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Sample records for contraceptive prevalence rate

  1. Effect of Village Midwife Program on Contraceptive Prevalence and Method Choice in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Emily H.; Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Fried, Bruce J.; Thomas, Duncan; Wheeler, Stephanie B.; Paul, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Indonesia established its Village Midwife Program in 1989 to combat high rates of maternal mortality. The program’s goals were to address gaps in access to reproductive health care for rural women, increase access to and use of family planning services, and broaden the mix of available contraceptive methods. In this study, we use longitudinal data from the Indonesia Family Life Survey to examine the program’s effect on contraceptive practice. We find that the program did not affect overall contraceptive prevalence but did affect method choice. Over time, for women using contraceptives, midwives were associated with increased odds of injectable contraceptive use and decreased odds of oral contraceptive and implant use. Although the Indonesian government had hoped that the Village Midwife Program would channel women into using longer-lasting methods, the women’s “switching behavior” indicates that the program succeeded in providing additional outlets for and promoting the use of injectable contraceptives. PMID:24323659

  2. The contraceptive prevalence survey project: content and status.

    PubMed

    Lewis, G L

    1983-01-01

    The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) selected Westinghouse Health Systems to carry out contraceptive surveys. The primary objectives of the Contraceptive Prevalence Surveys (CPS) are to determine periodically the levels of contraceptive use in the country; to examine the correlates of and differentials in these levels in order to assess the impact of various types of governmental and nongovernmental programs; to identify factors that will facilitate an increase in contraceptive use, particularly factors involved in program planning activities; and to institutionalize in each country the capability to design and implement studies of contraceptive prevalence, to be undertaken at regular intervals by an in-country agency. Each CPS generally collects data on the basic demographic background of the country concerned, knowledge of contraceptive methods, prior contraceptive experience and current method used, past fertility behavior and future fertility intentions, present utilization of various types of service delivery systems, perceived accessibility of contraceptives, and reasons for nonacceptance of contraception. In the CPS project, data collection and field operations have been strongly stressed. Efforts have recently been made to expand the extent and sophistication of CPS data analysis. For example, 2 countries are currently using a series of mathematical techniques called synthetic estimators to estimate subnational levels of contraceptive use by merging CPS and census data. Westinghouse, in cooperation with the University of Michigan, is currently working to develop community characteristics module for inclusion in future CPS projects.

  3. Contraceptive prevalence and preference in a cohort of south–east Nigerian women

    PubMed Central

    Egede, John Okafor; Onoh, Robinson Chukwudi; Umeora, Odidika Ugochukwu Joannes; Iyoke, Chukwuemeka Anthony; Dimejesi, Ikechukwu Benedict Okechukwu; Lawani, Lucky Osaheni

    2015-01-01

    Background Rates of fertility, population growth, and maternal deaths in Nigeria are among the highest in the world, with an estimated 4% of all births being unwanted and 7% mistimed. These are caused mainly by nonuse, inappropriate choice, and difficulty in accessing contraceptive commodities. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and factors influencing the choice and sources of contraceptive options among market women in Ebonyi State, Nigeria. Methods This was a questionnaire-based, cross-sectional, descriptive study involving 330 market women of reproductive age in Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria. A survey was carried out to identify their knowledge, use, and sources of contraception and the factors that influence their contraceptive practices. Results Knowledge of contraception was high (275 [83.3%]), and 229 (69.4%) of the study population approved of contraceptive use. However, only 93 (28.3%) of the respondents were currently using any form of contraception. Fifty-four women (16.3%) were using modern methods. The commonly used forms of modern contraception were the barrier method (male condoms, 27 [8.2%]), the oral contraceptive pill (10 [3.0%]), injectables (8 [2.5%]), and the intrauterine contraceptive device (7 [2.0%]). The most common source of contraceptive products was patent medicine dealers (58 [51%]). The main barriers to use of contraception were desire for more children (86 [26.1%]), religious prohibition (62 [18.8%]), spousal disapproval (32 [9.7%]), and the perceived side effects of modern contraceptives (25 [7.6%]). There was a significant association for approval of contraception when the model was adjusted for religion (odds ratio [OR] 0.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.18–0.84; P=0.02); educational status (OR 2.84, 95% CI 0.96–8.40; P=0.04); parity (OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.09–2.85; P=0.03); and social class (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.26–5.11; P=0.01). Conclusion There is good knowledge about contraception among Nigerian

  4. Estimating Contraceptive Prevalence Using Logistics Data for Short-Acting Methods: Analysis Across 30 Countries

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Marc; Brown, Niquelle; Sacher, Suzy; Hatch, Benjamin; Inglis, Andrew; Aronovich, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) is a vital indicator used by country governments, international donors, and other stakeholders for measuring progress in family planning programs against country targets and global initiatives as well as for estimating health outcomes. Because of the need for more frequent CPR estimates than population-based surveys currently provide, alternative approaches for estimating CPRs are being explored, including using contraceptive logistics data. Methods: Using data from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) in 30 countries, population data from the United States Census Bureau International Database, and logistics data from the Procurement Planning and Monitoring Report (PPMR) and the Pipeline Monitoring and Procurement Planning System (PipeLine), we developed and evaluated 3 models to generate country-level, public-sector contraceptive prevalence estimates for injectable contraceptives, oral contraceptives, and male condoms. Models included: direct estimation through existing couple-years of protection (CYP) conversion factors, bivariate linear regression, and multivariate linear regression. Model evaluation consisted of comparing the referent DHS prevalence rates for each short-acting method with the model-generated prevalence rate using multiple metrics, including mean absolute error and proportion of countries where the modeled prevalence rate for each method was within 1, 2, or 5 percentage points of the DHS referent value. Results: For the methods studied, family planning use estimates from public-sector logistics data were correlated with those from the DHS, validating the quality and accuracy of current public-sector logistics data. Logistics data for oral and injectable contraceptives were significantly associated (P<.05) with the referent DHS values for both bivariate and multivariate models. For condoms, however, that association was only significant for the bivariate model. With the exception of the CYP

  5. Prevalence and Determinants of Contraceptive use among Employed and Unemployed Women in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Ahmed Zohirul; Mondal, Md. Nazrul Islam; Khatun, Mt. Laily; Rahman, Md. Mosiur; Islam, Md. Rafiqul; Mostofa, Md. Golam; Hoque, Md. Nazrul

    2016-01-01

    Background: Contraceptive use plays a significant role in controlling fertility, particularly in reaching the replacement level of fertility. The association between women’s employment status and contraceptive use is poorly studied and understood in Bangladesh. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that influence contraceptive use among employed and unemployed women in Bangladesh. Methods: Data and necessary information of 16,616 married women were extracted from the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS) 2011. The cross sectional data has been used for univariate analysis, to carry out the description of the variables; bivariate analysis, to find the associations among the variables; and binary logistic regression analysis, to evaluate the effects of selected sociodemographic factors on contraceptive use. Results: The results revealed that the contraceptive use was found higher among employed women (67%) than that of unemployed women. Women’s age, education, region, number of living children, and child preference were found to be significantly associated with current use of contraception among employed women. On the other hand, women’s age, education, husband’s education, region, residence, religion, number of living children, ever heard about family planning, and child preference were identified as the significant predictors of contraceptive use among unemployed women. Conclusion and Global Health Implications: A gap in using contraceptives among employed and unemployed women is identified. By creating employment opportunities for women to be enhanced the contraceptive use. Moreover, the sociodemographic factors need to be taken into consideration in formulating policies and implementing programs to increase the contraceptive prevalence rate among women. PMID:28058196

  6. Oral contraceptive use and prevalence of infection with Chlamydia trachomatis in women.

    PubMed

    Kinghorn, G R; Waugh, M A

    1981-06-01

    One thousand eight non-pregnant women aged 16-34 years, presenting for the first time at a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases (STD), were examined and screened for infection with Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Candida species. The respective prevalence rates were 21.1%, 20.7%, 13.4%, and 27.8%. Isolation rates for C trachomatis, either occurring alone or in association with other genital infections, were significantly greater in women using oral contraceptive agents. This was not because oral contraceptive users were more promiscuous. The findings strengthen the case for providing a routine chlamydial culture service for women attending STD clinics. They also indicate that the likelihood of chlamydial infection in women taking oral contraceptives is increased.

  7. Prevalence and factors affecting use of long acting and permanent contraceptive methods in Jinka town, Southern Ethiopia: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mekonnen, Getachew; Enquselassie, Fikre; Tesfaye, Gezahegn; Semahegn, Agumasie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In Ethiopia, knowledge of contraceptive methods is high though there is low contraceptive prevalence rate. This study was aimed to assess prevalence and associated factors of long acting and permanent contraceptive methods in Jinka town, southern Ethiopia. Methods Community based cross sectional survey was conducted to assess the prevalence and factors affecting long acting and permanent methods of contraceptives utilization from March to April 2008. Eight hundred child bearing age women were participated in the quantitative study and 32 purposively selected focus group discussants were participated in the qualitative study. Face to face interview was used for data collection. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 13.0 statistical software. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were computed to analyze the data. Results The prevalence of long acting and permanent contraceptive method was 7.3%. Three fourth (76.1%) of the women have ever heard about implants and implant 28 (50%) were the most widely used method. Almost two third of women had intention to use long acting and permanent methods. Knowledge of contraceptive and age of women have significant association with the use of long acting and permanent contraceptive methods. Conclusion The overall prevalence of long acting and permanent contraceptive method was low. Knowledge of contraceptive and age of women have significant association with use of long acting and permanent contraceptive. Extensive health information should be provided. PMID:25404960

  8. Prevalence of Abortion and Contraceptive Practice among Women Seeking Repeat Induced Abortion in Western Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Lamina, Mustafa Adelaja

    2015-01-01

    Background. Induced abortion contributes significantly to maternal mortality in developing countries yet women still seek repeat induced abortion in spite of availability of contraceptive services. The aim of this study is to determine the rate of abortion and contraceptive use among women seeking repeat induced abortion in Western Nigeria. Method. A prospective cross-sectional study utilizing self-administered questionnaires was administered to women seeking abortion in private hospitals/clinics in four geopolitical areas of Ogun State, Western Nigeria, from January 1 to December 31 2012. Data were analyzed using SPSS 17.0. Results. The age range for those seeking repeat induced abortion was 15 to 51 years while the median age was 25 years. Of 2934 women seeking an abortion, 23% reported having had one or more previous abortions. Of those who had had more than one abortion, the level of awareness of contraceptives was 91.7% while only 21.5% used a contraceptive at their first intercourse after the procedure; 78.5% of the pregnancies were associated with non-contraceptive use while 17.5% were associated with contraceptive failure. The major reason for non-contraceptive use was fear of side effects. Conclusion. The rate of women seeking repeat abortions is high in Nigeria. The rate of contraceptive use is low while contraceptive failure rate is high. PMID:26078881

  9. Contraception in The Netherlands: the low abortion rate explained.

    PubMed

    Ketting, E; Visser, A P

    1994-07-01

    This article gives a review of the main factors that are related to the low abortion rate in the Netherlands. Attention is payed to figures on abortion and the use of contraceptive methods since the beginning of the 1960s up to the end of the 1980s. The strong acceptance of family planning was influenced by changing values regarding sexuality and the family, the transition from an agricultural to a modern industrial society, rapid economic growth, declining influence of the churches on daily life, introduction of modern mass media and the increased general educational level. The introduction of modern contraceptives (mainly the pill and contraceptive sterilization) was stimulated by a strong voluntary family planning movement, fear for overpopulation, a positive role of GPs, and the public health insurance system. A reduction of unwanted pregnancies has been accomplished through successful strategies for the prevention of teenage pregnancy (including sex education, open discussions on sexuality in mass media, educational campaigns and low barrier services) as well as through wide acceptance of sterilization. The Dutch experience with family planning shows the following characteristics: a strong wish to reduce reliance on abortion, ongoing sexual and contraceptive education related to the actual experiences of the target groups, and low barrier family planning services.

  10. [Oral contraceptive use and prevalence of infection with Chlamydia trachomatis in women (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kinghorn, G R; Waugh, M A

    1983-05-01

    1080 nonpregnant women ages 16-34 years, presenting for the 1st time at a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases (STD), were examined and screened for infection with Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrheae, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Candida species. The respective prevalence rates were 21.1%, 20.7%, 13.4%, and 27.8%. Isolation rates for Chlamydia trachomatis, either occurring alone or in association with other genital infections, were significantly greater in women using oral contraceptives (OCs). This was not because OC users were more promiscuous. The findings strengthen the case for providing a routine chlamydial culture service for women attending STD clinics. They also indicate that the likelihood of chlamydial infection in women taking OCs is greater. (author's)

  11. Use of long-acting reversible contraceptives to reduce the rate of teen pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rome, Ellen

    2015-11-01

    Long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) are safe for use in adolescents and do not rely on compliance or adherence for effectiveness. Continuation rates are higher and pregnancy rates are lower for adolescent users of LARCs compared with short-acting methods such as oral contraceptives. Similarly, repeat pregnancy rates are lower when LARCs are used compared with other forms of contraception. Myths and misconceptions about LARCs and other contraceptives remain a barrier to their use. Health care providers are in a unique position to provide confidential care to adolescents, and should provide education to them about the various contraceptive options, especially LARCs.

  12. The link between oral contraceptive use and prevalence in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Strifert, Kim

    2014-12-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of developmental disabilities that include full syndrome autism, Asperger's syndrome, and other pervasive developmental disorders. The identified prevalence of ASD has increased in a short time period across multiple studies causing some to conclude that it has reached epidemic proportions in the U.S. Many possible explanations for the rise in numbers of individuals diagnosed with ASD have been offered and yet, causes and contributing factors for ASD are inadequately understood. Current evidence suggests that both genetics and environment play a part in causing ASD. One possible risk factor for the increase in prevalence has been profoundly overlooked in the existing biomedical and epidemiologic literature. As the prevalence of ASD has risen in the last sixty years, so has the prevalence of the usage of the oral contraceptives and other modern hormonal delivery methods. In 1960 about one million American women were using oral contraceptives, today close to 11 million women in the U.S. use oral contraceptives. Eighty-two percent of sexually active women in the U.S. have used oral contraceptives at some point during their reproductive years. Thus, the growth in use of progesterone/estrogen-based contraceptives in the United State has reached near-ubiquitous levels among women in the child-bearing age range. The suppression of ovulation produced by estrogen-progesterone is an indisputable abnormality. It is logical to consider the outcome of the ovum that would have been normally released from the ovary during ovulation. To date there is no comprehensive research into the potential neurodevelopmental effects of oral contraceptive use on progeny. The issue has been only sparsely considered in the biomedical literature. This article hypothesizes that the compounds, estrogen and progesterone, used in oral contraceptives modify the condition of the oocyte and give rise to a potent risk factor that helps explain the recent increase

  13. The Creeping Pearl: Why Has the Rate of Contraceptive Failure Increased in Clinical Trials of Combined Hormonal Contraceptive Pills?

    PubMed Central

    Trussell, James; Portman, David

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite several drawbacks, the Pearl Index continues to be the most widely used statistical measure of contraceptive failure. However, Pearl indices reported in studies of newer hormonal contraceptives appear to be increasing. STUDY DESIGN We searched PubMed and MIS databases for prospective trials evaluating oral contraceptive (OC) efficacy to examine potential factors that could contribute to increasing Pearl indices. RESULTS Numerous potential factors were identified, including an increased rate of failures of newer OCs, deficiencies in methods of calculating contraceptive failure rates, differences in study design and changes in patient populations resulting in increased rates of contraceptive failures due to the inappropriate or inconsistent use of the method. CONCLUSIONS The two most likely important contributors to the increase in Pearl indices are more frequent pregnancy testing with more sensitive tests and less adherent study populations. Because study populations appear to be increasingly representative of the likely actual users once the product is marketed, we can expect to see even higher failure rates in ongoing and future studies. This result poses challenges for companies and regulatory agencies. PMID:23683581

  14. Prevalent and Incident Bacterial Vaginosis Are Associated with Sexual and Contraceptive Behaviours in Young Australian Women

    PubMed Central

    Fairley, Christopher K.; Chen, Marcus Y.; Tabrizi, Sepehr N.; Donovan, Basil; Kaldor, John M.; McNamee, Kathryn; Urban, Eve; Walker, Sandra; Currie, Marian; Birden, Hudson; Bowden, Francis; Garland, Suzanne; Pirotta, Marie; Gurrin, Lyle; Hocking, Jane S.

    2013-01-01

    Background To determine prevalence and incidence of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and risk factors in young sexually-active Australian women. Methods 1093 women aged 16–25 years were recruited from primary-care clinics. Participants completed 3-monthly questionnaires and self-collected vaginal smears 6-monthly for 12-months. The primary endpoint was a Nugent Score = 7–10 (BV) and the secondary endpoint was a NS = 4–10 (abnormal flora [AF]). BV and AF prevalence estimates and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were derived, and adjusted odds ratios (AOR) calculated to explore epidemiological associations with prevalent BV and AF. Proportional-hazards regression models were used to examine factors associated with incident BV and AF. Results At baseline 129 women had BV [11.8% (95%CI: 9.4–14.2)] and 188 AF (17.2%; 15.1–19.5). Prevalent BV was associated with having a recent female partner [AOR = 2.1; 1.0–4.4] and lack of tertiary-education [AOR = 1.9; 1.2–3.0]; use of an oestrogen-containing contraceptive (OCC) was associated with reduced risk [AOR = 0.6; 0.4–0.9]. Prevalent AF was associated with the same factors, and additionally with >5 male partners (MSP) in 12-months [AOR = 1.8; 1.2–2.5)], and detection of C.trachomatis or M.genitalium [AOR = 2.1; 1.0–4.5]. There were 82 cases of incident BV (9.4%;7.7–11.7/100 person-years) and 129 with incident AF (14.8%; 12.5–17.6/100 person-years). Incident BV and AF were associated with a new MSP [adjusted rate ratio (ARR) = 1.5; 1.1–2.2 and ARR = 1.5; 1.1–2.0], respectively. OCC-use was associated with reduced risk of incident AF [ARR = 0.7; 0.5–1.0]. Conclusion This paper presents BV and AF prevalence and incidence estimates from a large prospective cohort of young Australian women predominantly recruited from primary-care clinics. These data support the concept that sexual activity is strongly associated with the development of BV and AF and that use of an OCC

  15. Clinical pearls: factors affecting reported contraceptive efficacy rates in clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Burkman, Ronald T

    2002-01-01

    Current combination oral contraceptives (OCs) are among the most popular, safe, and effective methods of reversible contraception. There are, however, many factors that can affect contraceptive failure rates as reported in clinical trials, including subject characteristics, factors related to study methodology and data analysis, and publication biases. The variability of these factors among clinical trials makes meaningful comparisons of contraceptive efficacy data across studies difficult, if not misleading or erroneous. It is even more difficult to reconcile the differences between clinical trial efficacy rates and everyday use rates; for instance, the National Survey of Family Growth reported that the rate of OC failure is close to 8% in the United States, which is higher than rates reported in clinical trials. Thus, it is important for the clinician to consider the many factors that can influence reporting of contraceptive failure rates in clinical trials and be aware of the limitations in differentiating OCs on the basis of contraceptive efficacy derived from clinical trial data. Furthermore, clinical trial data may not accurately predict contraceptive efficacy in everyday use.

  16. Low prevalence of contraceptive counseling at Srinagarind hospital, Thailand among women of reproductive age with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective Unplanned pregnancy in women with SLE can have grave complications both for the child and the woman. We studied the prevalence of contraceptive counseling among women of reproductive age with SLE at a university hospital in Northeast Thailand. Methods Recruited: 125 women with SLE, between 15 and 50 years, followed up at the Rheumatology Clinic. A questionnaire was administered and the results analyzed to identify the prevalence of contraceptive counseling. Results The majority of women with SLE had had their reproductive goals evaluated (76.00%, 95% CI 66–83) and received contraceptive counseling (72%). Among the SLE patients at risk for pregnancy, only one-third used effective contraception and one-fifth of those did not have any background knowledge about SLE and pregnancy. Contraceptive counseling was more frequently given to women who had had a previous pregnancy or who were already concerned about SLE as related to pregnancy. Conclusion The majority of SLE patients had at one time or other received contraceptive counseling, but some reported not grasping the gravity. The survey results presented herein suggest that a multidisciplinary team is needed to improve patient knowledge regarding SLE as it affects on pregnancy and relatedly contraceptive counseling. PMID:23577791

  17. Postpartum amenorrhea in selected developing countries: estimates from contraceptive prevalence surveys.

    PubMed

    Knodel, J; Lewis, G

    1984-01-01

    Data collected in contraceptive prevalence surveys for Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Barbados, Colombia, Costa Rica, and Peru on how soon following childbirth menstruation returned provide the basis for national level estimates of the duration of postpartum amenorrhea. 2 somewhat different techniques are used for estimating median and mean durations of postpartum amenorrhea. The results are compared with information indicating patterns of breastfeeding. The analysis indicates considerable cross-national variation in the mean and median duration of postpartum amenorrhea and suggests that estimating postpartum amenorrhea from information on breastfeeding alone could be misleading. What is most striking about the results is how quickly postpartum amenorrhea appears to terminate in most of the countries. Only for Korean women is the median duration substantially above 1/2 a year. The results suggest that at least for most of the limited number of developing countries for which Westinghouse Contraceptive Prevalence Survey data are available, postpartum nonsusceptibility is providing protection against a new pregnancy for only a relatively short period following a birth for the majority of women. In all the countries with available data except Costa Rica, breastfeeding is close to universal, involving at least 90% of all children; in Costa Rica, only about 3/4 of children are ever breastfed. The average duration of breastfeeding is noticeably longer in the 3 Asian countries than in the Latin American ones.

  18. Emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    Two oral postcoital contraceptive agents are currently available. The first is a 2 x 2 pill; the second is a 5 x 5. Both release a higher dose of hormones than conventional contraceptive pills. Success rates range between 96% and 99%. They must be taken within 72 hours of intercourse. Side effects include nausea and vomiting. Contraindications are the same as for the common oral contraceptives. The contraceptive mode of action can be any of the following: 1) by making the lining of the uterus unreceptive; 2) by slowing the movement of the egg in the fallopian tube; or 3) by affecting the release of the egg. Emergency contraceptive pills have no effect once implantation takes place. The IUD can be used as an emergency postcoital contraceptive method if placed within 10 days of coitus. They are usually placed within 5-7 days because of laws regarding when birth control becomes abortion. One failure has been reported in Great Britain (December, 1993). Side effects are the same as with regular use. RU486/PG may be used in the future as an emergency contraceptive agent. Research is in progress on success rates and side effects. This agent could potentially be used at any time. Currently, emergency contraception can only be obtained by prescription. Limited hours and interrogating staff are obstacles in such emergencies. British women's groups are asking that emergency oral contraceptive pills be made available over the counter with advice from the pharmacist.

  19. [Postcoital contraception].

    PubMed

    Hamerlynck, J V

    1981-07-11

    Some form of postcoital contraception for protection against unwanted pregnancy is indispensable today especially in cases of rape, failed mechanical contraception, or 1st sexual contact without contraception. A tabletform of postcoital contraceptive would be acceptable if 100% certainty is assured and it doesn't involve adverse effects. Postcoitally administered high-dose estrogens proved effective in Macaca mulatta. Diethylstilbestrol in variable dosages with or without ethinylestradiol was used in various studies and with variable results. Pregnancy rates depended on time of coitus in cycle, contraceptive dosage, and time of administration after coitus (within 72 hours). Conjugated estrogens and various progestagens or combinations of both have been tried with variable success. Another form of postcoital contraception is IUD insertion within 7 days following unprotected coitus. Advantages of this method are the time factors and absence of adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives. Postcoital hormonal contraceptives cause changes in the endometrium which prevent blastocyst implantation. They alter tubal function affecting zygote movement towards the uterus. They have an antiovulatory effect and may be luteolytic. Estrogens have more severe side effects than progestagens. Nausea, vomiting, mastodynia, fluid retention, and vaginal bleeding can result from estrogens. Progestagens can cause irregular bleeding. Combination of both can cause menstrual irregularity. Postcoital hormonal contraceptives are contraindicated in heart and liver diseases, thrombosis, and pregnancy (teratogenic and carcinogenic effects on offspring). Pregnancy despite postcoital contraception results in extrauterine pregnancy in 10% of patients. The most important reservations in evaluating publications on this subject are: 1) lack of control group; 2) estimation of pregnancy probability is not reliable because of study population used; 3) patient fertility cannot be ascertained; and 4

  20. Emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David A; Raymond, Elizabeth G

    2002-08-06

    Emergency contraception is used to prevent pregnancy after a coital act not adequately protected by a regular method of contraception. In contrast to early medical abortion, emergency contraception prevents a pregnancy from starting and does not disrupt an established pregnancy. The most commonly used approaches consist of two oral doses of contraceptive steroids. The levonorgestrel-only regimen (levonorgestrel, 0.75 mg, repeated in 12 hours) appears to be more effective and better tolerated than the Yuzpe regimen (ethinyl estradiol, 100 microg, and levonorgestrel, 0.5 mg, repeated in 12 hours). In the largest randomized, controlled trial to date, levonorgestrel prevented about 85% of pregnancies that would have occurred without its use. Hormonal emergency contraception has no known medical contraindications, although it is not indicated for suspected or confirmed pregnancy. However, if hormonal emergency contraception is inadvertently taken in early pregnancy, neither the woman nor the fetus will be harmed. Nausea and vomiting associated with the Yuzpe regimen can be reduced by prophylactic use of meclizine. A strong medical and legal case exists for making hormonal emergency contraception available over the counter, as has happened in countries other than the United States. Easier access to and wider use of emergency contraception could dramatically lower the high rates of unintended pregnancy and induced abortion in the United States.

  1. Use of Contraception and Attitudes towards Contraceptive Use in Swedish Women - A Nationwide Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kopp Kallner, Helena; Thunell, Louise; Brynhildsen, Jan; Lindeberg, Mia; Gemzell Danielsson, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe contraceptive use and attitudes towards contraceptive use in Sweden which has the highest abortion rate in Western Europe. Secondary objectives were to investigate knowledge of contraceptive methods and outcomes of unplanned and unwanted pregnancies. Design Telephone survey. Setting National survey of women living in Sweden. Population Women between 16 and 49 years. Methods The survey contained 22 questions with free text and multi choice answers on demographics, contraceptive use, knowledge of and attitudes towards contraception, the importance of monthly bleeding and experience of unintended pregnancy. Main Outcome Measures Distribution of use of contraceptive methods and non-use of contraception among Swedish women. Prevalence and outcome of unintended pregnancies. Results A total of 1001 women participated in the survey. Of all women, 721/1001 (72.1%) currently used contraception whereas 268/1001 (26.8%) women did not. Long acting reversible contraception, (LARC; implant and intra uterine contraception) was used by 24.3% of women. The unmet need of contraception in Sweden was estimated at 8.9% (89/1001 women). A total of 781 (78%) women had never experienced an unintended pregnancy whereas 220 (22%) women had had at least one unintended pregnancy. Users and non-users alike stated that one of the most important characteristics of a contraceptive method is its effectiveness. Conclusions Sweden has a large unmet need for contraception. Furthermore, a large proportion of women have experienced at least one unintended pregnancy. Increasing contraceptive use and promotion of LARC is a possible way forward in the effort to reduce the rates of unwanted pregnancies. PMID:25992901

  2. Typical-use contraceptive failure rates in 43 countries with Demographic and Health Survey data: summary of a detailed report

    PubMed Central

    Polis, Chelsea B.; Bradley, Sarah E.K.; Bankole, Akinrinola; Onda, Tsuyoshi; Croft, Trevor; Singh, Susheela

    2016-01-01

    Background While most unintended pregnancies occur because couples do not use contraception, contraceptive failure is also an important underlying cause. However, few recent studies outside of the United States have estimated contraceptive failure rates, and most such studies have been restricted to married women, to a limited number of countries and to 12-month failure rate estimates. Methods Using self-reported data from 43 countries with Demographic and Health Survey data, we estimated typical-use contraceptive failure rates for seven contraceptive methods at 12, 24 and 36 months of use. We provide a median estimate for each method across 43 countries overall, in seven subregions and in individual countries. We assess differences by various demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. Estimates are not corrected for potential errors in retrospective reporting contraceptive use or potential underreporting of abortion, which may vary by country and subgroups within countries. Results Across all included countries, reported 12-month typical-use failure rates were lowest for users of longer-acting methods such as implants (0.6 failures per 100 episodes of use), intrauterine devices (1.4) and injectables (1.7); intermediate for users of short-term resupply methods such as oral contraceptive pills (5.5) and male condoms (5.4); and highest for users of traditional methods such as withdrawal (13.4) or periodic abstinence (13.9), a group largely using calendar rhythm. Conclusions Our findings help us to highlight those methods, subregions and population groups that may be in need of particular attention for improvements in policies and programs to address higher contraceptive failure rates. PMID:27018154

  3. Contraceptive implants.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding.

  4. Providing Contraception to Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Raidoo, Shandhini; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents have high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique reproductive health challenges. Providing confidential contraceptive services to adolescents is important in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy. Long-acting contraception such as the intrauterine device and contraceptive implant are recommended as first-line contraceptives for adolescents because they are highly effective with few side effects. The use of barrier methods to prevent sexually transmitted infections should be encouraged. Adolescents have limited knowledge of reproductive health and contraceptive options, and their sources of information are often unreliable. Access to contraception is available through a variety of resources that continue to expand.

  5. Prescribing contraceptives for women with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Mary V; Ross, Ruth

    2011-07-01

    Although women with serious mental illness have high rates of lifetime sexual partners, they infrequently use contraception. Consequently, the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections is high in this population. In addition, while the overall rate of pregnancy in women with schizophrenia of child-bearing age is lower than in the general population, the percentage of pregnancies that are unwanted is higher than that in the general population. The objective of this paper is to help clinicians explore knowledge of appropriate methods of contraception for women who suffer from schizophrenia. The authors reviewed recent literature on the use of contraceptive methods by women with schizophrenia treated with antipsychotic and adjunctive medications. Contraceptive counseling to women and their partners is an important part of comprehensive care for women with serious and persistent mental illness. Women with schizophrenia who smoke, are overweight, or have diabetes, migraine, cardiovascular disease, or a family history of breast cancer should be offered non-hormonal contraception. Women with more than one sexual partner should be advised on barrier methods in addition to any other contraceptive measures they are using. Clinicians should be alert for potential interactions among oral hormonal contraceptives, smoking, and therapeutic drugs. Long-lasting contraceptive methods, such as intrauterine devices, progesterone depot injections, or tubal ligation are reasonable options for women having no wish to further expand their families.

  6. Improving access to emergency contraception under the Scottish Sexual Health Strategy: can rates of unintended pregnancy be reduced?

    PubMed

    McGowan, James G

    2013-09-01

    Unintended pregnancy is a global sexual health problem. Outcomes of unintended pregnancy include unwanted childbirth and abortion, which may be associated with negative physical and psychosocial health implications for women. In Scotland, the Scottish Sexual Health Strategy has the stated goal of improving the sexual health of the people of Scotland. One aim of the Strategy is to reduce rates of unintended pregnancy and one policy designed to achieve this is 'widening access to emergency contraception'. This paper examines the success of this policy with reference to the implicit link it makes between expanding access to emergency contraception and increasing its effective use, aiming thereby to reduce rates of unintended pregnancy. Since there is evidence that previous policies and strategies expanding access to emergency contraception have failed to reduce such rates, alternative approaches to achieve a reduction in unintended pregnancies are discussed.

  7. Male contraception.

    PubMed

    Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald S

    2002-04-01

    Currently approved male-directed contraceptive methods include condoms and vas occlusion. Vas occlusion is very effective but is intended to be non-reversible. Condoms have a relatively high failure rate, at least partially due to compliance problems and are not accepted by many couples. The only other male-oriented methods in clinical trials utilize the administration of testosterone alone or its combination with another gonadotropin-suppressing agent such as a progestin or a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist. Studies published in the 1990s demonstrated that a testosterone-containing hormonal contraceptive method suppressed spermatogenesis to azoospermia in most men and severe oligozoospermia in the remaining. The contraceptive efficacy after treatment with testosterone alone was comparable to that of female hormonal methods. Having proven that reversible male contraception is a reality, present trials are attempting to identify the best androgen delivery system and the most effective androgen plus progestin preparation. It is likely that the first marketed male hormonal contraceptive method will be a long-acting (injectable or implant) combination of an androgen plus a progestin. Research is continuing to identify other target areas for male contraceptive development, including agents with post-testicular and epididymal sites of action.

  8. [Contraception in immigrant women: influence of sociocultural aspects on the choice of contraceptive method].

    PubMed

    Paraíso Torras, B; Maldonado Del Valle, M D; López Muñoz, A; Cañete Palomo, M L

    2013-01-01

    There are currently 6 million immigrants living in Spain. Half of them are women, the majority of whom are of childbearing age. These women, who suffer high rates of induced abortion, form a special group who require a special approach to their reproductive health. In order to study the use of contraceptive methods in this population, a review was made of 1100 clinical histories from our Sexual Health and Reproduction Clinic. Latin American women were the most prevalent group who came to seek information about contraception, followed by Eastern Europeans and Moroccans. Fewer Asian and Sub-Saharan women sought these services. The contraceptives most frequently used were the intrauterine device (used mostly by Latin American and Eastern European women), and combined oral contraception, most used by Moroccan women. It is important to advise the immigrant women about contraceptive methods, taking into account their preferences, in order to improve adherence to the method.

  9. Contraceptive Sponge

    MedlinePlus

    Contraceptive sponge Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff The contraceptive sponge is a type of birth control (contraceptive) that prevents ... shaped, and made of polyurethane foam. The contraceptive sponge contains spermicide, which blocks or kills sperm. Before ...

  10. Plan A: postabortion contraception.

    PubMed

    Micks, Elizabeth; Prager, Sarah

    2014-12-01

    More than 1 million abortions are performed annually in the United States. Women presenting for abortion care are often motivated by the pregnancy to use effective contraception; they are also at high risk for repeat unintended pregnancy. For these reasons, abortion represents an optimal time to initiate effective contraception. There is strong evidence that most methods of contraception, including intrauterine devices and the contraceptive implant, should be initiated at the time of the abortion procedure. Most women ovulate within the first month after an abortion. If provision of contraception is delayed, women are less likely to use effective contraception and more likely to have a repeat unintended pregnancy. Although some methods of permanent contraception can be safely performed at the time of abortion, federal and state laws often restrict these procedures being performed concurrently. Contraceptive counseling and provision at the time of abortion are important strategies to decrease rates of unintended pregnancy.

  11. Contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    Contraception is a pillar in reducing adolescent pregnancy rates. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that pediatricians develop a working knowledge of contraception to help adolescents reduce risks of and negative health consequences related to unintended pregnancy. Over the past 10 years, a number of new contraceptive methods have become available to adolescents, newer guidance has been issued on existing contraceptive methods, and the evidence base for contraception for special populations (adolescents who have disabilities, are obese, are recipients of solid organ transplants, or are HIV infected) has expanded. The Academy has addressed contraception since 1980, and this policy statement updates the 2007 statement on contraception and adolescents. It provides the pediatrician with a description and rationale for best practices in counseling and prescribing contraception for adolescents. It is supported by an accompanying technical report.

  12. Socioeconomic factors associated with contraceptive use and method choice in urban slums of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Kamal, S M Mostafa

    2015-03-01

    This article explores the socioeconomic factors affecting contraceptive use and method choice among women of urban slums using the nationally representative 2006 Bangladesh Urban Health Survey. Both bivariate and multivariate statistical analyses were applied to examine the relationship between a set of sociodemographic factors and the dependent variables. Overall, the contraceptive prevalence rate was 58.1%, of which 53.2% were modern methods. Women's age, access to TV, number of unions, nongovernmental organization membership, working status of women, number of living children, child mortality, and wealth index were important determinants of contraceptive use and method preference. Sex composition of surviving children and women's education were the most important determinants of contraceptive use and method choice. Programs should be strengthened to provide nonclinical modern methods free of cost among the slum dwellers. Doorstep delivery services of modern contraceptive methods may raise the contraceptive prevalence rate among the slum dwellers in Bangladesh.

  13. Continuation rates for oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy. The ESHRE Capri Workshop Group.

    PubMed

    2000-08-01

    Despite the safety and effectiveness of low oestrogen-dose oral contraceptives (OC) and postmenopausal hormone replacement there is poor continuity of use of these agents by women. Patterns of use and the reasons affecting different frequencies of use in different countries are presented. Continuity and discontinuation rates are difficult to assess accurately but it is believed that the main reasons why women discontinue use of these agents are concerns about their perceived health risks and the presence of, or fear of, adverse clinical effects, particularly unscheduled uterine bleeding and weight gain. More information is needed about OC continuation rates in order to improve the acceptability of these safe, effective agents. Most women discontinue use of postmenopausal hormonal replacement within 2 years of initiating the therapy. Reasons include disappearance of symptoms of oestrogen deficiency, lack of awareness of health benefits of oestrogen, presence of side-effects (such as breast tenderness and weight gain), presence of uterine bleeding and increasing age. Suggestions to increase continuation of OC include extensive individual pretreatment counselling with a different emphasis in different age groups, education at the time of follow-up visits and telephone calls, and extensive use of educational aids such as brochures, pamphlets and audio tapes, and improvement of pharmaceutical packaging information. In conclusion there is an urgent need to assess the value of these strategies by long-term large controlled studies.

  14. Heart rate variability across the menstrual cycle in young women taking oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, André L; Ramos, Plínio S; Vianna, Lauro C; Ricardo, Djalma R

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that resting heart rate variability (HRV) is modified by different phases of the menstrual cycle in nonusers of oral contraceptive pills (OCP); however, the effect of OCP on autonomic control of the heart remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate HRV during the low hormone (LH-not taking OCP) and during the high hormone (HH-active OCP use) phases of the menstrual cycle in young women. Seventeen healthy women (19-31 years) taking OCP for at least 6 consecutive months were enrolled in this study. Plasma estradiol and progesterone were verified at each visit. HRV was assessed by using one-lead electrocardiography in time and frequency domains, in which participants rested in the supine position for a 20-min period with a breathing rate of 15 cycles/min. In addition, resting heart rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were obtained. Both plasma estradiol (LH: 19.8 ± 4.2 pg/mL vs. HH: 12.4 ± 1.5 pg/mL; p > .05) and progesterone (LH: 0.247 ± 0.58 ng/mL vs. HH: 0.371 ± 0.08 ng/mL; p > .05) (mean ± SE) levels were similar in both phases. No significant difference was obtained for any component of HRV, heart rate, or blood pressure between the LH and HH phases (p > .05). These results provide preliminary evidence that use of OCP does not affect HRV during the menstrual cycle in healthy women.

  15. Emergency contraception in Mexico City: what do health care providers and potential users know and think about it?

    PubMed

    Langer, A; Harper, C; Garcia-Barrios, C; Schiavon, R; Heimburger, A; Elul, B; Renoso Delgado, S; Ellertson, C

    1999-10-01

    Emergency contraception promises to reduce Mexico's high unwanted pregnancy and unsafe abortion rates. Because oral contraceptives are sold over-the-counter, several emergency contraceptive regimens are already potentially available to those women who know about the method. Soon, specially packaged emergency contraceptives may also arrive in Mexico. To initiate campaigns promoting emergency contraception, we interviewed health care providers and clients at health clinics in Mexico City, ascertaining knowledge, attitudes, and practices concerning the method. We found limited knowledge, but nevertheless cautious support for emergency contraception in Mexico. Health care providers and clients greatly overestimated the negative health effects of emergency contraception, although clients overwhelmingly reported that they would use or recommend it if needed. Although providers typically advocated medically controlled distribution, clients believed emergency contraception should be more widely available, including in schools and vending machines with information prevalent in the mass media and elsewhere.

  16. Long-acting reversible contraception.

    PubMed

    Peck, Susan A

    2013-10-01

    Although short-acting reversible hormonal contraceptives, such as oral contraceptives and the contraceptive patch and vaginal ring, remain the most commonly used contraceptive methods in the United States, they are also associated with the highest failure rates. Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) methods, such as intrauterine devices and contraceptive implants, offer high continuation rates and very low failure rates, and are safe for use in most women. The provision of LARC methods to adolescent, young adult and nulliparous women is a relatively new concept that offers an innovative option for these populations.

  17. Emergency Contraception

    MedlinePlus

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ114 CONTRACEPTION Emergency Contraception • What is emergency contraception (EC)? • How does EC work? • What are the different types of EC? • What is the most ...

  18. Emergency contraception

    MedlinePlus

    Morning-after pill; Postcoital contraception; Birth control - emergency; Plan B; Family planning - emergency contraception ... Emergency contraception most likely prevents pregnancy in the same way as regular birth control pills: By preventing or delaying ...

  19. Emergency Contraception

    MedlinePlus

    ... contraception are available: emergency contraceptive pills and the copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD).Emergency contraceptive pills include ... for emergency use, talk to your doctor.The copper-containing IUD (brand name: Paragard) is a small, ...

  20. Complications and continuation rates associated with two types of long-acting contraception

    PubMed Central

    Berenson, Abbey B.; Tan, Alai; Hirth, Jacqueline M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare complication and continuation rates of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) with the subdermal etonogestrel (ENG) implant across the US among women 15 – 44 years of age. Study Design A retrospective study of health insurance claims records from 2007–2011 identified a cohort of women who had LNG-IUS (n=79,920) or ENG implants (n=7,374) inserted and had insurance coverage for 12 months post-insertion. Claims for complications were examined 12 months after insertion, or until removal of either device within each of three age groups. Results After its introduction in 2007, the frequency of ENG implants increased each year and almost 1/3 of all insertions were in teenagers. However, among women ≤ 24 years old who had delivered an infant in the prior 8 weeks, a LNG-IUS was more likely to be inserted than an ENG implant (P < .05). The most frequent complications with both methods were related to abnormal menstruation, which was more likely to occur among ENG implant users. Overall, 83–88% of the entire sample used their chosen method for at least 12 months. The odds of continuation were similar for both methods among teenagers, but ENG implants were more likely to be removed prematurely among women 20 – 24 years old (OR 1.21, 95% CI: 1.06–1.39) and 25 – 44 years old (OR 1.49, 95% CI: 1.35–1.64). Conclusions Both of these long-acting contraceptive methods are well tolerated among women of all ages, and demonstrate high continuation rates. PMID:25555662

  1. Prevalence rates for diabetes mellitus in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Haddock, L; de Conty, I T

    1991-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze prevalence data for diabetes mellitus obtained from a household interview of a random sample of the general population by the Department of Health of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico for the years 1975-1986. Details of the prevalence rate by sex and age were analyzed for the years 1981, 1984, 1985, and 1986 and for the urban and rural population in 1985. The mean prevalence rate of known cases of diabetes showed a tendency to increase from 3.1% in 1975 to 5.1% in 1986. Prevalence rates adjusted for age and sex showed an increase in the mean prevalence for 1986 compared with that of 1981. The prevalence rate was significantly higher for the rural population for the age-group 45-64 yr old and for the urban population for the age-group greater than or equal to 65 yr. The prevalence rate compares with that of Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans in the New York City area. On the basis of the prevalence data, approximately 90% of the diabetic population is non-insulin dependent and 10% are insulin dependent. Major risk factors thought to explain the increased prevalence of non-insulin-dependent diabetes are increasing longevity of the Puerto Rican population, genetic predisposition, obesity, and changes in life-styles. In conclusion, Puerto Ricans, as other Hispanic Americans, have a higher prevalence of diabetes than the white American population.

  2. Contraception: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Sitruk-Ware, Regine

    2006-03-01

    Although it is estimated that the population growth rate will decline to a replacement level by 2050, it is also now predicted that the total world population will reach 8.9 billion in that year -- far higher than the 2004 estimate of 6.4 billion. More than 26 billion new couples will need contraceptives in the next half century. Although a steady increase in contraceptive use has been observed in both developed and developing countries, the contraceptive needs of a high percentage of couples have not yet been met and the number of unplanned pregnancies continues to increase. The actual use of contraception differs from region to region. Although no new method has been registered for many years, several new products have been marketed during the last 5. Among these are new implants, medicated intrauterine systems, contraceptive vaginal rings, transdermal patches and several new combined oral contraceptive formulations. New contraceptive methods have been developed to meet the objectives of expanding contraceptive choices for both women and men and answering an unmet need for contraceptives with a long-term action that meet the expectations of consumers. Simplicity, reversibility and effectiveness are the desired features of a male contraceptive, but no new male contraceptive method is yet available. New areas of basic research include studies on genes, proteins and enzymes involved in the reproductive system. The new methods will be targeted to specific interactions within the reproductive system at the level of ovaries and testes, as well as between spermatozoa and ova. This futuristic approach still keeps in mind the need for better access to existing contraceptive methods, as well as the discovery of new contraceptives that are simple to use, safe, reversible and inexpensive. In the future, contraceptives may be combined with other medicinal agents to provide dual protection against both pregnancy and other preventable conditions, such as sexually transmitted

  3. [Contraceptive methods].

    PubMed

    Toivonen, J

    1987-01-01

    Interest in contraceptive devices has increased in recent years due to their safety and protection offered against venereal disease. Use of the devices prevents sperm from entering the uterine canal. Failure of a device is usually caused either because the contraceptive outside the uterus is wrongly positioned or because not enough active spermicidal ingredients were released before ejaculation. Mass production of condoms was made possible through utilization of latex rubber. Different color and shape alternatives have made condom usage more popular in developing countries. The diaphragm and its variation, the cervical cap, are treated with spermicide and then placed inside the vagina. Correct size of the contraceptive is an important consideration. Spermicides consist of active substances that kill sperm, as well as a carrier substance such as foam, ointment and jelly. The newest preventive device is the contraceptive sponge, which can stay in place for up to 36 hours. IN vitro studies show that effectiveness of condoms is 0.5-2.0 (Pearl's index). Combination use of diaphragm and spermicide yields a protection rate of 2-20 (life-table index), and spermicides 0.3-30.0. Risks associated with these methods include local irritation. It was believed that some spermicides increased rats of miscarriage, Down's Syndrome and other chromosomal abnormalities, as well as limb anomalies. Diaphragm use increases potential for urinary tract infections. Toxic shock may occur with some users of sponge and diaphragm. All the mentioned contraceptives protect from infection, and are most suitable for people who cannot tolerate hormonal preparations or IUD's, who are in a casual sexual relationship or nursing mothers or youth.

  4. Forgettable contraception.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David A

    2009-12-01

    The term "forgettable contraception" has received less attention in family planning than has "long-acting reversible contraception." Defined here as a method requiring attention no more often than every 3 years, forgettable contraception includes sterilization (female or male), intrauterine devices, and implants. Five principal factors determine contraceptive effectiveness: efficacy, compliance, continuation, fecundity, and the timing of coitus. Of these, compliance and continuation dominate; the key determinants of contraceptive effectiveness are human, not pharmacological. Human nature undermines methods with high theoretical efficacy, such as oral contraceptives and injectable contraceptives. By obviating the need to think about contraception for long intervals, forgettable contraception can help overcome our human fallibility. As a result, all forgettable contraception methods provide first-tier effectiveness (contraceptives today with exclusively first-tier effectiveness is the one that can be started -- and then forgotten for years.

  5. [Social marketers' lack of success in using CSM discipline to harness commercial resources and increase contraceptive prevalence].

    PubMed

    Davies, J

    1984-01-01

    Social marketers have certainly shown that the CSM discipline can quickly and cost-effectively harness commercial resources to increase contraceptive prevalence. But why hasn't the social marketing idea caught on in more countries? According to Social Marketing Forum, only a tiny number of countries have active programs after more than a decade of effort. The most likely reason for this lack of success is doubt and fear on the part of both developing countries' officials and donor agencies about allowing marketing enthusiasts--with our very noticeable advertising methods--to join the family planning fight. And what has our answer been? Usually, a head-on retort such as, "But look at all the condoms we've sold]" And that gets us nowhere, because the successful peddling of 1 not-so-impressive method doesn't begin to balance the fears of a possible backlash that brash condom promotions could bring down on official heads. The lesson we should be learning is that social marketers possess to narrow an outlook and promote a small range of products that don't enthuse decisionmakers. Hence, we are often perceived as condom salesmen--and not much more. What should we be doing? We should be selling the idea of using private sector experience to assist national development. That means social development, particularly improved health, family planning and women's education. These 3 activities have proven effective in reducing fertility and would add up to a marketing opportunity--a longterm challenge that should enthuse dicisionmakers, private sector entrepreneurs and donor agencies alike. Further, our model--the commercial sector--is renowned for branching out and secceeding in a broad range of endeavors. As an example, Procter and Gamble uses separate divisions to market different products. Initiatives already exist in many countries to harness the private sector as a development tool. Social marketers should be leading the initiative--and benefitting from it, too.

  6. [Family planning. Regional differences in contraceptive practice].

    PubMed

    Palma Cabrera, Y; Suarez Morales, J

    1994-01-01

    Great efforts have been made to measure contraceptive prevalence in Mexico and to assess various aspects of differential usage. At present, 63.1% of fertile aged women in union are estimated to use a method. State prevalence rates ranged from 77.2% of couples in Baja California Sub to 46.3% in Oaxaca. In general, northern states and Mexico City had the highest prevalence rates and states in the center and south had the lowest. Results of the 1988 Survey of Determinants of Contraceptive Prevalence permit identification of sociocultural variables related to contraceptive usage. The data show that residents of the northwestern states have a considerably higher educational level and proportion urban than do those of the center or southeast. The southeast lagged the center in indicators of household characteristics and services, income, and infant mortality, and also had a higher rate of female labor force participation. The states of the center had a lower rate of contraceptive usage at 54.8% than did those of the southeast at 56.4%. The rate for the northwest states was 71.8%. Knowledge of contraceptive methods in the northwest and center was nearly universal, but almost one-fourth of rural women in the southeast reported not knowing a method. Reasons for not using a method varied in the three regions. Problems of access, lack of knowledge, and fear of side effects were the principal factors in the southeast. Opposition of the woman or spouse or religious beliefs were the main factors in the center. No significant barriers of culture or access were identified in the northwest. The average ideal family size was around 3.5 children in all three regions. The survey results demonstrate that having children was highly valued in all three regions. Children were more highly valued in the southeast for companionship, aid, and economic contribution; in the center as sources of affective relations; and in the northwest for satisfaction or personal fulfillment of the woman.

  7. Acceptability of contraception for men: a review.

    PubMed

    Glasier, Anna

    2010-11-01

    Methods of contraception for use by men include condoms, withdrawal and vasectomy. Prevalence of use of a method and continuation rates are indirect measures of acceptability. Worldwide, none of these "male methods" accounts for more than 7% of contraceptive use although uptake varies considerably between countries. Acceptability can be assessed directly by asking about intended (hypothetical) use and assessing satisfaction during/after use. Since they have been around for a very long time, there are very few data of this nature on condoms (as contraceptives rather than for prevention of infection), withdrawal or vasectomy. There are direct data on the acceptability of hormonal methods for men but from relatively small clinical trials which undoubtedly do not represent the real world. Surveys undertaken among the male general public demonstrate that, whatever the setting, at least 25% of men - and in most countries substantially more - would consider using hormonal contraception. Although probably an overestimate of the number of potential users when such a method becomes available, it would appear that hormonal contraceptives for men may have an important place on the contraceptive menu. Despite commonly expressed views to the contrary, most women would trust their male partner to use a hormonal method.

  8. Long-term contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Brown, Audrey

    2010-10-01

    To avoid unintended pregnancy, women in the UK need to consistently use reliable contraception for over 30 years. The long-acting reversible contraceptive methods compromise the progestogen-only implant, the progestogen-only injectable contraceptive, the copper-bearing intra-uterine device and the levonorgestrel-releasing intra-uterine system. These methods of contraception are highly reliable in pregnancy prevention, and are amongst the medically safest methods for users. Despite this, these long-acting methods are used by less than 10% of the UK population. National guidance has advised that increasing uptake of these long-acting methods will reduce the unplanned pregnancy rate. In addition, these methods are more cost effective than the oral contraceptive even at 1 year of use. Obstetricians and gynaecologists frequently come into contact with women requiring contraceptive advice, and should have a sound knowledge of the long-acting methods.

  9. [Contraception and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Amate, P; Luton, D; Davitian, C

    2013-06-01

    The mean age of first sexual intercourse is still around 17 in France, but a lot of teenagers are concerned by contraception before, with approximately 25% of sexually active 15-year-old girls. The contraceptive method must take into consideration some typical features of this population, as sporadic and non-planned sexual activity, with several sexual partners in a short period of time. In 2004, the "Haute Autorité de santé" has recommended, as first-line method, combined oral contraceptive (COC) pills, in association with male condoms. Copper-containing intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCD) and etonogestrel-containing subcutaneous implant have been suggested but not recommended. However, oral contraceptive pill, as a user-based method, carries an important typical-use failure rate, because remembering taking a daily pill, and dealing with stop periods, may be challenging. Some easier-to-use method should be kept in mind, as 28-day COC packs, transdermal contraceptive patches, and vaginal contraceptive rings. Moreover, American studies have shown that long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC), i.e. IUCD and implant, have many advantages for teenagers: very effective, safe, invisible. They seem well-fitted for this population, with high satisfaction and continuation rates, as long as side effects are well explained. Thus, LARC methods should be proposed more widely to teenagers. Anyway, before prescribing a contraceptive method, it is important to determine the specific situation of every teenager, to let them choose the method that they consider as appropriate in their own case, and to think about the availability of the chosen method. It is necessary to explain how to handle mistakes or misses with user-based contraceptive methods, and emergency contraception can be anticipated and prescribed in advanced provision. The use of male condoms should be encouraged for adolescents, with another effective contraceptive method, in order to reduce the high risk

  10. [Contraception and obesity].

    PubMed

    Lobert, M; Pigeyre, M; Gronier, H; Catteau-Jonard, S; Robin, G

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing massively over several decades in industrialized countries. Obese women are sexually active but they use fewer contraceptive methods and are at high risk of unintended pregnancy. In addition, obesity is an important risk factor for venous thromboembolism events and arterial thrombosis (myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke). All of these data are to be considered in choosing a contraceptive method for obese women. Except depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injection, the progestin-only contraceptives (progestin only pills and etonogestrel subdermal implant) and the intra-uterine devices are the preferred contraceptive methods in obese women. The combined estrogen-progestin contraceptives (pill, patch and vaginal ring) may be proposed in very strict conditions (no other associated vascular risk factor). Obesity does not increase the risk of failure of most contraceptive methods. Bariatric surgery is a complex situation. It requires to program a possible pregnancy and contraception is needed for several months. Some bariatric surgical techniques such as by-pass can induce gastrointestinal malabsorption. In this situation, all oral contraceptives are not recommended because of a higher risk of failure.

  11. [Hormonal contraception].

    PubMed

    Prilepskaia, V N

    1991-12-01

    Effective contraceptives contribute to the regulation of births, protect the health of women, reduce maternal and perinatal mortality and gynecological diseases, and prevent abortion-related complications. Complications after abortion average 30%, and among primigravidas the rate reaches 45%. Abortion can result in sterility and in the inability to carry out the pregnancy. Oral contraceptives (OCs) are used by 150 million globally. In new preparations ethinyl estradiol (EE) and levonorgestrel (LNG) are the most common components. In the 2-phase and 3-phase preparations Sequilar, Anteovin, and lipid profile safe Triquilar the gestagen component was reduced 40%. Continuin and Famulen are minipills, and Postinor is a postcoital contraceptive. Absolute contraindications of OCs include thromboembolytic diseases, severe cardiovascular system diseases, liver disorders, cirrhosis, cerebral vascular diseases, grave diabetes, jaundice, and malignant tumors of the mammae and sexual organs. Rigevidon, Triquilar, and Trisiston have high steroid content with minimal side effects. The protective effect of OCs are: 2-3 times lower risk of inflammation of the small pelvis, lower risk of malignant and benign ovarian tumors that lasts even after discontinuation, uterine cancer prevention (antiproliferation effect on the endometrium and inhibition of mitotic activity of the myometrium), and reduced risk of benign breast neoplasms. The finding that estrogen-induced risk of breast cancer increases with longterm contraceptive use in young nulliparas has not been persuasively proven. The optimal duration of uninterrupted OC use is 1-1.5 years. Monophasic estrogen-gestagen preparations include Bisecurin, Non-Ovlon, Ovidon, Rigevidon, Minisiston, and Demulen with low dosages of EE, LNG, norethisterone acetate, and diacetate ethonodiol. Norplant is a subdermal silastic capsule with effectiveness for up to 5 years.

  12. Changes in contraceptive use and fertility: Panama, 1976 to 1984.

    PubMed

    Warren, C W; Oberle, M W; Morris, L; Medica, W

    1988-01-01

    From 1976 to 1984 important demographic changes occurred in Panama. The total fertility rate declined from 4.5 to 3.7, and contraceptive use among married women 20-44 years of age increased from 55% to 63%. However, using data from 3 national level reproductive health surveys which were conducted in Panama in 1976, 1979, and 1984, we found that most of the changes took place between 1976 and 1979. Since 1979, overall contraceptive use and fertility have remained virtually unchanged, although there has been an important method-mix shift toward an increase in the use of contraceptive sterilization and IUD's, with an accompanying decline in the use of oral contraceptives. Although the singulate mean age at marriage remained relatively constant, the average duration of breastfeeding rose 23% during the period. Further gains in contraceptive prevalence and reduction in unplanned fertility in Panama will largely depend on enhanced program efforts 1st begun in the early 1970's by the Panama Ministry of Health. Future program efforts especially should be directed toward encouraging young couples to space their children more effectively by using temporary methods of contraception. The surveys used for this analysis were the 1976 Panama National Fertility Survey of the World Fertility Survey program, the 1979 Panama Contraceptive Prevalence Survey (Westinghouse), and the 1984 Panama Maternal-Child Health/Family Planning Survey.

  13. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Maclennan, A H

    1987-12-01

    Over 60 million women use highly efficient and safe modern combined oral contraceptives (OCs) every day. A women who takes the oral contraceptive for 5 years before the age of 30 will actually live 12 days longer, although a woman taking the pill for the 1st time for 5 years after the age of 30 will have her life span reduced on the average by 80 days. OC related morbidity and mortality mostly occur in women over 35 who smoke. Combined low dose OCs are safe for women who do not smoke, at least to 45 years of age and probably to the menopause. The prescription of OCs is also safe to the young adolescent. The pill does not interfere with maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary ovarian axis and does not increase the incidence of amenorrhoea, oligomenorrhoea or infertility in later life. Patients with contraindications to estrogen therapy are excluded from OC use (history of thromboembolism, major heart disease, liver disease, breast cancer). Low-dose (30-35 mcg estrogen-containing monophasic or triphasic) pills are recommended. Combined oral contraceptives contain either ethinyl estradiol (1.7 to 2 times more potent) or mestranol. After absorption the progestagens, norethisterone acetate, ethynodiol diacetate and lynoestrenol are all metabolized to norethisterone. The progestagen-only pill has about a 2% failure rate and poorer cycle control than the combined pill, but it lacks estrogenic, progestagenic and androgenic side effects. This pill is suitable for the lactating mother, for smokers over 35, for hypertensive patients, and for those with a history of thrombosis. The efficacy of the progestagen-only pill is restored in 3 days of pill taking. Postcoital contraception is an alternative: treatment can be given for at least 72 hours after intercourse. The Yuzpe method calls for the patient to take 2 combined oral contraceptive tablets containing levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol (Eugynon or Ovral) followed by a further 2 tablets 12 hours later. This regimen

  14. Unintended Pregnancy and Contraception Among Active Duty Servicewomen and Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Vinita; Borrero, Sonya; Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla

    2012-01-01

    The number of women of childbearing age who are active duty service members or veterans of the U.S. military is increasing. These women may seek reproductive health care at medical facilities operated by the military, in the civilian sector or through the Department of Veterans Affairs. This article reviews the current data on unintended pregnancy and prevalence of and barriers to contraceptive use among active duty and veteran women. Active duty servicewomen have high rates of unintended pregnancy and low contraceptive use which may be due to official prohibition of sexual activity in the military, logistic difficulties faced by deployed women and limited patient and provider knowledge of available contraceptives. In comparison, little is known about rates of unintended pregnancy and contraceptive use among women veterans. Based on this review, research recommendations to address these issues are provided. PMID:22200252

  15. Prevalence Rates of Mental Disorders in Chilean Prisons

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, Adrian P.; Alvarado, Rubén; Fritsch, Rosemarie; Poblete, Catalina; Villagra, Carolina; Kastner, Sinja; Priebe, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Objective High rates of mental disorders have been reported for prison populations worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The present study aimed to establish prevalence rates of mental disorders in Chilean prisoners. Method A nationwide random sample of 1008 prisoners was assessed in 7 penal institutions throughout Chile. Twelve-month prevalence rates were established using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) and compared to the prevalence rates previously published for the general population. Results Prevalence rates were 12.2% (95% CI, 10.2-14.1) for any substance use disorder, 8.3% (6.6-10.0) for anxiety disorders, 8.1% (6.5-9.8) for affective disorders, 5.7% (4.4-7.1) for intermittent explosive disorders, 2.2% (1.4-3.2) for ADHD of the adult, and 0.8% (0.3-1.3) for non-affective psychoses. Significantly higher prevalence rates among prisoners as compared to the general population in Chile were seen for major depression (6.1% vs. 3.7% males, Z=2.58, p<0.05) and illicit drug use (3.3% vs. 0.6% males with drug abuse, Z=2.04, p<0.05; 2.6% vs. 0.1% females with drug abuse, Z=5.36, p<0.001; 3.4% vs. 1.1% males with drug dependence, Z=3.70; p<0.001). Dysthymia (6.5% vs. 15.6%, Z=-2.39, p<0.05), simple (3.3% vs. 11.5%, Z=-3.13, p<0.001) and social phobias (3.9% vs. 9.7%, Z=2.38, p<0.05) were significantly less frequent in the female prison population than in the general population. One-year prevalence rates of alcohol abuse (2.3% vs. 3.9%; Z=-2.04; p<0.05) and dependence (2.7% vs. 8.2%; Z=-5.24; p<0.001) were less prevalent in the male prison population than in the general population. Conclusions Service provision for prison populations in Chile should acknowledge high rates of depression and illicit drug use. Overall prevalence rates are lower than reported in other LMICs. Previous research in prison populations in LMICs might have overestimated prevalence rates of mental disorders. PMID:23894415

  16. Contraceptive Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troen, Philip; And Others

    This report provides an overview of research activities and needs in the area of contraceptive development. In a review of the present state, discussions are offered on the effectiveness and drawbacks of oral contraceptives, intrauterine devices, barrier methods, natural family planning, and sterilization. Methods of contraception that are in the…

  17. State Variations in Women’s Socioeconomic Status and Use of Modern Contraceptives in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Lamidi, Esther O.

    2015-01-01

    Background According to the 2014 World Population Data Sheet, Nigeria has one of the highest fertility and lowest contraceptive prevalence rates around the world. However, research suggests that national contraceptive prevalence rate overshadows enormous spatial variations in reproductive behavior in the country. Objective I examined the variations in women’s socioeconomic status and modern contraceptive use across states in Nigeria. Methods Using the 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey data (n = 18,910), I estimated the odds of modern contraceptive use among sexually active married and cohabiting women in a series of multilevel logistic regression models. Results The share of sexually active, married and cohabiting women using modern contraceptives widely varied, from less than one percent in Kano, Yobe, and Jigawa states, to 40 percent in Osun state. Most of the states with low contraceptive prevalence rates also ranked low on women’s socioeconomic attributes. Results of multilevel logistic regression analyses showed that women residing in states with greater shares of women with secondary or higher education, higher female labor force participation rates, and more women with health care decision-making power, had significantly higher odds of using modern contraceptives. Differences in women’s participation in health care decisions across states remained significantly associated with modern contraceptive use, net of individual-level socioeconomic status and other covariates of modern contraceptive use. Conclusion Understanding of state variations in contraceptive use is crucial to the design and implementation of family planning programs. The findings reinforce the need for state-specific family planning programs in Nigeria. PMID:26258578

  18. Immaculate contraception.

    PubMed

    Smith, K

    The city of Dundee has the highest teen pregnancy and abortion rate in Scotland. In the heart of the city, The Corner is a health and information drop-in center for people aged 12-25 years which has provided a range of health promotion activities, contraception services, and general information and advice since April 1996. 8000 inquiries were posed from young people in Dundee and the surrounding areas in The Corner's first full year of operation, one-third on sexual health. A survey conducted last December found that 55% of the center's clients were aged 12-15. Young people helped to design the center, creating a cafe atmosphere in the main drop-in area with tables, chairs, and loungers. Reference literature is on display, music plays, and a series of computers is linked to health information databases. In this environment, clients can hang out, ask questions, and receive condoms or other contraceptive services without the embarrassment of attending a local family planning clinic. The examination and counseling rooms are also relaxed and warmly-appointed. The Corner has also offered emergency contraception since January, one of the few places in Scotland where nurses can provide it. While The Corner has received some local criticism, it is operating within the laws and codes of professional practices. The center is jointly funded by Tayside Health Board, Dundee City Council, and the Scottish Office. Finally, the center has a travel program which offers a package of activities based upon a different foreign country each week.

  19. Postpartum contraception.

    PubMed

    Sober, Stephanie; Schreiber, Courtney A

    2014-12-01

    As birth spacing has demonstrated health benefits for a woman and her children, contraception after childbirth is recognized as an important health issue. The potential risk of pregnancy soon after delivery underscores the importance of initiating postpartum contraception in a timely manner. The contraceptive method initiated in the postpartum period depends upon a number of factors including medical history, anatomic and hormonal factors, patient preference, and whether or not the woman is breastfeeding. When electing a contraceptive method, informed choice is paramount. The availability of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods immediately postpartum provides a strategy to achieve reductions in unintended pregnancy.

