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Sample records for contraception status correlation

  1. Oral contraceptives: current status.

    PubMed

    Burkman, R T

    2001-03-01

    During the past four decades, oral contraceptives have remained a safe and effective method of birth control. Reductions in the estrogen and progestin dosages have significantly decreased the incidence of cardiovascular complications. The association between oral contraceptives and breast cancer appears to be primarily because of detection bias or possibly a promotional effect. Despite the changes in formulation, the problems related to side effects have not been totally solved. Because compliance and successful use is strongly affected by side effects, improvement in this area is probably the biggest challenge faced by developers of oral contraceptives. It is also clear that there are a growing number of significant noncontraceptive benefits that accrue in oral contraceptive users. Unfortunately, many women do not know about these benefits. Thus, one of the issues that providers need to continue to address is how to provide better information about oral contraceptives and contraception in general to patients.

  2. The contraceptive prevalence survey project: content and status.

    PubMed

    Lewis, G L

    1983-01-01

    The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) selected Westinghouse Health Systems to carry out contraceptive surveys. The primary objectives of the Contraceptive Prevalence Surveys (CPS) are to determine periodically the levels of contraceptive use in the country; to examine the correlates of and differentials in these levels in order to assess the impact of various types of governmental and nongovernmental programs; to identify factors that will facilitate an increase in contraceptive use, particularly factors involved in program planning activities; and to institutionalize in each country the capability to design and implement studies of contraceptive prevalence, to be undertaken at regular intervals by an in-country agency. Each CPS generally collects data on the basic demographic background of the country concerned, knowledge of contraceptive methods, prior contraceptive experience and current method used, past fertility behavior and future fertility intentions, present utilization of various types of service delivery systems, perceived accessibility of contraceptives, and reasons for nonacceptance of contraception. In the CPS project, data collection and field operations have been strongly stressed. Efforts have recently been made to expand the extent and sophistication of CPS data analysis. For example, 2 countries are currently using a series of mathematical techniques called synthetic estimators to estimate subnational levels of contraceptive use by merging CPS and census data. Westinghouse, in cooperation with the University of Michigan, is currently working to develop community characteristics module for inclusion in future CPS projects.

  3. Rural-urban differential in contraceptive use status in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Uddin, M M; Kabir, M; Choudhury, S R; Ahmed, T; Bhuyan, M R

    1985-01-01

    less a U-shaped pattern was observed between the level of education and the ever use rate. Differentials by employment status show that those who were not employed had the highest use rate compared to those employed with or without cash. The average number of methods ever used was 2.0 by urban women and 1.7 by rural women. This difference may be explained in terms of accessibility and availability of family planning methods. The rate of current users of any methods was estimated to be 29.2% in the urban and 17.5% in the rural areas. The analysis shows that contraceptive use was substantially higher in urban than in rural areas. The rural-urban differences could be due in part to differences in educational attainment of the women in the 2 areas. Ever user rates have increased considerably in both areas compared to the 1979 CPS.

  4. Current contraceptive status among women aged 15-44: United States, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Kimberly; Daugherty, Jill; Jones, Jo

    2014-12-01

    Nearly all women use contraception at some point in their lifetimes, although at any given time they may not be using contraception for reasons such as seeking pregnancy, being pregnant, or not being sexually active. Using data from the 2011-2013 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) on contraceptive use in the month of the interview, this report provides a snapshot of current contraceptive status among women aged 15-44 in the United States. In addition to describing use of any method by age, Hispanic origin and race, and educational attainment, patterns of use are described for the four most commonly used contraceptive methods: the oral contraceptive pill, female sterilization, the male condom, and long-acting reversible contraceptives, which include contraceptive implants and intrauterine devices.

  5. The Current Status of Oral Contraceptives: Progress and Recent Innovations.

    PubMed

    Golobof, Alexandra; Kiley, Jessica

    2016-05-01

    Millions of women in the United States and abroad use oral contraceptive pills. These popular contraceptives are the most common reversible birth control method in the United States, and a wide variety of pills are available for prescription. Oral contraceptives provide safe and effective protection against pregnancy and offer several noncontraceptive benefits. Over the years, advances in the laboratory and knowledge gained through epidemiologic data promoted the development of new contraceptive preparations. Generations of oral contraceptives emerged over time, containing lower doses of estrogens and new and novel progestins. The current review discusses the clinical characteristics of oral contraceptives, with emphasis on basic pharmacology and the evolution of various contraceptive formulations and regimens.

  6. State Variations in Women’s Socioeconomic Status and Use of Modern Contraceptives in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Lamidi, Esther O.

    2015-01-01

    Background According to the 2014 World Population Data Sheet, Nigeria has one of the highest fertility and lowest contraceptive prevalence rates around the world. However, research suggests that national contraceptive prevalence rate overshadows enormous spatial variations in reproductive behavior in the country. Objective I examined the variations in women’s socioeconomic status and modern contraceptive use across states in Nigeria. Methods Using the 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey data (n = 18,910), I estimated the odds of modern contraceptive use among sexually active married and cohabiting women in a series of multilevel logistic regression models. Results The share of sexually active, married and cohabiting women using modern contraceptives widely varied, from less than one percent in Kano, Yobe, and Jigawa states, to 40 percent in Osun state. Most of the states with low contraceptive prevalence rates also ranked low on women’s socioeconomic attributes. Results of multilevel logistic regression analyses showed that women residing in states with greater shares of women with secondary or higher education, higher female labor force participation rates, and more women with health care decision-making power, had significantly higher odds of using modern contraceptives. Differences in women’s participation in health care decisions across states remained significantly associated with modern contraceptive use, net of individual-level socioeconomic status and other covariates of modern contraceptive use. Conclusion Understanding of state variations in contraceptive use is crucial to the design and implementation of family planning programs. The findings reinforce the need for state-specific family planning programs in Nigeria. PMID:26258578

  7. Male hormonal contraceptives: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Amory, John K

    2005-01-01

    Because of the shortcomings of currently available methods of male contraception, efforts have been made to develop additional forms of contraception for men. The most promising approach to male contraceptive development involves hormones, and requires the administration of exogenous testosterone. When administered to a healthy man, testosterone functions as a contraceptive by suppressing the secretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone from the pituitary, thereby depriving the testes of the signals required for normal spermatogenesis. After 2-3 months of treatment, low levels of pituitary gonadotropins lead to markedly decreased sperm counts and effective contraception in the majority of men. Treatment with exogenous testosterone has proven not to be associated with serious adverse effects and is well tolerated by men. In addition, sperm counts uniformly normalize when testosterone is discontinued. Thus, male hormonal contraception is safe, effective, and reversible; however, spermatogenesis is not suppressed to zero in all men, meaning that some diminished potential for fertility persists. Because of this, recent studies have combined testosterone with progestogens and/or gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists to further suppress pituitary gonadotropins and optimize contraceptive efficacy. Current combinations of testosterone and progestogens completely suppress spermatogenesis in 80-90% of men without severe adverse effects, with significant suppression in the remainder of individuals. Recent trials with newer, long-acting forms of injectable testosterone, which can be administered every 8 weeks, combined with progestogens, administered either orally or by long-acting implant, have yielded promising results and may soon result in the marketing of a safe, reversible, and effective hormonal contraceptive for men.

  8. Correlates of women's cancer screening and contraceptive knowledge among female emergency department patients

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Roland C; Gee, Erin M; Bock, Beth C; Becker, Bruce M; Clark, Melissa A

    2007-01-01

    Background Lack of knowledge regarding preventive health services for women might impede campaigns to expand these services in the emergency department setting. For 18–55-year-old English-speaking women visiting an urban emergency department, we aimed to: (1) Ascertain their knowledge regarding the applicability, purpose, and recommended intervals of three women's cancer screening and three contraceptive methods; and (2) Determine if patient age, race/ethnicity, medical insurance status, and current or recent usage of these methods are associated with greater or lesser knowledge about them. Methods Emergency department-based survey on recent or current usage and knowledge about Pap smears, breast self-examinations, mammograms, condoms, birth control, and emergency contraception. Analyses included calculation of summary statistics and creation of multivariable logistic regression models. Results Of 1,100 patients eligible for the study, 69.9% agreed to participate. Most of the participants were < age 35, white, single (never married and no partner), Catholic, and had private medical insurance. Participant's recent or current usage of a particular cancer screening or contraceptive method varied by type of method: Pap smear within the past year (69.1%), breast self-exam within the past month (45.5%), mammogram within the past year (65.7% for women age 45–55), condom usage during every episode of sexual intercourse (15.4%), current usage of birth control pills (17.8%), and ever use of emergency contraception (9.3%). The participants correctly answered 87.9% of all survey questions about condoms, 82.5% about birth control pills, 78.5% about breast self-exams, 52.9% about Pap smears, 35.4% about mammograms, and 25.0% about emergency contraception. In multivariable logistic regression models, survey participants who had private medical insurance and those who recently or currently used a given screening or contraceptive method had a greater odds of correctly answering

  9. Contraceptive Equity

    PubMed Central

    Temkin, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The Equity in Prescription Insurance and Contraceptive Coverage Act, introduced in Congress in 1997 and still unpassed, seeks to redress health insurers’ failure to pay for birth control as they pay for other prescription drugs, most paradoxically Viagra. In 1936 the International Workers Order (IWO), a fraternal society, became the first insurer to include contraception in its benefits package. A forerunner in the movement for prepaid medical care, the IWO offered its members primary care and contraceptive services for annual flat fees. Founded at a time when the legal status of contraception was in flux, the IWO’s Birth Control Center was the only such clinic to operate on an insurance system. Recent state laws and judicial actions have revived the IWO’s groundbreaking view of contraception as a basic preventive service deserving of insurance coverage. PMID:17761562

  10. The Impact on Breastfeeding and Pregnancy Status of Household Contraceptive Distribution in Rural Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Bordes, Ary; Allman, James; Verly, Adeline

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents data from an experimental project which distributed oral contraceptives, foam, and condoms to households in three rural areas of Haiti between January 1978 and March 1980. The contraceptive distribution had little apparent impact on traditional, prolonged breastfeeding patterns, and the percentage of women pregnant after eight months of field operations declined over 35 per cent in the two areas where contraceptive acceptance and use were highest. (Am J Public Health 1982; 72:825-838.) PMID:7091480

  11. Socio-economic correlates of contraceptive knowledge among women in Kuala Lumpur and Petaling Jaya, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Salleh, N M; Peng, T N; Arshat, H

    1986-12-01

    Knowledge about contraception was examined in relation to selected socioeconomic variables. A total of 2567 currently married women aged 15-49 years residing in Kuala Lumpur and Petaling Jaya were interviewed. The majority of the women knew of at least 1 contraceptive method. An index termed Contraceptive Knowledge Score (CKS) was used to measure the level of knowledge about contraception. The CKS achieved differed significantly by age, area of residence and ethnic group. The other socioeconomic variables significantly associated with CKS are schooling, occupation, income, childhood residence and age at marriage. These relationships persisted even after adjusting for differences in age, ethnicity and area of residence. Overall the CKS attained have a wide range and there is no significant difference of the mean CKS attained, between users and non-users of contraceptives.

  12. Contraceptive Sponge

    MedlinePlus

    Contraceptive sponge Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff The contraceptive sponge is a type of birth control (contraceptive) that prevents ... shaped, and made of polyurethane foam. The contraceptive sponge contains spermicide, which blocks or kills sperm. Before ...

  13. Effect of HIV status on fertility desire and knowledge of long-acting reversible contraception of postpartum Malawian women.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Michele S; Rosenberg, Nora E; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Stuart, Gretchen S; Miller, William C; Kaliti, Stephen M; Mwale, Mwawi; Bonongwe, Phylos P; Tang, Jennifer H

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the most recent pregnancy intentions and family planning preferences of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected postpartum Malawian women, and to assess whether HIV status is associated with fertility desire and knowledge of intrauterine contraception (IUC) and the subdermal contraceptive implant. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the baseline characteristics of Malawian women enrolled in a prospective cohort study assessing postpartum contraceptive uptake and continuation. Women at a government hospital completed a baseline survey assessing reproductive history, family planning preferences, and knowledge of IUC and the implant. We used Pearson's chi-square tests to compare these parameters between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women. Modified Poisson regression was performed to assess the association between HIV status and fertility desire and knowledge about IUC and the implant. Of 634 postpartum women surveyed, HIV-infected women were more likely to report their most recent pregnancy was unintended (49% vs. 37%, p = 0.004). Nearly all women (97%) did not want a child in the next 2 years, but HIV-infected women were more likely to desire no more children (adjusted prevalence ratio [PR]: 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.33, 1.89). HIV-infected women were also less likely to know that IUC (adjusted PR: 0.72; 95% CI: 0.61, 0.84) and the implant (adjusted PR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.75, 0.92) are safe during breast-feeding. Postpartum women strongly desire family spacing and many HIV-infected postpartum women desire no more children, suggesting an important role for these long-acting methods. Education about the efficacy and safety of IUC and the implant particularly during breast-feeding may facilitate postpartum use.

  14. MHC-correlated odour preferences in humans and the use of oral contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, S. Craig; Gosling, L. Morris; Carter, Vaughan; Petrie, Marion

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies in animals and humans show that genes in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) influence individual odours and that females often prefer odour of MHC-dissimilar males, perhaps to increase offspring heterozygosity or reduce inbreeding. Women using oral hormonal contraceptives have been reported to have the opposite preference, raising the possibility that oral contraceptives alter female preference towards MHC similarity, with possible fertility costs. Here we test directly whether contraceptive pill use alters odour preferences using a longitudinal design in which women were tested before and after initiating pill use; a control group of non-users were tested with a comparable interval between test sessions. In contrast to some previous studies, there was no significant difference in ratings between odours of MHC-dissimilar and MHC-similar men among women during the follicular cycle phase. However, single women preferred odours of MHC-similar men, while women in relationships preferred odours of MHC-dissimilar men, a result consistent with studies in other species, suggesting that paired females may seek to improve offspring quality through extra-pair partnerships. Across tests, we found a significant preference shift towards MHC similarity associated with pill use, which was not evident in the control group. If odour plays a role in human mate choice, our results suggest that contraceptive pill use could disrupt disassortative mate preferences. PMID:18700206

  15. Emergency Contraception

    MedlinePlus

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ114 CONTRACEPTION Emergency Contraception • What is emergency contraception (EC)? • How does EC work? • What are the different types of EC? • What is the most ...

  16. Emergency contraception

    MedlinePlus

    Morning-after pill; Postcoital contraception; Birth control - emergency; Plan B; Family planning - emergency contraception ... Emergency contraception most likely prevents pregnancy in the same way as regular birth control pills: By preventing or delaying ...

  17. Emergency Contraception

    MedlinePlus

    ... contraception are available: emergency contraceptive pills and the copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD).Emergency contraceptive pills include ... for emergency use, talk to your doctor.The copper-containing IUD (brand name: Paragard) is a small, ...

  18. Forgettable contraception.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David A

    2009-12-01

    The term "forgettable contraception" has received less attention in family planning than has "long-acting reversible contraception." Defined here as a method requiring attention no more often than every 3 years, forgettable contraception includes sterilization (female or male), intrauterine devices, and implants. Five principal factors determine contraceptive effectiveness: efficacy, compliance, continuation, fecundity, and the timing of coitus. Of these, compliance and continuation dominate; the key determinants of contraceptive effectiveness are human, not pharmacological. Human nature undermines methods with high theoretical efficacy, such as oral contraceptives and injectable contraceptives. By obviating the need to think about contraception for long intervals, forgettable contraception can help overcome our human fallibility. As a result, all forgettable contraception methods provide first-tier effectiveness (contraceptives today with exclusively first-tier effectiveness is the one that can be started -- and then forgotten for years.

  19. Safety implications of transferring the oral contraceptive from prescription-only to over-the-counter status.

    PubMed

    Potts, M; Denny, C

    1995-12-01

    The idea of making oral contraceptives available without prescription has a long history, and has been recently revived in the US and the UK. High dose oral contraceptives have generally been replaced by low dose formulations and, subsequently, most cardiovascular risks have been reduced and a protection against ovarian and uterine cancers has been consistently demonstrated. Oral contraceptive compliance, however, continues to be a problem, but there is no reason to assume that wise practice would be any more or less if oral contraceptives were available over-the-counter (OTC). Some countries have introduced alternatives to prescription-only oral contraceptives, whereby nurses, midwives, social workers and/or pharmacists are incorporated into the distribution process. This article concludes that the balance of risks and benefits is in favour of OTC access for oral contraceptives.

  20. [Effect of combined hormonal oral contraception on the somatic and psychic status of women of reproductive age].

    PubMed

    Vertkin, A L; Nosova, A V

    2012-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the topical problem of maintaining somatic and psychic health of the women of reproductive age by rational pregnancy planning and prevention of abortions by modern methods of contraception including combined oral hormonal contraception. Unfortunately, this approach is rarely employed in this country (5-6%). Results of retrospective analysis of medical documentation, clinical efficacy and safety of modern combined oral hormonal contraception are presented.

  1. Contraception after thirty-five.

    PubMed

    Luukkainen, T

    1992-04-01

    Our knowledge about the safety, the incidence of side effects, and the effectiveness of contraceptive methods for women in premenopause, or during the last decade of their reproductive life, has not been a primary interest for research and development in fertility control. The main purpose of trials for the evaluation of new contraceptive methods is to test their effectiveness, and therefore only women below 38 years of age are accepted. Furthermore, when new methods are being tested, only healthy women are accepted, and those having health problems of almost any kind are excluded. Therefore our knowledge about the contraceptive methods in women over 40 years of age is scanty and comes from trials with a long-lasting follow-up on healthy women who can use the method without problems until they are 45 or reach menopause. We have very limited reported information on the use of contraceptives by women who have cardiovascular disease, diabetes, liver problems, etc. Therefore the main body of experience in this review comes from healthy women between 35 and 44. On the other hand, one should remember that these women have a high motivation to use contraceptive methods and therefore the continuation rate in the trials is high. This compensates for the relatively small number of acceptors by giving more women-years in follow-up. Continuation rate and the proper use of methods are directly correlated to increase in age, socioeconomical status, and to education of users. Highly educated women in this age group have very low failure rate with almost any method.

  2. Contraceptive Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troen, Philip; And Others

    This report provides an overview of research activities and needs in the area of contraceptive development. In a review of the present state, discussions are offered on the effectiveness and drawbacks of oral contraceptives, intrauterine devices, barrier methods, natural family planning, and sterilization. Methods of contraception that are in the…

  3. The worldwide use of steroidal contraception.

    PubMed

    Diczfalusy, E

    1989-01-01

    Historically, concerns about rapidly growing populations and resources that could not support them persuaded governments of developing countries to initiate family planning programs. Between the early 1960s and the early 1980s, the number of governments supporting these programs increased from 7 to approximately 120. Today, 52 governments in developing countries provide support to family planning programs because of the demographic rationale, and 65 governments do so because of human rights and health considerations: The effective use of family planning significantly diminishes infant, child, and maternal mortality and morbidity. Forty-five percent of married women of reproductive age worldwide are practicing contraception today; however, 69% do so in East Asia and only 11% in Africa. Female sterilization and use of intrauterine devices are the most popular methods in developing countries, and oral contraceptives and condoms, in developed countries. Of the 400 million women of reproductive age, 140 million (35%) are relying on family planning methods requiring male cooperation and less than 60 million (15%) are using oral contraceptives. More than half of these oral contraceptive users live in four countries: the United States, Brazil, France, and the Federal Republic of Germany. On the other hand, the percentage of currently married women, aged 15 to 19 years, who have never used any form of contraception is as high as 85% to 90% in Bangladesh, Sudan, and Pakistan. In many developing countries, there is a statistically significant correlation between women's use of contraception and years of education. Other important factors influencing contraceptive prevalence include the established or perceived side effects of currently available methods, the status of women, the political climate, and a number of behavioral and social determinants.

  4. Postpartum contraception.

    PubMed

    Sober, Stephanie; Schreiber, Courtney A

    2014-12-01

    As birth spacing has demonstrated health benefits for a woman and her children, contraception after childbirth is recognized as an important health issue. The potential risk of pregnancy soon after delivery underscores the importance of initiating postpartum contraception in a timely manner. The contraceptive method initiated in the postpartum period depends upon a number of factors including medical history, anatomic and hormonal factors, patient preference, and whether or not the woman is breastfeeding. When electing a contraceptive method, informed choice is paramount. The availability of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods immediately postpartum provides a strategy to achieve reductions in unintended pregnancy.

  5. Emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    Van Look, P F; von Hertzen, H

    1993-01-01

    The term 'emergency contraception', as employed in this paper, refers to methods that are used as emergency procedures to prevent pregnancy following unprotected intercourse. Alternative, less appropriate, terms are postcoital and 'morning-after' contraception. References to postcoital preparations can be found as far back as 1500 BC in Egyptian papyri, but it was not until fairly recently that contraceptive research has been able to at least partially fulfill that need. The development of hormonal methods of emergency contraception goes back to the 1960s when the first human trials of postcoitally administered high-dose oestrogens were undertaken. Combined oestrogen- progestogen combination therapy (the so-called Yuzpe regimen) was introduced in the early 1970s, while the postcoital insertion of an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) for emergency contraception was first reported in 1976. Other compounds that have been tested more recently include levonorgestrel, the antiprogestogen mifepristone, and danazol. Although there is some debate about the magnitude of the protective effect, few people question the important role that emergency contraception can play in preventing unwanted pregnancy and hence maternal mortality and morbidity resulting from unsafe abortion. Given that the most often used methods of emergency contraception, namely the Yuzpe regimen and postcoital insertion of an IUD, rely on technology that has been available for some 30 years, family planning programmes that claim to be concerned with improving women's reproductive health, cannot really be excused if they do not provide emergency contraception as part of their routine services.

  6. Emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    Two oral postcoital contraceptive agents are currently available. The first is a 2 x 2 pill; the second is a 5 x 5. Both release a higher dose of hormones than conventional contraceptive pills. Success rates range between 96% and 99%. They must be taken within 72 hours of intercourse. Side effects include nausea and vomiting. Contraindications are the same as for the common oral contraceptives. The contraceptive mode of action can be any of the following: 1) by making the lining of the uterus unreceptive; 2) by slowing the movement of the egg in the fallopian tube; or 3) by affecting the release of the egg. Emergency contraceptive pills have no effect once implantation takes place. The IUD can be used as an emergency postcoital contraceptive method if placed within 10 days of coitus. They are usually placed within 5-7 days because of laws regarding when birth control becomes abortion. One failure has been reported in Great Britain (December, 1993). Side effects are the same as with regular use. RU486/PG may be used in the future as an emergency contraceptive agent. Research is in progress on success rates and side effects. This agent could potentially be used at any time. Currently, emergency contraception can only be obtained by prescription. Limited hours and interrogating staff are obstacles in such emergencies. British women's groups are asking that emergency oral contraceptive pills be made available over the counter with advice from the pharmacist.

  7. [Postcoital contraception].

    PubMed

    Hamerlynck, J V

    1981-07-11

    Some form of postcoital contraception for protection against unwanted pregnancy is indispensable today especially in cases of rape, failed mechanical contraception, or 1st sexual contact without contraception. A tabletform of postcoital contraceptive would be acceptable if 100% certainty is assured and it doesn't involve adverse effects. Postcoitally administered high-dose estrogens proved effective in Macaca mulatta. Diethylstilbestrol in variable dosages with or without ethinylestradiol was used in various studies and with variable results. Pregnancy rates depended on time of coitus in cycle, contraceptive dosage, and time of administration after coitus (within 72 hours). Conjugated estrogens and various progestagens or combinations of both have been tried with variable success. Another form of postcoital contraception is IUD insertion within 7 days following unprotected coitus. Advantages of this method are the time factors and absence of adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives. Postcoital hormonal contraceptives cause changes in the endometrium which prevent blastocyst implantation. They alter tubal function affecting zygote movement towards the uterus. They have an antiovulatory effect and may be luteolytic. Estrogens have more severe side effects than progestagens. Nausea, vomiting, mastodynia, fluid retention, and vaginal bleeding can result from estrogens. Progestagens can cause irregular bleeding. Combination of both can cause menstrual irregularity. Postcoital hormonal contraceptives are contraindicated in heart and liver diseases, thrombosis, and pregnancy (teratogenic and carcinogenic effects on offspring). Pregnancy despite postcoital contraception results in extrauterine pregnancy in 10% of patients. The most important reservations in evaluating publications on this subject are: 1) lack of control group; 2) estimation of pregnancy probability is not reliable because of study population used; 3) patient fertility cannot be ascertained; and 4

  8. Contraceptive Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulka, Barbara S.; And Others

    The objective of research in contraceptive evaluation is to improve the ability of individuals to choose contraceptive methods best suited to their needs and circumstances and to provide information that will lead to the development of safer and more effective methods. There are usually three considerations in judging the importance of a method of…

  9. Emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David A; Raymond, Elizabeth G

    2002-08-06

    Emergency contraception is used to prevent pregnancy after a coital act not adequately protected by a regular method of contraception. In contrast to early medical abortion, emergency contraception prevents a pregnancy from starting and does not disrupt an established pregnancy. The most commonly used approaches consist of two oral doses of contraceptive steroids. The levonorgestrel-only regimen (levonorgestrel, 0.75 mg, repeated in 12 hours) appears to be more effective and better tolerated than the Yuzpe regimen (ethinyl estradiol, 100 microg, and levonorgestrel, 0.5 mg, repeated in 12 hours). In the largest randomized, controlled trial to date, levonorgestrel prevented about 85% of pregnancies that would have occurred without its use. Hormonal emergency contraception has no known medical contraindications, although it is not indicated for suspected or confirmed pregnancy. However, if hormonal emergency contraception is inadvertently taken in early pregnancy, neither the woman nor the fetus will be harmed. Nausea and vomiting associated with the Yuzpe regimen can be reduced by prophylactic use of meclizine. A strong medical and legal case exists for making hormonal emergency contraception available over the counter, as has happened in countries other than the United States. Easier access to and wider use of emergency contraception could dramatically lower the high rates of unintended pregnancy and induced abortion in the United States.

  10. Intrauterine contraception.

    PubMed

    Whaley, Natalie S; Burke, Anne E

    2015-11-01

    Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are effective, reversible forms of contraception with high patient satisfaction and continuation. IUDs can be safely used by most women and should be considered the first-line method of contraception for all women. This descriptive review will discuss the clinical issues associated with IUDs - including management of side effects, noncontraceptive uses and insertion and removal. When the burdens of cost are removed, women are more likely to select and IUDs. Health policy changes that increase insurance coverage for contraception will improve access to IUDs. IUDs remain an underutilized form of contraception in USA and efforts to improve availability and access to long-acting reversible contraception methods is needed to optimize their use.

  11. A correlational approach to predicting operator status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shingledecker, Clark A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses a research approach for identifying and validating candidate physiological and behavioral parameters which can be used to predict the performance capabilities of aircrew and other system operators. In this methodology, concurrent and advance correlations are computed between predictor values and criterion performance measures. Continuous performance and sleep loss are used as stressors to promote performance variation. Preliminary data are presented which suggest dependence of prediction capability on the resource allocation policy of the operator.

  12. Contraceptive implants.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding.

  13. Emergency Contraception

    MedlinePlus

    ... against STDs even when using another method of birth control. If a condom breaks (or a couple has ... Emergency contraception is not recommended as a regular birth control method . Instead, it is used for emergencies only. ...

  14. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Oesterheld, Jessica R; Cozza, Kelly; Sandson, Neil B

    2008-01-01

    Nearly 50 years ago, the introduction of Enovid (norethynodrel 10 microg and mestranol 150 microg), which provided convenient and reliable contraception, revolutionized birth control. Reports of interactions between oral contraceptives (OCs) and other drugs began to trickle into the literature. At first, these drug interactions appeared to be random and unrelated. Increased understanding of P450 enzymes and phase II reactions of sulfation and glucuronidation has permitted preliminary categorization and assessment of the clinical relevance of these drug interactions.

  15. Male contraception.

    PubMed

    Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald S

    2002-04-01

    Currently approved male-directed contraceptive methods include condoms and vas occlusion. Vas occlusion is very effective but is intended to be non-reversible. Condoms have a relatively high failure rate, at least partially due to compliance problems and are not accepted by many couples. The only other male-oriented methods in clinical trials utilize the administration of testosterone alone or its combination with another gonadotropin-suppressing agent such as a progestin or a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist. Studies published in the 1990s demonstrated that a testosterone-containing hormonal contraceptive method suppressed spermatogenesis to azoospermia in most men and severe oligozoospermia in the remaining. The contraceptive efficacy after treatment with testosterone alone was comparable to that of female hormonal methods. Having proven that reversible male contraception is a reality, present trials are attempting to identify the best androgen delivery system and the most effective androgen plus progestin preparation. It is likely that the first marketed male hormonal contraceptive method will be a long-acting (injectable or implant) combination of an androgen plus a progestin. Research is continuing to identify other target areas for male contraceptive development, including agents with post-testicular and epididymal sites of action.

  16. Absence of correlation between magnesium and riboflavin status.

    PubMed

    Eisinger, J; Clairet, D; Brue, F; Ayavou, T

    1993-06-01

    Erythrocyte magnesium and glutathione reductase activity coefficient (EGR-AC), reflecting vitamin B-2 status, were assessed in 11 athletes, 20 patients with fibromyalgia, 18 patients with hypothyroidism, and 13 controls. No correlation was demonstrated between erythrocyte magnesium and EGR-AC.

  17. [Correlation of psychoemotional status and adaptation to complete dentures].

    PubMed

    Barkan, I Yu; Stafeev, A A; Repin, V S

    2015-01-01

    Patients with full adentia are characterized by the formation of specific psycho-emotional status. Rational psychotherapeutic support of these patients largely determines the efficiency of dental prosthetic treatment. At the same time, the definition of mental and emotional status is not included in the diagnostic examination protocol. Considering the above the purpose of the study was to evaluate mental and emotional status of patients receiving complete dentures. Prosthetic rehabilitation of 30 patients with complete teeth loss was performed and clinical evaluation and evaluation of mental and emotional status were carried out before and after treatment. Patients with negative experiences of prosthetics showed a higher level of personal and situational anxiety. There was correlation of adaptation to removable dentures and the patient's personality traits. It is determined that emotional instability during treatment tends to decrease affecting the timing of adaptation to complete dentures. It is noted that patients with repeated prosthetics have earlier recovery of coordination ability of the masticatory muscles.

  18. Emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    Ellertson, C; Trussell, J; Stewart, F; Koenig, J; Raymond, E G; Shochet, T

    2001-12-01

    Emergency contraceptives are methods that prevent pregnancy when used shortly after unprotected sex. Three different emergency contraceptive methods are safe, simple, and widely available in the United States. These are: (1) ordinary combined oral contraceptives containing ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel taken in a higher dose for a short period of time and started within a few days after unprotected intercourse; (2) levonorgestrel-only tablets used similarly; and (3) copper-bearing intrauterine devices inserted within approximately 1 week after unprotected intercourse. Emergency contraceptive use is best known for women who have been raped, but the methods are also appropriate for women who have experienced condom breaks, women who did not use any method because they were not planning on having sex, or women who had unprotected intercourse for any other reason. Unfortunately, few women know about emergency contraceptives, and few clinicians think to inform their patients routinely about the option. A nationwide toll-free hotline (1-888-NOT-2-LATE) and a website (http://not-2-late.com) can help women learn about these options. Sharing "family planning's best-kept secret" widely with women could prevent as many as a million unwanted pregnancies annually in the United States.

  19. Future contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Alexander, N J

    1995-09-01

    This article looks at the improvements that may occur in contraceptives in the near future. While no product currently under study would be ideal (highly effective, safe, readily reversible, free of side effects, coitally independent, counteract the spread of sexually transmitted diseases, and inexpensive), several would come closer than those available today. For men, the condom is the only currently available contraception, and a thinner version has recently been introduced in response to the criticism that condoms reduce sexual pleasure. Methods under study for men include manipulating hormones to halt sperm production by the intramuscular injection of an androgen in combination with a progestin or by blocking the activity of gonadotropin-releasing hormone. In the future, long-acting reversible agents should be available to directly halt sperm production or maturation. In men and women, vaccines should become available that would use antibodies to disrupt reproduction. Additional hormonal options in women should include hormone-releasing vaginal rings, a simplified contraceptive implant delivery system, a hormone-releasing IUD, and a monthly pill. Vaginal chemicals could be used to impede some of the necessary changes that sperm undergo after ejaculation. Spermicides will also be available with the ability to prevent STDs. The order of appearance of these new contraceptives will probably be nonlatex condoms, vaginal rings, and new implants, followed by disease-reducing spermicides, hormone-releasing IUDs, new emergency contraceptives, a three-month injectable for men, biodegradable implants for women, and immunocontraceptives (if they receive the backing of the industry).

  20. Abortion and contraceptive use in sub-Saharan Africa: how women plan their families.

    PubMed

    Lauro, Don

    2011-03-01

    Based on available evidence, this review article posits that contemporary use of abortion in sub-Saharan Africa often substitutes for and sometimes surpasses modern contraceptive practice. Some studies and some data sets indicate that this occurs not only among adolescents but also within older age groups. In several sub-Saharan cities, particularly where contraceptive use is low and access to clinical abortion is high (though largely illegal), abortion appears to be the method of choice for limiting or spacing births. Even in rural areas, women may regularly resort to abortion, often using extremely unsafe procedures, instead of contraception. Available data seem to indicate that relatively high levels of abortion correlate with low access to modern contraception, low status of women, strong sanctions against out-of-wedlock pregnancy, traditional tolerance of abortion, and availability of modern abortion practices. Abortion has been and will likely continue to be used to plan families within much of sub-Saharan Africa.

  1. Correlation of sense of coherence with oral health behaviors, socioeconomic status, and periodontal status

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Kommuri Sahithi; Doshi, Dolar; Kulkarni, Suhas; Reddy, Bandari Srikanth; Reddy, Madupu Padma

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The sense of coherence (SOC) has been suggested to be highly applicable concept in the public health area because a strong SOC is stated to decrease the likelihood of perceiving the social environment as stressful. This reduces the susceptibility to the health-damaging effect of chronic stress by lowering the likelihood of repeated negative emotions to stress perception. Materials and Methods: The demographic data and general information of subjects' oral health behaviors such as frequency of cleaning teeth, aids used to clean teeth, and dental attendance were recorded in the self-administered questionnaire. The SOC-related data were obtained using the short version of Antonovsky's SOC scale. The periodontal status was recorded based on the modified World Health Organization 1997 pro forma. Results: The total of 780 respondents comprising 269 (34.5%) males and 511 (65.5%) females participated in the study. A significant difference was noted among the subjects for socioeconomic status based on gender (P = 0.000). The healthy periodontal status (community periodontal index [CPI] code 0) was observed for 67 (24.9%) males and 118 (23.1%) females. The overall SOC showed statistically negative correlation with socioeconomic status scale (r = −0.287). The CPI and loss of attachment (periodontal status) were significantly and negatively correlated with SOC. Conclusion: The present study concluded that a high level of SOC was associated with good oral health behaviors, periodontal status, and socioeconomic status.

  2. [Contraceptive methods].

    PubMed

    Toivonen, J

    1987-01-01

    Interest in contraceptive devices has increased in recent years due to their safety and protection offered against venereal disease. Use of the devices prevents sperm from entering the uterine canal. Failure of a device is usually caused either because the contraceptive outside the uterus is wrongly positioned or because not enough active spermicidal ingredients were released before ejaculation. Mass production of condoms was made possible through utilization of latex rubber. Different color and shape alternatives have made condom usage more popular in developing countries. The diaphragm and its variation, the cervical cap, are treated with spermicide and then placed inside the vagina. Correct size of the contraceptive is an important consideration. Spermicides consist of active substances that kill sperm, as well as a carrier substance such as foam, ointment and jelly. The newest preventive device is the contraceptive sponge, which can stay in place for up to 36 hours. IN vitro studies show that effectiveness of condoms is 0.5-2.0 (Pearl's index). Combination use of diaphragm and spermicide yields a protection rate of 2-20 (life-table index), and spermicides 0.3-30.0. Risks associated with these methods include local irritation. It was believed that some spermicides increased rats of miscarriage, Down's Syndrome and other chromosomal abnormalities, as well as limb anomalies. Diaphragm use increases potential for urinary tract infections. Toxic shock may occur with some users of sponge and diaphragm. All the mentioned contraceptives protect from infection, and are most suitable for people who cannot tolerate hormonal preparations or IUD's, who are in a casual sexual relationship or nursing mothers or youth.

  3. Women's autonomy, education and employment in Oman and their influence on contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    Al Riyami, Asya; Afifi, Mustafa; Mabry, Ruth M

    2004-05-01

    Since 1970 political and economic changes have brought about great improvements in health and education in Oman, and since 1994 the government has provided free contraceptives to all married couples in primary health care centres. Despite rapid socio-economic development, the fertility rate was 4.2 in 2001. The aim of this study was to define baseline data on ever-married women's empowerment in Oman from a national study in 2000, analyse the correlates of women's empowerment and the effect of empowerment on unmet need for contraception. Two indicators of empowerment were used: women's involvement in decision-making and freedom of movement. Bivariate analysis was used to link these measures and their proxies, education and employment status, with use of a family planning method. Education was a key indicator of women's status. Unmet contraceptive need for women exposed to pregnancy was nearly 25%, but decreased significantly with educational level and paid employment. While empowered women were more likely to use contraception, women's education was a better predictor of "met need" than autonomy, as traditional factors and community influence remain strong. For nearly half the 1,830 women in the study, the husband decided whether contraception was used. Fewer than 1% were using contraception before their first child as women are expected to have a child within the first year of marriage.

  4. Long-acting steroid contraceptive technology.

    PubMed

    Grubb, G

    1991-01-01

    Long-acting steroid contraceptive technologies that have either been recently approved or are currently under study are reviewed and the status of contraceptive research in the US is noted. The benefits and drawbacks, as well as the duration and possible cost, of each method are discussed. Approved by the Food and Drug Administration on December 10, 1990, Norplant is reportedly the first new contraceptive technology available to women in the US since the 1960s. This implant delivery system, which lasts up to 5 years, is cheaper than the pill and nearly as effective as sterilization. Study is currently under way on other multiyear, nonbiodegradable and biodegradable implants. Although already used by 4 million women worldwide, the long-acting injectable Depo-Provera has yet to be approved for use in the US. 5 new types of injectables are being developed. Steroid-containing IUDs have been in the market for some time, and current research is attempting to increase their contraceptive life beyond 1 year. Contraceptive developers are also exploring transdermal delivery systems, vaginal rings, and buccal and sublingual delivery. It is considered misleading to call Norplant the first new contraceptive introduced since the pill. Over the past 20 years, virtually every contraceptive has been significantly improved, developments that have enhanced the contraceptive options of couples. Because new contraceptive technologies are increasingly complex, their development is much slower. Consequently, it is concluded that in the foreseeable future, the demand for more acceptable contraceptives will be met through improvements of currently available technologies.

  5. [Hormonal contraception].

    PubMed

    Prilepskaia, V N

    1991-12-01

    Effective contraceptives contribute to the regulation of births, protect the health of women, reduce maternal and perinatal mortality and gynecological diseases, and prevent abortion-related complications. Complications after abortion average 30%, and among primigravidas the rate reaches 45%. Abortion can result in sterility and in the inability to carry out the pregnancy. Oral contraceptives (OCs) are used by 150 million globally. In new preparations ethinyl estradiol (EE) and levonorgestrel (LNG) are the most common components. In the 2-phase and 3-phase preparations Sequilar, Anteovin, and lipid profile safe Triquilar the gestagen component was reduced 40%. Continuin and Famulen are minipills, and Postinor is a postcoital contraceptive. Absolute contraindications of OCs include thromboembolytic diseases, severe cardiovascular system diseases, liver disorders, cirrhosis, cerebral vascular diseases, grave diabetes, jaundice, and malignant tumors of the mammae and sexual organs. Rigevidon, Triquilar, and Trisiston have high steroid content with minimal side effects. The protective effect of OCs are: 2-3 times lower risk of inflammation of the small pelvis, lower risk of malignant and benign ovarian tumors that lasts even after discontinuation, uterine cancer prevention (antiproliferation effect on the endometrium and inhibition of mitotic activity of the myometrium), and reduced risk of benign breast neoplasms. The finding that estrogen-induced risk of breast cancer increases with longterm contraceptive use in young nulliparas has not been persuasively proven. The optimal duration of uninterrupted OC use is 1-1.5 years. Monophasic estrogen-gestagen preparations include Bisecurin, Non-Ovlon, Ovidon, Rigevidon, Minisiston, and Demulen with low dosages of EE, LNG, norethisterone acetate, and diacetate ethonodiol. Norplant is a subdermal silastic capsule with effectiveness for up to 5 years.

  6. Emergency Contraception Website

    MedlinePlus

    Text Only Full media Version Get Emergency Contraception NOW INFO about Emergency Contraception Q&A about Emergency Contraception Español | Arabic Find a Morning After Pill Provider Near You This website is ...

  7. Contraceptive practices.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, J E; Rao, P S

    1976-08-01

    A family life education program (FLEP) providing contraceptive services within a comprehensive health care organization for low-income, inner-city adolescents is described. Each female patient attending in the July 1-September 30, 1974, period was included in a study undertaken to identify and serve the unmet needs of the teen-age population in the community of East Harlem. Of the 334 females interviewed, almost 1/2 were black, 37% were Hispanic, 12% were white, and 2% were Oriental, totals representative of the surrounding community. The questionnaire included information on demographic and social background, sexual history, reproductive history, and contraceptive experience. Comparisons are made on the answers between groups. Personal contacts and school outreach were the 2 main sources of referral to the clinic. Sexual history was found to be associated with social background rather than physiological factors. More than 1/2 the teen-agers had never used contraception prior to their 1st clinic visit and another 1/4 of the girls were using unreliable methods. The study indicated that teen-agers will use good programs which are designed to meet their needs. For teen-agers, a free-standing clinic offering comprehensive health care is the ideal situation.

  8. [Male contraception].

    PubMed

    Demoulin, A

    1984-04-01

    Among the reasons why male hormonal contraception has lagged behind female methods are the necessity of preserving virility, the fact that spermatogenesis is a continuous process, the need to control secondary effects and toxicity, and the requirement that modes of administration be acceptable to both partners. Among currently available reversible mehtods, withdrawal is undoubtedly the most ancient. It is still widespread but cannot be recommended because of its limited effectiveness. The condom is used by about 10% of couples worldwide as a principal or temporary method, but its inter-ference with sensation has limited its acceptance. Condoms are nevertheless highly effective when used with a spermicide. Various androgens are currently under investigation. High doses of testosterone can induce azoospermia without affecting libido but their side effects may be serious. The use of combinations of steroids permits doses to be reduced and offers promise for the future. The combination of oral medroxyprogesterone acetate and percutaneous testosterone is one of the better approaches; the combination is effective and nontoxic but has the disadvantage of percutaneous administration. Gossypol, a pigment extracted from the cotton plant, has been used as a contraceptive in China with a reported efficacy of 99.89%, recovery of fertility within 3 months, and no effect on future fertility. However, its toxicity appears to be significant in the animal and its reversibility is uncertain. A search is on for analogs which would preserve the contraceptive effects while eliminating toxic effects. Several gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs under investigation for their interference with spermatogenesis have given promising results. Several chemicals tested for contraceptive effects have had unacceptably high toxicity. Chinese investigators have reported good results with various physical methods of interfering with sperm production, but their reversibility and innocuity

  9. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Maclennan, A H

    1987-12-01

    Over 60 million women use highly efficient and safe modern combined oral contraceptives (OCs) every day. A women who takes the oral contraceptive for 5 years before the age of 30 will actually live 12 days longer, although a woman taking the pill for the 1st time for 5 years after the age of 30 will have her life span reduced on the average by 80 days. OC related morbidity and mortality mostly occur in women over 35 who smoke. Combined low dose OCs are safe for women who do not smoke, at least to 45 years of age and probably to the menopause. The prescription of OCs is also safe to the young adolescent. The pill does not interfere with maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary ovarian axis and does not increase the incidence of amenorrhoea, oligomenorrhoea or infertility in later life. Patients with contraindications to estrogen therapy are excluded from OC use (history of thromboembolism, major heart disease, liver disease, breast cancer). Low-dose (30-35 mcg estrogen-containing monophasic or triphasic) pills are recommended. Combined oral contraceptives contain either ethinyl estradiol (1.7 to 2 times more potent) or mestranol. After absorption the progestagens, norethisterone acetate, ethynodiol diacetate and lynoestrenol are all metabolized to norethisterone. The progestagen-only pill has about a 2% failure rate and poorer cycle control than the combined pill, but it lacks estrogenic, progestagenic and androgenic side effects. This pill is suitable for the lactating mother, for smokers over 35, for hypertensive patients, and for those with a history of thrombosis. The efficacy of the progestagen-only pill is restored in 3 days of pill taking. Postcoital contraception is an alternative: treatment can be given for at least 72 hours after intercourse. The Yuzpe method calls for the patient to take 2 combined oral contraceptive tablets containing levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol (Eugynon or Ovral) followed by a further 2 tablets 12 hours later. This regimen

  10. Levels and correlates of maternal nutritional status in urban Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Baqui, A H; Arifeen, S E; Amin, S; Black, R E

    1994-05-01

    Researchers analyzed anthropometric data from 2417 nonpregnant mothers, socioeconomic data from 2048 mothers, reproductive history data from 1314 mothers, and socioeconomic and reproductive history data from 1185 mothers to determine the levels and correlates of maternal nutritional status of nonpregnant mothers in the slums of Dhaka, Bangladesh. Mean weight, height, middle-upper-arm-circumference (MUAC), and body mass index (BMI) of the 2417 mothers stood at 41.8 kg, 148.8 cm, 232.5 mm, and 18.8, respectively. Multivariate regression analyses revealed that mothers' schooling and household economic status had a significant positive effect on weight, MUAC, and BMI (p .05 and .01, respectively). Schooling had a significant positive association with mothers' height (p .05), but household economic status did not. Maternal height and weight had a significant negative association with child death (p .001 and .05, respectively). Mothers equal to or less than 155 cm had an increased risk of child death (odds ratio [OR] = 1.4-2.64), with those less than 140 cm in height having the greatest risk of child death (OR = 2.64). Short stature linked to child loss indicates a possible intergenerational influence of poor childhood nutrition, suggesting that improvement of nutritional status for girls would improve child health in the next generation. Sophisticated and long-term planning is needed, however, to achieve improved nutritional status of girls due to various obstacles (e.g., son preference, poverty, food scarcity, and high prevalence of infectious diseases). In the meantime, maternal and child health workers should target shorter mothers (i.e., 145 cm) for appropriate prenatal and obstetric care, since they face the greatest risk of child death.

  11. Understanding the cognitive impact of the contraceptive estrogen Ethinyl Estradiol: tonic and cyclic administration impairs memory, and performance correlates with basal forebrain cholinergic system integrity.

    PubMed

    Mennenga, Sarah E; Gerson, Julia E; Koebele, Stephanie V; Kingston, Melissa L; Tsang, Candy W S; Engler-Chiurazzi, Elizabeth B; Baxter, Leslie C; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A

    2015-04-01

    Ethinyl Estradiol (EE), a synthetic, orally bio-available estrogen, is the most commonly prescribed form of estrogen in oral contraceptives, and is found in at least 30 different contraceptive formulations currently prescribed to women as well as hormone therapies prescribed to menopausal women. Thus, EE is prescribed clinically to women at ages ranging from puberty to reproductive senescence. Here, in two separate studies, the cognitive effects of cyclic or tonic EE administration following ovariectomy (Ovx) were evaluated in young female rats. Study I assessed the cognitive effects of low and high doses of EE, delivered tonically via a subcutaneous osmotic pump. Study II evaluated the cognitive effects of low, medium, and high doses of EE administered via a daily subcutaneous injection, modeling the daily rise and fall of serum EE levels with oral regimens. Study II also investigated the impact of low, medium and high doses of EE on the basal forebrain cholinergic system. The low and medium doses utilized here correspond to the range of doses currently used in clinical formulations, and the high dose corresponds to doses prescribed to a generation of women between 1960 and 1970, when oral contraceptives first became available. We evaluate cognition using a battery of maze tasks tapping several domains of spatial learning and memory as well as basal forebrain cholinergic integrity using immunohistochemistry and unbiased stereology to estimate the number of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-producing cells in the medial septum and vertical/diagonal bands. At the highest dose, EE treatment impaired multiple domains of spatial memory relative to vehicle treatment, regardless of administration method. When given cyclically at the low and medium doses, EE did not impact working memory, but transiently impaired reference memory during the learning phase of testing. Of the doses and regimens tested here, only EE at the highest dose impaired several domains of memory

  12. Does knowledge about antiretroviral therapy and mother-to-child transmission affect the relationships between HIV status and fertility preferences and contraceptive use? New evidence from Nigeria and Zambia.

    PubMed

    Bankole, Akinrinola; Biddlecom, Ann E; Dzekedzeke, Kumbutso; Akinyemi, Joshua O; Awolude, Olutosin; Adewole, Isaac F

    2014-09-01

    The increasing availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and drug regimens to prevent mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) has probably changed the context of childbearing for people living with HIV. Using data from 2009-2010 community-based surveys in Nigeria and Zambia, this study explores whether women's knowledge about ART and PMTCT influences the relationship between HIV status and fertility preferences and contraceptive behaviour. The findings show that women living with HIV are more likely to want more children in Nigeria and to want to limit childbearing in Zambia compared with HIV-negative women. While there is no significant difference in contraceptive use by women's HIV status in the two countries, women who did not know their HIV status are less likely to use contraceptives relative to women who are HIV-negative. Knowledge about ART reduces the childbearing desires of HIV-positive women in Nigeria and knowledge about PMTCT increases desire for more children among HIV-positive women in Zambia, as well as contraceptive use among women who do not know their HIV status. The findings indicate that knowledge about HIV prevention and treatment services changes how living with HIV affects childbearing desires and, at least in Zambia, pregnancy prevention, and highlight the importance of access to accurate knowledge about ART and PMTCT services to assist women and men to make informed childbearing decisions. Knowledge about ART and PMTCT should be promoted not only through HIV treatment and maternal and newborn care facilities but also through family planning centres and the mass media.

  13. Postcoital contraception.

    PubMed

    McLaren, H C

    1977-02-05

    My colleague Dr. C.L. Brewer (January 15, p. 169) is within his rights to ask for a precise definition of abortion and contraception. I define abortion as the deliberate destruction of the embryo once it is embedded in the uterus. The absolutist on the abortion issue, until he is sure that an IUD never works by destroying an embedded embryo, must logically eschew this technique, advising his patient as to his ethical objections. She may then seek other advice once she has the facts. However, to insist that those who advise an IUD with the motive of contraception cannot herefore object to, say, intrauterine saline aimed at the destruction of a moving 27-week fetus is, in my view, stretching his argument. With further stretching it could be carried to absurdity in the rubella-early pregnancy dilemma: why not deliver the child, examine it carefully, and then if imperfect kill it with a silver hammer? Unthinkable, even if logical. Still, Dr. Brewer has a point and (with me) no doubt he will sympathize with Pope John and his advisers in their support for family spacing only by the avoidance of the fertile days - esthetically admirable but, alas, not always effective. How absurd the Catholic Church would now look if 10 years ago it had blessed the IUD only to find that it may operate not only by preventing the embedding of the zygot but by destroying it in situ - by definition an abortion. The future may settle the debate with hormones which convert the endometrium to a nonreceptive state so that a fetus is never embedded in the womb. Even better, we may develop a male hormone which prevents sperm from penetrating the ovum. Meantime, motive is important: contraception is not abortion and our abortionists should not dress up as delayed contraceptors. (Editor's note: This correspondence is now closed.)

  14. Immaculate contraception.

    PubMed

    Smith, K

    The city of Dundee has the highest teen pregnancy and abortion rate in Scotland. In the heart of the city, The Corner is a health and information drop-in center for people aged 12-25 years which has provided a range of health promotion activities, contraception services, and general information and advice since April 1996. 8000 inquiries were posed from young people in Dundee and the surrounding areas in The Corner's first full year of operation, one-third on sexual health. A survey conducted last December found that 55% of the center's clients were aged 12-15. Young people helped to design the center, creating a cafe atmosphere in the main drop-in area with tables, chairs, and loungers. Reference literature is on display, music plays, and a series of computers is linked to health information databases. In this environment, clients can hang out, ask questions, and receive condoms or other contraceptive services without the embarrassment of attending a local family planning clinic. The examination and counseling rooms are also relaxed and warmly-appointed. The Corner has also offered emergency contraception since January, one of the few places in Scotland where nurses can provide it. While The Corner has received some local criticism, it is operating within the laws and codes of professional practices. The center is jointly funded by Tayside Health Board, Dundee City Council, and the Scottish Office. Finally, the center has a travel program which offers a package of activities based upon a different foreign country each week.

  15. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, A J; Leversee, J H

    1990-09-01

    Management of oral contraception requires an understanding of the relationships between the method's effectiveness, noncontraceptive benefits, and hormonal adverse effects. The new multiphasic combinations or OCs containing 35 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol and 0.5-1.0 mg of norethindrone or equivalent result in a maximum combination of efficacy and safety for the patient with minimal annoying problems for the patient and the prescriber. Patient education regarding early warning symptoms of adverse effects, breakthrough bleeding, and lack of withdrawal bleeding adds an additional margin of safety and reduces patient questions and uncertainties.

  16. [Postabortion contraception].

    PubMed

    Morales del Olmo, R A; Vega, A; Fuentes, G; Pérez Palacios, G

    1998-02-01

    In Mexico, as in almost all the Latin American countries, abortion represents an important maternal morbidity-mortality reason. It has been pointed out that those women who had an abortion, are in greater risk to repeat this condition than those women who have not had the episode. For this reason, it is a transcendental matter, the use of modern contraceptive technology for fertility regulation with the aim to avoid not planned pregnancies and their devastating consequences. This document reviews-according to the Family Planning Official Norm of the Ministry of Health-those different contractive alternatives, that can be used in the postabortion.

  17. Correlates of the health statuses of the faculty at midlife

    PubMed Central

    Galeon, Galvin Alaan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Between the school years of 2009-2012, the turnover record of the University of San Jose-Recoletos (USJ-R), Cebu City, Philippines showed that permanent faculty members who left the institution were all midlifers. Their reasons varied from health issues to greener pasture elsewhere. Materials and Methods: This study then sought to explore the health statuses of the faculty midlifers of the USJ-R. The data were collected through survey conducted among the 106 faculty midlifers of the university. This study applied multivariate analyses to the survey data using Pearson-moment of correlation to determine the relationship between the sociodemographic profile of the research participants and their health statuses. Results: This research revealed that faculty midlifers are generally well physically. They showed emotional maturity and have positive outlook toward midlife. More so, their health conditions are significantly related with their sex, age, years of teaching, educational attainment, and income. Conclusion: At midlife, the faculty members of USJ-R can still generally be considered physically well. Thus, if they are well-managed, they can become relevant and better contributors to the attainment of the basic goals and objectives of the educational institution and the educational system in general. PMID:27134476

  18. [Male contraception].

    PubMed

    Demery, A

    1987-05-01

    Except for condoms, male contraception is very slightly utilized in France. Several male experimental methods are under study. A synthetic luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analog has been used successfully in women and offers promise in men of blocking LHRH and thus blocking spermatogenesis. Several nonsteroid substances such an hypertensives and adrenaline would suppress follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone release, but are too toxic for use. The combination of 40 mcg ethinyl estradiol and 20 mg of methyltestosterone inhibits gonadotropin release and produces azoospermia in men, but at the risk of loss of libido, constant gynecomastia, and testicular atrophy. Several combinations of androgens and progestins have been evaluated. Percutaneous testosterone and medroxyprogesterone acetate appears to be the most effective, with good metabolic tolerance and maintenance of libido and sexual performance. Injections of inhibine, a testicular factor that controls secretion of follicle stimulating hormone by feedback, offer promise of suppressing spermatogenesis without affecting other systems. Numerous substances are known to inhibit spermatogenesis but are to toxic for use or entail an unacceptable loss of libido. Gossypol has been employed as a contraceptive by the Chinese for its action in inhibiting protein synthesis, but it is known to have serious secondary effects. Among male methods currently in use, the condom had a Pearl index of .4-1.6 in the most recent British studies. Coitus interruptus can seriously interfere with sexual pleasure and has a failure rate of 25-30%. Vasectomy is safe, effective, and easy to perform, but is not a reversible method. The combination of 20 mg of medroxyprogesterone acetate in 2 daily doses and 100 mg of testosterone applied in an abdominal spray has given very promising results in 2 small studies in France and merits further development and diffusion.

  19. [Topical contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Alipov, V I; Korkhov, V V

    1982-02-01

    Recently there has been little interest in topical contraceptives. The most popular are the cervical cap and the diaphragm. Other types of mechanical contraceptive devices are being investigated. Standley and Kessler have developed a device for introduction into the cervical canal with a reservoir of spermatocide, it does not block the flow of blood during menstruation. New models of vaginal rings are also being developed which are simple enough for self-insertion and also contain a reservoir of spermatocide. Work is being done on spermatocide-containing sponges in many countries. Another project being investigated is the possibility of using natural proteins, collagens, and other substances which absorb spermatozoids. The ancients used various vaginal suppositories to kill spermatozoids; in the late 19th century quinine sulfate was used for this, and a variety of substances have been used recently. These spermicidal creams also have the advantage of acting as anti-infectious agents in many cases. But they do have some negative effects. They are about 85% effective, are local irritants, and some cause discomfort during intercourse. And it is possible that some are resorbed by the body and act on the liver and other organs. Vaginal globules and suppositories are also popular. The "Kontraceptin-T" brand contains quinosol, boric acid, and tannin. There are also foaming tablets which are mixed with water and then introduced. New locally-active chemical substances are being developed in Japan, West Germany, and the USSR. Kontraceptin-E contains paranonyl-phenoxypolyethylene glycol and sodium dioctylsulfosuccinate. The "Norforks" and other preparations contain mercurial compounds which may turn out to be harmful. The future promises the development of products which will act to prevent fertilization by acting on the hyaluronidase and the acrosine of the spermatozoid, thus preventing it from penetrating the ovum. It would be best to find enzyme inhibitors which are

  20. Postpartum Care and Contraception in Obese Women.

    PubMed

    Maclean, Courtney C; Thompson, Ivana S

    2016-03-01

    Postpartum obese women have an increased risk of breastfeeding difficulties and depression. Retaining the pregnancy weight at 6 months postpartum predicts long-term obesity. Risks for weight retention include excessive gestational weight gain, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, diet, exercise, depression, and duration of breastfeeding. Exercise and reducing total caloric intake promote postpartum weight loss. Intrauterine devices and contraceptive implants are the most effective contraceptives for obese women. Contraceptive pills, patches, and vaginal rings are effective options; however, obese women should be made aware of a potential increased risk of venous thromboembolism. Vasectomy and hysteroscopic sterilization carry the least surgical risk for obese women.

  1. Biological variability and impact of oral contraceptives on vitamins B(6), B(12) and folate status in women of reproductive age.

    PubMed

    McArthur, Jennifer O; Tang, HoMan; Petocz, Peter; Samman, Samir

    2013-09-16

    Vitamins B(6), B(12) and folate play crucial metabolic roles especially during the reproductive years for women. There is limited reporting of within-subject variability of these vitamins. This study aimed to determine the within and between subject variability in serum vitamins B(6), B(12), folate and erythrocyte folate concentrations in young women; identify factors that contribute to variability; and determine dietary intakes and sources of these vitamins. Data were obtained from the control group of a trial aimed at investigating the effect of iron on the nutritional status of young women (age 25.2 ± 4.2 year; BMI 21.9 ± 2.2 kg/m2). The coefficients of variability within-subject (CVI) and between-subject (CVG) for serum vitamins B(6), B(12)and folate, and erythrocyte folate were calculated. Food frequency questionnaires provided dietary data. CVI and CVG were in the range 16.1%-25.7% and 31.7%-62.2%, respectively. Oral contraceptive pill (OCP) use was associated (P = 0.042) with lower serum vitamin B12 concentrations. Initial values were 172 ± 16 pmol/L and 318 ± 51 pmol/L for OCP and non-OCP users, respectively; with differences maintained at four time points over 12 weeks. BMI, age, physical activity, alcohol intake and haematological variables did not affect serum or erythrocyte vitamin concentrations. Vitamin B12 intakes were derived from traditional and unexpected sources including commercial energy drinks. Young women using OCP had significantly lower serum vitamin B12 concentrations. This should be considered in clinical decision making and requires further investigation.

  2. Oral steroid contraception.

    PubMed

    Sech, Laura A; Mishell, Daniel R

    2015-11-01

    Oral steroid contraception is a popular method of family planning worldwide. Over the past several decades, this method of contraception has changed significantly by decreasing the estrogen dose, changing the progestin component, and reducing the hormone free interval. Despite the popularity of oral steroid contraception, there has been much criticism regarding the associated risks of venous thromboembolism and stroke. Despite these established, yet uncommon risks, oral steroid contraception has many important health benefits. This review highlights the available formulations of oral contraceptives along with their evidence-based associated risks and benefits. Highlights regarding future directions for development of novel oral contraceptives are also addressed.

  3. Providing Contraception to Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Raidoo, Shandhini; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents have high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique reproductive health challenges. Providing confidential contraceptive services to adolescents is important in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy. Long-acting contraception such as the intrauterine device and contraceptive implant are recommended as first-line contraceptives for adolescents because they are highly effective with few side effects. The use of barrier methods to prevent sexually transmitted infections should be encouraged. Adolescents have limited knowledge of reproductive health and contraceptive options, and their sources of information are often unreliable. Access to contraception is available through a variety of resources that continue to expand.

  4. [Evolution of the Hungarian oral contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Seregély, G

    1992-11-01

    Author gives a review of the development of Hungarian oral contraceptives from the beginning to the present status. He describes the three main historical phases that means the high-dose combined pills, the low-dose compositions and the most modern two- and three-phasic preparations. Besides, he mentions the monohormonal mini-pills and the so-called postcoital pill, too. He refers to the fact that the Hungarian pharmaceutical research followed truly the international development in oral contraception, too.

  5. Plan A: postabortion contraception.

    PubMed

    Micks, Elizabeth; Prager, Sarah

    2014-12-01

    More than 1 million abortions are performed annually in the United States. Women presenting for abortion care are often motivated by the pregnancy to use effective contraception; they are also at high risk for repeat unintended pregnancy. For these reasons, abortion represents an optimal time to initiate effective contraception. There is strong evidence that most methods of contraception, including intrauterine devices and the contraceptive implant, should be initiated at the time of the abortion procedure. Most women ovulate within the first month after an abortion. If provision of contraception is delayed, women are less likely to use effective contraception and more likely to have a repeat unintended pregnancy. Although some methods of permanent contraception can be safely performed at the time of abortion, federal and state laws often restrict these procedures being performed concurrently. Contraceptive counseling and provision at the time of abortion are important strategies to decrease rates of unintended pregnancy.

  6. Contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ott, Mary A; Sucato, Gina S

    2014-10-01

    A working knowledge of contraception will assist the pediatrician in both sexual health promotion as well as treatment of common adolescent gynecologic problems. Best practices in adolescent anticipatory guidance and screening include a sexual health history, screening for pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, counseling, and if indicated, providing access to contraceptives. Pediatricians' long-term relationships with adolescents and families allow them to help promote healthy sexual decision-making, including abstinence and contraceptive use. Additionally, medical indications for contraception, such as acne, dysmenorrhea, and heavy menstrual bleeding, are frequently uncovered during adolescent visits. This technical report provides an evidence base for the accompanying policy statement and addresses key aspects of adolescent contraceptive use, including the following: (1) sexual history taking, confidentiality, and counseling; (2) adolescent data on the use and side effects of newer contraceptive methods; (3) new data on older contraceptive methods; and (4) evidence supporting the use of contraceptives in adolescent patients with complex medical conditions.

  7. Contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    Contraception is a pillar in reducing adolescent pregnancy rates. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that pediatricians develop a working knowledge of contraception to help adolescents reduce risks of and negative health consequences related to unintended pregnancy. Over the past 10 years, a number of new contraceptive methods have become available to adolescents, newer guidance has been issued on existing contraceptive methods, and the evidence base for contraception for special populations (adolescents who have disabilities, are obese, are recipients of solid organ transplants, or are HIV infected) has expanded. The Academy has addressed contraception since 1980, and this policy statement updates the 2007 statement on contraception and adolescents. It provides the pediatrician with a description and rationale for best practices in counseling and prescribing contraception for adolescents. It is supported by an accompanying technical report.

  8. Contraceptive revolution.

    PubMed

    Segal, S J

    1994-06-01

    Global population will increase by almost 1 billion people in the 1990s, the largest 10-year increase ever recorded. In 1994 alone, population will surpass 5.7 billion. The prospect of double-digit billions of people is worrisome, especially since these numbers may affect global warming, supplies of fresh water, destruction of rain forests, industrial pollution, and sustainable development. Yet, many indicators of quality of life show that people enjoy a better quality of life today than they did 100 years ago. Between India's independence and now, life expectancy increased by 20 years, infant mortality decreased 2-fold, literacy increased, and the food supply stabilized. Even though India's population has almost tripled since 1947, its economy increased rapidly and is 1 of the world's top 10 economies. University enrollment stands at 4.5 million. Agricultural production has exceeded demand. India represents the potential for human achievement through technological advancement and social organization. If the world's first national family planning program had been more successful when it began in 1952 in an India of 350 million people, India's population would be around 500 million instead of the expected 1 billion in 2000. All countries need to achieve a sustainable balance between human numbers and needs and natural resources. Family planning is an essential, cost-effective part of any development strategy. Family planning use has reduced fertility from 6 to 3.6 in developing countries. In 1965, only 8% used contraception, while more than 50% use it now. The most remarkable family planning/fertility reduction successes are Bangladesh, Brazil, Colombia, Indonesia, Mexico, and Thailand. Sufficient investment in family planning is needed if significant declines in fertility are to occur. More than 90% of the developing world's people are in countries with official family planning programs. Cost-effective assistance by donors and developing countries implementing

  9. Searching for Ideal Contraceptives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Djerassi, Carl

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the problem of adolescent pregnancy and focuses on improving contraception as a practical solution. Describes the advantages and disadvantages of existing methods (the condom, the pill, and the contraceptive sponge). Predicts that the development of a fundamentally new contraceptive, such as a monthly menses-inducer pill, will not occur…

  10. Contraception and Breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Pieh Holder, Kelly Lynne

    2015-12-01

    Postpartum contraception is important to lengthening birth intervals and improving the health of women and children. For breastfeeding women the choice and timing of contraception may influence breastfeeding and infant growth patterns. Nonhormonal methods of contraception are the preferred choice for breastfeeding women. Progestin-only methods comprise a viable next option. Combined hormonal methods of contraception containing estrogen and progestin may be considered as a third option for birth control in breastfeeding women. The objective of this chapter is to review the current literature and recommendations for the use of hormonal and nonhormonal methods of contraception while breastfeeding.

