middle Income Country Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Waqas; Azmat, Syed Khurram; Ali, Moazzam; Sheikh, Muhammad Ishaque; Abbas, Ghazunfer; Temmerman, Marleen; Avan, Bilal Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There is little available evidence of associations between the various dimensions of women's empowerment and contraceptive use having been examined - and of how these associations are mediated by women's socio-economic and demographic statuses. We assessed these phenomena in Pakistan using a structured-framework approach. Methods We analyzed data on 2,133 women who were either using any form of contraceptive or living with unmet need for contraception. The survey was conducted during May - June 2012, with married women of reproductive age (15–49 years) in three districts of Punjab. The dimensions of empowerment were categorized broadly into: economic decision-making, household decision-making, and women's mobility. Two measures were created for each dimension, and for the overall empowerment: women's independent decisions, and those taken jointly by couples. Contraceptive use was categorized as either female-only or couple methods on the basis of whether a method requires the awareness of, or some support and cooperation from, the husband. Multinomial regression was used, by means of Odds Ratios (OR), to assess associations between empowerment dimensions and female-only and couple contraceptive methods. Results Overall, women tend to get higher decision-making power with increased age, higher literacy, a greater number of children, or being in a household that has superior socio-economic status. The measures for couples' decision-making for overall empowerment and for each dimension of it showed positive associations with couple methods as well as with female-only methods. The only exception was the measure of economic empowerment, which was associated only with the couple method. Conclusion Couples' joint decision-making is a stronger determinant of the use of contraceptive methods than women-only decision-making. This is the case over and above the contribution of women's socio-demographic and economic statuses. Effort needs to be made to educate

  10. Impact of Contraceptive Counseling in Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Lauren B.; Tregear, Stephen J.; Curtis, Kathryn M.; Tiller, Marie; Pazol, Karen; Mautone-Smith, Nancy; Gavin, Loretta E.

    2015-01-01

    Context This systematic review evaluated the evidence on the impact of contraceptive counseling provided in clinical settings on reproductive health outcomes to provide information to guide national recommendations on quality family planning services. Evidence acquisition Multiple databases were searched during 2010–2011 for peer-reviewed articles published in English from January 1985 through February 2011 describing studies that evaluated contraceptive counseling interventions in clinical settings. Studies were excluded if they focused primarily on prevention of HIV or sexually transmitted infections, focused solely on men, or were conducted outside the U.S., Canada, Europe, Australia, or New Zealand. Evidence synthesis The initial search identified 12,327 articles, of which 22 studies (from 23 articles) met the inclusion criteria. Six studies examined the impact of contraceptive counseling among adolescents, with four finding a significant positive impact on at least one outcome of interest. Sixteen studies examined the impact of counseling among adults or mixed populations (adults and adolescents), with 11 finding a significant positive impact on at least one outcome of interest. Conclusions Promising components of contraceptive counseling were identified despite the diversity of interventions and inability to compare the relative effectiveness of one approach versus another. The evidence base would be strengthened by improved documentation of counseling procedures; assessment of intervention implementation and fidelity to put study findings into context; and development and inclusion of more RCTs, studies conducted among general samples of women, and studies with sample sizes sufficient to detect important behavioral outcomes at least 12 months post-intervention. PMID:26190845

  11. The myth about contraceptives and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ibekwe, J

    1993-03-18

    Science and modern medicine accord us many advantages, e.g., contraceptive drugs, but many people still do not use them. Contraceptive drugs include oral contraceptives and injectables. OCs are very effective and are associated with minor side effects (e.g., mood changes, breast tenderness, nausea, and changes in weight, mild headache, and spotting between periods), perhaps explaining why they are one of the most often used contraceptive in essentially every country. Women who smoke; are 35 years old; or either have or have a family history of hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and use OCs are at higher risk of a cardiovascular episode. On the other hand, OCs protect against ovarian and endometrial cancers. Research does not yet confirm or disprove their effect on breast cancer development. OCs appear not to be linked to breast cancer through age 59. Yet, studies of women 45 years old suggest that OCs increases the breast cancer risk in these women who had their first menses before age 13 and used OCs for a long time before their first pregnancy. OCs may facilitate growth of breast tumors that other causes activated, and therefore, do not likely increase the overall risk. Researchers recognize the death of knowledge about breast cancer development, so they call for more research, including basic molecular, cellular, and biochemical studies. In Nigeria, breast cancer is rare, while deaths due to pregnancy and childbirth are common, indicating that OC use can prevent many female deaths. Prolonged breast feeding; later age at first menses; earlier age at menopause; earlier age at first full-term pregnancy larger families; low fat, high fiber diets; and thinness, all of which are common in developing countries, have a protective effect against breast cancer. Further, women in developing countries begin OC use later than women in developed countries.

  12. The "new" contraceptive method of breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Townsend, S

    1992-10-01

    The consensus statement of lactation specialists at a meeting in Bellagio, Italy, states that breast feeding can be an effective contraception until menstruation resumes, a mother supplements breast milk with considerable amounts of other foods, or the infant is 6 months old. If any of these 3 conditions occur, mothers should use another contraceptive. If they do not occur, this lactational amenorrhea method (LAM) is 98% effective. New research shows that amenorrhea along may indicate the need to use contraception. For example, a multicountry study demonstrates that amenorrhea alone prevents pregnancy is 94% of mothers 1 year postpartum (97% at 6 months postpartum). Disregarding the supplementation rule should only be advocated in countries where women usually breast feed for a long period and experience resumption of menstruation after 1 year or more. Some research shows that at least 15 breast feeds per day, with each breast feed lasting at least 10 minutes, are required to maintain lactational amenorrhea after the first six months. Medical personnel and commercial advertising of infant formulas promote early supplementation, thereby making it difficult to drop the food supplementation rule. Further, many hospitals tend to encourage breast feeding for child health reasons rather than family planning reasons. Moreover, family planning programs emphasize contraceptives. Thus, it may be hard to encourage hospital and family planning staff to promote LAM. In some countries, e.g., Honduras, mothers trained in LAM lead breast feeding support groups to promote LAM among other mothers. Regardless of the ongoing debate about the LAM criteria, information about LAM should be available to all breast feeding mothers.

