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Sample records for contrast mri perfusion

  1. Benefits of dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI for glioma diagnosis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Ramon Francisco; Cha, Soonmee

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Glioma are the most common supra-tentorial brain tumor in the USA with an estimated annual incidence of 17,000 new cases per year. Dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced (DSC) perfusion MRI noninvasively characterizes tumor biology allowing for the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of glioma. This MRI technique utilizes the rapid changes in signal intensity caused by a rapid intravascular bolus of paramagnetic contrast agent to calculate physiologic perfusion metrics. DSC perfusion MRI has increasingly become an integrated part of glioma imaging. The specific aim of this article is to review the benefits of DSC perfusion MRI in the therapy of glioma. PMID:25438812

  2. Placental Perfusion In Uterine Ischemia Model as Evaluated by Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Drobyshevsky, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Background To validate DCE MRI method of placental perfusion estimation and to demonstrate application of the method in a rabbit model of fetal antenatal hypoxia-ischemia. Methods Placental perfusion was estimated by dynamic contrast imaging with bolus injection of Gd-DTPA in 3 Tesla GE magnet in a rabbit model of placental ischemia–reperfusion in rabbit dams at embryonic day 25 gestation age. Placental perfusion was measured using steepest slope method on DCE MRI before and after intermittent 40 min uterine ischemia. Antioxidants (n = 2 dams, 9 placentas imaged) or vehicle (n = 5 dams, 23 placenta imaged) were given systemically in a separate group of dams during reperfusion–reoxygenation. Placental perfusion was also measured in two dams from the antioxidant group (10 placentas) and two dams from the control group (12 placentas) by fluorescent microspheres method. Results While placental perfusion estimates between fluorescent microspheres and DCE MRI were significantly correlated (R2 = 0.85; P < 0.01), there was approximately 33% systematic underestimation by the latter technique. DCE MRI showed a significant decrease in maternal placental perfusion in reperfusion–reoxygenation phase in the saline, 0.44 ± 0.06 mL/min/g (P = 0.012, t-test), but not in the antioxidant group, 0.62 ± 0.06 mL/min/g, relative to preocclusion values (0.77 ± 0.07 and 0.84 ± 0.12 mL/min/g, correspondingly). Conclusion Underestimation of true perfusion in placenta by steepest slope DCE MRI is significant and the error appears to be systematic. PMID:25854322

  3. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Perfusion Parameters as Imaging Biomarkers of Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment is the leading factor in angiogenesis. Angiogenesis can be identified by dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI (DCE MRI). Here we investigate the relationship between perfusion parameters on DCE MRI and angiogenic and prognostic factors in patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Perfusion parameters (Ktrans, kep and ve) of 81 IDC were obtained using histogram analysis. Twenty-fifth, 50th and 75th percentile values were calculated and were analyzed for association with microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and conventional prognostic factors. Correlation between MVD and ve50 was positive (r = 0.33). Ktrans50 was higher in tumors larger than 2 cm than in tumors smaller than 2 cm. In multivariate analysis, Ktrans50 was affected by tumor size and MVD with 12.8% explanation. There was significant association between Ktrans50 and tumor size and MVD. Therefore we conclude that DCE MRI perfusion parameters are potential imaging biomarkers for prediction of tumor angiogenesis and aggressiveness. PMID:28036342

  4. Contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for pulmonary diseases: basics and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Lee, Ho Yun; Miura, Sachiko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of regional pulmonary perfusion as well as nodule and tumor perfusions in various pulmonary diseases are currently performed by means of nuclear medicine studies requiring radioactive macroaggregates, dual-energy computed tomography (CT), and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques and unenhanced and dynamic first-pass contrast enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as time-resolved three-dimensional or four-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Perfusion scintigraphy, single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and SPECT fused with CT have been established as clinically available scintigraphic methods; however, they are limited by perfusion information with poor spatial resolution and other shortcomings. Although positron emission tomography with 15O water can measure absolute pulmonary perfusion, it requires a cyclotron for generation of a tracer with an extremely short half-life (2 min), and can only be performed for academic purposes. Therefore, clinicians are concentrating their efforts on the application of CT-based and MRI-based quantitative and qualitative perfusion assessment to various pulmonary diseases. This review article covers 1) the basics of dual-energy CT and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques, 2) the basics of time-resolved contrast-enhanced MRA and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI, and 3) clinical applications of contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for patients with pulmonary nodule, lung cancer, and pulmonary vascular diseases. We believe that these new techniques can be useful in routine clinical practice for not only thoracic oncology patients, but also patients with different pulmonary vascular diseases. PMID:27523813

  5. Contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for pulmonary diseases: basics and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Lee, Ho Yun; Miura, Sachiko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of regional pulmonary perfusion as well as nodule and tumor perfusions in various pulmonary diseases are currently performed by means of nuclear medicine studies requiring radioactive macroaggregates, dual-energy computed tomography (CT), and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques and unenhanced and dynamic first-pass contrast enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as time-resolved three-dimensional or four-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Perfusion scintigraphy, single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and SPECT fused with CT have been established as clinically available scintigraphic methods; however, they are limited by perfusion information with poor spatial resolution and other shortcomings. Although positron emission tomography with 15O water can measure absolute pulmonary perfusion, it requires a cyclotron for generation of a tracer with an extremely short half-life (2 min), and can only be performed for academic purposes. Therefore, clinicians are concentrating their efforts on the application of CT-based and MRI-based quantitative and qualitative perfusion assessment to various pulmonary diseases. This review article covers 1) the basics of dual-energy CT and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques, 2) the basics of time-resolved contrast-enhanced MRA and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI, and 3) clinical applications of contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for patients with pulmonary nodule, lung cancer, and pulmonary vascular diseases. We believe that these new techniques can be useful in routine clinical practice for not only thoracic oncology patients, but also patients with different pulmonary vascular diseases.

  6. Repeatability of Cerebral Perfusion Using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI in Glioblastoma Patients12

    PubMed Central

    Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Emblem, Kyrre E.; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Bjørnerud, Atle; Vangel, Mark G.; Gerstner, Elizabeth R.; Schmainda, Kathleen M.; Paynabar, Kamran; Wu, Ona; Wen, Patrick Y.; Batchelor, Tracy; Rosen, Bruce; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study evaluates the repeatability of brain perfusion using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with a variety of post-processing methods. METHODS Thirty-two patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were recruited. On a 3-T MRI using a dual-echo, gradient-echo spin-echo DSC-MRI protocol, the patients were scanned twice 1 to 5 days apart. Perfusion maps including cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were generated using two contrast agent leakage correction methods, along with testing normalization to reference tissue, and application of arterial input function (AIF). Repeatability of CBV and CBF within tumor regions and healthy tissues, identified by structural images, was assessed with intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and repeatability coefficients (RCs). Coefficients of variation (CVs) were reported for selected methods. RESULTS CBV and CBF were highly repeatable within tumor with ICC values up to 0.97. However, both CBV and CBF showed lower ICCs for healthy cortical tissues (up to 0.83), healthy gray matter (up to 0.95), and healthy white matter (WM; up to 0.93). The values of CV ranged from 6% to 10% in tumor and 3% to 11% in healthy tissues. The values of RC relative to the mean value of measurement within healthy WM ranged from 22% to 42% in tumor and 7% to 43% in healthy tissues. These percentages show how much variation in perfusion parameter, relative to that in healthy WM, we expect to observe to consider it statistically significant. We also found that normalization improved repeatability, but AIF deconvolution did not. CONCLUSIONS DSC-MRI is highly repeatable in high-grade glioma patients. PMID:26055170