  11. Permanent Contraception for Women.

    PubMed

    Patil, Eva; Jensen, Jeffrey T

    2016-05-01

    Permanent contraception is a highly desired and commonly used contraceptive option for women around the world who desire never to become pregnant. Current methods of female permanent contraception require surgery. Postpartum tubal ligation and interval surgical tubal ligation are safe and effective, do not interfere with menstrual cycles, and require no ongoing cost or medical checkups. Hysteroscopic tubal occlusion offers a less invasive surgical approach, but requires an imaging study for verification of correct placement. However, not all women have access to a surgeon trained to provide permanent contraception, or they may face other prohibitive logistic or financial burdens. The development of novel permanent contraception methods that are immediately effective and/or nonsurgical could help improve access to and acceptability of permanent contraception. The expansion of permanent contraception options could help women achieve their family planning goals and reduce unintended pregnancies.

  12. Contraception: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Sitruk-Ware, Regine

    2006-03-01

    Although it is estimated that the population growth rate will decline to a replacement level by 2050, it is also now predicted that the total world population will reach 8.9 billion in that year -- far higher than the 2004 estimate of 6.4 billion. More than 26 billion new couples will need contraceptives in the next half century. Although a steady increase in contraceptive use has been observed in both developed and developing countries, the contraceptive needs of a high percentage of couples have not yet been met and the number of unplanned pregnancies continues to increase. The actual use of contraception differs from region to region. Although no new method has been registered for many years, several new products have been marketed during the last 5. Among these are new implants, medicated intrauterine systems, contraceptive vaginal rings, transdermal patches and several new combined oral contraceptive formulations. New contraceptive methods have been developed to meet the objectives of expanding contraceptive choices for both women and men and answering an unmet need for contraceptives with a long-term action that meet the expectations of consumers. Simplicity, reversibility and effectiveness are the desired features of a male contraceptive, but no new male contraceptive method is yet available. New areas of basic research include studies on genes, proteins and enzymes involved in the reproductive system. The new methods will be targeted to specific interactions within the reproductive system at the level of ovaries and testes, as well as between spermatozoa and ova. This futuristic approach still keeps in mind the need for better access to existing contraceptive methods, as well as the discovery of new contraceptives that are simple to use, safe, reversible and inexpensive. In the future, contraceptives may be combined with other medicinal agents to provide dual protection against both pregnancy and other preventable conditions, such as sexually transmitted

  13. Female Adolescent Contraceptive Decision Making and Risk Taking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Sharon A.; Green, Vicki

    1993-01-01

    Findings from 60 sexually active, unmarried females, ages 14 through 18, revealed that cognitive capacity and cognitive egocentrism variables as well as age, grade, and ethnic status significantly predicted 6 of 7 decision-making variables in contraceptive use model. One cognitive capacity variable and one sexual contraceptive behavior variable…

  14. Misperceptions of weight status among adolescents: sociodemographic and behavioral correlates

    PubMed Central

    Bodde, Amy E; Beebe, Timothy J; Chen, Laura P; Jenkins, Sarah; Perez-Vergara, Kelly; Finney Rutten, Lila J; Ziegenfuss, Jeanette Y

    2014-01-01

    Objective Accurate perceptions of weight status are important motivational triggers for weight loss among overweight or obese individuals, yet weight misperception is prevalent. To identify and characterize individuals holding misperceptions around their weight status, it may be informative for clinicians to assess self-reported body mass index (BMI) classification (ie, underweight, normal, overweight, obese) in addition to clinical weight measurement. Methods Self-reported weight classification data from the 2007 Current Visit Information – Child and Adolescent Survey collected at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, were compared with measured clinical height and weight for 2,993 adolescents. Results While, overall, 74.2% of adolescents accurately reported their weight status, females, younger adolescents, and proxy (vs self) reporters were more accurate. Controlling for demographic and behavioral characteristics, the higher an individual’s BMI percentile, the less likely there was agreement between self-report and measured BMI percentile. Those with high BMI who misperceive their weight status were less likely than accurate perceivers to attempt weight loss. Conclusion Adolescents’ and proxies’ misperception of weight status increases with BMI percentile. Obtaining an adolescent’s self-perceived weight status in addition to measured height and weight offers clinicians valuable baseline information to discuss motivation for weight loss. PMID:25525400

  15. Women's empowerment and regional variation of contraceptive norms in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Deb, Suman; Kabir, Ahmad; Kawsar, L A

    2010-01-01

    Using data derived from the 2007 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS), this study investigates the regional variation of contraceptive norms according to the empowerment status of women in Bangladesh. The result suggests that contraceptive norms vary from region to region. Logistic regression analysis suggests that there exists a positive relationship between women's empowerment and use of contraceptive methods in all regions except Barisal and Chittagong. The result also indicates that women's empowerment has a significant positive effect on contraceptive norms in the Dhaka, Khulna, and Rajshahi regions.

  16. Neural Correlates of Socioeconomic Status in the Developing Human Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Kimberly G.; Houston, Suzanne M.; Kan, Eric; Sowell, Elizabeth R.

    2012-01-01

    Socioeconomic disparities in childhood are associated with remarkable differences in cognitive and socio-emotional development during a time when dramatic changes are occurring in the brain. Yet, the neurobiological pathways through which socioeconomic status (SES) shapes development remain poorly understood. Behavioral evidence suggests that…

  17. Neurocognitive Correlates of Socioeconomic Status in Kindergarten Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Kimberly G.; Norman, M. Frank; Farah, Martha J.

    2005-01-01

    Socioeconomic status (SES) is strongly associated with cognitive ability and achievement during childhood and beyond. Little is known about the developmental relationships between SES and specific brain systems or their associated cognitive functions. In this study we assessed neurocognitive functioning of kindergarteners from different…

  18. Combined oral contraceptives: health benefits beyond contraception.

    PubMed

    Caserta, D; Ralli, E; Matteucci, E; Bordi, G; Mallozzi, M; Moscarini, M

    2014-09-01

    It has been recognized for over 50 years that combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are also capable of offering health benefits beyond contraception through the treatment and prevention of several gynaecological and medical disorders. During the last years a constant attention was given to the adverse effects of COCs, whereas their non-contraceptive benefits were underestimated. To date, most women are still unaware of the therapeutic uses of hormonal contraceptives, while on the contrary there is an extensive and constantly increasing of these non-contraceptive health benefits. This review summarizes the conditions of special interest for physicians, including dysmenorrhoea, menorrhagia, hyperandrogenism (acne, hirsutism, polycystic ovary syndrome), functional ovarian cysts, endometriosis, premenstrual syndrome, myomas, pelvic inflammatory disease, bone mineral density, benign breast disease and endometrial/ovarian and colorectal cancer. The benefits of COCs in rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, menstrual migraine and in perimenopause have also been treated for more comprehensive information. Using COCs specifically for non-contraceptive indications is still outside the product licence in the majority of cases. We strongly believe that these aspects are not of minor relevance and they deserve a special consideration by health providers and by the mass media, which have the main responsibility in the diffusion of scientific information. Thus, counseling and education are necessary to help women make well-informed health-care decisions and it is also crucial to increase awareness among general practitioners and gynaecologists.

  19. Long-term contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Brown, Audrey

    2010-10-01

    To avoid unintended pregnancy, women in the UK need to consistently use reliable contraception for over 30 years. The long-acting reversible contraceptive methods compromise the progestogen-only implant, the progestogen-only injectable contraceptive, the copper-bearing intra-uterine device and the levonorgestrel-releasing intra-uterine system. These methods of contraception are highly reliable in pregnancy prevention, and are amongst the medically safest methods for users. Despite this, these long-acting methods are used by less than 10% of the UK population. National guidance has advised that increasing uptake of these long-acting methods will reduce the unplanned pregnancy rate. In addition, these methods are more cost effective than the oral contraceptive even at 1 year of use. Obstetricians and gynaecologists frequently come into contact with women requiring contraceptive advice, and should have a sound knowledge of the long-acting methods.

  20. Oral Contraceptive Pill and PCOS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health PCOS: The Oral Contraceptive Pill Posted under Health Guides . ... of oral contraceptive pills for young women with PCOS? Regular and Lighter Periods: Oral contraceptive pills can ...

  1. [Contraception and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Amate, P; Luton, D; Davitian, C

    2013-06-01

    The mean age of first sexual intercourse is still around 17 in France, but a lot of teenagers are concerned by contraception before, with approximately 25% of sexually active 15-year-old girls. The contraceptive method must take into consideration some typical features of this population, as sporadic and non-planned sexual activity, with several sexual partners in a short period of time. In 2004, the "Haute Autorité de santé" has recommended, as first-line method, combined oral contraceptive (COC) pills, in association with male condoms. Copper-containing intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCD) and etonogestrel-containing subcutaneous implant have been suggested but not recommended. However, oral contraceptive pill, as a user-based method, carries an important typical-use failure rate, because remembering taking a daily pill, and dealing with stop periods, may be challenging. Some easier-to-use method should be kept in mind, as 28-day COC packs, transdermal contraceptive patches, and vaginal contraceptive rings. Moreover, American studies have shown that long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC), i.e. IUCD and implant, have many advantages for teenagers: very effective, safe, invisible. They seem well-fitted for this population, with high satisfaction and continuation rates, as long as side effects are well explained. Thus, LARC methods should be proposed more widely to teenagers. Anyway, before prescribing a contraceptive method, it is important to determine the specific situation of every teenager, to let them choose the method that they consider as appropriate in their own case, and to think about the availability of the chosen method. It is necessary to explain how to handle mistakes or misses with user-based contraceptive methods, and emergency contraception can be anticipated and prescribed in advanced provision. The use of male condoms should be encouraged for adolescents, with another effective contraceptive method, in order to reduce the high risk

  2. Oral contraception and sexuality.

    PubMed

    Dennerstein, L; Burrows, G

    1976-05-22

    A search of the literature has been carried out to determined how oral contraceptives affect sexuality in women. Some studies featured a high incidence of loss of libido. This could perhaps be attributed to preparations containing progestational compounds. However, no adequate double-blind trial has confirmed this observation. Some psychological and pharmacological aspects of contraceptions are discussed. More research is needed to ascertain why women often lose their sexual interest when taking oral contraceptives.

  3. [Weariness of contraception].

    PubMed

    Borg, V

    1979-07-01

    Mechanical methods of contraception tend nowadays to be considered as unsafe and the "modern" contraceptives are more popular. The advantage of the intrauterine device is that once it has been placed, one can forget about it. However it is necessary for the woman to undergo checkups and have the device replaced regularly. IUD's are not always very well tolerated psychologically. Women are influenced by information, the fear of the risks, the opinion of their friends and families and the media, and they end up getting tired of this method of contraception. Oral contraceptives are 100% safe but only provided one does not forget to take it: it imposes a daily routine which disturbs many women after a certain time. They then tend to relate all their problems to the pill. Women are aware of the risks contained in oral contraceptives, and they refuse to run these risks by themselves. Whichever method of contraception one chooses, it liberates the woman from the fear of unwanted pregnancy. A good contraception should do this, plus separate the idea of procreation from the sexual intercourse. This seems to be going well for a few years, but after a while a weariness appears. The answer may be to find a contraception suitable to both partners, so that they could make their own decision.

  4. Oral contraceptives in migraine.

    PubMed

    Allais, Gianni; Gabellari, Ilaria Castagnoli; De Lorenzo, Cristina; Mana, Ornella; Benedetto, Chiara

    2009-03-01

    Combined oral contraceptives are a safe and highly effective method of birth control, but they can also raise problems of clinical tolerability and/or safety in migraine patients. It is now commonly accepted that, in migraine with aura, the use of combined oral contraceptives is always contraindicated, and that their intake must also be suspended by patients suffering from migraine without aura if aura symptoms appear. The newest combined oral contraceptive formulations are generally well tolerated in migraine without aura, and the majority of migraine without aura sufferers do not show any problems with their use; nevertheless, the last International Classification of Headache Disorders identifies at least two entities evidently related to the use of combined oral contraceptives: exogenous hormone-induced headache and estrogen-withdrawal headache. As regards the safety, even if both migraine and combined oral contraceptive intake are associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke, migraine without aura per se is not a contraindication for combined oral contraceptive use. Other risk factors (tobacco use, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity and diabetes) must be carefully considered when prescribing combined oral contraceptives in migraine without aura patients, in particular in women aged over 35 years. Furthermore, the exclusion of a hereditary thrombophilia and of alterations of coagulative parameters should precede any decision of combined oral contraceptive prescription in migraine patients.

  5. [Contraception and obesity].

    PubMed

    Lobert, M; Pigeyre, M; Gronier, H; Catteau-Jonard, S; Robin, G

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing massively over several decades in industrialized countries. Obese women are sexually active but they use fewer contraceptive methods and are at high risk of unintended pregnancy. In addition, obesity is an important risk factor for venous thromboembolism events and arterial thrombosis (myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke). All of these data are to be considered in choosing a contraceptive method for obese women. Except depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injection, the progestin-only contraceptives (progestin only pills and etonogestrel subdermal implant) and the intra-uterine devices are the preferred contraceptive methods in obese women. The combined estrogen-progestin contraceptives (pill, patch and vaginal ring) may be proposed in very strict conditions (no other associated vascular risk factor). Obesity does not increase the risk of failure of most contraceptive methods. Bariatric surgery is a complex situation. It requires to program a possible pregnancy and contraception is needed for several months. Some bariatric surgical techniques such as by-pass can induce gastrointestinal malabsorption. In this situation, all oral contraceptives are not recommended because of a higher risk of failure.

  6. Nonprescription vaginal contraception.

    PubMed

    Edelman, D A

    1980-01-01

    Data on the efficacy of vaginal contraceptive suppositories and foams available in the United States are reviewed, and data on a new vaginal contraceptive, the Collatex sponge, is presented. The efficacy of this device appears to be similar to that of the diaphragm.

  7. Migraine and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Mousa, G Y

    1982-10-01

    Migraine is a common complaint in optometric practice. Three cases of migrainous patients taking oral contraceptives are presented in this report. The role of oral contraceptives in triggering a migraine attack and possibly elevating the risk of a stroke in a patient with migraine is discussed. The counseling an optometrist can provide in such cases in discussed.

  8. Vaginal mechanical contraceptive devices.

    PubMed

    Smith, M; Barwin, B N

    1983-10-01

    The alleged adverse effects of oral contraceptives and intrauterine devices have led to increased consumer and physician demand for vaginal contraceptive devices. The efficacy and the advantages and disadvantages of vaginal sponges, cervical caps and diaphragms are discussed and compared in this article.

  9. Contraception in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Riphagen, F E; von Schoultz, B

    1989-06-01

    In 1987, a survey of contraceptive use, knowledge and attitudes was conducted in Sweden by the International Health Foundation (IHF) as part of a multi-country study that has so far involved six other countries in Europe. The women involved, who were aged 15-44, completed a standard questionnaire. The overall percentage use of contraceptive methods, especially the reliable ones, was found to be high (95%). Oral contraception was the most frequently used method, followed by barrier methods and the intrauterine device (IUD). Contraceptive methods were chosen or abandoned mainly because of health reasons and better reliability. Knowledge of fertility proved to be generally good. Medical methods such as oral contraceptives and IUDs were associated with health hazards. In the case of the pill, fears of cardiovascular risks, thrombosis and cancer were widespread, while infection risk and menorrhagia were the most frequently quoted perceived disadvantages of the IUD. Indeed, these two methods suffer from a very negative image among Swedish users.

  10. Behavioral correlates of maternal antibody status among children with autism.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Daniel; Duncanson, Paul; Boyce, Robert; Hansen, Robin; Ashwood, Paul; Pessah, Isaac N; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Van de Water, Judy

    2012-07-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) affect approximately 1 in 110 children in the United States. This report profiles fetal-brain reactive autoantibodies of a large cohort of mothers of children with autism and controls, yielding significant associations between the presence of IgG reactivity to fetal brain proteins at 37 and 73 kDa and a childhood diagnosis of full autism (p = 0.0005), which also correlated with lower expressive language scores (p = 0.005). Additionally, we report on reactivity to proteins at 39 and 73 kDa, which correlated with the broader diagnosis of ASD (p = 0.0007) and increased irritability on the Aberrant Behavioral Checklist (p = 0.05). This study provides evidence of multiple patterns of reactivity to fetal brain proteins by maternal antibodies associated with ASD and specific childhood behavioral outcomes.

  11. [Community marketing of contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Urrutia, J M

    1987-09-01

    The 5-year-old community contraceptive distribution program developed by PROFAMILIA, Colombia's private family planning organization, has given excellent results, but several cost-effectiveness comparisons with social marketing programs have suggested that commercial distribution programs are superior. The community contraceptive distribution program has a high content of information and education activities, which produced significant increases in knowledge and use of contraception in the communities covered. It has been a fundamental support for the social marketing program, creating much of the demand for contraceptive products that the social marketing program has filled. The social marketing program has given good results in terms of volume of sales and in cost-effectiveness since 1976, prompting calls for replacement of the community contraceptive distribution program by the social marketing program in those sectors where knowledge and use of contraception have achieved acceptable levels. An experiment in the Department of Santander in 1984 and 1985 gave very favorable results, suggesting that community contraceptive distribution programs should be replaced by social marketing programs in all more developed markets. But economic problems in 1985 and the decision of manufacturers to decrease the profit margin for PROFAMILIA jeopardized the social marketing program. The community distribution program covered about 20% of the market. Reduced profits in the social marketing program threatened its continued expansion, at the same time that potential demand was growing because of increases in the fertile aged population and increased use of contraception. To meet the need, PROFAMILIA combined the community contraceptive distribution and social marketing programs into a new entity to be called community marketing. The strategy of the community marketing program will be to maintain PROFAMILIA's participation in the market and aid the growth of demand for

  12. Neurocognitive correlates of socioeconomic status in kindergarten children.

    PubMed

    Noble, Kimberly G; Norman, M Frank; Farah, Martha J

    2005-01-01

    Socioeconomic status (SES) is strongly associated with cognitive ability and achievement during childhood and beyond. Little is known about the developmental relationships between SES and specific brain systems or their associated cognitive functions. In this study we assessed neurocognitive functioning of kindergarteners from different socioeconomic backgrounds, using tasks drawn from the cognitive neuroscience literature in order to determine how childhood SES predicts the normal variance in performance across different neurocognitive systems. Five neurocognitive systems were examined: the occipitotemporal/visual cognition system, the parietal/spatial cognition system, the medial temporal/memory system, the left perisylvian/language system, and the prefrontal/executive system. SES was disproportionately associated with the last two, with low SES children performing worse than middle SES children on most measures of these systems. Relations among language, executive function, SES and specific aspects of early childhood experience were explored, revealing intercorrelations and a seemingly predominant role of individual differences in language ability involved in SES associations with executive function.

  13. The 1998 Canadian Contraception Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, William A.; Boroditsky, Richard; Bridges, Martha L.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the 1998 Canadian Contraception Study, a mailed survey which asked women about contraceptive practices past, present, and future (including use of oral contraceptives, condoms, and sterilization); familiarity with and opinion about different contraception methods; and general sexual and reproductive health. The paper also examines…

  14. Brain size is correlated with endangerment status in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Abelson, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    Increases in relative encephalization (RE), brain size after controlling for body size, comes at a great metabolic cost and is correlated with a host of cognitive traits, from the ability to count objects to higher rates of innovation. Despite many studies examining the implications and trade-offs accompanying increased RE, the relationship between mammalian extinction risk and RE is unknown. I examine whether mammals with larger levels of RE are more or less likely to be at risk of endangerment than less-encephalized species. I find that extant species with large levels of encephalization are at greater risk of endangerment, with this effect being strongest in species with small body sizes. These results suggest that RE could be a valuable asset in estimating extinction vulnerability. Additionally, these findings suggest that the cost–benefit trade-off of RE is different in large-bodied species when compared with small-bodied species. PMID:26888034

  15. Brain size is correlated with endangerment status in mammals.

    PubMed

    Abelson, Eric S

    2016-02-24

    Increases in relative encephalization (RE), brain size after controlling for body size, comes at a great metabolic cost and is correlated with a host of cognitive traits, from the ability to count objects to higher rates of innovation. Despite many studies examining the implications and trade-offs accompanying increased RE, the relationship between mammalian extinction risk and RE is unknown. I examine whether mammals with larger levels of RE are more or less likely to be at risk of endangerment than less-encephalized species. I find that extant species with large levels of encephalization are at greater risk of endangerment, with this effect being strongest in species with small body sizes. These results suggest that RE could be a valuable asset in estimating extinction vulnerability. Additionally, these findings suggest that the cost-benefit trade-off of RE is different in large-bodied species when compared with small-bodied species.

  16. Contraception and headache.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, E Anne

    2013-02-01

    Most women have used at least 1 method of contraception during their reproductive years, with the majority favoring combined oral contraceptives. Women are often concerned about the safety of their method of choice and also ask about likely effects on their pre-existing headache or migraine and restrictions on using their headache medication. While there should be no restriction to the use of combined hormonal contraceptives by women with migraine without aura, the balance of risks vs benefits for women with aura are debatable. Migraine with aura, but not migraine without aura, is associated with a twofold increased risk of ischemic stroke, although the absolute risk is very low in healthy, nonsmoking women. Although ethinylestradiol has been associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke, the risk is dose-dependent. Low-dose pills currently used are considerably safer than pills containing higher doses of ethinylestradiol but they are not risk-free. This review examines the evidence available regarding the effect that different methods of contraception have on headache and migraine and identifies strategies available to minimize risk and to manage specific triggers such as estrogen "withdrawal" headache and migraine associated with combined hormonal contraceptives. The independent risks of ischemic stroke associated with migraine and with hormonal contraceptives are reviewed, and guidelines for use of contraception by women with migraine are discussed in light of the current evidence.

  17. Evidence based contraceptive choices.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alison; Glasier, Anna

    2006-10-01

    People who attend for contraceptive advice have usually formulated an idea of the type of contraceptive that will suit them best. They may wish to use a method that is long, short or medium acting. These are defined as follows: Long-acting method requires renewal no more frequently than every 3 months (e.g. injectable or intrauterine). Short-acting method used daily or with every act of intercourse (e.g. pills, condoms) Medium-acting method requires renewal weekly or monthly (e.g. ring, patch). For men the choice is limited to condoms or vasectomy. Some women do not wish to use hormonal preparations or have an intrauterine device (IUD) or implant inserted. There may also be cultural influences making certain methods of contraception unacceptable. Each of these factors influences the final decision of which method of contraception is decided upon. In addition to taking a full medical and sexual history to identify any risks to the individual's health, which might be increased by a particular contraceptive, time must be spent discussing the options available. It is important to ensure that there is a full understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of each method. The most successful contraceptive method is likely to be the one that the woman (or man) chooses, rather than the one the clinician chooses for them. Access for women to contraception can be improved by having convenient clinic times and service developments such as nurse prescribing and Patient Group Directions.

  18. Male hormonal contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Amory, J K

    2006-06-01

    Efforts are underway to develop additional forms of contraception for men. The most promising approach to male contraceptive development involves the administration of exogenous testosterone (T). When administered to a man, T functions as a contraceptive by suppressing the secretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone from the pituitary, thereby depriving the testes of the signals required for spermatogenesis. After 2-3 months of treatment, low levels of these gonadotropins lead to markedly decreased sperm counts and effective contraception in a majority of men. Hormonal contraception with exogenous T has proven to be free from serious adverse effects and is well tolerated by men. In addition, sperm counts uniformly normalize when the exogenous T is discontinued. Thus, male hormonal is safe, effective and reversible; however, spermatogenesis is not suppressed to zero in all men, meaning that some diminished potential for fertility persists. Because of this recent studies have combined T with progestogens and/or gonadotropin-releasing antagonists to further suppress pituitary gonadotropins and optimize contraceptive efficacy. Current combinations of T and progestogens completely suppress spermatogenesis without severe side effects in 80-90% of men, with significant suppression in the remainder of individuals. Recent trials with newer, long-acting forms of injectable T, which can be administered every 8 weeks, combined with progestogens, administered either orally or by long-acting implant, have yielded promising results and may soon result in the marketing of a safe, reversible and effective hormonal contraceptive for men.

  19. Postpartum contraceptive methods.

    PubMed

    1990-08-01

    Contraceptive methods suitable for postpartum women include sterilization, intrauterine devices (IUDs), barrier methods, oral contraceptives, implants, injectables, breastfeeding, and natural family planning. Couples considering either male or female sterilization should receive counseling since this method is irreversible; however, it is very effective. IUDs are effective, reversible, and can be inserted as early as 10 minutes following placental delivery. Barrier methods are not as effective and include condoms, spermicides, diaphragm, and cervical caps. While condoms and spermicides can be employed whenever sexual activity resumes, diaphragms and cervical caps can be used 4-6 weeks postpartum. The progestin-only and the combined oral contraceptives are both very effective. There is disagreement among professionals regarding when nursing mothers should start taking oral contraceptives and implant and injectable contraceptives. Implants and injectable contraceptives have long acting effects. Breastfeeding is a natural form of contraception which can last up to 6 months; it also supplies nutritional and immunological benefits. Natural family planning requires providing women with information on fertility awareness.

  20. Post-coital contraception.

    PubMed

    Ashton, J R; Chambers, J; Hall, D J

    1984-03-01

    137,000 British women chose to have an abortion in 1981 and about 25% were teenagers. A recent estimate noted that 10% of unintended pregnancies could have been avoided if postcoital contraception had been obtainable. The availability of postcoital contraception is limited and few doctors have much knowledge of or interest in this contraceptive method. 2 questions that arise are why have doctors been so slow to adopt this effective method of birth control and what are the chances of its availability in the National Health Service (NHS) improving. Postcoital contraception is a comparatively new and until recently unpublicized fertility control method, and there was little knowledge of it among the general population or the medical profession. Doctors' ignorance and reluctance to provide the method may have been due in part to the fact that the pharmaceutical firms have been hesitant to recommend oral contraceptive (OC) pills for this use. There is no specially packaged product, and it is necessary for a patient to be given 4 pills from a 21-pill pack. This has meant that the method has not been advertized, as most new methods would be, in the medical magazines. Hopefully, this lack of knowledge has been rectified by the Family Planning Association. As part of its campaign to launch the method, it has sent details to all general practitioners. Attitudes to postcoital contraception are important, and clearly there are strong parallels with the abortion issues and legal and moral undercurrents as well. Many doctors might have been put off providing postcoital contraception by the experience of the 2 clinics (BPAS in Sheffield and the Caithorpe Nursing Home in Birmingham) which had been reported by Life, an antiabortion pressure group, to the Director of Public Prosecutions under the Offences Against the Persons Act 1863. But on May 10, 1983 the Attorney General announced that the provisionof postcoital contraception is not a criminal offense. This statement may not be

  1. Family and Community Influences on Health and Socioeconomic Status: Sibling Correlations Over the Life Course.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Bhashkar

    2011-09-06

    This paper presents new estimates of sibling correlations in health and socioeconomic outcomes over the life course in the U.S. Sibling correlations provide an omnibus measure of the importance of all family and community influences. I find that sibling correlations in a range of health and socioeconomic outcomes start quite high at birth and remain high over the life course. The sibling correlation in birth weight is estimated to be 0.5. Sibling correlations in test scores during childhood are as high as 0.6. Sibling correlations in adult men's wages are also around 0.5. Decompositions provide suggestive evidence on which pathways may account for the gradients in health and SES by family background. For example, sibling correlations in cognitive skills and non-cognitive skills during childhood are lower controlling for family income. Similarly, parent education levels can account for a sizable portion of the correlation in adult health status among brothers.

  2. Family and Community Influences on Health and Socioeconomic Status: Sibling Correlations Over the Life Course*

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, Bhashkar

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents new estimates of sibling correlations in health and socioeconomic outcomes over the life course in the U.S. Sibling correlations provide an omnibus measure of the importance of all family and community influences. I find that sibling correlations in a range of health and socioeconomic outcomes start quite high at birth and remain high over the life course. The sibling correlation in birth weight is estimated to be 0.5. Sibling correlations in test scores during childhood are as high as 0.6. Sibling correlations in adult men’s wages are also around 0.5. Decompositions provide suggestive evidence on which pathways may account for the gradients in health and SES by family background. For example, sibling correlations in cognitive skills and non-cognitive skills during childhood are lower controlling for family income. Similarly, parent education levels can account for a sizable portion of the correlation in adult health status among brothers. PMID:23412989

  3. Barriers to modern contraceptive use in rural Peru.

    PubMed

    Tucker, G M

    1986-01-01

    This paper examines Quechua-speaking Indians' choice of contraceptive methods and discusses barriers to the use of modern contraceptives. A study conducted in a Peruvian highland community shows that contraceptive choice is strongly related to a couple's life experiences, their contact with urban centers, their economic status, and their emphasis on cultural values. Among contraceptive users, husbands are concerned with family size and encourage their wives to seek information about the use of modern contraceptives. A discrepancy in attitudes exists between spouses: the men's positive attitude toward modern contraception contrasts with the women's traditional desire for a large family. In this study population, modern contraception is a novelty that has reached only a few families. The majority of the couples practice natural and traditional family planning methods, which are not reliable. Villagers do not use modern contraceptives as a result of cultural barriers created by family planning services that do not take into account the lifestyle of these people, insufficient knowledge of human physiology, comments from dissatisfied users, and women's reliance on their reproductive role for self-esteem.

  4. Contraception and Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can contraception reduce the risk of getting a sexually transmitted disease (STD)? ​​​​​ ​​​ Related A-Z Topics Endometriosis HIV/AIDS Infertility and Fertility All related topics NICHD News and ...

  5. Pipeline for contraceptive development.

    PubMed

    Blithe, Diana L

    2016-11-01

    The high rates of unplanned pregnancy reflect an unmet need for effective contraceptive methods for women, especially for individuals with health risks such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and other conditions that may contraindicate use of an estrogen-containing product. Improvements in safety, user convenience, acceptability, and availability of products remain important goals of the contraceptive development program. Another important goal is to minimize the impact of the products on the environment. Development of new methods for male contraception has the potential to address many of these issues of safety for women who have contraindications to effective contraceptive methods but want to protect against pregnancy. It would also address a huge unmet need for men who want to control their fertility. Products under development for men would not introduce ecotoxic hormones into the water system.

  6. Post abortion contraception.

    PubMed

    Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Kopp, Helena Kallner

    2015-11-01

    A safe induced abortion has no impact on future fertility. Ovulation may resume as early as 8 days after the abortion. There is no difference in return to fertility after medical or surgical abortion. Most women resume sexual activity soon after an abortion. Contraceptive counseling and provision should therefore be an integrated part of the abortion services to help women avoid another unintended pregnancy and risk, in many cases an unsafe, abortion. Long-acting reversible contraceptive methods that includes implants and intrauterine contraception have been shown to be the most effective contraceptive methods to help women prevent unintended pregnancy following an abortion. However, starting any method is better than starting no method at all. This Special Report will give a short guide to available methods and when they can be started after an induced abortion.

  7. [Breastfeeding and contraception].

    PubMed

    Treffers, P E

    1999-09-18

    In the Netherlands many women stop breastfeeding in the first few months postpartum. In 1997, only 16.9% of all 3-month-old babies received full breastfeeding. One of the causes may be insufficient support by the medical profession. A second factor is that often combined oral contraceptives are prescribed to breastfeeding women. As it has been shown that estrogens in these contraceptives inhibit lactation, this is probably one of the reasons why breastfeeding frequently fails in this country. WHO advises not to use estrogens during lactation. According to recent research the lactational amenorrhoea method of contraception (LAM) is highly effective during the first 4 months postpartum. In the 5th and 6th month the effectiveness is strongly dependent on the accuracy by which the conditions are met. The medical profession should pay more attention to the support of breastfeeding and contraception in relation to each other.

  8. History of oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Dhont, Marc

    2010-12-01

    On the 50th birthday of the pill, it is appropriate to recall the milestones which have led to its development and evolution during the last five decades. The main contraceptive effect of the pill being inhibition of ovulation, it may be called a small miracle that this drug was developed long before the complex regulation of ovulation and the menstrual cycle was elucidated. Another stumbling block on its way was the hostile climate with regard to contraception that prevailed at the time. Animal experiments on the effect of sex steroids on ovulation, and the synthesis of sex steroids and orally active analogues were the necessary preliminaries. We owe the development of oral contraceptives to a handful of persons: two determined feminists, Margaret Sanger and Katherine McCormick; a biologist, Gregory Pincus; and a gynaecologist, John Rock. Soon after the introduction of the first pills, some nasty and life-threatening side effects emerged, which were due to the high doses of sex steroids. This led to the development of new preparations with reduced oestrogen content, progestins with more specific action, and alternative administration routes. Almost every decade we have witnessed a breakthrough in oral contraception. Social and moral objections to birth control have gradually disappeared and, notwithstanding some pill scares, oral contraceptives are now one of the most used methods of contraception. Finally, all's well that ends well: recent reports have substantiated the multiple noncontraceptive health benefits paving the way for a bright future for this 50-year-old product.

  9. Male contraception: history and development.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Paul; Wald, Moshe

    2014-02-01

    Although the twentieth century has seen great strides in the development of female contraception, not a single new agent has been introduced as an approved method for common use for male contraception. Condoms (considered uncomfortable by some) and vasectomy (a permanent invasive procedure) are the only options provided to men, leaving an undue burden on women to bear contraceptive responsibility. Significant developments have, however, been made with regard to hormonal and nonhormonal contraception, and minor, reversible, procedural contraception. This article reviews the currently available, soon to be available, and theoretically possible methods of male contraception.

  10. Contraceptive needs of the adolescent.

    PubMed

    Steyn, Petrus S; Goldstuck, Norman D

    2014-08-01

    The provision of contraception to adolescents requires specific attention. Adolescents require contraceptive methods which are safe, effective and simple to use. While long-acting reversible contraceptive methods are preferable, they should have a choice and not be forced or mandated especially in situations where this may compromise safety. After counselling they should have the ability to choose any method of contraception. Under the appropriate circumstances, each method of contraception may have a place. This chapter will be devoted to evaluating the most current scientific rationale for the indication for use of each method of contraception in adolescents.

  11. Current contraceptive research and development.

    PubMed

    Reape, Kathleen Z

    2005-10-01

    The approval of various new contraceptive products in recent years has resulted in broadening the options available to women. Trends in contraceptive research for hormonal products include variations in dose and dosing regimens, introduction of novel compounds, evaluation of products for noncontraceptive indications, and development of nonoral delivery systems and male contraceptives. Nonhormonal areas of research include microbicidal products, dual protection methods, and contraceptive vaccines. For each of these categories, contraceptive products currently in development and the potential implications for adolescents are discussed. Ongoing contraceptive research and development activity is robust and should ensure the continued availability of various new products for adolescents.

  12. Long-acting reversible contraception.

    PubMed

    Peck, Susan A

    2013-10-01

    Although short-acting reversible hormonal contraceptives, such as oral contraceptives and the contraceptive patch and vaginal ring, remain the most commonly used contraceptive methods in the United States, they are also associated with the highest failure rates. Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) methods, such as intrauterine devices and contraceptive implants, offer high continuation rates and very low failure rates, and are safe for use in most women. The provision of LARC methods to adolescent, young adult and nulliparous women is a relatively new concept that offers an innovative option for these populations.

  13. Correlation between Food Schemes and Children Nutrient Status at the Toddler's Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratnaningsih, Tri; Lestari, Indah

    2016-01-01

    The nutrient in the meal is very important, especially for the children at the toddler's age. The aim of this research was to know the correlation between the food schemes with the children nutrient status at the toddler's age (1-3 years). The research design was cross sectional. The population for this research was all of the mothers and the…

  14. Parental Socio-Economic Status as Correlate of Child Labour in Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elegbeleye, O. S.; Olasupo, M. O.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between parental socio-economic status and child labour practices in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The study employed survey method to gather data from 200 parents which constituted the study population. Pearson Product Moment Correlation and t-test statistics were used for the data analyses. The outcome of the study…

  15. Correlates of AUDIT Risk Status for Male and Female College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMartini, Kelly S.; Carey, Kate B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The current study identified gender-specific correlates of hazardous drinker status as defined by the AUDIT. Participants: A total of 462 college student volunteers completed the study in 2006. The sample was predominantly Caucasian (75%) and female (55%). Methods: Participants completed a survey assessing demographics, alcohol use…

  16. Recasting image of contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Rimon Jg; Kiragu, K

    1993-03-01

    Even though contraceptives are linked to sex which, along with sensuality and peer acceptance, is used to market consumer goods, contraceptives are promoted in a hygienic, clinical way. Glamorous images which divert from adverse health effects are used to sell unhealthy goods, e.g., alcohol and cigarettes, but technical and intimidating promotion techniques centering on risks are used to promote family planning (FP) products and services which actually save the lives of mothers and children and improve their health. Until recently, only the medical system provided FP products and services so consumers identified them with illness and a help-seeking behavior. The image of contraceptives must be remolded to gain people's attention. To avoid instilling mistrust of a method in consumers, even those who believe in birth spacing, it is important for images to be positive and to reflect accurate information. In Indonesia, the Dualima condom has been linked to responsible fatherhood thereby creating a positive image and removing the negative image of a condom being linked to illicit sex. In the US, condom adds show the user in control, especially in reference to AIDS. Prior to promotion of any contraceptive, complete, clear communication and marketing plans are needed to identify and to focus on consumers' perceived needs. A survey in Egypt shows that the most important attributes of a contraceptive are ease of use, healthiness, and effectiveness and that Egyptians considered IUDs to best fit these attributes. Images of contraceptive users often determine whether potential users do choose to use contraceptives. For example, in Cameroon and the Philippines, female users are considered to be smart, rich, educated, confident and in control of their lives. In the Philippines, male users are perceived to be loving, caring, and considerate husbands. The mass medias can improve providers' public image as was the case in Turkey and Egypt.

  17. Serum hepcidin level correlates with hyperlipidemia status in patients following allograft renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Xue, D; He, X; Zhou, C

    2014-01-01

    Hepcidin is synthesized and secreted by liver cells and has been reported as one of the hormone molecules that regulates iron homeostasis. To determine whether serum level of hepcidin can be used as a biomarker for the evaluation of chronic inflammatory status, iron level and renal function in patients following allograft renal transplantation, serum levels of hepcidin, interleukin (IL)-6, ferritin, serum iron, and renal functions were measured. Sixty patients were included in the current study and were further separated into groups with or without hyperlipidemia. We found that allogeneic kidney transplant recipients with hyperlipidemia have significantly increased serum levels of hepcidin, IL-6, and ferritin. The increased serum hepcidin is positively correlated with serum IL-6 and ferritin as analyzed by single-factor correlation analysis. Multivariant correlation analysis in all specimens further demonstrated that serum hepcidin negatively correlated with glomerular filtration rate, and positively correlated with serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, serum ferritin, and IL-6. Our study demonstrated that serum level of hepcidin after allogeneic kidney transplantation not only reflects the status of chronic inflammation but can also indicate changes in renal function. Thus, hepcidin has the potential to be used as a promising marker for the detection and monitoring of the status of chronic inflammation, hyperlipidemia, and renal function in patients following allograft renal transplantation.

  18. Contraception in perimenopause.

    PubMed

    Taneepanichskul, Surasak; Dusitsin, Nikorn

    2003-06-01

    Women in their forties are still potentially fertile, and pregnancy in this age group is attended with increased maternal mortality, spontaneous abortion, fetal anomalies and perinatal mortality. Contraception for women in this age group has special risks and benefits; both should be balanced to choose between the different options available. Recent epidemiological and clinical pharmacology studies have indicated the safety of extending the use of combined oral contraceptives (COCs) beyond the age of 35 years and up to menopause. Women who have reasons for avoiding COCs can use progestogen-only contraceptives like pills, depot injectables and implants. Implant combines high efficacy and long-term effect. Both copper-releasing and levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine contraceptive device (LNG-IUD) combine the advantages of high efficacy and long-term effect. The reduced fecundity above the age of forty can allow extending the use beyond the accepted term, and up to one or two years beyond the menopause without the need for replacement. The levonorgestrel IUD has the advantage of reducing the amount of menstrual bleeding. The condom has the added benefit of protection against sexual transmitted diseases (STDs). Male or female sterilization is an excellent contraceptive option, provided that this approach is culturally acceptable and available at reasonable cost and low risk.

  19. Correlation of parental socioeconomic status indicators with morphological and motor dimensions of preschool children.

    PubMed

    Bala, Gustav; Katić, Ratko; Mikalacki, Milena

    2010-09-01

    Measuring instruments for assessment of parental socioeconomic status, anthropometric characteristics and motor abilities were used in a sample of 643 preschool children aged 4-6 years and their parents, recruited from preschool institutions in several towns in Voivodina, Serbia. The aim was to analyze the correlation of parental socioeconomic status indicators with morphological and motor dimensions of preschool children. Study results showed the socioeconomic status of the children's families to be relatively homogeneous, with no statistically significant differences in any of the socioeconomic status indicators between families with male and female children. Male and female children differed significantly in the overall space of anthropometric and motor variables, and to a lesser extent in individual variables. The general morphological factor treated as the children's growth and development, and general motor factor were qualitatively comparable. The correlations of socioeconomic factor with general morphological and motor factors of the children were not statistically significant, with the exception of motor factor in 6-year-old male children, at elementary school enrolment. Study results suggested the differences in biological growth and development and motor development recorded in preschool children from Voivodina, Serbia, to be attributable to hereditary factor rather than socioeconomic and environmental factors. Inclusion of older children and use of more socioeconomic status indicators along with some additional indicators should probably yield more reliable results on the issue.

  20. Contraception. Slow train gathers speed.

    PubMed

    Hampton, N; Kubba, A

    The otherwise slow pace of contraceptive research developments has recently quickened, with new products developed, more on the way, and encouraging new data emerging about existing methods. While the 1995 UK pill scare called attention to a differential in the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) between pills containing levonorgestrel or norethisterone and those containing desogestrel or gestodene, there is only an extremely small level of excess mortality attributable to third-generation progestogens, less than 2 per million women per year. Tentative evidence suggests that pills with less anti-estrogenic progestogens are neutral with regard to coronary artery disease. The pill remains extremely safe for healthy young women, although additional research with larger numbers of participants is warranted. Salient research findings are that the combined oral contraceptive pill may protect against colon cancer, the pill appears to offer no protection against bone fractures, new products contain less estrogen and have a shortened pill-free interval, a WHO paper showed no significant association between cardiovascular disease and the use of oral or injectable progestogens, a UK study showed no correlation between bone density and plasma estrogen concentrations among long-term users of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, and a WHO controlled trial found a progestogen-only method of emergency contraception to be considerably more effective in preventing expected pregnancies than the Yuzpe regimen. The T 380 copper IUD provides very high protection against intrauterine and extrauterine pregnancies for 10 years and is now available in an improved inserting mechanism, the Mirena levonorgestrel-releasing IUD system is now licensed for 5 years, and the GyneFIX IUD implant is a frameless device fixed during insertion to the fundal myometrium.

  1. Adolescent Religiosity and Contraceptive Usage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Studer, Marlena; Thornton, Arland

    1987-01-01

    Examined contraceptive use by never married, sexually experienced female adolescents (N=224). Found birth control pills to be the single most popular method of contraception. Subjects who reported regularly attending religious services were less likely to have used an effective, medical method of contraception than those who rarely attended…

  2. Contraception for cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla; Hess, Rachel; Trussell, James

    2009-11-01

    Women who have survived cancer may need guidance in choosing a method of contraception. This paper reviews the evidence supporting the safety and efficacy of available methods of contraception for cancer survivors and concludes that the Copper T380A intrauterine device (IUD), a highly effective, reversible, long-acting, hormone-free method should be considered a first-line contraceptive option for women with a history of a hormonally mediated cancer. However, the levonorgestrel-containing IUD may be preferable for women being treated with tamoxifen and women who have survived non-hormonally mediated cancers. Women with IUDs can undergo all forms of imaging, including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

  3. [Contraception in perimenopause].

    PubMed

    Merki-Feld, G S

    2000-10-01

    Perimenopausal women are still potentially fertile and pregnancy is attended with increased maternal and perinatal mortality. Several contraceptive methods can be used therapeutic for the treatment of climacteric symptoms like menstrual irregularities, flushes and vaginal dryness. Low-dose oral contraceptives (OC) prevent climacteric symptoms and additionally protect from perimenopausal bone loss. However, the individual cardiovascular risk increases with age and is even higher in perimenopausal women using OCs. Therefore for women with cardiovascular risk factors sterilization, barrier methods, progestin-only methods and intrauterine devices (IUD) are the better choice. Prolonged and heavy menses can be treated with the levonorgestrel-releasing IUD or injectable progestogens. If estrogen replacement is necessary, a low-dose treatment with natural estrogens can be combined with barrier methods, the levonorgestrel-releasing IUD and injectable progestogens. The variety of contraceptive options available to perimenopausal women allows individual counseling and thus may enhance compliance.

  4. Oral contraceptives: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Derman, R

    1989-09-01

    Cardiovascular risks attributable to oral contraceptive use may now be subdivided into those that appear to be secondary to the estrogen component, i.e., venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and those linked to the progestin component, i.e., small vessel disease including myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident. It appears that venous risk is attributable to subtle changes in clotting factors, while arterial risk may be secondary to changes in glucose and lipid metabolism. In order to determine which women are at greatest risk from oral contraceptive use, Spellacy et al. has developed a risk scoring form that aids in the screening process. After excluding women with an absolute contraindication to pill use, women at greatest risk for cardiovascular disease related to oral contraceptive use are those with a family history of hyperlipidemia, gestational or overt diabetics, hypertensives, and smokers over the age of 35. The gradual reduction by manufacturers of the steroid content of oral contraceptives appears to have lessened the incidence of adverse effects. Our current knowledge of risk factors permits the clinician to reduce exposure to oral contraceptive-related mortality by as much as 86 per cent. As we continue to search for ways to reduce risk among oral contraceptive users, it is important to note that more than 25 per cent of women are still taking formulations containing 50 micrograms of estrogen. It becomes the responsibility of the practicing physician to "step-down" these patients to lower-dose preparations such as the multiphasics. Such preparations also represent optimal therapy for first-time pill users.

  5. Contraceptive developments for men.

    PubMed

    Amory, John K

    2007-03-01

    Efforts are underway to develop new methods of contraception for men. The most promising approach to male contraceptive development is hormonal and involves the administration of testosterone. When testosterone is administered to a man, it functions as a contraceptive by suppressing the secretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone from the pituitary gland, thereby depriving the testes of the signals required for spermatogenesis. After two to three months of treatment, low levels of gonadotropins lead to markedly decreased sperm counts and effective contraception in a majority of men. In many clinical trials, male hormonal contraception has proven to be free from serious adverse effects and is well-tolerated by men. In addition, sperm parameters uniformly normalize when treatment is discontinued. The main drawback to this approach is the observation that spermatogenesis is not suppressed to zero in all men, meaning that some potential for fertility persists. Because of this, recent studies have combined testosterone with progestogens and/or gonadotropin-releasing antagonists to synergistically suppress pituitary gonadotropins and improve suppression of spermatogenesis. Current combinations of testosterone and progestogens severely suppress spermatogenesis without severe side effects in 80-90% of men, with significant suppression in the remainder of individuals. Recent trials with newer, long-acting forms of injectable testosterone, such as testosterone undecanoate, which can be administered every 8-10 weeks, combined with progestogens, administered either orally or by long-acting implant, have yielded promising results and may soon result in the marketing of a safe, reversible and effective hormonal contraceptive for men.

  6. An "Imperfect" Contraceptive Society: Fertility and Contraception in Italy.

    PubMed

    Gribaldo, Alessandra; Judd, Maya D; Kertzer, David I

    2009-09-01

    Italy represents an unexpected and in some ways paradoxical outcome in terms of fertility control: a drop to one of the lowest birth rates in the world has been accompanied by the preponderant use of "traditional" methods despite the availability of "modern" contraception. Using data from 349 interviews conducted in 2005-2006 in four Italian cities, we argue that Italian women achieve "unplanned" AND desired conceptions through the use of withdrawal and natural methods. While data from other countries reveal similar notions of ambivalence surrounding pregnancy intentions and contraceptive use, Italy stands out for the surprising correlation between highly "managing" the conditions under which children are born and the socially commended approach of "letting births happen". Such results suggest the need to rethink theoretical understandings of low fertility. Through the use of non-technological methods individuals manipulate culturally produced norms and beliefs about the appropriate moment to have a child; simultaneously, their actions are embedded in larger cultural, economic, and political processes.

  7. [Contraception in adolescents].

    PubMed

    1992-12-01

    The proportion of women aged 15-19 in Colombia who are mothers declined from 14% in 1985 to 10% in 1990, but the actual number of cases increased due to population growth. Some 1,780,000 adolescents who have had children or are pregnant require family planning services. An additional, unknown number of adolescent pregnancies are terminated by abortion. It is estimated that 95% of adolescent pregnancies diagnosed or followed by PROFAMILIA's center for young people were unwanted. Reasons for making family planning services available to adolescents include the ever young age at initiation of sexual activity, the very low rates of contraceptive usage among sexually active adolescents, the lack of information of adolescents concerning reproduction and contraception, and their fear and guilt surrounding their sexual activity and contraceptive usage. Obstetrical services appear reluctant to furnish adolescent mothers with information on contraception, and the pharmacists and their employees who provide such information may not be aware of contraindications for this age group or whether adolescents are adequately instructed in use of the method. The rising age at marriage increases the span of time that adolescents are at risk of unwanted pregnancy. Adolescents who are well informed about sexuality and contraception and trained in decision making, self-esteem, and responsible parenthood are likely to postpone sexual activity. Information on contraception and family planning services needs to be made available to adolescents in a way that will actually motivate use. Information on sex and contraception should be made available at puberty and should include the form of use, contraindications, and advantages and disadvantages of all methods appropriate to adolescents. Orientation and assistance in selecting the best method should be individually tailored and should be provided in schools or other places accessible to young people, in a language they can understand. Rhythm and

  8. Correlates of HIV-status awareness among adults in Nairobi slum areas.

    PubMed

    Ettarh, Remare Renner; Kimani, James; Kyobutungi, Catherine; Wekesah, Frederick

    2012-12-01

    The prevalence of HIV in the adult population in slum areas in Nairobi, Kenya, is higher than for residents in the city as a whole. This disparity suggests that the characteristics of slum areas may adversely influence the HIV-prevention strategies directed at reducing the national prevalence of HIV. The objective of the study was to identify some of the sociodemographic and behavioural correlates of HIV-status awareness among the adult population of two slums in Nairobi. In a household-based survey conducted by the African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC), 4 767 men and women aged between 15 and 54 years were randomly sampled from two slums (Korogocho and Viwandani) in Nairobi and data were collected on the social and health context of HIV and AIDS in these settlements. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with HIV-status awareness. The proportion of respondents that had ever been tested and knew their HIV status was 53%, with the women having greater awareness of their HIV status (62%) than the men (38%). Awareness of HIV status was significantly associated with age, sex, level of education, marital status and slum of residence. The lower level of HIV-status awareness among the men compared with the women in the slums suggests a poor uptake of HIV-testing services by males. Innovative strategies are needed to ensure greater access and uptake of HIV-testing services by the younger and less-educated residents of these slums if the barriers to HIV-status awareness are to be overcome.

  9. Differences in the Nonuse of any Contraception and Use of Specific Contraceptive Methods in HIV Positive and HIV Negative Rwandan Women

    PubMed Central

    Adedimeji, Adebola A.; Hoover, Donald R.; Shi, Qiuhu; Cohen, Mardge H.; Gard, Tracy; Anastos, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Contraception can reduce the dual burden of high fertility and high HIV prevalence in sub-Sahara Africa, but significant barriers remain regarding access and use. We describe factors associated with nonuse of contraception and with use of specific contraceptive methods in HIV positive and HIV negative Rwandan women. Data from 395 HIV-positive and 76 HIV-negative women who desired no pregnancy in the previous 6 months were analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models to identify clinical and demographic characteristics that predict contraceptive use. Differences in contraceptive methods used were dependent on marital/partner status, partner's knowledge of a woman's HIV status, and age. Overall, condoms, abstinence, and hormonal methods were the most used, though differences existed by HIV status. Less than 10% of women both HIV+ and HIV− used no contraception. Important differences exist between HIV-positive and HIV-negative women with regard to contraceptive method use that should be addressed by interventions seeking to improve contraceptive prevalence. PMID:23304468

  10. Correlation of vitamin A nutritional status on alpha-tocopherol in the colostrum of lactating women.

    PubMed

    de Lira, Larissa Queiroz; Lima, Mayara Santa Rosa; de Medeiros, Jovilma Maria Soares; da Silva, Isabelle Ferreira; Dimenstein, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The adequate supply of vitamins A and E to newborns is essential. However, factors such as maternal nutritional status and nutrient interaction may limit its bioavailability. The aim of this study was to establish nutritional status for vitamins A and E and evaluate the correlation of retinol on colostrum alpha-tocopherol in lactating women. A total of 103 lactating women were recruited at a Brazilian public maternity hospital. Fasting serum and colostrum samples were collected in the immediate post-partum. Retinol and alpha-tocopherol levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and nutritional status for these vitamins was defined from specific cut-off points for serum and colostrum. Mean serum and colostrum retinol (1.49 µmol L(-1) , 2.18 µmol L(-1) ) and alpha-tocopherol (26.4 µmol L(-1) , 26.1 µmol L(-1) ) indicated satisfactory biochemical status. However, we found a prevalence of subclinical deficiency of vitamin A and vitamin E in serum (15.5% and 16%) and colostrum (50% and 60%). Lactating women with serum retinol ≥ 1.05 µmol L(-1) showed an inverse correlation between serum retinol and alpha-tocopherol concentration in the colostrum (P = 0.008, r = -0.28). This association was not observed in serum level < 1.05 µmol L(-1) . The nutritional status of lactating women for vitamins A and E was adequate, although there is a risk of subclinical deficiency. The negative correlation of serum retinol on alpha-tocopherol concentration in the colostrum must be carefully evaluated in situations of vitamin A supplementation, because alpha-tocopherol bioavailability in maternal milk may be compromised.

  11. Obesity and hormonal contraceptive efficacy.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer A; Burke, Anne E

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern affecting an increasing proportion of reproductive-aged women. Avoiding unintended pregnancy is of major importance, given the increased risks associated with pregnancy, but obesity may affect the efficacy of hormonal contraceptives by altering how these drugs are absorbed, distributed, metabolized or eliminated. Limited data suggest that long-acting, reversible contraceptives maintain excellent efficacy in obese women. Some studies demonstrating altered pharmacokinetic parameters and increased failure rates with combined oral contraceptives, the contraceptive patch and emergency contraceptive pills suggest decreased efficacy of these methods. It is unclear whether bariatric surgery affects hormonal contraceptive efficacy. Obese women should be offered the full range of contraceptive options, with counseling that balances the risks and benefits of each method, including the risk of unintended pregnancy.

  12. Contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yen, Sophia; Martin, Susanne

    2013-02-01

    CME EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: 1.Identify and explain the four currently available methods of emergency contraception.2.Discuss the risk and benefits of intrauterine devices as a first-line option for contraception in adolescents.3.Review strategies for explaining the most common contraceptive methods to an adolescent. The US has the highest pregnancy rate of any industrialized nation, approximately twice that of Canada, four times that of France, and eight times that of Japan or Italy.1 In recent years, the rate has declined, partially due to delayed coitarche (age of onset of vaginal sexual intercourse) but mainly due to greater use of contraception.2 Per the 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (a national survey of about 15,000 youth in schools), 33% of high school freshmen, 44% of sophomores, 53% of juniors, and 63% of seniors have had vaginal sexual intercourse. To prevent unplanned and unwanted teenage pregnancies, which have negative consequences on a teenager's health and future, pediatricians must be able to provide birth control or at least know where to refer their patients in need.

  13. Contraceptive Beach Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Edith B.; Miller, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    Abstinence-based sexuality education includes a discussion about the various types of contraception available today. This lesson addresses the knowledge and skills identified in the National Health Education Standards, and can be used with two different audiences-students and teachers. Included in the lesson are step-by-step procedures, a…

  14. Antibiotics and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    DeRossi, Scott S; Hersh, Elliot V

    2002-10-01

    With the exception of rifampin-like drugs, there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting the ability of commonly prescribed antibiotics, including all those routinely employed in outpatient dentistry, to either reduce blood levels and/or the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. To date, all clinical trials studying the effects of concomitant antibiotic therapy (with the exception of rifampin and rifabutin) have failed to demonstrate an interaction. Like all drugs, oral contraceptives are not 100% effective with the failure rate in the typical United States population reported to be as high as 3%. It is thus possible that the case reports of unintended pregnancies during antibiotic therapy may simply represent the normal failure rate of these drugs. Considering that both drug classes are prescribed frequently to women of childbearing potential, one would expect a much higher rate of oral contraceptive failure in this group of patients if a true drug:drug interaction existed. On the other hand, if the interaction does exist but is a relatively rare event, occurring in, say, 1 in 5000 women, clinical studies such as those described in this article would not detect the interaction. The pharmacokinetic studies of simultaneous antibiotic and oral contraceptive ingestion, and the retrospective studies of pregnancy rates among oral contraceptive users exposed to antibiotics, all suffer from one potential common weakness, i.e., their relatively small sample size. Sample sizes in the pharmacokinetic trials ranged from 7 to 24 participants, whereas the largest retrospective study of pregnancy rates still evaluated less than 800 total contraceptive users. Still, the incidence of such a rare interaction would not differ from the accepted normal failure rate of oral contraceptive therapy. The medico-legal ramifications of what looks like at best a rare interaction remains somewhat "murky." On one hand, we have medico-legal experts advising the profession to exercise caution

  15. Contraceptive advertising in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lebow, M A

    1994-01-01

    Despite the fact that most Americans support the advertising of family planning methods, the minority opposition has influenced the formulation of contraceptive advertising policies. This article attempts to clarify the current status of contraceptive advertising and to suggest a sensible public policy for the future. Opening with a review of opinion polls taken since 1985, the article points out that 70% of station managers reported their belief that contraceptive advertising would offend many people despite the fact that 87% of respondents in a public survey indicated no objection to such advertising. The policies that network television stations have adopted are traced from those instituted in the 1960s by the National Association of Broadcaster's Code Authority. These policies govern the airing of Public Service Announcements (PSAs) as well as advertisements. Magazines and newspapers also resist accepting contraceptive advertising, although they do not face the same regulations as the broadcast media. US Food and Drug Administration policies also act as a barrier to product-specific advertisements on network television despite the fact that the American Medical Association no longer opposes such advertising and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists offered to provide valid information about advertising claims to the media. A review of attempts to advertise contraceptives shows that opposition has dropped significantly in the past 10 years for advertisements in newspapers, on cable television, in magazines, on some commercial television stations, and on many radio stations. However, the major television networks still fail to accept such advertisements. Part of the change that is occurring can be attributable to the emergence of AIDS and the need to promote methods to prevent the disease. However, much AIDS-related advertising has been in the form of PSAs, which are less and less available. The major obstacles to contraceptive advertising today

  16. The effects of contraception on female poverty.

    PubMed

    Browne, Stephanie P; LaLumia, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Poverty rates are particularly high among households headed by single women, and childbirth is often the event preceding these households' poverty spells. This paper examines the relationship between legal access to the birth control pill and female poverty. We rely on exogenous cross-state variation in the year in which oral contraception became legally available to young, single women. Using census data from 1960 to 1990, we find that having legal access to the birth control pill by age 20 significantly reduces the probability that a woman is subsequently in poverty. We estimate that early legal access to oral contraception reduces female poverty by 0.5 percentage points, even when controlling for completed education, employment status, and household composition.

  17. Socioeconomic factors associated with contraceptive use and method choice in urban slums of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Kamal, S M Mostafa

    2015-03-01

    This article explores the socioeconomic factors affecting contraceptive use and method choice among women of urban slums using the nationally representative 2006 Bangladesh Urban Health Survey. Both bivariate and multivariate statistical analyses were applied to examine the relationship between a set of sociodemographic factors and the dependent variables. Overall, the contraceptive prevalence rate was 58.1%, of which 53.2% were modern methods. Women's age, access to TV, number of unions, nongovernmental organization membership, working status of women, number of living children, child mortality, and wealth index were important determinants of contraceptive use and method preference. Sex composition of surviving children and women's education were the most important determinants of contraceptive use and method choice. Programs should be strengthened to provide nonclinical modern methods free of cost among the slum dwellers. Doorstep delivery services of modern contraceptive methods may raise the contraceptive prevalence rate among the slum dwellers in Bangladesh.

  18. Contraception: traditional and religious attitudes.

    PubMed

    Schenker, J G; Rabenou, V

    1993-04-01

    Humans have tried to control fertility for centuries. Primitive, preliterate societies practiced infanticide and abortion. When primitive women understood the advantages of conception control, they tried, when possible, to use contraception. In the 4th century B.C., Plato and Aristotle advocated a one-child family. Greek medical literature reported a hollow tube inserted through the cervix into the uterus and a potion as contraceptives. Islamic physicians had much knowledge about conception control. The attitudes toward contraception. In the 5th century B.C., Saint Augustine condemned contraception, even among married couples. The condom emerged in the early modern period. Yet, they were usually worn to protect against disease, e.g., bilharzia in Egypt and syphilis in Europe. The cervical cap and the diaphragm are examples of occlusive pessaries. By 1880, contraceptives and spermicides were advertised. In 1928, the IUD joined the existing contraceptives. Today we have combined oral contraceptives. Judaic law requires husbands to fulfill their wives sexual needs, separate from their duty to procreate. It also calls men, not women, to procreate and forbids men from masturbating, thus Judaic law does not forbid women from practicing contraception. The Roman Catholic church forbids contraceptive use because it is a sin against nature. Some Protestant denominations have allowed contraceptive use. Islamic law states that children are gifts from Allah. Some Moslems believe that they must have many children, but Allah and the Prophet state that children have rights to education and future security. These rights allow couples to prevent pregnancy. Neither Hinduism nor Buddhism prohibit contraceptive use. Differences in husband-wife communication, sex roles, access to contraceptives, and traditional family values will have more of an effect on contraceptive use and fertility than theological barriers or the social class of religious groups.

  19. Adolescents and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, J S

    1991-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) options for adolescents are provides. Clarification for those desiring a birth control method is necessary and the benefits of decreased acne and dysmenorrhea with low dose OCs should be stressed along with the importance of compliance. A community effort is suggested to communicate the sexual and contraceptive alternatives, including abstinence and outercourse (sexual stimulation to orgasm without intercourse). Attention is given to concerns associated with teenage sexual activity, prevention of adolescent pregnancy, contraceptive options for the adolescent patient, adolescent attitudes toward birth control OCs, management of the adolescent OC user, manipulation of steroid components of OCs to respond to adolescent concerns, and other hormonal contraceptive options such as minipills or abstinence. The text is supplemented with tables: the % of US women by single years of age for 1971, 1976, 1979, and 1982; comparative pregnancy and abortion rates for the US and 5 other countries; federal cost for teen childbearing; adolescent nonhormonal contraceptive methods (advantages, disadvantages, and retail cost); checklist to identify those at risk for noncompliance with OCs; hormonal side effects of OCs; risks from OCs to adolescents; and benefits of OCs. Concern about adolescent pregnancy dates back to Aristotle. A modern profile shows girls form single-parent families are sexually active at an earlier age, adolescent mothers produce offspring who repeat the cycle, victims of sexual abuse are more likely to be sexually active, and teenagers in foster care are 4 times more likely to be sexually active and 8 times more likely to become pregnant. Prevention involves a multifaceted approach. OCs are the most appropriate contraceptive choice for adolescents. Frequency of intercourse is closely associated with OC use after approximately 15 months of unprotected sexual activity. At risk for noncompliance variables are scales of personality development

  20. Contraception with Chlormadinone Acetate in Woman with Previous Contraceptive Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, R. P. H.; Williams, Roger

    1970-01-01

    The oral contraceptive chlormadinone acetate has been given for eight months to a woman who had developed jaundice during four pregnancies, and twice while taking a combined contraceptive pill. No side-effects or changes in liver function were observed. This is further evidence that progestogens used for contraception, and in particular those derived from hydroxyprogesterone, are less hepatotoxic than the oestrogenic components. PMID:4189931

  1. Potencies of oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Chihal, H J; Peppler, R D; Dickey, R P

    1978-02-01

    This letter is a response to the discussion by Edgren and Sturtevant (125:1029, 1976) on potencies of oral contraceptives (OCs). It is agreed that the results of studies in animal models on OC potencies may not necessarily reflect true potencies in human subjects, however, these animal models do allow the evaluation of the biological effects and interactions of the components of OCs. Data obtained in animal studies are acknowledged to be valuable aids in the study of human diseases. Likewise, mouse uterine response to contraceptive steroids is 1 criterion to be used in evaluating steroid potency. As previously reported, the importance of the mouse uterine response is that the contribution of the progestin component to the total estrogenic potency of the OC is demonstrated.

  2. New contraceptive options.

    PubMed

    Archer, D F

    2001-03-01

    New contraceptive modalities that are being introduced into the US marketplace reflect many changes in the delivery of existing steroidal products. These products are available now not only as oral medications but also as transdermal, intravaginal, intrauterine, and implantable or injectable devices. Each of these has its own unique profile and enhances the ability of consumers to pick and choose the product that is most acceptable to them. However, development of new barrier contraceptives, particularly those that have the potential to reduce the heterosexual transmission of HIV or to reduce a bacterial infection such as Chlamydia or Neisseria gonorrhea, continues to be moving forward in clinical trials. These products can have a lower efficacy compared with the steroidal products but, because of their other benefits, may be of significant medical use.

  3. [Contraception in teenagers (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hubinont, P O

    1982-04-01

    The age at which adolescents start a sexual life is becoming younger and younger, and it is usually not accompanied by any correct knowledge of contraceptive methods. This particular group is more at risk of unwanted pregnancy; since a contraceptive method which is totally effective and totally reversible is not yet at hand. Several methods can be recommended to adolescents and include: 1) barrier contraception with condom and spermicidal agents, in those cases in which the couple has only occasional contacts; 2) low dose progestational oral contraception when the couple has a regular sex life; and 3) postcoital contraception only in cases of incest or rape, to be administered not later than 12 hours after coitus. While recent studies have demonstrated that low dose hormonal contraception is not harmful to the menstrual patterns and to the genetic patrimony of adolescent girls, the use of an IUD can eventually cause an infection leading to a future tubal sterility.