  20. College Students' Perceived Disease Risk versus Actual Prevalence Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Dickerson, Justin B.; Sosa, Erica T.; McKyer, E. Lisako J.; Ory, Marcia G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare college students' perceived disease risk with disease prevalence rates. Methods: Data were analyzed from 625 college students collected with an Internet-based survey. Paired t-tests were used to separately compare participants' perceived 10-year and lifetime disease risk for 4 diseases: heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and…

  1. Unmet contraceptive needs among refugees

    PubMed Central

    Aptekman, Marina; Rashid, Meb; Wright, Vanessa; Dunn, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe what women of reproductive age who received primary care at a refugee health clinic were using for contraception upon arrival to the clinic, and to quantify the unmet contraceptive needs within that population. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Crossroads Clinic in downtown Toronto, Ont. Participants Women of reproductive age (15 to 49 years) who first presented for care between December 1, 2011, and December 1, 2012. To be included, a woman had to have had 2 or more clinic visits or an annual health examination. Exclusion criteria for the contraception prevalence calculation were female sexual partner, menopause, hysterectomy, pregnancy, or trying to conceive. Main outcome measures Contraception use prevalence was measured, as was unmet contraceptive need, which was calculated using a modified version of the World Health Organization’s definition: the number of women with an unmet need was expressed as a percentage of women of reproductive age who were married or in a union, or who were sexually active. Results Overall, 52 women met the criteria for inclusion in the contraceptive prevalence calculation. Of these, 16 women (30.8%) did not use any form of contraception. Twelve women were pregnant at some point in the year and stated the pregnancy was unwanted or mistimed. An additional 14 women were not using contraception but had no intention of becoming pregnant within the next 2 years. There were no women with postpartum amenorrhea not using contraception and who had wanted to delay or prevent their previous pregnancy. In total, 97 women were married or in a union, or were sexually active. Unmet need was calculated as follows: (12 + 14 + 0)/97 = 26.8%. Conclusion There was a high unmet contraceptive need in the refugee population in our study. All women of reproductive age should be screened for contraceptive need when first seeking medical care in Canada. PMID:25642489

  2. Obesity and hormonal contraceptive efficacy.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer A; Burke, Anne E

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern affecting an increasing proportion of reproductive-aged women. Avoiding unintended pregnancy is of major importance, given the increased risks associated with pregnancy, but obesity may affect the efficacy of hormonal contraceptives by altering how these drugs are absorbed, distributed, metabolized or eliminated. Limited data suggest that long-acting, reversible contraceptives maintain excellent efficacy in obese women. Some studies demonstrating altered pharmacokinetic parameters and increased failure rates with combined oral contraceptives, the contraceptive patch and emergency contraceptive pills suggest decreased efficacy of these methods. It is unclear whether bariatric surgery affects hormonal contraceptive efficacy. Obese women should be offered the full range of contraceptive options, with counseling that balances the risks and benefits of each method, including the risk of unintended pregnancy.

  3. Implementing personalized medicine with asymmetric information on prevalence rates.

    PubMed

    Antoñanzas, Fernando; Juárez-Castelló, Carmelo A; Rodríguez-Ibeas, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    Although personalized medicine is becoming the new paradigm to manage some diseases, the economics of personalized medicine have only focused on assessing the efficiency of specific treatments, lacking a theoretical framework analyzing the interactions between pharmaceutical firms and healthcare systems leading to the implementation of personalized treatments. We model the interaction between the hospitals and the manufacturer of a new treatment as an adverse selection problem where the firm does not have perfect information on the prevalence across hospitals of the genetic characteristics of the patients making them eligible to receive a new treatment. As a result of the model, hospitals with high prevalence rates benefit from the information asymmetry only when the standard treatment is inefficient when applied to the patients eligible to receive the new treatment. Otherwise, information asymmetry has no value. Personalized medicine may be fully or partially implemented depending on the proportion of high prevalence hospitals.

  4. Emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    Van Look, P F; von Hertzen, H

    1993-01-01

    The term 'emergency contraception', as employed in this paper, refers to methods that are used as emergency procedures to prevent pregnancy following unprotected intercourse. Alternative, less appropriate, terms are postcoital and 'morning-after' contraception. References to postcoital preparations can be found as far back as 1500 BC in Egyptian papyri, but it was not until fairly recently that contraceptive research has been able to at least partially fulfill that need. The development of hormonal methods of emergency contraception goes back to the 1960s when the first human trials of postcoitally administered high-dose oestrogens were undertaken. Combined oestrogen- progestogen combination therapy (the so-called Yuzpe regimen) was introduced in the early 1970s, while the postcoital insertion of an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) for emergency contraception was first reported in 1976. Other compounds that have been tested more recently include levonorgestrel, the antiprogestogen mifepristone, and danazol. Although there is some debate about the magnitude of the protective effect, few people question the important role that emergency contraception can play in preventing unwanted pregnancy and hence maternal mortality and morbidity resulting from unsafe abortion. Given that the most often used methods of emergency contraception, namely the Yuzpe regimen and postcoital insertion of an IUD, rely on technology that has been available for some 30 years, family planning programmes that claim to be concerned with improving women's reproductive health, cannot really be excused if they do not provide emergency contraception as part of their routine services.

  5. Pipeline for contraceptive development.

    PubMed

    Blithe, Diana L

    2016-11-01

    The high rates of unplanned pregnancy reflect an unmet need for effective contraceptive methods for women, especially for individuals with health risks such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and other conditions that may contraindicate use of an estrogen-containing product. Improvements in safety, user convenience, acceptability, and availability of products remain important goals of the contraceptive development program. Another important goal is to minimize the impact of the products on the environment. Development of new methods for male contraception has the potential to address many of these issues of safety for women who have contraindications to effective contraceptive methods but want to protect against pregnancy. It would also address a huge unmet need for men who want to control their fertility. Products under development for men would not introduce ecotoxic hormones into the water system.

  6. Alternate scenarios for population control in Pakistan: the issue of contraceptive method mix.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, T; Ali, S M

    1992-01-01

    The authors review Pakistan's population program, with a focus on the ideal mix of contraceptive methods needed to slow population growth. "Our objective in this exercise is to estimate the extent of services required to achieve a certain level of the Contraceptive Prevalence Rate (CPR) necessary to bring fertility down to a level desired by women." Comparison is made between single- and multiple-method approaches.

  7. Hormonal Contraception and HIV/AIDS Transmission: Challenges for Zimbabwe’s Reproductive Health Service Providers in Promoting Informed Contraception Choices

    PubMed Central

    Marima-Matarira, Hilda T.

    2013-01-01

    None-barrier methods are the most predominant contraceptive methods of choice among Zimbabwean women, with the contraceptive pill being the most popular. The spread of HIV/AIDS is most prevalent in sub-Saharan African countries, Zimbabwe included. The prevalent mode of transmission is unprotected heterosexual sex. Although Zimbabwe boasts of a high literacy rate some women may still be vulnerable like in other parts of the world, as they may not understand the role of the Zimbabwe National Family Planning Council (ZNFPC) and other reproductive health service providers. This is because some women at risk may expose themselves to unprotected sex while they are on hormonal contraceptives. This paper seeks to infer into pros and cons of hormonal contraceptive use among Zimbabwean women. There is also need to discuss the effectiveness of providers (ZNFPC clinics and the Ministry of Health) in educating women about the risk of HIV transmission, which may be associated with some non-barrier methods of contraception. An understanding of women’s attitudes towards the different forms of contraception is of paramount importance as is that of the factors that could contribute to women in different social settings resorting to uninformed contraceptive choices. PMID:28299105

  8. Contraceptive Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulka, Barbara S.; And Others

    The objective of research in contraceptive evaluation is to improve the ability of individuals to choose contraceptive methods best suited to their needs and circumstances and to provide information that will lead to the development of safer and more effective methods. There are usually three considerations in judging the importance of a method of…

  9. [Male contraception].

    PubMed

    Demery, A

    1987-05-01

    Except for condoms, male contraception is very slightly utilized in France. Several male experimental methods are under study. A synthetic luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analog has been used successfully in women and offers promise in men of blocking LHRH and thus blocking spermatogenesis. Several nonsteroid substances such an hypertensives and adrenaline would suppress follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone release, but are too toxic for use. The combination of 40 mcg ethinyl estradiol and 20 mg of methyltestosterone inhibits gonadotropin release and produces azoospermia in men, but at the risk of loss of libido, constant gynecomastia, and testicular atrophy. Several combinations of androgens and progestins have been evaluated. Percutaneous testosterone and medroxyprogesterone acetate appears to be the most effective, with good metabolic tolerance and maintenance of libido and sexual performance. Injections of inhibine, a testicular factor that controls secretion of follicle stimulating hormone by feedback, offer promise of suppressing spermatogenesis without affecting other systems. Numerous substances are known to inhibit spermatogenesis but are to toxic for use or entail an unacceptable loss of libido. Gossypol has been employed as a contraceptive by the Chinese for its action in inhibiting protein synthesis, but it is known to have serious secondary effects. Among male methods currently in use, the condom had a Pearl index of .4-1.6 in the most recent British studies. Coitus interruptus can seriously interfere with sexual pleasure and has a failure rate of 25-30%. Vasectomy is safe, effective, and easy to perform, but is not a reversible method. The combination of 20 mg of medroxyprogesterone acetate in 2 daily doses and 100 mg of testosterone applied in an abdominal spray has given very promising results in 2 small studies in France and merits further development and diffusion.

  10. Intrauterine contraception.

    PubMed

    Whaley, Natalie S; Burke, Anne E

    2015-11-01

    Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are effective, reversible forms of contraception with high patient satisfaction and continuation. IUDs can be safely used by most women and should be considered the first-line method of contraception for all women. This descriptive review will discuss the clinical issues associated with IUDs - including management of side effects, noncontraceptive uses and insertion and removal. When the burdens of cost are removed, women are more likely to select and IUDs. Health policy changes that increase insurance coverage for contraception will improve access to IUDs. IUDs remain an underutilized form of contraception in USA and efforts to improve availability and access to long-acting reversible contraception methods is needed to optimize their use.

  11. Contraceptive Equity

    PubMed Central

    Temkin, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The Equity in Prescription Insurance and Contraceptive Coverage Act, introduced in Congress in 1997 and still unpassed, seeks to redress health insurers’ failure to pay for birth control as they pay for other prescription drugs, most paradoxically Viagra. In 1936 the International Workers Order (IWO), a fraternal society, became the first insurer to include contraception in its benefits package. A forerunner in the movement for prepaid medical care, the IWO offered its members primary care and contraceptive services for annual flat fees. Founded at a time when the legal status of contraception was in flux, the IWO’s Birth Control Center was the only such clinic to operate on an insurance system. Recent state laws and judicial actions have revived the IWO’s groundbreaking view of contraception as a basic preventive service deserving of insurance coverage. PMID:17761562

  12. Lifetime Prevalence Rates of Sleep Paralysis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Jacques P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine lifetime prevalence rates of sleep paralysis. Data Sources Keyword term searches using “sleep paralysis”, “isolated sleep paralysis”, or “parasomnia not otherwise specified” were conducted using MEDLINE (1950-present) and PsychINFO (1872-present). English and Spanish language abstracts were reviewed, as were reference lists of identified articles. Study Selection Thirty five studies that reported lifetime sleep paralysis rates and described both the assessment procedures and sample utilized were selected. Data Extraction Weighted percentages were calculated for each study and, when possible, for each reported subsample. Data Synthesis Aggregating across studies (total N = 36533), 7.6% of the general population, 28.3% of students, and 31.9% of psychiatric patients experienced at least one episode of sleep paralysis. Of the psychiatric patients with panic disorder, 34.6% reported lifetime sleep paralysis. Results also suggested that minorities experience lifetime sleep paralysis at higher rates than Caucasians. Conclusions Sleep paralysis is relatively common in the general population and more frequent in students and psychiatric patients. Given these prevalence rates, sleep paralysis should be assessed more regularly and uniformly in order to determine its impact on individual functioning and better articulate its relation to psychiatric and other medical conditions. PMID:21571556

  13. Relationships between attitudes toward sexuality, sexual behaviors, and contraceptive practices among Chinese medical and nursing undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yingchun; Luo, Taizhen; Zhou, Ying

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we investigated attitudes toward sexuality, the prevalence of sexual behaviors and contraceptive use among Chinese medical and nursing undergraduates, and relationships between attitudes toward sexuality and sexual and contraceptive practices among these participants. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study carried out by using a Personal Attitude toward Sexuality Scale and Sexual and Contraceptive Questionnaire. The participants were recruited in the researcher's lectures. A total of 158 participants joined this study. Overall, Chinese medical and nursing undergraduates in this study held relatively conservative attitudes toward sexuality. The prevalence of sexually-active students was relatively low, and the percentage of contraceptive use among those sexually-active students was also low. Participants' attitudes toward sexuality had statistically-significant effects on their sexual and contraceptive practices. Nearly half of the sexually-active participants reported never using any contraceptive method during sexual intercourse. This finding has important public health implications, as young people represent the group with the largest rate of new infections of HIV/AIDS in China. A more comprehensive sexual education program that extends to college undergraduates and promotes the social acceptability of using contraception, specifically condoms, is needed.

  14. Prevalence rates for depression by industry: a claims database analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alterman, Toni; Bushnell, P. Timothy; Li, Jia; Shen, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To estimate and interpret differences in depression prevalence rates among industries, using a large, group medical claims database. Methods Depression cases were identified by ICD-9 diagnosis code in a population of 214,413 individuals employed during 2002–2005 by employers based in western Pennsylvania. Data were provided by Highmark, Inc. (Pittsburgh and Camp Hill, PA). Rates were adjusted for age, gender, and employee share of health care costs. National industry measures of psychological distress, work stress, and physical activity at work were also compiled from other data sources. Results Rates for clinical depression in 55 industries ranged from 6.9 to 16.2 %, (population rate = 10.45 %). Industries with the highest rates tended to be those which, on the national level, require frequent or difficult interactions with the public or clients, and have high levels of stress and low levels of physical activity. Conclusions Additional research is needed to help identify industries with relatively high rates of depression in other regions and on the national level, and to determine whether these differences are due in part to specific work stress exposures and physical inactivity at work. Clinical significance Claims database analyses may provide a cost-effective way to identify priorities for depression treatment and prevention in the workplace. PMID:24907896

  15. Emergency Contraception

    MedlinePlus

    ... against STDs even when using another method of birth control. If a condom breaks (or a couple has ... Emergency contraception is not recommended as a regular birth control method . Instead, it is used for emergencies only. ...

  16. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Oesterheld, Jessica R; Cozza, Kelly; Sandson, Neil B

    2008-01-01

    Nearly 50 years ago, the introduction of Enovid (norethynodrel 10 microg and mestranol 150 microg), which provided convenient and reliable contraception, revolutionized birth control. Reports of interactions between oral contraceptives (OCs) and other drugs began to trickle into the literature. At first, these drug interactions appeared to be random and unrelated. Increased understanding of P450 enzymes and phase II reactions of sulfation and glucuronidation has permitted preliminary categorization and assessment of the clinical relevance of these drug interactions.

  17. Gambling disorder: estimated prevalence rates and risk factors in Macao.

    PubMed

    Wu, Anise M S; Lai, Mark H C; Tong, Kwok-Kit

    2014-12-01

    An excessive, problematic gambling pattern has been regarded as a mental disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM) for more than 3 decades (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 1980). In this study, its latest prevalence in Macao (one of very few cities with legalized gambling in China and the Far East) was estimated with 2 major changes in the diagnostic criteria, suggested by the 5th edition of DSM (APA, 2013): (a) removing the "Illegal Act" criterion, and (b) lowering the threshold for diagnosis. A random, representative sample of 1,018 Macao residents was surveyed with a phone poll design in January 2013. After the 2 changes were adopted, the present study showed that the estimated prevalence rate of gambling disorder was 2.1% of the Macao adult population. Moreover, the present findings also provided empirical support to the application of these 2 recommended changes when assessing symptoms of gambling disorder among Chinese community adults. Personal risk factors of gambling disorder, namely being male, having low education, a preference for casino gambling, as well as high materialism, were identified.

  18. Chlamydia trachomatis cervical infection and oral contraceptive use among adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Oh, M K; Feinstein, R A; Soileau, E J; Cloud, G A; Pass, R F

    1989-09-01

    This study examines the relationship between oral contraceptive use and Chlamydia trachomatis cervical infection in women less than 19 years of age. The clinical and epidemiologic data of 73 (19.4% prevalence rate) girls with chlamydial infection were analyzed, with special attention given to contraceptive use. The findings were compared with data from 303 girls who were chlamydia negative to assess the relationship between oral contraceptive use and C. trachomatis infection. Use of an oral contraceptive for 6 months or longer was associated with chlamydial infection (p = 0.005; odds ratio = 2.41; 95% confidence interval 1.53-3.29). Oral contraceptive use was not associated with an increased rate of Neisseria gonorrhoeae or Trichomonas vaginalis infection. Association of oral contraceptive use with chlamydial infection remained significant after adjustments were made for confounding variables in a logistic regression process (p = 0.013). This study suggests that oral contraceptive use may promote chlamydial infection of the cervix or enhance the detection of the C. trachomatis from the cervix in this population.

  19. Emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    Ellertson, C; Trussell, J; Stewart, F; Koenig, J; Raymond, E G; Shochet, T

    2001-12-01

    Emergency contraceptives are methods that prevent pregnancy when used shortly after unprotected sex. Three different emergency contraceptive methods are safe, simple, and widely available in the United States. These are: (1) ordinary combined oral contraceptives containing ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel taken in a higher dose for a short period of time and started within a few days after unprotected intercourse; (2) levonorgestrel-only tablets used similarly; and (3) copper-bearing intrauterine devices inserted within approximately 1 week after unprotected intercourse. Emergency contraceptive use is best known for women who have been raped, but the methods are also appropriate for women who have experienced condom breaks, women who did not use any method because they were not planning on having sex, or women who had unprotected intercourse for any other reason. Unfortunately, few women know about emergency contraceptives, and few clinicians think to inform their patients routinely about the option. A nationwide toll-free hotline (1-888-NOT-2-LATE) and a website (http://not-2-late.com) can help women learn about these options. Sharing "family planning's best-kept secret" widely with women could prevent as many as a million unwanted pregnancies annually in the United States.

  20. Future contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Alexander, N J

    1995-09-01

    This article looks at the improvements that may occur in contraceptives in the near future. While no product currently under study would be ideal (highly effective, safe, readily reversible, free of side effects, coitally independent, counteract the spread of sexually transmitted diseases, and inexpensive), several would come closer than those available today. For men, the condom is the only currently available contraception, and a thinner version has recently been introduced in response to the criticism that condoms reduce sexual pleasure. Methods under study for men include manipulating hormones to halt sperm production by the intramuscular injection of an androgen in combination with a progestin or by blocking the activity of gonadotropin-releasing hormone. In the future, long-acting reversible agents should be available to directly halt sperm production or maturation. In men and women, vaccines should become available that would use antibodies to disrupt reproduction. Additional hormonal options in women should include hormone-releasing vaginal rings, a simplified contraceptive implant delivery system, a hormone-releasing IUD, and a monthly pill. Vaginal chemicals could be used to impede some of the necessary changes that sperm undergo after ejaculation. Spermicides will also be available with the ability to prevent STDs. The order of appearance of these new contraceptives will probably be nonlatex condoms, vaginal rings, and new implants, followed by disease-reducing spermicides, hormone-releasing IUDs, new emergency contraceptives, a three-month injectable for men, biodegradable implants for women, and immunocontraceptives (if they receive the backing of the industry).

  1. Contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yen, Sophia; Martin, Susanne

    2013-02-01

    CME EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: 1.Identify and explain the four currently available methods of emergency contraception.2.Discuss the risk and benefits of intrauterine devices as a first-line option for contraception in adolescents.3.Review strategies for explaining the most common contraceptive methods to an adolescent. The US has the highest pregnancy rate of any industrialized nation, approximately twice that of Canada, four times that of France, and eight times that of Japan or Italy.1 In recent years, the rate has declined, partially due to delayed coitarche (age of onset of vaginal sexual intercourse) but mainly due to greater use of contraception.2 Per the 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (a national survey of about 15,000 youth in schools), 33% of high school freshmen, 44% of sophomores, 53% of juniors, and 63% of seniors have had vaginal sexual intercourse. To prevent unplanned and unwanted teenage pregnancies, which have negative consequences on a teenager's health and future, pediatricians must be able to provide birth control or at least know where to refer their patients in need.

  2. Antibiotics and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    DeRossi, Scott S; Hersh, Elliot V

    2002-10-01

    With the exception of rifampin-like drugs, there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting the ability of commonly prescribed antibiotics, including all those routinely employed in outpatient dentistry, to either reduce blood levels and/or the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. To date, all clinical trials studying the effects of concomitant antibiotic therapy (with the exception of rifampin and rifabutin) have failed to demonstrate an interaction. Like all drugs, oral contraceptives are not 100% effective with the failure rate in the typical United States population reported to be as high as 3%. It is thus possible that the case reports of unintended pregnancies during antibiotic therapy may simply represent the normal failure rate of these drugs. Considering that both drug classes are prescribed frequently to women of childbearing potential, one would expect a much higher rate of oral contraceptive failure in this group of patients if a true drug:drug interaction existed. On the other hand, if the interaction does exist but is a relatively rare event, occurring in, say, 1 in 5000 women, clinical studies such as those described in this article would not detect the interaction. The pharmacokinetic studies of simultaneous antibiotic and oral contraceptive ingestion, and the retrospective studies of pregnancy rates among oral contraceptive users exposed to antibiotics, all suffer from one potential common weakness, i.e., their relatively small sample size. Sample sizes in the pharmacokinetic trials ranged from 7 to 24 participants, whereas the largest retrospective study of pregnancy rates still evaluated less than 800 total contraceptive users. Still, the incidence of such a rare interaction would not differ from the accepted normal failure rate of oral contraceptive therapy. The medico-legal ramifications of what looks like at best a rare interaction remains somewhat "murky." On one hand, we have medico-legal experts advising the profession to exercise caution

  3. [Contraception in adolescents].

    PubMed

    1992-12-01

    The proportion of women aged 15-19 in Colombia who are mothers declined from 14% in 1985 to 10% in 1990, but the actual number of cases increased due to population growth. Some 1,780,000 adolescents who have had children or are pregnant require family planning services. An additional, unknown number of adolescent pregnancies are terminated by abortion. It is estimated that 95% of adolescent pregnancies diagnosed or followed by PROFAMILIA's center for young people were unwanted. Reasons for making family planning services available to adolescents include the ever young age at initiation of sexual activity, the very low rates of contraceptive usage among sexually active adolescents, the lack of information of adolescents concerning reproduction and contraception, and their fear and guilt surrounding their sexual activity and contraceptive usage. Obstetrical services appear reluctant to furnish adolescent mothers with information on contraception, and the pharmacists and their employees who provide such information may not be aware of contraindications for this age group or whether adolescents are adequately instructed in use of the method. The rising age at marriage increases the span of time that adolescents are at risk of unwanted pregnancy. Adolescents who are well informed about sexuality and contraception and trained in decision making, self-esteem, and responsible parenthood are likely to postpone sexual activity. Information on contraception and family planning services needs to be made available to adolescents in a way that will actually motivate use. Information on sex and contraception should be made available at puberty and should include the form of use, contraindications, and advantages and disadvantages of all methods appropriate to adolescents. Orientation and assistance in selecting the best method should be individually tailored and should be provided in schools or other places accessible to young people, in a language they can understand. Rhythm and

  4. Contraceptive use in Indonesia: a history of the programme and the characteristics of users.

    PubMed

    Samosir, O B

    1992-12-01

    In Indonesia, President Suharto instituted a population policy in the late 1960s to achieve national development goals. The government also introduced education, health, and economic-oriented development programs. Since then, it has continued to provide political, legal, moral, administrative, and financial support to the national family planning (FP) program. The program was first introduced in the most populous provinces of Java and Bali. It eventually spread to the remaining provinces. It has 3 component programs to achieve national population goals: on extension program (IEC activities and free contraceptives), program maintenance (community-based distribution), and an institutionalization program (integrated programs, population education, and recruiting community leaders). In 1987, the FP Self-Reliance and Blue Circle Campaign programs began to turn FP responsibilities over to communities and individuals. Between 1967 and 1981, the total fertility rate (TFR) fell from 5.61 to 4.06. The greatest fertility declines were in Bali (48.11%) and North Sulawesi (47.2%). An analysis of 1987 National Indonesian Contraceptive Prevalence Survey data shows that the TFR fell from 4.3 to 3.5 (23%) between 1984 and 1987. Between 1980 and 1987, the contraceptive use rate rose from 27 to 48%. Java and Bali had the highest contraceptive user rates. Large family size had a significant positive effect on contraceptive use. Educated women were more likely to use contraceptives than uneducated women, especially in Outer Java-Bali regions. In some regions, the husband's education affected contraceptive use. Muslim women were less likely to use contraceptives than other women in Bali and Outer Java-Bali I. Even though urban women had the highest use rates, the FP program was more successful in rural areas. The success of the national FP program and other development programs accounted for the fertility decline as well as the decline in mortality, resulting in a fall in the population

  5. Emergency Contraception Website

    MedlinePlus

    Text Only Full media Version Get Emergency Contraception NOW INFO about Emergency Contraception Q&A about Emergency Contraception Español | Arabic Find a Morning After Pill Provider Near You This website is ...

  6. Contraceptive practices.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, J E; Rao, P S

    1976-08-01

    A family life education program (FLEP) providing contraceptive services within a comprehensive health care organization for low-income, inner-city adolescents is described. Each female patient attending in the July 1-September 30, 1974, period was included in a study undertaken to identify and serve the unmet needs of the teen-age population in the community of East Harlem. Of the 334 females interviewed, almost 1/2 were black, 37% were Hispanic, 12% were white, and 2% were Oriental, totals representative of the surrounding community. The questionnaire included information on demographic and social background, sexual history, reproductive history, and contraceptive experience. Comparisons are made on the answers between groups. Personal contacts and school outreach were the 2 main sources of referral to the clinic. Sexual history was found to be associated with social background rather than physiological factors. More than 1/2 the teen-agers had never used contraception prior to their 1st clinic visit and another 1/4 of the girls were using unreliable methods. The study indicated that teen-agers will use good programs which are designed to meet their needs. For teen-agers, a free-standing clinic offering comprehensive health care is the ideal situation.

  7. Impact of Social Franchising on Contraceptive Use When Complemented by Vouchers: A Quasi-Experimental Study in Rural Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Khurram Azmat, Syed; Tasneem Shaikh, Babar; Hameed, Waqas; Mustafa, Ghulam; Hussain, Wajahat; Asghar, Jamshaid; Ishaque, Muhammad; Ahmed, Aftab; Bilgrami, Mohsina

    2013-01-01

    Background Pakistan has had a low contraceptive prevalence rate for the last two decades; with preference for natural birth spacing methods and condoms. Family planning services offered by the public sector have never fulfilled the demand for contraception, particularly in rural areas. In the private sector, cost is a major constraint. In 2008, Marie Stopes Society – a local NGO started a social franchise programme along with a free voucher scheme to promote uptake of IUCDs amongst the poor. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of this approach, which is designed to increase modern long term contraceptive awareness and use in rural areas of Pakistan. Methodology We used a quasi-experimental study design with controls, selecting one intervention district and one control district from the Sindh and Punjab provinces. In each district, we chose a total of four service providers. A baseline survey was carried out among 4,992 married women of reproductive age (MWRA) in February 2009. Eighteen months after the start of intervention, an independent endline survey was conducted among 4,003 women. We used multilevel logistic regression for analysis using Stata 11. Results Social franchising used alongside free vouchers for long term contraceptive choices significantly increased the awareness of modern contraception. Awareness increased by 5% in the intervention district. Similarly, the ever use of modern contraceptive increased by 28.5%, and the overall contraceptive prevalence rate increased by 19.6%. A significant change (11.1%) was recorded in the uptake of IUCDs, which were being promoted with vouchers. Conclusion Family planning franchise model promotes awareness and uptake of contraceptives. Moreover, supplemented with vouchers, it may enhance the use of IUCDs, which have a significant cost attached. Our research also supports a multi-pronged approach- generating demand through counselling, overcoming financial constraints by offering vouchers, training

  8. Committee opinion no. 539: adolescents and long-acting reversible contraception: implants and intrauterine devices.

    PubMed

    2012-10-01

    Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC)—intrauterine devices and the contraceptive implant—are safe and appropriate contraceptive methods for most women and adolescents. The LARC methods are top-tier contraceptives based on effectiveness, with pregnancy rates of less than 1% per year for perfect use and typical use. These contraceptives have the highest rates of satisfaction and continuation of all reversible contraceptives. Adolescents are at high risk of unintended pregnancy and may benefit from increased access to LARC methods.

  9. [Male contraception].

    PubMed

    Demoulin, A

    1984-04-01

    Among the reasons why male hormonal contraception has lagged behind female methods are the necessity of preserving virility, the fact that spermatogenesis is a continuous process, the need to control secondary effects and toxicity, and the requirement that modes of administration be acceptable to both partners. Among currently available reversible mehtods, withdrawal is undoubtedly the most ancient. It is still widespread but cannot be recommended because of its limited effectiveness. The condom is used by about 10% of couples worldwide as a principal or temporary method, but its inter-ference with sensation has limited its acceptance. Condoms are nevertheless highly effective when used with a spermicide. Various androgens are currently under investigation. High doses of testosterone can induce azoospermia without affecting libido but their side effects may be serious. The use of combinations of steroids permits doses to be reduced and offers promise for the future. The combination of oral medroxyprogesterone acetate and percutaneous testosterone is one of the better approaches; the combination is effective and nontoxic but has the disadvantage of percutaneous administration. Gossypol, a pigment extracted from the cotton plant, has been used as a contraceptive in China with a reported efficacy of 99.89%, recovery of fertility within 3 months, and no effect on future fertility. However, its toxicity appears to be significant in the animal and its reversibility is uncertain. A search is on for analogs which would preserve the contraceptive effects while eliminating toxic effects. Several gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs under investigation for their interference with spermatogenesis have given promising results. Several chemicals tested for contraceptive effects have had unacceptably high toxicity. Chinese investigators have reported good results with various physical methods of interfering with sperm production, but their reversibility and innocuity

  10. Contraception in the Developing World: Special Considerations.

    PubMed

    Schivone, Gillian B; Blumenthal, Paul D

    2016-05-01

    The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) estimates that there are 225 million women and girls with unmet contraceptive need yearly. Unmet need for contraception is defined as women who desire a delay in childbearing and are not using a modern method of contraception. It is projected that providing contraception to these women would avert 36 million abortions, 70,000 maternal deaths, and 52 million unintended pregnancies overall. In the past 30 years, there has been an increase both in population and in contraception use in the developing world. As a result, it is estimated that in 2015 there were 500 million contraceptive users in developing countries, which is nearly double the prevalence in 2000. Unfortunately, women and girls in developing nations still face many obstacles in obtaining modern methods of contraception. Particular challenges in the developing world include lack of access due to inadequate number of trained providers, fewer method options, and "stock-outs" of contraceptive supplies. Innovative strategies for decreasing unmet need will have to address these challenges, and will necessarily involve programmatic solutions such as community-based distribution and social marketing campaigns. Additionally, increasing uptake of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods will be essential for achieving the goal of decreasing unmet need.

  11. Evidence from peninsular Malaysia of breastfeeding as a contraceptive method.

    PubMed

    Rao, S R

    1992-01-01

    This report examines Malaysian women's perceptions of the contraceptive effect of breastfeeding, the determinants of their perceptions, and any effect these perceptions might have on nursing duration and contraceptive use. The report also considers whether women are consciously replacing breastfeeding with modern contraceptive methods. Data from the 1976 Malaysian Family Life Survey are analyzed, and the author concludes that Malaysian women do perceive that breastfeeding has a contraceptive effect, but that this perception is not universal. Ethnicity and desire for a particular family size are the most significant determinants of this perception. Finally, Malaysian women's recognition of the contraceptive effect of nursing does not influence either the duration of their breastfeeding or their adoption of contraception. Malaysian women may not be abandoning breastfeeding to adopt contraception. More probably, breastfeeding declines and contraceptive prevalence increases with modernization.

  12. Acceptance rate, probability of follow-up, and expulsion of postpartum intrauterine contraceptive device offered at two primary health centers, North India

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Shashi; Archana, S.; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Ahamed, Farhad; Haldar, Partha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Acceptance rate of postpartum intrauterine contraceptive device (PPIUCD) offered through a public health approach is unknown. Our aim was to describe the acceptance rate, expulsion, and follow-up and factors associated with it when PPIUCD was offered to women delivering at two primary health centers (PHCs). Methods: We analyzed routine health data of deliveries at two PHCs in district Faridabad, India between May and December 2014, having sociodemographic variables, obstetric history, and during the follow-up check-up at 6-weeks postpartum for in situ status of intrauterine contraceptive device, side effects, and complications. Results: The overall acceptance rate among those eligible for PPIUCD was 39% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 35.1–42.9). Independent predictor of acceptance was a monthly family income of rate, and removal rate at 6 weeks postpartum was 18.0% and 13.0%, respectively. Expulsion by 6 weeks was associated with, age >25 years (O.R.: 2.21, 95% CI: 1.03–4.73), gravida ≥4 (O.R.: 4.01, 95% CI: 1.28–12.56), and a living previous-child (O.R.: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.04–2.19). Conclusion: Acceptance rate of PPIUCD was higher than that reported in literature. Women from lower income family, having at least one living child, and having attended antenatal care clinic were more likely to accept PPIUCD. PMID:28348988

  13. Contraceptive Use and Pregnancy Outcomes among Opioid Drug-Using Women: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Cornford, Charles S.; Close, Helen J.; Bray, Roz; Beere, Deborah; Mason, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The contraceptive needs of illicit opioid users differ from non-drug users but are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to describe contraceptive use and pregnancy outcomes in opioid-using women, and to examine their association with a range of risk factors. Method This retrospective cohort study used UK general practice records, Treatment Outcomes Profile and National Drug Treatment Monitoring System data, and a nested data validation exercise. A cohort of 376 women aged 20–61 years were in active treatment for opioid addiction in October 2010 at two specialised primary care practices in North-East England. Outcomes were age-adjusted prevalence estimates for contraceptive use and pregnancy outcomes in users of illicit opioids. The association between lifestyle-related risk factors and contraception was explored. Results Drug-using women made lower use of planned (non-condom) contraception (24% vs 50%, p<0.001), had more frequent pregnancy terminations (0.46 vs. 0.025, p = 0.004) and higher annual incidence of chlamydia (1.1% vs. 0.33%, p<0.001), when compared with age-matched population data. Specifically, there was low use of oral contraceptives (4% vs. 25%, p<0.001), IUCD (1% vs. 6%, p<0.001), and sterilisation (7% vs. 6%, p = 0.053), but higher rates of injectable contraceptives (6% vs. 3%, p = 0.003). A total of 64% of children aged <16 years born to this group did not live with their mother. No individual risk factor (such as sex-working) significantly explained the lower use or type of non-condom contraception. Conclusions This is the first study to describe planned contraceptive use among drug-users, as well as the association with a range of risk factors and pregnancy outcomes. The low uptake of planned contraception, set against high rates of terminations and sexually transmitted disease demonstrates the urgent clinical need to improve contraceptive services, informed by qualitative work to explore the values and beliefs influencing

  14. Postcoital contraception.

    PubMed

    McLaren, H C

    1977-02-05

    My colleague Dr. C.L. Brewer (January 15, p. 169) is within his rights to ask for a precise definition of abortion and contraception. I define abortion as the deliberate destruction of the embryo once it is embedded in the uterus. The absolutist on the abortion issue, until he is sure that an IUD never works by destroying an embedded embryo, must logically eschew this technique, advising his patient as to his ethical objections. She may then seek other advice once she has the facts. However, to insist that those who advise an IUD with the motive of contraception cannot herefore object to, say, intrauterine saline aimed at the destruction of a moving 27-week fetus is, in my view, stretching his argument. With further stretching it could be carried to absurdity in the rubella-early pregnancy dilemma: why not deliver the child, examine it carefully, and then if imperfect kill it with a silver hammer? Unthinkable, even if logical. Still, Dr. Brewer has a point and (with me) no doubt he will sympathize with Pope John and his advisers in their support for family spacing only by the avoidance of the fertile days - esthetically admirable but, alas, not always effective. How absurd the Catholic Church would now look if 10 years ago it had blessed the IUD only to find that it may operate not only by preventing the embedding of the zygot but by destroying it in situ - by definition an abortion. The future may settle the debate with hormones which convert the endometrium to a nonreceptive state so that a fetus is never embedded in the womb. Even better, we may develop a male hormone which prevents sperm from penetrating the ovum. Meantime, motive is important: contraception is not abortion and our abortionists should not dress up as delayed contraceptors. (Editor's note: This correspondence is now closed.)

  15. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, A J; Leversee, J H

    1990-09-01

    Management of oral contraception requires an understanding of the relationships between the method's effectiveness, noncontraceptive benefits, and hormonal adverse effects. The new multiphasic combinations or OCs containing 35 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol and 0.5-1.0 mg of norethindrone or equivalent result in a maximum combination of efficacy and safety for the patient with minimal annoying problems for the patient and the prescriber. Patient education regarding early warning symptoms of adverse effects, breakthrough bleeding, and lack of withdrawal bleeding adds an additional margin of safety and reduces patient questions and uncertainties.

  16. [Postabortion contraception].

    PubMed

    Morales del Olmo, R A; Vega, A; Fuentes, G; Pérez Palacios, G

    1998-02-01

    In Mexico, as in almost all the Latin American countries, abortion represents an important maternal morbidity-mortality reason. It has been pointed out that those women who had an abortion, are in greater risk to repeat this condition than those women who have not had the episode. For this reason, it is a transcendental matter, the use of modern contraceptive technology for fertility regulation with the aim to avoid not planned pregnancies and their devastating consequences. This document reviews-according to the Family Planning Official Norm of the Ministry of Health-those different contractive alternatives, that can be used in the postabortion.

  17. The contraceptive needs for STD protection among women in jail.

    PubMed

    Oswalt, Krista; Hale, Galen J; Cropsey, Karen L; Villalobos, Gabriella C; Ivey, Sara E; Matthews, Catherine A

    2010-08-01

    We assessed the contraceptive needs of women in jails and their sexually transmitted disease (STD) history and risk to determine effective contraceptive methods for this population. A survey of demographics, sexual health, contraceptive use, and preferred method of contraception was completed by participants recruited at jails in a medium-sized metropolitan area. Results from 188 women indicated high rates of STDs, inconsistent contraceptive use, and use of unreliable and user-dependent contraception methods. Intended contraceptive use following release varied depending on women's ability to bear children. Women planning to use condoms after release were more likely to have had an STD and more sexual partners than were women not planning to use condoms. Racial differences were found for participants' sexual health and contraception histories. These women were at high risk for STDs and appeared to need education about contraception methods. Therefore, they might benefit from education on safe sex practices provided prior to release.

  18. Spousal communication on family planning and perceived social support for contraceptive practices in a sample of Malaysian women

    PubMed Central

    Najafi-Sharjabad, Fatemeh; Rahman, Hejar Abdul; Hanafiah, Muhamad; Syed Yahya, Sharifah Zainiyah

    2014-01-01

    Background: In Malaysia, contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) during past three decades has been steady, with only 34% of women practicing modern contraception. The aim of this study was to determine the factors associated with modern contraceptive practices with a focus on spousal communication and perceived social support among married women working in the university. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out using self-administered structured questionnaire. The association between variables were assessed using Chi-square test, independent sample t-test, and logistic regression. Results: Overall, 36.8% of women used modern contraceptive methods. Significant association was found between contraceptive practice and ethnicity (P = 0.003), number of pregnancies (P < 0.001), having child (P = 0.003), number of children (P < 0.001), positive history of mistimed pregnancy (P = 0.006), and experience of unwanted pregnancy (P = 0.003). The final model showed Malay women were 92% less likely to use modern contraception as compared to non-Malay women. Women who discussed about family planning with their spouses were more likely to practice modern contraception than the women who did not [odds ratio (OR): 2.2, Confidence Interval (CI): 1.3–3.7]. Those women with moderate (OR: 4.9, CI: 1.6–10.8) and strong (OR: 14, CI: 4.5–26.4) perception of social support for contraceptive usage were more likely to use modern contraception than the women with poor perception of social support. Conclusion: Spousal communication regarding family planning would be an effective way to motivate men for supporting and using contraceptives. Family planning education initiatives should target both men and women, particularly high-risk cases, for promoting healthy timing and spacing of pregnancies. Ethnic disparities need to be considered in planning reproductive health programs. PMID:25949248

  19. Explanatory Model to Describe School District Prevalence Rates for Mental Retardation and Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Suzanne

    1994-01-01

    Data reports from South Carolina's 92 independent school districts during 1980-81 were used to calculate prevalence rates of mental retardation and learning disabilities. These prevalence rates were 41.66/1,000 children enrolled for mental retardation and 33.21/1,000 children enrolled for learning disabilities. Additional analysis showed that…

  20. National Prevalence Rates of Bully Victimization among Students with Disabilities in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Jamilia J.; Lund, Emily M.; Zhou, Qiong; Kwok, Oi-man; Benz, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence rates of bully victimization and risk for repeated victimization among students with disabilities using the Special Education Elementary Longitudinal Study and the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 longitudinal datasets. Results revealed that a prevalence rate ranging from 24.5% in elementary school to…

  1. Sexual Desire and Hormonal Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Boozalis, Amanda; Tutlam, Nhial T.; Robbins, Camaryn Chrisman; Peipert, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of hormonal contraception on sexual desire. Materials and Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 1,938 of the 9,256 participants enrolled in the Contraceptive CHOICE Project. This subset included participants enrolled between April and September 2011 who completed a baseline and six-month telephone survey. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association between contraceptive method and report of lacking interest in sex, controlling for potential confounding variables. Results More than one in five participants (23.9%) reported lacking interest in sex at 6 months after initiating a new contraceptive method. Of 262 copper IUD users (referent group), 18.3% reported lacking interest in sex. Our primary outcome was more prevalent in women who are young (<18 years: adjusted odds ratio (ORadj)=2.04), black (ORadj=1.78), and married or living with a partner (ORadj=1.82). Compared to copper IUD users, participants using depot medroxyprogesterone (ORadj=2.61, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.47-4.61), the vaginal ring (ORadj=2.53, 95% CI=1.37-4.69), and the implant (ORadj=1.60, 95% CI=1.03-2.49) more commonly reported lack of interest in sex. We found no association between use of the hormonal IUD, oral contraceptive pill, and patch and lack of interest in sex. Conclusion CHOICE participants using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, the contraceptive ring, and implant were more likely to report a lack of interest in sex compared to copper IUD users. Future research should confirm these findings and their possible physiological basis. Clinicians should be reassured that most women do not experience reduced sex drive with the use of most contraceptive methods. PMID:26855094

  2. Adolescents and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, J S

    1991-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) options for adolescents are provides. Clarification for those desiring a birth control method is necessary and the benefits of decreased acne and dysmenorrhea with low dose OCs should be stressed along with the importance of compliance. A community effort is suggested to communicate the sexual and contraceptive alternatives, including abstinence and outercourse (sexual stimulation to orgasm without intercourse). Attention is given to concerns associated with teenage sexual activity, prevention of adolescent pregnancy, contraceptive options for the adolescent patient, adolescent attitudes toward birth control OCs, management of the adolescent OC user, manipulation of steroid components of OCs to respond to adolescent concerns, and other hormonal contraceptive options such as minipills or abstinence. The text is supplemented with tables: the % of US women by single years of age for 1971, 1976, 1979, and 1982; comparative pregnancy and abortion rates for the US and 5 other countries; federal cost for teen childbearing; adolescent nonhormonal contraceptive methods (advantages, disadvantages, and retail cost); checklist to identify those at risk for noncompliance with OCs; hormonal side effects of OCs; risks from OCs to adolescents; and benefits of OCs. Concern about adolescent pregnancy dates back to Aristotle. A modern profile shows girls form single-parent families are sexually active at an earlier age, adolescent mothers produce offspring who repeat the cycle, victims of sexual abuse are more likely to be sexually active, and teenagers in foster care are 4 times more likely to be sexually active and 8 times more likely to become pregnant. Prevention involves a multifaceted approach. OCs are the most appropriate contraceptive choice for adolescents. Frequency of intercourse is closely associated with OC use after approximately 15 months of unprotected sexual activity. At risk for noncompliance variables are scales of personality development

  3. Associations between national gambling policies and disordered gambling prevalence rates within Europe.

    PubMed

    Planzer, Simon; Gray, Heather M; Shaffer, Howard J

    2014-01-01

    Policymakers and other interested stakeholders currently are seeking information about the comparative effectiveness of different regulatory approaches to minimising gambling-related harm. This study responds to this research gap by exploring associations between gambling policies and disordered gambling prevalence rates. We gathered information about gambling policies for thirty European jurisdictions and past-year prevalence rates for disordered gambling for twelve of these jurisdictions. We present policy trends and prevalence rates and then describe the level of association between policy and prevalence. We observe one statistically significant association between policy and prevalence: rates of sub-clinical (i.e., Level 2) disordered gambling were higher within environments that mandated less strict regulation of advertising for online gambling. Finally, we discuss the implications of our research in the context of the current process regarding the pan-European regulation of gambling. Our findings do not offer evidence for certain assumptions made in the past by the European judiciary.

  4. Rural-urban differential in contraceptive use status in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Uddin, M M; Kabir, M; Choudhury, S R; Ahmed, T; Bhuyan, M R

    1985-01-01

    Data from the 1981 Contraceptive Prevalence Survey (CPS) in Bangladesh were analyzed to identify and facilitate understanding of the factors responsible for urban-rural differentials in contraceptive use. The information was collected from a nationally representative sample of ever married women under 50 years. A 3-stage stratified cluster sampling design was used. A total of 196 sample areas were considered of which 116 were rural and 80 urban. The total number of households in the sample was 7393 -- 5455 rural and 1938 urban. 6269 rural and 2241 ever married eligible women were interviewed. The level of knowledge of at least 1 traditional contraceptive method was 61% for urban and 55% for rural women. The level of ever use of any specific contraceptive method was about 49% in urban and 34% in rural areas. The oral contraceptive (OC) was the most popular method of contraception in both the urban (26%) and in the rural (12.1%) areas. The popularity of other methods also varied between urban and rural residents. The higher use of some specific methods in urban areas possibly was a function of the greater avilability and accessibility of methods. The percentage of women who have ever used contraception in urban areas ranged from 27.8% at the ages of 15-19 to 59.9% at the ages of 35-39. At the ages of 40-44, the proportion of women who have ever used contraception declined by almost 14% from ages 35-39 and by as much as 20% after 44. Women in rural areas also were found to have ever used contraception at a lower rate than urban women at all age groups. In general, younger and older married women were less likely to have ever used contraception than women aged 20-39. In rural Bangladesh, more educated women and women who were employed with cash payment were more likely than other women to have ever used family planning. Women who never attended school were least likely to practice family planning (34% in urban areas and 30% in rural areas). In the urban areas more or

  5. Socio-cultural inhibitors to use of modern contraceptive techniques in rural Uganda: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Kabagenyi, Allen; Reid, Alice; Ntozi, James; Atuyambe, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Family planning is one of the cost-effective strategies in reducing maternal and child morbidity and mortality rates. Yet in Uganda, the contraceptive prevalence rate is only 30% among married women in conjunction with a persistently high fertility rate of 6.2 children per woman. These demographic indicators have contributed to a high population growth rate of over 3.2% annually. This study examines the role of socio-cultural inhibitions in the use of modern contraceptives in rural Uganda. Methods This was a qualitative study conducted in 2012 among men aged 15-64 and women aged 15-49 in the districts of Mpigi and Bugiri in rural Uganda. Eighteen selected focus group discussions (FGDs), each internally homogeneous, and eight in-depth interviews (IDIs) were conducted among men and women. Data were collected on sociocultural beliefs and practices, barriers to modern contraceptive use and perceptions of and attitudes to contraceptive use. All interviews were tape recoded, translated and transcribed verbatim. All the transcripts were coded, prearranged into categories and later analyzed using a latent content analysis approach, with support of ATLAS.ti qualitative software. Suitable quotations were used to provide in-depth explanations of the findings. Results Three themes central in hindering the uptake of modern contraceptives emerged: (i) persistence of socio-cultural beliefs and practices promoting births (such as polygamy, extending family lineage, replacement of the dead, gender-based violence, power relations and twin myths). (ii) Continued reliance on traditional family planning practices and (iii) misconceptions and fears about modern contraception. Conclusion Sociocultural expectations and values attached to marriage, women and child bearing remain an impediment to using family planning methods. The study suggests a need to eradicate the cultural beliefs and practices that hinder people from using contraceptives, as well as a need to scale

  6. [Topical contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Alipov, V I; Korkhov, V V

    1982-02-01

    Recently there has been little interest in topical contraceptives. The most popular are the cervical cap and the diaphragm. Other types of mechanical contraceptive devices are being investigated. Standley and Kessler have developed a device for introduction into the cervical canal with a reservoir of spermatocide, it does not block the flow of blood during menstruation. New models of vaginal rings are also being developed which are simple enough for self-insertion and also contain a reservoir of spermatocide. Work is being done on spermatocide-containing sponges in many countries. Another project being investigated is the possibility of using natural proteins, collagens, and other substances which absorb spermatozoids. The ancients used various vaginal suppositories to kill spermatozoids; in the late 19th century quinine sulfate was used for this, and a variety of substances have been used recently. These spermicidal creams also have the advantage of acting as anti-infectious agents in many cases. But they do have some negative effects. They are about 85% effective, are local irritants, and some cause discomfort during intercourse. And it is possible that some are resorbed by the body and act on the liver and other organs. Vaginal globules and suppositories are also popular. The "Kontraceptin-T" brand contains quinosol, boric acid, and tannin. There are also foaming tablets which are mixed with water and then introduced. New locally-active chemical substances are being developed in Japan, West Germany, and the USSR. Kontraceptin-E contains paranonyl-phenoxypolyethylene glycol and sodium dioctylsulfosuccinate. The "Norforks" and other preparations contain mercurial compounds which may turn out to be harmful. The future promises the development of products which will act to prevent fertilization by acting on the hyaluronidase and the acrosine of the spermatozoid, thus preventing it from penetrating the ovum. It would be best to find enzyme inhibitors which are

  7. Advance Provision of Emergency Contraception for Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamji, Jehan-Marie; Swartwout, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Emergency contraception is most effective at preventing unintended pregnancy when taken as early as possible following unprotected sexual intercourse. Advance provision of this medication supports more timely and effective use. In the midst of rising teen pregnancy rates, current policies often limit access to emergency contraception for…

  8. Oral steroid contraception.

    PubMed

    Sech, Laura A; Mishell, Daniel R

    2015-11-01

    Oral steroid contraception is a popular method of family planning worldwide. Over the past several decades, this method of contraception has changed significantly by decreasing the estrogen dose, changing the progestin component, and reducing the hormone free interval. Despite the popularity of oral steroid contraception, there has been much criticism regarding the associated risks of venous thromboembolism and stroke. Despite these established, yet uncommon risks, oral steroid contraception has many important health benefits. This review highlights the available formulations of oral contraceptives along with their evidence-based associated risks and benefits. Highlights regarding future directions for development of novel oral contraceptives are also addressed.

  9. Oral contraceptive marketing in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Bamgboye, E A; Ladipo, O A

    1992-10-01

    The demographic transition in Nigeria is gradually moving towards the second stage. There is clear evidence of a declining mortality but the fertility rate remains exceptionally high. A realistic approach towards reducing fertility rate is the use of oral contraceptive. This study assesses the distribution system of oral contraceptive in Ibadan, the second largest city in Nigeria. The findings revealed that the people are aware of modern oral contraceptives as they purchase them freely at chemist shops. But effective distribution is hampered by existing channels and high costs. A local source recommended is the proprietary medicine stores, often at convenient locations to the potential users of contraceptives. The current cost which is between $1.3 and $19.5 per couple-years of protection is exorbitant, consuming 0.5-7.8% of the gross annual income of the average individual. Therefore, the government should subsidize the prices of oral contraceptives, to facilitate freedom from the tyranny of excessive fertility.

  10. Long-acting contraceptive options.

    PubMed

    Kaunitz, A M

    1996-01-01

    Long-acting contraceptive methods are appropriate choices for women who prefer the convenience and high contraceptive efficacy of methods not requiring frequent compliance, and women for whom contraceptive doses of estrogen are either medically contraindicated or associated with persistent intolerable side effects. Annual pregnancy rates for the three methods described below are less than 1 per 100 woman-years. As currently formulated, levonorgestrel implants (Norplant) consist of six 34 x 2.4 mm soft plastic implants, each filled with 36 mg of crystalline levonorgestrel. Irregular and often persistent menstrual bleeding and spotting constitute the most important side effects experienced by and leading to method discontinuation in implant users. Implant removal is technically more difficult and time-consuming than insertion. Depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA or Depo-Provera) is injected as an aqueous suspension of microcrystals. Intramuscular injection of 150 mg of DMPA results in more than 3 months of contraception. Irregular bleeding and spotting followed by amenorrhea, constitute the most importance side effects experienced by DMPA users. Because DMPA use can result in prolonged (but not permanent) infertility, DMPA is not an optimum contraceptive choice for women who may want to conceive in the next one or two years. The Copper T380A intrauterine device (IUD) provides reversible contraception for up to 10 years. IUDs act as contraceptives, not early abortafacients. Recent epidemiologic data indicate that long-term IUD use does not increase the occurrence of pelvic inflammatory disease. Heavier menstrual flow and cramps constitute the main side effects experienced by women using the copper IUD. Intrauterine device insertion and removal are accomplished during brief office-based procedures.

  11. The impact of oral contraception on chlamydial infection among patients with pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Spinillo, A; Gorini, G; Piazzi, G; Baltaro, F; Monaco, A; Zara, F

    1996-09-01

    The prevalence of oral contraceptive use in association with chlamydial pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and the presence of anti-chlamydial IgG and IgA in a population of 144 hospitalized and outpatient subjects with a standard diagnosis of PID was studied. The rates of chlamydial PID and IgA detection were 15.3% (22/144) and 13.9% (20/144), respectively. After stratification for age, number of pregnancies, and lifetime sexual partners, the rates of chlamydial PID (odds ratio = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.10 - 0.89) and IgA detection (odds ratio = 0.23, 95% CI = 0.07 - 0.73) were lower among previous or current oral contraceptive users than in women who had never used birth control methods. Analyses of linear trend indicated a negative association between increasing duration of exposure to hormonal contraception and anti-chlamydial IgG and IgA. This study confirms that among patients with chlamydial PID, the frequency of oral contraceptive use is lower than that in patients with PID of other etiology. Serologic studies suggest a possible relationship between hormonal contraception and changes in immune response or susceptibility to chlamydial infection.

  12. Nonprescription contraceptives: increasing in popularity.

    PubMed

    Reinders, T P

    1985-09-01

    The nonprescription forms of birth control now receive much attention due to the ongoing controversy about the prescription contraceptive methods. Condoms, 1 of these nonprescription methods, are the most effective nonprescription contraceptives available and among the most widely used. They are simple to use, inexpensive, and not associated with any major adverse effects. Condoms are unique in that they are a reliable contraceptive for males. It is estimated that 1 of 3 people who use contraception worldwide will rely on a male method. In the US this figure is somewhat lower, 18%. In other countries, such as Japan, condoms are the chief contraceptive method. If properly used, the failure rate for condoms is quite low; the lowest observed failure rate is 2%. In contrast, with typical users, the failure rate approaches 10%. The industry has taken several quality control measures to produce a safe and reliable condom. The principal material tested is usually either of the 2 ingredients used to make them, latex or collagenous tissue taken from the lamb cecum. Condoms definitely can protect against sexually transmitted diseases, simply because they prevent the infecting organisms from being transferred across the condom wall. The contraceptive efficacy of the condom is greatly enhanced when a spermicide is used at the same time. In terms of effectiveness, of 100 users that start the year using foams, creams, jellies, or vaginal suppositories containing nonoxynol 9 and used them consistently, the lowest observed rate of failure has been 3-5%. In actual use, the pregnancy rate is probably closer to 18%. Few side effects have been reported with spermicides. The most common of these is a burning sensation. The foaming suppository has been widely promoted as an effective vaginal contraceptive. It does not really offer any advantage over any of the other dosage forms except for convenience. It is the combination of foam and condom that pharmacists need to pay particular

  13. Contraception in lactating women.

    PubMed

    Díaz, S; Croxatto, H B

    1993-12-01

    Lactating women need contraception after first menses, supplementation or 6 months postpartum, or before, according to personal or programmatic reasons. Non-hormonal methods have no influence on lactation and are the first choice. Intrauterine devices (IUDs) inserted during amenorrhea are safe and show good continuation rates. Progestin-only methods do not affect breast-feeding and should be used after 6 weeks to prevent transference of orally active steroids to the newborn. Progesterone rings and Nestorone implants are effective new methods, that use orally inactive steroids.

  14. Contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ott, Mary A; Sucato, Gina S

    2014-10-01

    A working knowledge of contraception will assist the pediatrician in both sexual health promotion as well as treatment of common adolescent gynecologic problems. Best practices in adolescent anticipatory guidance and screening include a sexual health history, screening for pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, counseling, and if indicated, providing access to contraceptives. Pediatricians' long-term relationships with adolescents and families allow them to help promote healthy sexual decision-making, including abstinence and contraceptive use. Additionally, medical indications for contraception, such as acne, dysmenorrhea, and heavy menstrual bleeding, are frequently uncovered during adolescent visits. This technical report provides an evidence base for the accompanying policy statement and addresses key aspects of adolescent contraceptive use, including the following: (1) sexual history taking, confidentiality, and counseling; (2) adolescent data on the use and side effects of newer contraceptive methods; (3) new data on older contraceptive methods; and (4) evidence supporting the use of contraceptives in adolescent patients with complex medical conditions.

  15. Neighborhood Incarceration Rate and Asthma Prevalence in New York City: A Multilevel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Clemens S.; Subramanian, S. V.; Wang, Emily A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the association between neighborhood incarceration rate and asthma prevalence and morbidity among New York City adults. Methods. We used multilevel modeling techniques and data from the New York City Community Health Survey (2004) to analyze the association between neighborhood incarceration rate and asthma prevalence, adjusting for individual-level sociodemographic, behavioral, and environmental characteristics. We examined interactions between neighborhood incarceration rate, respondent incarceration history, and race/ethnicity. Results. The mean neighborhood rate of incarceration was 5.4% (range = 2.1%–12.8%). Neighborhood incarceration rate was associated with individual-level asthma prevalence (odds ratio [OR] = 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03, 1.10) in unadjusted models but not after adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics (OR = 1.01; 95% CI = 0.98, 1.04). This association did not differ according to respondent race/ethnicity. Conclusions. Among New York City adults, the association between neighborhood incarceration rate and asthma prevalence is explained by the sociodemographic composition of neighborhoods and disparities in asthma prevalence at the individual level. Public health practitioners should further engage with criminal justice professionals and correctional health care providers to target asthma outreach efforts toward both correctional facilities and neighborhoods with high rates of incarceration. PMID:23488496

  16. Contraceptive revolution.

    PubMed

    Segal, S J

    1994-06-01

    Global population will increase by almost 1 billion people in the 1990s, the largest 10-year increase ever recorded. In 1994 alone, population will surpass 5.7 billion. The prospect of double-digit billions of people is worrisome, especially since these numbers may affect global warming, supplies of fresh water, destruction of rain forests, industrial pollution, and sustainable development. Yet, many indicators of quality of life show that people enjoy a better quality of life today than they did 100 years ago. Between India's independence and now, life expectancy increased by 20 years, infant mortality decreased 2-fold, literacy increased, and the food supply stabilized. Even though India's population has almost tripled since 1947, its economy increased rapidly and is 1 of the world's top 10 economies. University enrollment stands at 4.5 million. Agricultural production has exceeded demand. India represents the potential for human achievement through technological advancement and social organization. If the world's first national family planning program had been more successful when it began in 1952 in an India of 350 million people, India's population would be around 500 million instead of the expected 1 billion in 2000. All countries need to achieve a sustainable balance between human numbers and needs and natural resources. Family planning is an essential, cost-effective part of any development strategy. Family planning use has reduced fertility from 6 to 3.6 in developing countries. In 1965, only 8% used contraception, while more than 50% use it now. The most remarkable family planning/fertility reduction successes are Bangladesh, Brazil, Colombia, Indonesia, Mexico, and Thailand. Sufficient investment in family planning is needed if significant declines in fertility are to occur. More than 90% of the developing world's people are in countries with official family planning programs. Cost-effective assistance by donors and developing countries implementing

  17. Searching for Ideal Contraceptives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Djerassi, Carl

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the problem of adolescent pregnancy and focuses on improving contraception as a practical solution. Describes the advantages and disadvantages of existing methods (the condom, the pill, and the contraceptive sponge). Predicts that the development of a fundamentally new contraceptive, such as a monthly menses-inducer pill, will not occur…

  18. Drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Kavita; Stuart, Gretchen S.; Robinson, Jennifer; Gray, Andrew L.; Tepper, Naomi K.; Gaffield, Mary E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To summarize published evidence on drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals. Design: Systematic review of the published literature. Methods: We searched PubMed, POPLINE, and EMBASE for peer-reviewed publications of studies (in any language) from inception to 21 September 2015. We included studies of women using hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals concurrently. Outcomes of interest were effectiveness of either therapy, toxicity, or pharmacokinetics. We used standard abstraction forms to summarize and assess strengths and weaknesses. Results: Fifty reports from 46 studies were included. Most antiretrovirals whether used for therapy or prevention, have limited interactions with hormonal contraceptive methods, with the exception of efavirenz. Although depot medroxyprogesterone acetate is not affected, limited data on implants and combined oral contraceptive pills suggest that efavirenz-containing combination antiretroviral therapy may compromise contraceptive effectiveness of these methods. However, implants remain very effective despite such drug interactions. Antiretroviral plasma concentrations and effectiveness are generally not affected by hormonal contraceptives. Conclusion: Women taking antiretrovirals, for treatment or prevention, should not be denied access to the full range of hormonal contraceptive options, but should be counseled on the expected rates of unplanned pregnancy associated with all contraceptive methods, in order to make their own informed choices. PMID:28060009

  19. Contraception in women with medical problems

    PubMed Central

    Dhanjal, Mandish K

    2008-01-01

    Women with medical disease have a higher incidence of maternal mortality compared with healthy women, with cardiac disease now being the most common cause of maternal death in the UK. A handful of medical conditions exist where pregnancy is not recommended due to mortality rates approaching 50%. It is imperative that such women have the most reliable methods of contraception available. Contraceptive agents may themselves affect medical disease, or may interact with medications used by such women. There may be a range of contraceptive agents suitable for each medical condition. The contraceptive selected should be tailored to suit the individual. The following points should be considered when deciding on the most appropriate contraceptive agent: efficacy, thrombotic risk (oestrogen containing contraceptives), arterial risks (oestrogen containing contraceptives), infective risk (e.g. insertion of intrauterine device [IUD]), vagal stimulation (e.g. insertion of IUD, ESSURE®), bleeding risks with patients on anticoagulants, interaction with concomitant drugs, effects of anaesthesia and ease of use. This review aims to cover the different contraceptive agents available and the best ones to use for certain medical illnesses. PMID:27582790

  20. Luteinizing hormone--releasing hormone agonists: a quick reference for prevalence rates of potential adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lauren M; Tran, Susan; Robinson, John W

    2013-12-01

    Men with prostate cancer (PCa) frequently undergo androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), typically in the form of a depot injection of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists (LHRHa). LHRHa are associated with many adverse effects (eg, hot flashes, sexual dysfunction, loss of muscle mass, osteopenia, metabolic syndrome), which drastically impact patient quality of life. This literature review, which includes a comprehensive table documenting prevalence rates, provides a quick reference for health care professionals involved in the care of men undergoing ADT with LHRHa. Primary sources were acquired from PubMed using the search terms "androgen deprivation therapy" and each potentially adverse effect (eg, "androgen deprivation therapy and hot flashes"). Commonly cited review articles were also examined for citations of original studies containing prevalence rates. More than 270 articles were reviewed. In contrast to many existing reviews, rates are cited exclusively from original sources. The prevalence rates, obtained from original sources, suggest that more than half of documented adverse effects are experienced by as many as 40% or more of patients. A critique of the literature is also provided. Although there is a vast literature of both original and review articles on specific adverse effects of LHRHa, the quality of research on prevalence rates for some adverse effects is subpar. Many review articles contain inaccuracies and do not cite original sources. The table of prevalence rates will serve as a quick reference for health care providers when counseling patients and will aid in the development of evidence-based patient education materials.

  1. Capture-recapture-adjusted prevalence rates of type 2 diabetes are related to social deprivation.

    PubMed

    Ismail, A A; Beeching, N J; Gill, G V; Bellis, M A

    1999-12-01

    We examined the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and social deprivation in one urban district in Liverpool from October 1995 to September 1996 inclusive. This area has a stable Caucasian population of 176, 682. Lists were made of all known diabetics attending six different medical points of contact during the year, and were condensed and aggregated to eliminate duplicates. From postcode data, each patient was assigned to residence in one of the 14 electoral wards in the district, for which demographic structure and standardized measures of social deprivation were known (Townsend index). The crude period prevalences of type 1 and type 2 diabetes were estimated for each ward. Crude prevalence data were then corrected by applying capture-recapture (CR) techniques to the different patient datasets to allow for undercount. The crude period prevalence (95%CI) of diabetes was 1.5% (1.4-1.5%), or 2585/176, 682. The mean age of people with diabetes was not significantly different between electoral wards. The crude period prevalence of type 2 diabetes within individual wards ranged from 0.4% (0.3-0.6%) in the least deprived area to 4.1% (3.6-4.6%) in the most deprived area. The corresponding range of CR-adjusted period prevalence rates of type 2 diabetes was from 3.2% (2.8-3.6%) to 6.7% (6.1-7.4%), and there was strong correlation between both crude and CR-adjusted prevalence and social deprivation in each ward (r=0.76, p<0.001 for crude; and r=0. 49, p<0.005 for CR-adjusted prevalence). There was no correlation between the crude or CR-adjusted period prevalence rates of type 1 diabetes and Townsend index (r=0.14, p=NS). This strong correlation between the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and social deprivation has important implications for the planning of health-care delivery.

  2. Vaginal contraceptives still evolving.

    PubMed

    Pearson, R M

    1986-01-01

    The effort to develop vaginal contraceptives began in the distant past and is still underway today. 1000 years ago, South American Indians inserted into the vagina bark strips impregnated with quinine. In medieval times women used vaginal inserts of cloth soaked in honey or vinegar. Quinine pessaries were introduced into Europe in the late 1800s, and in the early 1900s investigators began to study the effects of various chemicals on sperm motility. Following World War II, surfactant spermicides which disrupt the sperm membrane were developed and marketed. Many of these preparations contained nonoxynol-9. Currently, the D-isomer of propranolol is being examined as a spermicidal contraceptive, and several bacteriocides, e.g., benzalkonium and chlorhexidine, are being developed as spermicides which reduce the penetrability of cervical mucus. Other chemicals being investigated act by inhibiting the acrosome reaction. Advantages of vaginal contraceptives are that they are inexpensive, reversible, and relatively safe and easy to use. Generally they require no medical intervention or supervision. In addition, spermicides may kill or inhibit the growth of organisms responsible for sexually transmitted diseases. Disadvantages of spermicides are that they are generally less effective than many other methods, some interfere with sexual spontaneity, they may cause local irritations, and some women find them messy to use. Recently, concerns were expressed about the possible teratogenic effects of sperimicides. Most of these concerns proved to be unfounded. Given the many new avenues of research, the major disadvantage of sperimicides, i.e., their high failure rates, may be minimized in the near future.