  7. Quantitative Perfusion Analysis of First-Pass Contrast Enhancement Kinetics: Application to MRI of Myocardial Perfusion in Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Binita; Storey, Pippa; Iqbal, Sohah; Slater, James; Axel, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Perfusion analysis from first-pass contrast enhancement kinetics requires modeling tissue contrast exchange. This study presents a new approach for numerical implementation of the tissue homogeneity model, incorporating flexible distance steps along the capillary (NTHf). Methods The proposed NTHf model considers contrast exchange in fluid packets flowing along the capillary, incorporating flexible distance steps, thus allowing more efficient and stable calculations of the transit of tracer through the tissue. We prospectively studied 8 patients (62 ± 13 years old) with suspected CAD, who underwent first-pass perfusion CMR imaging at rest and stress prior to angiography. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI) were estimated using both the NTHf and the conventional adiabatic approximation of the TH models. Coronary artery lesions detected at angiography were clinically assigned to one of three categories of stenosis severity (‘insignificant’, ‘mild to moderate’ and ‘severe’) and related to corresponding myocardial territories. Results The mean MBF (ml/g/min) at rest/stress and MPRI were 0.80 ± 0.33/1.25 ± 0.45 and 1.68 ± 0.54 in the insignificant regions, 0.74 ± 0.21/1.09 ± 0.28 and 1.54 ± 0.46 in the mild to moderate regions, and 0.79 ± 0.28/0.63 ± 0.34 and 0.85 ± 0.48 in the severe regions, respectively. The correlation coefficients of MBFs at rest/stress and MPRI between the NTHf and AATH models were r = 0.97/0.93 and r = 0.91, respectively. Conclusions The proposed NTHf model allows efficient quantitative analysis of the transit of tracer through tissue, particularly at higher flow. Results of initial application to MRI of myocardial perfusion in CAD are encouraging. PMID:27583385

  8. Semi-quantitative assessment of pulmonary perfusion in children using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetita, Catalin; Thong, William E.; Ou, Phalla

    2013-03-01

    This paper addresses the study of semi-quantitative assessment of pulmonary perfusion acquired from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in a study population mainly composed of children with pulmonary malformations. The automatic analysis approach proposed is based on the indicator-dilution theory introduced in 1954. First, a robust method is developed to segment the pulmonary artery and the lungs from anatomical MRI data, exploiting 2D and 3D mathematical morphology operators. Second, the time-dependent contrast signal of the lung regions is deconvolved by the arterial input function for the assessment of the local hemodynamic system parameters, ie. mean transit time, pulmonary blood volume and pulmonary blood flow. The discrete deconvolution method implements here a truncated singular value decomposition (tSVD) method. Parametric images for the entire lungs are generated as additional elements for diagnosis and quantitative follow-up. The preliminary results attest the feasibility of perfusion quantification in pulmonary DCE-MRI and open an interesting alternative to scintigraphy for this type of evaluation, to be considered at least as a preliminary decision in the diagnostic due to the large availability of the technique and to the non-invasive aspects.

  9. The correlation of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis in rabbit VX2 liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhiming; Liang, Qianwen; Liang, Changhong; Zhong, Guimian

    2014-12-01

    Our objective is to explore the value of liver cancer contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis in liver cancer and the correlation between these two analysis methods. Rabbit VX2 liver cancer model was established in this study. CEUS was applied. Sono Vue was applied in rabbits by ear vein to dynamically observe and record the blood perfusion and changes in the process of VX2 liver cancer and surrounding tissue. MRI perfusion quantitative analysis was used to analyze the mean enhancement time and change law of maximal slope increasing, which were further compared with the pathological examination results. Quantitative indicators of liver cancer CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis were compared, and the correlation between them was analyzed by correlation analysis. Rabbit VX2 liver cancer model was successfully established. CEUS showed that time-intensity curve of rabbit VX2 liver cancer showed "fast in, fast out" model while MRI perfusion quantitative analysis showed that quantitative parameter MTE of tumor tissue increased and MSI decreased: the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The diagnostic results of CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis were not significantly different (P > 0.05). However, the quantitative parameter of them were significantly positively correlated (P < 0.05). CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis can both dynamically monitor the liver cancer lesion and surrounding liver parenchyma, and the quantitative parameters of them are correlated. The combined application of both is of importance in early diagnosis of liver cancer.

  10. Clinical Applications of Contrast-Enhanced Perfusion MRI Techniques in Gliomas: Recent Advances and Current Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Heng; Tong, Haipeng; Wang, Sumei; Yang, Yizeng

    2017-01-01

    Gliomas possess complex and heterogeneous vasculatures with abnormal hemodynamics. Despite considerable advances in diagnostic and therapeutic techniques for improving tumor management and patient care in recent years, the prognosis of malignant gliomas remains dismal. Perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging techniques that could noninvasively provide superior information on vascular functionality have attracted much attention for evaluating brain tumors. However, nonconsensus imaging protocols and postprocessing analysis among different institutions impede their integration into standard-of-care imaging in clinic. And there have been very few studies providing a comprehensive evidence-based and systematic summary. This review first outlines the status of glioma theranostics and tumor-associated vascular pathology and then presents an overview of the principles of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and dynamic susceptibility contrast-MRI (DSC-MRI), with emphasis on their recent clinical applications in gliomas including tumor grading, identification of molecular characteristics, differentiation of glioma from other brain tumors, treatment response assessment, and predicting prognosis. Current challenges and future perspectives are also highlighted.

  11. [An evaluation of ischemic stroke using dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, H; Igarashi, H; Katayama, Y; Terashi, A

    1998-04-01

    Thrombolytic therapy during the hyperacute stage is important for salvaging dying cerebral tissue. To date, however, accurate non-invasive assessment of an ischemic lesion during the hyperacute stage has not been possible. Perfusion MRI may be the key to the quick diagnosis of ischemic lesions. To assess the feasibility of dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI, echo planar imaging was performed in 10 patients with ischemic stroke. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), mean transit time (MTT), and relative cerebral blood flow(rCBF) were measured based on moment analysis and the gamma variate method. These measurements, however, are not suitable for the detection of cerebral ischemia during the hyperacute stage. Therefore, we additionally studied the changes in a concentration curve (time-delta R* curve) of Gd-DTPA, injected into the median vein of the forearm. From the curve the SUM (delta R*) time to peak and the delta R* peak, which may be calculated quickly, were determined and were compared to rCBV, MTT, and rCBF, respectively. The rCBV and the rCBF in the ischemic regions were less than those in the contralateral healthy regions (p < 0.05), and the MTT in the ischemic regions was longer than that in the contralateral healthy regions (p < 0.05). Additionally, SUM (delta R*) and the delta R* peak in the ischemic regions were less, and the time to peak in the ischemic regions was longer than the value in the contralateral healthy regions (p < 0.05), correlating well to the rCBV, rCBF, and MTT measurements. Also, images of these parameters, depicting the ischemic lesion earlier than conventional T2 weighted images, can be easily made by using an MRI console. These results suggest that the SUM (delta R*), time to peak and the delta R* peak images calculated with dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI may be one of the best techniques for the detection of cerebral ischemic lesions during the hyperacute stage.

  12. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI perfusion for differentiating between melanoma and lung cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Hatzoglou, Vaios; Tisnado, Jamie; Mehta, Alpesh; Peck, Kyung K; Daras, Mariza; Omuro, Antonio M; Beal, Kathryn; Holodny, Andrei I

    2017-04-01

    Brain metastases originating from different primary sites overlap in appearance and are difficult to differentiate with conventional MRI. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI can assess tumor microvasculature and has demonstrated utility in characterizing primary brain tumors. Our aim was to evaluate the performance of plasma volume (Vp) and volume transfer coefficient (K(trans) ) derived from DCE-MRI in distinguishing between melanoma and nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) brain metastases. Forty-seven NSCLC and 23 melanoma brain metastases were retrospectively assessed with DCE-MRI. Regions of interest were manually drawn around the metastases to calculate Vpmean and Kmeantrans. The Mann-Whitney U test and receiver operating characteristic analysis (ROC) were performed to compare perfusion parameters between the two groups. The Vpmean of melanoma brain metastases (4.35, standard deviation [SD] = 1.31) was significantly higher (P = 0.03) than Vpmean of NSCLC brain metastases (2.27, SD = 0.96). The Kmeantrans values were higher in melanoma brain metastases, but the difference between the two groups was not significant (P = 0.12). Based on ROC analysis, a cut-off value of 3.02 for Vpmean (area under curve = 0.659 with SD = 0.074) distinguished between melanoma brain metastases and NSCLC brain metastases (P < 0.01) with 72% specificity. Our data show the DCE-MRI parameter Vpmean can differentiate between melanoma and NSCLC brain metastases. The ability to noninvasively predict tumor histology of brain metastases in patients with multiple malignancies can have important clinical implications.