  13. Depo-Provera: an injectable contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Wigington, S

    The contraceptive effect of Depo-Provera or medroxyprogesterone acetate, a long-acting injectable progestogen, has been mainly attributed to its ability to prevent ovulation through its action on the hypothalamic pituitary axis, reducing the levels of plasma gonadotropin, progesterone, and estradiol, and suppressing the midcycle surge of luteinizing hormone. Its other contraceptive effects are thickening of the cervical mucus, causing a barrier to spermatozoa, alteration in tubal ovum transport, and atrophy of the endometrium. A standard dose of 150 mg injected every 3 months is as effective as the combined oral pill and more effective than the progestogen-only pill or IUD. Contraindications to use are thrombophlebitis, liver dysfunctions, suspected breast or genital malignancy, and abnormal uterine bleeding. Reported discontinuation rates range from 7-80%. The World Health Organization (1977) reported a gross cumulative discontinuation rate of 23.4/100 women years in 8 centers. Depo-Provera has a long list of short-term (menstrual disorders, fluid retention, nausea, hair loss, and others) and long-term (delayed fertility return, congenital abnormalities, cancer others) disorders. Its advantages include: 1) convenience, 2) effectiveness, 3) no risk of infection or other side effects of the coil, 4) none of proven side effects or long-term hazards of estrogen, and 5) no inhibition of lactation. The safety of Depo-Provera has been a controversial issue which led to its banning in the U.S. Its carcinogenic potential has been reported in clinical trials with animals. Its greatest disadvantage is that it takes control of a woman's fertility firmly out of her hands into those of the doctor. Depo-Provera should not be used except as an absolute last resort. It should not be used as a long-term contraceptive in this country, and research monies should instead be channeled into the development of a safe, reliable contraceptive with no systemic side effects.

  14. Contraception Use, Abortions, and Births: The Effect of Insurance Mandates.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Karen

    2015-08-01

    Beginning August, 2012, the U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) required new private health insurance plans to cover contraceptive methods and counseling without requiring an insured's copay. The ACA represents the first instance of federally mandated contraception insurance coverage, but 30 U.S. states had already mandated contraceptive insurance coverage through state-level legislation prior to the ACA. This study examines whether mandated insurance coverage of contraception affects contraception use, abortions, and births. I find that mandates increase the likelihood of contraception use by 2.1 percentage points, decrease the abortion rate by 3 %, and have an insignificant impact on the birth rate. The results imply a lower-bound estimate that the ACA will result in approximately 25,000 fewer abortions. PMID:26153735

  15. Orientation of senior nursing students toward access to contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Elder, R G

    1976-01-01

    Attitudes of 264 senior students of nursing toward providing contraception services to all who want them were assessed in 1974 through a questionnaire. In general, the students expressed permissive attitudes toward dispensing contraceptives to all except one group-very young tennagers. They were reluctant to endorse educating young people about contraception prior to puberty; one-half considered 15 or older the best age to educate. When contraceptive dispersal outside professional control was considered, students evidenced restricitive attitudes. Less than one-third endorsed placing nonprescription contraceptives in vending machines or food markets. Students with more permissive attitudes toward free access to contraceptives were more likely to express permissive attitudes toward premarital sex, nontraditional views of woman's role, and high concern about population problems. They were less likely to consider religion important, to attend sectarian schools, or to be of the Catholic faith.

  16. Can mass media advetising increase contraceptive use?

    PubMed

    Udry, J R; Clark, L T; Chase, C L; Levy, M

    1972-07-01

    A $330,000 multimedia advertising campaign was undertaken in 4 U.S. cities (Columbus, Ohio; Memphis, Tennessee; Altoona, Pennsylvania; Jackson, Mississippi) November 1970-May 1971 by the Family Planning Evaluation project (University of North Carolina) to evaluate the cost and effectiveness of commercial advertising in increasing contraceptive utilization among active fertile individuals. The ads ran on radio, television, in special editions of Life and Look, and in local daily, ethnic, and community newspapers. The level of complaints was below what had been anticipated, and there was no unacceptable community opposition even in the saturation cases. The level of awareness was higher during the campaign for television and radio advertising but not for newspaper and magazine advertising (interviews). The number of "new" patients to family planning clinics was low (ranging from 24 to 444) and it appears that mass media advertising is not an effective recruitment technique. No differences were found in new prescription sales of oral contraceptives or sales of condoms between the media sites and their controls during the 6-month campaign. Mass media campaigns might be more effective in non-US settings where contraceptive knowledge is not great and usage is not widespread. PMID:5040824

  17. Mechanism of action of levonorgestrel emergency contraception

    PubMed Central

    Kahlenborn, Chris; Peck, Rebecca; Severs, Walter B.

    2015-01-01

    There has been much debate regarding levonorgestrel emergency contraception's (LNG-EC's) method of action since 1999 when the Food and Drug Administration first approved its use. Proponents of LNG-EC have argued that they have moral certitude that LNG-EC works via a non-abortifacient mechanism of action, and claim that all the major scientific and medical data consistently support this hypothesis. However, newer medical data serve to undermine the consistency of the non-abortifacient hypothesis and instead support the hypothesis that preovulatory administration of LNG-EC has significant potential to work via abortion. The implications of the newer data have important ramifications for medical personnel, patients, and both Catholic and non-Catholic emergency room protocols. In the future, technology such as the use of early pregnancy factor may have the potential to quantify how frequently preovulatory LNG-EC works via abortion. Lay Summary: How Plan B (levonorgestrel emergency contraception) works has been vigorously debated ever since the Food and Drug Administration approved it in 1999. Many doctors and researchers claim that it has either no—or at most—an extremely small chance of working via abortion. However, the latest scientific and medical evidence now demonstrates that levonorgestrel emergency contraception theoretically works via abortion quite often. The implications of the newer data have important ramifications for medical personnel, patients, and both Catholic and non-Catholic emergency room rape protocols. PMID:25698840

  18. Tunisia: rural contraceptive distribution project has impact.

    PubMed

    1979-10-01

    The Tunisian National Development Plan calls for a 40% reduction in the annual growth rate by the year 2000. The Office National du Planning Familial et de la Population (ONPFP) aims, within the next 5 years, to make the delivery of contraceptive information and services more efficient and more widespread throughout the rural areas of the country. A pilot project, the Planning Familial a Domicile (PFAD), which was launched in 1976 demonstrated the feasibility of moving from the traditional clinic-based family planning program to a door-to-door contraceptive distribution system. After 2 years of intensive household distribution within the target area by nonmedical personnel, contraceptive use had increased from 6.6% to 17.7%, an increase of 168%. The success of this pilot project has led the ONPFP to institute further family planning extension services throughout the rural areas of the country. 2 current household distribution projects have grown out of the PFAD experience. These are designed to test the feasibility of integrated delivery of family planning and maternal/child health services. An additional program, the Planning Familial en Milieu Rural (PFMR), is assessing the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of using mobile clinics and social assistants for family planning work.