  3. Gestodene-containing contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Kuhl, H; Jung-Hoffmann, C; Wiegratz, I

    1995-12-01

    As GSD is the most potent progestogen used in oral contraceptives, the doses of GSD can be lower than those of other progestogen components. The monophasic (30 micrograms EE + 75 micrograms GSD) and the triphasic formulation (30 micrograms EE + 50 micrograms GSD/40 micrograms EE + 70 micrograms GSD/30 micrograms EE + 100 micrograms GSD) suppress gonadotropin release and ovarian function profoundly and inhibit ovulation reliably. The strong anti-estrogenic and progestogenic effectiveness of GSD is based on the high GSD serum concentrations achieved during daily intake. Because of the weak androgenic properties of GSD, both formulations can be characterized as estrogen-dominant with respect to their hepatic effects. Except for the first cycles, both formulations afford good cycle control, and the rate of side effects is similar to that with comparable low-dose oral contraceptives. The levels of total and free androgens and androgen precursors, as well as of peripheral androgen activity, are significantly reduced, resulting in a reduced incidence of acne. The concentrations of SHBG and other serum-binding globulins are elevated considerably, and thyroid function is almost unaffected. The estrogen-dominant effect on hepatic metabolism of both formulations also is reflected by a significant increase in the levels of triglycerides and VLDL, HDL, and some apolipoproteins, while LDL-CH and total CH remain unchanged. Similar to other low-dose oral contraceptives, the GSD-containing preparations cause a slight impairment of glucose tolerance that does not appear to be of clinical relevance. However, a significant increase exists in pro-coagulatory and fibrinolytic activity that leads to a considerable stimulation of fibrin turnover. In predisposed women, this may contribute to an elevated risk of venous and arterial thromboembolic diseases.

  4. Workshop on injectable contraceptives.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    At a workshop in Dhaka on February 10, 1994, district and thana level managers discussed the problems associated with a project that delivers injectable contraceptives to the doorsteps of clients. The workshop, which was organized by the Bangladesh government and the Maternal and Child Health-Family Planning (MCH-FP) Extension Project of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), identified lack of appropriate training, inefficient supervision, and inadequate knowledge about and facilities for the disposal of used syringes and needles as problems. There was agreement among participants that use of the injectables, depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and norethisterone enanthate (NET-EN), had led to increases in contraceptive use. The 6-month old project had been initiated in 8 thanas by the Directorate of Family Planning of the government of Bangladesh, with the technical assistance of the MCH-FP Extension Project, after ICDDR,B noticed that the rates of use for all types of contraceptives had increased in the rural areas of Matlab, Abhoynagar, and Sirajganj with doorstep delivery by field workers. During the same period, use of injectables that were offered by female paramedics at static centers had remained low. At the workshop, Dr. Rushikesh Maru of the Extension Project spoke about the effective administration of the injectables within 15 days before or after the due date. Mr. AKM Rafiquz Zaman, former director general of Family Planning, government of Bangladesh, requested further expansion in at least 1 thana of each district and in all municipalities and urban slums.

  5. Contraception and Breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Pieh Holder, Kelly Lynne

    2015-12-01

    Postpartum contraception is important to lengthening birth intervals and improving the health of women and children. For breastfeeding women the choice and timing of contraception may influence breastfeeding and infant growth patterns. Nonhormonal methods of contraception are the preferred choice for breastfeeding women. Progestin-only methods comprise a viable next option. Combined hormonal methods of contraception containing estrogen and progestin may be considered as a third option for birth control in breastfeeding women. The objective of this chapter is to review the current literature and recommendations for the use of hormonal and nonhormonal methods of contraception while breastfeeding.

  6. Counselling and knowledge about contraceptive mode of action among married women; a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Topsever, Pınar; Filiz, Müge; Aladağ, Nihal; Topallı, Ruşen; Ciğerli, Özlem; Görpelioğlu, Süleyman

    2006-01-01

    Background Family planning counselling which covers knowledge transfer about contraceptive mode of action, by enabling informed choice, improves compliance to and efficiency of contraceptive methods. The objective of this study was to investigate associations between family planning counselling, counsellor and correct knowledge about mode of action of modern contraceptive methods among married women. Methods For this cross-sectional study, stratified (according to current modern contraceptive method in use) random sampling was performed from the registries of two primary health care centres. Main outcomes were; prevalence of family planning counselling, professional background of the counsellor and correct knowledge about mode of action. A semi-structured questionnaire developed by the researchers was applied via face-to-face interview. The answers about mode of action were categorized as correct vs. incorrect by consensus rating. Results Prevalence of counselling and correct knowledge about mode of action was 49.0% and 39.3%, respectively. Higher educated women were significantly more likely to know the mode of action (p < 0.001). Being counselled by a physician (54.1%, n = 120) was not associated with correct knowledge about mode of action (p = 0.79). Non-barrier method users were less educated (p = 0.001), more often counselled (60.8% vs. 8.0%) and less knowledgeable (p < 0.001) about mode of action of their contraceptive method, compared to condom users. Nevertheless, counselled non-barrier method users were significantly more likely to know the correct mode of action of their chosen method (p = 0.021) than counselled condom users. Conclusion The beneficial effect of counselling on knowledge about mode of action of the more complicated, medical (non-barrier) contraceptive methods suggests that the use of family planning counselling services in primary health care should be promoted; furthermore, counselling strategies and content should be re-structured for

  7. Permanent Contraception for Women.

    PubMed

    Patil, Eva; Jensen, Jeffrey T

    2016-05-01

    Permanent contraception is a highly desired and commonly used contraceptive option for women around the world who desire never to become pregnant. Current methods of female permanent contraception require surgery. Postpartum tubal ligation and interval surgical tubal ligation are safe and effective, do not interfere with menstrual cycles, and require no ongoing cost or medical checkups. Hysteroscopic tubal occlusion offers a less invasive surgical approach, but requires an imaging study for verification of correct placement. However, not all women have access to a surgeon trained to provide permanent contraception, or they may face other prohibitive logistic or financial burdens. The development of novel permanent contraception methods that are immediately effective and/or nonsurgical could help improve access to and acceptability of permanent contraception. The expansion of permanent contraception options could help women achieve their family planning goals and reduce unintended pregnancies.

  8. [Contraception and society].

    PubMed

    Miyahara, S

    1988-01-01

    Dramatic decreases in the birth rate between 1947 and 1955 in Japan is due to legalized abortion and wide-spread practice of contraception but is also to some socio-economic changes. In 1947, the birth rate in Japan reached its highest, 34.3/1000 but dramatically decreased by 50% over the next 8 years. The birth rate, which went down to 17.2/1000 in 1955, increased again gradually till 1974 but has been decreasing. Total fertility rate is 1.8 as of now. Eugenic Law was passed in 1948 in Japan. 30% had the experience of contraception in 1950; 52% in 1955; 63% in 1959; 72% in 1965. 15% experienced abortion in 1952; 27%, in 1955; 41% in 1961. A post war baby boom occurred amid shortage of food, shelter and employment, and the experience of poverty prompted people to limit the size of family. Post-war Japan no longer was obsessed with producing an heir. Neither was there a need to produce many children because of improved infant mortality rates. Due to the fast paced industrialization of Japan between 1950 and 1960 a potentially high fertility population migrated from rural to urban areas, where big families were not advantageous. Although the socio economic life of Japanese people greatly improved after 1960, the birth rate has not increased very much. Money is now used more for material comforts in daily life, leisure, and education of small number of children. There is also a trend among some part of population not to have children because of environmental deterioration.

  9. Contraceptive vaginal rings: a review.

    PubMed

    Brache, Vivian; Faundes, Anibal

    2010-11-01

    Development efforts on contraceptive vaginal rings were initiated over 40 years ago based on two principles: the capacity of the vaginal epithelium to absorb steroids and the capacity of elastomers to release these hormones at a nearly constant rate. Numerous models of contraceptive vaginal rings (CVRs) have been studied, but only two have reached the market: NuvaRing, a combined ring that releases etonogestrel (ENG) and ethinylestradiol (EE), and Progering, a progesterone-releasing ring for use in lactating women. The main advantages of CVRs are their effectiveness (similar to or slightly better than the pill), ease of use without the need of remembering a daily routine, user's ability to control initiation and discontinuation, nearly constant release rate allowing for lower doses, greater bioavailability and good cycle control with the combined ring. The main disadvantages are related to the mode of delivery; CVRs may cause vaginal discharge and complaints, ring expulsion is not uncommon, the ring may be felt during coitus and vaginal insertion may be unpleasant for some women. The studies reviewed in this article provide evidence that CVRs are safe, effective and highly acceptable to women. There is no doubt that CVRs offer a new, effective contraceptive option to women, expanding their available choices of hormonal contraception.

  10. Contraception and abortion in Romania.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B R; Horga, M; Andronache, L

    1993-04-03

    After the downfall of the Ceausescu regime in December, 1989, the new Government of Romania abolished the law that prohibited abortions on request. Subsequently, the rate of legally induced abortions increased significantly while the rate of maternal mortality declined dramatically. Despite the large number of women who request induced abortions, most women and gynaecologists say that they would prefer to prevent unwanted pregnancies through the use of modern contraception. In this paper we examine factors that contribute to the disparity between women's desire to use modern contraception to prevent unwanted pregnancies and their practice of having induced abortions to prevent unwanted births. The results show that women (and suggest that men) need a wide choice of dependably available high-quality contraceptives; they need to be able to obtain information, counselling, and methods from a wide range of sources/health-care providers; both women's and men's perceptions about, and use of, modern contraception could be positively affected through sexual education started in secondary school; and, to reduce repeat abortions, women's post-abortion family-planning needs must not be neglected.

  11. [Recent changes in contraceptive use and fertility in Korea].

    PubMed

    Cho, N H; Kong, S K; Lim, J K

    1984-12-01

    In order to achieve planned demographic targets set for the period 1982-86, the government announced a new comprehensive population control policy in December 1981. This new set of policies calls for: 1) improving the current operation and management systems of the national family planning program; 2) strengthening the innovative social support policies including the incentive and disincentive schemes which encourage the small family; 3) integrating the family planning programs with other developed programs; and 4) establishing an end to these programs. As a result of government efforts to set up population measures, the number of those undergoing sterilization with 2 or fewer children and the contraceptive acceptance rate have increased greatly since 1982. The contraceptive practice rate for those ages 15-44 went to 58% in 1982. The total fertility rate dipped from 2.7 births/woman in 1981 to 2.4 in 1983. However, regional differentials in fertility rates are clearly observed. The urban fertility rate is lower than the rural and the regional differentials in fertility seem to derive from the strong son preference which is quite prevalent in the rural sector. The increase in contraceptive practice rate has contributed to the improvement of maternal health by preventing induced abortion. Since the inception of the family planning slogan focusing on the 1-child family, the proportion of respondents who said 1 child was enough rose from 16% in 1982 to 65% in 1984. With appropriate incentives, this figure is likely to increase. What remains is to lower the fertility rate for those in the 20-29 age group who currently account for over 80% of the total annual births. The current program management systems must recruit new acceptors among the younger age groups and must persuade them to resort to temporary contraceptive methods for birth spacing. The social support policies must be strengthened by providing preferential treatment for those with only 1 child and

  12. What Influences Adolescent Girls’ Decision-Making Regarding Contraceptive Methods Use and Childbearing? A Qualitative Exploratory Study in Rangpur District, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Shahabuddin, A. S. M.; Nöstlinger, Christiana; Delvaux, Thérèse; Sarker, Malabika; Bardají, Azucena; Brouwere, Vincent De; Broerse, Jacqueline E. W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Bangladesh has the highest rate of adolescent pregnancy in South Asia. Child marriage is one of the leading causes of pregnancies among adolescent girls. Although the country’s contraceptive prevalence rate is quite satisfactory, only 52% of married adolescent girls use contraceptive methods. This qualitative study is aimed at exploring the factors that influence adolescent girls’ decision-making process in relation to contraceptive methods use and childbearing. Methods and Results We collected qualitative data from study participants living in Rangpur district, Bangladesh. We conducted 35 in-depth interviews with married adolescent girls, 4 key informant interviews, and one focus group discussion with community health workers. Adolescent girls showed very low decision-making autonomy towards contraceptive methods use and childbearing. Decisions were mainly made by either their husbands or mothers-in-law. When husbands were unemployed and financially dependent on their parents, then the mothers-in-law played most important role for contraceptive use and childbearing decisions. Lack of reproductive health knowledge, lack of negotiation and communication ability with husbands and family members, and mistrust towards contraceptive methods also appeared as influential factors against using contraception resulting in early childbearing among married adolescent girls. Conclusions Husbands and mothers-in-law of newly married adolescent girls need to be actively involved in health interventions so that they make more informed decisions regarding contraceptive use to delay pregnancies until 20 years of age. Misunderstanding and distrust regarding contraceptives can be diminished by engaging the wider societal actors in health intervention including neighbours, and other family members. PMID:27336673

  13. The vaginal contraceptive sponge.

    PubMed

    Edelman, D A

    1984-06-01

    The vaginal contraceptive sponge, approved on April 1, 1983 by the US Food Administration (FDA) for sale in the US as a single use, disposable, over-the-counter contraceptive, is made of polyurethane and designed to be biocompatible with the vaginal environment. The sponge is available in a single size, is round, and about 5.5 cm in diameter and 2.5 cm thick. An indentation on 1 side helps to ensure the sponge's correct placement against the cervix. A polyester retrieval loop attached to the sponge facilitates removal. Postcoital tests of the sponge without the spermicide indicated that it was ineffective in preventing sperm from entering the cervical canal. Before insertion, the contraceptive sponge is moistened with tap water to activate the spermicide and is inserted into the vagina with the indentation placed against the cervis. The sponge has been designed to provide continuous protection against pregnancy for at least 24 hours after insertion. Following a successful phase ii clinical trail of the sponge, in 1979 comparative phase iii clinical trials were initiated by Family Health International. The following trials were conducted: sponge versus the diaphragm (arcing-spring) used with a spermicide (nonoxynol-9) at 13 clinics in the US (1439 subjects) and at 2 clinics in Canada and the UK (502 subjects); sponge versus a foaming spermicidal (menfegol) suppository at 5 clinics in Yugoslavia, Taiwan, and Bangladesh (1386) subjects); and sponge versus spermicidal (nonoxynol-9) foam at 2 clinics in Israel and Thailand (366 subjects). In all trials the contraceptive methods were raondomly assigned. Clinics were required to follow up subjects for 1 year. Only the US study has been completed. In the comparative trials of the sponge and diaphragm (both US based and overseas) the pregnancy rates were significantly higher for the sponge. In the comparative trials of the sponge and foaming suppositories or spermicidal foam there were no significant differences between the

  14. Statistics of hematologic malignancies in Korea: incidence, prevalence and survival rates from 1999 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeon Jin; Park, Eun-Hye; Jung, Kyu-Won; Kong, Hyun-Joo; Won, Young-Joo; Lee, Joo Young; Yoon, Jong Hyung; Park, Byung-Kiu; Lee, Hyewon; Eom, Hyeon-Seok

    2012-01-01

    Background The nationwide statistical analysis of hematologic malignancies in Korea has not been reported yet. Methods The Korea Central Cancer Registry and the Korean Society of Hematology jointly investigated domestic incidence rates and prevalence of hematologic malignancies occurred between 1999 and 2008, and analyzed survival rates of patients who were diagnosed between 1993 and 2008. Data of hematologic malignancies from 1993 to 2008 were obtained from the Korean National Cancer Incidence Data base. The crude incidence rates, age-specific incidence rates, age-standardized incidence rates, annual percentage change of incidence, and prevalence from 1999-2008 were calculated. Survival rates for patients diagnosed in 1993-2008 were estimated. Results In 2008, a total of 8,006 cases of hematologic malignancies were occurred, which comprised 4.5% of all malignancies. In all genders, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, myeloid leukemia, and multiple myeloma were most frequent diseases. In terms of age, ages between 60 and 69 were most prevalent. From 1999 to 2008, the age-standardized incidence rates increased from 10.2 to 13.7, and the annual percentage change was 3.9%. The 5-year survival rate increased from 38.2% during 1993-1995 to 55.2% during 2004-2008. As of January 2009, number of patients with 10-year prevalence was 33,130, and with 5- to 10-year prevalence was 10,515. Conclusion This is the first nationwide statistical report of hematologic malignancies in Korea. It could be used as the basic information to help investigate epidemiologic characteristics, evaluate progress during the past years, and establish future strategies for hematologic malignancies. Periodic statistical analysis of hematologic malignancies in Korea should be continued. PMID:22479275

  15. Consequences of high incarceration rate and high obesity prevalence on the prison system.

    PubMed

    Leddy, Meaghan A; Schulkin, Jay; Power, Michael L

    2009-10-01

    Incarceration and obesity rates have both increased in the United States. An implication is that there will be more obese inmates, which likely will raise the prevalence of obesity-related diseases, affecting the cost and performance of correctional health care. Other issues include increased costs of transport, restraint, and housing. There is surprisingly little published information on inmate obesity prevalence. The few published research studies suggest obesity prevalence in prisons reflects that of their region. Cardiovascular-related prisoner deaths appear to be associated with state-level obesity, though other risk factors are likely involved. Weight gain while incarcerated is common, and the prevalence of diabetes is increasing. The data suggest that preventive care is not a priority in prisons. Evidence from Japan suggests restricted diets and enforced activity can improve inmate health.

  16. Contraception after thirty-five.

    PubMed

    Luukkainen, T

    1992-04-01

    Our knowledge about the safety, the incidence of side effects, and the effectiveness of contraceptive methods for women in premenopause, or during the last decade of their reproductive life, has not been a primary interest for research and development in fertility control. The main purpose of trials for the evaluation of new contraceptive methods is to test their effectiveness, and therefore only women below 38 years of age are accepted. Furthermore, when new methods are being tested, only healthy women are accepted, and those having health problems of almost any kind are excluded. Therefore our knowledge about the contraceptive methods in women over 40 years of age is scanty and comes from trials with a long-lasting follow-up on healthy women who can use the method without problems until they are 45 or reach menopause. We have very limited reported information on the use of contraceptives by women who have cardiovascular disease, diabetes, liver problems, etc. Therefore the main body of experience in this review comes from healthy women between 35 and 44. On the other hand, one should remember that these women have a high motivation to use contraceptive methods and therefore the continuation rate in the trials is high. This compensates for the relatively small number of acceptors by giving more women-years in follow-up. Continuation rate and the proper use of methods are directly correlated to increase in age, socioeconomical status, and to education of users. Highly educated women in this age group have very low failure rate with almost any method.

  17. Relationship between entomological inoculation rate, Plasmodium falciparum prevalence rate, and incidence of malaria attack in rural Gabon.

    PubMed

    Elissa, N; Migot-Nabias, F; Luty, A; Renaut, A; Touré, F; Vaillant, M; Lawoko, M; Yangari, P; Mayombo, J; Lekoulou, F; Tshipamba, P; Moukagni, R; Millet, P; Deloron, P

    2003-03-01

    To assess the relationships between variations of Plasmodium falciparum transmission and those of peripheral parasitaemia prevalence or malaria attack incidence rates in regions with limited fluctuations of transmission, we conducted a follow-up in two Gabonese populations. Entomological surveys were carried out from May 1995 to April 1996 in Dienga, and from May 1998 to April 1999 in Benguia. In Dienga, malaria transmission was seasonal, being not detected during two 3-month periods. Mean entomological inoculation rate (EIR) was 0.28 infective bite/person/night. In Benguia, malaria transmission was perennial with seasonal fluctuations, mean EIR being 0.76 infective bite/person/night. In Dienga, 301 schoolchildren were followed from October 1995 to March 1996. Clinical malaria attack was defined as fever associated with >5000 parasites/microl of blood. P. falciparum prevalence varied from 28 to 42%, and monthly malaria attack incidence from 30 to 169 per thousand. In Benguia, the entire population (122 persons) was followed from November 1998 to April 1999. Prevalence varied from 22 to 50%, and monthly malaria attack incidence from 52 to 179 per thousand. In each area, entomological variations were not related to parasite prevalence, but preceded malaria attack incidence with 1- or 2-month time lag, corresponding to the pre-patency period that differs in the two populations, possibly according to differences in immunity related to parasite transmission.

  18. [Problems with male contraception. 1. Physiological foundations, male contraception (mechanical procedures, contraceptives)].

    PubMed

    Schill, W B

    1978-08-03

    The various aspects of male fertility control are elaborated. A discussion of spermatogenesis and fertilization mechanisms lays the groundwork for determining how these processes can be inhibited. Mechanical male contraceptive methods are coitus interruptus and coitus condomatus. Coitus interruptus can cause neurotic disturbances in both partners and has a failure rate of 10-20/100 use-years. The condom has a failure rate of about 7/100 use-years. Vasectomy is the most practicable operative male contraceptive method. Scrotal hematoma, scrotal abcesses, and congestive epididymitis are possible post-operative complications. 2/3 of the men who have vasectomies develop sperm autoantibodies, and some develop sperm granulomas. Spontaneous recanalization occurs in .8% of the cases. The incipience of azoospermia after vasectomy is dependent on the number of ejaculations but is difficult to predict. Castration and increasing the temperature of the gonads are other operative methods of male contraception. Medicamentive methods of male contraception must be safe, effective, fast, and reversible; they must cause no genetic changes, disturbances in libido or potency, or changes in secondary sex characteristics. Medicamental agents can affect spermatogenesis; the maturation of the spermatozoa; transport, motility, or metabolism of the spermatozoa; capacitation of the spermatozoa; or the penetration enzymes. Heavy metal compounds, cytostatic, or antibiotic compounds are unsuitable as spermatogenic inhibitors due to side effects. 5-Thio-D-Glucose may show promise as an antispermatogenic agent.

  19. State-level Uterine Corpus Cancer Incidence Rates Corrected for Hysterectomy Prevalence, 2004-2008

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Rebecca L.; Devesa, Susan S.; Cokkinides, Vilma; Ma, Jiemin; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2012-01-01

    Background The interpretation of uterine cancer rates is hindered by the inclusion of women whose uterus has been surgically removed in the population at risk. Hysterectomy prevalence varies widely by state and race/ethnicity, exacerbating this issue. Methods We estimated hysterectomy-corrected, age-adjusted uterine corpus cancer incidence rates by race/ethnicity for 49 states and the District of Columbia during 2004-2008 using case counts obtained from population-based cancer registries; population data from the U.S. Census Bureau; and hysterectomy prevalence data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Corrected and uncorrected incidence rates were compared with regard to geographic and racial/ethnic disparity patterns and the association with obesity. Results Among non-Hispanic whites, uterine cancer incidence rates (per 100,000 woman-years) uncorrected for hysterectomy prevalence ranged from 17.1 in Louisiana to 32.1 in New Jersey, mirrored regional hysterectomy patterns, and were not correlated with obesity prevalence (Pearson’s correlation coefficient, r = 0.06, two-sided p = 0.68). In comparison, hysterectomy-corrected rates were higher by 30% (District of Columbia) to more than 100% (Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, and Oklahoma), displayed no discernible geographic pattern, and were moderately associated with obesity (r = 0.37, two-sided p = 0.009). For most states, hysterectomy correction diminished or reversed the black/white deficit and accentuated the Hispanic/white deficit. Conclusion Failure to adjust uterine cancer incidence rates for hysterectomy prevalence distorts true geographic and racial patterns and substantially underestimates the disease burden, particularly for Southern states. Impact Correction for hysterectomy is necessary for the accurate evaluation of uterine cancer rates. PMID:23125334

  20. [Resistance and compliance to contraception in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Pichot, F; Dayan-lintzer, M

    1985-10-01

    Although inadequate information on sex and contraception is frequently believed to account for contraceptive failure in adolescents, other factors including resistence to contraception or poor compliance with method requirements have been invoked to explain contraceptive failures in well-informed adolescents. Sexual relations are beginning at ever-younger ages in France; a 1980 survey indicated that 50% had their 1st sexual relations before age 17. Sexual activity is sporadic and irregular but usually occurs with the same partner. At least 50% of 1st sexual relations are unprotected by contraception, and half of adolescent pregnancies occur in the 1st 6th months of sexual activity. 6-12 months pass on average before sexually active adolescents begin to use contraception. Rates of pregnancy and abortion have increased especially among adolescents under 16, and in 1979 almost 20% of all abortions were in women under 20 years old. In 1980, only 20% of adolescents used contraception, with 17.3% using oral contraceptives. Few statistics exist on the complex phenomenon of conscious or subconscious contraceptive resistence in adolescence, and clinical experience serves as a better guide. A frequent attitude among adolescents is that sexual relations should be spontaneous and romantic, traits viewed as incompatible with contraception. "Magical thinking", failure to appreciate the real risk of pregnancy, and dissociation of sex and pregnancy are common. Adolescents who doubt their fecundity may engage in unprotected relations to reassure themselves, while some seeking to assert their femininity may use pills although they have no need for contraception. Guilt and ambivalence may be unconscious motivations for poor contraceptive use. Young girls in cold, uncaring, neglectful, or conflict-ridden homes may seek affection from a sexual partner and wish to have a baby to demonstrate their attachment. Such situations often lead to well-accepted pregnancies and may also

  1. Burden of Type 2 Diabetes in Mexico: Past, Current and Future Prevalence and Incidence Rates

    PubMed Central

    Meza, Rafael; Barrientos-Gutierrez, Tonatiuh; Rojas-Martinez, Rosalba; Reynoso-Noverón, Nancy; Palacio-Mejia, Lina Sofia; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mexico diabetes prevalence has increased dramatically in recent years. However, no national incidence estimates exist, hampering the assessment of diabetes trends and precluding the development of burden of disease analyses to inform public health policy decision-making. Here we provide evidence regarding current magnitude of diabetes in Mexico and its future trends. Methods We used data from the Mexico National Health and Nutrition Survey, and age-period-cohort models to estimate prevalence and incidence of self-reported diagnosed diabetes by age, sex, calendar-year (1960–2012), and birth-cohort (1920–1980). We project future rates under three alternative incidence scenarios using demographic projections of the Mexican population from 2010–2050 and a Multi-cohort Diabetes Markov Model. Results Adult (ages 20+) diagnosed diabetes prevalence in Mexico increased from 7% to 8.9% from 2006 to 2012. Diabetes prevalence increases with age, peaking around ages 65–68 to then decrease. Age-specific incidence follows similar patterns, but peaks around ages 57–59. We estimate that diagnosed diabetes incidence increased exponentially during 1960–2012, roughly doubling every 10 years. Projected rates under three age-specific incidence scenarios suggest diabetes prevalence among adults (ages 20+) may reach 13.7–22.5% by 2050, affecting 15–25 million individuals, with a lifetime risk of 1 in 3 to 1 in 2. Conclusions Diabetes prevalence in Mexico will continue to increase even if current incidence rates remain unchanged. Continued implementation of policies to reduce obesity rates, increase physical activity, and improve population diet, in tandem with diabetes surveillance and other risk control measures is paramount to substantially reduce the burden of diabetes in Mexico. PMID:26546108

  2. Combined oral contraceptives: health benefits beyond contraception.

    PubMed

    Caserta, D; Ralli, E; Matteucci, E; Bordi, G; Mallozzi, M; Moscarini, M

    2014-09-01

    It has been recognized for over 50 years that combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are also capable of offering health benefits beyond contraception through the treatment and prevention of several gynaecological and medical disorders. During the last years a constant attention was given to the adverse effects of COCs, whereas their non-contraceptive benefits were underestimated. To date, most women are still unaware of the therapeutic uses of hormonal contraceptives, while on the contrary there is an extensive and constantly increasing of these non-contraceptive health benefits. This review summarizes the conditions of special interest for physicians, including dysmenorrhoea, menorrhagia, hyperandrogenism (acne, hirsutism, polycystic ovary syndrome), functional ovarian cysts, endometriosis, premenstrual syndrome, myomas, pelvic inflammatory disease, bone mineral density, benign breast disease and endometrial/ovarian and colorectal cancer. The benefits of COCs in rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, menstrual migraine and in perimenopause have also been treated for more comprehensive information. Using COCs specifically for non-contraceptive indications is still outside the product licence in the majority of cases. We strongly believe that these aspects are not of minor relevance and they deserve a special consideration by health providers and by the mass media, which have the main responsibility in the diffusion of scientific information. Thus, counseling and education are necessary to help women make well-informed health-care decisions and it is also crucial to increase awareness among general practitioners and gynaecologists.

  3. Residual ovarian activity during oral steroid contraception.

    PubMed

    van Heusden, A M; Fauser, B C J M

    2002-01-01

    Steroid drugs with contraceptive properties have been available in the clinical setting for over four decades and are still subject to improvement. Estrogens, progestins and anti-progestins have been used alone or in various combinations, regimens and routes of administration to favour the balance between efficacy and undesirable effects. One of the most important changes in this respect is the gradual lowering of steroid dosage in commercially available contraceptives. Current steroid contraceptive pills still achieve the goal of suppression of pituitary-ovarian activity, but the margins for error are minimal. In this review the available data on modes of action and the effects on suppressing pituitary-ovarian activity by different forms of oral contraception are reassessed. Although pregnancy rates provide a crude measure of contraceptive efficacy, no benchmark for pituitary-ovarian inhibition is available to test the suppressive potential of contraceptive drugs. Consequently, many studies provide incomplete and/or incomparable results. For the further study of those forms of steroid contraception that rely predominantly on suppression of ovarian activity, prevention of dominant follicles selection should be the objective.

  4. Depression and anxiety in ovarian cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prevalence rates

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Sam; Prescott, Philip; Mason, Jessica; McLeod, Natalie; Lewith, George

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To systematically review the literature pertaining to the prevalence of depression and anxiety in patients with ovarian cancer as a function of treatment stage. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Participants 3623 patients with ovarian cancer from primary research investigations. Primary outcome measure The prevalence of depression and anxiety in patients with ovarian cancer as a function of treatment stage. Results We identified 24 full journal articles that met the inclusion criteria for entry into the meta-analysis resulting in a pooled sample size of 3623 patients. The meta-analysis of prevalence rates identified pretreatment, on-treatment and post-treatment depression prevalences of 25.34% (CI 22.79% to 28.07%), 22.99% (CI 19.85% to 26.46%) and 12.71% (CI 10.14% to 15.79%), respectively. Pretreatment, on-treatment and post-treatment anxiety prevalences were 19.12% (CI 17.11% to 21.30%), 26.23% (CI 22.30% to 30.56%) and 27.09% (CI 23.10% to 31.49%). Conclusions Our findings suggest that the prevalence of depression and anxiety in women with ovarian cancer, across the treatment spectrum, is significantly greater than in the healthy female population. With the growing emphasis on improving the management of survivorship and quality of life, we conclude that further research is warranted to ensure psychological distress in ovarian cancer is not underdiagnosed and undertreated. PMID:26621509

  5. Oral contraceptives: current status.

    PubMed

    Burkman, R T

    2001-03-01

    During the past four decades, oral contraceptives have remained a safe and effective method of birth control. Reductions in the estrogen and progestin dosages have significantly decreased the incidence of cardiovascular complications. The association between oral contraceptives and breast cancer appears to be primarily because of detection bias or possibly a promotional effect. Despite the changes in formulation, the problems related to side effects have not been totally solved. Because compliance and successful use is strongly affected by side effects, improvement in this area is probably the biggest challenge faced by developers of oral contraceptives. It is also clear that there are a growing number of significant noncontraceptive benefits that accrue in oral contraceptive users. Unfortunately, many women do not know about these benefits. Thus, one of the issues that providers need to continue to address is how to provide better information about oral contraceptives and contraception in general to patients.

  6. Prevalence Rates of Depression, Anxiety, and Somatization among Rural Southwestern Native American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Carolyn T.; Morris, Christopher; Crowley, Susan L.

    Internalizing symptoms, which include anxiety and depression, may be the most common pattern of psychopathology found in children. However, the knowledge base targeting internalizing symptomology in Native American children of the Southwest is surprisingly limited. This paper reports on a study of prevalence rates of internalizing disorders among…

  7. Perceived Prevalence of Teasing and Bullying Predicts High School Dropout Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Dewey; Gregory, Anne; Huang, Francis; Fan, Xitao

    2013-01-01

    This prospective study of 276 Virginia public high schools found that the prevalence of teasing and bullying (PTB) as perceived by both 9th-grade students and teachers was predictive of dropout rates for this cohort 4 years later. Negative binomial regression indicated that one standard deviation increases in student- and teacher-reported PTB were…

  8. One-Year Prevalence Rates of Major Depressive Disorder in First-Year University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, E. Lisa; McLeod, Peter J.; Gleich, Stephen S.; Hand, Denise

    2006-01-01

    First-year university students may be more at risk for experiencing Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) than the general population given associated risk factors of this age range. A two-phase procedure was used to estimate the one-year prevalence rate of MDD and comorbid Major Anxiety Disorders among first-year university students at a small Canadian…

  9. The prevalence, awareness and control rate of hypertension among elderly in northwest of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Samad; Pourafkari, Leili; Tajlil, Arezou; Sahebihagh, Mohammad Hassan; Mohammadpoorasl, Asghar; Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Nader, Nader D; Azizi Zeinalhajlou, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adequate treatment of hypertension is infrequent in older patients. Determining the prevalence of hypertension in older patients, identifying the pattern of the treatment in this age group and evaluating their awareness of the disease may help healthcare systems to devise appropriate programs for controlling the disease. Methods: This descriptive cross sectional study included a sample from population of Tabriz, a large city in North-West of Iran, who were 60 years or older. Data collection and blood pressure measurements were conducted in the households of the participants from 1st June 2015 through 1st August 2015. Hypertension was defined as systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥150/90 mm Hg or receiving anti-hypertensive medications. Prevalence and determinants of hypertension, awareness of patients about their diagnosis and prevalence of treatment and adequately controlled blood pressure were determined. Results: The prevalence of hypertension was 68.0%. Among hypertensive patients 81.8% were aware of their diagnosis, 78.0% were receiving antihypertensive medications. Among treated patients, 46.2% were adequately controlled. In univariate analysis, prevalence of hypertension was significantly higher in women (74.0% vs. 60.7%, P < 0.001). Women were more likely to be aware of diagnosis and to receive antihypertensive medications; however, the prevalence of adequately controlled blood pressure was similar in treated men and women. Among included variables in logistic regression analysis, older age, lower number of family members in household, cardiac diseases, being on low salt low fat diet, higher Body mass index (BMI) and not being educated were independently associated with having hypertension. Conclusion: Hypertension is highly prevalent among older population of Tabriz. Despite high rate of treatment, the rates of control are relatively low, indicating a demand for prevention and better management of hypertension in older

  10. Oral Contraceptive Pill and PCOS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health PCOS: The Oral Contraceptive Pill Posted under Health Guides . ... of oral contraceptive pills for young women with PCOS? Regular and Lighter Periods: Oral contraceptive pills can ...

  11. Oral contraception and sexuality.

    PubMed

    Dennerstein, L; Burrows, G

    1976-05-22

    A search of the literature has been carried out to determined how oral contraceptives affect sexuality in women. Some studies featured a high incidence of loss of libido. This could perhaps be attributed to preparations containing progestational compounds. However, no adequate double-blind trial has confirmed this observation. Some psychological and pharmacological aspects of contraceptions are discussed. More research is needed to ascertain why women often lose their sexual interest when taking oral contraceptives.

  12. Reversible Contraception Update: The Importance of Long-Acting Reversible Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Mestad, Renee E.; Kenerson, Jessica; Peipert, Jeffrey F.

    2011-01-01

    The past several years have seen an expansion in contraception options. Emerging data support the use of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) such as the intrauterine device and subdermal implant as the most effective methods of contraception with the highest continuation rates and very high levels of patient satisfaction. In addition, the appropriate target population for the use of the intrauterine device now includes nulliparous women and adolescents. When a patient considers initiating a new contraceptive method, it is important to consider the characteristics of each method, including the side effects, effectiveness, and patient acceptability. Additionally, medical comorbidities must also be evaluated prior to choosing a method. In this article, we provide a brief overview of available reversible contraceptive methods, with an emphasis on LARC. PMID:19641264

  13. Associations of Intimate Partner Violence with Unintended Pregnancy and Pre-Pregnancy Contraceptive Use in South Asia

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Anita; McDougal, Lotus

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess associations of intimate partner violence (IPV) with pregnancy intendedness and pre-pregnancy contraceptive use among pregnant women in South Asia. Study Design Cross-sectional analyses were conducted using most recent Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) from Bangladesh, India and Nepal for married, pregnant women aged 15–49 years who responded to IPV assessments specific to current marriage (N=4738). Adjusted logistic and multinomial regression analyses were conducted with pooled data to assess associations of IPV ever (sexual only, physical only, sexual plus physical, none) with the outcomes of pregnancy intendedness (wanted, mistimed or unwanted) and pre-pregnancy contraceptive use (no, traditional, or modern), for the current pregnancy. Results IPV was not associated with a mistimed or unwanted pregnancy. Sexual IPV was associated with pre-pregnancy modern contraceptive use (aOR=2.32, 95% CI=1.24, 4.36); sexual plus physical IPV was associated with pre-pregnancy traditional contraceptive use (aOR=1.85, 95% CI=1.12, 3.07). Post-hoc analysis of reasons for pre-pregnancy contraceptive discontinuation revealed that women with a history of IPV, particularly sexual IPV, had higher prevalence of contraceptive failure (sexual only: 37.3%, sexual plus physical: 30.9%, physical only: 22.6%, no IPV: 13.6%). Conclusion Pregnant women who experienced sexual IPV from husbands were more likely to use contraceptives pre-pregnancy but had no reduced risk unintended pregnancy, possibly due to higher rates of pre-pregnancy contraceptive failure among those with this history. These findings suggest that victims of sexual IPV are able to acquire and use family planning services, but require more support to sustain effective contraceptive use. Implications Family planning services are reaching women affected by sexual IPV, and programs should be sensitive to this concern and the heightened vulnerability to contraceptive failure these women face. Long

  14. Long-acting reversible contraceptives: intrauterine devices and the contraceptive implant.

    PubMed

    Espey, Eve; Ogburn, Tony

    2011-03-01

    The provision of effective contraception is fundamental to the practice of women's health care. The most effective methods of reversible contraception are the so-called long-acting reversible contraceptives, intrauterine devices and implants. These methods have multiple advantages over other reversible methods. Most importantly, once in place, they do not require maintenance and their duration of action is long, ranging from 3 to 10 years. Despite the advantages of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods, they are infrequently used in the United States. Short-acting methods, specifically oral contraceptives and condoms, are by far the most commonly used reversible methods. A shift from the use of short-acting methods to long-acting reversible contraceptive methods could help reduce the high rate of unintended pregnancy in the United States. In this review of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods, we discuss the intrauterine devices and the contraceptive implant available in the United States, and we describe candidates for each method, noncontraceptive benefits, and management of complications.

  15. Estimating the Prevalence and Awareness Rates of Hypertension in Africa: A Systematic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Adeloye, Davies; Basquill, Catriona

    2014-01-01

    Background The burden of hypertension is high in Africa, and due to rapid population growth and ageing, the exact burden on the continent is still far from being known. We aimed to estimate the prevalence and awareness rates of hypertension in Africa based on the cut off “≥140/90 mm Hg”. Methods We conducted a systematic search of Medline, EMBASE and Global Health. Search date was set from January 1980 to December 2013. We included population-based studies on hypertension, conducted among people aged ≥15 years and providing numerical estimates on the prevalence of hypertension in Africa. Overall pooled prevalence of hypertension in mixed, rural and urban settings in Africa were estimated from reported crude prevalence rates. A meta-regression epidemiological modelling, using United Nations population demographics for the years 1990, 2000, 2010 and 2030, was applied to determine the prevalence rates and number of cases of hypertension in Africa separately for these four years. Results Our search returned 7680 publications, 92 of which met the selection criteria. The overall pooled prevalence of hypertension in Africa was 19.7% in 1990, 27.4% in 2000 and 30.8% in 2010, each with a pooled awareness rate (expressed as percentage of hypertensive cases) of 16.9%, 29.2% and 33.7%, respectively. From the modelling, over 54.6 million cases of hypertension were estimated in 1990, 92.3 million cases in 2000, 130.2 million cases in 2010, and a projected increase to 216.8 million cases of hypertension by 2030; each with an age-adjusted prevalence of 19.1% (13.9, 25.5), 24.3% (23.3, 31.6), 25.9% (23.5, 34.0), and 25.3% (24.3, 39.7), respectively. Conclusion Our findings suggest the prevalence of hypertension is increasing in Africa, and many hypertensive individuals are not aware of their condition. We hope this research will prompt appropriate policy response towards improving the awareness, control and overall management of hypertension in Africa. PMID:25090232

  16. Vaginal contraception--an update.

    PubMed

    Edelman, D A; Thompson, S

    1982-04-01

    A number of new and innovative methods of vaginal contraceptive have been developed in recent years and are currently being evaluated. Some of these methods are described briefly and the available data on their safety and efficacy are presented. 3 types of contraceptive sponges have been developed--collagen sponge, intravaginal insert, and Secure sponge--and are now being evaluated. The collagen sponge, a cylindrical-shaped disk, exerts its contraceptive effect by acting as a physical barrier to the sperm and through its ability to absorb semen much in excess of its own weight. Preliminary data confirm the effectiveness of the sponge obtained from post-coital tests. The intravaginal insert (IVI) is made of a polyester material incorporating the spermicide nonoxynol-9. In a small clinical evaluation of the IVI, 49 women were followed up for 1 month. No pregnancies or unexpected adverse reactions were reported. The Secure sponge is made of polyurethane and incorporates 1 g of the spermicide nonoxynol-9. Its primary mode of action in preventing pregnancy is through the release of nonoxynol-9. In a multiclinic phase 2 evaluation of the Secure, which included 382 women, the 6-month gross life-table pregnancy rate was 3.8 +or- 1.3/100 women; the 6-month gross discontinuation rate for all reasons was 26.2 +or- 3.4/100 women. Sufficient data from the comparative trials of the Secure and Neo Sampoon foaming suppository studies conducted in Yugoslavia, Taiwan, and Bangladesh have been reported to the International Fertility Research Program (IFRP). The 12-month life-table rates for reasons leading to discontinuation of the contraceptive methods were not significantly different except for the category of "other personal reasons." The advantages Secure provides over other vaginal contraceptives are identified. Foaming vaginal suppositories similar to Neo Sampoon but containing 100 mg nonoxynol-9 are being developed and evaluated in the U.S. Clinical data on these products are

  17. Can early breastfeeding support increase the 6-8 week breastfeeding prevalence rate?

    PubMed

    Price, Linda

    2014-05-01

    Breastfeeding has significant health benefits for mothers and babies and is an important strategy to reduce health inequalities (UNICEF, 2010). The Baby Friendly Initiative, a strategy to increase breastfeeding rates, has been adopted by the trust. In line with the trust's priorities, the health visiting team initiated a project to increase the 6-8 breastfeeding prevalence rates. Breastfeeding mothers in a defined project area were offered breastfeeding support in their homes within the first postnatal week. Although the results after six months did demonstrate an overall increase in the 6-8 week prevalence rate of 5%, the monthly figures where disappointingly inconsistent and it was difficult to attribute the rise to the increased support offered. Nevertheless, the feedback from mothers who received support demonstrated that it was valued and had a positive impact on their confidence to continue to breastfeed.

  18. Survey on the use of health services by adult men: prevalence rates and associated factors1

    PubMed Central

    de Arruda, Guilherme Oliveira; Marcon, Sonia Silva

    2016-01-01

    Objective estimate the prevalence and identify factors associated with the use of health services by men between 20 and 59 years of age. Method population-based, cross-sectional domestic survey undertaken with 421 adult men, selected through systematic random sampling. The data were collected through a structured instrument and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics with multiple logistic regression. Results the prevalence rate of health service use during the three months before the interviews was 42.8%, being higher among unemployed men with a religious creed who used private hospitals more frequently, had been hospitalized in the previous 12 months and referred some disease. Conclusion the prevalence of health service use by adult men does not differ from other studies and was considered high. It shows to be related with the need for curative care, based on the associated factors found. PMID:27027680

  19. Barrier methods of contraception.

    PubMed

    Skrine, R L

    1985-05-01

    Barrier methods of contraception make up an essential part of the present contraceptive range, and doctors need to know in detail how to choose and fit them as well as how to instruct patients in their use. This discussion reviews the mode of action of the barrier method and then focuses on the vaginal diaphragm, the cervical or vault cap, the collatex (Today) sponge, condoms, emotionl problems associated with the use of barrier methods, advantages of barrier methods, and future developments. Barrier methods of contraception are only effective if used consistently and carefully. Failure rates vary greatly between studies, but in selected populations the failure rate for the diaphragm with spermicide can be as low as 1.9/100 woman years (wy) and for the condom 3.6 per 100wy (Vessey et al., 1982). If known user failures are removed, the figure for the condom can drop to as low as 0.4 per 100wy (John, 1973), which compares favorably with that of the combined oral contraceptive. Other studies quote failure rates of 10 per 100wy or more. These methods call for considerable participation by the patient at or before each act of intercourse and there is, therefore, great scope for inefficient use, either as a result of poor instruction or because couples find that they interfere with happy, relaxed sexual activity -- or fear that they may do so. Doctors need to understand the feelings of their patients before recommending them. The aim of a barrier method is to prevent live sperm from meeting the ovum. This is accomplished by the combination of a physical barrier with a spermicide. In the case of the condom, the integrity of the physical barrier is the most important factor, although some patients feel more secure with an additional spermicide. The vaginal barriers used at present do not produce a "water-tight" fit, and the principle is that the spermicide is held over the cervix by the barrier. It is also possible that the device acts partially by holding the alkaline

  20. Advance provision of emergency contraception for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Adamji, Jehan-Marie; Swartwout, Kathryn

    2010-12-01

    Emergency contraception is most effective at preventing unintended pregnancy when taken as early as possible following unprotected sexual intercourse. Advance provision of this medication supports more timely and effective use. In the midst of rising teen pregnancy rates, current policies often limit access to emergency contraception for adolescents. A literature search identified three recent experimental studies of advance provision for adolescents. This article reviews those studies and finds strong support for advance provision for adolescents. Usage of emergency contraception increased with advance provision and there was no increase in negative sexual behaviors or decrease in usage of other contraceptive forms. Implications of these findings for school nurses and school-based health center staff are also discussed.

  1. Prevalence rate of chronic overuse pain among sport-poomsae-Taekwondo athletes.

    PubMed

    Koh, Jae O

    2016-07-07

    BACKGROUNDː To estimate the prevalence of chronic overuse pain (COP) and to identify possible risk factors of COP in sport-poomsae-Taekwondo. METHODSː This is a cross-sectional survey. A total of 263 sport-poomsae competitors (112 females; 151 males; aged between 12-44 years), who competed at the 2014 sport-poomsae- Taekwondo competition, participated in this study. The prevalence rate of COP and possible risk factors associated with COP were analyzed by using Chi-square tests and independent t-tests. RESULTSː A total of 173 athletes reported that they experienced COP (65.8%; 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 60.5-71.5). Female athletes showed a higher prevalence rate than their male counterparts (75.9% vs. 58.3%). Lower body (61.5%) and knee joints (26.4%) were the two primarily injured body part. A total of 101 athletes reported that they injured in the previous year. Among those, 81.2% were suffered from COP. The technique that caused pain most frequently was side-kick among females and front-kick among males. Prevalence rates of COP were significantly different by sex, education level, training hour, and a history of injury. CONCLUSIONː The prevalence of COP is high among sport-poomsae-Taekwondo athletes. Competitors who are female, have a history of injury, and train for extended hours were more likely to experience COP. To identify other potential risk factors of COP in sport- poomsae-Taekwondo, more research is needed to build upon the findings.

  2. Contraceptive Practices Among Female Cancer Survivors of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Dominick, Sally A.; McLean, Mamie R.; Whitcomb, Brian W.; Gorman, Jessica R.; Mersereau, Jennifer E.; Bouknight, Janet M.; Su, H. Irene

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare rates of contraception between reproductive-aged cancer survivors and women in the general U.S. population. Among survivors, the study examined factors associated with use of contraception and emergency contraception. Methods This study analyzed enrollment data from an ongoing national prospective cohort study on reproductive health after cancer entitled the Fertility Information Research Study. We compared current contraceptive use in survivors with that of the general population ascertained by the 2006–2010 National Survey for Family Growth. Log-binomial regression models estimated relative risks for characteristics associated with use of contraception, World Health Organization tiers I–II (sterilization and hormonal) contraceptive methods, and emergency contraception in survivors. Results Data from 295 survivors (mean age 31.6 ± 5.7 years, range 20–44 years) enrolled in this prospective study (85% response rate) were examined. Age-adjusted rates of using tiers I–II contraceptive methods were lower in survivors than the general population (34% [28.8–40.0] compared with 53% [51.5–54.5], P<.01). Only 56% of survivors reported receiving family planning services (counseling, prescription or procedure related to birth control) since cancer diagnosis. In adjusted analysis, receipt of family planning services was associated with both increased use of tiers I–II contraceptive methods (relative risk 1.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–1.5) and accessing emergency contraception (relative risk 5.0, 95% CI 1.6–16.3) in survivors. Conclusion Lower rates of using Tiers I–II contraceptive methods were found in reproductive-aged cancer survivors compared to the general population of U.S. women. Exposure to family planning services across the cancer care continuum may improve contraception utilization among these women. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01843140. PMID:26181090

  3. Prevalence and Incidence Rates of Dementia and Cognitive Impairment No Dementia in the Mexican Population

    PubMed Central

    Mejia-Arango, Silvia; Gutierrez, Luis Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence and incidence of dementia and cognitive impairment without dementia (CIND) in the Mexican population. Methods The MHAS study is a prospective panel study of health and aging in Mexico with 7,000 elders that represent 8 million subjects nationally. Using measurements of cognition and activities of daily living of dementia cases and CIND were identified at baseline and follow up. Overall incidence rates and specific rates for sex, age and education were calculated. Results Prevalence was 6.1% and 28.7% for dementia and CIND, respectively. Incidence rates were 27.3 per 1,000 person-years for dementia and 223 per 1,000 persons-year for CIND. Rates of dementia and CIND increased with advancing age and decreased with higher educational level; sex had a differential effect depending on the age strata. Hypertension, diabetes and depression were risk factors for dementia but not for CIND. Discussion These data provide estimates of prevalence and incidence of dementia and cognitive impairment in the Mexican population for projection of future burden. PMID:21948770

  4. [Weariness of contraception].

    PubMed

    Borg, V

    1979-07-01

    Mechanical methods of contraception tend nowadays to be considered as unsafe and the "modern" contraceptives are more popular. The advantage of the intrauterine device is that once it has been placed, one can forget about it. However it is necessary for the woman to undergo checkups and have the device replaced regularly. IUD's are not always very well tolerated psychologically. Women are influenced by information, the fear of the risks, the opinion of their friends and families and the media, and they end up getting tired of this method of contraception. Oral contraceptives are 100% safe but only provided one does not forget to take it: it imposes a daily routine which disturbs many women after a certain time. They then tend to relate all their problems to the pill. Women are aware of the risks contained in oral contraceptives, and they refuse to run these risks by themselves. Whichever method of contraception one chooses, it liberates the woman from the fear of unwanted pregnancy. A good contraception should do this, plus separate the idea of procreation from the sexual intercourse. This seems to be going well for a few years, but after a while a weariness appears. The answer may be to find a contraception suitable to both partners, so that they could make their own decision.

  5. Oral contraceptives in migraine.

    PubMed

    Allais, Gianni; Gabellari, Ilaria Castagnoli; De Lorenzo, Cristina; Mana, Ornella; Benedetto, Chiara

    2009-03-01

    Combined oral contraceptives are a safe and highly effective method of birth control, but they can also raise problems of clinical tolerability and/or safety in migraine patients. It is now commonly accepted that, in migraine with aura, the use of combined oral contraceptives is always contraindicated, and that their intake must also be suspended by patients suffering from migraine without aura if aura symptoms appear. The newest combined oral contraceptive formulations are generally well tolerated in migraine without aura, and the majority of migraine without aura sufferers do not show any problems with their use; nevertheless, the last International Classification of Headache Disorders identifies at least two entities evidently related to the use of combined oral contraceptives: exogenous hormone-induced headache and estrogen-withdrawal headache. As regards the safety, even if both migraine and combined oral contraceptive intake are associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke, migraine without aura per se is not a contraindication for combined oral contraceptive use. Other risk factors (tobacco use, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity and diabetes) must be carefully considered when prescribing combined oral contraceptives in migraine without aura patients, in particular in women aged over 35 years. Furthermore, the exclusion of a hereditary thrombophilia and of alterations of coagulative parameters should precede any decision of combined oral contraceptive prescription in migraine patients.

  6. Nonprescription vaginal contraception.

    PubMed

    Edelman, D A

    1980-01-01

    Data on the efficacy of vaginal contraceptive suppositories and foams available in the United States are reviewed, and data on a new vaginal contraceptive, the Collatex sponge, is presented. The efficacy of this device appears to be similar to that of the diaphragm.

  7. Migraine and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Mousa, G Y

    1982-10-01

    Migraine is a common complaint in optometric practice. Three cases of migrainous patients taking oral contraceptives are presented in this report. The role of oral contraceptives in triggering a migraine attack and possibly elevating the risk of a stroke in a patient with migraine is discussed. The counseling an optometrist can provide in such cases in discussed.

  8. Vaginal mechanical contraceptive devices.

    PubMed

    Smith, M; Barwin, B N

    1983-10-01

    The alleged adverse effects of oral contraceptives and intrauterine devices have led to increased consumer and physician demand for vaginal contraceptive devices. The efficacy and the advantages and disadvantages of vaginal sponges, cervical caps and diaphragms are discussed and compared in this article.

  9. Contraception in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Riphagen, F E; von Schoultz, B

    1989-06-01

    In 1987, a survey of contraceptive use, knowledge and attitudes was conducted in Sweden by the International Health Foundation (IHF) as part of a multi-country study that has so far involved six other countries in Europe. The women involved, who were aged 15-44, completed a standard questionnaire. The overall percentage use of contraceptive methods, especially the reliable ones, was found to be high (95%). Oral contraception was the most frequently used method, followed by barrier methods and the intrauterine device (IUD). Contraceptive methods were chosen or abandoned mainly because of health reasons and better reliability. Knowledge of fertility proved to be generally good. Medical methods such as oral contraceptives and IUDs were associated with health hazards. In the case of the pill, fears of cardiovascular risks, thrombosis and cancer were widespread, while infection risk and menorrhagia were the most frequently quoted perceived disadvantages of the IUD. Indeed, these two methods suffer from a very negative image among Swedish users.

  10. The worldwide use of steroidal contraception.

    PubMed

    Diczfalusy, E

    1989-01-01

    Historically, concerns about rapidly growing populations and resources that could not support them persuaded governments of developing countries to initiate family planning programs. Between the early 1960s and the early 1980s, the number of governments supporting these programs increased from 7 to approximately 120. Today, 52 governments in developing countries provide support to family planning programs because of the demographic rationale, and 65 governments do so because of human rights and health considerations: The effective use of family planning significantly diminishes infant, child, and maternal mortality and morbidity. Forty-five percent of married women of reproductive age worldwide are practicing contraception today; however, 69% do so in East Asia and only 11% in Africa. Female sterilization and use of intrauterine devices are the most popular methods in developing countries, and oral contraceptives and condoms, in developed countries. Of the 400 million women of reproductive age, 140 million (35%) are relying on family planning methods requiring male cooperation and less than 60 million (15%) are using oral contraceptives. More than half of these oral contraceptive users live in four countries: the United States, Brazil, France, and the Federal Republic of Germany. On the other hand, the percentage of currently married women, aged 15 to 19 years, who have never used any form of contraception is as high as 85% to 90% in Bangladesh, Sudan, and Pakistan. In many developing countries, there is a statistically significant correlation between women's use of contraception and years of education. Other important factors influencing contraceptive prevalence include the established or perceived side effects of currently available methods, the status of women, the political climate, and a number of behavioral and social determinants.

  11. New hormonal methods of contraception.

    PubMed

    Newton, J R

    1996-04-01

    Three types of new contraceptive delivery system have been discussed in this chapter. Each have novel methods of delivery and may be acceptable to certain groups of women. It is clear that subdermal contraceptive implants are extremely useful as a long-term method of contraception, and provided insertion occurs correctly, removal will then be easy. The second-generation implants using a single rod, compared with the first-generation ones using six capsules, would appear to offer advantages both to the patient and in relation to the training of medical and paramedical personnel who have to fit the subdermal implant. The main disadvantage is the incidence of irregular bleeding, which, by and large, can be overcome by pre-insertion counselling and by time. The second method of delivery, vaginal rings, offers high patient acceptability, but a usable ring for contraception has as yet to be developed. Two approaches appear to be the use of a continuous progestogen-only ring, or a combined ring releasing oestrogen and progestogen with a 21-day-in, 7-day-out cycle of use. Ongoing studies will indicate whether vaginal lesions are significant or related to the flexibility of the ring. If these studies prove satisfactory, further development of the vaginal rings, both as an alternative method for interval use or as a specific postpartum form of contraception using progesterone-releasing rings, will be developed. Significant developments in the use of a combined monthly injectable have led to the release of two preparations, Cyclofem and Mesigyna, which are now available in many countries. This combined approach offers a significant reduction in amenorrhoea rates and unacceptable bleeding, the majority of women having acceptable menstrual patterns even during the first 3 months of use. All three methods have low and acceptable rates of pregnancy, the lowest being seen with the subdermal implants and with combined monthly injectables. Due to the length of action of subdermal

  12. [Community marketing of contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Urrutia, J M

    1987-09-01

    The 5-year-old community contraceptive distribution program developed by PROFAMILIA, Colombia's private family planning organization, has given excellent results, but several cost-effectiveness comparisons with social marketing programs have suggested that commercial distribution programs are superior. The community contraceptive distribution program has a high content of information and education activities, which produced significant increases in knowledge and use of contraception in the communities covered. It has been a fundamental support for the social marketing program, creating much of the demand for contraceptive products that the social marketing program has filled. The social marketing program has given good results in terms of volume of sales and in cost-effectiveness since 1976, prompting calls for replacement of the community contraceptive distribution program by the social marketing program in those sectors where knowledge and use of contraception have achieved acceptable levels. An experiment in the Department of Santander in 1984 and 1985 gave very favorable results, suggesting that community contraceptive distribution programs should be replaced by social marketing programs in all more developed markets. But economic problems in 1985 and the decision of manufacturers to decrease the profit margin for PROFAMILIA jeopardized the social marketing program. The community distribution program covered about 20% of the market. Reduced profits in the social marketing program threatened its continued expansion, at the same time that potential demand was growing because of increases in the fertile aged population and increased use of contraception. To meet the need, PROFAMILIA combined the community contraceptive distribution and social marketing programs into a new entity to be called community marketing. The strategy of the community marketing program will be to maintain PROFAMILIA's participation in the market and aid the growth of demand for

  13. Pelvic inflammatory disease and oral contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    Feldblum, P J; Burton, N; Rosenberg, M J

    1986-10-01

    Oral contraceptive use has been shown to protect against gonococcal pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), but the effect on chlamydial PID is uncertain. Chlamydia infection is rising in incidence and has become the major cause of PID in many areas. PID may cause infertility, impairing the future reproduction of women. Previous studies on oral contraceptives and PID relied on hospitalized women, which may have biased the sample to include mainly gonococcal PID. Several studies show increased risk of endocervical chlamydia infection in users of oral contraceptives. The postulated mechanism is cervical ectopy, exposing more squamous epithelium to the organisms. Nevertheless, there is evidence indicating that despite the increased incidence of endocervical infection, oral contraceptives may inhibit the organisms from ascending, thus still offering a protective affect against both gonococcal and chlamydial PID. Future research must focus on the prevalence of chlamydia infection in Africa, and the natural history of the illness. The effect of different types of oral contraceptives on chlamydia infection must be evaluated.

  14. Factors Associated with Hormonal and Intrauterine Contraceptive Use among HIV-Infected Men and Women in Lilongwe, Malawi: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Phiri, Sam; Ng'ambi, Wingston; Krashin, Jamie W.; Mlundira, Linly; Chaweza, Thom; Samala, Bernadette; Tweya, Hannock; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Haddad, Lisa B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Understanding the factors associated with the use of hormonal and intrauterine contraception among HIV-infected men and women may lead to interventions that can help reduce high unintended pregnancy rates. Materials and Methods. This study is a subanalysis of a cross-sectional survey of 289 women and 241 men who were sexually active and HIV-infected and were attending HIV care visits in Lilongwe, Malawi. We estimated adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) to evaluate factors associated with hormonal and intrauterine contraceptive use for men and women in separate models. Results and Discussion. 39.8% of women and 33.2% of men (p = 0.117) reported that they were using hormonal or intrauterine contraception at last intercourse. Having greater than 3 children was the only factor associated with hormonal and intrauterine contraceptive use among men. Among women, younger age, not wanting a pregnancy in 2 years, being with their partner for more than 4 years, and being able to make family planning decisions by themselves were associated with hormonal and intrauterine contraceptive use. Conclusions. The men and women in our study population differed in the factors associated with hormonal and intrauterine contraceptive use. Understanding these differences may help decrease unmet FP needs among HIV-infected men and women. PMID:27642245

  15. A Continuation of the Paradigm Wars? Prevalence Rates of Methodological Approaches across the Social/Behavioral Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alise, Mark A.; Teddlie, Charles

    2010-01-01

    A new line of research has emerged that examines the prevalence rates of mixed methods within disciplines in the social/behavioral sciences. Research presented in this article is unique in that it examines prevalence rates across multiple disciplines using an established cross-disciplinary classification scheme. Results indicate that there are…

  16. The 1998 Canadian Contraception Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, William A.; Boroditsky, Richard; Bridges, Martha L.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the 1998 Canadian Contraception Study, a mailed survey which asked women about contraceptive practices past, present, and future (including use of oral contraceptives, condoms, and sterilization); familiarity with and opinion about different contraception methods; and general sexual and reproductive health. The paper also examines…

  17. Workshop on long-term contraceptives.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    The National Population Council Secretariat (NPCS) of Ghana held a three-day workshop on long-term contraceptives in 1996 in collaboration with the Ministry of Health, the Association of Voluntary Surgical Contraception, and the Johns Hopkins Population Communication Services. The session was funded by USAID. The executive director of NPCS, Dr. Richard Turkson, said that the slow rate of contraceptive acceptance was an obstacle to population control despite political concern that rapid population growth exerted an adverse impact on the economy. Only 10% of married women were using long-term or permanent methods of contraception. The hope was voiced that the participants would devise practical and cost-effective education, information, and communication (IEC) strategies to boost the demand for long-term contraceptive methods among sexually active people in Ghana. It was essential that these strategies and activities were based on a realist assessment of the demographic and social situation of the country. The examination of case studies in cultures similar to Ghana would also offer valuable lessons. The factors that hinder the acceptance of long-term methods include misconceptions, myths, and false rumors rooted in a general lack of knowledge among the people. Participants were urged to come up with strategies to counter these problems, and service providers were encouraged to improve their knowledge about contraceptive methods and counseling skills. Male involvement in contraception was also advocated. Statistics show that most Ghanians practicing contraception were using short-term methods such as foaming tablets, pills, and condoms. However, it is necessary to shift to long-term methods such as injectables, implants, and sterilization in order to achieve significant reductions in fertility.

  18. Current prevalence rate of latex allergy: Why it remains a problem?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Miaozong; McIntosh, James; Liu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This article aims to review the current prevalence rate of latex allergy among healthcare workers, susceptible patients, and the general public, and to investigate why latex is still a ubiquitous occupational health hazard. Methods: Scientific publications on PubMed, particularly those published within the last five years, and current regulations from agencies such as Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were reviewed. Consumer and commercial products that may contain latex were also surveyed. Results: Approximately 12 million tons of natural rubber latex is produced annually and is widely used to manufacture millions of consumer and commercial products. Only limited number of latex-derived products have been approved and regulated by government agencies, such as FDA, whereas the majority of finished products do not label whether they contain latex. Owing to millions of unidentifiable products containing latex and many routes for exposure to latex, preventing contact with latex allergens and reducing the prevalence of latex allergy are more difficult than expected. Reported data suggest that the average prevalence of latex allergy worldwide remains 9.7%, 7.2%, and 4.3% among healthcare workers, susceptible patients, and general population, respectively. Conclusions: Latex-derived products are ubiquitous, and latex allergy remains a highly prevalent health risk in many occupations and to the general population. Developing alternative materials and increasing the ability to identify and label latex-derived products will be practicable approaches to effectively control the health risks associated with latex. PMID:27010091

  19. Global contraceptive use improves health.

    PubMed

    Ross, J A

    1988-01-01

    Over 40% of all cohabiting women, in Asia and Latin America, are using contraceptives, most of them modern methods. In many countries, upper order births are disappearing, and rural birth rates in some regions have fallen nearly as much as urban ones. The average family size is diminishing sharply. It is close to 2 children in Thailand, and below 2 throughout urban China. 4/5 of the developing world's population live in only 17 countries, in which contraceptive use has risen from 41% to 52% of couples in 10 years. Moreover, family planning programs affect the overall health of the population: fewer births have meant fewer maternal deaths, and fewer orphans, fewer infant and child deaths, fewer high-risk births (especially at short intervals and upper parities), fewer children left unimmunized, and fewer unserved by the health services. The extent of this quiet social revolution has its limits. Mainly in the 50 struggling countries of sub-Saharan Africa, most of them with weak health ministries, as well as, among the largest 8 countries, Nigeria and Pakistan, which have changed little. But both are reactivating their family planning programs, and the concentration of 2/3 of the developing world's population in 8 large countries means that only 8 administrations can control the course of vital rates. The consequence of the great transformation induced by contraceptive use has begun to give developing world's women control over their own child bearing, adding freedom to their lives. Nevertheless, if the contraceptive revolution has enormously advanced the cause of international health, it still has a long way to go.

  20. Contraception and headache.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, E Anne

    2013-02-01

    Most women have used at least 1 method of contraception during their reproductive years, with the majority favoring combined oral contraceptives. Women are often concerned about the safety of their method of choice and also ask about likely effects on their pre-existing headache or migraine and restrictions on using their headache medication. While there should be no restriction to the use of combined hormonal contraceptives by women with migraine without aura, the balance of risks vs benefits for women with aura are debatable. Migraine with aura, but not migraine without aura, is associated with a twofold increased risk of ischemic stroke, although the absolute risk is very low in healthy, nonsmoking women. Although ethinylestradiol has been associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke, the risk is dose-dependent. Low-dose pills currently used are considerably safer than pills containing higher doses of ethinylestradiol but they are not risk-free. This review examines the evidence available regarding the effect that different methods of contraception have on headache and migraine and identifies strategies available to minimize risk and to manage specific triggers such as estrogen "withdrawal" headache and migraine associated with combined hormonal contraceptives. The independent risks of ischemic stroke associated with migraine and with hormonal contraceptives are reviewed, and guidelines for use of contraception by women with migraine are discussed in light of the current evidence.

