Science.gov

Sample records for contrast mixture ratio

  1. Variable mixture ratio performance through nitrogen augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichel, R.; Obrien, C. J.; Bair, E. K.

    1988-01-01

    High/variable mixture ratio O2/H2 candidate engine cycles are examined for earth-to-orbit vehicle application. Engine performance and power balance information are presented for the candidate cycles relative to chamber pressure, bulk density, and mixture ratio. Included in the cycle screening are concepts where a third fluid (liquid nitrogen) is used to achieve a variable mixture ratio over the trajectory from liftoff to earth orbit. The third fluid cycles offer a very low risk, fully reusable, low operation cost alternative to high/variable mixture ratio bipropellant cycles. Variable mixture ratio engines with extendible nozzle are slightly lower performing than a single mixture ratio engine (MR = 7:1) with extendible nozzle. Dual expander engines (MR = 7:1) have slightly better performance than the single mixture ratio engine. Dual fuel dual expander engines offer a 16 percent improvement over the single mixture ratio engine.

  2. High/variable mixture ratio O2/H2 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, A.; Parsley, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    Vehicle/engine analysis studies have identified the High/Dual Mixture Ratio O2/H2 Engine cycle as a leading candidate for an advanced Single Stage to Orbit (SSTO) propulsion system. This cycle is designed to allow operation at a higher than normal O/F ratio of 12 during liftoff and then transition to a more optimum O/F ratio of 6 at altitude. While operation at high mixture ratios lowers specific impulse, the resultant high propellant bulk density and high power density combine to minimize the influence of atmospheric drag and low altitude gravitational forces. Transition to a lower mixture ratio at altitude then provides improved specific impulse relative to a single mixture ratio engine that must select a mixture ratio that is balanced for both low and high altitude operation. This combination of increased altitude specific impulse and high propellant bulk density more than offsets the compromised low altitude performance and results in an overall mission benefit. Two areas of technical concern relative to the execution of this dual mixture ratio cycle concept are addressed. First, actions required to transition from high to low mixture ratio are examined, including an assessment of the main chamber environment as the main chamber mixture ratio passes through stoichiometric. Secondly, two approaches to meet a requirement for high turbine power at high mixture ratio condition are examined. One approach uses high turbine temperature to produce the power and requires cooled turbines. The other approach incorporates an oxidizer-rich preburner to increase turbine work capability via increased turbine mass flow.

  3. Concept of planetary gear system to control fluid mixture ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgroarty, J. D.

    1966-01-01

    Mechanical device senses and corrects for fluid flow departures from the selected flow ratio of two fluids. This system has been considered for control of rocket engine propellant mixture control but could find use wherever control of the flow ratio of any two fluids is desired.

  4. Statistical analyses of plume composition and deposited radionuclide mixture ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Terrence D.; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Eckert-Gallup, Aubrey Celia; Brito, Roxanne; Hunt, Brian D.; Osborn, Douglas M.

    2014-01-01

    A proposed method is considered to classify the regions in the close neighborhood of selected measurements according to the ratio of two radionuclides measured from either a radioactive plume or a deposited radionuclide mixture. The subsequent associated locations are then considered in the area of interest with a representative ratio class. This method allows for a more comprehensive and meaningful understanding of the data sampled following a radiological incident.

  5. High/variable mixture ratio oxygen/hydrogen engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, William H.; Beveridge, John H.

    1988-01-01

    A LOX/LH2 high/variable mixture ratio booster upper stage is described. The engine has high thrust-weight ratio as a booster and high specific impulse as an upper stage engine. Operation at high mixture ratio utilizes the propellants at high bulk density. The engine may use multiple turbopump-preburners for higher thrust ratings. The engine uses the full flow cycle to obtain minimum turbine inlet temperatures for a given chamber pressure and to avoid interpropellant shaft seals and other single point failure modes. A portion of the liquid hydrogen is used to regeneratively cool the thrust chamber assembly. The warmed hydrogen coolant is then used to drive the fuel boost turbopump. All propellants arrive at the gas-gas injector ready to burn. Shear mixing of the parallel flowing high velocity, low density fuel-rich gases with the high density, low velocity oxidizer-rich gases provides complete combustion with a modest chamber volume. Combustion stability is assured by the injection of the heated fuel-rich gases and the comparatively low volume ratio of the propellants before and after combustion. The high area ratio nozzle skirt is fitted with a low area ratio nozzle skirt insert for optimum low altitude performance. The overall engine characteristics make it a candidate for ALS, Shuttle-C, LRB, and SSTO applications.

  6. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Mark; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-01

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  7. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner.

    PubMed

    Müller, Mark; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-01

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  8. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Mark Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-15

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  9. Measurement of Contrast Ratios for 3D Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    stereoscopic, autostereoscopic , 3D , display ABSTRACT 3D image display devices have wide applications in medical and entertainment areas. Binocular (stereoscopic...and system crosstalk. In many 3D display systems viewer’ crosstalk is an important issue for good performance, especial in autostereoscopic display...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADPO 11343 TITLE: Measurement of Contrast Ratios for 3D Display

  10. Effect of Mixture Pressure and Equivalence Ratio on Detonation Cell Size for Hydrogen-Air Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Detonation MAPE Mean Absolute Percent Error PDE Pulsed Detonation Engine RDE Rotating Detonation Engine ZND...1997. DeBarmore, Nick D., Paul King, Fred Schauer, and John Hoke, “Nozzle Guide Vane Integration into Rotating Detonation Engine,” 51st AIAA...initial mixture pressure and equivalence ratio. ^Hydrogen and air, detonation cell size, detonation , cell size, Rotating Detonation Engine, RDE U U U UU 129 Dr. Paul I. King, AFIT/ENY (937) 255-3636 x4628

  11. High variable mixture ratio oxygen/hydrogen engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, C. M.; Tu, W. H.; Weiss, A. H.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of an O2/H2 engine to operate over a range of high-propellant mixture ratios was previously shown to be advantageous in single stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicles. The results are presented for the analysis of high-performance engine power cycles operating over propellant mixture ratio ranges of 12 to 6 and 9 to 6. A requirement to throttle up to 60 percent of nominal thrust was superimposed as a typical throttle range to limit vehicle acceleration as propellant is expended. The object of the analysis was to determine areas of concern relative to component and engine operability or potential hazards resulting from the operating requirements and ranges of conditions that derive from the overall engine requirements. The SSTO mission necessitates a high-performance, lightweight engine. Therefore, staged combustion power cycles employing either dual fuel-rich preburners or dual mixed (fuel-rich and oxygen-rich) preburners were examined. Engine mass flow and power balances were made and major component operating ranges were defined. Component size and arrangement were determined through engine layouts for one of the configurations evaluated. Each component is being examined to determine if there are areas of concern with respect to component efficiency, operability, reliability, or hazard. The effects of reducing the maximum chamber pressure were investigated for one of the cycles.

  12. Improving the Visible and Infrared Contrast Ratio of Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, Murzy; Li, Mary; Moseley, Harvey; Franz, Dave; Yun, Zheng; Kutyrev, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Three device improvements have been developed that dramatically enhance the contrast ratio of microshutters. The goal of a microshutter is to allow as much light through as possible when the shutters are in the open configuration, and preventing any light from passing through when they are in the closed position. The ratio of the transmitted light that is blocked is defined here as the contrast ratio. Three major components contribute to the improved performance of these microshutters: 1. The precise implementation of light shields, which protect the gap around the shutters so no light can leak through. It has been ascertained that without the light shield there would be a gap on the order of 1 percent of the shutter area, limiting the contrast to a maximum of 100. 2. The precise coating of the interior wall of each microshutter was improved with an insulator and metal using an angle deposition technique. The coating prevents any infrared light that finds an entrance on the surface of the microshutter cell from being emitted from a sidewall. Since silicon is in effect transparent to any light with a wavelength longer than .1 micrometer, these coatings are essential to blocking any stray signals when the shutters are closed. 3. A thin film of molybdenum nitride (MoN) was integrated onto the surface of the microshutter blade. This film provides the majority of light blockage over the microshutter and also ensures that the shutter can be operated over a wide temperature range by maintaining its flatness. These improvements were motivated by the requirements dictated by the James Webb Space Telescope NIRSpec instrument. The science goals of the NIRSpec require observing some of the very faintest objects in a given field of view that also may contain some very bright objects. To observe the faint objects, the light from the bright objects - which could be thousands of times brighter - must be completely blocked. If a closed microshutter is even slightly transmissive, a

  13. Use of a Mixture of Gadolinium and Iodinated Contrast for Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Badiola, Carlos M.

    2004-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the image quality of gadolinium digital subtraction angiography (DSA) can be improved by the addition of small quantities of iodinated contrast to gadolinium. The optical density (OD) of a mixture of four parts gadolinium-based contrast to one part iodinated contrast was measured through a phantom study and compared to that of full-strength gadolinium, full strength iodinated contrast, and a 20% solution of iodinated contrast. We also compared the clinical image quality of the mixture of gadolinium-based contrast and iodinated contrast relative to full-strength gadolinium and full strength iodinated contrast during DSA. The DSA image quality of the gadolinium-iodinated contrast mixture was significantly improved relative to images obtained with full-strength gadolinium and compared favorably to that obtained with full-strength iodinated contrast. The phantom data showed that the OD of the gadolinium-iodinated contrast mixture was much greater than that of full strength gadolinium and the 20% iodinated contrast solution. The increase in OD was greater than that expected from a simple additive effect of the OD of the contrast agents. Adding a small amount of iodinated contrast to gadolinium results in a significant improvement in the radiographic density and DSA image quality of gadolinium. This simple technique appears to overcome one of the major limitations of gadolinium-based angiography-poor radiographic density-while continuing to minimize the volume of administered iodinated contrast.

  14. Quantitative analysis of contrast to noise ratio using a phase contrast x-ray imaging prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Kang, Minhua; Chen, Wei R.; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) of the x-ray images taken with the phase contrast imaging mode and compare them with the CNR of the images taken under the conventional mode. For each mode, three images were taken under three exposure conditions of 100 kVp (2.8mAs), 120 kVp (1.9mAs) and 140kVp (1.42mAs). A 1.61cm thick contrast detail phantom was used as an imaging object. For phase contrast, the source to image detector distance (SID) was 182.88 cm and the source to object (SOD) distance was 73.15 cm. The SOD was the same as SID in the conventional imaging mode. A computed radiography (CR) plate was used as a detector and the output CR images were converted to linear form in relation with the incident x-ray exposure. To calculate CNR, an image processing software was used to determine the mean pixel value and the standard deviation of the pixels in the region of interest (ROI) and in the nearby background around ROI. At any given exposure condition investigated in this study, the CNR values for the phase contrast images were better as compared to the corresponding conventional mode images. The superior image quality in terms of CNR is contributed by the phase-shifts resulted contrast, as well as the reduced scatters due to the air gap between the object and the detector.

  15. Contrast to Noise Ratio and Contrast Detail Analysis in Mammography:A Monte Carlo Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, V.; Delis, H.; Kalogeropoulou, C.; Zampakis, P.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2015-09-01

    The mammographic spectrum is one of the major factors affecting image quality in mammography. In this study, a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation model was used to evaluate image quality characteristics of various mammographic spectra. The anode/filter combinations evaluated, were those traditionally used in mammography, for tube voltages between 26 and 30 kVp. The imaging performance was investigated in terms of Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) and Contrast Detail (CD) analysis, by involving human observers, utilizing a mathematical CD phantom. Soft spectra provided the best characteristics in terms of both CNR and CD scores, while tube voltage had a limited effect. W-anode spectra filtered with k-edge filters demonstrated an improved performance, that sometimes was better compared to softer x-ray spectra, produced by Mo or Rh anode. Regarding the filter material, k-edge filters showed superior performance compared to Al filters.

  16. The Maximum Cumulative Ratio as a tool for mixture ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A set of slides in PowerPoint. This is an invited presentation to a workshop funded by the EU government. The work presented is talking for a published paper and will illustrate science policy issues for setting standards for mixtures. I am speaking as a technical expert in the field of mixture risk assessment. I an not acting as a spokesperson for EPA policy on mixtures.

  17. The effect of size ratio on the sphere structure factor in colloidal sphere-plate mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinacchi, G.; Doshi, N.; Prescott, S. W.; Cosgrove, T.; Grillo, I.; Lindner, P.; Phipps, J. S.; Gittins, D.; van Duijneveldt, J. S.

    2012-11-01

    Binary mixtures of colloidal particles of sufficiently different sizes or shapes tend to demix at high concentration. Already at low concentration, excluded volume interactions between the two species give rise to structuring effects. Here, a new theoretical description is proposed of the structure of colloidal sphere-plate mixtures, based on a density expansion of the work needed to insert a pair of spheres and a single sphere in a sea of them, in the presence or not of plates. The theory is first validated using computer simulations. The predictions are then compared to experimental observations using silica spheres and gibbsite platelets. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to determine the change of the structure factor of spheres on addition of platelets, under solvent contrast conditions where the platelets were invisible. Theory and experiment agreed very well for a platelet/sphere diameter ratio D/d = 2.2 and reasonably well for D/d = 5. The sphere structure factor increases at low scattering vector Q in the presence of platelets; a weak reduction of the sphere structure factor was predicted at larger Q, and for the system with D/d = 2.2 was indeed observed experimentally. At fixed particle volume fraction, an increase in diameter ratio leads to a large change in structure factor. Systems with a larger diameter ratio also phase separate at lower concentrations.

  18. The Oxygen Ratio: A Fuel-Independent Measure of Mixture Stoichiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C J; Musculus, M P; Pickett, L M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2003-12-19

    The pollutant-formation characteristics and other properties of a combustion reaction typically depend strongly on the proximity of the mixture to its stoichiometric condition, i.e., the ''mixture stoichiometry.'' A quantitative, widely applicable measure of this mixture property is therefore a critical independent variable in the study of combustion systems. Such a parameter enables the clear separation of mixture stoichiometry effects from other effects (e.g., fuel molecular structure, product temperature, diluent concentration, pressure). The parameter most often used to quantify mixture stoichiometry is the equivalence ratio. Unfortunately, the equivalence ratio fails to properly account for oxygen in oxygenates, i.e., compounds that have oxygen chemically bound within the fuel molecule. This manuscript introduces the oxygen ratio, a parameter that properly characterizes mixture stoichiometry for a broader class of reactants than does the equivalence ratio, including oxygenates. A detailed definition of the oxygen ratio is provided and used to show its relationship to the equivalence ratio. The definition is also used to quantify errors involved when the equivalence ratio is used as a measure of mixture stoichiometry with oxygenates. Proper usage of the oxygen ratio is discussed and the oxygen ratio is used to interpret results in a practical example.

  19. A new hybrid double divisor ratio spectra method for the analysis of ternary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Rasha M.; Maher, Hadir M.

    2008-10-01

    A new spectrophotometric method was developed for the simultaneous determination of ternary mixtures, without prior separation steps. This method is based on convolution of the double divisor ratio spectra, obtained by dividing the absorption spectrum of the ternary mixture by a standard spectrum of two of the three compounds in the mixture, using combined trigonometric Fourier functions. The magnitude of the Fourier function coefficients, at either maximum or minimum points, is related to the concentration of each drug in the mixture. The mathematical explanation of the procedure is illustrated. The method was applied for the assay of a model mixture consisting of isoniazid (ISN), rifampicin (RIF) and pyrazinamide (PYZ) in synthetic mixtures, commercial tablets and human urine samples. The developed method was compared with the double divisor ratio spectra derivative method (DDRD) and derivative ratio spectra-zero-crossing method (DRSZ). Linearity, validation, accuracy, precision, limits of detection, limits of quantitation, and other aspects of analytical validation are included in the text.

  20. A new hybrid double divisor ratio spectra method for the analysis of ternary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Rasha M; Maher, Hadir M

    2008-10-01

    A new spectrophotometric method was developed for the simultaneous determination of ternary mixtures, without prior separation steps. This method is based on convolution of the double divisor ratio spectra, obtained by dividing the absorption spectrum of the ternary mixture by a standard spectrum of two of the three compounds in the mixture, using combined trigonometric Fourier functions. The magnitude of the Fourier function coefficients, at either maximum or minimum points, is related to the concentration of each drug in the mixture. The mathematical explanation of the procedure is illustrated. The method was applied for the assay of a model mixture consisting of isoniazid (ISN), rifampicin (RIF) and pyrazinamide (PYZ) in synthetic mixtures, commercial tablets and human urine samples. The developed method was compared with the double divisor ratio spectra derivative method (DDRD) and derivative ratio spectra-zero-crossing method (DRSZ). Linearity, validation, accuracy, precision, limits of detection, limits of quantitation, and other aspects of analytical validation are included in the text.

  1. A neural network-based estimator for the mixture ratio of the Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, T. H.; Musgrave, J.

    1992-01-01

    In order to properly utilize the available fuel and oxidizer of a liquid propellant rocket engine, the mixture ratio is closed loop controlled during main stage (65 percent - 109 percent power) operation. However, because of the lack of flight-capable instrumentation for measuring mixture ratio, the value of mixture ratio in the control loop is estimated using available sensor measurements such as the combustion chamber pressure and the volumetric flow, and the temperature and pressure at the exit duct on the low pressure fuel pump. This estimation scheme has two limitations. First, the estimation formula is based on an empirical curve fitting which is accurate only within a narrow operating range. Second, the mixture ratio estimate relies on a few sensor measurements and loss of any of these measurements will make the estimate invalid. In this paper, we propose a neural network-based estimator for the mixture ratio of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The estimator is an extension of a previously developed neural network based sensor failure detection and recovery algorithm (sensor validation). This neural network uses an auto associative structure which utilizes the redundant information of dissimilar sensors to detect inconsistent measurements. Two approaches have been identified for synthesizing mixture ratio from measurement data using a neural network. The first approach uses an auto associative neural network for sensor validation which is modified to include the mixture ratio as an additional output. The second uses a new network for the mixture ratio estimation in addition to the sensor validation network. Although mixture ratio is not directly measured in flight, it is generally available in simulation and in test bed firing data from facility measurements of fuel and oxidizer volumetric flows. The pros and cons of these two approaches will be discussed in terms of robustness to sensor failures and accuracy of the estimate during typical transients using

  2. Novel spectrophotometric method for selective determination of compounds in ternary mixtures (dual wavelength in ratio spectra).

    PubMed

    Saad, Ahmed S

    2015-08-05

    A simple selective spectrophotometric method for determination of compounds in ternary mixture was developed by combining the resolution power of two well-known methods that are commonly used for binary mixtures; namely ratio difference method and dual wavelength. The new method (dual wavelength in ratio spectra) was successfully applied for the determination of a ternary mixture of betamethasone dipropionate (BM), clotrimazole (CT) and benzyl alcohol (BA) in pure powder form and in their pharmaceutical preparation. The difference in amplitudes (ΔP) in the ratio spectra at 252.0 and 258.0 nm (ΔP(252.0-258.0 nm)) corresponds to BM, while ΔP(266.8-255.4 nm) and ΔP(254.2-243.5 nm) corresponds to CT and BA, respectively. The method was validated as per the USP 2005 guidelines. The developed method can be used in quality control laboratories for routine analysis of compounds in ternary mixtures.

  3. Application of Taguchi methods to dual mixture ratio propulsion system optimization for SSTO vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Douglas O.; Unal, Resit; Joyner, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    The application of advanced technologies to future launch vehicle designs would allow the introduction of a rocket-powered, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) launch system early in the next century. For a selected SSTO concept, a dual mixture ratio, staged combustion cycle engine that employs a number of innovative technologies was selected as the baseline propulsion system. A series of parametric trade studies are presented to optimize both a dual mixture ratio engine and a single mixture ratio engine of similar design and technology level. The effect of varying lift-off thrust-to-weight ratio, engine mode transition Mach number, mixture ratios, area ratios, and chamber pressure values on overall vehicle weight is examined. The sensitivity of the advanced SSTO vehicle to variations in each of these parameters is presented, taking into account the interaction of each of the parameters with each other. This parametric optimization and sensitivity study employs a Taguchi design method. The Taguchi method is an efficient approach for determining near-optimum design parameters using orthogonal matrices from design of experiments (DOE) theory. Using orthogonal matrices significantly reduces the number of experimental configurations to be studied. The effectiveness and limitations of the Taguchi method for propulsion/vehicle optimization studies as compared to traditional single-variable parametric trade studies is also discussed.

  4. Simulation Analysis of Computer-Controlled pressurization for Mixture Ratio Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Leslie A.; Bishop-Behel, Karen; Benfield, Michael P. J.; Kelley, Anthony; Woodcock, Gordon R.

    2005-01-01

    A procedural code (C++) simulation was developed to investigate potentials for mixture ratio control of pressure-fed spacecraft rocket propulsion systems by measuring propellant flows, tank liquid quantities, or both, and using feedback from these measurements to adjust propellant tank pressures to set the correct operating mixture ratio for minimum propellant residuals. The pressurization system eliminated mechanical regulators in favor of a computer-controlled, servo- driven throttling valve. We found that a quasi-steady state simulation (pressure and flow transients in the pressurization systems resulting from changes in flow control valve position are ignored) is adequate for this purpose. Monte-Carlo methods are used to obtain simulated statistics on propellant depletion. Mixture ratio control algorithms based on proportional-integral-differential (PID) controller methods were developed. These algorithms actually set target tank pressures; the tank pressures are controlled by another PID controller. Simulation indicates this approach can provide reductions in residual propellants.

  5. RL10A-3-3B high mixture ratio qualification program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, T.; Varella, D.; Smith, C.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the high mixture ratio qualification testing of the RL10 engine for the Shuttle/Centaur program are presented. The objective of the engine qualification test was to demonstrate the suitability of the RL10A-3-3B engine for space vehicle flight by subjecting it to the testing specified in RL10A-3-3B Model Specification Number 2295 dated February 1986. The applicable section of the specification is presented. Due to payload volume advantages which can be achieved by increasing the operating mixture ratio of the RL10, a decision was made to qualify the engine to run at a higher mixture ratio. A program was created to qualify the RL10 engine for operation at 15,000 pounds thrust and a nominal 6.0 to 1 mixture ratio. This model of the engine was designated the RL10A-3-3B. The qualification program included three test series as follows: (1) hardware durability and limits test in which the engine completed 23 firings and 4605.7 seconds with 1588.7 seconds at less than 6.6 mixture ratio; (2) preliminary qualification test in which the engine completed 26 firings and 5750 seconds; and (3) qualification test in which the engine completed 26 hot firings and 5693.4 seconds with 905.9 seconds at 6.7 mixture ratio. Several changes in engine hardware were required for operation of the RL10A-3-3B engine in the Space Shuttle which include a duel pressure switch ignition, an oxidizer flow control, and helium plumbing changes.

  6. Finite mixture models for the computation of isotope ratios in mixed isotopic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffler, Daniel; Laaha, Gregor; Leisch, Friedrich; Kappel, Stefanie; Prohaska, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Finite mixture models have been used for more than 100 years, but have seen a real boost in popularity over the last two decades due to the tremendous increase in available computing power. The areas of application of mixture models range from biology and medicine to physics, economics and marketing. These models can be applied to data where observations originate from various groups and where group affiliations are not known, as is the case for multiple isotope ratios present in mixed isotopic samples. Recently, the potential of finite mixture models for the computation of 235U/238U isotope ratios from transient signals measured in individual (sub-)µm-sized particles by laser ablation - multi-collector - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICPMS) was demonstrated by Kappel et al. [1]. The particles, which were deposited on the same substrate, were certified with respect to their isotopic compositions. Here, we focus on the statistical model and its application to isotope data in ecogeochemistry. Commonly applied evaluation approaches for mixed isotopic samples are time-consuming and are dependent on the judgement of the analyst. Thus, isotopic compositions may be overlooked due to the presence of more dominant constituents. Evaluation using finite mixture models can be accomplished unsupervised and automatically. The models try to fit several linear models (regression lines) to subgroups of data taking the respective slope as estimation for the isotope ratio. The finite mixture models are parameterised by: • The number of different ratios. • Number of points belonging to each ratio-group. • The ratios (i.e. slopes) of each group. Fitting of the parameters is done by maximising the log-likelihood function using an iterative expectation-maximisation (EM) algorithm. In each iteration step, groups of size smaller than a control parameter are dropped; thereby the number of different ratios is determined. The analyst only influences some control

  7. Synthesis and characterization of magnesium substituted biphasic mixtures of controlled hydroxyapatite/{beta}-tricalcium phosphate ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, S.; Lemos, I.A.F.; Rocha, J.H.G.; Ferreira, J.M.F. . E-mail: jmf@cv.ua.pt

    2005-10-15

    The present paper investigates the preparation of magnesium (Mg) substituted biphasic mixtures of different hydroxyapatite (HAP)/{beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) ratios through aqueous precipitation method. The concentrations of added magnesium (Mg) were varied with the calcium in order to obtain constant (Ca+Mg)/P ratios of 1.67 ranging from 1.62+0.05, 1.58+0.09 and 1.54+0.13, respectively. The as prepared powders were calcined at different temperatures to study the phase behaviour and thermal stability. The powders were characterized by the following analytical techniques: TG-DTA, X-ray diffraction and FT-IR. The results have shown that substitution of Mg in the calcium-deficient apatites resulted in the formation of biphasic mixtures of different HAP/{beta}-TCP ratios after heating above 700 deg. C. The ratios of the formation of phase mixtures were dependent on the calcium deficiency in the apatites with the higher deficiency having the strongest impact on the increased formation of {beta}-TCP and the substituted Mg was found to stabilize the {beta}-TCP phase. - Graphical abstract: Role of Mg in the behaviour of calcium-deficient apatites during calcination to form biphasic mixtures.

  8. The effect of varying the number of contributors on likelihood ratios for complex DNA mixtures.

    PubMed

    Benschop, Corina C G; Haned, Hinda; Jeurissen, Loes; Gill, Peter D; Sijen, Titia

    2015-11-01

    Interpretation of DNA mixtures with three or more contributors, defined here as high order mixtures, is difficult because of the inevitability of allele sharing. Allele sharing complicates the estimation of the number of contributors, which is an important parameter to assess the probative value. Consequently, these mixtures may not be deemed suitable for interpretation and reporting. In this study, we generated three-, four- and five-person mixtures with little or no drop-out and with varying levels of allele sharing. For these DNA mixtures we computed likelihood ratios (LRs) using the LRmix model, and always using persons of interest that are true contributors. We assessed the influence of different scenarios on the LR, and used (1) the true or an incorrect number of contributors, (2) zero, one or two anchored individuals and (3) an equal number of contributors under Hp and Hd or an extra contributor under Hd. It was shown that the LR varied considerably when the hypotheses used an incorrect number of contributors, especially when individuals were anchored under the hypotheses. Overall, when analysing high order mixtures, there may occur a transition from LR greater than one to less than one if an incorrect number of contributors is conditioned. This is a result of allele sharing among the multiple contributors rather than allele drop-out, since this study only utilised samples with little or no drop-out.

  9. Mean centering of double divisor ratio spectra, a novel spectrophotometric method for analysis of ternary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Said A.; Elzanfaly, Eman S.; Salem, Maissa Y.; El-Zeany, Badr A.

    2016-01-01

    A novel spectrophotometric method was developed for determination of ternary mixtures without previous separation, showing significant advantages over conventional methods. The new method is based on mean centering of double divisor ratio spectra. The mathematical explanation of the procedure is illustrated. The method was evaluated by determination of model ternary mixture and by the determination of Amlodipine (AML), Aliskiren (ALI) and Hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) in laboratory prepared mixtures and in a commercial pharmaceutical preparation. For proper presentation of the advantages and applicability of the new method, a comparative study was established between the new mean centering of double divisor ratio spectra (MCDD) and two similar methods used for analysis of ternary mixtures, namely mean centering (MC) and double divisor of ratio spectra-derivative spectrophotometry (DDRS-DS). The method was also compared with a reported one for analysis of the pharmaceutical preparation. The method was validated according to the ICH guidelines and accuracy, precision, repeatability and robustness were found to be within the acceptable limits.

  10. Mean centering of double divisor ratio spectra, a novel spectrophotometric method for analysis of ternary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Said A; Elzanfaly, Eman S; Salem, Maissa Y; El-Zeany, Badr A

    2016-01-15

    A novel spectrophotometric method was developed for determination of ternary mixtures without previous separation, showing significant advantages over conventional methods. The new method is based on mean centering of double divisor ratio spectra. The mathematical explanation of the procedure is illustrated. The method was evaluated by determination of model ternary mixture and by the determination of Amlodipine (AML), Aliskiren (ALI) and Hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) in laboratory prepared mixtures and in a commercial pharmaceutical preparation. For proper presentation of the advantages and applicability of the new method, a comparative study was established between the new mean centering of double divisor ratio spectra (MCDD) and two similar methods used for analysis of ternary mixtures, namely mean centering (MC) and double divisor of ratio spectra-derivative spectrophotometry (DDRS-DS). The method was also compared with a reported one for analysis of the pharmaceutical preparation. The method was validated according to the ICH guidelines and accuracy, precision, repeatability and robustness were found to be within the acceptable limits.

  11. The influence of grain size ratio upon the relative mobility in bimodal sediment mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudill, Ashley; Frey, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    The behaviour of grain mixtures varies from that of uniform grain, which has implications for bedload sediment transport in gravel-bed rivers. In particular, sediment mixtures act to modify the level of mobility within the bed, leading to aggradation or degradation, which has significant implications for river stability. Previous work has reported upon this change in mobility within bimodal mixtures; however we do not know how far grain size ratio influences these results. We hypothesise that there is a link between the change in levels of mobility and the grain size ratio due to varying amounts of infiltration, which controls the hiding/exposure function. This poster will present experimental results from an investigation designed to isolate the influence of grain size ratio upon the change in levels of mobility in bimodal sediment mixtures. This experimental investigation was undertaken using various sizes of spherical particles in a relatively narrow flume. Using this arrangement, we are able to observe effects at the particle scale in order to understand the individual and bulk grain behaviour.

  12. NMR characterization of functional groups: 9--isomer ratios of available chloromethylstyrene mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, S. L.; Khune, G. D.; Khatri, N. A.

    1985-01-01

    From the assignments of the 1H and 13C 11.7 tesla NMR spectra of available mixtures of m- and p-chloromethylstyrene, the proportion of the meta and para compounds are easily determined. For these materials from two common commercial sources, proportions of 72 and 28% and 68 and 32% were found. These concentrations are substantially different from the often assumed 60 and 40% for the meta and para compounds, respectively. The influence of this difference on the desired properties of copolymers made from such mixtures is discussed. An alternative quantitative procedure for determining the chloromethyl group isomer ratios is also described which employs silver trifluoroacetate in acetone displacement of chloride and 19F NMR examination of the resulting ester mixture with a 2.3 tesla spectrometer.

  13. Practical method and device for enhancing pulse contrast ratio for lasers and electron accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Shukui; Wilson, Guy

    2014-09-23

    An apparatus and method for enhancing pulse contrast ratios for drive lasers and electron accelerators. The invention comprises a mechanical dual-shutter system wherein the shutters are placed sequentially in series in a laser beam path. Each shutter of the dual shutter system has an individually operated trigger for opening and closing the shutter. As the triggers are operated individually, the delay between opening and closing first shutter and opening and closing the second shutter is variable providing for variable differential time windows and enhancement of pulse contrast ratio.

  14. Hard-sphere mixture excess free energy at infinite size ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Tukur, N.M.; Hamad, E.Z.; Mansoori, G.A.

    1999-02-01

    This article presents the exact limiting value of the derivative of the excess Helmholtz energy, A{sup E}, with respect to molecular size at constant temperature, density and composition for a binary mixture of hard spheres with an infinite size ratio ({sigma}{sub 11}/{sigma}{sub 22}{r_arrow}{infinity}); i.e., lim{sub {sigma}{sub 22}{r_arrow}0}[({partial_derivative}A{sub hs}{sup E}/RT)/{partial_derivative}{sigma}{sub 22}]{sub T,{rho},x,{sigma}{sub 11}}=({pi}/2){rho}x{sub 1}x{sub 2}{sigma}{sub 11}{sup 2}/(1{minus}({pi}/6){rho}x{sub 1}{sigma}{sub 11}{sup 3}). This limiting value is compared with the Mansoori{endash}Carnahan{endash}Starling{endash}Leland (MCSL) and also used to test the limits of some commonly used models in estimating the excess free energy of solvents in mixtures or polymer solutions. The models evaluated include the van Laar, Wilson, Edmond{endash}Ogston, Flory{endash}Huggins, Lacome{endash}Sanchez, Scott{endash}Magat, and Chen {ital et al.} It is shown that while the MCSL equation of state produces the same limiting value as the exact value reported here the other mixture models deviate from the exact value. This expression may be utilized to correct the mixture theories at their infinite size ratio limits. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Three different spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra for determination of binary mixture of Amlodipine and Atorvastatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Hany W.; Hassan, Said A.; Salem, Maissa Y.; El-Zeiny, Badr A.

    2011-12-01

    Three simple, specific, accurate and precise spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra are developed for the simultaneous determination of Amlodipine besylate (AM) and Atorvastatin calcium (AT) in tablet dosage forms. The first method is first derivative of the ratio spectra ( 1DD), the second is ratio subtraction and the third is the method of mean centering of ratio spectra. The calibration curve is linear over the concentration range of 3-40 and 8-32 μg/ml for AM and AT, respectively. These methods are tested by analyzing synthetic mixtures of the above drugs and they are applied to commercial pharmaceutical preparation of the subjected drugs. Standard deviation is <1.5 in the assay of raw materials and tablets. Methods are validated as per ICH guidelines and accuracy, precision, repeatability and robustness are found to be within the acceptable limit.

  16. Age differences in the distractor-ratio effect as a function of contrast level.

    PubMed

    White, Cale; Wheatley, Dana; Konwisorz, Olga; Scialfa, Charles T

    2007-09-01

    Latencies (RT) and eye movement measures were used to examine the effects of age and contrast on the distractor-ratio effect (DRE) in visual search. Younger and older adults performed a contrast x orientation conjunction search task where the ratios of white to black distractors and luminance contrast levels were varied. The distractor-ratio manipulation had similar effects for older and younger adults on both RT and the number of fixations required to find the target. Both measures were largely independent of distractor ratio on target-present trials, while both RTs and the fixation number increased with the number of items sharing the target's contrast polarity on target-absent trials. A more detailed analysis of eye movements suggested that younger adults were a bit more adept at attending to the smaller set of distractors, which presumably facilitated both overt and covert search. Generalized slowing can account for the age differences in RT, but the fixation number data speak to another mechanism, perhaps increased cautiousness on the part of the elderly when signal strength is low.

  17. Modeling of pharmaceuticals mixtures toxicity with deviation ratio and best-fit functions models.

    PubMed

    Wieczerzak, Monika; Kudłak, Błażej; Yotova, Galina; Nedyalkova, Miroslava; Tsakovski, Stefan; Simeonov, Vasil; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-11-15

    The present study deals with assessment of ecotoxicological parameters of 9 drugs (diclofenac (sodium salt), oxytetracycline hydrochloride, fluoxetine hydrochloride, chloramphenicol, ketoprofen, progesterone, estrone, androstenedione and gemfibrozil), present in the environmental compartments at specific concentration levels, and their mutual combinations by couples against Microtox® and XenoScreen YES/YAS® bioassays. As the quantitative assessment of ecotoxicity of drug mixtures is an complex and sophisticated topic in the present study we have used two major approaches to gain specific information on the mutual impact of two separate drugs present in a mixture. The first approach is well documented in many toxicological studies and follows the procedure for assessing three types of models, namely concentration addition (CA), independent action (IA) and simple interaction (SI) by calculation of a model deviation ratio (MDR) for each one of the experiments carried out. The second approach used was based on the assumption that the mutual impact in each mixture of two drugs could be described by a best-fit model function with calculation of weight (regression coefficient or other model parameter) for each of the participants in the mixture or by correlation analysis. It was shown that the sign and the absolute value of the weight or the correlation coefficient could be a reliable measure for the impact of either drug A on drug B or, vice versa, of B on A. Results of studies justify the statement, that both of the approaches show similar assessment of the mode of mutual interaction of the drugs studied. It was found that most of the drug mixtures exhibit independent action and quite few of the mixtures show synergic or dependent action.

  18. Formation of smectic phases in binary liquid crystal mixtures with a huge length ratio

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Friederike; Hartley, C Scott; Roberts, Jeffrey C; Lemieux, Robert P; Giesselmann, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Summary A system of two liquid-crystalline phenylpyrimidines differing strongly in molecular length was studied. The phase diagram of these two chemically similar mesogens, with a length ratio of 2, was investigated, and detailed X-ray diffraction and electrooptical measurements were performed. The phase diagram revealed a destabilization of the nematic phase, which is present in the pure short compound, while the smectic state was stabilized. The short compound forms smectic A and smectic C phases, whereas the longer compound forms a broad smectic C phase and a narrow higher-ordered smectic phase. Nevertheless, in the mixtures, the smectic C phase is destabilized and disappears rapidly, whereas smectic A is the only stable phase observed over a broad concentration range. In addition, the smectic translational order parameters as well as the tilt angles of the mixtures are reduced. The higher-ordered smectic phase of the longer mesogen was identified as a smectic F phase. PMID:23019439

  19. Smart manipulation of ratio spectra for resolving a pharmaceutical mixture of Methocarbamol and Paracetamol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essam, Hebatallah M.; Abd-El Rahman, Mohamed K.

    2015-04-01

    Two smart, specific, accurate and precise spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra are developed for simultaneous determination of Methocarbamol (METH) and Paracetamol (PAR) in their combined pharmaceutical formulation without preliminary separation. Method A, is an extended ratio subtraction one (EXRSM) coupled with ratio subtraction method (RSM), which depends on subtraction of the plateau values from the ratio spectrum. Method B is a ratio difference spectrophotometric one (RDM) which measures the difference in amplitudes of ratio spectra between 278 and 286 nm for METH and 247 and 260 nm for PAR. The calibration curves are linear over the concentration range of 10-100 μg mL-1 and 2-20 μg mL-1 for METH and PAR, respectively. The specificity of the developed methods was investigated by analyzing different laboratory prepared mixtures of the two drugs. Both methods were applied successfully for the determination of the selected drugs in their combined dosage form. Furthermore, validation was performed according to ICH guidelines; accuracy, precision and repeatability are found to be within the acceptable limits. Statistical studies showed that both methods can be competitively applied in quality control laboratories.

  20. Enhancement of the contrast ratio associated with surface waves in a metal pillar-slit structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yunsong; Zhao Liming; Wang Huaiyu; Lan Sheng

    2011-03-15

    A simple optical structure, termed a pillar-slit structure, is proposed to enhance the contrast ratio of the weak optical signal. The structure consists of a metal slit surrounded by two metal pillars and can be directly incorporated onto optical sensors. The waves excited on the incident surface are modulated by the pillars and then scattered by the slit entrance so as to generate the in-slit surface plasmon polaritons passing through the slit. The transmission power is modified by the surface wave intensity. This structure is capable of suppressing background and enhancing signal light simultaneously. A calculated illustration by the numerical simulation method shows that an increase of the contrast ratio can be exceeded 900 times.

  1. Display characterization by eye: contrast ratio and discrimination throughout the grayscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gille, Jennifer; Arend, Larry; Larimer, James O.

    2004-06-01

    We have measured the ability of observers to estimate the contrast ratio (maximum white luminance / minimum black or gray) of various displays and to assess luminous discrimination over the tonescale of the display. This was done using only the computer itself and easily-distributed devices such as neutral density filters. The ultimate goal of this work is to see how much of the characterization of a display can be performed by the ordinary user in situ, in a manner that takes advantage of the unique abilities of the human visual system and measures visually important aspects of the display. We discuss the relationship among contrast ratio, tone scale, display transfer function and room lighting. These results may contribute to the development of applications that allow optimization of displays for the situated viewer / display system without instrumentation and without indirect inferences from laboratory to workplace.

  2. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  3. A Method to Compensate for Display System Contrast Ratio Differences in Distributed Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    paper also describes a method used to remap all pixel colors and intensities with the adjustment algorithm during run-time, using plug-in shader ...range of chroma and intensities. Following PowerPoint color swatch analysis, the following method (Table 1) was selected as the most promising...Contrast Ratio Test Results Using the same test sphere, test equipment, and test methods in all three display systems yielded the following results

  4. Experiments using machine learning to approximate likelihood ratios for mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, K.; Pavez, J.; Louppe, G.; Brooks, W. K.

    2016-10-01

    Likelihood ratio tests are a key tool in many fields of science. In order to evaluate the likelihood ratio the likelihood function is needed. However, it is common in fields such as High Energy Physics to have complex simulations that describe the distribution while not having a description of the likelihood that can be directly evaluated. In this setting it is impossible or computationally expensive to evaluate the likelihood. It is, however, possible to construct an equivalent version of the likelihood ratio that can be evaluated by using discriminative classifiers. We show how this can be used to approximate the likelihood ratio when the underlying distribution is a weighted sum of probability distributions (e.g. signal plus background model). We demonstrate how the results can be considerably improved by decomposing the ratio and use a set of classifiers in a pairwise manner on the components of the mixture model and how this can be used to estimate the unknown coefficients of the model, such as the signal contribution.

  5. An assessment of the information content of likelihood ratios derived from complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Clare D; Rudin, Norah; Inman, Keith; Lohmueller, Kirk E

    2016-05-01

    With the increasing sensitivity of DNA typing methodologies, as well as increasing awareness by law enforcement of the perceived capabilities of DNA typing, complex mixtures consisting of DNA from two or more contributors are increasingly being encountered. However, insufficient research has been conducted to characterize the ability to distinguish a true contributor (TC) from a known non-contributor (KNC) in these complex samples, and under what specific conditions. In order to investigate this question, sets of six 15-locus Caucasian genotype profiles were simulated and used to create mixtures containing 2-5 contributors. Likelihood ratios were computed for various situations, including varying numbers of contributors and unknowns in the evidence profile, as well as comparisons of the evidence profile to TCs and KNCs. This work was intended to illustrate the best-case scenario, in which all alleles from the TC were detected in the simulated evidence samples. Therefore the possibility of drop-out was not modeled in this study. The computer program DNAMIX was then used to compute LRs comparing the evidence profile to TCs and KNCs. This resulted in 140,000 LRs for each of the two scenarios. These complex mixture simulations show that, even when all alleles are detected (i.e. no drop-out), TCs can generate LRs less than 1 across a 15-locus profile. However, this outcome was rare, 7 of 140,000 replicates (0.005%), and associated only with mixtures comprising 5 contributors in which the numerator hypothesis includes one or more unknown contributors. For KNCs, LRs were found to be greater than 1 in a small number of replicates (75 of 140,000 replicates, or 0.05%). These replicates were limited to 4 and 5 person mixtures with 1 or more unknowns in the numerator. Only 5 of these 75 replicates (0.004%) yielded an LR greater than 1,000. Thus, overall, these results imply that the weight of evidence that can be derived from complex mixtures containing up to 5 contributors

  6. New stutter ratio distribution for DNA mixture interpretation based on a continuous model.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Sho; Hamano, Yuya; Morimoto, Chie; Kawai, Chihiro; Fujimoto, Shuntaro; Tamaki, Keiji

    2016-03-01

    In forensic science, DNA mixture interpretation is traditionally based on a binary model, which does not account for peak-height information in DNA profiles. In recent years, some countries have adopted a continuous model in which peak heights are used and stochastic effects are considered to enable rigorous calculation of likelihood ratios. However, this model requires certain biological parameters which affect the expected allelic and stutter peak heights. In this paper, we focused on estimating the distribution of the stutter ratio (SR) in 15 short tandem repeat loci in relation to the allele repeat number. We estimated the SR values of 234 single-source DNA samples by using a commercially available kit. In all loci except for D8S1179, D21S11, and D2S1338, a simple log-normal distribution model was fitted to the variability of SR. For D21S11, we developed a new distribution model in which distinct log-normal distributions between complete and incomplete repeat units are used (a separate log-normal distribution model). For D8S1179 and D2S1338, we developed another new distribution model that mixes two log-normal distributions to explain two types of repeat structures appearing within the same number of allele repeats. These two models were fitted to the observed SR values more accurately than the simple log-normal distribution model. We expected these new SR models to be applied to DNA mixture interpretation based on a continuous model.

  7. Derivative-ratio spectrophotometric method for the determination of ternary mixture of aspirin, paracetamol and salicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Yazbi, Fawzi A.; Hammud, Hassan H.; Assi, Sulaf A.

    2007-10-01

    A derivative spectrophotometric method was developed for the assay of a ternary mixture of aspirin (ASP), paracetamol (PAR) and salicylic acid (SAL). The method is based on the use of the first and second derivatives of the ratio spectra and measurement at zero-crossing wavelengths. The ratio spectra were obtained by dividing the absorption spectrum of the mixture by that of one of the components. The concentration of the other components are then determined from their respective calibration curves treated similarly. The described method was applied for the determination of these combinations in synthetic mixtures and dosage forms. The results obtained were accurate and precise.

  8. Derivative-ratio spectrophotometric method for the determination of ternary mixture of aspirin, paracetamol and salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    El-Yazbi, Fawzi A; Hammud, Hassan H; Assi, Sulaf A

    2007-10-01

    A derivative spectrophotometric method was developed for the assay of a ternary mixture of aspirin (ASP), paracetamol (PAR) and salicylic acid (SAL). The method is based on the use of the first and second derivatives of the ratio spectra and measurement at zero-crossing wavelengths. The ratio spectra were obtained by dividing the absorption spectrum of the mixture by that of one of the components. The concentration of the other components are then determined from their respective calibration curves treated similarly. The described method was applied for the determination of these combinations in synthetic mixtures and dosage forms. The results obtained were accurate and precise.

  9. Epitaxial growth of quantum rods with high aspect ratio and compositional contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. H.; Patriarche, G.; Fiore, A.

    2008-12-01

    The epitaxial growth of quantum rods (QRs) on GaAs was investigated. It was found that GaAs thickness in the GaAs/InAs superlattice used for QR formation plays a key role in improving the QR structural properties. Increasing the GaAs thickness results in both an increased In compositional contrast between the QRs and surrounding layer, and an increased QR length. QRs with an aspect ratio of up to 10 were obtained, representing quasiquantum wires in a GaAs matrix. Due to modified confinement and strain potential, such nanostructure is promising for controlling gain polarization.

  10. Measurements of the reflectance, contrast ratio, and scattering properties of digital micromirror devices (DMDs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobiev, Dmitry; Travinsky, Anton; Quijada, Manuel A.; Ninkov, Zoran; Raisanen, Alan D.; Robberto, Massimo; Heap, Sara

    2016-07-01

    Digital micromirror devices (DMDs) are micro-electro- mechanical systems, originally developed to display images in projector systems. A DMD in the focal plane of an imaging system can be used as a reprogrammable slit mask of a multi-object spectrometer (MOS) by tilting some of the mirrors towards the spectrometer and tilting the rest of the mirrors away, thereby rejecting the unwanted light (due to the background and foreground objects). A DMD-based MOS can generate new, arbitrary slit patterns in seconds, which significantly reduces the overhead time during astronomical observations. Critically, DMD-based slit masks are extremely lightweight, compact and mechanically robust, which makes them attractive for use in space-based telescopes. As part of a larger effort to investigate the use of DMDs in space telescopes (sponsored by a NASA Strategic Astrophysics Technologies grant), we characterized the optical performance of Texas Instruments DMDs to determine their suitability for use in multi-object spectrometers. The performance of a DMD-based MOS is significantly affected by its optical throughput (reflectance), contrast ratio (the ability of the DMD to reject unwanted light) and scattering properties (which could lead to crosstalk and reduced signal-to-noise ratio in the spectrometer). We measured and quantified the throughput and contrast ratio of a Texas Instruments DMD in several configurations (which emulate the operation of a typical DMD-based MOS) and investigated the scattering properties of the individual DMD mirrors. In this work we present the results of our analysis, describe the performance of a typical DMD- based MOS and discuss the practical limitations of these instruments (such as maximum density of sources and expected signal-to- noise ratio).

  11. Modeling the effects of distortion, contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio on stereophotogrammetric range mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellar, R. Glenn; Deen, Robert G.; Huffman, William C.; Willson, Reginald G.

    2016-09-01

    Stereophotogrammetry typically employs a pair of cameras, or a single moving camera, to acquire pairs of images from different camera positions, in order to create a three dimensional `range map' of the area being observed. Applications of this technique for building three-dimensional shape models include aerial surveying, remote sensing, machine vision, and robotics. Factors that would be expected to affect the quality of the range maps include the projection function (distortion) of the lenses and the contrast (modulation) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the acquired image pairs. Basic models of the precision with which the range can be measured assume a pinhole-camera model of the geometry, i.e. that the lenses provide perspective projection with zero distortion. Very-wide-angle or `fisheye' lenses, however (for e.g. those used by robotic vehicles) typically exhibit projection functions that differ significantly from this assumption. To predict the stereophotogrammetric range precision for such applications, we extend the model to the case of an equidistant lens projection function suitable for a very-wide-angle lens. To predict the effects of contrast and SNR on range precision, we perform numerical simulations using stereo image pairs acquired by a stereo camera pair on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity. Contrast is degraded and noise is added to these data in a controlled fashion and the effects on the quality of the resulting range maps are assessed.

  12. Highly photostable, reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein with high contrast ratio for live-cell superresolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Mingshu; Li, Dong; He, Wenting; Peng, Jianxin; Betzig, Eric; Xu, Pingyong

    2016-01-01

    Two long-standing problems for superresolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy are high illumination intensity and long acquisition time, which significantly hamper its application for live-cell imaging. Reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) have made it possible to dramatically lower the illumination intensities in saturated depletion-based SR techniques, such as saturated depletion nonlinear structured illumination microscopy (NL-SIM) and reversible saturable optical fluorescence transition microscopy. The characteristics of RSFPs most critical for SR live-cell imaging include, first, the integrated fluorescence signal across each switching cycle, which depends upon the absorption cross-section, effective quantum yield, and characteristic switching time from the fluorescent “on” to “off” state; second, the fluorescence contrast ratio of on/off states; and third, the photostability under excitation and depletion. Up to now, the RSFPs of the Dronpa and rsEGFP (reversibly switchable EGFP) families have been exploited for SR imaging. However, their limited number of switching cycles, relatively low fluorescence signal, and poor contrast ratio under physiological conditions ultimately restrict their utility in time-lapse live-cell imaging and their ability to reach the desired resolution at a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we present a truly monomeric RSFP, Skylan-NS, whose properties are optimized for the recently developed patterned activation NL-SIM, which enables low-intensity (∼100 W/cm2) live-cell SR imaging at ∼60-nm resolution at subsecond acquisition times for tens of time points over broad field of view. PMID:27562163

  13. Rayleigh-Bénard convection in binary mixtures with separation ratios near zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez-Lerma, Marco A.; Ahlers, Guenter; Cannell, David S.

    1995-12-01

    We present an experimental study of convection in binary mixtures with separation ratios Ψ close to zero. Measurements of the Hopf frequency for Ψ<0 were used to determine the relationship between Ψ and the mass concentration x with high precision. These results are consistent with but more precise than earlier measurements by conventional techniques. For Ψ>0, we found that the pattern close to onset consisted of squares. Our data give the threshold of convection rc≡Rc/Rc0 (Rc is the critical Rayleigh number of the mixture and Rc0 that of the pure fluid) from measurements of the refractive-index power of the pattern as revealed by a very sensitive quantitative shadowgraph method. Over the range Ψ<~0.011, corresponding to rc>~0.2, these results are in good agreement with linear stability analysis. The measured refractive-index power varies by six orders of magnitude as a function of r and for r>~0.55 is in reasonable agreement with predictions based on the ten-mode Lorenz-like Galerkin truncation of Müller and Lücke [H. W. Müller and M. Lücke, Phys. Rev. A 38, 2965 (1988)]. For smaller r, the model predicts a cancellation between contributions to the refractive index from concentration and temperature variations, which does not seem to occur in the physical system. Determinations of the wave numbers of the patterns near onset are consistent with the theoretically predicted small critical wave numbers at positive Ψ. As r approaches one, we find that q approaches the critical wave number qc0~=3 of the pure fluid. (c) 1995 The American Physical Society

  14. The mechanisms associated with the development of hypertension after exposure to lead, mercury species or their mixtures differs with the metal and the mixture ratio.

    PubMed

    Wildemann, Tanja M; Siciliano, Steven D; Weber, Lynn P

    2016-01-02

    Hypertension is considered to be the most important risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases. Beside life-style risk factors, exposure to lead and mercury species are increasingly discussed as potential risk factors. Although there are a few previous studies, the underlying mechanism by which exposure to lead and mercury disturb blood pressure regulation is not currently understood. Potential mechanisms are oxidative stress production, kidney damage and activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), all of which can interact to cause dysregulation of blood pressure. Male rats (Wistar) were exposed to lead, inorganic mercury, methylmercury or two mixtures of all three metals for four weeks through the drinking water. The two mixture ratios were based on ratios of known reference values or environmental exposure from the literature. To investigate the potential mechanism of actions, blood pressure was measured after four weeks and compared to plasma nitrotyrosine or reduced/oxidized glutathione levels in liver as markers for oxidative stress. Plasma renin and angiotensin II levels were used as markers for RAS activation. Finally, kidney function and injury were assessed via urinary and plasma creatinine levels, creatinine clearance and urinary kidney-injury molecule (KIM-1). While exposure to lead by itself increased oxidative stress and kidney damage along with blood pressure, inorganic mercury did not affect blood pressure or any end-point examined. Conversely, methylmercury instead increased RAS activation along with blood pressure. Surprisingly, when administered as mixtures, lead no longer increased oxidative stress or altered kidney function. Moreover, the mixture based on an environmental ratio no longer had an effect on blood pressure, while the reference value ratio still retained an increase in blood pressure. Based on our results, the prominent mechanism of action associated with the development of hypertension seems to be oxidative

  15. Extreme Contrast Ratio Imaging of Sirius with a Charge Injection Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batcheldor, D.; Foadi, R.; Bahr, C.; Jenne, J.; Ninkov, Z.; Bhaskaran, S.; Chapman, T.

    2016-02-01

    The next fundamental steps forward in understanding our place in the universe could be a result of advances in extreme contrast ratio (ECR) imaging and point-spread function (PSF) suppression. For example, blinded by quasar light we have yet to fully understand the processes of galaxy and star formation and evolution, and there is an ongoing race to obtain a direct image of an exo-Earth lost in the glare of its host star. To fully explore the features of these systems, we must perform observations in which contrast ratios (CRs) of at least one billion can be regularly achieved with sub 0.″1 inner working angles. Here, we present the details of a latest-generation 32-bit charge injection device (CID) that could conceivably achieve CRs on the order of one billion. We also demonstrate some of its ECR imaging abilities for astronomical imaging. At a separation of two arcminutes, we report a direct CR of {{Δ }}{m}v=18.3,{log}({CR})=7.3, or 1 part in 20 million, from observations of the Sirius field. The atmospheric conditions present during the collection of this data prevented less modest results, and we expect to be able to achieve higher CRs, with improved inner working angles, simply by operating a CID at a world-class observing site. However, CIDs do not directly provide any PSF suppression. Therefore, combining CID imaging with a simple PSF suppression technique like angular differential imaging could provide a cheap and easy alternative to the complex ECR techniques currently being employed.

  16. Sedimentary Sulphur:Iron Ratio Indicates Vivianite Occurrence: A Study from Two Contrasting Freshwater Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rothe, Matthias; Kleeberg, Andreas; Grüneberg, Björn; Friese, Kurt; Pérez-Mayo, Manuel; Hupfer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of studies constrain the importance of iron for the long-term retention of phosphorus (P) under anoxic conditions, i.e. the formation of reduced iron phosphate minerals such as vivianite (Fe3(PO4)2⋅8H2O). Much remains unknown about vivianite formation, the factors controlling its occurrence, and its relevance for P burial during early sediment diagenesis. To study the occurrence of vivianite and to assess its relevance for P binding, surface sediments of two hydrologically contrasting waters were analysed by heavy-liquid separation and subsequent powder X-ray diffraction. In Lake Arendsee, vivianite was present in deeper sediment horizons and not in the uppermost layers with a sharp transition between vivianite and non-vivianite bearing layers. In contrast, in lowland river Lower Havel vivianite was present in the upper sediment layers and not in deeper horizons with a gradual transition between non-vivianite and vivianite bearing layers. In both waters, vivianite occurrence was accompanied by the presence of pyrite (FeS2). Vivianite formation was favoured by an elevated iron availability through a lower degree of sulphidisation and was present at a molar ratio of total sulphur to reactive iron smaller than 1.1, only. A longer lasting burden of sediments by organic matter, i.e. due to eutrophication, favours the release of sulphides, and the formation of insoluble iron sulphides leading to a lack of available iron and to less or no vivianite formation. This weakening in sedimentary P retention, representing a negative feedback mechanism (P release) in terms of water quality, could be partly compensated by harmless Fe amendments. PMID:26599406

  17. Sedimentary Sulphur:Iron Ratio Indicates Vivianite Occurrence: A Study from Two Contrasting Freshwater Systems.

    PubMed

    Rothe, Matthias; Kleeberg, Andreas; Grüneberg, Björn; Friese, Kurt; Pérez-Mayo, Manuel; Hupfer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of studies constrain the importance of iron for the long-term retention of phosphorus (P) under anoxic conditions, i.e. the formation of reduced iron phosphate minerals such as vivianite (Fe3(PO4)2⋅8H2O). Much remains unknown about vivianite formation, the factors controlling its occurrence, and its relevance for P burial during early sediment diagenesis. To study the occurrence of vivianite and to assess its relevance for P binding, surface sediments of two hydrologically contrasting waters were analysed by heavy-liquid separation and subsequent powder X-ray diffraction. In Lake Arendsee, vivianite was present in deeper sediment horizons and not in the uppermost layers with a sharp transition between vivianite and non-vivianite bearing layers. In contrast, in lowland river Lower Havel vivianite was present in the upper sediment layers and not in deeper horizons with a gradual transition between non-vivianite and vivianite bearing layers. In both waters, vivianite occurrence was accompanied by the presence of pyrite (FeS2). Vivianite formation was favoured by an elevated iron availability through a lower degree of sulphidisation and was present at a molar ratio of total sulphur to reactive iron smaller than 1.1, only. A longer lasting burden of sediments by organic matter, i.e. due to eutrophication, favours the release of sulphides, and the formation of insoluble iron sulphides leading to a lack of available iron and to less or no vivianite formation. This weakening in sedimentary P retention, representing a negative feedback mechanism (P release) in terms of water quality, could be partly compensated by harmless Fe amendments.

  18. A simple procedure for estimating pseudo risk ratios from exposure to non-carcinogenic chemical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Scinicariello, Franco; Portier, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Non-cancer risk assessment traditionally assumes a threshold of effect, below which there is a negligible risk of an adverse effect. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry derives health-based guidance values known as Minimal Risk Levels (MRLs) as estimates of the toxicity threshold for non-carcinogens. Although the definition of an MRL, as well as EPA reference dose values (RfD and RfC), is a level that corresponds to "negligible risk," they represent daily exposure doses or concentrations, not risks. We present a new approach to calculate the risk at exposure to specific doses for chemical mixtures, the assumption in this approach is to assign de minimis risk at the MRL. The assigned risk enables the estimation of parameters in an exponential model, providing a complete dose-response curve for each compound from the chosen point of departure to zero. We estimated parameters for 27 chemicals. The value of k, which determines the shape of the dose-response curve, was moderately insensitive to the choice of the risk at the MRL. The approach presented here allows for the calculation of a risk from a single substance or the combined risk from multiple chemical exposures in a community. The methodology is applicable from point of departure data derived from quantal data, such as data from benchmark dose analyses or from data that can be transformed into probabilities, such as lowest-observed-adverse-effect level. The individual risks are used to calculate risk ratios that can facilitate comparison and cost-benefit analyses of environmental contamination control strategies.

  19. Contrasting magnetism in dilute and supersaturated cobalt-fullerene mixture films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentiev, V.; Stupakov, A.; Pokorný, J.; Lavrentieva, I.; Vacik, J.; Dejneka, A.; Barchuk, M.; Čapková, P.

    2015-08-01

    The combination of cobalt with nanocarbons promises hybrid nanostructures that are ideal for the development of memory storage and spin-transfer electronics. Here, we report a dramatic effect of composition on the magnetic properties of the Co x C60 mixtures, whose nanostructure was organized upon simultaneous deposition and sequential exposure to air. We assert a critical change in the mixture’s organization yielding either the composite nanostructure as array of the Co/CoO core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) in the C60-based matrix at a high content of Co (a supersaturated mixture or SSM) or a coexistence of fcc-C60 and CoaC60 fulleride when the Co content x is lower than some critical value {{x}\\text{c}} (an ultradilute mixture or UDM). Magnetization of the SSM composite exhibits a superparamagnetic effect caused by the small Co/CoO NPs. Similar magnetization of the UDM with x=0.7 revealed a stable ferromagnetism and evidenced the formation of a magnetic Co2C60 fulleride. Phase composition in the UDM and SSM films was verified with the XRD and Raman spectra. The UDM and SSM films reveal great difference in content of the remaining oxygen which implies easy diffusion of O2 molecules within the C60-based phases and their splitting at the Co NP surface followed by formation of CoO shells. The results obtained indicate controlled access to a variety of promising Co-C60 magnetic nanostructures.

  20. Assessment of the Contrast to Noise Ratio in PET Scanners with Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michail, C. M.; Karpetas, G. E.; Fountos, G. P.; Valais, I. G.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Kandarakis, I. S.; Panayiotakis, G. S.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of PET scanners through a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plane source. The source was simulated using a previously validated Monte Carlo model. The model was developed by using the GATE MC package and reconstructed images obtained with the STIR software for tomographic image reconstruction. The PET scanner simulated was the GE DiscoveryST. A plane source consisted of a TLC plate, was simulated by a layer of silica gel on aluminum (Al) foil substrates, immersed in 18F-FDG bath solution. Image quality was assessed in terms of the CNR. CNR was estimated from coronal reconstructed images of the plane source. Images were reconstructed by the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE)-OSMAPOSL. OSMAPOSL reconstruction was assessed by using various subsets (3, 15 and 21) and various iterations (2 to 20). CNR values were found to decrease when both iterations and subsets increase. Two (2) iterations were found to be optimal. The simulated PET evaluation method, based on the TLC plane source, can be useful in image quality assessment of PET scanners.