  19. Information, education and communication for emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    Puri, Chander P; Hazari, Kamal; Kulkarni, Ragini

    2006-09-01

    The utilisation of the emergency contraception pills is very low both in the public and private sectors. The major reason for this under-utilisation is the lack of awareness about the method among the users or the providers. A real need arises to aware the potential users or the healthcare providers like obstetrician and gynaecologists, medical practitioners, family planning counsellors, nurses and ANMs. Wider dissemination of information, education and communication about emergency contraception relating to the proper usage, mode of action and provision is the need. The information, education and communication materials developed should always be in languages socioculturally appropriate to the target audience. Mass media like TV, newspapers and women's magazine should also be included for dissemination of messages. Service providers should be informed correctly about the method. Healthcare providers would need basic scientific information of the contents of the emergency contraception pills, mode of action, indications, contra-indications, etc. Emphasis should be put on the method for use only as an emergency or 'second chance' when a primary method is not used or has failed.

  20. An underage teenager who requests contraception.

    PubMed

    Rogers, A; Piegsa, K; Kerrigan, P

    1997-04-01

    A 14-year-old girl, Toni, and her 22-year-old boyfriend of 3 weeks present to the family practitioner seeking a prescription for oral contraception in anticipation of the couple's first act of sexual intercourse. Mike, Toni's first boyfriend, requests the contraception for Toni on her behalf. The physician is a longtime friend of Toni's parents and has known Toni since her birth. Drs. Kerrigan and Piegsa would both provide Toni with oral contraception and maintain physician-patient confidentiality, while Dr. Rogers would deny the request and inform the parents that Toni is at risk. Drs. Kerrigan and Piegsa emphasize the need to garner and maintain Toni's trust and to speak with her alone at subsequent meetings in the near future. That sexual intercourse between the two is technically rape must be explained, and the need to protect against sexually transmitted diseases and HIV must be stressed. Toni should be asked how relations are at home, whether she feels pressured by her partner, and discretely assessed with regard to her level of maturity. PMID:9206286

  1. The social marketing of contraceptives in Mexico.

    PubMed

    De La Macorra, L

    1980-07-01

    The success in social marketing of the PROFAM brand of subsidized contraceptives, by a nonprofit private institution that supports the Mexican government program, is related here. PROFAM began in 1978, when half of contraceptives were purchased commercially from drugstores: they were neither economical, consistently distributed, nor advertised. Comprehensive market research revealed that a great demand existed. It generated information for choice of items to market, package design, and instructions. In 1979, pills, condoms, foam, cream and vaginal suppositories, all locally produced were distributed. A serious problem initially was the impropriety of using the word "contraceptive" in the media. The first phase of advertising targeted newspapers. After 3 months, 40% of Mexico's drugstores carried PROFAM. The second phase of advertising, in radio, magazines and newspapers, approached consumers with information tailored to the specific socioeconomic group involved. The third phase, geared to rural areas and general stores, concentrates on advantages of each method. Other aggressive aspects of the campaign include house to house sampling and a mail-in question and answer service. Evidence of success in broadcasting the PROFAM message is the frequent reference to PROFAM in jokes in the media and even in graffiti. The government's goal is to reduce the growth rate form 2.9 percent annually to 1 percent by 2000.

  2. Update on contraception: benefits and risks of the new formulations.

    PubMed

    Batur, Pelin; Elder, Julie; Mayer, Mark

    2003-08-01

    Several new contraceptives have become available to women in recent years. These new agents include ultra-low-dose oral contraceptives as well as injectable, vaginal, and patch formulations. We review these, with emphasis on the Yasmin pill (which contains a new progestin), the Lunelle once-a-month injection, the Ortho Evra patch, the NuvaRing vaginal ring, the Mirena intrauterine device, and emergency contraceptive kits. Patient education regarding these options is essential for patient compliance and satisfaction.

  3. Contraceptive Practices Among Female Cancer Survivors of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Dominick, Sally A.; McLean, Mamie R.; Whitcomb, Brian W.; Gorman, Jessica R.; Mersereau, Jennifer E.; Bouknight, Janet M.; Su, H. Irene

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare rates of contraception between reproductive-aged cancer survivors and women in the general U.S. population. Among survivors, the study examined factors associated with use of contraception and emergency contraception. Methods This study analyzed enrollment data from an ongoing national prospective cohort study on reproductive health after cancer entitled the Fertility Information Research Study. We compared current contraceptive use in survivors with that of the general population ascertained by the 2006–2010 National Survey for Family Growth. Log-binomial regression models estimated relative risks for characteristics associated with use of contraception, World Health Organization tiers I–II (sterilization and hormonal) contraceptive methods, and emergency contraception in survivors. Results Data from 295 survivors (mean age 31.6 ± 5.7 years, range 20–44 years) enrolled in this prospective study (85% response rate) were examined. Age-adjusted rates of using tiers I–II contraceptive methods were lower in survivors than the general population (34% [28.8–40.0] compared with 53% [51.5–54.5], P<.01). Only 56% of survivors reported receiving family planning services (counseling, prescription or procedure related to birth control) since cancer diagnosis. In adjusted analysis, receipt of family planning services was associated with both increased use of tiers I–II contraceptive methods (relative risk 1.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–1.5) and accessing emergency contraception (relative risk 5.0, 95% CI 1.6–16.3) in survivors. Conclusion Lower rates of using Tiers I–II contraceptive methods were found in reproductive-aged cancer survivors compared to the general population of U.S. women. Exposure to family planning services across the cancer care continuum may improve contraception utilization among these women. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01843140. PMID:26181090

  4. Effects of Administration of Fostamatinib on Blood Concentrations of an Oral Contraceptive in Healthy Female Subjects

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-02-17

    Scientific Terminology Rheumatoid Arthritis, Healthy Female Volunteers, Pharmacokinetics, Oral Contraceptive, Drug-drug Interaction; Laymen Terminology Level of Oral Contraceptive in Blood, Oral Contraceptive, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Drug -Drug Interaction

  5. Contraceptive strategies for young women in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Ruusuvaara, L; Johansson, E D

    1999-12-01

    Safe, effective and affordable contraceptives have been available for a few decades, yet, in many countries, the struggle for reproductive rights continues. Children, still, are forced to give birth to children in many nations. In most industrialized countries, where contraceptive counselling and abortions have been options, fertility rates have reached all time lows. Effective contraception improves health and well-being as well and may be used for conditions other than birth control. Young girls often initially take oral contraceptives primarily to reduce menstrual pain and blood loss; they also welcome a contraceptive that eliminates menstrual bleeding. Women using oral contraceptives and Norplant experience about 50% reduction in menstrual blood; 90% reduction in blood loss is achieved with the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (Mirena). Teenagers and their parents are often misinformed about the side-effects of oral contraceptives and birth control in general, which may adversely affect compliance. Adequate, user-friendly and supportive information about contraception is necessary to ensure proper use of the pill and other birth control methods. In addition, emergency contraceptives should be easily accessible. The mortality and morbidity of young women would be dramatically reduced by the global use of medical abortion as well. Only a combined effort by policy makers, educators, parents and health-care providers can enhance the reproductive (and future!) health of both young females and males.