  4. Sexual health and contraception.

    PubMed

    Straw, Fiona; Porter, Charlotte

    2012-10-01

    Sexual health encompasses 'sexual development and reproductive health, as well as the ability to develop and maintain meaningful interpersonal relationships; appreciate one's own body; interact with both genders in respectful and appropriate ways; express affection, love and intimacy in ways consistent with one's own values'. The 2008 WHO Consensus Statement additionally noted that 'responsible adolescent intimate relationships' should be 'consensual, non-exploitative, honest, pleasurable and protected against unintended pregnancy and STDs if any type of intercourse occurs'. Young people (YP) must, therefore, be able to access sexual health information and services that meet their needs. For most YP, interest in sexual activity begins with puberty, and this is associated with increasingly sexualised behaviour, including exploration of themselves and others. Most YP find this a confusing time, and so it is important that health professionals are able to offer advice regarding the wide range of sexual health issues, including sexuality, choice of partner, contraception, risk and management of sexually transmitted infections (STI) in a confident and approachable manner. YP have never had so much choice or information available to them, and this can be confusing for them. There is good evidence that YP who get information from their parents are likely to initiate sexual activity later than their peers who access information from their friends. However, there is also evidence that some YP would prefer to get sexual health information from health professionals. It is therefore imperative that all health professionals who see YP have an awareness of sexual health issues, and know where to signpost YP should they need more specialist sexual health advice and/or treatment. Where appropriate, one-to-one sexual health advice should be provided to YP on how to prevent and get tested for STIs, and how to prevent unwanted pregnancies. Advice should also be given on all methods

  5. Contraceptive Behavior in Young Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    adolescents does not use CONTRACEPTIVE BEHAVIOR 13 contraceptives. This group accounts for 75% of all unintended teenage pregnancies, 50% of which occur in...skills many adolescents have not yet aquired when sexual acivity begins. The result, all too often, is pregnancy and parenthood. Impact of teenage ...of the adolescent (Neinstein, 1987). Fear of parental notification presents another obstacle for the sexually active teenager desiring contraception

  6. Therapeutic uses of contraceptive steroids.

    PubMed

    Starks, G C

    1984-09-01

    During the past 20 years, contraceptive steroids have undergone significant changes as the result of an increased understanding of their metabolic, pharmacologic, and hormonal activities. During this time, prospective and retrospective epidemiologic studies have elucidated several noncontraceptive health benefits of oral contraceptive steroids, including their therapeutic effects for endometriosis, dysmenorrhea, polycystic ovarian disease, and benign breast disease. From this review it appears that the benefits of oral contraceptive steroids in young, healthy, nonsmoking women far outweigh their more publicized, infrequent risks.

  7. Contraception and sexually transmitted diseases.

    PubMed

    Creatsas, G

    1997-12-01

    The needs for contraception are increasing world-wide as more women desire protection from unwanted pregnancies. Since the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) has increased in many countries, consultation for contraception should be provided together with that on STDs. Each woman may choose the contraceptive method according to her needs but she should also be informed about the beneficial and negative effects of the method in preventing STDs.

  8. Contraceptives versus abortifacients.

    PubMed

    Barber, H R

    1990-11-01

    A less-publicized aspect of the famed Louisiana abortion bill would have outlawed the use of IUDs and oral contraceptives (OCs), a provision that ignores the difference between contraceptives and abortifacients. The bill, which was vetoed by Governor Buddy Roemer, stirred widespread controversy in its effort to sharply restrict abortion. Many of those involved in the discussion -- including the State Attorney General's office -- have contended that IUDs and OCs induce abortions by destroying fertilized eggs. But such statements disregard scientific studies that indicate that both contraceptive methods work by preventing fertilization. Research has shown that IUDs, especially copper-IUDs, restrict the transport of sperm, thereby preventing fertilization. One study revealed the presence of sperm in the fallopian tubes of non-IUD users 15-30 minutes after insemination, but found no sperm in the tubes of IUD users. Inhibiting ovulation, OCs work through a combination of estrogen and progestin. OCs prevent fertility by activating various mechanisms: they suppress the release of certain hormones, and cause a thickening of the cervical mucus which impairs sperm motility. Although neither IUDs nor OCs can be considered abortifacients, a small but vocal minority has succeeded in obscuring this fact. And it is the role of science to resolve the controversy by making the facts clear.

  9. Contraceptive implants and lactation.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Soledad

    2002-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of four contraceptive implants, plant, Implanon, Nestorone and Elcometrine, have been evaluated during use in the postpartum period by lactating women. These implants provide highly effective contraceptive protection with no negative effect on breastfeeding or infant growth and development. Breastfeeding women initiating Norplant use in the second postpartum month experience significantly longer periods of amenorrhea than do untreated women or intrauterine device users. After weaning, the bleeding pattern is similar to that observed in non-nursing women. Norplant use does not affect bone turnover and density during lactation. Norplant and Implanon release orally active progestins while Nestorone and Elcometrine implants release an orally inactive progestin, which represents an advantage since the infant should be free of steroidal effects. The infant's daily intake of steroids (estimated from concentrations in maternal milk during the first month of use) range from 90 to 100 ng of levonorgestrel (Norplant), 75-120 ng of etonogestrel (Implanon), and 50 ng and 110 ng of Nestorone (Nestorone and Elcometrine implants, respectively). Nursing women needing contraception may use progestin-only implants when nonhormonal methods are not available or acceptable. Implants that deliver orally active steroids should only be used after 6 weeks postpartum to avoid transferring of steroids to the newborn.

  10. Correlation of MGMT promoter methylation status with gene and protein expression levels in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Miyuki; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli Mieko; Camargo, Anamaria Aranha; Moura, Ricardo Pereira; de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Cabrera, Hector Navarro; Begnami, Marcos; Rosemberg, Sérgio; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: 1) To correlate the methylation status of the O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter to its gene and protein expression levels in glioblastoma and 2) to determine the most reliable method for using MGMT to predict the response to adjuvant therapy in patients with glioblastoma. BACKGROUND: The MGMT gene is epigenetically silenced by promoter hypermethylation in gliomas, and this modification has emerged as a relevant predictor of therapeutic response. METHODS: Fifty-one cases of glioblastoma were analyzed for MGMT promoter methylation by methylation-specific PCR and pyrosequencing, gene expression by real time polymerase chain reaction, and protein expression by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: MGMT promoter methylation was found in 43.1% of glioblastoma by methylation-specific PCR and 38.8% by pyrosequencing. A low level of MGMT gene expression was correlated with positive MGMT promoter methylation (p = 0.001). However, no correlation was found between promoter methylation and MGMT protein expression (p = 0.297). The mean survival time of glioblastoma patients submitted to adjuvant therapy was significantly higher among patients with MGMT promoter methylation (log rank = 0.025 by methylation-specific PCR and 0.004 by pyrosequencing), and methylation was an independent predictive factor that was associated with improved prognosis by multivariate analysis. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: MGMT promoter methylation status was a more reliable predictor of susceptibility to adjuvant therapy and prognosis of glioblastoma than were MGMT protein or gene expression levels. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing methods were both sensitive methods for determining MGMT promoter methylation status using DNA extracted from frozen tissue. PMID:22012047

  11. Influence of combined oral contraceptives on the periodontal condition

    PubMed Central

    DOMINGUES, Roberta Santos; FERRAZ, Bruna Fidêncio Rahal; GREGHI, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; de REZENDE, Maria Lúcia Rubo; PASSANEZI, Euloir; SANT'ANA, Adriana Campos Passanezi

    2012-01-01

    Most studies investigating the impact of oral contraceptives have been performed some years ago, when the level of sexual hormones was greater than the actual formulations. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of current combined oral contraceptives (COC) on periodontal tissues, correlating the clinical parameters examined with the total duration of continuous oral contraceptive intake. Material and methods Twenty-five women (19-35 years old) taking combined oral contraceptives for at least 1 year were included in the test group. The control group was composed by 25 patients at the same age range reporting no use of hormone-based contraceptive methods. Clinical parameters investigated included pocket probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), sulcular bleeding index (SBI) and plaque index (Pl.I). Data were statistically evaluated by unpaired t test, Pearson's correlation test and Spearman's correlation test. Results The test group showed increased PD (2.228±0.011 x 2.154±0.012; p<0.0001) and SBI (0.229±0.006 x 0.148±0.005, p<0.0001) than controls. No significant differences between groups were found in CAL (0.435±0.01 x 0.412±0.01; p=0.11). The control group showed greater Pl.I than the test group (0.206±0.007 x 0.303±0.008; p<0.0001). No correlation between the duration of oral contraceptive intake, age and periodontal parameters was observed. Conclusions These findings suggest that the use of currently available combined oral contraceptives can influence the periodontal conditions of the patients, independently of the level of plaque accumulation or total duration of medication intake, resulting in increased gingival inflammation. PMID:22666846

  12. Correlation between tumor histology, steroid receptor status, and adenosine deaminase complexing protein immunoreactivity in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Rao, B R; Slotman, B J; Geldof, A A; Dinjens, W N

    1990-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) immunoreactivity was investigated in 40 ovarian tumors and correlated with clinicopathologic parameters, including tumor steroid receptor content. Ten (29%) of 34 common epithelial ovarian carcinomas showed ADCP reactivity. Reactivity for ADCP was seen more frequently in mucinous (100%; p less than 0.001), well-differentiated (73%; p less than 0.001) and Stage I (56%; p less than 0.05) ovarian carcinomas. Furthermore, tumors that contained high levels of androgen receptors and tumors that did not contain estrogen receptors were more frequently ADCP positive (p less than 0.05). However, after stratifying for histologic grade, no correlation between ADCP reactivity and receptor status was found. Determination of ADCP reactivity appears to be of limited value in ovarian cancer.

  13. Unmet contraceptive needs among refugees

    PubMed Central

    Aptekman, Marina; Rashid, Meb; Wright, Vanessa; Dunn, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe what women of reproductive age who received primary care at a refugee health clinic were using for contraception upon arrival to the clinic, and to quantify the unmet contraceptive needs within that population. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Crossroads Clinic in downtown Toronto, Ont. Participants Women of reproductive age (15 to 49 years) who first presented for care between December 1, 2011, and December 1, 2012. To be included, a woman had to have had 2 or more clinic visits or an annual health examination. Exclusion criteria for the contraception prevalence calculation were female sexual partner, menopause, hysterectomy, pregnancy, or trying to conceive. Main outcome measures Contraception use prevalence was measured, as was unmet contraceptive need, which was calculated using a modified version of the World Health Organization’s definition: the number of women with an unmet need was expressed as a percentage of women of reproductive age who were married or in a union, or who were sexually active. Results Overall, 52 women met the criteria for inclusion in the contraceptive prevalence calculation. Of these, 16 women (30.8%) did not use any form of contraception. Twelve women were pregnant at some point in the year and stated the pregnancy was unwanted or mistimed. An additional 14 women were not using contraception but had no intention of becoming pregnant within the next 2 years. There were no women with postpartum amenorrhea not using contraception and who had wanted to delay or prevent their previous pregnancy. In total, 97 women were married or in a union, or were sexually active. Unmet need was calculated as follows: (12 + 14 + 0)/97 = 26.8%. Conclusion There was a high unmet contraceptive need in the refugee population in our study. All women of reproductive age should be screened for contraceptive need when first seeking medical care in Canada. PMID:25642489

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing molecules correlate with clinical status in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Barr, Helen L; Halliday, Nigel; Cámara, Miguel; Barrett, David A; Williams, Paul; Forrester, Douglas L; Simms, Rebecca; Smyth, Alan R; Honeybourne, David; Whitehouse, Joanna L; Nash, Edward F; Dewar, Jane; Clayton, Andrew; Knox, Alan J; Fogarty, Andrew W

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces quorum sensing signal molecules that are potential biomarkers for infection.A prospective study of 60 cystic fibrosis patients with chronic P. aeruginosa, who required intravenous antibiotics for pulmonary exacerbations, was undertaken. Clinical measurements and biological samples were obtained at the start and end of the treatment period. Additional data were available for 29 of these patients when they were clinically stable.Cross-sectionally, quorum sensing signal molecules were detectable in the sputum, plasma and urine of 86%, 75% and 83% patients, respectively. They were positively correlated between the three biofluids. Positive correlations were observed for most quorum sensing signal molecules in sputum, plasma and urine, with quantitative measures of pulmonary P. aeruginosa load at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation. Plasma concentrations of 2-nonyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline (NHQ) were significantly higher at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation compared to clinical stability (p<0.01). Following the administration of systemic antibiotics, plasma 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (p=0.02) and NHQ concentrations (p<0.01) decreased significantly.In conclusion, quorum sensing signal molecules are detectable in cystic fibrosis patients with pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection and are positively correlated with quantitative measures of P. aeruginosa. NHQ correlates with clinical status and has potential as a novel biomarker for P. aeruginosa infection.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing molecules correlate with clinical status in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, Nigel; Cámara, Miguel; Barrett, David A.; Williams, Paul; Forrester, Douglas L.; Simms, Rebecca; Smyth, Alan R.; Honeybourne, David; Whitehouse, Joanna L.; Nash, Edward F.; Dewar, Jane; Clayton, Andrew; Knox, Alan J.; Fogarty, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces quorum sensing signal molecules that are potential biomarkers for infection. A prospective study of 60 cystic fibrosis patients with chronic P. aeruginosa, who required intravenous antibiotics for pulmonary exacerbations, was undertaken. Clinical measurements and biological samples were obtained at the start and end of the treatment period. Additional data were available for 29 of these patients when they were clinically stable. Cross-sectionally, quorum sensing signal molecules were detectable in the sputum, plasma and urine of 86%, 75% and 83% patients, respectively. They were positively correlated between the three biofluids. Positive correlations were observed for most quorum sensing signal molecules in sputum, plasma and urine, with quantitative measures of pulmonary P. aeruginosa load at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation. Plasma concentrations of 2-nonyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline (NHQ) were significantly higher at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation compared to clinical stability (p<0.01). Following the administration of systemic antibiotics, plasma 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (p=0.02) and NHQ concentrations (p<0.01) decreased significantly. In conclusion, quorum sensing signal molecules are detectable in cystic fibrosis patients with pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection and are positively correlated with quantitative measures of P. aeruginosa. NHQ correlates with clinical status and has potential as a novel biomarker for P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:26022946

  16. Vaginal contraceptives still evolving.

    PubMed

    Pearson, R M

    1986-01-01

    The effort to develop vaginal contraceptives began in the distant past and is still underway today. 1000 years ago, South American Indians inserted into the vagina bark strips impregnated with quinine. In medieval times women used vaginal inserts of cloth soaked in honey or vinegar. Quinine pessaries were introduced into Europe in the late 1800s, and in the early 1900s investigators began to study the effects of various chemicals on sperm motility. Following World War II, surfactant spermicides which disrupt the sperm membrane were developed and marketed. Many of these preparations contained nonoxynol-9. Currently, the D-isomer of propranolol is being examined as a spermicidal contraceptive, and several bacteriocides, e.g., benzalkonium and chlorhexidine, are being developed as spermicides which reduce the penetrability of cervical mucus. Other chemicals being investigated act by inhibiting the acrosome reaction. Advantages of vaginal contraceptives are that they are inexpensive, reversible, and relatively safe and easy to use. Generally they require no medical intervention or supervision. In addition, spermicides may kill or inhibit the growth of organisms responsible for sexually transmitted diseases. Disadvantages of spermicides are that they are generally less effective than many other methods, some interfere with sexual spontaneity, they may cause local irritations, and some women find them messy to use. Recently, concerns were expressed about the possible teratogenic effects of sperimicides. Most of these concerns proved to be unfounded. Given the many new avenues of research, the major disadvantage of sperimicides, i.e., their high failure rates, may be minimized in the near future.

  17. Potencies of oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Edgren, R A; Sturtevant, F M

    1976-08-15

    Oral contraceptives are combinations of estrogens and progestogens or, in the case of the mini-pills, progestogens alone. With specific test procedures in laboratory animals or human subjects, it is possible to assign potency evaluations to the components relative to the progestational, estrogenic, or antiestrogenic activities of the progestogen or to the estrogenic potencies of the estrogenic component. It might even be possible to quantify the synergistic effects of the estrogen on the progestational agent. Unfortunately, however, it is impossible now to amalgamate such assay results into single estimates of the potencies of the combinations (either the combination products per se or the combination tablets of sequential products). For example, an over-all estrogenic potency of a combination preparation would involve the integration of contributions form the estrogen itself plus the estrogenic products of metabolism of the progestogen minus the antagonistic effect of the progestational agent, if any. These factors cannot now be quantified independently, much less merged into a single figure of clinical significance. Further, even if it were possible to produce such an estimate, it is unlikely that the evaluation would be meaningful in relation to any putative side effect or adverse reaction, i.e., the alleged thrombogenic effects of oral contraceptives cannot currently be related directly to any measure of potency that will allow prediction of these clinical conditions from laboratory models. Any evaluation of the potential of a given contraceptive to produce a specific side effect will depend upon data generated with specific regard to that adverse reaction and the individual product in question.

  18. Gestodene-containing contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Kuhl, H; Jung-Hoffmann, C; Wiegratz, I

    1995-12-01

    As GSD is the most potent progestogen used in oral contraceptives, the doses of GSD can be lower than those of other progestogen components. The monophasic (30 micrograms EE + 75 micrograms GSD) and the triphasic formulation (30 micrograms EE + 50 micrograms GSD/40 micrograms EE + 70 micrograms GSD/30 micrograms EE + 100 micrograms GSD) suppress gonadotropin release and ovarian function profoundly and inhibit ovulation reliably. The strong anti-estrogenic and progestogenic effectiveness of GSD is based on the high GSD serum concentrations achieved during daily intake. Because of the weak androgenic properties of GSD, both formulations can be characterized as estrogen-dominant with respect to their hepatic effects. Except for the first cycles, both formulations afford good cycle control, and the rate of side effects is similar to that with comparable low-dose oral contraceptives. The levels of total and free androgens and androgen precursors, as well as of peripheral androgen activity, are significantly reduced, resulting in a reduced incidence of acne. The concentrations of SHBG and other serum-binding globulins are elevated considerably, and thyroid function is almost unaffected. The estrogen-dominant effect on hepatic metabolism of both formulations also is reflected by a significant increase in the levels of triglycerides and VLDL, HDL, and some apolipoproteins, while LDL-CH and total CH remain unchanged. Similar to other low-dose oral contraceptives, the GSD-containing preparations cause a slight impairment of glucose tolerance that does not appear to be of clinical relevance. However, a significant increase exists in pro-coagulatory and fibrinolytic activity that leads to a considerable stimulation of fibrin turnover. In predisposed women, this may contribute to an elevated risk of venous and arterial thromboembolic diseases.

  19. Workshop on injectable contraceptives.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    At a workshop in Dhaka on February 10, 1994, district and thana level managers discussed the problems associated with a project that delivers injectable contraceptives to the doorsteps of clients. The workshop, which was organized by the Bangladesh government and the Maternal and Child Health-Family Planning (MCH-FP) Extension Project of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), identified lack of appropriate training, inefficient supervision, and inadequate knowledge about and facilities for the disposal of used syringes and needles as problems. There was agreement among participants that use of the injectables, depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and norethisterone enanthate (NET-EN), had led to increases in contraceptive use. The 6-month old project had been initiated in 8 thanas by the Directorate of Family Planning of the government of Bangladesh, with the technical assistance of the MCH-FP Extension Project, after ICDDR,B noticed that the rates of use for all types of contraceptives had increased in the rural areas of Matlab, Abhoynagar, and Sirajganj with doorstep delivery by field workers. During the same period, use of injectables that were offered by female paramedics at static centers had remained low. At the workshop, Dr. Rushikesh Maru of the Extension Project spoke about the effective administration of the injectables within 15 days before or after the due date. Mr. AKM Rafiquz Zaman, former director general of Family Planning, government of Bangladesh, requested further expansion in at least 1 thana of each district and in all municipalities and urban slums.

  20. Expanding contraceptive options.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    The goals of Family Health International (FHI) have been to introduce a variety of birth control options to people in developing countries, and to provide information to the user on the advantages and disadvantages of each method. FHI has worked with many developing countries in clinical trials of established as well as new contraceptive methods. These trials played an important part in making 2 sterilization procedures, laparoscopy and minilaparotomy popular for women. Further research improved the methods and have made them the most popular in the world, chosen by 130 million users. FHI is doing clinical trials on a new IUD, that is a copper bearing T-shaped device called the TCu380A. they have collected data on over 10,000 women using IUD's and early analysis indicates TCu380A is more effective than others. FHI is also evaluating devices such as Norplant that will prevent pregnancy up to 5 years by implanting the capsules in the arm. More than 8,000 women are being tested to determine the acceptability of implants in different geographical locations. Other research groups are doing work in 10 additional countries: Bangladesh will expand its program to 24,000 women and Nepal to 8,000 women. Trials are also being conducted on progestogen pills, since they do not lesson the volume of milk in breast feeding. FHI has also worked to introduce creative community-based distribution channels. In one case, specially trained health workers delivered contraceptives door-to-door in over 150,000 households. They found that 2 of 3 women accepted the pills and in a follow up survey 90% were still using them. FHI is now focusing on ways to improve moving new contraceptives from clinical testing on everyday use. They will coordinate training programs, educational material, media campaigns, and efforts with other international organizations, government agencies, and family planning groups.

  1. Contraception in lactating women.

    PubMed

    Díaz, S; Croxatto, H B

    1993-12-01

    Lactating women need contraception after first menses, supplementation or 6 months postpartum, or before, according to personal or programmatic reasons. Non-hormonal methods have no influence on lactation and are the first choice. Intrauterine devices (IUDs) inserted during amenorrhea are safe and show good continuation rates. Progestin-only methods do not affect breast-feeding and should be used after 6 weeks to prevent transference of orally active steroids to the newborn. Progesterone rings and Nestorone implants are effective new methods, that use orally inactive steroids.

  2. Postpartum and postabortal insertion of intrauterine contraceptive devices.

    PubMed

    Martorella, L A; Esposito, J M

    1975-04-01

    One hundred forty-four patients are studied over an 18 month period. Postpartum and postabortal insertions of intrauterine contraceptive devices using the Lippes Loop and the Dalkon Shield are compared. The age, parity, previous methods of contraception, and marital status of the study group indicated a poorly motivated patient population. Although accidental pregnancy rates and expulsion rates are higher, the technique is considered worth-while in the population studied. Future research should be directed toward improved devices in order to decrease side effects and to increase appeal of the technique to those who will benefit most.

  3. Determinants of contraceptive use among women of reproductive age in Great Britain and Germany. I: Demographic factors.

    PubMed

    Oddens, B J; Lehert, P

    1997-10-01

    Multifactorial analyses of data from representative British and German national contraception surveys were used to examine the principal demographic determinants of contraceptive use by women. Contraceptive use appeared to be determined mainly by reference to 'reproductive status' (the combined impact of age, marital status, parity and future child wish). Women who were postponing pregnancies were using oral contraceptives, whereas those who wanted no more children relied more on intrauterine devices or sterilisation. Differences between the countries suggested that the choice of contraceptive method was influenced by health care policy, the organisation of the relevant services and differential provider preferences. The contraceptive method used was also related to having occasional rather than steady sexual partners (more condom use), lower educational level (less oral contraceptive use) and frequent church attendance (greater use of condoms and periodic abstinence). Contraception decisions appeared to follow a fixed pattern, based more on a couple's demographic situation (reproductive status, country, educational level and religious beliefs) than on the characteristics of the contraceptive methods. This resulted in an unnecessarily restricted choice of methods.

  4. Steroidal contraceptive vaginal rings.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, N N

    2003-06-01

    The development of steroid-releasing vaginal rings over the past three decades is reviewed to illustrate the role of this device as an effective hormonal contraceptive for women. Vaginal rings are made of polysiloxane rubber or ethylene-vinyl-acetate copolymer with an outer diameter of 54-60 mm and a cross-sectional diameter of 4-9.5 mm and contain progestogen only or a combination of progestogen and oestrogen. The soft flexible combined ring is inserted in the vagina for three weeks and removed for seven days to allow withdrawal bleeding. Progesterone/progestogen-only rings are kept in for varying periods and replaced without a ring-free period. Rings are in various stages of research and development but a few, such as NuvaRing, have reached the market in some countries. Women find this method easy to use, effective, well tolerated and acceptable with no serious side-effects. Though the contraceptive efficacy of these vaginal rings is high, acceptability is yet to be established.

  5. Medicinal plants: conception / contraception.

    PubMed

    Chaing, H S; Merino-chavez, G; Yang, L L; Wang, F N; Hafez, E S

    1994-01-01

    Researchers have conducted considerable experiments on the effectiveness and therapeutic values of Chinese herbs and parts of plants. We should not ignore the significance of natural medicine. The Chinese have been perfecting medicinal therapy based on the raw ingredients of plants/herbs and their derivatives for thousands of years. Chinese practitioners of traditional medicine prescribe medicines based on yin and yang. Traditional medicine is communicated in a verb or written form. Natural resources used in traditional medicine to treat diseases are not limited to just medicinal plants but also include animals, shell fish, and minerals. Parts of plants used in traditional medicine are leaves, stems, flowers, bark, and root. Chinese medicine is the world's oldest continuous surviving tradition. The Chinese experimented with local plants, often resulting in mild to violent reactions. This process allowed them to become familiar with poisonous plants and those that could relieve pain or successfully treat illness. Current allopathic medicines are composed of synthetic compounds copied from natural chemical derivatives, which tend to be more potent than the original compound. Some medicinal plants used to effect conception/contraception include Striga astiatica (contraceptive); Eurycoma longifolia (male virility); and a mixture of lengkuas, mengkudu masak, black pepper seeds, ginger, salt, and 2 eggs (increase libido). Women in Malaysia take jamu to preserve their body shape and to provide nutrition during pregnancy. Praneem causes local cell-mediated immunity in the uterus. Clinical trials of Praneem with or without the hCG vaccine are planned.

  6. Abortion and contraceptive failure.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    Persona, marketed by Unipath, is a new method of natural family planning which has been on the market since 1996. It works by measuring the hormone levels in a woman's urine and letting her know when she is not fertile and may have sex without using a barrier method of contraception. The British Pregnancy Advisory Service (BPAS) found that their surveyed clients who reported using Persona had 188 abortions in 3 months and concluded that there was a need for better information and more advice for couples who plan to use the method. The other major non-NHS abortion provider, Marie Stopes International, reported similar findings, with about 60 women per month visiting their clinics for abortions after having used the method. The BPAS survey also showed that 43% of the women who had an abortion after using Persona were aged 24 years or younger even though Persona is intended for use by women aged 25-40 years in stable relationships. A similar proportion also reported having sex on days when the method told them that they were most fertile. These latter women were not asked if they used another method of contraception on fertile days. An additional 13% reported ignoring the instructions to wait for 3 natural periods after terminating pill use before beginning to use Persona.

  7. Adolescent contraception: nonhormonal methods.

    PubMed

    Kulig, J W

    1989-06-01

    A comparison of the advantages, disadvantages, and costs of each method is presented in Table 1. Barrier methods of contraception offer adolescents protection against both pregnancy and STDs, but innovative approaches are needed to enhance availability and acceptability. Condom use in conjunction with a vaginal spermicide would provide optimal protection. The "female condom" may prove to be an effective alternative. Diaphragms and cervical caps can be prescribed for well-educated, highly motivated adolescents comfortable with insertion and removal. The vaginal contraceptive sponge provides many of the advantages of the diaphragm and cap without the need for an examination and fitting and also may be used as a backup method with the condom. Vaginal spermicides used alone are significantly less effective than in combination with a mechanical barrier. The IUD is not considered appropriate for most adolescents due to its association with an increased risk of pelvic infection. Periodic abstinence requires accurate identification of the fertile period, extensive education, and partner cooperation. Sterilization is rarely considered an option in adolescents. Alternate forms of sexual expression are available to adolescents who choose to abstain from intercourse.

  8. The vaginal contraceptive sponge.

    PubMed

    Edelman, D A

    1984-06-01

    The vaginal contraceptive sponge, approved on April 1, 1983 by the US Food Administration (FDA) for sale in the US as a single use, disposable, over-the-counter contraceptive, is made of polyurethane and designed to be biocompatible with the vaginal environment. The sponge is available in a single size, is round, and about 5.5 cm in diameter and 2.5 cm thick. An indentation on 1 side helps to ensure the sponge's correct placement against the cervix. A polyester retrieval loop attached to the sponge facilitates removal. Postcoital tests of the sponge without the spermicide indicated that it was ineffective in preventing sperm from entering the cervical canal. Before insertion, the contraceptive sponge is moistened with tap water to activate the spermicide and is inserted into the vagina with the indentation placed against the cervis. The sponge has been designed to provide continuous protection against pregnancy for at least 24 hours after insertion. Following a successful phase ii clinical trail of the sponge, in 1979 comparative phase iii clinical trials were initiated by Family Health International. The following trials were conducted: sponge versus the diaphragm (arcing-spring) used with a spermicide (nonoxynol-9) at 13 clinics in the US (1439 subjects) and at 2 clinics in Canada and the UK (502 subjects); sponge versus a foaming spermicidal (menfegol) suppository at 5 clinics in Yugoslavia, Taiwan, and Bangladesh (1386) subjects); and sponge versus spermicidal (nonoxynol-9) foam at 2 clinics in Israel and Thailand (366 subjects). In all trials the contraceptive methods were raondomly assigned. Clinics were required to follow up subjects for 1 year. Only the US study has been completed. In the comparative trials of the sponge and diaphragm (both US based and overseas) the pregnancy rates were significantly higher for the sponge. In the comparative trials of the sponge and foaming suppositories or spermicidal foam there were no significant differences between the

  9. European society of contraception statement on contraception in obese women.

    PubMed

    Merki-Feld, Gabriele S; Skouby, Sven; Serfaty, David; Lech, Medard; Bitzer, Johannes; Crosignani, Pier Giorgio; Cagnacci, Angelo; Sitruk-Ware, Regine

    2015-02-01

    The obesity 'epidemic' continues to increase, mostly but not only in developed countries. As overweight and obese women are at an increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) at baseline and at a much higher risk during pregnancy, it is essential to help these women to plan pregnancies carefully and to use contraceptives with a positive ratio of benefits versus risks. The Expert Group on hormonal and molecular contraception of the European Society of Contraception convened to review the existing evidence and propose recommendations to the prescribers in line with most recent studies and with the Medical Eligibility Criteria of the World Health Organisation.

  10. Contraceptive prevalence and preference in a cohort of south–east Nigerian women

    PubMed Central

    Egede, John Okafor; Onoh, Robinson Chukwudi; Umeora, Odidika Ugochukwu Joannes; Iyoke, Chukwuemeka Anthony; Dimejesi, Ikechukwu Benedict Okechukwu; Lawani, Lucky Osaheni

    2015-01-01

    Background Rates of fertility, population growth, and maternal deaths in Nigeria are among the highest in the world, with an estimated 4% of all births being unwanted and 7% mistimed. These are caused mainly by nonuse, inappropriate choice, and difficulty in accessing contraceptive commodities. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and factors influencing the choice and sources of contraceptive options among market women in Ebonyi State, Nigeria. Methods This was a questionnaire-based, cross-sectional, descriptive study involving 330 market women of reproductive age in Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria. A survey was carried out to identify their knowledge, use, and sources of contraception and the factors that influence their contraceptive practices. Results Knowledge of contraception was high (275 [83.3%]), and 229 (69.4%) of the study population approved of contraceptive use. However, only 93 (28.3%) of the respondents were currently using any form of contraception. Fifty-four women (16.3%) were using modern methods. The commonly used forms of modern contraception were the barrier method (male condoms, 27 [8.2%]), the oral contraceptive pill (10 [3.0%]), injectables (8 [2.5%]), and the intrauterine contraceptive device (7 [2.0%]). The most common source of contraceptive products was patent medicine dealers (58 [51%]). The main barriers to use of contraception were desire for more children (86 [26.1%]), religious prohibition (62 [18.8%]), spousal disapproval (32 [9.7%]), and the perceived side effects of modern contraceptives (25 [7.6%]). There was a significant association for approval of contraception when the model was adjusted for religion (odds ratio [OR] 0.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.18–0.84; P=0.02); educational status (OR 2.84, 95% CI 0.96–8.40; P=0.04); parity (OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.09–2.85; P=0.03); and social class (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.26–5.11; P=0.01). Conclusion There is good knowledge about contraception among Nigerian

  11. A balanced JA/ABA status may correlate with adaptation to osmotic stress in Vitis cells.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ahmed; Seo, Mitsunori; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kamiya, Yuji; Nick, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Water-related stress is considered a major type of plant stress. Osmotic stress, in particular, represents the common part of all water-related stresses. Therefore, plants have evolved different adaptive mechanisms to cope with osmotic-related disturbances. In the current work, two grapevine cell lines that differ in their osmotic adaptability, Vitis rupestris and Vitis riparia, were investigated under mannitol-induced osmotic stress. To dissect signals that lead to adaptability from those related to sensitivity, osmotic-triggered responses with respect to jasmonic acid (JA) and its active form JA-Ile, abscisic acid (ABA), and stilbene compounds, as well as the expression of their related genes were observed. In addition, the transcript levels of the cellular homeostasis gene NHX1 were examined. The data are discussed with a hypothesis suggesting that a balance of JA and ABA status might correlate with cellular responses, either guiding cells to sensitivity or to progress toward adaptation.

  12. Effect of Moderate Aerobic Exercise Training on Autonomic Functions and its Correlation with the Antioxidant Status.

    PubMed

    Gupt, Anju Madan; Kumar, Mukesh; Sharma, Rajesh Kumar; Misra, Rajesh; Gupt, Anadi

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic exercise is a proven measure to enhance the cardio-respiratory efficiency. This improvement isprimarily due to improvement in autonomic function where in there is increase in the parasympathetic function and decrease in sympathetic function. Exercise also affects many metabolic activities in our body and may be one of the factors which reduce the oxidative stress. The aim of the present study was to see the effect of moderate aerobic exercise training on autonomic function and its correlation with antioxidant status. 30 healthy volunteers in the age group of 18-22 years were screened. Autonomic function tests included activity (tone) and reactivity parameters. Antioxidant status was assessed by the level of malondialdehyde in plasma. We observed a significant change in SBP, DBP, LF nu, HF nu, delta value of DBP in CPT and MDA. Our findings are consistent with earlier findings that short duration physical training is known to reduce blood pressure and that there is a relationship between HF (in HRV) and training response Physical exercise also provides a favorable change in the biochemical parameters such as MDA.

  13. Contraception-related venous thromboembolism in adolescents.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Sarah H

    2014-02-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a rare but serious complication of combined hormonal contraception. While the absolute risk of VTE is low in adolescents, thrombotic events in contraception users younger than the age of 20 years account for 5 to 10% of total contraception-related VTE events in population studies, because of the high frequency of contraception use in adolescents. An increased risk of VTE exists not only with oral contraceptives, but also the contraceptive patch and vaginal ring. Most adolescents who experience contraception-related VTE have additional transient or inherited thrombotic risk factors at the time of VTE. Although the presence of inherited thrombophilia impacts the risk of contraception-related VTE, thrombophilia screening before contraception prescribing should be targeted only to high-risk populations. Pediatric institutions, caregivers, and young women need to be aware of the risk of VTE with estrogen-containing contraception, and maintain a high index of suspicion for this complication in women using these agents.

  14. Correlations between posterior longitudinal ligament status and size of bone fragment in thoracolumbar burst fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhaohui; Zhou, Yanhong; Li, Ningning; Xie, Xiangtao

    2015-01-01

    This study aim to determine the correlation between the size of bone fragment and injury of posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL). In this study retrospectively analyze medical chart of patients with thoracolumbar burst fractures from June 2010 to December 2012. Patients were divided into two groups (Intact group and Disrupted group) according to the result of MRI assessing status of PLL. All the fractures were classified according to the Arbeit Fuer Osteoosynthese (AO) classification system. Neurological status was classified according to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA). Mimics measured the height and width of bone fragment (HBF and WBF), transverse canal diameter (TCD) and calculate the height of posterior wall of the injury vertebrae, ratio of height of bone fragment occupying height of posterior wall of vertebrae body (RHBF) and ratio of width of bone fragment occupying transverse canal diameter (RWBF). The results indicated that 52 patients were included in the study. There are 31 patients with intact PLL and 21 patients with disrupted PLL. There was significant difference on the HBF (t = -3.646, P = 0.001), WBF (t = -3.615, P = 0.001), RHBF (t = -4.124, P = 0.000) and RWBF (t = -3.305, P = 0.002) between the intact group and injury group. There was a significant correlation between injury of PLL and ASIA grade (OR = 7.851, P = 0.005), and AO classification (OR = 6.401, P = 0.011), and RHBF (OR = 6.455, P = 0.011), and HBF (OR = 5.208, P = 0.022). In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that AO classification, ASIA grade, HBF and RHBF could act as the predictors of injury of PLL. PMID:25932230

  15. Ovarian reserve screening before contraception?

    PubMed

    Kushnir, Vitaly A; Barad, David H; Gleicher, Norbert

    2014-11-01

    Women are increasingly delaying conception to later years. Hormonal contraception induces artificial cyclicity, which does not, like natural cyclicity, reflect normal, physiological ovarian behaviour. Therefore, long-term users of hormonal contraceptives, in particular, fail to derive potential diagnostic benefits from changes in menstrual cyclicity, which usually alerts patients and physicians to developing ovarian pathology. Timely diagnosis of ovarian problems is further hampered, as anti-Müllerian hormone is suppressed by hormonal contraceptives, making the accurate assessment of functional ovarian reserve more difficult. Women on long-term hormonal contraceptives who develop premature ovarian senescence at young ages, therefore, often go undiagnosed until termination of hormonal contraception, when they present with either post-contraception amenorrhea, other menstrual abnormalities or infertility. As evolving screening options now permit the detection of young women at risk for premature ovarian senescence, it is proposed that young women are offered 'risk screening' for premature ovarian senescence before starting long-term hormonal contraception. A potential protocol is outlined.

  16. Male contraception: expanding reproductive choice.

    PubMed

    Rajalakshmi, M

    2005-11-01

    The development of steroid-based oral contraceptives had revolutionized the availability of contraceptive choice for women. In order to expand the contraceptive options for couples by developing an acceptable, safe and effective male contraceptive, scientists have been experimenting with various steroidal/non-steroidal regimens to suppress testicular sperm production. The non-availability of a long-acting androgen was a limiting factor in the development of a male contraceptive regimen since all currently tested anti-spermatogenic agents also concurrently decrease circulating testosterone levels. A combination regimen of long-acting progestogen and androgen would have advantage over an androgen-alone modality since the dose of androgen required would be much smaller in the combination regimen, thereby decreasing the adverse effects of high steroid load. The progestogen in the combination regimen would act as the primary anti-spermatogenic agent. Currently, a number of combination regimens using progestogen or GnRH analogues combined with androgen are undergoing trials. The side effects of long-term use of androgens and progestogens have also undergone evaluation in primate models and the results of these studies need to be kept in view, while considering steroidal regimens for contraceptive use in men. Efforts are also being made to popularize non-scalpel vasectomy and to develop condoms of greater acceptability. The development of contraceptive vaccines for men, using sperm surface epitopes not expressed in female reproductive tract as source, still requires considerable research efforts.

  17. Contraceptive effects of extended lactational amenorrhoea: beyond the Bellagio Consensus.

    PubMed

    Short, R V; Lewis, P R; Renfree, M B; Shaw, G

    1991-03-23

    We have recorded the duration of lactational anovulation and amenorrhoea in a well-nourished group of Australian women who breastfed their babies throughout the study. The data enabled us to compare the theoretical cumulative probability of conception among breastfeeding women who had unprotected intercourse irrespective of their menstrual status with that of those who had unprotected intercourse only during lactational amenorrhoea. Breastfeeding alone is not an effective form of contraception, since all the women in our study resumed normal ovulation while still breastfeeding. However, among women who have unprotected intercourse only during lactational amenorrhoea but adopt other contraceptive measures when they resume menstruation, only 1.7% would have become pregnant during the first 6 months of amenorrhoea, only 7% after 12 months, and only 13% after 24 months. Thus for our women it would be possible to extend the Bellagio Consensus Conference guidelines which stated that lactational amenorrhoea can only be relied on as a contraceptive for the first 6 months post-partum in women who are fully or almost fully breastfeeding. The lactational amenorrhoea method can be relied on for excellent contraceptive protection in the first 6 months of breastfeeding, irrespective of when supplements are introduced into the baby's diet; for women who continue to breastfeed the method can also give good protection for up to 12 months post partum. Once menstruation has returned, other forms of contraception are essential to prevent pregnancy.

  18. Emergency contraception: Focus on the facts.

    PubMed

    Najera, Deanna Bridge

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress on contraception, and in particular emergency contraception, has been made in the past decade. Emergency contraception was first introduced as a stand-alone prescription in 1998, and the interaction of politics and medicine meant a tumultuous course to the drug becoming available over the counter. This article reviews how emergency contraception works, the effectiveness of different methods, pros and cons, and the history of emergency contraception.

  19. [When is breast feeding contraceptive?].

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    Breast-feeding has always been perceived as a contraceptive measure, probably because it is associated with amenorrhea. However, many pregnancies occur during breast-feeding, often quite soon after delivery. A pregnancy occurring 3 months after delivery is considered at risk for both the mother and child. Three conditions are necessary for a 98% contraceptive efficacy of lactation: total amenorrhea; exclusive breast-feeding on demand, both day and night; and occurrence within the first 6 months postpartum. If the three conditions are met, no additional contraceptive method is needed. Beyond 6 months, another method should be used.

  20. [Mercilon - the optimal oral contraceptive].

    PubMed

    Rachev, E; Damianov, L; Kolarov, G; Novachkov, V; Ivanov, S

    2000-01-01

    The authors review the effect of the oral contraceptive Mercilon on menstrual cycle, contraceptive efficacy, lipid profile, safety profile and adverse effects in a group of 32 women, included in the survey. The results of the trial show excellent contraceptive effect with Pearl Index of 0.00 and good control over the menstrual cycle. No negative or unfavorable effects were seen on the lipid profile as well as on the liver kidney and coangulant system function. Minor side effects were seen in only 5% of the patients.

  1. Behavioral Correlates of Primates Conservation Status: Intrinsic Vulnerability to Anthropogenic Threats

    PubMed Central

    Lootvoet, Amélie Christelle; Philippon, Justine; Bessa-Gomes, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral traits are likely to influence species vulnerability to anthropogenic threats and in consequence, their risk of extinction. Several studies have addressed this question and have highlighted a correlation between reproductive strategies and different viability proxies, such as introduction success and local extinction risk. Yet, very few studies have investigated the effective impact of social behaviour, and evidence regarding global extinction risk remains scant. Here we examined the effects of three main behavioral factors: the group size, the social and reproductive system, and the strength of sexual selection on global extinction risk. Using Primates as biological model, we performed comparative analysis on 93 species. The conservation status as described by the IUCN Red List was considered as a proxy for extinction risk. In addition, we added previously identified intrinsic factors of vulnerability to extinction, and a measure of the strength of the human impact for each species, described by the human footprint. Our analysis highlighted a significant effect of two of the three studied behavioral traits, group size and social and reproductive system. Extinction risk is negatively correlated with mean group size, which may be due to an Allee effect resulting from the difficulties for solitary and monogamous species to find a partner at low densities. Our results also indicate that species with a flexible mating system are less vulnerable. Taking into account these behavioral variables is thus of high importance when establishing conservation plans, particularly when assessing species relative vulnerability. PMID:26444966

  2. Correlation analysis of hyperspectral absorption features with the water status of coast live oak leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Ruiliang; Ge, Shaokui; Kelly, Nina M.; Gong, Peng

    2002-01-01

    A total of 139 reflectance spectra (between 350 and 2500 nm) from coast live oak (Quercus Agrifolia) leaves were measured in the laboratory with a spectrometer FieldSpec½Pro FR. Correlation analysis was conducted between absorption features, three-band ratio indices derived from the spectra and corresponding relative water content (RWC, %) of oak leaves. The experimental results indicate that there exist linear relationships between the RWC of oak leaves and absorption feature parameters: wavelength position (WAVE), absorption feature depth (DEP), width (WID) and the multiplication of DEP and WID (AREA) at the 975 nm, 1200 nm and 1750 nm positions and two three-band ratio indices: RATIO975 and RATIO1200, derived at 975 nm and 1200 nm. AREA has a higher and more stable correlation with RWC compared to other features. It is worthy of noting that the two three-band ratio indices, RATIO975 and RATIO1200, may have potential application in assessing water status in vegetation.

  3. Barrier methods of contraception.

    PubMed

    Skrine, R L

    1985-05-01

    Barrier methods of contraception make up an essential part of the present contraceptive range, and doctors need to know in detail how to choose and fit them as well as how to instruct patients in their use. This discussion reviews the mode of action of the barrier method and then focuses on the vaginal diaphragm, the cervical or vault cap, the collatex (Today) sponge, condoms, emotionl problems associated with the use of barrier methods, advantages of barrier methods, and future developments. Barrier methods of contraception are only effective if used consistently and carefully. Failure rates vary greatly between studies, but in selected populations the failure rate for the diaphragm with spermicide can be as low as 1.9/100 woman years (wy) and for the condom 3.6 per 100wy (Vessey et al., 1982). If known user failures are removed, the figure for the condom can drop to as low as 0.4 per 100wy (John, 1973), which compares favorably with that of the combined oral contraceptive. Other studies quote failure rates of 10 per 100wy or more. These methods call for considerable participation by the patient at or before each act of intercourse and there is, therefore, great scope for inefficient use, either as a result of poor instruction or because couples find that they interfere with happy, relaxed sexual activity -- or fear that they may do so. Doctors need to understand the feelings of their patients before recommending them. The aim of a barrier method is to prevent live sperm from meeting the ovum. This is accomplished by the combination of a physical barrier with a spermicide. In the case of the condom, the integrity of the physical barrier is the most important factor, although some patients feel more secure with an additional spermicide. The vaginal barriers used at present do not produce a "water-tight" fit, and the principle is that the spermicide is held over the cervix by the barrier. It is also possible that the device acts partially by holding the alkaline

  4. [Contraception and society].

    PubMed

    Miyahara, S

    1988-01-01

    Dramatic decreases in the birth rate between 1947 and 1955 in Japan is due to legalized abortion and wide-spread practice of contraception but is also to some socio-economic changes. In 1947, the birth rate in Japan reached its highest, 34.3/1000 but dramatically decreased by 50% over the next 8 years. The birth rate, which went down to 17.2/1000 in 1955, increased again gradually till 1974 but has been decreasing. Total fertility rate is 1.8 as of now. Eugenic Law was passed in 1948 in Japan. 30% had the experience of contraception in 1950; 52% in 1955; 63% in 1959; 72% in 1965. 15% experienced abortion in 1952; 27%, in 1955; 41% in 1961. A post war baby boom occurred amid shortage of food, shelter and employment, and the experience of poverty prompted people to limit the size of family. Post-war Japan no longer was obsessed with producing an heir. Neither was there a need to produce many children because of improved infant mortality rates. Due to the fast paced industrialization of Japan between 1950 and 1960 a potentially high fertility population migrated from rural to urban areas, where big families were not advantageous. Although the socio economic life of Japanese people greatly improved after 1960, the birth rate has not increased very much. Money is now used more for material comforts in daily life, leisure, and education of small number of children. There is also a trend among some part of population not to have children because of environmental deterioration.

  5. Oral Health and Oral Contraceptive - Is it a Shadow behind Broad Day Light? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Patthi, Basavaraj; Singla, Ashish; Gupta, Ritu; Dhama, Kuldeep; Niraj, Lav Kumar; Kumar, Jishnu Krishna; Prasad, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oral contraceptives are one of the risk factors for gingival disease. Oral contraceptives can affect the proliferation of cell, growth and differentiation of tissues in the periodontium. Nowadays recent research has suggested that the newer generation oral contraceptives have less influence on gingival diseases. Aim The purpose of this study was to systematically review the effect of oral contraceptives on periodontium. Materials and Methods A literature review was performed; PubMed, PubMed Central and Cochrane Library, Embase, Google Scholar were searched from 1970 up to December 2015 to identify appropriate studies. Results Out of the total 94 titles appeared 13 articles fulfilled the criteria and were selected for the review. Two articles which were hand searched and one article which was through e-mail was also included. The hormones progesterone and estrogen have direct impact on immune system of the body and thus, affect the pattern and rate of collagen production in the gingiva. Furthermore, the review also shows that longer duration usage of oral contraceptive could lead to poorer oral hygiene status, gingival inflammation and increased susceptibility to periodontal disease. Conclusion There are relatively few studies evaluating the effect of oral contraceptives on periodontium. It was found that oral contraceptives have a marked effect on periodontium. The gingival changes after use of oral contraceptives are pronounced in the first few months and with the passage of time these changes get enhanced. PMID:28050520

  6. FastStats: Contraceptive Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inflicted Injury Life Stages and Populations Age Groups Adolescent Health Child Health Infant Health Older Persons' Health ... Contraceptive Use Infertility Reproductive Health Notice Regarding FastStats Mobile Application Get Email Updates To receive email updates ...

  7. Media exposure increases contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    Retherford, R D; Mishra, V

    1997-08-01

    India's national family welfare program has been broadcasting family planning messages on the radio and television for many years. The electronic mass media play a major role in teaching women about the benefits of small families and providing them with information on contraception. Radio and television are particularly important in India, a country in which 63% of currently married reproductive-age women are illiterate. An analysis of nationally representative data from India's 1992-93 National Family Health Survey (NFHS) on 84,558 currently married women aged 13-49 years indicates that general exposure to radio, television, and cinema has a strong positive effect upon current contraceptive use and the intended future use of contraception. Specific exposure to family planning messages has a significant positive effect upon current and intended future contraceptive behavior beyond the general effect of media exposure.

  8. Progestin-Only Oral Contraceptives

    MedlinePlus

    ... oral contraceptives are a very effective method of birth control, but they do not prevent the spread of ... on another day, use a backup method of birth control (such as a condom and/or a spermicide) ...

  9. How Effective Is Male Contraception?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Resources and Publications How effective is male contraception? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... health care providers to determine which method of birth control is best for them. For men, methods of ...

  10. Use of and access to oral and injectable contraceptives in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Mareni Rocha; Leite, Silvana Nair; Tavares, Noemia Urruth Leão; Oliveira, Maria Auxiliadora; Arrais, Paulo Sergio Dourado; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso; Pizzol, Tatiane da Silva Dal; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Mengue, Sotero Serrate

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze the prevalence of current use of oral and injectable contraceptives by Brazilian women, according to demographic and socioeconomic variables and issues related to access to those medicines. METHODS A cross-sectional, population-based analytical study with probability sampling based on data from the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos (PNAUM – National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines), carried out between September 2013 and February 2014 in 20,404 Brazilian urban households. Prevalence was calculated based on reports from non-pregnant women aged 15-49 on the use of oral or injectable contraceptives. The independent variables were gender, age, level of education, socioeconomic class, Brazilian region and marital status. Also analyzed were access, means of payment, sources, and reported medicines. Statistical analyses considered 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) and Pearson Chi-square test to evaluate the statistical significance of differences between groups, considering a 5% significance level. RESULTS Prevalence of use was 28.2% for oral contraceptives (OC) and 4.5% for injectable contraceptives (IC). The highest prevalence of oral contraceptives was in the South region (37.5%) and the lowest in the North region (15.7%). For injectable contraceptives there was no difference between regions. Access was higher for oral contraceptive users (90.7%) than injectable contraceptives users (81.2%), as was direct payment (OC 78.1%, IC 58.0%). Users who paid for contraceptives acquired them at retail pharmacies (OC 95.0% and IC 86.6%) and at Farmácia Popular (Popular Pharmacy Program) (OC 4.8% and IC 12.7%). Free of charge contraceptives were mostly obtained from the Brazilian Unified Health System – SUS (OC 86.7%; IC 96.0%). Free samples were reported by 10.4% of users who did not pay for oral contraceptives. Most of paying users did not try to obtain

  11. [Guidance on use of contraceptive methods. What contraceptive method should be used?].

    PubMed

    Osler, M

    1991-02-18

    Advice on contraceptive methods must take into consideration the general health status of the woman, including adiposity, blood pressure, smoking, and medications used. Age and previous births or abortions, for instance, have a bearing on choosing the IUD. The stability of the relationship with the partner or spouse is important with regard to sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The couple's preference is of prime importance. Information about different methods for all age groups is available in the form of books, videos, and films. Educational materials for students is a high priority, because a timely and through knowledge of protection prevents future problems. The sensational stories and unbalanced reports on sexuality by the daily press is often harmful. The method chosen has to be effective, easy to use, inexpensive and free of risks and side effects. The introduction of low-dose oral contraceptives has minimized risks, and fears about side effects have been exaggerated. A detailed tallying of the risks and benefits creates uncertainty in the patient, and thus increases the risk of noncompliance. The correct use of the condom and the diaphragm requires care. If some basic rules were observed, the number of abortions per year could decrease from 20,000 to 10,000-15,000. These guidelines include: high efficacy, protection against STDs, postcoital contraception in case of omission, regular annual medical checkups, taking no chances with unprotected sex and considering sterilization when family size has been completed.

  12. Percentage tumor necrosis following chemotherapy in neuroblastoma correlates with MYCN status but not survival.

    PubMed

    Bomken, Simon; Davies, Beverley; Chong, Leeai; Cole, Michael; Wood, Katrina M; McDermott, Michael; Tweddle, Deborah A

    2011-03-01

    The percentage of chemotherapy-induced necrosis in primary tumors corresponds with outcome in several childhood malignancies, including high-risk metastatic diseases. In this retrospective pilot study, the authors assessed the importance of postchemotherapy necrosis in high-risk neuroblastoma with a histological and case notes review of surgically resected specimens. The authors reviewed all available histology of 31 high-risk neuroblastoma cases treated with COJEC (dose intensive etoposide and vincristine with either cyclophosphamide, cisplatin or carboplatin) or OPEC/OJEC (etoposide, vincristine and cyclophosphamide with alternating cisplatin [OPEC] or carboplatin [OJEC]) induction chemotherapy in 2 Children's Cancer & Leukaemia Group (CCLG) pediatric oncology centers. The percentage of postchemotherapy necrosis was assessed and compared with MYCN amplification status and overall survival. The median percentage of postchemotherapy tumor necrosis was 60%. MYCN status was available for 28 cases, of which 12 were amplified (43%). Survival in cases with ≥ 60% necrosis or ≥ 90% necrosis was not better than those with less necrosis, nor was percentage necrosis associated with survival using Cox regression. However, MYCN-amplified tumors showed a higher percentage of necrosis than non-MYCN-amplified tumors, 71.3% versus 37.2% (P = .006). This effect was not related to prechemotherapy necrosis and did not confer improved overall survival. Postchemotherapy tumor necrosis is higher in patients with MYCN amplification. In this study, postchemotherapy necrosis did not correlate with overall survival and should not lead to modification of postoperative treatment. However, these findings need to be confirmed in a larger prospective study of children with high-risk neuroblastoma.

  13. Individuals with hematological malignancies before undergoing chemotherapy present oxidative stress parameters and acute phase proteins correlated with nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Carolina de Quadros; Borges, Dayanne da Silva; de Oliveira, Paula Fernanda; Chagas, Thayz Rodrigues; Del Moral, Joanita Angela Gonzaga; Durigon, Giovanna Steffanello; Dias, Bruno Vieira; Vieira, André Guedes; Gaspareto, Patrick; Trindade, Erasmo Benício Santos de Moraes; Nunes, Everson Araújo

    2015-01-01

    Hematological malignancies present abnormal blood cells that may have altered functions. This study aimed to evaluate nutritional status, acute phase proteins, parameters of cell's functionality, and oxidative stress of patients with hematological malignancies, providing a representation of these variables at diagnosis, comparisons between leukemias and lymphomas and establishing correlations. Nutritional status, C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin, phagocytic capacity and superoxide anion production of mononuclear cells, lipid peroxidation and catalase activity in plasma were evaluated in 16 untreated subjects. Main diagnosis was acute leukemia (n = 9) and median body mass index (BMI) indicated overweight (25.6 kg/m(2)). Median albumin was below (3.2 g/dL) and CRP above (37.45 mg/L) the reference values. Albumin was inversely correlated with BMI (r = -0.53). Most patients were overweight before the beginning of treatment and had a high CRP/albumin ratio, which may indicate a nutrition inflammatory risk. BMI values correlated positively with lipid peroxidation and catalase activity. A strong correlation between catalase activity and lipid peroxidation was found (r = 0.75). Besides the elevated BMI, these patients also have elevated CRP values and unexpected relations between nutritional status and albumin, reinforcing the need for nutritional counseling during the course of chemotherapy, especially considering the correlations between oxidative stress parameters and nutritional status evidenced here.

  14. Beyond the Condom: Frontiers in Male Contraception.

    PubMed

    Roth, Mara Y; Amory, John K

    2016-05-01

    Nearly half of all pregnancies worldwide are unplanned, despite numerous contraceptive options available. No new contraceptive method has been developed for men since the invention of condom. Nevertheless, more than 25% of contraception worldwide relies on male methods. Therefore, novel effective methods of male contraception are of interest. Herein we review the physiologic basis for both male hormonal and nonhormonal methods of contraception. We review the history of male hormonal contraception development, current hormonal agents in development, as well as the potential risks and benefits of male hormonal contraception options for men. Nonhormonal methods reviewed will include both pharmacological and mechanical approaches in development, with specific focus on methods which inhibit the testicular retinoic acid synthesis and action. Multiple hormonal and nonhormonal methods of male contraception are in the drug development pathway, with the hope that a reversible, reliable, safe method of male contraception will be available to couples in the not too distant future.

  15. The contraception needs of the perimenopausal woman.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Sarah M R; Gebbie, Ailsa E

    2014-08-01

    Perimenopausal women have low fertility but must still be advised to use contraception until natural sterility is reached if they are sexually active. Patterns of contraceptive use vary in different countries worldwide. Long-acting reversible contraceptive methods offer reliable contraception that may be an alternative to sterilisation. Hormonal methods confer significant non-contraceptive benefits, and each individual woman should weigh up the benefits and risks of a particular method. No method of contraception is contraindicated by age alone, although combined hormonal contraception and injectable progestogens are not recommended for women over the age of 50 years. The intrauterine system has particular advantages as a low-dose method of effective hormonal contraception, which also offers control of menstrual dysfunction and endometrial protection in women requiring oestrogen replacement. Condoms are recommended for personal protection against sexually transmitted infections in new relationships. Standard hormone replacement therapy is not a method of contraception.

  16. Emergency contraception and Catholic hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bucar, L; Nolan, D

    1999-01-01

    The "Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care," which outline policies for Catholic hospitals in the US, are ambiguous on the topic of emergency contraception. Recent evidence suggests that, in the absence of definitive guidelines, Catholic hospitals are erring on the side of not providing emergency contraception. A survey of 589 US Catholic hospitals conducted by Catholics for a Free Choice found that 82% refused to supply emergency contraception--even to rape victims. Directive 36, which governs cases of sexual assault, could be argued to sanction the provision of emergency contraception. It states, "A female who has been raped should be able to defend herself against a potential conception from the sexual assault. If, after appropriate testing, there is no evidence that conception has occurred already, she may be treated with medications that would prevent ovulation, sperm capacitation, or fertilization. It is not permissible, however, to initiate or to recommend treatments that have as their purpose or direct effect the removal, destruction, or interference with the implantation of a fertilized ovum." Because the process of conception takes approximately 2 days, it would be consistent with the Catholic Church's position to offer emergency contraception within 24 hours of a rape. Since no currently available test can confirm or deny conception as early as 72 hours after unprotected intercourse, the timetable for emergency contraception, Catholic hospitals should be able to provide this service to all women and still abide by the directives.

  17. Urban adolescent females' views on the implant and contraceptive decision-making: a double paradox.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, H; Miller, S; Martinez, E; Loeb, L; Darney, P

    1997-01-01

    Focus groups and in-depth interviews were used to explore the decline in popularity of the contraceptive implant in a clinic-based sample of 41 ethnically diverse, urban, sexually active adolescents. While these teenagers' socioeconomic status and patterns of inconsistent contraceptive use made them potentially ideal implant recipients, they were unlikely to select this method. Negative media reports about the method were less influential than social conditions such as peer perspectives and gender relations. Oral networks that propagated misinformation went unchallenged because of the silence of satisfied users. Personal factors such as future orientation, autonomous decision-making and value of control also influenced contraceptive decision-making.

  18. Contraceptive practices among women seeking termination of pregnancy in one public hospital in Eastern Cape, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Oluwole, Ebenezer O.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is significantly high contraceptive knowledge in South Africa, but the uptake of contraceptives is average to low with resultant soaring of unplanned pregnancy and rising statistics of termination of pregnancy (TOP) services. This study aimed to establish the contraceptive practices among women in the South African population seeking TOP in one public hospital in Eastern Cape, South Africa. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among women seeking TOP in a women’s clinic. Self-administered questionnaires were used as data collection tool, and the data collected were entered into SPSS software for analysis, using descriptive statistics to calculate frequencies and percentages while chi-square test was used to determine the associations between the socio-demography and contraceptive practices of the participants. Results Majority of the women were aged between 20 and 29 years, had secondary education, unemployed, single and resided in townships. Contraceptive uptake prior to termination of pregnancy (CTOP) among them was 44.1%, but 85.8% had good contraceptives knowledge. Their contraceptive practices are determined by partner’s opinion, source and availability of contraceptives, previous CTOP, side effect of contraceptives and having children. Age group, educational level and employment status were found to be related to the contraceptive practices of the participants but were not statistically significant. Conclusion To reduce unplanned pregnancies and subsequent number of women seeking CTOP, the socio-economic factors associated with contraceptive practices as well as the programmes, policies and guidelines of contraceptives need to be improved on for any improvement on the factors determining contraceptive practices. PMID:27608676

  19. Toward prevention of alcohol exposed pregnancies: characteristics that relate to ineffective contraception and risky drinking

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Stefania; Farrell, Leah V.; Penberthy, J. Kim; Ceperich, Sherry Dyche; Ingersoll, Karen S.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol-exposed pregnancy is a leading cause of preventable birth defects in the United States. This paper describes the motivational patterns that relate to risky drinking and ineffective contraception, two behaviors that can result in alcohol-exposed pregnancy. As part of an intervention study aimed at reducing alcohol-exposed pregnancy 124 women were recruited and reported demographic characteristics, readiness to change, stages of change, drinking, contraception, and sexual behavior history. Our results showed the following. Drinking: A significant positive correlation was found between the number of drinks consumed in 90 days and the Importance to reduce drinking (r = .23, p = .008). A significant negative correlation between number of drinks and confidence to reduce drinking (r = −.39, p = .000) was found as well. Significant differences were found in the total number of drinks consumed in 90 days between the five stages of change (F = (4,118), 3.12, p = .01). Women in Preparation reported drinking a significantly higher number of drinks than women in other stages of change. Contraception: There were significant negative correlations between ineffective contraception and Importance (r = −.38, p = .00), confidence (r = −.20, p = .02) and Readiness (r = −.43, p = .00) to use contraception effectively. Significant differences in contraception ineffectiveness were found for women in different stages of change (F = (4,115) 8.58, p = .000). Women in Precontemplation reported significantly higher levels of contraception ineffectiveness compared to women in other stages of change. Results show a clear relationship between higher alcohol consumption and higher levels of motivation to reduce drinking. In contrast, higher levels of ineffective contraception were related to lower levels of motivation to use contraception effectively. This suggests risky drinking may be better targeted with brief skills building interventions and ineffective contraception may

  20. Sexual and Reproductive Health Knowledge, Contraception Uptake, and Factors Associated with Unmet Need for Modern Contraception among Adolescent Female Sex Workers in China

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Megan S. C.; Zhang, Xu-Dong; Kennedy, Elissa; Li, Yan; Yang, Yin; Li, Lin; Li, Yun-Xia; Temmerman, Marleen; Luchters, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Objective In China, policy and social taboo prevent unmarried adolescents from accessing sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services. Research is needed to determine the SRH needs of highly disadvantaged groups, such as adolescent female sex workers (FSWs). This study describes SRH knowledge, contraception use, pregnancy, and factors associated with unmet need for modern contraception among adolescent FSWs in Kunming, China. Methods A cross-sectional study using a one-stage cluster sampling method was employed to recruit adolescents aged 15 to 20 years, and who self-reported having received money or gifts in exchange for sex in the past 6 months. A semi-structured questionnaire was administered by trained peer educators or health workers. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to determine correlates of low knowledge and unmet need for modern contraception. Results SRH knowledge was poor among the 310 adolescents surveyed; only 39% had heard of any long-acting reversible contraception (implant, injection or IUD). Despite 98% reporting not wanting to get pregnant, just 43% reported consistent condom use and 28% currently used another form of modern contraception. Unmet need for modern contraception was found in 35% of adolescents, and was associated with having a current non-paying partner, regular alcohol use, and having poorer SRH knowledge. Past abortion was common (136, 44%). In the past year, 76% had reported a contraception consultation but only 27% reported ever receiving SRH information from a health service. Conclusions This study demonstrated a low level of SRH knowledge, a high unmet need for modern contraception and a high prevalence of unintended pregnancy among adolescent FSWs in Kunming. Most girls relied on condoms, emergency contraception, or traditional methods, putting them at risk of unwanted pregnancy. This study identifies an urgent need for Chinese adolescent FSWs to be able to access quality SRH information and effective modern

  1. Sperm protamine-status correlates to the fertility of breeding bulls.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Sule; Vargovic, Peter; Oliveira, Rodrigo; Belser, Lauren E; Kaya, Abdullah; Moura, Arlindo; Sutovsky, Peter; Parrish, John; Topper, Einko; Memili, Erdoğan

    2015-04-01

    During fertilization, spermatozoa make essential contributions to embryo development by providing oocyte activating factors, centrosomal components, and paternal chromosomes. Protamines are essential for proper packaging of sperm DNA; however, in contrast to the studies of oocyte-related female infertility, the influence of sperm chromatin structure on male infertility has not been evaluated extensively. The objective of this study was to determine the sperm chromatin content of bull spermatozoa by evaluating DNA fragmentation, chromatin maturity/protamination, PRM1 protein status, and nuclear shape in spermatozoa from bulls with different fertility. Relationships between protamine 1 (PRM1) and the chromatin integrity were ascertained in spermatozoa from Holstein bulls with varied (high vs. low) but acceptable fertility. Sperm DNA fragmentation and chromatin maturity (protamination) were tested using Halomax assay and toluidine blue staining, respectively. The PRM1 content was assayed using Western blotting and in-gel densitometry, flow cytometry, and immunocytochemistry. Fragmentation of DNA was increased and chromatin maturity significantly reduced in spermatozoa from low-fertility bulls compared to those from high-fertility bulls. Field fertility scores of the bulls were negatively correlated with the percentage of spermatozoa displaying reduced protamination and fragmented DNA using toluidine blue and Halomax, respectively. Bull fertility was also positively correlated with PRM1 content by Western blotting and flow cytometry. However, detection of PRM1 content by Western blotting alone was not predictive of bull fertility. In immunocytochemistry, abnormal spermatozoa showed either a lack of PRM1 or scattered localization in the apical/acrosomal region of the nuclei. The nuclear shape was distorted in spermatozoa from low-fertility bulls. In conclusion, we showed that inadequate amount and localization of PRM1 were associated with defects in sperm chromatin

  2. Oral contraceptive agents.

    PubMed

    Shearman, R P

    1986-02-17

    The history of the development of oral contraceptives (OCs) has been a progressive reduction in dosage to what is now probably the lowest does that is compatible with the desired therapeutic effect -- to inhibit ovluation. Yet, controversy and argument continue. A table lists the OCs that are available in Australia. Many of these preparations, although having different trade names, have an identical composition. Since the withdrawal of sequential OCs from the Australian market, there are only 2 generic types. These are the progestogen only (mini) OCs, which consist of either 30 mcg of levonorgestrel or 350 mcg of norethisterone given at the same time every day; and the combined OCs, which contain an estrogen and a progestogen. In the last 12 months, some of the older high-dose OCs have been withdrawn, and it seems likely that further withdrawals will follow. Only 2 estrogens are used in the formulation of the OC, but there is a greater variety of progestogens. Ethinyl estradiol is used in most preparations. A small minority of OCs contain mestranol, the 3-methyl ether of ethinyl estradiol. Currently, there are only 4 OC agents that are available in Australia that contain mestranol and 2 of these contain the high doses of 100 mcg. Fundamentally, there are 2 types of progestogens -- those that contain, or are metabolized to, norethisterone and those that contain norgestrel or its close relative, desogestrel. With the exception of the norgestrel group and desogestrel, all other progestins, including norethisterone itself, are effective in vivo after they have been metablized to norethisterone. Mestranol is effective in humans after demethylation to ethinyl estradiol. In the norgesterel group, since d-norgestrel is inert endocrinologically, 250 mcg of levonorgestrel and 500 mcg of dl-norgestrel are equivalent. Levonorgestrel and desogestrel are of approximately equal potency. With the combined OC agents, the overwhelming mechanism of action is by the inhibition of the

  3. Oral contraceptives and cancer.

    PubMed

    Edgren, R A

    1991-01-01

    Concerns over the safety of oral contraceptives (OCs) have led to numerous empirical studies of the relationship of OC use to normal pregnancy outcomes, pituitary effects, cardiovascular accidents, and cancer. The article reviews some of the results of studies on the effects of OC use on ovarian, uterine, cervical, and breast cancer and on hepatic cancer and melanomas. Reference is made to direct study results rather than to reviews of studies, although it is noted that the critical reviews of Goldzieher and Realini reflect appropriate critiques of the validity of the methods employed in the analysis of cancers as well as cardiovascular risks. Concern is raised for meta-analysis of pooled data. In spite of the 30 years of research on OCs there is no definitive answer to the question of cause and effect. The epidemiological articles reviewed do not meet the standards of critical editorial review boards of experimental journals; confirmation of findings is also lacking. Studies suggesting increased risks as well as those showing positive benefits are questionable. The conclusion reached is that OCs protect against ovarian and uterine cancers and do not cause mammary, cervical, or liver cancer or melanoma. This conclusion is based on inconclusive data. The conclusion on hepatic cancer is that the 3 retrospective case control studies and anecdotal reports are flawed in design, and little confidence can be placed on such a limited number of cases. Malignant melanoma conclusions are that the data are inconsistent and hover around a risk of one for long-term OC-users. There is no increased risk related to OC-use. Ovarian cancer risk seems to be decreased in about 40% of OC-users. Endometrial cancer risk seems to be decreased, except for the sequential contraceptive Oracon which is associated with increased risk. Decreased risk is related to length of usage and continues after stoppage. Cervical carcinoma results appear to confirm the finding that prolonged OC use slightly

  4. Correlation between nutritional status and Staphylococcus colonization in hip and knee replacement patients.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Ran; Russell, Tara A; Shea, Megan; Slover, James D

    2011-01-01

    Orthopaedic patients with poor nutritional status are at an increased risk of postoperative complications, such as infection and wound healing. Nasal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus, especially with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, has been shown to be a risk factor for surgical-site infections. We examined the incidence of nutritional depletion in our arthroplasty population and its correlation with Staphylococcus aureus colonization. We conducted a retrospective review of prospectively collected data of our arthroplasty patient population. Patients with known Staphylococcus aureus colonization or surgical-site infection were compared with a random cohort of patients. Patient demographics, preoperative nasal culture, and two nutritional screening scores were collected. Six hundred and fifty-two patients underwent arthroplasty and completed preoperative nasal cultures and nutritional assessment. A high percentage (27%) of our patients demonstrated some level of nutritional depletion prior to joint replacement. Overall nutritional scores were not significantly associated with surgery-type, preoperative nasal culture, or surgical- site infection in our patient population.