  1. Testing for Additivity in Chemical Mixtures Using a Fixed-Ratio Ray Design and Statistical Equivalence Testing Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fixed-ratio ray designs have been used for detecting and characterizing interactions of large numbers of chemicals in combination. Single chemical dose-response data are used to predict an “additivity curve” along an environmentally relevant ray. A “mixture curve” is estimated fr...

  2. Association Between Contrast Media Volume-Glomerular Filtration Rate Ratio and Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury After Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Celik, Omer; Ozturk, Derya; Akin, Fatih; Ayca, Burak; Yalcın, Ahmet Arif; Erturk, Mehmet; Bıyık, Ismail; Ayaz, Ahmet; Akturk, Ibrahim Faruk; Enhos, Asım; Aslan, Serkan

    2015-07-01

    We hypothesized that contrast media volume-estimated glomerular filtration rate (CV-e-GFR) ratio may be a predictor of contrast media-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). We investigated the associations between CV-e-GFR ratio and CI-AKI in 597 patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI). An absolute ≥0.3 mg/dL increase in serum creatinine compared with baseline levels within 48 hours after the procedure was considered as CI-AKI; 78 (13.1%) of the 597 patients experienced CI-AKI. The amount of contrast during procedure was higher in the CI-AKI group than in those without CI-AKI (153 vs 135 mL, P = .003). The CV-e-GFR ratio was significantly higher in patients with CI-AKI than without (2.3 vs 1.5, P < .001). In multivariate analysis, independent predictors of CI-AKI were low left ventricular ejection fraction (P = .018, odds ratio [OR] = 0.966), e-GFR <60 mL/min (P = .012, OR = 2.558), and CV-e-GFR >2 (P < .001, OR = 5.917). In conclusion, CV-e-GFR ratio is significantly associated with CI-AKI after pPCI.

  3. High-contrast ratio and long lifetime polymer electrochromic devices (ECDs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Dai; Xu, Chunye; Liu, Lu; Kaneko, Calen; Taya, Minoru

    2005-05-01

    The preparation and characterization of a type of ECD which was based on a cathodic EC polymer film, Poly [3, 3-dimethyl-3, 4-dihydro-2H-thieno [3, 4-b][1, 4] dioxepine] (PProDOT-Me2) is reported. A typical device was constructed by sandwiching a gel electrolyte between a PProDOT-Me2 EC film deposited on Indium Tin oxide (ITO) coated glass and a counter electrode which was also ITO glass coated by a Vanadium oxide (V2O5) thin film. The ECD has been characterized. Device contrast ratio, measured as Ε%T, was equal to 60%, and ranged from 2% to 62% between the colored and bleached state measured at 580 nm. A lifetime of over 100,000 cycles between the fully oxidized and fully reduced state has been achieved with only 6% change in the transmittance. The switching speed of a 2.5cm x 2.5cm ECD could be reached in 1 second between the bleached and colored state. The device also has a long open circuit memory. It can remain in the bleached or colored state without being energized for 30 days, and the change in transmittance is less than 6% in colored state. The cyclic voltammetry method was used to detect the moisture content in the gel electrolyte. ECDs of various dimensions were also prepared, 2.5cm x 2.5cm, 7.5cm x 7.5cm, 15cm x 15cm and 30cm x 30cm. The largest scale EC polymer device achieved is 30cm x 30cm. Low sheet resistance ITO glass and a thin-film silver deposition frame were applied to overcome the electric potential drop across the ITO glass surface.

  4. Detecting Departure From Additivity Along a Fixed-Ratio Mixture Ray With a Piecewise Model for Dose and Interaction Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Gennings, Chris; Wagner, Elizabeth D.; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Plewa, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    For mixtures of many chemicals, a ray design based on a relevant, fixed mixing ratio is useful for detecting departure from additivity. Methods for detecting departure involve modeling the response as a function of total dose along the ray. For mixtures with many components, the interaction may be dose dependent. Therefore, we have developed the use of a three-segment model containing both a dose threshold and an interaction threshold. Prior to the dose threshold, the response is that of background; between the dose threshold and the interaction threshold, an additive relationship exists; the model allows for departure from additivity beyond the interaction threshold. With such a model, we can conduct a hypothesis test of additivity, as well as a test for a region of additivity. The methods are illustrated with cytotoxicity data that arise when Chinese hamster ovary cells are exposed to a mixture of nine haloacetic acids. PMID:21359103

  5. A comparative study of different aspects of manipulating ratio spectra applied for ternary mixtures: derivative spectrophotometry versus wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Salem, Hesham; Lotfy, Hayam M; Hassan, Nagiba Y; El-Zeiny, Mohamed B; Saleh, Sarah S

    2015-01-25

    This work represents a comparative study of different aspects of manipulating ratio spectra, which are: double divisor ratio spectra derivative (DR-DD), area under curve of derivative ratio (DR-AUC) and its novel approach, namely area under the curve correction method (AUCCM) applied for overlapped spectra; successive derivative of ratio spectra (SDR) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) methods. The proposed methods represent different aspects of manipulating ratio spectra of the ternary mixture of Ofloxacin (OFX), Prednisolone acetate (PA) and Tetryzoline HCl (TZH) combined in eye drops in the presence of benzalkonium chloride as a preservative. The proposed methods were checked using laboratory-prepared mixtures and were successfully applied for the analysis of pharmaceutical formulation containing the cited drugs. The proposed methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines. A comparative study was conducted between those methods regarding simplicity, limitation and sensitivity. The obtained results were statistically compared with those obtained from the reported HPLC method, showing no significant difference with respect to accuracy and precision.

  6. A comparative study of different aspects of manipulating ratio spectra applied for ternary mixtures: Derivative spectrophotometry versus wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Hesham; Lotfy, Hayam M.; Hassan, Nagiba Y.; El-Zeiny, Mohamed B.; Saleh, Sarah S.

    2015-01-01

    This work represents a comparative study of different aspects of manipulating ratio spectra, which are: double divisor ratio spectra derivative (DR-DD), area under curve of derivative ratio (DR-AUC) and its novel approach, namely area under the curve correction method (AUCCM) applied for overlapped spectra; successive derivative of ratio spectra (SDR) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) methods. The proposed methods represent different aspects of manipulating ratio spectra of the ternary mixture of Ofloxacin (OFX), Prednisolone acetate (PA) and Tetryzoline HCl (TZH) combined in eye drops in the presence of benzalkonium chloride as a preservative. The proposed methods were checked using laboratory-prepared mixtures and were successfully applied for the analysis of pharmaceutical formulation containing the cited drugs. The proposed methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines. A comparative study was conducted between those methods regarding simplicity, limitation and sensitivity. The obtained results were statistically compared with those obtained from the reported HPLC method, showing no significant difference with respect to accuracy and precision.

  7. Comparative study of novel spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra: An application on pharmaceutical ternary mixture of omeprazole, tinidazole and clarithromycin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfy, Hayam Mahmoud; Abdel-Monem Hagazy, Maha

    2012-10-01

    Three simple, specific, accurate and precise spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra are developed for simultaneous determination of omeprazole (OM), tinidazole (TN) and clarithromycin (CL) in tablets. Method A, is an extended ratio subtraction one (EXRSM). Method B is a ratio difference spectrophotometric one (RDSM), while method C is mean centering of ratio spectra (MCR). The calibration curves are linear over the concentration range of 1-20 μg/mL, 10-60 μg/mL and 0.25-1.0 mg/mL for OM, TN and CL, respectively. The specificity of the developed methods is investigated by analyzing laboratory prepared mixtures of the three drugs and their combined dosage form. Standard deviation values are less than 1.5 in the assay of raw materials and tablets. The three methods are validated as per ICH guidelines and accuracy, precision, repeatability and robustness are found to be within the acceptable limits.

  8. A CO2-Free Synthetic Host-Odor Mixture That Attracts and Captures Triatomines: Effect of Emitted Odorant Ratios.

    PubMed

    Guidobaldi, F; Guerenstein, P G

    2016-07-01

    Triatomines, vectors of Chagas Disease, are hematophagous insects. Efforts have been made to develop synthetic attractants based on vertebrate odor-to lure them into traps. However, because those lures are not practical or have low capture efficiency, they are not in use in control programs. Therefore, more work is needed to reach a practical and efficient odor lure. Recently, a three-component, CO2-free, synthetic blend of vertebrate odor (consisting of ammonia, l-(+)-lactic acid, and hexanoic acid), known as Sweetscent (Biogents AG, Regensburg, Germany), was shown to attract and capture triatomines in the laboratory. In this study, using a trap olfactometer and an odor blend with constituents similar to those of Sweetscent (delivered from low-density polyethylene sachets) we found that the odorant ratios of the mixtures have a strong effect in the capture of triatomines. The blend with the most efficient combination of odorant ratios evoked ca. 81% capture in two relevant triatomine species. In the case of the most effective odor mixtures, we measured the odor mass emission for the three components of the mixture and therefore were able to estimate the odorant ratios emitted that were responsible for such a high capture performance. Thus, in those mixtures, pentanoic acid was the main component (ca. 65 %) followed by ammonia (ca. 28%) and, l(+)-lactic acid (ca. 7 %). Our results are encouraging as efficient, practical, and cheap odor baits to trap triatomines in the field would be within reach. The odor-delivery system used should be improved to increase stability of odor emission.

  9. Sex ratio and sexual dimorphism of three lice species with contrasting prevalence parasitizing the house sparrow.

    PubMed

    Pap, Péter László; Adam, Costică; Vágási, Csongor István; Benkő, Zoltán; Vincze, Orsolya

    2013-02-01

    Female-biased sex ratio is a common phenomenon in parasites; however, the cause and consequence of the skewed sex ratio is less well known. Here, we studied the difference in sex ratio, a possible mechanism responsible for the development of unbalanced proportion of sexes and its consequences on sexual size dimorphism, between 3 louse species parasitizing the house sparrow Passer domesticus. Philopterus fringillae was more prevalent than Sturnidoecus refractariolus and Brueelia cyclothorax. As expected, the most common species, which was probably least affected by isolation and, hence, inbreeding, was characterized by a balanced sex ratio, whereas the 2 other species with low prevalence were significantly more female biased than expected on the basis of the local mate competition hypothesis. Further, in support of this notion, we found that P. fringillae infrapopulation size significantly, and positively, correlated with the sex ratio. Finally, we found significant differences in sexual dimorphism among the 3 louse species and, as expected, the relative size of males was smallest in species with a more female-biased sex ratio.

  10. Spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra for simultaneous determination of binary mixtures with sever overlapping spectra: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, H; Fayez, Y

    2014-12-10

    Three simple, specific and accurate spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra were developed and validated for simultaneous determination of Rabeprazole sodium (RB) and Domperidone (DP) in their binary mixture without prior separation. Method A, is constant center spectrophotometric method (CC). Method B is a ratio difference spectrophotometric one (RD), while method C is a combined ratio isoabsorptive point-ratio difference method (RIRD). Linear correlations were obtained in range of 4-44μg/mL for both Rabeprazole sodium and Domperidone. The mean percentage recoveries of RB were 99.69±0.504 for method A, 99.83±0.483 for (B) and 100.31±0.499 for (C), respectively, and that of DP were 99.52±0.474 for method A, 100.12±0.505 for (B) and 100.16±0.498 for (C), respectively. Specificity was investigated by analysis of laboratory prepared mixtures containing the cited drugs and their combined tablet dosage form. The obtained results were statistically compared with those obtained by the reported methods, showing no significant difference with respect to accuracy and precision. The three methods were validated as per ICH guidelines and can be applied for routine analysis in quality control laboratories.

  11. Search for novel contrast materials in dual-energy x-ray breast imaging using theoretical modeling of contrast-to-noise ratio.

    PubMed

    Karunamuni, R; Maidment, A D A

    2014-08-07

    Contrast-enhanced (CE) dual-energy (DE) x-ray breast imaging uses a low- and high-energy x-ray spectral pair to eliminate soft-tissue signal variation and thereby increase the detectability of exogenous imaging agents. Currently, CEDE breast imaging is performed with iodinated contrast agents. These compounds are limited by several deficiencies, including rapid clearance and poor tumor targeting ability. The purpose of this work is to identify novel contrast materials whose contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) is comparable or superior to that of iodine in the mammographic energy range. A monoenergetic DE subtraction framework was developed to calculate the DE signal intensity resulting from the logarithmic subtraction of the low- and high-energy signal intensities. A weighting factor is calculated to remove the dependence of the DE signal on the glandularity of the breast tissue. Using the DE signal intensity and weighting factor, the CNR for materials with atomic numbers (Z) ranging from 1 to 79 are computed for energy pairs between 10 and 50 keV. A group of materials with atomic numbers ranging from 42 to 63 were identified to exhibit the highest levels of CNR in the mammographic energy range. Several of these materials have been formulated as nanoparticles for various applications but none, apart from iodine, have been investigated as CEDE breast imaging agents. Within this group of materials, the necessary dose fraction to the LE image decreases as the atomic number increases. By reducing the dose to the LE image, the DE subtraction technique will not provide an anatomical image of sufficient quality to accompany the contrast information. Therefore, materials with Z from 42 to 52 provide nearly optimal values of CNR with energy pairs and dose fractions that provide good anatomical images. This work is intended to inspire further research into new materials for optimized CEDE breast functional imaging.

  12. Comparative study of spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra: an application on pharmaceutical binary mixture of cinnarizine and dimenhydrinate.

    PubMed

    Lamie, Nesrine T

    2015-04-15

    Four simple, specific, accurate and precise spectrophotometric methods are developed and validated for simultaneous determination of cinnarizine (CIN) and dimenhydrinate (DIM) in a binary mixture with overlapping spectra, without preliminary separation. The first method is dual wavelength spectrophotometry (DW), the second is a ratio difference spectrophotometric one (RD) which measures the difference in amplitudes between 250 and 270 nm of ratio spectrum, the third one is novel constant center spectrophotometric method (CC) and the fourth method is mean centering of ratio spectra (MCR). The calibration curve is linear over the concentration range of 4-20 and 10-45 μg/ml for CIN and DIM, respectively. These methods are tested by analyzing synthetic mixtures of the above drugs and they are applied to commercial pharmaceutical preparation of the subjected drugs. The validity of results was assessed by applying standard addition technique. The results obtained were found to agree statistically with those obtained by a reported method, showing no significant difference with respect to accuracy and precision.

  13. Comparative study of spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra: An application on pharmaceutical binary mixture of cinnarizine and dimenhydrinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamie, Nesrine T.

    2015-04-01

    Four simple, specific, accurate and precise spectrophotometric methods are developed and validated for simultaneous determination of cinnarizine (CIN) and dimenhydrinate (DIM) in a binary mixture with overlapping spectra, without preliminary separation. The first method is dual wavelength spectrophotometry (DW), the second is a ratio difference spectrophotometric one (RD) which measures the difference in amplitudes between 250 and 270 nm of ratio spectrum, the third one is novel constant center spectrophotometric method (CC) and the fourth method is mean centering of ratio spectra (MCR). The calibration curve is linear over the concentration range of 4-20 and 10-45 μg/ml for CIN and DIM, respectively. These methods are tested by analyzing synthetic mixtures of the above drugs and they are applied to commercial pharmaceutical preparation of the subjected drugs. The validity of results was assessed by applying standard addition technique. The results obtained were found to agree statistically with those obtained by a reported method, showing no significant difference with respect to accuracy and precision.

  14. Fiber Optic Raman Sensor to Monitor Concentration Ratio of Nitrogen and Oxygen in a Cryogenic Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Kalluru, Rajamohan R.; Yueh, Fang-Yu; Singh, Jagdish P.; SaintCyr, William

    2007-01-01

    A spontaneous Raman scattering optical fiber sensor is developed for a specific need of NASA/SSC for long-term detection and monitoring of the quality of liquid oxygen (LOX) in the delivery line during ground testing of rocket engines. The sensor performance was tested in the laboratory and with different excitation light sources. To evaluate the sensor performance with different excitation light sources for the LOX quality application, we have used the various mixtures of liquid oxygen and liquid nitrogen as samples. The study of the sensor performance shows that this sensor offers a great deal of flexibility and provides a cost effective solution for the application. However, an improved system response time is needed for the real-time, quantitative monitoring of the quality of cryogenic fluids in harsh environment.

  15. The effect of soil: water ratios on the mineralisation of phenanthrene: LNAPL mixtures in soil.

    PubMed

    Doick, Kieron J; Semple, Kirk T

    2003-03-14

    Contamination of soil by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is frequently associated with non-aqueous-phase liquids. Measurement of the catabolic potential of a soil or determination of the biodegradable fraction of a contaminant can be done using a slurried soil respirometric system. This work assessed the impact of increasing the concentration of transformer oil and soil:water ratio on the microbial catabolism of [(14)C]phenanthrene to (14)CO(2) by a phenanthrene-degrading inoculum. Slurrying (1:1, 1:2, 1:3 and 1:5 soil:water ratios) consistently resulted in statistically higher rates and extents of mineralisation than the non-slurried system (2:1 soil:water ratio; P<0.01). The maximum extents of mineralisation observed occurred in the 1:2-1:5 soil:water ratio microcosms irrespective of transformer oil concentration. Transformer oil concentrations investigated displayed no statistically significant effect on total mineralisation (P>0.05). Soil slurries 1:2 or greater, but less than 1:5 (soil:water), are recommended for bioassay determinations of total contaminant bioavailability due to greater overall mineralisation and improved reproducibility.

  16. On-board Optical Spectrometry for Detection of Mixture Ratio and Eroded Materials in Rocket Engine Exhaust Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, Sarkis; Kittinger, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Optical spectrometry can provide means to characterize rocket engine exhaust plume impurities due to eroded materials, as well as combustion mixture ratio without any interference with plume. Fiberoptic probes and cables were designed, fabricated and installed on Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME), allowing monitoring of the plume spectra in real time with a Commercial of the Shelf (COTS) fiberoptic spectrometer, located in a test-stand control room. The probes and the cables survived the harsh engine environments for numerous hot-fire tests. When the plume was seeded with a nickel alloy powder, the spectrometer was able to successfully detect all the metallic and OH radical spectra from 300 to 800 nanometers.

  17. Reflective dual-mode liquid crystal display possessing low power consumption and high contrast ratio under ambient light.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehyung; Lee, Joong Ha; Yoon, Tae-Hoon; Choi, Suk-Won

    2012-07-02

    We propose a reflective dual-mode liquid crystal display (RD-LCD) which has advantages of long memory retention time and high contrast ratio. The proposed device adopts ideal bistable characteristics, a cell thickness over pitch (d/p) of 0.25. It can realize long memory retention time, thereby reducing power consumption. In addition, an optical configuration for the RD-LCD makes low light leakages at dark state and shows good dispersion characteristics in both dark and bright states over the entire visible ranges. We experimentally confirmed retention time over 6 months in memory mode and memory and dynamic contrast ratios of 47:1 and 43:1 under ambient light, respectively. As a result, the proposed RD-LCD demonstrates convincingly that it is a candidate for green display.

  18. Larger phylogenetic distances in litter mixtures: lower microbial biomass and higher C/N ratios but equal mass loss.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xu; Berg, Matty P; Butenschoen, Olaf; Murray, Phil J; Bartish, Igor V; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Dong, Ming; Prinzing, Andreas

    2015-05-07

    Phylogenetic distances of coexisting species differ greatly within plant communities, but their consequences for decomposers and decomposition remain unknown. We hypothesized that large phylogenetic distance of leaf litter mixtures increases differences of their litter traits, which may, in turn, result in increased resource complementarity or decreased resource concentration for decomposers and hence increased or decreased chemical transformation and reduction of litter. We conducted a litter mixture experiment including 12 common temperate tree species (evolutionarily separated by up to 106 Myr), and sampled after seven months, at which average mass loss was more than 50%. We found no effect of increased phylogenetic distance on litter mass loss or on abundance and diversity of invertebrate decomposers. However, phylogenetic distance decreased microbial biomass and increased carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratios of litter mixtures. Consistently, four litter traits showed (marginally) significant phylogenetic signal and in three of these traits increasing trait difference decreased microbial biomass and increased C/N. We suggest that phylogenetic proximity of litter favours microbial decomposers and chemical transformation of litter owing to a resource concentration effect. This leads to a new hypothesis: closely related plant species occurring in the same niche should promote and profit from increased nutrient availability.

  19. Larger phylogenetic distances in litter mixtures: lower microbial biomass and higher C/N ratios but equal mass loss

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xu; Berg, Matty P.; Butenschoen, Olaf; Murray, Phil J.; Bartish, Igor V.; Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.; Dong, Ming; Prinzing, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic distances of coexisting species differ greatly within plant communities, but their consequences for decomposers and decomposition remain unknown. We hypothesized that large phylogenetic distance of leaf litter mixtures increases differences of their litter traits, which may, in turn, result in increased resource complementarity or decreased resource concentration for decomposers and hence increased or decreased chemical transformation and reduction of litter. We conducted a litter mixture experiment including 12 common temperate tree species (evolutionarily separated by up to 106 Myr), and sampled after seven months, at which average mass loss was more than 50%. We found no effect of increased phylogenetic distance on litter mass loss or on abundance and diversity of invertebrate decomposers. However, phylogenetic distance decreased microbial biomass and increased carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratios of litter mixtures. Consistently, four litter traits showed (marginally) significant phylogenetic signal and in three of these traits increasing trait difference decreased microbial biomass and increased C/N. We suggest that phylogenetic proximity of litter favours microbial decomposers and chemical transformation of litter owing to a resource concentration effect. This leads to a new hypothesis: closely related plant species occurring in the same niche should promote and profit from increased nutrient availability. PMID:25876845

  20. Methods for the shaping high-power picosecond laser pulses with a high-contrast ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Malinov, V. A.; Charukchev, A. V.; Chernov, V. N.; Nikitin, N. V.; Potapov, S. L.; Efanov, V. M.; Yarin, P. M.

    1998-02-20

    We present the performance of the electrooptical system based on four Pockels cells with 10 and 20 mm diameters, each of them is driving by its own drift step recovery diode pulse generator. We are developing electro-optic deflector system for CPA laser using two identical deflectors (diverging and converging) and three spatial filters. The results of numerical modeling of the time-dependent distributions of the intensity in the beam are presented. A peak-to-background intensity ratio more than five orders is achieved by this technique. We have developed a new pulse generator based on single drift step recovery diode producing two identical electrical pulses with output voltage up to 15 kV, FWHM of 1.5 ns, rise time of 0.7 ns and jitter of 100 ps at a 100 Hz repetition rate to electro-optic deflectors.

  1. The influence of equivalence ratio and Soret effect on the ignition of hydrogen-air mixtures in supersonic boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Figueira da Silva, L.F.; Deshaies, B.

    1994-12-31

    As a result of viscous heating, spontaneous ignition of a supersonic flow of premixed combustible gases can occur in boundary layers. In a previous numerical study, the main structure of the reacting flow related to this specific type of ignition was given in the case of a laminar boundary layer of hydrogen and air developing over a flat plate. To complete the first mapping of the ignition as a function of the boundary conditions, the authors present in this paper the results of a specific study of the influence of the equivalence ratio of the mixture on ignition. The equivalence ratio is found to modify the chemical induction time in the boundary layer as follows: (1) in a direct way, (2) via the dependence of the wall temperature on the composition. Because of these combined effects, the minimum induction length is obtained for unusually lead mixtures. As it modifies local composition, the Soret effect is also found to change the boundary-layer induction length.

  2. Complex DNA mixture analysis in a forensic context: evaluating the probative value using a likelihood ratio model.

    PubMed

    Haned, Hinda; Benschop, Corina C G; Gill, Peter D; Sijen, Titia

    2015-05-01

    The interpretation of mixed DNA profiles obtained from low template DNA samples has proven to be a particularly difficult task in forensic casework. Newly developed likelihood ratio (LR) models that account for PCR-related stochastic effects, such as allelic drop-out, drop-in and stutters, have enabled the analysis of complex cases that would otherwise have been reported as inconclusive. In such samples, there are uncertainties about the number of contributors, and the correct sets of propositions to consider. Using experimental samples, where the genotypes of the donors are known, we evaluated the feasibility and the relevance of the interpretation of high order mixtures, of three, four and five donors. The relative risks of analyzing high order mixtures of three, four, and five donors, were established by comparison of a 'gold standard' LR, to the LR that would be obtained in casework. The 'gold standard' LR is the ideal LR: since the genotypes and number of contributors are known, it follows that the parameters needed to compute the LR can be determined per contributor. The 'casework LR' was calculated as used in standard practice, where unknown donors are assumed; the parameters were estimated from the available data. Both LRs were calculated using the basic standard model, also termed the drop-out/drop-in model, implemented in the LRmix module of the R package Forensim. We show how our results furthered the understanding of the relevance of analyzing high order mixtures in a forensic context. Limitations are highlighted, and it is illustrated how our study serves as a guide to implement likelihood ratio interpretation of complex DNA profiles in forensic casework.

  3. Evidence for positive, but not negative, behavioral contrast with wheel-running reinforcement on multiple variable-ratio schedules.

    PubMed

    Belke, Terry W; Pierce, W David

    2016-12-01

    Rats responded on a multiple variable-ratio (VR) 10 VR 10 schedule of reinforcement in which lever pressing was reinforced by the opportunity to run in a wheel for 30s in both the changed (manipulated) and unchanged components. To generate positive contrast, the schedule of reinforcement in the changed component was shifted to extinction; to generate negative contrast, the schedule was shifted to VR 3. With the shift to extinction in the changed component, wheel-running and local lever-pressing rates increased in the unchanged component, a result supporting positive contrast; however, the shift to a VR 3 schedule in the changed component showed no evidence of negative contrast in the unaltered setting, only wheel running decreased in the unchanged component. Changes in wheel-running rates across components were consistent in showing a compensation effect, depending on whether the schedule manipulation increased or decreased opportunities for wheel running in the changed component. These findings are the first to demonstrate positive behavioral contrast on a multiple schedule with wheel running as reinforcement in both components.

  4. Optimization of contrast-to-tissue ratio through pulse windowing in dual-frequency “acoustic angiography” imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Brooks D.; Shelton, Sarah E.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Early-stage tumors in many cancers are characterized by vascular remodeling, indicative of transformations in cell function. We have previously presented a high-resolution ultrasound imaging approach for detecting these changes which is based on microbubble contrast agents. In this technique, images are formed from only the higher harmonics of microbubble contrast agents, producing images of vasculature alone with 100–200 μm resolution. In this article, shaped transmit pulses are applied to imaging the higher broadband harmonic echoes of microbubble contrast agents, and the effects of varying pulse window and phasing on microbubble and tissue harmonic echoes are evaluated using a dual-frequency transducer in vitro and in vivo. An increase in contrast-to-tissue ratio of 6.8 ± 2.3 dB was observed in vitro by using an inverted pulse with a cosine window relative to a non-inverted pulse with a rectangular window. The increase in mean image intensity due to contrast enhancement in vivo in five rodents was 13.9 ± 3.0 dB greater for an inverted cosine-windowed pulse and 17.8 ± 3.6 dB greater for a non-inverted Gaussian-windowed relative to a non-inverted pulse with a rectangular window. Implications for pre-clinical and diagnostic imaging are also discussed. PMID:25819467

  5. Signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and their trade-offs with resolution in axial-shear strain elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thitaikumar, Arun; Krouskop, Thomas A.; Ophir, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    In axial-shear strain elastography, the local axial-shear strain resulting from the application of quasi-static axial compression to an inhomogeneous material is imaged. In this paper, we investigated the image quality of the axial-shear strain estimates in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNRasse) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRasse) using simulations and experiments. Specifically, we investigated the influence of the system parameters (beamwidth, transducer element pitch and bandwidth), signal processing parameters (correlation window length and axial window shift) and mechanical parameters (Young's modulus contrast, applied axial strain) on the SNRasse and CNRasse. The results of the study show that the CNRasse (SNRasse) is maximum for axial-shear strain values in the range of 0.005-0.03. For the inclusion/background modulus contrast range considered in this study (<10), the CNRasse (SNRasse) is maximum for applied axial compressive strain values in the range of 0.005%-0.03%. This suggests that the RF data acquired during axial elastography can be used to obtain axial-shear strain elastograms, since this range is typically used in axial elastography as well. The CNRasse (SNRasse) remains almost constant with an increase in the beamwidth while it increases as the pitch increases. As expected, the axial shift had only a weak influence on the CNRasse (SNRasse) of the axial-shear strain estimates. We observed that the differential estimates of the axial-shear strain involve a trade-off between the CNRasse (SNRasse) and the spatial resolution only with respect to pitch and not with respect to signal processing parameters. Simulation studies were performed to confirm such an observation. The results demonstrate a trade-off between CNRasse and the resolution with respect to pitch.

  6. Signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and their trade-offs with resolution in axial-shear strain elastography.

    PubMed

    Thitaikumar, Arun; Krouskop, Thomas A; Ophir, Jonathan

    2007-01-07

    In axial-shear strain elastography, the local axial-shear strain resulting from the application of quasi-static axial compression to an inhomogeneous material is imaged. In this paper, we investigated the image quality of the axial-shear strain estimates in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR(asse)) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR(asse)) using simulations and experiments. Specifically, we investigated the influence of the system parameters (beamwidth, transducer element pitch and bandwidth), signal processing parameters (correlation window length and axial window shift) and mechanical parameters (Young's modulus contrast, applied axial strain) on the SNR(asse) and CNR(asse). The results of the study show that the CNR(asse) (SNR(asse)) is maximum for axial-shear strain values in the range of 0.005-0.03. For the inclusion/background modulus contrast range considered in this study (<10), the CNR(asse) (SNR(asse)) is maximum for applied axial compressive strain values in the range of 0.005%-0.03%. This suggests that the RF data acquired during axial elastography can be used to obtain axial-shear strain elastograms, since this range is typically used in axial elastography as well. The CNR(asse) (SNR(asse)) remains almost constant with an increase in the beamwidth while it increases as the pitch increases. As expected, the axial shift had only a weak influence on the CNR(asse) (SNR(asse)) of the axial-shear strain estimates. We observed that the differential estimates of the axial-shear strain involve a trade-off between the CNR(asse) (SNR(asse)) and the spatial resolution only with respect to pitch and not with respect to signal processing parameters. Simulation studies were performed to confirm such an observation. The results demonstrate a trade-off between CNR(asse) and the resolution with respect to pitch.

  7. Digital breast tomosynthesis: studies of the effects of acquisition geometry on contrast-to-noise ratio and observer preference of low-contrast objects in breast phantom images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Schmitz, Andrea; Zelakiewicz, Scott; Telang, Santosh; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Watcharotone, Kuanwong; Helvie, Mark A.; Paramagul, Chintana; Neal, Colleen; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Larson, Sandra C.; Carson, Paul L.

    2014-10-01

    The effect of acquisition geometry in digital breast tomosynthesis was evaluated with studies of contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) and observer preference. Contrast-detail (CD) test objects in 5 cm thick phantoms with breast-like backgrounds were imaged. Twelve different angular acquisitions (average glandular dose for each ~1.1 mGy) were performed ranging from narrow angle 16° with 17 projection views (16d17p) to wide angle 64d17p. Focal slices of SART-reconstructed images of the CD arrays were selected for CNR computations and the reader preference study. For the latter, pairs of images obtained with different acquisition geometries were randomized and scored by 7 trained readers. The total scores for all images and readings for each acquisition geometry were compared as were the CNRs. In general, readers preferred images acquired with wide angle as opposed to narrow angle geometries. The mean percent preferred was highly correlated with tomosynthesis angle (R = 0.91). The highest scoring geometries were 60d21p (95%), 64d17p (80%), and 48d17p (72%); the lowest scoring were 16d17p (4%), 24d9p (17%) and 24d13p (33%). The measured CNRs for the various acquisitions showed much overlap but were overall highest for wide-angle acquisitions. Finally, the mean reader scores were well correlated with the mean CNRs (R = 0.83).

  8. Improvement of contrast ratio in quadriphase-shift-keying optical label recognition with passive optical waveguide circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishikawa, Hiroki; Makimoto, Yoshihiro; Inoshita, Kensuke; Igarashi, Sanae; Goto, Nobuo; Yanagiya, Shin-ichiro

    2016-05-01

    In photonic label routing networks, recognition of optical labels is one of the key functions. We have proposed waveguide-type optical circuits for recognition of optical labels encoded in quadriphase-shift-keying (QPSK) form. A basic device for the circuits consists of a 3-dB directional coupler, two Y-branches, and an asymmetric X-junction coupler. We employed a scheme of complete interference of optical waves between each coded pulse and a reference pulse in our previously reported paper. The contrast ratio of the output at the destination output port to the outputs at the other ports was reported to decrease to 1.6, 1.28, and 1.13 for two-, three-, and four-stage circuits for recognition of 16, 64, and 256 QPSK labels, respectively. We find optimum circuits with improved contrast ratio of 1.8, 1.6, and 1.47 for 16, 64, and 256 labels, respectively. The recognition operation with the improved circuits is numerically confirmed using the beam propagation method. Noise tolerance of the proposed circuits is also clarified by numerical simulation. The improved circuits are optimum from the viewpoint of efficient use of optical power and noise tolerance.

  9. Contrasting Sr isotope ratios in plagioclase from different formations of the mid-Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkel, W. A.; Wolff, J.; Eckberg, A.; Ramos, F.

    2008-12-01

    Many early Columbia River Basalt flows of the Steens and Imnaha Formations are characterized by abundant, texturally complex, coarse plagioclase phenocrysts. In Imnaha lavas, the feldspars typically have more radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr than whole rock and matrix, and may exhibit complex isotopic zoning that is not correlated with An content. Imnaha plagioclase grains are interpreted as variably-contaminated crystals produced when high-crystallinity mid-crustal basaltic intrusions exchanged interstitial melt with adjacent partly-melted crustal rock; this isotopically variable debris was then remobilized by subsequent intrusion of mantle-derived basalt and brought to the surface as an isotopically heterogeneous mixture. In contrast, plagioclase grains in the texturally very similar Steens lavas are isotopically near-homogeneous and 87Sr/86Sr is not significantly displaced from that of the bulk rock. This is consistent with magma- crust interaction at low degrees of crustal melting during the early stages of the Columbia River flood basalt episode, where Steens and Imnaha lavas were erupted from distinct magma systems hosted by different types of crust that exerted different degrees of isotopic leverage on the mantle-derived magmas [1]. Thermal input to the Steens system declined at the same time as the Imnaha magmatic flux increased to ultimately produce the huge outpouring of Grande Ronde lavas, which are mixtures of mantle- and crust-derived liquids, the latter produced during high degrees of crustal melting during the time of peak magmatic flux. [1] Wolff et al. (2008) Nature Geoscience 1, 177-180.

  10. Optimization of Contrast-to-Tissue Ratio by Adaptation of Transmitted Ternary Signal in Ultrasound Pulse Inversion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Girault, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast imaging has provided more accurate medical diagnoses thanks to the development of innovating modalities like the pulse inversion imaging. However, this latter modality that improves the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) is not optimal, since the frequency is manually chosen jointly with the probe. However, an optimal choice of this command is possible, but it requires precise information about the transducer and the medium which can be experimentally difficult to obtain, even inaccessible. It turns out that the optimization can become more complex by taking into account the kind of generators, since the generators of electrical signals in a conventional ultrasound scanner can be unipolar, bipolar, or tripolar. Our aim was to seek the ternary command which maximized the CTR. By combining a genetic algorithm and a closed loop, the system automatically proposed the optimal ternary command. In simulation, the gain compared with the usual ternary signal could reach about 3.9 dB. Another interesting finding was that, in contrast to what is generally accepted, the optimal command was not a fixed-frequency signal but had harmonic components. PMID:23573167

  11. D-OPTIMAL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS TO TEST FOR DEPARTURE FROM ADDITIVITY IN A FIXED-RATIO RAY MIXTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessors are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of assessing interactions between chemicals in a mixture. Most traditional designs for evaluating interactions are prohibitive when the number of chemicals in the mixture is large. However, evaluation of interacti...

  12. Determining the Maximum Cumulative Ratios for Mixtures Observed in Ground Water Wells Used as Drinking Water Supplies in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xianglu; Price, Paul S.

    2011-01-01

    The maximum cumulative ratio (MCR) developed in previous work is a tool to evaluate the need to perform cumulative risk assessments. MCR is the ratio of the cumulative exposures to multiple chemicals to the maximum exposure from one of the chemicals when exposures are described using a common metric. This tool is used to evaluate mixtures of chemicals measured in samples of untreated ground water as source for drinking water systems in the United States. The mixtures of chemicals in this dataset differ from those examined in our previous work both in terms of the predicted toxicity and compounds measured. Despite these differences, MCR values in this study follow patterns similar to those seen earlier. MCR values for the mixtures have a mean (range) of 2.2 (1.03–5.4) that is much smaller than the mean (range) of 16 (5–34) in the mixtures in previous study. The MCR values of the mixtures decline as Hazard Index (HI) values increase. MCR values for mixtures with larger HI values are not affected by possible contributions from chemicals that may occur at levels below the detection limits. This work provides a second example of use of the MCR tool in the evaluation of mixtures that occur in the environment. PMID:22408599

  13. Determining the maximum cumulative ratios for mixtures observed in ground water wells used as drinking water supplies in the United States.

    PubMed

    Han, Xianglu; Price, Paul S

    2011-12-01

    The maximum cumulative ratio (MCR) developed in previous work is a tool to evaluate the need to perform cumulative risk assessments. MCR is the ratio of the cumulative exposures to multiple chemicals to the maximum exposure from one of the chemicals when exposures are described using a common metric. This tool is used to evaluate mixtures of chemicals measured in samples of untreated ground water as source for drinking water systems in the United States. The mixtures of chemicals in this dataset differ from those examined in our previous work both in terms of the predicted toxicity and compounds measured. Despite these differences, MCR values in this study follow patterns similar to those seen earlier. MCR values for the mixtures have a mean (range) of 2.2 (1.03-5.4) that is much smaller than the mean (range) of 16 (5-34) in the mixtures in previous study. The MCR values of the mixtures decline as Hazard Index (HI) values increase. MCR values for mixtures with larger HI values are not affected by possible contributions from chemicals that may occur at levels below the detection limits. This work provides a second example of use of the MCR tool in the evaluation of mixtures that occur in the environment.

  14. Transport coefficients of hard-sphere mixtures. III. Diameter ratio 0.4 and mass ratio 0.03 at high fluid density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erpenbeck, Jerome J.

    1993-07-01

    The equation of state and the transport coefficients of shear viscosity, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusion, and mutal diffusion are estimated for a binary, equimolar mixture of hard spheres having a diameter ratio of 0.4 and a mass ratio of 0.03 at volumes in the range 1.7V0 to 3V0 (V0=1/2 √2 Ntsumaxaσ3a, where xa are the mole fractions, σa are the diameters, and N is the number of particles), complementing and, in some cases, improving earlier low-density results through Monte Carlo, molecular-dynamics calculations using the Green-Kubo formulas. Calculations are reported for 108 to 2048 particles, so that both finite-system and, in the case of the transport coefficients, long-time tail corrections can be applied to obtain accurate estimates of the pressure and the transport coefficients in the thermodynamic limit. Corrections of both types are found to be increasingly important at higher densities, for which the pressure is observed to become nonlinear in 1/N over the range covered. The Mansoori-Carnahan-Starling-Leland (MCSL) equation is found to account for the pressure with considerable accuracy for V>=1.7V0 the difference between the observed (infinite-system) pressure and the MCSL prediction increases monotonically with density, reaching 0.4% at V=1.7V0. For volumes below 2V0 the pressure in excess of the MCSL prediction is found to ``soften'' slightly in its dependence on the density. The pressure is also compared with the known virial series (B2 and B3) and the difference is fitted to a rational polynomial from which estimates for B4 and B5 are derived. The transport coefficients are compared with the predictions of the revised Enskog theory, evaluated using the MCSL equation of state. The shear viscosity coefficient is found to lie within about 5% of the theory over much of the range of densities, exceeding the Enskog prediction at both high and low densities and rising sharply at the highest densities. The thermal conductivity drops to about 94

  15. Estimate of the optimum weight ratio in zero-valent iron/pumice granular mixtures used in permeable reactive barriers for the remediation of nickel contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, P S; Moraci, N; Suraci, P

    2012-03-15

    This paper presents the results of laboratory column tests aimed at defining the optimum weight ratio of zero-valent iron (ZVI)/pumice granular mixtures to be used in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for the removal of nickel from contaminated groundwater. The tests were carried out feeding the columns with aqueous solutions of nickel nitrate at concentrations of 5 and 50 mg/l using three ZVI/pumice granular mixtures at various weight ratios (10/90, 30/70 and 50/50), for a total of six column tests; two additional tests were carried out using ZVI alone. The most successful compromise between reactivity (higher ZVI content) and long-term hydraulic performance (higher Pumice content) seems to be given by the ZVI/pumice granular mixture with a 30/70 weight ratio.

  16. Soil surface colonization by phototrophic indigenous organisms, in two contrasted soils treated by formulated maize herbicide mixtures.

    PubMed

    Joly, Pierre; Misson, Benjamin; Perrière, Fanny; Bonnemoy, Frédérique; Joly, Muriel; Donnadieu-Bernard, Florence; Aguer, Jean-Pierre; Bohatier, Jacques; Mallet, Clarisse

    2014-11-01

    Soil phototrophic microorganisms, contributors to soil health and food webs, share their particular metabolism with plants. Current agricultural practices employ mixtures of pesticides to ensure the crops yields and can potentially impair these non-target organisms. However despite this environmental reality, studies dealing the susceptibility of phototrophic microorganisms to pesticide mixtures are scarce. We designed a 3 months microcosm study to assess the ecotoxicity of realistic herbicide mixtures of formulated S-metolachlor (Dual Gold Safeneur(®)), mesotrione (Callisto(®)) and nicosulfuron (Milagro(®)) on phototrophic communities of two soils (Limagne vertisol and Versailles luvisol). The soils presented different colonizing communities, with diatoms and chlorophyceae dominating communities in Limagne soil and cyanobacteria and bryophyta communities in Versailles soil. The results highlighted the strong impairment of Dual Gold Safeneur(®) treated microcosms on the biomass and the composition of both soil phototrophic communities, with no resilience after a delay of 3 months. This study also excluded any significant mixture effect on these organisms for Callisto(®) and Milagro(®) herbicides. We strongly recommend carrying on extensive soil studies on S-metolachlor and its commercial formulations, in order to reconsider its use from an ecotoxicological point of view.

  17. Plant/soil concentration ratios of 226Ra for contrasting sites around an active U mine-mill.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, S A; Whicker, F W

    1988-12-01

    Concentrations of 226Ra were determined in native vegetation and underlying substrate (soil and tailings) at various sites around a conventional open-pit, acid leach U production operation in Wyoming. Plant/soil concentration ratios (CRs) for 226Ra were estimated for various sites, including weathered tailings; a tailings impoundment shoreline; downwind from exposed tailings; a mine overburden reclamation area; and several background locations. Radium-226 concentrations for vegetation and substrate and CR values from the perturbed sites were elevated above background. The highest vegetation concentration (1.3 Bq g-1) was found in a grass which had invaded exposed, weathered tailings. Levels of 226Ra in soil and vegetation and CR values decreased with distance from the tailings impoundment edge. CR values varied significantly among sites, but few differences were found between plant species groups. The observed CR values ranged from 0.07 at the background and reclamation areas to 0.4 downwind from the tailings area. Average CR values for plants growing on exposed tailings and within one meter from the impoundment edge were 0.15 and 0.3, respectively. CR values of 226Ra for plants on tailings substrates were comparatively low in contrast to other radionuclides in the U chain. We speculate that in the case of sulfuric acid leached tailings-derived material, 226Ra is sequestered as sulfate, which is highly insoluble relative to the sulfates of the other elements (e.g., U and Th) resulting in reduced availability for plant uptake.

  18. Contrasting Effects of Intraspecific Trait Variation on Trait-Based Niches and Performance of Legumes in Plant Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Roscher, Christiane; Schumacher, Jens; Schmid, Bernhard; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Niche differentiation, assumed to be a key mechanism of species coexistence, requires that species differ in their functional traits. So far it remains unclear to which extent trait plasticity leads to niche shifts of species at higher plant diversity, thereby increasing or decreasing niche overlap between species. To analyse this question it is convenient to measure niches indirectly via the variation in resource-uptake traits rather than directly via the resources used. We provisionally call these indirectly measured niches trait-based niches. We studied shoot- and leaf-morphological characteristics in seven legume species in monoculture and multi-species mixture in experimental grassland. Legume species varied in the extent of trait variation in response to plant diversity. Trait plasticity led to significant shifts in species niches in multiple dimensions. Single-species niches in several traits associated with height growth and filling of canopy space were expanded, while other niche dimensions were compressed or did not change with plant diversity. Niche separation among legumes decreased in dimensions related to height growth and space filling, but increased in dimensions related to leaf size and morphology. The total extent of occupied niche space was larger in mixture than in the combined monocultures for dimensions related to leaf morphology and smaller for dimensions related to whole-plant architecture. Taller growth, greater space filling and greater plasticity in shoot height were positively, while larger values and greater plasticity in specific leaf area were negatively related with increased performance of species in mixture. Our study shows that trait variation in response to plant diversity shifts species niches along trait axes. Plastically increased niche differentiation is restricted to niche dimensions that are apparently not related to size-dependent differences between species, but functional equivalence (convergence in height growth) rather

  19. Contrasting effects of intraspecific trait variation on trait-based niches and performance of legumes in plant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Roscher, Christiane; Schumacher, Jens; Schmid, Bernhard; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Niche differentiation, assumed to be a key mechanism of species coexistence, requires that species differ in their functional traits. So far it remains unclear to which extent trait plasticity leads to niche shifts of species at higher plant diversity, thereby increasing or decreasing niche overlap between species. To analyse this question it is convenient to measure niches indirectly via the variation in resource-uptake traits rather than directly via the resources used. We provisionally call these indirectly measured niches trait-based niches. We studied shoot- and leaf-morphological characteristics in seven legume species in monoculture and multi-species mixture in experimental grassland. Legume species varied in the extent of trait variation in response to plant diversity. Trait plasticity led to significant shifts in species niches in multiple dimensions. Single-species niches in several traits associated with height growth and filling of canopy space were expanded, while other niche dimensions were compressed or did not change with plant diversity. Niche separation among legumes decreased in dimensions related to height growth and space filling, but increased in dimensions related to leaf size and morphology. The total extent of occupied niche space was larger in mixture than in the combined monocultures for dimensions related to leaf morphology and smaller for dimensions related to whole-plant architecture. Taller growth, greater space filling and greater plasticity in shoot height were positively, while larger values and greater plasticity in specific leaf area were negatively related with increased performance of species in mixture. Our study shows that trait variation in response to plant diversity shifts species niches along trait axes. Plastically increased niche differentiation is restricted to niche dimensions that are apparently not related to size-dependent differences between species, but functional equivalence (convergence in height growth) rather

  20. POWER AND SAMPLE SIZE CALCULATIONS FOR LINEAR HYPOTHESES ASSOCIATED WITH MIXTURES OF MANY COMPONENTS USING FIXED-RATIO RAY DESIGNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Response surface methodology, often supported by factorial designs, is the classical experimental approach that is widely accepted for detecting and characterizing interactions among chemicals in a mixture. In an effort to reduce the experimental effort as the number of compound...

  1. D-OPTIMAL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGNS TO TEST FOR DEPARTURE FROM ADDITIVITY IN A FIXED-RATIO MIXTURE RAY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional factorial designs for evaluating interactions among chemicals in a mixture are prohibitive when the number of chemicals is large. However, recent advances in statistically-based experimental design have made it easier to evaluate interactions involving many chemicals...

  2. Ultralow dose dentomaxillofacial CT imaging and iterative reconstruction techniques: variability of Hounsfield units and contrast-to-noise ratio

    PubMed Central

    Bischel, Alexander; Stratis, Andreas; Kakar, Apoorv; Bosmans, Hilde; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Gassner, Eva-Maria; Puelacher, Wolfgang; Pauwels, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether application of ultralow dose protocols and iterative reconstruction technology (IRT) influence quantitative Hounsfield units (HUs) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in dentomaxillofacial CT imaging. Methods: A phantom with inserts of five types of materials was scanned using protocols for (a) a clinical reference for navigated surgery (CT dose index volume 36.58 mGy), (b) low-dose sinus imaging (18.28 mGy) and (c) four ultralow dose imaging (4.14, 2.63, 0.99 and 0.53 mGy). All images were reconstructed using: (i) filtered back projection (FBP); (ii) IRT: adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-50 (ASIR-50), ASIR-100 and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR); and (iii) standard (std) and bone kernel. Mean HU, CNR and average HU error after recalibration were determined. Each combination of protocols was compared using Friedman analysis of variance, followed by Dunn's multiple comparison test. Results: Pearson's sample correlation coefficients were all >0.99. Ultralow dose protocols using FBP showed errors of up to 273 HU. Std kernels had less HU variability than bone kernels. MBIR reduced the error value for the lowest dose protocol to 138 HU and retained the highest relative CNR. ASIR could not demonstrate significant advantages over FBP. Conclusions: Considering a potential dose reduction as low as 1.5% of a std protocol, ultralow dose protocols and IRT should be further tested for clinical dentomaxillofacial CT imaging. Advances in knowledge: HU as a surrogate for bone density may vary significantly in CT ultralow dose imaging. However, use of std kernels and MBIR technology reduce HU error values and may retain the highest CNR. PMID:26859336

  3. Quality assurance in MRI breast screening: comparing signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kousi, Evanthia; Borri, Marco; Dean, Jamie; Panek, Rafal; Scurr, Erica; Leach, Martin O.; Schmidt, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    MRI has been extensively used in breast cancer staging, management and high risk screening. Detection sensitivity is paramount in breast screening, but variations of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a function of position are often overlooked. We propose and demonstrate practical methods to assess spatial SNR variations in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast examinations and apply those methods to different protocols and systems. Four different protocols in three different MRI systems (1.5 and 3.0 T) with receiver coils of different design were employed on oil-filled test objects with and without uniformity filters. Twenty 3D datasets were acquired with each protocol; each dataset was acquired in under 60 s, thus complying with current breast DCE guidelines. In addition to the standard SNR calculated on a pixel-by-pixel basis, we propose other regional indices considering the mean and standard deviation of the signal over a small sub-region centred on each pixel. These regional indices include effects of the spatial variation of coil sensitivity and other structured artefacts. The proposed regional SNR indices demonstrate spatial variations in SNR as well as the presence of artefacts and sensitivity variations, which are otherwise difficult to quantify and might be overlooked in a clinical setting. Spatial variations in SNR depend on protocol choice and hardware characteristics. The use of uniformity filters was shown to lead to a rise of SNR values, altering the noise distribution. Correlation between noise in adjacent pixels was associated with data truncation along the phase encoding direction. Methods to characterise spatial SNR variations using regional information were demonstrated, with implications for quality assurance in breast screening and multi-centre trials.

  4. DETECTING INTERACTIONS(S) AND ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF COMPONENT SUBSETS IN A CHEMICAL MIXTURE USING FIXED-RATIO MIXTURE RAY DESIGNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An important environmental and regulatory issue is the protection of human health from potential adverse effects of cumulative exposure to multiple chemicals. Gennings et al. (2002) and Meadows et al. (2002) suggest restricting inference to specific fixed-ratio rays of interest....

  5. Two-photon Laurdan studies of the ternary lipid mixture DOPC:SM:cholesterol reveal a single liquid phase at sphingomyelin:cholesterol ratios lower than 1.

    PubMed

    Carravilla, Pablo; Nieva, José L; Goñi, Félix M; Requejo-Isidro, Jose; Huarte, Nerea

    2015-03-10

    The ternary lipid mixture DOPC:eggSM:cholesterol in excess water has been studied in the form of giant unilamellar vesicles using two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Previous publications based on single-photon fluorescence microscopy had reported heterogeneous phase behavior (phase coexistence) in the region of the triangular phase diagram corresponding to SM:cholesterol molar ratios <1. We have examined this region by two-photon microscopy of Laurdan-labeled mixtures and have found that, under our conditions, only a single liquid phase exists. We have shown that macroscopic phase separation in the above region can be artifactually induced by one-photon excitation of the fluorescent probes and ensuing photooxidation and is prevented using two-photon excitation. The main effect of increasing the concentration of cholesterol in mixtures containing 30 mol % SM was to increase the rigidity of the disordered domains. Increasing the concentration of SM in mixtures containing 20 mol % cholesterol gradually augmented the rigidity of the ordered domains, while the disordered domains reached minimal order at a SM:cholesterol 2.25:1 molar ratio, which then increased again. Moreover, the detailed measurement of Laurdan generalized polarization across the whole phase diagram allowed the representation, for both the single- and two-phase regions, of the gradual variation of membrane lateral packing along the diagram, which we found to be governed largely by SM:cholesterol interactions.

  6. Regional impact of exposure to a polychlorinated biphenyl and polychlorinated dibenzofuran mixture from contaminated rice oil on stillbirth rate and secondary sex ratio.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Kashima, Saori; Tokinobu, Akiko; Kato, Tsuguhiko; Tsuda, Toshihide

    2013-09-01

    Yusho disease, a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDF) mixed poisoning caused by contaminated rice oil, occurred in Japan in 1968. The evidence on reproductive outcome is limited. We therefore evaluated the regional impact of the exposure to the PCB and PCDF mixture on stillbirth rate and secondary sex ratio among the residents in two severely affected areas. We selected the regionally-affected towns of Tamanoura (n=4390 in 1970) and Naru (n=6569) in Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan, for study. We obtained data on stillbirths (spontaneous/artificial) and live-born births (total/male/female) from 1958 to 1994. For a decade and a half after the exposure, an increase in the rate of spontaneous stillbirths coincided with a decrease in the male sex ratio. Compared with the years 1958-1967, the ratios for spontaneous stillbirth rates were 2.16 (95% confidence interval: 1.58 to 2.97) for 1968-1977 and 1.80 (95% confidence interval: 1.25 to 2.60) for 1978-1987. The sex ratio (male proportion) was 0.483 (95% confidence interval: 0.457 to 0.508) in the first 10years after exposure. Exposure to a mixture of PCBs and PCDFs affected stillbirth and sex ratio for a decade and a half after the exposure.

  7. Evaluating the efficiency of spectral resolution of univariate methods manipulating ratio spectra and comparing to multivariate methods: an application to ternary mixture in common cold preparation.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Azza Aziz; Salem, Hesham; Hegazy, Maha; Ali, Omnia

    2015-02-25

    Simple, accurate, and selective methods have been developed and validated for simultaneous determination of a ternary mixture of Chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM), Pseudoephedrine HCl (PSE) and Ibuprofen (IBF), in tablet dosage form. Four univariate methods manipulating ratio spectra were applied, method A is the double divisor-ratio difference spectrophotometric method (DD-RD). Method B is double divisor-derivative ratio spectrophotometric method (DD-RD). Method C is derivative ratio spectrum-zero crossing method (DRZC), while method D is mean centering of ratio spectra (MCR). Two multivariate methods were also developed and validated, methods E and F are Principal Component Regression (PCR) and Partial Least Squares (PLSs). The proposed methods have the advantage of simultaneous determination of the mentioned drugs without prior separation steps. They were successfully applied to laboratory-prepared mixtures and to commercial pharmaceutical preparation without any interference from additives. The proposed methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines. The obtained results were statistically compared with the official methods where no significant difference was observed regarding both accuracy and precision.

  8. Evaluating the efficiency of spectral resolution of univariate methods manipulating ratio spectra and comparing to multivariate methods: An application to ternary mixture in common cold preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, Azza Aziz; Salem, Hesham; Hegazy, Maha; Ali, Omnia

    2015-02-01

    Simple, accurate, and selective methods have been developed and validated for simultaneous determination of a ternary mixture of Chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM), Pseudoephedrine HCl (PSE) and Ibuprofen (IBF), in tablet dosage form. Four univariate methods manipulating ratio spectra were applied, method A is the double divisor-ratio difference spectrophotometric method (DD-RD). Method B is double divisor-derivative ratio spectrophotometric method (DD-RD). Method C is derivative ratio spectrum-zero crossing method (DRZC), while method D is mean centering of ratio spectra (MCR). Two multivariate methods were also developed and validated, methods E and F are Principal Component Regression (PCR) and Partial Least Squares (PLSs). The proposed methods have the advantage of simultaneous determination of the mentioned drugs without prior separation steps. They were successfully applied to laboratory-prepared mixtures and to commercial pharmaceutical preparation without any interference from additives. The proposed methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines. The obtained results were statistically compared with the official methods where no significant difference was observed regarding both accuracy and precision.

  9. Contrasting brood-sex ratio flexibility in two opiine (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) parasitoids of tephritid (Diptera) fruit files

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mass-rearing of fruit fly parasitoids for augmentative release would be more economical if production could be biased towards females. If sex ratios are ever to be manipulated under rearing conditions it is important to determine if, then understand why, sex ratio flexibility exists. Unequal brood-s...

  10. Influence of Seeding Ratio, Planting Date, and Termination Date on Rye-Hairy Vetch Cover Crop Mixture Performance under Organic Management

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Andrew; Cogger, Craig; Bary, Andy; Fortuna, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Cover crop benefits include nitrogen accumulation and retention, weed suppression, organic matter maintenance, and reduced erosion. Organic farmers need region-specific information on winter cover crop performance to effectively integrate cover crops into their crop rotations. Our research objective was to compare cover crop seeding mixtures, planting dates, and termination dates on performance of rye (Secale cereale L.) and hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) monocultures and mixtures in the maritime Pacific Northwest USA. The study included four seed mixtures (100% hairy vetch, 25% rye-75% hairy vetch, 50% rye-50% hairy vetch, and 100% rye by seed weight), two planting dates, and two termination dates, using a split-split plot design with four replications over six years. Measurements included winter ground cover; stand composition; cover crop biomass, N concentration, and N uptake; and June soil NO3--N. Rye planted in mid-September and terminated in late April averaged 5.1 Mg ha-1 biomass, whereas mixtures averaged 4.1 Mg ha-1 and hairy vetch 2.3 Mg ha-1. Delaying planting by 2.5 weeks reduced average winter ground cover by 65%, biomass by 50%, and cover crop N accumulation by 40%. Similar reductions in biomass and N accumulation occurred for late March termination, compared with late April termination. Mixtures had less annual biomass variability than rye. Mixtures accumulated 103 kg ha-1 N and had mean C:N ratio <17:1 when planted in mid-September and terminated in late April. June soil NO3--N (0 to 30 cm depth) averaged 62 kg ha-1 for rye, 97 kg ha-1 for the mixtures, and 119 kg ha-1 for hairy vetch. Weeds comprised less of the mixtures biomass (20% weeds by weight at termination) compared with the monocultures (29%). Cover crop mixtures provided a balance between biomass accumulation and N concentration, more consistent biomass over the six-year study, and were more effective at reducing winter weeds compared with monocultures. PMID:26080008

  11. Influence of Seeding Ratio, Planting Date, and Termination Date on Rye-Hairy Vetch Cover Crop Mixture Performance under Organic Management.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Andrew; Cogger, Craig; Bary, Andy; Fortuna, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Cover crop benefits include nitrogen accumulation and retention, weed suppression, organic matter maintenance, and reduced erosion. Organic farmers need region-specific information on winter cover crop performance to effectively integrate cover crops into their crop rotations. Our research objective was to compare cover crop seeding mixtures, planting dates, and termination dates on performance of rye (Secale cereale L.) and hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) monocultures and mixtures in the maritime Pacific Northwest USA. The study included four seed mixtures (100% hairy vetch, 25% rye-75% hairy vetch, 50% rye-50% hairy vetch, and 100% rye by seed weight), two planting dates, and two termination dates, using a split-split plot design with four replications over six years. Measurements included winter ground cover; stand composition; cover crop biomass, N concentration, and N uptake; and June soil NO3(-)-N. Rye planted in mid-September and terminated in late April averaged 5.1 Mg ha(-1) biomass, whereas mixtures averaged 4.1 Mg ha(-1) and hairy vetch 2.3 Mg ha(-1). Delaying planting by 2.5 weeks reduced average winter ground cover by 65%, biomass by 50%, and cover crop N accumulation by 40%. Similar reductions in biomass and N accumulation occurred for late March termination, compared with late April termination. Mixtures had less annual biomass variability than rye. Mixtures accumulated 103 kg ha(-1) N and had mean C:N ratio <17:1 when planted in mid-September and terminated in late April. June soil NO3(-)-N (0 to 30 cm depth) averaged 62 kg ha(-1) for rye, 97 kg ha(-1) for the mixtures, and 119 kg ha(-1) for hairy vetch. Weeds comprised less of the mixtures biomass (20% weeds by weight at termination) compared with the monocultures (29%). Cover crop mixtures provided a balance between biomass accumulation and N concentration, more consistent biomass over the six-year study, and were more effective at reducing winter weeds compared with monocultures.

  12. Effect of hydrogen ratio on plasma parameters of N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} gas mixture glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    El-Brulsy, R. A.; Abd Al-Halim, M. A.; Abu-Hashem, A.; Rashed, U. M.; Hassouba, M. A.

    2012-05-15

    A dc plane glow discharge in a nitrogen-hydrogen (N{sub 2}-H{sub 2}) gas mixture has been operated at discharge currents of 10 and 20 mA. The electron energy distribution function (EEDF) at different hydrogen concentrations is measured. A Maxwellian EEDF is found in the positive column region, while in both cathode fall and negative glow regions, a non-Maxwellian one is observed. Langmuir electric probes are used at different axial positions, gas pressures, and hydrogen concentrations to measure the electron temperature and plasma density. The electron temperature is found to increase with increasing H{sub 2} concentration and decrease with increasing both the axial distance from the cathode and the mixture pressure. At first, with increasing distance from the cathode, the ion density decreases, while the electron density increases; then, as the anode is further approached, they remain nearly constant. At different H{sub 2} concentrations, the electron and ion densities decrease with increasing the mixture pressure. Both the electron and ion densities slightly decrease with increasing H{sub 2} concentration.