  6. The effects of hormonal contraceptives on glycemic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Manuel E.; Alfaro, Andrea A.

    2014-01-01

    A number of side effects have been linked to the use of hormonal contraceptives, among others, alterations in glucose levels. Hence, the objective of this mini-review is to show the main effects of hormonal contraceptive intake on glycemic regulation. First, the most relevant studies on this topic are described, then the mechanisms that might be accountable for this glycemic regulation impairment as exerted by hormonal contraceptives are discussed. Finally, we briefly discuss the ethical responsibility of health professionals to inform about the potential risks on glycemic homeostasis regarding hormonal contraceptive intake. PMID:25249703

  7. Contraceptive knowledge, sexual behavior, and factors associated with contraceptive use among female undergraduate university students in Kilimanjaro region in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Sweya, Mussa N; Msuya, Sia E; Mahande, Michael J; Manongi, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that knowledge of contraceptives, especially among the youth in universities, remains limited, and the rate of premarital sexual activity, unwanted pregnancies, and illegal abortions remains higher among university students. This study aimed to assess contraceptive knowledge, sexual behavior, and factors associated with contraceptive use among female undergraduate university students in Kilimanjaro region in Tanzania. Methods A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted from May to June 2015 among undergraduate female students in four universities in Kilimanjaro region. A self-administered questionnaire was given to the participants. Data analysis was performed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. An odds ratio with 95% confidence interval for factors associated with modern contraceptive use was computed using multiple logistic regression models. A P-value of <5% (two-tailed) was considered statistically significant. Results A total of 401 students were involved in the study. Two-thirds (260, 64.8%) of the participants had had sexual intercourse. The majority (93.8%) of the participants had knowledge of contraception. One hundred and seventy-five (43.6%) sexually active women reported that they used contraceptives in the past, while 162 (40.4%) were current contraceptive users. More than half (54.2%) of the sexually active group started sexual activity between the ages of 20–24 years. The most popular methods of contraception used were condoms, withdrawal, and periodic abstinence. The main sources of information about contraception were friends, television, and health care workers (44.8%, 40.3%, and 39.0%, respectively). Conclusion Most of the participants had knowledge of contraception. However, the rate of contraceptive use was low. The majority of the respondents were sexually active and started sexual activity at >18 years of age. Hence, advocacy for

  8. The Oportunidades Conditional Cash Transfer Program: Effects on Pregnancy and Contraceptive Use among Young Rural Women in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Darney, Blair G.; Weaver, Marcia R.; Sosa-Rubi, Sandra G.; Walker, Dilys; Servan-Mori, Edson; Prager, Sarah; Gakidou, Emmanuela

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT Oportunidades is a large conditional cash transfer program in Mexico. It is important to examine whether the program has any direct effect on pregnancy experience and contraceptive use among young rural women, apart from those through education. METHODS Data from the 1992, 2006 and 2009 waves of a nationally representative, population-based survey were used to describe trends in pregnancy experience, contraceptive use and education among rural adolescent (15–19) and young adult (20–24) women in Mexico. To examine differences in pregnancy experience and current modern contraceptive use among young women, multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted among matched 2006 samples of women with and without exposure to Oportunidades, predicted probabilities were calculated and indirect effects were estimated. RESULTS Over the three survey waves, the proportion of adolescent and young adult women reporting ever being pregnant stayed flat (33–36%) and contraceptive use increased steadily (from 13% in 1992 to 19% in 2009). Educational attainment rose dramatically: The proportion of women with a secondary education increased from 28% in 1992 to 46% in 2009. In multivariable analyses, exposure to Oportunidades was not associated with pregnancy experience among adolescents. Educational attainment, marital status, pregnancy experience and access to health insurance—but not exposure to Oportunidades—were positively associated with current modern contraceptive use among adolescent and young adult women. CONCLUSION Through its effect on education, Oportunidades indirectly influences fertility among adolescents. It is important for Mexico to focus on strategies to increase contraceptive use among young rural nulliparous women, regardless of whether they are enrolled in Oportunidades. PMID:24393726

  9. Effects of the contraceptive skin patch and subdermal contraceptive implant on markers of endothelial cell activation and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Juarez, Jesus; Sanchez-Serrano, Juan Carlos; Moreno-Hernandez, Manuel; Alvarado-Moreno, Jose Antonio; Hernandez-Lopez, Jose Rubicel; Isordia-Salas, Irma; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham

    2015-07-01

    Changes in blood coagulation factors may partially explain the association between hormonal contraceptives and thrombosis. Therefore, the likely effects of the contraceptive skin patch and subdermal contraceptive implant on levels of inflammatory markers and endothelial activation were analyzed. This was an observational, prospective, longitudinal, nonrandomized study composed of 80 women between 18 and 35 years of age who made the decision to use the contraceptive skin patch or subdermal contraceptive implant. vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), endothelial cell leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1), von Willebrand factor (VWF), and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1(PAI-1) as well as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were assayed before and after 4 months of use of the contraceptive method. VCAM-1, VWF, and PAI-1 remained unchanged in the contraceptive skin patch group; however, a significant increase in hsCRP (0.29-0.50 mg/dL; P =.012) and a significant decrease in ELAM-1 (44-25 ng/mL; P =.022) were observed. A significant diminution in VCAM-1 (463-362 ng/mL; P =.022) was also found in the subdermal contraceptive implant group. Our results strongly suggest that these contraceptive methods do not induce endothelial activation after 4 months of use. Increase in hsCRP levels was unrelated to changes in markers of endothelial activation.