  13. Automated scoring of regional lung perfusion in children from contrast enhanced 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Tobias; Eichinger, Monika; Bauman, Grzegorz; Bischoff, Arved; Puderbach, Michael; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2012-03-01

    MRI perfusion images give information about regional lung function and can be used to detect pulmonary pathologies in cystic fibrosis (CF) children. However, manual assessment of the percentage of pathologic tissue in defined lung subvolumes features large inter- and intra-observer variation, making it difficult to determine disease progression consistently. We present an automated method to calculate a regional score for this purpose. First, lungs are located based on thresholding and morphological operations. Second, statistical shape models of left and right children's lungs are initialized at the determined locations and used to precisely segment morphological images. Segmentation results are transferred to perfusion maps and employed as masks to calculate perfusion statistics. An automated threshold to determine pathologic tissue is calculated and used to determine accurate regional scores. We evaluated the method on 10 MRI images and achieved an average surface distance of less than 1.5 mm compared to manual reference segmentations. Pathologic tissue was detected correctly in 9 cases. The approach seems suitable for detecting early signs of CF and monitoring response to therapy.

  14. Relationship between diffusion parameters derived from intravoxel incoherent motion MRI and perfusion measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of soft tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Simona; Stefanetti, Linda; Sperati, Francesca; Anelli, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the link between diffusion parameters measured by intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the perfusion metrics obtained with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI in soft tissue tumors (STTs). Twenty-eight patients affected by histopathologically confirmed STT were included in a prospective study. All patients underwent both DCE MRI and IVIM DWI. The perfusion fraction f, diffusion coefficient D and perfusion-related diffusion coefficient D* were estimated using a bi-exponential function to fit the DWI data. DCE MRI was acquired with a temporal resolution of 3-5 s. Maps of the initial area under the gadolinium concentration curve (IAUGC), time to peak (TTP) and maximum slope of increase (MSI) were derived using commercial software. The relationships between the DCE MRI and IVIM DWI measurements were assessed by Spearman's test. To exclude false positive results under multiple testing, the false discovery rate (FDR) procedure was applied. The Mann-Whitney test was used to evaluate the differences between all variables in patients with non-myxoid and myxoid STT. No significant relationship was found between IVIM parameters and any DCE MRI parameters. Higher f and D*f values were found in non-myxoid tumors compared with myxoid tumors (p = 0.004 and p = 0.003, respectively). MSI was significantly higher in non-myxoid tumors than in myxoid tumors (p = 0.029). From the visual assessments of single clinical cases, both f and D*f maps were in satisfactory agreement with DCE maps in the extreme cases of an avascular mass and a highly vascularized mass, whereas, for tumors with slight vascularity or with a highly heterogeneous perfusion pattern, this association was not straightforward. Although IVIM DWI was demonstrated to be feasible in STT, our data did not support evident relationships between perfusion-related IVIM parameters and perfusion measured by DCE MRI.

  15. On the Dark Rim Artifact in Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Myocardial Perfusion Studies

    PubMed Central

    Di Bella, E.V.R.; Parker, D.L.; Sinusas, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    A dark band or rim along parts of the subendocardial border of the left ventricle (LV) and the myocardium has been noticed in some dynamic contrast-enhanced MR perfusion studies. The artifact is thought to be due to susceptibility effects from the gadolinium bolus, motion, or resolution, or a combination of these. Here motionless ex vivo hearts in which the cavity was filled with gadolinium are used to show that dark rim artifacts can be consistent with resolution effects alone. PMID:16200553

  16. A linear mixed perfusion model for tissue partial volume correction of perfusion estimates in dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI: Impact on absolute quantification, repeatability, and agreement with pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, André; Wirestam, Ronnie; Lind, Emelie; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Knutsson, Linda

    2017-06-01

    The partial volume effect (PVE) is an important source of bias in brain perfusion measurements. The impact of tissue PVEs in perfusion measurements with dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) has not yet been well established. The purpose of this study was to suggest a partial volume correction (PVC) approach for DSC-MRI and to study how PVC affects DSC-MRI perfusion results. A linear mixed perfusion model for DSC-MRI was derived and evaluated by way of simulations. Twenty healthy volunteers were scanned twice, including DSC-MRI, arterial spin labeling (ASL), and partial volume measurements. Two different algorithms for PVC were employed and assessed. Simulations showed that the derived model had a tendency to overestimate perfusion values in voxels with high fractions of cerebrospinal fluid. PVC reduced the tissue volume dependence of DSC-MRI perfusion values from 44.4% to 4.2% in gray matter and from 55.3% to 14.2% in white matter. One PVC method significantly improved the voxel-wise repeatability, but PVC did not improve the spatial agreement between DSC-MRI and ASL perfusion maps. Significant PVEs were found for DSC-MRI perfusion estimates, and PVC successfully reduced those effects. The findings suggest that PVC might be an important consideration for DSC-MRI applications. Magn Reson Med 77:2203-2214, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Lung ventilation- and perfusion-weighted Fourier decomposition magnetic resonance imaging: in vivo validation with hyperpolarized 3He and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Grzegorz; Scholz, Alexander; Rivoire, Julien; Terekhov, Maxim; Friedrich, Janet; de Oliveira, Andre; Semmler, Wolfhard; Schreiber, Laura Maria; Puderbach, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to validate ventilation-weighted (VW) and perfusion-weighted (QW) Fourier decomposition (FD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized (3)He MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion (DCE) MRI in a controlled animal experiment. Three healthy pigs were studied on 1.5-T MR scanner. For FD MRI, the VW and QW images were obtained by postprocessing of time-resolved lung image sets. DCE acquisitions were performed immediately after contrast agent injection. (3)He MRI data were acquired following the administration of hyperpolarized helium and nitrogen mixture. After baseline MR scans, pulmonary embolism was artificially produced. FD MRI and DCE MRI perfusion measurements were repeated. Subsequently, atelectasis and air trapping were induced, which followed with FD MRI and (3)He MRI ventilation measurements. Distributions of signal intensities in healthy and pathologic lung tissue were compared by statistical analysis. Images acquired using FD, (3)He, and DCE MRI in all animals before the interventional procedure showed homogeneous ventilation and perfusion. Functional defects were detected by all MRI techniques at identical anatomical locations. Signal intensity in VW and QW images was significantly lower in pathological than in healthy lung parenchyma. The study has shown usefulness of FD MRI as an alternative, noninvasive, and easily implementable technique for the assessment of acute changes in lung function. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Non-contrast-enhanced perfusion and ventilation assessment of the human lung by means of fourier decomposition in proton MRI.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Grzegorz; Puderbach, Michael; Deimling, Michael; Jellus, Vladimir; Chefd'hotel, Christophe; Dinkel, Julien; Hintze, Christian; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Schad, Lothar R

    2009-09-01

    Assessment of regional lung perfusion and ventilation has significant clinical value for the diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary diseases. In this work a new method of non-contrast-enhanced functional lung MRI (not dependent on intravenous or inhalative contrast agents) is proposed. A two-dimensional (2D) true fast imaging with steady precession (TrueFISP) pulse sequence (TR/TE = 1.9 ms/0.8 ms, acquisition time [TA] = 112 ms/image) was implemented on a 1.5T whole-body MR scanner. The imaging protocol comprised sets of 198 lung images acquired with an imaging rate of 3.33 images/s in coronal and sagittal view. No electrocardiogram (ECG) or respiratory triggering was used. A nonrigid image registration algorithm was applied to compensate for respiratory motion. Rapid data acquisition allowed observing intensity changes in corresponding lung areas with respect to the cardiac and respiratory frequencies. After a Fourier analysis along the time domain, two spectral lines corresponding to both frequencies were used to calculate the perfusion- and ventilation-weighted images. The described method was applied in preliminary studies on volunteers and patients showing clinical relevance to obtain non-contrast-enhanced perfusion and ventilation data.