  5. Parameters of oxidative stress status in healthy subjects: their correlations and stability after sample collection.

    PubMed

    Firuzi, Omidreza; Mladenka, Premysl; Riccieri, Valeria; Spadaro, Antonio; Petrucci, Rita; Marrosu, Giancarlo; Saso, Luciano

    2006-01-01

    It has been proposed that sample storage may have some influence on the parameters of oxidative stress status (OSS) in biological fluids. We measured four important OSS parameters in plasma of 23 healthy subjects and repeated the measurements in the same samples kept at -70 degrees C after different time intervals. Hydroperoxides and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were determined by ferrous ion oxidation in presence of xylenol orange (FOX) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays, respectively. Sulfhydryls and carbonyls were measured spectrophotometrically. In fresh samples, OSS seemed to increase with age and relatively good correlations were found among different parameters. The mean values of hydroperoxides (6.08 microM), TAC (0.334 mM Trolox equivalent), and sulfhydryls (0.562 mM) in fresh samples did not show any significant change after 1, 7, and 30 days of storage. Mean carbonyl concentration determined after 1 day storage (2.0 nmol/mg protein) did not change after 30 days. However, extents of changes in hydroperoxide concentrations varied considerably from one individual to another, even after 1 day. A similar phenomenon was observed in TAC, but after 7 days. We suggest measuring hydroperoxides in fresh samples and TAC maximally after 1 week. Sulfhydryls and carbonyls showed more stability and can be measured at least 1 month after sample collection.

  6. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-telomere association correlates with redox status in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Pariona-Llanos, Ricardo; Pavani, Raphael Souza; Reis, Marcelo; Noël, Vincent; Silber, Ariel Mariano; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a classical metabolic enzyme involved in energy production and plays a role in additional nuclear functions, including transcriptional control, recognition of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA and maintenance of telomere structure. Here, we show that the recombinant protein T. cruzi GAPDH (rTcGAPDH) binds single-stranded telomeric DNA. We demonstrate that the binding of GAPDH to telomeric DNA correlates with the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+/NADH). We observed that GAPDH-telomere association and NAD+/NADH balance changed throughout the T. cruzi life cycle. For example, in replicative epimastigote forms of T. cruzi, which show similar intracellular concentrations of NAD+ and NADH, GAPDH binds to telomeric DNA in vivo and this binding activity is inhibited by exogenous NAD+. In contrast, in the T. cruzi non-proliferative trypomastigote forms, which show higher NAD+ concentration, GAPDH was absent from telomeres. In addition, NAD+ abolishes physical interaction between recombinant GAPDH and synthetic telomere oligonucleotide in a cell free system, mimicking exogenous NAD+ that reduces GAPDH-telomere interaction in vivo. We propose that the balance in the NAD+/NADH ratio during T. cruzi life cycle homeostatically regulates GAPDH telomere association, suggesting that in trypanosomes redox status locally modulates GAPDH association with telomeric DNA.

  7. Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase-Telomere Association Correlates with Redox Status in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Pariona-Llanos, Ricardo; Pavani, Raphael Souza; Reis, Marcelo; Noël, Vincent; Silber, Ariel Mariano; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a classical metabolic enzyme involved in energy production and plays a role in additional nuclear functions, including transcriptional control, recognition of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA and maintenance of telomere structure. Here, we show that the recombinant protein T. cruzi GAPDH (rTcGAPDH) binds single-stranded telomeric DNA. We demonstrate that the binding of GAPDH to telomeric DNA correlates with the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+/NADH). We observed that GAPDH-telomere association and NAD+/NADH balance changed throughout the T. cruzi life cycle. For example, in replicative epimastigote forms of T. cruzi, which show similar intracellular concentrations of NAD+ and NADH, GAPDH binds to telomeric DNA in vivo and this binding activity is inhibited by exogenous NAD+. In contrast, in the T. cruzi non-proliferative trypomastigote forms, which show higher NAD+ concentration, GAPDH was absent from telomeres. In addition, NAD+ abolishes physical interaction between recombinant GAPDH and synthetic telomere oligonucleotide in a cell free system, mimicking exogenous NAD+ that reduces GAPDH-telomere interaction in vivo. We propose that the balance in the NAD+/NADH ratio during T. cruzi life cycle homeostatically regulates GAPDH telomere association, suggesting that in trypanosomes redox status locally modulates GAPDH association with telomeric DNA. PMID:25775131

  8. Social and Physical Environmental Correlates of Adults’ Weekend Sitting Time and Moderating Effects of Retirement Status and Physical Health

    PubMed Central

    Van Holle, Veerle; McNaughton, Sarah A.; Teychenne, Megan; Timperio, Anna; Van Dyck, Delfien; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Salmon, Jo

    2014-01-01

    Emerging research suggests that prolonged sedentary behaviour (SB) is detrimental to health. Changes in SB patterns are likely to occur during particular life stages, for example at retirement age (55–65-year-old). Evidence on socio-ecological SB correlates is scarce and inconsistent in this age group. Moreover, the influence of socio-ecological correlates may vary depending on health and retirement status. This study examined social and environment correlates of overall weekend day sitting among adults at or approaching retirement age, and moderating effects of perceived physical health and retirement status. Baseline data from the Wellbeing, Eating and Exercise for a Long Life study in 2839 Australian adults (55–65-year-old) were analysed. Participants self-reported proximal social factors, neighbourhood social and physical environment, physical health and retirement status. MLwiN multilevel regression analyses were conducted. In the multivariable model, only social support from friends/colleagues to discourage sitting (B = −0.891; p = 0.036) was associated with overall weekend day sitting. No moderation of retirement status, nor physical health were found in the multivariable results. Results from this study suggest the importance of social factors in relation to weekend day sitting among 55–65-year-old adults. Health promotion initiatives in this age group should pay special attention to enhancing social interaction opportunities. Moreover, findings suggest that SB-specific correlates may need to be examined in future research. PMID:25243886

  9. Social and physical environmental correlates of adults' weekend sitting time and moderating effects of retirement status and physical health.

    PubMed

    Van Holle, Veerle; McNaughton, Sarah A; Teychenne, Megan; Timperio, Anna; Van Dyck, Delfien; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Salmon, Jo

    2014-09-19

    Emerging research suggests that prolonged sedentary behaviour (SB) is detrimental to health. Changes in SB patterns are likely to occur during particular life stages, for example at retirement age (55-65-year-old). Evidence on socio-ecological SB correlates is scarce and inconsistent in this age group. Moreover, the influence of socio-ecological correlates may vary depending on health and retirement status. This study examined social and environment correlates of overall weekend day sitting among adults at or approaching retirement age, and moderating effects of perceived physical health and retirement status. Baseline data from the Wellbeing, Eating and Exercise for a Long Life study in 2839 Australian adults (55-65-year-old) were analysed. Participants self-reported proximal social factors, neighbourhood social and physical environment, physical health and retirement status. MLwiN multilevel regression analyses were conducted. In the multivariable model, only social support from friends/colleagues to discourage sitting (B = -0.891; p = 0.036) was associated with overall weekend day sitting. No moderation of retirement status, nor physical health were found in the multivariable results. Results from this study suggest the importance of social factors in relation to weekend day sitting among 55-65-year-old adults. Health promotion initiatives in this age group should pay special attention to enhancing social interaction opportunities. Moreover, findings suggest that SB-specific correlates may need to be examined in future research.

  10. [Correlation of bioelectric activity of maxillofacial muscles with postural status and chewing function in patients with disocclusion].

    PubMed

    Krechina, E K; Pogabalo, I V; Verzilova, M V; Markov, N M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation between the activity and the function of the maxillofacial muscles and the postural status in patients with the Class II malocclusions. The study revealed posture stabilizing function of sterno-cleido-mastoid muscles and interference of postural and maxillofacial muscles. In addition in class II patients asymmetric masticatory dysfunctions were identified.

  11. Fertility regulation technology: status and prospects.

    PubMed

    Segal, S J; Nordberg, O S

    1977-03-01

    The current status of and prospects for contraceptive methods is reviewed. Regulations governing the development, safety, and effectiveness of contraceptive methods are discussed, as well as the nature of the female and male reproductive system. Methods reviewed include coitus interruptus, the condom, spermicidal contraceptive agents, postcoital douching, the vaginal diaphragm, male and female sterilization, the rhythm method, oral contraceptives, IUDs, induced abortion, progesterone-releasing IUDs, postcoital estrogens, abortifacient agents (prostaglandins), immunization against human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG), pharmacologic suppression of the corpus luteum, long-acting injections of Depo-Provera, implantation of capsules containing norgestrel, the intravaginal ring, intracervical devices, release of contraceptive steroids through an arm bracelet, and male contraceptive agents. New areas of contraceptive research include influencing the release of luteininzing hormone-releasing hormone, ''turning-off'' corpus luteum function in early pregnancy by competitors for HCG, affecting sperm or ovarian membranes to prevent fertilization, and interferring with sperm and egg development.

  12. Sexual Desire and Hormonal Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Boozalis, Amanda; Tutlam, Nhial T.; Robbins, Camaryn Chrisman; Peipert, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of hormonal contraception on sexual desire. Materials and Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 1,938 of the 9,256 participants enrolled in the Contraceptive CHOICE Project. This subset included participants enrolled between April and September 2011 who completed a baseline and six-month telephone survey. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association between contraceptive method and report of lacking interest in sex, controlling for potential confounding variables. Results More than one in five participants (23.9%) reported lacking interest in sex at 6 months after initiating a new contraceptive method. Of 262 copper IUD users (referent group), 18.3% reported lacking interest in sex. Our primary outcome was more prevalent in women who are young (<18 years: adjusted odds ratio (ORadj)=2.04), black (ORadj=1.78), and married or living with a partner (ORadj=1.82). Compared to copper IUD users, participants using depot medroxyprogesterone (ORadj=2.61, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.47-4.61), the vaginal ring (ORadj=2.53, 95% CI=1.37-4.69), and the implant (ORadj=1.60, 95% CI=1.03-2.49) more commonly reported lack of interest in sex. We found no association between use of the hormonal IUD, oral contraceptive pill, and patch and lack of interest in sex. Conclusion CHOICE participants using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, the contraceptive ring, and implant were more likely to report a lack of interest in sex compared to copper IUD users. Future research should confirm these findings and their possible physiological basis. Clinicians should be reassured that most women do not experience reduced sex drive with the use of most contraceptive methods. PMID:26855094

  13. Long-acting contraceptive options.

    PubMed

    Kaunitz, A M

    1996-01-01

    Long-acting contraceptive methods are appropriate choices for women who prefer the convenience and high contraceptive efficacy of methods not requiring frequent compliance, and women for whom contraceptive doses of estrogen are either medically contraindicated or associated with persistent intolerable side effects. Annual pregnancy rates for the three methods described below are less than 1 per 100 woman-years. As currently formulated, levonorgestrel implants (Norplant) consist of six 34 x 2.4 mm soft plastic implants, each filled with 36 mg of crystalline levonorgestrel. Irregular and often persistent menstrual bleeding and spotting constitute the most important side effects experienced by and leading to method discontinuation in implant users. Implant removal is technically more difficult and time-consuming than insertion. Depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA or Depo-Provera) is injected as an aqueous suspension of microcrystals. Intramuscular injection of 150 mg of DMPA results in more than 3 months of contraception. Irregular bleeding and spotting followed by amenorrhea, constitute the most importance side effects experienced by DMPA users. Because DMPA use can result in prolonged (but not permanent) infertility, DMPA is not an optimum contraceptive choice for women who may want to conceive in the next one or two years. The Copper T380A intrauterine device (IUD) provides reversible contraception for up to 10 years. IUDs act as contraceptives, not early abortafacients. Recent epidemiologic data indicate that long-term IUD use does not increase the occurrence of pelvic inflammatory disease. Heavier menstrual flow and cramps constitute the main side effects experienced by women using the copper IUD. Intrauterine device insertion and removal are accomplished during brief office-based procedures.

  14. 'They think it's all up to the girls': gender, risk and responsibility for contraception.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Much research suggests that attitudes towards responsibility for use of contraception amongst young people are strongly gendered. However, decision making, if 'decisions' happen at all, is bound up with notions of hegemonic masculine and feminine roles as well as factors concerning relationship status. Data from two earlier qualitative studies were re-analysed with an emphasis on findings related to gender and responsibility for use of contraception. The first study investigated unintended conceptions amongst 16-20-year-old women. Interviews focused on knowledge and views about contraception, sex education and sexual health services. The second study involved focus groups with two groups of 14-18-year-old men to explore their views on sex education, sexual health and contraception. Almost all the young women said that young men viewed contraception as 'not their job'. In contrast, the young men thought that responsibility should be shared. The key issue, however, related to relationship status, with decision-making being shared in long-term relationships. There are some gender differences in accounting for decisions about use of contraception, however the key issue revolves around relationship status.

  15. Prevalence and Determinants of Contraceptive use among Employed and Unemployed Women in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Ahmed Zohirul; Mondal, Md. Nazrul Islam; Khatun, Mt. Laily; Rahman, Md. Mosiur; Islam, Md. Rafiqul; Mostofa, Md. Golam; Hoque, Md. Nazrul

    2016-01-01

    Background: Contraceptive use plays a significant role in controlling fertility, particularly in reaching the replacement level of fertility. The association between women’s employment status and contraceptive use is poorly studied and understood in Bangladesh. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that influence contraceptive use among employed and unemployed women in Bangladesh. Methods: Data and necessary information of 16,616 married women were extracted from the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS) 2011. The cross sectional data has been used for univariate analysis, to carry out the description of the variables; bivariate analysis, to find the associations among the variables; and binary logistic regression analysis, to evaluate the effects of selected sociodemographic factors on contraceptive use. Results: The results revealed that the contraceptive use was found higher among employed women (67%) than that of unemployed women. Women’s age, education, region, number of living children, and child preference were found to be significantly associated with current use of contraception among employed women. On the other hand, women’s age, education, husband’s education, region, residence, religion, number of living children, ever heard about family planning, and child preference were identified as the significant predictors of contraceptive use among unemployed women. Conclusion and Global Health Implications: A gap in using contraceptives among employed and unemployed women is identified. By creating employment opportunities for women to be enhanced the contraceptive use. Moreover, the sociodemographic factors need to be taken into consideration in formulating policies and implementing programs to increase the contraceptive prevalence rate among women. PMID:28058196

  16. [Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and contraception].

    PubMed

    Erny, R; Porte, H

    1989-06-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) have shown a considerable resurgence in recent years both in number of cases and in spread of new infectious agents. The spread of STDs is favored by numerous factors including the liberalization of sexual behavior made possible by reliable contraception. Information on STDs has not been widely diffused. Changes in the status of women and the development of means of communication and transportation have encouraged less rigid control of sexual behavior. STDs themselves have often escaped diagnosis or not been cured despite treatment, increasing the risk of spread. Numerous organisms cause STDs, from external parasites to life-threatening viruses. 60% of upper genital tract infections that can lead to sterility, tubal alterations, ectopic pregnancy and pain result from STDs. Chlamydia infections are insidious and chronic, and cause greater damage with each recurrence. The risk of STDs should be considered in contraceptive choice along with other indications and contraindications. Combined oral contraceptives provide protection against acute upper genital tract infections. The protective role has been explained by scanty and highly viscous cervical mucus forming a barrier against germs and by reductions of menstrual flow, myometrial activity, and inflammation. It is actually uncertain whether combined oral contraceptives protect against latent chlamydia infections, since higher rates of cervicitis caused by chlamydia have been found in pill users. In situations carrying risk of STDs, pill users should be protected by a supplementary barrier method. IUDs have been implicated in numerous studies in acute pelvic infections. Possible explanations are the local trauma and inflammations due to the physical presence of the IUD, more abundant bleeding, absence of a cervical barrier to motile sperm that could be a vector for germs, and possible ascent of the infectious agent on the string. Other risk factors are involved. Epidemiologic

  17. Effects of Contraceptive Education on Adolescent Male Contraceptive Behavior and Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Mary E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between contraceptive education and teenage male contraceptive behavior was investigated. Findings indicated that brief or moderately in-depth contraceptive education had little effect on contraceptive behavior. The teenage pregnancy and other sex-related problems may make parents and schools more amenable to comprehensive…

  18. Contraception and Birth Control: Other FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... STD)? NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials More Information Contraception and Birth Control: Other FAQs Skip sharing on social media links ... section. How can I choose a method of contraception? The choice of birth control depends on many ...

  19. Mifepristone for luteal phase contraception.

    PubMed

    Croxatto, Horacio B

    2003-12-01

    The concept of luteal phase contraception and the use of mifepristone in clinical trials, which allows for testing of its validity, as well as clinical pharmacological research designed to understand its mode of action, are reviewed. Early luteal phase administration has a variety of morphological, physiological and biochemical effects on the endometrium that are likely to interfere with embryonic-endometrial interactions. In fact, specifically designed pilot clinical trials as well as data derived from emergency contraception studies indicate that early luteal phase administration of mifepristone is highly effective in preventing pregnancy, with minimal disturbance of hormonal parameters or menstrual cyclicity. Mid and late luteal phase administration of mifepristone at doses above 25 mg are highly effective in inducing endometrial bleeding in nonconceptional cycles. However, administration of mifepristone within the period between implantation and expected menses fails to induce bleeding in a significant proportion of cases, and furthermore the bleeding induced does not insure the termination of pregnancy. While the data suggest there is potential for a once-a-month contraceptive pill, it is likely that no molecule endowed with partial agonistic properties, like mifepristone, will completely and reliably suppress the essential functions of progesterone in order to achieve contraceptive efficacy comparable to that of modern contraceptive methods.

  20. Conditioning Military Women for Optimal Performance: Effects of Contraceptive Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    an extremely low failure rate (0.0-1.2 per 100 woman -years) and is used by 11 million women in over 90 countries, including the United States (22,58...disease including thyroid disease and hyperprolactinemia ; e) lack of any recent (within three months) changes in menstrual status; f) appropriate activity...In: Clinical Gynecol Endocrinol Infertil . 5th ed. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins; 1994. 59. SteinhampfMP, Blackwell RE. Contraception. In: Carr BR

  1. [Post-abortion contraception: effects of contraception services and reproductive intention].

    PubMed

    Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela

    2016-02-01

    Contraceptive counseling and the supply of contraceptive methods are part of post-abortion care and positively influence the subsequent use of contraceptive methods. Studies showing such evidence have been conducted predominantly in countries with no legal restrictions on abortion and with adequate care for women that terminate a pregnancy. However, little is known about contraceptive practices in contexts where abortion is illegal, as in Brazil, in which post-abortion contraceptive care is inadequate. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of contraceptive care on male condom use and oral and injectable contraceptives in the six months post-abortion, considering reproductive intention. The results showed that contraceptive care only has a positive effect on the use of oral contraceptives in the first six months post-abortion, as long as the woman had a medical consultation in the same month in which she received information on contraception. One or the other intervention alone had no significant impact.

  2. Regulation of BDNF chromatin status and promoter accessibility in a neural correlate of associative learning

    PubMed Central

    Ambigapathy, Ganesh; Zheng, Zhaoqing; Keifer, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression critically controls learning and its aberrant regulation is implicated in Alzheimer's disease and a host of neurodevelopmental disorders. The BDNF gene is target of known DNA regulatory mechanisms but details of its activity-dependent regulation are not fully characterized. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the epigenetic regulation of the turtle BDNF gene (tBDNF) during a neural correlate of associative learning using an in vitro model of eye blink classical conditioning. Shortly after conditioning onset, the results from ChIP-qPCR show conditioning-dependent increases in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) and repressor basic helix-loop-helix binding protein 2 (BHLHB2) binding to tBDNF promoter II that corresponds with transcriptional repression. In contrast, enhanced binding of ten-eleven translocation protein 1 (Tet1), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) to promoter III corresponds with transcriptional activation. These actions are accompanied by rapid modifications in histone methylation and phosphorylation status of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). Significantly, these remarkably coordinated changes in epigenetic factors for two alternatively regulated tBDNF promoters during conditioning are controlled by Tet1 and ERK1/2. Our findings indicate that Tet1 and ERK1/2 are critical partners that, through complementary functions, control learning-dependent tBDNF promoter accessibility required for rapid transcription and acquisition of classical conditioning. PMID:26336984

  3. Correlation between Histological Status of the Pulp and Its Response to Sensibility Tests

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Mandana; Khayat, Akbar; Zamaheni, Sara; Shojaeian, Shiva

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of sensibility tests by correlating it with histologic pulp condition. Methods and Materials: Assessment of clinical signs and symptoms were performed on 65 permanent teeth that were scheduled to be extracted for periodontal, prosthodontic or orthodontic reasons. The normal pulp and reversible pulpitis were considered as treatable tooth conditions while irreversible pulpitis and necrosis were considered as untreatable conditions. The teeth were then extracted and sectioned for histological analysis of dental pulp. Histologic status and classification corresponded to the treatable or untreatable pulp condition. Comparisons between histological treatable and untreatable pulp condition were performed with chi-square analysis for sensibility test responses. The positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy to detect untreatable from treatable pulp condition were calculated for each test. Results: A significant difference was detected in the normal and a sharp lingered response to heat and cold tests. There was significant difference in the negative response to EPT between histological groups. The kappa agreement coefficient between clinical and histological diagnosis of pulp condition was about 0.843 (P<0.001). The accuracy of cold and heat tests and EPT to detect treatable pulp or untreatable pulp states were 78, 74 and 62%, respectively. The sensibility tests diagnosed untreatable pulpitis with a higher probability (NPV=63%-67% -54%, PPV=83%-91% -95% for heat, cold and EPT, respectively). Conclusion: Sensibility test results were more likely to diagnose pulpal disease or untreatable pulp conditions. However, to increase the diagnostic accuracy patient history, clinical signs and symptoms and also radiographic findings in conjunction with sensibility tests must be used. The result of this small study demonstrated a good agreement between clinical and histological pulp

  4. Correlation of serum lead levels with inflammation, nutritional status, and clinical complications in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Pouresmaeil, Rahmat; Razeghi, Effat; Ahmadi, Farokhlagha

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine blood lead level (BLL) in hemodialysis (HD) patients and their relation with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and albumin which are inflammatory and nutritional biomarkers, respectively, and clinical complications. A total of 93 patients, who were dialyzed at least for 3 months, were included in the study. Blood samples were collected before HD and BLL was measured and categorized as three equal groups: low normal (BLL < 8 μg/dL), middle normal (BLL = 8-10.6 μg/dL), and high normal (BLL > 10.6 μg/dL). All patients had normal BLL, 9.7 ± 3.4 g/dL. Patients with abnormal hsCRP level (>3 mg/L) had higher BLL than other patients (16.4 ± 0.8 vs. 11.5 ± 2.7 mg/L, p = 0.003). Patients with BLL > 10.6 μg/dL had significantly lower hemoglobin, ferritin, iron, and albumin levels and higher hsCRP and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels than the patients with BLL < 8 μg/dL. In addition, BLL revealed a significant positive correlation with duration of dialysis. We concluded that BLL associated to inflammation, malnutritional status, iron-deficiency condition, and high iPTH level in HD patients.

  5. American values and contraceptive acceptance.

    PubMed

    Rzepka, J R

    1979-07-01

    A number of individual personality factors and social norms may be associated with reproductive confusion and/or irresponsibility. More specifically, the values underlying common American social norms may contribute to ineffective birth planning in the following ways: 1) The traditional roles of women in our society seem to encourage parenthood. The rule has been early marriage, closely spaced children, and few alternate sources of satisfaction or self-esteem. 2) Our culture strongly encourages family life. Children are a symbol of normalcy. 3) The importance of sexual enjoyment per se often conflicts with contraceptive use. Conversely, innocence is also valued and also contributes to unprotected sexual activity. 4) Religious reasons or adherence to concepts of natural law are almost always given by people opposed to contraception. 5) Health is important to Americans, and birth control methods negatively affect health in real and imagined ways. Social norms, though changing, remain essentially congruent with former contraceptive technology and former ideologies, customs, and dreams.

  6. Hormonal contraception in the male.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R A

    2000-01-01

    The hormonal approach to male contraception is based on the suppression of gonadotrophin secretion with secondary suppression of spermatogenesis. This can be achieved by administration of testosterone or other androgen alone, but combined administration with a progestogen or GnRH analogue allows the dose of testosterone to be reduced to physiological replacement doses. This approach has been investigated for many years but without identification of a regimen which results in sufficient suppression of spermatogenesis to provide ensured contraception in all men, safely and conveniently. The reasons for this are discussed, and recent developments towards a regimen that fulfills all these criteria are described. Crucial to development of any new product is that it will be used: surveys of both men and women indicate firmly positive attitudes towards a 'male pill'. There are, therefore, grounds for cautious optimism that the next decade may see the introduction of the first novel male contraceptive for several hundred years.

  7. Prevention of unintended pregnancy and use of contraception-important factors for preconception care.

    PubMed

    Kallner, Helena Kopp; Danielsson, Kristina Gemzell

    2016-09-20

    Preservation of fertility and optimizing health before pregnancy is becoming increasingly important in societies where childbirth often is postponed. Research shows that as women postpone childbirth they achieve higher levels of education and higher incomes. This leads to advantages for their children and for society. However, as women postpone childbearing they are at risk for contracting conditions which may affect fertility and/or pregnancies, pregnancy outcome, and the newborn child. Preconception counseling is therefore becoming increasingly important. Women are often unaware of the added health benefits of contraception and have the right to be well informed so they can make decisions to fulfill their reproductive desires. Contraception can reduce the risk of unintended pregnancies, ectopic and molar pregnancies, and sexually transmitted infections. In addition, hormonal contraceptives reduce the risk of some types of cancer, dysmenorrhea, heavy menstrual bleeding, and anemia and are a treatment for endometriosis. Contraception should increasingly be looked upon as a means of preserving fertility and optimizing health status before a planned pregnancy. Thus, effective contraception can provide women with a possibility of achieving their long-term reproductive goals, although childbearing is actually postponed. The most effective contraceptive methods are the long-acting reversible contraceptives, which have been shown to be highly effective especially in young women who have difficulties with adherence to user-dependent methods. Therefore, these methods should increasingly be promoted in all age groups.

  8. Oral contraceptives and liver function

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Tom

    1969-01-01

    Oral contraceptives can cause liver damage and jaundice but this is very rare in women in the United Kingdom. The drugs are contraindicated where there is a history of recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and acute or chronic disturbance of liver function which can be congenital or acquired. It is not yet known whether the oestrogenic or progestogenic components of oral contraceptives cause the hepatic abnormalities. The available data suggest that neither oestrogens nor progestogens in low doses impair hepatic excretory processes. The full implications of the continued administration of oestrogens and progestogens for many years on liver proteins are not yet known.

  9. Nonprescription contraceptives: increasing in popularity.

    PubMed

    Reinders, T P

    1985-09-01

    The nonprescription forms of birth control now receive much attention due to the ongoing controversy about the prescription contraceptive methods. Condoms, 1 of these nonprescription methods, are the most effective nonprescription contraceptives available and among the most widely used. They are simple to use, inexpensive, and not associated with any major adverse effects. Condoms are unique in that they are a reliable contraceptive for males. It is estimated that 1 of 3 people who use contraception worldwide will rely on a male method. In the US this figure is somewhat lower, 18%. In other countries, such as Japan, condoms are the chief contraceptive method. If properly used, the failure rate for condoms is quite low; the lowest observed failure rate is 2%. In contrast, with typical users, the failure rate approaches 10%. The industry has taken several quality control measures to produce a safe and reliable condom. The principal material tested is usually either of the 2 ingredients used to make them, latex or collagenous tissue taken from the lamb cecum. Condoms definitely can protect against sexually transmitted diseases, simply because they prevent the infecting organisms from being transferred across the condom wall. The contraceptive efficacy of the condom is greatly enhanced when a spermicide is used at the same time. In terms of effectiveness, of 100 users that start the year using foams, creams, jellies, or vaginal suppositories containing nonoxynol 9 and used them consistently, the lowest observed rate of failure has been 3-5%. In actual use, the pregnancy rate is probably closer to 18%. Few side effects have been reported with spermicides. The most common of these is a burning sensation. The foaming suppository has been widely promoted as an effective vaginal contraceptive. It does not really offer any advantage over any of the other dosage forms except for convenience. It is the combination of foam and condom that pharmacists need to pay particular

  10. The changing pattern of contraception in Lahore, Pakistan: 1963-80.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, F; Hussain, M

    1985-07-01

    This paper attempts to test the dictum that social change begins in better educated, economically well-off and relatively less tradition-bound strata of the urban society and that it then spreads to the lower social strata and eventually affects the rural populations also. It analyzes temporal changes in the prevalence of contraception as reported by female respondents in 2 sample surveys conducted in the city of Lahore during 1963 and 1980. Altogether 1960 ever-married females aged over 15 were interviewed in the 1963 survey and 993 in the 1980 survey. Compared to 1980 respondents, those in the 1963 survey were older, educated and belonged to a medium or high socioeconomic status category. In 1963, 18% of the respondents were not aware of any method of contraception; by 1980 this proportion was reduced to 11%. The most spectacular change was observed in the prortion of respondents who were practising family planning. In 1963, only 7% of the respondents had ever used any method of contraception; this proportion increased to 48% in 1980. Moreover, substantial differences were noted with regard to the methods of contraception used. The use of condoms seems to have declined while that of the IUD the pill, sterilization and withdrawal seems to have increased. It is interesting that abstinence remained an important method of contraception. Use of contraception is found to vary with age, education and socioeconomic status of respondents. The degree of association between these 3 characteristics and contraceptive usage increased substantially from 1963 to 1980. 1980 survey results indicate that current as well as ever use of contraception show an inverted V-shaped pattern with age and parity. The prevalence of contraception increases with age, reaching a maximum of 41% for current users and 63% for ever users in the age group 35-39. A similar pattern is observed in relation to the parity of respondents with a maximum amongst women who had borne 6 children. Education shows

  11. Oral contraception following abortion

    PubMed Central

    Che, Yan; Liu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Linan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oral contraceptives (OCs) following induced abortion offer a reliable method to avoid repeated abortion. However, limited data exist supporting the effective use of OCs postabortion. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis in the present study reported immediate administration of OCs or combined OCs postabortion may reduce vaginal bleeding time and amount, shorten the menstruation recovery period, increase endometrial thickness 2 to 3 weeks after abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. A total of 8 major authorized Chinese and English databases were screened from January 1960 to November 2014. Randomized controlled trials in which patients had undergone medical or surgical abortions were included. Chinese studies that met the inclusion criteria were divided into 3 groups: administration of OC postmedical abortion (group I; n = 1712), administration of OC postsurgical abortion (group II; n = 8788), and administration of OC in combination with traditional Chinese medicine postsurgical abortion (group III; n = 19,707). In total, 119 of 6160 publications were included in this analysis. Significant difference was observed in group I for vaginal bleeding time (P = 0.0001), the amount of vaginal bleeding (P = 0.03), and menstruation recovery period (P < 0.00001) compared with the control groups. Group II demonstrated a significant difference in vaginal bleeding time (P < 0.00001), the amount of vaginal bleeding (P = 0.0002), menstruation recovery period (P < 0.00001), and endometrial thickness at 2 (P = 0.003) and 3 (P < 0.00001) weeks postabortion compared with the control group. Similarly, a significant difference was observed in group III for reducing vaginal bleeding time (P < 0.00001) and the amount of vaginal bleeding (P < 0.00001), shortening the menstruation recovery period (P < 0.00001), and increasing endometrial thickness 2 and 3 weeks after surgical abortion (P < 0

  12. Estrogen potency of oral contraceptive pills.

    PubMed

    Chihal, H J; Peppler, R D; Dickey, R P

    1975-01-01

    The estrogen potencies of 9 oral contraceptive pills, Enovid-E, Enovid-5, Ovulen, Demulen, Norinyl+80, Norinyl+50, Ovral, Norlestrin 1 mg. and Norlestrin 2.5 mg., were determined by bioassay. Relative estrogen potency was determined by analysis of variance. Enovid-5, the most estrogenic compound, had a potency of 4.88 compared to ethinyl estradiol, 50 mcg. equal 1.00; Ovral, the least estrogenic compound, had a potency of 0.81, a sixfold difference. Estrogen potencies at a fractional dose of 0.00155 correlate with reports of the incidence of minor side effects and thromboembolic disease. The effect of progestins on estrogen potency was purely additive (norgestrel and norethynodrel), purely antagonistic, or additive at low concentrations and antagonistic at high concentrations (norethindrone, norethindrone acetate, and ethynodiol diacetate). These results suggest that pills with a greater margin of safety might be developed by utilizing greater ratios of progestin to estrogen. In addition, differences in relative estrogen potency of oral contraceptive pills may be used as a basis for better clinical selection.

  13. Increased activity of osteocyte autophagy in ovariectomized rats and its correlation with oxidative stress status and bone loss

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yuehua Zheng, Xinfeng Li, Bo Jiang, Shengdan Jiang, Leisheng

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Examine autophagy level in the proximal tibia of ovariectomized rats. • Investigate whether autophagy level is associated with bone loss. • Investigate whether autophagy level is associated with oxidative stress status. - Abstract: Objectives: The objectives of the present study were to investigate ovariectomy on autophagy level in the bone and to examine whether autophagy level is associated with bone loss and oxidative stress status. Methods: 36 female Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-operated (Sham), and ovariectomized (OVX) rats treated either with vehicle or 17-β-estradiol. At the end of the six-week treatment, bone mineral density (BMD) and bone micro-architecture in proximal tibias were assessed by micro-CT. Serum 17β-estradiol (E2) level were measured. Total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, catalase (CAT) activity in proximal tibia was also determined. The osteocyte autophagy in proximal tibias was detected respectively by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), immunofluorescent histochemistry (IH), realtime-PCR and Western blot. In addition, the spearman correlation between bone mass, oxidative stress status, serum E2 and autophagy were analyzed. Results: Ovariectomy increased Atg5, LC3, and Beclin1 mRNA and proteins expressions while decreased p62 expression. Ovariectomy also declined the activities of T-AOC, CAT, and SOD. Treatment with E2 prevented the reduction in bone mass as well as restored the autophagy level. Furthermore, LC3-II expression was inversely correlated with T-AOC, CAT, and SOD activities. A significant inverse correlation between LC3-II expression and BV/TV, Tb.N, BMD in proximal tibias was found. Conclusions: Ovariectomy induced oxidative stress, autophagy and bone loss. Autophagy of osteocyte was inversely correlated with oxidative stress status and bone loss.

  14. There is a Positive Correlation Between Socioeconomic Status and Ovarian Reserve in Women of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Barut, Mert Ulaş; Agacayak, Elif; Bozkurt, Murat; Aksu, Tarık; Gul, Talip

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential association between socioeconomic status and ovarian reserve, anti-Mullerian hormone level, antral follicle count, and follicle stimulating hormone level in women of reproductive age. Material/Methods A total of 101 married women between 20–35 years of age who presented to the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Health Research System In Vitro Fertilization (HRS IVF) Center between October 2014 and November 2015 and met the inclusion criteria were included in this study. The participants were divided into three socioeconomic groups using Kuppuswamy’s socioeconomic status scale. Thirty-one participants were assigned to the low socioeconomic status group, 37 to the middle socioeconomic status group, and 33 to the high socioeconomic status group. On days 3–6 of the menstrual cycle, 10 mL of blood was collected from the participants for follicle stimulating hormone and anti-Mullerian hormone measurements. Transvaginal ultrasonography was performed for both ovaries for the purpose of counting antral follicles measuring 2–10 mm in diameter. Results Both ovarian reserve parameters, namely anti-Mullerian hormone level and antral follicle count, exhibited a significant association with socioeconomic status (p=0.000 and p=0.000, respectively). The association between follicle stimulating hormone level and socioeconomic status was also significant (p=0.000). Conclusions A low socioeconomic status aggravated by sources of stress such as undernutrition and financial hardships affects ovarian reserve, which should be remembered in approaching infertile patients. PMID:27847382

  15. Contraceptive vaginal rings: a review.

    PubMed

    Brache, Vivian; Faundes, Anibal

    2010-11-01

    Development efforts on contraceptive vaginal rings were initiated over 40 years ago based on two principles: the capacity of the vaginal epithelium to absorb steroids and the capacity of elastomers to release these hormones at a nearly constant rate. Numerous models of contraceptive vaginal rings (CVRs) have been studied, but only two have reached the market: NuvaRing, a combined ring that releases etonogestrel (ENG) and ethinylestradiol (EE), and Progering, a progesterone-releasing ring for use in lactating women. The main advantages of CVRs are their effectiveness (similar to or slightly better than the pill), ease of use without the need of remembering a daily routine, user's ability to control initiation and discontinuation, nearly constant release rate allowing for lower doses, greater bioavailability and good cycle control with the combined ring. The main disadvantages are related to the mode of delivery; CVRs may cause vaginal discharge and complaints, ring expulsion is not uncommon, the ring may be felt during coitus and vaginal insertion may be unpleasant for some women. The studies reviewed in this article provide evidence that CVRs are safe, effective and highly acceptable to women. There is no doubt that CVRs offer a new, effective contraceptive option to women, expanding their available choices of hormonal contraception.

  16. Contraception and abortion in Romania.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B R; Horga, M; Andronache, L

    1993-04-03

    After the downfall of the Ceausescu regime in December, 1989, the new Government of Romania abolished the law that prohibited abortions on request. Subsequently, the rate of legally induced abortions increased significantly while the rate of maternal mortality declined dramatically. Despite the large number of women who request induced abortions, most women and gynaecologists say that they would prefer to prevent unwanted pregnancies through the use of modern contraception. In this paper we examine factors that contribute to the disparity between women's desire to use modern contraception to prevent unwanted pregnancies and their practice of having induced abortions to prevent unwanted births. The results show that women (and suggest that men) need a wide choice of dependably available high-quality contraceptives; they need to be able to obtain information, counselling, and methods from a wide range of sources/health-care providers; both women's and men's perceptions about, and use of, modern contraception could be positively affected through sexual education started in secondary school; and, to reduce repeat abortions, women's post-abortion family-planning needs must not be neglected.

  17. Contraception in the prepill era.

    PubMed

    Connell, E B

    1999-01-01

    Although medical history has documented the desire to control fertility since ancient times, safe and effective contraception did not exist until this century and has not been equally available to all people. Strong moral sentiments, economic and social class factors, religious beliefs, familial and gender relations, and political as well as legal constraints have often limited the ability of physicians in favor of contraception to provide advice and methods of birth control to their patients. By the early 1900s, a constellation of factors--in particular, the large influx of poor immigrants, and feminist groups advocating women's rights--helped to move forward a birth-control movement in this country and abroad. In the early 20th century, Margaret Sanger became one of the most avid proponents of contraception in the United States. By 1950, she and Katharine McCormick had contracted with biologist Gregory Pincus to develop an effective birth control pill. A collaborative effort by Pincus and other researchers led to trials of the pill in Puerto Rico, Haiti, and Mexico between 1956 and 1957, which provided the basis for an application to the Food and Drug Administration for approval of the first oral contraceptive.

  18. Contraception and the Adolescent Diabetic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fennoy, Ilene

    1989-01-01

    Data from a study of 11 teenage diabetics suggests that pregnancy among adolescent diabetics is more frequent than among the general population, at a time when diabetic control is poor because of psychosocial factors associated with adolescence. Current recommendations regarding contraception for diabetic women, focusing on barrier methods, are…

  19. The association between smoking and sexual behavior among teens in US contraceptive clinics.

    PubMed Central

    Zabin, L S

    1984-01-01

    A study of teenage women in 32 contraceptive clinics in the United States shows a strong negative relationship between age of first intercourse and the level of cigarette smoking; the association is strong enough to reverse the usual correlation of smoking and age during the teenage years. Preventive, timely contraceptive behavior is also negatively associated to smoking. These findings suggest that interventions could well be designed and located in settings which take this association into account. PMID:6696159

  20. [Intrauterine contraception in nulliparous women].

    PubMed

    Prilepskaia, V N; Mezhevitinova, E A

    1991-04-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of various methods of contraception in nulliparous women are reviewed with special emphasis in hormonal and intrauterine contraception. The use of hormonal contraceptives in young women can induce changes in the still immature hypothalamo-hypophyseal-ovarian system. One of the most frequent side-effects of hormonal contraceptives in young nulliparous women is amenorrhea. Short-term use of 2 or triphasic contraceptives with low content of estrogens and gestagens can stimulate secretion of hormones by ovaries and lead to development of polycystic ovary or endometrial hyperplasia. Intrauterine devices (IUD) do not have a negative systemic effect on the hypothalamo-hypophyseal-ovarian system. Among the IUD models recommended for the use in nulliparous women are Copper-T, Nova-T, Multiload. Effectiveness of IUD ranges from 91.3% for inert Lippes loop, to 98.3% for copper-containing IUD, and 99.8% for progesterone-containing IUD. Dilatation of narrow cervical canal in nulliparous women prior to insertion of IUD can cause traumatic injury of the cervical canal and subsequent cervix insufficiency. Anatomical characteristics of the uterus in young nulliparous women (greater length of the cervical canal in comparison with the length of the cervix cavity) require careful selection of the IUD size to fit the size of the cervix cavity. Complications associated with the use of an IUD include pelvic inflammation with subsequent tubal infertility. The frequency of ectopic pregnancy ranges from 4.1% after the use of inert IUD, to 3% after the use of copper-containing IUD, and 16% after the use of progesterone-containing IUD. Complications are the most frequent within the first 3-8 months of the use of IUD.

  1. [Contraception and hepatogastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Grimaud, J C; Bourliere, M

    1989-05-01

    Complications of oral contraceptives (OCs) affecting the gastrointestinal tract, liver and pancreas are rare but potentially serious. Hepatobiliary complications are by far the most frequent and varied. Hepatic lesions will probably decline in frequency as low-dose OCs replace higher dosed pills. Intrahepatic cholestasis induced by OCs resembles that of pregnancy. There may be a genetic predisposition to both conditions involving a dose-dependent estrogen effect of decreasing bile secretion. Intrahepatic cholestasis appears within 6 cycles of OC use. Symptoms include pruritus with anorexia, asthenia, vomiting, and weight loss without fever, rash or abdominal pain. Termination of OCs clears the condition without sequelae within 1-3 months, sometimes after a temporary aggravation. A moderate and asymptomatic cytolysis may appear when OC treatment is begun. Sinusoidal dilatation has been conclusively linked to OCs although few cases have been published. Clinical manifestations other than hepatomegaly are variable. Abdominal pain and fever are the most common. The condition is not related to duration of use and disappears 5-15 days after OC use is terminated. The relative risk of Budd-Chiari syndrome in OC users is estimated at 2.37. OCs increase the prevalence of hepatic adenomas as a function of duration of treatment. They are usually discovered fortuitously but may be revealed by vague abdominal pains. Hemorrhagic complications are more likely in OC users. It may be difficult to distinguish between adenomas, hepatocellular carcinoma, and focal nodular hyperplasia. A puncture biopsy guided by sonography may aid diagnosis. The natural history of adenomas is poorly understood and treatment remains controversial. OCs do not appear to increase the risk of focal nodular hyperplasia but they increase the size of the tumor and the risk of hemorrhage. OCs should be terminated because of risk of hemorrhage. Surgical resection is not indicated unless there are complication or

  2. Correlates of Parental Misperception of Their Child’s Weight Status: The ‘Be Active, Eat Right’ Study

    PubMed Central

    Remmers, Teun; van Grieken, Amy; Renders, Carry M.; Hirasing, Remy A.; Broeren, Suzanne M. L.; Raat, Hein

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study reported on correlates of parental perception of their child’s weight status. Associations between parental misperception (i.e., underestimation of the child’s weight) and parental intention to improve their child’s overweight-related health behaviors and their child meeting guidelines regarding these behaviors were also investigated. Methods Baseline data from the population-based ‘Be active, eat right study’ were used. The population for analysis consisted of 630 overweight and 153 obese five year-old children and their parents. Questionnaires were used to measure parental perception of the child’s weight status, correlates of misperception (i.e., child age, child gender, child BMI, parental age, parental gender, parental country of birth, parental educational level and parental weight status), overweight-related health behaviors (i.e., child playing outside, having breakfast, drinking sweet beverages, and watching TV), and parental intention to improve these behaviors. Height and weight were measured using standardized protocols. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed. Results In total, 44.40% of the parents misperceived their child’s weight status. Parental misperception was associated with lower child BMI, the parent being the father, a foreign parental country of birth, and a lower parental education level (p<0.05). Parental misperception was not associated with parental intention to improve child overweight-related health behavior, nor with child meeting the guidelines of these behaviors. Discussion This study showed that almost half of the parents with an overweight or obese child misperceived their child’s weight status. A correct parental perception may be a small stepping-stone in improving the health of overweight and obese children. PMID:24551191

  3. [Problems with male contraception. 1. Physiological foundations, male contraception (mechanical procedures, contraceptives)].

    PubMed

    Schill, W B

    1978-08-03

    The various aspects of male fertility control are elaborated. A discussion of spermatogenesis and fertilization mechanisms lays the groundwork for determining how these processes can be inhibited. Mechanical male contraceptive methods are coitus interruptus and coitus condomatus. Coitus interruptus can cause neurotic disturbances in both partners and has a failure rate of 10-20/100 use-years. The condom has a failure rate of about 7/100 use-years. Vasectomy is the most practicable operative male contraceptive method. Scrotal hematoma, scrotal abcesses, and congestive epididymitis are possible post-operative complications. 2/3 of the men who have vasectomies develop sperm autoantibodies, and some develop sperm granulomas. Spontaneous recanalization occurs in .8% of the cases. The incipience of azoospermia after vasectomy is dependent on the number of ejaculations but is difficult to predict. Castration and increasing the temperature of the gonads are other operative methods of male contraception. Medicamentive methods of male contraception must be safe, effective, fast, and reversible; they must cause no genetic changes, disturbances in libido or potency, or changes in secondary sex characteristics. Medicamental agents can affect spermatogenesis; the maturation of the spermatozoa; transport, motility, or metabolism of the spermatozoa; capacitation of the spermatozoa; or the penetration enzymes. Heavy metal compounds, cytostatic, or antibiotic compounds are unsuitable as spermatogenic inhibitors due to side effects. 5-Thio-D-Glucose may show promise as an antispermatogenic agent.

  4. Vaginal contraception--an update.

    PubMed

    Edelman, D A; Thompson, S

    1982-04-01

    A number of new and innovative methods of vaginal contraceptive have been developed in recent years and are currently being evaluated. Some of these methods are described briefly and the available data on their safety and efficacy are presented. 3 types of contraceptive sponges have been developed--collagen sponge, intravaginal insert, and Secure sponge--and are now being evaluated. The collagen sponge, a cylindrical-shaped disk, exerts its contraceptive effect by acting as a physical barrier to the sperm and through its ability to absorb semen much in excess of its own weight. Preliminary data confirm the effectiveness of the sponge obtained from post-coital tests. The intravaginal insert (IVI) is made of a polyester material incorporating the spermicide nonoxynol-9. In a small clinical evaluation of the IVI, 49 women were followed up for 1 month. No pregnancies or unexpected adverse reactions were reported. The Secure sponge is made of polyurethane and incorporates 1 g of the spermicide nonoxynol-9. Its primary mode of action in preventing pregnancy is through the release of nonoxynol-9. In a multiclinic phase 2 evaluation of the Secure, which included 382 women, the 6-month gross life-table pregnancy rate was 3.8 +or- 1.3/100 women; the 6-month gross discontinuation rate for all reasons was 26.2 +or- 3.4/100 women. Sufficient data from the comparative trials of the Secure and Neo Sampoon foaming suppository studies conducted in Yugoslavia, Taiwan, and Bangladesh have been reported to the International Fertility Research Program (IFRP). The 12-month life-table rates for reasons leading to discontinuation of the contraceptive methods were not significantly different except for the category of "other personal reasons." The advantages Secure provides over other vaginal contraceptives are identified. Foaming vaginal suppositories similar to Neo Sampoon but containing 100 mg nonoxynol-9 are being developed and evaluated in the U.S. Clinical data on these products are

  5. Prevalence and correlates of perceived teeth health status and oral health behavior among school-going adolescents in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Peltzer, Karl; Tepirou, Chher; Pengpid, Supa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of the study was to investigate perceived teeth health status and oral health behavior, as well as their correlates, among adolescents in Cambodia. The analysis included 3806 Cambodian school children (mean age 15.7 years, SD=1.8 years) who took part in the “Global School-based Student Health Survey” (GSHS) in 2013. Overall, 7.8% of the students reported poor perceived teeth status, 18.0% had missed school in the past year because of a toothache, 26.7% engaged in combined oral health behavior (brushing teeth twice daily or more often = 79.8%, using fluoride toothpaste = 59.9%, and drinking soft drinks less than once a day = 53.6%), and 59.9% had never visited a dentist for a routine examination or other dental work. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, older age, being female, missing school because of a toothache, having a toothache in the past 12 months, poor oral health behavior and sedentary leisure time were associated with poor perceived teeth status. Older age, good perceived teeth status, having had a dental check-up, washing hands before eating and after toilet use, and not eating fast food were associated with a positive oral health behavior (brushing teeth twice daily or more often, using fluoride toothpaste, and drinking soft drinks less than once a day). Significant proportions of poor perceived teeth status and poor oral health behavior were found among school children in Cambodia. Various risk factors (sociodemographic, dental variables, general health risk behaviors) for perceived poor teeth status, oral health behavior and never having had a dental check-up were identified, which can be utilized for intervention programs. PMID:28008205

  6. Evaluation of Humoral Immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific Antigens for Correlation with Clinical Status and Effective Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Niki, Mamiko; Suzukawa, Maho; Akashi, Shunsuke; Nagai, Hideaki; Ohta, Ken; Inoue, Manabu; Niki, Makoto; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Morimoto, Kozo; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Kitada, Seigo; Matsumoto, Sohkichi; Suzuki, Koichi; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Although tuberculosis remains a major global health problem, Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only available vaccine. However, BCG has limited applications, and a more effective vaccine is needed. Cellular mediated immunity (CMI) is thought to be the most important immune response for protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, the recent failure of a clinical trial for a booster BCG vaccine and increasing evidence of antibody-mediated immunity prompted us to evaluate humoral immunity to Mtb-specific antigens. Using Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot and Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assays, we observed less correlation of both CMI and IgG titers with patient clinical status, including serum concentration of C reactive protein. However, IgA titers against Mtb were significantly correlated with clinical status, suggesting that specific IgA antibodies protect against Mtb proliferation. In addition, in some cases, IgA antibody titers were significantly associated with the serum concentration of total albumin, which supports the idea that humoral immunity can be influenced by the nutritional status. Based on these observations, we propose that the induction of humoral immunity should be included as an option in TB vaccine development strategies. PMID:26568961

  7. The Correlates of Tracking Policy: Opportunity Hoarding, Status Competition, or a Technical-Functional Explanation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Sean; Price, Heather

    2011-01-01

    In this analysis, the authors explore the relationship between the social context of high schools and school-to-school variation in tracking policies. The authors consider three explanations for the implementation of highly elaborated tracking systems: opportunity hoarding, status competition, and a technical-functional explanation. Building on…

  8. New hormonal methods of contraception.

    PubMed

    Newton, J R

    1996-04-01

    Three types of new contraceptive delivery system have been discussed in this chapter. Each have novel methods of delivery and may be acceptable to certain groups of women. It is clear that subdermal contraceptive implants are extremely useful as a long-term method of contraception, and provided insertion occurs correctly, removal will then be easy. The second-generation implants using a single rod, compared with the first-generation ones using six capsules, would appear to offer advantages both to the patient and in relation to the training of medical and paramedical personnel who have to fit the subdermal implant. The main disadvantage is the incidence of irregular bleeding, which, by and large, can be overcome by pre-insertion counselling and by time. The second method of delivery, vaginal rings, offers high patient acceptability, but a usable ring for contraception has as yet to be developed. Two approaches appear to be the use of a continuous progestogen-only ring, or a combined ring releasing oestrogen and progestogen with a 21-day-in, 7-day-out cycle of use. Ongoing studies will indicate whether vaginal lesions are significant or related to the flexibility of the ring. If these studies prove satisfactory, further development of the vaginal rings, both as an alternative method for interval use or as a specific postpartum form of contraception using progesterone-releasing rings, will be developed. Significant developments in the use of a combined monthly injectable have led to the release of two preparations, Cyclofem and Mesigyna, which are now available in many countries. This combined approach offers a significant reduction in amenorrhoea rates and unacceptable bleeding, the majority of women having acceptable menstrual patterns even during the first 3 months of use. All three methods have low and acceptable rates of pregnancy, the lowest being seen with the subdermal implants and with combined monthly injectables. Due to the length of action of subdermal

  9. Induced abortion and contraception in Italy.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, A; Grandolfo, M E

    1991-09-01

    This article discusses the legal and epidemiologic status of abortion in Italy, and its relationship to fertility and contraception. Enacted in May 1978, Italy's abortion law allows the operation to be performed during the 1st 90 days of gestation for a broad range of health, social, and psychological reasons. Women under 18 must receive written permission from a parent, guardian, or judge in order to undergo an abortion. The operation is free of charge. Health workers who object to abortion because of religious or moral reasons are exempt from participating. Regional differences exist concerning the availability of abortion, easy to procure in some places and difficult to obtain in others. After an initial increase following legalization, the abortion rate was 13.5/1000 women aged 15-44 and the abortion ratio was 309/1000 live births -- an intermediate rate and ratio compared to other countries. By the time the Abortion Act of 1978 was adopted, Italy already had one of the lowest fertility levels in Europe. Thus, the legalization of abortion has had no impact on fertility trends. Contrary to initial fears that the legalization of abortion would make abortion a method of family planning, 80% of the women who sought an abortion in 1983-88 were using birth control at the time (withdrawal being the most common method used by this group). In fact, most women who undergo abortions are married, between the ages of 25-34, and with at least one child. Evidence indicates widespread ignorance concerning reproduction. In a 1989 survey, only 65% of women could identify the fertile period of the menstrual cycle. Italy has no sex education in schools or national family planning programs. Compared to most of Europe, Italy still has low levels of reliable contraceptive usage. This points to the need to guarantee the availability of abortion.

  10. An Ethinyl Estradiol-Levonorgestrel Containing Oral Contraceptive Does Not Alter Cytochrome P4502C9 In Vivo Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Jacob; Maslen, Cheryl; Edelman, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Oral contraceptives have been in wide use for more than 50 years. Levonorgestrel, a commonly employed progestin component of combined oral contraceptives, was implicated in drug–drug interactions mediated via CYP2C9. Although in vitro studies refuted this interaction, there are no confirmatory in vivo studies. In the current study, we examined the phenotypic status of CYP2C9 using low-dose (125 mg) tolbutamide before and after oral contraceptive use in reproductive age women. Blood was collected 24 hours after the tolbutamide oral dose was administered, plasma was isolated, and tolbutamide concentration (C24) was measured using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. The natural logarithm of tolbutamide C24, a metric for CYP2C9 phenotype, was found to be equivalent (within 80%–125% equivalency boundaries) before and after oral contraceptive use. In conclusion, levonorgestrel-containing oral contraceptives, the most commonly used form of oral contraception, do not affect the status of the CYP2C9 enzyme. This suggests that it is safe to coadminister levonorgestrel-containing oral contraceptives and CYP2C9 substrates, which include a wide array of drugs. PMID:24368832

  11. An ethinyl estradiol-levonorgestrel containing oral contraceptive does not alter cytochrome P4502C9 in vivo activity.

    PubMed

    Cherala, Ganesh; Pearson, Jacob; Maslen, Cheryl; Edelman, Alison

    2014-03-01

    Oral contraceptives have been in wide use for more than 50 years. Levonorgestrel, a commonly employed progestin component of combined oral contraceptives, was implicated in drug-drug interactions mediated via CYP2C9. Although in vitro studies refuted this interaction, there are no confirmatory in vivo studies. In the current study, we examined the phenotypic status of CYP2C9 using low-dose (125 mg) tolbutamide before and after oral contraceptive use in reproductive age women. Blood was collected 24 hours after the tolbutamide oral dose was administered, plasma was isolated, and tolbutamide concentration (C24) was measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The natural logarithm of tolbutamide C24, a metric for CYP2C9 phenotype, was found to be equivalent (within 80%-125% equivalency boundaries) before and after oral contraceptive use. In conclusion, levonorgestrel-containing oral contraceptives, the most commonly used form of oral contraception, do not affect the status of the CYP2C9 enzyme. This suggests that it is safe to co-administer levonorgestrel-containing oral contraceptives and CYP2C9 substrates, which include a wide array of drugs.

  12. 'Stratified Contraception': Emergency Contraceptive Pills and Women's Differential Experiences in Contemporary India.

    PubMed

    Sheoran, Nayantara

    2015-01-01

    Available without prescriptions in India since 2005, emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) and their advertisements have provided women with increased contraceptive options and a vocabulary to talk about their reproductive lives. I draw on long-term fieldwork with women in urban India about ECPs, demonstrating a new form of 'stratified contraception' enabled by these pills and their advertisements. I posit that there are within India spaces that replicate the luxuries and privileges of the global North. These material conditions, I suggest, are replicated when it comes to contraception as there are hubs of women consumers of contraception and contraceptive advertising that participate in an 'imagined cosmopolitanism' within the global South in close proximity to 'contraceptive ghettos.' Moving beyond simplistic binaries, I outline three major stratifications along which women experience this medical technology and outline the implications for women and their contraceptive choices when notions of northern privilege exist in the 'South.'

  13. Recent innovations in oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Cremer, Miriam; Phan-Weston, Scarlett; Jacobs, Adam

    2010-03-01

    Traditional forms of oral contraception contain 21 days of hormone-containing pills and 7 days of placebo during the hormone-free interval (HFI). Since 2003, the Food and Drug Administration has approved 24/4, 84/7, and 365-day regimens. These regimens shorten the HFI in an attempt to decrease bleeding and menstrual-associated side effects. Safety and efficacy of these regimens is comparable with traditional 21/7 dosing. Extended regimens are associated with high patient satisfaction. Bleeding patterns are similar or shorter in women using extended regimens, along with improvement in menstrual symptoms. One of the new formulations contains the new progestin drospirenone, which has antimineralocorticoid and antiandrogenic properties. This review summarizes the data about new formulations of oral contraception available in the United Sates and also provides a summary of the current literature on drospirenone.

  14. Contraceptive pills and acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, T N; Mital, H S; Gupta, S K

    1981-06-01

    This article reports a case of acute pancreatitis in a patient taking the oral contraceptive pill. A 32 year old mother had been on combined contraceptive pills since 1975. In 1978 she started having upper abdominal and retrosternal pain. She became critically ill with peripheral circulatory collapse, dyspnoea and cyanosis. A superficial thrombophlebitis was noted on the medial aspect of the right thigh. The diagnosis of pancreatitis was considered with history of recurrent abdominal pain. After several tests and supportive therapy (intravenous fluids, antibiotics, steriods), the woman started showing improvements in 48 hours and recovered in 10 days. This case differs from previously described cases in that the cholesterol and triglyceride levels were normal. The hypoglycemia has not been described previously.

  15. Choosing the appropriate oral contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Langer, A; Devanesan, M; Pelosi, M A

    1978-06-01

    The estrogen and progestin in most oral contraceptives, regardless of amounts, can produce undesirable side effects in any woman. The convenience and effectiveness, however, make oral contraceptives an excellent birth control method for the correctly screened patient. The use of relatively small doses of estrogen combined with a progestin complementary to the estrogenic, progestogenic, and androgenic needs of the patient will reduce the risk of side effects. Above the 50 ug estrogen level there is significantly higher risk of pulmonary embolism, venous thrombosis, and cerebral thrombosis. Hypertension, depression and hepatic disorders are other potential side effects. Less serious complications are breakthrough bleeding, likely caused by low level estrogen dosage and amenorrhea. Progestogenic effects include sustained noncyclic weight gain and amenorrhea. Prescribing these agents necessitates adequate follow-up and willingness to alter the prescription.

  16. Relationship between contraceptive method and vaginal flora.

    PubMed

    Peddie, B A; Bishop, V; Bailey, R R; McGill, H

    1984-08-01

    This study was undertaken to assess whether the vaginal flora was affected by the method of contraception, and in particular as to whether the incidence of vaginal candidiasis increased when oral contraceptives were used. One thousand and two consecutive vaginal or cervical swabs from women attending a family planning centre were cultured. Candida albicans was isolated from 13% of women using no contraception, 16% using oral contraceptives, and from 9%, 19% and 18% of those using diaphragms, intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCD) and condoms respectively. These differences were not statistically significant. Women using an IUCD had significantly more Gram-positive cocci cultured than women in any other group, while those using diaphragms had significantly more Gram-negative bacilli. Our clinical impression that the use of oral contraceptives led to an increase in vaginal candidiasis, was not confirmed by this study.