  1. Evidence based contraceptive choices.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alison; Glasier, Anna

    2006-10-01

    People who attend for contraceptive advice have usually formulated an idea of the type of contraceptive that will suit them best. They may wish to use a method that is long, short or medium acting. These are defined as follows: Long-acting method requires renewal no more frequently than every 3 months (e.g. injectable or intrauterine). Short-acting method used daily or with every act of intercourse (e.g. pills, condoms) Medium-acting method requires renewal weekly or monthly (e.g. ring, patch). For men the choice is limited to condoms or vasectomy. Some women do not wish to use hormonal preparations or have an intrauterine device (IUD) or implant inserted. There may also be cultural influences making certain methods of contraception unacceptable. Each of these factors influences the final decision of which method of contraception is decided upon. In addition to taking a full medical and sexual history to identify any risks to the individual's health, which might be increased by a particular contraceptive, time must be spent discussing the options available. It is important to ensure that there is a full understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of each method. The most successful contraceptive method is likely to be the one that the woman (or man) chooses, rather than the one the clinician chooses for them. Access for women to contraception can be improved by having convenient clinic times and service developments such as nurse prescribing and Patient Group Directions.

  2. Male hormonal contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Amory, J K

    2006-06-01

    Efforts are underway to develop additional forms of contraception for men. The most promising approach to male contraceptive development involves the administration of exogenous testosterone (T). When administered to a man, T functions as a contraceptive by suppressing the secretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone from the pituitary, thereby depriving the testes of the signals required for spermatogenesis. After 2-3 months of treatment, low levels of these gonadotropins lead to markedly decreased sperm counts and effective contraception in a majority of men. Hormonal contraception with exogenous T has proven to be free from serious adverse effects and is well tolerated by men. In addition, sperm counts uniformly normalize when the exogenous T is discontinued. Thus, male hormonal is safe, effective and reversible; however, spermatogenesis is not suppressed to zero in all men, meaning that some diminished potential for fertility persists. Because of this recent studies have combined T with progestogens and/or gonadotropin-releasing antagonists to further suppress pituitary gonadotropins and optimize contraceptive efficacy. Current combinations of T and progestogens completely suppress spermatogenesis without severe side effects in 80-90% of men, with significant suppression in the remainder of individuals. Recent trials with newer, long-acting forms of injectable T, which can be administered every 8 weeks, combined with progestogens, administered either orally or by long-acting implant, have yielded promising results and may soon result in the marketing of a safe, reversible and effective hormonal contraceptive for men.

  3. Postpartum contraceptive methods.

    PubMed

    1990-08-01

    Contraceptive methods suitable for postpartum women include sterilization, intrauterine devices (IUDs), barrier methods, oral contraceptives, implants, injectables, breastfeeding, and natural family planning. Couples considering either male or female sterilization should receive counseling since this method is irreversible; however, it is very effective. IUDs are effective, reversible, and can be inserted as early as 10 minutes following placental delivery. Barrier methods are not as effective and include condoms, spermicides, diaphragm, and cervical caps. While condoms and spermicides can be employed whenever sexual activity resumes, diaphragms and cervical caps can be used 4-6 weeks postpartum. The progestin-only and the combined oral contraceptives are both very effective. There is disagreement among professionals regarding when nursing mothers should start taking oral contraceptives and implant and injectable contraceptives. Implants and injectable contraceptives have long acting effects. Breastfeeding is a natural form of contraception which can last up to 6 months; it also supplies nutritional and immunological benefits. Natural family planning requires providing women with information on fertility awareness.

  4. Post-coital contraception.

    PubMed

    Ashton, J R; Chambers, J; Hall, D J

    1984-03-01

    137,000 British women chose to have an abortion in 1981 and about 25% were teenagers. A recent estimate noted that 10% of unintended pregnancies could have been avoided if postcoital contraception had been obtainable. The availability of postcoital contraception is limited and few doctors have much knowledge of or interest in this contraceptive method. 2 questions that arise are why have doctors been so slow to adopt this effective method of birth control and what are the chances of its availability in the National Health Service (NHS) improving. Postcoital contraception is a comparatively new and until recently unpublicized fertility control method, and there was little knowledge of it among the general population or the medical profession. Doctors' ignorance and reluctance to provide the method may have been due in part to the fact that the pharmaceutical firms have been hesitant to recommend oral contraceptive (OC) pills for this use. There is no specially packaged product, and it is necessary for a patient to be given 4 pills from a 21-pill pack. This has meant that the method has not been advertized, as most new methods would be, in the medical magazines. Hopefully, this lack of knowledge has been rectified by the Family Planning Association. As part of its campaign to launch the method, it has sent details to all general practitioners. Attitudes to postcoital contraception are important, and clearly there are strong parallels with the abortion issues and legal and moral undercurrents as well. Many doctors might have been put off providing postcoital contraception by the experience of the 2 clinics (BPAS in Sheffield and the Caithorpe Nursing Home in Birmingham) which had been reported by Life, an antiabortion pressure group, to the Director of Public Prosecutions under the Offences Against the Persons Act 1863. But on May 10, 1983 the Attorney General announced that the provisionof postcoital contraception is not a criminal offense. This statement may not be

  5. Disturbances of motor unit rate modulation are prevalent in muscles of spastic-paretic stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Heckman, C. J.; Powers, R. K.; Rymer, W. Z.; Suresh, N. L.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke survivors often exhibit abnormally low motor unit firing rates during voluntary muscle activation. Our purpose was to assess the prevalence of saturation in motor unit firing rates in the spastic-paretic biceps brachii muscle of stroke survivors. To achieve this objective, we recorded the incidence and duration of impaired lower- and higher-threshold motor unit firing rate modulation in spastic-paretic, contralateral, and healthy control muscle during increases in isometric force generated by the elbow flexor muscles. Impaired firing was considered to have occurred when firing rate became constant (i.e., saturated), despite increasing force. The duration of impaired firing rate modulation in the lower-threshold unit was longer for spastic-paretic (3.9 ± 2.2 s) than for contralateral (1.4 ± 0.9 s; P < 0.001) and control (1.1 ± 1.0 s; P = 0.005) muscles. The duration of impaired firing rate modulation in the higher-threshold unit was also longer for the spastic-paretic (1.7 ± 1.6 s) than contralateral (0.3 ± 0.3 s; P = 0.007) and control (0.1 ± 0.2 s; P = 0.009) muscles. This impaired firing rate of the lower-threshold unit arose, despite an increase in the overall descending command, as shown by the recruitment of the higher-threshold unit during the time that the lower-threshold unit was saturating, and by the continuous increase in averages of the rectified EMG of the biceps brachii muscle throughout the rising phase of the contraction. These results suggest that impairments in firing rate modulation are prevalent in motor units of spastic-paretic muscle, even when the overall descending command to the muscle is increasing. PMID:24572092

  6. Disturbances of motor unit rate modulation are prevalent in muscles of spastic-paretic stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Mottram, C J; Heckman, C J; Powers, R K; Rymer, W Z; Suresh, N L

    2014-05-01

    Stroke survivors often exhibit abnormally low motor unit firing rates during voluntary muscle activation. Our purpose was to assess the prevalence of saturation in motor unit firing rates in the spastic-paretic biceps brachii muscle of stroke survivors. To achieve this objective, we recorded the incidence and duration of impaired lower- and higher-threshold motor unit firing rate modulation in spastic-paretic, contralateral, and healthy control muscle during increases in isometric force generated by the elbow flexor muscles. Impaired firing was considered to have occurred when firing rate became constant (i.e., saturated), despite increasing force. The duration of impaired firing rate modulation in the lower-threshold unit was longer for spastic-paretic (3.9 ± 2.2 s) than for contralateral (1.4 ± 0.9 s; P < 0.001) and control (1.1 ± 1.0 s; P = 0.005) muscles. The duration of impaired firing rate modulation in the higher-threshold unit was also longer for the spastic-paretic (1.7 ± 1.6 s) than contralateral (0.3 ± 0.3 s; P = 0.007) and control (0.1 ± 0.2 s; P = 0.009) muscles. This impaired firing rate of the lower-threshold unit arose, despite an increase in the overall descending command, as shown by the recruitment of the higher-threshold unit during the time that the lower-threshold unit was saturating, and by the continuous increase in averages of the rectified EMG of the biceps brachii muscle throughout the rising phase of the contraction. These results suggest that impairments in firing rate modulation are prevalent in motor units of spastic-paretic muscle, even when the overall descending command to the muscle is increasing.

  7. Contraceptive knowledge, sexual behavior, and factors associated with contraceptive use among female undergraduate university students in Kilimanjaro region in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Sweya, Mussa N; Msuya, Sia E; Mahande, Michael J; Manongi, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that knowledge of contraceptives, especially among the youth in universities, remains limited, and the rate of premarital sexual activity, unwanted pregnancies, and illegal abortions remains higher among university students. This study aimed to assess contraceptive knowledge, sexual behavior, and factors associated with contraceptive use among female undergraduate university students in Kilimanjaro region in Tanzania. Methods A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted from May to June 2015 among undergraduate female students in four universities in Kilimanjaro region. A self-administered questionnaire was given to the participants. Data analysis was performed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. An odds ratio with 95% confidence interval for factors associated with modern contraceptive use was computed using multiple logistic regression models. A P-value of <5% (two-tailed) was considered statistically significant. Results A total of 401 students were involved in the study. Two-thirds (260, 64.8%) of the participants had had sexual intercourse. The majority (93.8%) of the participants had knowledge of contraception. One hundred and seventy-five (43.6%) sexually active women reported that they used contraceptives in the past, while 162 (40.4%) were current contraceptive users. More than half (54.2%) of the sexually active group started sexual activity between the ages of 20–24 years. The most popular methods of contraception used were condoms, withdrawal, and periodic abstinence. The main sources of information about contraception were friends, television, and health care workers (44.8%, 40.3%, and 39.0%, respectively). Conclusion Most of the participants had knowledge of contraception. However, the rate of contraceptive use was low. The majority of the respondents were sexually active and started sexual activity at >18 years of age. Hence, advocacy for

  8. Crime and violence in Brazil: Systematic review of time trends, prevalence rates and risk factors☆

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Joseph; Cerqueira, Daniel Ricardo de Castro; Kahn, Tulio

    2013-01-01

    Between 1980 and 2010 there were 1 million homicides in Brazil. Dramatic increases in homicide rates followed rises in inequality, more young men in the population, greater availability of firearms, and increased drug use. Nevertheless, disarmament legislation may have helped reduce homicide rates in recent years. Despite its very high rate of lethal violence, Brazil appears to have similar levels of general criminal victimization as several other Latin American and North American countries. Brazil has lower rates of drug use compared to other countries such as the United States, but the prevalence of youth drug use in Brazil has increased substantially in recent years. Since 1990, the growth of the Brazilian prison population has been enormous, resulting in the fourth largest prison population in the world. Through a systematic review of the literature, we identified 10 studies assessing the prevalence of self-reported offending in Brazil and 9 studies examining risk factors. Levels of self-reported offending seem quite high among school students in Brazil. Individual and family-level risk factors identified in Brazil are very similar to those found in high-income countries. PMID:24027422

  9. Crime and violence in Brazil: Systematic review of time trends, prevalence rates and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Murray, Joseph; Cerqueira, Daniel Ricardo de Castro; Kahn, Tulio

    2013-09-01

    Between 1980 and 2010 there were 1 million homicides in Brazil. Dramatic increases in homicide rates followed rises in inequality, more young men in the population, greater availability of firearms, and increased drug use. Nevertheless, disarmament legislation may have helped reduce homicide rates in recent years. Despite its very high rate of lethal violence, Brazil appears to have similar levels of general criminal victimization as several other Latin American and North American countries. Brazil has lower rates of drug use compared to other countries such as the United States, but the prevalence of youth drug use in Brazil has increased substantially in recent years. Since 1990, the growth of the Brazilian prison population has been enormous, resulting in the fourth largest prison population in the world. Through a systematic review of the literature, we identified 10 studies assessing the prevalence of self-reported offending in Brazil and 9 studies examining risk factors. Levels of self-reported offending seem quite high among school students in Brazil. Individual and family-level risk factors identified in Brazil are very similar to those found in high-income countries.

  10. Oral contraceptive compliance during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Serfaty, D

    1997-06-17

    A review of the available literature suggests that adolescent lack of compliance with oral contraceptives (OCs) is a multifactorial problem that requires a multifactorial solution. Because of their lack of experience with contraception, higher frequency of intercourse, higher intrinsic fertility, and pattern of frequent stopping or switching of methods, adolescents experience higher OC failure rates than do adult women. Adolescents also are more likely to forget to take the pill or to discontinue due to side effects, without consulting their physician. A survey of European young women identified contraceptive protection without weight gain as the most necessary change in OCs. Adolescents must be counseled not to miss a single pill, observe the pill-free interval, take phasic formulations in the right order, and use a back-up method in case of diarrhea and vomiting or when certain medications (e.g., antibiotics and anti-epileptics) are used concurrently, and be informed of steps to take in the event of side effects and unprotected intercourse. The quality of the counseling appears to be more important to compliance than the quantity of information provided. Pharmacists should complete the counseling initiated by the physician and explain prescription use. The most significant predictor of consistent OC use is the adolescent's motivation.

  11. Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) normative elevation rates: comparisons with epidemiological prevalence rates.

    PubMed

    Tarescavage, Anthony M; Marek, Ryan J; Finn, Jacob A; Hicks, Adam; Rapier, Jessica L; Ben-Porath, Yossef S

    2013-01-01

    Odland, Berthelson, Sharma, Martin, and Mittenberg ( 2013 ) caution that clinically elevated scale scores produced by members of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008 /2011) normative sample raise concerns about the potential for false positive findings of psychopathology. However, the MMPI-2-RF normative sample is intended to represent the general population of the United States, 26.2% of which met criteria for a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV (APA, 1994 ) disorder in a 12-month period (Kessler, Chiu, Demler, & Walters, 2005 ). In the current study we compare scale elevation rates in the MMPI-2-RF normative sample to prevalence rates of mental disorders primarily drawn from the National Comorbidity Study Replication (Kessler et al., 2005 ). Our objective was to evaluate MMPI-2-RF elevation rates in an epidemiological context. Results indicate that MMPI-2-RF scale elevation rates were generally consistent with epidemiological data when examined in the context of standard interpretation guidelines for the inventory. We also reiterate Ben-Porath and Tellegen's (2008/2011) caution that MMPI-2-RF scale elevations alone are not sufficient to indicate the presence of psychiatric disorder. Rather they are best viewed as indications of the need to evaluate the individual for possible disorder(s). Implications of these results, limitations of this study, and future directions in research are discussed.

  12. Evaluative Indices Assigned to Contraceptive Methods by University Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Robert J.; Malo, Teri L.; Dodd, Virginia J.; Daley, Ellen M.; Mayer, Alyssa B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Preordinate attitudes and beliefs about contraception may influence acceptance or rejection of a particular method. Purpose: We examined the attitudes about contraception methods held by undergraduate students (N=792) at two large southeastern universities in the United States. Methods: Twelve methods were rated on 40 semantic…

  13. Contraception and Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can contraception reduce the risk of getting a sexually transmitted disease (STD)? ​​​​​ ​​​ Related A-Z Topics Endometriosis HIV/AIDS Infertility and Fertility All related topics NICHD News and ...

  14. Post abortion contraception.

    PubMed

    Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Kopp, Helena Kallner

    2015-11-01

    A safe induced abortion has no impact on future fertility. Ovulation may resume as early as 8 days after the abortion. There is no difference in return to fertility after medical or surgical abortion. Most women resume sexual activity soon after an abortion. Contraceptive counseling and provision should therefore be an integrated part of the abortion services to help women avoid another unintended pregnancy and risk, in many cases an unsafe, abortion. Long-acting reversible contraceptive methods that includes implants and intrauterine contraception have been shown to be the most effective contraceptive methods to help women prevent unintended pregnancy following an abortion. However, starting any method is better than starting no method at all. This Special Report will give a short guide to available methods and when they can be started after an induced abortion.

  15. [Breastfeeding and contraception].

    PubMed

    Treffers, P E

    1999-09-18

    In the Netherlands many women stop breastfeeding in the first few months postpartum. In 1997, only 16.9% of all 3-month-old babies received full breastfeeding. One of the causes may be insufficient support by the medical profession. A second factor is that often combined oral contraceptives are prescribed to breastfeeding women. As it has been shown that estrogens in these contraceptives inhibit lactation, this is probably one of the reasons why breastfeeding frequently fails in this country. WHO advises not to use estrogens during lactation. According to recent research the lactational amenorrhoea method of contraception (LAM) is highly effective during the first 4 months postpartum. In the 5th and 6th month the effectiveness is strongly dependent on the accuracy by which the conditions are met. The medical profession should pay more attention to the support of breastfeeding and contraception in relation to each other.

  16. Contraceptive strategies for young women in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Ruusuvaara, L; Johansson, E D

    1999-12-01

    Safe, effective and affordable contraceptives have been available for a few decades, yet, in many countries, the struggle for reproductive rights continues. Children, still, are forced to give birth to children in many nations. In most industrialized countries, where contraceptive counselling and abortions have been options, fertility rates have reached all time lows. Effective contraception improves health and well-being as well and may be used for conditions other than birth control. Young girls often initially take oral contraceptives primarily to reduce menstrual pain and blood loss; they also welcome a contraceptive that eliminates menstrual bleeding. Women using oral contraceptives and Norplant experience about 50% reduction in menstrual blood; 90% reduction in blood loss is achieved with the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (Mirena). Teenagers and their parents are often misinformed about the side-effects of oral contraceptives and birth control in general, which may adversely affect compliance. Adequate, user-friendly and supportive information about contraception is necessary to ensure proper use of the pill and other birth control methods. In addition, emergency contraceptives should be easily accessible. The mortality and morbidity of young women would be dramatically reduced by the global use of medical abortion as well. Only a combined effort by policy makers, educators, parents and health-care providers can enhance the reproductive (and future!) health of both young females and males.

  17. History of oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Dhont, Marc

    2010-12-01

    On the 50th birthday of the pill, it is appropriate to recall the milestones which have led to its development and evolution during the last five decades. The main contraceptive effect of the pill being inhibition of ovulation, it may be called a small miracle that this drug was developed long before the complex regulation of ovulation and the menstrual cycle was elucidated. Another stumbling block on its way was the hostile climate with regard to contraception that prevailed at the time. Animal experiments on the effect of sex steroids on ovulation, and the synthesis of sex steroids and orally active analogues were the necessary preliminaries. We owe the development of oral contraceptives to a handful of persons: two determined feminists, Margaret Sanger and Katherine McCormick; a biologist, Gregory Pincus; and a gynaecologist, John Rock. Soon after the introduction of the first pills, some nasty and life-threatening side effects emerged, which were due to the high doses of sex steroids. This led to the development of new preparations with reduced oestrogen content, progestins with more specific action, and alternative administration routes. Almost every decade we have witnessed a breakthrough in oral contraception. Social and moral objections to birth control have gradually disappeared and, notwithstanding some pill scares, oral contraceptives are now one of the most used methods of contraception. Finally, all's well that ends well: recent reports have substantiated the multiple noncontraceptive health benefits paving the way for a bright future for this 50-year-old product.

  18. Rates of Prevalent HIV Infection, Prevalent Diagnoses, and New Diagnoses Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in US States, Metropolitan Statistical Areas, and Counties, 2012-2013

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Travis Howard; Sullivan, Patrick Sean

    2016-01-01

    Background In the United States, men who have sex with men (MSM) increasingly represent the majority of people living with and acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Local and federal surveillance programs estimate the number of persons living with an HIV diagnosis, persons living with HIV infection, and new diagnoses. Given the absence of population-based estimates of the number of MSM for US states, metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), or counties, it is not possible to accurately estimate rates using these indicators at these levels, inhibiting the ability to understand HIV burden and to direct prevention efforts. Objective To synthesize recently published estimates of MSM population size with publicly available HIV surveillance data, in order to estimate the prevalence of HIV diagnosis and infection and the rate of new diagnoses, at the national, state, MSA, and county levels. Methods The number of MSM living with HIV infection in 2012 (prevalence), living with an HIV diagnosis in 2012 (diagnosed prevalence), and newly diagnosed with HIV infection in 2013 (new diagnosis), at state, MSA, and county levels, were obtained from publicly available data from AIDSVu.org and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The estimated number of MSM living in every US county was calculated using recently published methodology that utilized data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and American Community Survey. Estimated county-level MSM counts were aggregated to form MSA- and state-level totals. From this, we estimated HIV prevalence, diagnosed prevalence, and new diagnosis rates. Results The estimated HIV prevalence among MSM in the United States in 2012 was 15.0% (666,900/4,452,772), the diagnosed HIV prevalence in 2012 was 11.1% (493,453/4,452,772), and the new diagnosis rate for 2013 was 0.7 per 100 MSM. For diagnosed prevalence at the state level, 6 states had both <15,000 cases and diagnosed prevalence rates of ≥15

  19. Oral contraceptive agents.

    PubMed

    Shearman, R P

    1986-02-17

    midcycle peak of luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion and, hence, the inhibition of ovulation. Progestogen-only OCs have additional actions such as effects on cervical and fallopian tube mucin. Minor side-effects include disturbance of the menstrual cycle, changes in weight, and changes in mood. Major side-effects relate to 4 areas -- subsequent reproduction, the cardiovascular system, other metabolic effects, and the risk of malignancy. A table presents the absolute contraindication contraindications. There is not the slightest doubt that a woman who is over 35, who smokes, and who, in addition, may be obese and has hypertension should not use OCs. Progestogen (mini) OCs have a slightly higher failure rate and a greater incidence of irregular bleeding than have combined OCs. The mini OC has little place in women who need effective hormonal contraception and good cycle control. The mini OC may have a place in a patient who finds other contraception unacceptable and in whom estrogens are contraindicated specifically.

  20. Changes in Yearly Birth Prevalence Rates of Children with Down Syndrome in the Period 1986-2007 in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Graaf, G.; Haveman, M.; Hochstenbach, R.; Engelen, J.; Gerssen-Schoorl, K.; Poddighe, P.; Smeets, D.; van Hove, G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Netherlands are lacking reliable national empirical data in relation to the development of birth prevalence of Down syndrome. Our study aims at assessing valid national live birth prevalence rates for the period 1986-2007. Method: On the basis of the annual child/adult ratio of Down syndrome diagnoses in five out of the eight Dutch…

  1. Contraceptive use among female sex workers in three Russian cities

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Caitlin E.; Wirtz, Andrea L.; Mogilniy, Vladimir; Peryshkina, Alena; Beyrer, Chris; Decker, Michele R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of, and factors associated with, use of non-barrier contraception (intrauterine device, hormonal contraceptives, and female sterilization) among female sex workers (FSWs) in three Russian cities. Methods A secondary analysis of data from a cross-sectional survey of FSWs aged 18 years and older from Kazan, Krasnoyarsk, and Tomsk was undertaken. Participants had completed a one-time computer-based survey in 2011. Among the 708 with a current contraceptive need, logistic regression was used to evaluate factors associated with use of non-barrier contraceptives. Results Use of non-barrier contraceptives was reported by 237 (33.5%) FSWs. Use of non-barrier contraceptives was associated with being in sex work longer (≥4 years vs <1 year: adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.70; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.51–14.66) and having a non-paying partner (AOR 2.02; 95% CI 1.32–3.11). Odds of non-barrier contraception were reduced among FSWs who had ever worked with a pimp/momka (AOR 0.46; 95% CI 0.24–0.87), who had experienced recent client-perpetrated violence (AOR 0.19; 95% CI 0.07–0.52), or reporting consistent condom use (AOR 0.30; 95% CI 0.16–0.54). Only 13 (5.5%) of the 237 FSWs using non-barrier contraception reported consistent condom use. Conclusion Only one-third reported use of non-barrier contraception, suggesting substantial unmet contraceptive needs. FSWs are an important target population for family planning, reproductive health counseling, and care. PMID:26387467

  2. Male contraception: history and development.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Paul; Wald, Moshe

    2014-02-01

    Although the twentieth century has seen great strides in the development of female contraception, not a single new agent has been introduced as an approved method for common use for male contraception. Condoms (considered uncomfortable by some) and vasectomy (a permanent invasive procedure) are the only options provided to men, leaving an undue burden on women to bear contraceptive responsibility. Significant developments have, however, been made with regard to hormonal and nonhormonal contraception, and minor, reversible, procedural contraception. This article reviews the currently available, soon to be available, and theoretically possible methods of male contraception.

  3. Contraceptive needs of the adolescent.

    PubMed

    Steyn, Petrus S; Goldstuck, Norman D

    2014-08-01

    The provision of contraception to adolescents requires specific attention. Adolescents require contraceptive methods which are safe, effective and simple to use. While long-acting reversible contraceptive methods are preferable, they should have a choice and not be forced or mandated especially in situations where this may compromise safety. After counselling they should have the ability to choose any method of contraception. Under the appropriate circumstances, each method of contraception may have a place. This chapter will be devoted to evaluating the most current scientific rationale for the indication for use of each method of contraception in adolescents.

  4. Current contraceptive research and development.

    PubMed

    Reape, Kathleen Z

    2005-10-01

    The approval of various new contraceptive products in recent years has resulted in broadening the options available to women. Trends in contraceptive research for hormonal products include variations in dose and dosing regimens, introduction of novel compounds, evaluation of products for noncontraceptive indications, and development of nonoral delivery systems and male contraceptives. Nonhormonal areas of research include microbicidal products, dual protection methods, and contraceptive vaccines. For each of these categories, contraceptive products currently in development and the potential implications for adolescents are discussed. Ongoing contraceptive research and development activity is robust and should ensure the continued availability of various new products for adolescents.

  5. A Lower-Cost Option for Intrauterine Contraception.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Kim

    2016-01-01

    In March 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Liletta (Actavis, Dublin, Ireland), a new intrauterine device for contraception. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend use of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) as first-line pregnancy prevention. LARC efficacy rates are similar to those of sterilization, with the possibility for quick return of fertility upon removal of the device. Despite benefits and recommendations for this form of contraception, access and high cost remain barriers to use. Liletta is the first lower-cost option for intrauterine contraception. Available to qualified clinics and health centers at a reduced rate, this device may increase availability and decrease the overall cost to women who desire intrauterine contraception.

  6. Food allergies in developing and emerging economies: need for comprehensive data on prevalence rates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Although much is known today about the prevalence of food allergy in the developed world, there are serious knowledge gaps about the prevalence rates of food allergy in developing countries. Food allergy affects up to 6% of children and 4% of adults. Symptoms include urticaria, gastrointestinal distress, failure to thrive, anaphylaxis and even death. There are over 170 foods known to provoke allergic reactions. Of these, the most common foods responsible for inducing 90% of reported allergic reactions are peanuts, milk, eggs, wheat, nuts (e.g., hazelnuts, walnuts, almonds, cashews, pecans, etc.), soybeans, fish, crustaceans and shellfish. Current assumptions are that prevalence rates are lower in developing countries and emerging economies such as China, Brazil and India which raises questions about potential health impacts should the assumptions not be supported by evidence. As the health and social burden of food allergy can be significant, national and international efforts focusing on food security, food safety, food quality and dietary diversity need to pay special attention to the role of food allergy in order to avoid marginalization of sub-populations in the community. More importantly, as the major food sources used in international food aid programs are frequently priority allergens (e.g., peanut, milk, eggs, soybean, fish, wheat), and due to the similarities between food allergy and some malnutrition symptoms, it will be increasingly important to understand and assess the interplay between food allergy and nutrition in order to protect and identify appropriate sources of foods for sensitized sub-populations especially in economically disadvantaged countries and communities. PMID:23256652

  7. Obtaining a male circumcision prevalence rate of 80% among adults in a short time

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Esaie; Rain-Taljaard, Reathe; Tsepe, Motlalepule; Monkwe, Cornelius; Taljaard, Dirk; Hlatswayo, Florence; Xaba, Dumazile; Molomo, Tebogo; Lissouba, Pascale; Puren, Adrian; Auvert, Bertran

    2017-01-01

    Abstract World Health Organization recommends a target for the male circumcision prevalence rate of 80%. This rate will have a substantial impact on the human immunodeficiency virus-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic in Eastern and Southern Africa. The objective of the study was to assess whether an innovative intervention can lead to an increased voluntary male medical circumcision (VMMC) uptake among adults in a short time. This prospective observational study of a demand generation intervention was conducted in the township of Orange Farm (South Africa) in August to November 2015. In this community male circumcision prevalence rate among adults was stable between 2010 and 2015 at 55% and 57%, despite regular VMMC campaigns at community level and the presence of a VMMC clinic that offered free VMMC. The intervention took place in a random sample of 981 households where 522 men aged 18 to 49 years accepted to participate in the study. Among the 226 uncircumcised men, 212 accepted to be enrolled in the intervention study. A personal male circumcision adviser trained in interpersonal communication skills was assigned to each uncircumcised participant. The male circumcision advisers were trained to explain the risks and benefits of VMMC, and to discuss 24 possible reasons given by men for not being circumcised. Participants were then followed for 9 weeks. Each participant had a maximum of 3 motivational interviews at home. Participants who decided to be circumcised received financial compensation for their time equivalent to 2.5 days of work at the minimum South African salary rate. Among the 212 uncircumcised men enrolled in the intervention, 69.8% (148/212; 95% confidence interval [CI]; 63.4%–75.7%) agreed to be circumcised, which defines the uptake of the intervention. The male circumcision prevalence rate of the sample increased from 56.7% (296/522) to 81.4% (425/522; 77.9%–84.6%), P < 0.001, corresponding to a relative increase of 43.6% (95% CI

  8. Recasting image of contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Rimon Jg; Kiragu, K

    1993-03-01

    Even though contraceptives are linked to sex which, along with sensuality and peer acceptance, is used to market consumer goods, contraceptives are promoted in a hygienic, clinical way. Glamorous images which divert from adverse health effects are used to sell unhealthy goods, e.g., alcohol and cigarettes, but technical and intimidating promotion techniques centering on risks are used to promote family planning (FP) products and services which actually save the lives of mothers and children and improve their health. Until recently, only the medical system provided FP products and services so consumers identified them with illness and a help-seeking behavior. The image of contraceptives must be remolded to gain people's attention. To avoid instilling mistrust of a method in consumers, even those who believe in birth spacing, it is important for images to be positive and to reflect accurate information. In Indonesia, the Dualima condom has been linked to responsible fatherhood thereby creating a positive image and removing the negative image of a condom being linked to illicit sex. In the US, condom adds show the user in control, especially in reference to AIDS. Prior to promotion of any contraceptive, complete, clear communication and marketing plans are needed to identify and to focus on consumers' perceived needs. A survey in Egypt shows that the most important attributes of a contraceptive are ease of use, healthiness, and effectiveness and that Egyptians considered IUDs to best fit these attributes. Images of contraceptive users often determine whether potential users do choose to use contraceptives. For example, in Cameroon and the Philippines, female users are considered to be smart, rich, educated, confident and in control of their lives. In the Philippines, male users are perceived to be loving, caring, and considerate husbands. The mass medias can improve providers' public image as was the case in Turkey and Egypt.

  9. Dual protection against unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections: what is the best contraceptive approach?

    PubMed

    Cates, Willard; Steiner, Markus J

    2002-03-01

    In the midst of the global epidemics of both unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection, contraceptive options that provide dual protection are ideal. However, those contraceptives with the best record of preventing pregnancy under typical use conditions (sterilization, hormonal methods, intrauterine devices) provide little if any protection against sexually transmitted infection. Alternatively, barrier contraceptive methods (specifically, condoms), which can reduce risks of many sexually transmitted infections, are associated with relatively higher pregnancy rates for most users than other contraceptives. This situation has produced a dilemma for those wishing to promote dual protection: whether to advocate use of two methods (one primarily to prevent pregnancy and the other primarily to prevent infections) or whether to emphasize use of condoms for both purposes. Data comparing these two approaches are limited and often contradictory. We discuss the underlying concepts of exposure to both pregnancy and infection, provide a broad overview of the effectiveness of contraceptive methods against these two conditions, present approaches to optimize dual protection, and propose several new directions for necessary research. In the absence of evidence-based recommendations, we believe clinicians should assist clients in assessing their likelihood of exposure to infection, either by prevalence of sexually transmitted infection in the community or by the specific risk factors of the client. If exposure is likely, particularly to the more serious infections such as human immunodeficiency virus, the one-method approach should be given greater weight. However, in settings where unintended pregnancy is the greater concern, emphasizing the two-methods approach as a first option may be appropriate.

  10. Contraception for Adolescents: Focusing on Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptives (LARC) to Improve Reproductive Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy rates in the U.S. have reached an all-time low from their peak in the 1980s and 1990s. However, the U.S. maintains the highest rate of teenage pregnancy among developed nations. Adolescents experience higher typical use failure rates for user-dependent contraceptives compared to their adult counterparts. Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), IUDs and implants, have failure rates that are both very low and independent of user age. In settings where the most effective methods are prioritized and access barriers are removed, the majority of adolescents initiate LARC. Use of LARC by adolescents significantly reduces rates of overall and repeat teen pregnancy. All methods of contraception are safe for use in teens, including IUDs and DMPA. Dual use of LARC and barrier methods to reduce risk of sexually transmitted infection, is the optimal contraceptive strategy for most adolescents. Adolescent access to evidence-based and confidential contraceptive services, provided in a manner that respects autonomy, is a vital public health goal. PMID:27635305

  11. Contraception for Adolescents: Focusing on Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptives (LARC) to Improve Reproductive Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Bliss; Salcedo, Jennifer

    2015-03-01

    Adolescent pregnancy rates in the U.S. have reached an all-time low from their peak in the 1980s and 1990s. However, the U.S. maintains the highest rate of teenage pregnancy among developed nations. Adolescents experience higher typical use failure rates for user-dependent contraceptives compared to their adult counterparts. Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), IUDs and implants, have failure rates that are both very low and independent of user age. In settings where the most effective methods are prioritized and access barriers are removed, the majority of adolescents initiate LARC. Use of LARC by adolescents significantly reduces rates of overall and repeat teen pregnancy. All methods of contraception are safe for use in teens, including IUDs and DMPA. Dual use of LARC and barrier methods to reduce risk of sexually transmitted infection, is the optimal contraceptive strategy for most adolescents. Adolescent access to evidence-based and confidential contraceptive services, provided in a manner that respects autonomy, is a vital public health goal.

  12. Changes in hypertension prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control rates in Turkey from 2003 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Sengul, Sule; Akpolat, Tekin; Erdem, Yunus; Derici, Ulver; Arici, Mustafa; Sindel, Sukru; Karatan, Oktay; Turgan, Cetin; Hasanoglu, Enver; Caglar, Sali; Erturk, Sehsuvar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The study aimed to assess the current epidemiology of hypertension, including its prevalence, the awareness of the condition and its treatment and control, in Turkey to evaluate changes in these factors over the last 10 years by comparing the results with the prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Turkey (PatenT) study data (2003), as well as to assess parameters affecting awareness and the control of hypertension. Methods: The PatenT 2 study was conducted on a representative sample of the Turkish adult population (n = 5437) in 2012. Specifically trained staff performed the data collection. Hypertension was defined as mean SBP or DBP at least 140/90 mmHg, previously diagnosed disease or the use of antihypertensive medication. Awareness and treatment were assessed by self-reporting, and control was defined as SBP/DBP less than 140/90 mmHg. Results: Although the prevalence of hypertension in the PatenT and PatenT 2 surveys was stable at approximately 30%, hypertension awareness, treatment, and control rates have improved in Turkey. Overall, 54.7% of hypertensive patients were aware of their diagnosis in 2012 compared with 40.7% in 2003. The hypertension treatment rate increased from 31.1% in 2003 to 47.4% in 2012, and the control rate in hypertensives increased from 8.1% in 2003 to 28.7% in 2012. The rate of hypertension control in treated patients improved between 2003 (20.7%) and 2012 (53.9%). Awareness of hypertension was positively associated with older age, being a woman, residing in an urban area, a history of parental hypertension, being a nonsmoker, admittance by a physician, presence of diabetes mellitus, and being obese or overweight; it was inversely associated with a higher amount of daily bread consumption. Factors associated with better control of hypertension were younger age, female sex, residing in an urban area, and higher education level in Turkey. Conclusion: Although some progress has been made in

  13. Contraception in perimenopause.

    PubMed

    Taneepanichskul, Surasak; Dusitsin, Nikorn

    2003-06-01

    Women in their forties are still potentially fertile, and pregnancy in this age group is attended with increased maternal mortality, spontaneous abortion, fetal anomalies and perinatal mortality. Contraception for women in this age group has special risks and benefits; both should be balanced to choose between the different options available. Recent epidemiological and clinical pharmacology studies have indicated the safety of extending the use of combined oral contraceptives (COCs) beyond the age of 35 years and up to menopause. Women who have reasons for avoiding COCs can use progestogen-only contraceptives like pills, depot injectables and implants. Implant combines high efficacy and long-term effect. Both copper-releasing and levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine contraceptive device (LNG-IUD) combine the advantages of high efficacy and long-term effect. The reduced fecundity above the age of forty can allow extending the use beyond the accepted term, and up to one or two years beyond the menopause without the need for replacement. The levonorgestrel IUD has the advantage of reducing the amount of menstrual bleeding. The condom has the added benefit of protection against sexual transmitted diseases (STDs). Male or female sterilization is an excellent contraceptive option, provided that this approach is culturally acceptable and available at reasonable cost and low risk.

  14. Do antimicrobials increase the carriage rate of penicillin resistant pneumococci in children? Cross sectional prevalence study.

    PubMed Central

    Arason, V. A.; Kristinsson, K. G.; Sigurdsson, J. A.; Stefánsdóttir, G.; Mölstad, S.; Gudmundsson, S.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the correlation of antimicrobial consumption with the carriage rate of penicillin resistant and multiresistant pneumococci in children. DESIGN: Cross sectional and analytical prevalence study. SETTING: Five different communities in Iceland. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Prevalence of nasopharyngeal carriage of penicillin resistant pneumococci in children aged under 7 years in relation to antibiotic use as determined by information from parents, patient's records, and total sales of antimicrobials from local pharmacies in four study areas. RESULTS: Total antimicrobial sales for children (6223 prescriptions) among the four areas for which data were available ranged from 9.6 to 23.2 defined daily doses per 1000 children daily (1.1 to 2.6 courses yearly per child). Children under 2 consumed twice as much as 2-6 year olds (20.5 v 10.9 defined daily doses per 1000 children daily). Nasopharyngeal specimens were obtained from 919 children, representing 15-38% of the peer population groups in the different areas. Pneumococci were carried by 484 (52.7%) of the children, 47 (9.7%) of the isolates being resistant to penicillin or multiresistant. By multivariate analysis age (< 2 years), area (highest antimicrobial consumption), and individual use of antimicrobials significantly influenced the odds of carrying penicillin resistant pneumococci. By univariate analysis, recent antimicrobial use (two to seven weeks) and use of co-trimoxazole were also significantly associated with carriage of penicillin resistant pneumococci. CONCLUSIONS: Antimicrobial use, with regard to both individual use and total antimicrobial consumption in the community, is strongly associated with nasopharyngeal carriage of penicillin resistant pneumococci in children. Control measures to reduce the prevalence of penicillin resistant pneumococci should include reducing the use of antimicrobials in community health care. PMID:8761224

  15. Statistical approach for evaluation of contraceptive data.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Vriyesh

    2008-04-01

    This article will define how best to analyse data collected from a longitudinal follow up on contraceptive use and discontinuation, with special consideration to the needs of developing countries. Accessibility and acceptability of contraceptives at the ground level remains low and it is an overlooked area of research. The author presents a set of propositions that are closer in spirit to practical recommendations than to formal theorems. We will comment specifically on issues of model validation of model through bootstrapping techniques. The paper makes a presentation of a multivariate model to assess the rate of discontinuation of contraception, while accounting for the possibility that there may be factors that influence both a couple's choice of provider and their probability of discontinuation.

  16. Effect of rice cultivation on the prevalence and infection rates of Schistosoma intermediate host.

    PubMed

    el-Hawy, A M; Negm, I A; el-Alamy, M A; Agina, A A

    1993-12-01

    In this study, it was aimed to explore the effect of rice cultivation on the prevalence, density and infection rates on the snail intermediate hosts of human schistosomiasis. A village was chosen and examine for the main water canal supplying the rice field by making three successive scoops at 10.20, 30, 40 and 50 meters up stream the site of the pump supplying the rice field. The same was done in the large irrigation canal supplying 50 feddans of rice up to 100 meters (i.e. 10 sampling sites). Also the drains in between the rice fields were examined at 10 meters distance throughout the drain. The hunted snails were sorted, the Biomphalaria alexanderina and Bulinus truncatus were separated, their age was determined then crushed to look for immature stages under the microscope. Also the vegetations coming in the scoops were examined. The results showed that rice cultivation and irrigation is a suitable site for the prevalence and intensity of snails. Both species of snails were found in the main canal, irrigation canal and drains. All Bulinus truncatus snails were free from infections. The number of infected Biomphalaria alexanderina snails was significantly higher in the irrigation canal and drains than main canal which may be attributed to pollution of the drain water and irrigation canal by micturition and defecation or to the use of water in ablution.

  17. Stroke in women - oral contraception, pregnancy, and hormone replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Rantanen, Kirsi; Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease affecting millions of people worldwide every year. Female stroke victims have higher mortality rates and they do not re-cover as well as men. Women's longevity and different vascular risk factor burden like a larger prevalence of atrial fibrillation play a role. Women also have unique risk factors such as oral contraception, pregnancy, estrogen decrease after the menopause and hormone replacement therapy, which should all be evaluated and taken into consideration in treatment decisions both in the acute phase of stroke and in secondary prevention. In this review, the evidence regarding these hormonal aspects and the risk of stroke in women are evaluated. The relevant guidelines are studied and research gaps identified. Future topics for research are recommended and current treatment possibilities and their risks discussed.

  18. Adolescent Religiosity and Contraceptive Usage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Studer, Marlena; Thornton, Arland

    1987-01-01

    Examined contraceptive use by never married, sexually experienced female adolescents (N=224). Found birth control pills to be the single most popular method of contraception. Subjects who reported regularly attending religious services were less likely to have used an effective, medical method of contraception than those who rarely attended…

  19. Contraception for cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla; Hess, Rachel; Trussell, James

    2009-11-01

    Women who have survived cancer may need guidance in choosing a method of contraception. This paper reviews the evidence supporting the safety and efficacy of available methods of contraception for cancer survivors and concludes that the Copper T380A intrauterine device (IUD), a highly effective, reversible, long-acting, hormone-free method should be considered a first-line contraceptive option for women with a history of a hormonally mediated cancer. However, the levonorgestrel-containing IUD may be preferable for women being treated with tamoxifen and women who have survived non-hormonally mediated cancers. Women with IUDs can undergo all forms of imaging, including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

  20. [Contraception in perimenopause].

    PubMed

    Merki-Feld, G S

    2000-10-01

    Perimenopausal women are still potentially fertile and pregnancy is attended with increased maternal and perinatal mortality. Several contraceptive methods can be used therapeutic for the treatment of climacteric symptoms like menstrual irregularities, flushes and vaginal dryness. Low-dose oral contraceptives (OC) prevent climacteric symptoms and additionally protect from perimenopausal bone loss. However, the individual cardiovascular risk increases with age and is even higher in perimenopausal women using OCs. Therefore for women with cardiovascular risk factors sterilization, barrier methods, progestin-only methods and intrauterine devices (IUD) are the better choice. Prolonged and heavy menses can be treated with the levonorgestrel-releasing IUD or injectable progestogens. If estrogen replacement is necessary, a low-dose treatment with natural estrogens can be combined with barrier methods, the levonorgestrel-releasing IUD and injectable progestogens. The variety of contraceptive options available to perimenopausal women allows individual counseling and thus may enhance compliance.

  1. Psychological, social, and spiritual effects of contraceptive steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Hanna; Cortés, Manuel E

    2015-08-01

    Governments and society have accepted and enthusiastically promoted contraception, especially contraceptive steroid hormones, as the means of assuring optimal timing and number of births, an undoubted health benefit, but they seldom advert to their limitations and side effects. This article reviews the literature on the psychological, social, and spiritual impact of contraceptive steroid use. While the widespread use of contraceptive steroid hormones has expanded life style and career choices for many women, their impact on the women's well-being, emotions, social relationships, and spirituality is seldom mentioned by advocates, and negative effects are often downplayed. When mentioned at all, depression and hypoactive sexual desire are usually treated symptomatically rather than discontinuing their most frequent pharmacological cause, the contraceptive. The rising incidence of premarital sex and cohabitation and decreased marriage rates parallel the use of contraceptive steroids as does decreased church attendance and/or reduced acceptance of Church teaching among Catholics. Lay summary: While there is wide, societal acceptance of hormonal contraceptives to space births, their physical side effects are often downplayed and their impact on emotions and life styles are largely unexamined. Coincidental to the use of "the pill" there has been an increase in depression, low sexual desire, "hook-ups," cohabitation, delay of marriage and childbearing, and among Catholics, decreased church attendance and reduced religious practice. Fertility is not a disease. Birth spacing can be achieved by natural means, and the many undesirable effects of contraception avoided.

  2. Psychological, social, and spiritual effects of contraceptive steroid hormones

    PubMed Central

    Klaus, Hanna; Cortés, Manuel E.

    2015-01-01

    Governments and society have accepted and enthusiastically promoted contraception, especially contraceptive steroid hormones, as the means of assuring optimal timing and number of births, an undoubted health benefit, but they seldom advert to their limitations and side effects. This article reviews the literature on the psychological, social, and spiritual impact of contraceptive steroid use. While the widespread use of contraceptive steroid hormones has expanded life style and career choices for many women, their impact on the women's well-being, emotions, social relationships, and spirituality is seldom mentioned by advocates, and negative effects are often downplayed. When mentioned at all, depression and hypoactive sexual desire are usually treated symptomatically rather than discontinuing their most frequent pharmacological cause, the contraceptive. The rising incidence of premarital sex and cohabitation and decreased marriage rates parallel the use of contraceptive steroids as does decreased church attendance and/or reduced acceptance of Church teaching among Catholics. Lay summary: While there is wide, societal acceptance of hormonal contraceptives to space births, their physical side effects are often downplayed and their impact on emotions and life styles are largely unexamined. Coincidental to the use of “the pill” there has been an increase in depression, low sexual desire, “hook-ups,” cohabitation, delay of marriage and childbearing, and among Catholics, decreased church attendance and reduced religious practice. Fertility is not a disease. Birth spacing can be achieved by natural means, and the many undesirable effects of contraception avoided. PMID:26912936

  3. Oral contraceptives: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Derman, R

    1989-09-01

    Cardiovascular risks attributable to oral contraceptive use may now be subdivided into those that appear to be secondary to the estrogen component, i.e., venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and those linked to the progestin component, i.e., small vessel disease including myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident. It appears that venous risk is attributable to subtle changes in clotting factors, while arterial risk may be secondary to changes in glucose and lipid metabolism. In order to determine which women are at greatest risk from oral contraceptive use, Spellacy et al. has developed a risk scoring form that aids in the screening process. After excluding women with an absolute contraindication to pill use, women at greatest risk for cardiovascular disease related to oral contraceptive use are those with a family history of hyperlipidemia, gestational or overt diabetics, hypertensives, and smokers over the age of 35. The gradual reduction by manufacturers of the steroid content of oral contraceptives appears to have lessened the incidence of adverse effects. Our current knowledge of risk factors permits the clinician to reduce exposure to oral contraceptive-related mortality by as much as 86 per cent. As we continue to search for ways to reduce risk among oral contraceptive users, it is important to note that more than 25 per cent of women are still taking formulations containing 50 micrograms of estrogen. It becomes the responsibility of the practicing physician to "step-down" these patients to lower-dose preparations such as the multiphasics. Such preparations also represent optimal therapy for first-time pill users.

  4. Contraceptive developments for men.

    PubMed

    Amory, John K

    2007-03-01

    Efforts are underway to develop new methods of contraception for men. The most promising approach to male contraceptive development is hormonal and involves the administration of testosterone. When testosterone is administered to a man, it functions as a contraceptive by suppressing the secretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone from the pituitary gland, thereby depriving the testes of the signals required for spermatogenesis. After two to three months of treatment, low levels of gonadotropins lead to markedly decreased sperm counts and effective contraception in a majority of men. In many clinical trials, male hormonal contraception has proven to be free from serious adverse effects and is well-tolerated by men. In addition, sperm parameters uniformly normalize when treatment is discontinued. The main drawback to this approach is the observation that spermatogenesis is not suppressed to zero in all men, meaning that some potential for fertility persists. Because of this, recent studies have combined testosterone with progestogens and/or gonadotropin-releasing antagonists to synergistically suppress pituitary gonadotropins and improve suppression of spermatogenesis. Current combinations of testosterone and progestogens severely suppress spermatogenesis without severe side effects in 80-90% of men, with significant suppression in the remainder of individuals. Recent trials with newer, long-acting forms of injectable testosterone, such as testosterone undecanoate, which can be administered every 8-10 weeks, combined with progestogens, administered either orally or by long-acting implant, have yielded promising results and may soon result in the marketing of a safe, reversible and effective hormonal contraceptive for men.

  5. Knowledge and factors determining choice of contraception among Singaporean women

    PubMed Central

    Gosavi, Arundhati; Ma, Yueyun; Wong, Hungchew; Singh, Kuldip

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The study aimed to assess the level of awareness and knowledge of contraception among women in Singapore, and identify the factors that influence contraception choice. METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 259 female patients, aged 21–49 years, who attended the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Clinic at National University Hospital, Singapore. An original questionnaire on nine contraceptive methods was used. Respondents who had ≥ 2 correct answers for a method (out of four questions) were considered to have good knowledge of the method. Participants were asked to rate factors known to influence contraceptive choice as important or not important. RESULTS Awareness of the following methods was high: condom (100.0%), oral contraception pill (89.2%), tubal ligation (73.0%) and copper intrauterine device (IUD) (72.2%). The women were least aware of hormonal IUD (24.3%). Women who were parous, had a previous abortion, had completed their family or used contraception previously were more likely to have a higher awareness of contraception. 89.2% of the women had good knowledge of the condom; among those aware of hormonal IUD, only 46.0% had good knowledge of it. Women who had used hormonal IUD and the condom were more likely to have good knowledge of them. Many rated efficacy (90.5%) and a healthcare professional’s advice (90.1%) as important in contraceptive choice. Few considered peer influence (21.0%) and cultural practices (16.3%) to be important. CONCLUSION Women in Singapore have poor awareness and knowledge of contraception, especially long-acting reversible methods. More effective ways are needed to educate women about contraceptive methods. PMID:26762287

  6. Comparative study on the acceptance and use of contraceptive methods in a rural population in Kelantan.

    PubMed

    Kamalanathan, J P

    1990-12-01

    Contraceptive prevalence was determined in the Kelantan region of Malaysia, an area with relatively poor health indices. 350 women attending health clinics on rubber and palm-oil estates and living in surrounding suburbs were surveyed by clinic workers or during home visits. The sample included 273 Malays, 64 Indians and 13 Chinese. This area of Peninsular Malaysia is noted for the highest infant mortality rate (17.7), second highest crude birth rate (35.2) and highest dependency ratio (88%) in the country. 44.9% practiced contraception, highest in Chinese and lowest in Indians. Methods used were pills by (55%), traditional methods (19%), tubal ligation (18%), safe period (14%), injections (5.5%), IUD (4.7%), and condom (2.3%). The Malaysian traditional methods are herbal preparations from tree bark or roots, herb pills, and exercises after coitus. 34% of the non contraceptors had used contraception before but stopped because of side effects, religious or spousal objections, or desire to conceive. 74% had married in their teens. 46% of the non-contraceptors were spacing their children by prolonged breastfeeding.

  7. Scaling Up Family Planning to Reduce Maternal and Child Mortality: The Potential Costs and Benefits of Modern Contraceptive Use in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Chola, Lumbwe; McGee, Shelley; Tugendhaft, Aviva; Buchmann, Eckhart; Hofman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Family planning contributes significantly to the prevention of maternal and child mortality. However, many women still do not use modern contraception and the numbers of unintended pregnancies, abortions and subsequent deaths are high. In this paper, we estimate the service delivery costs of scaling up modern contraception, and the potential impact on maternal, newborn and child survival in South Africa. Methods The Family Planning model in Spectrum was used to project the impact of modern contraception on pregnancies, abortions and births in South Africa (2015-2030). The contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) was increased annually by 0.68 percentage points. The Lives Saved Tool was used to estimate maternal and child deaths, with coverage of essential maternal and child health interventions increasing by 5% annually. A scenario analysis was done to test impacts when: the change in CPR was 0.1% annually; and intervention coverage increased linearly to 99% in 2030. Results If CPR increased by 0.68% annually, the number of pregnancies would reduce from 1.3 million in 2014 to one million in 2030. Unintended pregnancies, abortions and births decrease by approximately 20%. Family planning can avert approximately 7,000 newborn and child and 600 maternal deaths. The total annual costs of providing modern contraception in 2030 are estimated to be US$33 million and the cost per user of modern contraception is US$7 per year. The incremental cost per life year gained is US$40 for children and US$1,000 for mothers. Conclusion Maternal and child mortality remain high in South Africa, and scaling up family planning together with optimal maternal, newborn and child care is crucial. A huge impact can be made on maternal and child mortality, with a minimal investment per user of modern contraception. PMID:26076482

  8. The copper intrauterine device for emergency contraception: an opportunity to provide the optimal emergency contraception method and transition to highly effective contraception.

    PubMed

    Dermish, Amna I; Turok, David K

    2013-07-01

    Worldwide, 40% of all pregnancies are unintended. Widespread, over-the-counter availability of oral emergency contraception (EC) has not reduced unintended pregnancy rates. The EC visit presents an opportunity to initiate a highly effective method of contraception in a population at high risk of unintended pregnancy who are actively seeking to avoid pregnancy. The copper intrauterine device (IUD), the most effective method of EC, continues to provide contraception as effective as sterilization for up to 12 years, and it should be offered as the first-line method of EC wherever possible. Increased demand for and supply of the copper IUD for EC may have an important role in reducing rates of unintended pregnancy. The EC visit should include access to the copper IUD as optimal care but should ideally include access to all highly effective methods of contraception.

  9. Pancreatitis, multiple infarcts and oral contraception

    PubMed Central

    Foster, M. E.; Powell, D. E. B.

    1975-01-01

    The fact that oral contraceptives may predispose to thrombosis is not disputed, although its frequency is still debated. Any reliable assessment of the prevalence of this complication must in the main depend on careful statistical studies of well controlled groups, because the isolated case may well be coincidental when conditions such as coronary thrombosis, cerebral thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism are not extreme rarities in adult women. However, occasionally the clinical and pathological findings are so striking that they afford compelling evidence. The patient to be described presented with clinical features of pancreatitis that did not initially suggest an association with oral contraception. A hitherto undescribed state of multiple infarcts was found at post-mortem. This also illustrates the way in which the official figures for thrombotic complications can be underestimated. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:1197171

  10. Mapping the serological prevalence rate of West Nile fever in equids, Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Bargaoui, R; Lecollinet, S; Lancelot, R

    2015-02-01

    West Nile fever (WNF) is a viral disease of wild birds transmitted by mosquitoes. Humans and equids can also be affected and suffer from meningoencephalitis. In Tunisia, two outbreaks of WNF occurred in humans in 1997 and 2003; sporadic cases were reported on several other years. Small-scale serological surveys revealed the presence of antibodies against WN virus (WNV) in equid sera. However, clinical cases were never reported in equids, although their population is abundant in Tunisia. This study was achieved to characterize the nationwide serological status of WNV in Tunisian equids. In total, 1189 sera were collected in 2009 during a cross-sectional survey. Sera were tested for IgG antibodies, using ELISA and microneutralization tests. The estimated overall seroprevalence rate was 28%, 95% confidence interval [22; 34]. The highest rates were observed (i) in the north-eastern governorates (Jendouba, 74%), (ii) on the eastern coast (Monastir, 64%) and (iii) in the lowlands of Chott El Jerid and Chott el Gharsa (Kebili, 58%; Tozeur, 52%). Environmental risk factors were assessed, including various indicators of wetlands, wild avifauna, night temperature and chlorophyllous activity (normalized difference vegetation index: NDVI). Multimodel inference showed that lower distance to ornithological sites and wetlands, lower night-time temperature, and higher NDVI in late spring and late fall were associated with higher serological prevalence rate. The model-predicted nationwide map of WNF seroprevalence rate in Tunisian equids highlighted different areas with high seroprevalence probability. These findings are discussed in the perspective of implementing a better WNF surveillance system in Tunisia. This system might rely on (i) a longitudinal survey of sentinel birds in high-risk areas and time periods for WNV transmission, (ii) investigations of bird die-offs and (iii) syndromic surveillance of equine meningoencephalitis.

  11. An "Imperfect" Contraceptive Society: Fertility and Contraception in Italy.

    PubMed

    Gribaldo, Alessandra; Judd, Maya D; Kertzer, David I

    2009-09-01

    Italy represents an unexpected and in some ways paradoxical outcome in terms of fertility control: a drop to one of the lowest birth rates in the world has been accompanied by the preponderant use of "traditional" methods despite the availability of "modern" contraception. Using data from 349 interviews conducted in 2005-2006 in four Italian cities, we argue that Italian women achieve "unplanned" AND desired conceptions through the use of withdrawal and natural methods. While data from other countries reveal similar notions of ambivalence surrounding pregnancy intentions and contraceptive use, Italy stands out for the surprising correlation between highly "managing" the conditions under which children are born and the socially commended approach of "letting births happen". Such results suggest the need to rethink theoretical understandings of low fertility. Through the use of non-technological methods individuals manipulate culturally produced norms and beliefs about the appropriate moment to have a child; simultaneously, their actions are embedded in larger cultural, economic, and political processes.

  12. Contraceptive Beach Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Edith B.; Miller, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    Abstinence-based sexuality education includes a discussion about the various types of contraception available today. This lesson addresses the knowledge and skills identified in the National Health Education Standards, and can be used with two different audiences-students and teachers. Included in the lesson are step-by-step procedures, a…

  13. Differences in the Nonuse of any Contraception and Use of Specific Contraceptive Methods in HIV Positive and HIV Negative Rwandan Women

    PubMed Central

    Adedimeji, Adebola A.; Hoover, Donald R.; Shi, Qiuhu; Cohen, Mardge H.; Gard, Tracy; Anastos, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Contraception can reduce the dual burden of high fertility and high HIV prevalence in sub-Sahara Africa, but significant barriers remain regarding access and use. We describe factors associated with nonuse of contraception and with use of specific contraceptive methods in HIV positive and HIV negative Rwandan women. Data from 395 HIV-positive and 76 HIV-negative women who desired no pregnancy in the previous 6 months were analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models to identify clinical and demographic characteristics that predict contraceptive use. Differences in contraceptive methods used were dependent on marital/partner status, partner's knowledge of a woman's HIV status, and age. Overall, condoms, abstinence, and hormonal methods were the most used, though differences existed by HIV status. Less than 10% of women both HIV+ and HIV− used no contraception. Important differences exist between HIV-positive and HIV-negative women with regard to contraceptive method use that should be addressed by interventions seeking to improve contraceptive prevalence. PMID:23304468

  14. Using prevalence indices to aid interpretation and comparison of agreement ratings between two or more observers.

    PubMed

    Burn, Charlotte C; Weir, Alex A S

    2011-05-01

    Veterinary clinical and epidemiological investigations demand observer reliability. Kappa (κ) statistics are often used to adjust the observed percentage agreement according to that expected by chance. In highly homogenous populations, κ ratings can be poor, despite percentage agreements being high, because the probability of chance agreement is also high. Veterinary researchers are often unsure how to interpret these ambiguous results. It is suggested that prevalence indices (PIs), reflecting the homogeneity of the sample, should be reported alongside percentage agreements and κ values. Here, a published PI calculation is extended, permitting extrapolation to situations involving three or more observers. A process is proposed for classifying results into those that do and do not attain clinically useful ratings, and those tested on excessively homogenous populations and which are therefore inconclusive. Pre-selection of balanced populations, or adjustment of scoring thresholds, can help reduce population homogeneity. Reporting PIs in observer reliability studies in veterinary science and other disciplines enables reliability to be interpreted usefully and allows results to be compared between studies.

  15. Population prevalence of edentulism and its association with depression and self-rated health.

    PubMed

    Tyrovolas, Stefanos; Koyanagi, Ai; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Haro, Josep Maria; Kassebaum, Nicholas J; Chrepa, Vanessa; Kotsakis, Georgios A

    2016-11-17

    Edentulism is associated with various adverse health outcomes but treatment options in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are limited. Data on its prevalence and its effect on mental health and overall-health is lacking, especially from LMICs. Self-reported data on complete edentulism obtained by standardized questionnaires on 201,953 adults aged ≥18 years from 50 countries which participated in the World Health Survey (WHS) 2002-2004 were analyzed. Age and sex-standarized edentulism prevalence ranged from 0.1% (95% CI = 0.0-0.3) (Myanmar) to 14.5% (95% CI = 13.1-15.9) (Zimbabwe), and 2.1% (95% CI = 1.5-3.0) (Ghana) to 32.3% (95% CI = 29.0-35.8) (Brazil) in the younger and older age groups respectively. Edentulism was significantly associated with depression (OR 1.57, 95% CI = 1.23-2.00) and poor self-rated health (OR 1.38, 95% CI = 1.03-1.83) in the younger group with no significant associations in the older age group. Our findings highlight the edentulism-related health loss in younger persons from LMICs. The relative burden of edentulism is likely to grow as populations age and live longer. Given its life-long nature and common risk factors with other NCDs, edentulism surveillance and prevention should be an integral part of the global agenda of NCD control.

  16. Population prevalence of edentulism and its association with depression and self-rated health

    PubMed Central

    Tyrovolas, Stefanos; Koyanagi, Ai; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.; Haro, Josep Maria; Kassebaum, Nicholas J.; Chrepa, Vanessa; Kotsakis, Georgios A.

    2016-01-01

    Edentulism is associated with various adverse health outcomes but treatment options in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are limited. Data on its prevalence and its effect on mental health and overall-health is lacking, especially from LMICs. Self-reported data on complete edentulism obtained by standardized questionnaires on 201,953 adults aged ≥18 years from 50 countries which participated in the World Health Survey (WHS) 2002–2004 were analyzed. Age and sex-standarized edentulism prevalence ranged from 0.1% (95% CI = 0.0–0.3) (Myanmar) to 14.5% (95% CI = 13.1–15.9) (Zimbabwe), and 2.1% (95% CI = 1.5–3.0) (Ghana) to 32.3% (95% CI = 29.0–35.8) (Brazil) in the younger and older age groups respectively. Edentulism was significantly associated with depression (OR 1.57, 95% CI = 1.23–2.00) and poor self-rated health (OR 1.38, 95% CI = 1.03–1.83) in the younger group with no significant associations in the older age group. Our findings highlight the edentulism-related health loss in younger persons from LMICs. The relative burden of edentulism is likely to grow as populations age and live longer. Given its life-long nature and common risk factors with other NCDs, edentulism surveillance and prevention should be an integral part of the global agenda of NCD control. PMID:27853193

  17. Rare chromosome abnormalities, prevalence and prenatal diagnosis rates from population-based congenital anomaly registers in Europe.

    PubMed

    Wellesley, Diana; Dolk, Helen; Boyd, Patricia A; Greenlees, Ruth; Haeusler, Martin; Nelen, Vera; Garne, Ester; Khoshnood, Babak; Doray, Berenice; Rissmann, Anke; Mullaney, Carmel; Calzolari, Elisa; Bakker, Marian; Salvador, Joaquin; Addor, Marie-Claude; Draper, Elizabeth; Rankin, Judith; Tucker, David

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the prevalence and types of rare chromosome abnormalities (RCAs) in Europe for 2000-2006 inclusive, and to describe prenatal diagnosis rates and pregnancy outcome. Data held by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies database were analysed on all the cases from 16 population-based registries in 11 European countries diagnosed prenatally or before 1 year of age, and delivered between 2000 and 2006. Cases were all unbalanced chromosome abnormalities and included live births, fetal deaths from 20 weeks gestation and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly. There were 10,323 cases with a chromosome abnormality, giving a total birth prevalence rate of 43.8/10,000 births. Of these, 7335 cases had trisomy 21,18 or 13, giving individual prevalence rates of 23.0, 5.9 and 2.3/10,000 births, respectively (53, 13 and 5% of all reported chromosome errors, respectively). In all, 473 cases (5%) had a sex chromosome trisomy, and 778 (8%) had 45,X, giving prevalence rates of 2.0 and 3.3/10,000 births, respectively. There were 1,737 RCA cases (17%), giving a prevalence of 7.4/10,000 births. These included triploidy, other trisomies, marker chromosomes, unbalanced translocations, deletions and duplications. There was a wide variation between the registers in both the overall prenatal diagnosis rate of RCA, an average of 65% (range 5-92%) and the prevalence of RCA (range 2.4-12.9/10,000 births). In all, 49% were liveborn. The data provide the prevalence of families currently requiring specialised genetic counselling services in the perinatal period for these conditions and, for some, long-term care.