  19. Comparison of dynamic susceptibility contrast-MRI perfusion quantification methods in the presence of delay and dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maan, Bianca; Simões, Rita Lopes; Meijer, Frederick J. A.; Klaas Jan Renema, W.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2011-03-01

    The perfusion of the brain is essential to maintain brain function. Stroke is an example of a decrease in blood flow and reduced perfusion. During ischemic stroke the blood flow to tissue is hampered due to a clot inside a vessel. To investigate the recovery of stroke patients, follow up studies are necessary. MRI is the preferred imaging modality for follow up because of the absence of radiation dose concerns, contrary to CT. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast (DSC) MRI is an imaging technique used for measuring perfusion of the brain, however, is not standard applied in the clinical routine due to lack of immediate patient benefit. Several post processing algorithms are described in the literature to obtain cerebral blood flow (CBF). The quantification of CBF relies on the deconvolution of a tracer concentration-time curve in an arterial and a tissue voxel. There are several methods to obtain this deconvolution based on singular-value decomposition (SVD). This contribution describes a comparison between the different approaches as currently there is no best practice for (all) clinical relevant situations. We investigate the influence of tracer delay, dispersion and recirculation on the performance of the methods. In the presence of negative delays, the truncated SVD approach overestimates the CBF. Block-circulant and reformulated SVD are delay-independent. Due to its delay dependent behavior, the truncated SVD approach performs worse in the presence of dispersion as well. However all SVD approaches are dependent on the amount of dispersion. Moreover, we observe that the optimal truncation parameter varies when recirculation is added to noisy data, suggesting that, in practice, these methods are not immune to tracer recirculation. Finally, applying the methods to clinical data resulted in a large variability of the CBF estimates. Block-circulant SVD will work in all situations and is the method with the highest potential.

  20. 3D pulmonary perfusion MRI and MR angiography of pulmonary embolism in pigs after a single injection of a blood pool MR contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Fink, Christian; Ley, Sebastian; Puderbach, Michael; Plathow, Christian; Bock, Michael; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of contrast-enhanced 3D perfusion MRI and MR angiography (MRA) of pulmonary embolism (PE) in pigs using a single injection of the blood pool contrast Gadomer. PE was induced in five domestic pigs by injection of autologous blood thrombi. Contrast-enhanced first-pass 3D perfusion MRI (TE/TR/FA: 1.0 ms/2.2 ms/40 degrees; voxel size: 1.3 x 2.5 x 4.0 mm3; TA: 1.8 s per data set) and high-resolution 3D MRA (TE/TR/FA: 1.4 ms/3.4 ms/40 degrees; voxel size: 0.8 x 1.0 x 1.6 mm3) was performed during and after a single injection of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight of Gadomer. Image data were compared to pre-embolism Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI and post-embolism thin-section multislice CT (n = 2). SNR measurements were performed in the pulmonary arteries and lung. One animal died after induction of PE. In all other animals, perfusion MRI and MRA could be acquired after a single injection of Gadomer. At perfusion MRI, PE could be detected by typical wedge-shaped perfusion defects. While the visualization of central PE at MRA correlated well with the CT, peripheral PE were only visualized by CT. Gadomer achieved a higher peak SNR of the lungs compared to Gd-DTPA (21 +/- 8 vs. 13 +/- 3). Contrast-enhanced 3D perfusion MRI and MRA of PE can be combined using a single injection of the blood pool contrast agent Gadomer.

  1. Brain capillary transit time heterogeneity in healthy volunteers measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced T1 -weighted perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Henrik B W; Vestergaard, Mark B; Lindberg, Ulrich; Iversen, Helle K; Cramer, Stig P

    2017-06-01

    Capillary transit time heterogeneity, measured as CTH, may set the upper limit for extraction of substances in brain tissue, e.g., oxygen. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced T1 weighted MRI (DCE-MRI) at 3 Tesla (T), in estimating CTH based on a gamma-variate model of the capillary transit time distribution. In addition, we wanted to investigate if a subtle increase of the blood-brain barrier permeability can be incorporated into the model, still allowing estimation of CTH. Twenty-three healthy subjects were scanned at 3.0T MRI system applying DCE-MRI and using a gamma-variate model to estimate CTH as well as cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and permeability of the blood-brain barrier, measured as the influx constant Ki . For proof of principle we also investigated three patients with recent thromboembolic events and a patient with a high grade brain tumor. In the healthy subjects, we found a narrow symmetric delta-like capillary transit time distribution in basal ganglia gray matter with median CTH of 0.93 s and interquartile range of 1.33 s. The corresponding residue impulse response function was compatible with the adiabatic tissue homogeneity model. In two patients with complete occlusion of the internal carotid artery and in the patient with a brain tumor CTH was increased with values up to 6 s in the affected brain tissue, with an exponential like residue impulse response function. Our results open the possibility of characterizing brain perfusion by the capillary transit time distribution using DCE-MRI, theoretically a determinant of efficient blood to brain transport of important substances. 2 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;45:1809-1820. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. The value of resting-state functional MRI in subacute ischemic stroke: comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ling; Li, Jingwei; Li, Weiping; Zhou, Fei; Wang, Fangfang; Schwarz, Christopher G; Liu, Renyuan; Zhao, Hui; Wu, Wenbo; Zhang, Xin; Li, Ming; Yu, Haiping; Zhu, Bin; Villringer, Arno; Zang, Yufeng; Zhang, Bing; Lv, Yating; Xu, Yun

    2017-01-31

    To evaluate the potential clinical value of the time-shift analysis (TSA) approach for resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) data in detecting hypoperfusion of subacute stroke patients through comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion weighted imaging (DSC-PWI). Forty patients with subacute stroke (3-14 days after neurological symptom onset) underwent MRI examination. Cohort A: 31 patients had MRA, DSC-PWI and BOLD data. Cohort B: 9 patients had BOLD and MRA data. The time delay between the BOLD time course in each voxel and the mean signal of global and contralateral hemisphere was calculated using TSA. Time to peak (TTP) was employed to detect hypoperfusion. Among cohort A, 14 patients who had intracranial large-vessel occlusion/stenosis with sparse collaterals showed hypoperfusion by both of the two approaches, one with abundant collaterals showed neither TTP nor TSA time delay. The remaining 16 patients without obvious MRA lesions showed neither TTP nor TSA time delay. Among cohort B, eight patients showed time delay areas. The TSA approach was a promising alternative to DSC-PWI for detecting hypoperfusion in subacute stroke patients who had obvious MRA lesions with sparse collaterals, those with abundant collaterals would keep intact local perfusion.