  17. The community-based Health Extension Program significantly improved contraceptive utilization in West Gojjam Zone, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Yitayal, Mezgebu; Berhane, Yemane; Worku, Alemayehu; Kebede, Yigzaw

    2014-01-01

    Background Ethiopia has implemented a nationwide primary health program at grassroots level (known as the Health Extension Program) since 2003 to increase public access to basic health services. This study was conducted to assess whether households that fully implemented the Health Extension Program have improved current contraceptive use. Methods A cross-sectional community-based survey was conducted to collect data from 1,320 mothers using a structured questionnaire. A multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the predictors of current contraceptive utilization. A propensity score analysis was used to determine the contribution of the Health Extension Program “model households” on current contraceptive utilization. Result Mothers from households which fully benefited from the Health Extension Program (“model households”) were 3.97 (adjusted odds ratio, 3.97; 95% confidence interval, 3.01–5.23) times more likely to use contraceptives compared with mothers from non-model households. Model household status contributed to 29.3% (t=7.08) of the increase in current contraceptive utilization. Conclusion The Health Extension Program when implemented fully could help to increase the utilization of contraceptives in the rural community and improve family planning. PMID:24868165

  18. Phenotypic analysis of T cells infiltrating colon cancers: Correlations with oncogenetic status

    PubMed Central

    Chirica, Mircea; Le Bourhis, Lionel; Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; Chardiny, Victor; Bouhidel, Fatiha; Foulboeuf, Laure; Gornet, Jean Marc; Lourenco, Nelson; Dulphy, Nicolas; Toubert, Antoine; Allez, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancers (CRC) develop in the face of an important immune system associated with the intestinal mucosal tissue. The immune response against the tumor has been proposed to affect the prognosis of patients undergoing treatment for CRC. In this study T cells infiltrating the tumor were compared with T cells populating the unaffected neighboring mucosal tissue and cells from the peripheral blood. We observed that T cells from the tumor harbor an activated phenotype, with engagement of the NKG2D pathway in CD8 T cells. We show that mucosal and tumor-infiltrating T cells are enriched in NKG2D CD4 T cells, which exhibit cytotoxic functions. Finally, T cell populations in the tumor were modified according to its oncogenetic status, with higher percentages of CD8 T cells isolated from patients with microsatellite instable tumor status. PMID:26405567

  19. Global contraceptive use improves health.

    PubMed

    Ross, J A

    1988-01-01

    Over 40% of all cohabiting women, in Asia and Latin America, are using contraceptives, most of them modern methods. In many countries, upper order births are disappearing, and rural birth rates in some regions have fallen nearly as much as urban ones. The average family size is diminishing sharply. It is close to 2 children in Thailand, and below 2 throughout urban China. 4/5 of the developing world's population live in only 17 countries, in which contraceptive use has risen from 41% to 52% of couples in 10 years. Moreover, family planning programs affect the overall health of the population: fewer births have meant fewer maternal deaths, and fewer orphans, fewer infant and child deaths, fewer high-risk births (especially at short intervals and upper parities), fewer children left unimmunized, and fewer unserved by the health services. The extent of this quiet social revolution has its limits. Mainly in the 50 struggling countries of sub-Saharan Africa, most of them with weak health ministries, as well as, among the largest 8 countries, Nigeria and Pakistan, which have changed little. But both are reactivating their family planning programs, and the concentration of 2/3 of the developing world's population in 8 large countries means that only 8 administrations can control the course of vital rates. The consequence of the great transformation induced by contraceptive use has begun to give developing world's women control over their own child bearing, adding freedom to their lives. Nevertheless, if the contraceptive revolution has enormously advanced the cause of international health, it still has a long way to go.

  20. Contraception technology: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Nath, Anita; Mishell, Daniel R

    2013-03-01

    Steady progress in contraception research has been achieved over the past 50 years. Hormonal and nonhormonal modern contraceptives have improved women's lives by reducing different health conditions that contributed to considerable morbidity. However, the contraceptives available today are not suitable to all users, and the need to expand contraceptive choices still exists. Novel products such as new implants, contraceptive vaginal rings, transdermal patches and newer combinations of oral contraceptives have recently been introduced in family planning programs, and hormonal contraception is widely used for spacing and limiting births. Concerns over the adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives have led to research and development of new combinations with improved metabolic profile. Recent developments include use of natural compounds such as estradiol and estradiol valerate with the hope to decrease thrombotic risk, in combination with newer progestins derived from the progesterone structure or from spirolactone, in order to avoid the androgenic effects. Progesterone antagonists and progesterone receptor modulators are highly effective in blocking ovulation and preventing follicular rupture and are undergoing investigations in the form of oral pills and in semi-long-acting delivery systems. Future developments also include the combination of a contraceptive with an antiretroviral agent for dual contraception and protection against sexually transmitted diseases, to be used before intercourse or on demand, as well as for continuous use in dual-protection rings. Although clinical trials of male contraception have reflected promising results, limited involvement of industry in that area of research has decreased the likelihood of having a male method available in the current decade. Development of nonhormonal methods is still at an early stage of research, with the identification of specific targets within the reproductive system in ovaries and testes, as well as

  1. Oral contraceptive compliance during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Serfaty, D

    1997-06-17

    A review of the available literature suggests that adolescent lack of compliance with oral contraceptives (OCs) is a multifactorial problem that requires a multifactorial solution. Because of their lack of experience with contraception, higher frequency of intercourse, higher intrinsic fertility, and pattern of frequent stopping or switching of methods, adolescents experience higher OC failure rates than do adult women. Adolescents also are more likely to forget to take the pill or to discontinue due to side effects, without consulting their physician. A survey of European young women identified contraceptive protection without weight gain as the most necessary change in OCs. Adolescents must be counseled not to miss a single pill, observe the pill-free interval, take phasic formulations in the right order, and use a back-up method in case of diarrhea and vomiting or when certain medications (e.g., antibiotics and anti-epileptics) are used concurrently, and be informed of steps to take in the event of side effects and unprotected intercourse. The quality of the counseling appears to be more important to compliance than the quantity of information provided. Pharmacists should complete the counseling initiated by the physician and explain prescription use. The most significant predictor of consistent OC use is the adolescent's motivation.

  2. DNA Copy Number Aberrations, and Human Papillomavirus Status in Penile Carcinoma. Clinico-Pathological Correlations and Potential Driver Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lambros, Maryou; Stankiewicz, Elzbieta; Ng, Charlotte K. Y.; Weigelt, Britta; Rajab, Ramzi; Tinwell, Brendan; Corbishley, Cathy; Watkin, Nick; Berney, Dan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.

    2016-01-01

    Penile squamous cell carcinoma is a rare disease, in which somatic genetic aberrations have yet to be characterized. We hypothesized that gene copy aberrations might correlate with human papillomavirus status and clinico-pathological features. We sought to determine the spectrum of gene copy number aberrations in a large series of PSCCs and to define their correlations with human papillomavirus, histopathological subtype, and tumor grade, stage and lymph node status. Seventy formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded penile squamous cell carcinomas were centrally reviewed by expert uropathologists. DNA was extracted from micro-dissected samples, subjected to PCR-based human papillomavirus assessment and genotyping (INNO-LiPA human papillomavirus Genotyping Extra Assay) and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization using a 32K Bacterial Artificial Chromosome array platform. Sixty-four samples yielded interpretable results. Recurrent gains were observed in chromosomes 1p13.3-q44 (88%), 3p12.3-q29 (86%), 5p15.33-p11 (67%) and 8p12-q24.3 (84%). Amplifications of 5p15.33-p11 and 11p14.1-p12 were found in seven (11%) and four (6%) cases, respectively. Losses were observed in chromosomes 2q33-q37.3 (86%), 3p26.3-q11.1 (83%) and 11q12.2-q25 (81%). Although many losses and gains were similar throughout the cohort, there were small significant differences observed at specific loci, between human papillomavirus positive and negative tumors, between tumor types, and tumor grade and nodal status. These results demonstrate that despite the diversity of genetic aberrations in penile squamous cell carcinomas, there are significant correlations between the clinico-pathological data and the genetic changes that may play a role in disease natural history and progression and highlight potential driver genes, which may feature in molecular pathways for existing therapeutic agents. PMID:26901676

  3. Chromatin status of apoptosis genes correlates with sensitivity to chemo-, immune- and radiation therapy in colorectal cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Benard, Anne; Janssen, Connie M; van den Elsen, Peter J; van Eggermond, Marja C J A; Hoon, Dave S B; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Kuppen, Peter J K

    2014-12-01

    The apoptosis pathway of programmed cell death is frequently deregulated in cancer. An intact apoptosis pathway is required for proper response to anti-cancer treatment. We investigated the chromatin status of key apoptosis genes in the apoptosis pathway in colorectal cancer cell lines in relation to apoptosis induced by chemo-, immune- or radiation therapy. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we measured the presence of transcription-activating histone modifications H3Ac and H3K4me3 and silencing modifications H3K9me3 and H3K27me3 at the gene promoter regions of key apoptosis genes Bax, Bcl2, Caspase-9, Fas (CD95) and p53. Cell lines DLD1, SW620, Colo320, Caco2, Lovo and HT29 were treated with cisplatin, anti-Fas or radiation. The apoptotic response was measured by flow cytometry using propidium iodide and annexin V-FITC. The chromatin status of the apoptosis genes reflected the activation status of the intrinsic (Bax, Bcl2, Caspase-9 and p53) and extrinsic (Fas) pathways. An active intrinsic apoptotic pathway corresponded to sensitivity to cisplatin and radiation treatment of cell lines DLD1, SW620 and Colo320. An active Fas promoter corresponded to an active extrinsic apoptotic pathway in cell line DLD1. mRNA expression data correlated with the chromatin status of the apoptosis genes as measured by ChIP. In conclusion, the results presented in this study indicate that the balance between activating and silencing histone modifications, reflecting the chromatin status of apoptosis genes, can be used to predict the response of tumor cells to different anti-cancer therapies and could provide a novel target to sensitize tumors to obtain adequate treatment responses.

  4. Communication about Contraception and Knowledge of Oral Contraceptives amongst Norwegian High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Thomas; Skjeldestad, Finn Egil

    2003-01-01

    Examines communication about contraception and specific knowledge of oral contraceptives (OCs) in a sample of Norwegian high school students. More females than males discussed contraception at least monthly. Discussions were predominantly held with peers and not adults. Females were far more knowledgeable about OCs than males. The most significant…

  5. [Oral contraception and circulatory risks].

    PubMed

    Wingrave, S J

    1984-10-01

    The longterm prospective study of health effects of oral contraceptives (OCs) conducted by the Royal College of General Practitioners compared 23,000 OC users with 23,000 controls matched for age and marital status. As of 1981, 55 deaths attributable to circulatory problems had occurred in ever-users of OCs, ciompared to 10 in controls, giving a relative risk of 4.2 for OC users. No relation was found between duration of use and mortality risk among users, although mortality risks were greater at all durations of use than for nonusers. Parity was related to mortality risk among users but not among controls. The most significant factors affecting the relation between pill use and circulatory risk were age and smoking. Among users who smoked, the risk ratios were 3.4 for those aged 25-34, 4.2 for those aged 35-44, 7.4 for those aged 45 and over, and 5.1 for the entire group. Among nonsmoking pill users, the ratios were 1.6 for those aged 25-34, 3.3 for those aged 35-44, 4.6 for those 45 and over, and 3.2 for the total sample. Among smokers, the rates of excess deaths were 1 in 10,000 for users aged 15-34, 1 in 2000 for those aged 35-44, and 1 in550 for those aged 45 and over. Among nonsmokers, the rates were 1 in 50,000 users for those aged 25-34, 1 in 6700 for those aged 35-44, and 1 in 2500 for those aged 45 and over. The majority of deaths were attributed to ischemic cardiac problems and to sub-arachnoid hemorrhages, and risks appeared to be elevated in former as well as current users. The total incidence of circulatory effects in former users appears to be elevated only for cerebrovascular disorders, but the suggestion of residual effects requires further study before conclusions can be drawn. Smokers who developed cardiovascular or cerebrovascular problems were at 2-3 times greater risk of dying than were other women. The percentages of fatal cases of ischemic heart and cerebrovascular diseases were 22.8% among ever-users who smoked, 10.9% among controls who

  6. Contraception in the Developing World: Special Considerations.

    PubMed

    Schivone, Gillian B; Blumenthal, Paul D

    2016-05-01

    The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) estimates that there are 225 million women and girls with unmet contraceptive need yearly. Unmet need for contraception is defined as women who desire a delay in childbearing and are not using a modern method of contraception. It is projected that providing contraception to these women would avert 36 million abortions, 70,000 maternal deaths, and 52 million unintended pregnancies overall. In the past 30 years, there has been an increase both in population and in contraception use in the developing world. As a result, it is estimated that in 2015 there were 500 million contraceptive users in developing countries, which is nearly double the prevalence in 2000. Unfortunately, women and girls in developing nations still face many obstacles in obtaining modern methods of contraception. Particular challenges in the developing world include lack of access due to inadequate number of trained providers, fewer method options, and "stock-outs" of contraceptive supplies. Innovative strategies for decreasing unmet need will have to address these challenges, and will necessarily involve programmatic solutions such as community-based distribution and social marketing campaigns. Additionally, increasing uptake of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods will be essential for achieving the goal of decreasing unmet need.

  7. Contraceptive specifications: report on a workshop.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A A; Berelson, B

    1971-01-01

    It was suggested at a meeting in 1967 on the behavioral sciences and family planning programs that social scientists should be involved in the design of new contraceptives. The Center of Population Research and the Population Council held a 2-day workshop in August 1969 to develop a more rational approach to the design of new contraceptives by working out the specifications for the variety of methods suitable for use by different population groups. The potential impact of improved contraception is great. According to the 1965 National Fertility Survey, 20% of all births occurring between 1960-1965 were unwanted. If 3/4 of these births were averted, a reduction of 15% in the number of births in 1960-1965 would have taken place. Characteristics of contraceptives are numerous, and it is recommended that the goal should be a variety of methods that would be useful under differing circumstances. In the development of new methods of contraception, it is acceptability, even more than effectiveness, that investigators are trying to improve. There are a number of social and psychological factors affecting acceptability. The kinds of contraceptives considered acceptable may differ at various stages of family growth. Contraceptives must be dependable, acceptable, harmless, simple, and cheap. In making observations and suggestions for research, it was noted that the development of an ideal contraceptive that is universally preferred is unlikely. Research should aim toward an improved contraceptive system or technology--a variety of methods rather than a single best method.

  8. Hormonal correlates of social status and courtship display in the cooperatively lekking lance-tailed manakin.

    PubMed

    DuVal, Emily H; Goymann, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Though cooperative behavior has long been a focus of evolutionary biology, the proximate hormonal mechanisms underlying cooperative interactions remain poorly understood. Lance-tailed manakins (Chiroxiphia lanceolata) are tropical passerines that form long-term male-male partnerships and cooperate in paired male courtship displays. To elucidate patterns of natural hormonal variation in relation to cooperation and reproductive behavior, we examined circulating androgen levels of male lance-tailed manakins in relation to social status, display behavior, and time of year. We found significantly higher circulating androgen levels in alpha-ranked (breeding) males compared to non-alpha adult males in the population. Beta males, which participated in courtship displays but did not copulate, had androgen levels indistinguishable from those of unpaired adult males that never displayed for females, suggesting that an elevated concentration of plasma testosterone in tropical lekking birds may be associated primarily with copulatory behavior or other status-specific traits, and not the performance of courtship display. Androgens decreased throughout the breeding season for males of all status categories. Interestingly, alphas that displayed for females in the observation session prior to sampling had lower androgen levels than alphas that did not display for females. This pattern may result from female discrimination against alpha males at display areas with high levels of social conflict among males, as social disruption is linked to elevated testosterone in many species. However, recent change of a display partner was not related to alpha androgen levels. We discuss alternative explanations and the possible implications of these results, and generate several testable predictions for future investigations.

  9. Altered composition of epidermal lipids correlates with Staphylococcus aureus colonization status in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Villarreal, M; Stewart, S; Choi, J; Indra, G; Babineau, D C; Philpot, C; David, G; Yoshida, T; Boguniewicz, M; Hanifin, J; Beck, L A; Leung, D; Simpson, E; Indra, A K

    2017-02-28

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by disrupted epidermal barrier functions.(1) Stratum corneum (SC) consists of corneocytes and a lipid-rich extracellular matrix, which plays a key role in epidermal permeability barrier (EPB) functions.(2,3) Major lipid constituents of the SC are ceramides (CERs), free fatty acids (FFAs), cholesterol and triglycerides (TGs).(2,3) Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) colonization is an important trigger of AD.(4) Comprehensive profiling of SC lipids using S.aureus colonization status, and association between S.aureus colonization and skin lipid composition, has never been documented. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Correlation between Radiologic Sign of Lumbar Lordosis and Functional Status in Patients with Chronic Mechanical Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Alireza; Farahangiz, Siamak; Pakniat Jahromi, Bita; Setayeshpour, Nazanin; Nasseri, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A cross-sectional study. Purpose To describe the correlation between lumbar lordosis angle and functional status of patients with chronic mechanical low back pain (CMLBP). Overview of Literature There are different and conflicting opinions regarding the relationship between the degree of lumbar lordosis and functional status of patients with low back pain. Nonetheless, the severity of lordosis is still one of the routine physical exams considered in rehabilitation clinics. Methods The degree of lumbar lordosis of 150 patients with CMLBP was measured by means of Cobb's method using sagittal standing spinal radiographs. Subjects with probable secondary causes of low back pain (trauma, congenital anomaly, spinal infection, rheumatologic problems and history of spinal surgery) were excluded. Besides recording demographic data, their score of functional disability was estimated using Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, one of the most useful and reliable questionnaires. Comparison between these data was made regarding different age and gender groups. Results In this study, 119 subjects were female and 31 male, with an age range of 19-85 years. The average degree of lumbar lordosis was 44.69±11.43 and that of Oswestry disability index (ODI) 30.52%. Although we found a significant direct relationship between age and degree of lumbar lordosis (Pearson's correlation coefficient, p=0.016, r=0.197), while insignificant correlation was seen between the degree of lumbar lordosis and ODI (p=0.129). Conclusions There was no significant correlation between the degree of lumbar lordosis and the score of functional disability with regards to different age groups and gender. PMID:25346808

  11. Correlation of diffusion tensor imaging parameters with neural status in Pott’s spine

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nikhil; Saini, Namita Singh; Kumar, Sudhir; Rajagopalan, Mukunth; Chakraborti, Kanti Lal; Jain, Anil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been used in cervical trauma and spondylotic myelopathy, and it has been found to correlate with neural deficit and prognosticate neural recovery. Such a correlation has not been studied in Pott’s spine with paraplegia. Hence, this prospective study has been used to find correlation of DTI parameters with neural deficit in these patients. Methods: Thirty-four patients of spinal TB were enrolled and DTI was performed before the start of treatment and after six months. Fractional anisotropy (FA), Mean diffusivity (MD), and Tractography were studied. Neurological deficit was graded by the Jain and Sinha scoring. Changes in FA and MD at and below the site of lesion (SOL) were compared to above the SOL (control) using the unpaired t-test. Pre-treatment and post-treatment values were also compared using the paired t-test. Correlation of DTI parameters with neurological score was done by Pearson’s correlation. Subjective assessment of Tractography images was done. Results: Mean average FA was not significantly decreased at the SOL in patients with paraplegia as compared to control. After six months of treatment, a significant decrease (p = 0.02) in mean average FA at the SOL compared to pre-treatment was seen. Moderate positive correlation (r = 0.49) between mean average FA and neural score after six months of treatment was found. Tractography images were not consistent with severity of paraplegia. Conclusion: Unlike spondylotic myelopathy and trauma, epidural collection and its organized inflammatory tissue in Pott’s spine precludes accurate assessment of diffusion characteristics of the compressed cord. PMID:27163110

  12. Lack of correlation between BRCA1 carrier status and HER-2/neu (ERBB2) gene amplification in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, J.S.; Giraldez, R.A.; Flom, K.

    1994-09-01

    We examined 4{mu}m paraffin-embedded tissue sections from twenty female breast tumors for the presence of HER-2/neu (ERBB2) gene amplification. The study population consisted of ten BRCA1 carriers and ten non-BRCA1 carriers. Carrier status was assessed through linkage analysis. Detection of HER-2/neu gene amplification was performed blinded with respect to BRCA1 status. Forty cells representing at least two different areas of each tumor were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a HER-2/neu cosmid probe. We did not find any cases which showed the typical HER-2/neu gene amplification profile (homogeneous distribution of cells with > 4 signals per cell). In half of the cases, small foci that appeared amplified were identified as clusters of cells with > 4 signals. Modifying our analysis to compensate for this, cases were considered to be amplified if nine or more cells out of forty contained over four HER-2/neu signals. For the 10 BRCA1 carrier positive samples, 5 were HER-2/neu amplified and 5 were not. Similarly, of the 10 BRCA1 carrier negative samples, 5 were HER-2/neu amplified and 5 were not. Therefore, we found no statistical correlation between BRCA1 carrier status and amplification of the HER-2/neu gene in the tumors studied.

  13. P15 - Reduced Physical Activity Correlates with Osteopenic or Osteoporotic Status in Postmenopausal Women: Preliminary Results from the Prof Project

    PubMed Central

    Piscitelli, P.; Coli, G.; Argentiero, A.; Neglia, C.; Chitano, G.; Paladini, D.; Mundi, S.; Paladini, L.; Greco, M.; Girasoli, C.; Gianicolo, M. E.; Pantile, V.; Argentiero, D.; De Padova, G.; Pansa, L.; Nibio, L.; Di Giuseppe, P.; Minosi, A.; Cirasino, L.; Laselva, G.; Scialpi, M.; Benvenuto, M.; D’Angela, D.; Brandi, M. L.; Distante, A.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Italy has a considerable yearly incidence of osteoporotic fractures: about 300,000. In this context, preventive strategies are based mainly on early identification of people at higher risk of fractures and of clinical risk factors. Within the PROF (Prevention of Osteoporotic Fractures) project, i.e. a synergic effort of researchers and clinicians aimed at preventing osteoporotic fractures in Southern Apulia (Salento), a region with an increasing number of elderly people, we investigated the correlation between reduced physical activity and osteopenic or osteoporotic status in postmenopausal women. Methods: During the years 2009–2010, 5665 postmenopausal women (mean age 62 years, range 39 to 86) underwent quantitative bone ultrasound (QUS) measurement at the heel and phalanx. Demographic and anamnestic data were recorded for all the patients, including BMI, nutrition, menopause, physical activity, previous fractures, familial fragility fractures. Three demineralisation categories were identified a priori: a) Demineralisation, when any T-score <−1.0 SD was observed; b) Severe demineralisation, whenever a T-score <−2.0 was observed, corresponding to a higher risk of fracture; c) Osteoporosis, whenever a T-score <−2.5±0.2 (for the heel) or T-score <−3.2±0.2 (for the phalanx) was observed. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed in order to assess the correlation between low physical activity (patients declaring themselves to be completely sedentary) and osteopenic or osteoporotic status. Results: Of the 5665 women, demineralisation was observed in 4487 patients (79%), corresponding to severe osteopenia or osteoporotic status in 2823 women (50% of all the examined subjects) and frank osteoporosis in 846 patients (15%). In total, of the 1255 women with a clinical history of reduced physical activity, 1058 (84.3%) presented demineralisation corresponding at least to an osteopenic status. In addition, demineralisation typical of severe osteopenia

  14. Counseling adolescents about contraception: towards the development of an evidence-based protocol for contraceptive counselors.

    PubMed

    Jaccard, James; Levitz, Nicole

    2013-04-01

    Research on contraceptive counseling of adolescents in clinics and service delivery settings is considered. The provider context as well as the developmental context of adolescence is characterized and their implications for contraceptive counseling are explicated. After reviewing research on the effectiveness of contraceptive counseling, it was concluded there is little empirical evidence to support the efficacy of current practices considered as a totality. Twelve principles for effective contraceptive counseling were then derived as a basis for building an evidence-based contraceptive counseling protocol for adolescents.

  15. Socio-Demographic and Economic Correlates of Overweight Status in Chinese Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, Bin; Chou, Chih-Ping; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Reynolds, Kim; Clark, Florence; Palmer, Paula H.; Gallaher, Peggy; Sun, Ping; Guo, Qian; Johnson, C. Anderson

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate overweight prevalence and socio-demographic and economic correlates in Chinese adolescents. Methods: Weight, height, waist circumference, and socio-demographic and economic variables of 6863 middle and high school students were measured. Results: 10% of girls and 17% of boys were overweight. Waist circumference and…

  16. Prevalence and Correlates of Postsecondary Residential Status among Young Adults with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kristy A.; Shattuck, Paul T.; Cooper, Benjamin P.; Roux, Anne M.; Wagner, Mary

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence and correlates of three living arrangements (with a parent or guardian, independently or with a roommate, or in a supervised setting) among a nationally representative sample of postsecondary young adults with an autism spectrum disorder. We assessed living arrangements since leaving high school. Compared with…

  17. Heart Rate Correlates of Attachment Status in Young Mothers and Their Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelenko, Marina; Kraemer, Helena; Huffman, Lynne; Gschwendt, Miriam; Pageler, Natalie; Steiner, Hans

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore heart rate (HR) correlates of attachment behavior in young mothers and their infants to generate specific hypotheses and to provide pilot data on which studies to test those hypotheses might be based. Method: Using the strange situation procedure, patterns of attachment were assessed in 41 low-income adolescent mothers and…

  18. The correlation between body mass index and breast cancer risk or estrogen receptor status in Okinawan women.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Kentaro; Tamaki, Nobumitsu; Terukina, Shigeharu; Kamada, Yoshihiko; Uehara, Kano; Arakaki, Miwa; Miyashita, Minoru; Ishida, Takanori; McNamara, Keely May; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Sasano, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    Dietary changes resulting from the post-World War II occupation of Okinawa by the US military have been largely deleterious, resulting in a marked increase of obesity among Okinawan residents. In this study, we examined the association between BMI and the risk of developing breast cancer according to the menstruation status and age, and the correlation between BMI and expression of estrogen receptor (ER). Breast cancer cases were 3,431 females without any personal or family history of breast cancer. Control subjects were 5,575 women drawn from the clinical files of Nahanishi Clinic. We found that women, who were overweight or obese, regardless of menopausal stage, had a higher risk of breast cancer compared to women with normal weight and this difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001, respectively). This risk was especially apparent in older (> 40 years) overweight or obese women. The women who were overweight or obese during postmenopausal ages were at higher risk of ER-positive breast cancer compared to women with normal weight. Results of our present study clearly indicate that increased BMI was associated with increased risk of developing breast cancer in Okinawan women, regardless of menopausal status. In addition, there was statistically significant correlation between BMI and ER expression in the postmenopausal period. Given the obesity epidemic associated with the extreme sociological and dietary changes brought about by the post-war occupation of Okinawa, the present study provides essential guidelines on the management, treatment and future breast cancer risk in Okinawa.

  19. An “Imperfect” Contraceptive Society: Fertility and Contraception in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Gribaldo, Alessandra; Judd, Maya D.; Kertzer, David I.

    2013-01-01

    Italy represents an unexpected and in some ways paradoxical outcome in terms of fertility control: a drop to one of the lowest birth rates in the world has been accompanied by the preponderant use of “traditional” methods despite the availability of “modern” contraception. Using data from 349 interviews conducted in 2005–2006 in four Italian cities, we argue that Italian women achieve “unplanned” AND desired conceptions through the use of withdrawal and natural methods. While data from other countries reveal similar notions of ambivalence surrounding pregnancy intentions and contraceptive use, Italy stands out for the surprising correlation between highly “managing” the conditions under which children are born and the socially commended approach of “letting births happen”. Such results suggest the need to rethink theoretical understandings of low fertility. Through the use of non-technological methods individuals manipulate culturally produced norms and beliefs about the appropriate moment to have a child; simultaneously, their actions are embedded in larger cultural, economic, and political processes. PMID:25045191

  20. [Oral contraceptive pill and thrombotic risk: epidemiological studies].

    PubMed

    Fruzzetti, F; Perini, D; Spirito, N; Manca, R

    2012-12-01

    The venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a rare event during childbearing age and during the assumption of combined oral contraceptive. The absolute risk of VTE in users of combined oral contraceptives is 20-30 per 100000 women years. A number of case-control studies published in recent years have shown an apparent increase in the risk of VTE among users of oral contraceptives (OCs) containing desogestrel, gestodene, drospirenone and cyproterone, relative to the use of levonorgestrel. The data derived from these recent studies is of borderline statistical significance because any important factors are not considered to evaluate the real correlation between the assumption of OCs and risk of venous thromboembolism. Among the factors that should be considered, there are: EE dose, duration of use, coexistance of other risk factors of venous thromboembolism (age, BMI, familiarity, surgical interventions) and other prescription bias. The lack of these factors is likely to contribute to the increased risk of venous thromboembolism observed in users of third-generation OCs when compared to that in users of second-generation OCs. To date, because of the inadequacy of epidemiological studies, the data about the correlation between OCs and TVE, are not conclusive and it will be necessary to carry out other studies to clarify this debating point, definitively.

  1. Uterine peristalsis and junctional zone: correlation with age and postmenopausal status.

    PubMed

    Kiguchi, Kayo; Kido, Aki; Kataoka, Masako; Shitano, Fuki; Fujimoto, Koji; Himoto, Yuki; Moribata, Yusaku; Kurata, Yasuhisa; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Okada, Tomohisa; Togashi, Kaori

    2017-02-01

    Background Although age-related change of junctional zone (JZ) of the uterus has been known, there has been no previous systematic study of age-related changes of uterine peristalsis that is observed as the wave conduction of the thickest or darkest area within the JZ. Purpose To examine the age-related changes of uterine peristalsis in pre and postmenopausal women using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to determine the correlation between peristalsis and JZ on T2-weighted (T2W) imaging. Material and Methods Cine MRI analysis was performed in 64 premenopausal volunteers and in 43 postmenopausal women. The peristaltic frequency, JZ detectability, and JZ thickness were evaluated and compared between the two groups. In the premenopausal group, the correlations between age and each item was examined. In the postmenopausal group, the number of years after menopause was used instead of age. The correlation between peristaltic frequency and JZ detectability or thickness was also analyzed. Results Peristaltic frequency and JZ detectability significantly differed between the two groups, while JZ thickness did not. Peristaltic frequency did not vary significantly with age before menopause and no peristalsis was observed after menopause. JZ detectability did not change significantly with age or number of years after menopause, while JZ thickness significantly increased with age before menopause, but did not vary after menopause. A significant moderate correlation was observed between JZ detectability and peristaltic frequency, but not between JZ thickness and peristaltic frequency. Conclusion Uterine peristalsis frequency did not change significantly according to age, but observed peristalsis on MRI significantly decreased after menopause.

  2. The Combined Use of Correlative and Mechanistic Species Distribution Models Benefits Low Conservation Status Species

    PubMed Central

    Rougier, Thibaud; Lassalle, Géraldine; Drouineau, Hilaire; Dumoulin, Nicolas; Faure, Thierry; Deffuant, Guillaume; Rochard, Eric; Lambert, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Species can respond to climate change by tracking appropriate environmental conditions in space, resulting in a range shift. Species Distribution Models (SDMs) can help forecast such range shift responses. For few species, both correlative and mechanistic SDMs were built, but allis shad (Alosa alosa), an endangered anadromous fish species, is one of them. The main purpose of this study was to provide a framework for joint analyses of correlative and mechanistic SDMs projections in order to strengthen conservation measures for species of conservation concern. Guidelines for joint representation and subsequent interpretation of models outputs were defined and applied. The present joint analysis was based on the novel mechanistic model GR3D (Global Repositioning Dynamics of Diadromous fish Distribution) which was parameterized on allis shad and then used to predict its future distribution along the European Atlantic coast under different climate change scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5). We then used a correlative SDM for this species to forecast its distribution across the same geographic area and under the same climate change scenarios. First, projections from correlative and mechanistic models provided congruent trends in probability of habitat suitability and population dynamics. This agreement was preferentially interpreted as referring to the species vulnerability to climate change. Climate change could not be accordingly listed as a major threat for allis shad. The congruence in predicted range limits between SDMs projections was the next point of interest. The difference, when noticed, required to deepen our understanding of the niche modelled by each approach. In this respect, the relative position of the northern range limit between the two methods strongly suggested here that a key biological process related to intraspecific variability was potentially lacking in the mechanistic SDM. Based on our knowledge, we hypothesized that local adaptations to cold

  3. Status and perspective of FARCOS: A new correlator array for nuclear reaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, E. V.; Acosta, L.; Auditore, L.; Boiano, C.; Cardella, G.; Castoldi, A.; D'Andrea, M.; Dell'aquila, D.; De Filippo, E.; De Luca, S.; Fichera, F.; Francalanza, L.; Giudice, N.; Gnoffo, B.; Grimaldi, A.; Guazzoni, C.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Minniti, T.; Norella, S.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Saccá, G.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2016-05-01

    The experimental investigation of Heavy Ion reactions at Fermi energies requires an accurate measurement of observables, such as linear momentum and energy of the detected particles. In order to address this problem, dedicated and flexible correlator arrays are useful tools to be coupled with 4π detectors. One of these arrays is FARCOS, presently under construction at the INFN Sezione di Catania and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS).

  4. Maternal Health Status Correlates with Nest Success of Leatherback Sea Turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) from Florida

    PubMed Central

    Perrault, Justin R.; Miller, Debra L.; Eads, Erica; Johnson, Chris; Merrill, Anita; Thompson, Larry J.; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2012-01-01

    Of the seven sea turtle species, the critically endangered leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) exhibits the lowest and most variable nest success (i.e., hatching success and emergence success) for reasons that remain largely unknown. In an attempt to identify or rule out causes of low reproductive success in this species, we established the largest sample size (n = 60–70 for most values) of baseline blood parameters (protein electrophoresis, hematology, plasma biochemistry) for this species to date. Hematologic, protein electrophoretic and biochemical values are important tools that can provide information regarding the physiological condition of an individual and population health as a whole. It has been proposed that the health of nesting individuals affects their reproductive output. In order to establish correlations with low reproductive success in leatherback sea turtles from Florida, we compared maternal health indices to hatching success and emergence success of their nests. As expected, hatching success (median = 57.4%) and emergence success (median = 49.1%) in Floridian leatherbacks were low during the study period (2007–2008 nesting seasons), a trend common in most nesting leatherback populations (average global hatching success = ∼50%). One protein electrophoretic value (gamma globulin protein) and one hematologic value (red blood cell count) significantly correlated with hatching success and emergence success. Several maternal biochemical parameters correlated with hatching success and/or emergence success including alkaline phosphatase activity, blood urea nitrogen, calcium, calcium∶phosphorus ratio, carbon dioxide, cholesterol, creatinine, and phosphorus. Our results suggest that in leatherbacks, physiological parameters correlate with hatching success and emergence success of their nests. We conclude that long-term and comparative studies are needed to determine if certain individuals produce nests with lower

  5. Use of Contraception and Attitudes towards Contraceptive Use in Swedish Women - A Nationwide Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kopp Kallner, Helena; Thunell, Louise; Brynhildsen, Jan; Lindeberg, Mia; Gemzell Danielsson, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe contraceptive use and attitudes towards contraceptive use in Sweden which has the highest abortion rate in Western Europe. Secondary objectives were to investigate knowledge of contraceptive methods and outcomes of unplanned and unwanted pregnancies. Design Telephone survey. Setting National survey of women living in Sweden. Population Women between 16 and 49 years. Methods The survey contained 22 questions with free text and multi choice answers on demographics, contraceptive use, knowledge of and attitudes towards contraception, the importance of monthly bleeding and experience of unintended pregnancy. Main Outcome Measures Distribution of use of contraceptive methods and non-use of contraception among Swedish women. Prevalence and outcome of unintended pregnancies. Results A total of 1001 women participated in the survey. Of all women, 721/1001 (72.1%) currently used contraception whereas 268/1001 (26.8%) women did not. Long acting reversible contraception, (LARC; implant and intra uterine contraception) was used by 24.3% of women. The unmet need of contraception in Sweden was estimated at 8.9% (89/1001 women). A total of 781 (78%) women had never experienced an unintended pregnancy whereas 220 (22%) women had had at least one unintended pregnancy. Users and non-users alike stated that one of the most important characteristics of a contraceptive method is its effectiveness. Conclusions Sweden has a large unmet need for contraception. Furthermore, a large proportion of women have experienced at least one unintended pregnancy. Increasing contraceptive use and promotion of LARC is a possible way forward in the effort to reduce the rates of unwanted pregnancies. PMID:25992901

  6. Ultrasound appearances of Implanon implanted contraceptive devices.

    PubMed

    McNeill, G; Ward, E; Halpenny, D; Snow, A; Torreggiani, W

    2009-01-01

    Subdermal contraceptive devices represent a popular choice of contraception. Whilst often removed without the use of imaging, circumstances exist where imaging is required. Ultrasound is the modality of choice. The optimal technique and typical sonographic appearances are detailed in this article.

  7. Advance Provision of Emergency Contraception for Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamji, Jehan-Marie; Swartwout, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Emergency contraception is most effective at preventing unintended pregnancy when taken as early as possible following unprotected sexual intercourse. Advance provision of this medication supports more timely and effective use. In the midst of rising teen pregnancy rates, current policies often limit access to emergency contraception for…

  8. Drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Kavita; Stuart, Gretchen S.; Robinson, Jennifer; Gray, Andrew L.; Tepper, Naomi K.; Gaffield, Mary E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To summarize published evidence on drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals. Design: Systematic review of the published literature. Methods: We searched PubMed, POPLINE, and EMBASE for peer-reviewed publications of studies (in any language) from inception to 21 September 2015. We included studies of women using hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals concurrently. Outcomes of interest were effectiveness of either therapy, toxicity, or pharmacokinetics. We used standard abstraction forms to summarize and assess strengths and weaknesses. Results: Fifty reports from 46 studies were included. Most antiretrovirals whether used for therapy or prevention, have limited interactions with hormonal contraceptive methods, with the exception of efavirenz. Although depot medroxyprogesterone acetate is not affected, limited data on implants and combined oral contraceptive pills suggest that efavirenz-containing combination antiretroviral therapy may compromise contraceptive effectiveness of these methods. However, implants remain very effective despite such drug interactions. Antiretroviral plasma concentrations and effectiveness are generally not affected by hormonal contraceptives. Conclusion: Women taking antiretrovirals, for treatment or prevention, should not be denied access to the full range of hormonal contraceptive options, but should be counseled on the expected rates of unplanned pregnancy associated with all contraceptive methods, in order to make their own informed choices. PMID:28060009

  9. Prescribing contraceptives for women with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Mary V; Ross, Ruth

    2011-07-01

    Although women with serious mental illness have high rates of lifetime sexual partners, they infrequently use contraception. Consequently, the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections is high in this population. In addition, while the overall rate of pregnancy in women with schizophrenia of child-bearing age is lower than in the general population, the percentage of pregnancies that are unwanted is higher than that in the general population. The objective of this paper is to help clinicians explore knowledge of appropriate methods of contraception for women who suffer from schizophrenia. The authors reviewed recent literature on the use of contraceptive methods by women with schizophrenia treated with antipsychotic and adjunctive medications. Contraceptive counseling to women and their partners is an important part of comprehensive care for women with serious and persistent mental illness. Women with schizophrenia who smoke, are overweight, or have diabetes, migraine, cardiovascular disease, or a family history of breast cancer should be offered non-hormonal contraception. Women with more than one sexual partner should be advised on barrier methods in addition to any other contraceptive measures they are using. Clinicians should be alert for potential interactions among oral hormonal contraceptives, smoking, and therapeutic drugs. Long-lasting contraceptive methods, such as intrauterine devices, progesterone depot injections, or tubal ligation are reasonable options for women having no wish to further expand their families.

  10. Understanding Adolescent Contraceptive Choice: An Empirical Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Nancy E.; And Others

    Research using expectancy models has shown contraceptive choice among adults to be a rational process in that intentions and behaviors reflect an individual's beliefs, values, attitudes, and perceptions of social norms. This study examined whether such an approach could accurately represent adolescents' contraceptive decision-making. It used the…

  11. Contraception in women with medical problems

    PubMed Central

    Dhanjal, Mandish K

    2008-01-01

    Women with medical disease have a higher incidence of maternal mortality compared with healthy women, with cardiac disease now being the most common cause of maternal death in the UK. A handful of medical conditions exist where pregnancy is not recommended due to mortality rates approaching 50%. It is imperative that such women have the most reliable methods of contraception available. Contraceptive agents may themselves affect medical disease, or may interact with medications used by such women. There may be a range of contraceptive agents suitable for each medical condition. The contraceptive selected should be tailored to suit the individual. The following points should be considered when deciding on the most appropriate contraceptive agent: efficacy, thrombotic risk (oestrogen containing contraceptives), arterial risks (oestrogen containing contraceptives), infective risk (e.g. insertion of intrauterine device [IUD]), vagal stimulation (e.g. insertion of IUD, ESSURE®), bleeding risks with patients on anticoagulants, interaction with concomitant drugs, effects of anaesthesia and ease of use. This review aims to cover the different contraceptive agents available and the best ones to use for certain medical illnesses. PMID:27582790

  12. Contraceptive efficacy of lactational amenorrhea in urban Chilean women.

    PubMed

    Díaz, S; Aravena, R; Cárdenas, H; Casado, M E; Miranda, P; Schiappacasse, V; Croxatto, H B

    1991-04-01

    The contraceptive efficacy of breastfeeding was assessed in 236 healthy urban women who were followed at monthly intervals during the first postpartum year. Proportional hazard models were used to evaluate the influence of time postpartum, menstrual status and breastfeeding pattern upon the risk of pregnancy. Time and menstrual status had a highly significant effect on this risk. Those women who remained in amenorrhea had cumulative probabilities of pregnancy of 0.9% and 17% at 6 and 12 months postpartum, respectively. In those who recovered menstrual cycles, the risk rose to 36% and 55% at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Milk supplementation also increased significantly the risk when considered alone but not when time and/or menstrual status were included in the analysis. However, amenorrheic women who introduced bottle feeding, had a higher risk of pregnancy after 6 months postpartum than those who remained fully nursing. The analysis was unable to detect a significant influence of the nursing frequency. The results confirm that lactational amenorrhea is an effective contraceptive during the first six months postpartum. The first postpartum bleeding marks a great increase in the risk of pregnancy. Supplementation also increases the risk, particularly in amenorrheic women.

  13. Cervical Chlamydia trachomatis infection in university women: relationship to history, contraception, ectopy, and cervicitis.

    PubMed

    Harrison, H R; Costin, M; Meder, J B; Bownds, L M; Sim, D A; Lewis, M; Alexander, E R

    1985-10-01

    Endocervical Chlamydia trachomatis infection was found in 13 of 162 volunteer female university students (8%). Infection was correlated with younger age (p less than 0.05), less than or equal to 4 years of intercourse (p less than 0.05), a history of gonorrhea (p less than 0.01), and exposure to a partner with urethritis (p less than 0.01). Women who used intrauterine or barrier contraception had less infection (2%) than did women who used oral contraception (14.3%, p less than 0.05) or none at all (10.7%, p less than 0.05). Infection was strongly associated with a cervicitis score calculated from erythema, ectopy, discharge, and secretions that contained white blood cells (p less than 0.0001). By multivariate analysis, a proposed clinical approach was arrived at for testing for chlamydial organisms all women with cervicitis who were not using barrier contraception. The positive predictive value of this approach for chlamydial infection was 28%, and the negative predictive value 98.4%. Cervical ectopy was increased in women who used oral contraception (p less than 0.01), and infection was increased in women with ectopy, regardless of their contraceptive method (p less than 0.001). These results will aid in more rapid diagnosis of endocervical chlamydial infection and in the choice of contraception in young women and high-prevalence groups.

  14. Factors affecting the choice of nonpermanent contraceptive methods among married women.

    PubMed

    MacDowell, M; Lee, E S

    1984-01-01

    Data from the 1976 US National Survey of Family Growth were used to examine the effect of sociodemographic factors on choice of nonpermanent contraceptive methods among white, fecund, married women aged 15-44 who intend no additional births. A multivariate analysis revealed that age of the respondent had a strong negative relationship to the effectiveness of contraceptive chosen. Being Catholic had a negative effect on the effectiveness of contraceptive chosen, but significant interaction occurred between age and parity and between age and education. 1 explanation may be that increased age may result in reduced perception of risk that an unwanted birth will occur. Another explanation is that concerns about health risks associated with the pill or IUD use may lead to use of other methods among older women. The most probable explanation of the observed relationship is a cohort effect. Older women who began marital contraception at an earlier point in time have continued to use the same methods as were initially available early in their marriage. The lack of a significant association between parity and the effectiveness of contraceptive method chosen based on multivariate analysis is most likely due to the high correlation between parity and age. The lack of a significant effect of education on choice of method may be explained by the nearly universal access to all methods of contraception for married women. Further research on the same lines is strongly urged to shed light on current behavior patterns.

  15. Aberrant promoter methylation of SH3GL2 gene in vulvar squamous cell carcinoma correlates with clinicopathological characteristics and HPV infection status

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; He, Yinghui; Han, Xue; Zhang, Shitai; Xu, Yan; Zhou, Yang; Song, Zixuan; Ouyang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study attempted to examine the methylation status of SH3GL2 gene in different types of human vulvar lesions and its correlation with clinicopathological parameters. Methods: Immunohistochemical analysis was used to identify the expression status of SH3GL2 in vulvar squamous cell carcinoma (VSCC), vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) and benign vulvar squamous epithelium tissues. Bisulfite genomic sequencing method was used to detect methylation status of the SH3GL2 gene. Clinicopathological correlation of the alterations was analysed by the chi-square tests. Results: Immunohistochemical analysis showed expression of SH3GL2 in VSCC was significantly downregulated than that in VIN and normal vulvar tissues. In accordance with higher frequency of methylation status in SH3GL2, statistical analysis showed methylation status of SH3GL2 was closely related to tumor TNM stage (P=0.003), but not related to age, tumor volume, tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis and VIN grade. High-methylation status of SH3GL2 showed significant association with HPV infection status. Conclusions: Our results indicated that the methylation status of SH3GL2 gene was associated with the TNM staging and HPV infection status of VSCC, suggesting that it might play a synergistic role in the development of VSCC. PMID:26823912

  16. Marketing contraceptives in rural Thailand.

    PubMed

    Viravaidya, M

    1988-01-01

    It can be difficult to administer and motivate field workers in family planning programs. In the case of social marketing, the last distributors in the chain are small shopkeepers who keep part of the final sale price. Thus contraceptives become part and parcel of their routine business, and the margin becomes both their remuneration and their motivation. In Thailand and most other countries with social marketing programs, part of the selling price also returns to the program, providing some degree of cost recovery. As family planning succeeds and per capita incomes rise, individuals will be able to pay an increasing part of the total cost of family planning. In the interim, international agencies and governments will continue to provide subsidies. In rural countries like Thailand, social marketing programs can be initiated and expanded relatively rapidly because they build on an existing infrastructure; they can also reach the most distant parts of the country. Skills of local advertising agencies are available in practically all Third World countries. Sales are a reliable record of progress and can be used to suggest innovations or practical solutions to problems. Small shopkeepers often feel more comfortable vending contraceptives than many experts would expect and as members of the community, intuitively know what the community's standards are. Individuals handling oral contraceptives often require some training and supervision by full-time staff who can answer questions that arise; local physicians may also be notified of the program for referral of problem cases. If there is a problem with social marketing programs, it is that they are sometimes too successful--leading to large bills for contraceptive commodities. However, if evaluated in terms of cost-effectiveness, they are less expensive than their alternatives. Along with access to voluntary sterilization and community-based distribution programs, social marketing is a keystone in the arch of family

  17. Recent trends in contraceptive use among Korean adolescents: Results from a nationwide survey from year 2013 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Soo Hyun; Jang, Hae In; Yoon, Byung-Koo; Choi, Doo-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was aimed to evaluate the recent trends in contraceptive use among Korean adolescents. Methods Data reviewed were from the 2013–2015 Korean Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey, which is a stratified, multistage-sampling designed online-based research project performed annually by the Korean government to ensure a nationally representative sample of Korean adolescence. Eight questions related to the topic of contraception were reviewed for the outcome variables. Results A total of 212,538 adolescents attending middle school and high school participated in the survey, and 8,755 students among them who were sexually active were included in the study. The percentage of contraceptive use showed a steady increase from 39% in 2013 to 48.7% in 2015; however, the proportion of adolescents who have never used any kind of contraception still remains high. Highly effective methods such as oral contraceptives and intrauterine devices were used by only 10% to 15% of sexually active adolescents. Conclusion The present study demonstrates the status of contraceptive use among Korean adolescents. Our data have the potential to help healthcare providers to formulate policies and develop interventions for encouraging effective contraceptive use among sexually active Korean adolescents. PMID:27896255

  18. Oral contraceptive marketing in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Bamgboye, E A; Ladipo, O A

    1992-10-01

    The demographic transition in Nigeria is gradually moving towards the second stage. There is clear evidence of a declining mortality but the fertility rate remains exceptionally high. A realistic approach towards reducing fertility rate is the use of oral contraceptive. This study assesses the distribution system of oral contraceptive in Ibadan, the second largest city in Nigeria. The findings revealed that the people are aware of modern oral contraceptives as they purchase them freely at chemist shops. But effective distribution is hampered by existing channels and high costs. A local source recommended is the proprietary medicine stores, often at convenient locations to the potential users of contraceptives. The current cost which is between $1.3 and $19.5 per couple-years of protection is exorbitant, consuming 0.5-7.8% of the gross annual income of the average individual. Therefore, the government should subsidize the prices of oral contraceptives, to facilitate freedom from the tyranny of excessive fertility.

  19. Venous thromboembolism in women taking hormonal contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Molina, Angeles; Monreal, Manuel

    2010-02-01

    Hormonal contraceptives are a popular method of contraception, but their use has been associated with an increased risk for venous thromboembolism. In order to reduce such risk, these compounds have been changed in their dosage, chemical composition and route of administration. The absolute risk of death from pulmonary embolism in contraceptive users has been estimated to be 10.5 (95% CI: 6.2-16.6) per million woman-years. The safest option is an oral contraceptive containing levonorgestrel combined with a low dose of estrogen. Identifying women at increased risk for venous thromboembolism is difficult, and greater use of thromboprophylaxis during immobility or minor surgery should be warranted. Several authors have called for all women to be screened for thrombophilia before prescription of hormonal contraceptives, but its cost-effectiveness remains uncertain.

  20. [High-dose progestational contraception: side effects].

    PubMed

    Gorins, A

    1993-02-01

    Women rarely depend on progestational contraception. In France, physicians are unsure of its indications. Progestational contraception presents advantages for certain indications where a particular condition exists and, more particularly, for women aged 40 and over. Women who can use it are those who have contraindications to estrogen use. These contraindications include uterine fibroids, endometrial hyperplasia, endometriosis, and fibro-cystic disease of the breast. It does produces side effects but those affecting metabolism seem to be almost negligible, like those of the third generation progestins. These side effects are metrorrhagias, amenorrhea, weight gain, and atherogenic metabolic changes. Yet, the nor-pregnane derivatives (which do effectively suppress ovulation) do not adversely affect glucose and lipid parameters. Progestational contraception probably cannot assure absolute safety as can combined oral contraceptives. It is not yet clear whether women who have been treated for breast cancer should use progestational contraception.

  1. Sequential, solid-phase assay for biotin in physiologic fluids that correlates with expected biotin status

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, D.M.; DuBois, D.B.

    1986-03-01

    Interest in accurate measurement of biotin concentrations in plasma and urine has been stimulated by recent advances in the understanding of biotin-responsive inborn errors of metabolism and by several reports describing acquired biotin deficiency during parenteral alimentation. This paper presents a biotin assay utilizing radiolabeled avidin in a sequential, solid-phase method; the assay has increased sensitivity compared to previous methods (greater than or equal to 10 fmol/tube), correlates with expected trends in biotin concentrations in blood and urine in a rat model of biotin deficiency, and can utilize commercially available radiolabeled avidin.

  2. Neural Correlates of Math Gains Vary Depending on Parental Socioeconomic Status (SES)

    PubMed Central

    Demir-Lira, Özlem Ece; Prado, Jérôme; Booth, James R.

    2016-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the neural predictors of math development, and asked whether these predictors vary as a function of parental socioeconomic status (SES) in children ranging in age from 8 to 13 years. We independently localized brain regions subserving verbal versus spatial processing in order to characterize relations between activation in these regions during an arithmetic task and long-term change in math skill (up to 3 years). Neural predictors of math gains encompassed brain regions subserving both verbal and spatial processing, but the relation between relative reliance on these regions and math skill growth varied depending on parental SES. Activity in an area of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) identified by the verbal localizer was related to greater growth in math skill at the higher end of the SES continuum, but lesser improvements at the lower end. Activity in an area of the right superior parietal cortex identified by the spatial localizer was related to greater growth in math skill at the lower end of the SES continuum, but lesser improvements at the higher end. Results highlight early neural mechanisms as possible neuromarkers of long-term arithmetic learning and suggest that neural predictors of math gains vary with parental SES. PMID:27378987

  3. [Anxiety level during morphine abstinence correlates with the status of nitrergic system in the rat hippocampus].

    PubMed

    Peregud, D I; Vorontsova, O N; Iakovlev, A A; Panchenko, L F; Guliaeva, N V

    2007-04-01

    Opiate addiction is accompanied by long-term structural and functional changes in brain regions persisting during abstinence, this status being an experimental model of the aberrant neuroplasticity. Nitric oxide is known to be involved in mechanisms of psychopathological events during opiate abstinence. In this study, indices of a nitregic system (nitric synthase activity--NOS, nitrites and nitrates concentration--NOx-) were measured in the rat brain region during morphine abstinence. Prior to this, the rats were tested for anxiety in an elevated plus maze. NOS activity increased in hippocampus 3 days after morphine withdrawal, while NOx--6 days after withdrawal. No changes of the nitrergic system could be revealed in other brain regions under study. Six days (but not 3 days) after morphine withdrawal, rats visited the open arms of the plus maze more frequently and spent more time in these arms as compared with respective controls. The data suggest that nitrergic system changes in the hippocampus may be involved in molecular mechanisms of behavioural alteration during morphine abstinence in rats.

  4. Cyberbullying among male adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: prevalence, correlates, and association with poor mental health status.

    PubMed

    Yen, Cheng-Fang; Chou, Wen-Jiun; Liu, Tai-Ling; Ko, Chih-Hung; Yang, Pinchen; Hu, Huei-Fan

    2014-12-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence rates and multilevel correlates of cyberbullying victims and perpetrators among male adolescents diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in Taiwan. The relationships between cyberbullying involvement and depression, anxiety, and suicidality were also examined. The experiences of cyberbullying victimization and perpetration in 251 male adolescents with ADHD were assessed. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the correlates of cyberbullying victims and perpetrators. The relationships between cyberbullying involvement and depression, anxiety, and suicidality were examined using multiple regression analysis. A total of 48 (19.1%) and 36 (14.3%) participants reported that they were cyberbullying victims or perpetrators, respectively. Those who had increased age and a higher parental occupational socioeconomic status, and reported more severe traditional passive bullying victimization were more likely to be cyberbullying victims. Those who had increased age and combined-type ADHD, and reported lower BAS reward responsiveness, more severe Internet addiction and more severe traditional passive bullying perpetration were more likely to be cyberbullying perpetrators. Cyberbullying victims reported more severe depression and suicidality than those who were not cyberbullying victims. A high proportion of male adolescents with ADHD are involved in cyberbullying. Clinicians, educational professionals, and parents of adolescents should monitor the possibility of cyberbullying involvement among male adolescents with ADHD who exhibit the cyberbullying correlates identified in this study.

  5. Correlations between Cognitive Impairments and Employment Status in Patients with Diffuse Axonal Injury

    PubMed Central

    HIROTA, Shin; INAJI, Motoki; NARIAI, Tadashi; HARA, Mutsuya; TAMAKI, Masashi; MAEHARA, Taketoshi; TOMITA, Hiroki; TONE, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) may initially present with prominent physical impairments, but their cognitive dysfunctions are more persistent and are attributable to later unemployment. In this study, we analyzed how the findings of early and delayed neuropsychological assessments correlated with employment outcome of patients with DAI. A total of 56 patients with DAI without motor or visual dysfunction were included in this study. The neuropsychological battery consisted of the Wechsler Adult Intelligent Scale - Revised (WAIS-R), Wechsler Memory Scale - Revised (WMS-R), Trail Making Test (TMT), Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), and Word Fluency Test (WFT). This battery of tests was administered twice in early stage after injury and in later stage. The results of all of the neuropsychological tests improved significantly (P <0.001) between the early and later assessments. All scores other than TMT part A and B improved to the normal range (Z-score ≥ 2). The patient characteristics (age, gender, initial Glasgow Coma Scale, and duration of posttraumatic amnesia) had no relationship to the outcome. The results of TMT part B, however, were significantly correlated with employment outcome in both the early and later assessments (P = 0.01, 0.04). Given that TMT evaluates visual attention, we surmise that a lack of attention may be the core symptom of the cognitive deficit and cause the re-employment failure in patients with DAI. TMT part B in both early and later assessments has the potential to accurately predict chronic functional outcome. PMID:28003570

  6. Status of correlation of Quaternary stratigraphic units in the western conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birkeland, P.W.; Crandell, D.R.; Richmond, G.M.

    1971-01-01

    Deposits of Quaternary age from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Coast in the western conterminous United States represent a great variety of environments. The deposits include those of continental and alpine glaciers, glacial meltwater streams, nonglacial streams, pluvial lakes, marine environments, eolian environments, and masswasting environments. On two charts we have attempted to correlate representative sequences of deposits of many of these environments, based on published sources and recent unpublished investigations. Evidence for correlation is based mainly on stratigraphic sequence, soil characteristics, the amount of subsequent erosion and interlayered volcanic ash beds identifiable as to source. Chronologic control is based on numerous radiocarbon dates, U-series dates on marine fossils, and K-Ar dates on volcanic rocks. The Bishop volcanic ash bed and one of the Pearlette-like volcanic ash beds appear to represent significant regional key horizons, respectively about 700,000 and 600,000 years old. Rock magnetism is shown to suggest the paleomagnetic polarity at the time of rock deposition. Assigned land-mammal ages of included fossils help to put limits on the age of some units. ?? 1971.

  7. Seroprevalence of Bartonella henselae infection and correlation with disease status in cats in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Glaus, T; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Greene, C; Glaus, B; Wolfensberger, C; Lutz, H

    1997-11-01

    The prevalence of infection with Bartonella henselae was investigated in cats from different areas of Switzerland. Serum samples of 728 cats were examined for antibodies to B. henselae by immunofluorescent antibody testing, and the results were analyzed with a view to a possible correlation between a positive titer and signalment, clinical signs, infection with feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), feline coronavirus (FCoV), or feline spumavirus (FeSFV), and the living environments of the cats. The seroprevalence in all cats was 8.3%. No significantly different prevalence was found in sick versus healthy cats (9.2 versus 7.2%); however, in sick cats seropositive for B. henselae, there was an increased frequency of stomatitis and a variety of diseases of the kidneys and the urinary tract. There was an increased prevalence of B. henselae in cats positive for FCoV (P = 0.0185) or FeSFV (P = 0.0235) and no statistically significant increased prevalence in cats infected with FeLV or FIV. There was no correlation between a positive titer and sex or breed. The same prevalence of B. henselae antibodies was found in cats with and without access to the outdoors and in cats from single- and multicat households. The seroprevalence was increased in cats living south of the Alps (12.1%); however, this difference was not significant (P = 0.0616).

  8. Enzymatic correlates of energy status in wild yellow perch inhabiting clean and contaminated environments.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Charles; Campbell, Peter G C; Couture, Patrice

    2011-09-01

    Enzymes representing a variety of metabolic pathways were examined in yellow perch (Perca flavescens) collected from a metal-contaminated region (Rouyn-Noranda, Québec, Canada) to determine which were most closely related to fish condition factor, pyloric caeca weight, and visceral lipid accumulation, as well to seek a better understanding of the influence of metal contamination on the physiology and biometrics of perch. Compared to laboratory fish, wild perch were under important energy restrictions. The condition factor of wild fish was correlated with indicators of aerobic metabolism (citrate synthase, cytochrome C oxidase), protein anabolism (nucleoside diphosphokinase), and indicators of lipid accumulation (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, visceral lipid index). Pyloric caeca weights were well correlated with indicators of protein anabolism, but only when both seasons were examined together, possibly indicating a lag in the response of enzymes to changes in diet. The addition of contaminant stress to existing energy restrictions led to changes in the relationships between enzymes and biometrics, reducing the predictive power of the models for perch in contaminated lakes. The present study broadens our knowledge of the impact of metal contamination on energy accumulation and tissue metabolic capacities in wild perch.

  9. [Resistance and compliance to contraception in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Pichot, F; Dayan-lintzer, M

    1985-10-01

    Although inadequate information on sex and contraception is frequently believed to account for contraceptive failure in adolescents, other factors including resistence to contraception or poor compliance with method requirements have been invoked to explain contraceptive failures in well-informed adolescents. Sexual relations are beginning at ever-younger ages in France; a 1980 survey indicated that 50% had their 1st sexual relations before age 17. Sexual activity is sporadic and irregular but usually occurs with the same partner. At least 50% of 1st sexual relations are unprotected by contraception, and half of adolescent pregnancies occur in the 1st 6th months of sexual activity. 6-12 months pass on average before sexually active adolescents begin to use contraception. Rates of pregnancy and abortion have increased especially among adolescents under 16, and in 1979 almost 20% of all abortions were in women under 20 years old. In 1980, only 20% of adolescents used contraception, with 17.3% using oral contraceptives. Few statistics exist on the complex phenomenon of conscious or subconscious contraceptive resistence in adolescence, and clinical experience serves as a better guide. A frequent attitude among adolescents is that sexual relations should be spontaneous and romantic, traits viewed as incompatible with contraception. "Magical thinking", failure to appreciate the real risk of pregnancy, and dissociation of sex and pregnancy are common. Adolescents who doubt their fecundity may engage in unprotected relations to reassure themselves, while some seeking to assert their femininity may use pills although they have no need for contraception. Guilt and ambivalence may be unconscious motivations for poor contraceptive use. Young girls in cold, uncaring, neglectful, or conflict-ridden homes may seek affection from a sexual partner and wish to have a baby to demonstrate their attachment. Such situations often lead to well-accepted pregnancies and may also

  10. Molybdate uptake by Agrobacterium tumefaciens correlates with the cellular molybdenum cofactor status.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Ali, Koral; Sonnenschein, Marleen; Robrahn, Laura; Strauss, Daria; Narberhaus, Franz; Masepohl, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    Many enzymes require the molybdenum cofactor, Moco. Under Mo-limiting conditions, the high-affinity ABC transporter ModABC permits molybdate uptake and Moco biosynthesis in bacteria. Under Mo-replete conditions, Escherichia coli represses modABC transcription by the one-component regulator, ModE, consisting of a DNA-binding and a molybdate-sensing domain. Instead of a full-length ModE protein, many bacteria have a shorter ModE protein, ModE(S) , consisting of a DNA-binding domain only. Here, we asked how such proteins sense the intracellular molybdenum status. We show that the Agrobacterium tumefaciens ModE(S) protein Atu2564 is essential for modABC repression. ModE(S) binds two Mo-boxes in the modA promoter as shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Northern analysis revealed cotranscription of modE(S) with the upstream gene, atu2565, which was dispensable for ModE(S) activity. To identify genes controlling ModE(S) function, we performed transposon mutagenesis. Tn5 insertions resulting in derepressed modA transcription mapped to the atu2565-modE(S) operon and several Moco biosynthesis genes. We conclude that A. tumefaciens ModE(S) activity responds to Moco availability rather than to molybdate concentration directly, as is the case for E. coli ModE. Similar results in Sinorhizobium meliloti suggest that Moco dependence is a common feature of ModE(S) regulators.

  11. Correlation of Third Molar Status with Incidence of Condylar and Angle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Menon, Suresh; Kumar, Veerendra; V, Srihari; Priyadarshini, Yogitha

    2016-09-01

    The mandibular angle and condylar regions are most prone to fractures and this has been attributed to the presence/absence or the position of the third molars. This retrospective study was undertaken to analyze the correlation between the third molars and incidence of condylar and angle fractures in 104 patients treated for these fractures during the period from June 2009 to December 2013. Clinical and radiographic records of these patients were studied to look for the presence and position of third molars and their relation to incidence of condylar or angle fractures. There was a definite positive relation to impacted third molars and increased incidence of angle fractures. The condylar fractures were more commonly seen when the third molars were fully erupted or missing. Third molar impactions predispose to angle fractures and missing or fully erupted third molars predispose to condylar fractures.

  12. Synchrotron radiation analysis of possible correlations between metal status in human cementum and periodontal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.R.; Naftel, S.J.; Nelson, A.J.; Edwards, M.; Mithoowani, H.; Stakiw, J.

    2010-03-16

    Periodontitis is a serious disease that affects up to 50% of an adult population. It is a chronic condition involving inflammation of the periodontal ligament and associated tissues leading to eventual tooth loss. Some evidence suggests that trace metals, especially zinc and copper, may be involved in the onset and severity of periodontitis. Thus we have used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging on cross sections of diseased and healthy teeth using a microbeam to explore the distribution of trace metals in cementum and adhering plaque. The comparison between diseased and healthy teeth indicates that there are elevated levels of zinc, copper and nickel in diseased teeth as opposed to healthy teeth. This preliminary correlation between elevated levels of trace metals in the cementum and plaque of diseased teeth suggests that metals may play a role in the progress of periodontitis.

  13. Hormonal contraception and risk of cardiovascular disease. An international perspective.

    PubMed

    Farley, T M; Collins, J; Schlesselman, J J

    1998-03-01

    smoking are greater than the additional risks attributable to OC use. The risk attributable to OC use in women < 35 years of age is small, even if they smoke, but there are substantially increased risks in older women who both smoke and use OC. The additional mortality attributable to OC use can be reduced by screening users, as this results in lower relative risks of ischemic stroke and MI. Differences between OC types in the relative risk of VTE contribute little to the total cardiovascular mortality associated with OC use, even though the total number of cardiovascular events is increased. A potential reduction in the risk of MI with desogestrel and gestodene compared with levonorgestrel-containing OC would have little difference on overall mortality rates in women in their 20s and 30s, but may result in a net reduction in OC-attributable mortality in women aged 40-44 years who smoke. An overall quantification of the risks for different types of oral contraceptive users is necessary for an informed choice of contraceptive method, and any assessment of the balance of cardiovascular risks is complex. The model provides a tool to assess, at the level of the individual, the risks associated with use of different OC according to personal circumstances. It is important to consider the user's age and smoking status when determining OC attributable risks.