  13. Evaluation of scatter mitigation strategies for x-ray cone-beam CT: impact of scatter subtraction and anti-scatter grids on contrast-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazos, Dimitrios; Lasio, Giovanni; Evans, Joshua; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2007-03-01

    The large contribution of scatter to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) x-ray projections significantly degrades image quality, both through streaking and cupping artifacts and by loss of low contrast boundary detectability. The goal of this investigation is to compare the efficacy of three widely used scatter mitigation methods: subtractive scatter correction (SSC); anti-scatter grids (ASG); and beam modulating with bowtie filters; for improving signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and cupping artifacts. A simple analytic model was developed to predict scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) and CNR as a function of cylindrical phantom thickness. In addition, CBCT x-ray projections of a CatPhan QA phantom were measured, using a Varian CBCT imaging system, and computed, using an inhouse Monte Carlo photon-transport code to more realistically evaluate the impact of scatter mitigation techniques. Images formed with uncorrected sinograms acquired without ASGs and bow-tie filter show pronounced cupping artifacts and loss of contrast. Subtraction of measured scatter profiles restores image uniformity and CT number accuracy, but does not improve CNR, since the improvement in contrast almost exactly offset by the increase in relative x-ray noise. ASGs were found to modestly improve CNR (up to 20%, depending ASG primary transmission and selectivity) only in body scans, while they can reduce CNR for head phantoms where SPR is low.

  14. Comparing CO2 flux data from eddy covariance methods with bowen ratio energy balance methods from contrasting soil management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring CO2 fluxes from contrasting soil management practices is important for understanding the role of agriculture in source-sink relationship with CO2 flux. There are several micrometeorological methods for measuring CO2 emissions, however all are expensive and thus do not easily lend themselve...

  15. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Applied to Reacting Gases for Mixture Ratio Measurement and Detection of Metallic Species

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-29

    et al, Laser Diagnostics of Painted Artworks: Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in Pigment Identification, Applied Spectroscopy , Vol. 51, No. 7...Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Online Engine Equivalence Ratio Measurements, Applied Spectroscopy , Vol. 57, No. 9, pp. 1183-1189, 2003. Fisher...A. K., at al. Flame Emission Spectroscopy for Equivalence Ratio Monitoring, Applied Spectroscopy , Vol. 52, No. 5, pp. 658-662, 1998. Laser Induced

  16. Plasma parameters and active species kinetics in CF4/O2/Ar gas mixture: effects of CF4/O2 and O2/Ar mixing ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junmyung; Kwon, Kwang-Ho; Efremov, A.

    2016-12-01

    The effects of both CF4/O2 and O2/Ar mixing ratios in three-component CF4/O2/Ar mixture on plasma parameters, densities and fluxes of active species determining the dry etching kinetics were analyzed. The investigation combined plasma diagnostics by Langmuir probes and zero-dimensional plasma modeling. It was found that the substitution of CF4 for O2 at constant fraction of Ar in a feed gas produces the non-monotonic change in F atom density, as it was repeatedly reported for the binary CF4/O2 gas mixtures. At the same time, the substitution of Ar for O2 at constant fraction of CF4 results in the monotonic increase in F atom density toward more oxygenated plasmas. The natures of these phenomena as well as theirs possible impacts on the etching/polymerization kinetics were discussed in details.

  17. Comparative Study of Novel Ratio Spectra and Isoabsorptive Point Based Spectrophotometric Methods: Application on a Binary Mixture of Ascorbic Acid and Rutin

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Hany W.; Bakheit, Ahmed H.; Naguib, Ibrahim A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents novel methods for spectrophotometric determination of ascorbic acid (AA) in presence of rutin (RU) (coformulated drug) in their combined pharmaceutical formulation. The seven methods are ratio difference (RD), isoabsorptive_RD (Iso_RD), amplitude summation (A_Sum), isoabsorptive point, first derivative of the ratio spectra (1DD), mean centering (MCN), and ratio subtraction (RS). On the other hand, RU was determined directly by measuring the absorbance at 358 nm in addition to the two novel Iso_RD and A_Sum methods. The work introduced in this paper aims to compare these different methods, showing the advantages for each and making a comparison of analysis results. The calibration curve is linear over the concentration range of 4–50 μg/mL for AA and RU. The results show the high performance of proposed methods for the analysis of the binary mixture. The optimum assay conditions were established and the proposed methods were successfully applied for the assay of the two drugs in laboratory prepared mixtures and combined pharmaceutical tablets with excellent recoveries. No interference was observed from common pharmaceutical additives. PMID:26885440

  18. Simultaneous determination of chloramphenicol, dexamethasone and naphazoline in ternary and quaternary mixtures by RP-HPLC, derivative and wavelet transforms of UV ratio spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Vu Dang; Hue, Nguyen Thu; Tho, Nguyen Huu; Nguyen, Hue Minh Thi

    2015-03-01

    The application of chemometrics-assisted UV spectrophotometry and RP-HPLC to the simultaneous determination of chloramphenicol, dexamethasone and naphazoline in ternary and quaternary mixtures is presented. The spectrophotometric procedure is based on the first-order derivative and wavelet transforms of ratio spectra using single, double and successive divisors. The ratio spectra were differentiated and smoothed using Savitzky-Golay filter; whereas wavelet transform realized with wavelet functions (i.e. db6, gaus5 and coif3) to obtain highest spectral recoveries. For the RP-HPLC procedure, the separation was achieved on a ZORBAX SB-C18 (150 × 4.6 mm; 5 μm) column at ambient temperature and the total run time was less than 7 min. A mixture of acetonitrile - 25 mM phosphate buffer pH 3 (27:73, v/v) was used as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min and the effluent monitored by measuring absorbance at 220 nm. Calibration graphs were established in the range 20-70 mg/L for chloramphenicol, 6-14 mg/L for dexamethasone and 3-8 mg/L for naphazoline (R2 > 0.990). The RP-HPLC and ratio spectra transformed by a combination of derivative-wavelet algorithms proved to be able to successfully determine all analytes in commercial eye drop formulations without sample matrix interference (mean percent recoveries, 97.4-104.3%).

  19. Fiber optic Raman sensor to monitor the concentration ratio of nitrogen and oxygen in a cryogenic mixture.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vidhu S; Kalluru, Rajamohan R; Yueh, Fang Y; Singh, Jagdish P; Cyr, William St; Khijwania, Sunil K

    2007-06-01

    A spontaneous Raman scattering optical fiber sensor was developed for a specific need of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for long-term detection and monitoring of the purity of liquid oxygen (LO(2)) in the oxidizer feed line during ground testing of rocket engines. The Raman peak intensity ratios for liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) and LO(2) with varied weight ratios (LN(2)/LO(2)) were analyzed for their applicability to impurity sensing. The study of the sensor performance with different excitation light sources has helped to design a miniaturized, cost-effective system for this application. The optimal system response time of this miniaturized sensor for LN(2)/LO(2) measurement was found to be in the range of a few seconds. It will need to be further reduced to the millisecond range for real-time, quantitative monitoring of the quality of cryogenic fluids in a harsh environment.

  20. Investigation of mass dependence effects for the accurate determination of molybdenum isotope amount ratios by MC-ICP-MS using synthetic isotope mixtures.

    PubMed

    Malinovsky, Dmitry; Dunn, Philip J H; Petrov, Panayot; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Methodology for absolute Mo isotope amount ratio measurements by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) using calibration with synthetic isotope mixtures (SIMs) is presented. For the first time, synthetic isotope mixtures prepared from seven commercially available isotopically enriched molybdenum metal powders ((92)Mo, (94)Mo, (95)Mo, (96)Mo, (97)Mo, (98)Mo, and (100)Mo) are used to investigate whether instrumental mass discrimination of Mo isotopes in MC-ICP-MS is consistent with mass-dependent isotope distribution. The parent materials were dissolved and mixed as solutions to obtain mixtures with accurately known isotope amount ratios. The level of elemental impurities in the isotopically enriched molybdenum metal powders was quantified by ICP-MS by using both high-resolution and reaction cell instruments to completely resolve spectral interferences. The Mo isotope amount ratio values with expanded uncertainty (k = 2), determined by MC-ICP-MS for a high-purity Mo rod from Johnson Matthey, were as follows: (92)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.9235(9), (94)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.5785(8), (96)Mo/(95)Mo = 1.0503(9), (97)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.6033(6), (98)Mo/(95)Mo = 1.5291(20), and (100)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.6130(7). A full uncertainty budget for the measurements is presented which shows that the largest contribution to the uncertainty budget comes from correction for elemental impurities (∼51%), followed by the contribution from weighing operations (∼26 %). The atomic weight of molybdenum was calculated to be 95.947(2); the uncertainty in parentheses is expanded uncertainty with the coverage factor of 2. A particular advantage of the developed method is that calibration factors for all six Mo isotope amount ratios, involving the (95)Mo isotope, were experimentally determined. This allows avoiding any assumption on mass-dependent isotope fractions in MC-ICP-MS, inherent to the method of double spike previously used for Mo isotope amount ratio

  1. Processes affecting oxygen isotope ratios of atmospheric and ecosystem sulfate in two contrasting forest catchments in Central Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Novak; Myron J. Mitchell; Iva Jackova; Frantisek Buzek; Jana Schweigstillova; Lucie Erbanova; Richard Prikryl; Daniela Fottova

    2007-02-15

    Sulfate aerosols are harmful as respirable particles. They also play a role as cloud condensation nuclei and have radiative effects on global climate. A combination of {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4} data with catchment sulfur mass balances was used to constrain processes affecting S cycling in the atmosphere and spruce forests of the Czech Republic. Extremely high S fluxes via spruce throughfall and runoff were measured at Jezeri (49 and 80 kg S ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, respectively). The second catchment, Na Lizu, was 10 times less polluted. In both catchments, {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4} decreased in the following order: open-area precipitation {gt} throughfall {gt} runoff. The 180-SO{sub 4} values of throughfall exhibited a seasonal pattern at both sites, with maxima in summer and minima in winter. This seasonal pattern paralleled {delta}{sup 18}O-H{sub 2}O values, which were offset by -18{per_thousand}. Sulfate in throughfall was predominantly formed by heterogeneous (aqueous) oxidation of SO{sub 2}. Wet-deposited sulfate in an open area did not show systematic {delta}{sup 18}O-SO{sub 4} trends, suggesting formation by homogeneous (gaseous) oxidation and/or transport from large distances. The percentage of incoming S that is organically cycled in soil was similar under the high and the low pollution. High-temperature {sup 18}O-rich sulfate was not detected, which contrasts with North American industrial sites. 29 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Iodine potassium iodide improves the contrast-to-noise ratio of micro-computed tomography images of the human middle ear.

    PubMed

    Rohani, S A; Ghomashchi, S; Umoh, J; Holdsworth, D W; Agrawal, S K; Ladak, H M

    2016-12-01

    High-resolution imaging of middle-ear geometry is necessary for finite-element modeling. Although micro-computed tomography (microCT) is widely used because of its ability to image bony structures of the middle ear, it is difficult to visualize soft tissues - including the tympanic membrane and the suspensory ligaments/tendons - because of lack of contrast. The objective of this research is to quantitatively evaluate the efficacy of iodine potassium iodide (IKI) solution as a contrast agent. Six human temporal bones were used in this experiment, which were obtained in right-left pairs, from three cadaveric heads. All bones were fixed using formaldehyde. Three bones (one from each pair) were stained in IKI solution for 2 days, whereas the other three were not stained. Samples were scanned using a microCT system at a resolution of 20 μm. Eight soft tissues in the middle ear were segmented: anterior mallear ligament, incudomallear joint, lateral mallear ligament, posterior incudal ligament, stapedial annular ligament, stapedius muscle, tympanic membrane and tensor tympani muscle. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of each soft tissue were calculated for each temporal bone. Combined CNRs of the soft tissues in unstained samples were 6.1 ± 3.0, whereas they were 8.1 ± 2.7 in stained samples. Results from Welch's t-test indicate significant difference between the two groups at a 95% confidence interval. Results for paired t-tests for each of the individual soft tissues also indicated significant improvement of contrast in all tissues after staining. Relatively large soft tissues in the middle ear such as the tympanic membrane and the tensor tympani muscle were impacted by staining more than smaller tissues such as the stapedial annular ligament. The increase in contrast with IKI solution confirms its potential application in automatic segmentation of the middle-ear soft tissues.

  3. Enhanced contrast ratios and rapid-switching color-changeable devices based on poly(3,4-propylenedioxythiophene) derivative and counterelectrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chunye; Tamagawa, Hirohisa; Uchida, Mikio; Taya, Minoru

    2002-07-01

    A large contrast ratio and rapid switching electrochromic(EC) polymer device which consists of laminated two-layer structure between two electrodes was proposed. The new design which only comprises an ITO coated glass electrode, a cathodic poly(3,4-propylenedioxythiophene) derivative (PProDOT-(CH3$2) EC polymer film, a solid electrolyte and an Au-based counterelectrode which replaces anodic EC polymer and ITO electrode. Carbon-based counterelectrode was prepared for comparing with Au-based counterelectrode. Lithography and sputtering were used for Au patterning on glass substrate, while screen printing was used for carbon-based counterelectrode. Covering percentage of Au is less than 20%, in order to keep the electrode high transmittance. We also prepared a solid electrolyte, such as poly(methyl metracrylate)(PMMA) based containing LiClO4 gel electrolyte for solid state applications. A special parafilm was utilized on sealing the assembly device. Color change of high contrast ratio of transmittance (>(Delta) 50% T) of the device is rapidly (0.5-1s) obtained upon applied 2.5V voltage and repeatable (10,000 times). The temperature range under which the switching is stable is wide, -40 degree(s)C 100 degree(s)C. The repeatability of current of EC polymer devices while color change was estimated by electrochemistry.

  4. Simultaneous determination of a ternary mixture of doxylamine succinate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, and folic acid by the ratio spectra-zero-crossing, double divisor-ratio spectra derivative, and column high-performance liquid chromatographic methods.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Ashutosh; Rajput, Sadhana J

    2008-01-01

    Three simple, rapid, and accurate methods, i.e., the derivative ratio spectra-zero-crossing method (method I), double divisor-ratio spectra derivative method (method II), and column reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) method (method III) were developed for the simultaneous determination of doxylamine succinate (DOX), pyridoxine hydrochloride (PYR), and folic acid (FA) in their ternary mixtures and in tablets. In methods I and II, the calibration graphs were linear in the range of 2.5-80, 1.0-40, and 1.0-30 microg/mL for DOX, PYR, and FA, respectively. In the HPLC method, the separation of these compounds was performed using mobile phase consisting of 0.05 M phosphate buffer (pH 6.3)-methanol-acetonitrile (50 + 20 + 30, v/v/v), and UV detection was performed at 263 nm. Linearity was observed between the concentrations of the analytes and peak areas [correlation coefficient (r) > or =0.9998] in the concentration range of 1.0-200, 4.0-600, and 4.0-600 microg/mL for DOX, PYR, and FA, respectively. The standard deviation of retention time in method III was 0.011, 0.015, and 0.016 for DOX, PYR, and FA, respectively. The precision studies for all of the methods gave relative standard deviation values of <2%. The results obtained from the methods were statistically compared by means of Student's t-test and the variance ratio F-test. It was concluded that all of the developed methods were equally accurate, sensitive, and precise. These methods could be applied to determine DOX, PYR, and FA in their combined dosage forms.

  5. Dual optical role of low-index injection layers for efficient polarizer-free high contrast-ratio organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyunsu; Chung, Jin; Lee, Jaeho; Kim, Eunhye; Yoo, Seunghyup

    2015-04-20

    Polarizer-free high contrast-ratio organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are explored with a structure involving a semi-reflective Cr-based bottom electrode and a dielectric-capped thin Ag top electrode. Their efficiency is shown to be improved significantly with little sacrifice in luminous reflectance by adopting low-refractive-index injection layers that can increase the effective reflectance from the bottom electrode and simultaneously reduce the loss owing to surface plasmon polariton modes. OLEDs employing a low-refractive-index injection layer exhibit improved current efficiency by up to ca. 27.4% than those using index-matched injection layers, with luminous reflectance maintained at as low as 4%.

  6. The Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) in High Definition (HD) Mode for Improved Contrast-to-Noise Ratio and Resolution in Fluoroscopy and Roadmapping.

    PubMed

    Panse, Ashish; Ionita, C N; Wang, W; Natarajan, S K; Jain, A; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2010-10-30

    During image guided interventional procedures, superior resolution and image quality is critically important. Operating the MAF in the new High Definition (HD) fluoroscopy mode provides high resolution and increased contrast-to-noise ratio. The MAF has a CCD camera and a 300 micron cesium iodide x-ray convertor phosphor coupled to a light image intensifier (LII) through a fiber-optic taper. The MAF captures 1024 × 1024 pixels with an effective pixel size of 35 microns, and is capable of real-time imaging at 30 fps. The HD mode uses the advantages of higher exposure along with a small focal spot effectively improving the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the spatial resolution. The Control Acquisition Processing and Image Display System (CAPIDS) software for the MAF controls the LII gain. The interventionalist can select either fluoroscopic or angiographic modes using the two standard foot pedals. When improved image quality is needed and the angiography footpedal is used for HD mode, the x-ray machine will operate at a preset higher exposure rate using a small focal spot, while the CAPIDS will automatically adjust the LII gain to achieve proper image brightness. HD mode fluoroscopy and roadmapping are thus achieved conveniently during the interventional procedure. For CNR and resolution evaluation we used a bar phantom with images taken in HD mode with both the MAF and a Flat Panel Detector (FPD). It was seen that the FPD could not resolve more than 2.8 lp/mm whereas the MAF could resolve more than 5 lp/mm. The CNR of the MAF was better than that of the FPD by 60% at lower frequencies and by 600% at the Nyquist frequency of the FPD. The HD mode has become the preferred mode during animal model interventions because it enables detailed features of endovascular devices such as stent struts to be visualized clearly for the first time. Clinical testing of the MAF in HD mode is imminent.

  7. APT-Weighted and NOE-Weighted Image Contrasts in Glioma with Different RF Saturation Powers Based on Magnetization Transfer Ratio Asymmetry Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jinyuan; Hong, Xiaohua; Zhao, Xuna; Gao, Jia-Hong; Yuan, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the saturation-power dependence of amide proton transfer (APT)-weighted and nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE)-weighted image contrasts in a rat glioma model at 4.7 T. Methods 9L tumor-bearing rats (n = 8) and fresh eggs (n = 4) were scanned on a 4.7-T animal MRI scanner. Z-spectra over an offset range of ±6 ppm were acquired with different saturation powers, followed by the magnetization transfer-ratio (MTR) asymmetry analyses around the water resonance. Results The NOE signal upfield from the water resonance (−2.5 to −5 ppm) was clearly visible at lower saturation powers (e.g., 0.6 μT) and was larger in the contralateral normal brain tissue than in the tumor. Conversely, the APT effect downfield from the water resonance was observed at relatively higher saturation powers (e.g., 2.1 μT) and was larger in the tumor than in the contralateral normal brain tissue. The NOE decreased the APT-weighted image signal, based on the MTR asymmetry analysis, but increased the APT-weighted image contrast between the tumor and contralateral normal brain tissue. Conclusion The APT and NOE image signals in tumor are maximized at different saturation powers. The saturation power of roughly 2 μT is ideal for APT-weighted imaging at clinical B0 field strengths. PMID:23661598

  8. Effect of the Si/Al ratio and of the zeolite structure on the performance of dealuminated zeolites for the reforming of hydrocarbon mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Smirniotis, P.G.; Zhang, W.

    1996-09-01

    Various 12-membered ring pore zeolites were employed for the reforming of synthetic hydrocarbon mixtures which simulate industrial naphthas. All the zeolites were dealuminated to various extents. It was found that, under the present conditions over the samples which are slightly dealuminated, bimolecular-condensation reactions followed by recracking are responsible for the relatively large selectivities of C{sub 4} paraffins. The monomolecular cracking (via pentacoordinated carbonium ions) of the latter hydrocarbons is responsible for the large generation of CH{sub 4} from the cracking of C{sub 4} paraffins. When the Si/Al ratio increases, the selectivity of methane passes through a steep minimum, while those of C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, and C{sub 5} pass through a maximum. It was also found that the zeolite pore structure is a very important factor for the time on stream activity of zeolite-based catalysts. Zeolites with reduced aluminum content and pore structures, which do not favor the formation of coke precursors in their cavities, can lead to very promising catalysts for acid-catalyzed reactions. From this study a 12-membered ring pore zeolite, which demonstrates minimal coke deactivation, was identified.

  9. Successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication spectrophotometric method for determination of hydroquinone in complex mixture with its degradation products, tretinoin and methyl paraben.

    PubMed

    Elghobashy, Mohamed R; Bebawy, Lories I; Shokry, Rafeek F; Abbas, Samah S

    2016-03-15

    A sensitive and selective stability-indicating successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication (SRS-CM) spectrophotometric method was studied and developed for the spectrum resolution of five component mixture without prior separation. The components were hydroquinone in combination with tretinoin, the polymer formed from hydroquinone alkali degradation, 1,4 benzoquinone and the preservative methyl paraben. The proposed method was used for their determination in their pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The zero order absorption spectra of hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben were determined at 293, 357.5, 245 and 255.2 nm, respectively. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration ranges of 4.00-46.00, 1.00-7.00, 0.60-5.20, and 1.00-7.00 μg mL(-1) for hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben, respectively. The pharmaceutical formulation was subjected to mild alkali condition and measured by this method resulting in the polymerization of hydroquinone and the formation of toxic 1,4 benzoquinone. The proposed method was validated according to ICH guidelines. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the reported method.

  10. Successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication spectrophotometric method for determination of hydroquinone in complex mixture with its degradation products, tretinoin and methyl paraben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elghobashy, Mohamed R.; Bebawy, Lories I.; Shokry, Rafeek F.; Abbas, Samah S.

    2016-03-01

    A sensitive and selective stability-indicating successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication (SRS-CM) spectrophotometric method was studied and developed for the spectrum resolution of five component mixture without prior separation. The components were hydroquinone in combination with tretinoin, the polymer formed from hydroquinone alkali degradation, 1,4 benzoquinone and the preservative methyl paraben. The proposed method was used for their determination in their pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The zero order absorption spectra of hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben were determined at 293, 357.5, 245 and 255.2 nm, respectively. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration ranges of 4.00-46.00, 1.00-7.00, 0.60-5.20, and 1.00-7.00 μg mL- 1 for hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben, respectively. The pharmaceutical formulation was subjected to mild alkali condition and measured by this method resulting in the polymerization of hydroquinone and the formation of toxic 1,4 benzoquinone. The proposed method was validated according to ICH guidelines. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the reported method.

  11. Contrasting effects of age on the plasma/whole blood lead ratio in men and women with a history of lead exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, Fernando; Curtius, Adilson J.; Buzalaf, Marilia R.; Tanus-Santos, Jose E.

    2006-09-15

    We examined the effect of age and sex on the relationship between the concentrations of Pb in blood (Pb-B) and in plasma (Pb-P) in an adult population with a history of lead exposure. Pb-P was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Pb-B by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS). We studied 154 adults (56 men and 98 women) from 18 to 60-year old. Pb-B levels varied from 10.0 to 428.0 {mu}g/L, with a mean of 76 {mu}g/L. Blood lead levels varied from 10.0 to 428.0 {mu}g/L in men (mean, 98.3 {mu}g/L) and from 10.0 to 263.0 {mu}g/L (mean, 62.8 {mu}g/L) in women. Corresponding Pb-Ps were 0.02-2.9 {mu}g/L (mean, 0.66 {mu}g/L) and 0.02-1.5 {mu}g/L (mean, 0.42 {mu}g/L) in men and women, respectively. The relationship between Pb-B and Pb-P was found to be curvilinear (r=0.757, P<0.001 Spearman's correlation). The two quantities are related by the line y=0.0006x {sup 1492} (y=Pb-P, and x=Pb-B). The %Pb-P/Pb-B ratio ranged from 0.03% to 1.85%. A positive association was found between %Pb-P/Pb-B ratio and Pb-B levels. When data were separated by sex, this association was also relevant for men (y=0.0184x {sup 0.702}) and women (y=0.0534x {sup 0.5209}) (y=%Pb-P/Pb-B and x=Pb-B). Moreover, we found an interesting positive correlation between Log (Pb-P/Pb-B) and age for women (r=0.31, P<0.0001) and a negative correlation for men (r=-0.164, P=0.07). Taken together, these results suggest contrasting effects of age on the plasma/whole blood lead ratio in men and women with a history of lead exposure. Moreover, sex might play an important role in the metabolism of lead, implying further consideration on the kinetic models constructed of lead toxicity.

  12. High-Resolution Ultrasound-Switchable Fluorescence Imaging in Centimeter-Deep Tissue Phantoms with High Signal-To-Noise Ratio and High Sensitivity via Novel Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bingbing; Bandi, Venugopal; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Pei, Yanbo; D’Souza, Francis; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-01-01

    For many years, investigators have sought after high-resolution fluorescence imaging in centimeter-deep tissue because many interesting in vivo phenomena—such as the presence of immune system cells, tumor angiogenesis, and metastasis—may be located deep in tissue. Previously, we developed a new imaging technique to achieve high spatial resolution in sub-centimeter deep tissue phantoms named continuous-wave ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (CW-USF). The principle is to use a focused ultrasound wave to externally and locally switch on and off the fluorophore emission from a small volume (close to ultrasound focal volume). By making improvements in three aspects of this technique: excellent near-infrared USF contrast agents, a sensitive frequency-domain USF imaging system, and an effective signal processing algorithm, for the first time this study has achieved high spatial resolution (~ 900 μm) in 3-centimeter-deep tissue phantoms with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and high sensitivity (3.4 picomoles of fluorophore in a volume of 68 nanoliters can be detected). We have achieved these results in both tissue-mimic phantoms and porcine muscle tissues. We have also demonstrated multi-color USF to image and distinguish two fluorophores with different wavelengths, which might be very useful for simultaneously imaging of multiple targets and observing their interactions in the future. This work has opened the door for future studies of high-resolution centimeter-deep tissue fluorescence imaging. PMID:27829050

  13. Single-Step 3-D Image Reconstruction in Magnetic Induction Tomography: Theoretical Limits of Spatial Resolution and Contrast to Noise Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Hollaus, Karl; Rosell-Ferrer, Javier; Merwa, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a low-resolution imaging modality for reconstructing the changes of the complex conductivity in an object. MIT is based on determining the perturbation of an alternating magnetic field, which is coupled from several excitation coils to the object. The conductivity distribution is reconstructed from the corresponding voltage changes induced in several receiver coils. Potential medical applications comprise the continuous, non-invasive monitoring of tissue alterations which are reflected in the change of the conductivity, e.g. edema, ventilation disorders, wound healing and ischemic processes. MIT requires the solution of an ill-posed inverse eddy current problem. A linearized version of this problem was solved for 16 excitation coils and 32 receiver coils with a model of two spherical perturbations within a cylindrical phantom. The method was tested with simulated measurement data. Images were reconstructed with a regularized single-step Gauss–Newton approach. Theoretical limits for spatial resolution and contrast/noise ratio were calculated and compared with the empirical results from a Monte-Carlo study. The conductivity perturbations inside a homogeneous cylinder were localized for a SNR between 44 and 64 dB. The results prove the feasibility of difference imaging with MIT and give some quantitative data on the limitations of the method. PMID:17031597

  14. Increased x-ray conversion efficiency from ultra high contrast, relativistic laser pulse irradiation of large aspect ratio, vertically aligned nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollinger, R. C.; Bargsten, C.; Shlyaptsev, V. N.; Kaymak, V.; Pukhov, A.; Capeluto, M. G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, S.; Rockwood, A.; Curtis, A.; Rocca, J. J.

    2016-10-01

    Recent experiments at Colorado State University have shown that the effective trapping of clean, Joule-level fs laser pulses of relativistic intensity in arrays of high aspect ratio aligned nanowire creates multi-kev, near solid density, large scale (>4um deep) plasmas. The drastically decreased radiative life time and increased hydrodynamic cooling time from these plasmas increases the x-ray conversion efficiency. We measured a record conversion efficiency of 10% into hv>1KeV photons (2pi steradians), and of 0.3% for hv>6KeV. The experiments used Au and Ni nanowires of 55nm, 80nm and 100nm in diameter with 12% of solid density irradiated by high contrast (>1012) pulses of 60fs FWHM duration from a frequency doubled Ti:Sa laser at intensities of I =5x1019Wcm-2. We also present preliminary results on x-ray emission from Rhodium nanowires in the 19-22KeV range and demonstrate the potential of this picosecond X-ray source in flash radiography. This work was supported by the Fusion Energy Program, Office of Science of the U.S Department of Energy, and by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency Grant HDTRA-1-10-1-0079.

  15. Comparative study between recent methods manipulating ratio spectra and classical methods based on two-wavelength selection for the determination of binary mixture of antazoline hydrochloride and tetryzoline hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Halim, Lamia M.; Abd-El Rahman, Mohamed K.; Ramadan, Nesrin K.; EL Sanabary, Hoda F. A.; Salem, Maissa Y.

    2016-04-01

    A comparative study was developed between two classical spectrophotometric methods (dual wavelength method and Vierordt's method) and two recent methods manipulating ratio spectra (ratio difference method and first derivative of ratio spectra method) for simultaneous determination of Antazoline hydrochloride (AN) and Tetryzoline hydrochloride (TZ) in their combined pharmaceutical formulation and in the presence of benzalkonium chloride as a preservative without preliminary separation. The dual wavelength method depends on choosing two wavelengths for each drug in a way so that the difference in absorbance at those two wavelengths is zero for the other drug. While Vierordt's method, is based upon measuring the absorbance and the absorptivity values of the two drugs at their λmax (248.0 and 219.0 nm for AN and TZ, respectively), followed by substitution in the corresponding Vierordt's equation. Recent methods manipulating ratio spectra depend on either measuring the difference in amplitudes of ratio spectra between 255.5 and 269.5 nm for AN and 220.0 and 273.0 nm for TZ in case of ratio difference method or computing first derivative of the ratio spectra for each drug then measuring the peak amplitude at 250.0 nm for AN and at 224.0 nm for TZ in case of first derivative of ratio spectrophotometry. The specificity of the developed methods was investigated by analyzing different laboratory prepared mixtures of the two drugs. All methods were applied successfully for the determination of the selected drugs in their combined dosage form proving that the classical spectrophotometric methods can still be used successfully in analysis of binary mixture using minimal data manipulation rather than recent methods which require relatively more steps. Furthermore, validation of the proposed methods was performed according to ICH guidelines; accuracy, precision and repeatability are found to be within the acceptable limits. Statistical studies showed that the methods can be

  16. Comparative study between recent methods manipulating ratio spectra and classical methods based on two-wavelength selection for the determination of binary mixture of antazoline hydrochloride and tetryzoline hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Halim, Lamia M; Abd-El Rahman, Mohamed K; Ramadan, Nesrin K; El Sanabary, Hoda F A; Salem, Maissa Y

    2016-04-15

    A comparative study was developed between two classical spectrophotometric methods (dual wavelength method and Vierordt's method) and two recent methods manipulating ratio spectra (ratio difference method and first derivative of ratio spectra method) for simultaneous determination of Antazoline hydrochloride (AN) and Tetryzoline hydrochloride (TZ) in their combined pharmaceutical formulation and in the presence of benzalkonium chloride as a preservative without preliminary separation. The dual wavelength method depends on choosing two wavelengths for each drug in a way so that the difference in absorbance at those two wavelengths is zero for the other drug. While Vierordt's method, is based upon measuring the absorbance and the absorptivity values of the two drugs at their λ(max) (248.0 and 219.0 nm for AN and TZ, respectively), followed by substitution in the corresponding Vierordt's equation. Recent methods manipulating ratio spectra depend on either measuring the difference in amplitudes of ratio spectra between 255.5 and 269.5 nm for AN and 220.0 and 273.0 nm for TZ in case of ratio difference method or computing first derivative of the ratio spectra for each drug then measuring the peak amplitude at 250.0 nm for AN and at 224.0 nm for TZ in case of first derivative of ratio spectrophotometry. The specificity of the developed methods was investigated by analyzing different laboratory prepared mixtures of the two drugs. All methods were applied successfully for the determination of the selected drugs in their combined dosage form proving that the classical spectrophotometric methods can still be used successfully in analysis of binary mixture using minimal data manipulation rather than recent methods which require relatively more steps. Furthermore, validation of the proposed methods was performed according to ICH guidelines; accuracy, precision and repeatability are found to be within the acceptable limits. Statistical studies showed that the methods can be

  17. Influence of mixture ratio and pH to solidification/stabilization process of hospital solid waste incineration ash in Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Sobiecka, Elzbieta; Obraniak, Andrzej; Antizar-Ladislao, Blanca

    2014-09-01

    Solidification/stabilization (S/S) is an established utilization technology to treat hazardous wastes. This research explored the influence of pH (3-12) on the immobilization of heavy metals present in five mixtures of hospital solid waste incinerator ash and Portland cement, following two different processes of waste solidification/stabilization (cement hydration and granulation). In general, cement hydration process resulted in more stable products than granulation process. A high ash content in the mixture with Portland cement (60wt%) resulted in the highest immobilization of Pb(2+) and Cu(2+), while a low ash content in the mixture (10wt%) resulted in the lowest leachability of Zn(2+). When ash and Portland cement was mixed in equal proportions (50wt%) the highest encapsulation was observed for Ni(2+), Cd(2+) and Cr(3+). Neutral and weak alkaline pH values within the range pH=7-8 resulted in the lowest leachability of the monitored heavy metals.

  18. K(alpha) x-ray emission characterization of 100 Hz, 15 mJ femtosecond laser system with high contrast ratio.

    PubMed

    Fourmaux, S; Serbanescu, C; Kincaid, R E; Krol, A; Kieffer, J C

    2008-12-12

    We report K(alpha) x-ray production with a high energy (110 mJ per pulse at 800 nm before compression/15 mJ at 400 nm after compression), high repetition rate (100 Hz), and high pulse contrast (better than 10(-9) at 400 nm) laser system. To develop laser-based x-ray sources for biomedical imaging requires to use high-energy and high-power ultra-fast laser system where compression is achieved under vacuum. Using this type of laser system, we demonstrate long-term stability of the x-ray yield, conversion efficiency higher than 1.5 x 10(-5) with a Mo target, and the x-ray spot size close to the optical focal spot. This high-repetition K(alpha) x-ray source can be very useful for x-ray phase-contrast imaging.

  19. The contrasting effects of ad libitum and restricted feeding of a diet very high in saturated fats on sex ratio and metabolic hormones in mice.

    PubMed

    Alexenko, Andrei P; Mao, Jiude; Ellersieck, Mark R; Davis, Angela M; Whyte, Jeffrey J; Rosenfeld, Cheryl S; Roberts, R Michael

    2007-10-01

    Skewing of the sex ratio towards males occurs among pups born to mice fed a very high saturated fat (VHF) diet. In the present study, we tested whether the fat content of the VHF diet rather than the number of calories consumed is responsible for this effect. Eight-week-old NIH Swiss mice were placed on the VHF diet either ad libitum (VHF) or in a restricted manner (VHF-R). The VHF-R mice gained weight at a similar rate to controls fed a standard chow diet. Mice were bred at 15 wk and subsequently at 26 wk and 35 wk of age. Overall, the VHF, VHF-R, and control groups delivered 244, 242, and 274 pups, respectively, with male proportions of 0.60, 0.43, and 0.48, respectively. The pup sex ratios of the VHF group (favoring males) and VHF-R group (favoring females) each differed from 0.5 (P < 0.01). The sex ratios also differed (P < 0.0001) between the VHF and control groups, and between the VHF and VHF-R groups. Within the diet groups, maternal body weight had no effect on sex ratio. Serum leptin concentrations among the dams were similar in the VHF and VHF-R groups but higher than in the control group, while the IGF1 and corticosterone levels were comparable in all three groups. Therefore, the atypical sex ratios of offspring born to dams on the VHF diet seem to be influenced by the amount of fat consumed. Since males fed the VHF diet had neither more Y-sperm nor sired more sons than daughters, the dietary effects are manifested exclusively through the female.

  20. A single diamagnetic catalyCEST MRI contrast agent that detects cathepsin B enzyme activity by using a ratio of two CEST signals

    PubMed Central

    Hingorani, Dina V.; Montano, Luis A.; Randtke, Edward A.; Lee, Yeon Sun; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Julio; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    CatalyCEST MRI can detect enzyme activity by monitoring the change in chemical exchange with water after a contrast agent is cleaved by an enzyme. Often these molecules use paramagnetic metals and are delivered with an additional non-responsive reference molecule. To improve this approach for molecular imaging, a single diamagnetic agent with enzyme-responsive and enzyme-unresponsive CEST signals was synthesized and characterized. The CEST signal from the aryl amide disappeared after cleavage of a dipeptidyl ligand with cathepsin B, while a salicylic acid moiety was largely unresponsive to enzyme activity. The ratiometric comparison of the two CEST signals from the same agent allowed for concentration independent measurements of enzyme activity. The chemical exchange rate of the salicylic acid moiety was unchanged after enzyme catalysis, which further validated that this moiety was enzyme-unresponsive. The temperature dependence of the chemical exchange rate of the salicylic acid moiety was non-Arrhenius, suggesting a two-step chemical exchange mechanism for salicylic acid. The good detection sensitivity at low saturation power facilitates clinical translation, along with the potentially low toxicity of a non-metallic MRI contrast agent. The modular design of the agent constitutes a platform technology that expands the variety of agents that may be employed by catalyCEST MRI for molecular imaging. PMID:26633584

  1. Airborne ultraviolet imaging system for oil slick surveillance: oil-seawater contrast, imaging concept, signal-to-noise ratio, optical design, and optomechanical model.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenhua; Yu, Lei; Cao, Diansheng; Wu, Qingwen; Yu, Xiangyang; Lin, Guanyu

    2015-09-01

    The airborne ultraviolet imaging system, which assesses oil slick areas better than visible and infrared optical systems, was designed to monitor and track oil slicks in coastal regions. A model was built to achieve the upwelling radiance distribution of oil-covered sea and clean seawater, based on the radiance transfer software. With this model, the oil-seawater contrast, which affects the detection of oil-covered coastal areas, was obtained. The oil-seawater contrast, fundamental imaging concept, analog calculation of SNR, optical design, and optomechanical configuration of the airborne ultraviolet imaging system are illustrated in this paper. The study of an airborne ultraviolet imaging system with F-number 3.4 and a 40° field of view (FOV) in near ultraviolet channel (0.32-0.38 μm) was illustrated and better imaging quality was achieved. The ground sample distance (GSD) is from 0.35 to 0.7 m with flight height ranges from 0.5 to 1 km. Comparisons of detailed characteristics of the airborne ultraviolet imaging system with the corresponding characteristics of previous ultraviolet systems were tabulated, and these comparisons showed that this system can achieve a wide FOV and a relative high SNR. A virtual mechanical prototype and tolerances analysis are illustrated in this paper to verify the performance of fabrication and assembly of the ultraviolet system.

  2. A single diamagnetic catalyCEST MRI contrast agent that detects cathepsin B enzyme activity by using a ratio of two CEST signals.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, Dina V; Montano, Luis A; Randtke, Edward A; Lee, Yeon Sun; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Julio; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    CatalyCEST MRI can detect enzyme activity by monitoring the change in chemical exchange with water after a contrast agent is cleaved by an enzyme. Often these molecules use paramagnetic metals and are delivered with an additional non-responsive reference molecule. To improve this approach for molecular imaging, a single diamagnetic agent with enzyme-responsive and enzyme-unresponsive CEST signals was synthesized and characterized. The CEST signal from the aryl amide disappeared after cleavage of a dipeptidyl ligand with cathepsin B, while a salicylic acid moiety was largely unresponsive to enzyme activity. The ratiometric comparison of the two CEST signals from the same agent allowed for concentration independent measurements of enzyme activity. The chemical exchange rate of the salicylic acid moiety was unchanged after enzyme catalysis, which further validated that this moiety was enzyme-unresponsive. The temperature dependence of the chemical exchange rate of the salicylic acid moiety was non-Arrhenius, suggesting a two-step chemical exchange mechanism for salicylic acid. The good detection sensitivity at low saturation power facilitates clinical translation, along with the potentially low toxicity of a non-metallic MRI contrast agent. The modular design of the agent constitutes a platform technology that expands the variety of agents that may be employed by catalyCEST MRI for molecular imaging.

  3. Concentration ratios of methamphetamine to amphetamine in blood can help to distinguish use of methamphetamine from various mixtures of the two stimulants.

    PubMed

    Jones, A W; Holmgren, A

    2012-01-01

    Using a forensic toxicology database, the authors investigated cases of driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) if methamphetamine (MA) was identified in the blood samples (N = 9,310). The concentrations of MA and amphetamine (AM) in blood were determined after liquid-liquid extraction by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry at limits of quantitation of 0.03 mg/L for both stimulants. In 814 cases, AM was negative in blood and MA was positive at mean (median) and highest concentrations of 0.19 mg/L (0.11 mg/L) and 3.4 mg/L, respectively. Both amines were present in blood in 8,496 cases at concentrations of 0.54 mg/L (0.35 mg/L) and 10.4 mg/L for AM and 0.41 mg/L (0.22 mg/L) and 5.6 mg/L for MA. However, the correlation between AM and MA was low and insignificant (r = -0.13) in the whole material. The coefficient of correlation increased to r = 0.41 (P < 0.001) when the MA/AM concentration ratio was >1. When MA/AM ratios were selected at intervals of 1.0 (e.g., >3.0 and <4.0 up to >9.0 and <10.0), the correlation between AM and MA was r = 0.99 (P < 0.001). Such cases represent the use of MA without contamination from AM, and the mean (median) and highest concentrations of this secondary amine in blood of DUID suspects were 0.72 mg/L (0.56 mg/L) and 4.2 mg/L, respectively.

  4. The contrast study of anammox-denitrifying system in two non-woven fixed-bed bioreactors (NFBR) treating different low C/N ratio sewage.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fan; Zhang, Hanmin; Yang, Fenglin; Qiang, Hong; Zhang, Guangyi

    2012-06-01

    Two non-woven fixed-bed bioreactors (NFBR) based on different substrates (nitrite and nitrate) were constructed to study the environmental adaptability for temperature and organic matter of anammox-denitrifying system and nitrogen removal performance. The two reactors were successfully operated for 200 days. The average removal rates of nitrogen and COD of R2 were 81% and 93%, respectively. Besides, the nitrogen removal rate of R1 was 95% under not more than 105 mg/l of COD. The experimental results indicated that the R2 based on nitrate had a good nitrogen removal performance at room temperature (25 °C). Additionally, the analysis results of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that the percentage compositions of anammox in R1 and R2 were 84% and 65% on day 189. Finally, the possible nitrogen removal model of anammox-denitrifying system was constructed. According to nitrogen balance and C/N ratios of denitrification, the nitrogen removal approaches of R1 and R2 were obtained.

  5. Experiments directed to the compound-specific determination of the stable carbon isotope ratios of the Toxaphene congener B8-1413 in two technical mixtures and Antarctic Weddell seal.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Walter; Schlatterer, Jörg; Gleixner, Gerd

    2006-03-31

    The carbon stable isotope ratio (delta(13)C value) of an environmentally-relevant Toxaphene congener in technical products and a biological sample from a remote region was in the focus of this work. For this reason, the major octachlorobornane residue of the multicomponent pesticide Toxaphene in biological samples, 2-endo,3-exo,5-endo,6-exo,8,8,10,10-octachlorobornane (B8-1413 or P26), was quantitatively enriched from two technical Toxaphene mixtures (Toxaphene and Melipax) in duplicates as well as from an Antarctic Weddell seal sample. Normal phase followed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with three columns, respectively, coupled in series was used for this purpose. Four of the five fractionated samples fulfilled the requirement of an interference-free GC-elution for subsequent determination of the delta(13)C value by gas chromatography interfaced to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-IRMS). B8-1413 in Toxaphene (n=1) was more depleted in (12)C than in Melipax (n=2), which agrees with previous results obtained for the entire mixtures. The B8-1413 isolate from a Weddell seal sample from the Antarctic showed a delta(13)C value between the two technical products. Although a source appointment to the one or the other product was not possible, this example indicates that long range transport to the Antarctic and by uptake and food-chain bioaccumulation of B8-1413 in seals did not change the delta(13)C value significantly. The observed differences in one duplicate sample indicate that statistic evaluation of samples used for isotope ratio MS measurements is an important issue.

  6. Mixture Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.

    2007-12-01

    A mixture experiment involves combining two or more components in various proportions or amounts and then measuring one or more responses for the resulting end products. Other factors that affect the response(s), such as process variables and/or the total amount of the mixture, may also be studied in the experiment. A mixture experiment design specifies the combinations of mixture components and other experimental factors (if any) to be studied and the response variable(s) to be measured. Mixture experiment data analyses are then used to achieve the desired goals, which may include (i) understanding the effects of components and other factors on the response(s), (ii) identifying components and other factors with significant and nonsignificant effects on the response(s), (iii) developing models for predicting the response(s) as functions of the mixture components and any other factors, and (iv) developing end-products with desired values and uncertainties of the response(s). Given a mixture experiment problem, a practitioner must consider the possible approaches for designing the experiment and analyzing the data, and then select the approach best suited to the problem. Eight possible approaches include 1) component proportions, 2) mathematically independent variables, 3) slack variable, 4) mixture amount, 5) component amounts, 6) mixture process variable, 7) mixture of mixtures, and 8) multi-factor mixture. The article provides an overview of the mixture experiment designs, models, and data analyses for these approaches.

  7. A numerical study of the effect of various reactions, pressure and gas mixture ratio on the density distribution of etchant species (H, Br, Br+, and HBr+) in HBr/He plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, Banat; Aman-ur-Rehman

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a fluid model has been used to study the effect of gas mixing ratio and pressure on the density distribution of important etchant species, i.e., hydrogen (H), bromine (Br), Br+, and HBr+ in HBr/He plasma. Our simulation results show that the densities of active etchant species H, Br, and HBr+ increase with the increase in pressure as well as the HBr fraction in HBr/He mixture. On the contrary, the density of Br+ decreases with the increase in He percentage in HBr/He mixture and with the increase in the pressure. Time averaged reaction rates (of the reactions involved in the production and consumption of these species) have been calculated to study the effect of these reactions on the density distribution of these species. The spatial distribution of these species is explained with the help of the time averaged reaction rates. Important reactions have been identified that contribute considerably to the production and consumption of these active species. The code has been optimized by identifying 26 reactions (out of 40 reactions which contribute in the production and consumption of these species) that have insignificant effect on the densities of H, Br, Br+, and HBr+. This shows that out of 40 reactions, only 14 reactions can be used to calculate the density and distribution of the important species in HBr/He plasma discharge.

  8. Elemental ratios for characterization of quantum-dots populations in complex mixtures by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation on-line coupled to fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Menendez-Miranda, Mario; Fernandez-Arguelles, Maria T; Costa-Fernandez, Jose M; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2014-08-11

    Separation and identification of nanoparticles of different composition, with similar particle diameter, coexisting in heterogeneous suspensions of polymer-coated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) have been thoroughly assessed by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled on-line to fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) detectors. Chemical characterization of any previously on-line separated nanosized species was achieved by the measurement of the elemental molar ratios of every element involved in the synthesis of the QDs, using inorganic standards and external calibration by flow injection analysis (FIA). Such elemental molar ratios, strongly limited so far to pure single nanoparticles suspensions, have been achieved with adequate accuracy by coupling for the first time an ICP-QQQ instrument to an AF4 system. This hyphenation turned out to be instrumental to assess the chemical composition of the different populations of nanoparticles coexisting in the relatively complex mixtures, due to its capabilities to detect the hardly detectable elements involved in the synthesis. Interestingly such information, complementary to that obtained by fluorescence, was very valuable to detect and identify unexpected nanosized species, present at significant level, produced during QDs synthesis and hardly detectable by standard approaches.

  9. Contrast Materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... veins of the body, including vessels in the brain, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis and legs soft tissues of the body, including the muscles, fat and skin brain breast Microbubble Contrast Materials Microbubble contrast materials are ...

  10. Compound valence is conserved in binary odor mixtures in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Michael; Hansson, Bill S; Knaden, Markus

    2014-10-15

    Most naturally occurring olfactory signals do not consist of monomolecular odorants but, rather, are mixtures whose composition and concentration ratios vary. While there is ample evidence for the relevance of complex odor blends in ecological interactions and for interactions of chemicals in both peripheral and central neuronal processing, a fine-scale analysis of rules governing the innate behavioral responses of Drosophila melanogaster towards odor mixtures is lacking. In this study we examine whether the innate valence of odors is conserved in binary odor mixtures. We show that binary mixtures of attractants are more attractive than individual mixture constituents. In contrast, mixing attractants with repellents elicits responses that are lower than the responses towards the corresponding attractants. This decrease in attraction is repellent-specific, independent of the identity of the attractant and more stereotyped across individuals than responses towards the repellent alone. Mixtures of repellents are either less attractive than the individual mixture constituents or these mixtures represent an intermediate. Within the limits of our data set, most mixture responses are quantitatively predictable on the basis of constituent responses. In summary, the valence of binary odor mixtures is predictable on the basis of valences of mixture constituents. Our findings will further our understanding of innate behavior towards ecologically relevant odor blends and will serve as a powerful tool for deciphering the olfactory valence code.

  11. TU-F-18A-08: Effect of Quantum Detection Efficiency and Energy Bin Selection On Contrast-To-Noise-Ratio for Energy-Resolved Photon-Counting Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lam Ng, A; Ding, H; Cho, H; Molloi, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Energy-resolved photon-counting detectors have the capability to discriminate photons according to their energies. By using optimal energy weighting factors, the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) of the reconstructed image can be improved. In this work, we investigate how quantum detection efficiency (QDE) affects the determination of the optimal energy threshold bins, and therefore the CNR improvement of photon-counting detectors. Methods: In this simulation study a photon-counting detector, based on Silicon (Si), was investigated. A task-oriented algorithm was used to determine the optimal energy bin setting in order to maximize CNR. Projection-based and Image-based energy weighting techniques were implemented. A 13 mm PMMA phantom with two contrast materials, hydroxyapatite (HA) and iodine (I), at different concentrations (100, 200, and 300 mg/mL for HA and 2, 4, and 8 mg/mL for I) was used. TASMIP algorithm was used to generate the spectrum with 2.7 mm Al filter. Different tube voltages, number of energy bins, and bin widths were investigated. Different thicknesses of Si were also investigated to determine the QDE effect on CNR. Results: CNR increased as the detector material thickness increased until it reached 30 mm for Si thickness such that the CNR value was near to the value predicted by an ideal detector. Also, the results indicated that the improvement of CNR due to the QDE is task-dependent when comparing weighted images to photon-counting images. For hydroxyapatite the improvement is approximately 20%, whereas for iodine it is less than 10%. Conclusion: The results showed that the improvement of CNR for an energy-resolved photon-counting detector is highly task-dependent when QDE is taken into account.

  12. Newborn Rabbit Perception of 6-Odorant Mixtures Depends on Configural Processing and Number of Familiar Elements

    PubMed Central

    Romagny, Sébastien; Thomas-Danguin, Thierry; Coureaud, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    Perception of odors, i.e. usually of mixtures of odorants, is elemental (the odorants' odor qualities are perceived in the mixture) or configural (the odor quality of the mixture differs from the one of each odorant). In human adults, the Red Cordial (RC) mixture is a configurally-processed, 6-odorant mixture. It evokes a red cordial odor quality while none of the elements carries that odor. Interestingly, in newborn rabbits, the same RC mixture is weak configurally perceived: the newborns behaviorally respond to all the elements after conditioning to the whole mixture, but not to the mixture after conditioning to a single element. Thus, they perceive in the RC mixture both the odor quality of the RC configuration and the quality of each element. Here, we aimed to determine whether this perception is modulated by quantitative (number of elements) and/or qualitative bits of information (nature of elements) previously learned by the animals. Newborns were conditioned to RC sub-mixtures of different complexity and composition before behavioral testing to RC. Pups generalized their sucking-related response to RC after learning at least 4 odorants. In contrast, after conditioning to sub-mixtures of another 6-odorant mixture, the elementally perceived MV mixture, pups responded to MV after learning one or two odorants. The different generalization to RC and MV mixtures after learning some of their elements is discussed according to three hypotheses: i) the configural perception of RC sub-mixtures, ii) the ratio of familiar/unfamiliar individual information elementally and configurally perceived, iii) the perception of RC becoming purely elemental. The results allow the first hypothesis to be dismissed, while further experiments are required to distinguish between the remaining two. PMID:25248149

  13. Polymeric gastrointestinal MR contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Tilcock, C; Unger, E C; Ahkong, Q F; Fritz, T; Koenig, S H; Brown, R D

    1991-01-01

    Combining either paramagnetic (gadolinium chelates) or superparamagnetic (ferrite) contrast agents with polymers such as polyethylene glycol or cellulose, or with simple sugars such as dextrose, results in mixtures that exhibit improved T1 and/or T2 relaxivity compared with that of the contrast agent alone. It is suggested that the addition of such inexpensive and nontoxic polymers or saccharides may improve the effectiveness and decrease the cost of enteric contrast agents.

  14. Contrastive Lexicology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, R. R. K.

    This paper deals with the relation between etymologically related words in different languages. A survey is made of seven stages in the development of contrastive lexicology. These are: prelinguistic word studies, semantics, lexicography, translation, foreign language learning, bilingualism, and finally contrastive analysis. Concerning contrastive…

  15. Contrastive Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Carl

    Contrastive analysis is viewed as an interlinguistic, bidirectional phenomenon which is concerned with both the form and function of language. As such, contrastive analysis must view language psycholinguistically and sociolinguistically as a system to be both described and acquired. Due to the need for a psychological component in the analysis,…

  16. Contrast lipocryolysis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Hernán; Melamed, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Alternative crystal structures are possible for all lipids and each different crystal structure is called a polymorphic form. Inter-conversion between polymorphisms would imply the possibility of leaning crystal formation toward the most effective polymorphism for adipocyte destruction. Food industry has been tempering lipids for decades. Tempering technology applied to lipocryolysis gave birth to “contrast lipocryolysis”, which involves pre- and post-lipocryolysis fat layer heating as part of a specific tempering protocol. In this study, we evaluated the skinfold thickness of 10 subjects after a single contrast lipocryolysis session and witnessed important and fast reductions. PMID:25068088

  17. Contrast cystography.

    PubMed

    Essman, Stephanie C

    2005-02-01

    Cystography is a radiographic study performed to aid in evaluation of the urinary bladder for extramural, mural, or intraluminal lesions. These lesions may primarily involve the urinary bladder or may be an extension of disease from adjacent organs. Cystography is easy to perform with relatively few complications. Different types of cystography (positive versus negative contrast) may be used depending on the type of information that the clinician hopes to obtain. Although a valuable technique, it is important to correlate the findings on cystography with other clinical information to arrive at the final diagnosis.

  18. Pesticide mixtures in streams of several European countries and the USA.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Verena C; Szöcs, Eduard; Bhowmik, Avit Kumar; Vijver, Martina G; Schäfer, Ralf B

    2016-12-15

    Given the multitude of pesticides used in agriculture, adjacent streams are typically exposed to pesticide mixtures. Previous studies analysed the ecological risks of a few pesticide mixtures or were limited to an individual region or crop, whereas a large scale analysis of pesticide mixtures is missing. We analysed routine monitoring data from Germany, France, the Netherlands and the USA comprising a total of 4532 sites and 56,084 sampling occasions with the aim to identify the most frequently detected pesticides, their metabolites and mixtures. The most frequently detected compounds were dominated by herbicides and their metabolites. Mixtures mostly comprised of two up to five compounds, whereas mixtures in the USA and France had clearly less compounds than those of Germany and the Netherlands. The number of detected pesticides and thereby the size of mixtures is positively correlated to the number of measured pesticides (r=0.57). In contrast, a low relationship was found to the ratio of agricultural areas within the catchment (r=0.17), and no relationship was found to the size of the catchment (r=0.06). Overall, our study provides priority mixtures for different countries that may be used for future ecotoxicological studies to improve risk assessment for stream ecosystems.

  19. Concentration Addition, Independent Action and Generalized Concentration Addition Models for Mixture Effect Prediction of Sex Hormone Synthesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hadrup, Niels; Taxvig, Camilla; Pedersen, Mikael; Nellemann, Christine; Hass, Ulla; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Humans are concomitantly exposed to numerous chemicals. An infinite number of combinations and doses thereof can be imagined. For toxicological risk assessment the mathematical prediction of mixture effects, using knowledge on single chemicals, is therefore desirable. We investigated pros and cons of the concentration addition (CA), independent action (IA) and generalized concentration addition (GCA) models. First we measured effects of single chemicals and mixtures thereof on steroid synthesis in H295R cells. Then single chemical data were applied to the models; predictions of mixture effects were calculated and compared to the experimental mixture data. Mixture 1 contained environmental chemicals adjusted in ratio according to human exposure levels. Mixture 2 was a potency adjusted mixture containing five pesticides. Prediction of testosterone effects coincided with the experimental Mixture 1 data. In contrast, antagonism was observed for effects of Mixture 2 on this hormone. The mixtures contained chemicals exerting only limited maximal effects. This hampered prediction by the CA and IA models, whereas the GCA model could be used to predict a full dose response curve. Regarding effects on progesterone and estradiol, some chemicals were having stimulatory effects whereas others had inhibitory effects. The three models were not applicable in this situation and no predictions could be performed. Finally, the expected contributions of single chemicals to the mixture effects were calculated. Prochloraz was the predominant but not sole driver of the mixtures, suggesting that one chemical alone was not responsible for the mixture effects. In conclusion, the GCA model seemed to be superior to the CA and IA models for the prediction of testosterone effects. A situation with chemicals exerting opposing effects, for which the models could not be applied, was identified. In addition, the data indicate that in non-potency adjusted mixtures the effects cannot always be

  20. Psychophysical contrast calibration

    PubMed Central

    To, Long; Woods, Russell L; Goldstein, Robert B; Peli, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Electronic displays and computer systems offer numerous advantages for clinical vision testing. Laboratory and clinical measurements of various functions and in particular of (letter) contrast sensitivity require accurately calibrated display contrast. In the laboratory this is achieved using expensive light meters. We developed and evaluated a novel method that uses only psychophysical responses of a person with normal vision to calibrate the luminance contrast of displays for experimental and clinical applications. Our method combines psychophysical techniques (1) for detection (and thus elimination or reduction) of display saturating nonlinearities; (2) for luminance (gamma function) estimation and linearization without use of a photometer; and (3) to measure without a photometer the luminance ratios of the display’s three color channels that are used in a bit-stealing procedure to expand the luminance resolution of the display. Using a photometer we verified that the calibration achieved with this procedure is accurate for both LCD and CRT displays enabling testing of letter contrast sensitivity to 0.5%. Our visual calibration procedure enables clinical, internet and home implementation and calibration verification of electronic contrast testing. PMID:23643843

  1. Diameter control of gold nanoparticles synthesized in gas phase using atmospheric-pressure H2/Ar plasma jet and gold wire as the nanoparticle source: Control by varying the H2/Ar mixture ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Yoshiki

    2017-01-01

    This report describes diameter control of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) during synthesis using an atmospheric-pressure H2/Ar plasma jet drive with pulse-modulated ultrahigh frequency, employing Au wire as the NP source material. During this process, where most of the AuNPs are regarded as formed through condensation from Au vapor derived by the Au wire etching, the mean diameter varied in the approximate range of 2-12 nm with H2 volume ratios up to 3.9%. In plasma diagnostics, results showed that the H2 volume ratio influences the plasma discharge behaviour, which affects the heat flux density flowed into the Au wire, and the atomic hydrogen concentration in the plasma. Both seemed to influence the etching rate of the Au wire per unit area, which is directly related to the concentration of Au vapor in the plasma. The concentration is one factor affecting the particle size evolution because of the collisions among vapor species in reaction field. Therefore, the AuNP size variation with the H2 volume ratio was discussed from the perspective of the etching rate of the Au wire at each H2 volume ratio.

  2. Effects of saturation contrast on color recognition in night vision goggles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havig, Paul R.; Marasco, Peter L.; Post, David L.; Ellwanger, Harold L.; Reis, George A.

    2004-09-01

    In the past we have examined the luminance contrast ratios required to maintain color recognition in helmet-mounted displays (HMDs). Using typical daytime viewing conditions as simulated backgrounds we were able to determine 95% correct color recognition thresholds resulting in luminance contrast ratios averaging 1.17:1. Last year we adapted this research to determine the best colors to maintain color recognition of symbology that is on a night vision goggle (NVG) image. We simulated NVG P43 green phosphor and determined 95% correct color recognition thresholds. Results indicated that, on average, a luminance contrast ratio of nearly 1.5:1 was required to maintain color recognition. Review of the studies indicated that our simulated P43 phosphor was a much more saturated background, so saturation contrast may play as important a role as luminance contrast. A P45 white phosphor NVG may therefore be less problematic. Here we investigate the effects of both luminance and saturation contrast by manipulating color mixtures of green, yellow, and red symbology against two different backgrounds, P43 green and P45 white. We discuss our results in terms of both luminance and saturation contrast required for the maintenance of color recognition in NVGs.

  3. Air/fuel ratio controller

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, M.M.; Simko, A.O.

    1980-12-23

    An internal combustion engine has a fuel injection pump and an air/fuel ratio controller. The controller has a lever that is connected to the pump lever. An aneroid moves the controller lever as a function of changes in intake manifold vacuum to maintain a constant air/fuel ratio to the mixture charge. A fuel enrichment linkage is provided that modifies the movement of the fuel flow control lever by the aneroid in response to changes in manifold gas temperature levels and exhaust gas recirculation to maintain the constant air/fuel ratio. A manual override is provided to obtain a richer air/fuel ratio for maximum acceleration.