  3. The value of resting-state functional MRI in subacute ischemic stroke: comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Ling; Li, Jingwei; Li, Weiping; Zhou, Fei; Wang, Fangfang; Schwarz, Christopher G.; Liu, Renyuan; Zhao, Hui; Wu, Wenbo; Zhang, Xin; Li, Ming; Yu, Haiping; Zhu, Bin; Villringer, Arno; Zang, Yufeng; Zhang, Bing; Lv, Yating; Xu, Yun

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the potential clinical value of the time-shift analysis (TSA) approach for resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) data in detecting hypoperfusion of subacute stroke patients through comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion weighted imaging (DSC-PWI). Forty patients with subacute stroke (3–14 days after neurological symptom onset) underwent MRI examination. Cohort A: 31 patients had MRA, DSC-PWI and BOLD data. Cohort B: 9 patients had BOLD and MRA data. The time delay between the BOLD time course in each voxel and the mean signal of global and contralateral hemisphere was calculated using TSA. Time to peak (TTP) was employed to detect hypoperfusion. Among cohort A, 14 patients who had intracranial large-vessel occlusion/stenosis with sparse collaterals showed hypoperfusion by both of the two approaches, one with abundant collaterals showed neither TTP nor TSA time delay. The remaining 16 patients without obvious MRA lesions showed neither TTP nor TSA time delay. Among cohort B, eight patients showed time delay areas. The TSA approach was a promising alternative to DSC-PWI for detecting hypoperfusion in subacute stroke patients who had obvious MRA lesions with sparse collaterals, those with abundant collaterals would keep intact local perfusion. PMID:28139701

  4. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI as a valuable non-invasive tool to evaluate tissue perfusion of free flaps: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Claudia; Jung, Ernst M; Prantl, Lukas

    2010-01-01

    Early detection of a compromised circulation of free flaps and an immediate revision may lead to higher rates of flap salvage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perfusion of the entire flap using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). DCE was performed in 11 patients after flap transplantation using an optimized 3D gradient echo sequence to cover the whole flap. The percentage increase of signal intensity over time was evaluated for the free flap as well as for a reference tissue. Furthermore, normalized signal increase was calculated as the ratio of signal increase within the flaps to the signal increase in the reference tissue. Signal increase in free flaps and reference tissue was compared using the Wilcoxon-test (p < 0.05), normalized signal increase in normally perfused (n = 9) and in flaps with compromised perfusion (n = 2) using Mann-Whitney-test (p < 0.05). Signal increase within normally perfused flaps was similar to the reference tissue. In flaps with compromised perfusion the increase was significantly lower than in reference tissue. Normalized signal increase in adequately perfused flaps and flaps with compromised perfusion also showed a significant difference. DCE MRI may be a valuable non-invasive tool to evaluate tissue perfusion of the complete free flap.

  5. Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Imaging in MRI and CT: Theoretical Models and Current Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Handayani, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Prakken, N. H. J.; Slart, R. H. J. A.; Oudkerk, M.; Van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Vliegenthart, R.; Sijens, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), including higher spatial and temporal resolution, have made the prospect of performing absolute myocardial perfusion quantification possible, previously only achievable with positron emission tomography (PET). This could facilitate integration of myocardial perfusion biomarkers into the current workup for coronary artery disease (CAD), as MRI and CT systems are more widely available than PET scanners. Cardiac PET scanning remains expensive and is restricted by the requirement of a nearby cyclotron. Clinical evidence is needed to demonstrate that MRI and CT have similar accuracy for myocardial perfusion quantification as PET. However, lack of standardization of acquisition protocols and tracer kinetic model selection complicates comparison between different studies and modalities. The aim of this overview is to provide insight into the different tracer kinetic models for quantitative myocardial perfusion analysis and to address typical implementation issues in MRI and CT. We compare different models based on their theoretical derivations and present the respective consequences for MRI and CT acquisition parameters, highlighting the interplay between tracer kinetic modeling and acquisition settings. PMID:27088083

  6. 3D ECG- and respiratory-gated non-contrast-enhanced (CE) perfusion MRI for postoperative lung function prediction in non-small-cell lung cancer patients: A comparison with thin-section quantitative computed tomography, dynamic CE-perfusion MRI, and perfusion scan.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Seki, Shinichiro; Koyama, Hisanobu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Takenaka, Daisuke; Kassai, Yoshimori; Yui, Masao; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2015-08-01

    To compare predictive capabilities of non-contrast-enhanced (CE)- and dynamic CE-perfusion MRIs, thin-section multidetector computed tomography (CT) (MDCT), and perfusion scan for postoperative lung function in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Sixty consecutive pathologically diagnosed NSCLC patients were included and prospectively underwent thin-section MDCT, non-CE-, and dynamic CE-perfusion MRIs and perfusion scan, and had their pre- and postoperative forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 ) measured. Postoperative percent FEV1 (po%FEV1 ) was then predicted from the fractional lung volume determined on semiquantitatively assessed non-CE- and dynamic CE-perfusion MRIs, from the functional lung volumes determined on quantitative CT, from the number of segments observed on qualitative CT, and from uptakes detected on perfusion scans within total and resected lungs. Predicted po%FEV1 s were then correlated with actual po%FEV1 s, which were %FEV1 s measured postoperatively. The limits of agreement were also determined. All predicted po%FEV1 s showed significant correlation (0.73 ≤ r ≤ 0.93, P < 0.0001) and limits of agreement with actual po%FEV1 (non-CE-perfusion MRI: 0.3 ± 10.0%, dynamic CE-perfusion MRI: 1.0 ± 10.8%, perfusion scan: 2.2 ± 14.1%, quantitative CT: 1.2 ± 9.0%, qualitative CT: 1.5 ± 10.2%). Non-CE-perfusion MRI may be able to predict postoperative lung function more accurately than qualitatively assessed MDCT and perfusion scan. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Detection of Local Tumor Recurrence After Definitive Treatment of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Histogram Analysis of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced T1-Weighted Perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Choi, Young Jun; Park, Ji Eun; Sung, Yu Sub; Kim, Namkug; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the added value of histogram analysis of the ratio of initial to final 90-second time-signal intensity AUC (AUCR) for differentiating local tumor recurrence from contrast-enhancing scar on follow-up dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted perfusion MRI of patients treated for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). AUCR histogram parameters were assessed among tumor recurrence (n = 19) and contrast-enhancing scar (n = 27) at primary sites and compared using the t test. ROC analysis was used to determine the best differentiating parameters. The added value of AUCR histogram parameters was assessed when they were added to inconclusive conventional MRI results. Histogram analysis showed statistically significant differences in the 50th, 75th, and 90th percentiles of the AUCR values between the two groups (p < 0.05). The 90th percentile of the AUCR values (AUCR90) was the best predictor of local tumor recurrence (AUC, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.64-0.91) with an estimated cutoff of 1.02. AUCR90 increased sensitivity by 11.7% over that of conventional MRI alone when added to inconclusive results. Histogram analysis of AUCR can improve the diagnostic yield for local tumor recurrence during surveillance after treatment for HNSCC.

  8. Accelerated Dual-contrast First-pass Perfusion MRI of the Mouse Heart: Development and Application to Diet-induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Naresh, Nivedita K.; Chen, Xiao; Roy, Rene J.; Antkowiak, Patrick F.; Annex, Brian H.; Epstein, Frederick H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Gene-modified mice may be used to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying abnormal myocardial blood flow (MBF). We sought to develop a quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging technique for mice and to test the hypothesis that myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) is reduced in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Methods A dual-contrast saturation-recovery sequence with ky-t undersampling and a motion-compensated compressed sensing reconstruction algorithm was developed for first-pass MRI on a small-bore 7T system. Control mice were imaged at rest and with the vasodilators ATL313 and Regadenoson (n=6 each). In addition, we imaged mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 24 weeks. Results In control mice, MBF was 5.7±0.8 ml/g/min at rest and it increased to 11.8±0.6 ml/g/min with ATL313 and to 10.4±0.3 ml/g/min with Regadenoson. In HFD mice we detected normal resting MBF (5.6±0.4 vs. 5.0±0.3 on control diet), low MBF at stress (7.7±0.4 vs. 10.4±0.3 on control diet, p<0.05), and reduced MPR (1.4±0.2 vs. 2.0±0.3 on control diet, p<0.05). Conclusions Accelerated dual-contrast first-pass MRI with motion-compensated compressed sensing provides spatiotemporal resolution suitable for measuring MBF in free-breathing mice, and detected reduced MPR in DIO mice. These techniques may be used to study molecular mechanisms that underlie abnormal myocardial perfusion. PMID:24760707