  14. Males and Morals: Teenage Contraceptive Behavior Amid the Double Standard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scales, Peter

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews literature on teenage contraceptive behavior and teenage contraceptive decision making. The paper describes the persistence of a sexual double standard in terms of moral motivation to use contraception and in terms of the relative lack of communication about contraception among young partners. (Author)

  15. Name that Contraceptive! A Game for the Human Sexuality Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Martha S.

    2010-01-01

    There are many contraceptive choices available to people today. Learning about them can be dry, but the game "Name that Contraceptive!" can be a fun and interactive way to review, remember, and retain the details about contraceptive options. Name that Contraceptive is a card game in which students "bid" on the number of clues it will take them to…

  16. The Contraceptive Needs for STD Protection among Women in Jail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswalt, Krista; Hale, Galen J.; Cropsey, Karen L.; Villalobos, Gabriella C.; Ivey, Sara E.; Matthews, Catherine A.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the contraceptive needs of women in jails and their sexually transmitted disease (STD) history and risk to determine effective contraceptive methods for this population. A survey of demographics, sexual health, contraceptive use, and preferred method of contraception was completed by participants recruited at jails in a medium-sized…

  17. Correlation between Karnofsky Performance Status Scale and Short-Form Health Survey in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Arogundade, Fatiu A.; Zayed, Bahaa; Daba, Maryam; Barsoum, Rashad S.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessment of quality of life is vital inmonitoring response to various treatment measures. Various instruments, which include both generic and disease-specific instruments, are used in the assessment of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). In this study, we compare two commonly used generic instruments. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to compare two generic instruments, the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale and the SF-36 Health Survey in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The study also aims to find out the association (if any) between HRQOL scores using these two scales and various clinical and biochemical parameters. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-two maintenance HD patients were recruited after informed consents were obtained. Detailed sociodemographic data was obtained. They were assessed during their regular HD sessions. Serum chemistry (which included serum urea, creatinine, Na+, K+, HCO3-, Ca2+, Po4(2-)), albumin, globulin, total protein and hemoglobin (g/dl) were assessed in all the patients. Adequacy of HD was assessed using second-generation Daugirdais formula. HRQOL was assessed using the Karnofsky and SSF-36 instruments and the scores collated and compared. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 10. RESULTS: Fifty-five patients completed the study (27 males and 28 females, mean age 40.76 +/- 11.05 years and age range of 20-65 years). There was a significant positive correlation between Karnofsky scores and all eight SF-36 domains, but only physical functioning, social functioning and role limitation due to emotional problems maintained the significance on multiple regression analysis. The serum creatinine and hemoglobin postively correlated with physical function, bodily pain, social functioning and Karnofsky scores. Age of the patients correlated negatively with two SF-36 dimensions (physical functioning and role limitation due to physical fitness) and Karnofsky scores. CONCLUSION: This study revealed a good correlation between

  18. The state of hormonal contraception today: benefits and risks of hormonal contraceptives: combined estrogen and progestin contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Shulman, Lee P

    2011-10-01

    Discussion of effective birth control methods can be a challenging process for clinicians because the adoption and consistent use of contraception may be influenced by patients' fears, myths, and misperceptions. Over the years, new progestins have been included in combination contraceptives or are used alone to provide effective contraception as well as to decrease androgenic side effects and ameliorate the symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Alternative delivery systems and regimens have also been introduced to improve tolerability and continuance and convenience of use. This is a review of estrogen and progestin combinations and their effects.

  19. Adolescent contraception: review and guidance for pediatric clinicians.

    PubMed

    Potter, J; Santelli, J S

    2015-02-01

    The majority of adolescents initiate sexual activity during their teenage years, making contraception an important aspect of routine adolescent health care. Despite common misperceptions, all available methods of reversible contraception are appropriate for adolescent use. Contraceptive side effects profiles and barriers to use of certain methods should be considered when providing contraceptives to adolescents. In particular, ease of use, confidentiality, and menstrual effects are main concerns of adolescents. Contraceptive counseling with adolescents should describe method efficacy, discuss user preferences, explore barriers to use, counsel regarding sexually transmitted infection prevention, and consider what to do if contraception fails. Emergency contraception should be widely discussed with adolescents, as it is appropriate for use during gaps in other contraceptive use, method failure, and adolescents who are not using another form of contraception. Dual method use (condom plus a highly effective method of contraception) is the gold standard for prevention of both pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections.

  20. Correlation between Male Social Status, Testosterone Levels, and Parasitism in a Dimorphic Polygynous Mammal

    PubMed Central

    Negro, Sandra S.; Caudron, Abigail K.; Dubois, Michel; Delahaut, Philippe; Gemmell, Neil J.

    2010-01-01

    Life history trade-offs have often been assumed to be the consequence of restrictions in the availability of critical resources such as energy and nutrients, which necessitate the differential allocation of resources to costly traits. Here, we examined endocrine (testosterone) and health (parasite burdens) parameters in territorial and non-territorial New Zealand fur seal males. We documented intra-sexual differences in sexual behaviours, testosterone levels, and parasitism that suggest a trade-off exists between reproductive success and physical health, particularly susceptibility to helminths and acanthocephalans, in males displaying different mating tactics (i.e., territorial and non-territorial tactics). Levels of testosterone were higher in territorial males and correlated positively with reproductive effort (i.e., intra- and inter-sexual interactions). However, these territorial males also exhibited high levels of parasitic infection, which may impair survival in the long-term. Our study, while limited in sample size, provides preliminary evidence for a link between male mating tactics, testosterone levels and parasite loads, and potential effects on reproductive success and life history that should be explored further. PMID:20856933

  1. Physiogenomic analysis of CYP450 drug metabolism correlates dyslipidemia with pharmacogenetic functional status in psychiatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Ruaño, Gualberto; Villagra, David; Szarek, Bonnie; Windemuth, Andreas; Kocherla, Mohan; Gorowski, Krystyna; Berrezueta, Christopher; Schwartz, Harold I; Goethe, John

    2011-01-01

    Aims To investigate associations between novel human cytochrome P450 (CYP450) combinatory (multigene) and substrate-specific drug metabolism indices, and elements of metabolic syndrome, such as low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc), triglycerides and BMI, using physiogenomic analysis. Methods CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 genotypes and clinical data were obtained for 150 consecutive, consenting hospital admissions with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder and who were treated with psychotropic medications. Data analysis compared clinical measures of LDLc, HDLc, triglyceride and BMI with novel combinatory and substrate-specific CYP450 drug metabolism indices. Results We found that a greater metabolic reserve index score is related to lower LDLc and higher HDLc, and that a greater metabolic alteration index score corresponds with higher LDLc and lower HLDc values. We also discovered that the sertraline drug-specific indices correlated with cholesterol and triglyceride values. Conclusions Overall, we demonstrated how a multigene approach to CYP450 genotype analysis yields more accurate and significant results than single-gene analyses. Ranking the individual with respect to the population represents a potential tool for assessing risk of dyslipidemia in major depressive disorder patients who are being treated with psychotropics. In addition, the drug-specific indices appear useful for modeling a variable of potential relevance to an individual’s risk of drug-related dyslipidemia. PMID:21861666

  2. Neuropilin 1 expression correlates with differentiation status of epidermal cells and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Shahrabi-Farahani, Shokoufeh; Wang, Lili; Zwaans, Bernadette M M; Santana, Jeans M; Shimizu, Akio; Takashima, Seiji; Kreuter, Michael; Coultas, Leigh; D'Amore, Patricia A; Arbeit, Jeffrey M; Akslen, Lars A; Bielenberg, Diane R

    2014-07-01

    Neuropilins (NRPs) are cell surface receptors for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and SEMA3 (class 3 semaphorin) family members. The role of NRPs in neurons and endothelial cells has been investigated, but the expression and role of NRPs in epithelial cells is much less clear. Herein, the expression and localization of NRP1 was investigated in human and mouse skin and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Results indicated that NRP1 mRNA and protein was expressed in the suprabasal epithelial layers of the skin sections. NRP1 staining did not overlap with that of keratin 14 (K14) or proliferating cell nuclear antigen, but did co-localize with staining for keratin 1, indicating that differentiated keratinocytes express NRP1. Similar to the expression of NRP1, VEGF-A was expressed in suprabasal epithelial cells, whereas Nrp2 and VEGFR2 were not detectable in the epidermis. The expression of NRP1 correlated with a high degree of differentiation in human SCC specimens, human SCC xenografts, and mouse K14-HPV16 transgenic SCC. UVB irradiation of mouse skin induced Nrp1 upregulation. In vitro, Nrp1 was upregulated in primary keratinocytes in response to differentiating media or epidermal growth factor-family growth factors. In conclusion, the expression of NRP1 is regulated in the skin and is selectively produced in differentiated epithelial cells. NRP1 may function as a reservoir to sequester VEGF ligand within the epithelial compartment, thereby modulating its bioactivity.

  3. Neuropilin 1 expression correlates with differentiation status of epidermal cells and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Shahrabi-Farahani, Shokoufeh; Wang, Lili; Zwaans, Bernadette M. M.; Santana, Jeans M.; Shimizu, Akio; Takashima, Seiji; Kreuter, Michael; Coultas, Leigh; D'Amore, Patricia A.; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.; Akslen, Lars A.; Bielenberg, Diane R.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropilins (NRP) are cell surface receptors for VEGF and SEMA3 family members. The role of NRP in neurons and endothelial cells has been investigated, but the expression and role of NRP in epithelial cells is much less clear. Herein, the expression and localization of neuropilin 1 (NRP1) was investigated in human and mouse skin and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Results indicated that NRP1 mRNA and protein was expressed in the suprabasal epithelial layers of skin sections. NRP1 staining did not overlap with that of keratin 14 (K14) or proliferating cell nuclear antigen, but did colocalize with staining for keratin 1, indicating that differentiated keratinocytes express NRP1. Similar to the expression of NRP1, VEGF-A was expressed in suprabasal epithelial cells, whereas Nrp2 and VEGFR2 were not detectable in the epidermis. The expression of NRP1 correlated with a high degree of differentiation in human SCC specimens, human SCC xenografts, and mouse K14-HPV16 transgenic SCC. UVB irradiation of mouse skin induced Nrp1 upregulation. In vitro, Nrp1 was upregulated in primary keratinocytes in response to differentiating media or EGF-family growth factors. In conclusion, the expression of NRP1 is regulated in the skin and is selectively produced in differentiated epithelial cells. NRP1 may function as a reservoir to sequester VEGF ligand within the epithelial compartment, thereby modulating its bioactivity. PMID:24791743

  4. Contraception for adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Benito; Kozu, Katia T; Leal, Gabriela N; Silva, Marco F; Fernandes, Elisabeth G C; França, Camila M P; Souza, Fernando H C; Silva, Clovis A

    Contraception is an important issue and should be a matter of concern in every medical visit of adolescent and young patients with chronic rheumatic diseases. This narrative review discusses contraception methods in adolescents with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE), antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Barrier methods are safe and their use should be encouraged for all adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases. Combined oral contraceptives (COC) are strictly prohibited for JSLE and APS patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies. Reversible long-acting contraception can be encouraged and offered routinely to the JSLE adolescent patient and other rheumatic diseases. Progestin-only pills are safe in the majority of rheumatic diseases, although the main concern related to its use by adolescents is poor adherence due to menstrual irregularity. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injections every three months is a highly effective contraception strategy, although its long-term use is associated with decreased bone mineral density. COC or other combined hormonal contraceptive may be options for JIA and JDM patients. Oral levonorgestrel should be considered as an emergency contraception method for all adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases, including patients with contraindication to COC.

  5. Contraception for adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Benito; Kozu, Katia T; Leal, Gabriela N; Silva, Marco F; Fernandes, Elisabeth G C; França, Camila M P; Souza, Fernando H C; Silva, Clovis A

    2016-07-16

    Contraception is an important issue and should be a matter of concern in every medical visit of adolescent and young patients with chronic rheumatic diseases. This narrative review discusses contraception methods in adolescents with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE), antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Barrier methods are safe and their use should be encouraged for all adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases. Combined oral contraceptives (COC) are strictly prohibited for JSLE and APS patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies. Reversible long-acting contraception can be encouraged and offered routinely to the JSLE adolescent patient and other rheumatic diseases. Progestin-only pills are safe in the majority of rheumatic diseases, although the main concern related to its use by adolescents is poor adherence due to menstrual irregularity. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injections every three months is a highly effective contraception strategy, although its long-term use is associated with decreased bone mineral density. COC or other combined hormonal contraceptive may be options for JIA and JDM patients. Oral levonorgestrel should be considered as an emergency contraception method for all adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases, including patients with contraindication to COC.

  6. Controversies in contraception for women with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sanjeev V.

    2015-01-01

    Contraception is an important choice that offers autonomy to women with regard to prevention of unintended pregnancies. There is wide variation in the contraceptive practices between continents, countries, and societies. The medical eligibility for contraception for sexually active women with epilepsy (WWE) is determined by the type of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) that they use. Enzyme inducing AEDs such as phenobarbitone, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and oxcarbazepine increase the metabolism of orally administered estrogen (and progesterone to a lesser extent). Estrogen can increase the metabolism of certain AEDs, such as lamotrigine, leading to cyclical variation in its blood level with resultant adverse effect profile or seizure dyscontrol. AEDs and sex hormones can increase the risk of osteoporosis and fracture in WWE. The potential interactions between AEDs and hormonal contraception need to be discussed with all women in reproductive age-group. The alternate options of oral contraception such as intrauterine copper device, intrauterine levonorgestrel release system, and supplementary protection with barriers need to be presented to them. World Health Organization has recommended to avoid combination contraceptive pills containing estrogen and progesteron in women who desire contraception and in breastfeeding mothers. Care providers need to consider the option of non-enzyme-inducing AEDs while initiating long-term treatment in adolescent and young WWE. PMID:26425002

  7. Residual ovarian activity during oral steroid contraception.

    PubMed

    van Heusden, A M; Fauser, B C J M

    2002-01-01

    Steroid drugs with contraceptive properties have been available in the clinical setting for over four decades and are still subject to improvement. Estrogens, progestins and anti-progestins have been used alone or in various combinations, regimens and routes of administration to favour the balance between efficacy and undesirable effects. One of the most important changes in this respect is the gradual lowering of steroid dosage in commercially available contraceptives. Current steroid contraceptive pills still achieve the goal of suppression of pituitary-ovarian activity, but the margins for error are minimal. In this review the available data on modes of action and the effects on suppressing pituitary-ovarian activity by different forms of oral contraception are reassessed. Although pregnancy rates provide a crude measure of contraceptive efficacy, no benchmark for pituitary-ovarian inhibition is available to test the suppressive potential of contraceptive drugs. Consequently, many studies provide incomplete and/or incomparable results. For the further study of those forms of steroid contraception that rely predominantly on suppression of ovarian activity, prevention of dominant follicles selection should be the objective.

  8. Correlation between nutritional status and comprehensive physical performance measures among older adults with undernourishment in residential institutions

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Devinder KA; Manaf, Zahara A; Yusoff, Noor Aini M; Muhammad, Nur A; Phan, Mei Fang; Shahar, Suzana

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The consequences of combined undernourishment and decreased physical performance in older adults are debilitating and increases cost of care. To date, the information regarding the association between nutritional status and physical performance does not provide a complete picture. Most studies used limited or self-reported measures to evaluate physical performance. The objective of this study was to examine the correlation between nutritional status and comprehensive physical performance measures among undernourished older adults who reside in residential institutions. Methods Forty-seven older adults (26 males, 21 females) aged ≥60 (69.23±8.63) years who were identified as undernourished from two residential institutions participated in this study. A battery of physical performance tests (10 m gait speed test, dominant hand grip strength test, timed five-repetition sit-to-stand test, ten step test, arm curl test, scratch test, and respiratory muscle strength test), biochemical profiles (serum albumin, hemoglobin, serum ferritin, and prealbumin levels), and falls risk using the short-form Physiological Profile Approach were performed. The Functional Ability Questionnaire and Geriatric Depression Scale were also administered. Results The results demonstrated that generally older adults with undernourishment scored poorly on the physical performance tests, had depression, and a high risk of falls. Biochemical results demonstrated that 10.9% of the participants were anemic, 63% had hypoalbuminemia (<3.5 g/dL), and 21.7% were at risk of protein energy malnutrition with prealbumin level (100–170 mg/L). A significant correlation (P<0.05) was demonstrated between hand grip strength and ferritin, between self-reported mobility dependence and prealbumin levels, and between self-reported mobility tiredness and body mass index. Conclusion These results confirm that older adults with undernutrition have poor physical function, higher falls risk, and depression

  9. The Sexual Acceptability of Contraception: Reviewing the Literature and Building a New Concept

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Jenny A.; Smith, Nicole K.

    2016-01-01

    How contraceptives affect women’s sexual well-being is critically understudied. Fortunately, a growing literature focuses on sexual aspects of contraception, especially hormonal contraception’s associations with libido. However, a more holistic approach to contraceptive sexual acceptability is needed to capture the full range of women’s sexual experiences. We conducted a narrative literature review of this topic, working with an original sample of 3,001 citations published from 2005 to 2015. In Part 1, we draw from a subset of this literature (264 citations) to build a new conceptual model of sexual acceptability. Aspects include macro factors (gender, social inequality, culture, and structure), relationship factors (dyadic influences and partner preferences), and individual factors (sexual functioning, sexual preferences, such as dis/inhibition, spontaneity, pleasure, the sexual aspects of side effects, such as bleeding, mood changes, sexual identity and sexual minority status, and pregnancy intentions). In Part 2, we review the empirical literature on the sexual acceptability of individual methods (103 citations), applying the model as much as possible. Results suggest contraceptives can affect women’s sexuality in a wide variety of positive and negative ways that extend beyond sexual functioning alone. More attention to sexual acceptability could promote both women’s sexual well-being and more widespread, user-friendly contraceptive practices. PMID:26954608

  10. Intimate Partner Violence: Associated Factors and Acceptability of Contraception Among the Women

    PubMed Central

    Mundhra, Rajlaxmi; Singh, Nilanchali; Kaushik, Somya; Mendiratta, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of various types of domestic violence and to find out the impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) on adoption of contraceptive measures among the women who are victim to this. Materials and Methods: This questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of obstetrics and gynecology of a tertiary care hospital in Delhi. Four hundred and one postpartum females were randomly selected over a period of 5 months and were questioned about their age, parity, educational status, occupation, husband's education, monthly family income, and, if present, IPV in detail. These study participants were enquired about their contraceptive knowledge and use. Results: Sexual violence was seen in 38.4% of the cases, physical violence in 22.4% of the cases, and verbal abuse was seen in nearly 32.7% of the cases. In response to any of the three violence faced, only 23 women (11.79%) reacted by discussing with parents and friends. In 4.61% of the cases, the violence was so severe that she had to inform police. This study showed that higher percentage of women without IPV accepted immediate postpartum contraception methods as compared to those with IPV (35.9% vs. 25%, P = 0.023), but the overall frequency of using contraceptive methods was higher in those with IPV as compared to those without IPV (49% vs. 47%, P = 0.690). Conclusion: IPV is associated with increased contraceptive adoption. PMID:27385873

  11. The impact of over-the-counter availability of "Plan B" on teens' contraceptive decision making.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurti, Tamar; Eggers, Sara L; Fischhoff, Baruch

    2008-08-01

    In ruling on the over-the-counter status (OTC) of the emergency contraceptive, "Plan B", the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) questioned whether younger adolescent females could adequately self-select and self-medicate. That determination requires a judgment of fact, regarding how increased emergency contraceptive availability would affect adolescents' behavior, and a judgment of values, regarding the acceptability of different outcomes. We present a general approach to such problems, using analytical and empirical methods grounded in behavioral decision research. We illustrate it with findings from 30 in-depth interviews and follow-up surveys, with adolescent females aged 13-19 in the Pittsburgh area reporting how Plan B availability would affect three decisions (having sex, choosing contraceptives, using Plan B). Although the FDA expressed concern about younger teens using Plan B as their primary form of contraception, neither younger nor older teens revealed such an intention. However, teens preferred easier availability, should emergency contraceptive be needed. Incorporating an understanding of teens' decision-related perspectives can make such policies more predictable and transparent.

  12. The mechanism of action of hormonal contraceptives and intrauterine contraceptive devices.

    PubMed

    Rivera, R; Yacobson, I; Grimes, D

    1999-11-01

    Modern hormonal contraceptives and intrauterine contraceptive devices have multiple biologic effects. Some of them may be the primary mechanism of contraceptive action, whereas others are secondary. For combined oral contraceptives and progestin-only methods, the main mechanisms are ovulation inhibition and changes in the cervical mucus that inhibit sperm penetration. The hormonal methods, particularly the low-dose progestin-only products and emergency contraceptive pills, have effects on the endometrium that, theoretically, could affect implantation. However, no scientific evidence indicates that prevention of implantation actually results from the use of these methods. Once pregnancy begins, none of these methods has an abortifacient action. The precise mechanism of intrauterine contraceptive devices is unclear. Current evidence indicates they exert their primary effect before fertilization, reducing the opportunity of sperm to fertilize an ovum.

  13. Male hormonal contraception: looking back and moving forward.

    PubMed

    Roth, M Y; Page, S T; Bremner, W J

    2016-01-01

    Despite numerous contraceptive options available to women, approximately half of all pregnancies in the United States and worldwide are unplanned. Women and men support the development of reversible male contraception strategies, but none have been brought to market. Herein we review the physiologic basis for male hormonal contraception, the history of male hormonal contraception development, currents agents in development as well as the potential risks and benefits of male hormonal contraception for men.

  14. Male Hormonal Contraception: Looking Back and Moving Forward

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Mara Y.; Page, Stephanie T.; Bremner, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous contraceptive options available to women, approximately half of all pregnancies in the United States and worldwide are unplanned. Women and men support the development of reversible male contraception strategies, but none have been brought to market. Herein we review the physiologic basis for male hormonal contraception, the history of male hormonal contraception development, currents agents in development, as well as the potential risks and benefits of male hormonal contraception for men. PMID:26453296

  15. ADAMTS-13 metalloprotease abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus: is there a correlation with disease status?

    PubMed

    Klonizakis, P; Tselios, K; Sarantopoulos, A; Gougourellas, I; Rouka, E; Onufriadou, Z; Kapali, P; Kyriakou, D; Boura, P

    2013-04-01

    To clarify the role of ADAMTS-13 in the pathogenesis of thrombotic microangiopathy in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) we evaluated ADAMTS-13 profile (metalloprotease antigen levels, anti-ADAMTS-13 autoantibody levels, activity) in distinct patient groups according to disease activity, extent of cumulative tissue damage and history of antiphospholipid syndrome or end-organ damage. Forty-one lupus patients were analysed. ADAMTS-13 metalloprotease antigen levels and anti-ADAMTS-13 autoantibodies were evaluated by ELISA. ADAMTS-13 activity was measured by Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. ADAMTS-13 metalloprotease antigen levels were significantly decreased in patients with Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (SLICC/ACR) >1 (p<0.05). ADAMTS-13 metalloprotease antigen levels also exhibited a significant inverse correlation with anti-dsDNA levels (r= -0.60, p<0.05). Anti-ADAMTS-13 autoantibodies were marginally higher in patients with positive anti-dsDNA (p=0.08). Additionally, patients with positive anti-ADAMTS-13 autoantibodies exhibited the lowest activity levels (p<0.05). To our knowledge ADAMTS-13 profile in SLE has not been studied in regard to composite structured indices. The results of this study suggest that in patients with active SLE or considerable cumulative tissue damage, ADAMTS-13 levels may be decreased and anti-ADAMTS-13 autoantibodies may partially mediate this reduction. Further evaluation of ADAMTS-13 profile may explain its role in the pathogenesis of thrombotic microangiopathy in lupus patients and reveal a potential prognostic marker of microthrombotic manifestations in SLE.

  16. Factors affecting pituitary gonadotropin function in users of oral contraceptive steroids.

    PubMed

    Scott, J A; Brenner, P F; Kletzky, O A; Mishell, D R

    1978-04-01

    In order to determine whether certain factors influence the direct pituitary suppressive effect of contraceptive steroid, 50 subjects who had used various formulations of oral contraceptive steroids for periods of time ranging from one to nine years were stimulated with 50 microgram of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) during the last week of oral contraceptive ingestion. The response of lutinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) was compared to the results obtained in nine control subjects with regard to: (1) age of subject. (2) type of contraceptive formulation used, and (3) length of use. Prestimulation levels of LH and FSH, respectively, were significantly decreased in 37 (74 per cent) and 42 (84 per cent) of the subjects. Following GnRH stimulation, peak responses of serum LH and FSH, respectively, were also significantly lower than those in the control subjects in 40 (80 per cent) and 45 (90 per cent of the subjects. The degree of suppression of pituitary gonadotropins, both before and after GnRH administration was significantly correlated with the type of steroid formulation used, being greatest with a combination of d-norgestrel and ethinyl estradiol. No correlation was found with length of use of oral contraceptives or age of the subjects.

  17. Choosing a combined oral contraceptive pill

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Mary; Black, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Summary The combined oral contraceptive pill is an effective contraceptive method which can also offer other benefits. However, other contraceptive options should be discussed. If the pill is the chosen method, prescribe a pill with the lowest effective dose of oestrogen and progestogen. Pills containing levonorgestrel or norethisterone in combination with ethinyloestradiol 35 microgram or less are considered first-line. They are effective if taken correctly, have a relatively low risk of venous thromboembolism, and are listed on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. The pill is usually taken in a monthly cycle. Some women may prefer an extended pill regimen with fewer or no inactive pills. PMID:26648603

  18. Political and economic factors influencing contraceptive uptake.

    PubMed

    Sai, F T

    1993-01-01

    International, national and local level politics influence the uptake of contraception through consensuses, laws, financial and moral support or the creation of an enabling atmosphere. Opposition to contraception generally comes from some churches and groups opposed to particular technologies. Socio-economic factors, particularly education, the health care system and the perceived or actual cost of fertility regulation as compared to benefits expected from children also powerfully influence contraceptive use. For many poor women in developing countries their powerlessness in relation to their male partners is an important obstacle.

  19. Feminism and the Moral Imperative for Contraception.

    PubMed

    Espey, Eve

    2015-08-01

    This commentary is adapted from the Irvin M. Cushner Memorial Lecture, "Feminism and the Moral Imperative for Contraception," given at 2014 Annual Clinical Meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in Chicago. It provides a brief and simplified historical review of the feminist movement, primarily in the United States, focusing on feminism's association with contraception. This commentary reflects the perspective and opinions of the author. Contraception is fundamental to a woman's ability to achieve equality and realize her full social, economic, and intellectual potential.

  20. Contraceptive failure in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Trussell, James

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an update of previous estimates of first-year probabilities of contraceptive failure for all methods of contraception available in the United States. Estimates are provided of probabilities of failure during typical use (which includes both incorrect and inconsistent use) and during perfect use (correct and consistent use). The difference between these two probabilities reveals the consequences of imperfect use; it depends both on how unforgiving of imperfect use a method is and on how hard it is to use that method perfectly. These revisions reflect new research on contraceptive failure both during perfect use and during typical use. PMID:21477680

  1. Deletion status of p16 in effusion smear preparation correlates with that of underlying malignant pleural mesothelioma tissue.

    PubMed

    Hida, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Shinji; Hamasaki, Makoto; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Tsujimura, Tohru; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Kamei, Toshiaki; Taguchi, Kenichi; Iwasaki, Akinori; Oda, Yoshinao; Honda, Hiroshi; Nabeshima, Kazuki

    2015-11-01

    Differentiating malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) cells morphologically from reactive mesothelial hyperplasia cells is problematic. Homozygous deletion (HD) of p16 (CDKN2A), detected by FISH, is a good marker of malignancy and is useful to differentiate between these cells. However, the correlation between the p16 status of effusion smears and that of the underlying MPM tissues has not been investigated. We used p16-specific FISH to investigate 20 cases of MPM from which both effusion cytologic smears and histologic specimens were available. In five cases, histologic specimens included both an invasive component and surface mesothelial proliferation. In 14 cases (70%), MPM cells in both tissue sections and effusion smears were p16 HD-positive. Conversely, MPM cells in the remaining six tumors (30%) were p16 HD-negative in both tissue sections and effusion smears. For all five MPM cases with surface mesothelial proliferations and invasive components, the effusion smears, surface mesothelial proliferations, and invasive MPM components all displayed p16 deletion. Moreover, the extent to which p16 was deleted in smears highly correlated with the extent of p16 deletion in tissues. The p16 deletion percentages were also similar among smears, tissue surface proliferations, and invasive components. In cases with clinical and radiologic evidence of a diffuse pleural tumor, detection of p16 deletion in cytologic smear samples may permit MPM diagnosis without additional tissue examination. However, the absence of p16 deletion in cytologic smear samples does not preclude MPM.

  2. Assessment of the correlations between nicotine dependence, exhaled carbon monoxide levels and oral hygiene status: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    MOGA, MINODORA; BOSCA, ADINA BIANCA; BONDOR, COSMINA IOANA; ILEA, ARANKA; LUCACIU, ONDINE PATRICIA; IONEL, ANCA; MAN, MILENA ADINA; RAJNOVEANU, RUXANDRA MIOARA; CÂMPIAN, RADU SEPTIMIU

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim Cigarette smoking has negative effects on general health, including oral health. The aim of our study was to assess the correlations between nicotine dependence, exhaled carbon monoxide levels and oral hygiene status. Methods Smoker and non-smoker participants were enrolled in this observational study. The Fagerström test was used to classify nicotine dependences: low (score: 0–3), medium (score: 4–6) or high (score: 7–10). The oral hygiene status was classified according to the oral hygiene indices of plaque, calculus and gingival inflammation. Lastly, the exhaled carbon monoxide levels were measured with a MicroSmokelyzer (Bedfont Scientific Ltd., Kent, United Kingdom). Results Sixty five participants (50 smokers in the study group and 15 non-smokers in the control group) were enrolled between 11th and 29th of January 2016. No statistical differences were observed between the study group and the control group in terms of age (mean age±SD 23.5±1.9 and 24.0±1.5, respectively) or gender (50% and 26.6%, respectively). A statistically significant difference was observed between the 2 groups in terms of plaque, (p=0.036), calculus (p=0.001) and gingival indices (p<0.001). A positive correlation was found between the exhaled levels of carbon monoxide and the general Fagerström score (r=0.97, p<0.001) or the Fagerström score in smokers (r=0.93, p<0.001); a negative correlation was observed between the exhaled carbon monoxide levels and the number of tooth brushings daily (r=−0.41, p=0.001). The plaque index was statistically significantly associated with the exhaled carbon monoxide levels (p=0.008), general Fagerström score (p=0.016) and number of tooth brushings daily (p<0.001). The calculus and gingival indices were statistically significantly associated with the exhaled carbon monoxide levels (p<0.001), general Fagerström score (p<0.001) and score in smoker participants (p=0.029 and p=0.001, respectively) as well as the number of

  3. Contraceptive Counseling: Best Practices to Ensure Quality Communication and Enable Effective Contraceptive Use

    PubMed Central

    Dehlendorf, Christine; Krajewski, Colleen; Borrero, Sonya

    2014-01-01

    Improving the quality of contraceptive counseling is one strategy to prevent unintended pregnancy. We identify aspects of relational and task-oriented communication in family planning care that can assist providers in meeting their patients’ needs. Approaches to optimizing women's experiences of contraceptive counseling include working to develop a close, trusting relationship with patients and using a shared decision-making approach that focuses on eliciting and responding to patient preferences. Providing counseling about side effects and using strategies to promote contraceptive continuation and adherence can also help optimize women's use of contraception. PMID:25264697

  4. Vitamins and oral contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    Wynn, V

    1975-03-08

    Reports concerning the interaction between steroidal contraceptives (the combined pill) and vitamins indicate that in users the mean serum-vitamin-A level is raised and the mean serum-vitamin-B2 (riboflavine), vitamin-B6 (pyridoxine), vitamine-C, folic-acid, and vitamin-B12 levels are reduced. Other vitamins have been insufficiently studied for comment. Biochemical evidence of co-enzyme deficiency has been reported for vitamin B2, vitamin B6, and folic acid. Clinical effects due to vitamin deficiency have been described for vitamin B6--namely, depression and impaired glucose tolerance. Folic-acid deficiency with megaloblastic anaemia has been reported in only 21 cases.

  5. Men's Attitudes Towards Contraception in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Bietsch, Kristin E

    2015-09-01

    This paper examines male attitudes towards family planning in Sub-Saharan Africa. Studying attitudes is ideal as they can be calculated for all men, at any point in their lives, regardless of marital status, sexual activity, or fertility desires. We find that positive attitudes towards family planning have increased across Sub-Saharan Africa in the last two decades. We analyze both the association of positive attitudes with a variety of demographic characteristics (age, marital status, education, and religion) and the relationships with multiple forms of discussion about family planning (radio, television, friends, and partners). We find higher approval at older ages and higher levels of education, and lower levels of approval among Muslims compared to Christians. Interactions between characteristics and discussion of family planning. demonstrate that hearing or talking about contraception has different associations for different groups. This paper offers a new way to explore fertility and reproductive health in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  6. Advance provision of emergency contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Adamji, Jehan-Marie; Swartwout, Kathryn

    2010-12-01

    Emergency contraception is most effective at preventing unintended pregnancy when taken as early as possible following unprotected sexual intercourse. Advance provision of this medication supports more timely and effective use. In the midst of rising teen pregnancy rates, current policies often limit access to emergency contraception for adolescents. A literature search identified three recent experimental studies of advance provision for adolescents. This article reviews those studies and finds strong support for advance provision for adolescents. Usage of emergency contraception increased with advance provision and there was no increase in negative sexual behaviors or decrease in usage of other contraceptive forms. Implications of these findings for school nurses and school-based health center staff are also discussed.

  7. [Contraceptive vasectomy: does it have a future in France?].

    PubMed

    Arvis, G

    1986-03-01

    Despite its simplicity and freedom from complications, vasectomy in France faces significant legal, bureaucratic, political, ideologic, psychological, and medical obstacles. Legal obstacles are the most important inasmuch as a principal of French law holds that the individual does not have free disposition of his body. The sole existing French jurisprudence on the question equated male sterilization with premeditated assault and battery. Although no physician has been prosecuted for performing vasectomy since this 1936 Court of Appeals decision, physicians performing vasectomies remain somewhat at the mercy of the caprices of the magistrate. Social security refuses to pay for sterilization performed for contraceptive reasons, which may discourage low income candidates. The Council of the Order of Physicians opposes vasectomy because of its legal status and because article 22 of the Medical Code states that sterilization can only be performed for very serious medical indications. In 1983 the Council changed its recommendation to "very serious indications", dropping the word "medical", but it does not vigorously support vasectomy because of the legal question. Malpractice insurance coverage of vasectomy practitioners is based on whether the results of criminal trials indicate that the operator violated the penal code; the hazy legal status of vasectomy therefore makes insurance coverage unlikely. Political obstacles to vasectomy are far from resolved. No party has openly supported voluntary sterilization, less because of ideological or demagogic considerations than because of the fertility decline in France. Public opinion might question a law authorizing definitive contraception at a time when the replacement of generations is not even assured. Religious objections to contraception in general and sterilization in particular remain strong. A 1978 survey of 1273 French doctors showed that 35% of practicing Catholics but 61% of nonbelievers among them had favorable

  8. Social correlates of health status, quality of life, and mood states in patients treated with cannabidiol for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Szaflarski, Magdalena; Hansen, Barbara; Bebin, E Martina; Szaflarski, Jerzy P

    2017-02-21

    Social characteristics, such as socioeconomic status and race/ethnicity, play a role in the treatment and outcomes of patients with epilepsy (PWE), but little is known about how these factors affect patients receiving cannabidiol (CBD) to treat seizures. This exploratory study examined the sociodemographic profile of patients treated with CBD (n=80) and associations between social factors and patient-centered outcomes - overall health status, Quality of Life in Epilepsy-89 (QOLIE-89), and Profile of Mood States (POMS) - in this population. Associations were examined using Pearson correlations and multiple ordinary-least-squares regression (alpha=0.1). The sample was predominantly white (96%) and non-Hispanic/Latino (96%); 76% of patients had family incomes of $40,000+/year. Some patients/families reported experiencing food scarcity (13%), not being able to make ends meet (6%), or not being able to afford antiepileptic medications (8%). The patients' health ratings declined with age and income (p≤0.014), and there was a statistically significant interaction (p<0.055) between these variables: for example, a higher-income 10-year-old had a predicted health rating of 3 ("very good"), followed by a higher-income 40-year-old with a rating of 2 ("good"), a low-income 10-year-old with a rating of 1 ("fair"), and a low-income 40-year-old with a rating of 0 ("poor"). This is the first study reporting the social profile of patients taking pharmaceutical grade CBD for the treatment of epilepsy. The results suggest that despite free access to this treatment some patients may not be accessing CBD because of their socioeconomic situation or race/ethnicity. Larger, diverse samples and longitudinal data are needed to more accurately model social factors and patient-centered outcomes in PWE receiving CBD. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Cannabinoids and Epilepsy".

  9. Influence of Hypertension on pH of Saliva and Flow Rate in Elder Adults Correlating with Oral Health Status

    PubMed Central

    Talla, Harshavardhan; Poosa, Manasa; Gopaladas, Madhulatha; Meesala, Deepika; Jayanth, L

    2016-01-01

    Introduction One of the most prevalent systemic conditions seen in the elderly individuals is hypertension, but very sparse knowledge regarding the influence of hypertension on oral health in known. Aim Therefore, this study was carried out to evaluate the relationship between hypertension and salivary pH, flow rate and its effect on oral health status. Materials and Methods The study included 40 elderly individuals above 60 years of age, of which 20 individuals (control group) were normotensive without using any medication and 20 individuals (study group) were hypertensive using anti-hypertensive medication. Stimulated and unstimulated saliva samples were collected from all individuals and pH was measured using saliva pH strips, flow rate was measured using calibrated test tubes and was correlated with oral health status. Then the values were sent for statistical analysis where unpaired t-test, chi-square test were used. Results The results showed that there was no significant association of hypertension with stimulated and unstimulated flow rate, rather there was a significant association of hyper-tension with stimulated salivary pH i.e., there was a significant decrease in the pH of stimulated saliva. The study also revealed a significant association with presence of bleeding on probing and periodontal pockets in individuals who were hypertensive and using anti-hypertensive medication. Conclusion Hence, it is a necessity to monitor blood pressure for reconstruction and maintenance of oral health in older adults. More longitudinal studies are to be carried out to explore further relationship between oral health and hypertension in older adults. PMID:28050500

  10. The correlation between EGFR mutation status and the risk of brain metastasis in patients with lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Sun, Suo-Zhu; Yang, Ming; Shi, Jian-Ling; Xu, Wei; Wang, Xi-Fan; Song, Mao-Min; Chen, Huo-Ming

    2015-08-01

    To explore the correlation between epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status and the risk of brain metastasis (BM) in patients with lung adenocarcinoma, the clinical data of 100 patients with pathologically confirmed lung adenocarcinoma and known EGFR mutation status at exon 18, 19, 20, or 21 were analyzed retrospectively. The incidence of BM was similar between patients with wild-type EGFR and those with EGFR mutations (p = 0.48). However, among patients with EGFR mutations, the incidence of BM was significantly higher in patients with mutation at exon 19 than in patients with mutation at other sites (p = 0.007). Besides, among patients with heterochronous BM, 66.7 % had EGFR mutations. Regarding brain-metastasis-free survival (BMFS), patients with EGFR sensitive mutations (mutation at exon 19/21/and dual mutation) had significantly shorter BMFS compared with patients with wild-type EGFR (p = 0.018). For patients treated only with chemotherapy, BM was an unfavorable prognostic factor. Patients with BM had worse overall survival compared with those without BM (p = 0.035). However, in patients with BM and EGFR sensitive mutations, those treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) had significantly longer overall survival compared with those treated with chemotherapy only (p = 0.0081). In conclusion, among patients with EGFR mutations, those mutated at exon 19 had the highest incidence of BM. Furthermore, patients with EGFR mutations are more likely to develop heterochronous BM. The BMFS was significantly shorter in patients with EGFR sensitive mutations. TKIs improved the survival of patients with lung adenocarcinoma and BM who harbored EGFR sensitive mutations.

  11. ERICA: sexual initiation and contraception in Brazilian adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela; Fujimori, Elizabeth; Kuschnir, Maria Cristina Caetano; Chofakian, Christiane Borges do Nascimento; de Moraes, Ana Júlia Pantoja; Azevedo, George Dantas; dos Santos, Karine Ferreira; de Vasconcellos, Mauricio Teixeira Leite

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of sexual initiation and contraceptive use at the last sexual intercourse of Brazilian adolescents, according to sociodemographic features. METHODS The data were obtained from the Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA), a national school-based cross-sectional study. We included 74,589 adolescents from 32 geographic strata (27 capitals and five sets of municipalities with more than 100,000 inhabitants of each of the five macro-regions of the Country). Information on sexual initiation and contraceptive use at the last sexual intercourse (male condom and oral contraceptive pill) has been used. We have estimated prevalence and confidence intervals (95%CI) considering sample weights according to sex, age, type of school, residence status, macro-region and capitals. RESULTS We observed that 28.1% (95%CI 27.0-29.2) of the adolescents had already initiated sexual life, with higher prevalence among those aged 17 years (56.4%, 95%CI 53.9-58.9), males (33.5%, 95%CI 31.8-35.2), studying at public schools (29.9%, 95%CI 28.5-31.4), and from the Northern region (33.9%, 95%CI 32.3-35.4), mainly from Macapa, Manaus, and Rio Branco. Among those who had started their sexual life, 82.3% (95%CI 81.1-83.4) reported the use of contraceptive methods at the last intercourse, and the prevalence of use was higher among adolescents aged 17 years (85.3%, 95%CI 82.7-87.6), females (85.2%, 95%CI 83.8-86.5) and those living in the Southern region (85.9%, 95%CI 82.9-88.5). Male condom was used by 68.8% (95%CI 66.9-70.7), with no difference by type of school or macro-regions; the contraceptive pill was used by 13.4% (CI95% 12.2-14.6), and more frequently used among women (24.7%, 95%CI 22.5-27,0) and 17-year-old adolescents (20.8%, 95%CI 18.2-23.6) from urban settings(13.7%, 95%CI 12.5-14.9) and from the Southern region (22.6%, 95%CI 19.0-26.8), and less often in the Northern region. CONCLUSIONS ERICA’s data analysis on sexuality and

  12. ERICA: sexual initiation and contraception in Brazilian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela; Fujimori, Elizabeth; Kuschnir, Maria Cristina Caetano; Chofakian, Christiane Borges do Nascimento; de Moraes, Ana Júlia Pantoja; Azevedo, George Dantas; dos Santos, Karine Ferreira; de Vasconcellos, Mauricio Teixeira Leite

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of sexual initiation and contraceptive use at the last sexual intercourse of Brazilian adolescents, according to sociodemographic features. METHODS The data were obtained from the Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA), a national school-based cross-sectional study. We included 74,589 adolescents from 32 geographic strata (27 capitals and five sets of municipalities with more than 100,000 inhabitants of each of the five macro-regions of the Country). Information on sexual initiation and contraceptive use at the last sexual intercourse (male condom and oral contraceptive pill) has been used. We have estimated prevalence and confidence intervals (95%CI) considering sample weights according to sex, age, type of school, residence status, macro-region and capitals. RESULTS We observed that 28.1% (95%CI 27.0-29.2) of the adolescents had already initiated sexual life, with higher prevalence among those aged 17 years (56.4%, 95%CI 53.9-58.9), males (33.5%, 95%CI 31.8-35.2), studying at public schools (29.9%, 95%CI 28.5-31.4), and from the Northern region (33.9%, 95%CI 32.3-35.4), mainly from Macapa, Manaus, and Rio Branco. Among those who had started their sexual life, 82.3% (95%CI 81.1-83.4) reported the use of contraceptive methods at the last intercourse, and the prevalence of use was higher among adolescents aged 17 years (85.3%, 95%CI 82.7-87.6), females (85.2%, 95%CI 83.8-86.5) and those living in the Southern region (85.9%, 95%CI 82.9-88.5). Male condom was used by 68.8% (95%CI 66.9-70.7), with no difference by type of school or macro-regions; the contraceptive pill was used by 13.4% (CI95% 12.2-14.6), and more frequently used among women (24.7%, 95%CI 22.5-27,0) and 17-year-old adolescents (20.8%, 95%CI 18.2-23.6) from urban settings(13.7%, 95%CI 12.5-14.9) and from the Southern region (22.6%, 95%CI 19.0-26.8), and less often in the Northern region. CONCLUSIONS ERICA's data analysis on sexuality and contraception

  13. Contraceptive steroid effects on nonreproductive organ systems.

    PubMed

    Corson, S L

    1986-09-01

    Oral contraceptives affect many organ systems in addition to the reproductive tract. In some cases the alteration is just a clinical laboratory test result value; in others it represents a true alteration in metabolism, with the induction of increased enzyme activity. Even with the markedly reduced steroid content of today's oral contraceptives, the practitioner must continue to be aware of these potential and real effects on nonreproductive organ systems.

  14. Workshop on long-term contraceptives.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    The National Population Council Secretariat (NPCS) of Ghana held a three-day workshop on long-term contraceptives in 1996 in collaboration with the Ministry of Health, the Association of Voluntary Surgical Contraception, and the Johns Hopkins Population Communication Services. The session was funded by USAID. The executive director of NPCS, Dr. Richard Turkson, said that the slow rate of contraceptive acceptance was an obstacle to population control despite political concern that rapid population growth exerted an adverse impact on the economy. Only 10% of married women were using long-term or permanent methods of contraception. The hope was voiced that the participants would devise practical and cost-effective education, information, and communication (IEC) strategies to boost the demand for long-term contraceptive methods among sexually active people in Ghana. It was essential that these strategies and activities were based on a realist assessment of the demographic and social situation of the country. The examination of case studies in cultures similar to Ghana would also offer valuable lessons. The factors that hinder the acceptance of long-term methods include misconceptions, myths, and false rumors rooted in a general lack of knowledge among the people. Participants were urged to come up with strategies to counter these problems, and service providers were encouraged to improve their knowledge about contraceptive methods and counseling skills. Male involvement in contraception was also advocated. Statistics show that most Ghanians practicing contraception were using short-term methods such as foaming tablets, pills, and condoms. However, it is necessary to shift to long-term methods such as injectables, implants, and sterilization in order to achieve significant reductions in fertility.

  15. Contraception in women with epilepsy: pharmacokinetic interactions, contraceptive options, and management.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Caryn; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Contraceptive counseling is a critical component of the management of the female patient with epilepsy because of the increased risk of pregnancy associated with epilepsy and the multitude of interactions between antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and hormonal contraception. Steroid hormones and many of the AEDs are substrates for the cytochrome P450 enzyme system, in particular, the 3A4 isoenzyme. As a result, concomitant use of hormonal contraceptives and AEDs may pose a risk for unexpected pregnancy, seizures, and drug-related adverse effects. The risk of combined oral contraceptive (COC) failure is slightly increased in the presence of cytochrome P450 3A4 enzyme-inducing AEDs. Several AEDs induce the production of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) to which the progestins are tightly bound, resulting in lower concentrations of free progestin that may also lead to COC failure. There is no increase in the risk of COC failure in women taking nonenzyme-inducing AEDs. Oral contraceptives significantly increase the metabolism of lamotrigine, posing a risk of seizures when hormonal agents are initiated and/or toxicity during pill-free weeks. There is no evidence that COCs increase seizures in women with epilepsy. While higher dose COCs are one contraceptive option for women on enzyme-inducing AEDs, a variety of other options are available. Injectable contraception (depot medroxyprogesterone acetate) appears effective with AED use, but the potential for bone mineral density loss is a concern. Intrauterine devices (IUDs) and barrier methods do not rely on hormonal components for contraceptive efficacy, and are therefore appropriate to recommend for use in women using enzyme-inducing medications. This chapter reviews the evidence regarding the pharmacokinetic interaction between AEDs and oral contraceptive hormones, the known or potential interactions with alternative contraceptive methods, and provides practical advice for management of contraceptive needs in reproductive

  16. The contraceptive needs for STD protection among women in jail.

    PubMed

    Oswalt, Krista; Hale, Galen J; Cropsey, Karen L; Villalobos, Gabriella C; Ivey, Sara E; Matthews, Catherine A

    2010-08-01

    We assessed the contraceptive needs of women in jails and their sexually transmitted disease (STD) history and risk to determine effective contraceptive methods for this population. A survey of demographics, sexual health, contraceptive use, and preferred method of contraception was completed by participants recruited at jails in a medium-sized metropolitan area. Results from 188 women indicated high rates of STDs, inconsistent contraceptive use, and use of unreliable and user-dependent contraception methods. Intended contraceptive use following release varied depending on women's ability to bear children. Women planning to use condoms after release were more likely to have had an STD and more sexual partners than were women not planning to use condoms. Racial differences were found for participants' sexual health and contraception histories. These women were at high risk for STDs and appeared to need education about contraception methods. Therefore, they might benefit from education on safe sex practices provided prior to release.

  17. Ambivalence, communication and past use: understanding what influences women's intentions to use contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Campo, Shelly; Askelson, Natoshia M; Spies, Erica L; Losch, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Unintended pregnancy among women in the 18-30 age group is a public health concern. The Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM) provides a framework for exploring how women's perceptions of threat, efficacy, and fear influence intentions to use contraceptives. Past use and communication with best friends and partners were also considered. A telephone survey of 18-30-year-old women (N = 599) was completed. After univariate and bivariate analyses were conducted, the variables were entered into a hierarchal, multi-variate linear regression with three steps consistent with the EPPM to predict behavioral intention. The first step included the demographic variables of relationship status and income. The constructs for the EPPM were entered into step 2. Step 3 contained the fear measure. The model for the third step was significant, F(10,471) = 36.40, p < 0.001 and the variance explained by this complete model was 0.42. Results suggest that perceived severity of the consequences of an unintended pregnancy (p < 0.01), communication with friends (p < 0.01) and last sexual partner (p < 0.05), relationship status (p < 0.01), and past use (p < 0.001) were associated with women's intentions to use contraceptives. A woman's perception of the severity was related to her intention to use contraceptives. Half of the women (50.3%) reported ambivalence about the severity of an unintended pregnancy. In our study, talking with their last sexual partner had a positive effect on intentions to use contraceptives, while talking with friends influenced intentions in a negative direction. These results reconfirm the need for public health practitioners and health care providers to consider level of ambivalence toward unintended pregnancy, communication with partner, and relationship status when trying to improve women's contraceptive behaviors. Implications for effective communication interventions are discussed.

  18. Acceptability of contraception for men: a review.

    PubMed

    Glasier, Anna

    2010-11-01

    Methods of contraception for use by men include condoms, withdrawal and vasectomy. Prevalence of use of a method and continuation rates are indirect measures of acceptability. Worldwide, none of these "male methods" accounts for more than 7% of contraceptive use although uptake varies considerably between countries. Acceptability can be assessed directly by asking about intended (hypothetical) use and assessing satisfaction during/after use. Since they have been around for a very long time, there are very few data of this nature on condoms (as contraceptives rather than for prevention of infection), withdrawal or vasectomy. There are direct data on the acceptability of hormonal methods for men but from relatively small clinical trials which undoubtedly do not represent the real world. Surveys undertaken among the male general public demonstrate that, whatever the setting, at least 25% of men - and in most countries substantially more - would consider using hormonal contraception. Although probably an overestimate of the number of potential users when such a method becomes available, it would appear that hormonal contraceptives for men may have an important place on the contraceptive menu. Despite commonly expressed views to the contrary, most women would trust their male partner to use a hormonal method.

  19. Sexual Partners and Contraceptive Use: A 16-Year Prospective Study Predicting Abstinence and Risk Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siebenbruner, Jessica; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J.; Egeland, Byron

    2007-01-01

    Antecedents and correlates of sexual behavior among 167 (46 female) adolescents were examined in this multi-informant longitudinal study. Data were collected at birth through middle adolescence. Data on number of sexual partners and contraception use at age 16 defined sexual abstinence (SAs, n = 73), high-risk sexual behavior (HRTs, n = 45) and…

  20. [Factors associated with the non-utilization of contraceptives in adolescence].

    PubMed

    Boruchovitch, E

    1992-12-01

    The literature concerning the major correlates of the non-utilization contraceptives in adolescence is critically reviewed. Research findings are analyzed and discussed in terms of their contribution not only to a deeper understanding of adolescents' risk-taking sexual behavior, but also to the implementation of more effective and realistic sexual education for this age-group.

  1. The link between contraceptive methods and Chlamydia trachomatis infection.

    PubMed

    Blum, M; Pery, J; Kitai, E

    1988-09-01

    The effect of various contraceptive methods on Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection was examined in a group of 158 women, with a mean age of 26.9 years, patients of a family planning clinic. Their symptoms were mild abdominal pain or vaginal discharge. Antibodies to CT were examined by an indirect immunoperoxidase assay, with a commercial kit. From each patient a vaginal smear was collected for bacteriologic and mycologic study. In group I, consisting of 30 married women with a mean age of 31 years, 5 (16.7%) IUD users had a positive test for CT antibodies. In group II, comprising 57 women, with a mean age of 23.3 years, 22 (38.6%) oral contraceptive (OC) users, of whom 94.7% were unmarried, had positive tests for CT antibodies. The difference between these two groups was statistically significant (p less than 0.05). In group III, comprising 71 women with a mean age of 28.1 years, 62% unmarried and using other contraceptive methods, 15 (21.1%) had a positive test for CT antibodies. The incidence of CT infection was not different in the 3 groups under study, when the factors of age and marital status were taken into consideration (p greater than 0.30). Bacterial vaginal infection was found in 43.3% of the IUD users, compared with only 14% of the OC users (p less than 0.01). In contrast, in the OC users, candidiasis was predominant, the difference from the other groups being statistically significant (p less than 0.001). The women with positive antibodies also more frequently had colonies of bacterial and mycological vaginal infection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Knowledge, Perceptions, and Motivations for Contraception: Influence on Teens' Contraceptive Consistency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Suzanne; Franzetta, Kerry; Manlove, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, the authors examine the association between contraceptive use patterns in teens' first sexual relationships and their knowledge of, perceptions of, and motivations for contraception and pregnancy prevention. Results from logistic regression analyses show that knowledge,…

  3. Long-acting reversible contraceptives: intrauterine devices and the contraceptive implant.

    PubMed

    Espey, Eve; Ogburn, Tony

    2011-03-01

    The provision of effective contraception is fundamental to the practice of women's health care. The most effective methods of reversible contraception are the so-called long-acting reversible contraceptives, intrauterine devices and implants. These methods have multiple advantages over other reversible methods. Most importantly, once in place, they do not require maintenance and their duration of action is long, ranging from 3 to 10 years. Despite the advantages of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods, they are infrequently used in the United States. Short-acting methods, specifically oral contraceptives and condoms, are by far the most commonly used reversible methods. A shift from the use of short-acting methods to long-acting reversible contraceptive methods could help reduce the high rate of unintended pregnancy in the United States. In this review of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods, we discuss the intrauterine devices and the contraceptive implant available in the United States, and we describe candidates for each method, noncontraceptive benefits, and management of complications.

  4. Family planning communications and contraceptive use in Guatemala, El Salvador, and Panama.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, J T; Santiso, R; Cisneros, R J; Mascarin, F; Morris, L

    1982-01-01

    Recent contraceptive prevalence surveys in Guatemala, El Salvador, and panama included a module on family planning communications. This module provided useful feedback on the reach of each program and facilitated comparisons between countries. While almost all women in El Salvador have been reached by family planning messages, the percentage of women reached was lower in Panama and Guatemala. In all three countries rural, less educated, and unemployed women who worked inside the home or not at all were least likely to have seen or heard the messages. Exposure to family planning communications emerged as a strong correlate of contraceptive use, as shown in two separate analyses. These findings underscore the importance of communications in promoting contraceptive use.

  5. Study of Basic Coagulation Parameters among HIV Patients in Correlation to CD4 Counts and ART Status

    PubMed Central

    Manimaran, D; Rachakatla, Praveen; Bharathi, K; Afroz, Tameem; Sagar, Radha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV infection is known to cause coagulation abnormalities by various mechanism, especially during its late course. Aim The objective of this study was to analyse platelet count, prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time among HIV infected patients and to analyse these parameters with respect to their CD4 count and ART status. Materials and Methods A case control study was conducted with 120 HIV infected patients and 40 normal individuals. The blood samples were collected after obtaining consent from the subjects. The blood samples were processed for platelet count, prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time and CD4 count. The results were tabulated and analysed with statistical package. Results The platelet count was significantly decreased in HIV infected patients compared to controls. Though HIV patients with CD4 count less than 200cells/mm3 showed a decreased platelet count compared to those with CD4 count greater than 200cells/mm3, it was not statistically significant. Prothrombin Time (PT) and Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT) was significantly prolonged in HIV patients, but only aPTT showed significant inverse correlation with CD4 count. None of the parameters showed statistical significance on comparing HIV patients on ART with those not on ART. Conclusion Basic coagulation tests like platelet count, PT and especially aPTT can be used as prospective screening test to assess severity in HIV patients in resource limited settings where CD4 count is not available. PMID:27437222

  6. Geographically structured populations of Cryptococcus neoformans Variety grubii in Asia correlate with HIV status and show a clonal population structure.

    PubMed

    Khayhan, Kantarawee; Hagen, Ferry; Pan, Weihua; Simwami, Sitali; Fisher, Matthew C; Wahyuningsih, Retno; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Chowdhary, Anuradha; Ikeda, Reiko; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; Khan, Ziauddin; Ip, Margaret; Imran, Darma; Sjam, Ridhawati; Sriburee, Pojana; Liao, Wanqing; Chaicumpar, Kunyaluk; Vuddhakul, Varaporn; Meyer, Wieland; Trilles, Luciana; van Iersel, Leo J J; Meis, Jacques F; Klaassen, Corné H W; Boekhout, Teun

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is an important fungal disease in Asia with an estimated 140,000 new infections annually the majority of which occurs in patients suffering from HIV/AIDS. Cryptococcus neoformans variety grubii (serotype A) is the major causative agent of this disease. In the present study, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) using the ISHAM MLST consensus scheme for the C. neoformans/C. gattii species complex was used to analyse nucleotide polymorphisms among 476 isolates of this pathogen obtained from 8 Asian countries. Population genetic analysis showed that the Asian C. neoformans var. grubii population shows limited genetic diversity and demonstrates a largely clonal mode of reproduction when compared with the global MLST dataset. HIV-status, sequence types and geography were found to be confounded. However, a correlation between sequence types and isolates from HIV-negative patients was observed among the Asian isolates. Observations of high gene flow between the Middle Eastern and the Southeastern Asian populations suggest that immigrant workers in the Middle East were originally infected in Southeastern Asia.

  7. Reduction in heat shock protein 90 correlates to neuronal vulnerability in the rat piriform cortex following status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y-J; Kim, J-Y; Ko, A-R; Kang, T-C

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we addressed the question of whether the distinct patterns of heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and HSP90 expressions in the brain region represents the regional specific responses to status epilepsticus (SE) in an effort to better understand the role of HSPs in epileptogenic insult. HSP70 immunoreactivity was increased in CA3 pyramidal cells as well as dentate granule cells at 12h-1week after SE. HSP70 immunoreactivity was transiently increased in neurons within the piriform cortex (PC) following SE. Linear regression analysis showed no correlation between the intensity of NeuN and that of HSP70. In contrast to HSP70, HSP90 immunoreactivity was decreased in CA1-3 pyramidal cells at 4days-4weeks after SE. In addition, HSP90 immunoreactivity was decreased in PC neurons at 12h-4weeks after SE. linear regression analysis showed a direct proportional relationship between the intensity of NeuN and that of HSP90. Therefore, these findings suggest that HSP90 degradation may be closely related to neuronal vulnerability to SE insult.

  8. Examination of adolescents' screen time and physical fitness as independent correlates of weight status and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Ullrich-French, Sarah C; Power, Thomas G; Daratha, Kenn B; Bindler, Ruth C; Steele, Michael M

    2010-09-01

    Physical fitness performance is an important health correlate yet is often unrelated to sedentary behaviour in early adolescence. In this study, we examined the association of sedentary behaviour (i.e. screen time) with weight-related health markers and blood pressure, after controlling for cardiorespiratory fitness performance. American middle school students (N = 153, 56% females) aged 11-15 years (mean 12.6 years, s = 0.5) completed assessments of cardiorespiratory fitness performance, screen time, weight status (BMI percentile, waist-to-height ratio), and blood pressure. Multivariate analysis of covariance, controlling for cardiorespiratory fitness performance, found those who met the daily recommendation of 2 h or less of screen time (n = 36, 23.5%) had significantly lower BMI (p < 0.05) and systolic blood pressure (p < 0.01) compared with those who exceeded this recommendation. Findings suggest specific intervention programmes may be designed to target both cardiorespiratory fitness and sedentary behaviours to maximize early adolescent health because these behaviours are likely to have unique and independent effects on youth health markers.

  9. [Disease and contraception. Recent aspects].

    PubMed

    Rozenbaum, H

    1985-01-01

    This article reviews several different articles which have contributed to an understanding of the harmful or beneficial effects of oral contraceptives (OCs) on various diseases. The Royal College of General Practitioners study found that current OC users compared to women who had never used OCs had relative risks of .52 for menorrhagia, .37 for dysmenorrhea, .65 for irregular cycles, .72 for intermenstrual bleeding, and .71 for premenstrual syndrome. Several studies found combined OCs to offer protection against ovarian cysts. Microdose progestin only pills did not ameliorate most menstrual problems and aggravated ovarian cysts. Despite some theoretical grounds for suspecting an association between pituitary prolactinomas and OC use, recent studies have failed to find an increased relative risk for prolactinomas in women using OCs for contraceptive purposes, although 1 study found an increased risk in women using OCs for cycle control. 1 study reported 11 pregnancies in 30 diabetic women in 15 months of IUD use; the high rate was attributed to abnormal patterns of mineral deposit on the IUD surface. The 11 pregnancies occurred with 5 Gravigardes, 5 Saf-T-Coils, and 1 Dalkon Shield. Other studies on the contrary have noted no difference in pregnancy rates among 103 diabetic women using Copper Ts or 118 diabetic women using Lippes loops. Combined OCs appear to reduce the incidence of rheumatoid arthritis by 1/2 among current OC users and to protect former users as well. Combined OCs aggravate lupus erythmatous but synthetic progestins alone are effective without aggravating the condition. It has recently been argued that low dose OCs are not contraindicated in cases of sickle cell disease and may even offer protection against thromboembolic vascular accidents for women with sickle cell anemia. Estimates of relative risk of pelvic infection among IUD users vary from 1.5 to 6.5, with the risk apparently greatest for women under 25. Recent studies have indicated that

  10. Reasons for contraceptive nonuse among women having unmet need for contraception in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Sedgh, Gilda; Hussain, Rubina

    2014-06-01

    The level of unmet need for contraception-an important motivator of international family planning programs and policies-has declined only slightly in recent decades. This study draws upon data from 51 surveys conducted between 2006 and 2013 in Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean to provide an updated review of the reasons why many married women having unmet need are not practicing contraception. We examine the reasons for contraceptive nonuse and how these reasons vary across countries and according to national levels of unmet need and contraceptive use. We present specific findings regarding the most widespread reasons for nonuse, particularly infrequent sex and concerns regarding side effects or health risks. Our findings suggest that access to services that provide a range of methods from which to choose, and information and counseling to help women select and effectively use an appropriate method, can be critical in helping women having unmet need overcome obstacles to contraceptive use.

  11. Reversible Contraception Update: The Importance of Long-Acting Reversible Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Mestad, Renee E.; Kenerson, Jessica; Peipert, Jeffrey F.

    2011-01-01

    The past several years have seen an expansion in contraception options. Emerging data support the use of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) such as the intrauterine device and subdermal implant as the most effective methods of contraception with the highest continuation rates and very high levels of patient satisfaction. In addition, the appropriate target population for the use of the intrauterine device now includes nulliparous women and adolescents. When a patient considers initiating a new contraceptive method, it is important to consider the characteristics of each method, including the side effects, effectiveness, and patient acceptability. Additionally, medical comorbidities must also be evaluated prior to choosing a method. In this article, we provide a brief overview of available reversible contraceptive methods, with an emphasis on LARC. PMID:19641264

  12. Non-Hormonal Male Contraception: A Review and Development of an Eppin Based Contraceptive

    PubMed Central

    O’Rand, Michael G.; Silva, Erick J.R.; Hamil, Katherine G.

    2015-01-01

    Developing a non-hormonal male contraceptive requires identifying and characterizing an appropriate target and demonstrating its essential role in reproduction. Here we review the development of male contraceptive targets and the current therapeutic agents under consideration. In addition, the development of EPPIN as a target for contraception is reviewed. EPPIN is a well characterized surface protein on human spermatozoa that has an essential function in primate reproduction. EPPIN is discussed as an example of target development, testing in non-human primates, and the search for small organic compounds that mimic contraceptive antibodies; binding EPPIN and blocking sperm motility. Although many hurdles remain before the success of a non-hormonal male contraceptive, continued persistence should yield a marketable product. PMID:26593445

  13. [Contraception in immigrant women: influence of sociocultural aspects on the choice of contraceptive method].

    PubMed

    Paraíso Torras, B; Maldonado Del Valle, M D; López Muñoz, A; Cañete Palomo, M L

    2013-01-01

    There are currently 6 million immigrants living in Spain. Half of them are women, the majority of whom are of childbearing age. These women, who suffer high rates of induced abortion, form a special group who require a special approach to their reproductive health. In order to study the use of contraceptive methods in this population, a review was made of 1100 clinical histories from our Sexual Health and Reproduction Clinic. Latin American women were the most prevalent group who came to seek information about contraception, followed by Eastern Europeans and Moroccans. Fewer Asian and Sub-Saharan women sought these services. The contraceptives most frequently used were the intrauterine device (used mostly by Latin American and Eastern European women), and combined oral contraception, most used by Moroccan women. It is important to advise the immigrant women about contraceptive methods, taking into account their preferences, in order to improve adherence to the method.