  18. Use of Modern Contraception by the Poor Is Falling Behind

    PubMed Central

    Gakidou, Emmanuela; Vayena, Effy

    2007-01-01

    Background The widespread increase in the use of contraception, due to multiple factors including improved access to modern contraception, is one of the most dramatic social transformations of the past fifty years. This study explores whether the global progress in the use of modern contraceptives has also benefited the poorest. Methods and Findings Demographic and Health Surveys from 55 developing countries were analyzed using wealth indices that allow the identification of the absolute poor within each country. This article explores the macro level determinants of the differences in the use of modern contraceptives between the poor and the national averages of several countries. Despite increases in national averages, use of modern contraception by the absolute poor remains low. South and Southeast Asia have relatively high rates of modern contraception in the absolute poor, on average 17% higher than in Latin America. Over time the gaps in use persist and are increasing. Latin America exhibits significantly larger gaps in use between the poor and the averages, while gaps in sub-Saharan Africa are on average smaller by 15.8% and in Southeast Asia by 11.6%. Conclusions The secular trend of increasing rates of modern contraceptive use has not resulted in a decrease of the gap in use for those living in absolute poverty. Countries with large economic inequalities also exhibit large inequalities in modern contraceptive use. In addition to macro level factors that influence contraceptive use, such as economic development and provision of reproductive health services, there are strong regional variations, with sub-Saharan Africa exhibiting the lowest national rates of use, South and Southeast Asia the highest use among the poor, and Latin America the largest inequalities in use. PMID:17284155

  19. [The women and the right to contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Charchafche, Helena; Nilsson, Peter M

    2007-01-01

    During the first decades of the 20th century, many Swedish women were severely injured or died in complications following illegal abortions. Since legal abortion was forbidden, contraceptives were the only way to avoid pregnancy. But in the year 1910, a new Swedish law "Preventivlagen" prohibited any kind of advertising och public information considering contraceptives. They could still be sold in pharmacies or special medical stores, but it was no longer allowed to speak publicly about contraceptives in a leading manner. The punishment for disobeying was prison or fines. Some physicians and people involved in women liberation, public health and/or public education, claimed that the law brought negative medical, social and economic consequences, while others opposed the law being too soft. The law made the more than 100 years old question about contraceptives or not, a part of the medical, political and social agenda for the society. Some argument against contraceptives was concerned about the decreasing nativity rate--more use of contraceptives could make an even worse situation. Another reason was the fear of an increasing promiscuity if the contraceptives were more available. Still, many physicians and womens liberators did not se this as any big and important problems. They were more concerned about the women's health and her right to give birth to children at the time she wanted. Women had their right to be in charge of their lives, and should no longer be seen as victims of their biological nature. The right to contraceptives was not the only topic to be discussed during the late 19th century and the first decades of the 20th century. Another central right to be claimed, was the possibility for people, especially young people, to be educated in sexual questions. Many women and also women physicians fought for young peoples right to this information. The law "Preventivlagen" was abolished in 1938. After that, women hade their legal right to choose for

  20. Postcoital contraception: a delicate political issue.

    PubMed

    1984-04-01

    The controversy over government approvial of postcoital contraception in the US involves 1 basic question: will the federal government ever approve a method of contraception that some people consider an abortifacient, while others see it as a means of minimizing abortion. Although the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved postcoital contraceptive methods in the US, physicians have used morning after contraception for years, particularly in the treatment of rape victims. The FDA does not prohibit using a drug for purposes that are reflected in approved labeling. Problems have surfaced when clinicians treat patients in public family planning programs where state and federal funds are involved. Robert A. Hatcher, M.D., director of Grady Memorial Hospital's family planning program in Atlanta, maintains that postcoital contraceptives recruit into the medical system women who "otherwise might not seek help." Some clinicians believe that providing teenagers with postcoital contraceptives could lead to their initiation of ongoing contraceptive use. In a study of 125 rape victims treated with the Ovral morning after regimen, Hatcher et al. found that 97% of the women successfully completed the treatment. All victims began treatment within 24 hours after exposure. Among the study group, 56 women reported a prior pregnancy. Consequently, the proven fertility rate was 44.8%. 15 women experienced midcycle exposure, had proven fertility, and had positive sperm isolates. Study results showed that 7 women experienced pregnancies during the follow-up period. Researchers concluded that 2 of these women had existing intrauterine pregnancies at the time of exposure; 2 women did not complete the treatment protocol; and 1 woman believed she became pregnant by her regular partner after the assault. 16% of the study participants experienced side effects after the Ovral protocol. To determine if morning after pills could decrease the need for abortions, Hatcher et al

  1. Use of and access to oral and injectable contraceptives in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Mareni Rocha; Leite, Silvana Nair; Tavares, Noemia Urruth Leão; Oliveira, Maria Auxiliadora; Arrais, Paulo Sergio Dourado; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso; Pizzol, Tatiane da Silva Dal; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Mengue, Sotero Serrate

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze the prevalence of current use of oral and injectable contraceptives by Brazilian women, according to demographic and socioeconomic variables and issues related to access to those medicines. METHODS A cross-sectional, population-based analytical study with probability sampling based on data from the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos (PNAUM – National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines), carried out between September 2013 and February 2014 in 20,404 Brazilian urban households. Prevalence was calculated based on reports from non-pregnant women aged 15-49 on the use of oral or injectable contraceptives. The independent variables were gender, age, level of education, socioeconomic class, Brazilian region and marital status. Also analyzed were access, means of payment, sources, and reported medicines. Statistical analyses considered 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) and Pearson Chi-square test to evaluate the statistical significance of differences between groups, considering a 5% significance level. RESULTS Prevalence of use was 28.2% for oral contraceptives (OC) and 4.5% for injectable contraceptives (IC). The highest prevalence of oral contraceptives was in the South region (37.5%) and the lowest in the North region (15.7%). For injectable contraceptives there was no difference between regions. Access was higher for oral contraceptive users (90.7%) than injectable contraceptives users (81.2%), as was direct payment (OC 78.1%, IC 58.0%). Users who paid for contraceptives acquired them at retail pharmacies (OC 95.0% and IC 86.6%) and at Farmácia Popular (Popular Pharmacy Program) (OC 4.8% and IC 12.7%). Free of charge contraceptives were mostly obtained from the Brazilian Unified Health System – SUS (OC 86.7%; IC 96.0%). Free samples were reported by 10.4% of users who did not pay for oral contraceptives. Most of paying users did not try to obtain

  2. Contraception: traditional and religious attitudes.

    PubMed

    Schenker, J G; Rabenou, V

    1993-04-01

    Humans have tried to control fertility for centuries. Primitive, preliterate societies practiced infanticide and abortion. When primitive women understood the advantages of conception control, they tried, when possible, to use contraception. In the 4th century B.C., Plato and Aristotle advocated a one-child family. Greek medical literature reported a hollow tube inserted through the cervix into the uterus and a potion as contraceptives. Islamic physicians had much knowledge about conception control. The attitudes toward contraception. In the 5th century B.C., Saint Augustine condemned contraception, even among married couples. The condom emerged in the early modern period. Yet, they were usually worn to protect against disease, e.g., bilharzia in Egypt and syphilis in Europe. The cervical cap and the diaphragm are examples of occlusive pessaries. By 1880, contraceptives and spermicides were advertised. In 1928, the IUD joined the existing contraceptives. Today we have combined oral contraceptives. Judaic law requires husbands to fulfill their wives sexual needs, separate from their duty to procreate. It also calls men, not women, to procreate and forbids men from masturbating, thus Judaic law does not forbid women from practicing contraception. The Roman Catholic church forbids contraceptive use because it is a sin against nature. Some Protestant denominations have allowed contraceptive use. Islamic law states that children are gifts from Allah. Some Moslems believe that they must have many children, but Allah and the Prophet state that children have rights to education and future security. These rights allow couples to prevent pregnancy. Neither Hinduism nor Buddhism prohibit contraceptive use. Differences in husband-wife communication, sex roles, access to contraceptives, and traditional family values will have more of an effect on contraceptive use and fertility than theological barriers or the social class of religious groups.

  3. Contraception with Chlormadinone Acetate in Woman with Previous Contraceptive Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, R. P. H.; Williams, Roger

    1970-01-01

    The oral contraceptive chlormadinone acetate has been given for eight months to a woman who had developed jaundice during four pregnancies, and twice while taking a combined contraceptive pill. No side-effects or changes in liver function were observed. This is further evidence that progestogens used for contraception, and in particular those derived from hydroxyprogesterone, are less hepatotoxic than the oestrogenic components. PMID:4189931

  4. [The relation between trichomoniasis and contraceptive methods].

    PubMed

    Sönmez Tamer, Gülden; Keçeli Ozcan, Sema; Yücesoy, Gülseren; Gacar, Gülçin

    2009-01-01

    Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by Trichomonas vaginalis (T. vaginalis) infecting the urogenital system. In this study, the relation between different contraceptive methods used and T. vaginalis infection was investigated. A total of 253 women (aged from 20-48 years) with abnormal vaginal discharges who applied to the Obstetrics and Gynecology outpatient clinic were enrolled in the study. T. vaginalis was diagnosed by microscopic examination of direct and Giemsa stained preparations. In addition, contraceptive methods, such as an intrauterine device (IUD), coitus interruptus (CI), oral contraceptive (OC), condoms, and injection that had been used, were recorded in the patients' questionnaire forms. Of the 253 women, 207 were using one of the contraceptive methods and a total of 22 (8.69%) trichomoniasis cases were observed. T. vaginalis was detected in 13 of 114 IUD users (14.70%), 5 of 34 CI (11.40%) cases, 3 of 31 (9.67%) condom users, 1 of 46 (2.17%) nonusers. There was no relation between women using the method of OC and T. vaginalis infection. T. vaginalis is the cause of vulvovaginitis and women with abnormal vaginal discharges should be investigated for possible trichomoniasis. In this study, detection of a higher rate of T. vaginalis infection in IUD users means that IUD usage might increase the risk of Trichomonas infection.

  5. [Emergency oral contraception policy: the Peruvian experience].

    PubMed

    Pretell-Zárate, Eduardo A

    2013-07-01

    Emergency oral contraception is part of the sexual and reproductive rights of women. In 2001, this health policy was incorporated into the Rules of the National Family Planning Program of the Ministry of Health, primarily to prevent unwanted pregnancy and its serious consequences, induced abortion and the high associated maternal mortality rate, which are major public health problems. Scientific research has confirmed that the main mechanism of action of levonorgestrel, component of emergency oral contraception (EOC) is to inhibit or delay ovulation, preventing fertilization of the egg; additionally, it increases the thickening of the cervical mucus, making the sperm migration more difficult. No study has found endometrial abnormalities that may interfere with the implantation of the fertilized egg or embryo development of an implanted egg. However, despite the support of medical science and legal backing, the EOC is available only to users with economic resources, but its use has not been fully implemented in public sector services, due to obstacles created by groups opposed to contraception under claim of an alleged abortive effect that has already been ruled out scientifically. This article describes the administrative experience and legal confrontations between groups of power that prevent the proper implementation of an emergency contraception policy in Peru.

  6. [Contraception and hepatogastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Grimaud, J C; Bourliere, M

    1989-05-01

    Complications of oral contraceptives (OCs) affecting the gastrointestinal tract, liver and pancreas are rare but potentially serious. Hepatobiliary complications are by far the most frequent and varied. Hepatic lesions will probably decline in frequency as low-dose OCs replace higher dosed pills. Intrahepatic cholestasis induced by OCs resembles that of pregnancy. There may be a genetic predisposition to both conditions involving a dose-dependent estrogen effect of decreasing bile secretion. Intrahepatic cholestasis appears within 6 cycles of OC use. Symptoms include pruritus with anorexia, asthenia, vomiting, and weight loss without fever, rash or abdominal pain. Termination of OCs clears the condition without sequelae within 1-3 months, sometimes after a temporary aggravation. A moderate and asymptomatic cytolysis may appear when OC treatment is begun. Sinusoidal dilatation has been conclusively linked to OCs although few cases have been published. Clinical manifestations other than hepatomegaly are variable. Abdominal pain and fever are the most common. The condition is not related to duration of use and disappears 5-15 days after OC use is terminated. The relative risk of Budd-Chiari syndrome in OC users is estimated at 2.37. OCs increase the prevalence of hepatic adenomas as a function of duration of treatment. They are usually discovered fortuitously but may be revealed by vague abdominal pains. Hemorrhagic complications are more likely in OC users. It may be difficult to distinguish between adenomas, hepatocellular carcinoma, and focal nodular hyperplasia. A puncture biopsy guided by sonography may aid diagnosis. The natural history of adenomas is poorly understood and treatment remains controversial. OCs do not appear to increase the risk of focal nodular hyperplasia but they increase the size of the tumor and the risk of hemorrhage. OCs should be terminated because of risk of hemorrhage. Surgical resection is not indicated unless there are complication or

  7. Contraceptive practice, unwanted pregnancies and induced abortion in Southwest Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Omideyi, Adekunbi Kehinde; Akinyemi, Akanni Ibukun; Aina, Olabisi Idowu; Adeyemi, Adebanjo Babalola; Fadeyibi, Opeyemi Abiola; Bamiwuye, Samson Olusina; Akinbami, Catherine Abiola; Anazodo, Amechi

    2011-01-01

    Despite widespread awareness of and access to modern contraception, high rates of unwanted pregnancies and abortions still persist in many parts of the world, even where abortion is legally restricted. This article explores perspectives on contraception and abortion, contraceptive decision-making within relationships, and the management of unplanned pregnancies. It presents findings from an exploratory qualitative study based on 17 in-depth interviews and 6 focus group discussions conducted in 2 locations in Nigeria in 2006. The results suggest that couples do not practice contraception consistently because of perceived side effects and partner objections. Abortion is usually resorted to because pregnancy was unwanted due to incomplete educational attainment, economic hardship, immaturity, close pregnancy interval, and social stigma. Males usually have greater influence in contraceptive-decision making than females. Though induced abortion is negatively viewed in the community, it is still common, and women usually patronise quacks to obtain such services. An abortion experience can change future views and decisions towards contraception. Family planning interventions should include access to and availability of adequate family planning information. Educational campaigns should target males since they play an important role in contraceptive decision-making.

  8. Potencies of oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Chihal, H J; Peppler, R D; Dickey, R P

    1978-02-01

    This letter is a response to the discussion by Edgren and Sturtevant (125:1029, 1976) on potencies of oral contraceptives (OCs). It is agreed that the results of studies in animal models on OC potencies may not necessarily reflect true potencies in human subjects, however, these animal models do allow the evaluation of the biological effects and interactions of the components of OCs. Data obtained in animal studies are acknowledged to be valuable aids in the study of human diseases. Likewise, mouse uterine response to contraceptive steroids is 1 criterion to be used in evaluating steroid potency. As previously reported, the importance of the mouse uterine response is that the contribution of the progestin component to the total estrogenic potency of the OC is demonstrated.

  9. New contraceptive options.

    PubMed

    Archer, D F

    2001-03-01

    New contraceptive modalities that are being introduced into the US marketplace reflect many changes in the delivery of existing steroidal products. These products are available now not only as oral medications but also as transdermal, intravaginal, intrauterine, and implantable or injectable devices. Each of these has its own unique profile and enhances the ability of consumers to pick and choose the product that is most acceptable to them. However, development of new barrier contraceptives, particularly those that have the potential to reduce the heterosexual transmission of HIV or to reduce a bacterial infection such as Chlamydia or Neisseria gonorrhea, continues to be moving forward in clinical trials. These products can have a lower efficacy compared with the steroidal products but, because of their other benefits, may be of significant medical use.

  10. [Contraception in teenagers (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hubinont, P O

    1982-04-01

    The age at which adolescents start a sexual life is becoming younger and younger, and it is usually not accompanied by any correct knowledge of contraceptive methods. This particular group is more at risk of unwanted pregnancy; since a contraceptive method which is totally effective and totally reversible is not yet at hand. Several methods can be recommended to adolescents and include: 1) barrier contraception with condom and spermicidal agents, in those cases in which the couple has only occasional contacts; 2) low dose progestational oral contraception when the couple has a regular sex life; and 3) postcoital contraception only in cases of incest or rape, to be administered not later than 12 hours after coitus. While recent studies have demonstrated that low dose hormonal contraception is not harmful to the menstrual patterns and to the genetic patrimony of adolescent girls, the use of an IUD can eventually cause an infection leading to a future tubal sterility.

  11. Chlamydia trachomatis and oral contraceptive use: a quantitative review.

    PubMed Central

    Cottingham, J; Hunter, D

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--Chlamydia trachomatis is now recognised as a major sexually transmitted disease; oral contraceptive use is rapidly increasing particularly in developing countries. There are thus important public health implications of the many reports that isolation of C trachomatis is more frequent among users of oral contraceptives. The aim of this analysis was to assess the strength and consistency of this association by summarising published studies between 1972 and 1990. DESIGN--Studies identified were grouped according to whether they were prospective or case-control studies. Data were extracted and pooled estimates of the unadjusted odds ratios were made for all studies, as well as for sub-groups defined by an index of study quality, background prevalence of C trachomatis, and the contraceptive comparison being made. LOCATION--Studies in the analysis were mainly conducted in Europe and North America; the meta-analysis was done at the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. RESULTS--The pooled estimated unadjusted odds ratio for 29 case-control studies examined was 1.93 (95% CI, 1.77-2.11), indicating an almost twofold increased risk of chlamydial infection for oral contraceptive users. Neither study quality nor prevalence of C trachomatis modified this risk. When compared to the use of barrier contraceptives, however, the risk of infection for women using oral contraceptives increased to 2.91 (95% CI, 1.86-4.55). The pooled estimated protective effect of barrier methods in these studies was 0.34 (95% CI, 0.22-0.54). CONCLUSIONS--Cross-study comparisons of the relationship between oral contraceptive use and chlamydial infection are limited by the design and analysis of many component studies which did not control for confounding factors such as sexual behaviour and age. The almost twofold risk of increased chlamydial infection for oral contraceptive users, supported by the findings of two prospective studies, however, points to the importance of

  12. Sexual health and contraception.

    PubMed

    Straw, Fiona; Porter, Charlotte

    2012-10-01

    Sexual health encompasses 'sexual development and reproductive health, as well as the ability to develop and maintain meaningful interpersonal relationships; appreciate one's own body; interact with both genders in respectful and appropriate ways; express affection, love and intimacy in ways consistent with one's own values'. The 2008 WHO Consensus Statement additionally noted that 'responsible adolescent intimate relationships' should be 'consensual, non-exploitative, honest, pleasurable and protected against unintended pregnancy and STDs if any type of intercourse occurs'. Young people (YP) must, therefore, be able to access sexual health information and services that meet their needs. For most YP, interest in sexual activity begins with puberty, and this is associated with increasingly sexualised behaviour, including exploration of themselves and others. Most YP find this a confusing time, and so it is important that health professionals are able to offer advice regarding the wide range of sexual health issues, including sexuality, choice of partner, contraception, risk and management of sexually transmitted infections (STI) in a confident and approachable manner. YP have never had so much choice or information available to them, and this can be confusing for them. There is good evidence that YP who get information from their parents are likely to initiate sexual activity later than their peers who access information from their friends. However, there is also evidence that some YP would prefer to get sexual health information from health professionals. It is therefore imperative that all health professionals who see YP have an awareness of sexual health issues, and know where to signpost YP should they need more specialist sexual health advice and/or treatment. Where appropriate, one-to-one sexual health advice should be provided to YP on how to prevent and get tested for STIs, and how to prevent unwanted pregnancies. Advice should also be given on all methods

  13. Contraceptive Behavior in Young Women

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    adolescents does not use CONTRACEPTIVE BEHAVIOR 13 contraceptives. This group accounts for 75% of all unintended teenage pregnancies, 50% of which occur in...skills many adolescents have not yet aquired when sexual acivity begins. The result, all too often, is pregnancy and parenthood. Impact of teenage ...of the adolescent (Neinstein, 1987). Fear of parental notification presents another obstacle for the sexually active teenager desiring contraception

  14. Therapeutic uses of contraceptive steroids.

    PubMed

    Starks, G C

    1984-09-01

    During the past 20 years, contraceptive steroids have undergone significant changes as the result of an increased understanding of their metabolic, pharmacologic, and hormonal activities. During this time, prospective and retrospective epidemiologic studies have elucidated several noncontraceptive health benefits of oral contraceptive steroids, including their therapeutic effects for endometriosis, dysmenorrhea, polycystic ovarian disease, and benign breast disease. From this review it appears that the benefits of oral contraceptive steroids in young, healthy, nonsmoking women far outweigh their more publicized, infrequent risks.

  15. Contraception and sexually transmitted diseases.

    PubMed

    Creatsas, G

    1997-12-01

    The needs for contraception are increasing world-wide as more women desire protection from unwanted pregnancies. Since the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) has increased in many countries, consultation for contraception should be provided together with that on STDs. Each woman may choose the contraceptive method according to her needs but she should also be informed about the beneficial and negative effects of the method in preventing STDs.

  16. Contraceptives versus abortifacients.

    PubMed

    Barber, H R

    1990-11-01

    A less-publicized aspect of the famed Louisiana abortion bill would have outlawed the use of IUDs and oral contraceptives (OCs), a provision that ignores the difference between contraceptives and abortifacients. The bill, which was vetoed by Governor Buddy Roemer, stirred widespread controversy in its effort to sharply restrict abortion. Many of those involved in the discussion -- including the State Attorney General's office -- have contended that IUDs and OCs induce abortions by destroying fertilized eggs. But such statements disregard scientific studies that indicate that both contraceptive methods work by preventing fertilization. Research has shown that IUDs, especially copper-IUDs, restrict the transport of sperm, thereby preventing fertilization. One study revealed the presence of sperm in the fallopian tubes of non-IUD users 15-30 minutes after insemination, but found no sperm in the tubes of IUD users. Inhibiting ovulation, OCs work through a combination of estrogen and progestin. OCs prevent fertility by activating various mechanisms: they suppress the release of certain hormones, and cause a thickening of the cervical mucus which impairs sperm motility. Although neither IUDs nor OCs can be considered abortifacients, a small but vocal minority has succeeded in obscuring this fact. And it is the role of science to resolve the controversy by making the facts clear.

  17. Contraceptive implants and lactation.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Soledad

    2002-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of four contraceptive implants, plant, Implanon, Nestorone and Elcometrine, have been evaluated during use in the postpartum period by lactating women. These implants provide highly effective contraceptive protection with no negative effect on breastfeeding or infant growth and development. Breastfeeding women initiating Norplant use in the second postpartum month experience significantly longer periods of amenorrhea than do untreated women or intrauterine device users. After weaning, the bleeding pattern is similar to that observed in non-nursing women. Norplant use does not affect bone turnover and density during lactation. Norplant and Implanon release orally active progestins while Nestorone and Elcometrine implants release an orally inactive progestin, which represents an advantage since the infant should be free of steroidal effects. The infant's daily intake of steroids (estimated from concentrations in maternal milk during the first month of use) range from 90 to 100 ng of levonorgestrel (Norplant), 75-120 ng of etonogestrel (Implanon), and 50 ng and 110 ng of Nestorone (Nestorone and Elcometrine implants, respectively). Nursing women needing contraception may use progestin-only implants when nonhormonal methods are not available or acceptable. Implants that deliver orally active steroids should only be used after 6 weeks postpartum to avoid transferring of steroids to the newborn.

  18. Prevalence rates of Giardia and Cryptosporidium among diarrheic patients in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Natividad, Filipinas F; Buerano, Corazon C; Lago, Catherine B; Mapua, Cynthia A; de Guzman, Blanquita B; Seraspe, Ebonia B; Samentar, Lorena P; Endo, Takuro

    2008-11-01

    The prevalence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium among 3,456 diarrheic patients corrected from May 2004 to May 2005 in the Philippines was determined. Of 133 (3.8%) positive samples, 69 (2.0%) were positive for Giardia and 67 (1.9%) for Cryptosporidium. Three samples had co-infection with Giardia and Cryptosporidium. Luzon had the highest positive samples (5.0%) followed by Mindanao (4.9%), then Visayas (2.2%). Giardia was most prevalent in Mindanao (3.6%) while Cryptosporidium was most prevalent in Luzon (3.1%). The prevalence of Giardia (2.0%) among pediatric patients (0-18 years) did not significantly differ from that (1.9%) among adults (> 18 years old). However, for Cryptosporidium, the prevalence (2.9%) among pediatric patients was significantly higher compared to that (0.2%) among adult patients. In the pediatric population, the highest percentage of patients with Giardia was the 5-9 year old age group, while that of Cryptosporidium was in the 0-4 year old group. The prevalence of Giardia, but not Cryptosporidium, was significantly higher in male than female adults. Seasonality had a distinct peak in September with Cryptosporidium more prevalent in the rainy (2.6%) than dry season (0.9%).

  19. The effect of joint contraceptive decisions on the use of Injectables, Long-Acting and Permanent Methods (ILAPMs) among married female (15–49) contraceptive users in Zambia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Zambia’s fertility rate and unmet need for family planning are still high. This is in spite of the progress reported from 1992 to 2007 of the increase in contraceptive prevalence rate from 15% to 41% and use of modern methods of family planning from 9% to 33%. However, partner disapproval of family planning has been cited by many women in many countries including Zambia. Given the effectiveness of long-acting and permanent methods of family planning (ILAPMs) in fertility regulation, this paper sought to examine the relationship between contraceptive decision-making and use of ILAPMs among married women in Zambia. Methods This paper uses data from the 2007 Zambia Demographic and Health Survey. The analysis is based on married women (15–49) who reported using a method of family planning at the time of the survey. Out of the 7,146 women interviewed, only 1,630 women were valid for this analysis. Cross-tabulations and binary logistic regressions with Chi-square were used to analyse associations and the predictors of use of ILAPMs of contraception, respectively. A confidence interval of .95 was used in determining relationships between independent and dependent variables. Results Two thirds of women made joint decisions regarding contraception and 29% of the women were using ILAPMs. Women who made joint contraceptive decisions are significantly more likely to use ILAPMs than women who did not involve their husband in contraceptive decisions. However, the most significant predictor is the wealth index. Women from rich households are more likely to use ILAPMs than women from medium rich and poor households. Results also show that women of North Western ethnicities and those from Region 3 had higher odds of using ILAPMs than Tonga women and women from Region 2, respectively. Conclusion Joint contraceptive decision-making between spouses is key to use of ILAPMs in Zambia. Our findings have also shown that the wealth index is actually the strongest factor

  20. Construction Industry Apprentices' Substance Use: A Survey of Prevalence Rates, Reasons for Use, and Regional and Age Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    du Plessis, Karin; Corney, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence rates and reasons for substance use were studied in a sample of 172 male construction industry apprentices who had a mean age of 20 years. Results were compared with those of men in similar age groups in Victoria, and regional and age differences were explored. Findings indicate that more metropolitan apprentices had experimented with…

  1. How Variable Are Interstate Prevalence Rates of Learning Disabilities and Other Special Education Categories? A Longitudinal Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallahan, Daniel P.; Keller, Clayton E.; Martinez, Elizabeth A.; Byrd, E. Stephen; Gelman, Jennifer A.; Fan, Xitao

    2007-01-01

    This study compared interstate variability of prevalence rates for special education categories from 1984 to 1985 through 2001 to 2002, using the coefficient of variation (CV), which is designed to compare variances when the means of the groups compared are radically different. The category of learning disabilities, presumed by many to be the most…

  2. Prevalence rate for inherited thrombophilia in patients with chronic and recurrent venous leg ulceration.

    PubMed

    Wiszniewski, Adam; Bykowska, Ksenia; Bilski, Radoslaw; Jaśkowiak, Wojciech; Proniewski, Jacek

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence rate for inherited thrombophilia (IT) in patients with chronic (CVU) and recurrent venous leg ulceration. We also investigated and evaluated the severity of the clinical pattern of CVU in patients with and without IT. We examined 110 patients with CVU (the study group) and 110 healthy subjects (the control group). We prepared a questionnaire to be completed by each study participant. Ultrasound Doppler color imaging or/and duplex ultrasonography was performed to evaluate the efficiency of the venous system. The ankle-brachial index was calculated to determine the efficiency of the arterial system. We examined both groups for the presence of IT. IT was diagnosed in 30% of study group and in 1.8% of control group. Our diagnoses of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) were based on medical interviews, physical examinations, and an ultrasonography of the venous system and concerned 64 study group patients (58.2%), 35 of whom (31.8%) experienced recurrent DVT. Proximal and/or distal DVT was determined in an interview and/or by an ultrasonography performed for all patients with CVU and IT. In 94% of these patients, DVT was recurrent, and in 88% of patients with CVU and IT, we observed recurrent DVT and CVU. It recurred more often and persisted longer when compared to patients with CVU and no IT, despite similar management. No differences were observed in ulcer size, localization, or pain level related to ulceration between patients with CVU and IT and those with CVU and no IT.

  3. Oral Contraceptive Use and Psychiatric Disorders in a Nationally Representative Sample of Women

    PubMed Central

    Cheslack-Postava, Keely; Keyes, Katherine M.; Lowe, Sarah R.; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Examine the association between oral contraceptive use (any current use, duration and type) and major depression disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and panic disorder (PD) in a nationally representative sample of women in the United States. Methods Data were drawn from 1,105 women aged 20–39 in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys from 1999 to 2004. The associations between self-reported use of oral contraceptives in the past year and DSM-IV diagnosed and sub-threshold MDD, GAD, and PD in the past year were assessed comparing oral contraceptive users to all non-users, former users and former long-term users. Results Women using oral contraceptives had a lower past-year prevalence of all disorders assessed, other than sub-threshold MDD. When adjusted for confounders, women using oral contraceptives in the past year had significantly lower odds of sub-threshold PD, compared to former users (OR=0.34, 95% C.I. 0.14–0.84). Effects estimates were strongest for monophasic (versus multiphasic) oral contraceptive users. Conclusions Hormonal contraceptive use was associated with reduced risk of subthreshold PD. A potential mental health benefit of hormonal contraceptives has substantial public health implications; prospective longitudinal studies are needed to confirm whether hormonal contraceptive use improves mental health. PMID:25113319

  4. Contraceptive advertising in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lebow, M A

    1994-01-01

    are media reluctance, government regulation, lack of consistent effort on the part of advertisers, and a lack of consensus in society about the importance of this issue. These limits are the symptoms of a society which has an unrealistic view of sexual activity. Therefore, contraceptive advertising alone will not change the US's high unintended pregnancy and abortion rates.

  5. [A new contraceptive method: breast feeding].

    PubMed

    Townsend, S

    1993-08-01

    Even though women have known for centuries that breast feeding has a contraceptive effect, family planning agents have only recently promoted it. Family planning specialists at a meeting in Bellagio, Italy, on breast feeding developed directives referred to as the Lactational Amenorrhea Method (LAM). Adherence to these directives assure effective protection against pregnancy until resumption of menstruation, expansion of infant feeding to foods other than breast milk, or until 6 months postpartum. Nipple stimulation during suckling is sufficient to suppress ovulation. Frequent suckling or more intense suckling maintains the contraceptive effect, so the directives insist that mothers exclusively or almost exclusively breast feed their infants. LAM provides 98% effective protection against pregnancy for 6 months if women observe it as directed. After 6 months, they should use another family planning method. Scientists are trying to see whether they can make the directives more simple. They will discuss this possibility at their next international meeting in 1993 or 1994. Research indicates that the most crucial rule is amenorrhea and use of this rule will make LAM more easy to learn and use, thereby increasing its use. It is difficult to motivate hospital and family planning clinic staff to promote LAM. Information and education are needed to support LAM. for example, a project in Honduras is using peer counseling to promote LAM. Family Health International is following 1000 women for 1 year postpartum in Pakistan and the Philippines. This study's 6-month LAM efficacy rate was around 95%. Little research has looked at the cost effectiveness of LAM. Optimally, LAM is a temporary contraceptive method which must be followed immediately by another contraceptive method. Indeed, LAM counseling should often pregnancy. LAM supporters do not intend for LAM to be a substitute for family planning, but want LAM to be another method in the contraceptive method mix.

  6. Relationship between abortion and contraception: A comparative socio-demographic analysis of Czech and Slovak populations.

    PubMed

    Kocourkova, Jirina

    2016-01-01

    Before 1990, abortions were highly prevalent in Eastern Europe, including Czechoslovakia. After 1990, the Czech and Slovak populations experienced a significant decrease in the abortion rate. Because both states have complete statistics on abortion and identical histories of abortion legislation, trends in abortion rates between 1988 and 2008 can be compared in detail using standard and decomposition methods. Binary logistic regression with odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were used to identify the variables associated with changes in attitudes toward abortion between 1991 and 2008. First, a convergence in abortion rates was confirmed, although a higher abortion rate among unmarried Czech women remained in 2008. In contrast, a divergence in contraceptive practices was found; Slovaks have significantly lagged behind Czechs in the use of modern contraceptives. Differentials in attitudes toward abortion significantly increased (p < .001). Additionally, although a decline in the abortion rate was achieved without legal restrictions to access to abortions, various factors were responsible for this outcome. In the Czech Republic, improvements in family planning and increasing awareness of reproductive health have played key roles in promoting responsible sexual behavior, whereas in Slovakia, the stronger influence of the Catholic Church has contributed to the prevention of abortions.

  7. Factors associated with the contraindicated use of oral contraceptives in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Daniele Aparecida Silva; Felisbino-Mendes, Mariana Santos; Mendes, Mayara Santos; Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of the contraindicated use of oral contraceptives and the associated factors in Brazilian women. METHODS 20,454 women who answered the VIGITEL survey in 2008 also participated in this study, of which 3,985 reported using oral contraceptives. We defined the following conditions for the contraindicated use of contraceptives: hypertension; cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack, stroke/cerebrovascular accident; diabetes mellitus; being smoker and 35 years old or older. We estimated the prevalence and 95% confidence intervals of contraindicated use in users of oral contraceptives and the factors associated with contraindication by prevalence ratio and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS In the total population, 21% (95%CI 19.7–21.9) of women showed some contraindication to the use of oral contraceptives, of which 11.7% (95%CI 10.6–13.7) belonged to the group of users of oral contraceptives. The most frequent contraindication in users of oral contraceptives was hypertension (9.1%). The largest proportion of women with at least one contraindication was aged between 45 and 49 years (45.8%) and with education level between zero and eight years (23.8%). The prevalence of contraindication to oral contraceptives was higher in women less educated (zero to eight years of study) (PR = 2.46; 95%CI 1.57–3.86; p < 0.05) and with age between 35-44 years (PR = 4.00; 95%CI 2.34–6.83) and 45-49 years (PR = 5.59; 95%CI 2.90–10.75). CONCLUSIONS Age greater than or equal to 35 and low education level were demographic and iniquity factors, respectively, in the contraindicated use of oral contraceptives. PMID:28099550

  8. Potencies of oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Edgren, R A; Sturtevant, F M

    1976-08-15

    Oral contraceptives are combinations of estrogens and progestogens or, in the case of the mini-pills, progestogens alone. With specific test procedures in laboratory animals or human subjects, it is possible to assign potency evaluations to the components relative to the progestational, estrogenic, or antiestrogenic activities of the progestogen or to the estrogenic potencies of the estrogenic component. It might even be possible to quantify the synergistic effects of the estrogen on the progestational agent. Unfortunately, however, it is impossible now to amalgamate such assay results into single estimates of the potencies of the combinations (either the combination products per se or the combination tablets of sequential products). For example, an over-all estrogenic potency of a combination preparation would involve the integration of contributions form the estrogen itself plus the estrogenic products of metabolism of the progestogen minus the antagonistic effect of the progestational agent, if any. These factors cannot now be quantified independently, much less merged into a single figure of clinical significance. Further, even if it were possible to produce such an estimate, it is unlikely that the evaluation would be meaningful in relation to any putative side effect or adverse reaction, i.e., the alleged thrombogenic effects of oral contraceptives cannot currently be related directly to any measure of potency that will allow prediction of these clinical conditions from laboratory models. Any evaluation of the potential of a given contraceptive to produce a specific side effect will depend upon data generated with specific regard to that adverse reaction and the individual product in question.

  9. Expanding contraceptive options.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    The goals of Family Health International (FHI) have been to introduce a variety of birth control options to people in developing countries, and to provide information to the user on the advantages and disadvantages of each method. FHI has worked with many developing countries in clinical trials of established as well as new contraceptive methods. These trials played an important part in making 2 sterilization procedures, laparoscopy and minilaparotomy popular for women. Further research improved the methods and have made them the most popular in the world, chosen by 130 million users. FHI is doing clinical trials on a new IUD, that is a copper bearing T-shaped device called the TCu380A. they have collected data on over 10,000 women using IUD's and early analysis indicates TCu380A is more effective than others. FHI is also evaluating devices such as Norplant that will prevent pregnancy up to 5 years by implanting the capsules in the arm. More than 8,000 women are being tested to determine the acceptability of implants in different geographical locations. Other research groups are doing work in 10 additional countries: Bangladesh will expand its program to 24,000 women and Nepal to 8,000 women. Trials are also being conducted on progestogen pills, since they do not lesson the volume of milk in breast feeding. FHI has also worked to introduce creative community-based distribution channels. In one case, specially trained health workers delivered contraceptives door-to-door in over 150,000 households. They found that 2 of 3 women accepted the pills and in a follow up survey 90% were still using them. FHI is now focusing on ways to improve moving new contraceptives from clinical testing on everyday use. They will coordinate training programs, educational material, media campaigns, and efforts with other international organizations, government agencies, and family planning groups.

  10. [Fertility and contraception in the rural areas. Important changes in contraception].

    PubMed

    Zuniga Herrera, E

    1990-01-01

    National fertility surveys conducted in Mexico since 1969 indicate that fertility in rural areas (localities with under 2500 inhabitants) is declining. The total fertility rate of rural women in union aged 20-44 years declined from 8.2 in 1968 to 5.8 in 1985. The beginning of the steep decline in rural fertility apparently occurred between 1973-75, at a time when official family planing programs were just starting, especially those accessible to rural women. Knowledge of contraception spread rapidly between 1969-76. The number of women in union who had ever used contraception doubled between 1976-81 to 40.2%. Important rural health programs developed in the late 1970s may have influenced contraceptive usage. Fertility continued to decline between 1980-85. The proportion of women who had ever used contraception in 1985 increased by only 3.5% in comparison to the 1981 level, but by 1987 the use of traditional methods such as rhythm and withdrawal was almost nil, and the use of IUDs, injectables, and sterilization had expanded. The age specific fertility rates suggest that the fertility reduction between 1980 and 1985 resulted in large part from the behavior of women over 34.

  11. [Contraceptive advice for the postpartum period].

    PubMed

    Couvreur, I; Delcroix, M

    1984-04-01

    The immediate postpartum period and the week of hospitalization is a privileged time for imparting information about the physiology of reproduction and contraception. Contraceptive counseling at this time may be done in groups or in individual sessions. Apart from the usual requirements of efficacy, innocuity, acceptability, and reversibility, postpartum contraception must respect lactation and the return of menstruation. 3/4 of women ovulate before the 1st postpartum mentstrual period, but never before the 25th postpartum day. In the absence of lactation, about 80% ovulate within 9 weeks. If lactation occurs ovulation is delayed and usually 1 or more anovulatory cycles occur, but the rate of conception is difficult to estimate. Methods that are unsuitable for postpartum use include the temperature method because of the absence of the hyperthermic plateau, cervical caps and diaphragms because correct measurements cannot be made until 5-6 months after delivery, and IUDs becuase of the large size of the uterine cavity, the fragility of the walls, the presence of lochia, the large size of the cervix, and the absence of cervical mucus which protects against infection. Local contraception with tablets, spermicidal gels, or condoms is a good choice, especially for breastfeeding women, because of improved success rates, good tolerance, and acceptability. In prescribing oral contraceptives, pathologies of pregnancy such as hypertension and phlebitis must be considered along with the classical contraindicatins. The formulation must not affect the quality or quantity of milk. Standard dosed combined pills and monophasic and biphasic minidose pills increase the thromboembolic risk if they are taken soon after delivery, used by women who smoke, if the estrogen component is large, or if the women's cholesterol level is elevated. Minipills and progestagen-only micropills are interesting choices for postpartum women because of the reduced steroid doses. Micropills should be

  12. Interpersonal communication and contraception: Insights and evidences from Bangladesh demographic and health survey, 2011.

    PubMed

    Raut, Manoj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the role of exposure to mass media and interpersonal communication in predicting the current use of contraception in Bangladesh. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were carried out using the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS), 2011 data to explore the association between communication and the current use of contraception. After adjusting the related socioeconomic and demographic factors, the mass media did not seem to have any role in predicting contraceptive use behavior while the findings revealed that interpersonal communication [prevalence ratio (PR): 1.0984, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0801-1.1170] is a strong positive predictor of the current contraceptive use. It is a well-known fact that mass media performs only the knowledge function while interpersonal communication performs an additional function of persuasion. This analysis corroborates the statement that the role of interpersonal communication is quite important in predicting contraceptive use.

  13. Religious Denomination, Religious Involvement, and Modern Contraceptive Use in Southern Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Agadjanian, Victor

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between contraceptive use and religion remains a subject of considerable debate. This article argues that this relationship is rooted in context-specific institutional and organizational aspects of religious belonging and involvement. Drawing upon unique recent data from a population-based survey of women conducted in a predominantly Christian high-fertility area of Mozambique, this study examines the connections between religion and contraception from two complementary angles. First, differences in current use of modern contraceptives across main denominational groups are analyzed. The results show higher prevalence of modern contraceptive use among Catholics and, to a lesser extent, traditional Protestants net of other individual- and community-level factors. Second, an analysis of religious involvement reveals that frequent church attendance has a net positive association with modern contraceptive use regardless of denominational affiliation. These findings are situated within the historical context of religious, demographic, and socio-political dynamics of Mozambique and similar sub-Saharan settings. PMID:24006073

  14. Prevalence Rates and Demographic Characteristics Associated with Depression in Pregnancy and the Postpartum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotlib, Ian H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined prevalence of depression in 360 women during pregnancy and after delivery. At both assessments, approximately 25 percent reported elevated levels of depressive symptomatology. Ten percent met diagnostic criteria for depression during pregnancy; 6.8 percent were depressed postpartum. One-half of postpartum depression cases were new onset.…

  15. The effects of contraception on female poverty.

    PubMed

    Browne, Stephanie P; LaLumia, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Poverty rates are particularly high among households headed by single women, and childbirth is often the event preceding these households' poverty spells. This paper examines the relationship between legal access to the birth control pill and female poverty. We rely on exogenous cross-state variation in the year in which oral contraception became legally available to young, single women. Using census data from 1960 to 1990, we find that having legal access to the birth control pill by age 20 significantly reduces the probability that a woman is subsequently in poverty. We estimate that early legal access to oral contraception reduces female poverty by 0.5 percentage points, even when controlling for completed education, employment status, and household composition.

  16. Steroidal contraceptive vaginal rings.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, N N

    2003-06-01

    The development of steroid-releasing vaginal rings over the past three decades is reviewed to illustrate the role of this device as an effective hormonal contraceptive for women. Vaginal rings are made of polysiloxane rubber or ethylene-vinyl-acetate copolymer with an outer diameter of 54-60 mm and a cross-sectional diameter of 4-9.5 mm and contain progestogen only or a combination of progestogen and oestrogen. The soft flexible combined ring is inserted in the vagina for three weeks and removed for seven days to allow withdrawal bleeding. Progesterone/progestogen-only rings are kept in for varying periods and replaced without a ring-free period. Rings are in various stages of research and development but a few, such as NuvaRing, have reached the market in some countries. Women find this method easy to use, effective, well tolerated and acceptable with no serious side-effects. Though the contraceptive efficacy of these vaginal rings is high, acceptability is yet to be established.

  17. Medicinal plants: conception / contraception.

    PubMed

    Chaing, H S; Merino-chavez, G; Yang, L L; Wang, F N; Hafez, E S

    1994-01-01

    Researchers have conducted considerable experiments on the effectiveness and therapeutic values of Chinese herbs and parts of plants. We should not ignore the significance of natural medicine. The Chinese have been perfecting medicinal therapy based on the raw ingredients of plants/herbs and their derivatives for thousands of years. Chinese practitioners of traditional medicine prescribe medicines based on yin and yang. Traditional medicine is communicated in a verb or written form. Natural resources used in traditional medicine to treat diseases are not limited to just medicinal plants but also include animals, shell fish, and minerals. Parts of plants used in traditional medicine are leaves, stems, flowers, bark, and root. Chinese medicine is the world's oldest continuous surviving tradition. The Chinese experimented with local plants, often resulting in mild to violent reactions. This process allowed them to become familiar with poisonous plants and those that could relieve pain or successfully treat illness. Current allopathic medicines are composed of synthetic compounds copied from natural chemical derivatives, which tend to be more potent than the original compound. Some medicinal plants used to effect conception/contraception include Striga astiatica (contraceptive); Eurycoma longifolia (male virility); and a mixture of lengkuas, mengkudu masak, black pepper seeds, ginger, salt, and 2 eggs (increase libido). Women in Malaysia take jamu to preserve their body shape and to provide nutrition during pregnancy. Praneem causes local cell-mediated immunity in the uterus. Clinical trials of Praneem with or without the hCG vaccine are planned.

  18. Abortion and contraceptive failure.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    Persona, marketed by Unipath, is a new method of natural family planning which has been on the market since 1996. It works by measuring the hormone levels in a woman's urine and letting her know when she is not fertile and may have sex without using a barrier method of contraception. The British Pregnancy Advisory Service (BPAS) found that their surveyed clients who reported using Persona had 188 abortions in 3 months and concluded that there was a need for better information and more advice for couples who plan to use the method. The other major non-NHS abortion provider, Marie Stopes International, reported similar findings, with about 60 women per month visiting their clinics for abortions after having used the method. The BPAS survey also showed that 43% of the women who had an abortion after using Persona were aged 24 years or younger even though Persona is intended for use by women aged 25-40 years in stable relationships. A similar proportion also reported having sex on days when the method told them that they were most fertile. These latter women were not asked if they used another method of contraception on fertile days. An additional 13% reported ignoring the instructions to wait for 3 natural periods after terminating pill use before beginning to use Persona.

  19. Adolescent contraception: nonhormonal methods.

    PubMed

    Kulig, J W

    1989-06-01

    A comparison of the advantages, disadvantages, and costs of each method is presented in Table 1. Barrier methods of contraception offer adolescents protection against both pregnancy and STDs, but innovative approaches are needed to enhance availability and acceptability. Condom use in conjunction with a vaginal spermicide would provide optimal protection. The "female condom" may prove to be an effective alternative. Diaphragms and cervical caps can be prescribed for well-educated, highly motivated adolescents comfortable with insertion and removal. The vaginal contraceptive sponge provides many of the advantages of the diaphragm and cap without the need for an examination and fitting and also may be used as a backup method with the condom. Vaginal spermicides used alone are significantly less effective than in combination with a mechanical barrier. The IUD is not considered appropriate for most adolescents due to its association with an increased risk of pelvic infection. Periodic abstinence requires accurate identification of the fertile period, extensive education, and partner cooperation. Sterilization is rarely considered an option in adolescents. Alternate forms of sexual expression are available to adolescents who choose to abstain from intercourse.

  20. Sexual and Reproductive Health Knowledge, Contraception Uptake, and Factors Associated with Unmet Need for Modern Contraception among Adolescent Female Sex Workers in China

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Megan S. C.; Zhang, Xu-Dong; Kennedy, Elissa; Li, Yan; Yang, Yin; Li, Lin; Li, Yun-Xia; Temmerman, Marleen; Luchters, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Objective In China, policy and social taboo prevent unmarried adolescents from accessing sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services. Research is needed to determine the SRH needs of highly disadvantaged groups, such as adolescent female sex workers (FSWs). This study describes SRH knowledge, contraception use, pregnancy, and factors associated with unmet need for modern contraception among adolescent FSWs in Kunming, China. Methods A cross-sectional study using a one-stage cluster sampling method was employed to recruit adolescents aged 15 to 20 years, and who self-reported having received money or gifts in exchange for sex in the past 6 months. A semi-structured questionnaire was administered by trained peer educators or health workers. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to determine correlates of low knowledge and unmet need for modern contraception. Results SRH knowledge was poor among the 310 adolescents surveyed; only 39% had heard of any long-acting reversible contraception (implant, injection or IUD). Despite 98% reporting not wanting to get pregnant, just 43% reported consistent condom use and 28% currently used another form of modern contraception. Unmet need for modern contraception was found in 35% of adolescents, and was associated with having a current non-paying partner, regular alcohol use, and having poorer SRH knowledge. Past abortion was common (136, 44%). In the past year, 76% had reported a contraception consultation but only 27% reported ever receiving SRH information from a health service. Conclusions This study demonstrated a low level of SRH knowledge, a high unmet need for modern contraception and a high prevalence of unintended pregnancy among adolescent FSWs in Kunming. Most girls relied on condoms, emergency contraception, or traditional methods, putting them at risk of unwanted pregnancy. This study identifies an urgent need for Chinese adolescent FSWs to be able to access quality SRH information and effective modern

  1. European society of contraception statement on contraception in obese women.

    PubMed

    Merki-Feld, Gabriele S; Skouby, Sven; Serfaty, David; Lech, Medard; Bitzer, Johannes; Crosignani, Pier Giorgio; Cagnacci, Angelo; Sitruk-Ware, Regine

    2015-02-01

    The obesity 'epidemic' continues to increase, mostly but not only in developed countries. As overweight and obese women are at an increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) at baseline and at a much higher risk during pregnancy, it is essential to help these women to plan pregnancies carefully and to use contraceptives with a positive ratio of benefits versus risks. The Expert Group on hormonal and molecular contraception of the European Society of Contraception convened to review the existing evidence and propose recommendations to the prescribers in line with most recent studies and with the Medical Eligibility Criteria of the World Health Organisation.

  2. Postpartum Visit Attendance Increases the Use of Modern Contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Susan; Charles, RaShel; McGee, Elizabeth; Karjane, Nicole; Hines, Linda; Kornstein, Susan G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Delays in postpartum contraceptive use may increase risk for unintended or rapid repeat pregnancies. The postpartum care visit (PPCV) is a good opportunity for women to discuss family planning options with their health care providers. This study examined the association between PPCV attendance and modern contraceptive use using data from a managed care organization. Methods. Claims and demographic and administrative data came from a nonprofit managed care organization in Virginia (2008–2012). Information on the most recent delivery for mothers with singleton births was analyzed (N = 24,619). Routine PPCV (yes, no) and modern contraceptive use were both dichotomized. Descriptive analyses provided percentages, frequencies, and means. Multiple logistic regression was conducted and ORs and 95% CIs were calculated. Results. More than half of the women did not attend their PPCV (50.8%) and 86.9% had no modern contraceptive use. After controlling for the effects of confounders, women with PPCV were 50% more likely to use modern contraceptive methods than women with no PPCV (OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.31, 1.72). Conclusions. These findings highlight the importance of PPCV in improving modern contraceptive use and guide health care policy in the effort of reducing unintended pregnancy rates. PMID:28070422

  3. Contraceptive choice, sexually transmitted diseases, HIV infection, and future fecundity.

    PubMed

    Cates W

    1996-01-01

    Because contraception affects not only the risk of unplanned pregnancy but also that of sexually transmitted infections, the choice of particular methods is important to future fertility. However, certain trade-offs are necessary. Contraceptives with the best record of preventing pregnancy provide little protection against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Conversely, those barrier methods with higher failure rates for pregnancy can reduce the risk of acquiring or transmitting an STD. For example, condoms used correctly and consistently provide the best protection against infection. Although spermicides reduce lower genital tract bacterial STDs, their effectiveness against HIV is still unknown. In contrast to barrier methods, the IUD is associated with an increased risk for developing upper genital tract infection, primarily in the first month after insertion. Current literature raises paradoxical questions regarding the role of hormonal contraception in STDs and pelvic inflammatory disease. Moreover, epidemiological studies are equivocal regarding the public health value of recommending dual methods of contraception, one to prevent unplanned pregnancy and the other to prevent STDs. Investigations to date have focused on the use of the male condom added to other methods of contraception. In general, where participants were using primary methods other than the condom, the more effective the primary contraceptive method was in preventing pregnancy, the lower the level of consistent use of the male condom. Continued biologic and behavioral research will be necessary to disentangle these complex relationships.

  4. A qualitative analysis of long-acting reversible contraception.

    PubMed

    Sundstrom, Beth; Baker-Whitcomb, Annalise; DeMaria, Andrea L

    2015-07-01

    Increasing access to long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), including the intrauterine device and the implant is a public health and clinical imperative to reduce rates of unintended pregnancy. In 2012, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommended these methods for all women, including adolescents. Little research explores why young women reject these safe, effective contraceptive methods. A total of 53 women aged 18-24 years completed in-depth interviews. Analytical techniques from the grounded theory approach were used to identify patterns and themes across the data. Participants initiated hormonal contraception for "the pill's" beneficial side effects and believed a myth of perfect use, which constructed a false choice of LARC methods. Barriers to LARC options included access, medical resistance, and cost. Participants described a sense of unease about methods perceived as "alien." These women underestimated the risks of oral contraceptive pills and overestimated the risks of long-acting reversible contraception, including infertility. The myth of perfect use emerged as participants wanted to be in control by taking "the pill" every day; however, many described imperfect adherence. Findings include strategies for public health professionals and health care providers to distribute satisfactory and effective contraception for young women. Effective health communication campaigns will emphasize the desirable side effects, safety and increased effectiveness of LARC methods.

  5. Safety and Efficacy of Contraceptive Methods for Obese and Overweight Women.

    PubMed

    Lotke, Pamela S; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-12-01

    Increasing rates of obesity have become a major public health challenge. Given the added health risks that obese women have during pregnancy, preventing unwanted pregnancy is imperative. Clinicians who provide contraception must understand the efficacy, risks, and the weight changes associated with various contraceptive methods. Despite differences in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of hormonal contraceptives in overweight and obese women, efficacy does not appear to be severely impacted. Both estrogen-containing contraceptives and obesity increase the risk of venous thromboembolism, but the absolute risk remains acceptably low in reproductive age women.

  6. Use of contraceptive and related plants by the Kayapo Indians (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Elisabetsky, E; Posey, D A

    1989-10-01

    Interest in plant sources of prototypic contraceptive compounds is evidenced by numerous investigations and research projects. We suggest that the success rates of programs devised to evaluate pharmacological effects of traditionally employed contraceptives would be increased if native concepts of conception/contraception were taken into account. If ethnomedical and ethnopharmacological data are not carefully analysed, selection of plants to be evaluated will include those with little cross-cultural application. Kayapo concepts of menstruation, fertility, and contraception are presented, uses of related plants in culturally different groups are also analysed in order to indicate promising fertility-regulating plants used by the Kayapo.

  7. [PROFAMILIA studies the effectiveness of contraceptive marketing programs in Colombia].

    PubMed

    1987-01-01

    A recent study by PROFAMILIA, the private Colombian family planning organization, indicates that community based distribution programs and social marketing programs are not totally interchangeable forms of contraceptive distribution. Comparison of the efficacy of different systems in making contraceptives more accessible to the low income population led the researchers to conclude that social marketing programs work as well as community based distribution programs in rural areas which already have high rates of contraceptive usage. Community based distribution programs appear more effective than social marketing programs in areas where contraceptive usage is not yet well established. PROFAMILIA researchers conducted operational studies in 3 different states, each of which had a community based distribution program. In the first state the community based distribution program was suspended and a vender who had previously supplied only urban outlets added rural pharmacies to his route. The vender handled 3 kinds of pills, 2 types of spermicidal suppositories, and condoms. In a neighboring state, 3 instructors belonging to the community based distribution program were offered commissions of about 10% of the value of the products if the distributors they supervised met monthly sales quotas. The community based distribution program was left unchanged in the third state but a 2-member mobile team was trained to travel through the region by jeep, talking to community groups about the advantage of contraception. At the end of 18 months, sales of contraceptives had declined in the state where the community based distribution program was replaced by the social marketing program. The decline was believed to be related to unforeseen price increases for pills and devaluation of the Colombian peso. The social marketing project was however much more cost effective than the other 2, which continued to require PROFAMILIA subsidies. Contraceptive usage increased in the other 2 areas

  8. The Effect of Integrating Family Planning with a Maternal and Newborn Health Program on Postpartum Contraceptive Use and Optimal Birth Spacing in Rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Saifuddin; Ahmed, Salahuddin; McKaig, Catharine; Begum, Nazma; Mungia, Jaime; Norton, Maureen; Baqui, Abdullah H

    2015-09-01

    Meeting postpartum contraceptive need remains a major challenge in developing countries, where the majority of women deliver at home. Using a quasi-experimental trial design, we examine the effect of integrating family planning (FP) with a community-based maternal and newborn health (MNH) program on improving postpartum contraceptive use and reducing short birth intervals <24 months. In this two-arm trial, community health workers (CHWs) provided integrated FP counseling and services during home visits along with their outreach MNH activities in the intervention arm, but provided only MNH services in the control arm. The contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) in the intervention arm was 15 percent higher than in the control arm at 12 months, and the difference in CPRs remained statistically significant throughout the 24 months of observation. The short birth interval of less than 24 months was significantly lower in the intervention arm. The study demonstrates that it is feasible and effective to integrate FP services into a community-based MNH care program for improving postpartum contraceptive use and lengthening birth intervals.

  9. Contraception-related venous thromboembolism in adolescents.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Sarah H

    2014-02-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a rare but serious complication of combined hormonal contraception. While the absolute risk of VTE is low in adolescents, thrombotic events in contraception users younger than the age of 20 years account for 5 to 10% of total contraception-related VTE events in population studies, because of the high frequency of contraception use in adolescents. An increased risk of VTE exists not only with oral contraceptives, but also the contraceptive patch and vaginal ring. Most adolescents who experience contraception-related VTE have additional transient or inherited thrombotic risk factors at the time of VTE. Although the presence of inherited thrombophilia impacts the risk of contraception-related VTE, thrombophilia screening before contraception prescribing should be targeted only to high-risk populations. Pediatric institutions, caregivers, and young women need to be aware of the risk of VTE with estrogen-containing contraception, and maintain a high index of suspicion for this complication in women using these agents.

  10. Prevalence rates of health and welfare conditions in broiler chickens change with weather in a temperate climate

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Phil; Hajat, Shakoor

    2016-01-01

    Climate change impact assessment and adaptation research in agriculture has focused primarily on crop production, with less known about the potential impacts on livestock. We investigated how the prevalence of health and welfare conditions in broiler (meat) chickens changes with weather (temperature, rainfall, air frost) in a temperate climate. Cases of 16 conditions were recorded at approved slaughterhouses in Great Britain. National prevalence rates and distribution mapping were based on data from more than 2.4 billion individuals, collected between January 2011 and December 2013. Analysis of temporal distribution and associations with national weather were based on monthly data from more than 6.8 billion individuals, collected between January 2003 and December 2013. Ascites, bruising/fractures, hepatitis and abnormal colour/fever were most common, at annual average rates of 29.95, 28.00, 23.76 and 22.29 per 10 000, respectively. Ascites and abnormal colour/fever demonstrated clear annual cycles, with higher rates in winter than in summer. Ascites prevalence correlated strongly with maximum temperature at 0 and −1 month lags. Abnormal colour/fever correlated strongly with temperature at 0 lag. Maximum temperatures of approximately 8°C and approximately 19°C marked the turning points of curve in a U-shaped relationship with mortality during transportation and lairage. Future climate change research on broilers should focus on preslaughter mortality. PMID:27703686

  11. Methods for estimating comparable prevalence rates of food insecurity experienced by adults in 147 countries and areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, Mark; Cafiero, Carlo; Viviani, Sara

    2016-11-01

    Statistical methods based on item response theory are applied to experiential food insecurity survey data from 147 countries, areas, and territories to assess data quality and develop methods to estimate national prevalence rates of moderate and severe food insecurity at equal levels of severity across countries. Data were collected from nationally representative samples of 1,000 adults in each country. A Rasch-model-based scale was estimated for each country, and data were assessed for consistency with model assumptions. A global reference scale was calculated based on item parameters from all countries. Each country's scale was adjusted to the global standard, allowing for up to 3 of the 8 scale items to be considered unique in that country if their deviance from the global standard exceeded a set tolerance. With very few exceptions, data from all countries were sufficiently consistent with model assumptions to constitute reasonably reliable measures of food insecurity and were adjustable to the global standard with fair confidence. National prevalence rates of moderate-or-severe food insecurity assessed over a 12-month recall period ranged from 3 percent to 92 percent. The correlations of national prevalence rates with national income, health, and well-being indicators provide external validation of the food security measure.

  12. Ovarian reserve screening before contraception?

    PubMed

    Kushnir, Vitaly A; Barad, David H; Gleicher, Norbert

    2014-11-01

    Women are increasingly delaying conception to later years. Hormonal contraception induces artificial cyclicity, which does not, like natural cyclicity, reflect normal, physiological ovarian behaviour. Therefore, long-term users of hormonal contraceptives, in particular, fail to derive potential diagnostic benefits from changes in menstrual cyclicity, which usually alerts patients and physicians to developing ovarian pathology. Timely diagnosis of ovarian problems is further hampered, as anti-Müllerian hormone is suppressed by hormonal contraceptives, making the accurate assessment of functional ovarian reserve more difficult. Women on long-term hormonal contraceptives who develop premature ovarian senescence at young ages, therefore, often go undiagnosed until termination of hormonal contraception, when they present with either post-contraception amenorrhea, other menstrual abnormalities or infertility. As evolving screening options now permit the detection of young women at risk for premature ovarian senescence, it is proposed that young women are offered 'risk screening' for premature ovarian senescence before starting long-term hormonal contraception. A potential protocol is outlined.

  13. Male contraception: expanding reproductive choice.

    PubMed

    Rajalakshmi, M

    2005-11-01

    The development of steroid-based oral contraceptives had revolutionized the availability of contraceptive choice for women. In order to expand the contraceptive options for couples by developing an acceptable, safe and effective male contraceptive, scientists have been experimenting with various steroidal/non-steroidal regimens to suppress testicular sperm production. The non-availability of a long-acting androgen was a limiting factor in the development of a male contraceptive regimen since all currently tested anti-spermatogenic agents also concurrently decrease circulating testosterone levels. A combination regimen of long-acting progestogen and androgen would have advantage over an androgen-alone modality since the dose of androgen required would be much smaller in the combination regimen, thereby decreasing the adverse effects of high steroid load. The progestogen in the combination regimen would act as the primary anti-spermatogenic agent. Currently, a number of combination regimens using progestogen or GnRH analogues combined with androgen are undergoing trials. The side effects of long-term use of androgens and progestogens have also undergone evaluation in primate models and the results of these studies need to be kept in view, while considering steroidal regimens for contraceptive use in men. Efforts are also being made to popularize non-scalpel vasectomy and to develop condoms of greater acceptability. The development of contraceptive vaccines for men, using sperm surface epitopes not expressed in female reproductive tract as source, still requires considerable research efforts.

  14. Association of oral contraceptive use, other contraceptive methods, and infertility with ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Tworoger, Shelley S; Fairfield, Kathleen M; Colditz, Graham A; Rosner, Bernard A; Hankinson, Susan E

    2007-10-15

    Although oral contraceptives are protective for ovarian cancer, it is unclear how long this protection persists. The authors prospectively assessed this question as well as associations of other, less studied contraceptive methods (tubal ligation, rhythm method, diaphragm, condoms, intrauterine device, foam, spousal vasectomy) and infertility with ovarian cancer risk among 107,900 participants in the US Nurses' Health Study. During 28 years of follow-up (1976-2004), 612 cases of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer were confirmed. Duration of oral contraceptive use was inversely associated with risk (p-trend = 0.02), but no clear trend was observed for years since last use. However, for women using oral contraceptives for >5 years, the rate ratio for ovarian cancer for 20 years since last use (rate ratio (RR) = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.61, 1.39). Tubal ligation (RR = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.50, 0.87) was associated with decreased ovarian cancer risk, whereas intrauterine device use (RR = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.08, 2.85) and infertility (RR = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.75) were associated with an increased risk. Results suggest that the beneficial effect of oral contraceptives on ovarian cancer risk attenuates after 20 years since last use. Furthermore, tubal ligation, intrauterine device use, and infertility were associated with ovarian cancer risk.

  15. Emergency contraception: Focus on the facts.

    PubMed

    Najera, Deanna Bridge

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress on contraception, and in particular emergency contraception, has been made in the past decade. Emergency contraception was first introduced as a stand-alone prescription in 1998, and the interaction of politics and medicine meant a tumultuous course to the drug becoming available over the counter. This article reviews how emergency contraception works, the effectiveness of different methods, pros and cons, and the history of emergency contraception.

  16. HIV testing rates, prevalence, and knowledge among outpatients in Durban, South Africa: Time trends over four years.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Avila, Lynn; Regan, Susan; Chetty, Senica; Giddy, Janet; Ross, Douglas; Katz, Jeffrey N; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Losina, Elena; Walensky, Rochelle P; Bassett, Ingrid V

    2015-09-01

    The HIV public health messages in South Africa have increased. Our objective was to evaluate changes over time in HIV testing behaviour, prevalence and knowledge. We prospectively enrolled adults (≥18 years) prior to HIV testing at one urban and one peri-urban outpatient department in Durban, South Africa. A baseline questionnaire administered before testing included the number of prior HIV tests and four knowledge items. We used test results to estimate previously undiagnosed HIV prevalence among those tested. We assessed linear trends over enrollment. From November 2006 to August 2010, 5229 subjects enrolled and 4877 (93%) were HIV tested and had results available. Subjects reporting prior testing over time increased, from 13% in study year 1 to 42% in year 4 (linear trend p < 0.001). The HIV prevalence among those tested declined steadily and significantly over time, from 64% of enrollees in study year 1 to 39% in the final year (linear trend p < 0.001). The percentage of subjects who recognised that medicine can help people with HIV live longer increased from 80% in study year 1 to 96% in study year 4. Rates of HIV testing have increased and prevalence among those tested has decreased in outpatients in Durban, South Africa.

  17. [When is breast feeding contraceptive?].

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    Breast-feeding has always been perceived as a contraceptive measure, probably because it is associated with amenorrhea. However, many pregnancies occur during breast-feeding, often quite soon after delivery. A pregnancy occurring 3 months after delivery is considered at risk for both the mother and child. Three conditions are necessary for a 98% contraceptive efficacy of lactation: total amenorrhea; exclusive breast-feeding on demand, both day and night; and occurrence within the first 6 months postpartum. If the three conditions are met, no additional contraceptive method is needed. Beyond 6 months, another method should be used.

  18. [Mercilon - the optimal oral contraceptive].

    PubMed

    Rachev, E; Damianov, L; Kolarov, G; Novachkov, V; Ivanov, S

    2000-01-01

    The authors review the effect of the oral contraceptive Mercilon on menstrual cycle, contraceptive efficacy, lipid profile, safety profile and adverse effects in a group of 32 women, included in the survey. The results of the trial show excellent contraceptive effect with Pearl Index of 0.00 and good control over the menstrual cycle. No negative or unfavorable effects were seen on the lipid profile as well as on the liver kidney and coangulant system function. Minor side effects were seen in only 5% of the patients.

  19. The social marketing of contraceptives in Mexico.

    PubMed

    De La Macorra, L

    1980-07-01

    The success in social marketing of the PROFAM brand of subsidized contraceptives, by a nonprofit private institution that supports the Mexican government program, is related here. PROFAM began in 1978, when half of contraceptives were purchased commercially from drugstores: they were neither economical, consistently distributed, nor advertised. Comprehensive market research revealed that a great demand existed. It generated information for choice of items to market, package design, and instructions. In 1979, pills, condoms, foam, cream and vaginal suppositories, all locally produced were distributed. A serious problem initially was the impropriety of using the word "contraceptive" in the media. The first phase of advertising targeted newspapers. After 3 months, 40% of Mexico's drugstores carried PROFAM. The second phase of advertising, in radio, magazines and newspapers, approached consumers with information tailored to the specific socioeconomic group involved. The third phase, geared to rural areas and general stores, concentrates on advantages of each method. Other aggressive aspects of the campaign include house to house sampling and a mail-in question and answer service. Evidence of success in broadcasting the PROFAM message is the frequent reference to PROFAM in jokes in the media and even in graffiti. The government's goal is to reduce the growth rate form 2.9 percent annually to 1 percent by 2000.