  4. Development Characteristics of PMMA in alternative alcohol:water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocola, Leonidas E.

    2015-03-01

    The most widely used resist in electron beam lithography is polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The standard developers used are solution mixtures of isopropanol (IPA) and methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) in a ratio of 3:1 and mixtures of IPA and water (H2O) in a ratio of 7:3. The Globally Harmonized System (GHS) classification entry for IPA includes: Specific target organ toxicity - single exposure (Category 3). MIBK is much more hazardous than IPA. The only GHS classification entry for Ethanol is: Flammable liquids (Category 2), i.e. more environmentally safe. Using Ethanol/H2O as a developer will therefore enable lower hazardous waste disposal costs to cleanrooms. We find Ethanol/H2O at 85% volume (2:1 molar) exhibits excellent lithography results as good as with IPA/H2O, and better contrast and sensitivity than IPA/H2O and MIBK/IPA developers. Lithographic data shows trends similar to published cosolvency data, but differ too much to be explained by it. In addition, unusual development at 50% volume concentrations for both IPA and Ethanol in H2O show dramatic pothole formation instead of uniform thickness loss found in standard contrast curve exposures. We believe local pockets of concentrated alcohol water molar mixtures are responsible for such behavior. This work was supported by the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. Use of the Center for Nanoscale Materials was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  5. Binary Mixtures of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Display Nonadditive Mixture Interactions in an In Vitro Liver Cell Model.

    PubMed

    Gaskill, Stacey J; Bruce, Erica D

    2016-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been labeled contaminants of concern due to their carcinogenic potential, insufficient toxicological data, environmental ubiquity, and inconsistencies in the composition of environmental mixtures. The Environmental Protection Agency is reevaluating current methods for assessing the toxicity of PAHs, including the assumption of toxic additivity in mixtures. This study was aimed at testing mixture interactions through in vitro cell culture experimentation, and modeling the toxicity using quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR). Clone-9 rat liver cells were used to analyze cellular proliferation, viability, and genotoxicity of 15 PAHs in single doses and binary mixtures. Tests revealed that many mixtures have nonadditive toxicity, but display varying mixture effects depending on the mixture composition. Many mixtures displayed antagonism, similar to other published studies. QSARs were then developed using the genetic function approximation algorithm to predict toxic activity both in single PAH congeners and in binary mixtures. Effective concentrations inhibiting 50% of the cell populations were modeled, with R(2) = 0.90, 0.99, and 0.84, respectively. The QSAR mixture algorithms were then adjusted to account for the observed mixture interactions as well as the mixture composition (ratios) to assess the feasibility of QSARs for mixtures. Based on these results, toxic addition is improbable and therefore environmental PAH mixtures are likely to see nonadditive responses when complex interactions occur between components. Furthermore, QSAR may be a useful tool to help bridge these data gaps surrounding the assessment of human health risks that are associated with PAH exposures.

  6. Symmetric normal mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turmon, Michael

    2004-01-01

    We consider mixture density estimation under the symmetry constraint x = Az for an orthogonal matrix A. This distributional constraint implies a corresponding constraint on the mixture parameters. Focusing on the gaussian case, we derive an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to enforce the constraint and show results for modeling of image feature vectors.

  7. Near azeotropic mixture substitute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention comprises a refrigerant mixture consisting of a first mole fraction of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) and a second mole fraction of a component selected from the group consisting of a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124) and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b); a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a) and CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124); a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a) and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b); and a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124), CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b) and CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a).

  8. Multi-step contrast sensitivity gauge

    DOEpatents

    Quintana, Enrico C; Thompson, Kyle R; Moore, David G; Heister, Jack D; Poland, Richard W; Ellegood, John P; Hodges, George K; Prindville, James E

    2014-10-14

    An X-ray contrast sensitivity gauge is described herein. The contrast sensitivity gauge comprises a plurality of steps of varying thicknesses. Each step in the gauge includes a plurality of recesses of differing depths, wherein the depths are a function of the thickness of their respective step. An X-ray image of the gauge is analyzed to determine a contrast-to-noise ratio of a detector employed to generate the image.

  9. Perception of trigeminal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Filiou, Renée-Pier; Lepore, Franco; Bryant, Bruce; Lundström, Johan N; Frasnelli, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminal system is a chemical sense allowing for the perception of chemosensory information in our environment. However, contrary to smell and taste, we lack a thorough understanding of the trigeminal processing of mixtures. We, therefore, investigated trigeminal perception using mixtures of 3 relatively receptor-specific agonists together with one control odor in different proportions to determine basic perceptual dimensions of trigeminal perception. We found that 4 main dimensions were linked to trigeminal perception: sensations of intensity, warmth, coldness, and pain. We subsequently investigated perception of binary mixtures of trigeminal stimuli by means of these 4 perceptual dimensions using different concentrations of a cooling stimulus (eucalyptol) mixed with a stimulus that evokes warmth perception (cinnamaldehyde). To determine if sensory interactions are mainly of central or peripheral origin, we presented stimuli in a physical "mixture" or as a "combination" presented separately to individual nostrils. Results showed that mixtures generally yielded higher ratings than combinations on the trigeminal dimensions "intensity," "warm," and "painful," whereas combinations yielded higher ratings than mixtures on the trigeminal dimension "cold." These results suggest dimension-specific interactions in the perception of trigeminal mixtures, which may be explained by particular interactions that may take place on peripheral or central levels.

  10. The Contrastive Analysis Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wardhaugh, Ronald

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the strong contrastive analysis hypothesis, which claims predictive powers for contrastive analysis, and the weak hypothesis, which claims only that contrastive analysis can help account for observed difficulties in second language learning. The strong hypothesis is found untenable, and difficulties with the weak hypothesis are discussed…

  11. SEPARATION OF FLUID MIXTURES

    DOEpatents

    Lipscomb, R.; Craig, A.; Labrow, S.; Dunn, J.F.

    1958-10-28

    An apparatus is presented for separating gaseous mixtures by selectively freezing a constituent of the mixture and subsequently separating the frozen gas. The gas mixture is passed through a cylinder fltted with a cooling jacket, causing one gas to freeze on the walls of the cylinder. A set of scraper blades are provided in the interior of the cyllnder, and as the blades oscillate, the frozen gas is scraped to the bottom of the cylinder. Means are provided for the frozen material to pass into a heating chamber where it is vaporized and the product gas collected.

  12. FACS separation of non-compromised forensically relevant biological mixtures.

    PubMed

    Verdon, Timothy J; Mitchell, R John; Chen, Weisan; Xiao, Kun; van Oorschot, Roland A H

    2015-01-01

    Although focusing attention on the statistical analysis of complex mixture profiles is important, the forensic science community will also benefit from directing research to improving the reduction of the incidence of mixtures before DNA extraction. This preliminary study analysed the use of fluorescence assisted cell sorting (FACS) for separation of cellular mixtures before DNA extraction, specifically mixtures of relatively fresh blood and saliva from two donors, prepared in 14 different mixture ratios. Improvements in the number of detectable alleles from the targeted cell type and overall profile quality were seen when compared to the results from unseparated samples. STRmix calculations revealed increases in likelihood ratios after separation, demonstrating the potential for higher probative values to be obtained from forensically relevant mixtures after subjecting them to FACS than from unsorted samples.

  13. Gelation in mixtures of polymers and bidisperse colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Rahul; Conrad, Jacinta C.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of varying the volume fraction of large particles (r ) on the linear rheology and microstructure of mixtures of polymers and bidisperse colloids, in which the ratio of the small and large particle diameters was α =0.31 or α =0.45 . Suspensions formulated at a total volume fraction of ϕT=0.15 and a constant concentration of polymer in the free volume c /c*≈0.7 contained solid-like gels for small r and fluids or fluids of clusters at large r . The solid-like rheology and microstructure of these suspensions changed little with r when r was small, and fluidized only when r >0.8 . By contrast, dense suspensions with ϕT=0.40 and α =0.31 contained solid-like gels at all concentrations of large particles and exhibited only modest rheological and microstructural changes upon varying the volume fraction of large particles. These results suggest that the effect of particle-size dispersity on the properties of colloid-polymer mixtures are asymmetric in particle size and are most pronounced near a gelation boundary.

  14. Carbonaceous materials water mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Papalos, J.G.; Sinka, J.V.

    1985-04-30

    Particulate carbonaceous materials water mixtures are prepared by adding a condensate which is a condensation product of an aldehyde having from about 1 to about 7 carbon atoms, a benzene derivative such as benzene sulfonic acid, an alkyl benzene sulfonic acid having at least one alkyl group of from about 1 to about 20 carbon atoms and mixtures thereof, and optionally, and a naphthalene derivative such as naphthalene sulfonic acid, an alkyl naphthalene sulfonic acid having at least one alkyl group of from about 1 to about 12 carbon atoms and mixtures thereof. The condensate is added in an amount sufficient to reduce viscosity of the water mixture of carbonaceous materials, to stabilize carbonaceous materials in the water network and to improve pumpability. An acid form of the condensate or a salt may be added.

  15. Condensate Mixtures and Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermans, E.

    1998-09-14

    The experimental study of condensate mixtures is a particularly exciting application of the recently developed atomic-trap Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) technology: such multiple condensates represent the first laboratory systems of distinguishable boson superfluid mixtures. In addition, as the authors point out in this paper, the possibility of inter-condensate tunneling greatly enhances the richness of the condensate mixture physics. Not only does tunneling give rise to the oscillating particle currents between condensates of different chemical potentials, such as those studied extensively in the condensed matter Josephson junction experiments, it also affects the near-equilibrium dynamics and stability of the condensate mixtures. In particular, the stabilizing influence of tunneling with respect to spatial separation (phase separation) could be of considerable practical importance to the atomic trap systems. Furthermore, the creation of mixtures of atomic and molecular condensates could introduce a novel type of tunneling process, involving the conversion of a pair of atomic condensate bosons into a single molecular condensate boson. The static description of condensate mixtures with such type of pair tunneling suggests the possibility of observing dilute condensates with the liquid-like property of a self-determined density.

  16. Iodinated contrast medium as an aid to gallstone dissolution with methyl tert-butyl ether: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Lee, S H; Rawat, B; Fache, J S; Maciejewska, U; Burhenne, H J

    1990-05-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) floats on bile, whereas gallstones sink. Therefore, stones and MTBE are separated by a layer of bile. This study investigates the effect of contrast medium on flotation of gallstones in bile and its role in stone and fragment dissolution with MTBE. Fresh human gallstones, both calcified and noncalcified, from different patients were tested in vitro for flotation in bile, with and without addition of contrast medium. All gallstones or fragments sank in bile before the introduction of contrast medium. Noncalcified stones floated when the contrast medium-bile volume ratio was 1:6 or more, while double this amount of contrast medium was required to float calcified stones. Fragments did dissolve somewhat in MTBE in the presence of bile alone, but when contrast medium was added, almost complete dissolution occurred. This is thought to be due to increased contact between the fragments and MTBE, both floating on the contrast medium-bile mixture. Contrast material may be a useful adjuvant in gallstone dissolution therapy with MTBE in vivo.

  17. Estrogenic effects of mixtures of phyto- and synthetic chemicals on uterine growth of prepubertal rats.

    PubMed

    van Meeuwen, J A; van den Berg, M; Sanderson, J T; Verhoef, A; Piersma, A H

    2007-04-25

    Through the diet humans are exposed to many weak estrogenic phytochemicals (PCs) and synthetic chemicals (SCs), but most experimental studies used individual compounds rather than mixtures. Estrogenic effects were determined in the rat juvenile uterotrophic assay using a predefined phytochemical mixture (PCmix) containing coumestrol, genistein, naringenin, (+,-)catechin, (-,-)epicatechin and quercetin, and a predefined synthetic chemical mixture (SCmix) containing nonyl-, and octylphenol, beta-hexachlorocyclohexane, methoxychlor, bisphenol A and dibutylphthalate. The mixture composition was based on human dietary uptake and actual ratios in serum. 17beta-Estradiol and genistein were also tested individually. It was found that combinations of phytoestrogens and exogenous 17beta-estradiol act additive. In contrast SCmix, inactive by itself even at high dose levels relative to human exposure, caused no synergistic or antagonistic uterotrophic effect with E(2) and/or the PCmix. Based on ED(05) and ED(01) values of the PCmix the margin of exposure in regular human diet for a uterotrophic effect is estimated many orders of magnitude. However, food supplements with phytochemicals might bring individual exposure around ED(05) and ED(01) values of the PCmix. Based on the results of our study the contribution of SCs to total estrogenicity in human diet can probably be neglected.

  18. Testing for Additivity at Select Mixture Groups of Interest Based on Statistical Equivalence Testing Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stork, LeAnna M.; Gennings, Chris; Carchman, Richard; Carter, Jr., Walter H.; Pounds, Joel G.; Mumtaz, Moiz

    2006-12-01

    Several assumptions, defined and undefined, are used in the toxicity assessment of chemical mixtures. In scientific practice mixture components in the low-dose region, particularly subthreshold doses, are often assumed to behave additively (i.e., zero interaction) based on heuristic arguments. This assumption has important implications in the practice of risk assessment, but has not been experimentally tested. We have developed methodology to test for additivity in the sense of Berenbaum (Advances in Cancer Research, 1981), based on the statistical equivalence testing literature where the null hypothesis of interaction is rejected for the alternative hypothesis of additivity when data support the claim. The implication of this approach is that conclusions of additivity are made with a false positive rate controlled by the experimenter. The claim of additivity is based on prespecified additivity margins, which are chosen using expert biological judgment such that small deviations from additivity, which are not considered to be biologically important, are not statistically significant. This approach is in contrast to the usual hypothesis-testing framework that assumes additivity in the null hypothesis and rejects when there is significant evidence of interaction. In this scenario, failure to reject may be due to lack of statistical power making the claim of additivity problematic. The proposed method is illustrated in a mixture of five organophosphorus pesticides that were experimentally evaluated alone and at relevant mixing ratios. Motor activity was assessed in adult male rats following acute exposure. Four low-dose mixture groups were evaluated. Evidence of additivity is found in three of the four low-dose mixture groups.The proposed method tests for additivity of the whole mixture and does not take into account subset interactions (e.g., synergistic, antagonistic) that may have occurred and cancelled each other out.

  19. Mixture toxicity of the antiviral drug Tamiflu((R)) (oseltamivir ethylester) and its active metabolite oseltamivir acid.

    PubMed

    Escher, Beate I; Bramaz, Nadine; Lienert, Judit; Neuwoehner, Judith; Straub, Jürg Oliver

    2010-02-18

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) is an antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza A and B. The pro-drug Tamiflu is converted in the human body to the pharmacologically active metabolite, oseltamivir acid, with a yield of 75%. Oseltamivir acid is indirectly photodegradable and slowly biodegradable in sewage works and sediment/water systems. A previous environmental risk assessment has concluded that there is no bioaccumulation potential of either of the compounds. However, little was known about the ecotoxicity of the metabolite. Ester hydrolysis typically reduces the hydrophobicity and thus the toxicity of a compound. In this case, a zwitterionic, but overall neutral species is formed from the charged parent compound. If the speciation and predicted partitioning into biological membranes is considered, the metabolite may have a relevant contribution to the overall toxicity. These theoretical considerations triggered a study to investigate the toxicity of oseltamivir acid (OA), alone and in binary mixtures with its parent compound oseltamivir ethylester (OE). OE and OA were found to be baseline toxicants in the bioluminescence inhibition test with Vibrio fischeri. Their mixture effect lay between predictions for concentration addition and independent action for the mixture ratio excreted in urine and nine additional mixture ratios of OE and OA. In contrast, OE was an order of magnitude more toxic than OA towards algae, with a more pronounced effect when the direct inhibition of photosystem II was used as toxicity endpoint opposed to the 24h growth rate endpoint. The binary mixtures in this assay yielded experimental mixture effects that agreed with predictions for independent action. This is consistent with the finding that OE exhibits slightly enhanced toxicity, while OA acts as baseline toxicant. Therefore, with respect to mixture classification, the two compounds can be considered as acting according to different modes of toxic action, although there are

  20. A numerical study of laminar flames propagating in stratified mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiacheng

    Numerical simulations are carried out to study the structure and speed of laminar flames propagating in compositionally and thermally stratified fuel-air mixtures. The study is motivated by the need to understand the physics of flame propagation in stratified-charge engines and model it. The specific question of interest in this work is: how does the structure and speed of the flame in the stratified mixture differ from that of the flame in a corresponding homogeneous mixture at the same equivalence ratio, temperature, and pressure? The studies are carried out in hydrogen-air, methane-air, and n-heptane-air mixtures. A 30-species 184-step skeletal mechanism is employed for methane oxidation, a 9-species 21-step mechanism for hydrogen oxidation, and a 37-species 56-step skeletal mechanism for n-heptane oxidation. Flame speed and structure are compared with corresponding values for homogeneous mixtures. For compositionally stratified mixtures, as shown in prior experimental work, the numerical results suggest that when the flame propagates from a richer mixture to a leaner mixture, the flame speed is faster than the corresponding speed in the homogeneous mixture. This is caused by enhanced diffusion of heat and species from the richer mixture to the leaner mixture. In fact, the effects become more pronounced in leaner mixtures. Not surprisingly, the stratification gradient influences the results with shallower gradients showing less effect. The controlling role that diffusion plays is further assessed and confirmed by studying the effect of a unity Lewis number assumption in the hydrogen/air mixtures. Furthermore, the effect of stratification becomes less important when using methane or n-heptane as fuel. The laminar flame speed in a thermally stratified mixture is similar to the laminar flame speed in homogeneous mixture at corresponding unburned temperature. Theoretical analysis is performed and the ratio of extra thermal diffusion rate to flame heat release rate

  1. Potential of high-Z contrast agents in clinical contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, Tristan; Hupfer, Martin; Brauweiler, Robert; Eisa, Fabian; Kalender, Willi A.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Currently, only iodine- and barium-based contrast media (CM) are used in clinical contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT). High-Z metals would produce a higher contrast at equal mass density for the x-ray spectra used in clinical CT. Using such materials might allow for significant dose reductions in CE-CT. The purpose of this study was to quantify the potential for dose reduction when using CM based on heavy metals. Methods: The contrast-to-noise ratio weighted by dose (CNRD) was determined as a function of scan protocol by means of measurements and simulations on a clinical CT scanner. For simulations, water cylinders with diameters 160, 320, 480, and 640 mm were used to cover a broad range of patient sizes. Measurements were conducted with 160 and 320 mm water-equivalent plastic cylinders. A central bore of 13 mm diameter was present in all phantoms. The tube voltage was varied from 80 to 140 kV for measurements and from 60 to 180 kV for simulations. Additional tin filtration of thicknesses 0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 mm was applied in the simulation to evaluate a range of spectral hardness. The bore was filled with a mixture of water and 10 mg/ml of pure iodine, holmium, gadolinium, ytterbium, osmium, tungsten, gold, and bismuth for the simulations and with aqueous solutions of ytterbium, tungsten, gold, and bismuth salts as well as Iopromid containing 10 mg/ml of the pure materials for the measurements. CNRDs were compared to iodine at phantom size-dependent reference voltages for all high-Z materials and the resulting dose reduction was calculated for equal contrast-to-noise ratio. Results: Dose reduction potentials strongly depended on phantom size, spectral hardness, and tube voltage. Depending on the added filtration, a dose reduction of 19%-60% could be reached at 80 kV with gadolinium for the 160 mm phantom, 52%-69% at 100 kV with holmium for the 320 mm phantom, 62%-78% with 120 kV for hafnium and the 480 mm phantom and 74%-86% with 140 kV for gold

  2. Realistic environmental mixtures of micropollutants in surface, drinking, and recycled water: herbicides dominate the mixture toxicity toward algae.

    PubMed

    Tang, Janet Y M; Escher, Beate I

    2014-06-01

    Mixture toxicity studies with herbicides have focused on a few priority components that are most likely to cause environmental impacts, and experimental mixtures were often designed as equipotent mixtures; however, real-world mixtures are made up of chemicals with different modes of toxic action at arbitrary concentration ratios. The toxicological significance of environmentally realistic mixtures has only been scarcely studied. Few studies have simultaneously compared the mixture effect of water samples with designed reference mixtures comprised of the ratios of analytically detected concentrations in toxicity tests. In the present study, the authors address the effect of herbicides and other chemicals on inhibition of photosynthesis and algal growth rate. The authors tested water samples including secondary treated wastewater effluent, recycled water, drinking water, and storm water in the combined algae assay. The detected chemicals were mixed in the concentration ratios detected, and the biological effects of the water samples were compared with the designed mixtures of individual detected chemicals to quantify the fraction of effect caused by unknown chemicals. The results showed that herbicides dominated the algal toxicity in these environmentally realistic mixtures, and the contribution by the non-herbicides was negligible. A 2-stage model, which used concentration addition within the groups of herbicides and non-herbicides followed by the model of independent action to predict the mixture effect of the two groups, could predict the experimental mixture toxicity effectively, but the concentration addition model for herbicides was robust and sufficient for complex mixtures. Therefore, the authors used the bioanalytical equivalency concept to derive effect-based trigger values for algal toxicity for monitoring water quality in recycled and surface water. All water samples tested would be compliant with the proposed trigger values associated with the

  3. Ultrasound contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Ignee, Andre; Atkinson, Nathan S. S.; Schuessler, Gudrun; Dietrich, Christoph F.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) plays an important role in imaging of the mediastinum and abdominal organs. Since the introduction of US contrast agents (UCA) for transabdominal US, attempts have been made to apply contrast-enhanced US techniques also to EUS. Since 2003, specific contrast-enhanced imaging was possible using EUS. Important studies have been published regarding contrast-enhanced EUS and the characterization of focal pancreatic lesions, lymph nodes, and subepithelial tumors. In this manuscript, we describe the relevant UCA, their application, and specific image acquisition as well as the principles of image tissue characterization using contrast-enhanced EUS. Safety issues, potential future developments, and EUS-specific issues are reviewed. PMID:27824024

  4. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-09-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  5. Phase-contrast radiography.

    PubMed

    Gao, D; Pogany, A; Stevenson, A W; Wilkins, S W

    1998-01-01

    For the past 100 years, the paradigm for radiography has been premised on absorption as the sole means of contrast formation and on ray optics as the basis for image interpretation. A new conceptual approach to radiography has been developed that includes phase (ie, refractive) contrast and requires wave optics for proper treatment. This new approach greatly increases the amount of information that can be obtained with radiographic techniques and is particularly well suited to the imaging of soft tissue and of very small features in biologic samples. A key feature of the present technique of phase-contrast radiography is the use of a microfocus x-ray source about an order of magnitude (< or = 20 microm) smaller than that used in conventional radiography. Phase-contrast radiography offers a number of improvements over conventional radiography in a clinical setting, especially in soft-tissue imaging. These improvements include increased contrast resulting in improved visualization of anatomic detail, reduced absorbed dose to the patient, inherent image magnification and high spatial resolution, use of harder x rays, and relative ease of implementation. More technologically advanced detectors are currently being developed and commercialized, which will help fully realize the considerable potential of phase-contrast imaging.

  6. Perceived Speed of Compound Stimuli Is Moderated by Component Contrast, Not Overall Pattern Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The perception of speed is susceptible to manipulations of image contrast, both for simple sine wave and more complex stimuli, such that low-contrast patterns generally appear slower than their high-contrast equivalents. It is not known whether the crucial factor is the contrast of the underlying Fourier components or the contrast of the overall complex pattern. Here, two experiments investigate this issue using compound gratings, comprising two vertical sine wave stimuli with equal contrast, but a 3:1 spatial frequency ratio. Component gratings were summed in “peaks add” and in “peaks subtract” phase, creating conditions with either (a) identical component contrasts, despite differences in overall pattern contrast or (b) differences in component contrasts despite identical overall pattern contrast. Experiment 1 demonstrated that the perceived speed is determined by the contrast of the components regardless of relative phase and hence of overall pattern contrast. Experiment 2 replicated this result while eliminating potential explanations based on differences in spatial frequency content. Along with previous compound grating and plaid studies, the data support a two-stage velocity estimation process involving the derivation of separate speed signals for each Fourier component, followed by integration of these signals across spatial scales. PMID:27826408

  7. Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography and Angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosado-Mendez, I.; Palma, B. A.; Villasenor, Y.; Benitez-Bribiesca, L.; Brandan, M. E.

    2007-11-26

    Angiogenesis could be a means for pouring contrast media around tumors. In this work, optimization of radiological parameters for contrast-enhanced subtraction techniques in mammography has been performed. A modification of Lemacks' analytical formalism was implemented to model the X-ray absorption in the breast with contrast medium and detection by a digital image receptor. Preliminary results of signal-to-noise ratio analysis show the advantage of subtracting two images taken at different energies, one prior and one posterior to the injection of contrast medium. Preliminary experimental results using a custom-made phantom have shown good agreement with calculations. A proposal is presented for the clinical application of the optimized technique, which aims at finding correlations between angiogenesis indicators and dynamic variables of contrast medium uptake.

  8. Feasibility of 3D harmonic contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Voormolen, M M; Bouakaz, A; Krenning, B J; Lancée, C T; ten Cate, F J; de Jong, N

    2004-04-01

    Improved endocardial border delineation with the application of contrast agents should allow for less complex and faster tracing algorithms for left ventricular volume analysis. We developed a fast rotating phased array transducer for 3D imaging of the heart with harmonic capabilities making it suitable for contrast imaging. In this study the feasibility of 3D harmonic contrast imaging is evaluated in vitro. A commercially available tissue mimicking flow phantom was used in combination with Sonovue. Backscatter power spectra from a tissue and contrast region of interest were calculated from recorded radio frequency data. The spectra and the extracted contrast to tissue ratio from these spectra were used to optimize the excitation frequency, the pulse length and the receive filter settings of the transducer. Frequencies ranging from 1.66 to 2.35 MHz and pulse lengths of 1.5, 2 and 2.5 cycles were explored. An increase of more than 15 dB in the contrast to tissue ratio was found around the second harmonic compared with the fundamental level at an optimal excitation frequency of 1.74 MHz and a pulse length of 2.5 cycles. Using the optimal settings for 3D harmonic contrast recordings volume measurements of a left ventricular shaped agar phantom were performed. Without contrast the extracted volume data resulted in a volume error of 1.5%, with contrast an accuracy of 3.8% was achieved. The results show the feasibility of accurate volume measurements from 3D harmonic contrast images. Further investigations will include the clinical evaluation of the presented technique for improved assessment of the heart.

  9. Prevalence Incidence Mixture Models

    Cancer.gov

    The R package and webtool fits Prevalence Incidence Mixture models to left-censored and irregularly interval-censored time to event data that is commonly found in screening cohorts assembled from electronic health records. Absolute and relative risk can be estimated for simple random sampling, stratified sampling, and two-phase stratified sampling. Non-parametric (absolute risks only), semi-parametric, weakly-parametric (using B-splines), and some fully parametric (such as the logistic-Weibull) models are supported.

  10. Viscosity of concentrated suspensions of sphere/rod mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mor, R.; Gottlieb, M.; Graham, A.L.; Mondy, L.A.

    1996-05-01

    This paper discusses the viscosity of concentrated suspensions of sphere/rod mixtures by adopting the Thomas relations for spheres and Milliken`s for randomly oriented rods with aspect ratio of 20. The relative viscosity of a mixed suspension may now be calculated for any combination of rods (of aspect ratio 20) and spheres.

  11. Effect of contrast on human speed perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.; Thompson, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This study is part of an ongoing collaborative research effort between the Life Science and Human Factors Divisions at NASA ARC to measure the accuracy of human motion perception in order to predict potential errors in human perception/performance and to facilitate the design of display systems that minimize the effects of such deficits. The study describes how contrast manipulations can produce significant errors in human speed perception. Specifically, when two simultaneously presented parallel gratings are moving at the same speed within stationary windows, the lower-contrast grating appears to move more slowly. This contrast-induced misperception of relative speed is evident across a wide range of contrasts (2.5-50 percent) and does not appear to saturate (e.g., a 50 percent contrast grating appears slower than a 70 percent contrast grating moving at the same speed). The misperception is large: a 70 percent contrast grating must, on average, be slowed by 35 percent to match a 10 percent contrast grating moving at 2 deg/sec (N = 6). Furthermore, it is largely independent of the absolute contrast level and is a quasilinear function of log contrast ratio. A preliminary parametric study shows that, although spatial frequency has little effect, the relative orientation of the two gratings is important. Finally, the effect depends on the temporal presentation of the stimuli: the effects of contrast on perceived speed appears lessened when the stimuli to be matched are presented sequentially. These data constrain both physiological models of visual cortex and models of human performance. We conclude that viewing conditions that effect contrast, such as fog, may cause significant errors in speed judgments.

  12. [Contrast sonography of the urinary tract in children].

    PubMed

    Schneider, K; Jablonski, C; Fendel, H

    1986-02-01

    In 14 healthy children contrast sonography of the bladder was performed with various solutions prior to voiding cystourethrography. The solutions were introduced into the bladder via a bladder catheter. The contrast effects which occurred with iothalamate injections in the urine-filled bladder, with urine injections in the iothalamate-filled bladder, with injections of 0.9% saline solution, and with air injections into the iothalamate-filled bladder were sonographically demonstrated. In echogenicity and duration the intravesical air contrast was superior to all mixture contrasts in the bladder resulting from injections of the respective fluids.

  13. Importance of Molecular Structure on the Thermophoresis of Binary Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pardeep; Goswami, Debabrata

    2014-12-26

    Using thermal lens spectroscopy, we study the role of molecular structural isomers of butanol on the thermophoresis (or Soret effect) of binary mixtures of methanol in butanol. In this study, we show that the thermal lens signal due to the Soret effect changes its sign for all the different concentrations of binary mixtures of butanol with methanol except for the one containing tertiary-butanol. The magnitude and sign of the Soret coefficients strongly depend on the molecular structure of the isomers of butanol in the binary mixture with methanol. This isomerization dependence is in stark contrast to the expected mass dependence of the Soret effect.

  14. Rheology of binary granular mixtures in the dense flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Anurag; Khakhar, D. V.

    2011-11-01

    We study the rheology of granular mixtures in a steady, fully developed, gravity-driven flow on an inclined plane, by means of discrete element method (DEM) simulations. Results are presented for a single component system and binary mixtures with particles of different size and density. Inclination angles, composition, size ratios and density ratios are varied to obtain different segregated configurations at equilibrium. Steady state profiles of the mean velocity, volume fractions, shear stress, shear rate, inertial number and apparent viscosity across the depth of the flowing layer are reported for the different cases. The viscosity varies with height and is found to depend on the local bulk density and composition, which, in turn, depend on the size ratio, the mass ratio and the degree of segregation. For a single component system, a viscoplastic rheological model [P. Jop et al., Nature 441, 727 (2006)] describes the data quite well. We propose a modification of the model for the case of mixtures. The mixture model predicts the viscosity for both well-mixed and segregated granular mixtures differing in size, density or both, using the same model parameters as obtained for the single component system. The predictions of a model for the volume fraction of the mixtures also agree well with simulation results.

  15. Surface analysis of powder binary mixtures with ATR FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Planinsek, Odon; Planinsek, Daniela; Zega, Anamarija; Breznik, Matej; Srcic, Stane

    2006-08-17

    Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infra Red spectroscopy (ATR FTIR) has been used for surface analysis of powder mixtures. The appearance of one component on the surface of the mixture in greater amounts than that expected from the mass or volume ratio was quantified. Coloured mixtures containing methyl orange were analysed. They contained proportions of components from 0% to 100% in steps of 10%. Mixtures of non-sieved powders of methyl orange and Povidone were dark red when containing only 20% of methyl orange, indicating that particles of methyl orange were present on the surface of the mixture in higher amounts than expected from the mass ratios. Mixtures of methyl orange and Mg stearate, on the other hand, were a light colour, showing the presence of more Mg stearate on the surface than expected. Visual observations correlated with semiquantitative surface concentration determination by ATR FTIR spectroscopy using specific peaks of each component. Quantitative determination of components on the surface of the mixture, using the Beer Lambert law, was possible when characteristic peaks for the first component did not overlap with those of the other component. A non-linear correlation between peak height and concentration of a component in a mixture was explained by distribution of the particle size of components. With a small component, the larger number of particles in the same volume allowed them to surround the larger particles of the second component. These conclusions were confirmed by preparing mixtures with non-coloured components (Povidone-Eudragit, NaCl-Povidone, NaCl-Eudragit. Results again correlated with the ATR FTIR spectroscopy measurements. It was additionally shown that a small proportion of finer particles can drastically influence the surface of powder mixtures, due to their large contribution to the specific surface area. ATR FTIR is thus demonstrated to be a useful method for studying surfaces of powder mixtures also in terms of

  16. Synergetic effect of carbon nanopore size and surface oxidation on CO2 capture from CO2/CH4 mixtures.

    PubMed

    Furmaniak, Sylwester; Kowalczyk, Piotr; Terzyk, Artur P; Gauden, Piotr A; Harris, Peter J F

    2013-05-01

    We have studied the synergetic effect of confinement (carbon nanopore size) and surface chemistry (the number of carbonyl groups) on CO2 capture from its mixtures with CH4 at typical operating conditions for industrial adsorptive separation (298 K and compressed CO2-CH4 mixtures). Although both confinement and surface oxidation have an impact on the efficiency of CO2/CH4 adsorptive separation at thermodynamics equilibrium, we show that surface functionalization is the most important factor in designing an efficient adsorbent for CO2 capture. Systematic Monte Carlo simulations revealed that adsorption of CH4 either pure or mixed with CO2 on oxidized nanoporous carbons is only slightly increased by the presence of functional groups (surface dipoles). In contrast, adsorption of CO2 is very sensitive to the number of carbonyl groups, which can be examined by a strong electric quadrupolar moment of CO2. Interestingly, the adsorbed amount of CH4 is strongly affected by the presence of the co-adsorbed CO2. In contrast, the CO2 uptake does not depend on the molar ratio of CH4 in the bulk mixture. The optimal carbonaceous porous adsorbent used for CO2 capture near ambient conditions should consist of narrow carbon nanopores with oxidized pore walls. Furthermore, the equilibrium separation factor was the greatest for CO2/CH4 mixtures with a low CO2 concentration. The maximum equilibrium separation factor of CO2 over CH4 of ~18-20 is theoretically predicted for strongly oxidized nanoporous carbons. Our findings call for a review of the standard uncharged model of carbonaceous materials used for the modeling of the adsorption separation processes of gas mixtures containing CO2 (and other molecules with strong electric quadrupolar moment or dipole moment).

  17. Development characteristics of polymethyl methacrylate in alcohol/water mixtures: a lithography and Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocola, Leonidas E.; Costales, Maya; Gosztola, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) is the most widely used resist in electron beam lithography. This paper reports on a lithography and Raman spectroscopy study of development characteristics of PMMA in methanol, ethanol and isopropanol mixtures with water as developers. We have found that ethanol/water mixtures at a 4:1 volume ratio are an excellent, high resolution, non-toxic developer for exposed PMMA. We have also found that the proper methodology to use so that contrast data can be compared to techniques used in polymer science is not to rinse the developed resist but to immediately dry with nitrogen. Our results show how powerful simple lithographic techniques can be used to study ternary polymer solvent solutions when compared to other techniques used in the literature. Raman data show that both tightly bonded -OH groups and non-hydrogen bonded -OH groups play a role in the development of PMMA. Tightly hydrogen bonded -OH groups show pure Lorentzian Raman absorption only in the concentration ranges where ethanol/water and IPA/water mixtures are effective developers of PMMA, pointing to possible ordering or reduced amorphization due to the liquid state. The impact of understanding these interactions may open doors to a new developers of other electron beam resists that can reduce the toxicity of the waste stream.

  18. Development characteristics of polymethyl methacrylate in alcohol/water mixtures. A lithography and Raman spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Ocola, Leonidas E.; Costales, Maya; Gosztola, David J.

    2015-12-10

    Poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) is the most widely used resist in electron beam lithography. This paper reports on a lithography and Raman spectroscopy study of development characteristics of PMMA in methanol, ethanol and isopropanol mixtures with water as developers. We have found that ethanol/water mixtures at a 4:1 volume ratio are an excellent, high resolution, non-toxic, developer for exposed PMMA. We also have found that the proper methodology to use so that contrast data can be compared to techniques used in polymer science is not to rinse the developed resist but to immediately dry with nitrogen. Our results show how powerful simple lithographic techniques can be used to study ternary polymer solvent solutions when compared to other techniques used in the literature. Raman data shows that there both tightly bonded –OH groups and non-hydrogen bonded –OH groups play a role in the development of PMMA. Tightly hydrogen bonded –OH groups show pure Lorentzian Raman absorption only in the concentration ranges where ethanol/water and IPA/water mixtures are effective developers of PMMA. The impact of the understanding these interactions may open doors to a new developers of other electron beam resists that can reduce the toxicity of the waste stream.

  19. Acute toxicity to goldfish of mixtures of chloramines, copper, and linear alkylate sulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.F.; McKee, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The toxicity to goldfish (Carassius auratus) of mixtures of chloramines, copper, and linear alkylate sulfonate (LAS) was studied by continuous-flow toxicity tests during an exposure period of 96 hours. The individual toxicities of these three chemicals are either additive or synergistic in mixtures, depending on the rate of toxic action of the individual chemical, the toxicity ratio of the chemicals in the mixtures, and the concentration of the mixtures.

  20. Phonation in Tonal Contrasts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuang, Jianjing

    2013-01-01

    Phonation is used in many tonal languages, but how it should be incorporated into tonal systems is not well understood. The purpose of this dissertation thus is to examine the role of phonation in tonal contrasts, and to investigate how phonation and pitch interact in the tonal space. This dissertation presents close studies of tonal contrasts…

  1. Simultaneous blur contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Shernaaz M.; Webster, Michael A.; Taylor, John; Jaikumar, Jaikishan; Verma, Richa

    2001-06-01

    How well-focused an image appears can be strongly influenced by the surroundings context. A blurred surround can cause a central image to appear too sharp, while sharped surrounds can induce blur. We examined some spatial properties and stimulus selectivities of this 'simultaneous blur contrast.' Observers adjusted the focus of a central test image by a 2AFC staircase procedure that varied the slope of the image amplitude spectrum. The test were surrounded by 8 identical images with biased spectra, that were presented concurrently with the test for 0.5 sec on a uniform gray background. Contrast effects were comparable in magnitude for image sizes ranging from 1-deg to 4-deg in visual angle, but were stronger for test that were viwe4 in the periphery rather than fixated directly. Consistent biases were found for different types of grayscale images, including natural images, filtered noise, and simple edges. However, effects were weaker when surrounds and tests were drawn from different images, or differed in contrast-polarity or color, and thus do not depend on blur or on average spatial- frequency content per se. These induction effects may in part reflect a manifestation of selective contrast gain control

  2. Contrasting Views on Censorship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riel, Arthur R., Jr.

    This paper asserts that public demands for book censorship are but one aspect of a deep public dissatisfaction with the educational establishment, and develops the thesis that the cause of this dissatisfaction is the contrast in world views and religions of those in the educational establishment and the censors. The educational establishment…

  3. Factorial optimization of a six-cellulase mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.; Irwin, D.C.; Walker, L.P.; Wilson, D.B.

    1998-06-05

    A factorial experimental design approach was used to optimize mixtures of six cellulases (five Thermomonospora fusca cellulases and plus/minus Trichoderma reesei CBHI along with {beta}-glucosidase) so as to maximize the glucose produced from filter paper. Optimized mixture A and mixture B produced glucose at 25 and 8.3 {micro}mol glucose/{micro}mol enzyme/min, respectively, which are 8 and 1.5 times higher than the sum of the activity of the individual cellulases. In both mixtures, the glucose yield depended on the ratio and the cellulases used. Most enzymes showed synergistic interactions that increased the glucose yield. The yield of glucose with the optimum mixtures depended on the total enzyme concentration.

  4. Concrete mixture characterization. Cementitious barriers partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Protiere, Yannick

    2014-12-01

    This report summarizes the characterization study performed on two concrete mixtures used for radioactive waste storage. Both mixtures were prepared with approximately 425 kg of binder. The testing protocol mostly focused on determining the transport properties of the mixtures; volume of permeable voids (porosity), diffusion coefficients, and water permeability were evaluated. Tests were performed after different curing durations. In order to obtain data on the statistical distribution of transport properties, the measurements after 2 years of curing were performed on 10+ samples. Overall, both mixtures exhibited very low tortuosities and permeabilities, a direct consequence of their low water-to-binder ratio and the use of supplementary cementitious materials. The data generated on 2-year old samples showed that porosity, tortuosity and permeability follow a normal distribution. Chloride ponding tests were also performed on test samples. They showed limited chloride ingress, in line with measured transport properties. These test results also showed that both materials react differently with chloride, a consequence of the differences in the binder chemical compositions.

  5. Binomial Gaussian mixture filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitoharju, Matti; Ali-Löytty, Simo; Piché, Robert

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present a novel method for approximating a normal distribution with a weighted sum of normal distributions. The approximation is used for splitting normally distributed components in a Gaussian mixture filter, such that components have smaller covariances and cause smaller linearization errors when nonlinear measurements are used for the state update. Our splitting method uses weights from the binomial distribution as component weights. The method preserves the mean and covariance of the original normal distribution, and in addition, the resulting probability density and cumulative distribution functions converge to the original normal distribution when the number of components is increased. Furthermore, an algorithm is presented to do the splitting such as to keep the linearization error below a given threshold with a minimum number of components. The accuracy of the estimate provided by the proposed method is evaluated in four simulated single-update cases and one time series tracking case. In these tests, it is found that the proposed method is more accurate than other Gaussian mixture filters found in the literature when the same number of components is used and that the proposed method is faster and more accurate than particle filters.

  6. Contrast optimization in broadband passive polarimetric imaging.

    PubMed

    Boffety, Matthieu; Hu, Haofeng; Goudail, François

    2014-12-01

    Polarimetric imaging is often performed using light with a narrow spectrum for the sake of polarization measurement accuracy. However, due to the use of narrowband filters, this reduces the amount of light entering the system and thus the signal-to-noise ratio. This may not be the best choice for target detection applications, where a high target contrast is required rather than polarimetric accuracy. We address contrast optimization for broadband passive polarimetric imaging. We show through simulation and experiments that polarimetric contrast can be significantly increased by broadening the spectrum of analyzed light. In addition, we show that the contrast can be optimized by taking into account the spectral dependence of the scene and of the polarization analysis devices.

  7. Some properties of thermoplastic mixtures for forming ceramics by extrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mosin, Yu.M.; Leonov, V.G.

    1995-11-01

    The change in the rheological properties of mixtures for plastic forming based on cordierite and aluminum nitride as a function of the composition of the thermoplastic binder and the temperature is considered. A supposition on the influence of the ratio between the crystalline and the amorphous components of the thermoplastic dispersion medium on the properties of the mixture is made. Some recommendations on forming of ceramic pieces are given.

  8. Shear of ordinary and elongated granular mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Alexander; Kern, Matthew; Marschall, Theodore; Teitel, Stephen; Franklin, Scott

    2015-03-01

    We present an experimental and computational study of a mixture of discs and moderate aspect-ratio ellipses under two-dimensional annular planar Couette shear. Experimental particles are cut from acrylic sheet, are essentially incompressible, and constrained in the thin gap between two concentric cylinders. The annular radius of curvature is much larger than the particles, and so the experiment is quasi-2d and allows for arbitrarily large pure-shear strains. Synchronized video cameras and software identify all particles and track them as they move from the field of view of one camera to another. We are particularly interested in the global and local properties as the mixture ratio of discs to ellipses varies. Global quantities include average shear rate and distribution of particle species as functions of height, while locally we investigate the orientation of the ellipses and non-affine events that can be characterized as shear transformational zones or possess a quadrupole signature observed previously in systems of purely circular particles. Discrete Element Method simulations on mixtures of circles and spherocylinders extend the study to the dynamics of the force network and energy dissipated as the system evolves. Supported by NSF CBET #1243571 and PRF #51438-UR10.

  9. Safety Testing of Ammonium Nitrate Based Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Jason; Lappo, Karmen; Phelan, James; Peterson, Nathan; Gilbert, Don

    2013-06-01

    Ammonium nitrate (AN)/ammonium nitrate based explosives have a lengthy documented history of use by adversaries in acts of terror. While historical research has been conducted on AN-based explosive mixtures, it has primarily focused on detonation performance while varying the oxygen balance between the oxidizer and fuel components. Similarly, historical safety data on these materials is often lacking in pertinent details such as specific fuel type, particle size parameters, oxidizer form, etc. A variety of AN-based fuel-oxidizer mixtures were tested for small-scale sensitivity in preparation for large-scale testing. Current efforts focus on maintaining a zero oxygen-balance (a stoichiometric ratio for active chemical participants) while varying factors such as charge geometry, oxidizer form, particle size, and inert diluent ratios. Small-scale safety testing was conducted on various mixtures and fuels. It was found that ESD sensitivity is significantly affected by particle size, while this is less so for impact and friction. Thermal testing is in progress to evaluate hazards that may be experienced during large-scale testing.

  10. Chromatography: concepts and contrasts

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    As the author states in the Preface, this text attempts to provide a unified approach to chromatography (hence the title) by way of contrasting similarities and differences between gas chromatography (GC), column liquid chromatography (LC), and thin-layer chromatography (TLC). This book is also said to be pitched at an elementary level, suitable for most newcomers to the field (e.g., advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students in the academic world, as well as bench-level chemists in industry).

  11. High Contrast CRT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    about 10kV , the di ~ pla~ will he red , at 1 5— 2 ’’k \\ the displa ~ ~e i l l he green . With the xcept ion of the focus and anode potentials , the...re’e’n —lum inesce’nt mate ria l is more t -~ cit ed a nd the dis 1, l ;t ’, appea ls gree n. Vari ous mixtures ‘I the t~~o eoLu i s a r i’ t ’h...M ~ 2t ~~. 1 ht ’ correc t th in f i l m Ii ’p~ ‘. i t i o n tec hnique had hi - i -u prey o t m ’ ~ I ’, di ’t erm mci i leav ing only the la

  12. Polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.; Reischig, P.; Adrien, J.; Peetermans, S.; Ludwig, W.

    2014-11-15

    This tutorial review introduces the use of polychromatic radiation for 3D grain mapping using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography. The objective is to produce a 3D map of the grain shapes and orientations within a bulk, millimeter-sized polycrystalline sample. The use of polychromatic radiation enables the standard synchrotron X-ray technique to be applied in a wider range of contexts: 1) Using laboratory X-ray sources allows a much wider application of the diffraction contrast tomography technique. 2) Neutron sources allow large samples, or samples containing high Z elements to be studied. 3) Applied to synchrotron sources, smaller samples may be treated, or faster measurements may be possible. Challenges and particularities in the data acquisition and processing, and the limitations of the different variants, are discussed. - Highlights: • We present a tutorial review of polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography techniques. • The use of polychromatic radiation allows the standard synchrotron DCT technique to be extended to a range of other sources. • The characteristics and limitations of all variants of the techniques are derived, discussed and compared. • Examples using laboratory X-ray and cold neutron radiation are presented. • Suggestions for the future development of these techniques are presented.

  13. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Peev, D; Hofmann, T; Kananizadeh, N; Beeram, S; Rodriguez, E; Wimer, S; Rodenhausen, K B; Herzinger, C M; Kasputis, T; Pfaunmiller, E; Nguyen, A; Korlacki, R; Pannier, A; Li, Y; Schubert, E; Hage, D; Schubert, M

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm(2) object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  14. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peev, D.; Hofmann, T.; Kananizadeh, N.; Beeram, S.; Rodriguez, E.; Wimer, S.; Rodenhausen, K. B.; Herzinger, C. M.; Kasputis, T.; Pfaunmiller, E.; Nguyen, A.; Korlacki, R.; Pannier, A.; Li, Y.; Schubert, E.; Hage, D.; Schubert, M.

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm2 object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  15. Laboratory investigation of the toxicity and interaction of pesticide mixtures in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    George, Tara K; Liber, Karsten

    2007-01-01

    The probabilistic ecological risk assessment-toxic equivalent (PERA-TE) combination approach is a relatively new risk assessment approach used to assess the toxicity and interaction of chemical mixtures. The validity and effectiveness of the PERA-TE combination approach has been tested previously in field microcosm studies using pesticide mixtures. The related laboratory studies described here, using Daphnia magna, were conducted to verify the conclusions made regarding the toxicity and interaction of the mixtures tested in the microcosms. Two types of pesticide mixture were assessed: the first consisted of pesticides with similar modes of action (chlorpyrifos, diazinon, and azinphos-methyl; OP mixture), and the second consisted of pesticides with different modes of action (chlorpyrifos, endosulfan, and trifluralin; CET mixture). Similar to the field studies, PERA-TE mixtures with a predetermined effect assessment criterion (10th centile of acute toxicity effects distributions) and proportional ratio (89:11 for binary mixture and 80:10:10 for ternary mixtures) were tested. Further assessment of the (PERA-) TE approach was achieved by altering the effect assessment criterion (to EC/LC(50) point estimates) and the proportional ratio of the pesticides in the mixture (to 50:25:25). Generally, but with some exceptions, basing mixtures on species-specific effect criteria and/or changing the proportional ratio of pesticides in the mixture redistributed the concentration of pesticides in the mixture to produce an equitoxic response. The ability to produce these equitoxic responses supported the conclusions drawn from the field studies: The pesticide toxicity in the OP and CET PERA-TE mixtures were effectively additive. Furthermore, it is shown that these alternative (PERA-) TE mixtures would be suitable to confirm or reject the interaction of chemicals in a PERA-TE mixture.

  16. Toxicological approaches to complex mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Mauderly, J L

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of toxicological studies in understanding the health effects of environmental exposures to mixtures. The approach taken is to review mixtures that have received the greatest emphasis from toxicology; major mixtures research programs; the toxicologist's view of mixtures and approaches to their study; and the complementary roles of toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological studies. Studies of tobacco smoke, engine exhaust, combustion products, and air pollutants comprise most of the past research on mixtures. Because of their great experimental control over subjects, exposures, and endpoints, toxicologists tend to consider a wider range of toxic interactions among mixture components and sequential exposures than is practical for human studies. The three fundamental experimental approaches used by toxicologists are integrative (studying the mixture as a whole), dissective (dissecting a mixture to determine causative constituents), and synthetic (studying interactions between agents in simple combinations). Toxicology provides information on potential hazards, mechanisms by which mixture constituents interact to cause effects, and exposure dose-effect relationships; but extrapolation from laboratory data to quantitative human health risks is problematic. Toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological approaches are complementary but are seldom coordinated. Fostering synergistic interactions among the disciplines in studying the risks from mixtures could be advantageous. PMID:7515806

  17. Mixtures and Mineral Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumble, D.

    The monograph Mixtures and Mineral Reactions contains a large amount of information of value to mineralogists, petrologists, and geochemists. The first four chapters are a succinct account of the thermodynamic description of crystalline solutions. In these early chapters a comparison is made between different mathematical treatments of activitycomposition models, there is a discussion of the unmixing by exsolution of a single solution into two phases, and methods of computing phase equilibria in assemblages of different minerals are given. If the reader is perplexed by the discussion of standard states (cf. Figure 1.3), not to worry. That is a normal condition for anyone forced to choose between equivalent reference frames yet knowing, somewhere down the line, that the choice will ultimately make one's computational life more or less difficult.

  18. High Contrast CRT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    form brown sulfides or sulfates. By con- trast, No. 1720 glass does not acquire a brown coloration . How- ever, preliminary tests with 1723 glass show...TR-77-2639-F NL -mmo mhhmhul IIII,. BwII ---- i 11111--- IIIIIN III i 8’ II.I25 .11111 I .6 MCROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU Of...High Contrast Displays Two- Color CRT Laminar Flow Electron Gun Thin Film Phosphor Color Penetration Tube 2% AS~iTACT (ConIlm. a" Pove.. 0fdo if

  19. Cumulative effects of anti-androgenic chemical mixtures and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Kembra L. Howdeshell and L. Earl Gray, Jr.Toxicological studies of defined chemical mixtures assist human health risk assessment by characterizing the joint action of chemicals. This presentation will review the effects of anti-androgenic chemical mixtures on reproductive tract development in rats with a special focus on the reproductive toxicant phthalates. Observed mixture data are compared to mathematical mixture model predictions to determine how the individual chemicals in a mixture interact (e.g., response addition – probabilities of response for each individual chemical are added; dose-addition – the doses of each individual chemical at a given mixture dose are combined together based on the relative potency of the individual chemicals). Phthalate mixtures are observed to act in a dose-additive manner based on the relative potency of the individual phthalates to suppress fetal testosterone production. Similar dose-additive effects have been reported for mixtures of phthalates with anti-androgenic pesticides of differing mechanisms. Data from these phthalate experiments in rats can be used in conjunction with human biomonitoring data to determine individual hazard ratios. Furthermore, data from the toxicological studies can inform the analysis of human biomonitoring data on the association of detected chemicals and their metabolites with measured health outcomes. Data from phthalate experiments in rats can be used in conjunction with human biomonit

  20. Contrast and depth perception: effects of texture contrast and area contrast.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, Shigeru; Kitagawa, Norimichi; Akutsu, Hiromi

    2007-01-01

    Many objects in natural scenes have textures on their surfaces. Contrast of the texture surfaces (the texture contrast) reduces when the viewing distance increases. Similarly, contrast between the surfaces of the objects and the background (the area contrast) reduces when the viewing distance increases. The texture contrast and the area contrast were defined by the contrast between random dots, and by the contrast between the average luminance of the dot pattern and the luminance of the background, respectively. To examine how these two types of contrast influence depth perception, we ran two experiments. In both experiments two areas of random-dot patterns were presented against a uniform background, and participants rated relative depth between the two areas. We found that the rated depth of the patterned areas increased with increases in texture contrast. Furthermore, the effect of the texture contrast on depth judgment increased when the area contrast became low.

  1. Competition-Based Model of Pheromone Component Ratio Detection in the Moth

    PubMed Central

    Zavada, Andrei; Buckley, Christopher L.; Martinez, Dominique; Rospars, Jean-Pierre; Nowotny, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    For some moth species, especially those closely interrelated and sympatric, recognizing a specific pheromone component concentration ratio is essential for males to successfully locate conspecific females. We propose and determine the properties of a minimalist competition-based feed-forward neuronal model capable of detecting a certain ratio of pheromone components independently of overall concentration. This model represents an elementary recognition unit for the ratio of binary mixtures which we propose is entirely contained in the macroglomerular complex (MGC) of the male moth. A set of such units, along with projection neurons (PNs), can provide the input to higher brain centres. We found that (1) accuracy is mainly achieved by maintaining a certain ratio of connection strengths between olfactory receptor neurons (ORN) and local neurons (LN), much less by properties of the interconnections between the competing LNs proper. An exception to this rule is that it is beneficial if connections between generalist LNs (i.e. excited by either pheromone component) and specialist LNs (i.e. excited by one component only) have the same strength as the reciprocal specialist to generalist connections. (2) successful ratio recognition is achieved using latency-to-first-spike in the LN populations which, in contrast to expectations with a population rate code, leads to a broadening of responses for higher overall concentrations consistent with experimental observations. (3) when longer durations of the competition between LNs were observed it did not lead to higher recognition accuracy. PMID:21373177

  2. Hytrast: A New Contrast Medium for Bronchography

    PubMed Central

    Misener, F. J.; Quinlan, J. J.; Hiltz, J. E.

    1965-01-01

    In 1962 Hytrast, an aqueous suspension containing 50% w/v of combined iodine as a mixture of N-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-3,5-diiodopyridone-4 and 3,5-diiodopyridone-4, was introduced as a contrast medium for bronchography. Extensive clinical trials had suggested that this agent was superior to products usually employed for this purpose. At the Nova Scotia Sanatorium, Hytrast was used as a bronchographic contrast medium in 31 consecutive cases. For comparison purposes, the records of the first 50 patients in whom another contrast medium, Dionosil Oily, was used were reviewed. In all cases the contrast medium was introduced through a catheter passed into the bronchus with the aid of a laryngeal mirror, after local anesthesia was induced by pontocaine 2%. Experience in this limited number of cases was at variance with most published results. Hytrast was more irritating than Dionosil Oily, had a greater tendency to produce alveolarization, caused more frequent undesirable sequelae, and was retained in the lung for prolonged periods. PMID:14264971

  3. The Golden Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    2004-01-01

    The Golden Ratio is sometimes called the "Golden Section" or the "Divine Proportion", in which three points: A, B, and C, divide a line in this proportion if AC/AB = AB/BC. "Donald in Mathmagicland" includes a section about the Golden Ratio and the ratios within a five-pointed star or pentagram. This article presents two computing exercises that…

  4. Mechanisms of contrast agent destruction.

    PubMed

    Chomas, J E; Dayton, P; Allen, J; Morgan, K; Ferrara, K W

    2001-01-01

    Various applications of contrast-assisted ultrasound, including blood vessel detection, perfusion estimation, and drug delivery, require controlled destruction of contrast agent microbubbles. The lifetime of a bubble depends on properties of the bubble shell, the gas core, and the acoustic waveform impinging on the bubble. Three mechanisms of microbubble destruction are considered: fragmentation, acoustically driven diffusion, and static diffusion. Fragmentation is responsible for rapid destruction of contrast agents on a time scale of microseconds. The primary characteristics of fragmentation are a very large expansion and subsequent contraction, resulting in instability of the bubble. Optical studies using a novel pulsed-laser optical system show the expansion and contraction of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles with the ratio of maximum diameter to minimum diameter greater than 10. Fragmentation is dependent on the transmission pressure, occurring in over 55% of bubbles insonified with a peak negative transmission pressure of 2.4 MPa and in less than 10% of bubbles insonified with a peak negative transmission pressure of 0.8 MPa. The echo received from a bubble decorrelates significantly within two pulses when the bubble is fragmented, creating an opportunity for rapid detection of bubbles via a decorrelation-based analysis. Preliminary findings with a mouse tumor model verify the occurrence of fragmentation in vivo. A much slower mechanism of bubble destruction is diffusion, which is driven by both a concentration gradient between the concentration of gas in the bubble compared with the concentration of gas in the liquid, as well as convective effects of motion of the gas-liquid interface. The rate of diffusion increases during insonation, because of acoustically driven diffusion, producing changes in diameter on the time scale of the acoustic pulse length, thus, on the order of microseconds. Gas bubbles diffuse while they are not being insonified, termed

  5. On Establishing Underlying Tonal Contrast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Phonological field work is largely about establishing contrast in comparable environments. The notion of phonological contrast, however, can be confusing, particularly in its application to tone analysis. Does it mean phonemic contrast in the structuralist sense, or does it mean underlying contrast in the generative sense? Many linguists, in…

  6. Pycnonuclear reaction rates for binary ionic mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichimaru, S.; Ogata, S.; Van Horn, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    Through a combination of compositional scaling arguments and examinations of Monte Carlo simulation results for the interparticle separations in binary-ionic mixture (BIM) solids, we have derived parameterized expressions for the BIM pycnonuclear rates as generalizations of those in one-component solids obtained previously by Salpeter and Van Horn and by Ogata et al. We have thereby discovered a catalyzing effect of the heavier elements, which enhances the rates of reactions among the lighter elements when the charge ratio exceeds a critical value of approximately 2.3.

  7. Contrasting Martian Terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit captured this interesting view of martian topography just below the 'West Spur' portion of the 'Columbia Hills' on sol 208 (Aug. 2, 2004). The view is looking southwest. The rover's wheel tracks show the contrast between soft martian soil and the harder 'Clovis' rock outcrop, which scientists are now studying.

    The angle of the horizon indicates the tilt of the rover to be about 20 degrees. On the horizon is a small peak informally named 'Grissom Hill,' about 15 kilometers (9.3 miles) away. To the right of the peak is the edge of a 2-kilometer-wide (1.2-mile-wide) crater. A few weeks ago, Spirit stopped to conduct scientific studies of rocks in 'Hank's Hollow,' located on the right side of the image approximately one-third of the way down from the top. This photo was taken with Spirit's right rear hazard-avoidance camera.

  8. Thermodynamic origin of the solubility profile of drugs showing one or two maxima against the polarity of aqueous and nonaqueous mixtures: niflumic acid and caffeine.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Pilar; Navarro, J; Romero, S; Escalera, B

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the origin of the different solubility profiles of drugs against the polarity of solvent mixtures with a common cosolvent. Niflumic acid and caffeine where chosen as model drugs. The solubilities were measured at five or six temperatures in aqueous (ethanol-water) and nonaqueous (ethyl acetate-ethanol) mixtures. The enthalpies of solution were obtained at the harmonic mean of the experimental temperature. Solid phase changes were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry and thermomicroscopy. A single solubility maximum was obtained for niflumic acid against the solubility parameter of both mixtures that is not related to solid phase changes. In contrast, caffeine displays two maxima and anhydrous-hydrate transition occurs at the solubility peak in the amphiprotic mixture. The apparent enthalpies of solution of both drugs show endothermic maxima against solvent composition that are related to hydrophobic hydration. A general explanation for the cosolvent action in aqueous mixtures is proposed. The dominant mechanism shifts from entropy to enthalpy at a certain cosolvent ratio dependent on the hydrophobicity and the solubility parameter of the drug. Niflumic acid and caffeine show enthalpy-entropy compensation in ethanol-water, and this relationship is demonstrated for the first time in nonaqueous mixtures. The results support that enthalpy-entropy compensation is a general effect for the solubility of drugs in solvent mixtures. The shape of the solubility curves is correlated with the compensation plots. The solubility peaks separate different enthalpy-entropy relationships that also differentiate the solubility behavior of the hydrate and the anhydrous forms of caffeine.

  9. Using Mixture Regression to Identify Varying Effects: A Demonstration with Paternal Incarceration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, W. Justin; Pleck, Joseph; McBride, Brent

    2012-01-01

    The most widely used techniques for identifying the varying effects of stressors involve testing moderator effects via interaction terms in regression or multiple-group analysis in structural equation modeling. The authors present mixture regression as an alternative approach. In contrast to more widely used approaches, mixture regression…

  10. Characterisation of aerosol combustible mixtures generated using condensation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saat, Aminuddin; Dutta, Nilabza; Wahid, Mazlan A.