  14. Awareness and utilization of modern contraceptives among street women in North-West Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Contraception is a major component of reproductive health. Assessing the levels of contraceptive awareness and use helps to identify potential areas of intervention. Hence, this study was conducted to assess awareness, practice and associated factors of modern contraceptives among street women in North-West Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 204 street women from Gondar and Bahir Dar cities. Participants were recruited from “cluster” sites such as main road sides, isolated slum areas, around Churches and/or Mosques (in the mornings of Sundays and other religious feast days) and streets where street women usually reside and/or sleep. Data were collected using a pre-tested and structured interview questionnaire in local language (Amharic) after informed verbal consent. Data were then entered into SPSS version 16.0 for analysis. Binary logistic regression models were fit to assess associations and control confounding. Associations were measured by the Odds ratio and its 95% confidence interval. Results The mean (±SD) age of participants was 30.9 (± 8.7) years. Majority (90.7%) had ever heard about modern contraceptives. Nearly half (47.1%) had ever used and a third (34.3%) were current users. Three quarter of the current users (74.3%) were using injectables while 10% were on long acting or permanent methods. Marital status (AOR=2.81), family size (AOR=2.67) and age of 25–34 years (AOR=3.45) were associated with modern contraceptive use. Conclusions Current contraceptive use among street women is satisfactory considering their life styles and living conditions. However, further research is required to explain perceptions and hidden barriers. PMID:23031722

  15. Status of serum magnesium in Egyptian children with type 1 diabetes and its correlation to glycemic control and lipid profile.

    PubMed

    Shahbah, Doaa; El Naga, Amr Abo; Hassan, Tamer; Zakaria, Marwa; Beshir, Mohamed; Al Morshedy, Salah; Abdalhady, Mohamed; Kamel, Ezzat; Rahman, Doaa Abdel; Kamel, Lamiaa; Abdelkader, May

    2016-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus has been suggested to be the most common metabolic disorder associated with magnesium deficiency, having 25% to 39% prevalence. This deficit could be associated with the development of late diabetic complications, especially macroangiopathy.We aimed to evaluate the status of serum Mg in children with type 1 diabetes and assess its relation to glycemic control and lipid profile.We included 71 Egyptian children with type 1diabetes having their follow-up at Pediatric Endocrinology outpatient clinic, Zagazig University Hospital and 71 age- and sex-matched control. We measured Serum magnesium, HbA1c, and lipid profile in all study subjects.Diabetic children had significantly lower serum magnesium level compared to control children (1.83 ± .27 mg/dL in diabetic children versus 2.00 ± .16 mg/dL in control children). Taking cut-off level of serum magnesium <1.7 mg/dL for definition of hypomagnesemia, hypomagnesemia was detected in 28.2% of diabetic children compared to 9.9% of control children. In diabetic patients, there was statistically significant difference in HbA1c between hypomagnesemic and normomagnesemic group being higher in the low magnesium group, as it is mean ± SD was 11.93 ± 3.17 mg/dL in group I versus 8.92 ± 0.93 mg/dL in the normomagnesemic group. Serum magnesium was found to be positively correlated with HDL (P < 0.001), and negatively correlated with age, HbA1c, triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL, and duration of diabetes (P < 0.001).We concluded that total serum magnesium was frequently low in Egyptian children with type 1 diabetes and it is correlated with HbA1c and with lipid profile. Hypomagnesemia was more evident in patients with poor diabetic control and those with higher atherogenic lipid parameters. We suggest that low serum magnesium may be included in pathogenesis of poor glycemic control and abnormal lipid profile in children with type 1 diabetes. We need to perform further

  16. Status of serum magnesium in Egyptian children with type 1 diabetes and its correlation to glycemic control and lipid profile

    PubMed Central

    Shahbah, Doaa; El Naga, Amr Abo; Hassan, Tamer; Zakaria, Marwa; Beshir, Mohamed; Al Morshedy, Salah; Abdalhady, Mohamed; Kamel, Ezzat; Rahman, Doaa Abdel; Kamel, Lamiaa; Abdelkader, May

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diabetes mellitus has been suggested to be the most common metabolic disorder associated with magnesium deficiency, having 25% to 39% prevalence. This deficit could be associated with the development of late diabetic complications, especially macroangiopathy. We aimed to evaluate the status of serum Mg in children with type 1 diabetes and assess its relation to glycemic control and lipid profile. We included 71 Egyptian children with type 1diabetes having their follow-up at Pediatric Endocrinology outpatient clinic, Zagazig University Hospital and 71 age- and sex-matched control. We measured Serum magnesium, HbA1c, and lipid profile in all study subjects. Diabetic children had significantly lower serum magnesium level compared to control children (1.83 ± .27 mg/dL in diabetic children versus 2.00 ± .16 mg/dL in control children). Taking cut-off level of serum magnesium <1.7 mg/dL for definition of hypomagnesemia, hypomagnesemia was detected in 28.2% of diabetic children compared to 9.9% of control children. In diabetic patients, there was statistically significant difference in HbA1c between hypomagnesemic and normomagnesemic group being higher in the low magnesium group, as it is mean ± SD was 11.93 ± 3.17 mg/dL in group I versus 8.92 ± 0.93 mg/dL in the normomagnesemic group. Serum magnesium was found to be positively correlated with HDL (P < 0.001), and negatively correlated with age, HbA1c, triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL, and duration of diabetes (P < 0.001). We concluded that total serum magnesium was frequently low in Egyptian children with type 1 diabetes and it is correlated with HbA1c and with lipid profile. Hypomagnesemia was more evident in patients with poor diabetic control and those with higher atherogenic lipid parameters. We suggest that low serum magnesium may be included in pathogenesis of poor glycemic control and abnormal lipid profile in children with type 1 diabetes. We need to perform

  17. Action against contraceptive implant threatened.

    PubMed

    Dyer, C

    1995-08-19

    Norplant provides contraception over a five-year period through the gradual subcutaneous release of the progestogen levonorgestrel. It has been on the US market since 1991 and available in Great Britain since 1993. Already the subject of group legal actions in several US states, Norplant may soon be the target of lawyers in Britain for litigation. The lawyers allege that insertion of the implant under the skin of the upper arm by untrained doctors has led to painful and difficult removals and left women with scarred arms. Moreover, insufficient warning has been given about possible side effects such as mood swings and continuous vaginal bleeding. Hoechst Roussel, marketer of the implant in Britain, however, argues that only doctors trained in Norplant insertion and removal should attempt either procedure. Removal will be problematic only if preceded by a problem insertion. Hoechst Roussel recently advised gynecologists, in writing, not to attempt to extract the implant unless they are trained in the removal technique. By British law, the application of a drug product once approved for general release to general practitioners and family planning doctors cannot be restricted by a pharmaceutical company.

  18. Intrauterine contraceptive devices: MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Mark, A S; Hricak, H

    1987-02-01

    To assess the safety of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in women who have an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) in place, in vitro and in vivo studies were performed at both 0.35 and 1.5 T. Two commonly used IUDs were tested, one all of plastic, the other with a coil of copper wire on it. Specifically, the study assessed possible motion of the IUD in the magnetic field, potential of the IUD to heat up during two spin-echo imaging sequences commonly used in MR imaging of the pelvis (2,000/30 and 60 [repetition time, msec/echo time, msec], and 500/30), and the appearance on MR images of the IUD devices. A retrospective review of MR images of the pelvis in six women who had an IUD in place was also performed. Results show that an IUD does not move under the influence of the magnetic field, does not heat during spin-echo sequences commonly used for pelvic imaging, and does not produce artifacts in vitro or in vivo. Patients with either type of IUD can be safely imaged with MR, and MR images of the pelvis are not degraded by the presence of an IUD.

  19. Intra-uterine contraceptive devices.

    PubMed

    Elias, J

    1985-05-01

    Among the advantages of IUDs are the device's high continuation rate, the lack of systemic side effects, and the absence of a need for continual motivation to practice contraception. The effectiveness of plastic IUDs is directly proportional to their surface area, but the degree of excessive bleeding experienced is inversely related to device size. Thus, devices represent a compromise between large size for effectiveness and small size for acceptability. The optimum time to fit an IUD is during the 1st hald of the menstrual cycle. Absolute contraindications to IUD use include the presence of active pelvic inflammatory disease, undiagnosed irregular bleeding, a history of ectopic pregnancy or tubal surgery, and a distorted uteine cavity. Failure rates associated with IUD use range from 2-3% in the 1st year and then decrease. Since the main mechanism of action appears to be production of a sterile inflammatory reaction in the uterine cavity, the IUD prevents intrauterine pregnancy more effectively than ectopic pregnancy. Nonetheless, there is little evidence to suggest that IUD use actually increases the incidence of ectopic pregnancy. Resumption of fertility after IUD removal is not delayed. There is not need to change inert plastic IUDs in women who remain symptom free. The copper devices should be changed every 3-4 years. A search is under way for antifertility agents that can be incorporated into the device to reduce side effects. In general, the IUD is most suitable for older, parous women.

  20. Study of characteristics of condom-acceptors using condom as first choice and alternative method of contraception in 1981-1987 at the NPFDB, GHKL.

    PubMed

    Low Boon Song

    1990-06-01

    Factors influencing condom acceptance were studied and compared in 2 groups of condom-acceptors--those using condoms as a 1st method of contraception and those using condoms as an alternative method of contraception. Data was obtained by reviewing the condom-acceptor cards during 1981-1987 at the General Hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 208 cards for the 1st group and 230 for the 2nd group were included in the study. Statistical analysis was conducted to determine characteristics influencing condom-use. AGe of wife, duration of marriage, number of living children, wife's level of education and socioeconomic status were identified as factors influencing condom acceptance. No significant difference was observed between the 2 group concerning their purpose of contraception. Age of wife had a significant influence on the use of condoms as contraception. Age of wife had a significant influence on the use of condoms as contraception; 74.5% of group 1 users were 31 years and 56.5% of group 2 users were 30 years. A very significant relationship also exist between condom use and duration of marriage and number of living children; condom-acceptors using condoms as the 1st method of contraception did so within 9 years of marriage (85.6%) and practiced condom use when they had 2 of children (73.6%) while those who used condoms subsequently were married 10 years (46.5%) and did so after having 3 or children (57.8%). Significant differences were observed between groups in higher socioeconomic status and higher level of education. With 7 or more years of education, a significant proportion of condom-acceptors used condoms as a 1st method of contraception as compared with those who used it as a subsequent method of contraception. For the higher socioeconomic, a significant number of acceptors used condoms as a 1st method of contraception.

  1. 22 countries: tax relief for vaccines, ORS, and contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Krasovec, K; Connor, C

    1999-01-01

    This article presents the implementation of tax relief of the three key public health commodities--vaccines, oral rehydration salts (ORS), and contraceptives--in 22 countries. Tax relief was provided in the form of exemptions, waivers, reductions or some combination thereof, with the goal of improving the health status of the population. Tax relief is known to aid in the achievement of policy objectives, which include reduction of buyer's administrative cost, and budget needs, reduction of consumer prices and increase of product supply. Through a global e-mail survey in 1997, information on vaccine, ORS, and contraceptive tax exemptions was gathered. Results revealed that 68% of the countries granted tax relief. It was observed that 87% of the public sector benefits from tax relief for at least one commodity, 67% of the private nonprofit sector, and 53% of the private for-profit sector. On the other hand, the use of waiver procedures for tax relief greatly differs across countries. It was noted that tax exemptions rather than waiver procedures result in the greatest benefits. This article suggests further expansion of private nonprofit and for-profit sectors with appropriate guarantees of consumer savings, as well as implementation of tax relief.

  2. Low Contraceptive Use among Young Females in Uganda: Does Birth History and Age at Birth have an Influence? Analysis of 2011 Demographic and Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kabagenyi, Allen; Habaasa, Gilbert; Rutaremwa, Gideon

    2017-01-01

    Background Globally adolescent fertility has been associated with increased risk to maternal and child health morbidity and mortality. The low use of contraception has been associated with high fertility levels, which is remains a public health concern that efforts have been raised to avert this. We examine the influence history of a previous birth and age at first birth would have on young women’s use of contraception. Methods Using the 2011 Uganda Demographic and Health Survey data, we examine the predictors of contraceptive use on a sample of 3692 young females in Uganda. While controlling for education and age of respondents, logistic regression analyses were run to provide the net effect of the examined predictors on contraceptive use. The study variables included age of respondents, marital status, age at first birth, births in past five years, socioeconomic status, residence, region, education level, religion, occupation and whether the last child was wanted. Results The findings show that only 12% of the adolescents were using contraception at the time of the survey. The key predictors of contraceptive use among young women in Uganda were age at first birth, history of previous birth, current age, and place of residence, education and socioeconomic status. Respondents who had a birth in the 5 years prior to the survey had five times (OR = 5.0, 95% CI = 3.7-6.5) the odds of contraceptive use compared to those who had never had a birth. Further, adolescent females with at least a secondary education were more likely to use contraceptives (OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.2-2.0) than those with primary education. The odds of contraceptive use were least among adolescents from Northern region (OR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.2-0.6) compared to those from central region of Uganda. Muslim adolescent females were more likely to use contraceptives compared to Catholics (OR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.1-2.3). Conclusion There is great need to address issues that hinder young people from using

  3. [Intrauterine contraception from the viewpoint of an ambulatory gynecologic department].

    PubMed

    Hagen, P

    1981-09-01

    The history, current status, indications and contraindications for intrauterine contraception are described, information on safety and side effects is cited from the literature, and the experience of 1 clinic with IUDs is discussed. In 1976, 200,000 women in the German Democratic Republic used IUDs, or 50/1000 women aged 15-45. Intrauterine contraception had a slower and less steady development than oral contraception. The most widely used 2nd generation IUDs in East Germany were manufactured of plastic in the USSR, while the DANA copper and copper-T are the most widely used 3rd generation devices. The last days of the menstrual period are the best times for insertion, but placement immediately following abortion or birth is also possible. IUDs are indicated in cases where hormonal contraception is contraindicated. Contraindications to IUD use include suspicion of pregnancy, genital infection, atypical cytological finding, serious menstrual disturbances or bleeding of unknown cause, myomatous uterus, genital neoplasia, and deformation of the cervix or uterine cavity. The most significant complications and side effects of IUD use are bleeding disorders, dysmenorrhea, expulsion of the IUD, inflammation of the pelvic organs, undesired pregnancy, extrauterine pregnancy, and perforation of the uterus. Data from a gynecological clinic serving a predominantly rural area on 121 patients who used IUDs for a variety of reasons between June 1975 and August 1980 are presented. Observations covered a total of 4309 cycles and averaged 35.6 cycles per woman. Average age of patients was 31.7 years, no insertions were done in nulliparous patients, and the longest user had an IUD in place for 94 months. 29 patients had DANA superlux, 61 had DANA cor, 10 had DANA copper, and 21 had copper T devices. Complications and side effects were observed in 32 cases, including 19 cases of bleeding problems, of which 6 required removal; 5 of pregnancy, all of which were ended by abortions and

  4. Canadian Contraception Consensus (Part 1 of 4).

    PubMed

    Black, Amanda; Guilbert, Edith; Costescu, Dustin; Dunn, Sheila; Fisher, William; Kives, Sari; Mirosh, Melissa; Norman, Wendy V; Pymar, Helen; Reid, Robert; Roy, Geneviève; Varto, Hannah; Waddington, Ashley; Wagner, Marie-Soleil; Whelan, Anne Marie; Ferguson, Carrie; Fortin, Claude; Kielly, Maria; Mansouri, Shireen; Todd, Nicole

    2015-10-01

    Objectif : Fournir des lignes directrices aux fournisseurs de soins quant à l’utilisation de modes de contraception pour la prévention de la grossesse et quant à la promotion d’une sexualité saine. Issues : Orientation des praticiens canadiens en ce qui concerne l’efficacité globale, le mécanisme d’action, les indications, les contre-indications, les avantages n’étant pas liés à la contraception, les effets indésirables, les risques et le protocole de mise en œuvre des modes de contraception abordés; planification familiale dans le contexte de la santé sexuelle et du bien-être général; méthodes de counseling en matière de contraception; et accessibilité et disponibilité des modes de contraception abordés au Canada. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans MEDLINE et The Cochrane Library entre janvier 1994 et janvier 2015 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (p. ex. contraception, sexuality, sexual health) et de mots clés (p. ex. contraception, family planning, hormonal contraception, emergency contraception) appropriés. Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux études observationnelles et aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs publiés en anglais entre janvier 1994 et janvier 2015. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en juin 2015. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Valeurs : La qualité des résultats a été évaluée au moyen des critères décrits dans

  5. Canadian Contraception Consensus (Part 2 of 4).

    PubMed

    Black, Amanda; Guilbert, Edith; Costescu, Dustin; Dunn, Sheila; Fisher, William; Kives, Sari; Mirosh, Melissa; Norman, Wendy V; Pymar, Helen; Reid, Robert; Roy, Geneviève; Varto, Hannah; Waddington, Ashley; Wagner, Marie-Soleil; Whelan, Anne Marie; Ferguson, Carrie; Fortin, Claude; Kielly, Maria; Mansouri, Shireen; Todd, Nicole

    2015-11-01

    Objectif : Fournir des lignes directrices aux fournisseurs de soins quant à l’utilisation de modes de contraception pour la prévention de la grossesse et quant à la promotion d’une sexualité saine. Issues : Orientation des praticiens canadiens en ce qui concerne l’efficacité globale, le mécanisme d’action, les indications, les contre-indications, les avantages n’étant pas liés à la contraception, les effets indésirables, les risques et le protocole de mise en œuvre des modes de contraception abordés; planification familiale dans le contexte de la santé sexuelle et du bien-être général; méthodes de counseling en matière de contraception; et accessibilité et disponibilité des modes de contraception abordés au Canada. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans MEDLINE et The Cochrane Library entre janvier 1994 et janvier 2015 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (p. ex. contraception, sexuality, sexual health) et de mots clés (p. ex. contraception, family planning, hormonal contraception, emergency contraception) appropriés. Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux études observationnelles et aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs publiés en anglais entre janvier 1994 et janvier 2015. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en juin 2015. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Valeurs : La qualité des résultats a été évaluée au moyen des critères décrits dans

  6. Evidence from peninsular Malaysia of breastfeeding as a contraceptive method.

    PubMed

    Rao, S R

    1992-01-01

    This report examines Malaysian women's perceptions of the contraceptive effect of breastfeeding, the determinants of their perceptions, and any effect these perceptions might have on nursing duration and contraceptive use. The report also considers whether women are consciously replacing breastfeeding with modern contraceptive methods. Data from the 1976 Malaysian Family Life Survey are analyzed, and the author concludes that Malaysian women do perceive that breastfeeding has a contraceptive effect, but that this perception is not universal. Ethnicity and desire for a particular family size are the most significant determinants of this perception. Finally, Malaysian women's recognition of the contraceptive effect of nursing does not influence either the duration of their breastfeeding or their adoption of contraception. Malaysian women may not be abandoning breastfeeding to adopt contraception. More probably, breastfeeding declines and contraceptive prevalence increases with modernization.

  7. Psychosocial Correlates of AUDIT-C Hazardous Drinking Risk Status: Implications for Screening and Brief Intervention in College Settings.

    PubMed

    Wahesh, Edward; Lewis, Todd F

    2015-01-01

    The current study identified psychosocial variables associated with AUDIT-C hazardous drinking risk status for male and female college students. Logistic regression analysis revealed that AUDIT-C risk status was associated with alcohol-related negative consequences, injunctive norms, and descriptive norms for both male and female participants. Sociability and self-perception outcome expectancies predicted risk status for females. Cognitive and behavioral impairment expectancies predicted risk status for men in the sample. Implications for screening and brief intervention programming efforts are discussed.

  8. Whatever happened to the contraceptive revolution?

    PubMed

    Lincoln, R; Kaeser, L

    1988-01-01

    This article reviews the fates of various contraceptive methods since the modern era of contraception began in the 1950s. The recent experience with IUDs shows how easy it is to lose an existing method. Spermicides may be next. The pill, used by some 9-10 million American couples, looks firmly entrenched. Yet pill scares seem as enduring as the method: 2 of the most recent link oral contraceptives with increased vulnerability to AIDS and with breast cancer in women who took the pill prior to a 1st birth. Such scares could always endanger the availability of this product. The widespread concern about the AIDS epidemic represents both an opportunity for and a challenge to contraceptive development. Priorities in contraceptive research need to be reexamined to include methods that can deal simultaneously with unintended pregnancy and AIDS, as well as with less lethal sexually transmitted diseases. None of the new methods high in the research and development pipeline meet these criteria. The bright side of the picture is the number of promising leads for birth control methods that could be developed if there were adequate funding and if some of the other barriers to development were removed. Finally, the general public, health professionals, legislators and consumer and women's groups need a great deal of education on these issues.

  9. [Chlamydia trachomatis genital infections and contraception].

    PubMed

    Aloisio, T; Rullo, F; Smeraglia, R; Giorgio, A; Lettieri, G; Sannino, F; Martinelli, A

    1988-01-01

    330 women with a median age of 30.15 (+- 9.5) years sought gynecological consultation for advice on contraception and for cervical carcinoma screening. Anamnesis explored the presence of dysuria, dyspareunia, secretions, and pelvic pain, the number of partners, and type of contraceptive used. Endocervical samples were collected by means of tampon and the specimens were analyzed for 48 to 120 hours to find antigens of Chlamydia trachomatis (C.T.) by a solid phase immunoenzymatic test. Peripheral blood samples were also taken from all women to look for antibodies of C.T. and also the indirect immunoperoxidase test was used to search for specific antibodies of C.T. (IgM, IgA, IgE, IgG). The chi-square test was applied for statistical analysis. None of the women who used oral hormonal contraceptives or condoms were infected (presence of antigens and positivity for IgM and/or IgE and/or IgA), however, 36 of 90 IUD users (40%) were infected, 18 of 132 women who used no contraceptives whatsoever (13.7%) were also infected. 91% of the subjects had a single partner. In view of these findings the use of the condom and oral contraceptives is recommended with proper instruction about their potential side effects.

  10. Pelvic inflammatory disease and oral contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    Feldblum, P J; Burton, N; Rosenberg, M J

    1986-10-01

    Oral contraceptive use has been shown to protect against gonococcal pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), but the effect on chlamydial PID is uncertain. Chlamydia infection is rising in incidence and has become the major cause of PID in many areas. PID may cause infertility, impairing the future reproduction of women. Previous studies on oral contraceptives and PID relied on hospitalized women, which may have biased the sample to include mainly gonococcal PID. Several studies show increased risk of endocervical chlamydia infection in users of oral contraceptives. The postulated mechanism is cervical ectopy, exposing more squamous epithelium to the organisms. Nevertheless, there is evidence indicating that despite the increased incidence of endocervical infection, oral contraceptives may inhibit the organisms from ascending, thus still offering a protective affect against both gonococcal and chlamydial PID. Future research must focus on the prevalence of chlamydia infection in Africa, and the natural history of the illness. The effect of different types of oral contraceptives on chlamydia infection must be evaluated.

  11. Levonorgestrel subdermal implants. Contraception on trial.

    PubMed

    Frank, M L; DiMaria, C

    1997-12-01

    When they were introduced to the world market in the 1980s, levonorgestrel subdermal implants offered the promise of an exciting alternative to traditional hormonal contraception. They provide highly effective, long-acting protection from pregnancy, without the need for user compliance. Broad acceptability of the drug has been reported throughout the world. Recently, however, the implants have met with opposition. The drug is associated with a variety of adverse effects, and removal of implants can be problematic. Serious events have been reported in women using levonorgestrel subdermal implants, although causal relationships have not been demonstrated. Additionally, concerns have been raised over the potential for coercive use of the drug. Numerous law suits have been filed alleging serious problems with implants. As a result, the drug has received considerable negative media attention. Before the controversy over levonorgestrel subdermal implants erupted, contraceptive development had declined, resulting from limitations to profits and funding, legal threats, and changes in the insurance industry. The levonorgestrel subdermal implant experience may serve to accelerate this trend. While the introduction of levonorgestrel subdermal implants offered an alternative to the current array of medical contraception, its experience may serve to dampen future contraceptive development efforts. Costly litigation and much controversy involving the implants have acted to create disincentives to further research and development of new methods of medical contraception.

  12. Women segmentation based on contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    El-zanaty, F H

    1994-06-01

    In the past, the Egyptian Information, Education and Communication Center (IEC) SIS/IEC Center has used research findings to develop messages on the health benefits of family planning to mothers and children, proper use of contraceptive methods, and the need for acquiring correct information. A recent analysis of the 1995 Egypt Demographic and Health Survey data on 9153 currently married women aged 15-49 aimed to generate preliminary audience segments and profiles of different groups of current users, never users, and discontinuers of family planning methods so the Center can develop messages on family planning and birth spacing. 47.1% of all women in the analysis currently used contraception. 19.8% had used contraception, but did not do so currently. 33.1% had never used contraception. The leading factors affecting contraceptive use were husband's approval, husband-wife communications, desire for more children, and religion. Based on what was learned from discontinuers, the Center made two general conclusions. It needs to design special messages targeting discontinuers or never users. These special messages need to concern the groups' knowledge about different family planning methods, side effects, birth spacing methods, and birth limiting methods. Husband involvement in family planning is essential. Thus, the Center needs to develop special messages geared to men. To do so, however, a cluster analysis for husbands would be helpful in message development.

  13. Update on Permanent Contraception Options for Women

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Eva; Jensen, Jeffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Permanent methods are the most commonly used contraceptive options worldwide. Even with the increase in popularity and accessibility of long-acting reversible methods, there remains high demand for permanent options, especially among women in developing countries. Recent findings Traditional methods of permanent contraception (PC), such as post-partum tubal ligation and interval surgical tubal occlusion or electrocautery by mini-laparotomy or laparoscopy are safe and highly effective. Bilateral total salpingectomy for ovarian cancer risk reduction is currently being investigated. Hysteroscopic tubal occlusion reduces or eliminates the need for anesthesia, but requires surgical training and specialized equipment. Alternative PC methods are being explored including immediately effective hysteroscopic methods, and non-surgical permanent contraception (NSPC) methods that have the potential to improve access and reduce cost. Summary PC methods are an important part of the contraceptive methods mix designed to meet the needs of women who have completed desired family size or wish never to become pregnant. Current surgical approaches to permanent contraception are safe and highly effective. The development of a highly effective nonsurgical approach could simplify the provision of PC. PMID:26406934

  14. Gastrointestinal flora and gastrointestinal status in children with autism -- comparisons to typical children and correlation with autism severity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Children with autism have often been reported to have gastrointestinal problems that are more frequent and more severe than in children from the general population. Methods Gastrointestinal flora and gastrointestinal status were assessed from stool samples of 58 children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and 39 healthy typical children of similar ages. Stool testing included bacterial and yeast culture tests, lysozyme, lactoferrin, secretory IgA, elastase, digestion markers, short chain fatty acids (SCFA's), pH, and blood presence. Gastrointestinal symptoms were assessed with a modified six-item GI Severity Index (6-GSI) questionnaire, and autistic symptoms were assessed with the Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist (ATEC). Results Gastrointestinal symptoms (assessed by the 6-GSI) were strongly correlated with the severity of autism (assessed by the ATEC), (r = 0.59, p < 0.001). Children with 6-GSI scores above 3 had much higher ATEC Total scores than those with 6-GSI-scores of 3 or lower (81.5 +/- 28 vs. 49.0 +/- 21, p = 0.00002). Children with autism had much lower levels of total short chain fatty acids (-27%, p = 0.00002), including lower levels of acetate, proprionate, and valerate; this difference was greater in the children with autism taking probiotics, but also significant in those not taking probiotics. Children with autism had lower levels of species of Bifidobacter (-43%, p = 0.002) and higher levels of species of Lactobacillus (+100%, p = 0.00002), but similar levels of other bacteria and yeast using standard culture growth-based techniques. Lysozyme was somewhat lower in children with autism (-27%, p = 0.04), possibly associated with probiotic usage. Other markers of digestive function were similar in both groups. Conclusions The strong correlation of gastrointestinal symptoms with autism severity indicates that children with more severe autism are likely to have more severe gastrointestinal symptoms and vice versa. It is possible that

  15. [Lipids, lipoproteins, arterial accidents and oral contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Bakir, R; Hilliquin, P

    1986-01-01

    This work reviews lipoprotein metabolism and relationships to atherosclerosis, examines the nature of arterial accidents and lipid modifications that occur with oral contraceptive (OC) use, and assesses the practical consequences for OC prescription. Cholesterol, triglycerides, and phospholipids are not soluble in aqueous milieus, and their transport in plasma is provided by macromolecules comprising a protein part and a lipid part. 5 types of these lipoproteins are distinguished by their relative richness in lipids and protein and by the nature of their proteins. The chylomicrons carry exogenous triglycerides to the peripheral tissues and cholesterol of dietary origin to the liver. Very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol is secreted by the liver and transports triglycerides and cholesterol of endogenous origin. Low denisty lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol originates in the degradation of VLDL cholesterol and transports cholesterol to the cells. High density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol is secreted by the liver and intestines or formed in the course of degradation of chylomicrons and VLDL cholesterol. Its role is to carry excess cholesterol in the peripheral tissues to the liver for elimination in the bile. Cholesterol thus follows 2 different pathways in the body: a path from the liver to the peripheral cells, whose markers are LDL and VLDL cholesterol and the plasma apoprotein B, and a path of return of excess cholesterol from the tissues and especially the arteries to the liver, marked by HDL cholesterol and the plasma apoprotein A. Only a proper balance between the 2 flows can prevent an excess of cholesterol in the arteries and the consequent constitution of atherosclerotic lesions. LDL and to a lesser extent VLDL cholesterol are strongly and positively correlated to atherogenic risk, while HDL cholesterol is negatively correlated to risk, independently of other risk factors. Arterial accidents occurring with OC use do not seem to be atheromatous in

  16. Correlation of genetic variation among wild Trigonella foenum-graecum L. accessions with their antioxidant potential status.

    PubMed

    Haliem, E A; Al-Huqail, A A

    2014-12-12

    In this study, we analyzed the correlation between genetic variation based on random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), acid phosphatase, and glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase isozymes, and amino acid composition with the antioxidant potential status of 7 wild Trigonella foenum-graecum L. accessions collected from diverse ecogeographical regions. RAPD revealed that 90 DNA products had highly polymorphism value (94.12%) based on band numbers, with sizes ranging from 50-2100 base pairs, and band intensity. Of 49 DNA polymorphic bands, 31 unique and 3 monomorphic bands were scored. Acid phosphatase and glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase showed total polymorphism values of 90.00 and 93.75%, respectively, based on zymogram number, relative front (Rf), and optical intensity. Because isozymes are composed of amino acids, they were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography, which revealed the presences of 16 amino acids of variable content ranging from 13.21-15.35%, 9 of which are essential amino acids in humans. RAPD and isozymes showed similarly high estimates of genetic variability. Genetic relationships revealed by unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean clustering analysis based on data obtained from all primers of RAPD and each isozyme were very similar. The antioxidant potential based on free radical scavenging, 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, b-carotene-linoleate, total phenolic, and flavonoid contents values were variable among accessions. We found that fenugreek is a valuable genetic resource with high antioxidant activity. Their genotypes, based on data and clustering of RAPD, isozymes, and variable amino acid contents, combined with their antioxidant potential statues are important in fenugreek breeding and improvement programs.

  17. Residence time of carbon substrate for autotrophic respiration of a grassland ecosystem correlates with the carbohydrate status of its vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostler, Ulrike; Lehmeier, Christoph A.; Schleip, Inga; Schnyder, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Ecosystem respiration is composed of two component fluxes: (1) autotrophic respiration, which comprises respiratory activity of plants and plant-associated microbes that feed on products of recent photosynthetic activity and (2) heterotrophic respiration of microbes that decompose organic matter. The mechanistic link between the availability of carbon (C) substrate for ecosystem respiration and its respiratory activity is not well understood, particularly in grasslands. Here, we explore, how the kinetic features of the supply system feeding autotrophic ecosystem respiration in a temperate humid pasture are related to the content of water-soluble carbohydrates and remobilizable protein (as potential respiratory substrates) in vegetation biomass. During each September 2006, May 2007 and September 2007, we continuously labeled 0.8 m2 pasture plots with 13CO2/12CO2 and observed ecosystem respiration and its tracer content every night during the 14-16 day long labeling periods. We analyzed the tracer kinetics with a pool model, which allowed us to precisely partition ecosystem respiration into its autotrophic and heterotrophic flux components. At the end of a labeling campaign, we harvested aboveground and belowground plant biomass and analyzed its non-structural C contents. Approximately half of ecosystem respiration did not release any significant amount of tracer during the labeling period and was hence characterized as heterotrophic. The other half of ecosystem respiration was autotrophic, with a mean residence time of C in the respiratory substrate pool between 2 and 6 d. Both the rate of autotrophic respiration and the turnover of its substrate supply pool were correlated with plant carbohydrate content, but not with plant protein content. These findings are in agreement with studies in controlled environments that revealed water-soluble carbohydrates as the main substrate and proteins as a marginal substrate for plant respiration under favorable growth conditions

  18. Simulation of Wild Pig Control via Hunting and Contraceptives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    ER D C/ CE RL T R- 13 -2 1 Simulation of Wild Pig Control via Hunting and Contraceptives Co ns tr uc tio n En gi ne er in g R es ea rc...Simulation of Wild Pig Control via Hunting and Contraceptives Jennifer L. Burton, James D. Westervelt, and Stephen Ditchkoff Construction Engineering... contraceptives , and the combination of both on the Fort Benning, GA feral pig population. Results suggest that the combination of hunting and contraception

  19. Contraceptive implants: long acting and provider dependent contraception raises concerns about freedom of choice.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    David Bromham's editorial on contraceptive implants ignores the wider issues to voice concern that trial by media could limit contraceptive choice by jeopardising research into new methods. However, it is more beneficial to the public for points of conflict to be debated openly. Furthermore, the impetus for research into new contraceptive technology is driven by profit and political motives and is only marginally affected by the media. Implanted contraceptives may increase the choice of contraceptive methods, but they put control of fertility increasingly into the hands of the medical profession. Herein lies their greatest problem: their potential to increase providers' control over clients' choice. There is the danger that certain groups of women may be targeted for their use: in the United States the coercive use of Norplant for mothers receiving welfare benefit has been suggested. Long acting contraceptives are a contraceptive of choice only when they are available without pressure, as part of a wider menu; when instant removal on request is guaranteed; and when there is an open and free flow of information and opinions between users, health professionals, and special interest groups. Images p1394-a PMID:8956712

  20. Estimating Contraceptive Prevalence Using Logistics Data for Short-Acting Methods: Analysis Across 30 Countries

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Marc; Brown, Niquelle; Sacher, Suzy; Hatch, Benjamin; Inglis, Andrew; Aronovich, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) is a vital indicator used by country governments, international donors, and other stakeholders for measuring progress in family planning programs against country targets and global initiatives as well as for estimating health outcomes. Because of the need for more frequent CPR estimates than population-based surveys currently provide, alternative approaches for estimating CPRs are being explored, including using contraceptive logistics data. Methods: Using data from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) in 30 countries, population data from the United States Census Bureau International Database, and logistics data from the Procurement Planning and Monitoring Report (PPMR) and the Pipeline Monitoring and Procurement Planning System (PipeLine), we developed and evaluated 3 models to generate country-level, public-sector contraceptive prevalence estimates for injectable contraceptives, oral contraceptives, and male condoms. Models included: direct estimation through existing couple-years of protection (CYP) conversion factors, bivariate linear regression, and multivariate linear regression. Model evaluation consisted of comparing the referent DHS prevalence rates for each short-acting method with the model-generated prevalence rate using multiple metrics, including mean absolute error and proportion of countries where the modeled prevalence rate for each method was within 1, 2, or 5 percentage points of the DHS referent value. Results: For the methods studied, family planning use estimates from public-sector logistics data were correlated with those from the DHS, validating the quality and accuracy of current public-sector logistics data. Logistics data for oral and injectable contraceptives were significantly associated (P<.05) with the referent DHS values for both bivariate and multivariate models. For condoms, however, that association was only significant for the bivariate model. With the exception of the CYP

  1. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Florian; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rendl, Gundula; Rodrigues, Margarida; Pirich, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET) transcription in Hirschsprung’s disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) (n = 26) or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4). Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p < 0.005; RET-mutated, r = 0.81, p < 0.01). E-cadherin showed weak correlation, whereas EGFR and TTF-1 showed no significant correlation with tumor proliferation. EGFR, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 showed weak correlation with proliferation of RET-mutated tumors. Correlation between TTF-1 and tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = −0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression. PMID:27409604

  2. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Florian; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rendl, Gundula; Rodrigues, Margarida; Pirich, Christian

    2016-07-09

    Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET) transcription in Hirschsprung's disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) (n = 26) or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4). Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p < 0.005; RET-mutated, r = 0.81, p < 0.01). E-cadherin showed weak correlation, whereas EGFR and TTF-1 showed no significant correlation with tumor proliferation. EGFR, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 showed weak correlation with proliferation of RET-mutated tumors. Correlation between TTF-1 and tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = -0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression.

  3. Thrombotic risk of contraceptive transdermal patches and the contraceptive vaginal ring.

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    The annual risk of venous thrombosis has been estimated at 5 to 10 cases per 100 000 women aged 15 to 44 years who are not using hormonal contraception.The risk increases with age for all women. Combined oral oestrogen-progestin contraceptives increase the risk of venous and arterial thrombosis. The risk of venous thrombosis varies, depending on which oestrogen-progestin combination is used. It is about 20 cases per 100,000 woman-years with contraceptives combining norethisterone or levonorgestrel with ethinylestradiol at doses below 50 microgram.The risk is twice as high with third-generation oral contraceptives. In addition to the oral route, hormonal contraception is available as a a transdermal patch or a vaginal ring. What is the risk of thrombosis associated with these non-oral forms? A cohort study showed that the risk of venous thrombosis was approximately 8-fold higher among women using a transdermal patch and 7-fold higher in those using a vaginal ring compared to women not using contraception. Another study on arterial thrombosis demonstrated a statistically significant increase in the risk of stroke among vaginal ring users, but not in the risk of myocardial infarction. In practice, overall, these data show that the use of contraceptive transdermal patch or the contraceptive vaginal ring increases the risk of venous thrombosis.The excess risk of arterial thrombosis is unknown.When hormonal contraception is requested, it is better to recommend a combination containing levonorgestrel and less than 50 microgram of ethinylestradiol per tablet, which carries a lower risk of venous or arterial thrombosis.

  4. Psychosocial Correlates of AUDIT-C Hazardous Drinking Risk Status: Implications for Screening and Brief Intervention in College Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahesh, Edward; Lewis, Todd F.

    2015-01-01

    The current study identified psychosocial variables associated with AUDIT-C hazardous drinking risk status for male and female college students. Logistic regression analysis revealed that AUDIT-C risk status was associated with alcohol-related negative consequences, injunctive norms, and descriptive norms for both male and female participants.…

  5. Oral contraceptives and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K H; Millard, P S

    1996-10-01

    The Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer conducted a meta-analysis of data from 10 cohort and 44 case-control studies of the association between combined oral contraceptive (OC) use and breast cancer. 53,297 women with breast cancer and 100,239 women with no breast cancer from 25 countries worldwide were studied. Current OC users faced a 24% increased risk of developing breast cancer (confidence interval = 1.15-1.33). This risk fell steadily after cessation and reached 0 at 10 years and thereafter. Use of OCs with higher doses were associated with a greater risk of breast cancer than medium or low-dose OCs. The number of excess cancers in women while using OCs and up to 10 years after OC cessation stood at 0.5/10,000 women 16-19 years old, 1.5/10,000 women 20-24 years old, and 4.7/10,000 women 25-29 years old. The elevated risk of developing breast cancer did not differ by country of origin, ethnic background, reproductive history, or family history of breast cancer. OC users had less clinically advanced breast cancer than never-users who had breast cancer. This finding plus the moderate reduced risk of breast cancer more than 10 years after OC cessation suggest that OCs may effect earlier diagnosis of existing breast cancer instead of causing new breast cancers. The findings of this meta-analysis along with a plausible biologic mechanism (estrogen stimulates breast cancer cells) suggest a causal relationship between OC use and breast cancer. They also indicate that the risk is small, decreases with time, and is lower among low-dose OC users. It is reassuring that the breast cancers found among OC users is less clinically advanced than those found in never-users.

  6. Preferences for new and existing contraceptive products.

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Denzil G; Knox, Stephanie; Viney, Rosalie; Haas, Marion; Street, Deborah J

    2011-09-01

    New contraceptive methods provide greater choice in terms of effectiveness, management of side-effects, convenience and frequency of administration and flexibility, but make the decisions about contraception more complex. There are limited data on the factors that determine women's choices among these alternatives, to inform providers about the factors which are most important to women, or to predict uptake of new products. This paper reports on a choice experiment designed to elicit women's preferences in relation to prescribed contraception and to forecast the impact of the introduction of two new products into the Australian market. A generalised multinomial logit model is estimated and used in the simulation exercise. The model forecasts that the hormonal patch would be well received among women, achieving a greater market share than current non-pill products, but the vaginal ring would have limited appeal.

  7. Companies commit to emergency contraception -- have you?

    PubMed

    1999-12-01

    Despite the efforts of the medical community, as well as promotional efforts by pharmaceutical companies, relatively few women in the US have heard of emergency contraceptives (ECs). Gynetics, marketer of Preven, plans to file a new drug application for a levonorgestrel EC by the end of 1999, with an anticipated approval in the second half of 2000. Women's Capital Corp., marketer of Plan B, is also aiming for a national commercial launch of its product. According to a recently published acceptability study, women will use ECs when they are made available. A survey among 235 women at 13 Kaiser Permanente medical offices in San Diego, California, regarding their experiences with ECs showed that 91% were satisfied with ECs, and 97% said they would use ECs for emergencies only--dispelling fears that women would forego use of ongoing contraception. About 70% of the women who participated in the study were using a contraceptive method when they requested ECs.

  8. Statistical approach for evaluation of contraceptive data.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Vriyesh

    2008-04-01

    This article will define how best to analyse data collected from a longitudinal follow up on contraceptive use and discontinuation, with special consideration to the needs of developing countries. Accessibility and acceptability of contraceptives at the ground level remains low and it is an overlooked area of research. The author presents a set of propositions that are closer in spirit to practical recommendations than to formal theorems. We will comment specifically on issues of model validation of model through bootstrapping techniques. The paper makes a presentation of a multivariate model to assess the rate of discontinuation of contraception, while accounting for the possibility that there may be factors that influence both a couple's choice of provider and their probability of discontinuation.

  9. [Experience with gestodene-containing hormonal contraceptive].

    PubMed

    Szabó, L; Nagy, K; Godó, G

    1998-03-01

    An oral contraceptive containing gestodene (Minulet) was examined in collaborating with the Richter-Wyeth Pharmaceutical Factory. The authors present their experiences of monitoring of 591 cycles of a hundred women between 18 and 35 years of age. There were no pregnancy and severe side effects during that period. Irregular bleeding occurred in 17.5% of women in the beginning of the treatment, however it gradually decreased and ceased by the fifth cycle. Both the length and the quantity of the withdrawal bleeding decreased by the end of the sixth cycle. During the observation there was no amenorrhoea and the dysmenorrhoea presented a decreasing tendency, expressing in per cent of the cycles. Their own data support, that the oral contraceptives containing gestodene meet requirements of today's medical science, and beyond the low hormone content they also fulfil the next demands: reliable contraceptive effect, efficacy, excellent cycle control, good tolerability and limited side effects.

  10. Allergy to spermicidal lubricant in a contraceptive.

    PubMed

    van Ulsen, J; Stolz, E; van Joost, T; Geursen-Reitsma, A M

    1987-08-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is reported in a patient using a condom with the spermicidal lubricant Tectol. A 36 year old female, with no history of dermatitis or pruritus of the vagina or vulva, experienced itchy dermatitis 24-48 hours after her partner used a Durex Top Safe contraceptive containing Tectol. The dermatitis appeared on the neck, upper legs, underarms, and trunk area. When another contraceptive was used Durex Featherlite (without Tectol), the patient experienced no problems. Patch tests concluded that the Tectol lubricant was the cause for the reaction in the patient. Transmission of the lubricant to the patient occurred when the patient's partner, after handling the contraceptive (Durex Top Safe) during intercourse, placed his hands on the patient's body. To which exact element of Tectol the patient was sensitized could not be determined as the patient refused further treatment.

  11. Oral contraceptives in the treatment of acne.

    PubMed

    Tan, J K; Degreef, H

    2001-02-01

    Oral contraceptives (OCs) can reduce acne by lowering the production of adrenal and ovarian androgens, by inhibiting 5-alpha-reductase, which in turn, reduces the levels of dihydrotestosterone, and by stimulating sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), thus reducing the levels of free testosterone. In newer OCs, such as Tricyclen and Diane-35, the progestin component is minimally androgenic and anti-androgenic respectively, thereby enhancing the favorable profile of these products in the treatment of hyperandrogenic disorders, including acne. The efficacy of these agents and their long-term safety profile supports their use in various grades of acne in females: * As adjunctive therapy to topical agents for women with mild non-scarring acne desiring oral contraception * As primary therapy for patients with moderate non-scarring acne in combination with topical therapy and systemic antibiotics * As one of two preferred methods of contraception in patients with scarring and severe inflammatory acne being treated with systemic isotretinoin.

  12. Consuming contraceptive control: gendered distinctions in web-based contraceptive advertising.

    PubMed

    Medley-Rath, Stephanie R; Simonds, Wendy

    2010-10-01

    There are over a hundred contraceptives currently on the market in the USA. In this paper, we present a discourse analysis of the stand-alone websites for 43 contraceptives in an effort to understand what contraceptive manufacturers are selling consumers along with their products. Manufacturers tailor marketing messages to promote conventional sex and gender norms using a scientific discourse. In particular, these products appropriate feminist ideals about independence and bodily integrity and promise consumers control and choice over procreation and sexual health, while existing within a larger context of medical surveillance in a patriarchal and capitalist culture.

  13. Contraceptive practices and trends in France.

    PubMed

    Toulemon, L; Leridon, H

    1998-01-01

    This study describes current contraceptive practices in France over the past 30 years, by method, among single men and women, for dual method use, for pregnancy or sexually transmitted disease (STD) prevention, and at 1st intercourse. Data were obtained from the 1994 Fertility and Family Survey and previous fertility surveys. In 1994, 69% of women aged 20-49 years used contraceptives. Most women relied on the pill (about 36%), followed by the IUD (16%). 7% of women were sterilized. About 5% used condoms, and 6% used abstinence or withdrawal. 31% reported not using contraceptives, of whom 3% were sterile. 4% were infertile. 4% were pregnant. 4% desired pregnancy, and 11% had no ongoing sexual relationship. 5% were determined to be at risk for unintended pregnancy. About 83% of women reported ever use of the pill, and 58% had ever used condoms. Typical patterns of use during the 1980s include 10 years of pill use followed by IUD use. Contraceptive behavior only differed among single men and women not in a union. Some men and women reported multiple method use, especially pills and condoms. During 1988-94, pill use increased, IUD use decreased, and condom use increased. Condom use was higher among singles, among the well educated, and in large cities. During 1978-94, natural method use and sterilization declined. Women tended to identify condom use with pregnancy prevention. Men tended to include STD/AIDS prevention. Contraceptive use at 1st intercourse increased over time. Even though contraceptive use increased, the number of induced abortions remained constant, suggesting lower use-effectiveness.

  14. Contraception for women with diabetes: an update.

    PubMed

    Skouby, S O; Mølsted-Pedersen, L; Petersen, K R

    1991-06-01

    Today several effective contraceptive methods are available for women with IDDM. Contraceptive guidance as part of the pre-pregnancy counselling needs to be more widely implemented by general practitioners and in non-specialized obstetrical and gynaecological departments. Women with diabetes are generally well motivated, and thus the barrier methods may prove both acceptable and reliable contraceptive agents for some of these women. When, however, a high risk of user failure can be predicted, the IUD or hormonal contraception may be the only reversible alternative. According to our findings, IUDs can be recommended without reservation to women with IDDM. In women with previous GDM it seems that low dose oral contraceptive compounds may be administered without running the risk of inducing glucose intolerance, but long-term results are still unavailable. Natural oestrogens may be administered in combination with a progestogen for a limited period as an efficient and acceptable mode of contraception in women with IDDM without any concomitant adverse effects on diabetic control. From our investigations it also appears that short-term administration of combined low dose OCs containing the traditional progestogens (e.g. norethisterone or levonorgestrel) or the new gonane progestogens (e.g. gestodene) does not alter glycaemic control in women with IDDM. Similarly, these compounds do not cause any significant changes in lipid/lipoprotein levels during short-term treatment, although the intake of monophasic ethinyloestradiol/norethisterone preparations may result in higher triglyceride levels and tends to increase lipid levels more than triphasic ethinyloestradiol/levonorgestrel compounds. The results from our clinic have shown that OCs can be safely recommended at pre-conception counselling so that women with diabetes can obtain both optimal glycaemic control and efficient spacing of their pregnancies.

  15. Contraception, punishment and women who use drugs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In light of the recent debate on the use of financial incentives to promote long-acting contraception and sterilisation among women who use illicit drugs we discuss attitudes to contraception, pregnancy and parenting among Australian women who inject drugs. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 90 women of reproductive age about contraceptive use, preferences, reproductive histories, attitudes to and experiences of parenting. All women were either currently, or had previously injected drugs. The in-depth, semi-structured interviews were compared and contrasted for themes relating to drug use, contraception, pregnancy and parenting. Results Participants aspired to control their fertility, expressed individual contraceptive preferences and concerns for their children (both born and unborn). Most had tried a number of contraceptive methods interspersed by periods of non-use related to experiences of side-effects, being single or abstinent, believing that they were infertile and trying to conceive. Attitudes varied from woman to woman and in the same individual over their life course. Some believed that they were not likely to be capable, but most aspired to be successful mothers. Conclusions Women’s drug use should not automatically be associated with an inability to make informed health care choices or to care for children. Evidence suggests that women who use drugs do not need to be paid to limit or end their fertility. Rather, programs that aim to reduce barriers to obtaining free, non-discriminating reproductive advice and parenting assistance would better utilise women’s agency to improve their own reproductive health. PMID:24405890

  16. Factors affecting contraceptive use in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, N; Ringheim, K

    1996-01-01

    This study postulates that contraceptive use in Pakistan is affected by the usual demographic factors as well as husband-wife communication, female autonomy, son preference, religious beliefs, and family planning service supply. Analysis is based on data obtained from the Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey of 1990-91. Findings indicate that 74% of women never talked in the past year with their husbands about family planning. Almost 60% believed that family size was "up to God." About 47% knew where to obtain contraception; only 20.4% had easy access to a source of supplies. Current use was 14% and ever use was 22.4%. Analysis is based on three basic models. Model 1 includes the control variables and son preference. Model 2 includes husband-wife communication, religious attitudes, and female autonomy. Model 3 includes the addition of family planning to model 2 variables. Urban residence increases the odds of contraceptive use considerably only in Model 1. The influence of urban residence in the other models is reduced. Husband's education is significant only in Models 1 and 2 and insignificant in Model 3 when the family planning variable is included. Increased women's age is also insignificant in Model 3. Of the supply factors in Model 3, knowledge of a source and easy access to a source were highly significant, while mass media exposure was not important. Knowledge of a source was the most important predictor. Model 3 explained 90% of use. Among urban women, lack of husband-wife communication and fatalistic beliefs reduce the log-odds of contraceptive use. For rural women, age and women's secondary education were key predictors. Findings confirm that demographic and socio-cultural factors affect contraceptive use in Pakistan. All the theorized variables exerted a strong influence on contraceptive use, which can be counteracted by improved supply and service strategies.

  17. [The women and the right to contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Charchafche, Helena; Nilsson, Peter M

    2007-01-01

    During the first decades of the 20th century, many Swedish women were severely injured or died in complications following illegal abortions. Since legal abortion was forbidden, contraceptives were the only way to avoid pregnancy. But in the year 1910, a new Swedish law "Preventivlagen" prohibited any kind of advertising och public information considering contraceptives. They could still be sold in pharmacies or special medical stores, but it was no longer allowed to speak publicly about contraceptives in a leading manner. The punishment for disobeying was prison or fines. Some physicians and people involved in women liberation, public health and/or public education, claimed that the law brought negative medical, social and economic consequences, while others opposed the law being too soft. The law made the more than 100 years old question about contraceptives or not, a part of the medical, political and social agenda for the society. Some argument against contraceptives was concerned about the decreasing nativity rate--more use of contraceptives could make an even worse situation. Another reason was the fear of an increasing promiscuity if the contraceptives were more available. Still, many physicians and womens liberators did not se this as any big and important problems. They were more concerned about the women's health and her right to give birth to children at the time she wanted. Women had their right to be in charge of their lives, and should no longer be seen as victims of their biological nature. The right to contraceptives was not the only topic to be discussed during the late 19th century and the first decades of the 20th century. Another central right to be claimed, was the possibility for people, especially young people, to be educated in sexual questions. Many women and also women physicians fought for young peoples right to this information. The law "Preventivlagen" was abolished in 1938. After that, women hade their legal right to choose for

  18. Postcoital contraception: a delicate political issue.

    PubMed

    1984-04-01

    The controversy over government approvial of postcoital contraception in the US involves 1 basic question: will the federal government ever approve a method of contraception that some people consider an abortifacient, while others see it as a means of minimizing abortion. Although the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved postcoital contraceptive methods in the US, physicians have used morning after contraception for years, particularly in the treatment of rape victims. The FDA does not prohibit using a drug for purposes that are reflected in approved labeling. Problems have surfaced when clinicians treat patients in public family planning programs where state and federal funds are involved. Robert A. Hatcher, M.D., director of Grady Memorial Hospital's family planning program in Atlanta, maintains that postcoital contraceptives recruit into the medical system women who "otherwise might not seek help." Some clinicians believe that providing teenagers with postcoital contraceptives could lead to their initiation of ongoing contraceptive use. In a study of 125 rape victims treated with the Ovral morning after regimen, Hatcher et al. found that 97% of the women successfully completed the treatment. All victims began treatment within 24 hours after exposure. Among the study group, 56 women reported a prior pregnancy. Consequently, the proven fertility rate was 44.8%. 15 women experienced midcycle exposure, had proven fertility, and had positive sperm isolates. Study results showed that 7 women experienced pregnancies during the follow-up period. Researchers concluded that 2 of these women had existing intrauterine pregnancies at the time of exposure; 2 women did not complete the treatment protocol; and 1 woman believed she became pregnant by her regular partner after the assault. 16% of the study participants experienced side effects after the Ovral protocol. To determine if morning after pills could decrease the need for abortions, Hatcher et al

  19. Social marketing of contraceptives in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Schellstede, W P; Ciszewski, R L

    1984-01-01

    Since 1975 there has been a family planning program operating in Bangladesh which advertises and commercially distributes contraceptive products in both rural and urban areas throughout the country. The program, known as the Social Marketing Project (SMP) and managed by Population Services International (PSI), now serves almost 1 million acceptors per month at an annual cost per couple of less than US$6.50, including the cost of donated contraceptives. This paper looks at the evolution of the project and its growth through the years, and addresses some primary concerns of planners of social marketing programs.

  20. Clinical pharmacokinetics of contraceptive steroids. An update.

    PubMed

    Shenfield, G M; Griffin, J M

    1991-01-01

    The present article should be read in conjunction with the original review published in the Journal in 1983. There is no new information of major significance about the pharmacokinetics of levonorgestrel, norethisterone (norethindrone) or ethinylestradiol, although it has been shown that the concentrations of these hormones secreted in breast milk are small and mothers taking combined oral contraceptive steroids may breast-feed safely. Both levonorgestrel and ethinylestradiol can be successfully administered from appropriate vaginal formulations, but no clear advantages over oral administration have been demonstrated. Several new progestogens have been investigated. Desogestrel is a prodrug for its active metabolite 3-keto-desogestrel, gestodene is itself an active progestogen and norgestimate is a prodrug acting by conversion to norgestrel and its metabolites. All 3 compounds have good bioavailability with wide intersubject variation. The newer progestogens, like norethisterone and levonorgestrel, are bound to sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). This causes their plasma concentrations to increase with time, since SHBG is induced by ethinylestradiol even in doses of 30 micrograms daily. The binding capacity and affinity of SHBG do not increase in direct proportion to its concentration. Further drug interactions with oral contraceptive steroids have been described. Contraceptive steroids may inhibit hepatic microsomal enzyme metabolism and increase the plasma concentration and effect of some tricyclic antidepressants, the hydroxylated benzodiazepines, some beta-blocking drugs, methylxanthines, prednisolone and cyclosporin. There are no significant effects on vitamins. Oral contraceptive steroids induce glucuronidation and hence decrease plasma concentrations of some benzodiazepines, clofibric acid, paracetamol (acetaminophen) and possibly morphine. The plasma concentration of ethinylestradiol may be increased by competitive sulphation with paracetamol. Plasma

  1. Hormonal contraceptives and travel to high altitude.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Linda E

    2015-03-01

    Women frequently ask about the safety and efficacy of using hormonal contraception (HC), either oral contraceptive pills (OC) or other forms, when traveling to high altitude locales. What are the risks and benefits of using HC at high altitude? Does HC affect acclimatization, exercise performance, or occurrence of acute mountain sickness? This article reviews current data regarding the risks and benefits of HC at high altitude, both demonstrated and theoretical, with the aim of helping health care providers to advise women traveling above 2500 meters. Most healthy women can safely use HC when traveling to high altitude, but should be aware of the potential risks and inconveniences.

  2. Low Health System Performance, Indigenous Status and Antivenom Underdosage Correlate with Spider Envenoming Severity in the Remote Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio, Vanderson Souza; Gomes, André Alexandre; Silva, Iran Mendonça; Sachett, Jacqueline; Ferreira, Luiz Carlos Lima; Oliveira, Sâmella; Sabidò, Meritxell; Chalkidis, Hipócrates; Barbosa Guerra, Maria Graças Vale; Salinas, Jorge Luis; Wen, Fan Hui; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    .001)] were independently associated with a risk of severity. Living in a municipality located >300 km away from the state capital Manaus [OR = 1.53 (95%CI = 1.15–2.02; p = 0.003)] and living in a municipality with a MHSPI correlations shown here, envenomings occurring in remote rural areas, Indigenous status and living in a municipality located >300 km away from the state capital Manaus could be contributing factors to higher severity of spider envenomings in this area, as well as to antivenom underdosage. PMID:27227455

  3. Correlation of clinicopathological outcomes with changes in IHC4 status after NACT in locally advanced breast cancers: do pre-NACT ER/PR status act as better prognosticators?

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sanjoy; Saha, Animesh; Arun, Indu; Nayak, Sonali Susmita; Sinha, Subir; Agrawal, Sanjit; Parihar, Mayur; Ahmed, Rosina

    2015-01-01

    Background Following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) for breast cancer, changes in estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), HER2 status, and Ki-67 index (IHC4 status) and its correlation with pathological complete response (pCR) or relapse-free survival (RFS) rates could lead to better understanding of tumor management. Patients and methods Pre- and post-NACT IHC4 status and its changes were analyzed in 156 patients with breast cancer. Associations between pCR, RFS rates to IHC4 status pre- and post-NACT were investigated. Results pCR was found in 25.3% patients. Both ER and PR positive tumors had the lowest (14.3%) pCR compared to ER and PR negative (29%) or either ER-/PR-positive (38.6%) tumors. PR positivity was significantly associated with less likelihood of pCR (15% versus 34%). The pCR rate was low for luminal A subtype (13.68%) compared to 24.36%, 26.31%, and 33.33% for luminal B, HER2-enriched, and triple-negative subtypes, respectively. There was significant reduction in ER expression and Ki-67 index post-NACT. RFS of patients in whom the hormonal status changed from positive to negative was better compared to those of patients in whom the hormonal status changed from negative to positive. Conclusion Although changes in IHC4 occurred post-NACT, pre-NACT hazard ratio status prognosticated RFS better. pCR and RFS rates were lower in PR-positive tumors. PMID:26677343

  4. Sexual behaviour, contraceptive knowledge and use among female undergraduates’ students of Muhimbili and Dar es Salaam Universities, Tanzania: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    54.6% have had induced abortion. Marital status, age at first sex, ever had sex, ever been pregnant and unwanted pregnancies were associated with use of contraception. Conclusions Most of the student’s had knowledge of contraception. However, rate of contraception use is still low. Majority of the respondent were sexually active, with the majority started sexual activity at young age. This needs advocacy for adolescence reproductive health education to promote the use of the available contraceptive services amongst university students. PMID:25099502

  5. To use or not to use a condom: A prospective cohort study comparing contraceptive practices among HIV-infected and HIV-negative youth in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Unwanted pregnancy and HIV infection are issues of significant concern to young people. Limited data exists on contraceptive decision-making and practices among HIV-infected and HIV-negative young people in low resource settings with generalized HIV epidemics. Methods From July 2007 until April 2009, we recruited, and followed up over a one year period, a cohort of 501 HIV-negative and 276 HIV-infected young women and men aged 15-24 years residing in Kampala and Wakiso districts. We compared contraceptive use among HIV-infected and HIV-negative young people and assessed factors associated with contraceptive decision-making and use, using multivariate logistic regression modelling to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Contraceptive use among sexually active HIV-infected young people was 34% while it was 59% among the HIV-negative group. The condom was the most frequently used method of contraception. Only 24% of the HIV-infected used condoms consistently compared to 38% among the negative group OR 0.56 (95% CI 0.38, 0.82). HIV-infected young people were more likely to discuss safe sex behaviour with health workers OR 1.70 (95% CI 1.13, 2.57), though its effect on fertility decision-making was not significant. Throughout the year's follow-up, only 24% among the HIV-negative and 18% among the HIV-infected continued to use contraception while 12% and 28% among the HIV-negative and infected respectively did not use contraception at all. At multivariate analysis, the HIV-infected young people were less likely to maintain contraceptive use. Other factors independently associated with sustained contraceptive use were age of the respondent, marital status and being a male. Conversely, HIV-infected young people were less likely to initiate use of contraception. Being married or in a relationship was associated with higher odds of initiating contraceptive use. Conclusion Compared to the HIV-negative group, sexually active HIV

  6. Vietnam seeks help expanding voluntary surgical contraception.

    PubMed

    Piet-pelon, N J; Sukop, S

    1992-07-01

    Recent surveys by the Vietnamese Ministry of Health suggest that 60% of married women desire no more children. Yet only 2% of currently married women and less than 1/2 of 1% of their partners use sterilization. Underscoring the high unmet need for effective family planning, over 1 million abortions (legal in Vietnam for the past 20 years) are performed annually. This rate corresponds to 1 abortion for every live birth. The Ministry of Health has recently welcomed a variety of organizations, including AVSC, whose assistance can help expand the country's family planning programs. Sorely lacking in supplies, equipment, and trained personnel, Vietnam has merited priority status--2nd only to China and India--from the UNFPA, which has committed $36 million over the next 4 years. Other organizations currently working in Vietnam include the Population Council, the Population Crisis Committee, and the International Planned Parenthood Federation. Despite enormous casualties during the war years, and a decrease since the 1970s in average family size from 6 to 4 children, the population of Vietnam has continued to grow rapidly, far outpacing economic growth. Currently 67 million, the population is expected to reach 80 million by the year 2000. The average Vietnamese annual income is only $195, among the lowest in the world. Doi moi, the process of economic reform begun in 1986, coupled with new government incentives for families who have no more than 2 children, is changing the face of family planning in Vietnam. Newly opened pharmacies sell imported birth control pills and condoms (to those who can afford them), while government hospitals and health clinics provide mainly IUDs, in addition to limited supplies of pills and condoms. Throughout the country, some 8000 community-level health centers are staffed by nurse-midwives trained in family planning. Voluntary sterilization is available at the district, provincial, and national hospitals. All married women may obtain family

  7. A study of contraception as related to unwanted pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Grauer, H.

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of 150 women requesting therapeutic abortion. Mechanical failure of the contraceptive method used accounted for unwanted pregnancy in 89 (59%) women. In the remainder no method of contraception was used by either partner. Among women requesting abortion, failure to use contraceptives was commoner in the younger and unmarried than in older and married women. The data obtained were analyzed in an attempt to explain the failure and avoidance of contraception. Suggestions are made as to how to discourage the use of abortion as a method of contraception. PMID:4638848

  8. Addressing gaps in the contraceptive method mix: methods in development.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Kavita; Callahan, Rebecca; Dorflinger, Laneta

    2015-11-01

    Despite the availability of a variety of contraceptive methods, millions of women still have an unmet need for contraceptive choices. Short-acting methods are plagued by issues with adherence, leading to imperfect or inconsistent use and subsequent unintended pregnancy. Long-acting contraceptive methods such as intrauterine devices and contraceptive implants, while providing highly effective and safe contraception, do not meet the needs of all women, often due to cost, access or acceptability issues. Several new methods are in various stages of development and are designed to address the shortcomings of current methods. Providers should be aware of these future options and how they might better meet women's needs.

  9. Segmented corpus callosum diffusivity correlates with the Expanded Disability Status Scale score in the early stages of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros Rimkus, Carolina; de Faria Junqueira, Thiago; Callegaro, Dagoberto; Otaduy, Maria Concepción García; da Costa Leite, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to characterize the microscopic damage to the corpus callosum in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) with diffusion tensor imaging and to investigate the correlation of this damage with disability. The diffusion tensor imaging parameters of fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity provide information about the integrity of cell membranes, offering two more specific indices, namely the axial and radial diffusivities, which are useful for discriminating axon loss from demyelination. METHOD: Brain magnetic resonance imaging exams of 30 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were acquired in a 3T scanner. The axial diffusivities, radial diffusivities, fractional anisotropy, and mean diffusivity of five segments of the corpus callosum, correlated to the Expanded Disability Status Scale score, were obtained. RESULTS: All corpus callosum segments showed increased radial diffusivities and mean diffusivity, as well as decreased fractional anisotropy, in the relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis group. The axial diffusivity was increased in the posterior midbody and splenium. The Expanded Disability Status Scale scores correlated more strongly with axial diffusivities and mean diffusivity, with an isolated correlation with radial diffusivities in the posterior midbody of the corpus callosum. There was no significant correlation with lesion loads. CONCLUSION: Neurological dysfunction in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis can be influenced by commissural disconnection, and the diffusion indices of diffusion tensor imaging are potential biomarkers of disability that can be assessed during follow-up. PMID:24037007

  10. [Health risks of oral contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Meier, Christoph R

    2011-06-01

    Oral contraceptives (OC) are either composed of a combination of an estrogen derivative (usually ethinly estradiol) and a progestogen, or they contain a progestogen only. OC are characterized by a high effectiveness and have a low failure rate if taken correctly. Most women tolerate OC relatively well, but adverse effects do occur which are driven by the estrogen dose as well as by the type of progestogen. The most frequently reported adverse effects are nausea or vomiting, breast tenderness, headache or inbalanced mood, but these unwanted side effects are often transient. The fear of weight gain of many OC users is not necessarily supported by data from studies which report relatively little differences in body mass index on average during OC use. Nevertheless, substantial weight gain can occur in individual women. The widely discussed fear of breast cancer is also not justified, and the risk of developing ovarian or endometrial cancer is reduced for women who use OC on a regular basis. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the adverse effect with the greatest potential for serious harm if pulmonary embolism develops. This rare, but potentially dangerous adverse effect of OC has been discussed emotionally for many years and keeps attracting a lot of public interest. VTE is rare in young women, but the VTE risk is increased two- to sixfold for OC users as compared to non-users. The VTE risk increases with increasing estrogen dose, is highest in the first year of use, and is higher for OC from the third generation (containing desogestrel, gestodene or norgestimate) than for OC from the second generation (containing levonorgestrel) or than for the progestogen-only pill. According to most studies, OC containing the progestogens drospirenone or cyproterone acetate are similar with regard to VTE risks than OC from the third generation. Individual genetic susceptibility affecting the clotting system plays a major role in the risk of developing VTE in combination with OC, and

  11. Hormonal contraceptives and venous thromboembolism: Are inflammatory bowel disease patients at increased risk? A retrospective study on a prospective database.