  9. Measurement of perfusion and permeability from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in normal and pathological vertebral bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Biffar, Andreas; Sourbron, Steven; Schmidt, Gerwin; Ingrisch, Michael; Dietrich, Olaf; Reiser, Maximilian F; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2010-07-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data in vertebral bone marrow (vBM) are currently analyzed with descriptive indices. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a quantitative approach, considering the tissue composition of vBM. Therefore, a measurement of the water fraction, f(wat), and the precontrast relaxation times, T(10 wat), T(10 fat), was added to the routine protocol. Signal analysis was generalized by allowing for an arbitrary fraction of fat. Plasma flow, plasma volume, extraction flow, and interstitial volume were determined from dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI data. Simulations were used to determine the sensitivity to the precontrast values and to retrospectively verify the choice of the sequence parameters. Measurements were performed in healthy vertebral bodies (n = 30) and lesions of 15 patients with vertebral fractures. Extraction flow (milliliters per 100 mL/min) provided the strongest normal/abnormal separation: mean (standard deviation) was 0.3 (0.8) in healthy vBM and 6(4) in the fractures. Neglecting the fat component and the approximated signal analysis using relative signal enhancement produced significant differences. We conclude that correcting for the fat component in the signal and parametrization by tracer-kinetic analysis is necessary to avoid misinterpretation and/or systematic errors. The quantitative analysis is equally well suited as a descriptive parameter for the differentiation between normal and abnormal vertebral bone marrow. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. FAIR exempting separate T (1) measurement (FAIREST): a novel technique for online quantitative perfusion imaging and multi-contrast fMRI.

    PubMed

    Lai, S; Wang, J; Jahng, G H

    2001-01-01

    A new pulse sequence, dubbed FAIR exempting separate T(1) measurement (FAIREST) in which a slice-selective saturation recovery acquisition is added in addition to the standard FAIR (flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery) scheme, was developed for quantitative perfusion imaging and multi-contrast fMRI. The technique allows for clean separation between and thus simultaneous assessment of BOLD and perfusion effects, whereas quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) and tissue T(1) values are monitored online. Online CBF maps were obtained using the FAIREST technique and the measured CBF values were consistent with the off-line CBF maps obtained from using the FAIR technique in combination with a separate sequence for T(1) measurement. Finger tapping activation studies were carried out to demonstrate the applicability of the FAIREST technique in a typical fMRI setting for multi-contrast fMRI. The relative CBF and BOLD changes induced by finger-tapping were 75.1 +/- 18.3 and 1.8 +/- 0.4%, respectively, and the relative oxygen consumption rate change was 2.5 +/- 7.7%. The results from correlation of the T(1) maps with the activation images on a pixel-by-pixel basis show that the mean T(1) value of the CBF activation pixels is close to the T(1) of gray matter while the mean T(1) value of the BOLD activation pixels is close to the T(1) range of blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Contrast enhanced MRI characterization of the perfusion territories fed by individual coronary arteries in ex-vivo porcine heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeverenyi, Nikolaus M.; Searles, Bruce; Pertsov, Arkady

    2008-03-01

    Sudden cardiac death is often caused by ventricular arrhythmias. These arrhythmias are believed to originate from the border zones where tissue was damaged by an ischemic event involving the coronary arteries. The specific mechanisms relating the geometry of these territories to the electrical behavior remains poorly understood. A major problem is the lack of detailed information describing the morphology of the affected perfusion bed. We present the first perfusion MR images of excised whole heart preparations where the irregular boundaries of perfusion territories are described. The filling pattern and final volume of the RCA perfusion territory are clearly visualized.

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Contrast Agent Bolus Dispersion in a Coronary Bifurcation: Impact on MRI-Based Quantification of Myocardial Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Regine; Graafen, Dirk; Weber, Stefan; Schreiber, Laura M.

    2013-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced first-pass magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with a tracer kinetic model, for example, MMID4, can be used to determine myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR). Typically, the arterial input function (AIF) required for this methodology is estimated from the left ventricle (LV). Dispersion of the contrast agent bolus might occur between the LV and the myocardial tissue. Negligence of bolus dispersion could cause an error in MBF determination. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of bolus dispersion in a simplified coronary bifurcation geometry including one healthy and one stenotic branch on the quantification of MBF and MPR. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were combined with MMID4. Different inlet boundary conditions describing pulsatile and constant flows for rest and hyperemia and differing outflow conditions have been investigated. In the bifurcation region, the increase of the dispersion was smaller than inside the straight vessels. A systematic underestimation of MBF values up to −16.1% for pulsatile flow and an overestimation of MPR up to 7.5% were found. It was shown that, under the conditions considered in this study, bolus dispersion can significantly influence the results of quantitative myocardial MR-perfusion measurements. PMID:23533541

  13. Leakage decrease detected by dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI predicts survival in recurrent glioblastoma treated with bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Hilario, A; Sepulveda, J M; Hernandez-Lain, A; Salvador, E; Koren, L; Manneh, R; Ruano, Y; Perez-Nuñez, A; Lagares, A; Ramos, A

    2017-01-01

    In glioblastoma, tumor progression appears to be triggered by expression of VEGF, a regulator of blood vessel permeability. Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits angiogenesis by clearing circulating VEGF, resulting in a decline in the contrast-enhancing tumor, which does not always correlate with treatment response. Our objectives were: (1) to evaluate whether changes in DSC perfusion MRI-derived leakage could predict survival in recurrent glioblastoma, and (2) to estimate whether leakage at baseline was related to treatment outcome. We retrospectively analyzed DSC perfusion MRI in 24 recurrent glioblastomas treated with bevacizumab as second line chemotherapy. Leakage at baseline and changes in maximum leakage between baseline and the first follow-up after treatment were selected for quantitative analysis. Survival univariate analysis was made constructing survival curves using Kaplan-Meier method and comparing subgroups by log rank probability test. Leakage reduction at 8 weeks after initiation of bevacizumab treatment had a significant influence on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Median OS and PFS were 2.4 and 2.8 months longer for patients with leakage reduction at the first follow-up. Higher leakage at baseline was associated with leakage reduction after treatment. Odds ratio of treatment response was 9 for patients with maximum leakage at baseline >5. Leakage decrease may predict OS and PFS in recurrent glioblastomas treated with bevacizumab. Leakage reduction postulates as a potential biomarker for treatment response evaluation. Leakage at baseline seems to predict response to treatment, but was not independently associated with survival.

  14. Repeatability and Variability of Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Techniques in Mice: Comparison of Arterial Spin Labeling and First-pass Contrast-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Naresh, Nivedita K.; Chen, Xiao; Moran, Eric; Tian, Yikui; French, Brent A.; Epstein, Frederick H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Preclinical imaging of myocardial blood flow (MBF) can elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease. We compared the repeatability and variability of two methods, first-pass MRI and arterial spin labeling (ASL), for imaging MBF in mice. Methods Quantitative perfusion MRI in mice was performed using both methods at rest, with a vasodilator, and one day after myocardial infarction (MI). Image quality (score of 1–5, 5 best), between-session coefficient of variability (CVbs), intra-user coefficient of variability (CVintra-user) and inter-user coefficient of variability (CVinter-user) were assessed. Acquisition time was 1–2 minutes for first-pass MRI and approximately 40 minutes for ASL. Results Image quality was higher for ASL (3.94±0.09 vs. 2.88±0.10, p<0.05). Infarct zone CVbs was lower with first-pass (17±3% vs. 46±9%, p<0.05). The stress perfusion CVintra-user was lower for ASL (3±1% vs. 14±3%, p<0.05). The stress perfusion CVinter-user was lower for ASL (4±1% vs. 17±4%, p<0.05). Conclusion For low MBF conditions such as infarct, first-pass MRI is preferred due to better repeatability and variability. At high MBF such as at vasodilation, ASL may be more suitable due to superior image quality and lower user variability. First-pass MRI has a substantial speed advantage. PMID:26190350

  15. Contrast agents for MRI.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahi, H

    2013-12-01

    Contrast agents are divided into two categories. The first one is paramagnetic compounds, including lanthanides like gadolinium, which mainly reduce the longitudinal (T1) relaxation property and result in a brighter signal. The second class consists of super-paramagnetic magnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) such as iron oxides, which have a strong effect on the transversal (T2) relaxation properties. SPMNPs have the potential to be utilized as excellent probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For instance, clinically benign iron oxide and engineered ferrite nanoparticles provide a good MRI probing capability for clinical applications. Furthermore, the limited magnetic property and inability to escape from the reticuloendothelial system (RES) of the used nanoparticles impede their further advancement. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the engineered magnetic nanoparticle probes for the next-generation molecular MRI. Considering the importance of MRI in diagnosing diseases, this paper presents an overview of recent scientific achievements in the development of new synthetic SPMNP probes whereby the sensitive and target-specific observation of biological events at the molecular and cellular levels is feasible.