  10. Plasma fibrinogen in women: relationships with oral contraception, the menopause and hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, A J; Lowe, G D; Smith, W C; Tunstall-Pedoe, H

    1993-04-01

    Plasma fibrinogen was measured in 4837 women aged 25-64 years as part of the Scottish Heart Health Study and Scottish MONICA population surveys. The relationships of oral contraceptive use, the menopause and hormone replacement therapy were examined. Univariate analyses found that women with a history of oral contraceptive use, premenopausal women and those on hormone replacement therapy all had significantly lower fibrinogen levels than women who had never used oral contraceptives, postmenopausal women and non-hormone replacement users respectively. These differences persisted after age standardization. On multivariate analysis, menopausal status and hormone replacement therapy had independent effects on fibrinogen levels. Together with the common risk factors, 9.9% of the total variation in plasma fibrinogen levels was explained. However, less than 1% of this was from the combined menopausal and hormonal factors. These results confirm a postmenopausal rise in fibrinogen level which may be relevant to an increased risk of coronary heart disease. In addition, a protective effect with hormone replacement therapy is noted, although this was probably due to selection bias.

  11. Projecting the Unmet Need and Costs for Contraception Services After the Affordable Care Act

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Erika; Gavin, Lorrie; Rivera, Maria I.; Pazol, Karen; Moskosky, Susan; Weik, Tasmeen; Ku, Leighton

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated the number of women of reproductive age in need who would gain coverage for contraceptive services after implementation of the Affordable Care Act, the extent to which there would remain a need for publicly funded programs that provide contraceptive services, and how that need would vary on the basis of state Medicaid expansion decisions. Methods. We used nationally representative American Community Survey data (2009), to estimate the insurance status for women in Massachusetts and derived the numbers of adult women at or below 250% of the federal poverty level and adolescents in need of confidential services. We extrapolated findings to simulate the impact of the Affordable Care Act nationally and by state, adjusting for current Medicaid expansion and state Medicaid Family Planning Expansion Programs. Results. The number of low-income women at risk for unintended pregnancy is expected to decrease from 5.2 million in 2009 to 2.5 million in 2016, based on states’ current Medicaid expansion plans. Conclusions. The Affordable Care Act increases women’s insurance coverage and improves access to contraceptive services. However, for women who remain uninsured, publicly funded family planning programs may still be needed. PMID:26691128

  12. Contraceptive counselling and factors affecting women's contraceptive choices: results of the CHOICE study in Austria.

    PubMed

    Egarter, Christian; Grimm, Christoph; Nouri, Kazem; Ahrendt, Hans-Joachim; Bitzer, Johannes; Cermak, Christine

    2012-06-01

    Empirical evidence of the impact of contraceptive counselling and factors affecting women's contraceptive choices are limited. CHOICE (Contraceptive Health Research Of Informed Choice Experience) was a large-scale study in 11 European countries. Women in Austria aged 15-40 years considering a short-acting, reversible form of combined hormonal contraceptive were eligible to participate. The choices included the combined daily pill, weekly transdermal patch, and monthly vaginal ring. This study assessed and compared 2478 women's original preferences with their post-counselling choices and evaluated their perceptions and criteria for their choice. Women who were 'undecided' decreased from 18.1% pre-counselling to 3.2% post-counselling; significantly more women post-counselling chose the monthly ring (8.7% to 23.8%; difference 15.1%, 95% CI 13.3-16.8%; P<0.0001) or the weekly patch (6.2% to 7.8%; difference 1.7%, 95% CI 0.5-2.9%; P=0.0014). Women's primary reasons for choosing a method included 'easy to use' (daily pill, weekly patch and monthly ring) and 'still effective if I experience vomiting, diarrhoea' (weekly patch and monthly ring). Structured and balanced counselling led to changes in the method chosen.

  13. Keep Calm and Contracept! Addressing Young Women's Pleasure in Sexual Health and Contraception Consultations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanbury, Ali; Eastham, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Clinical sexual health consultations with young women often focus on avoiding "risks;" namely pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection transmission. They also typically fail to explore how contraception use can impact on the capacity to enjoy sexual relationships. In contrast, this paper argues that sexual pleasure should be a…

  14. Correlates of Sense of Control among Older Korean-American Immigrants: Financial Status, Physical Health Constraints, and Environmental Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Yuri; Kim, Giyeon; Chiriboga, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Responding to the need for more research on minority older populations, the present study assessed sense of control among older Korean-American immigrants. The association of sense of control with financial status, physical health constraints, and environmental challenges was examined with a sample of 230 older Korean-Americans (M[age] = 69.8,…

  15. Identity, Intimacy, Status and Sex Dating Goals as Correlates of Goal-Consistent Behavior and Satisfaction in Australian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Marguerite; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J.; Boislard-P., Marie-Aude

    2012-01-01

    The most common dating goals of adolescents are identity, intimacy, status and sex. In this study of Australian youth (16-30 years, N = 208), dating goals were expected to explain goal-consistent behavior in each domain. Also, goals coupled with consistent behavior were expected to be associated with greater satisfaction in each domain. Age,…

  16. Resting state alpha frequency is associated with menstrual cycle phase, estradiol and use of oral contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Brötzner, Christina P.; Klimesch, Wolfgang; Doppelmayr, Michael; Zauner, Andrea; Kerschbaum, Hubert H.

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing intrinsic brain activity in resting, but awake humans is dominated by alpha oscillations. In human, individual alpha frequency (IAF) is associated with cognitive performance. Noticeable, performance in cognitive and emotional tasks in women is associated with menstrual cycle phase and sex hormone levels, respectively. In the present study, we correlated frequency of alpha oscillation in resting women with menstrual cycle phase, sex hormone level, or use of oral contraceptives. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from 57 women (aged 24.07±3.67 years) having a natural menstrual cycle as well as from 57 women (aged 22.37±2.20 years) using oral contraceptives while they sat in an armchair with eyes closed. Alpha frequency was related to the menstrual cycle phase. Luteal women showed highest and late follicular women showed lowest IAF or center frequency. Furthermore, IAF as well as center frequency correlated negatively with endogenous estradiol level, but did not reveal an association with endogenous progesterone. Women using oral contraceptives showed an alpha frequency similar to women in the early follicular phase. We suggest that endogenous estradiol modulate resting alpha frequency. PMID:25010817

  17. The cardiovascular safety of triphasic contraceptive steroids.

    PubMed

    Shaarawy, M; Nafea, S; Abdel-Aziz, O; Rahseed, K; Sheiba, M

    1997-09-01

    It was hypothesized that estrogen-induced cardioprotection is mediated by up-regulation and down-regulation of expression of nitric oxide (NO) and P-selectin, respectively. Published data on circulating levels of the vasodilator NO, atherogenic glycoprotein P-selectin, and lipoprotein-a [Lp(a)] in users of triphasic contraceptive steroids are lacking. A total of 30 healthy women (nonusers, controls) and 82 women using oral triphasic contraceptive steroids (ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel: Triovlar, Schering AG) for 18 to 24 cycles participated in this study. Fasting blood samples were obtained from users and nonusers for the determination of P-selectin and Lp(a) by enzyme immunoassay and NO by a colorimetric method. The serum Lp(a) levels in OC users were significantly higher than those of nonusers. On the other hand, the serum NO levels in OC users were significantly elevated when compared to nonusers. Plasma P-selectin was significantly lowered in OC users p < 0.005. These results demonstrate the beneficial effects of ethinyl estradiol in the triphasic contraceptive regimen. Ethinyl estradiol may afford a degree of anti-atherogenic-cardioprotective effect by up-regulation of the expression of the vasodilator NO and down-regulation of the expression of the atherogenic P-selectin. This may outweigh the cardiovascular risk of the increased atherogenic Lp(a). This study may explain the very low rate of mortality from venous thromboembolism in OC users, which compares favorably with the risks that many people accept in daily life.