    PubMed

    Pellino, Gianluca; Sciaudone, Guido; Caprio, Francesca; Candilio, Giuseppe; De Fatico, G Serena; Reginelli, Alfonso; Canonico, Silvestro; Selvaggi, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies showed an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients receiving oral hormonal contraceptives. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) often affect young patients and represent a pro-coagulant condition. This could result from active inflammation, but a potential role for genetic and molecular factors has been suggested. Hormonal contraceptives have also been associated with increased risk of VTE and the risk may be greater in IBD patients that already are in a pro-coagulant status, but no definitive data are available in this population. The purpose of our study was to seek for differences of the risk of VTE in IBD patients receiving hormonal contraceptives compared with controls. This is a retrospective study. We interrogated a prospectively maintained database of IBD patients observed at our outpatient clinic between 2000 and 2014. All female patients managed conservatively, with no active disease, who were taking oral hormone contraceptives in the study period, were included. Patients observed for other-than-IBD conditions at our Unit and at the Unit of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, receiving contraceptives, served as controls (ratio 1:2). Patients with cancer, those receiving hormonal therapy, and those with known genetic predisposition to VTE were excluded. We included 146 six IBD patients and 290 controls. One patient in each group developed VTE. Overall, the incidence of VTE associated with oral contraceptives was 0.5%. IBD was associated with increased risk of VTE (OR 1.9, 95% CI 0.12-32.12, p > 0.99). Active smokers since 10 years (17.2%) had higher risks of VTE (OR 8.6, 95% CI 1.16-19.25, p = 0.03). Our data show that patients with IBD in remission are not at higher risk of VTE due to oral oestrogen-containing contraceptives compared with non-IBD controls. Smokers are at increased risk, irrespective of the baseline disease.

  12. [Correlation of size of the primary tumor and axillary node status with the p53 tumor suppressor gene in carcinoma of the breast].

    PubMed

    Topić, Brano; Stanković, N; Savjak, D; Grbić, S

    2002-01-01

    Correlation of standard pathomorphological prognostic parameters, primary tumor size and axillary nodal status with new prognostic factor in breast carcinoma: tumor suppressor gene p53 was analyzed. The studied sample included 65 women who underwent surgery for breast carcinoma at the Surgical Clinic of Clinical Center Banja Luka, from January 1st 1997 till January 1st 1999. Statistical data analysis was performed and correlation of prognostic factors was determined. The majority of authors in this field agree that the primary tumor size and axillary nodal status are the two most important prognostic factors. These factors are the best predictors of prognosis and survival of women who had the tumor and were operated on. Tumor markers were immunohistochemically determined in the last ten years and, according to the majority of authors, are still considered the additional or relative prognostic factors in breast carcinoma. Their prognostic value and significance increase almost daily. Most frequently determined tumor markers are bcl-2, pS2, Ki-67 and p53. There was a positive, directly proportional relationship between primary tumor size and tumor suppressor gene p53, but there was no positive correlation between the axillary nodal status and tumor suppressor gene p53. Significance of determination of new tumor markers as the prognostic factors was emphasized. These markers represent a powerful tool in the early detection and prevention of breast carcinoma.

  13. Young adults' contraceptive practices: an investigation of influences.

    PubMed

    Lowe, C S; Radius, S M

    1987-01-01

    This study investigated young adults' contraceptive behaviors and attitudes through application of a comprehensive, theoretical framework. Specifically, a social-psychological approach to understanding preventive behaviors (e.g., contraceptive practices), was developed, incorporating the Health Belief Model and other factors, which offered a means for evaluating the extent to which contraceptive behaviors were influenced by individual and group characteristics. The study group consisted of 283 unmarried students at several schools who were, on average, 19 years of age. Results suggested that effective contraceptive behavior associated most strongly with respondents' perceiving relatively few barriers to their use of contraception, their maintenance of extensive interpersonal skills, and their regarding peer norms as consistent with effective contraceptive behavior. Findings also underlined a need for continuing education about sexuality and contraception. Dangerous misinformation prevailed regarding respondents' knowledge of areas that include anatomy, physiology, and appropriate use of effective contraceptive methods. Finally, results implied a need to consider broad behavioral, social, and interpersonal issues as they relate to young adults' effective contraceptive behavior. Future studies of contraceptive risk taking are encouraged to examine both individual and social factors affecting sexual and contraceptive practices if unplanned pregnancy is to be minimized, if not eliminated.

  14. New strategies for providing hormonal contraception in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Townsend, John W; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Williams, Katherine; Askew, Ian; Brill, Klaus

    2011-05-01

    Even with progress in increasing access to effective contraception over the past decades, and the growing range of contraceptive methods available on the market, women in developing countries continue to report an unmet need for family planning. This constraint continues to challenge reproductive health policies and programs, while the momentum of population growth and the young age structure in developing countries leads to larger numbers of potential contraceptive users and increasing global demand in contraceptive markets. Of late, there is a renewed focus on increasing access to long-acting hormonal methods to effectively meet this need, establishing and effectively implementing new service delivery strategies. A number of processes have profoundly affected the procurement and use of hormonal contraceptive methods in developing countries: a supportive policy environment, evidence-based practices and an increasing diversity of delivery strategies play a significant part in increasing number of contraceptive users and the demand for hormonal contraception.

  15. New approaches to male non-hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Nya-Ngatchou, Jean-Jacques; Amory, John K

    2013-03-01

    A non-hormonal male contraceptive is a contraceptive that does not involve the administration of hormones or hormone blockers. This review will focus on the use of lonidamine derivatives and inhibitors of retinoic acid biosynthesis and function as approaches to male non-hormonal contraception. Two current lonidamine derivatives, adjudin and H2-gamendazole, are in development as male contraceptives. These potent anti-spermatogenic compounds impair the integrity of the apical ectoplasmic specialization, resulting in premature spermiation and infertility. Another approach to male contraceptive development is the inhibition of retinoic acid in the testes, as retinoic acid signaling is necessary for spermatogenesis. The administration of the retinoic acid receptor antagonist BMS-189453 reversibly inhibits spermatogenesis in mice. Similarly, oral dosing of WIN 18,446, which inhibits testicular retinoic acid biosynthesis, effectively contracepts rabbits. Hopefully, one of these approaches to non-hormonal male contraception will prove to be safe and effective in future clinical trials.

  16. The male role in contraception: implications for health education.

    PubMed

    Chng, C L

    1983-03-01

    Today most contraceptive efforts are focused on the female. The resultant diminished male role may have inadvertently undermined the many societal efforts at birth control. Many men, young and old, still perceive contraception as primarily a woman's responsibility, for after all, she suffers most directly from contraceptive failure. This attitude is unfortunate. Since decisions about pregnancy affect both partners, both should share the contraceptive burden equitably. More specifically, the two-fold purpose of the paper is: (1) to examine the available male contraceptives; and (2) to draw implications of the changing male role in contraception for health professionals in the school and community. The paper argues that while the involvement of men in contraception will not automatically solve the problem of unwanted pregnancy among the young, it can certainly make a difference--an important difference.

  17. Combined oral contraceptives: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Kiley, Jessica; Hammond, Cassing

    2007-12-01

    Millions of women use birth control pills for contraceptive and noncontraceptive reasons. Although there have been reports of rare adverse events, birth control pills do offer well-documented health benefits, including a decrease in the risk of ovarian and endometrial carcinoma. In addition, manufacturers continue to modify birth control pills to reduce side effects and medical risks.

  18. [The relation between trichomoniasis and contraceptive methods].

    PubMed

    Sönmez Tamer, Gülden; Keçeli Ozcan, Sema; Yücesoy, Gülseren; Gacar, Gülçin

    2009-01-01

    Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by Trichomonas vaginalis (T. vaginalis) infecting the urogenital system. In this study, the relation between different contraceptive methods used and T. vaginalis infection was investigated. A total of 253 women (aged from 20-48 years) with abnormal vaginal discharges who applied to the Obstetrics and Gynecology outpatient clinic were enrolled in the study. T. vaginalis was diagnosed by microscopic examination of direct and Giemsa stained preparations. In addition, contraceptive methods, such as an intrauterine device (IUD), coitus interruptus (CI), oral contraceptive (OC), condoms, and injection that had been used, were recorded in the patients' questionnaire forms. Of the 253 women, 207 were using one of the contraceptive methods and a total of 22 (8.69%) trichomoniasis cases were observed. T. vaginalis was detected in 13 of 114 IUD users (14.70%), 5 of 34 CI (11.40%) cases, 3 of 31 (9.67%) condom users, 1 of 46 (2.17%) nonusers. There was no relation between women using the method of OC and T. vaginalis infection. T. vaginalis is the cause of vulvovaginitis and women with abnormal vaginal discharges should be investigated for possible trichomoniasis. In this study, detection of a higher rate of T. vaginalis infection in IUD users means that IUD usage might increase the risk of Trichomonas infection.

  19. Disabled have many needs for contraception.

    PubMed

    Best, K

    1999-01-01

    Family planning practitioners tend to be unaware of the reproductive health needs of disabled people. In many developing countries, disabled women are not taken for routine gynecologic examinations because it is assumed they will not have children. Even in developed countries, women with paralysis, impaired motor function, and other obvious physical disabilities are rarely offered counseling on sexuality or contraception. With proper education and counseling, disabled men and women may finally be in a position to make a truly informed decision about their reproductive lives. The selection of a contraceptive method for a disabled woman depends on consideration of factors such as the quality of circulation, abnormal clotting, the degree of physical sensation, manual dexterity, possible interactions with other medications, the effect of contraceptives on the disease process, problems with menstrual hygiene, and depression. For example, oral contraceptives are contraindicated in women with impaired circulation, a history of cerebrovascular accident, and immobility of the extremities. Methods than increase menstrual bleeding (e.g., copper IUDs) can cause hygiene problems for women with compromised manual dexterity. Although use of a barrier method may be difficult for women with poor coordination or upper-extremity disabilities, sexually transmitted disease (STD) prevention is especially important for women with pelvic sensory impairments that could allow STD symptoms to go unrecognized. Also in need of assessment in patients with physical disabilities are the impact of the disability on sexual expression and the possibility that sexual abuse is occurring.

  20. The conscientious objection: debate on emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    Montanari Vergallo, G; Zaami, S; Di Luca, N M; Marinelli, E

    2017-01-01

    The authors discuss the emergency contraception (EC) topic, assessing scientific and ethical aspects. The almost totality of the studies carried out tends to report on the use of drugs as an emergency measure to prevent pregnancy. However, it is not yet completely excluded that emergency contraceptives can induce medical abortion. The debate on side effects of EC continues to be a highly emotional and controversial issue both for advocates who believe they will lower considerably the number of unintended pregnancies and abortions, and for opponents who believe that using emergency contraception amounts to an abortion. This latter hypothesis highlights the conflicting aspect of the conscientious objection to abortion of physicians and pharmacists. This research work is aimed at investigating the emergency contraception issue, paying particular attention to the medico-legal and regulatory aspects of this subject. Particularly, the authors focus on the conscientious objection in order to assess, if any, legal protection for physicians and pharmacists who claim a right to conscientious objection. Inappropriate use of EC could be resolved through a registry of user. This registry, of course, would not have the intention of persecution, but would only serve to detect possible cases of subjugation, exploitation and harassment.

  1. [Contraceptives, HIV, and other sexually transmitted diseases].

    PubMed

    Vandale-Toney, S; Conde-González, C J

    1995-01-01

    The large majority of women who acquire Human Immuno-Deficiency Virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are in their childbearing years and are current or potential users of contraceptive methods. Certain STDs augment women's risk for HIV due to damage which these diseases produce in the integrity of the epithelial lining of the vagina and the vulva. There also exists evidence that some contraceptive methods, such as the intrauterine device and certain hormonal products, may increase the risk of HIV and other STDs. Condoms and spermicides offer good levels of protection against these diseases, but are not highly effective contraceptives. The interrelations among these risks are important and create a great problem for women's reproductive health. Moreover, the high vulnerability of the female population for these diseases is also related to a variety of social factors which are referred to as gender relations (power of females in society relative to that of females). Among the gender-related inequalities which affect women are their lack of power to successfully control many aspects of sexual relations. Another problem has to do with the fact that there are no highly reliable female controlled methods for preventing infection by HIV and other STDs. Improvement in the reproductive health care of women depends on the development of new disease prevention products and structural changes in the delivery of care, as well as continued research efforts on the interrelations among contraceptive methods, HIV and other STD.

  2. An Oral Contraceptive Drug Interaction Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradstreet, Thomas E.; Panebianco, Deborah L.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on a two treatment, two period, two treatment sequence crossover drug interaction study of a new drug and a standard oral contraceptive therapy. Both normal theory and distribution-free statistical analyses are provided along with a notable amount of graphical insight into the dataset. For one of the variables, the decision on…

  3. Parental Involvement and Young Women's Contraceptive Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisco, Michelle L.

    2005-01-01

    Young adult women in the United States tend to delay family formation, pursue higher education and professional jobs, and become sexually active before marriage. Using effective contraception is the best way to ensure that nonmarital parenthood does not disrupt educational and career plans. Because parental involvement in education shapes…

  4. Contraception and Women with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Background: Contraception is widely prescribed to women with intellectual disabilities, yet little is known about what the women think and feel about this. One of the aims of the study was to explore what women understood and to what extent they were able to exercise choice and control. Method: Twenty-three women with mild and moderate…

  5. [Emergency oral contraception policy: the Peruvian experience].

    PubMed

    Pretell-Zárate, Eduardo A

    2013-07-01

    Emergency oral contraception is part of the sexual and reproductive rights of women. In 2001, this health policy was incorporated into the Rules of the National Family Planning Program of the Ministry of Health, primarily to prevent unwanted pregnancy and its serious consequences, induced abortion and the high associated maternal mortality rate, which are major public health problems. Scientific research has confirmed that the main mechanism of action of levonorgestrel, component of emergency oral contraception (EOC) is to inhibit or delay ovulation, preventing fertilization of the egg; additionally, it increases the thickening of the cervical mucus, making the sperm migration more difficult. No study has found endometrial abnormalities that may interfere with the implantation of the fertilized egg or embryo development of an implanted egg. However, despite the support of medical science and legal backing, the EOC is available only to users with economic resources, but its use has not been fully implemented in public sector services, due to obstacles created by groups opposed to contraception under claim of an alleged abortive effect that has already been ruled out scientifically. This article describes the administrative experience and legal confrontations between groups of power that prevent the proper implementation of an emergency contraception policy in Peru.

  6. Combined oral contraceptives: acceptability and effective use.

    PubMed

    Kubba, A; Guillebaud, J

    1993-01-01

    With over 60 million users of 'the pill' worldwide, safety and efficacy remain the two most relevant issues to both the consumer and the research scientist. Safety of combined oral contraception (COC) has advanced appreciably. Lessons learned from cohort and case-control studies have been applied to the practical management of oral contraception use, based on screening, selection and regular monitoring of users. Most health risks of COCs appear to be dependent on the dose and potency (or biological impact) of the constituent steroids. While many of the non-contraceptive benefits of COCs are maintained when modern low dose preparations are used, most, if not all, of the adverse effects have been reduced progressively. Moreover the range of modern hormonal contraceptives has widened with the introduction of a new generation of 'selective' progestogens (Desogestrel, Norgestimate and Gestodene), which have minimal androgenicity. User failure of COCs is still high in many countries. The cause is a combination of poor compliance and anxiety about perceived adverse effects. Compliance can be enhanced by improving the quality of instruction in pill use. Fears of adverse effects of COCs may be allayed through education of users and providers, and sympathetic management of side effects.

  7. Feminine Stereotype and the Use of Contraceptives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angell, Myra L.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    A sex-role stereotype questionnaire was administered to 67 females who were either (a) consistent users of contraceptives, (b) inconsistent users, (c) nonusers, or (d) virgins. No differences were found between the four groups for the feminine items; however, significant differences were obtained for the masculine items. (Author)

  8. The future of steroids in female contraception.

    PubMed

    Djerassi, C

    1987-11-15

    Given the lack of innovative advances in contraceptive research in past decades, steroid ovulation inhibitors are likely to play an even more significant role in female contraception by the year 2000. In developed countries in particular, oral contraceptive (OC) use is likely to increase in the next 15 years. In the US, where OC use has fallen from a high of 10 million users to the current level of 8 million acceptors, the pill's popularity is expected to rise again. This is due to 4 factors: 1) the discovery, through recent epidemiologic studies, of numerous noncontraceptive benefits of OC use that outweigh any deleterious effects; 2) the product litigation phenomenon, which has resulted in the withdrawal of IUDs from the US market, is not affecting the pharmaceutical companies that have an important stake in the OC market; 3) reductions in the daily dosage of the progestational and estrogenic components of OCs have led to less concern about possible longterm side effects; and 4) a political climate favoring restrictions on abortion is likely to increase reliance on highly effective methods of fertility control. In developing countries, long-acting (up to 5 years) subdermal silastic implants of progestogen-releasing devices are likely to find increasing acceptance. The only fundamentally new development in contraceptive technology that has any chance of being available by the year 2000 is use of sex-hormone-binding protein receptors for postcoital fertility control.

  9. The risks of venous thromboembolic disease among German women using oral contraceptives: a database study.

    PubMed

    Farmer, R D; Todd, J C; Lewis, M A; MacRae, K D; Williams, T J

    1998-02-01

    This study investigated the risk of venous thromboembolic disease (VTE) between second and third generation combined oral contraceptives, using the German MediPlus database of patient records. Women studied included 42 patients between the ages of 18 and 49 years, with a diagnosis of VTE treated with an anticoagulant, who were exposed to an oral contraceptive (OC). Four controls per patient (168), matched by year of birth and exposure to an OC on the even day, were identified. More women were users of second generation than third generation OC, and none were using progestogen-only pills. There was no significant difference between patients and control subjects with respect to the type of OC used on the event day (unadjusted odds ratio for third versus second generation users was 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38-1.57). There was no significant age difference between second and third generation users among patients or control subjects. Between January 1 and the event date, there was no significant difference between the patients and control subjects in terms of the number of oral contraceptive prescriptions, number of consultations for psychotherapeutic complaints, or mixed physical and psychotherapeutic consultations; however, patients did demonstrate significantly more consultations for purely physical complaints compared with control subjects (p < 0.0001). There were no significant consultation differences between patients with pulmonary emboli (n = 6) and other VTE patients (n = 36). No significant differences with respect to VTE risk between users of second and third generation oral contraceptives were found in this study. Consultations (physical) for patients were higher than for control subjects before the VTE event. If consultation rate relates to the general health status of a person, this might indicate that VTE risk is higher among women of poorer health, but that this is not related to the type of progestogen in the oral contraceptive that they use.

  10. [Family planning. Regional differences in contraceptive practice].

    PubMed

    Palma Cabrera, Y; Suarez Morales, J

    1994-01-01

    Great efforts have been made to measure contraceptive prevalence in Mexico and to assess various aspects of differential usage. At present, 63.1% of fertile aged women in union are estimated to use a method. State prevalence rates ranged from 77.2% of couples in Baja California Sub to 46.3% in Oaxaca. In general, northern states and Mexico City had the highest prevalence rates and states in the center and south had the lowest. Results of the 1988 Survey of Determinants of Contraceptive Prevalence permit identification of sociocultural variables related to contraceptive usage. The data show that residents of the northwestern states have a considerably higher educational level and proportion urban than do those of the center or southeast. The southeast lagged the center in indicators of household characteristics and services, income, and infant mortality, and also had a higher rate of female labor force participation. The states of the center had a lower rate of contraceptive usage at 54.8% than did those of the southeast at 56.4%. The rate for the northwest states was 71.8%. Knowledge of contraceptive methods in the northwest and center was nearly universal, but almost one-fourth of rural women in the southeast reported not knowing a method. Reasons for not using a method varied in the three regions. Problems of access, lack of knowledge, and fear of side effects were the principal factors in the southeast. Opposition of the woman or spouse or religious beliefs were the main factors in the center. No significant barriers of culture or access were identified in the northwest. The average ideal family size was around 3.5 children in all three regions. The survey results demonstrate that having children was highly valued in all three regions. Children were more highly valued in the southeast for companionship, aid, and economic contribution; in the center as sources of affective relations; and in the northwest for satisfaction or personal fulfillment of the woman.

  11. [A new contraceptive method: breast feeding].

    PubMed

    Townsend, S

    1993-08-01

    Even though women have known for centuries that breast feeding has a contraceptive effect, family planning agents have only recently promoted it. Family planning specialists at a meeting in Bellagio, Italy, on breast feeding developed directives referred to as the Lactational Amenorrhea Method (LAM). Adherence to these directives assure effective protection against pregnancy until resumption of menstruation, expansion of infant feeding to foods other than breast milk, or until 6 months postpartum. Nipple stimulation during suckling is sufficient to suppress ovulation. Frequent suckling or more intense suckling maintains the contraceptive effect, so the directives insist that mothers exclusively or almost exclusively breast feed their infants. LAM provides 98% effective protection against pregnancy for 6 months if women observe it as directed. After 6 months, they should use another family planning method. Scientists are trying to see whether they can make the directives more simple. They will discuss this possibility at their next international meeting in 1993 or 1994. Research indicates that the most crucial rule is amenorrhea and use of this rule will make LAM more easy to learn and use, thereby increasing its use. It is difficult to motivate hospital and family planning clinic staff to promote LAM. Information and education are needed to support LAM. for example, a project in Honduras is using peer counseling to promote LAM. Family Health International is following 1000 women for 1 year postpartum in Pakistan and the Philippines. This study's 6-month LAM efficacy rate was around 95%. Little research has looked at the cost effectiveness of LAM. Optimally, LAM is a temporary contraceptive method which must be followed immediately by another contraceptive method. Indeed, LAM counseling should often pregnancy. LAM supporters do not intend for LAM to be a substitute for family planning, but want LAM to be another method in the contraceptive method mix.

  12. Divorced women's sexual and contraceptive issues.

    PubMed

    Leslie, N J

    1988-01-01

    This work attempts to answer the question: could divorce create a feeling of alienation in women which causes one to feel vulnerable and detached and thus making sexual decision-making and planning difficult? When a women is married her sexuality is taken for granted because she is expected to have children; however, after a divorce, she must face many of the conflicts she felt as a young single woman. Guilt, planning contraceptive use, and coming to terms with her sexual behavior all present themselves again. 1 factor that must be considered is that contraceptive use is always assumed to be the function of the married women. Very little research has gone into the contraceptive use habits of unmarried women. This is primarily due to the societal assumption that unmarried woman don't have sex. This work contains the clinical observation of the author in which 28% of 459 prenatal patients were interviewed specifically because they were divorced. The conclusion is that divorced women are being neglected by the health care profession and are in great need of contraceptive counseling. This work primarily discusses a study done to expand and examine the conclusions of the clinical research. The study consisted of 101 sexually active, legally divorced, single women between the ages of 18-44 and physiologically capable of becoming pregnant. 53 of these women had experienced post-divorce pregnancies. Each woman was interviewed and given 3 standard tests: the Rosenberg Self-Acceptance Scale, the Snyder's Self-Monitoring Scale and Beckham's Coping Strategies Scale. The conclusion of the author is that divorce and its associated psychological problems may temporarily or permanently affect one's thoughts, feelings, and life course. Sexual and contraceptive use decision-making are both directly both directly affected by these changes. Some divorced women may be experiencing inadequate self-esteem, identity, and self-awareness.

  13. Hormonal contraception does not increase women's HIV acquisition risk in Zambian discordant couples, 1994–2012

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Kristin M.; Kilembe, William; Vwalika, Bellington; Khu, Naw Htee; Brill, Ilene; Chomba, Elwyn; Johnson, Brent A.; Haddad, Lisa; Tichacek, Amanda; Allen, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of hormonal contraceptive methods on risk of HIV acquisition among HIV-negative women cohabiting with HIV-positive male partners. Study design From 1994–2012, HIV discordant couples recruited from a couples’ voluntary HIV counseling and testing center in Lusaka, Zambia were followed longitudinally. HIV-negative partners were tested quarterly. This analysis is restricted to couples in which the man was HIV-positive and the woman was HIV-negative at enrollment and the man was not on antiretroviral treatment. Multivariate Cox models evaluated associations between time-varying contraceptive methods and HIV acquisition among women. Sensitivity analyses explored exposure misclassification and time-varying confounder mediation. Results Among 1393 couples, 252 incident infections occurred in women over 2842 couple-years (8.9 infections per 100 couple-years; 95% CI, 7.8–10.0). Multivariate Cox models indicated that neither injectable [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR)=1.2; 95% CI, 0.8–1.7], oral contraceptive pill (OCP, aHR=1.3; 95% CI, 0.9–1.8), or implant (aHR=1.1; 95% CI, 0.5–2.2) use was significantly associated with HIV acquisition relative to non-hormonal contraception controlling for woman's age, literacy and time-varying measures of genital ulceration/inflammation. This remained true when only looking at the subset of infections acquired from the spouse (82% of infections) and additionally controlling for baseline HIV viral load of the male partner, pregnancy status, and time-varying measures of sperm on a vaginal swab wet prep and self-reported unprotected sex. OCP and injectable users reported more unprotected sex (p<.001), and OCP users were more likely to have sperm on vaginal swab (p=.1) than nonhormonal method users. Conclusions We found no association between hormonal contraception and HIV acquisition risk in women. Condom use and reinforced condom counseling should always be recommended for HIV discordant couples. HIV

  14. Influence of Menstrual Cycle and Oral Contraceptive Phase on Spinal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Ellen; Reese, Maria; Okafor, Ezi; Chun, Danielle; Gagnon, Christine; Nigl, Franz; Dhaher, Yasin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rates of musculoskeletal injury differ substantially between the genders, with females more likely to experience conditions such as anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than males in the same sports. Emerging evidence suggests a significant hormonal contribution. Most research has focused solely on how hormonal fluctuations affect connective tissue, but a direct link between hormonal shifts, ligamentous laxity, and ACL injury has not been borne out. There is also evidence to suggest that sex hormones can modulate the central nervous system, but how this affects neuromuscular control is not well understood. Objective To determine whether changes in sex hormone concentrations would alter spinal excitability, measured across the menstrual and oral contraceptive pill cycle. We hypothesized that spinal excitability would fluctuate across the menstrual cycle (with increased excitability during the periovulatory phase due to peak estradiol concentration), but that there would be no fluctuation in oral contraceptive users. Design This was a prospective cohort study. Setting The study took place at a biomechanics laboratory at a rehabilitation hospital. Participants A total of 30 healthy women aged 18–35 who were similar in age, body composition, and exercise-training status were included. Fifteen of the women were eumenorrheic and nonusers of oral contraceptives (nonusers), and 15 of the women were taking oral contraceptives (users). Main Outcome Measures H-reflex (Hmax/Mmax ratio), serum estradiol, and progesterone concentrations were measured at 3 time points during the menstrual and contraceptive pill cycle. Results The H-reflex (Hmax/Mmax ratio) remained stable across the menstrual and contraceptive pill cycle. Spinal excitability was lower in the users compared with the nonusers across all testing sessions, but this was not statistically significant. Conclusions Our results suggest that acute fluctuations of endogenous estradiol and progesterone do

  15. Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis in asymptomatic women: relationship to history, contraception, and cervicitis.

    PubMed

    Bontis, J; Vavilis, D; Panidis, D; Theodoridis, T; Konstantinidis, T; Sidiropoulou, A

    1994-12-01

    The presence of Chlamydia trachomatis antigen was examined in 400 endocervical samples collected from an equal number of asymptomatic sexually active women. The overall prevalence was found to be 4%, using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Chlamydia infection was correlated with younger age (5.8%, p < 0.05), a history of pelvic inflammatory disease (30%, p < 0.0001), and more than four lifetime sexual partners (7.9%, p < 0.01). Women who used oral contraception had more infections (9.7%), than did women who used the intrauterine contraceptive device (4.8%, p > 0.05), condom (0%, p < 0.01) or no contraception (3.1%, p < 0.05). Infection was strongly associated with cervical erythema (8.2%, p < 0.0001), ectopy (7%, p < 0.05), friability (20%, p < 0.0001), and endocervical discharge (100%, p < 0.0001). These results support the view that Chlamydia trachomatis infection is associated with younger age, intense sexual life, and use of oral contraceptives. Given that the majority of infected women revealed cervical pathology, the detection of chlamydia in the high-risk female population with cervical changes seems to be essential.

  16. Deep vein thrombosis and the oestrogen content in oral contraceptives. An epidemiological analysis.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, A

    1985-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have pointed to a correlation between the oestrogen content of oral contraceptives and the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The correlation has been strongest in studies which partially consisted of adverse drug reaction reports to the Swedish Adverse Drug Reaction Advisory Committee (SADRAC). The present study analyzes the epidemiological basis of the adverse drug reaction reports on DVT in women on oral contraceptives to SADRAC. It verifies the reported correlation between the oestrogen content of the pills and the risk of DVT but it also demonstrates that this correlation probably was secondary to differences in the diagnostic standard of DVT, to differences in reporting policies to SADRAC and to an age difference between women on low-oestrogen-pills and those on high-oestrogen pills and is thus due to bias. It is concluded that adverse drug reaction reporting on oral contraceptives has been very unreliable, for which reason it cannot support any epidemiological conclusion concerning the relative thrombogenicity of high-oestrogen pills compared with that of low-oestrogen pills.

  17. P16 - Familial Fragility Fractures Correlate with Osteopenic And/Or Osteoporotic Status in Postmenopausal Women: Preliminary Results from the Prof Study

    PubMed Central

    Piscitelli, P.; Coli, G.; Neglia, C.; Chitano, G.; Argentiero, A.; Paladini, D.; Mundi, S.; Paladini, L.; Greco, M.; Girasoli, C.; Gianicolo, M.E.; Pantile, V.; Argentiero, D.; De Padova, G.; Pansa, L.; Nibio, L.; Di Giuseppe, P.; Minosi, A.; Cirasino, L.; Laselva, G.; Scialpi, M.; Rigliano, V.; Benvenuto, M.; D’Angela, D.; Brandi, M.L.; Distante, A.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Within the PROF (Prevention of Osteoporotic Fractures) project, i.e. a synergistic effort of researchers and clinicians aimed at preventing osteoporotic fractures in Southern Apulia (Salento), we analysed the correlation between familial fragility fractures and osteopenic/osteoporotic status in postmenopausal women. Methods: In the years 2009–2010, we screened 5665 postmenopausal women (mean age 62 years, range 39 to 86) by quantitative ultrasound testing, at the heel or phalanx. Demographic and anamnestic data were recorded for all the patients, including BMI, nutrition, menopause, physical activity, previous fractures, familial fragility fractures. Three demineralisation categories were identified a priori: Demineralisation, when any T-score <−1.0 SD was observed; b) Severe demineralisation, whenever a T-score <−2.0 was observed, corresponding to a higher risk of fracture; c) Osteoporosis, whenever a T-score <−2.5±0.2 (for the heel) or T-score <−3.2±0.2 (for the phalanx) was observed. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed in order to assess the correlation between familial fragility fractures (any osteoporotic fracture occurring in patients’ relatives) and the osteopenic or osteoporotic status of the patients themselves. Results: Demineralisation was observed in 4487 patients out of 5665 (79%). Demineralisation corresponding to severe osteopenia or osteoporotic status was confirmed in 2823 women (50% of all the examined subjects); 846 patients (15%) were found to be osteoporotic. A total of 358 women reported a family history of fragility fractures: of these, 298 (83%) presented demineralisation – as defined by T-score <−1 – corresponding at least to an osteopenic status. In the subgroup of women with familial fragility fractures, a status of severe osteopenia or osteoporosis was diagnosed in 191 patients (53%), with 76 of them being frankly osteoporotic (21%). Conclusions: The PROF study dataset suggests that the presence of

  18. Access to Emergency Contraception and its Impact on Fertility and Sexual Behavior.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Karen

    2016-04-01

    Half of all pregnancies in the USA are unintended, suggesting a high incidence of either improper or nonuse of contraceptives. Emergency birth control (EBC) provides individuals with additional insurance against unplanned pregnancy in the presence of contraception failure. This study is the first to estimate the impact of switching EBC from prescription to nonprescription status in the USA on abortions and risky sexual behavior as measured by STD rates. Utilizing state-level variation in access to EBC, we find that providing individuals with over-the-counter access to EBC leads to increase STD rates and has no effect on abortion rates. Moreover, individual-level analysis using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth indicates that risky sexual behavior such as engaging in unprotected sex and number of sexual encounters increases as a result of over-the-counter access to EBC, which is consistent with the state-level STD findings.

  19. Partner Roles in Contraceptive Use: What Do Adolescent Mothers Say?

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Dinah A.; Martins, Summer L.; Gilliam, Melissa L.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective To examine the role of sexual partners in adolescent mothers’ use of non-coital dependent contraceptive methods in the postpartum period. Design/Setting/Participants 40 African American adolescent mothers completed surveys and qualitative interviews during the first postpartum year as part of a larger longitudinal study in Chicago, Illinois. Themes related to contraception and sexual partners were analyzed. Main Outcome Measures Adolescent mothers’ reports of partners’ roles in the use of non-coital dependent contraceptive methods (i.e., oral contraceptives, intrauterine contraception, and depot medroxyprogesterone acetate). Results Partners largely supported the use of non-coital dependent contraceptive methods, yet mechanisms of support varied greatly, from advocating for specific methods to facilitating participants’ continuation of their chosen method. Unsupportive partners either expressed concerns about the safety and side effects of specific methods or desired another child in the near future. Participants valued these preferences to different degrees when making their contraceptive decisions. Conclusions Partners of adolescent mothers play varying roles in postpartum contraceptive decisions. They thus have the potential to both inhibit and facilitate the use of non-coital dependent contraception. Quantitative research is needed to further evaluate how partner attitudes and support behaviors, among other factors, affect contraceptive initiation and continuation among adolescent mothers. PMID:23089574

  20. Correlates of Sense of Control among Older Korean-American Immigrants: Financial Status, Physical Health Constraints, and Environmental Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Yuri; Kim, Giyeon; Chiriboga, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Responding to the need for more research on minority older populations, the present study assessed sense of control among older Korean-American immigrants. The association of sense of control with financial status, physical health constraints, and environmental challenges was examined with a sample of 230 older Korean-Americans (M[age] = 69.8,…

  1. Assessing the Consequences of Using Self-Report Data to Determine the Correlates of HIV Status: Conditional and Marginal Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rindskopf, David M.; Strauss, Shiela M.; Falkin, Gregory P.; Deren, Sherry

    2003-01-01

    This article examines whether relationships between individual characteristics and HIV status can be identified when self-report data are used as a proxy for HIV serotest results. The analyses use data obtained from HIV serotests and face-to-face interviews with 7,256 out-of-treatment drug users in ten sites from 1992 to 1998. Relationships…

  2. Identity, Intimacy, Status and Sex Dating Goals as Correlates of Goal-Consistent Behavior and Satisfaction in Australian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Marguerite; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J.; Boislard-P., Marie-Aude

    2012-01-01

    The most common dating goals of adolescents are identity, intimacy, status and sex. In this study of Australian youth (16-30 years, N = 208), dating goals were expected to explain goal-consistent behavior in each domain. Also, goals coupled with consistent behavior were expected to be associated with greater satisfaction in each domain. Age,…

  3. Presence of Streptococcus mutans strains harbouring the cnm gene correlates with dental caries status and IgA nephropathy conditions

    PubMed Central

    Misaki, Taro; Naka, Shuhei; Hatakeyama, Rina; Fukunaga, Akiko; Nomura, Ryota; Isozaki, Taisuke; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major pathogen of human dental caries. Strains harbouring the cnm gene, which encodes Cnm, a collagen-binding protein, contribute to the development of several systemic diseases. In this study, we analysed S. mutans strains isolated from the oral cavity of immunoglobulin (Ig)A nephropathy (IgAN) patients to determine potential relationships between cnm and caries status as well as IgAN conditions. Saliva specimens were collected from 109 IgAN patients and the cnm status of isolated S. mutans strains was determined using PCR. In addition, the dental caries status (decayed, missing or filled teeth [DMFT] index) in patients who agreed to dental consultation (n = 49) was evaluated. The DMFT index and urinary protein levels in the cnm-positive group were significantly higher than those in the cnm-negative group (p < 0.05). Moreover, the urinary protein levels in the high DMFT (≥15) group were significantly higher than those in the low DMFT (<15) group (p < 0.05). Our results show that isolation of cnm-positive S. mutans strains from the oral cavity may be associated with urinary protein levels in IgAN patients, especially those with a high dental caries status. PMID:27811984

  4. Hormonal and behavioural correlates of male dominance and reproductive status in captive colonies of the naked mole-rat, Heterocephalus glaber.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, F M; Faulkes, C G

    1998-01-01

    Naked mole-rat colonies are societies with a high reproductive skew, breeding being restricted to one dominant female (the 'queen') and 1-3 males. Other colony members of both sexes are reproductively suppressed. Experimental removal of breeding males allowed us to investigate the relationship between urinary testosterone and cortisol, dominance rank, and male reproductive status. Dominance rank was strongly correlated with body weight, age, and urinary testosterone titres in males. No relationship between urinary cortisol levels and male reproductive status or dominance was found. Breeding males were among the highest-ranking, heaviest and oldest males in their respective colonies, and were succeeded by other high-ranking, large, old colony males. In contrast to females, no evidence of competition over breeding status was observed among males. Male-male agonism was low both before and after removal of breeders and mate guarding was not observed. The lower reproductive skew for males compared with female skew or queen control over male reproduction may explain why males compete less strongly than females over breeding status after removal of same-sexed breeders. PMID:9721687

  5. [Contraceptive advice for the postpartum period].

    PubMed

    Couvreur, I; Delcroix, M

    1984-04-01

    The immediate postpartum period and the week of hospitalization is a privileged time for imparting information about the physiology of reproduction and contraception. Contraceptive counseling at this time may be done in groups or in individual sessions. Apart from the usual requirements of efficacy, innocuity, acceptability, and reversibility, postpartum contraception must respect lactation and the return of menstruation. 3/4 of women ovulate before the 1st postpartum mentstrual period, but never before the 25th postpartum day. In the absence of lactation, about 80% ovulate within 9 weeks. If lactation occurs ovulation is delayed and usually 1 or more anovulatory cycles occur, but the rate of conception is difficult to estimate. Methods that are unsuitable for postpartum use include the temperature method because of the absence of the hyperthermic plateau, cervical caps and diaphragms because correct measurements cannot be made until 5-6 months after delivery, and IUDs becuase of the large size of the uterine cavity, the fragility of the walls, the presence of lochia, the large size of the cervix, and the absence of cervical mucus which protects against infection. Local contraception with tablets, spermicidal gels, or condoms is a good choice, especially for breastfeeding women, because of improved success rates, good tolerance, and acceptability. In prescribing oral contraceptives, pathologies of pregnancy such as hypertension and phlebitis must be considered along with the classical contraindicatins. The formulation must not affect the quality or quantity of milk. Standard dosed combined pills and monophasic and biphasic minidose pills increase the thromboembolic risk if they are taken soon after delivery, used by women who smoke, if the estrogen component is large, or if the women's cholesterol level is elevated. Minipills and progestagen-only micropills are interesting choices for postpartum women because of the reduced steroid doses. Micropills should be

  6. Contraceptive method continuation according to type of provider.

    PubMed Central

    Einhorn, R F; Sear, A M; Perez, E; Cabrera, E

    1977-01-01

    A study was undertaken at the main PROFAMILIA clinic in Bogota, Colombia to compare the effectiveness of nurses and physicians in the delivery of family planning services. Contraceptive method continuation was the major outcome variable in this analysis. Clients were randomly assigned to physicians or nurses on their first visit and for the duration of care. On all revisits, data were collected pertaining to method prescribed, side effects, pregnancy, and method changes. There was a field survey at eight months to locate clinic drop-outs and determine their contraceptive use status. There were no significant differences in method continuation between clients who received services from physicians and those who received services from nurses. At nine months, the overall continuation of the first method prescribed was 79.1 per cent in the physicians' group and 75.8 per cent in the nurses' group (t = 1.057, p greater than .20). When controlling for first method used, the IUD users in the physicians' group had a continuation rate of 86.1 per cent and in the nurses' group 84.0 per cent (t = 0.556, p greater than .50). Of the pill users who received services from physicians, 78.1 per cent were continuing at nine months and 74.3 per cent of the pill clients in the nurses' group were continuing at nine months (t = 0.573, p greater than .50). There were no differences in pregnancy rates, side effects rates, and method change rates between the two groups. It may be concluded that these nurses were as effective as physicians in the delivery of family planning services. PMID:596499

  7. Contraception for Adolescents: Focusing on Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptives (LARC) to Improve Reproductive Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy rates in the U.S. have reached an all-time low from their peak in the 1980s and 1990s. However, the U.S. maintains the highest rate of teenage pregnancy among developed nations. Adolescents experience higher typical use failure rates for user-dependent contraceptives compared to their adult counterparts. Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), IUDs and implants, have failure rates that are both very low and independent of user age. In settings where the most effective methods are prioritized and access barriers are removed, the majority of adolescents initiate LARC. Use of LARC by adolescents significantly reduces rates of overall and repeat teen pregnancy. All methods of contraception are safe for use in teens, including IUDs and DMPA. Dual use of LARC and barrier methods to reduce risk of sexually transmitted infection, is the optimal contraceptive strategy for most adolescents. Adolescent access to evidence-based and confidential contraceptive services, provided in a manner that respects autonomy, is a vital public health goal. PMID:27635305

  8. Contraception for Adolescents: Focusing on Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptives (LARC) to Improve Reproductive Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Bliss; Salcedo, Jennifer

    2015-03-01

    Adolescent pregnancy rates in the U.S. have reached an all-time low from their peak in the 1980s and 1990s. However, the U.S. maintains the highest rate of teenage pregnancy among developed nations. Adolescents experience higher typical use failure rates for user-dependent contraceptives compared to their adult counterparts. Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), IUDs and implants, have failure rates that are both very low and independent of user age. In settings where the most effective methods are prioritized and access barriers are removed, the majority of adolescents initiate LARC. Use of LARC by adolescents significantly reduces rates of overall and repeat teen pregnancy. All methods of contraception are safe for use in teens, including IUDs and DMPA. Dual use of LARC and barrier methods to reduce risk of sexually transmitted infection, is the optimal contraceptive strategy for most adolescents. Adolescent access to evidence-based and confidential contraceptive services, provided in a manner that respects autonomy, is a vital public health goal.

  9. Recent experience with and future directions of contraceptive implants and injectable contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sanchez, F; Brache, V; Faundes, A

    1993-12-01

    Subdermal implantable contraception has been the most important addition to contraceptive technology in the past 2 decades. The Norplant system is only the first of a new family of long acting methods of high effectiveness, high acceptability, and prompt reversibility. The main advantage of the second generation implant systems, to be available soon, is the reduction in the number of implants, which greatly facilitates insertion and removal. However, great improvement in bleeding control is not to be expected. Large and carefully designed epidemiological studies have contributed to clear the main objections to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) as an injectable contraceptive. New progestin-only, long acting injectables are being tested, but significant improvements over existing methods are difficult to foresee, although every alternative is welcome. Monthly combined injectables have been in great demand, at least in China and Latin America, because of better bleeding control. Improved combined monthly injectables, less estrogenic and more progestin dominated, have been developed and are being introduced in several countries and should soon replace the old monthly injectables. Contraceptive implants and injectables have shown to be an important addition to the contraceptive options available to women throughout both the developing and developed world.

  10. Psychosocial correlates of nutritional status among people living with HIV on antiretroviral therapy: A matched case-control study in Central zone of Tigray, Northern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Weldu, Meresa Gebremedhin; Misgina, Kebede Haile

    2017-01-01

    Background Malnutrition hastens progression to Acquired Human Immunodeficiency Syndromes (AIDS) related illnesses; undermines adherence and response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-poor settings. However, nutritional status of people living with HIV (PLHIV) can be affected by various psychosocial factors which have not been well explored in Ethiopia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine psychosocial correlates of nutritional status among people living with HIV (PLHIV) on ART in Central zone of Tigray, Northern Ethiopia. Methods A matched case-control study design was conducted to assess psychosocial correlates of nutritional status among PLHIV on ART. Data were collected by an interviewer-administered technique using structured pre-tested questionnaire, record review using a checklist and anthropometric measurements. Cases were selected by simple random sampling and controls purposively to match the selected cases. Conditional logistic regression was used to compute relevant associations by STATA version 12. Results The psychosocial factors independently associated with malnutrition were ever consuming alcohol after starting ART [AOR = 4.7, 95% CI: 1.8–12.3], ever smoking cigarette after starting ART [AOR = 7.6, 95% CI: 2.3–25.5], depression [AOR = 2.8, 95% CI: 1.3, 6.1], not adhering to ART [AOR = 6.8,95% CI: 2.0–23.0] and being in the second lowest wealth quintile [AOR = 4.3,95% CI: 1.1–17.7]. Conclusion Ever consuming alcohol and ever smoking cigarette after starting ART, depression, not adhering to ART and being in the second lowest wealth quintile were significantly associated with malnutrition. Therefore; policies, strategies, and programs targeting people living with HIV should consider psychosocial factors that can impact nutritional status of people living with HIV enrolled on ART. PMID:28301592

  11. THE RETURNS OF FAMILY PLANNING: MACRO-LEVEL ASSESSMENT OF THE EFFECT OF CONTRACEPTIVE USE ON WOMEN'S ANAEMIA AND CHILDHOOD UNDERNUTRITION.

    PubMed

    Rana, Md Juel; Goli, Srinivas

    2016-12-29

    This study investigated the effect of family planning on the levels of women's anaemia and child undernutrition at the aggregate level using the compiled databases of the World Bank, UNICEF and the Economist Intelligence Unit. Correlation scatter matrix plots and multivariate OLS regression models were employed to assess the effect of family planning on women's anaemia and child nutritional status across countries. At the aggregate level, the bivariate correlation estimates found that the Contraceptive Prevalence Rate (CPR) was negatively associated with women's anaemia (r=-0.62, p<0.01), child underweight (r=-0.57, p<0.01) and child stunting (r=-0.63, p<0.01). The results of the OLS regression showed that the independent effect of CPR on women's anaemia (β=-0.35, p<0.01), child underweight (β=-0.13, p<0.01) and child stunting (β=-0.18, p<0.05) was negative, even after controlling for child marriage, female literacy, per capita GDP, poverty ratio, health expenditure and food security. The synthesis of these findings with the existing literature based on micro-data suggests pathways through which family planning influences the nutritional status of women and children. Family planning helps in avoiding shorter birth intervals, unintended pregnancy and unsafe abortion, which would otherwise result in nutrient depletion among mothers and further increase the risk of undernutrition in their children.

  12. The responsiveness and correlation between Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motor Status Scale, and the Action Research Arm Test in chronic stroke with upper-extremity rehabilitation robotic training.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xi-Jun; Tong, Kai-Yu; Hu, Xiao-Ling

    2011-12-01

    Responsiveness of clinical assessments is an important element in the report of clinical effectiveness after rehabilitation. The correlation could reflect the validity of assessments as an indication of clinical performance before and after interventions. This study investigated the correlation and responsiveness of Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), Motor Status Scale (MSS), Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) and the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), which are used frequently in effectiveness studies of robotic upper-extremity training in stroke rehabilitation. Twenty-seven chronic stroke patients were recruited for a 20-session upper-extremity rehabilitation robotic training program. This was a rater-blinded randomized controlled trial. All participants were evaluated with FMA, MSS, ARAT, MAS, and Functional Independent Measure before and after robotic training. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was applied for the analysis of correlation. The standardized response mean (SRM) and Guyatt's responsiveness index (GRI) were used to analyze responsiveness. Spearman's correlation coefficient showed a significantly high correlation (ρ=0.91-0.96) among FMA, MSS, and ARAT and a fair-to-moderate correlation (ρ=0.40-0.62) between MAS and the other assessments. FMA, MSS, and MAS on the wrist showed higher responsiveness (SRM=0.85-0.98, GRI=1.59-3.62), whereas ARAT showed relatively less responsiveness (SRM=0.22, GRI=0.81). The results showed that FMA or MSS would be the best choice for evaluating the functional improvement in stroke studies on robotic upper-extremity training with high responsiveness and good correlation with ARAT. MAS could be used separately to evaluate the spasticity changes after intervention in terms of high responsiveness.

  13. Pancreatitis, multiple infarcts and oral contraception

    PubMed Central

    Foster, M. E.; Powell, D. E. B.

    1975-01-01

    The fact that oral contraceptives may predispose to thrombosis is not disputed, although its frequency is still debated. Any reliable assessment of the prevalence of this complication must in the main depend on careful statistical studies of well controlled groups, because the isolated case may well be coincidental when conditions such as coronary thrombosis, cerebral thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism are not extreme rarities in adult women. However, occasionally the clinical and pathological findings are so striking that they afford compelling evidence. The patient to be described presented with clinical features of pancreatitis that did not initially suggest an association with oral contraception. A hitherto undescribed state of multiple infarcts was found at post-mortem. This also illustrates the way in which the official figures for thrombotic complications can be underestimated. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:1197171

  14. Contraceptive decision-making in military women.

    PubMed

    Chung-Park, Min S

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of women in the military related to the prevention of pregnancy. Ten single women, ages 19 to 24, volunteered to be participants. They were interviewed over a 12-week period in a private setting at a military clinic. The results of the study were that their decision to use contraception was influenced by their personal goals, family values, perceived support system, and effectiveness of the birth control. These women used contraceptive methods that they felt were right for them. The conclusion of the study was that women in active military duty are in need of reproductive health education, career counseling, and support. Nurses are in a good position to provide these needed services.

  15. [Some aspects of contraception in 1975].

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, C; Renaud, R

    1976-01-01

    Developments in the area of IUDs and experiments on male contraception are reviewed, the mechanisms of action of IUDs, including the copper types, and the importance of their shape and size, as well as that of the position of the copper in the uterine cavity are described, and possible contraindications, insertion techniques, subsequent examinations, the durability of IUDs, the possibility of expulsion and of complictions (perforation and infection), and the risk of abortion and extrauterine pregnancy in case of IUD failure are discussed. With respect to male contraception, still at an experimental stage, the methods reviewed are the administration of an androgen-progesterone combination (orally, by injection or implant), the administration of long-acting steroids (testosterone propionate, testosterone enanthate, medroxyprogesterone acetate), or of andantiandrogen to prevent the maturation of sperm, the reversible occlusion of the vas deferens and the insertion of foreign bodies in the vas deferens, as well as their side effects.

  16. [Contraceptive efficiency. Reflections on statistical evaluation and real value].

    PubMed

    Lagroua Weill-halle, M A

    1975-01-01

    The efficiency of contraceptive techniques is discussed in relation to the motivation of users. Comparative studies of contraceptive effici ency show side variations of efficiency for any particular method, dosage, or device. In addition, it has been found that: most contraceptive failures occur during the early years of a marriage; and have to do with the spacing rather than with the number of children, couples who want few children tend to use more efficient methods from the beginning of the marriage; and contraceptive efficiency tends to improve dramatically once the desired family size has been reached. These findings suggest that the intensity of the couple's motivation may be a crucial factor in contraceptive efficiency; the relational skills of the prescribing physician may be another. The example of contraceptive efficiency in the People's Republic of China is adduced.

  17. The combined oral contraceptive pill -- recent developments, risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Dragoman, Monica V

    2014-08-01

    The introduction of the birth control pill as an effective, coitally-independent method of contraception was a public health milestone of the last century. Over time, combined oral contraception (COC) formulations and pill-taking regimens have evolved with improved safety and tolerability while maintaining contraceptive efficacy. In addition to protection against pregnancy, use of combined oral contraception confers a number of significant non-contraceptive benefits to users. COC use is also associated with well-studied risks. Common side effects are generally self-limiting and improve with increasing duration of use while serious adverse events, including venous thromboembolism, are rare among healthy COC users. Contraceptive decision-making should include consideration of both the risks and benefits of a given method versus the real consequences of unintended pregnancy.

  18. [Contraception and breast feeding. Spacing of pregnancies. Present concepts].

    PubMed

    Buitrón-García-Figueroa, Rafael; Malanco-Hernández, Luz María; Lara-Ricalde, Roger; García-Hernández, Alejandra

    2014-06-01

    The risk of pregnancy in breastfeeding should be a concern of women. Family planning programs in the postnatal period contraceptive choices offer high efficiency. Breastfeeding is a natural contraception method (LAM) as a contraceptive shield has 98 % efficiency. Women should consider using an alternate contraceptive method when feeding requirements for this method to be effective are not met. Some of contraceptive alternatives in lactation include hormonal methods. According to the Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use WHO combined hormonal methods are contraindicated during breast feeding, hormonal progestogen only method are considered only in Group 3 and Group 1 immediate postpartum after 6 weeks postpartum. There are modifications to these criteria by the CDC and the UK for the use of these hormones in early in lactation.

  19. [Clinical trial of the combined contraceptive preparation, Ovidon].

    PubMed

    Nalbanski, B

    1979-01-01

    The efficacy of a new estrogen-progestin contraceptive agent Ovidon was evaluated in 65 women. The women were taking the contraceptive for 47 cycles (each Ovidon pill contained 0.25 mg of D-norgestrel and 0.05 mg of ethinyl estradiol). Prior to the Ovidon treatment, 15 women did not use any contraceptive agents or devices, 5 used hormonal contraceptives, 2 used IUDs, 4 used mechanical devices, 20 practiced coitus interraptus, and 9 used a biological method. Ovidon administration provided a 100% contraceptive effect. Side effects of Ovidon included fatigue (15 women), headache (4), irritability (3), fullness of the breast (27), hemorrhage (12), vaginal discharge (6), and changes in libido (22). Ovidon administration did not induce amenorrhea. A 1-3 kg weight gain was observed in 5 women. Laboratory studies showed no changes in hemoglobin levels, leukocyte count, cholesterol, and alkaline phosphatase levels. These findings indicated the safety and contraceptive efficacy of Ovidon.

  20. Long-acting injectable hormonal dosage forms for contraception.

    PubMed

    Wu, Linfeng; Janagam, Dileep R; Mandrell, Timothy D; Johnson, James R; Lowe, Tao L

    2015-07-01

    Although great efforts have been made to develop long-acting injectable hormonal contraceptives for more than four decades, few long-acting injectable contraceptives have reached the pharmaceutical market or even entered clinical trials. On the other hand, in clinical practice there is an urgent need for injectable long-acting reversible contraceptives which can provide contraceptive protection for more than 3 months after one single injection. Availability of such products will offer great flexibility to women and resolve certain continuation issues currently occurring in clinics. Herein, we reviewed the strategies exploited in the past to develop injectable hormonal contraceptive dosages including drug microcrystal suspensions, drug-loaded microsphere suspensions and in situ forming depot systems for long-term contraception and discussed the potential solutions for remaining issues met in the previous development.

  1. Factors affecting riboflavin requirements of oral contraceptive users and nonusers.

    PubMed

    Roe, D A; Bogusz, S; Sheu, J; McCormick, D B

    1982-03-01

    Riboflavin depletion has been identified in women on oral contraceptives (OC) but change in riboflavin nutriture has not been consistently demonstrated in all OC user groups studied. Discrepant findings in reports have been attributed to differences of pill formulation or riboflavin intake. Aims of this study were to compare the riboflavin requirements of healthy OC users and nonusers on diets prepared in a metabolic unit. A single daily menu and meal pattern was used. The basic diet providing riboflavin at a level of 0.6 mg/1000 kcal was used in the period of acclimation and period 1. In periods 2 and 3, the riboflavin content of the diet was increased to 0.8 and 1.0 mg/1000 kcal, respectively. The riboflavin status of subjects was monitored by erythrocyte glutathione reductase assay and urinary riboflavin excretion. Eight women on OC and 10 nonusers participated. Erythrocyte glutathione reductase assay values and urinary riboflavin excretion showed intersubject and interperiod differences but no significant group differences (OC versus non-OC) in erythrocyte glutathione reductase values or in urinary riboflavin per g creatinine. It was concluded that when dietary intake is controlled, OC do not significantly influence riboflavin status. Riboflavin needs were related to energy requirements of the subjects.

  2. The benefits of combined oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Drife, J

    1989-11-01

    The benefits of combined oral contraceptives are put into perspective, considering their effectiveness as a contraceptive, actual risks for breast, ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer, and effects of reproductive and other body systems. Combined oral contraceptives are the best contraceptives available except for injectable progestogens, therefore they an reduce the risk of maternal mortality by at least 5 in nonsmoking western women, or over 100 in developing countries. No data are available on mortality risk of the presumed safer low-dose pills. Pills reduce ectopic pregnancy to virtually nil. They decrease the risk of endometrial cancer, and of ovarian cancer for up to 15 years after use. Although they protect against benign breast disease, both fibrocystic disease and fibroadenoma, which are risk factors for breast cancer, it is unsettled whether pills affect breast cancer incidence. Cervical cancer risk may be slightly higher. Functional ovarian cysts requiring surgery are cut about 10-fold; corpus luteum and follicular cysts are also reduced. Fibroids are decreased in proportion to duration of use. Pelvic inflammatory disease rates fall 50% during use. Chlamydial infections have not fallen in pill users, but it is not known whether sexual activity is a factor. Combined pills cut abnormal uterine bleeding by about half, reduce the incidence of iron deficiency anemia and of premenstrual tension. Seizures related to menses also are controlled. Some studies find a reduction in rheumatoid arthritis. Most of the cardiovascular complications of pills are thought to be dose related. Since today's pills contain approximately the same dose as a whole cycle of the original pills, it is expected that these risks will be greatly reduced, especially with better screening of candidates that is now the rule.

  3. Intrauterine contraception: the pendulum swings back.

    PubMed

    MacIsaac, Laura; Espey, Eve

    2007-03-01

    Intrauterine contraception is the most widely used method of reversible fertility regulation in the world. Finally, IUC is undergoing a renaissance in the US and it's role will expand as new devices and systems are developed and as old biases among clinicians and women are erased. Successful fertility regulation is a defining factor of the overall health of a population; the expanded use of IUC can help achieve that public health success.

  4. [Contraception, abortion and sexually transmitted diseases].

    PubMed

    Nesheim, B I

    1992-02-28

    Contraceptives that protect against pregnancy tend to offer the least protection against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), particularly needed by young people who change partners frequently. Oral contraceptive (OCs) protect best against pregnancy and salpingitis, but they do not protect against infections of the cervix; thus, there is a higher incidence of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhea among OC users. The IUD is also very effective, but there is an elevated risk of infections during the first 20 days after fitting, as bacteria may move up to the uterus from the cervical canal during insertion. The effectiveness of the condom depends on the users, and studies show that when used consistently it provides significant protection against STDs. The diaphragm also protects against STDs, but it is insignificant from a quantitative point of view. In Norway, in 1977, 30% of 18-19 year old women used OCs, and 21% used IUDs. In contrast, in 1988, 65% of 20-year old women used OCs and 5% used IUDs. Condom use remains unchanged. The rate of abortion has not changed since 1977; it is highest among women aged 18-29 (about 30/1000 women per year), although safe contraception use has increased from 50% to 70% among women aged 18-19. Free-service health clinics with evening hours have met a clear need for counseling in the past 20 years. In the 1970s the demand was high for induced abortion, safe contraceptives, and IUD insertion. Later, OCs had lower hormone content and fewer site effects, and their dispensation became more widespread among general practitioners. Nowadays a large proportion of women seek advice on STDs, and 65% of them attend because the consultation is free. It is an important task of these clinics to provide guidance, examination, and treatment to high-risk people to help them avoid STDs and unwanted pregnancy.

  5. Sex discrimination and insurance for contraception.

    PubMed

    Law, S A

    1998-04-01

    Unintended pregnancy is a serious problem in the United States. Most private insurance plans do not pay for contraception even though they pay for other prescription drugs and devices. This Article argues that this pattern constitutes sex discrimination and is prohibited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended by the Pregnancy Discrimination Act. It discusses the reasons this issue has been neglected and suggests ways federal and state officials might remedy this common form of gender discrimination.

  6. Erythema nodosum and oral contraceptive therapy.

    PubMed

    Winkelman, R K

    1978-04-03

    A generalized erythema nodosum developed in a 17 year old girl receiving oral contraceptive therapy, which was immediately discontinued. The erythema failed to respond to tetracycline, potassium iodide or prednisone therapy (partially successful), and recurred 6 times, usually just before menstruation. The recommended therapy is bed rest, salicylates and 10 cm roller elastic bandages. No medication can help in the face of unrestricted physical activity.

  7. Effects of Administration of Fostamatinib on Blood Concentrations of an Oral Contraceptive in Healthy Female Subjects

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-02-17

    Scientific Terminology Rheumatoid Arthritis, Healthy Female Volunteers, Pharmacokinetics, Oral Contraceptive, Drug-drug Interaction; Laymen Terminology Level of Oral Contraceptive in Blood, Oral Contraceptive, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Drug -Drug Interaction

  8. 21 CFR 310.501 - Patient package inserts for oral contraceptives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... comparing the effectiveness of oral contraceptives to other methods of contraception. (4) A boxed warning... indications in addition to contraception that are identified in the professional labeling for the drug...

  9. 21 CFR 310.501 - Patient package inserts for oral contraceptives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... comparing the effectiveness of oral contraceptives to other methods of contraception. (4) A boxed warning... indications in addition to contraception that are identified in the professional labeling for the drug...

  10. 21 CFR 310.501 - Patient package inserts for oral contraceptives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... comparing the effectiveness of oral contraceptives to other methods of contraception. (4) A boxed warning... indications in addition to contraception that are identified in the professional labeling for the drug...

  11. 21 CFR 310.501 - Patient package inserts for oral contraceptives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... comparing the effectiveness of oral contraceptives to other methods of contraception. (4) A boxed warning... indications in addition to contraception that are identified in the professional labeling for the drug...

  12. 21 CFR 310.501 - Patient package inserts for oral contraceptives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... comparing the effectiveness of oral contraceptives to other methods of contraception. (4) A boxed warning... indications in addition to contraception that are identified in the professional labeling for the drug...

  13. Do progesterone-only contraceptives lead to more mood changes than other types?

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Kara; McCullough, Stephanie; Beach, Penny

    2016-12-01

    No. Women taking progesterone-only contraceptives don't appear to experience more depressive symptoms or mood changes than women on other hormonal contraceptives, and they may experience slightly less depression than women using no contraception.

  14. Contraceptive Practices Among Female Cancer Survivors of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Dominick, Sally A.; McLean, Mamie R.; Whitcomb, Brian W.; Gorman, Jessica R.; Mersereau, Jennifer E.; Bouknight, Janet M.; Su, H. Irene

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare rates of contraception between reproductive-aged cancer survivors and women in the general U.S. population. Among survivors, the study examined factors associated with use of contraception and emergency contraception. Methods This study analyzed enrollment data from an ongoing national prospective cohort study on reproductive health after cancer entitled the Fertility Information Research Study. We compared current contraceptive use in survivors with that of the general population ascertained by the 2006–2010 National Survey for Family Growth. Log-binomial regression models estimated relative risks for characteristics associated with use of contraception, World Health Organization tiers I–II (sterilization and hormonal) contraceptive methods, and emergency contraception in survivors. Results Data from 295 survivors (mean age 31.6 ± 5.7 years, range 20–44 years) enrolled in this prospective study (85% response rate) were examined. Age-adjusted rates of using tiers I–II contraceptive methods were lower in survivors than the general population (34% [28.8–40.0] compared with 53% [51.5–54.5], P<.01). Only 56% of survivors reported receiving family planning services (counseling, prescription or procedure related to birth control) since cancer diagnosis. In adjusted analysis, receipt of family planning services was associated with both increased use of tiers I–II contraceptive methods (relative risk 1.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–1.5) and accessing emergency contraception (relative risk 5.0, 95% CI 1.6–16.3) in survivors. Conclusion Lower rates of using Tiers I–II contraceptive methods were found in reproductive-aged cancer survivors compared to the general population of U.S. women. Exposure to family planning services across the cancer care continuum may improve contraception utilization among these women. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01843140. PMID:26181090

  15. Emergency contraception: the nurse's role in providing postcoital options.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, C E

    1997-01-01

    Emergency contraception refers to pregnancy prevention methods initiated after unprotected sexual intercourse. Research has shown that 75% of the 3.5 million unintended pregnancies that occur in the United States every year could be prevented through use of emergency contraception. Hormonal methods and postcoital insertion of intrauterine devices have been shown to be safe and effective. Nurses play an essential role in the distribution of emergency contraception as patient educators, advocates, and support persons.

  16. Effects of oral contraceptives in vaginal cytology.

    PubMed

    Montes, M B; Ferreira, A C; Fenólio, J C; Franceschini, S A; Toloi, M R

    2000-06-01

    Many literature studies have shown that long-term use of oral contraceptives (OC) is associated with lack of protection of the epithelium of the uterine cervix. Forty-five patients, from 18 to 35 years old, users of two contraceptive formulations, of different estrogenic concentration, took part in this study as volunteers to evaluate the predisposition of the cervix to pathologies. The results found before OC use were 11% of Chlamydia trachomatis infection and 13% of HPV infection. These pathologies were correctly treated and after 5 months of OC use we found total remission of Chlamydia trachomatis infection and 4% of persistent HPV infection. These data lead us to conclude that the OC studied here interfered very little with the presented pathologic results. The risk factors that we considered relevant were: 1) age group (the patients that presented HPV and C. trachomatis infections were young university students); 2) lifestyle (most patients certified that they did not combine the use of barrier contraceptives with the use of OC); 3) multiple sexual partners; 4) low socioeconomic condition.