  16. Repeatability and variability of myocardial perfusion imaging techniques in mice: Comparison of arterial spin labeling and first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Naresh, Nivedita K; Chen, Xiao; Moran, Eric; Tian, Yikui; French, Brent A; Epstein, Frederick H

    2016-06-01

    Preclinical imaging of myocardial blood flow (MBF) can elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease. We compared the repeatability and variability of two methods, first-pass MRI and arterial spin labeling (ASL), for imaging MBF in mice. Quantitative perfusion MRI in mice was performed using both methods at rest, with a vasodilator, and one day after myocardial infarction. Image quality (score of 1-5; 5 best), between-session coefficient of variability (CVbs ), intra-user coefficient of variability (CVintra-user ), and inter-user coefficient of variability (CVinter-user ) were assessed. Acquisition time was 1-2 min for first-pass MRI and approximately 40 min for ASL. Image quality was higher for ASL (3.94 ± 0.09 versus 2.88 ± 0.10; P < 0.05). Infarct zone CVbs was lower with first-pass (17 ± 3% versus 46 ± 9%; P < 0.05). The stress perfusion CVintra-user was lower for ASL (3 ± 1% versus 14 ± 3%; P < 0.05). The stress perfusion CVinter-user was lower for ASL (4 ± 1% versus 17 ± 4%; P < 0.05). For low MBF conditions such as infarct, first-pass MRI is preferred due to better repeatability and variability. At high MBF such as at vasodilation, ASL may be more suitable due to superior image quality and lower user variability. First-pass MRI has a substantial speed advantage. Magn Reson Med 75:2394-2405, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. AUR memorial award--1988. MRI enhancement of perfused tissues using chromium labeled red blood cells as an intravascular contrast agent

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, A.D.; Conturo, T.E.; Price, R.R.; Holburn, G.E.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr. )

    1989-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that chromium (Cr) labeling significantly decreases the relaxation times of packed red blood cells (RBCs). In this study, the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of human red cells was shortened from 836 ms to 29 ms and the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) shortened from 134 ms to 18 ms, when the cells were labeled at a Cr incubation concentration of 50 mM. Labeling of canine cells at 50 mM resulted in a T1 of 36 ms and a T2 of 26 ms. A labeling concentration of 10 mM produced similar relaxation enhancement, with uptake of 47% of the available Cr, and was determined to be optimal. The enhancement of longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates (1/T1,-1/T2) per amount of hemoglobin-bound Cr are 6.9 s-1 mM-1 and 9.8 s-1 mM-1 respectively, different from those of a pure Cr+3 solution. Labeling cells at 10 mM decreased the survival half-time in vivo from 16.6 days to 4.7 days in dogs. No difference in red cell survival was found with the use of hetero-transfusion versus auto-transfusion of labeled RBCs. Significant shortening of the T1 (912 ms to 266 ms, P = .03) and T2 (90 ms to 70 ms, P = .006) of spleen and the T1 (764 ms to 282 ms, P = .005) and the T2 (128 ms to 86 ms, P = .005) of liver occurred when 10% of the RBC mass of dogs was exchanged with Cr labeled cells. Liver and spleen spin density changes (P greater than 0.23) and muscle spin density and relaxation changes (P greater than 0.4) were insignificant. The in vivo T1 of a canine spleen which had been infarcted did not change following transfusion with labeled cells, where the T1 of liver did shorten. We believe this preliminary study suggests that Cr labeled red cells may have the potential to become an intravascular magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

  18. High Temporospatial Resolution Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) Wrist MRI with Variable-Density Pseudo-Random CIRcular Cartesian UnderSampling (CIRCUS) Acquisition: Evaluation of Perfusion in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Pedoia, Valentina; Heilmeier, Ursula; Ku, Eric; Su, Favian; Khanna, Sameer; Imboden, John; Graf, Jonathan; Link, Thomas; Li, Xiaojuan

    2016-01-01

    This study is to evaluate highly accelerated 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) wrist MRI for assessment of perfusion in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. A pseudo-random variable-density undersampling strategy, CIRcular Cartesian UnderSampling (CIRCUS), was combined with k-t SPARSE-SENSE reconstruction to achieve a highly accelerated 3D DCE wrist MRI. Two healthy volunteers and ten RA patients were studied. Two patients were on methotrexate (MTX) only (Group I) and the other eight were treated with a combination therapy of MTX and Anti-Tumour Necrosis Factor (TNF) therapy (Group II). Patients were scanned at baseline and 3-month follow-up. DCE MR images were used to evaluate perfusion in synovitis and bone marrow edema pattern in the RA wrist joints. A series of perfusion parameters were derived and compared with clinical disease activity scores of 28 joints (DAS28). 3D DCE wrist MR images were obtained with a spatial resolution of 0.3×0.3×1.5mm3 and temporal resolution of 5 s (with an acceleration factor of 20). The derived perfusion parameters, most notably, transition time (dT) of synovitis, showed significant negative correlations with DAS28-ESR (r=-0.80, p<0.05) and DAS28-CRP (r=-0.87, p<0.05) at baseline and also correlated significantly with treatment responses evaluated by clinical score changes between baseline and 3-month follow-up (with DAS28-ESR: r=-0.79, p<0.05, and DAS28-CRP: r=-0.82, p<0.05). Highly accelerated 3D DCE wrist MRI with improved temporospatial resolution has been achieved in RA patients and provides accurate assessment of neovascularization and perfusion in RA joints, showing promise as a potential tool for evaluating treatment responses. PMID:26608949

  19. Organic Nitrate Maintains Bone Marrow Blood Perfusion in Ovariectomized Female Rats: A Dynamic, Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J.; Ko, Chun Hay; Griffith, James F.; Deng, Min; Wong, Hing Lok; Gu, Tao; Huang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of nitrate on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone marrow perfusion in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats, and also the effects of nitrate on in vitro osteoblastic activity and osteoclastic differentiation of murine monocyte/macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. Female Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into OVX + nitrate group (isosorbide-5-mononitrate, ISM, 150 mg/kg/ day b.i.d), OVX + vehicle group, and control group. Lumbar spine CT bone densitometry and perfusion MRI were performed on the rats at baseline and week 8 post-OVX. The OVX rats’ BMD decreased by 22.5% ± 5.7% at week 8 (p < 0.001); while the OVX + ISM rats’ BMD decreased by 13.1% ± 2.7% (p < 0.001). The BMD loss difference between the two groups of rats was significant (p = 0.018). The OVX rats’ lumbar vertebral perfusion MRI maximum enhancement (Emax) decreased by 10.3% ± 5.0% at week 8 (p < 0.005), while in OVX + ISM rats, the Emax increased by 5.5% ± 6.9% (p > 0.05). The proliferation of osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells increased significantly with ISM treatment at 0.78 µM to 50 μM. Treatment of UMR-106 cells with ISM also stimulated the BrdU uptake. After the RAW 264.7 cells were co-treated with osteoclastogenesis inducer RANKL and 6.25 μM ~ 100 μM of ISM for 3 days, a trend of dose-dependent increase of osteoclast number was noted. PMID:24300395