    2012-06-01

    An accidental release of a liquid flammable substance might be formed as an aerosol (droplet and vapour mixture). This phenomenon might be due to high pressure sprays, pressurised liquid leaks and through condensation when hot vapour is rapidly cooled. Such phenomena require a fundamental investigation of mixture characterisation prior to any subsequent process such as evaporation and combustion. This paper describes characterisation study of droplet and vapour mixtures generated in a fan stirred vessel using condensation technique. Aerosol of isooctane mixtures were generated by expansion from initially a premixed gaseous fuel-air mixture. The distribution of droplets within the mixture was characterised using laser diagnostics. Nearly monosized droplet clouds were generated and the droplet diameter was defined as a function of expansion time. The effect of changes in pressure, temperature, fuel-air fraction and expansion ratio on droplet diameter was evaluated. It is shown that aerosol generation by expansion was influenced by the initial pressure and temperature, equivalence ratio and expansion rates. All these parameters affected the onset of condensation which in turn affected the variation in droplet diameter.

  11. Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 4 NIST Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  12. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Magyar, Rudolph J.; Root, Seth; Mattsson, Thomas; ...

    2015-04-22

    Mixtures of light elements with heavy elements are important in inertial confinement fusion. We explore the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) at elevated temperature and pressure is used to obtain the thermodynamic state properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. In order to validate these simulations, we have performed shock compression experiments using the Sandia Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with the completion of dissociation in ethane. Furthermore, themore » DFT-based simulation results compare well with the experimental data along the principal Hugoniots and are used to provide insight into the dissociation and temperature along the Hugoniots as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for several compositions suggesting a limiting compression for C-C bonded systems.« less

  13. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flicker, Dawn; Magyar, Rudolph; Root, Seth; Cochrane, Kyle; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Mixtures of light and heavy elements arise in inertial confinement fusion and planetary science. We present results on the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT/QMD) at elevated-temperature and pressure is used to obtain the properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. To validate the QMD simulations, we performed high-precision shock compression experiments using Sandia's Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis of the simulations correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with completion of dissociation in ethane. DFT-based simulation results compare well with experimental data and are used to provide insight into the dissociation as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for ethane, Xe-ethane, polymethyl-pentene, and polystyrene, suggesting that a limiting compression exists for C-C bonded systems. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Familial searching on DNA mixtures with dropout.

    PubMed

    Slooten, K

    2016-05-01

    Familial searching, the act of searching a database for a relative of an unknown individual whose DNA profile has been obtained, is usually restricted to cases where the DNA profile of that person has been unambiguously determined. Therefore, it is normally applied only with a good quality single source profile as starting point. In this article we investigate the performance of the method if applied to mixtures with and without allelic dropout, when likelihood ratios are computed with a semi-continuous (binary) model. We show that mixtures with dropout do not necessarily perform worse than mixtures without, especially if some separation between the donors is possible due to their different dropout probabilities. The familial searching true and false positive rates of mixed profiles on 15 loci are in some cases better than those of single source profiles on 10 loci. Thus, the information loss due to the fact that the person of interest's DNA has been mixed with that of other, and is affected by dropout, can be less than the loss of information corresponding to having 5 fewer loci available for a single source trace. Profiles typed on 10 autosomal loci are often involved in familial searching casework since many databases, including the Dutch one, in part consist of such profiles. Therefore, from this point of view, there seems to be no objection to extend familial searching to mixed or degraded profiles.

  15. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Magyar, Rudolph J.; Root, Seth; Mattsson, Thomas; Cochrane, Kyle Robert; Flicker, Dawn G.

    2015-04-22

    Mixtures of light elements with heavy elements are important in inertial confinement fusion. We explore the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) at elevated temperature and pressure is used to obtain the thermodynamic state properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. In order to validate these simulations, we have performed shock compression experiments using the Sandia Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with the completion of dissociation in ethane. Furthermore, the DFT-based simulation results compare well with the experimental data along the principal Hugoniots and are used to provide insight into the dissociation and temperature along the Hugoniots as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for several compositions suggesting a limiting compression for C-C bonded systems.

  16. Statistical mechanical theory of fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yueqiang; Wu, Zhengming; Liu, Weiwei

    2014-01-01

    A general statistical mechanical theory of fluid mixtures (liquid mixtures and gas mixtures) is developed based on the statistical mechanical expression of chemical potential of components in the grand canonical ensemble, which gives some new relationships between thermodynamic quantities (equilibrium ratio Ki, separation factor α and activity coefficient γi) and ensemble average potential energy u for one molecule. The statistical mechanical expressions of separation factor α and activity coefficient γi derived in this work make the fluid phase equilibrium calculations can be performed by molecular simulation simply and efficiently, or by the statistical thermodynamic approach (based on the saturated-vapor pressure of pure substance) that does not need microscopic intermolecular pair potential functions. The physical meaning of activity coefficient γi in the liquid phase is discussed in detail from a viewpoint of molecular thermodynamics. The calculated Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium (VLE) properties of argon-methane, methanol-water and n-hexane-benzene systems by this model fit well with experimental data in references, which indicates that this model is accurate and reliable in the prediction of VLE properties for small, large and strongly associating molecules; furthermore the statistical mechanical expressions of separation factor α and activity coefficient γi have good compatibility with classical thermodynamic equations and quantum mechanical COSMO-SAC approach.

  17. Brute force absorption contrast microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Graham R.; Mills, David

    2014-09-01

    In laboratory X-ray microtomography (XMT) systems, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is typically determined by the X-ray exposure due to the low flux associated with microfocus X-ray tubes. As the exposure time is increased, the SNR improves up to a point where other sources of variability dominate, such as differences in the sensitivities of adjacent X-ray detector elements. Linear time-delay integration (TDI) readout averages out detector sensitivities on the critical horizontal direction and equiangular TDI also averages out the X-ray field. This allows the SNR to be increased further with increasing exposure. This has been used in dentistry to great effect, allowing subtle variations in dentine mineralisation to be visualised in 3 dimensions. It has also been used to detect ink in ancient parchments that are too damaged to physically unroll. If sufficient contrast between the ink and parchment exists, it is possible to virtually unroll the tomographic image of the scroll in order that the text can be read. Following on from this work, a feasibility test was carried out to determine if it might be possible to recover images from decaying film reels. A successful attempt was made to re-create a short film sequence from a rolled length of 16mm film using XMT. However, the "brute force" method of scaling this up to allow an entire film reel to be imaged presents a significant challenge.

  18. Inviscid behaviour of fines-rich pyroclastic flows inferred from experiments on gas-particle mixtures [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, O.; Gilbertson, M. A.; Phillips, J. C.; Sparks, R. S. J.

    2005-12-01

    Experiments were carried out on granular flows generated by instantaneous release of gas-fluidised, bidisperse mixtures and propagating into a horizontal channel. The mixture consists of fine (< 100 μm) and coarse (> 100 μm) particles of same density, with corresponding grain size ratios of ˜ 2 to 9. Initial fluidisation of the mixture destroys the interparticle frictional contacts, and the flow behaviour then depends on the initial bed packing and on the timescale required to re-establish strong frictional contacts. At a fines mass fraction ( α) below that of optimal packing (˜ 40%), the initial mixtures consist of a continuous network of coarse particles with fines in interstitial voids. Strong frictional contacts between the coarse particles are probably rapidly re-established and the flows steadily decelerate. Some internal friction reduction appears to occur as α and the grain size ratio increases, possibly due to particle rolling and the lower roughness of internal shear surfaces. Segregation only occurs at large grain size ratio due to dynamical sieving with fines concentrated at the flow base. In contrast, at α above that for optimal packing, the initial mixtures consist of coarse particles embedded in a matrix of fines. Flow velocities and run-outs are similar to that of the monodisperse fine end-member, thus showing that the coarse particles are transported passively within the matrix whatever their amount and grain size are. These flows propagate at constant height and velocity as inviscid fluid gravity currents, thus suggesting negligible interparticle friction. We have determined a Froude number of 2.61 ± 0.08 consistent with the dam-break model for fluid flows, and with no significant variation as a function of α, the grain size ratio, and the initial bed expansion. Very little segregation occurs, which suggests low intensity particle interactions during flow propagation and that active fluidisation is not taking place. Strong frictional

  19. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry air and air/water vapor mixtures in the same forced convection cooling test rig (jet array impingement configurations) with mass ratios of water vapor to air up to 0.23. The primary objective was to verify by direct experiment that selected existing methods for evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of air/water vapor mixtures could be used with confidence to predict heat transfer coefficients for such mixtures using as a basis heat transfer data for dry air only. The property evaluation methods deemed most appropriate require as a basis a measured property value at one mixture composition in addition to the property values for the pure components.

  20. Contrast agents for MRI.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahi, H

    2013-12-01

    Contrast agents are divided into two categories. The first one is paramagnetic compounds, including lanthanides like gadolinium, which mainly reduce the longitudinal (T1) relaxation property and result in a brighter signal. The second class consists of super-paramagnetic magnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) such as iron oxides, which have a strong effect on the transversal (T2) relaxation properties. SPMNPs have the potential to be utilized as excellent probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For instance, clinically benign iron oxide and engineered ferrite nanoparticles provide a good MRI probing capability for clinical applications. Furthermore, the limited magnetic property and inability to escape from the reticuloendothelial system (RES) of the used nanoparticles impede their further advancement. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the engineered magnetic nanoparticle probes for the next-generation molecular MRI. Considering the importance of MRI in diagnosing diseases, this paper presents an overview of recent scientific achievements in the development of new synthetic SPMNP probes whereby the sensitive and target-specific observation of biological events at the molecular and cellular levels is feasible.

  1. Mixtures of thermostable enzymes show high performance in biomass saccharification.

    PubMed

    Kallioinen, Anne; Puranen, Terhi; Siika-aho, Matti

    2014-07-01

    Optimal enzyme mixtures of six Trichoderma reesei enzymes and five thermostable enzyme components were developed for the hydrolysis of hydrothermally pretreated wheat straw, alkaline oxidised sugar cane bagasse and steam-exploded bagasse by statistically designed experiments. Preliminary studies to narrow down the optimization parameters showed that a cellobiohydrolase/endoglucanase (CBH/EG) ratio of 4:1 or higher of thermostable enzymes gave the maximal CBH-EG synergy in the hydrolysis of hydrothermally pretreated wheat straw. The composition of optimal enzyme mixtures depended clearly on the substrate and on the enzyme system studied. The optimal enzyme mixture of thermostable enzymes was dominated by Cel7A and required a relatively high amount of xylanase, whereas with T. reesei enzymes, the high proportion of Cel7B appeared to provide the required xylanase activity. The main effect of the pretreatment method was that the required proportion of xylanase was higher and the proportion of Cel7A lower in the optimized mixture for hydrolysis of alkaline oxidised bagasse than steam-exploded bagasse. In prolonged hydrolyses, less Cel7A was generally required in the optimal mixture. Five-component mixtures of thermostable enzymes showed comparable hydrolysis yields to those of commercial enzyme mixtures.

  2. Pyogenic liver abscess: contrast-enhanced MR imaging in rats.

    PubMed

    Weissleder, R; Saini, S; Stark, D D; Elizondo, G; Compton, C; Wittenberg, J; Ferrucci, J T

    1988-01-01

    MR imaging was used to evaluate experimentally induced pyogenic liver abscesses in an animal model. Rats were examined before and after IV administration of either gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA), ferrite particles, or both contrast agents together. Pyogenic liver abscesses appeared hypointense on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. Bolus administration of Gd-DTPA using a fast spin-echo sequence with repetition time of 250 msec and echo time of 20 msec (SE 250/20) showed transient selective enhancement of normal hepatic tissue and increased lesion conspicuity, quantitatively assessed by the contrast-to-noise ratio, which increased from -35.7 to -59.0. Delayed leakage of Gd-DTPA into the abscess center partially obscured small lesions at 30-60 min. Ferrite particles reduced the signal intensity of normal liver, and the abscess then appeared homogenously hyperintense. Applying the SE 500/32 sequence, the contrast-to-noise ratio increased from -1.2 to +74.0. Coordinated administration of both contrast agents showed a further increase in contrast to +94.0, with a hyperintense abscess rim surrounded by hypointense liver. Gd-DTPA increases abscess-liver contrast by rim enhancement of the abscess wall, and ferrite increases the abscess-liver contrast by selectively decreasing the signal intensity of surrounding normal liver. As a result of increased contrast-to-noise ratio, both contrast agents, alone or in combination, increase the conspicuity of hepatic abscesses.

  3. Offer/Acceptance Ratio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Mimi

    1997-01-01

    Explores how human resource professionals, with above average offer/acceptance ratios, streamline their recruitment efforts. Profiles company strategies with internships, internal promotion, cooperative education programs, and how to get candidates to accept offers. Also discusses how to use the offer/acceptance ratio as a measure of program…

  4. Compression ratio effect on methane HCCI combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S. M.; Pitz, W.; Smith, J. R.; Westbrook, C.

    1998-09-29

    We have used the HCT (Hydrodynamics, Chemistry and Transport) chemical kinetics code to simulate HCCI (homogeneous charge compression ignition) combustion of methane-air mixtures. HCT is applied to explore the ignition timing, bum duration, NOx production, gross indicated efficiency and gross IMEP of a supercharged engine (3 atm. Intake pressure) with 14:1, 16:l and 18:1 compression ratios at 1200 rpm. HCT has been modified to incorporate the effect of heat transfer and to calculate the temperature that results from mixing the recycled exhaust with the fresh mixture. This study uses a single control volume reaction zone that varies as a function of crank angle. The ignition process is controlled by adjusting the intake equivalence ratio and the residual gas trapping (RGT). RGT is internal exhaust gas recirculation which recycles both thermal energy and combustion product species. Adjustment of equivalence ratio and RGT is accomplished by varying the timing of the exhaust valve closure in either 2-stroke or 4-stroke engines. Inlet manifold temperature is held constant at 300 K. Results show that, for each compression ratio, there is a range of operational conditions that show promise of achieving the control necessary to vary power output while keeping indicated efficiency above 50% and NOx levels below 100 ppm. HCT results are also compared with a set of recent experimental data for natural gas.

  5. Copper-zinc coergisms and metal toxicity at predefined ratio concentrations: Predictions based on synergistic ratio model.

    PubMed

    Obinna Obiakor, Maximilian; Damian Ezeonyejiaku, Chigozie

    2015-07-01

    A significant number of studies have centred on the single actions of heavy metals against test animals in predicting aquatic toxicity. However, practical existence of environmental toxicants is in multiple mixtures and variable undefined ratio combinatorial concentrations. Pollution abatement approaches in setting representative safe boundaries for metal contaminants is crucial with factual data on predictively modelled exposures of organisms to multiple mixtures. In continuance of our approach to toxicity of individual heavy metals, we determined the toxicity of binary mixtures of copper and zinc at predetermined ratios against tilapia species and also evaluated the coergisms based on synergistic ratio model for effective formulations of safe limits. Orecohromis niloticus species were exposed to copper and zinc (Cu:Zn) at ratios of 1:1 and 1:2 on 96hLC₅₀ index and mortality response analysed following the probit-log-dose regression with metal-metal interactions effectively modelled. The 96hLC₅₀ values for Cu:Zn were calculated to be 68.898 and 51.197 mg/l for ratios 1:1 and 1:2, respectively. The joint action toxicity of the metal mixtures was observed to differ from the metals acting singly against the same animal species. Synergistic coergisms were realized in most of the ratio mixtures except the antagonistic effect displayed by the combination of Cu:Zn in the ratio 1:1 when compared to the single action of copper. Biological toxicity of heavy metals however still appears uncertain, and consideration of multiple mixtures and interactions of toxicants in natural milieu is very crucial in environmental management of the existing and emerging contaminating metals.

  6. Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik

    2008-11-13

    All standard (medical) x-ray imaging technologies, rely primarily on the amplitude properties of the incident radiation, and do not depend on its phase. This is unchanged since the discovery by Roentgen that the intensity of an x-ray beam, as measured by the exposure on a film, was related to the relative transmission properties of an object. However, recently various imaging techniques have emerged which depend on the phase of the x-rays as well as the amplitude. Phase becomes important when the beam is coherent and the imaging system is sensitive to interference phenomena. Significant new advances have been made in coherent optic theory and techniques, which now promise phase information in medical imaging. The development of perfect crystal optics and the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation facilities have contributed to a significant increase in the application of phase based imaging in materials and life sciences. Unique source characteristics such as high intensity, monochromaticity, coherence and high collimating provide an ideal source for advanced imaging. Phase contrast imaging has been applied in both projection and computed tomography modes, and recent applications have been made in the field of medical imaging. Due to the underlying principle of X-ray detection conventional image receptors register only intensities of wave fields and not their phases. During the last decade basically five different methods were developed that translate the phase information into intensity variations. These methods are based on measuring the phase shift {phi} directly (using interference phenomena), the gradient {nabla}{sub {phi}}, or the Laplacian {nabla}{sup 2}{phi}. All three methods can be applied to polychromatic X-ray sources keeping in mind that the native source is synchrotron radiation, featuring monochromatic and reasonable coherent X-ray beams. Due to the vast difference in the coefficients that are driven absorption and phase effects (factor 1

  7. Maximum Likelihood and Minimum Distance Applied to Univariate Mixture Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yuh-Yin Wu; Schafer, William D.

    This Monte-Carlo study compared modified Newton (NW), expectation-maximization algorithm (EM), and minimum Cramer-von Mises distance (MD), used to estimate parameters of univariate mixtures of two components. Data sets were fixed at size 160 and manipulated by mean separation, variance ratio, component proportion, and non-normality. Results…

  8. Critical evaluation of spectroscopic indices for organic matter source tracing via end member mixing analysis based on two contrasting sources.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liyang; Hur, Jin

    2014-08-01

    Despite the wide use of absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy for tracking the sources of dissolved organic matter (DOM), there are limited studies on evaluating their source discrimination capabilities at variable solution chemistry (pH, NaCl, Ca(2+), and DOM concentration). For this study, we compared the applicability of several well-known spectroscopic indices via end member mixing analysis based on two contrasting DOM sources (Suwannee River fulvic acid and an algal DOM). The absorption coefficients and the intensities of fluorescent components from parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) showed linear relationships with increasing algal carbon fraction in the mixture of the two DOMs. In contrast, although they still behaved conservatively, spectral ratio indices such as spectral slopes, ratios of PARAFAC components, humification index, and fluorescence index changed in nonlinear patterns with the mixing ratios. The indices based on PARAFAC results exhibited strong discrimination capabilities, as indicated by high susceptibility to the changes in DOM sources relative to the analytical precision. While variable NaCl concentrations had limited effects, most fluorescence indices were considerably affected by other solution chemistry such as pH, Ca(2+), and DOM level. Our study demonstrated that the applicability of the source discrimination indices should be critically examined especially in the environments with notable changes in the solution chemistry. The solution chemistry effects could be minimized by adjusting samples to a constant condition prior to the measurements or otherwise the effects should be fully taken into account in interpreting the field observations.

  9. Recognition memory reveals just how CONTRASTIVE contrastive accenting really is

    PubMed Central

    Fraundorf, Scott H.; Watson, Duane G.; Benjamin, Aaron S.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of pitch accenting on memory were investigated in three experiments. Participants listened to short recorded discourses that contained contrast sets with two items (e.g. British scientists and French scientists); a continuation specified one item from the set. Pitch accenting on the critical word in the continuation was manipulated between non-contrastive (H* in the ToBI system) and contrastive (L+H*). On subsequent recognition memory tests, the L+H* accent increased hits to correct statements and correct rejections of the contrast item (Experiments 1–3), but did not impair memory for other parts of the discourse (Experiment 2). L+H* also did not facilitate correct rejections of lures not in the contrast set (Experiment 3), indicating that contrastive accents do not simply strengthen the representation of the target item. These results suggest comprehenders use pitch accenting to encode and update information about multiple elements in a contrast set. PMID:20835405

  10. Some results on Gaussian mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felgueiras, Miguel; Santos, Rui; Martins, João Paulo

    2014-10-01

    We investigate Gaussian mixtures with independent components, whose parameters are numerically estimated. A decomposition of a Gaussian mixture is presented when the components have a common variance. We introduce a shifted and scaled t-Student distribution as an approximation for the distribution of Gaussian mixtures when their components have a common mean and develop a hypothesis test for testing the equality of the components means. Finally, we analyse the fitness of the approximate model to the logarithmic daily returns of the Portuguese stock index PSI-20.

  11. Contrastive Analysis and Language Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Charles A.

    Contrastive analysis is basic to all linguistics since only by this approach can a general theory of language (language universals) be constructed and only with at least implicit contrastive analysis can a particular language be fully characterized. Two kinds of contrastive analysis have been basic to diachronic linguistics: the comparison of…

  12. Scavenging ratios based on inflow air concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W.E.; Dana, M.T.; Lee, R.N.; Slinn, W.G.N.; Thorp, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    Scavenging ratios were calculated from field measurements made during April 1985. Event precipitation samples were collected at the surface, but air chemistry measurements in the air mass feeding the precipitation were made from an aircraft. In contrast, ratios calculated in previous studies have used air concentration and precipitation chemistry data from only surface measurements. Average scavenging ratios were calculated for SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, total sulfate, total nitrate, and total ammonium for 5 events; the geometric mean of these scavenging ratios were 8.5 {times} 10{sup 5}, 5.6 {times} 10{sup 6}, 4.3 {times} 10{sup 5}, 3.4 {times} 10{sup 5}, 2.4 {times} 10{sup 6}, and 9.7 {times} 10{sup 4}, respectively. These means are similar to but less variable than previous ratios formed using only surface data.

  13. Sex ratios in bumble bees

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, A. F. G.

    1997-01-01

    The median proportion of investment in females among 11 populations of seven bumble bee (Bombus) species was 0.32 (range 0.07 to 0.64). By contrast, two species of workerless social parasites in the related genus Psithyrus had female-biased sex allocation, the reasons for which remain unclear. Male-biased sex allocation in Bombus contradicts the predictions of Trivers and Hare's sex ratio model for the social Hymenoptera, which are that the population sex investment ratio should be 0.5 (1:1) under queen control and 0.75 (3:1 females:males) under worker control (assuming single, once-mated, outbred queens and non-reproductive workers). Male bias in Bombus does not appear to be either an artefact, or purely the result of symbiotic sex ratio distorters. According to modifications of the Trivers–Hare model, the level of worker male-production in Bombus is insufficient to account for observed levels of male bias. There is also no evidence that male bias arises from either local resource competition (related females compete for resources) or local mate enhancement (related males cooperate in securing mates). Bulmer presented models predicting sexual selection for protandry (males are produced before females) in annual social Hymenoptera and, as a consequence (given some parameter values), male-biased sex allocation. Bumble bees fit the assumptions of Bulmer's models and are protandrous. These models therefore represent the best current explanation for the bees' male-biased sex investment ratios. This conclusion suggests that the relative timing of the production of the sexes strongly influences sex allocation in the social Hymenoptera.

  14. Finding of low-contrast formations in the solar corona using a low contrast method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, S. M.; Krissinel, B. B.; Obukhov, A. G.; Prosovetsky, D. V.; Smolkov, G. Ya.

    2009-12-01

    Coronal holes, bright coronal points, filaments, and prominences are among the initial factors responsible for variability of the space weather conditions. Radioheliographic data on low-contrast formations contain valuable information necessary for studying conditions of origination, peculiarities of evolution, and prediction of solar-terrestrial relations. It is important to identify these formations on the solar disk when physical properties of coronal holes are revealed. The algorithm based on the Wiener-Tikhonov filter modification with controlled parameters and a high-frequency contrast filter was developed in order to isolate low-contrast formations in the solar corona brightness distributions obtained at a wavelength of 5.2 cm from the Siberian solar radio telescope observations. In this case low-contrast sources are isolated in two main stages: (1) HF noise smoothing based on an evolutionary filter with controlled parameters and (2) contrasting of sources using an HF filter. The evolutionary filter regularization parameters and the dimensions of an HF contrast filter mask are selected depending on the signal-to-noise ratio and dimensions of the studied region based on the results of preliminary data processing. The corresponding software has been developed in order to identify low-contrast objects on the Sun’s radio images using this method. The algorithm is used to isolate filaments and coronal holes and the results of this usage are presented in this work.

  15. Gaussian mixture model-based gradient field reconstruction for infrared image detail enhancement and denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fan; Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Wenda; Qu, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Infrared images are characterized by low signal-to-noise ratio and low contrast. Therefore, the edge details are easily immerged in the background and noise, making it much difficult to achieve infrared image edge detail enhancement and denoising. This article proposes a novel method of Gaussian mixture model-based gradient field reconstruction, which enhances image edge details while suppressing noise. First, by analyzing the gradient histogram of noisy infrared image, Gaussian mixture model is adopted to simulate the distribution of the gradient histogram, and divides the image information into three parts corresponding to faint details, noise and the edges of clear targets, respectively. Then, the piecewise function is constructed based on the characteristics of the image to increase gradients of faint details and suppress gradients of noise. Finally, anisotropic diffusion constraint is added while visualizing enhanced image from the transformed gradient field to further suppress noise. The experimental results show that the method possesses unique advantage of effectively enhancing infrared image edge details and suppressing noise as well, compared with the existing methods. In addition, it can be used to effectively enhance other types of images such as the visible and medical images.

  16. Effect of interactive ternary mixtures on dispersion characteristics of ipratropium bromide in dry powder inhaler formulations.

    PubMed

    Beilmann, Bianca; Kubiak, René; Grab, Peter; Häusler, Heribert; Langguth, Peter

    2007-04-20

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of mixing order and the influence of adding fines on in vitro performance of ipratropium bromide (ITB) dry powder inhaler formulations. Coarse lactose (CL) in varying mass ratio with or without addition of micronized lactose (ML) and ITB in different mixing sequences was used to formulate ternary mixtures. A binary mixture composed of CL and ITP served as control. The in vitro deposition of ITB from these formulations was measured using an Andersen cascade impactor (aerosolization at 39 L/min) employing a HandiHaler as the delivery device. It was observed that mixing order has a significant effect (P < .05) on in vitro deposition of ITB. Formulations with preblending of CL and ITB produced similar deposition profiles as the control, regardless of the added ML. In contrast, formulations without preblending resulted in significantly higher fine particle dose (FPD) as compared with the control. In addition, an increased quantity of ML generally resulted in an increase in drug deposition. The results show that the effect of ML on dispersion of ITB is highly dependent upon the mixing order. The evaluation of atomic force measurement (AFM) to forecast drug detachment and predict the aerodynamic characteristics resulted in similar attraction forces for the different pairs lactose/lactose (42.66 +/- 25.01 nN) and lactose/ITB (46.77 +/- 17.04 nN).

  17. Endoscopy imaging intelligent contrast improvement.

    PubMed

    Sheraizin, S; Sheraizin, V

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a medical endoscopy video contrast improvement method that provides intelligent automatic adaptive contrast control. The method fundamentals are video data clustering and video data histogram modification. The video data clustering allows an effective use the low noise two channel contrast enhancement processing. The histogram analysis permitted to determine the video exposure type for simple and complicated contrast distribution. We determined the needed gamma value for automatic local area contrast improvement for the following exposure types: dark, normal, light, dark light, dark normal etc. The experimental results of medical endoscopy video processing allow defining the automatic gamma control range from 0.5 to 2.0.

  18. Triphilic Ionic-Liquid Mixtures: Fluorinated and Non-fluorinated Aprotic Ionic-Liquid Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Hollóczki, Oldamur; Macchiagodena, Marina; Weber, Henry; Thomas, Martin; Brehm, Martin; Stark, Annegret; Russina, Olga; Triolo, Alessandro; Kirchner, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    We present here the possibility of forming triphilic mixtures from alkyl- and fluoroalkylimidazolium ionic liquids, thus, macroscopically homogeneous mixtures for which instead of the often observed two domains—polar and nonpolar—three stable microphases are present: polar, lipophilic, and fluorous ones. The fluorinated side chains of the cations indeed self-associate and form domains that are segregated from those of the polar and alkyl domains. To enable miscibility, despite the generally preferred macroscopic separation between fluorous and alkyl moieties, the importance of strong hydrogen bonding is shown. As the long-range structure in the alkyl and fluoroalkyl domains is dependent on the composition of the liquid, we propose that the heterogeneous, triphilic structure can be easily tuned by the molar ratio of the components. We believe that further development may allow the design of switchable, smart liquids that change their properties in a predictable way according to their composition or even their environment. PMID:26305804

  19. High Aspect Ratio Wrinkles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Crosby, Alfred

    2015-03-01

    Buckling-induced surface undulations are widely found in living creatures, for instance, gut villi and the surface of flower petal cells. These undulations provide unique functionalities with their extremely high aspect ratios. For the synthetic systems, sinusoidal wrinkles that are induced by buckling a thin film attached on a soft substrate have been proposed to many applications. However, the impact of the synthetic wrinkles have been restricted by limited aspect ratios, ranging from 0 to 0.35. Within this range, wrinkle aspect ratio is known to increase with increasing compressive strain until a critical strain is reached, at which point wrinkles transition to localizations, such as folds or period doublings. Inspired by the living creatures, we propose that wrinkles can be stabilized in high aspect ratio by manipulating the strain energy in the substrate. We experimentally demonstrate this idea by forming a secondary crosslinking network in the wrinkled surface and successfully achieve aspect ratio as large as 0.8. This work not only provides insights for the mechanism of high aspect ratio structures seen in living creatures, but also demonstrates significant promise for future wrinkle-based applications.

  20. A Statistical Approach to Optimizing Concrete Mixture Design

    PubMed Central

    Alghamdi, Saeid A.

    2014-01-01

    A step-by-step statistical approach is proposed to obtain optimum proportioning of concrete mixtures using the data obtained through a statistically planned experimental program. The utility of the proposed approach for optimizing the design of concrete mixture is illustrated considering a typical case in which trial mixtures were considered according to a full factorial experiment design involving three factors and their three levels (33). A total of 27 concrete mixtures with three replicates (81 specimens) were considered by varying the levels of key factors affecting compressive strength of concrete, namely, water/cementitious materials ratio (0.38, 0.43, and 0.48), cementitious materials content (350, 375, and 400 kg/m3), and fine/total aggregate ratio (0.35, 0.40, and 0.45). The experimental data were utilized to carry out analysis of variance (ANOVA) and to develop a polynomial regression model for compressive strength in terms of the three design factors considered in this study. The developed statistical model was used to show how optimization of concrete mixtures can be carried out with different possible options. PMID:24688405

  1. Testing Mixture Models of Transitive Preference: Comment on Regenwetter, Dana, and Davis-Stober (2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    This article contrasts 2 approaches to analyzing transitivity of preference and other behavioral properties in choice data. The approach of Regenwetter, Dana, and Davis-Stober (2011) assumes that on each choice, a decision maker samples randomly from a mixture of preference orders to determine whether "A" is preferred to "B." In contrast, Birnbaum…

  2. Plutonium isotope ratio variations in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert E; La Mont, Stephen P; Eisele, William F; Fresquez, Philip R; Mc Naughton, Michael; Whicker, Jeffrey J

    2010-12-14

    Historically, approximately 12,000 TBq of plutonium was distributed throughout the global biosphere by thermo nuclear weapons testing. The resultant global plutonium fallout is a complex mixture whose {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio is a function of the design and yield of the devices tested. The average {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio in global fallout is 0.176 + 014. However, the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio at any location may differ significantly from 0.176. Plutonium has also been released by discharges and accidents associated with the commercial and weapons related nuclear industries. At many locations contributions from this plutonium significantly alters the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios from those observed in global fallout. We have measured the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios in environmental samples collected from many locations in North America. This presentation will summarize the analytical results from these measurements. Special emphasis will be placed on interpretation of the significance of the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios measured in environmental samples collected in the Arctic and in the western portions of the United States.

  3. Developmental Exposure to an Environmental PCB Mixture ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Developmental PCB exposure impairs hearing and induces brainstem audiogenic seizures in adult offspring. The degree to which this enhanced susceptibility to seizure is manifest in other brain regions has not been examined. Thus, electrical kindling of the amygdala was used to evaluate the effect of developmental exposure to an environmentally relevant PCB mixture on seizure susceptibility in the rat. Female Long-Evans rats were dosed orally with 0 or 6 mg/kg/day of the PCB mixture dissolved in corn oil vehicle during the perinatal period. On postnatal day (PND) 21, pups were weaned, and two males from each litter were randomly selected for the kindling study. As adults, the male rats were implanted bilaterally with electrodes in the basolateral amygdala. For each animal, afterdischarge (AD) thresholds in the amygdala were determined on the first day of testing followed by once daily stimulation at a standard 200 µA stimulus intensity until three stage 5 generalized seizures (GS) ensued. Developmental PCB exposure did not affect the AD threshold or total cumulative AD duration, but PCB exposure did increase the latency to behavioral manifestations of seizure propagation. PCB exposed animals required significantly more stimulations to reach stage 2 seizures compared to control animals, indicating an attenuated focal (amygdala) excitability. A delay in kindling progression from a focally stimulated limbic site stands in contrast to our previous finding of increase

  4. Influence factors of multicomponent mixtures containing reactive chemicals and their joint effects.

    PubMed

    Tian, Dayong; Lin, Zhifen; Yu, Jianqiao; Yin, Daqiang

    2012-08-01

    Organic chemicals usually coexist as a mixture in the environment, and the mixture toxicity of organic chemicals has received increased attention. However, research regarding the joint effects of reactive chemicals is lacking. In this study, we examined two kinds of reactive chemicals, cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes and determined their joint effects on Photobacterium phosphoreum. Three factors were found to influence the joint effects of multicomponent mixtures containing reactive chemicals, including the number of components, the dominating components and the toxic ratios. With an increased number of components, the synergistic or antagonistic effects (interactions) will weaken to the additive effects (non-interactions) if the added component cannot yield a much stronger joint effect with an existing component. Contrarily, the joint effect of the mixture may become stronger instead of weaker if the added components can yield a much stronger joint effect than the existing joint effect of the multicomponent mixture. The components that yield the strongest interactions in their binary mixture can be considered the dominating components. These components contribute more to the interactions of multicomponent mixtures than other components. Moreover, the toxic ratios also influence the joint effects of the mixtures. This study provides an insight into what are the main factors and how they influence the joint effects of multicomponent mixtures containing reactive chemicals, and thus, the findings are beneficial to the study of mixture toxicology.

  5. Increased Efficiency in SI Engine with Air Replaced by Oxygen in Argon Mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Killingsworth, N J; Rapp, V H; Flowers, D L; Aceves, S M; Chen, J; Dibble, R

    2010-01-13

    Basic engine thermodynamics predicts that spark ignited engine efficiency is a function of both the compression ratio of the engine and the specific heat ratio of the working fluid. In practice the compression ratio of the engine is often limited due to knock. Both higher specific heat ratio and higher compression ratio lead to higher end gas temperatures and increase the likelihood of knock. In actual engine cycles, heat transfer losses increase at higher compression ratios and limit efficiency even when the knock limit is not reached. In this paper we investigate the role of both the compression ratio and the specific heat ratio on engine efficiency by conducting experiments comparing operation of a single-cylinder variable-compression-ratio engine with both hydrogen-air and hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures. For low load operation it is found that the hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures result in higher indicated thermal efficiencies. Peak efficiency for the hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures is found at compression ratio 5.5 whereas for the hydrogen-air mixture with an equivalence ratio of 0.24 the peak efficiency is found at compression ratio 13. We apply a three-zone model to help explain the effects of specific heat ratio and compression ratio on efficiency. Operation with hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures at low loads is more efficient because the lower compression ratio results in a substantially larger portion of the gas to reside in the adiabatic core rather than in the boundary layer and in the crevices, leading to less heat transfer and more complete combustion.

  6. Wavelength and energy dependent absorption of unconventional fuel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, N.; Saleem, Z.; Mirza, A. A.

    2005-11-01

    Economic considerations of laser induced ignition over the normal electrical ignition of direct injected Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) engines has motivated automobile industry to go for extensive research on basic characteristics of leaner unconventional fuel mixtures to evaluate practical possibility of switching over to the emerging technologies. This paper briefly reviews the ongoing research activities on minimum ignition energy and power requirements of natural gas fuels and reports results of present laser air/CNG mixture absorption coefficient study. This study was arranged to determine the thermo-optical characteristics of high air/fuel ratio mixtures using laser techniques. We measured the absorption coefficient using four lasers of multiple wavelengths over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. The absorption coefficient of mixture was found to vary significantly over change of mixture temperature and probe laser wavelengths. The absorption coefficients of air/CNG mixtures were measured using 20 watts CW/pulsed CO2 laser at 10.6μm, Pulsed Nd:Yag laser at 1.06μm, 532 nm (2nd harmonic) and 4 mW CW HeNe laser at 645 nm and 580 nm for temperatures varying from 290 to 1000K using optical transmission loss technique.

  7. Faithful contrastive features in learning.

    PubMed

    Tesar, Bruce

    2006-09-10

    This article pursues the idea of inferring aspects of phonological underlying forms directly from surface contrasts by looking at optimality theoretic linguistic systems (Prince & Smolensky, 1993/2004). The main result proves that linguistic systems satisfying certain conditions have the faithful contrastive feature property: Whenever 2 distinct morphemes contrast on the surface in a particular environment, at least 1 of the underlying features on which the 2 differ must be realized faithfully on the surface. A learning procedure exploiting the faithful contrastive feature property, contrast analysis, can set the underlying values of some features, even where featural minimal pairs do not exist, but is nevertheless fundamentally limited in what it can set. This work suggests that observation of surface contrasts between pairs of words can contribute to the learning of underlying forms, while still supporting the view that interaction with the phonological mapping will be necessary to fully determine underlying forms.

  8. Near Infrared Spectra of Mixtures Relevant to Icy Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastrapa, Rachel M. E.; Bernstein, Max P.; Sanford, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    We will present near IR spectra of ice mixtures and review the differences between spectra of mixtures and those of pure solids: the creation of new features, weakening and shifting of bands, dependence on concentration, and changes with temperature. The forbidden CO2 (2nu3) overtone at 2.134 microns (4685/cm) is absent from the spectrum of pure CO2, but present in all of the following mixtures: H2O/CO2 = 5 and = 25, H2O:CH3OH:CO2 = 100:2.5:1, and CH3OH:CO2 = 5. Also, in mixtures of H2O and any other material, we see a feature at 1.89 microns (5290/cm) that is possibly related to the "dangling OH" feature at 2.73 microns (3360/cm). The features of a material in H2O are generally weaker and shifted to longer wavelength in comparison to the pure substance. For example, the largest near-IR absorption of pure solid CH4 is located at 2.324 microns (4303/cm) but is broader and at slightly longer wavelength in samples mixed with H2O. The degree of shifting and weakening depends on the ratio of the mixture. The mixture mentioned above was at a ratio of H2O/ CH4 = 3. When the ratio rises to H2O/ CH4 = 87, the CH4 feature at 2.324 microns is shifted to shorter wavelength and is much broader and weaker. In CH4/ H2O mixtures the peaks shift to higher frequency and become increasingly broad, but this trend is reversible on re-cooling, even though the phase transitions of H2O are irreversible. In short, mixtures created in the lab produce spectra that are very different from modeled combinations of end member species. Recent Cassini VIMS observations show the CO2 fundamental at 4.255 microns (2350/cm) on Iapetus [l] and at 4.26 microns (2347/cm) on Phoebe [2], while Galileo NIMS observed it at 4.25 microns (2353/cm) on Ganymede [3]. Since pure CO2 is located at 4.266 (2344/cm), the CO2 must be mixed with something else to produce the shift. A mixture of CH3OH:CO2 = 5 at 90 K shifts the fundamental to 4.262 microns (2346/cm). The shifts in the feature between satellites could

  9. Simulation of binary mixtures with the lattice Boltzman method.

    PubMed

    Arcidiacono, S; Mantzaras, J; Ansumali, S; Karlin, I V; Frouzakis, C; Boulouchos, K B

    2006-11-01

    A lattice Boltzman model for the simulation of binary mixtures is presented. Contrary to previous models, the present formulation is able to simulate mixtures with different Schmidt numbers and arbitrary molecular mass ratio of the components. In the hydrodynamic limit, the Navier-Stokes and the Stefan-Maxwell binary diffusion equations are recovered. The model is used for the simulation of binary diffusion and mixing layers. The results are found to be in good agreement with a derived similarity solution and with the predictions of a transient spectral element code.

  10. Red River Waterway Thermal Studies. Report 1. Concrete Mixture Selection and Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    used to develop 15 trial concrete mixtures. Ratios of Class C fly ash to total cementitious materials from 0.25 to 0.60 were studied . WaterJcement ratios...levels of fly ash as a cementitious material to limit heat production during early hydration and reduce the total cost of cementitious materials . The...potential for change in the performance of concrete mixtures as cementitious material proportions were varied. The testing reported in this report is

  11. Ratio imaging instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kenneth; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2003-01-01

    Using ratio imaging to obtain quantitative information from microscope images is a powerful tool that has been used successfully in numerous studies. Although ratio imaging reduces the effects of many parameters that can interfere with accurate measurements, it is not a panacea. In designing a ratio imaging experiment, all of the potential problems discussed in this chapter must be considered. Undoubtedly, other problems that were not discussed can also interfere with accurate and meaningful measurements. Many of the problems discussed here were observed in the authors' laboratories. In our experience there are no standard routines or methods that can foresee every problem before it has been encountered. Good experimental design can minimize problems, but the investigator must continue to be alert. Progress in instrumentation continues to overcome some of the difficulties encountered in ratio imaging. CCD cameras with 12- to 14-bit pixel depth are being used more frequently, and several confocal microscope manufacturers are now also using 12-bit digitization. The dramatic increase in the use of confocal microscopes over the past decade is now causing microscope manufacturers to more critically evaluate the effect of axial chromatic aberration in objectives, and recent designs to minimize this problem are being implemented. Other developments such as the use of AOTFs to attenuate laser lines extend the applicability of ratio imaging. Ratio imaging is clearly applicable to a wide range of cell biological problems beyond its widespread use for measuring ion concentrations. Imaginative but careful use of this technique should continue to provide novel insights into the properties of cells.

  12. Phase contrast MR angiography techniques.

    PubMed

    Dumoulin, C L

    1995-08-01

    Phase contrast MR methods encode information from macroscopic motion into the phase of the MR signal. Phase contrast methods can be applied with small and large fields-of-view, can give quantitative measures of velocity, and provide excellent suppression of signals from stationary tissue. Unlike time-of-flight methods, phase contrast methods directly measure flow and thus are not hindered by the artifactual appearance of tissue having short T1. Phase contrast angiograms can be two-dimensional (thin slice or projectile), three-dimensional, and/or time resolved and have applications throughout the body.

  13. Fuzzy-Contextual Contrast Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Anil; Verma, Om; Khanna, Chintan

    2017-02-08

    This paper presents contrast enhancement algorithms based on fuzzy contextual information of the images. We introduce fuzzy similarity index and fuzzy contrast factor to capture the neighborhood characteristics of a pixel. A new histogram, using fuzzy contrast factor of each pixel is developed, and termed as the fuzzy dissimilarity histogram (FDH). A cumulative distribution function (CDF) is formed with normalized values of FDH and used as a transfer function to obtain the contrast enhanced image. The algorithm gives good contrast enhancement and preserves the natural characteristic of the image. In order to develop a contextual intensity transfer function, we introduce a fuzzy membership function based on fuzzy similarity index and coefficient of variation of the image. The contextual intensity transfer function is designed using the fuzzy membership function to achieve final contrast enhanced image. The overall algorithm is referred as the fuzzy contextual contrast-enhancement (FCCE) algorithm. The proposed algorithms are compared with conventional and state-of-art contrast enhancement algorithms. The quantitative and visual assessment of the results is performed. The results of quantitative measures are statistically analyzed using t-test. The exhaustive experimentation and analysis show the proposed algorithm efficiently enhances contrast and yields in natural visual quality images.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Paul H.; Brainard, James R.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1997-01-01

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC.sub.16 H.sub.14 N.sub.6. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques.

  16. Dual-energy approach to contrast-enhanced mammography using the balanced filter method: Spectral optimization and preliminary phantom measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2007-11-15

    Dual-energy contrast agent-enhanced mammography is a technique of demonstrating breast cancers obscured by a cluttered background resulting from the contrast between soft tissues in the breast. The technique has usually been implemented by exploiting two exposures to different x-ray tube voltages. In this article, another dual-energy approach using the balanced filter method without switching the tube voltages is described. For the spectral optimization of dual-energy mammography using the balanced filters, we applied a theoretical framework reported by Lemacks et al. [Med. Phys. 29, 1739-1751 (2002)] to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in an iodinated contrast agent subtraction image. This permits the selection of beam parameters such as tube voltage and balanced filter material, and the optimization of the latter's thickness with respect to some critical quantity--in this case, mean glandular dose. For an imaging system with a 0.1 mm thick CsI:Tl scintillator, we predict that the optimal tube voltage would be 45 kVp for a tungsten anode using zirconium, iodine, and neodymium balanced filters. A mean glandular dose of 1.0 mGy is required to obtain an SNR of 5 in order to detect 1.0 mg/cm{sup 2} iodine in the resulting clutter-free image of a 5 cm thick breast composed of 50% adipose and 50% glandular tissue. In addition to spectral optimization, we carried out phantom measurements to demonstrate the present dual-energy approach for obtaining a clutter-free image, which preferentially shows iodine, of a breast phantom comprising three major components - acrylic spheres, olive oil, and an iodinated contrast agent. The detection of iodine details on the cluttered background originating from the contrast between acrylic spheres and olive oil is analogous to the task of distinguishing contrast agents in a mixture of glandular and adipose tissues.

  17. Spectral Masking in Mixtures of Mars-Relevant Minerals: Comparison of Laboratory End Members and Natural Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cull-Hearth, S.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, visible- to near-infrared (VNIR) reflectance spectroscopy has revealed an array of hydrated minerals on the surface of Mars. However, one of the major limitations of VNIR spectroscopy is how it responds to mixtures of minerals. Based on differences in optical constants, some phases can mask others in mixture, even when the first phase is more abundant. Here, we report on a laboratory study to measure the impact of mixtures on the VNIR spectra of hydrated/hydroxylated iron oxide and sulfate phases that are relevant to Mars geochemistry. Pure endmembers of hydrated/hydroxylated iron oxide and sulfate phases are synthesized in the lab, then mixed in known ratios, and measured via VNIR spectroscopy and XRD to assess the percentages of each mineral needed to mask others. Laboratory mixtures are then compared to natural mixtures from the Río Tinto/Río Odiel system and acid mine drainage (AMD) systems of southeastern Pennsylvania. Finally, both laboratory and natural mixtures are be compared to CRISM VNIR data from key iron-phase regions on Mars, including Aram Chaos, Mawrth Vallis, and Noctis Labyrinthus.

  18. Stratification dynamics in drying colloidal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Howard, Michael P; Nikoubashman, Arash; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2017-03-28

    Stratification in binary colloidal mixtures was investigated using implicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations. For large particle size ratios and film Péclet numbers greater than unity, smaller colloids migrated to the top of the film, while big colloids were pushed to the bottom, creating an "inverted" stratification. This peculiar behavior was observed in recent simulations and experiments conducted by Fortini et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2016, 116, 118301). To rationalize this behavior, particle size ratios and drying rates spanning qualitatively different Péclet number regimes were systematically studied, and the dynamics of the inverted stratification were quantified in detail. The stratified layer of small colloids was found to grow faster and to larger thicknesses for larger size ratios. Interestingly, inverted stratification was observed even at moderate drying rates where the film Péclet numbers were comparable to unity, but the thickness of the stratified layer decreased. A model based on dynamical density functional theory is proposed to explain the observed phenomena.

  19. Bayesian Kernel Mixtures for Counts.

    PubMed

    Canale, Antonio; Dunson, David B

    2011-12-01

    Although Bayesian nonparametric mixture models for continuous data are well developed, there is a limited literature on related approaches for count data. A common strategy is to use a mixture of Poissons, which unfortunately is quite restrictive in not accounting for distributions having variance less than the mean. Other approaches include mixing multinomials, which requires finite support, and using a Dirichlet process prior with a Poisson base measure, which does not allow smooth deviations from the Poisson. As a broad class of alternative models, we propose to use nonparametric mixtures of rounded continuous kernels. An efficient Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, and a simulation study is performed to assess performance. Focusing on the rounded Gaussian case, we generalize the modeling framework to account for multivariate count data, joint modeling with continuous and categorical variables, and other complications. The methods are illustrated through applications to a developmental toxicity study and marketing data. This article has supplementary material online.

  20. Digit ratio in birds.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Michael P; Thorpe, Patrick A; Brown, Barbara M; Sian, Katie

    2008-12-01

    The Homeobox (Hox) genes direct the development of tetrapod digits. The expression of Hox genes may be influenced by endogenous sex steroids during development. Manning (Digit ratio. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2002) predicted that the ratio between the lengths of digits 2 (2D) and 4 (4D) should be sexually dimorphic because prenatal exposure to estrogens and androgens positively influence the lengths of 2D and 4D, respectively. We measured digits and other morphological traits of birds from three orders (Passeriformes, house sparrow, Passer domesticus; tree swallow, Tachycineta bicolor; Pscittaciformes, budgerigar, Melopsittacus undulates; Galliformes, chicken, Gallus domesticus) to test this prediction. None were sexually dimorphic for 2D:4D and there were no associations between 2D:4D and other sexually dimorphic traits. When we pooled data from all four species after we averaged right and left side digits from each individual and z-transformed the resulting digit ratios, we found that males had significantly larger 2D:4D than did females. Tetrapods appear to be sexually dimorphic for 2D:4D with 2D:4D larger in males as in some birds and reptiles and 2D:4D smaller in males as in some mammals. The differences between the reptile and mammal lineages in the directionality of 2D:4D may be related to the differences between them in chromosomal sex determination. We suggest that (a) natural selection for a perching foot in the first birds may have overridden the effects of hormones on the development of digit ratio in this group of vertebrates and (b) caution be used in making inferences about prenatal exposure to hormones and digit ratio in birds.

  1. Evaluating forensic DNA mixtures with contributors of different structured ethnic origins: a computer software.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue-Qing; Fung, Wing K

    2003-08-01

    The effect of a structured population on the likelihood ratio of a DNA mixture has been studied by the current authors and others. In practice, contributors of a DNA mixture may belong to different ethnic/racial origins, a situation especially common in multi-racial countries such as the USA and Singapore. We have developed a computer software which is available on the web for evaluating DNA mixtures in multi-structured populations. The software can deal with various DNA mixture problems that cannot be handled by the methods given in a recent article of Fung and Hu.

  2. Predicting the toxicity of metal mixtures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Mebane, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    The toxicity of single and multiple metal (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) solutions to trout is predicted using an approach that combines calculations of: (1) solution speciation; (2) competition and accumulation of cations (H, Ca, Mg, Na, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) on low abundance, high affinity and high abundance, low affinity biotic ligand sites; (3) a toxicity function that accounts for accumulation and potency of individual toxicants; and (4) biological response. The approach is evaluated by examining water composition from single metal toxicity tests of trout at 50% mortality, results of theoretical calculations of metal accumulation on fish gills and associated mortality for single, binary, ternary, and quaternary metal solutions, and predictions for a field site impacted by acid rock drainage. These evaluations indicate that toxicity of metal mixtures depends on the relative affinity and potency of toxicants for a given aquatic organism, suites of metals in the mixture, dissolved metal concentrations and ratios, and background solution composition (temperature, pH, and concentrations of major ions and dissolved organic carbon). A composite function that incorporates solution composition, affinity and competition of cations for two types of biotic ligand sites, and potencies of hydrogen and individual metals is proposed as a tool to evaluate potential toxicity of environmental solutions to trout.

  3. Speech Enhancement Using Gaussian Scale Mixture Models.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jiucang; Lee, Te-Won; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2010-08-11

    This paper presents a novel probabilistic approach to speech enhancement. Instead of a deterministic logarithmic relationship, we assume a probabilistic relationship between the frequency coefficients and the log-spectra. The speech model in the log-spectral domain is a Gaussian mixture model (GMM). The frequency coefficients obey a zero-mean Gaussian whose covariance equals to the exponential of the log-spectra. This results in a Gaussian scale mixture model (GSMM) for the speech signal in the frequency domain, since the log-spectra can be regarded as scaling factors. The probabilistic relation between frequency coefficients and log-spectra allows these to be treated as two random variables, both to be estimated from the noisy signals. Expectation-maximization (EM) was used to train the GSMM and Bayesian inference was used to compute the posterior signal distribution. Because exact inference of this full probabilistic model is computationally intractable, we developed two approaches to enhance the efficiency: the Laplace method and a variational approximation. The proposed methods were applied to enhance speech corrupted by Gaussian noise and speech-shaped noise (SSN). For both approximations, signals reconstructed from the estimated frequency coefficients provided higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and those reconstructed from the estimated log-spectra produced lower word recognition error rate because the log-spectra fit the inputs to the recognizer better. Our algorithms effectively reduced the SSN, which algorithms based on spectral analysis were not able to suppress.

  4. Faithful Contrastive Features in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesar, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    This article pursues the idea of inferring aspects of phonological underlying forms directly from surface contrasts by looking at optimality theoretic linguistic systems (Prince & Smolensky, 1993/2004). The main result proves that linguistic systems satisfying certain conditions have the faithful contrastive feature property: Whenever 2…

  5. Unrestricted Mixture Models for Class Identification in Growth Mixture Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Min; Hancock, Gregory R.

    2014-01-01

    Growth mixture modeling has gained much attention in applied and methodological social science research recently, but the selection of the number of latent classes for such models remains a challenging issue, especially when the assumption of proper model specification is violated. The current simulation study compared the performance of a linear…

  6. Dipole oscillations in fermionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Chiacchiera, S.; Macri, T.; Trombettoni, A.

    2010-03-15

    We study dipole oscillations in a general fermionic mixture. Starting from the Boltzmann equation, we classify the different solutions in the parameter space through the number of real eigenvalues of the small oscillations matrix. We discuss how this number can be computed using the Sturm algorithm and its relation with the properties of the Laplace transform of the experimental quantities. After considering two components in harmonic potentials having different trapping frequencies, we study dipole oscillations in three-component mixtures. Explicit computations are done for realistic experimental setups using the classical Boltzmann equation without intraspecies interactions. A brief discussion of the application of this classification to general collective oscillations is also presented.

  7. Gaussian-mixture umbrella sampling

    PubMed Central

    van der Vaart, Arjan; Karplus, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the Gaussian-mixture umbrella sampling method (GAMUS), a biased molecular dynamics technique based on adaptive umbrella sampling that efficiently escapes free energy minima in multi-dimensional problems. The prior simulation data are reweighted with a maximum likelihood formulation, and the new approximate probability density is fit to a Gaussian-mixture model, augmented by information about the unsampled areas. The method can be used to identify free energy minima in multi-dimensional reaction coordinates. To illustrate GAMUS, we apply it to the alanine dipeptide (2D reaction coordinate) and tripeptide (4D reaction coordinate). PMID:19284746

  8. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and each mixture control must have guards or must be shaped or arranged to prevent confusion...

  9. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and each mixture control must have guards or must be shaped or arranged to prevent confusion...

  10. 16 CFR 1500.5 - Hazardous mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous mixtures. 1500.5 Section 1500.5... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.5 Hazardous mixtures. For a mixture of substances, the determination of whether the mixture is a “hazardous substance”...

  11. 16 CFR 1500.5 - Hazardous mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous mixtures. 1500.5 Section 1500.5... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.5 Hazardous mixtures. For a mixture of substances, the determination of whether the mixture is a “hazardous substance”...

  12. 16 CFR 1500.5 - Hazardous mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous mixtures. 1500.5 Section 1500.5... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.5 Hazardous mixtures. For a mixture of substances, the determination of whether the mixture is a “hazardous substance”...

  13. 16 CFR 1500.5 - Hazardous mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hazardous mixtures. 1500.5 Section 1500.5... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.5 Hazardous mixtures. For a mixture of substances, the determination of whether the mixture is a “hazardous substance”...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and each mixture control must have guards or must be shaped or arranged to prevent confusion...

  15. 16 CFR 1500.5 - Hazardous mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hazardous mixtures. 1500.5 Section 1500.5... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.5 Hazardous mixtures. For a mixture of substances, the determination of whether the mixture is a “hazardous substance”...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and each mixture control must have guards or must be shaped or arranged to prevent confusion...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and each mixture control must have guards or must be shaped or arranged to prevent confusion...

  18. Measurement of visual contrast sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vongierke, H. E.; Marko, A. R.

    1985-04-01

    This invention involves measurement of the visual contrast sensitivity (modulation transfer) function of a human subject by means of linear or circular spatial frequency pattern on a cathode ray tube whose contrast is automatically decreasing or increasing depending on the subject pressing or releasing a hand-switch button. The threshold of detection of the pattern modulation is found by the subject by adjusting the contrast to values which vary about the subject's threshold thereby determining the threshold and also providing by the magnitude of the contrast fluctuations between reversals some estimate of the variability of the subject's absolute threshold. The invention also involves the slow automatic sweeping of the spatial frequency of the pattern over the spatial frequencies after preset time intervals or after threshold has been defined at each frequency by a selected number of subject-determined threshold crossings; i.e., contrast reversals.

  19. Comparison of chronic mixture toxicity of nickel-zinc-copper and nickel-zinc-copper-cadmium mixtures between Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata.

    PubMed

    Nys, Charlotte; Van Regenmortel, Tina; Janssen, Colin R; Blust, Ronny; Smolders, Erik; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2017-04-01

    Although aquatic organisms in the environment are exposed to mixtures of metals, risk assessment for metals is most commonly performed on a metal-by-metal basis. To increase the knowledge about chronic mixture effects, the authors investigated whether metal mixture effects are dependent on the biological species, mixture composition, and metal concentration ratio. The authors evaluated the effects of quaternary Ni-Zn-Cu-Cd and ternary Ni-Zn-Cu mixtures on 48-h algal growth rate (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) and 7-d daphnid reproduction (Ceriodaphnia dubia) using a ray design. Single metals were 3-fold to 42-fold more toxic for C. dubia than for P. subcapitata, based on the 50% effective concentration expressed as free metal activity, the range representing different metals. Statistical analysis of mixture effects showed that the ternary and quaternary mixture effects were antagonistic on algal growth relative to the concentration addition (CA) model, when the analysis was based on dissolved concentrations and on free metal ion activities. Using the independent action (IA) model, mixture effects in both rays were statistically noninteractive for algal growth when the analysis was based on dissolved concentrations; however, the interactions shifted toward antagonism when based on free ion activities. The ternary Ni-Zn-Cu mixture acted antagonistically on daphnid reproduction relative to both reference models, either expressed as free ion activities or dissolved concentrations. When Cd was added to the mixture, however, the mixture effects shifted toward noninteractivity for daphnids. The metal concentration ratio did not significantly influence the magnitude of observed antagonistic effects. Regardless of statistical interactions observed, based on the present study, CA and in most instances also IA can serve as a protective model for ternary Ni-Zn-Cu and quaternary Ni-Zn-Cu-Cd toxicity to both species. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1056-1066. © 2016 SETAC.

  20. Using GC-MS to Determine Relative Reactivity Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, R. Daniel, Jr.

    1995-08-01

    An undergraduate organic chemistry microscale experiment involving the monochlorination of methylcyclohexane using sulfuryl chloride and benzoyl peroxide is described. Simple GC-MS analysis of the product mixture allows students to calculate relative reactivity ratios for free-radical chlorination of primary, secondary, and tertiary carbons in methylcyclohexane.

  1. Photophysical study of Zn phthalocyanine in binary solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staicu, A.; Pascu, A.; Boni, M.; Pascu, M. L.; Enescu, M.

    2013-07-01

    Photophysical properties of phthalocyanines are important in photodynamic therapy, where these compounds are proposed as photosensitizing agents. We report here some significant solvent effects on the photophysical properties of Zn phthalocyanine (ZnPc) observed in binary solvent mixture dimethyl sulfoxide/water at several ratios of cosolvents. The absorbance of ZnPc at the maximum of Q band has a sharp drop in intensity for a water mass percent in the solvent mixture larger than 40%. The same characteristic shows also the quantum yield of fluorescence. A particular result is the increase of singlet oxygen lifetime for water percentage raise up to 20% in the solvent mixture. The effects are discussed in connection with the particular solvent microenvironment, involving DMSO/water clusters formation and the strong interaction between the solute and the solvent.

  2. Preparation of reminiscent aroma mixture of Japanese soy sauce.

    PubMed

    Bonkohara, Kaori; Fuji, Maiko; Nakao, Akito; Igura, Noriyuki; Shimoda, Mitsuya

    2016-01-01

    To prepare an aroma mixture of Japanese soy sauce by fewest components, the aroma concentrate of good sensory attributes was prepared by polyethylene membrane extraction, which could extract only the volatiles with diethyl ether. GC-MS-Olfactometry was done with the aroma concentrate, and 28 odor-active compounds were detected. Application of aroma extract dilution analysis to the separated fraction revealed high flavor dilution factors with respect to acetic acid, 4-hydroxy-2(or5)-ethyl-5(or2)-methyl-3(2H)-furanone (HEMF), 3-methyl-1-butanol (isoamyl alcohol), and 3-(methylsulfanyl)propanal (methional). A model aroma mixture containing above four odorants showed a good similarity with the aroma of the soy sauce itself. Consequently, the reminiscent aroma mixture of soy sauce was prepared in water. The ratio of acetic acid, HEMF, isoamyl alcohol, and methional was 2500:300:100:1.

  3. Premixed flame propagation in combustible particle cloud mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, K.; Yang, B.

    1993-01-01

    The structures of premixed flames propagating in combustible systems, containing uniformly distributed volatile fuel particles, in an oxidizing gas mixtures is analyzed. The experimental results show that steady flame propagation occurs even if the initial equivalence ratio of the combustible mixture based on the gaseous fuel available in the particles, phi(u) is substantially larger than unity. A model is developed to explain these experimental observations. In the model it is presumed that the fuel particles vaporize first to yield a gaseous fuel of known chemical composition which then reacts with oxygen in a one-step overall process. It is shown that the interplay of vaporization kinetics and oxidation process, can result in steady flame propagation in combustible mixtures where the value of phi(u) is substantially larger than unity. This prediction is in agreement with experimental observations.