  18. [Alternation, or the best approach to contraception].

    PubMed

    Cazenave, J C; Courbil, L J; Poupee, J C; Schmidlin, B; Anglade, J P

    1982-11-01

    This article outlines the indications and contraindications of different contraceptive methods based on knowledge of the female reproductive cycle and variations by age and reproductive history. Methods should be chosen after clinical examination and interview to determine the wishes of the couple. The female reproductive cycle is reviewed through definitions and discussion of the endometrium, the ovaries and their endocrine and exocrine functions, the pituitary, and the hypothalamus, with indications where appropriate of their role in the action of specific contraceptive methods. Variations in the cycle at puberty, from adolescence to 35 years, at premenopause, postpartum and postabortion, and as a result of pathological conditions are described. The general characteristics, use instructions, effectiveness, and advantages and disadvantages of different contraceptive methods are then described, including the physiological methods (rhythm, temperature, and Billings); mechanical barriers and cervical chemical methods (condoms, diaphragms, spermicidal tablets); monophasic, sequential, and diphasic pills and progestin only pills; morning after pill; trimonthly injections of progesterone, and IUDs. Indications and contraindications for different age groups are outlined. IUDs are contraindicated for adolescents, low dose pills may be used at least 2 years after puberty if cycles are regular, and local spermicides may be the best choice for those with sporadic sexual activity. In general all methods may be utilized by women under 35 but different pill formulations are appropriate for different conditions and IUDs should be avoided in cases of local infection or retroverted uterus. For women over 35 sequential progestins are recommended to compensate for luteal insufficiency. Discontinuous progestins are recommended for premenopausal women because they simultaneously treat luteal insufficiency, mastopathies, and endometrial hypertrophies. For postpartum use minidose

  19. Sterilization in Finland: from eugenics to contraception.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, E; Rasimus, A; Forssas, E

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to describe the transition of sterilization in Finland from an eugenic tool to a contraceptive. Historical data were drawn from earlier reports in Finnish. Numbers of and reasons for sterilizations since 1950 were collected from nationwide sterilization statistics. Prevalence, characteristics of sterilized women, and women's satisfaction with sterilizations were studied from a 1994 nationwide survey (74% response rate). Logistic regression was used for adjustments. In the first half of the 20th century, eugenic ideology had influence in Finland as in other parts of Europe, and the 1935 and 1950 sterilization laws had an eugenic spirit. Regardless of this, the numbers of eugenic sterilizations remained low, and in practice, family planning was the main reason for sterilization. Nonetheless, prior to 1970 not all sterilizations were freely chosen, because sterilizations were sometimes used as a precondition for abortion. Female sterilizations showed remarkable fluctuation over time. Male sterilizations have been rare. The reasons stipulated by the law did not explain the numbers of sterilizations. In a 1994 survey, 9% of Finnish women reported they were using sterilization as their current contraceptive method (n = 189). Compared to women using other contraceptive methods, sterilized women were older, had had more births and pregnancies, and came from lower social classes. Sterilized women were satisfied with their sterilization, but there were women (8.5%) who regretted it. In conclusion, sterilizations have been and are likely to continue to be an important family planning method in Finland. The extreme gender ratio suggests a need for promoting male sterilizations, and women's expressed regrets suggest consideration of a higher age limit.

  20. Effect of contraceptives on the skin.

    PubMed

    1988-10-01

    Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) affect the skin 3 different ways. They decrease the amount of androgenic hormones produced in the ovaries and adrenal gland. They also limit the quantity of biologically active circulating testosterone. Finally, estrogen markedly decreases oil production in the sebaceous glands. Physicians should prescribe to women with acne a COC that is low in progestogen and high in estrogen. A biphasic pill with no more than 500 mcg norethisterone/day meets these requirements. If a woman is taking systemic antibiotics to treat acne, however, the physician should prescribe a biphasic pill containing 50 mcg ethinyl estradiol. Even though many believe that using COCs causes hair loss, there is little evidence to support it. Nevertheless, if a woman has indeed experienced hair loss, she should take a COC with a high estrogen to progestogen ratio. As in some pregnant women, cholasma may occur in women taking COCs when not protected from sunlight. Physicians need to prescribe the lowest possible dose of hormones in these women and counsel them to shield their face from sunlight. To err on the side of safety, women who have had a malignant melanoma should not use a hormonal contraceptive. In addition, women who have experienced many bouts of skin candidiasis should use an alternative contraceptive. Other skin disorders that they have been found to be more prevalent in women taking COCs include erythema nodosum, accelerated systemic lupus erythematosus, porphyria cutanea tarda, herpes gestationis, spider naevus, and telangiectasia. There also exists an association between dermatitis and barrier methods and spermicides. Some articles have suggested that copper containing IUDs have also cause a variety of skin disorders. PMID:3240155

  1. College Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors regarding Sex and Contraceptives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toews, Michelle L.; Yazedjian, Ani

    2012-01-01

    This study examined gender differences in college students' knowledge, attitudes, and sexual behaviors of 1,004 predominantly heterosexual students. Results indicated that students had limited knowledge about contraceptives and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Females had a more positive view about contraceptives and males had more…

  2. Premarital Contraceptives Usage among Male and Female Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornick, Joesph P.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Variables important in predicting female contraception usage were found to be those which involved dyadic commitment, conditions of love, self-esteem, and father's occupation (social class). The best predictors of male contraception usage involved experience in dating and internalization of role models via mother's and father's permissiveness.…

  3. Factors Influencing Contraceptive Behavior of Single College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Joseph W.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    This study investigates the premarital contraceptive behavior of 222 male and female college students. Contraceptive practice was examined in relation to dating patterns, level of emotional involvement with sex partners, types of birth control used, number of different sex partners, and reasons for failure to use birth control. (Author)