  20. Intra-uterine contraceptive devices.

    PubMed

    Elias, J

    1985-05-01

    Among the advantages of IUDs are the device's high continuation rate, the lack of systemic side effects, and the absence of a need for continual motivation to practice contraception. The effectiveness of plastic IUDs is directly proportional to their surface area, but the degree of excessive bleeding experienced is inversely related to device size. Thus, devices represent a compromise between large size for effectiveness and small size for acceptability. The optimum time to fit an IUD is during the 1st hald of the menstrual cycle. Absolute contraindications to IUD use include the presence of active pelvic inflammatory disease, undiagnosed irregular bleeding, a history of ectopic pregnancy or tubal surgery, and a distorted uteine cavity. Failure rates associated with IUD use range from 2-3% in the 1st year and then decrease. Since the main mechanism of action appears to be production of a sterile inflammatory reaction in the uterine cavity, the IUD prevents intrauterine pregnancy more effectively than ectopic pregnancy. Nonetheless, there is little evidence to suggest that IUD use actually increases the incidence of ectopic pregnancy. Resumption of fertility after IUD removal is not delayed. There is not need to change inert plastic IUDs in women who remain symptom free. The copper devices should be changed every 3-4 years. A search is under way for antifertility agents that can be incorporated into the device to reduce side effects. In general, the IUD is most suitable for older, parous women.

  1. Prevalence and rates of intimate partner violence among South African women during pregnancy and the postpartum period

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Allison K.; Moodley, Dhayendre; McNaughton-Reyes, Luz; Martin, Sandra L.; Foshee, Vangie; Maman, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health problem in South Africa. However, limited research exists on IPV during pregnancy and the postpartum period in South Africa. The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence, rates and correlates of IPV among South African women during pregnancy and the first nine months postpartum. Methods Data are from a longitudinal study with women recruited during pregnancy between 2008 and 2010 at a public clinic in Durban. We used a modified version of the World Health Organization’s IPV scale to estimate prevalence and rates of IPV during pregnancy, at four months postpartum and nine months postpartum and we used logistic regression to assess the correlates of IPV during this time. Results More than 20% of all women experienced at least one act of physical, psychological or sexual IPV during pregnancy. Nearly one-quarter of all women experienced at least one act of physical, psychological or sexual IPV during the first nine months postpartum. Psychological IPV was the most prevalent type of IPV during pregnancy and the first four months postpartum. Age and previous violence within the relationship were associated with IPV during pregnancy and IPV during the postpartum period. Conclusions The high levels of IPV during pregnancy and the postpartum period highlight the need to develop screening and intervention strategies specifically for this time. Further, women should be screened not only for physical violence but also psychological violence given that psychological violence may result in distinct negative consequences. PMID:24889116

  2. The Dynamics of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Prevalence and Management Rates among Rural Population in Henan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaotian; Wang, Ling; Wang, Panpan; Liu, Ruihua; Yang, Kaili; Qian, Xinling; Fan, Jingjing; Yu, Songcheng

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the dynamics of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) prevalence and management rates based on a rural cohort study in Henan Province of China. The rural prospective study was conducted for 20194 Chinese population ≥18 years in 2007-2008 and followed during 2013-2014. A total of 14009 individuals were recruited for the prospective analysis ultimately. Over 5.74 years of follow-up, the age-standardized prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of T2DM increased from 6.18%, 44.41%, 34.39%, and 19.08% at baseline to 7.87%, 59.64%, 52.17%, and 26.52% at follow-up in total population, respectively. Similar changes were found in men and women except the age-standardized control in men. The four parameters of T2DM were higher among various factors at follow-up than those at baseline. There was no statistical difference in awareness (P = 0.089) and treatment (P = 0.257) in the newly diagnosed T2DM compared with the rates at baseline. The current study indicated that the prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of T2DM displayed chronological increasing trends while the awareness, treatment, and control of T2DM were still disproportionally low in central China. More works are needed urgently to popularize public health education and improve the quality of medical care in T2DM. PMID:28326333

  3. Prevalence, rates and correlates of intimate partner violence among South African women during pregnancy and the postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Groves, Allison K; Moodley, Dhayendre; McNaughton-Reyes, Luz; Martin, Sandra L; Foshee, Vangie; Maman, Suzanne

    2015-03-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health problem in South Africa. However, limited research exists on IPV during pregnancy and the postpartum period in South Africa. The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence, rates and correlates of IPV among South African women during pregnancy and the first 9 months postpartum. Data are from a longitudinal study with women recruited during pregnancy between 2008 and 2010 at a public clinic in Durban. We used a modified version of the World Health Organization's IPV scale to estimate prevalence and rates of IPV during pregnancy, at 4 months postpartum and 9 months postpartum and we used logistic regression to assess the correlates of IPV during this time. More than 20 % of all women experienced at least one act of physical, psychological or sexual IPV during pregnancy. Nearly one-quarter of all women experienced at least one act of physical, psychological or sexual IPV during the first 9 months postpartum. Psychological IPV was the most prevalent type of IPV during pregnancy and the first 4 months postpartum. Age and previous violence within the relationship were associated with IPV during pregnancy and IPV during the postpartum period. The high levels of IPV during pregnancy and the postpartum period highlight the need to develop screening and intervention strategies specifically for this time. Further, women should be screened not only for physical violence but also psychological violence given that psychological violence may result in distinct negative consequences.

  4. The benefits of combined oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Drife, J

    1989-11-01

    The benefits of combined oral contraceptives are put into perspective, considering their effectiveness as a contraceptive, actual risks for breast, ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer, and effects of reproductive and other body systems. Combined oral contraceptives are the best contraceptives available except for injectable progestogens, therefore they an reduce the risk of maternal mortality by at least 5 in nonsmoking western women, or over 100 in developing countries. No data are available on mortality risk of the presumed safer low-dose pills. Pills reduce ectopic pregnancy to virtually nil. They decrease the risk of endometrial cancer, and of ovarian cancer for up to 15 years after use. Although they protect against benign breast disease, both fibrocystic disease and fibroadenoma, which are risk factors for breast cancer, it is unsettled whether pills affect breast cancer incidence. Cervical cancer risk may be slightly higher. Functional ovarian cysts requiring surgery are cut about 10-fold; corpus luteum and follicular cysts are also reduced. Fibroids are decreased in proportion to duration of use. Pelvic inflammatory disease rates fall 50% during use. Chlamydial infections have not fallen in pill users, but it is not known whether sexual activity is a factor. Combined pills cut abnormal uterine bleeding by about half, reduce the incidence of iron deficiency anemia and of premenstrual tension. Seizures related to menses also are controlled. Some studies find a reduction in rheumatoid arthritis. Most of the cardiovascular complications of pills are thought to be dose related. Since today's pills contain approximately the same dose as a whole cycle of the original pills, it is expected that these risks will be greatly reduced, especially with better screening of candidates that is now the rule.

  5. [Contraception, abortion and sexually transmitted diseases].

    PubMed

    Nesheim, B I

    1992-02-28

    Contraceptives that protect against pregnancy tend to offer the least protection against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), particularly needed by young people who change partners frequently. Oral contraceptive (OCs) protect best against pregnancy and salpingitis, but they do not protect against infections of the cervix; thus, there is a higher incidence of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhea among OC users. The IUD is also very effective, but there is an elevated risk of infections during the first 20 days after fitting, as bacteria may move up to the uterus from the cervical canal during insertion. The effectiveness of the condom depends on the users, and studies show that when used consistently it provides significant protection against STDs. The diaphragm also protects against STDs, but it is insignificant from a quantitative point of view. In Norway, in 1977, 30% of 18-19 year old women used OCs, and 21% used IUDs. In contrast, in 1988, 65% of 20-year old women used OCs and 5% used IUDs. Condom use remains unchanged. The rate of abortion has not changed since 1977; it is highest among women aged 18-29 (about 30/1000 women per year), although safe contraception use has increased from 50% to 70% among women aged 18-19. Free-service health clinics with evening hours have met a clear need for counseling in the past 20 years. In the 1970s the demand was high for induced abortion, safe contraceptives, and IUD insertion. Later, OCs had lower hormone content and fewer site effects, and their dispensation became more widespread among general practitioners. Nowadays a large proportion of women seek advice on STDs, and 65% of them attend because the consultation is free. It is an important task of these clinics to provide guidance, examination, and treatment to high-risk people to help them avoid STDs and unwanted pregnancy.

  6. Chapter 5: Actual and counterfactual smoking prevalence rates in the U.S. population via microsimulation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jihyoun; Meza, Rafael; Krapcho, Martin; Clarke, Lauren D; Byrne, Jeff; Levy, David T

    2012-07-01

    The smoking history generator (SHG) developed by the National Cancer Institute simulates individual life/smoking histories that serve as inputs for the Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network (CISNET) lung cancer models. In this chapter, we review the SHG inputs, describe its outputs, and outline the methodology behind it. As an example, we use the SHG to simulate individual life histories for individuals born between 1890 and 1984 for each of the CISNET smoking scenarios and use those simulated histories to compute the corresponding smoking prevalence over the period 1975-2000.

  7. Contraceptive Use Patterns across Teens' Sexual Relationships. Fact Sheet. Publication #2008-07

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcombe, Emily; Carrier, David; Manlove, Jennifer; Ryan, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Teens typically fail to use contraceptives consistently, which contributes to high rates of unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among this age group. Existing research has focused primarily on how teens' own characteristics are related to contraceptive use, but has paid less attention to how the characteristics of…

  8. [Disease and contraception. Recent aspects].

    PubMed

    Rozenbaum, H

    1985-01-01

    This article reviews several different articles which have contributed to an understanding of the harmful or beneficial effects of oral contraceptives (OCs) on various diseases. The Royal College of General Practitioners study found that current OC users compared to women who had never used OCs had relative risks of .52 for menorrhagia, .37 for dysmenorrhea, .65 for irregular cycles, .72 for intermenstrual bleeding, and .71 for premenstrual syndrome. Several studies found combined OCs to offer protection against ovarian cysts. Microdose progestin only pills did not ameliorate most menstrual problems and aggravated ovarian cysts. Despite some theoretical grounds for suspecting an association between pituitary prolactinomas and OC use, recent studies have failed to find an increased relative risk for prolactinomas in women using OCs for contraceptive purposes, although 1 study found an increased risk in women using OCs for cycle control. 1 study reported 11 pregnancies in 30 diabetic women in 15 months of IUD use; the high rate was attributed to abnormal patterns of mineral deposit on the IUD surface. The 11 pregnancies occurred with 5 Gravigardes, 5 Saf-T-Coils, and 1 Dalkon Shield. Other studies on the contrary have noted no difference in pregnancy rates among 103 diabetic women using Copper Ts or 118 diabetic women using Lippes loops. Combined OCs appear to reduce the incidence of rheumatoid arthritis by 1/2 among current OC users and to protect former users as well. Combined OCs aggravate lupus erythmatous but synthetic progestins alone are effective without aggravating the condition. It has recently been argued that low dose OCs are not contraindicated in cases of sickle cell disease and may even offer protection against thromboembolic vascular accidents for women with sickle cell anemia. Estimates of relative risk of pelvic infection among IUD users vary from 1.5 to 6.5, with the risk apparently greatest for women under 25. Recent studies have indicated that

  9. FastStats: Contraceptive Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inflicted Injury Life Stages and Populations Age Groups Adolescent Health Child Health Infant Health Older Persons' Health ... Contraceptive Use Infertility Reproductive Health Notice Regarding FastStats Mobile Application Get Email Updates To receive email updates ...

  10. Media exposure increases contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    Retherford, R D; Mishra, V

    1997-08-01

    India's national family welfare program has been broadcasting family planning messages on the radio and television for many years. The electronic mass media play a major role in teaching women about the benefits of small families and providing them with information on contraception. Radio and television are particularly important in India, a country in which 63% of currently married reproductive-age women are illiterate. An analysis of nationally representative data from India's 1992-93 National Family Health Survey (NFHS) on 84,558 currently married women aged 13-49 years indicates that general exposure to radio, television, and cinema has a strong positive effect upon current contraceptive use and the intended future use of contraception. Specific exposure to family planning messages has a significant positive effect upon current and intended future contraceptive behavior beyond the general effect of media exposure.

  11. Progestin-Only Oral Contraceptives

    MedlinePlus

    ... oral contraceptives are a very effective method of birth control, but they do not prevent the spread of ... on another day, use a backup method of birth control (such as a condom and/or a spermicide) ...

  12. How Effective Is Male Contraception?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Resources and Publications How effective is male contraception? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... health care providers to determine which method of birth control is best for them. For men, methods of ...

  13. How does relaxing the algorithm for autism affect DSM-V prevalence rates?

    PubMed

    Matson, Johnny L; Hattier, Megan A; Williams, Lindsey W

    2012-08-01

    Although it is still unclear what causes autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), over time researchers and clinicians have become more precise with detecting and diagnosing ASD. Many diagnoses, however, are based on the criteria established within the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM); thus, any change in these diagnostic criteria can have a great effect upon children with ASD and their families. It is predicted that the prevalence of ASD diagnoses will dramatically decrease with the adoption of the proposed DSM-5 criteria in 2013. The aim of this current study was to inspect the changes in prevalence first using a diagnostic criteria set which was modified slightly from the DSM-5 criteria (Modified-1 criteria) and again using a set of criteria which was relaxed even a bit more (Modified-2 criteria). Modified-1 resulted in 33.77 % fewer toddlers being diagnosed with ASD compared to the DSM-IV, while Modified-2 resulted in only a 17.98 % decrease in ASD diagnoses. Children diagnosed with the DSM-5 criteria exhibited the greatest levels of autism symptomatology, but the Mod-1, Mod-2, and DSM-IV groups still demonstrated significant impairments. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  14. Knowledge, attitude and practice of emergency contraceptive among women who seek abortion care at Jimma University specialized hospital, southwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Ethiopia maternal mortality rate is very high more than one in five women die from pregnancy or pregnancy related causes. The use of contraceptives to prevent unwanted pregnancies and unsafe abortion is an important strategy to minimize maternal mortality rate. Among various forms of contraception, emergency contraceptives are the only one that can be used after sexual intercourse offering chance to prevent unwanted pregnancy. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of emergency contraceptive among women who seek abortion care at Jimma University specialized hospital (JUSH). Methods Institution base cross-sectional study on knowledge, attitude and practice of emergency contraceptive was conducted at JUSH from April to June, 2011Data was collected using structured questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 17.0. Results In this study 89 women were interviewed. More than half of them (48) were from urban area and 41 were from rural area.46 (51.7%) of them were single. Of all the respondents only nine women had awareness about emergency contraceptive. Seven of the women mentioned pills as emergency contraception and only two of them mentioned both pills and injectable as emergency contraception. All of them have positive attitude towards emergency contraception but none of them have ever used emergency contraceptives. Conclusion and recommendation The finding revealed pregnancy among women of 15-19 years was very common. The knowledge and practice of emergency contraception is very low. But there is high positive attitude towards emergency contraceptives. Since there is much deficit on knowledge of women on emergency contraceptives, in addition to making them accessible; programs targeted at promotion and education of emergency contraceptives is helpful to prevent unwanted pregnancy. PMID:22410271

  15. Transmission rates, screening methods and costs of MRSA--a systematic literature review related to the prevalence in Germany.

    PubMed

    Tübbicke, A; Hübner, C; Kramer, A; Hübner, N-O; Fleßa, S

    2012-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections represent a serious challenge for health care institutions, which is inherent in the combination of prevalence, transmission rates and costs. Furthermore, performing an MRSA screening requires information on the complex system of effectiveness, accuracy and costs of different screening methods. The purpose of this study was to give an overview of parameters with decisive significance for the burden of MRSA and the selection of a specific MRSA screening strategy. A systematic literature search for peer-reviewed health economic studies associated with MRSA was performed (from 1995 to the present). Eighty-seven different studies met all inclusion and exclusion criteria. Primary outcomes included the prevalence of MRSA, MRSA transmission rates, performance characteristics of MRSA screening methods, costs for pre-emptive isolation precautions and costs per MRSA case. The prevalence rates reported for all inpatients (1.2-5.3 %) as well as for inpatients with risk factors or patients in risk areas (3.85-20.6 %) vary greatly. The range of cross-transmission rates per day reported for patients with MRSA in isolation is 0.00081-0.009 and for carriers not in isolation is 0.00137-0.140, respectively. For polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods, the mean sensitivity and specificity were 91.09 and 95.79 %, respectively. Culture methods show an average sensitivity of 89.01 % and an average specificity of 93.21 %. The turn-around time for PCR methods averages 15 h, while for the culture method, it can only be estimated as 48-72 h. This review filtered important parameters and cost drivers, and covered them with literature-based averages. These findings serve as an ideal evidence base for further health economic considerations of the cost-effectiveness of different MRSA screening methods.

  16. Beyond the Condom: Frontiers in Male Contraception.

    PubMed

    Roth, Mara Y; Amory, John K

    2016-05-01

    Nearly half of all pregnancies worldwide are unplanned, despite numerous contraceptive options available. No new contraceptive method has been developed for men since the invention of condom. Nevertheless, more than 25% of contraception worldwide relies on male methods. Therefore, novel effective methods of male contraception are of interest. Herein we review the physiologic basis for both male hormonal and nonhormonal methods of contraception. We review the history of male hormonal contraception development, current hormonal agents in development, as well as the potential risks and benefits of male hormonal contraception options for men. Nonhormonal methods reviewed will include both pharmacological and mechanical approaches in development, with specific focus on methods which inhibit the testicular retinoic acid synthesis and action. Multiple hormonal and nonhormonal methods of male contraception are in the drug development pathway, with the hope that a reversible, reliable, safe method of male contraception will be available to couples in the not too distant future.

  17. The contraception needs of the perimenopausal woman.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Sarah M R; Gebbie, Ailsa E

    2014-08-01

    Perimenopausal women have low fertility but must still be advised to use contraception until natural sterility is reached if they are sexually active. Patterns of contraceptive use vary in different countries worldwide. Long-acting reversible contraceptive methods offer reliable contraception that may be an alternative to sterilisation. Hormonal methods confer significant non-contraceptive benefits, and each individual woman should weigh up the benefits and risks of a particular method. No method of contraception is contraindicated by age alone, although combined hormonal contraception and injectable progestogens are not recommended for women over the age of 50 years. The intrauterine system has particular advantages as a low-dose method of effective hormonal contraception, which also offers control of menstrual dysfunction and endometrial protection in women requiring oestrogen replacement. Condoms are recommended for personal protection against sexually transmitted infections in new relationships. Standard hormone replacement therapy is not a method of contraception.

  18. Postpartum and postabortal insertion of intrauterine contraceptive devices.

    PubMed

    Martorella, L A; Esposito, J M

    1975-04-01

    One hundred forty-four patients are studied over an 18 month period. Postpartum and postabortal insertions of intrauterine contraceptive devices using the Lippes Loop and the Dalkon Shield are compared. The age, parity, previous methods of contraception, and marital status of the study group indicated a poorly motivated patient population. Although accidental pregnancy rates and expulsion rates are higher, the technique is considered worth-while in the population studied. Future research should be directed toward improved devices in order to decrease side effects and to increase appeal of the technique to those who will benefit most.

  19. [Methods of contraception, with special reference to sterilization].

    PubMed

    Lampé, L

    1980-09-28

    Broader use of sterilization as a method of family planning and population control is favored. The author points out all the dangers and side effects associated with various methods of contraception, i.e., the higher death and damage rate with increasing age, and smoking. Even with the IUD the death rate is low but not negligible; 3-4% have complications, while 0.4% require surgery (laparotomy, removal of uterus, removal of uterine appendix). For women over 35 or for mothers with 2-3 children, sterilization is the best method of contraception.

  20. Emergency contraception and Catholic hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bucar, L; Nolan, D

    1999-01-01

    The "Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care," which outline policies for Catholic hospitals in the US, are ambiguous on the topic of emergency contraception. Recent evidence suggests that, in the absence of definitive guidelines, Catholic hospitals are erring on the side of not providing emergency contraception. A survey of 589 US Catholic hospitals conducted by Catholics for a Free Choice found that 82% refused to supply emergency contraception--even to rape victims. Directive 36, which governs cases of sexual assault, could be argued to sanction the provision of emergency contraception. It states, "A female who has been raped should be able to defend herself against a potential conception from the sexual assault. If, after appropriate testing, there is no evidence that conception has occurred already, she may be treated with medications that would prevent ovulation, sperm capacitation, or fertilization. It is not permissible, however, to initiate or to recommend treatments that have as their purpose or direct effect the removal, destruction, or interference with the implantation of a fertilized ovum." Because the process of conception takes approximately 2 days, it would be consistent with the Catholic Church's position to offer emergency contraception within 24 hours of a rape. Since no currently available test can confirm or deny conception as early as 72 hours after unprotected intercourse, the timetable for emergency contraception, Catholic hospitals should be able to provide this service to all women and still abide by the directives.

  1. Flea species infesting dogs in Florida and Bartonella spp. prevalence rates.

    PubMed

    Yore, K; DiGangi, B; Brewer, M; Balakrishnan, N; Breitschwerdt, E B; Lappin, M

    2014-01-31

    Several Bartonella spp. associated with fleas can induce a variety of clinical syndromes in both dogs and humans. However, few studies have investigated the prevalence of Bartonella in the blood of dogs and their fleas. The objectives of this study were to determine the genera of fleas infesting shelter dogs in Florida, the prevalence of Bartonella spp. within the fleas, and the prevalence of Bartonella spp. within the blood of healthy dogs from which the fleas were collected. Fleas, serum, and EDTA-anti-coagulated whole blood were collected from 80 healthy dogs, and total DNA was extracted for PCR amplification of Bartonella spp. The genera of fleas infesting 43 of the dogs were determined phenotypically. PCR amplicons from blood and flea pools were sequenced to confirm the Bartonella species. Amplicons for which sequencing revealed homology to Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii (Bvb) underwent specific genotyping by targeting the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region. A total of 220 fleas were collected from 80 dogs and pooled by genus (43 dogs) and flea species. Bartonella spp. DNA was amplified from 14 of 80 dog blood samples (17.5%) and from 9 of 80 pooled fleas (11.3%). B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii DNA was amplified from nine dogs and five of the flea pools. Bartonella rochalimae (Br) DNA was amplified from six dogs and two flea pools. One of 14 dogs was co-infected with Bvb and Br. The dog was infested with Pulex spp. fleas containing Br DNA and a single Ctenocephalides felis flea. Of the Bvb bacteremic dogs, five and four were infected with genotypes II and I, respectively. Of the Bvb PCR positive flea pools, three were Bvb genotype II and two were Bvb genotype I. Amplification of Bvb DNA from Pulex spp. collected from domestic dogs, suggests that Pulex fleas may be a vector for dogs and a source for zoonotic transfer of this pathogen from dogs to people. The findings of this study provide evidence to support the hypothesis that flea-infested dogs may be a

  2. Role of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system in effective contraception

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Abdelhamid M; Ibrahim, Magdy M; Abou-Setta, Ahmed M

    2013-01-01

    Norgestrel, a synthetic progestin chemically derived from 19-nortestosterone, is six times more potent than progesterone, with variable binding affinity to various steroid receptors. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG IUS) provides a long-acting, highly effective, and reversible form of contraception, with a pearl index of 0.18 per 100 women-years. The locally released hormone leads to endometrial concentrations that are 200–800 times those found after daily oral use and a plasma level that is lower than that with other forms of levonorgestrel-containing contraception. The contraceptive effect of the LNG IUS is achieved mainly through its local suppressive effect on the endometrium, leading to endometrial thinning, glandular atrophy, and stromal decidualization without affecting ovulation. The LNG IUS is generally well tolerated. The main side effects are related to its androgenic activity, which is usually mild and transient, resolving after the first few months. Menstrual abnormalities are also common but well tolerated, and even become desirable (eg, amenorrhea, hypomenorrhea, and oligomenorrhea) with proper counseling of the patient during the choice of the method of contraception. The satisfaction rates after 3 years of insertion are high, reaching between 77% and 94%. The local effect of the LNG IUS on the endometrium and low rates of systemic adverse effects have led to its use in other conditions rather than contraception, as for the treatment of endometrial hyperplasia, benign menorrhagia, endometriosis, adenomyosis, and uterine fibroids. PMID:23990713

  3. The changing pattern of contraception in Lahore, Pakistan: 1963-80.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, F; Hussain, M

    1985-07-01

    This paper attempts to test the dictum that social change begins in better educated, economically well-off and relatively less tradition-bound strata of the urban society and that it then spreads to the lower social strata and eventually affects the rural populations also. It analyzes temporal changes in the prevalence of contraception as reported by female respondents in 2 sample surveys conducted in the city of Lahore during 1963 and 1980. Altogether 1960 ever-married females aged over 15 were interviewed in the 1963 survey and 993 in the 1980 survey. Compared to 1980 respondents, those in the 1963 survey were older, educated and belonged to a medium or high socioeconomic status category. In 1963, 18% of the respondents were not aware of any method of contraception; by 1980 this proportion was reduced to 11%. The most spectacular change was observed in the prortion of respondents who were practising family planning. In 1963, only 7% of the respondents had ever used any method of contraception; this proportion increased to 48% in 1980. Moreover, substantial differences were noted with regard to the methods of contraception used. The use of condoms seems to have declined while that of the IUD the pill, sterilization and withdrawal seems to have increased. It is interesting that abstinence remained an important method of contraception. Use of contraception is found to vary with age, education and socioeconomic status of respondents. The degree of association between these 3 characteristics and contraceptive usage increased substantially from 1963 to 1980. 1980 survey results indicate that current as well as ever use of contraception show an inverted V-shaped pattern with age and parity. The prevalence of contraception increases with age, reaching a maximum of 41% for current users and 63% for ever users in the age group 35-39. A similar pattern is observed in relation to the parity of respondents with a maximum amongst women who had borne 6 children. Education shows

  4. Prevalence of hypothyroidism in diabetic kidney disease and effect of thyroid hormone replacement on estimate glomerular filtration rate

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Sarita; Purwar, Naincy; Gupta, Arvind; Gupta, Poonam; Srivastava, Anubha

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To determine the prevalence of subclinical and overt hypothyroidism in diabetic kidney disease (DKD) and effect of thyroid hormone replacement on progression of DKD. Materials and Methods: A prospective cohort study on 41 adult DKD patients who were screened for hypothyroidism. Hypothyroid DKD patients were started on levothyroxine replacement and were reviewed after 3 and 6 months. Results: Of the total population, 14 (34.1%) cases were hypothyroid, among whom 12 (29.3%) cases were subclinical, and 2 (4.8%) were overt hypothyroidism. Prevalence of hypothyroidism and mean thyroid stimulating hormone levels increased with increasing severity of DKD. There were 2 (14.3%) hypothyroid cases in stage 3b, 4 (28.5%) cases in stage 4, and 8 (57.2%) in stage 5 DKD. The mean estimate glomerular filtration rate (ml/min/1.73 m2) at baseline was 13.6 ± 13.3 which increased to 16.4 ± 14.5 and 21.2 ± 15.3 after 3 and 6 months of thyroid hormone replacement therapy (THRT), respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Hypothyroidism is commonly associated with DKD. Prevalence of hypothyroidism increased with declining renal function. THRT significantly improved renal function in DKD patients with hypothyroidism after 3 and 6 months of therapy. PMID:27867882

  5. High Rates of Pregnancy among Vocational School Students: Results of Audio Computer-Assisted Self-Interview Survey in Chiang Rai, Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manopaiboon, Chomnad; Kilmarx, Peter H.; van Griensven, Frits; Chaikummao, Supaporn; Jeeyapant, Supaporn; Limpakarnjanarat, Khanchi; Uthaiworavit, Wat

    2003-01-01

    Examined prevalence of and factors associated with pregnancy and abortion among vocation school students in northern Thailand. Age, current contraceptive use, early initiation of sexual intercourse, alcohol and drug use, and sexual coercion were associated with self or partner pregnancy. High rates of pregnancy and abortion indicate the need for…

  6. Patterns of contraceptive use among Mexican-origin women

    PubMed Central

    White, Kari L.; Potter, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mexican women in the United States (US) have higher rates of fertility compared to other ethnic groups and women in Mexico. Whether variation in women’s access to family planning services or patterns of contraceptive use contributes to this higher fertility has received little attention. OBJECTIVE We explore Mexican women’s contraceptive use, taking into account women’s place in the reproductive life course. METHODS Using nationally representative samples from the US (National Survey of Family Growth) and Mexico (Encuesta National de la Dinámica Demográfica), we compared the parity-specific frequency of contraceptive use and fertility intentions for non-migrant women, foreign-born Mexicans in the US, US-born Mexicans, and whites. RESULTS Mexican women in the US were less likely to use IUDs and more likely to use hormonal contraception than women in Mexico. Female sterilization was the most common method among higher parity women in both the US and Mexico, however, foreign-born Mexicans were less likely to be sterilized, and the least likely to use any permanent contraceptive method. Although foreign-born Mexicans were slightly less likely to report that they did not want more children, differences in method use remained after controlling for women’s fertility intentions. CONCLUSION At all parities, foreign-born Mexicans used less effective methods. These findings suggest that varying access to family planning services may contribute to variation in women’s contraceptive use. COMMENTS Future studies are needed to clarify the extent to which disparities in fertility result from differences in contraceptive access. PMID:26146485

  7. Oral contraceptives and cancer.

    PubMed

    Edgren, R A

    1991-01-01

    Concerns over the safety of oral contraceptives (OCs) have led to numerous empirical studies of the relationship of OC use to normal pregnancy outcomes, pituitary effects, cardiovascular accidents, and cancer. The article reviews some of the results of studies on the effects of OC use on ovarian, uterine, cervical, and breast cancer and on hepatic cancer and melanomas. Reference is made to direct study results rather than to reviews of studies, although it is noted that the critical reviews of Goldzieher and Realini reflect appropriate critiques of the validity of the methods employed in the analysis of cancers as well as cardiovascular risks. Concern is raised for meta-analysis of pooled data. In spite of the 30 years of research on OCs there is no definitive answer to the question of cause and effect. The epidemiological articles reviewed do not meet the standards of critical editorial review boards of experimental journals; confirmation of findings is also lacking. Studies suggesting increased risks as well as those showing positive benefits are questionable. The conclusion reached is that OCs protect against ovarian and uterine cancers and do not cause mammary, cervical, or liver cancer or melanoma. This conclusion is based on inconclusive data. The conclusion on hepatic cancer is that the 3 retrospective case control studies and anecdotal reports are flawed in design, and little confidence can be placed on such a limited number of cases. Malignant melanoma conclusions are that the data are inconsistent and hover around a risk of one for long-term OC-users. There is no increased risk related to OC-use. Ovarian cancer risk seems to be decreased in about 40% of OC-users. Endometrial cancer risk seems to be decreased, except for the sequential contraceptive Oracon which is associated with increased risk. Decreased risk is related to length of usage and continues after stoppage. Cervical carcinoma results appear to confirm the finding that prolonged OC use slightly

  8. Contraceptives and minors: The Emperor Has No Clothes.

    PubMed

    Radosh, A

    1991-01-01

    The rate of teenage pregnancy in the US is significantly higher than in any other industrialized nation. Studies have shown the teenagers in other countries are not more sexually active. The biggest difference between US and the rest of the industrialized world is the US failure to make contraceptives easily available to teenagers. There are only 2 ways to prevent teenage pregnancy: 1) get them to shop having sex, or 2) get them to use contraceptives. When forming policy it is important to know which method will be more successful. Policymakers, educators, and health professionals are all guilty of rationalizing why option 1 will work better than option 2, even though their is little or no research or anecdotal evidence to support their claim. The facts are clear: in other industrialized countries the more freely available contraceptives are to teenagers, the lower the pregnancy rate. In New York City, 840 condoms were distributed in just 4 months upon request to participants in a male responsibility discussion group. Nationwide 2000 teenage boys were sent a coupon for free condoms by mail and 6% returned their coupons (the normal rate of return would be 3%). A 1988 study revealed that condom usage between 1979-88 among 17-19 year old males in metropolitan areas doubled. A 1987 Harris poll found that 60% of all adults favored condom advertising on television. A 1989 follow-up study revealed that 89% of parents of adolescents favored condom advertising on television. The most common reason given for not increasing access to contraceptives is that teenagers will receive the wrong message. Another fear is that parents will complain, yet in the 2000 condom coupon example, less than 1/3 of 1% of the parents complained. Is the rest of the industrialized world giving their teenagers the wrong message by making contraceptives easily available? Clearly, US policy against contraceptive access for teenagers is giving the worst message and the high teenage pregnancy rate is

  9. Trends in the Prevalence Rates and Numbers of Blind and Visually Impaired Schoolchildren.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirchner, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper draws on primary and secondary data sources to document an increasing number of visually handicapped children. The paper discusses socioeconomic trends, increased rates of handicapping conditions in general, increased number of legally blind schoolchildren, and evidence of an increase in retinopathy of prematurity. (JDD)

  10. Effects of state contraceptive insurance mandates.

    PubMed

    Dills, Angela K; Grecu, Anca M

    2017-02-01

    Using U.S. Natality data for 1996 through 2009 and an event analysis specification, we investigate the dynamics of the effects of state insurance contraceptive mandates on births and measures of parental investment: prenatal visits, non-marital childbearing, and risky behaviors during pregnancy. We analyze outcomes separately by age, race, and ethnicity. Among young Hispanic women, we find a 4% decline in the birth rate. There is evidence of a decrease in births to single mothers, consistent with increased wantedness. We also find evidence of selection into motherhood, which could explain the lack of a significant effect on birth outcomes.

  11. Patient counseling women using oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Celia E

    2007-06-01

    Oral contraceptives (OCs) are the most widely used form of reversible birth control in the United States. However, incorrect and/or inconsistent use may result in increased failure rates and unintended pregnancies, which present a significant cost burden to the health care system and HMOs. One of the best mechanisms to improve outcomes is through high-quality clinician-patient communication. Managed care organizations may benefit from encouraging their providers to counsel and educate patients on the proper use of OCs, as this may reduce unnecessary follow-up visits, lower the number of unintended pregnancies, and increase patient satisfaction with their health care.

  12. Changing trends in sex specific prevalence rates for childhood asthma, eczema, and hay fever.

    PubMed

    Osman, Mustafa; Tagiyeva, Nara; Wassall, Heather J; Ninan, Titus K; Devenny, Anne M; McNeill, Geraldine; Helms, Peter J; Russell, George

    2007-01-01

    Numerous surveys of school-aged children have shown increasing asthma prevalence with a less publicized but noticeable change in the male to female ratio. We sought to confirm this change in the sex ratio in four questionnaire-based surveys and investigate possible explanations. Identical questionnaire surveys were performed in 1989 (n=3,390), 1994 (n=4,047), 1999 (n=3,540) and 2004 (n=1,920) in school-children aged 9-11 years. Over these 15 years the male to female ratio (M:F) significantly narrowed for wheeze (1.34 to 0.98:1 P < 0.0002), for asthma (1.74 to 1.02:1 P < 0.0001), for eczema (1.42:1 to 0.81:1 P < 0.0001) and for hay fever (1.46 to 0.93:1 P < 0.0001). The diagnosis of asthma in children with wheeze was more commonly made in boys in 1989 relative risk RR 1.32 (1.12, 1.56), even in those with accompanying eczema and/or hay fever RR 1.20 (0.99, 1.45). By 2004 this sex bias in diagnosis was no longer present, RR 1.01 (0.91, 1.12) for wheeze and 1.02 (0.85, 1.21) for those with wheeze and eczema and/or hay fever. From 1989 to 2004 no significant difference in sex distribution changes between older and younger children occurred, making secular trends in the onset of puberty in females an unlikely contributory factor. The disappearance of the bias to diagnose asthma in symptomatic males but not in females may be partly responsible for the narrowing of the sex ratio, but other factors such as those enhancing the expression of asthma and atopy in females may also be implicated.

  13. Examining the prevalence rate of Pediculus capitis infestation according to sex and social factors in primary school children

    PubMed Central

    Doroodgar, Abbas; Sadr, Fakhraddin; Doroodgar, Masoud; Doroodgar, Moein; Sayyah, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence rate of head louse infestation among elementary students, and examine the associated factors with infection in the city of Aran and Bidgol. Methods A total of 19 boys' and girls' primary schools were selected by multistage, systematic random sampling. Overall, 3 590 students were examined for head lice infestation in urban areas of Aran and Bidgol during 2008. The diagnosis was based on live louse or nit on the scalp of students. The students were screened by standard questionnaire and demographic data in addition to related information were obtained by interview and observation. The data were analyzed by SPSS software using chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. Results The mean age of students was (8.68±1.58) years ranging between 6-12 years. The total prevalence of head louse infestation was 0.47%. This rate was 0.42% and 0.05% in female and male, respectively. There was a significant association between pediculosis and sex, father's job, mother's education, access to bathroom in home, prior infection, drug use and nationality, respectively (P<0.05). Conclusions The results showed that pediculosis was not a major health priority among primary school in city of Aran and Bidgol. However, enhancing the knowledge of students about head lice infestation and the existence of health teachers in schools can play a significant role in disease control.

  14. Barriers to Modern Contraceptive Use in Kinshasa, DRC

    PubMed Central

    Muanda, Mbadu; Gahungu Ndongo, Parfait; Taub, Leah D.; Bertrand, Jane T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research from Kinshasa, DRC, has shown that only one in five married women uses modern contraception; over one quarter have an unmet need for family planning; and almost 400 health facilities across Kinshasa report that they provide modern contraception. This study addresses the question: with reasonable physical access and relatively high unmet need, why is modern contraceptive prevalence so low? To this end, the research team conducted 6 focus groups of women (non-users of any method, users of traditional methods, and users of modern methods) and 4 of husbands (of users of traditional methods and in non-user unions) in health zones with relatively strong physical access to FP services. Five key barriers emerged from the focus group discussions: fear of side effects (especially sterility), costs of the method, sociocultural norms (especially the dominant position of the male in family decision-making), pressure from family members to avoid modern contraception, and lack of information/misinformation. These findings are very similar to those from 12 other studies of sociocultural barriers to family planning in sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, they have strong programmatic implications for the training of FP workers to counsel future clients and for the content of behavior change communication interventions. PMID:27907138

  15. Pulmonary embolus, oral contraceptives, and a clinical search.

    PubMed

    Maharry, J M

    1970-01-01

    At the Presbyterian Intercommunity Hospital, Whittier, California, 120 cases of pulmonary emboli occurred from 1959 through 1968. During this time there were 124,000 admissions and more than 20,000 live births. 51 of the pulmonary embolic cases were female; 25 were of childbearing age. 10 of these showed relationship to the use of oral contraceptives. 6 of them received oral contraceptives after pulmonary embolism without apparent aggravation or recurrence of thromboembolic disease. 2 of the 10 were taking birth control pills at the time they underwent hysterectomy. A pulmonary embolus followed each operation. 2 more were taking the pills and experienced pulmonary embolism without evidence of any predisposing cause. Short case summaries of the 10 are given, all of whom are living and well. Improvement of diagnosis by lung scanning shows that pulmonary embolism is more prevalent and less serious than previously believed. As thrombotic disease is considered a recurring disorder, its relationship to steroid contraceptives has not been totally substantiated. It is concluded that a history of such disease does not necessarily contraindicate the use of oral contraceptives. Following discussion, the author quotes an FDA claim that women who take birth control pills develop thrombo-phlebitis 3 times as frequently as women who do not. He notes that, even according to these Food and Drug Administration statistics, a woman could take the pills for 30 years without as much danger from thrombo-phlebitis as from a single pregnancy.

  16. Effects of Contraceptive Education on Adolescent Male Contraceptive Behavior and Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Mary E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between contraceptive education and teenage male contraceptive behavior was investigated. Findings indicated that brief or moderately in-depth contraceptive education had little effect on contraceptive behavior. The teenage pregnancy and other sex-related problems may make parents and schools more amenable to comprehensive…

  17. [IPPF declaration on breast feeding, fertility and postpartum contraception].

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    Mother's milk protects the newborn against various infections, especially against gastrointestinal infections, as well as strengthening the mother-child bond. Breast-feeding is also associated with birth spacing and plays an important role in the regulation of fertility in countries where the rate of use of contraceptives is low. In breast-feeding women amenorrhea may last several months or even a year, while in women who do not breast-feed menstruation returns 35-40 days postpartum. The risk of getting pregnant in women who rely on amenorrhea for contraception increases with the appearance of the first postpartum menstruation (spotting), with the introduction of food supplement into the diet of the infant, and approximately 6 months after childbirth. Family planning programs have to collaborate with maternal health programs with respect to the need for contraception, including postpartum contraception, which involves the training of nurse-midwives or traditional birth attendants. The choice of contraceptives includes the IUD, with a high degree of efficacy, which is particularly advantageous during breast-feeding. Tubal ligation has no negative effect on breast-feeding, but it also requires proper counseling. Other methods are vasectomy, implants and injectables containing progestational hormones, and estrogen-progesterone containing pills, which should not be used for 6 weeks after childbirth.

  18. Contraception and Mental Health: A Commentary on the Evidence and Principles for Practice

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Julia R.; Cwiak, Carrie A.; Allen, Rebecca H.; Marcus, Sheila M.

    2014-01-01

    Among the most prevalent and disabling chronic diseases affecting reproductive aged women worldwide, depression and anxiety can contribute to adverse reproductive health outcomes, including an increased risk of unintended pregnancy and its health and social consequences. For women with these common mental health conditions who wish to avoid an unintended pregnancy, effective contraception can be an important strategy to maintain and even improve health and wellbeing. Reproductive health clinicians play a critical role in providing and managing contraception to help women with mental health considerations achieve their desired fertility. In this commentary, we review the literature on relationships between mental health and contraception and describe considerations for clinical management of contraception among women with depression and anxiety. We discuss issues related to contraceptive method effectiveness and adherence concerns, mental health-specific contraceptive method safety and drug interaction considerations, and clinical counseling and management strategies. Given important gaps in current scientific knowledge of mental health and contraception, we highlight areas for future research. PMID:25511241

  19. Knowledge and use of emergency contraception among students of public secondary schools in Ilorin, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Babatunde, Oluwole Adeyemi; Ibirongbe, Demilade Olusola; Omede, Owen; Babatunde, Olubukola Oluwakemi; Durowade, Kabir Adekunle; Salaudeen, Adekunle Ganiyu; Akande, Tanimola Makanjuola

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Unintended pregnancy and unsafe abortion pose a major reproductive health challenge to adolescents. Emergency contraception is safe and effective in preventing unplanned pregnancy. The objective of this study was to assess the student's knowledge and use of emergency contraception. Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out in Ilorin, Nigeria, using multi-stage sampling method. Data was collected using pre-tested semi-structured self-administered questionnaire. Knowledge was scored and analysed. SPSS version 21.0 was used for data analysis. A p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results 27.8% of the respondents had good knowledge of emergency contraception. Majority of respondents (87.2%) had never used emergency contraception. Majority of those who had ever used emergency contraception (85.7%) used it incorrectly, using it more than 72 hours after sexual intercourse (p=0.928). Conclusion Knowledge about Emergency contraception and prevalence of use were low. Contraceptive education should be introduced early in the school curriculum for adolescents. PMID:27217897

  20. Contraception and mental health: a commentary on the evidence and principles for practice.

    PubMed

    Hall, Kelli Stidham; Steinberg, Julia R; Cwiak, Carrie A; Allen, Rebecca H; Marcus, Sheila M

    2015-06-01

    Among the most prevalent and disabling chronic diseases affecting reproductive-aged women worldwide, depression and anxiety can contribute to adverse reproductive health outcomes, including an increased risk of unintended pregnancy and its health and social consequences. For women with these common mental health conditions who want to avoid an unintended pregnancy, effective contraception can be an important strategy to maintain and even improve health and well-being. Reproductive health clinicians play a critical role in providing and managing contraception to help women with mental health considerations achieve their desired fertility. In this commentary, we review the literature on relationships between mental health and contraception and describe considerations for the clinical management of contraception among women with depression and anxiety. We discuss issues related to contraceptive method effectiveness and adherence concerns, mental health-specific contraceptive method safety and drug interaction considerations, and clinical counseling and management strategies. Given important gaps in current scientific knowledge of mental health and contraception, we highlight areas for future research.

  1. Helping Clinicians Prevent Pregnancy among Sexually Active Adolescents: U.S. Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use and U.S. Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Emily M

    2015-08-01

    The United States has made substantial progress in reducing teenage birth rates in recent decades, but rates remain high. Teen pregnancy can increase the risk of poor health outcomes and lead to decreased educational attainment, increased poverty, and welfare use, as well as increased cost to taxpayers. One of the most effective ways to prevent teenage pregnancy is through the use of effective birth control methods. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention has made the prevention of teenage pregnancy 1 of its 10 winnable battles. The CDC has released 2 evidence-based clinical guideline documents regarding contraceptive use for adolescents and adults. The first guideline, US Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use, 2010, helps clinicians recognize when a contraceptive method may not be safe to use for a particular adolescent but also when not to withhold a contraceptive method that is safe to use. The second document, US Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use, 2013, provides guidance for how to use contraceptive methods safely and effectively once they are deemed safe. Health care providers are encouraged to use these documents to provide safe and effective contraceptive care to patients seeking family planning, including adolescents.

  2. Contraception and Birth Control: Other FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... STD)? NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials More Information Contraception and Birth Control: Other FAQs Skip sharing on social media links ... section. How can I choose a method of contraception? The choice of birth control depends on many ...

  3. Mifepristone for luteal phase contraception.

    PubMed

    Croxatto, Horacio B

    2003-12-01

    The concept of luteal phase contraception and the use of mifepristone in clinical trials, which allows for testing of its validity, as well as clinical pharmacological research designed to understand its mode of action, are reviewed. Early luteal phase administration has a variety of morphological, physiological and biochemical effects on the endometrium that are likely to interfere with embryonic-endometrial interactions. In fact, specifically designed pilot clinical trials as well as data derived from emergency contraception studies indicate that early luteal phase administration of mifepristone is highly effective in preventing pregnancy, with minimal disturbance of hormonal parameters or menstrual cyclicity. Mid and late luteal phase administration of mifepristone at doses above 25 mg are highly effective in inducing endometrial bleeding in nonconceptional cycles. However, administration of mifepristone within the period between implantation and expected menses fails to induce bleeding in a significant proportion of cases, and furthermore the bleeding induced does not insure the termination of pregnancy. While the data suggest there is potential for a once-a-month contraceptive pill, it is likely that no molecule endowed with partial agonistic properties, like mifepristone, will completely and reliably suppress the essential functions of progesterone in order to achieve contraceptive efficacy comparable to that of modern contraceptive methods.

  4. Combined Oral Contraceptive Pills: Profile of Acceptors in a Tertiary Hospital in South-South Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Abasiattai, A M; Utuk, M N; Ojeh, S O; Eyo, U E

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Combined oral contraceptive pills were the first contraceptive method to provide sexual freedom of choice for women through reliable, personal and private control of fertility. They are the most widely used hormonal contraceptives and also the most popular non-surgical method of contraception. OBJECTIVE: To review the profile of acceptors of combined oral contraceptive pills at the University of Uyo Teaching Hospital, Uyo. METHODOLOGY: An 8 year review of all clients that accepted combined oral contraceptive pills in the family planning clinic. RESULTS: There were 1,146 new contraceptive acceptors during the period of study out of which 309 (27.9%) accepted the pills. Majority of the clients were between 20 and 29 years of age (54.0%), were multiparous (72.8%), Christians (99.7%) and 61.2% had tertiary level education. Two hundred and fifty-five women (82.5%) desired to use combined oral contraceptive pills to space births while 7.8% wanted to limit child bearing. There was a high discontinuation rate among the women (45.0%) and out of these 87.9% of the clients changed to other contraceptive methods. All the clients commenced their pills within seven days of menstruation and only the low dose monophasic preparations were available in the family planning unit and thus were given to the clients. CONCLUSION: Women who accept to initiate combined oral contraceptive pills in our center are young, well educated, multiparous women who want to space their pregnancies. However, due to the high discontinuation rate among the clients, there is need for further studies evaluating reasons for the high discontinuation rate, exploring interactions between clients and providers' and also providers' attitude towards combined pills in our environment.

  5. Cycle control with oral contraceptives: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Thorneycroft, I H

    1999-02-01

    Comparing the degree of cycle control provided by various oral contraceptives is problematic. The inherent limitations, small demonstrated differences, and differing methods of data presentation characteristic of these trials support the conclusion that it is almost impossible to compare the bleeding patterns of one preparation with those of another. Chlamydial infection, smoking, and inconsistency of use are factors that have significant effects on rates of spotting and breakthrough bleeding. Clinicians must alert patients to the possibility of intermenstrual bleeding and educate them with regard to the importance of continued, consistent oral contraceptive use to minimize those problems among pill users in their practices.

  6. Factors affecting the enterohepatic circulation of oral contraceptive steroids.

    PubMed

    Orme, M L; Back, D J

    1990-12-01

    Oral contraceptive steroids may undergo enterohepatic circulation, but it is relevant for only estrogens, because these compounds can be directly conjugated in the liver. Animal studies show convincing evidence of the importance of the enterohepatic circulation, but studies in humans are much less convincing. The importance of the route and the rate of metabolism of ethinyl estradiol are reviewed. Some antibiotics have been reported anecdotally to reduce the efficacy of oral contraceptive steroids, but controlled studies have not confirmed this observation. Although gut flora are altered by oral antibiotics, the blood levels of ethinyl estradiol are not reduced, and one antibiotic at least (cotrimoxazole) enhances the activity of ethinyl estradiol.

  7. [Post-abortion contraception: effects of contraception services and reproductive intention].

    PubMed

    Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela

    2016-02-01

    Contraceptive counseling and the supply of contraceptive methods are part of post-abortion care and positively influence the subsequent use of contraceptive methods. Studies showing such evidence have been conducted predominantly in countries with no legal restrictions on abortion and with adequate care for women that terminate a pregnancy. However, little is known about contraceptive practices in contexts where abortion is illegal, as in Brazil, in which post-abortion contraceptive care is inadequate. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of contraceptive care on male condom use and oral and injectable contraceptives in the six months post-abortion, considering reproductive intention. The results showed that contraceptive care only has a positive effect on the use of oral contraceptives in the first six months post-abortion, as long as the woman had a medical consultation in the same month in which she received information on contraception. One or the other intervention alone had no significant impact.

  8. Long-acting steroidal contraception: an update.

    PubMed

    Bardin, C W

    1989-01-01

    Long-acting, injectable contraceptives first became available in the 1960s. It is currently estimated that almost 3.5 million women are now using depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA); 800,000 are using norethindrone enanthate (NET-EN), and another few hundred thousand are using a variety of once-a-month injectables comprised of progestin plus estrogen. The advantages of injectable contraceptives are that they are highly effective, independent of coitus, easily administered, and they ensure regular contact with health services personnel. The last factor may be considered a disadvantage by some, since contact is more frequent than would be required for routine health services. The major disadvantage of the progestin-only formulations is disruption of normal menses, giving rise to unpredicted episodes of bleeding and spotting. With the once-a-month formulation, on the other hand, there are few discontinuations due to disruption of menses. For a long-acting method to be used longer than 6 months, it is desirable to choose an implant, since the method can be discontinued at will. The first implant system to be developed was Norplant, a set of six rubber capsules filled with levonorgestrel and implanted under the skin. The implant releases sufficient levels of medication to protect against pregnancy. For the first 5 years, the average failure rate was four or five per thousand users per year. The failure rate for women using standard oral contraceptives is approximately 20 to 50 per thousand. The most common side effect of the implant method is the disruption of the menstrual cycle, an effect that is particularly marked in the first month of use.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Hormonal contraception and pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Henry-Suchet, J

    1997-12-01

    Estrogen-progestogen contraception (OC) is significantly associated with a high prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis in the lower genital tracts of young women. In contrast, pelvic inflammatory disease is less frequent and is associated with milder pelvic lesions in OC users than in non-users. A recent study suggests that OC use can be associated with silent endometritis and salpingitis. The usual clinical, biological and laparoscopic signs of acute and chronic pelvic inflammatory disease are described. As shown tby several cost-benefit analyses, C. trachomatis detection in family planning centers is cost-effective and the eradication of bacteria is obtained in 90% of cases by a new treatment: azithromycin (1 g for 1 day). Although the data clearly show that C. trachomatis screening is cost-effective, selection of the diagnostic laboratory tests used in such screening programs should be carefully evaluated relative to cost, feasibility, specificity and sensitivity, and should be adapted to the presumed prevalence in screened populations. A systematic screening is indicated in populations susceptible to a prevalence of 5% or more.

  10. Emergency contraception. Widely available and effective but disappointing as a public health intervention: a review

    PubMed Central

    Baird, D.T.; Cameron, S.; Evers, J.L.H.; Gemzell-Danielsson, K.; Glasier, A.; Moreau, C.; Trussell, J.; von Hertzen, H.; Crosignani, P.G.; La Vecchia, C.; Volpe, A.; Glasier, A.; Crosignani, P.G.

    2015-01-01

    Emergency contraception (EC) prevents pregnancy after unprotected sex or contraceptive failure. Use of EC has increased markedly in countries where a product is available over the counter, yet barriers to availability and use remain. Although effective in clinical trials, it has not yet been possible to show a public health benefit of EC in terms of reduction of unintended pregnancy rates. Selective progesterone receptor modulators developed as emergency contraceptives offer better effectiveness than levonorgestrel, but still EC is less effective than use of ongoing regular contraception. Methods which inhibit ovulation whenever they are taken or which act after ovulation to prevent implantation and strategies to increase the uptake of effective ongoing contraception after EC use would prevent more pregnancies. PMID:25678571

  11. Factors inhibiting the use of reversible contraceptive methods in rural south India.

    PubMed

    Rajaretnam, T; Deshpande, R V

    1994-01-01

    In two rural districts in South India, the contraceptive prevalence rate for all modern family planning methods was 41 percent, and that for all reversible methods was only about 2 percent in 1990. Interviews with 35 health program professionals, 815 currently married women of reproductive age, 136 of their husbands, and 60 community leaders revealed that neither the demand for reversible methods nor the supply of services was strong in the study areas. Program managers and field-workers were not popularizing reversible methods, and therefore couples were unable to learn about their benefits. According to the authors, a strong commitment from program managers at all levels is needed to increase reversible-method use, and adequate services should be made available at clinics and in villages.

  12. American values and contraceptive acceptance.

    PubMed

    Rzepka, J R

    1979-07-01

    A number of individual personality factors and social norms may be associated with reproductive confusion and/or irresponsibility. More specifically, the values underlying common American social norms may contribute to ineffective birth planning in the following ways: 1) The traditional roles of women in our society seem to encourage parenthood. The rule has been early marriage, closely spaced children, and few alternate sources of satisfaction or self-esteem. 2) Our culture strongly encourages family life. Children are a symbol of normalcy. 3) The importance of sexual enjoyment per se often conflicts with contraceptive use. Conversely, innocence is also valued and also contributes to unprotected sexual activity. 4) Religious reasons or adherence to concepts of natural law are almost always given by people opposed to contraception. 5) Health is important to Americans, and birth control methods negatively affect health in real and imagined ways. Social norms, though changing, remain essentially congruent with former contraceptive technology and former ideologies, customs, and dreams.

  13. Hormonal contraception in the male.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R A

    2000-01-01

    The hormonal approach to male contraception is based on the suppression of gonadotrophin secretion with secondary suppression of spermatogenesis. This can be achieved by administration of testosterone or other androgen alone, but combined administration with a progestogen or GnRH analogue allows the dose of testosterone to be reduced to physiological replacement doses. This approach has been investigated for many years but without identification of a regimen which results in sufficient suppression of spermatogenesis to provide ensured contraception in all men, safely and conveniently. The reasons for this are discussed, and recent developments towards a regimen that fulfills all these criteria are described. Crucial to development of any new product is that it will be used: surveys of both men and women indicate firmly positive attitudes towards a 'male pill'. There are, therefore, grounds for cautious optimism that the next decade may see the introduction of the first novel male contraceptive for several hundred years.

  14. Oral Contraceptives and Bone Health in Female Runners

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    that a history of stress fractures, lower bone mass, lower dietary calcium intake, younger chronological age, younger age at menarche, and possibly a... history of irregular menstrual periods were associated with an increased risk. 15. SUBJECT TERMS bone mass, oral contraceptives, physical activity...year decrease). Although not statistically significant, a history of irregular menstrual periods was also associated with increased rate of stress

  15. Self-rated chronic conditions and 2-week prevalence in adults in Zhongshan, China: an epidemiological survey

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chunyan; Sun, Xiaomin; Geng, Qingshan; Fu, Rong; Yang, Hongling; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between behavioural factors and the risk of chronic conditions and 2-week prevalence. Design This was a cross-sectional survey. Setting The study was conducted in Zhongshan, China. Participants A multistage clustering sampling method was used to select a representative sample of residents from the household registration system between July and September 2011. The overall sample replacement rate was 9.4%, and the final sample included 43 028 individuals. Outcome measures Chronic conditions and 2-week prevalence. Results 4979 (11.6%) of the participants reported having at least one chronic condition, 1067 (2.5%) had two or more concurrent chronic conditions, and 6830 (15.9%) reported having at least one disease in a 2-week recall period. The most common chronic condition was primary hypertension, which was reported by 6.8% of participants. Logistic regression models demonstrated that the main factors for having a chronic condition and 2-week prevalence were older age (≥65 years of age; OR 44.91, 95% CI 33.05 to 61.03; and OR 12.71, 95% CI 10.44 to 15.46, respectively), obesity (OR 3.00, 95% CI 2.63 to 3.42; and OR 2.50, 95% CI 2.22 to 2.82, respectively) and being a former smoker (OR 3.02, 95% CI 2.54 to 3.58; and OR 3.24, 95% CI 2.74 to 3.82, respectively). Conclusions This study suggests that older age, obesity and unhealthy behaviours are high-risk factors for poorer health status among the residents of Zhongshan, China. The present findings highlight the importance of recognising and managing harmful behaviours in order to improve health. PMID:26560055

  16. Oral Health and Oral Contraceptive - Is it a Shadow behind Broad Day Light? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Patthi, Basavaraj; Singla, Ashish; Gupta, Ritu; Dhama, Kuldeep; Niraj, Lav Kumar; Kumar, Jishnu Krishna; Prasad, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oral contraceptives are one of the risk factors for gingival disease. Oral contraceptives can affect the proliferation of cell, growth and differentiation of tissues in the periodontium. Nowadays recent research has suggested that the newer generation oral contraceptives have less influence on gingival diseases. Aim The purpose of this study was to systematically review the effect of oral contraceptives on periodontium. Materials and Methods A literature review was performed; PubMed, PubMed Central and Cochrane Library, Embase, Google Scholar were searched from 1970 up to December 2015 to identify appropriate studies. Results Out of the total 94 titles appeared 13 articles fulfilled the criteria and were selected for the review. Two articles which were hand searched and one article which was through e-mail was also included. The hormones progesterone and estrogen have direct impact on immune system of the body and thus, affect the pattern and rate of collagen production in the gingiva. Furthermore, the review also shows that longer duration usage of oral contraceptive could lead to poorer oral hygiene status, gingival inflammation and increased susceptibility to periodontal disease. Conclusion There are relatively few studies evaluating the effect of oral contraceptives on periodontium. It was found that oral contraceptives have a marked effect on periodontium. The gingival changes after use of oral contraceptives are pronounced in the first few months and with the passage of time these changes get enhanced. PMID:28050520

  17. Gender differences in drunk driving prevalence rates and trends: a 20-year assessment using multiple sources of evidence.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jennifer

    2008-09-01

    This research tracked women's and men's drunk driving rates and the DUI sex ratio in the United States from 1982-2004 using three diverse sources of evidence. Sex-specific prevalence estimates and the sex ratio are derived from official arrest statistics from the Federal Bureau of Investigation, self-reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and traffic fatality data from the National Highway and Transportation Safety Administration. Drunk driving trends were analyzed using Augmented Dickey Fuller time series techniques. Female DUI arrest rates increased whereas male rates declined then stabilized, producing a significantly narrower sex ratio. According to self-report and traffic data, women's and men's drunk driving rates declined and the gender gap was unchanged. Women's overrepresentation in arrests relative to their share of offending began in the 1990s and accelerated in 2000. Women's arrest gains, contrasted with no systematic change in DUI behavior, and the timing of this shift suggest an increased vulnerability to arrest. More stringent laws and enforcement directed at less intoxicated offenders may inadvertently target female offending patterns.

  18. Oral contraceptives and liver function

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Tom

    1969-01-01

    Oral contraceptives can cause liver damage and jaundice but this is very rare in women in the United Kingdom. The drugs are contraindicated where there is a history of recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and acute or chronic disturbance of liver function which can be congenital or acquired. It is not yet known whether the oestrogenic or progestogenic components of oral contraceptives cause the hepatic abnormalities. The available data suggest that neither oestrogens nor progestogens in low doses impair hepatic excretory processes. The full implications of the continued administration of oestrogens and progestogens for many years on liver proteins are not yet known.

  19. Contraception and Unintended Pregnancy among Unmarried Female University Students: A Cross-sectional Study from China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjing; Long, Lu; Cai, Hui; Wu, Yue; Xu, Jing; Shu, Chang; Wang, Peng; Li, Bo; Wei, Qinyu; Shang, Xuejun; Wang, Xueyi; Zhang, Meimei; Xiong, Chengliang; Yin, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to understand the level of contraceptive knowledge and attitudes towards contraception, and then to explore the association between the contraceptive behavior and unintended pregnancy in unmarried female university students in China. A cross-sectional study was conducted of university students in 49 universities across 7 cities in China from September 2007 to January 2008. We distributed 74,800 questionnaires, of which 69,842 were returned. In this paper, the data from 35,383 unmarried female university students were analyzed. The prevalence of sexual intercourse in unmarried female university students was 10.2%. The prevalence of unintended pregnancy in those sexually active female university students, was 31.8%. Among students with pregnancy, 53.5% experienced two or more pregnancies. 28.3% of the students with sexual intercourse reported that they always adopted contraceptive methods, and of those 82.9% chose to use male condoms. The majority (83.9%) of students with unintended pregnancy chose to terminate the latest pregnancy by surgical abortion or medical abortion. The contraceptive knowledge level of students who experienced unintended pregnancy was lower than those who did not. In China, about one third of unmarried female students with sexual intercourse experience unintended pregnancy. A variety of contraceptive methods are adopted, but the frequency of contraceptive use is low. Most of unmarried female students who experienced unintended pregnancy would choose to terminate the pregnancy with surgical or medical abortion. University students, especially the ones who have experienced unintended pregnancy, lack contraceptive and reproductive health knowledge. PMID:26091505

  20. Contraception and Unintended Pregnancy among Unmarried Female University Students: A Cross-sectional Study from China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjing; Long, Lu; Cai, Hui; Wu, Yue; Xu, Jing; Shu, Chang; Wang, Peng; Li, Bo; Wei, Qinyu; Shang, Xuejun; Wang, Xueyi; Zhang, Meimei; Xiong, Chengliang; Yin, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to understand the level of contraceptive knowledge and attitudes towards contraception, and then to explore the association between the contraceptive behavior and unintended pregnancy in unmarried female university students in China. A cross-sectional study was conducted of university students in 49 universities across 7 cities in China from September 2007 to January 2008. We distributed 74,800 questionnaires, of which 69,842 were returned. In this paper, the data from 35,383 unmarried female university students were analyzed. The prevalence of sexual intercourse in unmarried female university students was 10.2%. The prevalence of unintended pregnancy in those sexually active female university students, was 31.8%. Among students with pregnancy, 53.5% experienced two or more pregnancies. 28.3% of the students with sexual intercourse reported that they always adopted contraceptive methods, and of those 82.9% chose to use male condoms. The majority (83.9%) of students with unintended pregnancy chose to terminate the latest pregnancy by surgical abortion or medical abortion. The contraceptive knowledge level of students who experienced unintended pregnancy was lower than those who did not. In China, about one third of unmarried female students with sexual intercourse experience unintended pregnancy. A variety of contraceptive methods are adopted, but the frequency of contraceptive use is low. Most of unmarried female students who experienced unintended pregnancy would choose to terminate the pregnancy with surgical or medical abortion. University students, especially the ones who have experienced unintended pregnancy, lack contraceptive and reproductive health knowledge.

  1. Side effects and discontinuation of oral contraceptive use in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Janowitz, B; Kane, T T; Arruda, J M; Covington, D L; Morris, L

    1986-07-01

    Oral contraceptives have many advantages, but sometimes also have side effects which can cause users to switch appropriately or inappropriately to less effective methods or abandon contraception. In Brazil, 2/3 of married women of childbearing age were using contraception in 1981, and 1/2 of these were using orals. Contraceptive behavior following reported side effects in users of oral contraceptives in Southern Brazil is examined in this study, in relation to diverse factors. Among 2904 currently-married women, aged 15-44, almost 75% reported that they had used the pill at some time, and of these, 45.6% were still doing so. Data on perceived side effects were gathered for all women. There was no independent medical evaluation of the effects, so the data did not necessarily represent actual prevalence of pill related problems. Women who reported problems with the pill were less likely to be current users (25%) than women who did not (65%). However, overall contraceptive prevalence was about the same in both groups (66.2% and 67.0% respectively), indicating that women who stop using oral contraceptives usually switch to another method. However, they are more likely to be using traditional methods than women in the general population, especially if they want more children. Termination of pill use varies little according to the type of problem reported. Women with problems who sought medical attention were more likely to stop using the pill, and 82.4% of women advised to stop by their physician did so, but the major factor affecting discontinuation was the reported experience of a problem. The most frequently reported problems were headaches (38.1%), nausea (34.1%), nervousness (27.9%), and vertigo (18.3%). Physician intervention should help to avoid women's abandoning oral contraceptives unnecessarily.

  2. Prevalence of hypothyroidism in nondiabetic chronic kidney disease and effect of thyroxine replacement on estimated glomerular filtration rate

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, S.; Purwar, N.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, P.; Srivastava, A.