  4. Multi-ratio transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, J.C.

    1987-07-14

    A preselected multi-ratio power transmission is described comprising: input means for transmitting drive forces; output means; first, second and third friction clutch means each selectively engageable with the input means for accepting drive forces. First input gear means drivingly connects with the first friction clutch means; second input gear means drivingly connects with the second friction clutch means; third input gear means drivingly connects with the third clutch means; first output gear means drivingly connects with the first input gear means; second output gear means drivingly connects with the first and second input gear means; third output means drivingly connects between the third input gear means and the output means; and one double-acting synchronizer clutch for selectively engaging the first output gear means with the output means and alternately the second output gear means with the output means. The first friction clutch means and the one double-acting synchronizer clutch cooperates during engagement to establish two forward drive ratios between the input and output means. The second friction clutch means and the one double-acting synchronizer clutch cooperates during engagement to establish two other forward drive ratios between the input and output means. The third friction clutch means is engageable to provide another forward drive ratio between the input means and the output means; and the one double-acting synchronizer clutch is relieved of transmitting drive forces during the engagement of the third friction clutch means and being manipulable for alternate connection with either the first output gear or the second output gear while the third friction clutch means is engaged.

  5. Taylor dispersion analysis of mixtures.

    PubMed

    Cottet, Hervé; Biron, Jean-Philippe; Martin, Michel

    2007-12-01

    Taylor dispersion analysis (TDA) is a fast and simple method for determining hydrodynamic radii. In the case of sample mixtures, TDA, as the other nonseparative methods, leads to an average diffusion coefficient on the different molecules constituting the mixture. We set in this work the equations giving, on a consistent basis, the average values obtained by TDA with detectors with linear response functions. These equations confronted TDA experiments of sample mixtures containing different proportions of a small molecule and a polymer standard. Very good agreement between theory and experiment was obtained. In a second part of this work, on the basis of monomodal or bimodal molar mass distributions of polymers, the different average diffusion coefficients corresponding to TDA were compared to the z-average diffusion coefficient (D(z)) obtained from dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments and to the weight average diffusion coefficient (D(w)). This latter value is sometimes considered as the most representative of the sample mixture. From these results, it appears that, for monomodal distribution and relatively low polydispersity (I = 1.15), the average diffusion coefficient generally derived from TDA is very close to Dw. However, for highly polydisperse samples (e.g., bimodal polydisperse distributions), important differences could be obtained (up to 35% between TDA and D(w)). In all the cases, the average diffusion coefficient obtained by TDA for a mass concentration detector was closer to the Dw value than the z-average obtained by DLS.

  6. Electrochemical signatures of multivitamin mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mohan, A M Vinu; Brunetti, Barbara; Bulbarello, Andrea; Wang, Joseph

    2015-11-21

    The ability of cyclic square wave voltammetry to identify distinct fingerprints of multiple vitamins, in a single voltammetric run, is demonstrated. This method represents an efficient alternative to more common techniques for fast screening of complex vitamin mixtures or commercial tablets due to its low cost, high speed and sensitivity.

  7. Genetic Analysis of Plant Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Griffing, B.

    1989-01-01

    Plant mixtures are difficult to analyze genetically because of possible interactions between neighboring plants (i.e., between plants in the same biological group). However, a genetic modeling scheme has been devised which, theoretically, can accommodate such interactions. This study was an attempt to put the theoretical modeling procedure to an experimental test. To this end an experimental procedure was devised that generated biological groups from a well defined base population. A cultural system was used which permitted growing plant mixtures in controlled environmental facilities. This allowed the experiment to be conducted over a wide range of temperature and nutrient conditions. Application of the theoretical gene model to the experimental data permitted identification of those classes of gene effects that were responsible for genetic variation exhibited by the mixtures. Adequacy of the genetic modeling description was corroborated by precise prediction of an independent genetic response. The genetic analyses also identified statistically significant temperature-and nutrient-dependent forms of heterosis. It was concluded that the study demonstrated the suitability of the theoretical group gene model for describing complexities inherent in plant mixtures. PMID:17246509

  8. The new numbers contrast sensitivity chart for contrast sensitivity measurement

    PubMed Central

    Khambhiphant, Bharkbhum; Tulvatana, Wasee; Busayarat, Mathu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop and assess the agreement between the 3 newly made numbers contrast sensitivity charts and the MARS contrast sensitivity chart (MARS) in contrast sensitivity measurement. Methods We developed 3 numbers contrast sensitivity charts for right, left and both eyes. Two hundred subjects were assigned to read numbers 0-9 for determining the degree of difficulty. Selected seven numbers were randomly arranged and the contrast of each number was decreased by the constant factor of 0.04 log units in the units as in the MARS. We assigned 112 subjects with visual acuity range from 20/480 to 20/20 to test once with the new chart and then with MARS Chart monocularly and binocularly by random order. Bland-Altman analysis for comparing two charts was performed. Results Bland-Altman analysis between 2 charts showed the mean differences were 0.04, 0.03, 0.04 log CS and the 95% limit of agreement (LOA) of the bias were (+0.26, −0.19), (+0.26, −0.20), (+0.25, −0.17) log CS for right, left and binocular. The Bland-Altman plot indicates a good concordance in 3 charts. Conclusions These charts show reasonable agreement and can be used interchangeably with the MARS. It is helpful for Thai people who can only read numbers in doing the test. We can use them in routinely contrast sensitivity measurement.

  9. Contrasting Rhetorics/Contrasting Cultures: Why Contrastive Rhetoric Needs a Better Conceptualization of Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Dwight

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with an underdeveloped notion in the EAP sub-discipline of contrastive rhetoric: culture. It argues that a better conceptualization of contrastive rhetoric needs to include a better conceptualization of culture. After engaging with the complex question "What is culture?" the paper moves on to consider four sets of current issues…

  10. Ratio model serves suprathreshold color- luminance discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankeralli, Marcel J.; Mullen, Kathy T.; Hine, Trevor J.

    2002-03-01

    We extended earlier results [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 16, 2625 (1999)] to examine how the responses of the three postreceptoral mechanisms are combined to subserve discrimination of suprathreshold stimuli. Test thresholds were obtained in the presence of suprathreshold pedestals selected in different quadrants of the red-green/luminance and blue-yellow/luminance planes of cardinal color space. We showed that (1) test threshold was directly proportional to pedestal contrast for pedestal contrasts exceeding five times pedestal contrast threshold, and (2) there were exceptions to this proportionality, notably when the test and pedestal directions were fixed in the cardinal directions. Results support a ratio model of suprathreshold color-luminance discrimination, in which discrimination depends on a ratio of outputs of the postreceptoral mechanisms. We also observed that when test threshold was measured as a function of test color-space direction, masking by the achromatic component of the pedestal was less than that by the chromatic component. In addition, masking by a dark (negative luminance component) pedestal was lower than masking by a light (positive luminance) pedestal of a similar contrast. Our results demonstrated that (1) there is no fundamental difference between discrimination in the isoluminant and in the two chromoluminant cardinal planes, (2) there exists the possibility that discrimination in cardinal directions differs from that in noncardinal (intermediate) directions, and (3) suprathreshold discrimination of luminance differences may be more sensitive than that of chromatic differences for a given suprathreshold pedestal.

  11. Separation of copper from aqueous sulfate solutions by mixtures of Cyanex 301 and LIX 984N.

    PubMed

    Fouad, E A

    2009-07-30

    The extraction equilibria of copper(II) with Cyanex 301, LIX 984N, and their mixtures have been investigated. Extraction was studied as a function of organic phase composition, sulfuric acid concentration, pH, temperature, initial copper concentration, mixing speed, and aqueous/organic volume ratio. Considerable synergistic enhancement has been observed in the extraction of Cu(2+) with mixtures of Cyanex 301 and LIX 984N. The results demonstrate that copper ion is extracted as CuRL(2)H with synergistic mixture. The thermodynamic parameter, enthalpy change (Delta H) of Cyanex 301, LIX 984N, and their mixtures have been determined and the endothermic process has been found. The synergistic enhancement factor of copper(II) with mixtures is higher at more acidic solutions, which suggests that it is a promising synergistic extraction system for the separation of copper(II) from more acidic medium. HCl was found to be more efficient for copper stripping from loaded synergistic mixtures.

  12. Uphill diffusion in multicomponent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-05-21

    Molecular diffusion is an omnipresent phenomena that is important in a wide variety of contexts in chemical, physical, and biological processes. In the majority of cases, the diffusion process can be adequately described by Fick's law that postulates a linear relationship between the flux of any species and its own concentration gradient. Most commonly, a component diffuses down the concentration gradient. The major objective of this review is to highlight a very wide variety of situations that cause the uphill transport of one constituent in the mixture. Uphill diffusion may occur in multicomponent mixtures in which the diffusion flux of any species is strongly coupled to that of its partner species. Such coupling effects often arise from strong thermodynamic non-idealities. For a quantitative description we need to use chemical potential gradients as driving forces. The transport of ionic species in aqueous solutions is coupled with its partner ions because of the electro-neutrality constraints; such constraints may accelerate or decelerate a specific ion. When uphill diffusion occurs, we observe transient overshoots during equilibration; the equilibration process follows serpentine trajectories in composition space. For mixtures of liquids, alloys, ceramics and glasses the serpentine trajectories could cause entry into meta-stable composition zones; such entry could result in phenomena such as spinodal decomposition, spontaneous emulsification, and the Ouzo effect. For distillation of multicomponent mixtures that form azeotropes, uphill diffusion may allow crossing of distillation boundaries that are normally forbidden. For mixture separations with microporous adsorbents, uphill diffusion can cause supra-equilibrium loadings to be achieved during transient uptake within crystals; this allows the possibility of over-riding adsorption equilibrium for achieving difficult separations.

  13. Microvascular contrast enhancement in optical coherence tomography using microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assadi, Homa; Demidov, Valentin; Karshafian, Raffi; Douplik, Alexandre; Vitkin, I. Alex

    2016-07-01

    Gas microbubbles (MBs) are investigated as intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) contrast agents. Agar + intralipid scattering tissue phantoms with two embedded microtubes were fabricated to model vascular blood flow. One was filled with human blood, and the other with a mixture of human blood + MB. Swept-source structural and speckle variance (sv) OCT images, as well as speckle decorrelation times, were evaluated under both no-flow and varying flow conditions. Faster decorrelation times and higher structural and svOCT image contrasts were detected in the presence of MB in all experiments. The effects were largest in the svOCT imaging mode, and uniformly diminished with increasing flow velocity. These findings suggest the feasibility of utilizing MB for tissue hemodynamic investigations and for microvasculature contrast enhancement in OCT angiography.

  14. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  15. Fourth virial coefficients of asymmetric nonadditive hard-disk mixtures.

    PubMed

    Saija, Franz; Santos, Andrés; Yuste, Santos B; López de Haro, Mariano

    2012-05-14

    The fourth virial coefficient of asymmetric nonadditive binary mixtures of hard disks is computed with a standard Monte Carlo method. Wide ranges of size ratio (0.05 ≤ q ≤ 0.95) and nonadditivity (-0.5 ≤ Δ ≤ 0.5) are covered. A comparison is made between the numerical results and those that follow from some theoretical developments. The possible use of these data in the derivation of new equations of state for these mixtures is illustrated by considering a rescaled virial expansion truncated to fourth order. The numerical results obtained using this equation of state are compared with Monte Carlo simulation data in the case of a size ratio q = 0.7 and two nonadditivities Δ = ±0.2.

  16. A theory of behavioral contrast.

    PubMed

    Killeen, Peter R

    2014-11-01

    The reinforcers that maintain target instrumental responses also reinforce other responses that compete with them for expression. This competition, and its imbalance at points of transition between different schedules of reinforcement, causes behavioral contrast. The imbalance is caused by differences in the rates at which different responses come under the control of component stimuli. A model for this theory of behavioral contrast is constructed by expanding the coupling coefficient of MPR (Killeen, 1994). The coupling coefficient gives the degree of association of a reinforcer with the target response (as opposed to other competing responses). Competing responses, often identified as interim or adjunctive or superstitious behavior, are intrinsic to reinforcement schedules, especially interval schedules. In addition to that base-rate of competition, additional competing responses may spill over from the prior component, causing initial contrast; and they may be modulated by conditioned reinforcement or punishment from stimuli associated with subsequent component change, causing terminal contrast. A formalization of these hypotheses employed (a) a hysteresis model of off-target responses giving rise to initial contrast, and (b) a competing traces model of the suppression or enhancement of ongoing competitive responses by signals of following-schedule transition. The theory was applied to transient contrast, the following schedule effect, and the component duration effect.

  17. Improved Linear Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging via Analysis of First-Order Speckle Statistics.

    PubMed

    Lowerison, Matthew R; Hague, M Nicole; Chambers, Ann F; Lacefield, James C

    2016-09-01

    The linear subtraction methods commonly used for preclinical contrast-enhanced imaging are susceptible to registration errors and motion artifacts that lead to reduced contrast-to-tissue ratios. To address this limitation, a new approach to linear contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is proposed based on the analysis of the temporal dynamics of the speckle statistics during wash-in of a bolus injection of microbubbles. In the proposed method, the speckle signal is approximated as a mixture of temporally varying random processes, representing the microbubble signal, superimposed onto spatially heterogeneous tissue backscatter in multiple subvolumes within the region of interest. A wash-in curve is constructed by plotting the effective degrees of freedom (EDoFs) of the histogram of the speckle signal as a function of time. The proposed method is, therefore, named the EDoF method. The EDoF parameter is proportional to the shape parameter of the Nakagami distribution. Images acquired at 18 MHz from a murine mammary fat pad breast cancer xenograft model were processed using gold-standard nonlinear amplitude modulation, conventional linear subtraction, and the proposed statistical method. The EDoF method shows promise for improving the robustness of linear CEUS based on reduced frame-to-frame variability compared with the conventional linear subtraction time-intensity curves. Wash-in curve parameters estimated using the EDoF method also demonstrate higher correlation to nonlinear CEUS than the conventional linear method. The conceptual basis of the statistical method implies that EDoF wash-in curves may carry information about vascular complexity that could provide valuable new imaging biomarkers for cancer research.

  18. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM

    PubMed Central

    Damircheli, Mehrnoosh; Payam, Amir F

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM). Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes. PMID:26114079

  19. Contrast-enhanced imaging of cerebral vasculature with laser speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, K.; Li, N.; Rege, A.; Jia, X.; All, A.; Thakor, N.

    2007-08-01

    High-resolution cerebral vasculature imaging has applications ranging from intraoperative procedures to basic neuroscience research. Laser speckle, with spatial contrast processing, has recently been used to map cerebral blood flow. We present an application of the technique using temporal contrast processing to image cerebral vascular structures with a field of view a few millimeters across and approximately 20 μm resolution through a thinned skull. We validate the images using fluorescent imaging and demonstrate a factor of 2-4 enhancement in contrast-to-noise ratios over reflectance imaging using white or spectrally filtered green light. The contrast enhancement enables the perception of approximately 10%-30% more vascular structures without the introduction of any contrast agent.

  20. Photon-counting spectral phase-contrast mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, E.; Roessl, E.; Koehler, T.; van Stevendaal, U.; Schulze-Wenck, I.; Wieberneit, N.; Stampanoni, M.; Wang, Z.; Kubik-Huch, R. A.; Hauser, N.; Lundqvist, M.; Danielsson, M.; Åslund, M.

    2012-03-01

    Phase-contrast imaging is an emerging technology that may increase the signal-difference-to-noise ratio in medical imaging. One of the most promising phase-contrast techniques is Talbot interferometry, which, combined with energy-sensitive photon-counting detectors, enables spectral differential phase-contrast mammography. We have evaluated a realistic system based on this technique by cascaded-systems analysis and with a task-dependent ideal-observer detectability index as a figure-of-merit. Beam-propagation simulations were used for validation and illustration of the analytical framework. Differential phase contrast improved detectability compared to absorption contrast, in particular for fine tumor structures. This result was supported by images of human mastectomy samples that were acquired with a conventional detector. The optimal incident energy was higher in differential phase contrast than in absorption contrast when disregarding the setup design energy. Further, optimal weighting of the transmitted spectrum was found to have a weaker energy dependence than for absorption contrast. Taking the design energy into account yielded a superimposed maximum on both detectability as a function of incident energy, and on optimal weighting. Spectral material decomposition was not facilitated by phase contrast, but phase information may be used instead of spectral information.

  1. Soret motion in non-ionic binary molecular mixtures.

    PubMed

    Leroyer, Yves; Würger, Alois

    2011-08-07

    We study the Soret coefficient of binary molecular mixtures with dispersion forces. Relying on standard transport theory for liquids, we derive explicit expressions for the thermophoretic mobility and the Soret coefficient. Their sign depends on composition, the size ratio of the two species, and the ratio of Hamaker constants. Our results account for several features observed in experiment, such as a linear variation with the composition; they confirm the general rule that small molecules migrate to the warm, and large ones to the cold.

  2. Toxicity of binary mixtures of metals and pyrethroid insecticides to Daphnia magna Straus. Implications for multi-substance risks assessment.

    PubMed

    Barata, Carlos; Baird, D J; Nogueira, A J A; Soares, A M V M; Riva, M C

    2006-06-10

    Two different concepts, termed concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA), describe general relationships between the effects of single substances and their corresponding mixtures allowing calculation of an expected mixture toxicity on the basis of known toxicities of the mixture components. Both concepts are limited to cases in which all substances in a mixture influence the same experimental endpoint, and are usually tested against a "fixed ratio design" where the mixture ratio is kept constant throughout the studies and the overall concentration of the mixture is systematically varied. With this design, interaction among toxic components across different mixture ratios and endpoints (i.e. lethal versus sublethal) is not assessed. In this study lethal and sublethal (feeding) responses of Daphnia magna individuals to single and binary combinations of similarly and dissimilarly acting chemicals including the metals (cadmium, copper) and the pyrethroid insecticides (lambda-cyhalothrin and deltamethrin) were assayed using a composite experimental design to test for interactions among toxic components across mixture effect levels, mixture ratios, lethal and sublethal toxic effects. To account for inter-experiment response variability, in each binary mixture toxicity assay the toxicity of the individual mixture constituents was also assessed. Model adequacy was then evaluated comparing the slopes and elevations of predicted versus observed mixture toxicity curves with those estimated for the individual components. Model predictive abilities changed across endpoints. The IA concept was able to predict accurately mixture toxicities of dissimilarly acting chemicals for lethal responses, whereas the CA concept did so in three out of four pairings for feeding response, irrespective of the chemical mode of action. Interaction effects across mixture effect levels, evidenced by crossing slopes, were only observed for the binary mixture Cd and Cu for lethal effects

  3. Perceptual blending in odor mixtures depends on the nature of odorants and human olfactory expertise.

    PubMed

    Barkat, S; Le Berre, E; Coureaud, G; Sicard, G; Thomas-Danguin, T

    2012-02-01

    Our olfactory system is confronted with complex mixtures of odorants, often recognized as single entities due to odor blending (e.g., coffee). In contrast, we are also able to discriminate odors from complex mixtures (e.g., off-odors). Therefore, the olfactory system is able to engage either configural or elemental processes when confronted with mixtures. However, the rules that govern the involvement of these processes during odor perception remain poorly understood. In our first experiment, we examined whether simple odorant mixtures (binary/ternary) could elicit configural perception. Twenty untrained subjects were asked to evaluate the odor typicality of mixtures and their constituents. The results revealed a significant increase in odor typicality in some but not all mixtures as compared with the single components, which suggest that perceptual odor blending can occur only in specific mixtures (configural processing). In our second experiment, we tested the hypothesis that general olfactory expertise can improve elemental perception of mixtures. Thirty-two trained subjects evaluated the odor typicality of the stimuli presented during the first experiment, and their responses were compared with those obtained from the untrained panelists. The results support the idea that general training with odors increases the elemental perception of binary and ternary blending mixtures.

  4. Generalized Beta Mixtures of Gaussians.

    PubMed

    Armagan, Artin; Dunson, David B; Clyde, Merlise

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, a rich variety of shrinkage priors have been proposed that have great promise in addressing massive regression problems. In general, these new priors can be expressed as scale mixtures of normals, but have more complex forms and better properties than traditional Cauchy and double exponential priors. We first propose a new class of normal scale mixtures through a novel generalized beta distribution that encompasses many interesting priors as special cases. This encompassing framework should prove useful in comparing competing priors, considering properties and revealing close connections. We then develop a class of variational Bayes approximations through the new hierarchy presented that will scale more efficiently to the types of truly massive data sets that are now encountered routinely.

  5. MULTIVARIATE KERNEL PARTITION PROCESS MIXTURES

    PubMed Central

    Dunson, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Mixtures provide a useful approach for relaxing parametric assumptions. Discrete mixture models induce clusters, typically with the same cluster allocation for each parameter in multivariate cases. As a more flexible approach that facilitates sparse nonparametric modeling of multivariate random effects distributions, this article proposes a kernel partition process (KPP) in which the cluster allocation varies for different parameters. The KPP is shown to be the driving measure for a multivariate ordered Chinese restaurant process that induces a highly-flexible dependence structure in local clustering. This structure allows the relative locations of the random effects to inform the clustering process, with spatially-proximal random effects likely to be assigned the same cluster index. An exact block Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, avoiding truncation of the infinite measure. The methods are applied to hormone curve data, and a dependent KPP is proposed for classification from functional predictors. PMID:24478563

  6. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  7. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Robert D.

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  8. Random Packings Of Rod-Sphere Mixtures Simulated By Mechanical Contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrylyuk, Andriy V.; Wouterse, Alan; Philipse, Albert P.

    2009-06-01

    We study the random close packing of a binary mixture of spheres and rod-like particles (spherocylinders) by the mechanical contraction computer simulation. We investigate the universality in packing of near-spheres by monitoring the position and the value of the maximum in the mixture packing density as a function of the mixture composition and the rod aspect ratio. We find that independently of the mixture composition the particles pack more efficiently/densely as the rod aspect ratio is perturbed slightly from zero and the maximum density is always reached at one unique rod aspect ratio of about 0.45. The dependence of the value of the maximum packing fraction on the mixture composition (the relative rod volume fraction) is linear, exhibiting some ideality in packing of near-spheres. This counter-intuitive finding suggests that even for high rod concentrations in a rod-sphere mixture the packing is governed by local contacts between the neighboring particles, which is usually observed for dilute colloidal suspensions and granular gases, where there is no correlation between the particles. The plausible explanation for this intriguing behavior is that the correlations between the particles are completely lost in the range of distances of several particle diameters, which can be originated from the decoupling of the orientational and translational degrees of freedom of the nearly spherical rods. This gives rise to the universality and locality of random close packing of the rod-sphere mixtures.

  9. Brain processing of a configural vs elemental odor mixture in the newborn rabbit.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nanette Y; Datiche, Frédérique; Wilson, Donald A; Gigot, Vincent; Thomas-Danguin, Thierry; Ferreira, Guillaume; Coureaud, Gérard

    2016-06-01

    Organisms are surrounded throughout life by chemically complex odors. How individuals process an odorant within a mixture or a mixture as a whole is a key question in neuroethology and chemical senses. This question is addressed here by using newborn rabbits, which can be rapidly conditioned to a new stimulus by single association with the mammary pheromone. After conditioning to ethyl maltol (odorant B), pups behaviorally respond to B and an A'B' mixture (68/32 ratio) but not to ethyl isobutyrate (odorant A) or an AB mixture (30/70 ratio). This suggests elemental and configural perception of A'B' and AB, respectively. We then explored the neural substrates underlying the processing of these mixtures with the hypothesis that processing varies according to perception. Pups were pseudoconditioned or conditioned to B on postnatal day 3 before exposure to B, A'B' or AB on day 4. Fos expression was not similar between groups (mainly in the olfactory bulb and posterior piriform cortex) suggesting a differential processing of the stimuli that might reflect either stimulus complexity or conditioning effect. Thus, the ratio of components in A'B' vs AB leads to differential activation of the olfactory system which may contribute to elemental and configural percepts of these mixtures. In addition, together with recent behavioral data, this highlights that configural perception occurs even in relatively immature animals, emphasizing the value of the newborn rabbit for exploration of odor mixture processing from molecules to brain and behavior.

  10. Development of BIATECH-54 standard mixtures for assessment of protein identification and relative expression.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Eugene; Hogan, Jason M; Higdon, Roger; Kolker, Natali; Landorf, Elizabeth; Yakunin, Alexander F; Collart, Frank R; van Belle, Gerald

    2007-10-01

    Mixtures of known proteins have been very useful in the assessment and validation of methods for high-throughput (HTP) MS (MS/MS) proteomics experiments. However, these test mixtures have generally consisted of few proteins at near equal concentration or of a single protein at varied concentrations. Such mixtures are too simple to effectively assess the validity of error rates for protein identification and differential expression in HTP MS/MS studies. This work aimed at overcoming these limitations and simulating studies of complex biological samples. We introduced a pair of 54-protein standard mixtures of variable concentrations with up to a 1000-fold dynamic range in concentration and up to ten-fold expression ratios with additional negative controls (infinite expression ratios). These test mixtures comprised 16 off-the-shelf Sigma-Aldrich proteins and 38 Shewanella oneidensis proteins produced in-house. The standard proteins were systematically distributed into three main concentration groups (high, medium, and low) and then the concentrations were varied differently for each mixture within the groups to generate different expression ratios. The mixtures were analyzed with both low mass accuracy LCQ and high mass accuracy FT-LTQ instruments. In addition, these 54 standard proteins closely follow the molecular weight distributions of both bacterial and human proteomes. As a result, these new standard mixtures allow for a much more realistic assessment of approaches for protein identification and label-free differential expression than previous mixtures. Finally, methodology and experimental design developed in this work can be readily applied in future to development of more complex standard mixtures for HTP proteomics studies.

  11. Konjac glucomannan and konjac glucomannan/xanthan gum mixtures as excipients for controlled drug delivery systems. Diffusion of small drugs.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Manceñido, Felipe; Landin, Mariana; Lacik, Igor; Martínez-Pacheco, Ramón

    2008-02-12

    Konjac glucomannan (KGM), alone or in combination with xanthan gum (XG), was evaluated as main component of systems capable of controlling the diffusion of small molecules with a view of their use in drug delivery. To provide the study with enough general character, KGM batches were obtained from the three main areas of excipient harmonization (Europe, USA and Japan). The rheological evaluation at physiological temperature of KGM (0.5%, w/v) aqueous dispersions, with or without XG at different ratios, showed significant variability among the three KGMs owing to differences in the acetylation degree. The Japanese and European varieties of KGM synergically interact with XG giving rise to gel formation; the synergism being maximum at a 1:1 ratio. By contrast, the American KGM does not show such effect forming only viscous solutions. Drug diffusion coefficients of theophylline and diltiazem HCl, with different molecular size and net charge, were evaluated in systems containing KGM/XG ratio 1:1. KGM/XG systems were more efficient than the XG alone dispersion for controlling drug diffusion of small molecules because of the gel formation. These results point out the potential of mixtures of some KGM types with XG to develop delivery systems capable of maintaining physical integrity and drug release control for up to 8-h period.

  12. Contrasting coloration in terrestrial mammals

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Here I survey, collate and synthesize contrasting coloration in 5000 species of terrestrial mammals focusing on black and white pelage. After briefly reviewing alternative functional hypotheses for coloration in mammals, I examine nine colour patterns and combinations on different areas of the body and for each mammalian taxon to try to identify the most likely evolutionary drivers of contrasting coloration. Aposematism and perhaps conspecific signalling are the most consistent explanations for black and white pelage in mammals; background matching may explain white pelage. Evidence for contrasting coloration is being involved in crypsis through pattern blending, disruptive coloration or serving other functions, such as signalling dominance, lures, reducing eye glare or in temperature regulation has barely moved beyond anecdotal stages of investigation. Sexual dichromatism is limited in this taxon and its basis is unclear. Astonishingly, the functional significance of pelage coloration in most large charismatic black and white mammals that were new to science 150 years ago still remains a mystery. PMID:18990666

  13. Multiscale image contrast amplification (MUSICA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuylsteke, Pieter; Schoeters, Emile P.

    1994-05-01

    This article presents a novel approach to the problem of detail contrast enhancement, based on multiresolution representation of the original image. The image is decomposed into a weighted sum of smooth, localized, 2D basis functions at multiple scales. Each transform coefficient represents the amount of local detail at some specific scale and at a specific position in the image. Detail contrast is enhanced by non-linear amplification of the transform coefficients. An inverse transform is then applied to the modified coefficients. This yields a uniformly contrast- enhanced image without artefacts. The MUSICA-algorithm is being applied routinely to computed radiography images of chest, skull, spine, shoulder, pelvis, extremities, and abdomen examinations, with excellent acceptance. It is useful for a wide range of applications in the medical, graphical, and industrial area.

  14. Remote sensing of high temperature H2O CO2 CO mixture with a correlated k-distribution fictitious gas method and the single-mixture gas assumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliot, C.; Le Maoult, Y.; El Hafi, M.; Flamant, G.

    2006-11-01

    Infrared spectra of high temperature H2O CO2 CO mixtures are calculated using narrow band models in order to simulate hot jet signature at long distance. The correlated k-distribution with fictitious gas (CKFG) approach generally gives accurate data in such situations (especially for long atmospheric paths) but results in long computation time in cases involving mixtures of gases. This time may be reduced if the mixture is treated as a single gas (single-mixture gas assumption, SMG). Thus the lines of the single-mixture gas are assigned to the fictitious gases. In this study, the accuracy of two narrow band models is evaluated. The first narrow band model considers one single-mixture gas and no fictitious gas (CK-SMG) whereas the second model accounts for one single-mixture gas and three fictitious gases (CKFG-SMG). Both narrow band models are compared with reference spectra calculated with a line-by-line (LBL) approach. As expected, the narrow band accuracy is improved by the fictitious gas (FG) assumption particularly when long atmospheric paths are involved. Concerning the SMG assumption, it may lead to an underestimation of about 10% depending on the variation of the gas mixture composition ratio. Nevertheless, in most of realistic situations the SMG assumption results in negligible errors and may be used for remote sensing of plume signature.

  15. Mixing properties of coaxial jets with large velocity ratios and large inverse density ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander Schumaker, S.; Driscoll, James F.

    2012-05-01

    An experimental study was conducted to better understand the mixing properties of coaxial jets as several parameters were systematically varied, including the velocity ratio, density ratio, and the Reynolds number. Diameters of the inner and outer jet were also varied. Coaxial jets are commonly used to mix fluids due to the simplicity of their geometry and the rapid mixing that they provide. A measure of the overall mixing efficiency is the stoichiometric mixing length (Ls), which is the distance along the jet centerline where the two fluids have mixed to some desired concentration, which was selected to be the stoichiometric concentration for H2/O2 and CH4/O2 in this case. For 56 cases, the profiles of mean mixture fraction, rms mixture fraction fluctuations (unmixedness), and Ls were measured using acetone planar laser induced fluorescence diagnostics. Results were compared to three mixing models. The entrainment model of Villermaux and Rehab showed good agreement with the data, indicating that the proper non-dimensional scaling parameter is the momentum flux ratio M. The work extends the existing database of coaxial jet scalar mixing properties because it considers the specific regime of large values of both the velocity ratio and the inverse density ratio, which is the regime in which rocket injectors operate. Also the work focuses on the mixing up to Ls where previous work focused on the mixing up to the end of the inner core. The Reynolds numbers achieved for a number of cases were considerably larger than previous gas mixing studies, which insures that the jet exit boundary conditions are fully turbulent.

  16. Model Misspecification: Finite Mixture or Homogeneous?

    PubMed Central

    Tarpey, Thaddeus; Yun, Dong; Petkova, Eva

    2007-01-01

    A common problem in statistical modelling is to distinguish between finite mixture distribution and a homogeneous non-mixture distribution. Finite mixture models are widely used in practice and often mixtures of normal densities are indistinguishable from homogenous non-normal densities. This paper illustrates what happens when the EM algorithm for normal mixtures is applied to a distribution that is a homogeneous non-mixture distribution. In particular, a population-based EM algorithm for finite mixtures is introduced and applied directly to density functions instead of sample data. The population-based EM algorithm is used to find finite mixture approximations to common homogeneous distributions. An example regarding the nature of a placebo response in drug treated depressed subjects is used to illustrate ideas. PMID:18974843

  17. High-Ratio Gear Train

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefever, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed arrangement of two connected planetary differentials results in gear ratio many times that obtainable in conventional series gear assembly of comparable size. Ratios of several thousand would present no special problems. Selection of many different ratios is available with substantially similar gear diameters. Very high gear ratios would be obtained from small mechanism.

  18. Effect of contrast media on urinary cytopathology specimens

    PubMed Central

    Frees, Sebastian; Bidnur, Samir; Metcalfe, Michael; Raven, Peter; Chavez-Munoz, Claudia; Moskalev, Igor; Fazli, Ladan; So, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Urological dogma dictates that washings collected from the urinary tract for cytological assessment must be performed without interference from contrast agents that may alter cellular integrity and diagnostic interpretation. In practice, the initial contrast used to outline the upper tracts is commonly discarded with subsequent saline washings sent for cytology. We hypothesize that contrast washings do not affect the morphology of urothelial carcinoma cells or the integrity of cytology interpretation. Methods: Samples obtained from (1) human bladder cell lines; (2) urine from a human xenograft bladder cancer model using UC-3 cells; and (3) patients with urothelial carcinoma were subjected to various experimental solutions (water, saline, urine, and dilutions of contrast media) for different exposure times. After exposure to various different solutions, samples underwent cytological analysis to assess morphologic and degenerative changes. Results: No cytological differences were seen when cells were exposed to ionic, hyperosmolar, or non-ionic low-osmolar contrast agents for any exposures up to five minutes. Cells exposed to mixtures of contrast agents and urine also demonstrated no evidence of degenerative change. Cells exposed to water for greater than one minute demonstrated significant hydropic degeneration impacting cytological interpretation. At 40 minutes or later, all reagents caused severe degeneration when evaluating urine samples from the mouse bladder cancer model and from patients undergoing urothelial carcinoma. Conclusions: Commonly used contrast agents have no effect on urinary cytology up to five minutes. Contrast washings of the urinary tract should not be discarded and can be sent for cytological diagnosis if fixed within this time period. PMID:27878040

  19. Structural and magnetic properties of a mechanochemically activated Ti-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} solid mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cristobal, A.A.; Ramos, C.P.; Bercoff, P.G.; Conconi, S.; Aglietti, E.F.; Botta, P.M.; Lopez, J.M. Porto

    2010-12-15

    The mechanochemical effects on the reactivity and properties of a titanium/hematite powder mixture with molar ratio of 1/2 are investigated. Crystalline-phase structure, composition, hyperfine and magnetic behaviors were analyzed as a function of activation time by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. The results showed that at relatively short activation times metallic Ti reduces part of the ferric ions, yielding a complex product formed mainly by a mix of two solid solutions Fe{sub 3-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 4} (titanomagnetites), both with very different x values (0 < x < 1). Also metallic iron and superparamagnetic hematite particles were detected by Moessbauer spectroscopy. As the mechanical treatment extends the composition of the reactive mixture changes, prevailing in the end the solid solution with higher x value. In contrast, when these activated samples are thermally treated the fraction of the solid solution which is richer in Ti diminishes. This fact produces a significant variation of the saturation magnetization of the obtained material.

  20. 21 CFR 82.6 - Certifiable mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and, in the case of mixtures which are aqueous solutions or aqueous pastes, sodium benzoate in a... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Certifiable mixtures. 82.6 Section 82.6 Food and... PROVISIONALLY LISTED COLORS AND SPECIFICATIONS General Provisions § 82.6 Certifiable mixtures. (a) A batch of...

  1. 21 CFR 82.6 - Certifiable mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and, in the case of mixtures which are aqueous solutions or aqueous pastes, sodium benzoate in a... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certifiable mixtures. 82.6 Section 82.6 Food and... PROVISIONALLY LISTED COLORS AND SPECIFICATIONS General Provisions § 82.6 Certifiable mixtures. (a) A batch of...

  2. 14 CFR 25.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mixture controls. 25.1147 Section 25.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control. The controls must...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 25.1147 Section 25.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control. The controls must...

  4. 14 CFR 27.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mixture controls. 27.1147 Section 27.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1147 Mixture controls. If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control and the controls must...

  5. 40 CFR 721.9540 - Polysulfide mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polysulfide mixture. 721.9540 Section... Substances § 721.9540 Polysulfide mixture. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polysulfide mixture (PMN P-93-1043)...

  6. 40 CFR 721.9540 - Polysulfide mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polysulfide mixture. 721.9540 Section... Substances § 721.9540 Polysulfide mixture. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polysulfide mixture (PMN P-93-1043)...

  7. 14 CFR 29.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 29.1147 Section 29.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and the...

  8. 14 CFR 29.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mixture controls. 29.1147 Section 29.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and the...

  9. 14 CFR 27.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 27.1147 Section 27.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1147 Mixture controls. If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control and the controls must...

  10. 40 CFR 721.9540 - Polysulfide mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polysulfide mixture. 721.9540 Section... Substances § 721.9540 Polysulfide mixture. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polysulfide mixture (PMN P-93-1043)...

  11. 14 CFR 25.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mixture controls. 25.1147 Section 25.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control. The controls must...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9540 - Polysulfide mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polysulfide mixture. 721.9540 Section... Substances § 721.9540 Polysulfide mixture. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polysulfide mixture (PMN P-93-1043)...

  13. 14 CFR 25.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mixture controls. 25.1147 Section 25.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control. The controls must...

  14. 14 CFR 27.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mixture controls. 27.1147 Section 27.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1147 Mixture controls. If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control and the controls must...

  15. 40 CFR 721.9540 - Polysulfide mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Polysulfide mixture. 721.9540 Section... Substances § 721.9540 Polysulfide mixture. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polysulfide mixture (PMN P-93-1043)...

  16. 14 CFR 29.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mixture controls. 29.1147 Section 29.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and the...

  17. 21 CFR 82.6 - Certifiable mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Certifiable mixtures. 82.6 Section 82.6 Food and... PROVISIONALLY LISTED COLORS AND SPECIFICATIONS General Provisions § 82.6 Certifiable mixtures. (a) A batch of a mixture which contains no straight color listed in subpart C or D may be certified for use in food,...

  18. 21 CFR 82.6 - Certifiable mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Certifiable mixtures. 82.6 Section 82.6 Food and... PROVISIONALLY LISTED COLORS AND SPECIFICATIONS General Provisions § 82.6 Certifiable mixtures. (a) A batch of a mixture which contains no straight color listed in subpart C or D may be certified for use in food,...

  19. 14 CFR 27.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixture controls. 27.1147 Section 27.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1147 Mixture controls. If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control and the controls must...

  20. 14 CFR 29.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixture controls. 29.1147 Section 29.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and the...

  1. 14 CFR 25.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixture controls. 25.1147 Section 25.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control. The controls must...

  2. 14 CFR 29.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mixture controls. 29.1147 Section 29.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and the...

  3. 14 CFR 27.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mixture controls. 27.1147 Section 27.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1147 Mixture controls. If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control and the controls must...

  4. 21 CFR 82.6 - Certifiable mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Certifiable mixtures. 82.6 Section 82.6 Food and... PROVISIONALLY LISTED COLORS AND SPECIFICATIONS General Provisions § 82.6 Certifiable mixtures. (a) A batch of a mixture which contains no straight color listed in subpart C or D may be certified for use in food,...

  5. Mixtures of Estrogenic Chemicals Enhance Vitellogenic Response in Sea Bass

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Ana D.; Freitas, Sandro; Scholze, Martin; Goncalves, José F.; Booij, Petra; Lamoree, Marja H.; Mañanós, Evaristo; Reis-Henriques, Maria A.

    2007-01-01

    Background The potential impact of natural and synthetic estrogens on aquatic ecosystems has attracted considerable attention because it is currently accepted that their joint effects are more severe when they are present in mixtures. Although it is well-known that they occur as mixtures in the marine environment, there is little information about the combined effects of estrogenic chemicals on marine biota. Objective In 14-day tests with juvenile sea bass, we analyzed singly and in combination the estrogenic activity of estradiol (E2), ethynylestradiol (EE2), and bisphenol A (BPA) using vitellogenin induction as an end point. Methods Fish were exposed to each compound, and on the basis of these concentration–response data, we predicted mixture effects by applying the model of concentration addition. The mixtures were tested using a fixed-ratio design, and the resulting mixture effects were compared to the predictions. Results EE2 was the most potent steroid, with an EC50 (median effective concentration) of 0.029 μg/L, 3.6 times more potent than E2 (EC50 = 0.104 μg/L); BPA was the least potent chemical, with an EC50 of 77.94 μg/L. The comparative assessment yielded a good agreement between observed and predicted mixture effects. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential hazard of these compounds to seawater life by their ability to act together in an additive manner. It provides evidence that concentration addition can be used as a predictive tool for assessing the combined effects of estrogenic chemicals in marine ecosystems. PMID:18174959

  6. Binocular contrast summation--I. Detection and discrimination.

    PubMed

    Legge, G E

    1984-01-01

    Binocular summation was evaluated for contrast detection and discrimination. Monocular and binocular forced-choice psychometric functions were measured for the detection of 0.5-c/deg sine-wave gratings presented alone (simple detection), or superimposed on identical background gratings (discrimination). The dependence of detectability d' on signal contrast C could be described by: d' = (C/C')n. C' is threshold contrast, and n is an index of the steepness of the psychometric function. n was near 2 for simple detection, near 1 for discrimination, and was approximately the same for monocular and binocular viewing. Monocular thresholds were about 1.5 times binocular thresholds for detection, but the ratio dropped for suprathreshold discrimination. These results reveal a dependence of binocular summation on background contrast. For simple detection, binocular detectabilities were at least twice monocular detectabilities . For contrast discrimination, the amount of binocular summation decreased. For a 25%-contrast background, there was little or no binocular summation. It is concluded that binocular contrast summation decreases as background contrast rises.

  7. Monitoring and optimizing the co-composting of dewatered sludge: a mixture experimental design approach.

    PubMed

    Komilis, Dimitrios; Evangelou, Alexandros; Voudrias, Evangelos

    2011-09-01

    The management of dewatered wastewater sludge is a major issue worldwide. Sludge disposal to landfills is not sustainable and thus alternative treatment techniques are being sought. The objective of this work was to determine optimal mixing ratios of dewatered sludge with other organic amendments in order to maximize the degradability of the mixtures during composting. This objective was achieved using mixture experimental design principles. An additional objective was to study the impact of the initial C/N ratio and moisture contents on the co-composting process of dewatered sludge. The composting process was monitored through measurements of O(2) uptake rates, CO(2) evolution, temperature profile and solids reduction. Eight (8) runs were performed in 100 L insulated air-tight bioreactors under a dynamic air flow regime. The initial mixtures were prepared using dewatered wastewater sludge, mixed paper wastes, food wastes, tree branches and sawdust at various initial C/N ratios and moisture contents. According to empirical modeling, mixtures of sludge and food waste mixtures at 1:1 ratio (ww, wet weight) maximize degradability. Structural amendments should be maintained below 30% to reach thermophilic temperatures. The initial C/N ratio and initial moisture content of the mixture were not found to influence the decomposition process. The bio C/bio N ratio started from around 10, for all runs, decreased during the middle of the process and increased to up to 20 at the end of the process. The solid carbon reduction of the mixtures without the branches ranged from 28% to 62%, whilst solid N reductions ranged from 30% to 63%. Respiratory quotients had a decreasing trend throughout the composting process.

  8. Effect of the Key Mixture Parameters on Shrinkage of Reactive Powder Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Reactive powder concrete (RPC) mixtures are reported to have excellent mechanical and durability characteristics. However, such concrete mixtures having high amount of cementitious materials may have high early shrinkage causing cracking of concrete. In the present work, an attempt has been made to study the simultaneous effects of three key mixture parameters on shrinkage of the RPC mixtures. Considering three different levels of the three key mixture factors, a total of 27 mixtures of RPC were prepared according to 33 factorial experiment design. The specimens belonging to all 27 mixtures were monitored for shrinkage at different ages over a total period of 90 days. The test results were plotted to observe the variation of shrinkage with time and to see the effects of the key mixture factors. The experimental data pertaining to 90-day shrinkage were used to conduct analysis of variance to identify significance of each factor and to obtain an empirical equation correlating the shrinkage of RPC with the three key mixture factors. The rate of development of shrinkage at early ages was higher. The water to binder ratio was found to be the most prominent factor followed by cement content with the least effect of silica fume content. PMID:25050395

  9. A Bibliography of Contrastive Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, John H.; Rice, Frank A.

    This 484-item bibliography is a revised and expanded version of William W. Gage's "Contrastive Studies in Linguistics: A Bibliographical Checklist" (CAL, 1961). Following a general section, the entries are arranged alphabetically by foreign language. The language headings are: Afrikaans, Arabic, Armenian, Azerbaijani, Bantu, Batak, Bengali,…

  10. Simultaneous density contrast is bidirectional.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hua-Chun; Baker, Curtis L; Kingdom, Frederick A A

    2016-11-01

    Simultaneous density contrast, or SDC, is the phenomenon in which the perceived density of a textured region is altered by a surround of different density (Mackay, 1973). SDC provides an experimental tool to investigate mechanisms of density coding, yet has not been systematically examined. We measured SDC with a 2AFC staircase procedure in which human observers judged which of two patterns, one with and one without a surround, appeared more dense. We used a range of surround densities varying from very sparse to very dense (0-76.8 dots/deg2), and two center test densities (6.4 and 12.8 dots/deg2). Psychometric functions were used to estimate both the points of subjective equality (PSE) and their precision. Unexpectedly we find a bidirectional SDC effect across the five observers: Not only does a denser surround reduce perceived density of the center, but a sparser surround enhances its perceived density. We also show that SDC is not mediated by either contrast-contrast or spatial-frequency contrast. Our results suggest the presence of multiple channels selective for texture density, with lateral inhibitory interactions between them.

  11. Visual acuity with reversed-contrast charts: II. Clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Westheimer, Gerald; Chu, Patricia; Huang, Wendy; Tran, Thuy; Dister, Robert

    2003-11-01

    Snellen visual acuity was measured in 106 patients ranging in age from 20 to 88 years in routine examinations in the general refraction clinic with two kinds of charts: the standard chart using black letters on a white background and a reversed-contrast display featuring white letters on a black background. The overall ratio of the white-on-black to the black-on-white Snellen fractions was 1.043. A scattergram relating this ratio to patient age revealed that the older the patient, the more the visual acuity was improved by switching to the reversed-contrast chart, with a regression line slope of 0.5 +/- 0.10. Impairment of the eye's optics, in particular by intraocular scatter causing a widening and flattening of the eye's point-spread function, explains these findings and suggests prognostic and therapeutic value of reversing the contrast polarity of displays.

  12. Contrast Measurements of the Microshutter Arrays for the NIRspec

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutyrev, Alexander; Chambers, J.; Moseley, S. H.; Rapchun, D.

    2008-01-01

    We have been developing programmable microshutter arrays for the Near Infrared Spectrometer (NIRSpec) on the James Webb Space telescope (JWST). These arrays are an enabling technology that allows to turn NIRSpec into a powerful multi-object spectrometer and tremendously increase its efficiency. The arrays are essentially 2D programmable masks that are designed to operate at cryogenic temperatures of JWST. The primary optical characteristic of the microshutter array is a contrast, that is defined as a ratio of the transmitted light intensity through open shutters to the intensity of the transmitted light through the closed shutters. To eliminate the noise and confusion from other sources in the field of view and therefore to improve the detection limit, the contrast provided by the microshutter array should be very high, with the goal of 10,000. The test system that we have developed specifically for the purpose of the high contrast characterization of the microshutter array devices has been used to test several microshutter arrays. It is capable of measuring contrast values of up to 10^5 and therefore can reliably measure contrast values of the arrays that satisfy the requirements. The arrays have been characterized for the contrast ratio and its behavior with temperature and other array operating parameters. The arrays that we have tested meet or exceed the NiRSpec requirements.

  13. Colorimetric Analysis and Spectral Transformation of Soil-Vegetation Mixture Reflectance for Canopy Coverage Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kancheva, R.; Borisova, D.; Mishev, D.

    Vegetation monitoring is one of the essential applications of remote sensing techniques in practice. Concerning agricultural plants an important task is crop state assessment during the growing period. Vegetation status and physiological development are defined by a set of bioparameters such as biomass amount, leaf area index, chlorophyll content, etc. Various methods of spectral data processing are used for their stimulation aiming mainly at the establishment of quantitative relationships between crop biophysical and reflectance properties. Canopy coverage is of a particular interest here because it is an important indicator of plant growth and is closely related with other bioparameters being at the same time a factor of soil-vegetation mixtures reflectance. This paper has the following objectives: - to study the colorimetric characteristics (color coordinates, trichromatic coefficients, excitation purity, dominant wavelength) of different soil types and species as well as their potential for canopy coverage estimation; - to compare and test the correspondence between coverage values evaluated through colorimetric analysis and by using various spectral data transformations (ratio indices, contrasts, normalized differences, linear combinations); - to demonstrate the joint application of both methods for increasing the accuracy and the reliability of canopy coverage assessment. Ground-based reflectance data from peas, spring barley and winter wheat grown on chernozem, alluvial-medow and grey forest soils were gathered. The measurements were performed with a multichannel radiometer in the 400-820 nm spectral band with a 10 nm step. Correlation and regression analysis of plot coverage, color features and spectral indices was carried out. Statistical relationships were derived and used later for canopy coverage estimation on independent data sets. The colorimetric analysis of the reflectance characteristics permited reliable and quite satisfactory coverage evaluations

  14. Generating mixtures of spatial qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, G.; Torres-Ruiz, F. A.; Neves, Leonardo; Delgado, A.; Saavedra, C.; Pádua, S.

    2008-10-01

    In a recent letter [L. Neves, G. Lima, J.G. Aguirre Gómez, C.H. Monken, C. Saavedra, S. Pádua, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 100501], we presented a scheme for generating pure entangled states of spatial qudits ( D-dimensional quantum systems) by using the momentum transverse correlation of the parametric down-converted photons. In this work, we discuss a generalization of this process to enable the creation of mixed states. With the technique proposed we experimentally generated a mixture of two spatial qubits.

  15. Spectral-Phase-Modulated Cross-Polarized Wave for Chirped Pulse Amplifier with High Contrast Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shuang; Wang, Zhao-Hua; Yang, Shuai-Shuai; Shen, Zhong-Wei; Dong, Quan-Li; Wei, Zhi-Yi

    2017-02-01

    Not Available Supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China under Grant No 2013CB922402, the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos 61575217 and 11434016, the Key Research Program of Frontier Sciences of Chinese Academy of Sciences under Grant Nos KJZD-EW-L11-03 and QYZDJ-SSW-JSC006, and the Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences under Grant No XDB16030200.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation study of binary fullerene mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberto, R.; Abramo, M. C.; Caccamo, C.

    2004-10-01

    We report constant-pressure molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of binary C60/Cn fullerene-mixtures ( n=70 , 76, 84, 96) modeled in terms of a spherically symmetric two-body potential. By starting from a liquid configuration of the system, we cool mixtures down to freezing and beyond, until room temperature is reached, in order to verify the formation of solid solutions, namely, of configurations characterized by a unique crystalline lattice whose sites are randomly occupied by the two component fullerene species. We first explore the entire concentration range of the C60x/C70(1-x)(0mixture and find fairly good agreement with experimental data, exhibiting partial reciprocal solubility of the two components into each other with an immiscibility gap at intermediate compositions. In fact, the system we simulate forms substitutional solid solutions over a wide range of concentrations except for 0.3⩽x⩽0.5 ; over such an interval, it turns out that the initially liquid mixture can be supercooled down to relatively low temperatures, until eventually a glassy phase is formed. The study is then extended to fullerene mixtures of molecular diameter ratio α=σC60/σCn smaller than in C60/C70 (where α=0.93 ), as is the case for C60/C76 (α=0.89) , C60/C84(α=0.85) and C60/C96 (α=0.79) . The effect of the size mismatch between the two species is dramatic: The solid immiscibility region rapidly expands even upon a tiny reduction of α , with formation of an amorphous phase at sufficiently low temperature, as found for the C60/C70 mixture. For the smallest α(C60/C96) cocrystallization of the two components turns out to be forbidden over the whole concentration axis. A mapping of the MD evidences of the fullerene mixtures’ phase behavior onto the phase diagram of binary hard-sphere mixtures (determined by other authors) turns out to be worthwhile and enlightnening. In particular, size ratio effects and the onset of glassy phases emerge in qualitative good agreement

  17. Prediction of acute toxicity of chemicals in mixtures: worms Tubifex tubifex and gas/liquid distribution.

    PubMed

    Tichý, M; Borek-Dohalský, V; Matousová, D; Rucki, M; Feltl, L; Roth, Z

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this contribution is to support our proposal of the procedure for predicting acute toxicity of binary mixtures by QSAR analysis techniques. The changes of a mixture composition are described by molar ratio R and visualized in the R-plot (QCAR--quantitative composition-activity relationships). The approach was inspired by Rault and Dalton's laws, their positive and negative deviations in the behavior of a mixture of real gases, by Loewe and Muischnek isoboles and by the Finney test of additivity. Acute toxicity was determined by the laboratory test with woms Tubifex tubifex. The additivity of the acute toxicity in the binary mixture benzene + nitrobenzene was confirmed and a new interaction is described: "mixed interaction" with the binary mixture aniline + ethanol. The "mixed interaction" means that depending on mixture composition, both potentiation and inhibition can occur. As the first physicochemical descriptor of the changes caused by the changing composition of binary mixtures, the gas/liquid equilibrium was studied and a composition of the gaseous phase was determined by a gas chromatographic method. The method for determination of concentrations in the gaseous phase was described. The gaseous phase composition of benzene + nitrobenzene. benzene + ethanol, benzene + aniline and ethanol + aniline mixtures was analyzed. It was found that if the concentrations of the mixture's components in the gaseous phase behave nonideally (they are not additive), the acute toxicity of the same mixture is not additive as well. Another descriptor to distinguish between potentiation and inhibition will be, however, necessary. The properties, both gaseous phase composition and the acute toxicity, of the benzene + nitrobenzene mixture are additive. In mixtures with the mixed interaction, the R-plot of the composition of the gaseous phase is complex with a large variation of results.

  18. Chronic toxicity of a mixture of chlorinated alkanes and alkenes in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fun-In; Kuo, Min-Liang; Shun, Chia-Tung; Ma, Yee-Chung; Wang, Jung-Der; Ueng, Tzuu-Huei

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the chronic toxicity of a mixture of chlorinated alkanes and alkenes (CA) consisting of chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene. These chlorinated organic solvents were present in the underground water near an electronic appliances manufactory in Taoyuan, Taiwan. Male and female weanling ICR mice were treated with low-, medium-, and high-dose CA mixtures in drinking water for 16 and 18 mo, respectively. A significant number of male mice treated with the high-dose CA mixture developed tail alopecia and deformation, which was not prominent in CA-treated female mice. Medium- and high-dose CA mixtures induced marginal increases of liver and lung weights, blood urea nitrogen, and serum creatinine levels in male mice. In female mice, the high-dose CA mixture increased liver, kidney, and uterus and ovary total weights, without affecting serum biochemistry parameters. CA mixtures had no effects on the total glutathione content or the level of glutathione S-transferase activity in the livers and kid- neys of male and female mice. Treatments with CA mixtures produced a trend of increasing frequency of hepatocelluar neoplasms in male mice, compared to male and female controls and CA-treated female mice. The high-dose CA mixture induced a significantly higher incidence of mammary adenocarcinoma in female mice. The calculated odds ratios of mammary adenocarcinoma in female mice induced by low-, medium-, and high-dose CA mixtures were 1.14, 1.37, and 3.53 times that of the controls, respectively. The low-dose CA mixture induced a higher incidence of cysts and inflammation in and around the ovaries. This study has demonstrated that the CA mixture is a potential carcinogen to male and female mice. These animal toxicology data may be important in assessing the health effects of individuals exposed to the CA mixture.

  19. Contrast optimization in broadband polarimetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Lijo; Hu, Haofeng; Boffety, Matthieu; Goudail, François

    2016-05-01

    For the sake of polarimetric accuracy, polarization imaging systems based on liquid crystal modulators often work at one given wavelength due to the strong chromatic properties of the liquid crystal retarders. This often requires the use of narrowband filters which reduces the amount of light in the system and thus the signal-to-noise ratio. For applications where the main parameter of interest is the target/background discriminability rather than polarimetric accuracy, spectral filtering may not be the best option. In this work, we investigate the impact of broadening the spectrum of the light entering the system on the discriminability performance of passive and active polarimetric systems. Through simulations, we show that broadening the bandwidth of the illumination can increase the contrast between two regions, as the increase of light flux compensates for the loss of polarimetric precision. Moreover, we show that taking into account the chromatic characteristics of the components of the imaging system can further enhance the contrast. We validate these findings through experiments in passive and active configurations, and demonstrate that the illumination bandwidth can be seen as an additional parameter to optimize polarimetric imaging set-ups.

  20. Synthesis of laboratory Ultrasound Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Park, Jingam; Park, Donghee; Shin, Unchul; Moon, Sanghyub; Kim, Chihyun; Kim, Han Sung; Park, Hyunjin; Choi, Kiju; Jung, Bongkwang; Oh, Jaemin; Seo, Jongbum

    2013-10-21

    Ultrasound Contrast Agents (UCAs) were developed to maximize reflection contrast so that organs can be seen clearly in ultrasound imaging. UCAs increase the signal to noise ratio (SNR) by linear and non-linear mechanisms and thus help more accurately visualize the internal organs and blood vessels. However, the UCAs on the market are not only expensive, but are also not optimized for use in various therapeutic research applications such as ultrasound-aided drug delivery. The UCAs fabricated in this study utilize conventional lipid and albumin for shell formation and perfluorobutane as the internal gas. The shape and density of the UCA bubbles were verified by optical microscopy and Cryo SEM, and compared to those of the commercially available UCAs, Definity® and Sonovue®. The size distribution and characteristics of the reflected signal were also analyzed using a particle size analyzer and ultrasound imaging equipment. Our experiments indicate that UCAs composed of spherical microbubbles, the majority of which were smaller than 1 um, were successfully synthesized. Microbubbles 10 um or larger were also identified when different shell characteristics and filters were used. These laboratory UCAs can be used for research in both diagnoses and therapies.

  1. Improving photoacoustic imaging contrast of brachytherapy seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Leo; Baghani, Ali; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Salcudean, Septimiu; Tang, Shuo

    2013-03-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy for treating prostate cancer where the radiation sources are seeds inserted into the prostate. Accurate localization of seeds during prostate brachytherapy is essential to the success of intraoperative treatment planning. The current standard modality used in intraoperative seeds localization is transrectal ultrasound. Transrectal ultrasound, however, suffers in image quality due to several factors such speckle, shadowing, and off-axis seed orientation. Photoacoustic imaging, based on the photoacoustic phenomenon, is an emerging imaging modality. The contrast generating mechanism in photoacoustic imaging is optical absorption that is fundamentally different from conventional B-mode ultrasound which depicts changes in acoustic impedance. A photoacoustic imaging system is developed using a commercial ultrasound system. To improve imaging contrast and depth penetration, absorption enhancing coating is applied to the seeds. In comparison to bare seeds, approximately 18.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio as well as a doubling of imaging depth are achieved. Our results demonstrate that the coating of the seeds can further improve the discernibility of the seeds.

  2. The nonlinear model for emergence of stable conditions in gas mixture in force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalutskov, Oleg; Uvarova, Liudmila

    2016-06-01

    The case of M-component liquid evaporation from the straight cylindrical capillary into N - component gas mixture in presence of external forces was reviewed. It is assumed that the gas mixture is not ideal. The stable states in gas phase can be formed during the evaporation process for the certain model parameter valuesbecause of the mass transfer initial equationsnonlinearity. The critical concentrations of the resulting gas mixture components (the critical component concentrations at which the stable states occur in mixture) were determined mathematically for the case of single-component fluid evaporation into two-component atmosphere. It was concluded that this equilibrium concentration ratio of the mixture components can be achieved by external force influence on the mass transfer processes. It is one of the ways to create sustainable gas clusters that can be used effectively in modern nanotechnology.

  3. Influence of molecular weight on structure and rheological properties of microcrystalline chitosan mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Katarzyna

    2015-08-01

    In the present work, the atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies and rheological properties of aqueous solutions of microcrystalline chitosan (MCCh), polyacrylamide (PAM) and their mixtures at different weight ratios have been investigated. Flow measurements were carried out using on solutions of native polymers and their mixtures with various weight fractions of components. It has been observed that the polymer solutions and their mixtures exhibited the non-Newtonian behavior with shear-thinning and/or shear-thickening areas. Rheological parameters from power law and activation energy of viscous flow are determined and discussed. The AFM images showed difference in surface properties films for the native polymers and their mixtures. The roughness of the mixtures increases with the increase of MCCh content. This may indicate a strong interaction between the polymeric components.

  4. Potentiation and antagonism of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin effects in a complex environmental mixture.