  4. Contraceptive Patterns of College Students Who Experienced Early Coitus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Murray L.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A study investigated the coital behavior, contraceptive use, and attitudes of 20-year-old male and female college students who experienced sexual intercourse early in adolescence (at 16 or younger) as contrasted to those who experienced coitus in late adolescence. Results indicate that older adolescents were more likely to use contraceptives and,…

  5. Evaluative Indices Assigned to Contraceptive Methods by University Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Robert J.; Malo, Teri L.; Dodd, Virginia J.; Daley, Ellen M.; Mayer, Alyssa B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Preordinate attitudes and beliefs about contraception may influence acceptance or rejection of a particular method. Purpose: We examined the attitudes about contraception methods held by undergraduate students (N=792) at two large southeastern universities in the United States. Methods: Twelve methods were rated on 40 semantic…

  6. Premarital Contraceptive Use: A Test of Two Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delamater, John; Maccorquodale, Patricia

    1978-01-01

    Tests the utility of two models for explaining contraceptive use by sexually active women (N=391). Significant relationships were found between use and permissive premarital standards and standard-behavior consistency. Neither model is particularly applicable to the contraceptive reports of sexually active males (N=354). (Author)

  7. [Animal welfare and contraception of zoo and wild animals].

    PubMed

    Wiesner, H

    1998-03-01

    Side effects and disadvantages of contraceptive methods currently used in zoo- and wild animals are presented and discussed. For the preservation of wild animal populations in captivity, i.e. in zoos, wild animal- and national parks, contraception alone is not suitable without a sensible supplementary postnatal selection.

  8. [Inefficacy of oral contraception during use of minocycline].

    PubMed

    de Groot, A C; Eshuis, H; Stricker, B H

    1990-06-23

    A healthy woman aged 21 years who used the oral contraceptive Trigynon became pregnant while being treated with Minocin (minocycline; 100 mg per day) for acne conglobata. While the risk of use of antibiotics such as this one reducing the efficacy of oral contraceptives is small, patients should nevertheless be informed that the risk exists.

  9. Service provider perspectives on post-abortion contraception in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Fan; Puri, Mahesh; Rocca, Corinne H; Blum, Maya; Henderson, Jillian T

    2016-01-01

    The government of Nepal has articulated a commitment to the provision of post-abortion contraception since the implementation of a legal safe abortion policy in 2004. Despite this, gaps in services remain. This study examined the perspectives of abortion service providers and administrators regarding strengths and shortcomings of post-abortion contraceptive service provision. In-depth interviews were conducted with 24 abortion providers and administrators at four major health facilities that provide legal abortion in Nepal. Facility factors perceived to impact post-abortion contraceptive services included on-site availability of contraceptive supplies, dedicated and well-trained staff and adequate infrastructure. Cultural norms emerged as influencing contraceptive demand by patients, including method use being unacceptable for women whose husbands migrate and limited decision-making power among women. Service providers described their personal views on appropriate childbearing and the use of specific contraceptive methods that influenced counselling. Findings suggest that improvements to a facility's infrastructure and training to address provider biases and misinformation may improve post-abortion family planning uptake. Adapting services to be sensitive to cultural expectations and norms may help address some barriers to contraceptive use. More research is needed to determine how to best meet the contraceptive needs of women who have infrequent sexual activity or who may face stigma for using family planning, including adolescents, unmarried women and women whose husbands migrate.

  10. Teens Reflect on Their Sources of Contraceptive Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Rachel K.; Biddlecom, Ann E.; Hebert, Luciana; Mellor, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Based on semistructured interviews with a racially and ethnically diverse sample of 58 U.S. high school students, this study examines teens' exposure to contraceptive information from a range of sources and the extent to which they trust this information. Teens report exposure to contraceptive information from many individuals and places, most…

  11. Pharmacy Access to Emergency Contraception in Rural and Frontier Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigbee, Jeri L.; Abood, Richard; Landau, Sharon Cohen; Maderas, Nicole Monastersky; Foster, Diana Greene; Ravnan, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Context: Timely access to emergency contraception (EC) has emerged as a major public health effort in the prevention of unintended pregnancies. The recent FDA decision to allow over-the-counter availability of emergency contraception for adult women presents important rural health implications. American women, especially those living in rural and…

  12. The Use of Contraception by Women with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, H. M. J.; Rook, F.; Maaskant, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Worldwide, contraception is frequently used by women for the prevention of conception, to regulate or postpone menstrual bleeding. The study aims to determine the use (number and method) of contraception by women with intellectual disabilities (ID), the indications, sources of referrals and relations with level of ID and age of the…

  13. Psychosexual Background of Female Adolescents Seeking Contraceptive Assistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichelt, Paul A.

    In order to better meet the needs of female adolescents coming to a Planned Parenthood League Teen Center for prescription contraceptives, a study was undertaken to understand their psychosexual history. The study focused on the past and present sexual and contraceptive behavior of 532 new clients under the age of 18. The data were collected…

  14. American Public Opinion Toward Sex Education and Contraception for Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichelt, Paul A.

    A study was undertaken to determine American attitudes toward sex education and contraceptive services to adolescents and toward the related topics of teenage pregnancy and related welfare and medical costs. The study was based on the premise that policy decisions regarding whether to offer sex education and contraceptive services to adolescents…

  15. Psychological, social, and spiritual effects of contraceptive steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Hanna; Cortés, Manuel E

    2015-08-01

    Governments and society have accepted and enthusiastically promoted contraception, especially contraceptive steroid hormones, as the means of assuring optimal timing and number of births, an undoubted health benefit, but they seldom advert to their limitations and side effects. This article reviews the literature on the psychological, social, and spiritual impact of contraceptive steroid use. While the widespread use of contraceptive steroid hormones has expanded life style and career choices for many women, their impact on the women's well-being, emotions, social relationships, and spirituality is seldom mentioned by advocates, and negative effects are often downplayed. When mentioned at all, depression and hypoactive sexual desire are usually treated symptomatically rather than discontinuing their most frequent pharmacological cause, the contraceptive. The rising incidence of premarital sex and cohabitation and decreased marriage rates parallel the use of contraceptive steroids as does decreased church attendance and/or reduced acceptance of Church teaching among Catholics. Lay summary: While there is wide, societal acceptance of hormonal contraceptives to space births, their physical side effects are often downplayed and their impact on emotions and life styles are largely unexamined. Coincidental to the use of "the pill" there has been an increase in depression, low sexual desire, "hook-ups," cohabitation, delay of marriage and childbearing, and among Catholics, decreased church attendance and reduced religious practice. Fertility is not a disease. Birth spacing can be achieved by natural means, and the many undesirable effects of contraception avoided. PMID:26912936

  16. Affective and Physical Changes Associated with Oral Contraceptive Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Alane L.; And Others

    Although investigations of the physiological effects of oral contraceptives suggest that affective changes may accompany their use, empirical documentation of these effects has not been consistent. This study examined physiological and affective changes accompanying use of a low-dosage oral contraceptive while controlling for possible expectancy…

  17. Psychological, social, and spiritual effects of contraceptive steroid hormones

    PubMed Central

    Klaus, Hanna; Cortés, Manuel E.