    2017-01-01

    Reduced T3 and free T4, elevated thyroid stimulating hormone, and hyporesponsiveness to thyrotropin releasing hormone raise questions about the presence of hypothyroidism in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and raise the possibility of benefit from thyroxine supplementation. A prospective cohort study was conducted on 73 nondiabetic CKD cases. Hypothyroid patients were started on levothyroxine and were reviewed after 3 and 6 months. The mean age of study population was 42.3 ± 16.8 years. Of the total population, 32 (43.8%) cases had hypothyroidism, among whom 2 (2.7%) had overt hypothyroidism and 30 (41.1%) had subclinical hypothyroidism. Prevalence of hypothyroidism increased with increasing severity of CKD. There were 1 (3.1%) case with hypothyroidism in stage 3b, 8 (25%) cases in stage 4, and 23 (71.9%) cases in stage 5. The mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (ml/min/1.73 m2) at baseline was 13.7 ± 8.9 which increased to 17.5 ± 6.8 and 22.4 ± 9.3 after 3 and 6 months of thyroid hormone replacement therapy (THRT), respectively (P < 0.001). Hypothyroidism is commonly associated with nondiabetic CKD and its prevalence increases with declining renal function. THRT significantly improves renal function in nondiabetic CKD with hypothyroidism. PMID:28356660

  3. Long term observation of MRSA prevalence in a German rehabilitation center: risk factors and variability of colonization rate

    PubMed Central

    Gieffers, Jens; Ahuja, André; Giemulla, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Background: Data on MRSA prevalence in rehabilitation centers are sparse. Methods: We screened more than 18,000 patients with neurological, cardiac/pulmonary or orthopedic diagnoses treated in three German rehabilitation centers and documented potential risk factors in almost 1,500 of them. Results: 2.1% were MRSA positive (CI 1.9%–2.4%). Prevalence was higher in neurologic patients (3.7%) and lower in orthopedic patients (0.9%). While the overall MRSA situation was stable over two years, the weekly MRSA rate fluctuated strongly (0.0% to 8.0%). We confirmed five risk factors in our study population. A risk adapted screening strategy derived from our data had a significance of 74% and a positive predictive value of only 2.2%. Conclusion: MRSA positivity is a rare and highly variable event, requiring a huge sample size to generate robust data. The benefit of a risk-adapted screening strategy over a general screening should be questioned in each individual setting. PMID:27777874

  4. The cardiovascular safety of triphasic contraceptive steroids.

    PubMed

    Shaarawy, M; Nafea, S; Abdel-Aziz, O; Rahseed, K; Sheiba, M

    1997-09-01

    It was hypothesized that estrogen-induced cardioprotection is mediated by up-regulation and down-regulation of expression of nitric oxide (NO) and P-selectin, respectively. Published data on circulating levels of the vasodilator NO, atherogenic glycoprotein P-selectin, and lipoprotein-a [Lp(a)] in users of triphasic contraceptive steroids are lacking. A total of 30 healthy women (nonusers, controls) and 82 women using oral triphasic contraceptive steroids (ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel: Triovlar, Schering AG) for 18 to 24 cycles participated in this study. Fasting blood samples were obtained from users and nonusers for the determination of P-selectin and Lp(a) by enzyme immunoassay and NO by a colorimetric method. The serum Lp(a) levels in OC users were significantly higher than those of nonusers. On the other hand, the serum NO levels in OC users were significantly elevated when compared to nonusers. Plasma P-selectin was significantly lowered in OC users p < 0.005. These results demonstrate the beneficial effects of ethinyl estradiol in the triphasic contraceptive regimen. Ethinyl estradiol may afford a degree of anti-atherogenic-cardioprotective effect by up-regulation of the expression of the vasodilator NO and down-regulation of the expression of the atherogenic P-selectin. This may outweigh the cardiovascular risk of the increased atherogenic Lp(a). This study may explain the very low rate of mortality from venous thromboembolism in OC users, which compares favorably with the risks that many people accept in daily life.

  5. Avoiding sedation in research MRI and spectroscopy in infants: our approach, success rate and prevalence of incidental findings.

    PubMed

    Gale, Christopher; Jeffries, Suzan; Logan, Karen Mary; Chappell, Karyn E; Uthaya, Sabita N; Modi, Neena

    2013-05-01

    Performing magnetic resonance investigations in a paediatric population can be difficult; image acquisition is commonly complicated by movement artefact and non-compliance. Sedation is widely used for clinically indicated investigations, but there is controversy when used for research imaging. Over a 10-year period we have performed whole body MRI on over 450 infants and hepatic magnetic resonance spectroscopy on over 270 infants. These investigations have been accomplished without the use of sedation in infants up to 3 months of age. Our overall success rate in achieving good quality images free of movement artefact is 94%. The prevalence of incidental findings on whole body (excluding brain) MRI in our cohort was 0.8%. We conclude that the use of sedation for research MRI in this group is not necessary. Our approach to MRI in infancy is also described.

  6. Clopidogrel use After Myocardial Revascularization: Prevalence, Predictors, and One-Year Survival Rate

    PubMed Central

    Prates, Paulo Roberto L.; Williams, Judson B.; Mehta, Rajendra H.; Stevens, Susanna R.; Thomas, Laine; Smith, Peter K.; Newby, L. Kristin; Kalil, Renato A. K.; Alexander, John H.; Lopes, Renato D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Antiplatelet therapy after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) has been used. Little is known about the predictors and efficacy of clopidogrel in this scenario. Objective Identify predictors of clopidogrel following CABG. Methods We evaluated 5404 patients who underwent CABG between 2000 and 2009 at Duke University Medical Center. We excluded patients undergoing concomitant valve surgery, those who had postoperative bleeding or death before discharge. Postoperative clopidogrel was left to the discretion of the attending physician. Adjusted risk for 1-year mortality was compared between patients receiving and not receiving clopidogrel during hospitalization after undergoing CABG. Results At hospital discharge, 931 (17.2%) patients were receiving clopidogrel. Comparing patients not receiving clopidogrel at discharge, users had more comorbidities, including hyperlipidemia, hypertension, heart failure, peripheral arterial disease and cerebrovascular disease. Patients who received aspirin during hospitalization were less likely to receive clopidogrel at discharge (P≤0.0001). Clopidogrel was associated with similar 1-year mortality compared with those who did not use clopidogrel (4.4% vs. 4.5%, P=0.72). There was, however, an interaction between the use of cardiopulmonary bypass and clopidogrel, with lower 1-year mortality in patients undergoing off-pump CABG who received clopidogrel, but not those undergoing conventional CABG (2.6% vs 5.6%, P Interaction = 0.032). Conclusion Clopidogrel was used in nearly one-fifth of patients after CABG. Its use was not associated with lower mortality after 1 year in general, but lower mortality rate in those undergoing off-pump CABG. Randomized clinical trials are needed to determine the benefit of routine use of clopidogrel in CABG. PMID:27556308

  7. Continuation rates, bleeding profile acceptability, and satisfaction of women using an oral contraceptive pill containing estradiol valerate and dienogest versus a progestogen-only pill after switching from an ethinylestradiol-containing pill in a real-life setting: results of the CONTENT study

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Paula; Serrani, Marco; Vogtländer, Kai; Parke, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral contraceptives are still associated with high discontinuation rates, despite their efficacy. There is a wide choice of oral contraceptives available, and the aim of this study was to assess continuation rates, bleeding profile acceptability, and the satisfaction of women in the first year of using a contraceptive pill containing estradiol valerate and dienogest (E2V/DNG) versus a progestogen-only pill (POP) in a real-life setting after discontinuing an ethinylestradiol-containing pill. Methods and results In this prospective, noninterventional, observational study, 3,152 patients were included for the efficacy analyses (n=2,558 women in the E2V/DNG group and n=592 in the POP group (two patients fulfilled the criteria of the efficacy population, but the used product was not known). Women had been taking an ethinylestradiol-containing pill ≥3 months before deciding to switch to the E2V/DNG pill or a POP. Overall, 19.8% (n=506) of E2V/DNG users and 25.8% (n=153) of POP users discontinued their prescribed pill. The median time to discontinuation was 157.0 days and 127.5 days, respectively. Time to discontinuation due to bleeding (P<0.0001) or other reasons (P=0.022) was significantly longer in the E2V/DNG group versus the POP group. The E2V/DNG pill was also associated with shorter (48.7% vs 44.1%), lighter (54% vs 46.1%), and less painful bleeding (91.1% vs 73.7%) and greater user satisfaction (80.7% vs 64.6%) than POP use, within 3–5 months after switch. Conclusion The E2V/DNG pill was associated with higher rates of continuation, bleeding profile acceptability, and user satisfaction than POP use and may be an alternative option for women who are dissatisfied with their current pill. PMID:27695365

  8. Oral contraception following abortion

    PubMed Central

    Che, Yan; Liu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Linan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oral contraceptives (OCs) following induced abortion offer a reliable method to avoid repeated abortion. However, limited data exist supporting the effective use of OCs postabortion. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis in the present study reported immediate administration of OCs or combined OCs postabortion may reduce vaginal bleeding time and amount, shorten the menstruation recovery period, increase endometrial thickness 2 to 3 weeks after abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. A total of 8 major authorized Chinese and English databases were screened from January 1960 to November 2014. Randomized controlled trials in which patients had undergone medical or surgical abortions were included. Chinese studies that met the inclusion criteria were divided into 3 groups: administration of OC postmedical abortion (group I; n = 1712), administration of OC postsurgical abortion (group II; n = 8788), and administration of OC in combination with traditional Chinese medicine postsurgical abortion (group III; n = 19,707). In total, 119 of 6160 publications were included in this analysis. Significant difference was observed in group I for vaginal bleeding time (P = 0.0001), the amount of vaginal bleeding (P = 0.03), and menstruation recovery period (P < 0.00001) compared with the control groups. Group II demonstrated a significant difference in vaginal bleeding time (P < 0.00001), the amount of vaginal bleeding (P = 0.0002), menstruation recovery period (P < 0.00001), and endometrial thickness at 2 (P = 0.003) and 3 (P < 0.00001) weeks postabortion compared with the control group. Similarly, a significant difference was observed in group III for reducing vaginal bleeding time (P < 0.00001) and the amount of vaginal bleeding (P < 0.00001), shortening the menstruation recovery period (P < 0.00001), and increasing endometrial thickness 2 and 3 weeks after surgical abortion (P < 0

  9. Preliminary data on changes in neural tube defect prevalence rates after folic acid fortification in South America.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Eduardo E; Orioli, Iêda M; Lopez-Camelo, Jorge S; Dutra, Maria da Graça; Nazer-Herrera, Julio

    2003-12-01

    Several South American countries are fortifying wheat flour with folic acid. However, only Chile started in 2000 to add 2.2 mg/kg, providing 360 microg daily per capita, an acceptable dosage for preventing the occurrence of some neural tube defect (NTD) cases. ECLAMC (Spanish acronym for the Latin American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations) routinely monitoring birth defects in South America since 1976, surveyed the impact of this fortification. Data from 361,374 births occurred in 43 South American hospitals, distributed in five different countries, active throughout the 1999-2001 triennium, were selected from the ECLAMC network. Birth prevalence rates for three different congenital anomalies with similar expected prevalence rates, were surveyed by the Cumulative Sum Method (CUSUM) method. They were NTD, oral clefts (OC), and Down syndrome (DS). Expected values were derived from observations made in 1999, and CUSUM was applied to the consecutive series of 24 months covering years 2000 and 2001. Only one of three congenital anomaly types, NTDs, in only one of five sampled out countries, Chile, showed a significant decrease, of 31%, during the 2000-2001 biennium, corresponding to the birth of the periconceptionally fortified infants. The level of significance (P < 0.001) was reached in the 20th month after fortification started, corresponding to August 2001. This is the first observation of a significant decrease in the occurrence of NTD after folic acid food fortification in a population little influenced by confounders common in the developed world as pre-existing secular decreasing trends, and partially unregistered induced abortions.

  10. Associations of hormonal contraceptive use with measures of HIV disease progression and antiretroviral therapy effectiveness☆

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, Maura K.; Jeng, Gary; Samarina, Anna; Akatova, Natalia; Martirosyan, Margarita; Kissin, Dmitry M.; Curtis, Kathryn M.; Marchbanks, Polly A.; Hillis, Susan D.; Mandel, Michele G.; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations between hormonal contraceptive use and measures of HIV disease progression and antiretroviral treatment (ART) effectiveness. Study design A prospective cohort study of women with prevalent HIV infection in St. Petersburg, Russia, was conducted. After contraceptive counseling, participants chose to use combined oral contraceptives (COCs), depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), a copper intrauterine device (IUD) or male condoms for pregnancy prevention. Among participants not using ART at enrollment, we used multivariate Cox regression to assess the association between current (time-varying) contraceptive use and disease progression, measured by the primary composite outcome of CD4 decline to <350 cells/mm3, ART initiation or death. Among participants using ART at enrollment, we used linear mixed models to estimate the predicted mean CD4 change at select time points by contraceptive method. Results During a total of 5233 months follow-up among participants not using ART with enrollment CD4 ≥ 350 cells/mm3 (n=315), 97 experienced disease progression. Neither current use of COCs [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.56–1.48] nor DMPA (aHR 1.28, 95% CI 0.71–2.31) was associated with a statistically significant increased risk for disease progression compared with use of nonhormonal methods (IUD or condoms). Among participants using ART at enrollment (n=77), we found no statistically significant differences in the predicted mean changes in CD4 cell count comparing current use of COCs (p=.1) or DMPA (p=.3) with nonhormonal methods. Conclusion Hormonal contraceptive use was not significantly associated with measures of HIV disease progression or ART effectiveness among women with prevalent HIV infection. Implications Hormonal contraceptive use was not significantly associated with measures of HIV disease progression or ART effectiveness among women with prevalent HIV infection. PMID:26197261

  11. Effect of missed combined hormonal contraceptives on contraceptive effectiveness: a systematic review☆

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Lauren B.; Steenland, Maria W.; Brahmi, Dalia; Marchbanks, Polly A.; Curtis, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Combined hormonal contraceptives (CHCs) are popular methods of reversible contraception in the United States, but adherence remains an issue as reflected in their lower rates of typical use effectiveness. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate evidence on the effect of missed CHCs on pregnancy rates as well as surrogate measures of contraceptive effectiveness (e.g., ovulation, follicular development, changes in hormone levels, cervical mucus quality). Study Design We searched the PubMed database for peer-reviewed articles published in any language from database inception through April 2012. We included studies that examined measures of contraceptive effectiveness during cycles with extended hormone-free intervals or nonadherence (e.g., omission of pills, delayed patch replacement) on days not adjacent to the hormone-free interval. We used standard abstract forms and grading systems to summarize and assess the quality of the evidence. Results The search strategy identified 1387 articles, of which 26 met our study selection criteria. There is wide variability in the amount of follicular development and risk of ovulation among women who extended the pill-free interval to 8–14 days; in general, the risk of ovulation was low, and among women who did ovulate, cycles were usually abnormal (i.e., low progesterone levels, small follicles and/or poor cervical mucus) (Level I, good, indirect to Level II-3, fair, indirect). Studies of women who missed one to four consecutive pills or 1–3 consecutive days of delay before patch replacement at times other than adjacent to the hormone-free interval reported little follicular activity and low risk of ovulation (Level I, fair, indirect to Level II-3, poor, indirect). Studies comparing 30 mcg versus 20 mcg mc ethinyl estradiol pills showed more follicular activity when 20 mcg ethinyl estradiol pills were missed (Level I, good, indirect). Conclusion Most of the studies in this evidence base relied on

  12. Contraception in the prepill era.

    PubMed

    Connell, E B

    1999-01-01

    Although medical history has documented the desire to control fertility since ancient times, safe and effective contraception did not exist until this century and has not been equally available to all people. Strong moral sentiments, economic and social class factors, religious beliefs, familial and gender relations, and political as well as legal constraints have often limited the ability of physicians in favor of contraception to provide advice and methods of birth control to their patients. By the early 1900s, a constellation of factors--in particular, the large influx of poor immigrants, and feminist groups advocating women's rights--helped to move forward a birth-control movement in this country and abroad. In the early 20th century, Margaret Sanger became one of the most avid proponents of contraception in the United States. By 1950, she and Katharine McCormick had contracted with biologist Gregory Pincus to develop an effective birth control pill. A collaborative effort by Pincus and other researchers led to trials of the pill in Puerto Rico, Haiti, and Mexico between 1956 and 1957, which provided the basis for an application to the Food and Drug Administration for approval of the first oral contraceptive.

  13. Contraception and the Adolescent Diabetic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fennoy, Ilene

    1989-01-01

    Data from a study of 11 teenage diabetics suggests that pregnancy among adolescent diabetics is more frequent than among the general population, at a time when diabetic control is poor because of psychosocial factors associated with adolescence. Current recommendations regarding contraception for diabetic women, focusing on barrier methods, are…

  14. [Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and contraception].

    PubMed

    Erny, R; Porte, H

    1989-06-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) have shown a considerable resurgence in recent years both in number of cases and in spread of new infectious agents. The spread of STDs is favored by numerous factors including the liberalization of sexual behavior made possible by reliable contraception. Information on STDs has not been widely diffused. Changes in the status of women and the development of means of communication and transportation have encouraged less rigid control of sexual behavior. STDs themselves have often escaped diagnosis or not been cured despite treatment, increasing the risk of spread. Numerous organisms cause STDs, from external parasites to life-threatening viruses. 60% of upper genital tract infections that can lead to sterility, tubal alterations, ectopic pregnancy and pain result from STDs. Chlamydia infections are insidious and chronic, and cause greater damage with each recurrence. The risk of STDs should be considered in contraceptive choice along with other indications and contraindications. Combined oral contraceptives provide protection against acute upper genital tract infections. The protective role has been explained by scanty and highly viscous cervical mucus forming a barrier against germs and by reductions of menstrual flow, myometrial activity, and inflammation. It is actually uncertain whether combined oral contraceptives protect against latent chlamydia infections, since higher rates of cervicitis caused by chlamydia have been found in pill users. In situations carrying risk of STDs, pill users should be protected by a supplementary barrier method. IUDs have been implicated in numerous studies in acute pelvic infections. Possible explanations are the local trauma and inflammations due to the physical presence of the IUD, more abundant bleeding, absence of a cervical barrier to motile sperm that could be a vector for germs, and possible ascent of the infectious agent on the string. Other risk factors are involved. Epidemiologic

  15. [The history of the contraceptive sheath].

    PubMed

    Guyotjeannin, C

    1984-06-01

    The condom, effective in preventing both pregnancy and venereal disease, had a limited role until the 19th century, when its use spread through all social strata. The 1st condoms may have been linen sheaths designed to protect against syphilis. A 16th century Neapolitan doctor provided a recipe for an antiseptic preparation to be applied for 4-5 hourrs, but after intercourse had occurred. A physician to Louis XV mentioned the condom in a book published in 1736, and in 1770 the condom was again described without being named. 4 yeears later it was again described and called the condom or English redingote. Later it was mentioned by the Marques de Sade, who alluded to its contraceptive effect. In the early 19th century, condoms made of sheep entrails were mentioned. Descriptions of the preparation of 3 grades of condom, regular, fine, and superfine, were later found. The discovery of the process of vulcanization of rubber in 1839 made possible more solid, marketable, and usable latex condoms. The condom apparently began to be used in the late 17th or early 18th century. Some authors state that it was invented by a Dr. Condom or Conton, a physician or knight in the court of Charls II of England. Othrs suggested that it was named after the city of Condom in Gascony or derived from a foreign word. The antivenereal disease qualities of condoms were described by Casanova and Gustave Flaubert, and other references to them may be found in the literature. Later the contraceptive use of the condom became progressively more common, beginning in the wealthier classes and spreading to the rural and lower classes perhaps by the later 18th century. The diffusion of contraception during the 19th century was cited as the cause of th slow decline in illegitimacy rates starting at the end of the century. The Church condemned the use of condoms for contraception, but the medical profession took a less hostile view due to their health function. At the present time, condoms are widely

  16. Postpartum Contraception: a Comparative Study of Berlin Women with and without Immigration Background.

    PubMed

    David, M; Brenne, S; Breckenkamp, J; Razum, O; Borde, T

    2015-09-01

    Research Questions: Are there differences in postpartum contraceptive use between women with and without immigration background? Do women more commonly use contraception following a high-risk pregnancy or caesarean section? What role does current breastfeeding play and, amongst immigrants, what is the effect of acculturation level on the frequency of contraceptive use? Study Population and Methods: Data collection was carried out as part of a larger study in three Berlin delivery units using standardised interviews (questionnaires covering e.g. sociodemographics, immigration history/acculturation and use of antenatal care); telephone interviews comprising 6 questions on postpartum contraception, breastfeeding and postpartum complications were conducted on a sample of the study population six months after delivery. Results: 247 women with, and 358 women without a background of immigration were included in the study (total study population n = 605, response rate 81.1 %). 68 % of 1st generation immigrants, 87 % of 2nd/3rd generation women and 73 % of women without immigration background (non-immigrants) used contraception. In the logistical regression analysis 1st generation immigrants were less likely than non-immigrants to be using contraception six months postpartum, and 1st generation immigrants with low acculturation level were significantly less likely to use contraception than 2nd/3rd generation women with low acculturation level. Conclusion: In the extended postpartum period there was no major difference in contraceptive use between immigrants in general and non-immigrants. It remains unclear whether the differing contraceptive behaviour of 1st generation immigrants is the result of less access to information, sociocultural factors or differing contraceptive requirements and further targeted, qualitative study is required.

  17. Postpartum Contraception: a Comparative Study of Berlin Women with and without Immigration Background

    PubMed Central

    David, M.; Brenne, S.; Breckenkamp, J.; Razum, O.; Borde, T.

    2015-01-01

    Research Questions: Are there differences in postpartum contraceptive use between women with and without immigration background? Do women more commonly use contraception following a high-risk pregnancy or caesarean section? What role does current breastfeeding play and, amongst immigrants, what is the effect of acculturation level on the frequency of contraceptive use? Study Population and Methods: Data collection was carried out as part of a larger study in three Berlin delivery units using standardised interviews (questionnaires covering e.g. sociodemographics, immigration history/acculturation and use of antenatal care); telephone interviews comprising 6 questions on postpartum contraception, breastfeeding and postpartum complications were conducted on a sample of the study population six months after delivery. Results: 247 women with, and 358 women without a background of immigration were included in the study (total study population n = 605, response rate 81.1 %). 68 % of 1st generation immigrants, 87 % of 2nd/3rd generation women and 73 % of women without immigration background (non-immigrants) used contraception. In the logistical regression analysis 1st generation immigrants were less likely than non-immigrants to be using contraception six months postpartum, and 1st generation immigrants with low acculturation level were significantly less likely to use contraception than 2nd/3rd generation women with low acculturation level. Conclusion: In the extended postpartum period there was no major difference in contraceptive use between immigrants in general and non-immigrants. It remains unclear whether the differing contraceptive behaviour of 1st generation immigrants is the result of less access to information, sociocultural factors or differing contraceptive requirements and further targeted, qualitative study is required. PMID:26500367

  18. Estimating Contraceptive Needs and Increasing Access to Contraception in Response to the Zika Virus Disease Outbreak--Puerto Rico, 2016.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Naomi K; Goldberg, Howard I; Bernal, Manuel I Vargas; Rivera, Brenda; Frey, Meghan T; Malave, Claritsa; Renquist, Christina M; Bracero, Nabal Jose; Dominguez, Kenneth L; Sanchez, Ramon E; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K; Rodriguez, Blanca R Cuevas; Simeone, Regina M; Pesik, Nicki T; Barfield, Wanda D; Ko, Jean Y; Galang, Romeo R; Perez-Padilla, Janice; Polen, Kara N D; Honein, Margaret A; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Jamieson, Denise J

    2016-04-01

    Zika virus is a flavivirus transmitted primarily by Aedes species mosquitoes. Increasing evidence links Zika virus infection during pregnancy to adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes, including pregnancy loss, intrauterine growth restriction, eye defects, congenital brain abnormalities, and other fetal abnormalities. The virus has also been determined to be sexually transmitted. Because of the potential risks associated with Zika virus infection during pregnancy, CDC has recommended that health care providers discuss prevention of unintended pregnancy with women and couples who reside in areas of active Zika virus transmission and do not want to become pregnant. However, limitations in access to contraception in some of these areas might affect the ability to prevent an unintended pregnancy. As of March 16, 2016, the highest number of Zika virus disease cases in the United States and U.S. territories were reported from Puerto Rico. The number of cases will likely rise with increasing mosquito activity in affected areas, resulting in increased risk for transmission to pregnant women. High rates of unintended and adolescent pregnancies in Puerto Rico suggest that, in the context of this outbreak, access to contraception might need to be improved. CDC estimates that 138,000 women of reproductive age (aged 15-44 years) in Puerto Rico do not desire pregnancy and are not using one of the most effective or moderately effective contraceptive methods, and therefore might experience an unintended pregnancy. CDC and other federal and local partners are seeking to expand access to contraception for these persons. Such efforts have the potential to increase contraceptive access and use, reduce unintended pregnancies, and lead to fewer adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes associated with Zika virus infection during pregnancy. The assessment of challenges and resources related to contraceptive access in Puerto Rico might be a useful model for other areas with active transmission

  19. [Intrauterine contraception in nulliparous women].

    PubMed

    Prilepskaia, V N; Mezhevitinova, E A

    1991-04-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of various methods of contraception in nulliparous women are reviewed with special emphasis in hormonal and intrauterine contraception. The use of hormonal contraceptives in young women can induce changes in the still immature hypothalamo-hypophyseal-ovarian system. One of the most frequent side-effects of hormonal contraceptives in young nulliparous women is amenorrhea. Short-term use of 2 or triphasic contraceptives with low content of estrogens and gestagens can stimulate secretion of hormones by ovaries and lead to development of polycystic ovary or endometrial hyperplasia. Intrauterine devices (IUD) do not have a negative systemic effect on the hypothalamo-hypophyseal-ovarian system. Among the IUD models recommended for the use in nulliparous women are Copper-T, Nova-T, Multiload. Effectiveness of IUD ranges from 91.3% for inert Lippes loop, to 98.3% for copper-containing IUD, and 99.8% for progesterone-containing IUD. Dilatation of narrow cervical canal in nulliparous women prior to insertion of IUD can cause traumatic injury of the cervical canal and subsequent cervix insufficiency. Anatomical characteristics of the uterus in young nulliparous women (greater length of the cervical canal in comparison with the length of the cervix cavity) require careful selection of the IUD size to fit the size of the cervix cavity. Complications associated with the use of an IUD include pelvic inflammation with subsequent tubal infertility. The frequency of ectopic pregnancy ranges from 4.1% after the use of inert IUD, to 3% after the use of copper-containing IUD, and 16% after the use of progesterone-containing IUD. Complications are the most frequent within the first 3-8 months of the use of IUD.

  20. Contraceptive sales in the setting of the Zika virus epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Bahamondes, Luis; Ali, Moazzam; Monteiro, Ilza; Fernandes, Arlete

    2017-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Has there been any influence of the Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak on the sales of contraceptive methods in Brazil? SUMMARY ANSWER Contraceptive sales in the 24 months of evaluation showed little variation and no significant change has been observed since the ZIKV outbreak. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Transmission of ZIKV is primarily by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes; however, sexual transmission has also been described. The association of several birth defects and the ZIKV infection during pregnancy has been established, and it was estimated in Bahia, Brazil that the infection rate could range from 10% to 80%. The World Health Organisation (WHO) declared the cluster of microcephaly cases and other neurological disorders a health emergency on 1 February 2016. The Brazilian government also made recommendations for women who were planning to become pregnant and who reside in ZIKV-affected areas to reconsider or postpone pregnancy. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The objective of this study was to assess the sales of contraceptive methods in Brazil, tracking it from before and through the ZIKV outbreak. We obtained information from all pharmaceutical companies based in Brazil and from the manufacturers of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs), including the copper-intrauterine device (IUD), the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) and implants, about contraceptives sales in the public and private sectors between September 2014 and August 2016. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS We analyzed the data for: (i) oral contraceptives, i.e. combined oral contraceptives (COC) and progestin-only pills (POP), and vaginal and transdermal contraceptives, (ii) injectable contraceptives, i.e. once-a-month and depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate, (iii) LARCs and (iv) emergency contraceptive (EC) pills. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Monthly sales of COC, POP, patches and vaginal rings represent the major sales segment of the market, i.e. 12.7–13

  1. Choices on contraceptive methods in post-abortion family planning clinic in the northeast Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In Brazil, a Ministry of Health report revealed women who underwent an abortion were predominantly in the use of contraceptive methods, but mentioned inconsistent or erroneously contraceptive use. Promoting the use of contraceptive methods to prevent unwanted pregnancies is one of the most effective strategies to reduce abortion rates and maternal morbidity and mortality. Therefore, providing post-abortion family planning services that include structured contraceptive counseling with free and easy access to contraceptive methods can be suitable. So the objective of this study is to determine the acceptance and selection of contraceptive methods followed by a post-abortion family planning counseling. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out from July to October 2008, enrolling 150 low income women to receive post-abortion care at a family planning clinic in a public hospital located in Recife, Brazil. The subjects were invited to take part of the study before receiving hospital leave from five different public maternities. An appointment was made for them at a family planning clinic at IMIP from the 8th to the 15th day after they had undergone an abortion. Every woman received information on contraceptive methods, side effects and fertility. Counseling was individualized and addressed them about feelings, expectations and motivations regarding contraception as well as pregnancy intention. Results Of all women enrolled in this study, 97.4% accepted at least one contraceptive method. Most of them (73.4%) had no previous abortion history. Forty of the women who had undergone a previous abortion, 47.5% reported undergoing unsafe abortion. Slightly more than half of the pregnancies (52%) were unwanted. All women had knowledge of the use of condoms, oral contraceptives and injectables. The most chosen method was injectables, followed by oral contraceptives and condoms. Only one woman chose an intrauterine device. Conclusion The acceptance rate of post

  2. Prevalence rates of respiratory symptoms in Italian general population samples exposed to different levels of air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Viegi, G. Univ. of Arizona, Tucson ); Paoletti, P.; Carrozzi, L.; Vellutini, M.; Diviggiano, E.; Pistelli, G.; Giutini, G. ); Di Pede, C. Occupational Medicine Service, Toscana ); Lebowitz, M.D. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors surveyed two general population samples aged 8 to 64 living in the unpolluted, rural area of the Po Delta (northern Italy) and in the urban area of Pisa (central Italy). Each subject filled out a standardized interviewer-administered questionnaire. The Pisa sample was divided into three groups according to their residence in the urban-suburban areas and to outdoor air pollution exposure (automobile exhaust only or industrial fumes as well). Significantly higher prevalence rates of all the respiratory symptoms and diseases were found in Pisa compared with the Po Delta. Current smoking was more frequent in the rural area, but the urban smokers had a higher lifetime cigarette consumption. Childhood respiratory trouble and recurrent respiratory illnesses were evenly distributed. Exposure to parental smoking in childhood and lower educational level were more frequent in Po Delta, whereas familial history of respiratory/allergic disorders and work and indoor exposures were more often reported in the city. Multiple logistic regression models estimating independently the role of the various risk factors showed significant odds ratios associated with residence in Pisa for all the symptoms but chronic phlegm. The conclusion, these preliminary analyses indicate an urban factor related to the rates of respiratory symptoms and diseases in Italy in the 1980s.

  3. Prevalence of poor self-rated health and associated risk factors among older adults in Cali, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Zapata-Ossa, Helmer de J; Cubides-Munévar, Ángela M; Curcio, Carmen L; Villegas, Juan de D; Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Self-rated health (SRH) has beeen considered an important marker of quality of life and an independent predictor of mortality in older adults. Objective: To determine the prevalence of poor SRH and identify risk factors associated with poor SRH among older adults residing in the Commune 18 of the city of Cali, Colombia, in 2009. Methods: A population-based cross-sectional study with a single-stage cluster sampling design. Sample included 314 persons aged 60 and older. The dependent variable, SRH was dichotomized into good (excellent, very good, good) and poor (fair, poor). Independent variables were sociodemographic, biological, mental, functional and geriatric syndromes. Logistic regression was used for multivariate statistical modeling. Results: Overall, 40.1% reported poor SRH (women 42.9%, men 35.0%). Factors independently associated with poor SRH were diabetes mellitus, depression, fear of falling and frailty syndrome (frail and pre-frail vs. non-frail). Widowed men reported poorer health than married men while other marital status (single/separated/divorced) was associated with better self-rated health in women. Conclusion: Potential modifiable factors such as depression and frailty syndrome are important determinants for poor SRH in Colombian older adults. PMID:24892239

  4. Sexual victimization of youth with a physical disability: an examination of prevalence rates, and risk and protective factors.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Johnson, Katrin; Eisner, Manuel P; Obsuth, Ingrid

    2014-11-01

    Children with disabilities have been shown to be at greater risk of victimization than those without. Although much of the research combines disability of any type into a single disability category, recent evidence suggests that not all types of disabilities are equally associated with victimization. To date, little knowledge exists about the victimization of youth with physical disabilities. This study used data from a national school-based survey of adolescents (n = 6,749, mean age = 15.41, SD = .66) in Switzerland to investigate sexual victimization (SV) among physically disabled youth. Two subtypes of SV were differentiated: contact SV, including penetration or touching/kissing, and non-contact SV, such as exhibitionism, verbal harassment, exposure to sexual acts, or cyber SV. A total of 360 (5.1%) youth self-identified as having a physical disability. Lifetime prevalence rates for contact SV were 25.95% for girls with a physical disability (odds ratio [OR] = 1.29 compared with able-bodied girls), 18.50% for boys with physical disability (OR = 2.78 compared with able-bodied boys), and 22.35% for the total sample with physical disability (OR = 1.74 compared with able-bodied youth). For non-contact SV, the lifetime prevalence was 48.11% for girls with a physical disability (OR = 1.44 compared with able-bodied girls), 31.76% for boys with physical disability (OR = 1.95 compared with able-bodied boys), and 40.28% for the total sample with physical disability (OR = 1.67 compared with able-bodied youth). After controlling for other risk factors, physical disability was a significant predictor of contact and non-contact SV for boys, but not for girls.

  5. ERICA: sexual initiation and contraception in Brazilian adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela; Fujimori, Elizabeth; Kuschnir, Maria Cristina Caetano; Chofakian, Christiane Borges do Nascimento; de Moraes, Ana Júlia Pantoja; Azevedo, George Dantas; dos Santos, Karine Ferreira; de Vasconcellos, Mauricio Teixeira Leite

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of sexual initiation and contraceptive use at the last sexual intercourse of Brazilian adolescents, according to sociodemographic features. METHODS The data were obtained from the Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA), a national school-based cross-sectional study. We included 74,589 adolescents from 32 geographic strata (27 capitals and five sets of municipalities with more than 100,000 inhabitants of each of the five macro-regions of the Country). Information on sexual initiation and contraceptive use at the last sexual intercourse (male condom and oral contraceptive pill) has been used. We have estimated prevalence and confidence intervals (95%CI) considering sample weights according to sex, age, type of school, residence status, macro-region and capitals. RESULTS We observed that 28.1% (95%CI 27.0-29.2) of the adolescents had already initiated sexual life, with higher prevalence among those aged 17 years (56.4%, 95%CI 53.9-58.9), males (33.5%, 95%CI 31.8-35.2), studying at public schools (29.9%, 95%CI 28.5-31.4), and from the Northern region (33.9%, 95%CI 32.3-35.4), mainly from Macapa, Manaus, and Rio Branco. Among those who had started their sexual life, 82.3% (95%CI 81.1-83.4) reported the use of contraceptive methods at the last intercourse, and the prevalence of use was higher among adolescents aged 17 years (85.3%, 95%CI 82.7-87.6), females (85.2%, 95%CI 83.8-86.5) and those living in the Southern region (85.9%, 95%CI 82.9-88.5). Male condom was used by 68.8% (95%CI 66.9-70.7), with no difference by type of school or macro-regions; the contraceptive pill was used by 13.4% (CI95% 12.2-14.6), and more frequently used among women (24.7%, 95%CI 22.5-27,0) and 17-year-old adolescents (20.8%, 95%CI 18.2-23.6) from urban settings(13.7%, 95%CI 12.5-14.9) and from the Southern region (22.6%, 95%CI 19.0-26.8), and less often in the Northern region. CONCLUSIONS ERICA’s data analysis on sexuality and

  6. ERICA: sexual initiation and contraception in Brazilian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela; Fujimori, Elizabeth; Kuschnir, Maria Cristina Caetano; Chofakian, Christiane Borges do Nascimento; de Moraes, Ana Júlia Pantoja; Azevedo, George Dantas; dos Santos, Karine Ferreira; de Vasconcellos, Mauricio Teixeira Leite

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of sexual initiation and contraceptive use at the last sexual intercourse of Brazilian adolescents, according to sociodemographic features. METHODS The data were obtained from the Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA), a national school-based cross-sectional study. We included 74,589 adolescents from 32 geographic strata (27 capitals and five sets of municipalities with more than 100,000 inhabitants of each of the five macro-regions of the Country). Information on sexual initiation and contraceptive use at the last sexual intercourse (male condom and oral contraceptive pill) has been used. We have estimated prevalence and confidence intervals (95%CI) considering sample weights according to sex, age, type of school, residence status, macro-region and capitals. RESULTS We observed that 28.1% (95%CI 27.0-29.2) of the adolescents had already initiated sexual life, with higher prevalence among those aged 17 years (56.4%, 95%CI 53.9-58.9), males (33.5%, 95%CI 31.8-35.2), studying at public schools (29.9%, 95%CI 28.5-31.4), and from the Northern region (33.9%, 95%CI 32.3-35.4), mainly from Macapa, Manaus, and Rio Branco. Among those who had started their sexual life, 82.3% (95%CI 81.1-83.4) reported the use of contraceptive methods at the last intercourse, and the prevalence of use was higher among adolescents aged 17 years (85.3%, 95%CI 82.7-87.6), females (85.2%, 95%CI 83.8-86.5) and those living in the Southern region (85.9%, 95%CI 82.9-88.5). Male condom was used by 68.8% (95%CI 66.9-70.7), with no difference by type of school or macro-regions; the contraceptive pill was used by 13.4% (CI95% 12.2-14.6), and more frequently used among women (24.7%, 95%CI 22.5-27,0) and 17-year-old adolescents (20.8%, 95%CI 18.2-23.6) from urban settings(13.7%, 95%CI 12.5-14.9) and from the Southern region (22.6%, 95%CI 19.0-26.8), and less often in the Northern region. CONCLUSIONS ERICA's data analysis on sexuality and contraception

  7. Committee Opinion No. 642: Increasing Access to Contraceptive Implants and Intrauterine Devices to Reduce Unintended Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    Unintended pregnancy persists as a major public health problem in the United States. Although lowering unintended pregnancy rates requires multiple approaches, individual obstetrician-gynecologists may contribute by increasing access to contraceptive implants and intrauterine devices. Obstetrician-gynecologists should encourage consideration of implants and intrauterine devices for all appropriate candidates, including nulliparous women and adolescents. Obstetrician-gynecologists should adopt best practices for long-acting reversible contraception insertion. Obstetrician-gynecologists are encouraged to advocate for coverage and appropriate payment and reimbursement for every contraceptive method by all payers in all clinically appropriate circumstances.

  8. Long-acting steroid contraceptive technology.

    PubMed

    Grubb, G

    1991-01-01

    Long-acting steroid contraceptive technologies that have either been recently approved or are currently under study are reviewed and the status of contraceptive research in the US is noted. The benefits and drawbacks, as well as the duration and possible cost, of each method are discussed. Approved by the Food and Drug Administration on December 10, 1990, Norplant is reportedly the first new contraceptive technology available to women in the US since the 1960s. This implant delivery system, which lasts up to 5 years, is cheaper than the pill and nearly as effective as sterilization. Study is currently under way on other multiyear, nonbiodegradable and biodegradable implants. Although already used by 4 million women worldwide, the long-acting injectable Depo-Provera has yet to be approved for use in the US. 5 new types of injectables are being developed. Steroid-containing IUDs have been in the market for some time, and current research is attempting to increase their contraceptive life beyond 1 year. Contraceptive developers are also exploring transdermal delivery systems, vaginal rings, and buccal and sublingual delivery. It is considered misleading to call Norplant the first new contraceptive introduced since the pill. Over the past 20 years, virtually every contraceptive has been significantly improved, developments that have enhanced the contraceptive options of couples. Because new contraceptive technologies are increasingly complex, their development is much slower. Consequently, it is concluded that in the foreseeable future, the demand for more acceptable contraceptives will be met through improvements of currently available technologies.

  9. Cervical Chlamydia trachomatis infection in university women: relationship to history, contraception, ectopy, and cervicitis.

    PubMed

    Harrison, H R; Costin, M; Meder, J B; Bownds, L M; Sim, D A; Lewis, M; Alexander, E R

    1985-10-01

    Endocervical Chlamydia trachomatis infection was found in 13 of 162 volunteer female university students (8%). Infection was correlated with younger age (p less than 0.05), less than or equal to 4 years of intercourse (p less than 0.05), a history of gonorrhea (p less than 0.01), and exposure to a partner with urethritis (p less than 0.01). Women who used intrauterine or barrier contraception had less infection (2%) than did women who used oral contraception (14.3%, p less than 0.05) or none at all (10.7%, p less than 0.05). Infection was strongly associated with a cervicitis score calculated from erythema, ectopy, discharge, and secretions that contained white blood cells (p less than 0.0001). By multivariate analysis, a proposed clinical approach was arrived at for testing for chlamydial organisms all women with cervicitis who were not using barrier contraception. The positive predictive value of this approach for chlamydial infection was 28%, and the negative predictive value 98.4%. Cervical ectopy was increased in women who used oral contraception (p less than 0.01), and infection was increased in women with ectopy, regardless of their contraceptive method (p less than 0.001). These results will aid in more rapid diagnosis of endocervical chlamydial infection and in the choice of contraception in young women and high-prevalence groups.

  10. Associations Between Abortion Services and Acceptance of Postabortion Contraception in Six Indian States.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sushanta K; Gulati, Sumit; Andersen, Kathryn L; Acre, Valerie; Warvadekar, Janardan; Navin, Deepa

    2015-12-01

    Women receiving induced abortions or postabortion care are at high risk of subsequent unintended pregnancy, and intervals of less than six months between abortion and subsequent pregnancy may be associated with adverse outcomes. This study highlights the prevalence and attributes of postabortion contraceptive acceptance from 2,456 health facilities in six major Indian states, among 292,508 women who received abortion care services from July 2011 through June 2014. Eighty-one percent of the women accepted postabortion contraceptive methods: 53 percent short-term, 11 percent intrauterine devices, and 16 percent sterilization. Postabortion contraceptive acceptance was highest among women who were aged 25 years and older, received first-trimester services, received induced abortion, attended primary-level health facilities, and had medical abortions. Doctors receiving post-training support were more likely to offer contraceptives, but no association was observed between such support and acceptance of IUDs or sterilization. Comprehensive service-delivery interventions, including ensuring availability of skilled providers and contraceptive commodities, offering clinical mentoring for providers, identifying and addressing provider bias, and improving provider counseling skills, can increase postabortion contraceptive acceptance and reduce unintended pregnancy.

  11. Effectiveness of Hormonal Contraception in HIV-Infected Women using Antiretroviral Therapy: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pyra, Maria; Heffron, Renee; Mugo, Nelly R.; Nanda, Kavita; Thomas, Katherine K.; Celum, Connie; Kourtis, Athena P.; Were, Edwin; Rees, Helen; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Baeten, Jared M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess whether antiretroviral therapy (ART) may diminish the effectiveness of hormonal contraceptive methods. Methods Using data from 5,153 HIV-infected women followed prospectively one to three years in three HIV prevention studies in Africa, we compared incident pregnancy rates by contraceptive method (implant, injectable, oral, or none) and ART use. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to determine adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) and test interactions between each method and ART use. Results During follow-up, 9% of women ever used implants, 40% used injectables, and 14% used oral contraceptives; 31% of women ever used ART, mostly nevirapine (75% of ART users) or efavirenz-based (15%). Among women not using contraception, pregnancy rates were 13.2 and 22.5 per 100 women-years for those on and not on ART, respectively. Implants greatly reduced the incidence of pregnancy among both women on ART (aHR 0.06, 95% CI 0.01-0.45) and not on ART (aHR 0.05, 95% CI 0.02-0.11). Injectables (aHR 0.18 on ART and aHR 0.20 not on ART) and oral contraceptives (aHR 0.37 on ART and aHR 0.36 not on ART) also reduced pregnancy risk, though by lesser degrees. ART use did not significantly diminish contraceptive effectiveness, although all methods showed non-statistically significant reduced effectiveness when concurrently using efavirenz. Conclusion Hormonal contraceptive methods are highly effective in reducing pregnancy risk in HIV-infected women, including those concurrently using ART. Studies of potential interactions between ART and contraceptives should evaluate real-world effectiveness of contraceptive methods; in this study, implants were the most effective method to prevent pregnancy, even during ART use. PMID:26544706

  12. Sex differences in conditioned stimulus discrimination during context-dependent fear learning and its retrieval in humans: the role of biological sex, contraceptives and menstrual cycle phases

    PubMed Central

    Lonsdorf, Tina B.; Haaker, Jan; Schümann, Dirk; Sommer, Tobias; Bayer, Janine; Brassen, Stefanie; Bunzeck, Nico; Gamer, Matthias; Kalisch, Raffael

    2015-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are more prevalent in women than in men. Despite this sexual dimorphism, most experimental studies are conducted in male participants, and studies focusing on sex differences are sparse. In addition, the role of hormonal contraceptives and menstrual cycle phase in fear conditioning and extinction processes remain largely unknown. Methods We investigated sex differences in context-dependent fear acquisition and extinction (day 1) and their retrieval/expression (day 2). Skin conductance responses (SCRs), fear and unconditioned stimulus expectancy ratings were obtained. Results We included 377 individuals (261 women) in our study. Robust sex differences were observed in all dependent measures. Women generally displayed higher subjective ratings but smaller SCRs than men and showed reduced excitatory/inhibitory conditioned stimulus (CS+/CS−) discrimination in all dependent measures. Furthermore, women using hormonal contraceptives showed reduced SCR CS discrimination on day 2 than men and free-cycling women, while menstrual cycle phase had no effect. Limitations Possible limitations include the simultaneous testing of up to 4 participants in cubicles, which might have introduced a social component, and not assessing postexperimental contingency awareness. Conclusion The response pattern in women shows striking similarity to previously reported sex differences in patients with anxiety. Our results suggest that pronounced deficits in associative discrimination learning and subjective expression of safety information (CS− responses) might underlie higher prevalence and higher symptom rates seen in women with anxiety disorders. The data call for consideration of biological sex and hormonal contraceptive use in future studies and may suggest that targeting inhibitory learning during therapy might aid precision medicine. PMID:26107163

  13. 'Stratified Contraception': Emergency Contraceptive Pills and Women's Differential Experiences in Contemporary India.

    PubMed

    Sheoran, Nayantara

    2015-01-01

    Available without prescriptions in India since 2005, emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) and their advertisements have provided women with increased contraceptive options and a vocabulary to talk about their reproductive lives. I draw on long-term fieldwork with women in urban India about ECPs, demonstrating a new form of 'stratified contraception' enabled by these pills and their advertisements. I posit that there are within India spaces that replicate the luxuries and privileges of the global North. These material conditions, I suggest, are replicated when it comes to contraception as there are hubs of women consumers of contraception and contraceptive advertising that participate in an 'imagined cosmopolitanism' within the global South in close proximity to 'contraceptive ghettos.' Moving beyond simplistic binaries, I outline three major stratifications along which women experience this medical technology and outline the implications for women and their contraceptive choices when notions of northern privilege exist in the 'South.'

  14. [Health risks of oral contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Meier, Christoph R

    2011-06-01

    Oral contraceptives (OC) are either composed of a combination of an estrogen derivative (usually ethinly estradiol) and a progestogen, or they contain a progestogen only. OC are characterized by a high effectiveness and have a low failure rate if taken correctly. Most women tolerate OC relatively well, but adverse effects do occur which are driven by the estrogen dose as well as by the type of progestogen. The most frequently reported adverse effects are nausea or vomiting, breast tenderness, headache or inbalanced mood, but these unwanted side effects are often transient. The fear of weight gain of many OC users is not necessarily supported by data from studies which report relatively little differences in body mass index on average during OC use. Nevertheless, substantial weight gain can occur in individual women. The widely discussed fear of breast cancer is also not justified, and the risk of developing ovarian or endometrial cancer is reduced for women who use OC on a regular basis. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the adverse effect with the greatest potential for serious harm if pulmonary embolism develops. This rare, but potentially dangerous adverse effect of OC has been discussed emotionally for many years and keeps attracting a lot of public interest. VTE is rare in young women, but the VTE risk is increased two- to sixfold for OC users as compared to non-users. The VTE risk increases with increasing estrogen dose, is highest in the first year of use, and is higher for OC from the third generation (containing desogestrel, gestodene or norgestimate) than for OC from the second generation (containing levonorgestrel) or than for the progestogen-only pill. According to most studies, OC containing the progestogens drospirenone or cyproterone acetate are similar with regard to VTE risks than OC from the third generation. Individual genetic susceptibility affecting the clotting system plays a major role in the risk of developing VTE in combination with OC, and

  15. Recent innovations in oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Cremer, Miriam; Phan-Weston, Scarlett; Jacobs, Adam

    2010-03-01

    Traditional forms of oral contraception contain 21 days of hormone-containing pills and 7 days of placebo during the hormone-free interval (HFI). Since 2003, the Food and Drug Administration has approved 24/4, 84/7, and 365-day regimens. These regimens shorten the HFI in an attempt to decrease bleeding and menstrual-associated side effects. Safety and efficacy of these regimens is comparable with traditional 21/7 dosing. Extended regimens are associated with high patient satisfaction. Bleeding patterns are similar or shorter in women using extended regimens, along with improvement in menstrual symptoms. One of the new formulations contains the new progestin drospirenone, which has antimineralocorticoid and antiandrogenic properties. This review summarizes the data about new formulations of oral contraception available in the United Sates and also provides a summary of the current literature on drospirenone.

  16. Contraceptive pills and acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, T N; Mital, H S; Gupta, S K

    1981-06-01

    This article reports a case of acute pancreatitis in a patient taking the oral contraceptive pill. A 32 year old mother had been on combined contraceptive pills since 1975. In 1978 she started having upper abdominal and retrosternal pain. She became critically ill with peripheral circulatory collapse, dyspnoea and cyanosis. A superficial thrombophlebitis was noted on the medial aspect of the right thigh. The diagnosis of pancreatitis was considered with history of recurrent abdominal pain. After several tests and supportive therapy (intravenous fluids, antibiotics, steriods), the woman started showing improvements in 48 hours and recovered in 10 days. This case differs from previously described cases in that the cholesterol and triglyceride levels were normal. The hypoglycemia has not been described previously.

  17. Choosing the appropriate oral contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Langer, A; Devanesan, M; Pelosi, M A

    1978-06-01

    The estrogen and progestin in most oral contraceptives, regardless of amounts, can produce undesirable side effects in any woman. The convenience and effectiveness, however, make oral contraceptives an excellent birth control method for the correctly screened patient. The use of relatively small doses of estrogen combined with a progestin complementary to the estrogenic, progestogenic, and androgenic needs of the patient will reduce the risk of side effects. Above the 50 ug estrogen level there is significantly higher risk of pulmonary embolism, venous thrombosis, and cerebral thrombosis. Hypertension, depression and hepatic disorders are other potential side effects. Less serious complications are breakthrough bleeding, likely caused by low level estrogen dosage and amenorrhea. Progestogenic effects include sustained noncyclic weight gain and amenorrhea. Prescribing these agents necessitates adequate follow-up and willingness to alter the prescription.

  18. Relationship between contraceptive method and vaginal flora.

    PubMed

    Peddie, B A; Bishop, V; Bailey, R R; McGill, H

    1984-08-01

    This study was undertaken to assess whether the vaginal flora was affected by the method of contraception, and in particular as to whether the incidence of vaginal candidiasis increased when oral contraceptives were used. One thousand and two consecutive vaginal or cervical swabs from women attending a family planning centre were cultured. Candida albicans was isolated from 13% of women using no contraception, 16% using oral contraceptives, and from 9%, 19% and 18% of those using diaphragms, intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCD) and condoms respectively. These differences were not statistically significant. Women using an IUCD had significantly more Gram-positive cocci cultured than women in any other group, while those using diaphragms had significantly more Gram-negative bacilli. Our clinical impression that the use of oral contraceptives led to an increase in vaginal candidiasis, was not confirmed by this study.

  19. Premenstrual Syndrome Symptomatology among Married Women of Fertile Age based on Methods of Contraception (Hormonal versus Non-Hormonal Methods of Contraception)

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshani, Nour Mohammad; Hosseinbor, Mohsen; Shahraki, Zahra; Sakhavar, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) refers to the cyclic occurrence of a set of disturbing physical, emotional or behavioral alterations that are of sufficient severity to interfere with interpersonal relations and routine life. Normal variations in gonadal estrogen and progesterone lead to biochemical reactions in the brain, resulting in PMS symptoms. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of PMS and PMDD signs among married women of fertile age (MWFA) based on the methods of birth control. Method and Materials: In a descriptive study, a number of 400 married women referring to 20 family healthcare clinics that use contraceptive methods were recruited and PMS questionnaire were administered to them. Results: From 400 subjects, 205 took oral contraceptive pills (hormonal methods of contraception) and 195 used other birth control methods (non-hormonal method). A number of 345 subjects (86.25%) at least experienced one PMS symptom and 55 subjects (13.75%) did not report any symptoms. Of those who use hormonal contraceptives (HCs), 182 (88.8%) reported PMS symptoms and 23(11.2) lacked any symptoms. Conclusion: About 86% of the subjects showed moderate to severe of PMS symptoms. Although using hormonal contraceptive method can theoretically reduce PMS symptoms, such effect was not observed in this study. The results of this research should be generalized with caution. Future studies are suggested. PMID:24576370

  20. Contraception technology: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Nath, Anita; Mishell, Daniel R

    2013-03-01

    Steady progress in contraception research has been achieved over the past 50 years. Hormonal and nonhormonal modern contraceptives have improved women's lives by reducing different health conditions that contributed to considerable morbidity. However, the contraceptives available today are not suitable to all users, and the need to expand contraceptive choices still exists. Novel products such as new implants, contraceptive vaginal rings, transdermal patches and newer combinations of oral contraceptives have recently been introduced in family planning programs, and hormonal contraception is widely used for spacing and limiting births. Concerns over the adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives have led to research and development of new combinations with improved metabolic profile. Recent developments include use of natural compounds such as estradiol and estradiol valerate with the hope to decrease thrombotic risk, in combination with newer progestins derived from the progesterone structure or from spirolactone, in order to avoid the androgenic effects. Progesterone antagonists and progesterone receptor modulators are highly effective in blocking ovulation and preventing follicular rupture and are undergoing investigations in the form of oral pills and in semi-long-acting delivery systems. Future developments also include the combination of a contraceptive with an antiretroviral agent for dual contraception and protection against sexually transmitted diseases, to be used before intercourse or on demand, as well as for continuous use in dual-protection rings. Although clinical trials of male contraception have reflected promising results, limited involvement of industry in that area of research has decreased the likelihood of having a male method available in the current decade. Development of nonhormonal methods is still at an early stage of research, with the identification of specific targets within the reproductive system in ovaries and testes, as well as

  1. Communication about Contraception and Knowledge of Oral Contraceptives amongst Norwegian High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Thomas; Skjeldestad, Finn Egil

    2003-01-01

    Examines communication about contraception and specific knowledge of oral contraceptives (OCs) in a sample of Norwegian high school students. More females than males discussed contraception at least monthly. Discussions were predominantly held with peers and not adults. Females were far more knowledgeable about OCs than males. The most significant…

  2. A Meta-Analysis of the Global Prevalence Rates of Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus Contamination of Different Raw Meat Products.

    PubMed

    Ou, Qianting; Peng, Yang; Lin, Dongxin; Bai, Chan; Zhang, Ting; Lin, Jialing; Ye, Xiaohua; Yao, Zhenjiang

    2017-03-30

    Previous research has indicated that raw meats are frequently contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus , but data regarding the pooled prevalence rates of S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) contamination in different types of raw meat products (beef, chicken, and pork) and across different periods, regions, and purchase locations remain inconsistent. We systematically searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Ovid, Web of Science, and HighWire databases to identify studies published up to June 2016. The STROBE guidelines were used to assess the quality of the 39 studies included in this meta-analysis. We observed no significant differences in the pooled prevalence rates of S. aureus and MRSA contamination identified in various raw meat products, with overall pooled prevalence rates of 29.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 22.8 to 35.9%) and 3.2% (95% CI, 1.8 to 4.9%) identified for the two contaminants, respectively. In the subgroup analyses, the prevalence of S. aureus contamination in chicken products was highest in Asian studies and significantly decreased over time worldwide. In European studies, the prevalence rates of S. aureus contamination in chicken and pork products were lower than those reported on other continents. The pooled prevalence rates of S. aureus contamination in chicken and pork products and MRSA contamination in beef and pork products were significantly higher in samples collected from retail sources than in samples collected from slaughterhouses and processing plants. These results highlight the need for good hygiene during transportation to and manipulation at retail outlets to reduce the risk of transmission of S. aureus and MRSA from meat products to humans.

  3. Contraceptive specifications: report on a workshop.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A A; Berelson, B

    1971-01-01

    It was suggested at a meeting in 1967 on the behavioral sciences and family planning programs that social scientists should be involved in the design of new contraceptives. The Center of Population Research and the Population Council held a 2-day workshop in August 1969 to develop a more rational approach to the design of new contraceptives by working out the specifications for the variety of methods suitable for use by different population groups. The potential impact of improved contraception is great. According to the 1965 National Fertility Survey, 20% of all births occurring between 1960-1965 were unwanted. If 3/4 of these births were averted, a reduction of 15% in the number of births in 1960-1965 would have taken place. Characteristics of contraceptives are numerous, and it is recommended that the goal should be a variety of methods that would be useful under differing circumstances. In the development of new methods of contraception, it is acceptability, even more than effectiveness, that investigators are trying to improve. There are a number of social and psychological factors affecting acceptability. The kinds of contraceptives considered acceptable may differ at various stages of family growth. Contraceptives must be dependable, acceptable, harmless, simple, and cheap. In making observations and suggestions for research, it was noted that the development of an ideal contraceptive that is universally preferred is unlikely. Research should aim toward an improved contraceptive system or technology--a variety of methods rather than a single best method.

  4. More access to contraception? Russian city surveyed.

    PubMed

    Dorman, S

    1993-03-01

    In 1991-1992, a survey of 650 15-to-67-year-old women in St. Petersburg, Russia, revealed a need to improve reproductive health care services. It followed a 1989 prototype survey. 57% of the women were married and 19% had never married. 48% had 1 child, 24% had at least 2 children, and 28% had no children. Even though 76% either had 1 child or none, 81% wanted to have at least 2 children. Housing and finances were leading reasons for limiting births. 91% of all women and 75% of 50-to- 24 year-old=-women had experienced at least 1 pregnancy. The mean number of children and abortions for women 25 years old and above were 1 and 3, respectively. Just 14% had never undergone an abortion. A small minority had had over 20 abortions. Despite the high frequency of abortions, most women (83%) considered abortion a threat to a woman's health. In fact, 40% believed abortion was responsible for deterioration of their health. 32% had conducted self-abortions in a nonmedical environment. (The abortion rate was about 2 times that of the birth rate in Russia.) The last pregnancy of 80% of all women (87% of those 25 years old) was unplanned. 32% of women who had ever been pregnant experienced an adolescent pregnancy. Respondents did not trust medical personnel and resented the obligation to pay bribes for even routine care. Just 1% thought that reproductive health care was satisfactory. Medical directors of Women's Consultation Clinics considered patients to be irresponsible and uninformed about family planning. In 1989, 12% of women considered contraception to be readily available, while in 1992, 38% did. This was mainly due to government allocation of funds to import IUDs and condoms. For example, prior to 1990, a clinic serving 4300 women inserted a mean number of 300 IUDs/year, but after 1990 it inserted almost 900. Further, abortions fell from 1150 to 800. In 1992, the most available contraception was condoms. Shortage of foreign exchange limits oral contraceptives, IUDs, and

  5. Reported Diabetes Mellitus Prevalence Rates in the Colombia Healthcare System from 2009 to 2012: Analysis by Regions Using Data of the Official Information Sources

    PubMed Central

    Barengo, Noël C.; Tamayo, Diana Carolina

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the reported diabetes mellitus (DM) prevalence rates of the 20–79-year-old population in Colombia from 2009 to 2012 reported by the healthcare system. Information on number of patients treated for DM was obtained by the Integral Information System of Social Protection (SISPRO), the registry of the Ministry of Health and Social Protection, and the High Cost Account (CAC), an organization to trace high expenditure diseases. From both sources age-standardized reported DM prevalence rates per 100.000 inhabitants from 2009 to 2012 were calculated. Whereas the reported DM prevalence rates of SISPRO revealed an increase from 964/100.000 inhabitants (2009) to 1398/100.000 inhabitants in 2012 (mean annual increase 141/100.000; p value: 0.001), the respective rates in the CAC register were 1082/100.000 (2009) and 1593/100.000 in 2012 (mean annual increase 165/100.000; p value: 0.026). The number of provinces reporting not less than 19% of the highest national reported DM prevalence rates (1593/100.000) increased from two in 2009 to ten in 2012. Apparently, the registries and the information retrieving system have been improved during 2009 and 2012, resulting in a greater capacity to identify and report DM cases by the healthcare system. PMID:26494999

  6. Use of hormonal contraceptives to control menstrual bleeding: attitudes and practice of Brazilian gynecologists

    PubMed Central

    Makuch, María Y; D Osis, Maria José; de Pádua, Karla Simonia; Bahamondes, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the attitudes and prescribing practices of Brazilian obstetricians and gynecologists regarding use of contraceptive methods to interfere with menstruation and/or induce amenorrhea. Methods We undertook a nationwide survey of Brazilian obstetricians and gynecologists selected using a computer-generated randomization system. Participants completed a questionnaire on prescription of contraceptives and extended/continuous regimens of combined oral contraceptives (COCs). Results In total, 79.2% of Brazilian obstetricians and gynecologists reported that 20%–40% of their patients consulted them for menstrual-related complaints and 26%–34% of the gynecologists reported that 21%–40% of their patients consulted them for reduction in the intensity, frequency, and/or duration of menstrual bleeding. Overall, 93% stated that medically induced amenorrhea represents no risk to women’s health and 82.5% said that they prescribed contraceptives to control menstruation or induce amenorrhea. The contraceptives most commonly prescribed were extended-cycle 24/4 or 26/2 COC regimens and the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system. Poisson regression analysis showed that Brazilian obstetricians and gynecologists prescribing contraceptives to control menstruation or induce amenorrhea consider extended-use or continuous-use COC regimens to be effective for both indications (prevalence ratio 1.23 [95% confidence interval 1.09–1.40] and prevalence ratio 1.28 [95% confidence interval 1.13–1.46], respectively). They also prescribed COCs with an interval of 24/4 or 26/2 to control bleeding patterns (prevalence ratio 1.10 [95% confidence interval 1.01–1.21]). Conclusion Brazilian obstetricians and gynecologists were favorably disposed toward prescribing extended-use or continuous-use COC regimens for control of menstrual bleeding or to induce amenorrhea on patient demand. PMID:24399887

  7. Receiving voluntary family planning services has no relationship with the paradoxical situation of high use of contraceptives and abortion in Vietnam: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Vietnam shows a paradoxical situation where high contraceptive prevalence goes together with high abortion rates. This study examined the associations between self-reports of having received voluntary family planning (VFP) services and induced abortions. Methods A cross sectional survey was conducted in Thai Nguyen province, covering a total of 1281 women. Data were derived from a sample of 935 married women aged 18–49 years who were ever-users (93.5%) and current users of contraceptives (84%), and had completed birth histories. The dependent variables were the likelihood of having an induced abortion and repeated (two or more) induced abortions. The main independent variable was having received the three VFP dimensions (counselling, broader information, and access to availability). The association was examined using multivariate logistic regressions, taking into account women’s socio-demographic characteristics. Results The overall induced abortion percentage was 19.4 per 100 pregnancies. None of the three VFP dimensions was significantly associated with the odds of having an induced abortion or having repeated induced abortions. Mother’s age of 35 or older, having more than three living children, and ever used female contraception methods significantly doubled or more the odds of having an induced abortion and significantly tripled the odds of having repeated abortions. Conclusions Results indicate that women receiving VFP services were not less likely to have induced abortions. The provision of family planning counselling, information on contraceptive method mix, and management skills to ensure availability, are in need of reinforcement in a new set of policy and program strategies in the future. PMID:22639926

  8. Provision of contraceptive services to homeless women: results of a survey of health care for the homeless providers.

    PubMed

    Saver, Barry G; Weinreb, Linda; Gelberg, Lillian; Zerger, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Homeless women have both a higher rate of pregnancy and a higher proportion of unintended pregnancies than other American women. The authors sought to learn about contraception services offered by providers of health care to homeless women and barriers to provision of long-acting, reversible contraception in these settings. A survey of the 31 member organizations in the national Health Care for the Homeless Practice-Based Research Network was conducted, inquiring about services provided and barriers to service provision. Among the 20 responding organizations (65% response rate), 17 directly provided contraceptive services; two referred patients elsewhere, and one provided no contraceptive services. All 17 that provided such services provided condoms; 15 provided oral contraceptives; 14 provided injectable contraception; 6 provided intrauterine devices, and 2 provided contraceptive implants. Barriers to providing the last two methods included lack of provider training, lack of resources for placement, costs, and concerns about complications. The present survey results suggested very limited access for homeless women across the country to the two most effective means of long-acting, reversible contraception. Modest investments of resources could reduce a number of barriers to providing these services.

  9. Induced abortion and contraception in Italy.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, A; Grandolfo, M E

    1991-09-01

    This article discusses the legal and epidemiologic status of abortion in Italy, and its relationship to fertility and contraception. Enacted in May 1978, Italy's abortion law allows the operation to be performed during the 1st 90 days of gestation for a broad range of health, social, and psychological reasons. Women under 18 must receive written permission from a parent, guardian, or judge in order to undergo an abortion. The operation is free of charge. Health workers who object to abortion because of religious or moral reasons are exempt from participating. Regional differences exist concerning the availability of abortion, easy to procure in some places and difficult to obtain in others. After an initial increase following legalization, the abortion rate was 13.5/1000 women aged 15-44 and the abortion ratio was 309/1000 live births -- an intermediate rate and ratio compared to other countries. By the time the Abortion Act of 1978 was adopted, Italy already had one of the lowest fertility levels in Europe. Thus, the legalization of abortion has had no impact on fertility trends. Contrary to initial fears that the legalization of abortion would make abortion a method of family planning, 80% of the women who sought an abortion in 1983-88 were using birth control at the time (withdrawal being the most common method used by this group). In fact, most women who undergo abortions are married, between the ages of 25-34, and with at least one child. Evidence indicates widespread ignorance concerning reproduction. In a 1989 survey, only 65% of women could identify the fertile period of the menstrual cycle. Italy has no sex education in schools or national family planning programs. Compared to most of Europe, Italy still has low levels of reliable contraceptive usage. This points to the need to guarantee the availability of abortion.