    PubMed

    Silkworth, J B; Cutler, D S; O'Keefe, P W; Lipinskas, T

    1993-04-01

    There is increasing need to understand the toxicity of complex environmental mixtures. The organic phase of a leachate (OPL) from the Love Canal chemical dump site is a complex mixture that contains over 100 organic compounds, including 0.74 ppm 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Mice congenic at the Ah locus were used to evaluate several toxic effects of the OPL, including immune function and hepatic enzyme induction. OPL toxicity was compared with that of pure TCDD in both C57BL/6J Ahb/b and congenic C57BL/6 Ahd/d (B6.D2) mice. Mice were given single oral doses of up to 2 g OPL/kg or 100 micrograms TCDD/kg, immunized, and evaluated after 7 days. The TCDD equivalent of the OPL was determined to be 3.9 and 5.0 ppm in C57BL/6J and B6.D2 mice, respectively. This is six times the TCDD content. The Ah phenotype-dependent response ratio was calculated by dividing the dose required to cause an effect in the B6.D2 strain by the dose causing the same effect in the C57BL/6J strain. Ratios based on both ED50s and the lowest observed adverse effect levels were used to determine whether each adverse effect was Ah phenotype-dependent, the extent to which TCDD contributed to the effect, whether there were interactive effects between the AhR ligands and nonligands and if they were additive, antagonistic, or synergistic, and whether the response was predictable based on the known chemical composition of the mixture. It was concluded that the non-TCDD component potentiated TCDD immune suppression, and possibly thymic atrophy, through AhR mechanisms. In contrast, this analysis indicated that the non-TCDD component of the OPL antagonized the ability of the TCDD component to induce hepatic AHH activity whereas OPL hepatomegaly was caused primarily by the non-TCDD component of the OPL. This study demonstrates that the toxicity of mixtures containing TCDD may not be accurately predicted based on the TCDD content alone and that this approach could be useful in the toxicologic

  5. Effect of Cement on Emulsified Asphalt Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruc, Seref; Celik, Fazil; Akpinar, M. Vefa

    2007-10-01

    Emulsified asphalt mixtures have environmental, economical, and logistical advantages over hot mixtures. However, they have attracted little attention as structural layers due to their inadequate performance and susceptibility to early life damage by rainfall. The objective of this article is to provide an improved insight into how the mechanical properties of emulsion mixtures may be improved and to determine the influence of cement on emulsified asphalt mixtures. Laboratory tests on strength, temperature susceptibility, water damage, creep and permanent deformation were implemented to evaluate the mechanical properties of emulsified asphalt mixtures. The test results showed that mechanical properties of emulsified asphalt mixtures have significantly improved with Portland cement addition. This experimental study suggested that cement modified asphalt emulsion mixtures might be an alternate way of a structural layer material in pavement.

  6. Vitellogenin induction by a mixture of steroidal estrogens in freshwater fishes and relevant risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Kong, Fan-Xiang; Wang, Shi-He; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Min

    2009-10-01

    The study method on combined effects of environmental contaminant mixture and ecological risk assessment was discussed. Batch tests were conducted to assess the in vivo potency of binary mixtures of estrogens using plasma vitellogenin concentrations in male crucian carp as the endpoint. The estrogenic potencies of 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) and 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE(2)) were determined following 14 day exposure to the individual chemicals and equipotent binary mixtures. A Nonlinear regression was obtained and 95% confidence limits of effect concentration were achieved using the bootstrap method. Concentration-response curve for fixed ratio binary mixtures of E(2) and EE(2) was compared with those for individual chemicals, using the biomathematical models of concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA). A complete overlap was found for the CA predictions with the 95% confidence interval of the best-fit regression line of the observed responses, and the IA predictions was shown lower than the observations. The observed mixture effects were considerably higher than those of the hormone alone and far exceeded the 95% confidence interval of the estrogen regression lines. The predicted effects of binary mixtures at different mixture ratios indicated that the potential impact of components on mixture would depend predominantly on its concentration, the mixture ratio and its relative potency. Results suggested that E(2) and EE(2) acted together in an additive manner and the combined effects can be accurately predicted in whole range of exposure concentration by the models of CA and IA, the model of CA might be realistic, but more useful for ecological risk assessment.

  7. Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject presentation, entitled, Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment, was presented at the International Space Station (ISS) Increment 33/34 Science Symposium. This presentation provides an overview of an international collaboration between NASA and CNES to study the behavior of a dilute aqueous solution of Na2SO4 (5% w) at near-critical conditions. The Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) investigation, serves as important precursor work for subsequent Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) experiments. The SCWM investigation will be performed in DECLICs High Temperature Insert (HTI) for the purpose of studying critical fluid phenomena at high temperatures and pressures. The HTI includes a completely sealed and integrated test cell (i.e., Sample Cell Unit SCU) that will contain approximately 0.3 ml of the aqueous test solution. During the sequence of tests, scheduled to be performed in FY13, temperatures and pressures will be elevated to critical conditions (i.e., Tc = 374C and Pc = 22 MPa) in order to observe salt precipitation, precipitate agglomeration and precipitate transport in the presence of a temperature gradient without the influences of gravitational forces. This presentation provides an overview of the motivation for this work, a description of the DECLIC HTI hardware, the proposed test sequences, and a brief discussion of the scientific research objectives.

  8. Differential effects of a complex organochlorine mixture on the proliferation of breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Aube, Michel; Larochelle, Christian; Ayotte, Pierre

    2011-04-15

    Organochlorine compounds (OCs) are a group of persistent chemicals that accumulate in fatty tissues with age. Although OCs has been tested individually for their capacity to induce breast cancer cell proliferation, few studies examined the effect of complex mixtures that comprise compounds frequently detected in the serum of women. We constituted such an OC mixture containing 15 different components in environmentally relevant proportions and assessed its proliferative effects in four breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, CAMA-1, MDAMB231) and in non-cancerous CV-1 cells. We also determined the capacity of the mixture to modulate cell cycle stage of breast cancer cells and to induce estrogenic and antiandrogenic effects using gene reporter assays. We observed that low concentrations of the mixture (100x10{sup 3} and 50x10{sup 3} dilutions) stimulated the proliferation of MCF-7 cells while higher concentrations (10x10{sup 3} and 5x10{sup 3} dilutions) had the opposite effect. In contrast, the mixture inhibited the proliferation of non-hormone-dependent cell lines. The mixture significantly increased the number of MCF-7 cells entering the S phase, an effect that was blocked by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780. Low concentrations of the mixture also caused an increase in CAMA-1 cell proliferation but only in the presence estradiol and dihydrotestosterone (p<0.05 at the 50x10{sup 3} dilution). DDT analogs and polychlorinated biphenyls all had the capacity to stimulate the proliferation of CAMA-1 cells in the presence of sex steroids. Reporter gene assays further revealed that the mixture and several of its constituents (DDT analogs, aldrin, dieldrin, {beta}-hexachlorocyclohexane, toxaphene) induced estrogenic effects, whereas the mixture and several components (DDT analogs, aldrin, dieldrin and PCBs) inhibited the androgen signaling pathway. Our results indicate that the complex OC mixture increases the proliferation of MCF-7 cells due to its estrogenic potential. The

  9. Influence of composition of reaction mixture on selectivity in oxidation of aromatic compounds on oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Belokopytov, Yu.V.; Pyatnitskii, Yu.I.; Tatarinova, T.A.; Strashnenko, A.V.

    1985-07-01

    A general outline is given of a kinetic model of oxidation of a hydrocarbon under the conditions of coexistence on the catalyst surface of sections of different oxidation levels. An analytical dependence has been obtained of the selectivity of the process and conversion on the composition of the reaction mixture. A qualitative agreement has been established between the theoretical and experimental dependences of selectivity and conversion on the ratio of the benzene and oxygen concentrations in the reaction mixture.

  10. Study of sensory diversity and redundancy to encode for chemical mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Gálvez, Agustín; Fernandez, Luis; Marco, Santiago

    2011-09-01

    Inspired by sensory diversity and redundancy at the olfactory epithelium, we have built a large chemical sensor array based on commercial MOX sensors. Different sensor families along with temperature modulation accounts for sensory diversity, whereas sensors of the same family combined with different load resistors provide redundancy to the system. To study the encoding of odor mixtures, a data collection consisting on the response of the array to 3 binary mixtures of ethanol, acetone, and butanone with 18 different concentration ratios is obtained.

  11. Analysis of functional effects of a mixture of five pesticides using a ray design.

    PubMed

    Gennings, Chris; Carter, W Hans; Casey, Michelle; Moser, Virginia; Carchman, Richard; Simmons, Jane Ellen

    2004-11-01

    The protection of human health from the adverse effects of cumulative environmental exposure to chemical mixtures is an important issue. Of particular interest is the detection and characterization of interaction among chemicals in complex mixtures. Response surface methodology, often supported by factorial designs, is the classical statistical experimental approach. Fixed-ratio ray designs, which may include the use of single chemical data in addition to data along mixture ray(s), have been proposed as an alternative approach. Such designs permit a reduction in the amount of experimental effort when the region of interest can be restricted to exposure-relevant mixing ratios. A 'single chemicals required' (SCR) approach and a 'single chemicals not required' (SCNR) approach are both described. The methods are illustrated with a five-chemical mixture of organophosphorus pesticides-acephate (ACE), diazinon (DIA), chlorpyrifos (CPF), malathion (MAL) and dimethoate (DIM). Their relative proportions in the mixture were based on the relative dietary human exposure estimates of each chemical as projected by the U.S. EPA Dietary Exposure Evaluation Model (DEEM). Use of the SCR and SCNR methods for binary endpoints are demonstrated using a dichotomized gait score as an indication of toxicity. For both methods, the overall hypothesis of additivity was rejected, indicating significant departure from additivity when the five pesticides were combined at the specified mixing ratio. By comparison of the predicted response under additivity to the modeled response of the experimental mixture data this departure from additivity was characterized as synergy (greater than additive toxicity). To examine the influence of malathion in the mixture, it was removed from the five-pesticide mixture (full ray) and the remaining four chemicals (reduced ray) were combined at the same relative proportions used in the full fixed-ratio ray There was not a significant departure from additivity along

  12. Thermal Transitions and Extrusion of Glycerol-Plasticized Whey Protein Mixtures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of glycerol and moisture contents on the thermal transitions of whey protein isolate (WPI) powder-glycerol-water mixtures were studied. Mixtures with ratios of 100:0, 70:30, 60:40 and 50:50 WPI:glycerol on a dry basis (db) were pre-conditioned to 0.34+/-0.01 (25.4±0.4ºC) and 0.48+/-0.02...

  13. Fractionation in Gay-Berne liquid crystal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Razo, J Antonio; Díaz-Herrera, Enrique; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2007-10-01

    We present a constant-pressure molecular dynamics simulation study of the phase behavior of binary (50:50) Gay-Berne liquid crystal mixtures consisting of elongated particles with different lengths (LA>LB) and equal diameters. We focus on systems at dense liquid-state conditions. Considering three mixtures characterized by different values of LA(B) and different length ratios q=LB/LA<1, we find complex fluid-fluid phase behavior resulting from the interplay between nematic, smectic-A-type, or smectic-B-type orientational ordering, on the one hand, and demixing into two phases of different composition (fractionation), on the other hand. The driving "forces" of demixing transitions are the temperature and the length ratio. Indeed, in the system characterized by the largest value of q (q=0.86) orientational order occurs already in mixed states, whereas full fractionation is found at q=0.71. The two resulting states are either of type smectic-B-nematic (intermediate temperatures) or smectic-B-smectic-B (low temperatures). In the intermediate case q=0.80 we observe a stepwise ordering and demixing behavior on cooling the system from high temperatures. Moreover, our results show that the stability range of (partially) nematic structures in mixtures of sufficiently small q can be significantly larger than in the pure counterparts, in qualitative agreement with experimental observations.

  14. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry and humid air in the same forced convection cooling scheme and were compared using appropriate nondimensional parameters (Nusselt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers). A forced convection scheme with a complex flow field, two dimensional arrays of circular jets with crossflow, was utilized with humidity ratios (mass ratio of water vapor to air) up to 0.23. The dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat of air, steam and air/steam mixtures are examined. Methods for determining gaseous mixture properties from the properties of their pure components are reviewed as well as methods for determining these properties with good confidence. The need for more experimentally determined property data for humid air is discussed. It is concluded that dimensionless forms of forced convection heat transfer data and empirical correlations based on measurements with dry air may be applied to conditions involving humid air with the same confidence as for the dry air case itself, provided that the thermophysical properties of the humid air mixtures are known with the same confidence as their dry air counterparts.

  15. Fuel properties of bituminous coal and pyrolytic oil mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Hazlin; Sharuddin, Munawar Zaman; Daud, Ahmad Rafizan Mohamad; Syed-Hassan, Syed Shatir A.

    2014-10-01

    Investigation on the thermal decomposition kinetics of coal-biooil slurry (CBS) fuel prepared at different ratios (100:0,70:30,60:40,0:100) was conducted using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA). The materials consisted of Clermont bituminous coal (Australia) and bio-oil (also known as pyrolytic oil) from the source of Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB) that was thermally converted by means of pyrolysis. Thermal decomposition of CBS fuel was performed in an inert atmosphere (50mL/min nitrogen) under non-isothermal conditions from room temperature to 1000°C at heating rate of 10°C/min. The apparent activation energy (Ea.) and pre-exponential factor (A) were calculated from the experimental results by using an Arrhenius-type kinetic model which first-order decomposition reaction was assumed. All kinetic parameters were tabulated based on the TG data obtained from the experiment. It was found that, the CBS fuel has higher reactivity than Clermont coal fuel during pyrolysis process, as the addition of pyrolytic oil will reduce the Ea values of the fuel. The thermal profiles of the mixtures showed potential trends that followed the characteristics of an ideal slurry fuel where high degradation rate is desirable. Among the mixture, the optimum fuel was found at the ratio of 60:40 of pyrolytic oil/coal mixtures with highest degradation rate. These findings may contribute to the development of a slurry fuel to be used in the vast existing conventional power plants.

  16. Hard-sphere kinetic models for inert and reactive mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polewczak, Jacek

    2016-10-01

    I consider stochastic variants of a simple reacting sphere (SRS) kinetic model (Xystris and Dahler 1978 J. Chem. Phys. 68 387-401, Qin and Dahler 1995 J. Chem. Phys. 103 725-50, Dahler and Qin 2003 J. Chem. Phys. 118 8396-404) for dense reacting mixtures. In contrast to the line-of-center models of chemical reactive models, in the SRS kinetic model, the microscopic reversibility (detailed balance) can be easily shown to be satisfied, and thus all mathematical aspects of the model can be fully justified. In the SRS model, the molecules behave as if they were single mass points with two internal states. Collisions may alter the internal states of the molecules, and this occurs when the kinetic energy associated with the reactive motion exceeds the activation energy. Reactive and non-reactive collision events are considered to be hard sphere-like. I consider a four component mixture A, B, A *, B *, in which the chemical reactions are of the type A+B\\rightleftharpoons {{A}\\ast}+{{B}\\ast} , with A * and B * being distinct species from A and B. This work extends the joined works with George Stell to the kinetic models of dense inert and reactive mixtures. The idea of introducing smearing-type effect in the collisional process results in a new class of stochastic kinetic models for both inert and reactive mixtures. In this paper the important new mathematical properties of such systems of kinetic equations are proven. The new results for stochastic revised Enskog system for inert mixtures are also provided.

  17. Adapted polarization state contrast image.

    PubMed

    Richert, Michael; Orlik, Xavier; De Martino, Antonello

    2009-08-03

    We propose a general method to maximize the polarimetric contrast between an object and its background using a predetermined illumination polarization state. After a first estimation of the polarimetric properties of the scene by classical Mueller imaging, we evaluate the incident polarized field that induces scattered polarization states by the object and background, as opposite as possible on the Poincar e sphere. With a detection method optimized for a 2-channel imaging system, Monte Carlo simulations of low flux coherent imaging are performed with various objects and backgrounds having different properties of retardance, dichroism and depolarization. With respect to classical Mueller imaging, possibly associated to the polar decomposition, our results show a noticeable increase in the Bhattacharyya distance used as our contrast parameter.

  18. High-contrast imaging testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Silva, D; Poyneer, L; Macintosh, B; Bauman, B; Palmer, D; Remington, T; Delgadillo-Lariz, M

    2008-01-23

    Several high-contrast imaging systems are currently under construction to enable the detection of extra-solar planets. In order for these systems to achieve their objectives, however, there is considerable developmental work and testing which must take place. Given the need to perform these tests, a spatially-filtered Shack-Hartmann adaptive optics system has been assembled to evaluate new algorithms and hardware configurations which will be implemented in these future high-contrast imaging systems. In this article, construction and phase measurements of a membrane 'woofer' mirror are presented. In addition, results from closed-loop operation of the assembled testbed with static phase plates are presented. The testbed is currently being upgraded to enable operation at speeds approaching 500 hz and to enable studies of the interactions between the woofer and tweeter deformable mirrors.

  19. Monitoring stiffness contrast in elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Miklos; Bharat, Shyam; Varghese, Tomy; Techavipoo, Udomchai; Liu, Wu

    2005-03-01

    Elastography is an imaging modality used to image tissue strains resulting from external quasi-static compression of tissue. Therefore, elastograms can be used to study variations in the stiffness of thermally coagulated regions of tissue. In this study, the variations in stiffness contrast of lesions formed by radio frequency (RF) ablation of canine liver tissue have been investigated. RF ablation was performed on in vitro canine liver tissue over a range of temperatures from 70 - 100 degrees C, and over a range of ablation times from 1 -- 8 minutes. Elastography was then performed on these samples and on normal tissue. It was expected that stiffness contrast would increase with increasing lesion temperature and ablation duration, on the basis that higher temperature and greater ablation durations lead to increased protein denaturation. This increase was seen with ablation duration, but is not obvious with ablation temperature. These and other results will be discussed.

  20. What contributes to the combined effect of a complex mixture?

    PubMed

    Altenburger, Rolf; Walter, Helge; Grote, Matthias

    2004-12-01

    The effect of a mixture of 10 compounds, which have previously been identified in an effect-directed analysis as potentially relevant for a specific contaminated riverine sediment (Brack et al. Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 1999, 37, 164), were investigated for the underlying joint effect. Components identified in an organic sediment extract included several PAHs (benzo[ghi]fluoranthene, benz[a]anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, 2-phenylnaphthalene, anthracene, and phenanthrene) plus prometryn, N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine, and parathion-methyl. Experiments were performed using a one-generation algal bioassay with the unicellular green algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus as well as chlorophyll fluorescence quenching analysis to describe the effects of the components and mixtures thereof. Analysis of the mixture effects based on concentration-response modeling of the effect data reveals that indeed effect contributions of several components can be expected although the mixture ratio is not equitoxic and the individual components vary greatly with respect to biological effect. Comparing predicted and observed mixture effects, the combined effect may not be attributed to a joint narcotic effect of the mixture components. Evidently, some of the components act specifically and dissimilar and may therefore be best described in their combined effect by response addition while for others a similar mode of action seems plausible. Chlorophyll fluorescence quenching analysis supports to discriminate between prometryn, N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine, and PAHs. A joint model for calculating the combined effect using concentration addition for the suspected unspecifically acting components in algae (PAHs and parathion-methyl) and subsequently response addition for this group and the other components clearly improves the description of the observed combined effect. Allocation of effect contributions to specific components using toxic units or effect contributions lead to different judgments. The

  1. Spinodal Clustering in Thin Films of Nanoparticle-Polymer Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Him Cheng; Cabral, João T.

    2010-07-01

    Thin supported polystyrene-C60 fullerene mixtures annealed above their glass transition temperature develop spinodal surface undulations which depend on film thickness h(20-500nm), polymer molecular mass Mw, temperature, and time t. The dominant wavelength λ˜1-10μm scales linearly with h and coarsening kinetics follow λ˜tα, with 0<α(h)<1/3; the morphology eventually pins at long times. This spinodal surface excitation contrasts with dewetting suppression and film stability observed in low-Mw polymers and results from the interplay of binary miscibility and fullerene substrate attraction.

  2. A Chlorfenapyr Mixture Net Interceptor® G2 Shows High Efficacy and Wash Durability against Resistant Mosquitoes in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    N’Guessan, Raphael; Odjo, Abibatou; Ngufor, Corine; Malone, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Malaria control through use of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LN) is threatened by the selection of anopheline mosquitoes strongly resistant to pyrethroid insecticides. To sustain future effectiveness it is essential to identify and evaluate novel insecticides suitable for nets. Mixtures of two insecticides with contrasting mode of action have the potential to kill resistant vectors and restore transmission control provided the formulation can withstand regular washing over the net’s life span. Method The efficacy of a novel mixture LN, Interceptor® G2, that combines the pyrrole chlorfenapyr and pyrethroid alpha-cypermethrin was evaluated under controlled household conditions (experimental hut trial) and by laboratory bioassay against pyrethroid resistant An. gambiae in Benin before and after standardized washing. Comparison arms included standard alpha-cypermethrin LN, nets hand-treated with chlorfenapyr-only and untreated nets. Results The chlorfenapyr-alphacypermethrin LN demonstrated improved efficacy and wash resistance compared to a standard alpha-cypermethrin LN against pyrethroid resistant mosquitoes (resistance ratio 207). In experimental hut trial alpha-cypermethrin LN killed only 20% (95% CI 15–26%) of host-seeking An. gambiae whilst mixture LN killed 71% (95% CI 65–77%). Mixture LN washed 20 times killed 65% (95% CI 58–71%), and thus intensive washing reduced efficacy by only 6% (95% CI 1.3–11%). The chlorfenapyr net killed 76% (95% CI 70–81%). Personal protection and blood feeding inhibition did not differ between mixture and pyrethroid LN; however, the mixture LN was 2.5 (95% CI: 2.1–3.1) times more protective than untreated nets. Standard WHO cone bioassays conducted during day time hours failed to anticipate field efficacy but overnight tunnel tests successfully predicted mixture LN and chlorfenapyr net efficacy in field trials. Conclusion Interceptor® G2 LN demonstrates the potential to control transmission and provide

  3. The Opposition Effect in Two Component Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Hapke, B. W.; Smythe, W. D.; Hale, A. S.; Piatek, J. L.

    2003-05-01

    Experiments find that the Opposition Effect (OE) in particulate materials is due to two processes, Shadow Hiding (SHOE) and Coherent Backscattering (CBOE)(Nelson, et al. 2000; 2002). SHOE arises because, as phase angle approaches zero, shadows cast by regolith grains on other grains become invisible to the observer. CBOE results from constructive interference beween rays traveling the same path but in opposite directions. We measured the angular scattering properties of 9 mixtures of Aluminum Oxide and Boron Carbide powders of the same particle diameter (25 microns). The reflectance of the materials ranged from 7-91%. Along with the reflectance phase curve we measured the circular polarization ratio, CPR-the ratio of the intensity of the light returned with the same helicity as the incident light to that with the opposite helicity. An increase in CPR with decreasing phase angle indicates increased multiple scattering and is consistent with CBOE. It might be expected that materials of higher albedo would exhibit increased multiple scattering and that CBOE would increase as albedo increases. Remarkably, we find the highest albedo samples did not have the strongest CBOE opposition peaks. Instead, the maximum CBOE contribution was for the samples with reflectance between 15 and 40%. We derived a theoretical model which reproduces the data quite satisfactorily. This model shows that the reflectance where we find the CBOE amplitude to be a maximum is where the contribution of second order scattering is largest relative to the other orders. Hence, for closely packed media the maximum contribution of CBOE does not occur in materials of highest albedo but where the relative contribution of second order scattering is largest. Nelson, et al. 2000. Icarus, 147, 545-558. Nelson, et al., 2002, Planetary and Space Science, 50, 849-856. This work was done at JPL supported by NASA's PGG program.

  4. Electrofluidic systems for contrast management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebello, Keith J.; Maranchi, Jeffrey P.; Tiffany, Jason E.; Brown, Christopher Y.; Maisano, Adam J.; Hagedon, Matthew A.; Heikenfeld, Jason C.

    2012-06-01

    Operating in dynamic lighting conditions and in greatly varying backgrounds is challenging. Current paints and state-ofthe- art passive adaptive coatings (e.g. photochromics) are not suitable for multi- environment situations. A semi-active, low power, skin is needed that can adapt its reflective properties based on the background environment to minimize contrast through the development and incorporation of suitable pigment materials. Electrofluidic skins are a reflective display technology for electronic ink and paper applications. The technology is similar to that in E Ink but makes use of MEMS based microfluidic structures, instead of simple black and white ink microcapsules dispersed in clear oil. Electrofluidic skin's low power operation and fast switching speeds (~20 ms) are an improvement over current state-ofthe- art contrast management technologies. We report on a microfluidic display which utilizes diffuse pigment dispersion inks to change the contrast of the underlying substrate from 5.8% to 100%. Voltage is applied and an electromechanical pressure is used to pull a pigment dispersion based ink from a hydrophobic coated reservoir into a hydrophobic coated surface channel. When no voltage is applied, the Young-Laplace pressure pushes the pigment dispersion ink back down into the reservoir. This allows the pixel to switch from the on and off state by balancing the two pressures. Taking a systems engineering approach from the beginning of development has enabled the technology to be integrated into larger systems.

  5. Emulsification Of Eutectic Salt Mixtures In Fluid Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Hawkins, T. W.

    1988-05-01

    High-internal-phase-volume emulsions of 75 volt 3/18/79 potassium iodide/sodium iodide/ urea model eutectic salt mixture in 83.5/16.5 Sartomer R-45HT hydroxy-terminated polybutadi-ene/Nujol mineral oil binder mixture were prepared at 60°C using water-in-oil emulsifiers and cured with isophorone diisocyanate or Desmodur N-100. The Nujol mineral oil enhanced the emulsification with a negligible reduction in the tensile properties of the cured elastomer. The average emulsion droplet sizes were ca. 200 nm initially, but increased slowly during curing to 500-1000 nm. The coalescence of the emulsion droplets followed the second-order dependence predicted by the von Smoluchowski diffusion-controlled flocculation; the rate constants were 1.05x10-18 and 9.58x10-18 cc/droplet-sec for dirnethyldioctadecylammonium bromide and Span 85 sorbitan trioleate, respectively. The isophorone diisocyanate reacted with emulsifiers containing primary hydroxyl or amine groups, to give unstable emulsions or no emulsions at all. Dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide with no primary hydroxyl or amine groups, however, did not react with isocyanates and gave stable emulsions. The reaction of the R-45HT hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene with isophorone diisocyanate followed the expec-ted second-order kinetics with a rate constant of 3.42x10-4 liters/mole-sec at 60°C. The tensile properties of the cured elastomers and emulsions generally increased with increasing NCO/OH ratio up to 1.6/1.0. With increasing volume fraction of dispersed phase, the maximum stress (tensile strength) decreased, the maximum strain (percent elongation) increased, and the initial modulus (tensile modulus) decreased, in contrast to the behavior of conventional filled polymer systems; however, the maximum stresses were in accord with theoretical values for a filled polymer in which the filler particles bear no load, the initial moduli were in accord with the predictions of an isostrain model, and the maximum strain increased

  6. Investigation on minimum ignition energy of mixtures of α-pinene-benzene/air.

    PubMed

    Coudour, B; Chetehouna, K; Rudz, S; Gillard, P; Garo, J P

    2015-01-01

    Minimum ignition energies (MIE) of α-pinene-benzene/air mixtures at a given temperature for different equivalence ratios and fuel proportions are experimented in this paper. We used a cylindrical chamber of combustion using a nanosecond pulse at 1,064 nm from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Laser-induced spark ignitions were studied for two molar proportions of α-pinene/benzene mixtures, respectively 20-80% and 50-50%. The effect of the equivalence ratio (Φ) has been investigated for 0.7, 0.9, 1.1 and 1.5 and ignition of fuel/air mixtures has been experimented for two different incident laser energies: 25 and 33 mJ. This study aims at observing the influence of different α-pinene/benzene proportions on the flammability of the mixture to have further knowledge of the potential of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and smoke mixtures to influence forest fires, especially in the case of the accelerating forest fire phenomenon (AFF). Results of ignition probability and energy absorption are based on 400 laser shots for each studied fuel proportions. MIE results as functions of equivalence ratio compared to data of pure α-pinene and pure benzene demonstrate that the presence of benzene in α-pinene-air mixture tends to increase ignition probability and reduce MIE without depending strongly on the α-pinene/benzene proportion.

  7. Colloid-polymer mixtures under slit confinement.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ramírez, Allan; Figueroa-Gerstenmaier, Susana; Odriozola, Gerardo

    2017-03-14

    We report a NVT molecular dynamic study of colloid-polymer mixtures under slit confinement. For this purpose, we are employing the Asakura-Oosawa model for studying colloidal particles, polymer coils, and hard walls as the external confining field. The colloid-polymer size ratio, q, is varied in the range 1⩾q⩾0.4 and the confinement distance, H, in 10σc⩾H⩾3σc, σc being the colloidal diameter. Vapor-liquid coexistence properties are assessed, from which phase diagrams are built. The obtained data fulfill the corresponding states law for a constant H when q is varied. The shift of the polymer and colloidal chemical potentials of coexistence follows a linear relationship with (H-σc)(-1) for H≳4σc. The confined vapor-liquid interfaces can be fitted with a semicircular line of curvature (H-σc)(-1), from which the contact angle can be obtained. We observe complete wetting of the confining walls for reservoir polymer concentrations above and close to the critical value, and partial wetting for reservoir polymer concentrations above and far from it.

  8. Colloid-polymer mixtures under slit confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Ramírez, Allan; Figueroa-Gerstenmaier, Susana; Odriozola, Gerardo

    2017-03-01

    We report a NVT molecular dynamic study of colloid-polymer mixtures under slit confinement. For this purpose, we are employing the Asakura-Oosawa model for studying colloidal particles, polymer coils, and hard walls as the external confining field. The colloid-polymer size ratio, q, is varied in the range 1 ⩾q ⩾0.4 and the confinement distance, H, in 10 σc ⩾H ⩾3 σc , σc being the colloidal diameter. Vapor-liquid coexistence properties are assessed, from which phase diagrams are built. The obtained data fulfill the corresponding states law for a constant H when q is varied. The shift of the polymer and colloidal chemical potentials of coexistence follows a linear relationship with (H-σc ) -1 for H ≳4 σc . The confined vapor-liquid interfaces can be fitted with a semicircular line of curvature (H-σc ) -1, from which the contact angle can be obtained. We observe complete wetting of the confining walls for reservoir polymer concentrations above and close to the critical value, and partial wetting for reservoir polymer concentrations above and far from it.

  9. Within- and between-city contrasts in nitrogen dioxide and mortality in 10 Canadian cities; a subset of the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort (CanCHEC).

    PubMed

    Crouse, Dan L; Peters, Paul A; Villeneuve, Paul J; Proux, Marc-Olivier; Shin, Hwashin H; Goldberg, Mark S; Johnson, Markey; Wheeler, Amanda J; Allen, Ryan W; Atari, Dominic Odwa; Jerrett, Michael; Brauer, Michael; Brook, Jeffrey R; Cakmak, Sabit; Burnett, Richard T

    2015-01-01

    The independent and joint effects of within- and between-city contrasts in air pollution on mortality have been investigated rarely. To examine the differential effects of between- versus within-city contrasts in pollution exposure, we used both ambient measurements and land use regression models to assess associations with mortality and exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) among ~735,600 adults in 10 of the largest Canadian cities. We estimated exposure contrasts partitioned into within- and between-city contrasts, and the sum of these as overall exposures, for every year from 1984 to 2006. Residential histories allowed us to follow subjects annually during the study period. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) adjusted for many personal and contextual variables. In fully-adjusted, random-effects models, we found positive associations between overall NO2 exposures and mortality from non-accidental causes (HR per 5 p.p.b.: 1.05; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-1.07), cardiovascular disease (HR per 5 p.p.b.: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.01-1.06), ischaemic heart disease (HR per 5 p.p.b.: 1.05; 95% CI: 1.02-1.08) and respiratory disease (HR per 5 p.p.b.: 1.04; 95% CI: 0.99-1.08), but not from cerebrovascular disease (HR per 5 p.p.b.: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.96-1.06). We found that most of these associations were determined by within-city contrasts, as opposed to by between-city contrasts in NO2. Our results suggest that variation in NO2 concentrations within a city may represent a more toxic mixture of pollution than variation between cities.

  10. Within- and between-city contrasts in nitrogen dioxide and mortality in 10 Canadian cities; a subset of the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort (CanCHEC)

    PubMed Central

    Crouse, Dan L; Peters, Paul A; Villeneuve, Paul J; Proux, Marc-Olivier; Shin, Hwashin H; Goldberg, Mark S; Johnson, Markey; Wheeler, Amanda J; Allen, Ryan W; Atari, Dominic Odwa; Jerrett, Michael; Brauer, Michael; Brook, Jeffrey R; Cakmak, Sabit; Burnett, Richard T

    2015-01-01

    The independent and joint effects of within- and between-city contrasts in air pollution on mortality have been investigated rarely. To examine the differential effects of between- versus within-city contrasts in pollution exposure, we used both ambient measurements and land use regression models to assess associations with mortality and exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) among ~735,600 adults in 10 of the largest Canadian cities. We estimated exposure contrasts partitioned into within- and between-city contrasts, and the sum of these as overall exposures, for every year from 1984 to 2006. Residential histories allowed us to follow subjects annually during the study period. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) adjusted for many personal and contextual variables. In fully-adjusted, random-effects models, we found positive associations between overall NO2 exposures and mortality from non-accidental causes (HR per 5 p.p.b.: 1.05; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03–1.07), cardiovascular disease (HR per 5 p.p.b.: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.01–1.06), ischaemic heart disease (HR per 5 p.p.b.: 1.05; 95% CI: 1.02–1.08) and respiratory disease (HR per 5 p.p.b.: 1.04; 95% CI: 0.99–1.08), but not from cerebrovascular disease (HR per 5 p.p.b.: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.96–1.06). We found that most of these associations were determined by within-city contrasts, as opposed to by between-city contrasts in NO2. Our results suggest that variation in NO2 concentrations within a city may represent a more toxic mixture of pollution than variation between cities. PMID:25605445

  11. Formation and spectra of clathrate hydrates of methanol and methanol-ether mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kenneth Dixon; Devlin, J. Paul

    1997-10-01

    Infrared spectra of mixed clathrate hydrates, with either ethylene oxide (EO) or tetrahydrofuran (THF) and methanol molecules as the guest species, have been obtained from thin films prepared by vapor deposition of D 2O mixtures in the 115-130 K range. Although methanol acts as a suppressant to the direct vapor deposition of a type I clathrate with EO, nearly complete conversion of 115 K amorphous codeposits, to the crystalline mixed clathrate, occurs upon warming near 150 K. By contrast, the type II clathrate of THF shows an increased crystalline quality when methanol is included in the vapor deposits of the mixed clathrate hydrate at 130 K. The observation of the OD stretch-mode band of weakly bonded CD 3OD near 2575 cm -1 is part of the evidence that the methanol molecules are encaged. However, as shown theoretically by Tanaka, the clathrate hydrates of methanol, even when mixed with an ether help gas, are not stable structures but form at low temperatures because of kinetic factors, only to decompose in the 140-160 K range. Attempts to prepare a simple type I or type II clathrate hydrate of methanol have produced mixed results. Limited amounts of clathrate hydrate form during deposition but annealing does not result in complete conversion to crystalline clathrates, particularly for host : guest ratios of 17 : 1.

  12. The production of carbon nanofibers and thin films on palladium catalysts from ethylene oxygen mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Jonathan; Doorn, Stephen; Atwater, Mark; Leseman, Zayd; Luhrs, Claudia C; Diez, Yolanda F; Diaz, Angel M

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of carbonaceous materials deposited in fuel rich ethylene-oxygen mixtures on three types of palladium: foil, sputtered film, and nanopowder, are reported. It was found that the form of palladium has a dramatic influence on the morphology of the deposited carbon. In particular, on sputtered film and powder, tight 'weaves' of sub-micron filaments formed quickly. In contrast, on foils under identical conditions, the dominant morphology is carbon thin films with basal planes oriented parallel to the substrate surface. Temperature, gas flow rate, reactant flow ratio (C2H4:02), and residence time (position) were found to influence both growth rate and type for all three forms of Pd. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, temperature-programmed oxidation, and Raman spectroscopy were used to assess the crystallinity of the as-deposited carbon, and it was determined that transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were the most reliable methods for determining crystallinity. The dependence of growth on reactor position, and the fact that no growth was observed in the absence of oxygen support the postulate that the carbon deposition proceeds by combustion generated radical species.

  13. Segmentation of Concealed Objects in Passive Millimeter-Wave Images Based on the Gaussian Mixture Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wangyang; Chen, Xiangguang; Wu, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Passive millimeter wave (PMMW) imaging has become one of the most effective means to detect the objects concealed under clothing. Due to the limitations of the available hardware and the inherent physical properties of PMMW imaging systems, images often exhibit poor contrast and low signal-to-noise ratios. Thus, it is difficult to achieve ideal results by using a general segmentation algorithm. In this paper, an advanced Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) algorithm for the segmentation of concealed objects in PMMW images is presented. Our work is concerned with the fact that the GMM is a parametric statistical model, which is often used to characterize the statistical behavior of images. Our approach is three-fold: First, we remove the noise from the image using both a notch reject filter and a total variation filter. Next, we use an adaptive parameter initialization GMM algorithm (APIGMM) for simulating the histogram of images. The APIGMM provides an initial number of Gaussian components and start with more appropriate parameter. Bayesian decision is employed to separate the pixels of concealed objects from other areas. At last, the confidence interval (CI) method, alongside local gradient information, is used to extract the concealed objects. The proposed hybrid segmentation approach detects the concealed objects more accurately, even compared to two other state-of-the-art segmentation methods.

  14. Relative activity of cholesterol in OPPC/cholesterol/sphingomyelin mixtures measured with an acoustic sensor.

    PubMed

    Melzak, Kathryn A; Gizeli, Electra

    2009-03-01

    Acoustic devices are sensitive to the mole fraction of cholesterol present in liposomes adsorbed to the device surface as a result of the different mechanical properties of the liposomes. This fact was exploited to develop an acoustic assay to determine the relative affinity of cholesterol for different lipid mixtures. In the assay described here, the initial rate of beta-cyclodextrin-induced removal of cholesterol was measured for liposomes having a range of compositions. The initial rate of cholesterol removal was found to be directly proportional to the concentration of beta-cyclodextrin (betaCD) present over the range of 0-7.5 mg/ml (0-6.6 mM), consistent with other assays measuring the betaCD-accelerated transfer of cholesterol between liposomes. The affinity of cholesterol for 1-oleoyl-2-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (OPPC) liposomes with a sphingomyelin mole fraction, chi(SPM), of 0.2 was found to be 1.4x higher than that for pure OPPC liposomes. For liposomes composed only of OPPC and cholesterol in varying ratios, the initial rate of cholesterol removal was determined as a function of cholesterol mole fraction (chi(C)). The initial rate of removal showed an increase at chi(C) = 0.13, consistent with phase diagrams showing the start of liquid ordered domain formation, but no such increase at chi(C) = 0.25, in contrast to the predictions of the umbrella model for OPPC/cholesterol interactions.

  15. Ratio estimation in SIMS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogliore, R. C.; Huss, G. R.; Nagashima, K.

    2011-09-01

    The determination of an isotope ratio by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) traditionally involves averaging a number of ratios collected over the course of a measurement. We show that this method leads to an additive positive bias in the expectation value of the estimated ratio that is approximately equal to the true ratio divided by the counts of the denominator isotope of an individual ratio. This bias does not decrease as the number of ratios used in the average increases. By summing all counts in the numerator isotope, then dividing by the sum of counts in the denominator isotope, the estimated ratio is less biased: the bias is approximately equal to the ratio divided by the summed counts of the denominator isotope over the entire measurement. We propose a third ratio estimator (Beale's estimator) that can be used when the bias from the summed counts is unacceptably large for the hypothesis being tested. We derive expressions for the variance of these ratio estimators as well as the conditions under which they are normally distributed. Finally, we investigate a SIMS dataset showing the effects of ratio bias, and discuss proper ratio estimation for SIMS analysis.

  16. Apparatus and method for operating internal combustion engines from variable mixtures of gaseous fuels

    DOEpatents

    Heffel, James W.; Scott, Paul B.; Park, Chan Seung

    2011-11-01

    An apparatus and method for utilizing any arbitrary mixture ratio of multiple fuel gases having differing combustion characteristics, such as natural gas and hydrogen gas, within an internal combustion engine. The gaseous fuel composition ratio is first sensed, such as by thermal conductivity, infrared signature, sound propagation speed, or equivalent mixture differentiation mechanisms and combinations thereof which are utilized as input(s) to a "multiple map" engine control module which modulates selected operating parameters of the engine, such as fuel injection and ignition timing, in response to the proportions of fuel gases available so that the engine operates correctly and at high efficiency irrespective of the gas mixture ratio being utilized. As a result, an engine configured according to the teachings of the present invention may be fueled from at least two different fuel sources without admixing constraints.

  17. Apparatus and method for operating internal combustion engines from variable mixtures of gaseous fuels

    DOEpatents

    Heffel, James W.; Scott, Paul B.

    2003-09-02

    An apparatus and method for utilizing any arbitrary mixture ratio of multiple fuel gases having differing combustion characteristics, such as natural gas and hydrogen gas, within an internal combustion engine. The gaseous fuel composition ratio is first sensed, such as by thermal conductivity, infrared signature, sound propagation speed, or equivalent mixture differentiation mechanisms and combinations thereof which are utilized as input(s) to a "multiple map" engine control module which modulates selected operating parameters of the engine, such as fuel injection and ignition timing, in response to the proportions of fuel gases available so that the engine operates correctly and at high efficiency irrespective of the gas mixture ratio being utilized. As a result, an engine configured according to the teachings of the present invention may be fueled from at least two different fuel sources without admixing constraints.

  18. Explosion pressures of hydrocarbon-air mixtures in closed vessels.

    PubMed

    Razus, Domnina; Movileanu, Codina; Brinzea, Venera; Oancea, D

    2006-07-31

    An experimental study on pressure evolution during closed vessel explosions of several gaseous fuel-air mixtures was performed, at various initial pressures within 0.3-1.2 bar and ambient initial temperature. Explosion pressures and explosion times are reported for methane-, n-pentane-, n-hexane-, propene-, butene-, butadiene-, cyclohexane- and benzene-air mixtures. The explosion pressures measured in a spherical vessel (Phi=10 cm) and in three cylindrical vessels with different diameter/height ratios are examined in comparison with the adiabatic explosion pressures, computed by assuming chemical equilibrium within the flame front. The influence of initial pressure, fuel concentration and heat losses during propagation (determined by the size and shape of the explosion vessel and by the position of the ignition source) on explosion pressures and explosion times are discussed for some of the examined systems.

  19. Terahertz identification and quantification of neurotransmitter and neurotrophy mixture

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yan; Yuan, Xiaorong; Zou, Xiang; Chen, Wanqing; Huang, Hui; Zhao, Hongwei; Song, Bo; Chen, Liang; Zhu, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz spectroscopy has been widely used for investigating the fingerprint spectrum of different substances. For cancerous tissues, the greatest difficulty is the absorption peaks of various substances contained in tissues overlap with each other, which are hard to identify and quantitative analyze. As a result, it is very hard to measure the presence of cancer cell and then to diagnose accurately. In this paper, we select three typical neurotransmitters (γ-aminobutyric acid, L-glutamic acid, dopamine hydrochloride) and two typical metabolites (inositol and creatine) in neurons to measure their terahertz spectra with different mixture ratios. By choosing characteristic absorption peaks, removing baseline and using the least square method, we can identify the components and proportions of each mixture, where the goodness of fit to practical situation is up to 94%. These results provide important evidences for identifying nerve substances and obtaining exact quantitative analysis. PMID:27895988

  20. Spontaneous ignition delay characteristics of hydrocarbon fuel-air mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefebvre, A. H.; Freeman, W. G.; Cowell, L. H.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of pressure on the autoignition characteristics of homogeneous mixtures of hydrocarbon fuels in air is examined. Autoignition delay times are measured for propane, ethylene, methane, and acetylene in a continuous flow apparatus featuring a multi-point fuel injector. Results are presented for mixture temperatures from 670K to 1020K, pressures from 1 to 10 atmospheres, equivalence ratios from 0.2 to 0.7, and velocities from 5 to 30 m/s. Delay time is related to pressure, temperature, and fuel concentration by global reaction theory. The results show variations in global activation energy from 25 to 38 kcal/kg-mol, pressure exponents from 0.66 to 1.21, and fuel concentration exponents from 0.19 to 0.75 for the fuels studied. These results are generally in good agreement with previous studies carried out under similar conditions.

  1. Mixtures Research at NIEHS: An Evolving Program

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Cynthia V; Carlin, Danielle J; DeVito, Micheal J; Thompson, Claudia L; Walker, Nigel J

    2014-01-01

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) has a rich history in evaluating the toxicity of mixtures. The types of mixtures assessed by the Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP) and the extramural community (through the Division of Extramural Research and Training (DERT)) have included a broad range of chemicals and toxicants, with each study having a unique set of questions and design considerations. Some examples of the types of mixtures studied include: groundwater contaminants, pesticides/fertilizers, dioxin-like chemicals (assessing the toxic equivalency approach), drug combinations, air pollution, metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, technical mixtures (e.g. pentachlorophenol, flame retardants), and mixed entities (e.g. herbals, asbestos). These endeavors have provided excellent data on the toxicity of specific mixtures and have been informative to the human health risk assessment process in general (e.g. providing data on low dose exposures to environmental chemicals). However, the mixtures research effort at NIEHS, to date, has been driven by test article nominations to the DNTP or by investigator-initiated research through DERT. Recently, the NIEHS has embarked upon an effort to coordinate mixtures research across both intramural and extramural divisions in order to maximize mixtures research results. A path forward for NIEHS mixtures research will be based on feedback from a Request for Information (RFI) designed to gather up-to-date views on the knowledge gaps and roadblocks to evaluating mixtures and performing cumulative risk assessment, and a workshop organized to bring together mixtures experts from risk assessment, exposure science, biology, epidemiology, and statistics. The future of mixtures research at NIEHS will include projects from nominations to DNTP, studies by extramural investigators, and collaborations across government agencies that address high-priority questions in the field of mixtures research

  2. Mixtures research at NIEHS: an evolving program.

    PubMed

    Rider, Cynthia V; Carlin, Danielle J; Devito, Micheal J; Thompson, Claudia L; Walker, Nigel J

    2013-11-16

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) has a rich history in evaluating the toxicity of mixtures. The types of mixtures assessed by the Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP) and the extramural community (through the Division of Extramural Research and Training, DERT) have included a broad range of chemicals and toxicants, with each study having a unique set of questions and design considerations. Some examples of the types of mixtures studied include: groundwater contaminants, pesticides/fertilizers, dioxin-like chemicals (assessing the toxic equivalency approach), drug combinations, air pollution, metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, technical mixtures (e.g., pentachlorophenol, flame retardants), and mixed entities (e.g., herbals, asbestos). These endeavors have provided excellent data on the toxicity of specific mixtures and have been informative to the human health risk assessment process in general (e.g., providing data on low dose exposures to environmental chemicals). However, the mixtures research effort at NIEHS, to date, has been driven by test article nominations to the DNTP or by investigator-initiated research through DERT. Recently, the NIEHS has embarked upon an effort to coordinate mixtures research across both intramural and extramural divisions in order to maximize mixtures research results. A path forward for NIEHS mixtures research will be based on feedback from a Request for Information (RFI) designed to gather up-to-date views on the knowledge gaps and roadblocks to evaluating mixtures and performing cumulative risk assessment, and a workshop organized to bring together mixtures experts from risk assessment, exposure science, biology, epidemiology, and statistics. The future of mixtures research at NIEHS will include projects from nominations to DNTP, studies by extramural investigators, and collaborations across government agencies that address high-priority questions in the field of mixtures research.

  3. Interdiffusion in binary ionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.; Pollock, E.L.

    1987-08-15

    In this paper we present molecular-dynamics and kinetic-theory calculations of the interdiffusion coefficients in dense binary ionic mixtures for conditions appropriate to both astrophysical and inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas. The diffusion coefficient is the product of a Green-Kubo integral and a thermodynamic prefactor. The molecular-dynamics and kinetic-theory estimates of the Green-Kubo portion agree very well, and it is found that this integral may also be well represented by the usual concentration-weighted sum of self-diffusion coefficients. In addition, the low-density limit of the thermodynamic prefactor is shown to represent an enhancement of the diffusion by the ''ambipolar'' electric field.

  4. Assessment of MRI Contrast Agent Kinetics via Retro-Orbital Injection in Mice: Comparison with Tail Vein Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Nojima, Masanori; Inoue, Yusuke; Ohtomo, Kuni; Kiryu, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    It is not known whether administration of contrast agent via retro-orbital injection or the tail vein route affects the efficiency of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore, we compared the effects of retro-orbital and tail vein injection on the kinetics of the contrast agent used for MRI in mice. The same group of nine healthy female mice received contrast agent via either route. An extracellular contrast agent was infused via the tail vein and retro-orbital vein, in random order. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed before and after administering the contrast agent. The contrast effects in the liver, kidney, lung, and myocardium were assessed. The average total times of venous puncture and mounting of the injection system were about 10 and 4 min for the tail vein and retro-orbital route, respectively. For all organs assessed, the maximum contrast ratio occurred 30 s after administration and the time course of the contrast ratio was similar with either routes. For each organ, the contrast ratios correlated strongly; the contrast ratios were similar. The retro-orbital and tail vein routes afforded similar results in terms of the kinetics of the contrast agent. The retro-orbital route can be used as a simple efficient alternative to tail vein injection for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of mice. PMID:26060990

  5. Heat transfer performance of a pulsating heat pipe charged with acetone-based mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenqing; Cui, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Yue

    2016-12-01

    Pulsating heat pipes (PHPs) are used as high efficiency heat exchangers, and the selection of working fluids in PHPs has a great impact on the heat transfer performance. This study investigates the thermal resistance characteristics of the PHP charged with acetone-based binary mixtures, where deionized water, methanol and ethanol were added to and mixed with acetone, respectively. The volume mixing ratios were 2:1, 4:1 and 7:1, and the heating power ranged from 10 to 100 W with filling ratios of 45, 55, 62 and 70%. At a low filling ratio (45%), the zeotropic characteristics of the binary mixtures have an influence on the heat transfer performance of the PHP. Adding water, which has a substantially different boiling point compared with that of acetone, can significantly improve the anti-dry-out ability inside the PHP. At a medium filling ratio (55%), the heat transfer performance of the PHP is affected by both phase transition characteristics and physical properties of working fluids. At high heating power, the thermal resistance of the PHP with acetone-water mixture is between that with pure acetone and pure water, whereas the thermal resistance of the PHP with acetone-methanol and acetone-ethanol mixtures at mixing ratios of 2:1 and 4:1 is less than that with the corresponding pure fluids. At high filling ratios (62 and 70%), the heat transfer performance of the PHP is mainly determined by the properties of working fluids that affects the flow resistance. Thus, the PHP with acetone-methanol and acetone-ethanol mixtures that have a lower flow resistance shows better heat transfer performance than that with acetone-water mixture.

  6. Accurate prediction of the response of freshwater fish to a mixture of estrogenic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Brian, Jayne V; Harris, Catherine A; Scholze, Martin; Backhaus, Thomas; Booy, Petra; Lamoree, Marja; Pojana, Giulio; Jonkers, Niels; Runnalls, Tamsin; Bonfà, Angela; Marcomini, Antonio; Sumpter, John P

    2005-06-01

    Existing environmental risk assessment procedures are limited in their ability to evaluate the combined effects of chemical mixtures. We investigated the implications of this by analyzing the combined effects of a multicomponent mixture of five estrogenic chemicals using vitellogenin induction in male fathead minnows as an end point. The mixture consisted of estradiol, ethynylestradiol, nonylphenol, octylphenol, and bisphenol A. We determined concentration-response curves for each of the chemicals individually. The chemicals were then combined at equipotent concentrations and the mixture tested using fixed-ratio design. The effects of the mixture were compared with those predicted by the model of concentration addition using biomathematical methods, which revealed that there was no deviation between the observed and predicted effects of the mixture. These findings demonstrate that estrogenic chemicals have the capacity to act together in an additive manner and that their combined effects can be accurately predicted by concentration addition. We also explored the potential for mixture effects at low concentrations by exposing the fish to each chemical at one-fifth of its median effective concentration (EC50). Individually, the chemicals did not induce a significant response, although their combined effects were consistent with the predictions of concentration addition. This demonstrates the potential for estrogenic chemicals to act additively at environmentally relevant concentrations. These findings highlight the potential for existing environmental risk assessment procedures to underestimate the hazard posed by mixtures of chemicals that act via a similar mode of action, thereby leading to erroneous conclusions of absence of risk.

  7. Accurate Prediction of the Response of Freshwater Fish to a Mixture of Estrogenic Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Brian, Jayne V.; Harris, Catherine A.; Scholze, Martin; Backhaus, Thomas; Booy, Petra; Lamoree, Marja; Pojana, Giulio; Jonkers, Niels; Runnalls, Tamsin; Bonfà, Angela; Marcomini, Antonio; Sumpter, John P.

    2005-01-01

    Existing environmental risk assessment procedures are limited in their ability to evaluate the combined effects of chemical mixtures. We investigated the implications of this by analyzing the combined effects of a multicomponent mixture of five estrogenic chemicals using vitellogenin induction in male fathead minnows as an end point. The mixture consisted of estradiol, ethynylestradiol, nonylphenol, octylphenol, and bisphenol A. We determined concentration–response curves for each of the chemicals individually. The chemicals were then combined at equipotent concentrations and the mixture tested using fixed-ratio design. The effects of the mixture were compared with those predicted by the model of concentration addition using biomathematical methods, which revealed that there was no deviation between the observed and predicted effects of the mixture. These findings demonstrate that estrogenic chemicals have the capacity to act together in an additive manner and that their combined effects can be accurately predicted by concentration addition. We also explored the potential for mixture effects at low concentrations by exposing the fish to each chemical at one-fifth of its median effective concentration (EC50). Individually, the chemicals did not induce a significant response, although their combined effects were consistent with the predictions of concentration addition. This demonstrates the potential for estrogenic chemicals to act additively at environmentally relevant concentrations. These findings highlight the potential for existing environmental risk assessment procedures to underestimate the hazard posed by mixtures of chemicals that act via a similar mode of action, thereby leading to erroneous conclusions of absence of risk. PMID:15929895

  8. Computing Isentropic Flow Properties of Air/R-134a Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Ray

    2006-01-01

    MACHRK is a computer program that calculates isentropic flow properties of mixtures of air and refrigerant R-134a (tetrafluoroethane), which are used in transonic aerodynamic testing in a wind tunnel at Langley Research Center. Given the total temperature, total pressure, static pressure, and mole fraction of R-134a in a mixture, MACHRK calculates the Mach number and the following associated flow properties: dynamic pressure, velocity, density, static temperature, speed of sound, viscosity, ratio of specific heats, Reynolds number, and Prandtl number. Real-gas effects are taken into account by treating the gases comprising the mixture as both thermally and calorically imperfect. The Redlich-Kwong equation of state for mixtures and the constant-pressure ideal heat-capacity equation for the mixture are used in combination with the departure- function approach of thermodynamics to obtain the equations for computing the flow properties. In addition to the aforementioned calculations for air/R-134a mixtures, a research version of MACHRK can perform the corresponding calculations for mixtures of air and R-12 (dichlorodifluoromethane) and for air/SF6 mixtures. [R-12 was replaced by R-134a because of environmental concerns. SF6 has been considered for use in increasing the Reynolds-number range.

  9. Immobilized contrast-enhanced MRI: Gadolinium-based long-term MR contrast enhancement of the vein graft vessel wall.

    PubMed

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Yu, Peng; Tao, Ming; Nguyen, Binh T; Campagna, Christina M; Karp, Jeffrey M; Mulkern, Robert V; Ozaki, C Keith; Rybicki, Frank J

    2011-01-01

    An implantable MR contrast agent that can be covalently immobilized on tissue during surgery has been developed. The rationale is that a durable increase in tissue contrast using an implantable contrast agent can enhance postsurgical tissue differentiation using MRI. For small-vessel (e.g., vein graft) MRI, the direct benefit of such permanent "labeling" of the vessel wall by modification of its relaxation properties is to achieve more efficient imaging. This efficiency can be realized as either increased contrast leading to more accurate delineation of vessel wall and lesion tissue boundaries, or, faster imaging without penalizing contrast-to-noise ratio, or a combination thereof. We demonstrate, for the first time, stable long-term MRI enhancement using such an exogenous contrast mechanism based on immobilizing a modified diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid gadolinium(3+) dihydrogen complex on a human vein using a covalent amide bond. Signal enhancement due to the covalently immobilized contrast agent is demonstrated for excised human vein specimens imaged at 3 T, and its long-term stability is demonstrated during a 4-month incubation period.

  10. Contrasting strategic and Milan therapies.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, L

    1983-12-01

    Three related models of therapy are often grouped together as the strategic therapies. These are brief therapy model associated with the Mental Research Institute, approaches developed by Jay Haley and Cloë Madanes, and the model developed by the Milan associates. Controversy exists, however, as to whether the Milan model should be included as a strategic therapy. It appears that the similarities among the three models can mask deeper differences, thus confounding the confusion. This paper contrast the models in their development, theory, and practice.

  11. Perceptual and imaginary mixtures in chemosensation.

    PubMed

    Schifferstein, H N

    1997-02-01

    D. Algom and W.S. Cain (1991) reported similar interaction patterns for perceived and imaginary mixtures of odorants. However, their experimental design did not allow sensitive statistical testing to demonstrate differences between conditions. Three experiments on 16 mixtures of sucrose-citric acid mixtures yielded significantly different interaction pattern for perceived and imaginary mixtures. Inconsistencies in the degrees of suppression in the imaginary condition suggested that participants did not base their responses on the inspection of a mental image but on incomplete implicit or explicit knowledge of sensory interactions. Participants knew the phenomenon of mixture suppression and knew that its effects were level dependent, but they were unable to predict the exact intensity of a mixture on the basis of the intensities of its unmixed components.

  12. Differentiating amorphous mixtures of cefuroxime axetil and copovidone by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Nicolaï, B; Perrin, M-A; Céolin, R; Rietveld, I B

    2014-03-01

    The amorphous, molecular solid dispersion of cefuroxime axetil and copovidone with the mass ratio 71/29 is compared to its pure components in the amorphous state and to an amorphous mechanical mixture with the same mass ratio. Calorimetric studies demonstrate that all these materials are vitreous. By using X-ray diffraction profiles, a clear difference can be observed between the local order of the solid dispersion and that of the mechanical mixture. More generally, it is shown how the presence or absence of additivity in the diffraction data can be used to distinguish between different amorphous mixtures.

  13. Thermal Analysis of Various Epoxy Mixtures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    Dicyandiamide Thermal analysis Accelerator r20 ABSTRAC r (Continue on revre side If necesary and identif by. block riimeyp.) 4 4 (SEE REVERSE SIDE...mixed with Monuron. Also, three-component mixtures, epoxide + Dicy/Monuron, were prepared with dicyandiamide . The mixtures were cured by differential... dicyandiamide and Monuron, on the curing process, was simulated by the isothermal reaction of two mixtures. A type of reaction kinetics having the

  14. Pervaporation of water/ethanol mixtures by an aromatic polyetherimide membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, R.Y.M.; Xianshe Feng )

    1992-10-01

    The pervaporation of water/ethanol mixtures through an aromatic polyetherimide membrane was attempted. The membrane was laboratory prepared using the solution casting technique. The sorption characteristics in relation to pervaporation were also studied. It was found that the preferential sorption was altered when the liquid composition was changed, whereas the water component permeated through the membrane preferentially over the whole range of feed mixture compositions. The experimental results were analyzed in terms of sorption ratio and permeation ratio to characterize nonideality of sorption and pervaporation. The effects of some operating parameters, including temperature, feed concentration, and permeate pressure, on the pervaporation performance were also investigated.

  15. Stability of cocarboxylase in parenteral nutrition mixtures stored in multilayer bags.

    PubMed

    Allwood, M C; Martin, H

    1998-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the stability of cocarboxylase, a thiamine derivative employed as a vitamin B1 source in multivitamin additives, in parenteral nutrition (PN) mixtures containing different commercial amino acid infusions. In particular, the influence of a metabisulphite-containing amino acid product, Freamine III, was investigated. A liquid chromatographic assay method for cocarboxylase was developed and employed to investigate cocarboxylase degradation during extended storage of PN mixtures at 5 degrees C in multilayered bags. Results indicated that cocarboxylase was relatively stable over the 28-day storage period in PN mixtures containing Synthamin or Vamin products as amino acid source. In contrast, degradation was accelerated in PN mixtures containing Freamine III, suggesting that cocarboxylase is degraded by sodium metabisulphite, showing similar sensitivity to thiamine.

  16. Catalytic Gasification of Coal using Eutectic Salt Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Atul Sheth; Pradeep Agrawal; Yaw D. Yeboah.

    1998-12-04

    The objectives of this study are to: identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process. A review of the collected literature was carried out. The catalysts which have been used for gasification can be roughly classified under the following five groups: alkali metal salts; alkaline earth metal oxides and salts; mineral substances or ash in coal; transition metals and their oxides and salts; and eutectic salt mixtures. Studies involving the use of gasification catalysts have been conducted. However, most of the studies focused on the application of individual catalysts. Only two publications have reported the study of gasification of coal char in CO2 and steam catalyzed by eutectic salt mixture catalysts. By using the eutectic mixtures of salts that show good activity as individual compounds, the gasification temperature can be reduced possibly with still better activity and gasification rates due to improved dispersion of the molten catalyst on the coal particles. For similar metal/carbon atomic ratios, eutectic catalysts were found to be consistently more active than their respective single salts. But the exact roles that the eutectic salt mixtures play in these are not well understood and details of the mechanisms remain unclear. The effects of the surface property of coals and the application methods of eutectic salt mixture catalysts with coal chars on the reactivity of gasification will be studied. Based on our preliminary evaluation of the literature, a ternary

  17. The BEAM-project: prediction and assessment of mixture toxicities in the aquatic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus, Thomas; Altenburger, Rolf; Arrhenius, Åsa; Blanck, Hans; Faust, Michael; Finizio, Antonio; Gramatica, Paola; Grote, Matthias; Junghans, Marion; Meyer, Wiebke; Pavan, Manuela; Porsbring, Tobias; Scholze, Martin; Todeschini, Roberto; Vighi, Marco; Walter, Helge; Horst Grimme, L.