    2015-01-01

    Governments and society have accepted and enthusiastically promoted contraception, especially contraceptive steroid hormones, as the means of assuring optimal timing and number of births, an undoubted health benefit, but they seldom advert to their limitations and side effects. This article reviews the literature on the psychological, social, and spiritual impact of contraceptive steroid use. While the widespread use of contraceptive steroid hormones has expanded life style and career choices for many women, their impact on the women's well-being, emotions, social relationships, and spirituality is seldom mentioned by advocates, and negative effects are often downplayed. When mentioned at all, depression and hypoactive sexual desire are usually treated symptomatically rather than discontinuing their most frequent pharmacological cause, the contraceptive. The rising incidence of premarital sex and cohabitation and decreased marriage rates parallel the use of contraceptive steroids as does decreased church attendance and/or reduced acceptance of Church teaching among Catholics. Lay summary: While there is wide, societal acceptance of hormonal contraceptives to space births, their physical side effects are often downplayed and their impact on emotions and life styles are largely unexamined. Coincidental to the use of “the pill” there has been an increase in depression, low sexual desire, “hook-ups,” cohabitation, delay of marriage and childbearing, and among Catholics, decreased church attendance and reduced religious practice. Fertility is not a disease. Birth spacing can be achieved by natural means, and the many undesirable effects of contraception avoided. PMID:26912936

  18. Knowledge of Emergency Contraceptive Pills among Hungarian Women Presenting for Induced Abortion or Seeking Emergency Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Kozinszky, Z.; Devosa, I.; Fekete, Z.; Szabó, D.; Sikovanyecz, J.; Pásztor, N.; Keresztúri, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the differences in contraceptive characteristics and the knowledge of emergency contraception (ECP) among women who used ECP after unprotected intercourse and those who sought an abortion. Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted in a Hungarian university hospital among women for whom ECP was prescribed after unprotected intercourse (n = 940) as well as women who presented for the termination of pregnancy (n = 1592) between January 1, 2005 and November 20, 2006. Their knowledge of ECP and their experience with and attitudes toward ECP use were targeted. Results: The availability of ECP was well known (87.9 %), but it was still greatly underutilized: applied by only 13 of the 1592 women who resorted to abortion. Primarily, the ECP group consisted of those who experienced a condom failure significantly more often (odds ratio [OR] = 4.1), followed by those cases where ECP applications was a consequence of not using any kind of contraception (OR = 3.8). Fewer than one third (32 %) of the abortion seekers had previously used ECP, and only one fifth knew how to obtain it. Appropriate awareness of ECP was influenced by information obtained from health-care providers (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.93) or school education (AOR = 1.82). Conclusions: More thorough education is needed to provide a deeper knowledge of ECP use during contraceptive counseling for women seeking abortion, including those contraceptive mishaps where unintended pregnancy can be prevented by ECP. PMID:27681523

  19. Knowledge of Emergency Contraceptive Pills among Hungarian Women Presenting for Induced Abortion or Seeking Emergency Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Kozinszky, Z.; Devosa, I.; Fekete, Z.; Szabó, D.; Sikovanyecz, J.; Pásztor, N.; Keresztúri, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the differences in contraceptive characteristics and the knowledge of emergency contraception (ECP) among women who used ECP after unprotected intercourse and those who sought an abortion. Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted in a Hungarian university hospital among women for whom ECP was prescribed after unprotected intercourse (n = 940) as well as women who presented for the termination of pregnancy (n = 1592) between January 1, 2005 and November 20, 2006. Their knowledge of ECP and their experience with and attitudes toward ECP use were targeted. Results: The availability of ECP was well known (87.9 %), but it was still greatly underutilized: applied by only 13 of the 1592 women who resorted to abortion. Primarily, the ECP group consisted of those who experienced a condom failure significantly more often (odds ratio [OR] = 4.1), followed by those cases where ECP applications was a consequence of not using any kind of contraception (OR = 3.8). Fewer than one third (32 %) of the abortion seekers had previously used ECP, and only one fifth knew how to obtain it. Appropriate awareness of ECP was influenced by information obtained from health-care providers (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.93) or school education (AOR = 1.82). Conclusions: More thorough education is needed to provide a deeper knowledge of ECP use during contraceptive counseling for women seeking abortion, including those contraceptive mishaps where unintended pregnancy can be prevented by ECP.

  20. Efficacy of a combined contraceptive regimen consisting of condoms and emergency contraception pills

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate and compare the effectiveness of the combined regimen (consisting of condoms and emergency contraception pills (ECP)) and using condoms only for the purpose of preventing pregnancy. Methods One-thousand-five-hundred-and-sixty-two (1,562) couples as volunteers enrolled at nine centers in Shanghai. Eight-hundred-and-twelve (812) were randomized to use male condoms and ECP (i.e., Levonorgestrel) as a back-up to condoms (the intervention group) and 750 to use male condoms only(the control group), according to their working unit. Participants were visited at admission and at the end of 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The cumulative life table rates were calculated for pregnancy and other reasons for discontinuation. Result The gross cumulative life table rates showed that the cumulative discontinuation rates for all reasons during the year of follow-up in the condoms plus emergency contraception group and the condoms only group were 7.76 ± 0.94 and 6.61 ± 0.91, respectively, per 100 women (χ2 = 0.41, p = 0.5227). The cumulative gross pregnancy rate of the condoms plus emergency contraception group and the condoms only group were 2.17 ± 0.52 and 1.25 ± 0.41, respectively, per 100 women (χ2 = 1.93, p = 0.1645). The Pearl Index in the condoms plus emergency contraception group and the condoms only group were 2.21% and 1.26%, respectively. Conclusion Male condoms remain a highly effective contraceptive method for a period of one year while consistently and correctly used. In addition, the lowest pregnancy rate followed from perfect use condom. PMID:24725355