  10. The Role of Quality Health Services and Discussion about Birth Spacing in Postpartum Contraceptive Use in Sindh, Pakistan: A Multilevel Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tappis, Hannah; Dahar, Zaib; Ali, Anayat; Agha, Sohail

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rapid population growth, stagnant contraceptive prevalence, and high unmet need for family planning present significant challenges for meeting Pakistan’s national and international development goals. Although health behaviors are shaped by multiple social and environmental factors, research on contraceptive uptake in Pakistan has focused on individual and household determinants, and little attention has been given to community characteristics that may affect access to services and reproductive behavior. Methods Individual and community determinants of contraceptive use were identified using multivariable multilevel logistic regression to analyze data from a 2014 cross-sectional survey of 6,200 mothers in 503 communities in Sindh, Pakistan. Results Only 27% of women who had given birth in the two years before the study reported using contraceptives. After adjusting for individual and community characteristics, there was no difference in the odds of contraceptive use between urban and rural women. Women who had delivered at a health facility had 1.4 times higher odds of contraceptive use than women who delivered at home. Those who received information about birth spacing from a doctor or relatives/friends had 1.81 and 1.38 times higher odds of contraceptive use, respectively, than those who did not. Living in a community where a higher proportion of women received quality antenatal care and where discussion of birth spacing was more common was significantly associated with contraceptive use. Community-wide poverty lowered contraceptive use. Conclusions Quality of care at the community level has strong effects on contraceptive use, independent of the characteristics of individual households or women. These findings suggest that powerful gains in contraceptive use may be realized by improving the quality of antenatal care in Pakistan. Community health workers should focus on generating discussion of birth spacing in the community. Outreach efforts should

  11. Effect of agricultural activities on prevalence rates, and clinical and presumptive malaria episodes in central Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Koudou, Benjamin G; Tano, Yao; Keiser, Jennifer; Vounatsou, Penelope; Girardin, Olivier; Klero, Kouassi; Koné, Mamadou; N'goran, Eliézer K; Cissé, Guéladio; Tanner, Marcel; Utzinger, Jürg

    2009-09-01

    Agricultural activities, among other factors, can influence the transmission of malaria. In two villages of central Côte d'Ivoire (Tiémélékro and Zatta) with distinctively different agro-ecological characteristics, we assessed Plasmodium prevalence rates, fever and clinically confirmed malaria episodes among children aged 15 years and below by means of repeated cross-sectional surveys. Additionally, presumptive malaria cases were monitored in dispensaries for a 4-year period. In Tiémélékro, we observed a decrease in malaria prevalence rates from 2002 to 2005, which might be partially explained by changes in agricultural activities from subsistence farming to cash crop production. In Zatta, where an irrigated rice perimeter is located in close proximity to human habitations, malaria prevalence rates in 2003 were significantly lower than in 2002 and 2005, which coincided with the interruption of irrigated rice farming in 2003/2004. Although malaria transmission differed by an order of magnitude in the two villages in 2003, there was no statistically significant difference between the proportions of severe malaria episodes (i.e. axillary temperature>37.5 degrees C plus parasitaemia>5000 parasites/microl blood). Our study underscores the complex relationship between malaria transmission, prevalence rate and the dynamics of malaria episodes. A better understanding of local contextual determinants, including the effect of agricultural activities, will help to improve the local epidemiology and control of malaria.

  12. Counseling adolescents about contraception: towards the development of an evidence-based protocol for contraceptive counselors.

    PubMed

    Jaccard, James; Levitz, Nicole

    2013-04-01

    Research on contraceptive counseling of adolescents in clinics and service delivery settings is considered. The provider context as well as the developmental context of adolescence is characterized and their implications for contraceptive counseling are explicated. After reviewing research on the effectiveness of contraceptive counseling, it was concluded there is little empirical evidence to support the efficacy of current practices considered as a totality. Twelve principles for effective contraceptive counseling were then derived as a basis for building an evidence-based contraceptive counseling protocol for adolescents.

  13. Hormonal contraception and risk of cardiovascular disease. An international perspective.

    PubMed

    Farley, T M; Collins, J; Schlesselman, J J

    1998-03-01

    The most frequent major adverse effect of hormonal contraception is an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The effect on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and myocardial infarction (MI) differs and is strongly influenced by smoking and the presence of other cardiovascular risks factors, such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus. The incidence of each disease rises with age and there are differences in risk among hormonal contraceptive preparations. This article provides a framework within which to assess the balance of risks among types of hormonal contraceptives according to individual circumstances. Data on cardiovascular disease mortality rates in women of reproductive age in different countries of the world were compiled from nationally reported statistics and supplemented where possible with reported disease incidence rates. Risks associated with current use of hormonal contraception were compiled from the most recent publications on the cardiovascular effects of steroid hormone contraception. These were combined to estimate the total cardiovascular incidence and mortality according to baseline cardiovascular risk and individual characteristics. Mortality rates for cardiovascular diseases are very low in women of reproductive age. Myocardial infarction mortality rates rise from < 0.4 per 100,000 woman-years at age 15-24 years to the range 2 to 7 per 100,000 woman-years at age 35-44 years. Stroke mortality rates similarly rise steeply with age and are between 3 and 5 times higher than those for MI. VTE mortality rates rise less steeply with age and are approximately one-tenth the MI mortality rates at age 35-44 years. The adverse effect of oral contraceptives (OC) on the risk of VTE is the most important contributor to the total number of cardiovascular cases attributable to OC use. The increased risk of stroke and MI dominate the patterns of mortality in OC users and smokers. The additional risks attributable to

  14. Prevalence of bovine subclinical endometritis 4h after insemination and its effects on first service conception rate.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, T B; Drillich, M; Tenhagen, B-A; Forderung, D; Heuwieser, W

    2009-01-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of subclinical endometritis 4h after AI and its effect on first service conception rate (FSCR) in dairy cows. A total of 201 Holstein-Friesian cows with no signs of clinical endometritis were examined 4h after first AI for signs of subclinical endometritis. Endometrial samples were collected from the uterus using the cytobrush technique. The proportion of polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) in the cytological sample was used to characterize an inflammation of the endometrium. Cows were categorized into three groups according to the proportion of PMN in the sample. Cows with 0% PMN (n=115) were assigned to group Zero, cows with >0-15% PMN (n=59) to group Medium, and cows with >15% PMN (n=27) to group High. Pregnancy diagnosis was performed between days 38-44 after AI by palpation of the uterus and its contents per rectum. The FSCR was significantly higher in group Medium than in groups Zero and High (57.6% vs. 39.1% and 29.6%). Statistical analysis revealed an interaction between parity and PMN group. Primiparous cows were at higher risk of being classified into group Medium than multiparous cows (OR=2.27, P=0.01). Primiparous cows in group Zero had lower odds of pregnancy after first AI than primiparous cows in group Medium (OR=0.3, P=0.02). A comparison with cows that were not examined for subclinical endometritis showed that the collection of endometrial samples itself had no effect on FSCR.

  15. [Oral contraception and circulatory risks].

    PubMed

    Wingrave, S J

    1984-10-01

    The longterm prospective study of health effects of oral contraceptives (OCs) conducted by the Royal College of General Practitioners compared 23,000 OC users with 23,000 controls matched for age and marital status. As of 1981, 55 deaths attributable to circulatory problems had occurred in ever-users of OCs, ciompared to 10 in controls, giving a relative risk of 4.2 for OC users. No relation was found between duration of use and mortality risk among users, although mortality risks were greater at all durations of use than for nonusers. Parity was related to mortality risk among users but not among controls. The most significant factors affecting the relation between pill use and circulatory risk were age and smoking. Among users who smoked, the risk ratios were 3.4 for those aged 25-34, 4.2 for those aged 35-44, 7.4 for those aged 45 and over, and 5.1 for the entire group. Among nonsmoking pill users, the ratios were 1.6 for those aged 25-34, 3.3 for those aged 35-44, 4.6 for those 45 and over, and 3.2 for the total sample. Among smokers, the rates of excess deaths were 1 in 10,000 for users aged 15-34, 1 in 2000 for those aged 35-44, and 1 in550 for those aged 45 and over. Among nonsmokers, the rates were 1 in 50,000 users for those aged 25-34, 1 in 6700 for those aged 35-44, and 1 in 2500 for those aged 45 and over. The majority of deaths were attributed to ischemic cardiac problems and to sub-arachnoid hemorrhages, and risks appeared to be elevated in former as well as current users. The total incidence of circulatory effects in former users appears to be elevated only for cerebrovascular disorders, but the suggestion of residual effects requires further study before conclusions can be drawn. Smokers who developed cardiovascular or cerebrovascular problems were at 2-3 times greater risk of dying than were other women. The percentages of fatal cases of ischemic heart and cerebrovascular diseases were 22.8% among ever-users who smoked, 10.9% among controls who

  16. Estrogen-free oral hormonal contraception: benefits of the progestin-only pill.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Nilson Roberto

    2010-09-01

    Although combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are commonly used and highly effective in preventing pregnancy, they may not be suitable for some women. COC use is associated with increased rates of cardiovascular events and is not recommended in nonbreastfeeding women in the immediate postpartum period or in breastfeeding women during the initial 6 months of breastfeeding. Moreover, estrogen-related adverse effects, such as headache, are common. Estrogen-free progestin-only pills (POPs) are a valuable option in women who prefer to take an oral hormonal contraceptive, but are ineligible for, or choose not to use, COCs. Although some POPs have been associated with lower contraceptive effectiveness than COCs, the POP containing desogestrel has shown similar contraceptive effectiveness to COCs. The most commonly reported complaints in women using all POPs are bleeding problems. Counseling women interested in using POPs about the variable bleeding patterns associated with this method may improve compliance and acceptance.

  17. Factors influencing married youths' decisions on contraceptive use in a rural area of Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Myo-Myo-Mon; Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed to describe the factors influencing the decision of married female youth and their husbands measured by self-rating on the magnitude and importance of each factor and person, and agreement between willingness to use and actual contraceptive use. A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Ayeyarwaddy Division, Myanmar. The decision to use contraception increased significantly due to motivation from a provider, friends, spousal communication, and benefits of contraception by multiple logistic regression. Influencing factors which attained the magnitude of >50% and importance of >5 scores for their decision were a couple's attitude, spousal communication, pregnancy susceptibility, couple's knowledge, and benefit of contraception. A fair agreement was found between willingness to use and actual use.

  18. [Oral combined contraception: is there any difference between ethinyl-estradiol and estradiol?].

    PubMed

    Trémollieres, F

    2012-02-01

    Estradiol 17-β, which is the natural estrogen in women, offers an alternative to ethinyl-estradiol to be used in combined oral contraceptives. Thanks to its biochemical structure, estradiol has a far lesser impact on the synthesis of hepatic proteins than ethinyl-estradiol, which is likely to result in a better metabolic and vascular profile. However and until lately, the different clinical trials that had investigated estradiol-containing oral contraceptives were limited by bleeding disturbances, with breakthrough and irregular bleeding and higher rates of discontinuation. Development of anti-gonadotropic progestins with a potent endometrial activity is likely to make possible their combination with estradiol in oral contraceptives. The objective of this current review is to provide an overview of the development of combined oral contraceptives containing natural estrogen from the respective biochemical and pharmacological characteristics of ethinyl-estradiol and estradiol.

  19. Conditioning Military Women for Optimal Performance: Effects of Contraceptive Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    an extremely low failure rate (0.0-1.2 per 100 woman -years) and is used by 11 million women in over 90 countries, including the United States (22,58...disease including thyroid disease and hyperprolactinemia ; e) lack of any recent (within three months) changes in menstrual status; f) appropriate activity...In: Clinical Gynecol Endocrinol Infertil . 5th ed. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins; 1994. 59. SteinhampfMP, Blackwell RE. Contraception. In: Carr BR

  20. Factors affecting intrauterine contraceptive device performance. I. Endometrial cavity length.

    PubMed

    Hasson, H M; Berger, G S; Edelman, D A

    1976-12-15

    The relationship of endometrial cavity length to intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) performance was evaluated in 319 patients wearing three types of devices. The rate of events, defined as pregnancy, expulsion, or medical removal, increased significantly when the length of the IUD was equal to, exceeded, or was shorter by two or more centimeters than the length of the endometrial cavity. Total uterine length was found to be a less accurate prognostic indicator of IUD performance than endometrial cavity length alone.

  1. Ultrasound appearances of Implanon implanted contraceptive devices.

    PubMed

    McNeill, G; Ward, E; Halpenny, D; Snow, A; Torreggiani, W

    2009-01-01

    Subdermal contraceptive devices represent a popular choice of contraception. Whilst often removed without the use of imaging, circumstances exist where imaging is required. Ultrasound is the modality of choice. The optimal technique and typical sonographic appearances are detailed in this article.

  2. Understanding Adolescent Contraceptive Choice: An Empirical Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Nancy E.; And Others

    Research using expectancy models has shown contraceptive choice among adults to be a rational process in that intentions and behaviors reflect an individual's beliefs, values, attitudes, and perceptions of social norms. This study examined whether such an approach could accurately represent adolescents' contraceptive decision-making. It used the…

  3. Substance Use and Other Mental Health Disorders Among Veterans Returning to the Inner City: Prevalence, Correlates, and Rates of Unmet Treatment Need

    PubMed Central

    Vazan, Peter; Golub, Andrew; Bennett, Alex S.

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of substance use and other mental health disorders of veterans (N = 269) who returned to predominantly low-income minority New York City neighborhoods between 2009 and 2012 are presented. Although prevalences of posttraumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and depression clustered around 20%, the estimated prevalence rates of alcohol use disorder, drug use disorder, and substance use disorder were 28%, 18%, and 32%, respectively. Only about 40% of veterans with any diagnosed disorder received some form of treatment. For alcohol use disorder, the estimate of unmet treatment need was 84%, which is particularly worrisome given that excessive alcohol use was the greatest substance use problem. PMID:23869460

  4. The first abortion - and the last? A study of the personality factors underlying repeated failure of contraception.

    PubMed

    Niemelä, P; Lehtinen, P; Rauramo, L; Hermansson, R; Karjalainen, R; Mäki, H; Storå, C A

    1981-06-01

    The causes leading to a second abortion were outlined in a psychological study comparing 30 women expecting a second abortion with 29 women who had successfully prevented conception after a first abortion. It was found that both groups improved their contraceptive practices after the first abortion. However, while the latter group continued with their improved practices, the former group went back to the earlier inefficient or non-existent contraceptive behavior. The inability to improve contraception in the long run was not related to differences in educational level or knowledge about contraceptive techniques but to the developmental level of personality structures. The women expecting their second abortion rated lower in control of impulsivity, emotional balance, realism, self-esteem and stability of life as well as capacity for more integrated personal relationships. The differences in personality development and consequently in the capacity for long-term contraception were found to be due to growth conditions in childhood.

  5. Contraception. Slow train gathers speed.

    PubMed

    Hampton, N; Kubba, A

    The otherwise slow pace of contraceptive research developments has recently quickened, with new products developed, more on the way, and encouraging new data emerging about existing methods. While the 1995 UK pill scare called attention to a differential in the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) between pills containing levonorgestrel or norethisterone and those containing desogestrel or gestodene, there is only an extremely small level of excess mortality attributable to third-generation progestogens, less than 2 per million women per year. Tentative evidence suggests that pills with less anti-estrogenic progestogens are neutral with regard to coronary artery disease. The pill remains extremely safe for healthy young women, although additional research with larger numbers of participants is warranted. Salient research findings are that the combined oral contraceptive pill may protect against colon cancer, the pill appears to offer no protection against bone fractures, new products contain less estrogen and have a shortened pill-free interval, a WHO paper showed no significant association between cardiovascular disease and the use of oral or injectable progestogens, a UK study showed no correlation between bone density and plasma estrogen concentrations among long-term users of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, and a WHO controlled trial found a progestogen-only method of emergency contraception to be considerably more effective in preventing expected pregnancies than the Yuzpe regimen. The T 380 copper IUD provides very high protection against intrauterine and extrauterine pregnancies for 10 years and is now available in an improved inserting mechanism, the Mirena levonorgestrel-releasing IUD system is now licensed for 5 years, and the GyneFIX IUD implant is a frameless device fixed during insertion to the fundal myometrium.

  6. Family planning communications and contraceptive use in Guatemala, El Salvador, and Panama.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, J T; Santiso, R; Cisneros, R J; Mascarin, F; Morris, L

    1982-01-01

    Recent contraceptive prevalence surveys in Guatemala, El Salvador, and panama included a module on family planning communications. This module provided useful feedback on the reach of each program and facilitated comparisons between countries. While almost all women in El Salvador have been reached by family planning messages, the percentage of women reached was lower in Panama and Guatemala. In all three countries rural, less educated, and unemployed women who worked inside the home or not at all were least likely to have seen or heard the messages. Exposure to family planning communications emerged as a strong correlate of contraceptive use, as shown in two separate analyses. These findings underscore the importance of communications in promoting contraceptive use.

  7. Marketing contraceptives in rural Thailand.

    PubMed

    Viravaidya, M

    1988-01-01

    It can be difficult to administer and motivate field workers in family planning programs. In the case of social marketing, the last distributors in the chain are small shopkeepers who keep part of the final sale price. Thus contraceptives become part and parcel of their routine business, and the margin becomes both their remuneration and their motivation. In Thailand and most other countries with social marketing programs, part of the selling price also returns to the program, providing some degree of cost recovery. As family planning succeeds and per capita incomes rise, individuals will be able to pay an increasing part of the total cost of family planning. In the interim, international agencies and governments will continue to provide subsidies. In rural countries like Thailand, social marketing programs can be initiated and expanded relatively rapidly because they build on an existing infrastructure; they can also reach the most distant parts of the country. Skills of local advertising agencies are available in practically all Third World countries. Sales are a reliable record of progress and can be used to suggest innovations or practical solutions to problems. Small shopkeepers often feel more comfortable vending contraceptives than many experts would expect and as members of the community, intuitively know what the community's standards are. Individuals handling oral contraceptives often require some training and supervision by full-time staff who can answer questions that arise; local physicians may also be notified of the program for referral of problem cases. If there is a problem with social marketing programs, it is that they are sometimes too successful--leading to large bills for contraceptive commodities. However, if evaluated in terms of cost-effectiveness, they are less expensive than their alternatives. Along with access to voluntary sterilization and community-based distribution programs, social marketing is a keystone in the arch of family

  8. Venous thromboembolism in women taking hormonal contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Molina, Angeles; Monreal, Manuel

    2010-02-01

    Hormonal contraceptives are a popular method of contraception, but their use has been associated with an increased risk for venous thromboembolism. In order to reduce such risk, these compounds have been changed in their dosage, chemical composition and route of administration. The absolute risk of death from pulmonary embolism in contraceptive users has been estimated to be 10.5 (95% CI: 6.2-16.6) per million woman-years. The safest option is an oral contraceptive containing levonorgestrel combined with a low dose of estrogen. Identifying women at increased risk for venous thromboembolism is difficult, and greater use of thromboprophylaxis during immobility or minor surgery should be warranted. Several authors have called for all women to be screened for thrombophilia before prescription of hormonal contraceptives, but its cost-effectiveness remains uncertain.

  9. [High-dose progestational contraception: side effects].

    PubMed

    Gorins, A

    1993-02-01

    Women rarely depend on progestational contraception. In France, physicians are unsure of its indications. Progestational contraception presents advantages for certain indications where a particular condition exists and, more particularly, for women aged 40 and over. Women who can use it are those who have contraindications to estrogen use. These contraindications include uterine fibroids, endometrial hyperplasia, endometriosis, and fibro-cystic disease of the breast. It does produces side effects but those affecting metabolism seem to be almost negligible, like those of the third generation progestins. These side effects are metrorrhagias, amenorrhea, weight gain, and atherogenic metabolic changes. Yet, the nor-pregnane derivatives (which do effectively suppress ovulation) do not adversely affect glucose and lipid parameters. Progestational contraception probably cannot assure absolute safety as can combined oral contraceptives. It is not yet clear whether women who have been treated for breast cancer should use progestational contraception.

  10. An “Imperfect” Contraceptive Society: Fertility and Contraception in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Gribaldo, Alessandra; Judd, Maya D.; Kertzer, David I.

    2013-01-01

    Italy represents an unexpected and in some ways paradoxical outcome in terms of fertility control: a drop to one of the lowest birth rates in the world has been accompanied by the preponderant use of “traditional” methods despite the availability of “modern” contraception. Using data from 349 interviews conducted in 2005–2006 in four Italian cities, we argue that Italian women achieve “unplanned” AND desired conceptions through the use of withdrawal and natural methods. While data from other countries reveal similar notions of ambivalence surrounding pregnancy intentions and contraceptive use, Italy stands out for the surprising correlation between highly “managing” the conditions under which children are born and the socially commended approach of “letting births happen”. Such results suggest the need to rethink theoretical understandings of low fertility. Through the use of non-technological methods individuals manipulate culturally produced norms and beliefs about the appropriate moment to have a child; simultaneously, their actions are embedded in larger cultural, economic, and political processes. PMID:25045191

  11. [Intrauterine contraception (author's trans)].

    PubMed

    Audebert, A J

    1982-11-01

    Biological and technical research findings have helped to increase the number of acceptors of the IUD in France to nearly 1.5 million in 1983. The endometrial effects of IUDs are better understood at the morphological level through the use of electron microscopy and at the functional level through use of doses of metabolites or hormonal receptors. More precise evaluation of modifications of the composition and biological properties of the uterine environment allow a better understanding of local physiological repercussions of the IUD. Copper IUDs, the most common type in use at present, are produced with numerous variations in size, shape, method of insertion, and other features. Factors conditioning the liberations of copper have not been studied until recently, but appear to depend on the woman herself as well as the quantity, quality, mode of incorporation and location of the device of the copper. There is no consensus as yet as to the optimal amount of copper, duration of the IUD, or role of the copper. Progesterone-freeing IUDs are on the point of being commercialized in France. Unlike copper IUDs, they release the substance at a constant rate over a determined period. The effects include diminution of fibrinolytic activity and liberation of prostaglandins, with consequent reductions in blood loss and menstrual pain. Because the properties of an IUD are modified by such conditions of use as the experience of the inserting physician and patient characteristics, comparison between different devices is difficult. The most important factor affecting performance of the IUD appears to be good adaptation of the device to the configuration of the uterine cavity. Complications are not always avoidable but they can be reduced by better patient selection and good technique of insertion, and their consequences can be limited by early identification and treatment.

  12. Safety, efficacy and patient acceptability of the contraceptive and non-contraceptive uses of the LNG-IUS.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, Paula H; Jensen, Jeffrey T

    2010-08-09

    Intrauterine devices (IUDs) provide highly effective, long-term, safe, reversible contraception, and are the most widely used reversible contraceptive method worldwide. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) is a T-shaped IUD with a steroid reservoir containing 52 mg of levonorgestrel that is released at an initial rate of 20 μg daily. It is highly effective, with a typical-use first year pregnancy rate of 0.1% - similar to surgical tubal occlusion. It is approved for 5 years of contraceptive use, and there is evidence that it can be effective for up to 7 years of continuous use. After removal, there is rapid return to fertility, with 1-year life-table pregnancy rates of 89 per 100 for women less than 30 years of age. Most users experience a dramatic reduction in menstrual bleeding, and about 15% to 20% of women become amenorrheic 1 year after insertion. The device's strong local effects on the endometrium benefit women with various benign gynecological conditions such as menorrhagia, dysmenorrhea, leiomyomata, adenomyosis, and endometriosis. There is also evidence to support its role in endometrial protection during postmenopausal estrogen replacement therapy, and in the treatment of endometrial hyperplasia.

  13. Population Reference Values and Prevalence Rates following Universal Screening for Subclinical Hypothyroidism during Pregnancy of an Afro-Caribbean Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nadine; Chatrani, Vikash; Taylor-Christmas, Anna-Kay; Choo-Kang, Eric; Smikle, Monica; Wright-Pascoe, Rosemarie; Phillips, Karen; Reid, Marvin

    2014-01-01

    Background Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) has been reported to be associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, however universal screening and treatment is controversial. Objectives Our objectives were to determine population-specific pregnancy reference values (R1) for serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4) at 14 weeks' gestation, along with the prevalence of SCH and thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb). Methods This was a prospective hospital-based cohort study. 1,402 subjects were recruited. Blood samples were obtained from 769 singleton pregnancies due to default between recruitment and scheduled blood draw. The prevalence of SCH was determined using R1, the laboratory non-pregnant reference values (R2) and previously recommended pregnancy reference values (R3). Results R1 for TSH and FT4 was 0.03-3.17 mU/l (mean ± SD, 1.1 ± 0.76) and 8.85-17.02 pmol/l (mean ± SD, 11.96 ± 2.06), respectively. The prevalence of SCH using reference values R1, R2 and R3 was 1.4% (11/769), 0.5% (4/769) and 1.9% (15/769). Prevalence was significantly greater using R3 when compared to R2 (p = 0.011). TPOAb prevalence was 2.6%. A significantly greater prevalence of TPOAb was found in subclinical hypothyroid subjects using all three reference values than in euthyroid subjects (∼25 vs. 2%, p < 0.05). Conclusions These reference values are the first to be reported for an Afro-Caribbean population. Our findings support the use of pregnancy-specific reference values in our population. PMID:25759799

  14. Intimate Partner Violence: Associated Factors and Acceptability of Contraception Among the Women

    PubMed Central

    Mundhra, Rajlaxmi; Singh, Nilanchali; Kaushik, Somya; Mendiratta, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of various types of domestic violence and to find out the impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) on adoption of contraceptive measures among the women who are victim to this. Materials and Methods: This questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of obstetrics and gynecology of a tertiary care hospital in Delhi. Four hundred and one postpartum females were randomly selected over a period of 5 months and were questioned about their age, parity, educational status, occupation, husband's education, monthly family income, and, if present, IPV in detail. These study participants were enquired about their contraceptive knowledge and use. Results: Sexual violence was seen in 38.4% of the cases, physical violence in 22.4% of the cases, and verbal abuse was seen in nearly 32.7% of the cases. In response to any of the three violence faced, only 23 women (11.79%) reacted by discussing with parents and friends. In 4.61% of the cases, the violence was so severe that she had to inform police. This study showed that higher percentage of women without IPV accepted immediate postpartum contraception methods as compared to those with IPV (35.9% vs. 25%, P = 0.023), but the overall frequency of using contraceptive methods was higher in those with IPV as compared to those without IPV (49% vs. 47%, P = 0.690). Conclusion: IPV is associated with increased contraceptive adoption. PMID:27385873

  15. Social Transmission and the Spread of Modern Contraception in Rural Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Alvergne, Alexandra; Gibson, Mhairi A.; Gurmu, Eshetu; Mace, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Socio-economic development has proven to be insufficient to explain the time and pace of the human demographic transition. Shifts to low fertility norms have thus been thought to result from social diffusion, yet to date, micro-level studies are limited and are often unable to disentangle the effect of social transmission from that of extrinsic factors. We used data which included the first ever use of modern contraception among a population of over 900 women in four villages in rural Ethiopia, where contraceptive prevalence is still low (<20%). We investigated whether the time of adoption of modern contraception is predicted by (i) the proportion of ever-users/non ever-users within both women and their husbands' friendships networks and (ii) the geographic distance to contraceptive ever-users. Using a model comparison approach, we found that individual socio-demographic characteristics (e.g. parity, education) and a religious norm are the most likely explanatory factors of temporal and spatial patterns of contraceptive uptake, while the role of person-to-person contact through either friendship or spatial networks remains marginal. Our study has broad implications for understanding the processes that initiate transitions to low fertility and the uptake of birth control technologies in the developing world. PMID:21799882

  16. Reduced rates of hospital-acquired UTI in medical patients. Prevalence surveys indicate effect of active infection control programmes.

    PubMed

    Christensen, M; Jepsen, O B

    2001-01-01

    Prevalence surveys have been part of the Danish infection control programme since 1974. Nationwide surveys were carried out in 1978, 1979, 1980, 1991 and 1999. The results indicate a net reduction of approximately 25%, mainly due to a reduction of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in medical patients. Results from the nationwide surveys are validated by results of occasional independent surveys performed in regions or single hospitals. The reduction coincides with preventive programmes focused on catheter policy and UTI. We conclude that the prevalence survey is an important part of our strategic programme for infection control in hospitals.

  17. A clinical trial of Neo Sampoon vaginal contraceptive tablets.

    PubMed

    Begum, S F; Liao, W C; McCann, M F; Ahmad, N

    1980-12-01

    Results are reported of a clinical trial of Neo Sampoon vaginal contraceptive tablets, conducted by the International Fertility Research Program (IFRP) in collaboration with the Dacca Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh. Of the 150 women enrolled, 115 remained in the study at the end of 12 months. The 12-month cumulative gross life-table rates per 100 women were 6.5 for pregnancy and 24.8 for discontinuation due to other reasons. Discomfort associated with the heart generated by the tablets' effervescence was the primary side effect of Neo Sampoon use, and was one of the major causes of discontinuation. Regularity of use and acceptability of this foaming tablet appeared to be high compared to other barrier methods. Further research is needed on Neo Sampoon and other vaginal contraceptives to develop and promote methods that can help meet the worldwide demand for fertility control.

  18. Seizure facilitating activity of the oral contraceptive ethinyl estradiol.

    PubMed

    Younus, Iyan; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2016-03-01

    Contraceptive management is critical in women with epilepsy. Although oral contraceptives (OCs) are widely used by many women with epilepsy, little is known about their impact on epileptic seizures and epileptogenesis. Ethinyl estradiol (EE) is the primary component of OC pills. In this study, we investigated the pharmacological effect of EE on epileptogenesis and kindled seizures in female mice using the hippocampus kindling model. Animals were stimulated daily with or without EE until generalized stage 5 seizures were elicited. EE treatment significantly accelerated the rate of epileptogenesis. In acute studies, EE caused a significant decrease in the afterdischarge threshold and increased the incidence and severity of seizures in fully-kindled mice. In chronic studies, EE treatment caused a greater susceptibility to kindled seizures. Collectively, these results are consistent with moderate proconvulsant-like activity of EE. Such excitatory effects may affect seizure risk in women with epilepsy taking OC pills.

  19. Males and Morals: Teenage Contraceptive Behavior Amid the Double Standard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scales, Peter

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews literature on teenage contraceptive behavior and teenage contraceptive decision making. The paper describes the persistence of a sexual double standard in terms of moral motivation to use contraception and in terms of the relative lack of communication about contraception among young partners. (Author)

  20. Name that Contraceptive! A Game for the Human Sexuality Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Martha S.

    2010-01-01

    There are many contraceptive choices available to people today. Learning about them can be dry, but the game "Name that Contraceptive!" can be a fun and interactive way to review, remember, and retain the details about contraceptive options. Name that Contraceptive is a card game in which students "bid" on the number of clues it will take them to…

  1. The Contraceptive Needs for STD Protection among Women in Jail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswalt, Krista; Hale, Galen J.; Cropsey, Karen L.; Villalobos, Gabriella C.; Ivey, Sara E.; Matthews, Catherine A.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the contraceptive needs of women in jails and their sexually transmitted disease (STD) history and risk to determine effective contraceptive methods for this population. A survey of demographics, sexual health, contraceptive use, and preferred method of contraception was completed by participants recruited at jails in a medium-sized…

  2. Vouchers in Fragile States: Reducing Barriers to Long-Acting Reversible Contraception in Yemen and Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Boddam-Whetham, Luke; Gul, Xaher; Al-Kobati, Eman; Gorter, Anna C

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In conflict-affected states, vouchers have reduced barriers to reproductive health services and have enabled health programs to use targeted subsidies to increase uptake of specific health services. Vouchers can also be used to channel funds to public- and private-service providers and improve service quality. The Yamaan Foundation for Health and Social Development in Yemen and the Marie Stopes Society (MSS) in Pakistan—both working with Options Consultancy Services—have developed voucher programs that subsidize voluntary access to long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) and permanent methods (PMs) of family planning in their respective fragile countries. The programs focus on LARCs and PMs because these methods are particularly difficult for poor women to access due to their cost and to provider biases against offering them. Using estimates of expected voluntary uptake of LARCs and PMs for 2014 based on contraceptive prevalence rates, and comparing these with uptake of LARCs and PMs through the voucher programs, we show the substantial increase in service utilization that vouchers can enable by contributing to an expanded method choice. In the governorate of Lahj, Yemen, vouchers for family planning led to an estimated 38% increase in 2014 over the expected use of LARCs and PMs (720 vs. 521 expected). We applied the same approach in 13 districts of Punjab, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK), and Sindh provinces in Pakistan. Our calculations suggest that vouchers enabled 10 times more women than expected to choose LARCs and PMs in 2014 in those areas of Pakistan (73,639 vs. 6,455 expected). Voucher programs can promote and maintain access to family planning services where existing health systems are hampered. Vouchers are a flexible financing approach that enable expansion of contraceptive choice and the inclusion of the private sector in service delivery to the poor. They can keep financial resources flowing where the public sector is prevented from

  3. The role of health literacy and numeracy in contraceptive decision-making for urban Chicago women.

    PubMed

    Yee, Lynn M; Simon, Melissa A

    2014-04-01

    Low functional health literacy and numeracy have known associations with poor health outcomes, yet little work has investigated these markers of health disparity in a family planning population. We used an in-depth qualitative process and 2 literacy and numeracy assessment tools, the REALM-7 and the Schwartz numeracy scale, to assess the role of literacy and numeracy in contraceptive decision-making in an urban Chicago population. Brief surveys and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 30 postpartum women who had received Medicaid-funded care at an obstetrics clinic in an academic medical center. In-person one-on-one interviews were then reviewed for themes using an iterative process. Qualitative analysis techniques identifying emergent themes were applied to interview data. Literacy and numeracy were assessed using REALM-7 and a validated 3-question numeracy scale. In this cohort of African American (63 %) and Hispanic (37 %) women (median age 26), 73 % had unplanned pregnancies. Although health literacy rates on the REALM-7 were adequate, numeracy scores were low. Low literacy and numeracy scores were associated with interview reports of poor contraceptive knowledge and difficulty with contraceptive use. Low health literacy and numeracy may play an important role in contraception decision-making in this low-income, minority population of women. We recommend further study of literacy and numeracy in a family planning population. Comprehensive contraception education and communication around the contraceptive decision-making process should take place at literacy and numeracy levels appropriate to each individual.

  4. Cost of unintended pregnancy in Norway: a role for long-acting reversible contraception

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Nathaniel; Schlueter, Max; Lowin, Julia; Lekander, Ingrid; Filonenko, Anna; Trussell, James; Skjeldestad, Finn Egil

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to quantify the cost burden of unintended pregnancies (UPs) in Norway, and to estimate the proportion of costs due to imperfect contraceptive adherence. Potential cost savings that could arise from increased uptake of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) were also investigated. Methods An economic model was constructed to estimate the total number of UPs and associated costs in women aged 15–24 years. Adherence-related UP was estimated using ‘perfect use’ and ‘typical use’ contraceptive failure rates. Potential savings from increased use of LARC were projected by comparing current costs to projected costs following a 5% increase in LARC uptake. Results Total costs from UP in women aged 15–24 years were estimated to be 164 million Norwegian Kroner (NOK), of which 81.7% were projected to be due to imperfect contraceptive adherence. A 5% increase in LARC uptake was estimated to generate cost savings of NOK 7.2 million in this group. Conclusions The cost of UP in Norway is substantial, with a large proportion of this cost arising from imperfect contraceptive adherence. Increased LARC uptake may reduce the UP incidence and generate cost savings for both the health care payer and contraceptive user. PMID:25537792

  5. WHO scientific group meeting on cardiovascular disease and steroid hormone contraceptives.

    PubMed

    1997-11-28

    More than 100 million women worldwide are thought to use steroid hormone contraceptive methods, with an estimated 93 million women using combined oral contraceptives (COCs). The composition and use of these contraceptive preparations, especially those of COCs, have changed dramatically over the years. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened a Scientific Group Meeting on Cardiovascular Disease and Steroid Hormone Contraception during November 3-7, 1997, to review current scientific data on the use of steroid hormone contraception as they relate to the risk of myocardial infarction, ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and venous thromboembolic disease. The group also reviewed the incidence of cardiovascular disease among women of reproductive age in general, how the effect of risk factors for cardiovascular disease may be changed using hormonal contraceptives, and whether different compositions of COCs have different cardiovascular risk profiles. The group was comprised of the authors of background papers prepared for the meeting and experts from around the world. The scientific group's conclusions are presented. The incidence and mortality rates of all cardiovascular diseases are very low among reproductive-age women. For women who do not smoke, who have their blood pressure checked, and who do not have hypertension or diabetes, the risk of myocardial infarction in COC users is not increased regardless of age. While current users of COCs have a low absolute risk of venous thromboembolism, their risk is still 3-6 times greater than that of nonusers, with the risk probably being highest during the first year of use.

  6. Women's autonomy, education and employment in Oman and their influence on contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    Al Riyami, Asya; Afifi, Mustafa; Mabry, Ruth M

    2004-05-01

    Since 1970 political and economic changes have brought about great improvements in health and education in Oman, and since 1994 the government has provided free contraceptives to all married couples in primary health care centres. Despite rapid socio-economic development, the fertility rate was 4.2 in 2001. The aim of this study was to define baseline data on ever-married women's empowerment in Oman from a national study in 2000, analyse the correlates of women's empowerment and the effect of empowerment on unmet need for contraception. Two indicators of empowerment were used: women's involvement in decision-making and freedom of movement. Bivariate analysis was used to link these measures and their proxies, education and employment status, with use of a family planning method. Education was a key indicator of women's status. Unmet contraceptive need for women exposed to pregnancy was nearly 25%, but decreased significantly with educational level and paid employment. While empowered women were more likely to use contraception, women's education was a better predictor of "met need" than autonomy, as traditional factors and community influence remain strong. For nearly half the 1,830 women in the study, the husband decided whether contraception was used. Fewer than 1% were using contraception before their first child as women are expected to have a child within the first year of marriage.

  7. The state of hormonal contraception today: benefits and risks of hormonal contraceptives: combined estrogen and progestin contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Shulman, Lee P

    2011-10-01

    Discussion of effective birth control methods can be a challenging process for clinicians because the adoption and consistent use of contraception may be influenced by patients' fears, myths, and misperceptions. Over the years, new progestins have been included in combination contraceptives or are used alone to provide effective contraception as well as to decrease androgenic side effects and ameliorate the symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Alternative delivery systems and regimens have also been introduced to improve tolerability and continuance and convenience of use. This is a review of estrogen and progestin combinations and their effects.

  8. Lactational amenorrhea method as a contraceptive strategy in Niger.

    PubMed

    Sipsma, Heather L; Bradley, Elizabeth H; Chen, Peggy G

    2013-05-01

    If used properly, the lactational amenorrhea method (LAM) can be a valuable family planning tool, particularly in low-income countries; however, the degree to which LAM is used correctly and characteristics associated with its use have not been well documented. We therefore sought to use nationally representative data from Niger, where fertility rates are high and women may have limited access to alternative contraceptive methods, to describe the proportion of women who use LAM correctly and the characteristics associated with LAM use. We utilized cross-sectional data from the 2006 Niger Demographic Health Survey. Our sample included all sexually active, non-pregnant, breastfeeding women using some form of contraception (N = 673, unweighted). We used weighted frequencies to describe the correct use of LAM and logistic regression models to describe women who chose LAM for contraception. Among our sample, 52% reported LAM as their primary method of contraception, but only 21% of the women who reported using LAM used it correctly. Women who reported using LAM were more likely to live in certain regions of the country, to have no formal education, and to have delivered their most recent baby at home. They were also less likely to have discussed family planning at a health facility or with their husband/partner in the past year. Results indicated that few women in Niger who reported using LAM used it correctly. Our findings reinforce the need to address this knowledge gap, especially given Niger's high fertility rate, and may inform efforts to improve family planning in Niger and in other low-income countries.

  9. The Current Status of Oral Contraceptives: Progress and Recent Innovations.

    PubMed

    Golobof, Alexandra; Kiley, Jessica

    2016-05-01

    Millions of women in the United States and abroad use oral contraceptive pills. These popular contraceptives are the most common reversible birth control method in the United States, and a wide variety of pills are available for prescription. Oral contraceptives provide safe and effective protection against pregnancy and offer several noncontraceptive benefits. Over the years, advances in the laboratory and knowledge gained through epidemiologic data promoted the development of new contraceptive preparations. Generations of oral contraceptives emerged over time, containing lower doses of estrogens and new and novel progestins. The current review discusses the clinical characteristics of oral contraceptives, with emphasis on basic pharmacology and the evolution of various contraceptive formulations and regimens.

  10. Adolescent contraception: review and guidance for pediatric clinicians.

    PubMed

    Potter, J; Santelli, J S

    2015-02-01

    The majority of adolescents initiate sexual activity during their teenage years, making contraception an important aspect of routine adolescent health care. Despite common misperceptions, all available methods of reversible contraception are appropriate for adolescent use. Contraceptive side effects profiles and barriers to use of certain methods should be considered when providing contraceptives to adolescents. In particular, ease of use, confidentiality, and menstrual effects are main concerns of adolescents. Contraceptive counseling with adolescents should describe method efficacy, discuss user preferences, explore barriers to use, counsel regarding sexually transmitted infection prevention, and consider what to do if contraception fails. Emergency contraception should be widely discussed with adolescents, as it is appropriate for use during gaps in other contraceptive use, method failure, and adolescents who are not using another form of contraception. Dual method use (condom plus a highly effective method of contraception) is the gold standard for prevention of both pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections.

  11. Large-scale survey of rates of achieving targets for blood glucose, blood pressure, and lipids and prevalence of complications in type 2 diabetes (JDDM 40)

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Hiroki; Oishi, Mariko; Takamura, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Katsuya; Shirabe, Shin-ichiro; Uchida, Daigaku; Sugimoto, Hidekatsu; Kurihara, Yoshio; Araki, Shin-ichi; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The fact that population with type 2 diabetes mellitus and bodyweight of patients are increasing but diabetes care is improving makes it important to explore the up-to-date rates of achieving treatment targets and prevalence of complications. We investigated the prevalence of microvascular/macrovascular complications and rates of achieving treatment targets through a large-scale multicenter-based cohort. Research design and methods A cross-sectional nationwide survey was performed on 9956 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus who consecutively attended primary care clinics. The prevalence of nephropathy, retinopathy, neuropathy, and macrovascular complications and rates of achieving targets of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) <7.0%, blood pressure <130/80 mm Hg, and lipids of low-density/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol <3.1/≥1.0 mmol/L and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol <3.8 mmol/L were investigated. Results The rates of achieving targets for HbA1c, blood pressure, and lipids were 52.9%, 46.8% and 65.5%, respectively. The prevalence of microvascular complications was ∼28% each, 6.4% of which had all microvascular complications, while that of macrovascular complications was 12.6%. With an increasing duration of diabetes, the rate of achieving target HbA1c decreased and the prevalence of each complication increased despite increased use of diabetes medication. The prevalence of each complication decreased according to the number achieving the 3 treatment targets and was lower in subjects without macrovascular complications than those with. Adjustments for considerable covariates exhibited that each complication was closely inter-related, and the achievement of each target was significantly associated with being free of each complication. Conclusions Almost half of the subjects examined did not meet the recommended targets. The risk of each complication was significantly affected by 1 on-target treatment (inversely) and the

  12. Contraception for adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Benito; Kozu, Katia T; Leal, Gabriela N; Silva, Marco F; Fernandes, Elisabeth G C; França, Camila M P; Souza, Fernando H C; Silva, Clovis A

    Contraception is an important issue and should be a matter of concern in every medical visit of adolescent and young patients with chronic rheumatic diseases. This narrative review discusses contraception methods in adolescents with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE), antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Barrier methods are safe and their use should be encouraged for all adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases. Combined oral contraceptives (COC) are strictly prohibited for JSLE and APS patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies. Reversible long-acting contraception can be encouraged and offered routinely to the JSLE adolescent patient and other rheumatic diseases. Progestin-only pills are safe in the majority of rheumatic diseases, although the main concern related to its use by adolescents is poor adherence due to menstrual irregularity. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injections every three months is a highly effective contraception strategy, although its long-term use is associated with decreased bone mineral density. COC or other combined hormonal contraceptive may be options for JIA and JDM patients. Oral levonorgestrel should be considered as an emergency contraception method for all adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases, including patients with contraindication to COC.

  13. Contraception for adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Benito; Kozu, Katia T; Leal, Gabriela N; Silva, Marco F; Fernandes, Elisabeth G C; França, Camila M P; Souza, Fernando H C; Silva, Clovis A

    2016-07-16

    Contraception is an important issue and should be a matter of concern in every medical visit of adolescent and young patients with chronic rheumatic diseases. This narrative review discusses contraception methods in adolescents with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE), antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Barrier methods are safe and their use should be encouraged for all adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases. Combined oral contraceptives (COC) are strictly prohibited for JSLE and APS patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies. Reversible long-acting contraception can be encouraged and offered routinely to the JSLE adolescent patient and other rheumatic diseases. Progestin-only pills are safe in the majority of rheumatic diseases, although the main concern related to its use by adolescents is poor adherence due to menstrual irregularity. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injections every three months is a highly effective contraception strategy, although its long-term use is associated with decreased bone mineral density. COC or other combined hormonal contraceptive may be options for JIA and JDM patients. Oral levonorgestrel should be considered as an emergency contraception method for all adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases, including patients with contraindication to COC.

  14. Controversies in contraception for women with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sanjeev V.

    2015-01-01

    Contraception is an important choice that offers autonomy to women with regard to prevention of unintended pregnancies. There is wide variation in the contraceptive practices between continents, countries, and societies. The medical eligibility for contraception for sexually active women with epilepsy (WWE) is determined by the type of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) that they use. Enzyme inducing AEDs such as phenobarbitone, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and oxcarbazepine increase the metabolism of orally administered estrogen (and progesterone to a lesser extent). Estrogen can increase the metabolism of certain AEDs, such as lamotrigine, leading to cyclical variation in its blood level with resultant adverse effect profile or seizure dyscontrol. AEDs and sex hormones can increase the risk of osteoporosis and fracture in WWE. The potential interactions between AEDs and hormonal contraception need to be discussed with all women in reproductive age-group. The alternate options of oral contraception such as intrauterine copper device, intrauterine levonorgestrel release system, and supplementary protection with barriers need to be presented to them. World Health Organization has recommended to avoid combination contraceptive pills containing estrogen and progesteron in women who desire contraception and in breastfeeding mothers. Care providers need to consider the option of non-enzyme-inducing AEDs while initiating long-term treatment in adolescent and young WWE. PMID:26425002

  15. The mechanism of action of hormonal contraceptives and intrauterine contraceptive devices.

    PubMed

    Rivera, R; Yacobson, I; Grimes, D

    1999-11-01

    Modern hormonal contraceptives and intrauterine contraceptive devices have multiple biologic effects. Some of them may be the primary mechanism of contraceptive action, whereas others are secondary. For combined oral contraceptives and progestin-only methods, the main mechanisms are ovulation inhibition and changes in the cervical mucus that inhibit sperm penetration. The hormonal methods, particularly the low-dose progestin-only products and emergency contraceptive pills, have effects on the endometrium that, theoretically, could affect implantation. However, no scientific evidence indicates that prevention of implantation actually results from the use of these methods. Once pregnancy begins, none of these methods has an abortifacient action. The precise mechanism of intrauterine contraceptive devices is unclear. Current evidence indicates they exert their primary effect before fertilization, reducing the opportunity of sperm to fertilize an ovum.

  16. Male hormonal contraception: looking back and moving forward.

    PubMed

    Roth, M Y; Page, S T; Bremner, W J

    2016-01-01

    Despite numerous contraceptive options available to women, approximately half of all pregnancies in the United States and worldwide are unplanned. Women and men support the development of reversible male contraception strategies, but none have been brought to market. Herein we review the physiologic basis for male hormonal contraception, the history of male hormonal contraception development, currents agents in development as well as the potential risks and benefits of male hormonal contraception for men.

  17. Male Hormonal Contraception: Looking Back and Moving Forward

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Mara Y.; Page, Stephanie T.; Bremner, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous contraceptive options available to women, approximately half of all pregnancies in the United States and worldwide are unplanned. Women and men support the development of reversible male contraception strategies, but none have been brought to market. Herein we review the physiologic basis for male hormonal contraception, the history of male hormonal contraception development, currents agents in development, as well as the potential risks and benefits of male hormonal contraception for men. PMID:26453296

  18. Choosing a combined oral contraceptive pill

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Mary; Black, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Summary The combined oral contraceptive pill is an effective contraceptive method which can also offer other benefits. However, other contraceptive options should be discussed. If the pill is the chosen method, prescribe a pill with the lowest effective dose of oestrogen and progestogen. Pills containing levonorgestrel or norethisterone in combination with ethinyloestradiol 35 microgram or less are considered first-line. They are effective if taken correctly, have a relatively low risk of venous thromboembolism, and are listed on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. The pill is usually taken in a monthly cycle. Some women may prefer an extended pill regimen with fewer or no inactive pills. PMID:26648603

  19. Postpartum Care and Contraception in Obese Women.

    PubMed

    Maclean, Courtney C; Thompson, Ivana S

    2016-03-01

    Postpartum obese women have an increased risk of breastfeeding difficulties and depression. Retaining the pregnancy weight at 6 months postpartum predicts long-term obesity. Risks for weight retention include excessive gestational weight gain, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, diet, exercise, depression, and duration of breastfeeding. Exercise and reducing total caloric intake promote postpartum weight loss. Intrauterine devices and contraceptive implants are the most effective contraceptives for obese women. Contraceptive pills, patches, and vaginal rings are effective options; however, obese women should be made aware of a potential increased risk of venous thromboembolism. Vasectomy and hysteroscopic sterilization carry the least surgical risk for obese women.

  20. Political and economic factors influencing contraceptive uptake.

    PubMed

    Sai, F T

    1993-01-01

    International, national and local level politics influence the uptake of contraception through consensuses, laws, financial and moral support or the creation of an enabling atmosphere. Opposition to contraception generally comes from some churches and groups opposed to particular technologies. Socio-economic factors, particularly education, the health care system and the perceived or actual cost of fertility regulation as compared to benefits expected from children also powerfully influence contraceptive use. For many poor women in developing countries their powerlessness in relation to their male partners is an important obstacle.

  1. Feminism and the Moral Imperative for Contraception.

    PubMed

    Espey, Eve

    2015-08-01

    This commentary is adapted from the Irvin M. Cushner Memorial Lecture, "Feminism and the Moral Imperative for Contraception," given at 2014 Annual Clinical Meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in Chicago. It provides a brief and simplified historical review of the feminist movement, primarily in the United States, focusing on feminism's association with contraception. This commentary reflects the perspective and opinions of the author. Contraception is fundamental to a woman's ability to achieve equality and realize her full social, economic, and intellectual potential.

  2. Contraceptive failure in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Trussell, James

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an update of previous estimates of first-year probabilities of contraceptive failure for all methods of contraception available in the United States. Estimates are provided of probabilities of failure during typical use (which includes both incorrect and inconsistent use) and during perfect use (correct and consistent use). The difference between these two probabilities reveals the consequences of imperfect use; it depends both on how unforgiving of imperfect use a method is and on how hard it is to use that method perfectly. These revisions reflect new research on contraceptive failure both during perfect use and during typical use. PMID:21477680

  3. Asymptomatic bacteriuria: prevalence rates of causal microorganisms, etiology of infection in different patient populations, and recent advances in molecular detection.

    PubMed

    Ipe, Deepak S; Sundac, Lana; Benjamin, William H; Moore, Kate H; Ulett, Glen C

    2013-09-01

    Bacteriuria, or the presence of bacteria in urine, is associated with both asymptomatic and symptomatic urinary tract infection and underpins much of the dynamic of microbial colonization of the urinary tract. The prevalence of bacteriuria in dissimilar patient groups such as healthy adults, institutionalized elderly, pregnant women, and immune-compromised patients varies widely. In addition, assessing the importance of 'significant bacteriuria' in infected individuals represents a diagnostic challenge, partly due to various causal microorganisms, and requires careful consideration of the distinct etiologies of bacteriuria in different populations and circumstances. Recent molecular discoveries have revealed how some bacterial traits can enable organisms to grow in human urine, which, as a fitness adaptation, is likely to influence the progression of bacteriuria in some individuals. In this review, we comprehensively analyze currently available data on the prevalence of causal organisms with a focus on asymptomatic bacteriuria in dissimilar populations. We evaluate recent advances in the molecular detection of bacteriuria from a diagnostic viewpoint and briefly discuss the potential benefits and some of the challenges of these approaches. Overall, this review provides an update on the comparative prevalence and etiology of bacteriuria from both microbiological and clinical perspectives.

  4. Contraceptive Counseling: Best Practices to Ensure Quality Communication and Enable Effective Contraceptive Use

    PubMed Central

    Dehlendorf, Christine; Krajewski, Colleen; Borrero, Sonya

    2014-01-01

    Improving the quality of contraceptive counseling is one strategy to prevent unintended pregnancy. We identify aspects of relational and task-oriented communication in family planning care that can assist providers in meeting their patients’ needs. Approaches to optimizing women's experiences of contraceptive counseling include working to develop a close, trusting relationship with patients and using a shared decision-making approach that focuses on eliciting and responding to patient preferences. Providing counseling about side effects and using strategies to promote contraceptive continuation and adherence can also help optimize women's use of contraception. PMID:25264697

  5. Vitamins and oral contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    Wynn, V

    1975-03-08

    Reports concerning the interaction between steroidal contraceptives (the combined pill) and vitamins indicate that in users the mean serum-vitamin-A level is raised and the mean serum-vitamin-B2 (riboflavine), vitamin-B6 (pyridoxine), vitamine-C, folic-acid, and vitamin-B12 levels are reduced. Other vitamins have been insufficiently studied for comment. Biochemical evidence of co-enzyme deficiency has been reported for vitamin B2, vitamin B6, and folic acid. Clinical effects due to vitamin deficiency have been described for vitamin B6--namely, depression and impaired glucose tolerance. Folic-acid deficiency with megaloblastic anaemia has been reported in only 21 cases.

  6. Sex education and contraceptive methods: knowledge and sources of information among the Estonian population.

    PubMed

    Kalda, R; Sarapuu, H; Pikk, A; Lember, M

    1998-06-01

    A survey on sex education and contraceptive methods was carried out within a monthly EMOR Omnibus Survey. By using a questionnaire, knowledge and attitudes, as well as the main sources of information on contraceptive methods and sex education, among the Estonian adult population (n = 618) was investigated. Of the respondents, 68% were female and 32% were males: the mean age was 34 years. Almost all respondents expressed the opinion that sex education should start at school and that education on contraceptive methods would reduce the number of abortions. The majority of the respondents believed that it would be more convenient to visit a family doctor than a gynecologist for family planning. Main sources of information on contraception were: literature, doctors and journals, as rated by females; and literature, partners and television, as rated by males. The roles of the school nurse, father and siblings were rated as comparatively small. The level of respondents' knowledge of contraceptive methods was not too high. It is concluded that the prerequisites for changing sexual behavior and knowledge over a short time are wider use of mass media and better sex education at schools. Also, it is necessary to prepare family doctors to offer family planning services to their patients.

  7. Documentation of Contraception and Pregnancy When Prescribing Potentially Teratogenic Medications for Reproductive-Age Women

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla; Postlethwaite, Debbie A.; Hung, Yun-Yi; Armstrong, Mary Anne

    2010-01-01

    Background Certain medications are identified by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as class D or X because they increase the risk for birth defects if used during pregnancy. Objective To assess pregnancy rates and the frequency of contraceptive counseling documented with prescriptions for class D or X drugs filled by women of reproductive age. Design Description of prescriptions filled in 2001. Setting A large health maintenance organization in northern California in 2001. Patients 488 175 women age 15 to 44 years who filled a total of 1 011 658 class A, B, D, or X prescriptions. Measurements Medications dispensed, contraceptive counseling, and pregnancy testing. Results A class D or X prescription was filled by 1 of every 6 women studied. Women who filled a prescription for class D or X medications were no more likely than women who filled prescriptions for safer, class A or B medications to have received contraceptive counseling, filled a contraceptive prescription, or been sterilized (48% vs. 51% of prescriptions). There was little variation by clinical indication in rates of contraceptive counseling with class D or X prescriptions, except for isotretinoin. Women who filled a class D or X prescription were only slightly less likely to have a pregnancy documented within 3 months than women filling a class A or B prescription (1.0% vs. 1.4% of prescriptions). Limitations International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes underestimate contraceptive counseling. Documentation of a positive pregnancy test after filling a prescription may overestimate medication use in early pregnancy. Women who filled several prescriptions are overrepresented in prescription analyses. Conclusion Prescriptions for potentially teratogenic medications are frequently filled by women of childbearing age without documentation of contraceptive counseling. PMID:17876020

  8. An all time low utilization of intrauterine contraceptive device as a birth spacing method- a qualitative descriptive study in district Rawalpindi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pakistan was among the leading countries in south Asia which started the family planning program in late 50s, forecasting the need to control the population. Despite this early intervention, fertility rate has declined but slower in Pakistan as compared to most other Asian countries. Pakistan has almost a stagnant contraceptive prevalence rate for more than a decade now, perhaps owing to the inadequate performance of the family planning programs. The provision and use of long term contraceptives such as IUCD has always been low (around 2%) and associated with numerous issues. Married women who want to wait before having another child, or end childbearing altogether, are not using any long term method of contraception. Methodology A descriptive qualitative study was conducted from May to July 2012, to explore and understand the perceptions of women regarding the use of IUCDs and to understand the challenges/issues at the service provider’s end. Six FGDs with community women and 12 in-depth interviews were conducted with family planning providers. The data was analyzed using the Qualitative Content Analysis approach. Results The study revealed that the family planning clients are reluctant to use IUCDs because of a number of myths and misconceptions associated with the method. They have reservations about the provider’s capability and quality of care at the facility. Private health providers are not motivated and are reluctant to provide the IUCDs because of inadequate counseling skills, lack of competence and improper supporting infrastructure. Government programs either do not have enough supplies or trained staff to promote the IUCD utilization. Conclusion Besides a well-designed community awareness campaign, providers’ communication and counseling skills have to be enhanced, as these are major contributing factors in IUCD acceptance. Ongoing training of all family planning service providers in IUCD insertion is very important, along with

  9. [Evolution of the Hungarian oral contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Seregély, G

    1992-11-01

    Author gives a review of the development of Hungarian oral contraceptives from the beginning to the present status. He describes the three main historical phases that means the high-dose combined pills, the low-dose compositions and the most modern two- and three-phasic preparations. Besides, he mentions the monohormonal mini-pills and the so-called postcoital pill, too. He refers to the fact that the Hungarian pharmaceutical research followed truly the international development in oral contraception, too.

  10. Contraceptive steroid effects on nonreproductive organ systems.

    PubMed

    Corson, S L

    1986-09-01

    Oral contraceptives affect many organ systems in addition to the reproductive tract. In some cases the alteration is just a clinical laboratory test result value; in others it represents a true alteration in metabolism, with the induction of increased enzyme activity. Even with the markedly reduced steroid content of today's oral contraceptives, the practitioner must continue to be aware of these potential and real effects on nonreproductive organ systems.

  11. The Language of Love?--Verbal versus Implied Consent at First Heterosexual Intercourse: Implications for Contraceptive Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Jenny A.; Trussell, James; Moore, Nelwyn B.; Davidson, J. Kenneth, Sr.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Little is known about how young people communicate about initiating intercourse. Purpose: This study was designed to gauge the prevalence of implied versus verbal consent at first intercourse in a U.S. college population, assess effects of consent type on contraceptive use, and explore the influences of gender, race and other factors.…

  12. Contraception in women with epilepsy: pharmacokinetic interactions, contraceptive options, and management.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Caryn; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Contraceptive counseling is a critical component of the management of the female patient with epilepsy because of the increased risk of pregnancy associated with epilepsy and the multitude of interactions between antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and hormonal contraception. Steroid hormones and many of the AEDs are substrates for the cytochrome P450 enzyme system, in particular, the 3A4 isoenzyme. As a result, concomitant use of hormonal contraceptives and AEDs may pose a risk for unexpected pregnancy, seizures, and drug-related adverse effects. The risk of combined oral contraceptive (COC) failure is slightly increased in the presence of cytochrome P450 3A4 enzyme-inducing AEDs. Several AEDs induce the production of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) to which the progestins are tightly bound, resulting in lower concentrations of free progestin that may also lead to COC failure. There is no increase in the risk of COC failure in women taking nonenzyme-inducing AEDs. Oral contraceptives significantly increase the metabolism of lamotrigine, posing a risk of seizures when hormonal agents are initiated and/or toxicity during pill-free weeks. There is no evidence that COCs increase seizures in women with epilepsy. While higher dose COCs are one contraceptive option for women on enzyme-inducing AEDs, a variety of other options are available. Injectable contraception (depot medroxyprogesterone acetate) appears effective with AED use, but the potential for bone mineral density loss is a concern. Intrauterine devices (IUDs) and barrier methods do not rely on hormonal components for contraceptive efficacy, and are therefore appropriate to recommend for use in women using enzyme-inducing medications. This chapter reviews the evidence regarding the pharmacokinetic interaction between AEDs and oral contraceptive hormones, the known or potential interactions with alternative contraceptive methods, and provides practical advice for management of contraceptive needs in reproductive

  13. Sexually transmitted diseases and Chlamydia trachomatis in women consulting for contraception.

    PubMed

    Avonts, D; Sercu, M; Heyerick, P; Vandermeeren, I; Piot, P

    1989-10-01

    To study the frequency of genital infections in women consulting their family doctor for contraception, 248 women (median age 23 years) were examined for a range of genital microorganisms. The prevalence of clue cells, Candida albicans and Trichomonas vaginalis were 21.0%, 12.9% and 2.0%, respectively. Neisseria gonorrhoeae was isolated in only one case, whereas Chlamydia trachomatis was found in 6.3% of women. A specific clinical picture for an infection with C. trachomatis in women was not seen. Given the prevalence of over 5% for C. trachomatis and the absence of typical signs and symptoms in infected women, screening for this organism is recommended in women requesting an intrauterine contraceptive device, to prevent complications such as pelvic inflammatory disease and their sequelae.

  14. Counseling and provision of long-acting reversible contraception in the US: National survey of nurse practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Cynthia C.; Stratton, Laura; Raine, Tina R.; Thompson, Kirsten; Henderson, Jillian T.; Blum, Maya; Postlethwaite, Debbie; Speidel, J Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Objective Nurse practitioners (NPs) provide frontline care in women’s health, including contraception, an essential preventive service. Their importance for contraceptive care will grow, with healthcare reforms focused on affordable primary care. This study assessed practice and training needs to prepare NPs to offer high-efficacy contraceptives - IUDs and implants. Method A US nationally representative sample of nurse practitioners in primary care and women’s health was surveyed in 2009 (response rate 69%, n=586) to assess clinician knowledge and practices, guided by the CDC US Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use. Results Two-thirds of women’s health NPs (66%) were trained in IUD insertions, compared to 12% of primary care NPs. Contraceptive counseling that routinely included IUDs was low overall (43%). Nurse practitioners used overly restrictive patient eligibility criteria, inconsistent with CDC guidelines. Insertion training (aOR=2.4, 95%CI: 1.10 5.33) and knowledge of patient eligibility (aOR=2.9, 95%CI: 1.91 4.32) were associated with IUD provision. Contraceptive implant provision was low: 42% of NPs in women’s health and 10% in primary care . Half of NPs desired training in these methods. Conclusion Nurse practitioners have an increasingly important position in addressing high unintended pregnancy in the U.S., but require specific training in long-acting reversible contraceptives. PMID:24128950

  15. Vector-borne disease surveillance in puerto rico: pathogen prevalence rates in canines ? Implications for public health and the u.s. Military ? Applying the one health concept.

    PubMed

    McCown, Michael E; Opel, Taylor; Grzeszak, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    prevalence, complete risk assessments, and impleme t timely preventive medicine and other preventive measures. The lower VBD prevalence rate in the canine samples from Fort Buchanan demonstrates the value of responsible pet ownership and importance of preventive medicine and public health.

  16. Estimating Plasmodium falciparum transmission rates in low-endemic settings using a combination of community prevalence and health facility data.

    PubMed

    Yukich, Joshua; Briët, Olivier; Bretscher, Michael T; Bennett, Adam; Lemma, Seblewengel; Berhane, Yemane; Eisele, Thomas P; Keating, Joseph; Smith, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    As some malaria control programs shift focus from disease control to transmission reduction, there is a need for transmission data to monitor progress. At lower levels of transmission, it becomes increasingly more difficult to measure precisely, for example through entomological studies. Many programs conduct regular cross sectional parasite prevalence surveys, and have access to malaria treatment data routinely collected by ministries of health, often in health management information systems. However, by themselves, these data are poor measures of transmission. In this paper, we propose an approach for combining annual parasite incidence and treatment data with cross-sectional parasite prevalence and treatment seeking survey data to estimate the incidence of new infections in the human population, also known as the force of infection. The approach is based on extension of a reversible catalytic model. The accuracy of the estimates from this model appears to be highly dependent on levels of detectability and treatment in the community, indicating the importance of information on private sector treatment seeking and access to effective and appropriate treatment.

  17. Prevalence of eating disorders in males: a review of rates reported in academic research and UK mass media.

    PubMed

    Sweeting, Helen; Walker, Laura; MacLean, Alice; Patterson, Chris; Räisänen, Ulla; Hunt, Kate

    Media presentations of health issues affect evaluations of personal susceptibility to particular illnesses and hence help-seeking behaviours. We examined data on prevalence of eating disorders (EDs - which are often characterised as 'female') among males in: scientific literature; readily-accessible web-based information; and UK newspaper articles (published 7/12/2002-7/12/2012). This revealed conflicting statistics. Academic papers suggest men comprise around 25% of community-based samples, but much lower proportions (10% or less) of clinic samples. Websites and newspapers present widely differing statistics both on prevalence overall (numbers with EDs in the UK ranged from 60,000 to 2.7 million), and in men (generally suggesting they constituted 10-25% of those with EDs), rarely distinguishing between diagnosed and non-diagnosed samples. By 2011, newspapers were more consistent on overall numbers with EDs in the UK (1.6 million) and the proportion who were men (20%), drawing on one website as the authoritative source. Conflicting statistics may confuse men searching for ED (or other) health-related information, lead to underestimations of male susceptibility to EDs and/or reinforce inappropriate stereotypes of EDs as confined to adolescent girls.

  18. Prevalence rates of sexual difficulties and associated distress in heterosexual men and women: results from an Internet survey in Flanders.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, Lies; Gijs, Luk; Enzlin, Paul

    2014-01-01

    As most epidemiological surveys on sexual problems have not included assessment of associated distress, the principal aim of this study was to p