    2003-11-01

    Freshwater and marine ecosystems are exposed to various multi-component mixtures of pollutants. Nevertheless, most ecotoxicological research and chemicals regulation focus on hazard and exposure assessment of individual substances only, the problem of chemical mixtures in the environment is ignored to a large extent. In contrast, the assessment of combination effects has a long tradition in pharmacology, where mixtures of chemicals are specifically designed to develop new products, e.g. human and veterinary drugs or agricultural and non-agricultural pesticides. In this area, two concepts are frequently used and are thought to describe fundamental relationships between single substance and mixture effects: Independent Action (Response Addition) and Concentration Addition. The question, to what extent these concepts may also be applied in an ecotoxicological and regulatory context may be considered a research topic of major importance, as the concepts would allow to make use of already existing single substance toxicity data for the predictive assessment of mixture toxicities. Two critical knowledge gaps are identified: (a) There is a lack of environmental realism, as a huge part of our current knowledge about the applicability of the concepts is restricted to artificial situations with respect to mixture composition or biological effect assessment. (b) The knowledge on what exactly is needed for using the concepts as tools for the predictive mixture toxicity assessment is insufficient. Both gaps seriously hamper the necessary, scientifically sound consideration of mixture toxicities in a regulatory context. In this paper, the two concepts will be briefly introduced, the necessity of considering the toxicities of chemical mixtures in the environment will be demonstrated and the applicability of Independent Action and Concentration Addition as tools for the prediction and assessment of mixture toxicities will be discussed. An overview of the specific aims and

  18. Lithium solvation in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Semino, Rocío; Zaldívar, Gervasio; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Laria, Daniel

    2014-12-07

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results pertaining to the solvation of Li{sup +} in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile binary mixtures. The results are potentially relevant in the design of Li-air batteries that rely on aprotic mixtures as solvent media. To analyze effects derived from differences in ionic size and charge sign, the solvation of Li{sup +} is compared to the ones observed for infinitely diluted K{sup +} and Cl{sup −} species, in similar solutions. At all compositions, the cations are preferentially solvated by dimethyl sulfoxide. Contrasting, the first solvation shell of Cl{sup −} shows a gradual modification in its composition, which varies linearly with the global concentrations of the two solvents in the mixtures. Moreover, the energetics of the solvation, described in terms of the corresponding solute-solvent coupling, presents a clear non-ideal concentration dependence. Similar nonlinear trends were found for the stabilization of different ionic species in solution, compared to the ones exhibited by their electrically neutral counterparts. These tendencies account for the characteristics of the free energy associated to the stabilization of Li{sup +}Cl{sup −}, contact-ion-pairs in these solutions. Ionic transport is also analyzed. Dynamical results show concentration trends similar to those recently obtained from direct experimental measurements.

  19. Confinement-Driven Phase Separation of Quantum Liquid Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisk, T. R.; Pantalei, C.; Kaiser, H.; Sokol, P. E.

    2012-08-01

    We report small-angle neutron scattering studies of liquid helium mixtures confined in Mobil Crystalline Material-41 (MCM-41), a porous silica glass with narrow cylindrical nanopores (d=3.4nm). MCM-41 is an ideal model adsorbent for fundamental studies of gas sorption in porous media because its monodisperse pores are arranged in a 2D triangular lattice. The small-angle scattering consists of a series of diffraction peaks whose intensities are determined by how the imbibed liquid fills the pores. Pure He4 adsorbed in the pores show classic, layer-by-layer film growth as a function of pore filling, leaving the long range symmetry of the system intact. In contrast, the adsorption of He3-He4 mixtures produces a structure incommensurate with the pore lattice. Neither capillary condensation nor preferential adsorption of one helium isotope to the pore walls can provide the symmetry-breaking mechanism. The scattering is consistent with the formation of randomly distributed liquid-liquid microdomains ˜2.3nm in size, providing evidence that confinement in a nanometer scale capillary can drive local phase separation in quantum liquid mixtures.

  20. Application of the wavelet method for the simultaneous quantitative determination of benazepril and hydrochlorothiazide in their mixtures.

    PubMed

    Dinç, Erdal; Baleanu, Dumitru

    2004-01-01

    The discrete and continuous wavelet transforms were applied to the overlapping signal analysis of the ratio data signal for simultaneous quantitative determination of the title subject compounds in samples. The ratio spectra data of the binary mixtures containing benazepril (BE) and hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) were transferred as data vectors into the wavelet domain. Signal compression, followed by a 1-dimension continuous wavelet transform (CWT), was used to obtain coincident transformed signals for pure BE and HCT and their mixtures. The coincident transformed amplitudes corresponding to both maximum and minimum points allowed construction of calibration graphs for each compound in the binary mixture. The validity of CWT calibrations was tested by analyzing synthetic mixtures of the investigated compounds, and successful results were obtained. All calculations were performed within EXCEL, C++, and MATLAB6.5 softwares. The obtained results indicated that our approach was flexible and applicable for the binary mixture analysis.

  1. Measurements of laminar burning velocities for natural gas-hydrogen-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zuohua; Zhang, Yong; Zeng, Ke; Liu, Bing; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Deming

    2006-07-15

    Laminar flame characteristics of natural gas-hydrogen-air flames were studied in a constant-volume bomb at normal temperature and pressure. Laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths were obtained at various ratios of hydrogen to natural gas (volume fraction from 0 to 100%) and equivalence ratios (f from 0.6 to 1.4). The influence of stretch rate on flame was also analyzed. The results show that, for lean mixture combustion, the flame radius increases with time but the increasing rate decreases with flame expansion for natural gas and for mixtures with low hydrogen fractions, while at high hydrogen fractions, there exists a linear correlation between flame radius and time. For rich mixture combustion, the flame radius shows a slowly increasing rate at early stages of flame propagation and a quickly increasing rate at late stages of flame propagation for natural gas and for mixtures with low hydrogen fractions, and there also exists a linear correlation between flame radius and time for mixtures with high hydrogen fractions. Combustion at stoichiometric mixture demonstrates the linear relationship between flame radius and time for natural gas-air, hydrogen-air, and natural gas-hydrogen-air flames. Laminar burning velocities increase exponentially with the increase of hydrogen fraction in mixtures, while the Markstein length decreases and flame instability increases with the increase of hydrogen fractions in mixture. For a fixed hydrogen fraction, the Markstein number shows an increase and flame stability increases with the increase of equivalence ratios. Based on the experimental data, a formula for calculating the laminar burning velocities of natural gas-hydrogen-air flames is proposed. (author)

  2. Near azeotropic mixture substitute for dichlorodifluoromethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A refrigerant and a process of formulating thereof that consists of a mixture of a first mole fraction of CH.sub.2 FCF.sub.3 and a second mole fraction of a component selected from the group consisting of a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 ; a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 ; and a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3, CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 and CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3.

  3. Cluster kinetics model for mixtures of glassformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenskelle, Lisa A.; McCoy, Benjamin J.

    2007-10-01

    For glassformers we propose a binary mixture relation for parameters in a cluster kinetics model previously shown to represent pure compound data for viscosity and dielectric relaxation as functions of either temperature or pressure. The model parameters are based on activation energies and activation volumes for cluster association-dissociation processes. With the mixture parameters, we calculated dielectric relaxation times and compared the results to experimental values for binary mixtures. Mixtures of sorbitol and glycerol (seven compositions), sorbitol and xylitol (three compositions), and polychloroepihydrin and polyvinylmethylether (three compositions) were studied.

  4. Dielectric gas mixtures containing sulfur hexafluoride

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Chathan M.

    1979-01-01

    Electrically insulating gaseous media of unexpectedly high dielectric strength comprised of mixtures of two or more dielectric gases are disclosed wherein the dielectric strength of at least one gas in each mixture increases at less than a linear rate with increasing pressure and the mixture gases are present in such proportions that the sum of their electrical discharge voltages at their respective partial pressures exceeds the electrical discharge voltage of each individual gas at the same temperature and pressure as that of the mixture.

  5. Dual-contrast MR imaging of liver cancer in rats.

    PubMed

    Weissleder, R; Saini, S; Stark, D D; Wittenberg, J; Ferrucci, J T

    1988-03-01

    MR contrast agents increase hepatic tumor conspicuity, as measured in terms of contrast-to-noise (C/N) ratios. With an animal model of hepatic metastases from breast cancer, IV administration of Gd-DTPA (0.2 mmol/kg) shows a biphasic time response, transiently increasing the signal intensity of liver relative to tumor, with C/N ratio magnitudes increasing from -5.7 to -16.3 (SE 250/20); after a delay, the signal intensity of tumor increases relative to liver with a reversal of the C/N sign from negative to positive and an increase in the C/N magnitude to +25.0. IV administration of ferrite particles (0.05 mmol Fe/kg) shows a monophasic time response, increasing signal intensity of tumor relative to liver from +1.5 to +49.5 (SE 500/30). When both contrast agents were administered together (dual-contrast technique), the tumor-liver C/N magnitude reached a maximum of +67.8 (SE 500/30) 12 min after drug infusion. Analysis of individual contrast and noise factors contributing to this technique revealed a strong correlation between the signal intensity of liver and the signal intensity of ghost artifacts, which increase after administration of Gd-DTPA (r = .89) and decrease after administration of ferrite (r = 1.0). Dual-contrast imaging shows a synergistic addition of contrast and suppression of noise from ghost artifacts, maximizing the C/N and increasing the conspicuity of focal liver lesions.

  6. A new ultrasonic transducer for improved contrast nonlinear imaging.

    PubMed

    Bouakaz, Ayache; Cate, Folkert ten; de Jong, Nico

    2004-08-21

    Second harmonic imaging has provided significant improvement in contrast detection over fundamental imaging. This improvement is a result of a higher contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) achievable at the second harmonic frequency. Nevertheless, the differentiation between contrast and tissue at the second harmonic frequency is still in many situations cumbersome and contrast detection remains nowadays as one of the main challenges, especially in the capillaries. The reduced CTR is mainly caused by the generation of second harmonic energy from nonlinear propagation effects in tissue, which hence obscures the echoes from contrast bubbles. In a previous study, we demonstrated theoretically that the CTR increases with the harmonic number. Therefore the purpose of our study was to increase the CTR by selectively looking to the higher harmonic frequencies. In order to be able to receive these high frequency components (third up to the fifth harmonic), a new ultrasonic phased array transducer has been constructed. The main advantage of the new design is its wide frequency bandwidth. The new array transducer contains two different types of elements arranged in an interleaved pattern (odd and even elements). This design enables separate transmission and reception modes. The odd elements operate at 2.8 MHz and 80% bandwidth, whereas the even elements have a centre frequency of 900 kHz with a bandwidth of 50%. The probe is connected to a Vivid 5 system (GE-Vingmed) and proper software is developed for driving. The total bandwidth of such a transducer is estimated to be more than 150% which enables higher harmonic imaging at an adequate sensitivity and signal to noise ratio compared to standard medical array transducers. We describe in this paper the design and fabrication of the array transducer. Moreover its acoustic properties are measured and its performances for nonlinear contrast imaging are evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The preliminary results demonstrate the advantages of

  7. Development and validation of a metal mixture bioavailability model (MMBM) to predict chronic toxicity of Ni-Zn-Pb mixtures to Ceriodaphnia dubia.

    PubMed

    Nys, Charlotte; Janssen, Colin R; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2017-01-01

    Recently, several bioavailability-based models have been shown to predict acute metal mixture toxicity with reasonable accuracy. However, the application of such models to chronic mixture toxicity is less well established. Therefore, we developed in the present study a chronic metal mixture bioavailability model (MMBM) by combining the existing chronic daphnid bioavailability models for Ni, Zn, and Pb with the independent action (IA) model, assuming strict non-interaction between the metals for binding at the metal-specific biotic ligand sites. To evaluate the predictive capacity of the MMBM, chronic (7d) reproductive toxicity of Ni-Zn-Pb mixtures to Ceriodaphnia dubia was investigated in four different natural waters (pH range: 7-8; Ca range: 1-2 mM; Dissolved Organic Carbon range: 5-12 mg/L). In each water, mixture toxicity was investigated at equitoxic metal concentration ratios as well as at environmental (i.e. realistic) metal concentration ratios. Statistical analysis of mixture effects revealed that observed interactive effects depended on the metal concentration ratio investigated when evaluated relative to the concentration addition (CA) model, but not when evaluated relative to the IA model. This indicates that interactive effects observed in an equitoxic experimental design cannot always be simply extrapolated to environmentally realistic exposure situations. Generally, the IA model predicted Ni-Zn-Pb mixture toxicity more accurately than the CA model. Overall, the MMBM predicted Ni-Zn-Pb mixture toxicity (expressed as % reproductive inhibition relative to a control) in 85% of the treatments with less than 20% error. Moreover, the MMBM predicted chronic toxicity of the ternary Ni-Zn-Pb mixture at least equally accurately as the toxicity of the individual metal treatments (RMSEMix = 16; RMSEZn only = 18; RMSENi only = 17; RMSEPb only = 23). Based on the present study, we believe MMBMs can be a promising tool to account for the effects of water

  8. The underlying toxicological mechanism of chemical mixtures: A case study on mixture toxicity of cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes to Photobacterium phosphoreum

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Dayong; Lin, Zhifen; Zhou, Xianghong; Yin, Daqiang

    2013-10-15

    Intracellular chemical reaction of chemical mixtures is one of the main reasons that cause synergistic or antagonistic effects. However, it still remains unclear what the influencing factors on the intracellular chemical reaction are, and how they influence on the toxicological mechanism of chemical mixtures. To reveal this underlying toxicological mechanism of chemical mixtures, a case study on mixture toxicity of cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes to Photobacterium phosphoreum was employed, and both their joint effects and mixture toxicity were observed. Then series of two-step linear regressions were performed to describe the relationships between joint effects, the expected additive toxicities and descriptors of individual chemicals (including concentrations, binding affinity to receptors, octanol/water partition coefficients). Based on the quantitative relationships, the underlying joint toxicological mechanisms were revealed. The result shows that, for mixtures with their joint effects resulting from intracellular chemical reaction, their underlying toxicological mechanism depends on not only their interaction with target proteins, but also their transmembrane actions and their concentrations. In addition, two generic points of toxicological mechanism were proposed including the influencing factors on intracellular chemical reaction and the difference of the toxicological mechanism between single reactive chemicals and their mixtures. This study provided an insight into the understanding of the underlying toxicological mechanism for chemical mixtures with intracellular chemical reaction. - Highlights: • Joint effects of nitriles and aldehydes at non-equitoxic ratios were determined. • A novel descriptor, ligand–receptor interaction energy (E{sub binding}), was employed. • Quantitative relationships for mixtures were developed based on a novel descriptor. • The underlying toxic mechanism was revealed based on quantitative relationships. • Two

  9. Quantification of signal detection performance degradation induced by phase-retrieval in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    In propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast (PB XPC) imaging, the measured image contains a mixture of absorption- and phase-contrast. To obtain separate images of the projected absorption and phase (i.e., refractive) properties of a sample, phase retrieval methods can be employed. It has been suggested that phase-retrieval can always improve image quality in PB XPC imaging. However, when objective (task-based) measures of image quality are employed, this is not necessarily true and phase retrieval can be detrimental. In this work, signal detection theory is utilized to quantify the performance of a Hotelling observer (HO) for detecting a known signal in a known background. Two cases are considered. In the first case, the HO acts directly on the measured intensity data. In the second case, the HO acts on either the retrieved phase or absorption image. We demonstrate that the performance of the HO is superior when acting on the measured intensity data. The loss of task-specific information induced by phase-retrieval is quantified by computing the efficiency of the HO as the ratio of the test statistic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the two cases. The effect of the system geometry on this efficiency is systematically investigated. Our findings confirm that phase-retrieval can impair signal detection performance in XPC imaging.

  10. Lidar ratio and depolarization ratio for cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Nai; Chiang, Chih-Wei; Nee, Jan-Bai

    2002-10-20

    We report on studies of the lidar and the depolarization ratios for cirrus clouds. The optical depth and effective lidar ratio are derived from the transmission of clouds, which is determined by comparing the backscattering signals at the cloud base and cloud top. The lidar signals were fitted to a background atmospheric density profile outside the cloud region to warrant the linear response of the return signals with the scattering media. An average lidar ratio, 29 +/- 12 sr, has been found for all clouds measured in 1999 and 2000. The height and temperature dependences ofthe lidar ratio, the optical depth, and the depolarization ratio were investigated and compared with results of LITE and PROBE. Cirrus clouds detected near the tropopause are usually optically thin and mostly subvisual. Clouds with the largest optical depths were found near 12 km with a temperature of approximately -55 degrees C. The multiple-scattering effect is considered for clouds with high optical depths, and this effect lowers the lidar ratios compared with a single-scattering condition. Lidar ratios are in the 20-40 range for clouds at heights of 12.5-15 km and are smaller than approximately 30 in height above 15 km. Clouds are usually optically thin for temperatures below approximately -65 degrees C, and in this region the optical depth tends to decrease with height. The depolarization ratio is found to increase with a height at 11-15 km and smaller than 0.3 above 16 km. The variation in the depolarization ratio with the lidar ratio was also reported. The lidar and depolarization ratios were discussed in terms of the types of hexagonal ice crystals.

  11. Adsorption of hydrophobin/β-casein mixtures at the solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Tucker, I M; Petkov, J T; Penfold, J; Thomas, R K; Cox, A R; Hedges, N

    2016-09-15

    The adsorption behaviour of mixtures of the proteins β-casein and hydrophobin at the hydrophilic solid-liquid surface have been studied by neutron reflectivity. The results of measurements from sequential adsorption and co-adsorption from solution are contrasted. The adsorption properties of protein mixtures are important for a wide range of applications. Because of competing factors the adsorption behaviour of protein mixtures at interfaces is often difficult to predict. This is particularly true for mixtures containing hydrophobin as hydrophobin possesses some unusual surface properties. At β-casein concentrations ⩾0.1wt% β-casein largely displaces a pre-adsorbed layer of hydrophobin at the interface, similar to that observed in hydrophobin-surfactant mixtures. In the composition and concentration range studied here for the co-adsorption of β-casein-hydrophobin mixtures the adsorption is dominated by the β-casein adsorption. The results provide an important insight into how the competitive adsorption in protein mixtures of hydrophobin and β-casein can impact upon the modification of solid surface properties and the potential for a wide range of colloid stabilisation applications.

  12. Protonic Ammonium Nitrate Ionic Liquids and Their Mixtures: Insights into Their Thermophysical Behavior.

    PubMed

    Canongia Lopes, José N; Esperança, José M S S; de Ferro, André Mão; Pereiro, Ana B; Plechkova, Natalia V; Rebelo, Luis P N; Seddon, Kenneth R; Vázquez-Fernández, Isabel

    2016-03-10

    This study is centered on the thermophysical characterization of different families of alkylammonium nitrate ionic liquids and their binary mixtures, namely the determination at atmospheric pressure of densities, electric conductivities and viscosities in the 288.15 < T/K < 353.15 range. First, measurements focusing on ethylammonium, propylammonium and butylammonium nitrate systems, and their binary mixtures, were determined. These were followed by studies involving binary mixtures composed of ethylammonium nitrate (with three hydrogen bond donor groups) and different homologous ionic liquids with differing numbers of hydrogen bond donor groups: diethylammonium nitrate (two hydrogen bond donors), triethylammonium nitrate (one hydrogen bond donor) and tetraethylammonium nitrate (no hydrogen bond donors). Finally, the behavior of mixtures with different numbers of equivalent carbon atoms in the alkylammonium cations was analyzed. The results show a quasi-ideal behavior for all monoalkylammonium nitrate mixtures. In contrast, the other mixtures show deviations from ideality, namely when the difference in the number of carbon atoms present in the cations increases or the number of hydrogen bond donors present in the cation decreases. Overall, the results clearly show that, besides the length and distribution of alkyl chains present in a cation such as alkylammonium, there are other structural and interaction parameters that influence the thermophysical properties of both pure compounds and their mixtures.

  13. Tailoring supramolecular nanotubes by bile salt based surfactant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gubitosi, Marta; Travaglini, Leana; di Gregorio, Maria Chiara; Pavel, Nicolae V; Vázquez Tato, José; Sennato, Simona; Olsson, Ulf; Schillén, Karin; Galantini, Luciano

    2015-06-08

    An approach for tailoring self-assembled tubular structures is described. By controlling the relative composition of a two-component surfactant mixture comprising the natural bile salt lithocholate and its bolamphiphilic derivative, it was possible to finely tune the nanotube cross-section of the mixed tubular aggregates that self-associated spontaneously in aqueous solution at pH 12. The diameter was found to vary up to 50% when the stoichiometric ratio of the two bile salts was changed. The tuning of supramolecular nanochannels with such remarkable precision is of significant interest for technological applications of these materials.

  14. Sex Ratio Elasticity Influences the Selection of Sex Ratio Strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaqiang; Wang, Ruiwu; Li, Yaotang; Sam Ma, Zhanshan

    2016-12-23

    There are three sex ratio strategies (SRS) in nature-male-biased sex ratio, female-biased sex ratio and, equal sex ratio. It was R. A. Fisher who first explained why most species in nature display a sex ratio of ½. Consequent SRS theories such as Hamilton's local mate competition (LMC) and Clark's local resource competition (LRC) separately explained the observed deviations from the seemingly universal 1:1 ratio. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is not yet a unified theory that accounts for the mechanisms of the three SRS. Here, we introduce the price elasticity theory in economics to define sex ratio elasticity (SRE), and present an analytical model that derives three SRSs based on the following assumption: simultaneously existing competitions for both resources A and resources B influence the level of SRE in both sexes differently. Consequently, it is the difference (between two sexes) in the level of their sex ratio elasticity that leads to three different SRS. Our analytical results demonstrate that the elasticity-based model not only reveals a highly plausible mechanism that explains the evolution of SRS in nature, but also offers a novel framework for unifying two major classical theories (i.e., LMC &LRC) in the field of SRS research.

  15. Sex Ratio Elasticity Influences the Selection of Sex Ratio Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaqiang; Wang, Ruiwu; Li, Yaotang; (Sam) Ma, Zhanshan

    2016-01-01

    There are three sex ratio strategies (SRS) in nature—male-biased sex ratio, female-biased sex ratio and, equal sex ratio. It was R. A. Fisher who first explained why most species in nature display a sex ratio of ½. Consequent SRS theories such as Hamilton’s local mate competition (LMC) and Clark’s local resource competition (LRC) separately explained the observed deviations from the seemingly universal 1:1 ratio. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is not yet a unified theory that accounts for the mechanisms of the three SRS. Here, we introduce the price elasticity theory in economics to define sex ratio elasticity (SRE), and present an analytical model that derives three SRSs based on the following assumption: simultaneously existing competitions for both resources A and resources B influence the level of SRE in both sexes differently. Consequently, it is the difference (between two sexes) in the level of their sex ratio elasticity that leads to three different SRS. Our analytical results demonstrate that the elasticity-based model not only reveals a highly plausible mechanism that explains the evolution of SRS in nature, but also offers a novel framework for unifying two major classical theories (i.e., LMC & LRC) in the field of SRS research. PMID:28009000

  16. Sex Ratio Elasticity Influences the Selection of Sex Ratio Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaqiang; Wang, Ruiwu; Li, Yaotang; (Sam) Ma, Zhanshan

    2016-12-01

    There are three sex ratio strategies (SRS) in nature—male-biased sex ratio, female-biased sex ratio and, equal sex ratio. It was R. A. Fisher who first explained why most species in nature display a sex ratio of ½. Consequent SRS theories such as Hamilton’s local mate competition (LMC) and Clark’s local resource competition (LRC) separately explained the observed deviations from the seemingly universal 1:1 ratio. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is not yet a unified theory that accounts for the mechanisms of the three SRS. Here, we introduce the price elasticity theory in economics to define sex ratio elasticity (SRE), and present an analytical model that derives three SRSs based on the following assumption: simultaneously existing competitions for both resources A and resources B influence the level of SRE in both sexes differently. Consequently, it is the difference (between two sexes) in the level of their sex ratio elasticity that leads to three different SRS. Our analytical results demonstrate that the elasticity-based model not only reveals a highly plausible mechanism that explains the evolution of SRS in nature, but also offers a novel framework for unifying two major classical theories (i.e., LMC & LRC) in the field of SRS research.

  17. Software For Computing Image Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Gigi L.

    1993-01-01

    RATIO_TOOL is interactive computer program for viewing and analyzing large sets of multispectral image data created by imaging spectrometer. Uses ratios between intensities in different spectral bands in order to spot significant areas of interest within multispectral image. Each image band viewed iteratively, or selected image band of set of data requested and displayed. When image ratios computed, result displayed as grayscale image. Written in C Language.

  18. Prevalence odds ratio versus prevalence ratio: choice comes with consequences.

    PubMed

    Tamhane, Ashutosh R; Westfall, Andrew O; Burkholder, Greer A; Cutter, Gary R

    2016-12-30

    Odds ratio, risk ratio, and prevalence ratio are some of the measures of association which are often reported in research studies quantifying the relationship between an independent variable and the outcome of interest. There has been much debate on the issue of which measure is appropriate to report depending on the study design. However, the literature on selecting a particular category of the outcome to be modeled and/or change in reference group for categorical independent variables and the effect on statistical significance, although known, is scantly discussed nor published with examples. In this article, we provide an example of a cross-sectional study wherein prevalence ratio was chosen over (Prevalence) odds ratio and demonstrate the analytic implications of the choice of category to be modeled and choice of reference level for independent variables. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Contrastive divergence in gaussian diffusions.

    PubMed

    Movellan, Javier R

    2008-09-01

    This letter presents an analysis of the contrastive divergence (CD) learning algorithm when applied to continuous-time linear stochastic neural networks. For this case, powerful techniques exist that allow a detailed analysis of the behavior of CD. The analysis shows that CD converges to maximum likelihood solutions only when the network structure is such that it can match the first moments of the desired distribution. Otherwise, CD can converge to solutions arbitrarily different from the log-likelihood solutions, or they can even diverge. This result suggests the need to improve our theoretical understanding of the conditions under which CD is expected to be well behaved and the conditions under which it may fail. In, addition the results point to practical ideas on how to improve the performance of CD.

  20. Multi-contrast Photoacoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie

    Photoacoustic microscopy is a hybrid imaging modality with high spatial resolution, moderate imaging depth, excellent imaging contrast and functional imaging capability. Taking full advantage of this powerful weapon, we have investigated different anatomical, functional, flow dynamic and metabolic parameter measurements using photoacoustic microscopy. Specifically, Evans-blue dye was used to enhance photoacoustic microscopy of capillaries; label-free transverse and axial blood flow was measured based on bandwidth broadening and time shift of the photoacoustic signals; metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified in vivo from all the five parameters measured by photoacoustic microcopy; whole cross-sectional imaging of small intestine was achieved on a double-illumination photoacoustic microscopy with extended depth of focus and imaging depth; hemodynamic imaging was performed on a MEMS-mirror enhanced photoacoustic microscopy with a cross-sectional imaging rate of 400 Hz. As a maturing imaging technique, PAM is expected to find new applications in both fundamental life science and clinical practice.

  1. Ultracentrifuge for separating fluid mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Lowry, Ralph A.

    1976-01-01

    1. A centrifuge for the separation of fluid mixtures having light and heavy fractions comprising a cylindrical rotor, disc type end-plugs closing the ends of the rotor, means for mounting said rotor for rotation about its cylindrical axis, a housing member enclosing the rotor, a vacuum chamber in said housing about the central portion of the rotor, a collection chamber at each end of the housing, the innermost side of which is substantially formed by the outer face of the end-plug, means for preventing flow of the fluid from the collection chambers to said vacuum chamber, at least one of said end-plugs having a plurality of holes therethrough communicating between the collection chamber adjacent thereto and the inside of the rotor to induce countercurrent flow of the fluid in the centrifuge, means for feeding fluid to be processed into the centrifuge, means communicating with the collection chambers to extract the light and heavy separated fractions of the fluid, and means for rotating the rotor.

  2. DOSY of sample-limited mixtures: comparison of cold, nano and conventional probes.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Scott A; Paschal, Jonathan; Kulanthaivel, Palaniappan

    2005-01-01

    The DOSY analysis of dilute mixtures can be a challenge because a high signal-to-noise ratio is required for the best DOSY results. The sensitivity increase gained from new probe technologies (e.g. cold and nano probes) could enable one to acquire good DOSY spectra on sample amounts too low for conventional probes. In this article, we investigated the performance of cold and nano probes for qualitative DOSY analysis of concentrated and sample-limited mixtures, and compared the results with those of the conventional probe. We first measured the fluid flow for each probe. All three probes exhibited only relatively small levels of flow; consequently, a double-stimulated echo pulse sequence was not employed in the subsequent DOSY experiments. This decision was based on three facts: (1) flow-induced phase distortions were not observed, (2) our intentions are only to perform qualitative mixture analysis, and (3) discarding 50% of the already limited signal cannot be afforded. Although the cold and nano probes produced DOSY results for the concentrated mixture that were inferior to the conventional probe, the increase in the signal-to-noise ratio observed with these probes proved to be advantageous for the dilute three-component mixture. Furthermore, the cold probe showed slightly superior performance over the nano probe; thus, we conclude that among the probes examined the cold probe is best suited for qualitative DOSY analysis of sample-limited mixtures.

  3. THE VISCOSITY OF HELIUM-CESIUM MIXTURES,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The viscosities of helium-cesium mixtures having mole fractions of cesium from zero to unity were evaluated using a Lennard - Jones 6-12 interaction potential for all encounters in the Enskog Chapman expressions for the viscosity of a binary mixture. (Author)

  4. THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM GAS MIXTURE

    DOEpatents

    Jury, S.H.

    1964-03-17

    A method of separating uranium from a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and other gases is described that comprises bringing the mixture into contact with anhydrous calcium sulfate to preferentially absorb the uranium hexafluoride on the sulfate. The calcium sulfate is then leached with a selective solvent for the adsorbed uranium. (AEC)

  5. Mixture Modeling: Applications in Educational Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harring, Jeffrey R.; Hodis, Flaviu A.

    2016-01-01

    Model-based clustering methods, commonly referred to as finite mixture modeling, have been applied to a wide variety of cross-sectional and longitudinal data to account for heterogeneity in population characteristics. In this article, we elucidate 2 such approaches: growth mixture modeling and latent profile analysis. Both techniques are…

  6. Mixture Modeling of Individual Learning Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streeter, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We show that student learning can be accurately modeled using a mixture of learning curves, each of which specifies error probability as a function of time. This approach generalizes Knowledge Tracing [7], which can be viewed as a mixture model in which the learning curves are step functions. We show that this generality yields order-of-magnitude…

  7. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Hunter, S.R.

    1987-02-20

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches. 6 figs.

  8. Process Dissociation and Mixture Signal Detection Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCarlo, Lawrence T.

    2008-01-01

    The process dissociation procedure was developed in an attempt to separate different processes involved in memory tasks. The procedure naturally lends itself to a formulation within a class of mixture signal detection models. The dual process model is shown to be a special case. The mixture signal detection model is applied to data from a widely…

  9. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; McCorkle, Dennis L.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1988-01-01

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches.

  10. Separation of organic azeotropic mixtures by pervaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.W.

    1991-12-01

    Distillation is a commonly used separation technique in the petroleum refining and chemical processing industries. However, there are a number of potential separations involving azetropic and close-boiling organic mixtures that cannot be separated efficiently by distillation. Pervaporation is a membrane-based process that uses selective permeation through membranes to separate liquid mixtures. Because the separation process is not affected by the relative volatility of the mixture components being separated, pervaporation can be used to separate azetropes and close-boiling mixtures. Our results showed that pervaporation membranes can be used to separate azeotropic mixtures efficiently, a result that is not achievable with simple distillation. The membranes were 5--10 times more permeable to one of the components of the mixture, concentrating it in the permeate stream. For example, the membrane was 10 times more permeable to ethanol than methyl ethyl ketone, producing 60% ethanol permeate from an azeotropic mixture of ethanol and methyl ethyl ketone containing 18% ethanol. For the ethyl acetate/water mixture, the membranes showed a very high selectivity to water (> 300) and the permeate was 50--100 times enriched in water relative to the feed. The membranes had permeate fluxes on the order of 0.1--1 kg/m{sup 2}{center dot}h in the operating range of 55--70{degrees}C. Higher fluxes were obtained by increasing the operating temperature.

  11. Optical imaging via biological object internal structure contrasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgaetsky, Vitaly M.; Tereshchenko, Sergei A.; Vorobiev, Nikolai S.; Tomilova, Larisa G.; Smirnov, Alexander V.; Ivanov, Andrei V.

    1995-01-01

    For successful application of laser tomography methods for earlier medical diagnostics the signal-to-noise ratio (contrast) must be increased. For this purpose it is possible to use the absorbing dyes. We have theoretically investigated optical imaging conditions in high scattering medium on a model object. In our experiments a YAG:Nd laser generating picosecond pulses was employed. Output radiation has been recorded by a high speed streak camera with 1.5 ps temporal resolution. The high stability of the laser and of measurement scheme characteristics was provided. We looked for the contrasting substances having tropism with pathologically changed tissue of the tumor. For this purpose some dyphthalocyanines were synthesized. The experiments with laboratory animals have demonstrated that saturated dye concentrations were noticeably lower than toxicologic dangerous concentration values. We have demonstrated a possibility of the contrasting for a model object. The experimental temporal profile of scattered radiation can be explained by the nonstationary two-flow theory.

  12. Mixture of Skewed α-Stable Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei, S. R. Hosseini; Nassiri, V.; Mohammadian, Gh. R.; Mohammadpour, A.

    2011-03-01

    Expectation maximization (EM) algorithm and the Bayesian techniques are two approaches for statistical inference of mixture models [3, 4]. By noting the advantages of the Bayesian methods, practitioners prefer them. However, implementing Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms can be very complicated for stable distributions, due to the non-analytic density or distribution function formulas. In this paper, we introduce a new class of mixture of heavy-tailed distributions, called mixture of skewed stable distributions. Skewed stable distributions belongs to the exponential family and they have analytic density representation. It is shown that skewed stable distributions dominate skew stable distribution functions and they can be used to model heavy-tailed data. The class of skewed stable distributions has an analytic representation for its density function and the Bayesian inference can be done similar to the exponential family of distributions. Finally, mixture of skewed stable distributions are compared to the mixture of stable distributions through a simulations study.

  13. Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Chum, H.L.; Filardo, G.

    1990-10-23

    A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70 C and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution. 1 fig.

  14. Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Chum, Helena L.; Filardo, Giuseppe

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70.degree. C. and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution.

  15. Prediction of viscosity of dense fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royal, Damian D.; Vesovic, Velisa; Trusler, J. P. Martin; Wakeham, William. A.

    The Vesovic-Wakeham (VW) method of predicting the viscosity of dense fluid mixtures has been improved by implementing new mixing rules based on the rigid sphere formalism. The proposed mixing rules are based on both Lebowitz's solution of the Percus-Yevick equation and on the Carnahan-Starling equation. The predictions of the modified VW method have been compared with experimental viscosity data for a number of diverse fluid mixtures: natural gas, hexane + hheptane, hexane + octane, cyclopentane + toluene, and a ternary mixture of hydrofluorocarbons (R32 + R125 + R134a). The results indicate that the proposed improvements make possible the extension of the original VW method to liquid mixtures and to mixtures containing polar species, while retaining its original accuracy.

  16. Attenuation of the detonation wave in hydrogen-air mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bivol, G. Yu; Golovastov, S. V.; Golub, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    The deceleration and attenuation of a detonation wave in hydrogen-air mixture was experimentally studied in a cylindrical channel. Inner walls of the wide section of the channel were covered with an acoustically absorbing layer. Experiments were carried out in hydrogen-air mixture at atmospheric pressure. Initially detonation was formed as a result of a deflagration to detonation transition. The dependence of velocity and pressure at the front of the detonation or shock wave on the thickness of the acoustically absorbing material and mixture composition (equivalence ratio) was presented. The results demonstrate that increasing the thickness of the porous material on the walls lead to further attenuation of the detonation wave to the point where it is not re-initiated at the distance of 15 calibers from the porous section. It was found that the recovery of the detonation wave after the passage of the acoustically absorbing section can happen if the shock wave velocity does not drop below Chapman-Jouguet acoustic velocity.

  17. Mach 2 combustion characteristics of hydrogen/hydrocarbon fuel mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Glenn S.; Northam, G. Burton; Bell, Randy A.

    1987-01-01

    The combustion of H2/CH4 and H2/C2H4 mixtures containing 10-70 vol pct hydrocarbon at cumbustor inlet Mach number 2 and temperatures 2000-4000 R is investigated experimentally, applying direct-connect test hardware and techniques similar to those described by Diskin and Northam (1987) in the facilities of the NASA Langley Hypersonic Propulsion Branch. The experimental setup, procedures, and data-reduction methods are described; and the results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Fuel type and mixture are found to have little effect on the wall heating rate measured near the combustor exit, but H2/C2H4 is shown to burn much more efficiently than H2/CH4, with no pilot-off blowout at equivalence ratios greater than 0.5. It is suggested that H2/hydrocarbon mixtures are feasible fuels (at least in terms of combustion efficiency) for scramjet SSTO vehicles operating at freestream Mach numbers above 4.

  18. Mach 2 combustion characteristics of hydrogen/hydrocarbon fuel mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Glenn S.; Jachimowski, C. J.; Northam, G. Burton; Bell, Randy A.

    1987-01-01

    The combustion of H2/CH4 and H2/C2H4 mixtures containing 10 to 70 vol pct hydrocarbon at combustor inlet Mach number 2 and temperatures 2000 to 4000 R is investigated experimentally, applying direct-connect test hardware and techniques similar to those described by Diskin and Northam (1987) in the facilities of the NASA Langley Hypersonic Propulsion Branch. The experimental setup, procedures, and data-reduction methods are described; and the results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Fuel type and mixture are found to have little effect on the wall heating rate measured near the combustor exit, but H2/C2H4 is shown to burn much more efficiently than H2/CH4, with no pilot-off blowout equivalence ratios greater than 0.5. It is suggested that H2/hydrocarbon mixtures are feasible fuels (at least in terms of combustion efficiency) for scramjet SSTO vehicles operating at freestream Mach numbers above 4.

  19. Shock compression response of Ti+B reactive powder mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, M.; Gurumurthy, A.; Kennedy, G. B.; Gokhale, A. M.; Thadhani, N. N.

    2014-05-01

    The shock compression response of Ti+2B (1:2 Ti:B stoichiometric ratio) reactive powder mixtures at ~50% theoretical material density (TMD) is investigated for shock pressures up to 5 GPa to investigate the possible shock-induced chemical reactivity of this highly exothermic mixture. The shock adiabat is produced from instrumented parallel-plate gas-gun impact experiments on encapsulated powders using poly-vinylidene fluoride (PVDF) stress gauges to measure the input and propagated stresses and wave speed in the powder. The shock compression regime is probed from crush-up to full density and onward to assess the potential onset of a shock-induced chemical reaction event in the powder mixture. A series of two-dimensional continuum meso-scale simulations on validated simulated microstructures are performed to predict the shock compression response and identify the meso-scale mechanics that are essential for reaction. The suitability of the synthetic microstructural representations is evaluated by comparing the experimental and predicted pressure traces.

  20. Shock compression response of Ti+B reactive powder mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Manny; Gurumurthy, Ashok; Kennedy, Gregory; Gokhale, Arun; Thadhani, Naresh

    2013-06-01

    The shock compression response of Ti+2B (1:2 Ti:B stoichiometric ratio) reactive powder mixtures at ~50% theoretical material density (TMD) is investigated for shock pressures up to 5 GPa to investigate the possible shock-induced chemical reactivity of this highly exothermic mixture. The shock adiabat is produced from instrumented parallel-plate gas-gun impact experiments on encapsulated powders using poly-vinylidene fluoride (PVDF) stress gauges to measure the input and propagated stress and wave speed in the powder. The shock compression regime is probed from crush-up to full density and onward to assess the potential onset of a shock-induced chemical reaction event in the powder mixture. A series of two-dimensional continuum meso-scale simulations on real and simulated microstructures are performed to predict the shock compression response and identify the meso-scale mechanics that is essential for the so-called ``ballotechnic'' reaction. These meso-scale mechanics are investigated through stereological evolution metrics that track particle interface evolution and their respective field variables. The suitability of the synthetic microstructural representations is evaluated by comparing the experimental and predicted pressure traces. We gratefully acknowledge support and funding from DTRA through Grant No. HDTRA1-10-1-0038 and the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship through the High Performance Computing and Modernization Office (HPCMO).

  1. Environmental complex mixture toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Gardner, H S; Brennan, L M; Toussaint, M W; Rosencrance, A B; Boncavage-Hennessey, E M; Wolfe, M J

    1998-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was found as a contaminant in the well supplying water to an aquatic testing laboratory. The groundwater was routinely screened by a commercial laboratory for volatile and semivolatile compounds, metals, herbicides, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency methods. Although TCE was the only reportable peak on the gas chromatograph, with average concentrations of 0.200 mg/l, other small peaks were also present, indicating the possibility that the contamination was not limited to TCE alone. A chronic 6-month carcinogenicity assay was conducted on-site in a biomonitoring trailer, using the Japanese medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) in an initiation-promotion protocol, with diethylnitrosamine (DEN) as the initiator and the TCE-contaminated groundwater as a promoter. Study results indicated no evidence of carcinogenic potential of the groundwater without initiation. There was, however, a tumor-promotional effect of the groundwater after DEN initiation. A follow-up laboratory study was conducted using reagent grade TCE added to carbon-filtered groundwater to simulate TCE concentrations comparable to those found in the contaminated groundwater. Study results indicated no promotional effects of TCE. These studies emphasize the necessity for on-site bioassays to assess potential environmental hazards. In this instance, chemical analysis of the groundwater identified TCE as the only reportable contaminant, but other compounds present below reportable limits were noted and may have had a synergistic effect on tumor promotion observed with the groundwater exposure. Laboratory toxicity testing of single compounds can produce toxicity data specific to that compound for that species but cannot take into account the possible toxic effects of mixtures of compounds.

  2. Environmental complex mixture toxicity assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, H S; Brennan, L M; Toussaint, M W; Rosencrance, A B; Boncavage-Hennessey, E M; Wolfe, M J

    1998-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was found as a contaminant in the well supplying water to an aquatic testing laboratory. The groundwater was routinely screened by a commercial laboratory for volatile and semivolatile compounds, metals, herbicides, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency methods. Although TCE was the only reportable peak on the gas chromatograph, with average concentrations of 0.200 mg/l, other small peaks were also present, indicating the possibility that the contamination was not limited to TCE alone. A chronic 6-month carcinogenicity assay was conducted on-site in a biomonitoring trailer, using the Japanese medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) in an initiation-promotion protocol, with diethylnitrosamine (DEN) as the initiator and the TCE-contaminated groundwater as a promoter. Study results indicated no evidence of carcinogenic potential of the groundwater without initiation. There was, however, a tumor-promotional effect of the groundwater after DEN initiation. A follow-up laboratory study was conducted using reagent grade TCE added to carbon-filtered groundwater to simulate TCE concentrations comparable to those found in the contaminated groundwater. Study results indicated no promotional effects of TCE. These studies emphasize the necessity for on-site bioassays to assess potential environmental hazards. In this instance, chemical analysis of the groundwater identified TCE as the only reportable contaminant, but other compounds present below reportable limits were noted and may have had a synergistic effect on tumor promotion observed with the groundwater exposure. Laboratory toxicity testing of single compounds can produce toxicity data specific to that compound for that species but cannot take into account the possible toxic effects of mixtures of compounds. Images Figure 2 PMID:9860885

  3. Dual-frequency chirp imaging for contrast detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chih-Hao; Shen, Che-Chou; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2011-05-01

    The method of dual-frequency (DF) difference excitation is capable of generating a low-frequency envelope component as the driving force of commercial contrast microbubbles by using a high-frequency pulse. Although the DF difference excitation method provides good lateral resolution in high-frequency contrast imaging, it suffers from degraded axial resolution because a longer-than-usual envelope component is required to induce the oscillation of microbubbles. In this study, a coded excitation technique (i.e. chirp waveform) is combined with the DF difference excitation method (also referred to as the DF chirp excitation method) to improve the axial resolution of contrast imaging while maintaining the impinging insonation energy. B-mode images were constructed to compare the performance of the DF chirp excitation method with the conventional tone-burst pulse method. Results indicate that the proposed DF chirp excitation method can provide better axial resolution after pulse compression. Moreover, as compared to the tone-burst pulse with the same pulse duration, the pulse compression results in a higher signal-to-noise ratio because of the temporal concentration of the received energy. Nevertheless, images with the DF chirp excitation method demonstrated noticeable image artefacts resulting from the range sidelobes. The DF chirp excitation method also produced obvious tissue harmonic generation that could degrade the contrast-to-tissue ratio at higher acoustic pressures.

  4. Amplitude-modulation chirp imaging for contrast detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng-Lin; Kuo, Yu-Chen; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2010-09-01

    We propose an amplitude-modulation chirp imaging method for contrast detection with high-frequency ultrasound. Our proposed method detects microbubbles by extracting and then selectively compressing the component of the backscattered chirp signal modulated by changes in the radii of microbubbles at their resonance frequency. Microbubbles are sonicated simultaneously with a narrowband, low-frequency pumping signal at their resonance frequency and a wideband, high-frequency imaging chirp signal. Changes in the radii of the resonant microbubbles result in periodic changes in their acoustic cross section that modulate the amplitude of the backscattered imaging chirp signal, forming pumping and imaging frequency sum-and-difference chirp terms. The frequency-sum or -difference chirp component is then extracted by a bandpass filter (BPF). Because a long imaging pulse duration is required to obtain a sufficient modulation depth on the chirp for contrast detection and to facilitate frequency-sum-and-difference signal extraction with the BPF, a chirp with a longer-than-usual waveform is used so pulse compression of the extracted chirp signal can then be performed to maintain the axial resolution, and even further improve the signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-tissue ratio. Experiments performed on flow phantoms with and without a speckle-generating background were performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed technique. These results indicate that our proposed method can potentially provide high-resolution contrast detection in the microvasculature.

  5. Dual-frequency chirp imaging for contrast detection.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chih-Hao; Shen, Che-Chou; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2011-05-07

    The method of dual-frequency (DF) difference excitation is capable of generating a low-frequency envelope component as the driving force of commercial contrast microbubbles by using a high-frequency pulse. Although the DF difference excitation method provides good lateral resolution in high-frequency contrast imaging, it suffers from degraded axial resolution because a longer-than-usual envelope component is required to induce the oscillation of microbubbles. In this study, a coded excitation technique (i.e. chirp waveform) is combined with the DF difference excitation method (also referred to as the DF chirp excitation method) to improve the axial resolution of contrast imaging while maintaining the impinging insonation energy. B-mode images were constructed to compare the performance of the DF chirp excitation method with the conventional tone-burst pulse method. Results indicate that the proposed DF chirp excitation method can provide better axial resolution after pulse compression. Moreover, as compared to the tone-burst pulse with the same pulse duration, the pulse compression results in a higher signal-to-noise ratio because of the temporal concentration of the received energy. Nevertheless, images with the DF chirp excitation method demonstrated noticeable image artefacts resulting from the range sidelobes. The DF chirp excitation method also produced obvious tissue harmonic generation that could degrade the contrast-to-tissue ratio at higher acoustic pressures.

  6. Calculations of phase equilibria for mixtures of triglycerides, fatty acids, and their esters in lower alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, D. A.; Ermakova, A.; Anikeev, V. I.

    2011-01-01

    The objects of study were mixtures containing triglycerides and lower alcohols and also the products of the transesterification of triglycerides, glycerol and fatty acid esters. The Redlich-Kwong-Soave equation of state was used as a thermodynamic model for the phase state of the selected mixtures over wide temperature, pressure, and composition ranges. Group methods were applied to determine the critical parameters of pure substances and their acentric factors. The parameters obtained were used to calculate the phase diagrams and critical parameters of mixtures containing triglycerides and lower alcohols and the products of the transesterification of triglycerides, glycerol and fatty acid esters, at various alcohol/oil ratios. The conditions of triglyceride transesterification in various lower alcohols providing the supercritical state of reaction mixtures were selected.

  7. Fluorescence lifetime contrast in small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanujan, V. Krishnan; Bandyopadhyay, Abhik; Sun, LuZhe; Herman, Brian A.

    2007-02-01

    Early detection of primary tumors is the key for effective therapeutic intervention and successful patient survival. Small animal models emulating human diseases are powerful tools for our comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of tumor formation and metastasis to distant sites. Our long-term goal is to develop a non-invasive, multiphoton-fluorescence lifetime imaging (MP-FLIM) modality that can precisely quantify these steps in animal tumor models at a very early stage. The specific hypothesis is that fluorescence lifetime can be employed as reliable contrast parameter for providing higher detection sensitivity as compared with conventional intensity-based tumor imaging approaches and therefore it is possible to detect smaller tumor volumes (early detection) than those achieved by other prevailing methods. We base this hypothesis on our recent observations that (1) fluorescence lifetime is "intrinsic" to the fluorophore and its measurement is not affected by concentration and/or spectral artifacts as in intensity-based methods, (2) multiphoton excitation can enable increased tissue penetrability and reduced phototoxicity and (3) MP-FLIM approach can discriminate background autofluorescence from the fluorescent proteins in thick tissues thereby achieving a ten-fold increase in signal-to-background ratio over the intensity-based approaches. We present our preliminary data to support this hypothesis in primary tumor detection in nu/nu athymic mouse models.

  8. Contrast, induction, facilitation, suppression, and conservation1

    PubMed Central

    Allison, James

    1976-01-01

    Ten rats received all of their water in daily 1-hr sessions. Following a baseline phase in which lever and water spout were freely available throughout each session, subjects were trained to press the lever for water on mixed schedules composed of two alternating components. Each component gave access to water for a fixed cumulation of drinking time every time the rat cumulated a fixed amount of lever-pressing time. Changes in one component produced contrast and induction effects, both positive and negative, with respect to both lever pressing and drinking in the unchanged component. All schedules facilitated lever pressing relative to baseline. All schedules suppressed drinking relative to baseline, even though contingency sessions allowed ample time to perform the baseline amount of drinking. The entire pattern of results was predicted in quantitative detail by assuming that the total amount of a dimension apportioned to lever pressing and drinking is conserved between baseline and contingency sessions. Conservation theory was shown to predict several effects produced by simple fixed-ratio schedules, and was compared favorably with probability-differential (Premack, 1971) and response-deprivation (Timberlake and Allison, 1974) theory. PMID:16811902

  9. Gas emissions and engine behavior when gasoline-alcohol mixtures are used.

    PubMed

    Arapatsakos, C I; Karkanis, A N; Sparis, P D

    2003-09-01

    This paper deals with the use of gasoline-methanol and gasoline-ethanol mixtures in a small four-stroke engine of internal combustion that is used for the movement of a small alternative generator. It was observed that CO and HC emissions decrease compared to gasoline when the percentage of methanol, ethanol in the fuel was increased, under different load conditions (without load conditions and under full electrical load conditions). The use of gasoline-methanol mixtures showed a higher decrease of emissions. When the mixtures of gasoline-70%methanol and gasoline-90%ethanol and 100%ethanol for which the engine malfunctioned, the rpm of the engine were not constant and the emissions were increased. It is also important that (with the existing regulation of the fuel/air ratio that refers to gasoline) the engine functioned for the case of gasoline-methanol mixtures up to a concentration of -70%methanol mixture, while for the case of gasoline-ethanol mixtures until the use of 100%ethanol. Furthermore, during the use of the mixtures of gasoline-methanol and gasoline-ethanol there was a small increase of fuel consumption when the percentage of the methanol or ethanol in the fuel was increased.

  10. Experimental study of bentonite-soil mixtures as anti-seepage materials of constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Li, Zifu; Zhao, Xin; Li, Haihan

    2011-01-01

    In this study, mixtures of different kinds of bentonite and soil were used and tested in order to find a cheap alternative to current anti-seepage materials for constructed wetlands. The anti-seepage layer of constructed wetlands was simulated in the experimental study and the permeability coefficient of the mixed materials was determined in order to evaluate the anti-seepage effect of mixtures. The main results are as follows: (i) The minimum mass ratio of bentonite to soil is 10%; (ii) Within a certain range, the more compact and higher the wet density is, then the better anti-seepage effect is (under the condition of certain moisture content). The permeability coefficient of the mixed materials exponentially increased with the increase of wet density; (iii) At the wet density of 1.83 g/cm(3), corresponding with the optimum compactness, the mixture of natural sodium bentonite produced in Wyoming, USA and soil from Cangzhou, Hebei province showed the best anti-seepage performance; (iv) The impermeability of the mixture with smaller particle sizes of bentonite was far better than that with the bigger particle sizes; (v) The hydration effect of bentonite changed the structure of the mixture materials into a special structure that is similar to that of pure bentonite. The particles of the mixture became expanded under SEM investigation and the mixture became more compact, which could have the same or similar effect as pure bentonite for anti-seepage.

  11. Environmental Risk Assessment of Pharmaceutical Mixtures: Demands, Gaps, and Possible Bridges.

    PubMed

    Backhaus, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The ecotoxicological risk of pharmaceutical mixtures typically exceeds the risk of each individual compound, which calls specific attention to the fact that monitoring surveys routinely find complex pharmaceutical mixtures in various environmental compartments. However, although the body of evidence on the ecotoxicology of pharmaceutical mixtures is quite consistent, the current guidelines for the environmental risk assessment of pharmaceuticals often do not explicitly address mixture effects. Data availability and acceptable methods often limit such assessments. A tiered approach that begins with summing up individual risk quotients, i.e., the ratio between the predicted or measured environmental concentration and the predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) is therefore suggested in this paper, in order to improve the realism of the environmental risk assessment of pharmaceuticals. Additionally, the use of a mixture-specific assessment factor, as well as the classical mixture toxicity concepts of concentration addition and independent action is explored. Finally, specific attention is given to the exposure-based waiving of environmental risk assessments, as currently implemented in screening or pre-screening phases (tier 0 in Europe, categorical exclusion in the USA), since even low, individually non-toxic concentrations might combine to produce substantial mixture effects.

  12. Low resistivity, low contrast pays

    SciTech Connect

    Sneider, R.M.; Kulha, J.T. |

    1996-08-01

    Major hydrocarbon accumulations have been produced over the past 40 years in low resistivity, low contrast (LRLC) sands in the Gulf of Mexico Basin (GOM). LRLC reservoirs were commonly considered wet, tight, misidentified as a shale or overlooked, but are being re-evaluated now in other world basins, including Latin America. Seismic response, drill cuttings, cores, log response, petrophysical models, and production testing provide an integrated LRLC evaluation. Causes of LRLC pay in the GOM include: laminated clean sands with shales; silts or shaly sands; clay-coated sands; glauconitic sands; sands with interstitial dispersed clay; sands with disseminated pyrite or other conductive minerals; clay-lined burrows; clay clasts; altered volcanic/feldspathic framework grains; and very fine-grained sand with very saline water. LRLC depositional systems include: deepwater fans, with levee-channel complexes; delta front and toe deposits; shingle turbidites; and alluvial and deltaic channel fills. Geological and petrophysical models developed in the GOM for evaluation of LRLC pay are applicable in Latin America. An Archie clean sand or Waxman-Smits shaly sand model are commonly used to evaluate LRLC anomalies. Often, shaly sand models are not necessarily suited for LRLC evaluation. The Archie lithology exponent (m) and saturation exponent (n) for many LRLC reservoirs range from 1.4 to 1.85, and 1.2 to 1.8, respectively. In thinly laminated LRLC reservoirs, net sand distribution is identified with high resolution logging tools, rock examination and interval testing.

  13. Laser Image Contrast Enhancement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Robert L. (Inventor); Holmes, Richard R. (Inventor); Witherow, William K. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An optical image enhancement system provides improved image contrast in imaging of a target in high temperature surroundings such as a furnace. The optical system includes a source of vertically polarized light such as laser and a beam splitter for receiving the light and directing the light toward the target. A retardation plate is affixed to a target-facing surface of the beam splitter and a vertical polarizer is disposed along a common optical path with the beam splitter between the retardation plate and the target. A horizontal polarizer disposed in the common optical path, receives light passing through a surface of the beam splitter opposed to the target-facing surface. An image detector is disposed at one end of the optical path. A band pass filter having a band pass filter characteristic matching the frequency of the vertically polarized light source is disposed in the path between the horizontal polarizer and the image detector. The use of circular polarization, together with cross polarizers, enables the reflected light to be passed to the detector while blocking thermal radiation.

  14. [Spectroscopic study on the high voltage fast pulsed discharge of nitrogen, ammonia or their mixture].

    PubMed

    Liu, Z P; Wang, P N; Yang, W D; Zheng, J B; Li, F M

    2001-10-01

    The emission spectra from the pulsed discharge plasma of nitrogen, ammonia or their mixture were measured. In the discharge of pure nitrogen gas, as the pressure increased, the discharge volume decreased and more dissociation of nitrogen molecules occurred due to the higher energy density. In the discharge of ammonia, N,N+ and NH+ were observed, but no NH2 and NH3 were detected, indicating that ammonia, which has the lower dissociation and ionization energies as compared to nitrogen, was highly dissociated. The discharge of the mixture of N2 and NH3 was also studied. The dependence of the dissociation of nitrogen on the ratio of nitrogen to ammonia was investigated by emission spectra. The optimal ratio for nitrogen dissociation was obtained. The advantage of using the mixture of nitrogen and ammonia in the synthesis of nitrides was discussed.

  15. Hydrodynamics and Segregation in Poiseuille Flow of a Binary Granular Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ronak; Alam, Meheboob

    2016-11-01

    Steady State profiles of hydrodynamic fields have been computed for the Poiseulle flow of a dilute bi-disperse granular mixture using DSMC (direct simulation Monte Carlo) method. The effects of mass bidispersity and inelasticity are studied and it is found that species segregation follows a non-monotonic trend with increasing mass-ratio if the particles are inelastic. Mixture velocity shows a similar trend. Nonequipartition of granular temperature is expectedly enhanced with increasing mass-ratio and inelasticity, but is additionally a strong function of Knudsen number. Effort is made to compare simulation results with a continuum theory for dilute binary granular mixtures, with the aim being to check if theory is able to predict the novel segregation tendencies uncovered in DSMC simulations.

  16. Theoretical study of miscibility and glass-forming trends in mixtures of polystyrene spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, W.-H.; Stroud, D.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical study of glass-forming trends and miscibility in mixtures of polystyrene spheres (polyballs) of different diameters, suspended in an aqueous solution, is presented. The polyballs are assumed to be charged and to interact via a Debye-Hueckel screened Coulomb potential. The Helmholtz free energy is calculated from a variational principle based on the Gibbs-Bogoliubov inequality, in which a mixture of hard spheres of different diameters is chosen as the reference system. It is found that when the charges of the two types of polyballs are sufficiently different, the variationally determined ratio of hard-sphere diameters differs substantially, leading to packing difficulties characteristic of glass formation. The experimentally observed range of glass formation corresponds to a ratio of hard-sphere diameters of 0.8 or less. Calculations of the free energy as a function of concentration indicate that the liquid polyball mixture is stable against the phase separation, even for widely different polyball charges.

  17. Mechanistic investigation of beta-galactosidase-activated MR contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Urbanczyk-Pearson, Lauren M; Femia, Frank J; Smith, Jeffrey; Parigi, Giacomo; Duimstra, Joseph A; Eckermann, Amanda L; Luchinat, Claudio; Meade, Thomas J

    2008-01-07

    We report a mechanistic investigation of an isomeric series of beta-galactosidase-activated magnetic resonance contrast agents. Our strategy focuses on the synthesis of macrocyclic caged-complexes that coordinatively saturate a chelated lanthanide. Enzyme cleavage of the complex results in an open coordination site available for water that creates a detectable MR contrast agent. The complexes consist of a DO3A Gd(III) chelator modified with a galactopyranose at the N-10 position of the macrocycle. We observed significant differences in relaxometric properties and coordination geometry that can be correlated to subtle variations of the linker between the macrocycle and the galactopyranose. After synthesis and purification of the R, S, and racemic mixtures of complexes 1 and 3 and measurement of the hydration number, water residence lifetime, and longitudinal relaxation rates, we propose mechanisms for water exclusion from the lanthanide in the precleavage state. While the stereochemistry of the linker does not influence the agents' properties, the mechanism of water exclusion for each isomer is significantly influenced by the position of modification. Data for one series with a methyl group substituted on the sugar-macrocycle linker at the alpha-position suggests a steric mechanism where the galactopyranose sugar blocks water from the Gd(III) center. In contrast, our observations for a second series with methyl substitution at the beta position of the sugar-macrocycle linker are consistent with a mechanism in which a bidentate anion occupies two available coordination sites of Gd(III) in the precleavage state.

  18. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, John F.

    1989-01-01

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor.

  19. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1989-08-22

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor. 10 figs.

  20. Anisotropy of bituminous mixture in the linear viscoelastic domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Benedetto, Hervé; Sauzéat, Cédric; Clec'h, Pauline

    2016-08-01

    Some anisotropic properties in the linear viscoelastic domain of bituminous mixtures compacted with a French LPC wheel compactor are highlighted in this paper. Bituminous mixture is generally considered as isotropic even if the compaction process on road or in laboratory induces anisotropic properties. Tension-compression complex modulus tests have been performed on parallelepipedic specimens in two directions: (i) direction of compactor wheel movement (direction I, which is horizontal) and (ii) direction of compaction (direction II, which is vertical). These tests consist in measuring sinusoidal axial and lateral strains as well as sinusoidal axial stress, when sinusoidal axial loading is applied on the specimen. Different loading frequencies and temperatures are applied. Two complex moduli, EI ^{*} and E_{II}^{*}, and four complex Poisson's ratios, ν_{{II-I}}^{*}, ν_{{III-I}}^{*}, ν_{{I-II}}^{*} and ν_{{III-II}}^{*}, were obtained. The vertical direction appears softer than the other ones for the highest frequencies. There are very few differences between the two directions I and II for parameters concerning viscous effects (phase angles φ(EI) and φ(E_{II}), and shift factors). The four Poisson's ratios reveal anisotropic properties but rheological tensor can be considered as symmetric when considering very similar values obtained for the two measured parameters (I-II and II-I)