  20. Perfusion MRI: The Five Most Frequently Asked Clinical Questions

    PubMed Central

    Essig, Marco; Nguyen, Thanh Binh; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Saake, Marc; Provenzale, James M.; Enterline, David S.; Anzalone, Nicoletta; Dörfler, Arnd; Rovira, Àlex; Wintermark, Max; Law, Meng

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This article addresses questions that radiologists frequently ask when planning, performing, processing, and interpreting MRI perfusion studies in CNS imaging. CONCLUSION Perfusion MRI is a promising tool in assessing stroke, brain tumors, and neurodegenerative diseases. Most of the impediments that have limited the use of perfusion MRI can be overcome to allow integration of these methods into modern neuroimaging protocols. PMID:23971482

  1. Theoretical considerations in measurement of time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity curves in estimates of regional myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Takahiro; Ishida, Masaki; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Nagata, Motonori; Sakuma, Hajime; Ichihara, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method to determine time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity (TSI) curves for accurate estimation of myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI. Estimation of myocardial perfusion with contrast-enhanced MRI using kinetic models requires faithful recording of contrast content in the blood and myocardium. Typically, the arterial input function (AIF) is obtained by setting a region of interest in the left ventricular cavity. However, there is a small delay between the AIF and the myocardial curves, and such time discrepancies can lead to errors in flow estimation using Patlak plot analysis. In this study, the time discrepancies between the arterial TSI curve and the myocardial tissue TSI curve were estimated based on the compartment model. In the early phase after the arrival of the contrast agent in the myocardium, the relationship between rate constant K1 and the concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and arterial blood (LV blood) can be described by the equation K1={dCmyo(tpeak)/dt}/Ca(tpeak), where Cmyo(t) and Ca(t) are the relative concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and in the LV blood, respectively, and tpeak is the time corresponding to the peak of Ca(t). In the ideal case, the time corresponding to the maximum upslope of Cmyo(t), tmax, is equal to tpeak. In practice, however, there is a small difference in the arrival times of the contrast agent into the LV and into the myocardium. This difference was estimated to correspond to the difference between tpeak and tmax. The magnitudes of such time discrepancies and the effectiveness of the correction for these time discrepancies were measured in 18 subjects who underwent myocardial perfusion MRI under rest and stress conditions. The effects of the time discrepancies could be corrected effectively in the myocardial perfusion estimates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  2. Tumor Vessel Compression Hinders Perfusion of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agents1

    PubMed Central

    Galiè, Mirco; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Montani, Maura; Amici, Augusto; Calderan, Laura; Marzola, Pasquina; Benati, Donatella; Merigo, Flavia; Marchini, Cristina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is an advanced approach to in vivo assessment of tumor vascularity and is being increasingly adopted in clinical oncology. It is based on 1- to 10 µm-sized gas microbubbles, which can cross the capillary beds of the lungs and are effective echo enhancers. It is known that high cell density, high transendothelial fluid exchange, and poorly functioning lymphatic circulation all provoke solid stress, which compresses vessels and drastically reduces tumor blood flow. Given their size, we supposed that the perfusion of microbubbles is affected by anatomic features of tumor vessels more than are contrast agents traditionally used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Here, we compared dynamic information obtained from CEUS and DCE-MRI on two experimental tumor models exhibiting notable differences in vessel anatomy. We found that tumors with small, flattened vessels show a much higher resistance to microbubble perfusion than to MRI contrast agents, and appear scarcely vascularized at CEUS examination, despite vessel volume adequate for normal function. Thus, whereas CEUS alone could induce incorrect diagnosis when tumors have small or collapsed vessels, integrated analysis using CEUS and DCE-MRI allows in vivo identification of tumors with a vascular profile frequently associated with malignant phenotypes. PMID:15967105

  3. Cerebral Blood Volume Analysis in Glioblastomas Using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast-Enhanced Perfusion MRI: A Comparison of Manual and Semiautomatic Segmentation Methods

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Seung Chai; Choi, Seung Hong; Yeom, Jeong A.; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Ryoo, Inseon; Kim, Soo Chin; Shin, Hwaseon; Lee, A. Leum; Yun, Tae Jin; Park, Chul-Kee; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Sung-Hye

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare the reproducibilities of manual and semiautomatic segmentation method for the measurement of normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV) using dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced (DSC) perfusion MR imaging in glioblastomas. Materials and Methods Twenty-two patients (11 male, 11 female; 27 tumors) with histologically confirmed glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) were examined with conventional MR imaging and DSC imaging at 3T before surgery or biopsy. Then nCBV (means and standard deviations) in each mass was measured using two DSC MR perfusion analysis methods including manual and semiautomatic segmentation method, in which contrast-enhanced (CE)-T1WI and T2WI were used as structural imaging. Intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility were assessed according to each perfusion analysis method or each structural imaging. Interclass correlation coefficient (ICC), Bland-Altman plot, and coefficient of variation (CV) were used to evaluate reproducibility. Results Intraobserver reproducibilities on CE-T1WI and T2WI were ICC of 0.74–0.89 and CV of 20.39–36.83% in manual segmentation method, and ICC of 0.95–0.99 and CV of 8.53–16.19% in semiautomatic segmentation method, repectively. Interobserver reproducibilites on CE-T1WI and T2WI were ICC of 0.86–0.94 and CV of 19.67–35.15% in manual segmentation method, and ICC of 0.74–1.0 and CV of 5.48–49.38% in semiautomatic segmentation method, respectively. Bland-Altman plots showed a good correlation with ICC or CV in each method. The semiautomatic segmentation method showed higher intraobserver and interobserver reproducibilities at CE-T1WI-based study than other methods. Conclusion The best reproducibility was found using the semiautomatic segmentation method based on CE-T1WI for structural imaging in the measurement of the nCBV of glioblastomas. PMID:23950891

  4. Large enhancement of perfusion contribution on fMRI signal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The perfusion contribution to the total functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal was investigated using a rat model with mild hypercapnia at 9.4 T, and human subjects with visual stimulation at 4 T. It was found that the total fMRI signal change could be approximated as a linear superposition of ‘true' blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD; T2/T2*) effect and the blood flow-related (T1) effect. The latter effect was significantly enhanced by using short repetition time and large radiofrequency pulse flip angle and became comparable to the ‘true' BOLD signal in response to a mild hypercapnia in the rat brain, resulting in an improved contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Bipolar diffusion gradients suppressed the intravascular signals but had no significant effect on the flow-related signal. Similar results of enhanced fMRI signal were observed in the human study. The overall results suggest that the observed flow-related signal enhancement is likely originated from perfusion, and this enhancement can improve CNR and the spatial specificity for mapping brain activity and physiology changes. The nature of mixed BOLD and perfusion-related contributions in the total fMRI signal also has implication on BOLD quantification, in particular, the BOLD calibration model commonly used to estimate the change of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen. PMID:22395206

  5. Error estimation for perfusion parameters obtained using the two-compartment exchange model in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luypaert, R.; Sourbron, S.; Makkat, S.; de Mey, J.

    2010-11-01

    In theory, the application of the two-compartment exchange model (2CXM) to data from a dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI exam allows the estimation of the plasma flow, plasma volume, extraction flow and extravascular-extracellular volume. The aim of this paper was to explore whether simulations based on the 2CXM could provide useful information on the trustworthiness of the results. The deviations from the input values of the haemodynamic quantities were estimated for a 'reference tissue' with a clear bi-phasic response and four 'limit tissues' with more challenging 2CXM fitting properties. The impact of the instrumental factors sampling step (Ts), acquisition window (Tacq) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was investigated. Each factor was varied separately, while keeping the other ones at a value above concern. Measurement guidelines to ensure that all deviations fell within a predefined range (±20%) could not be derived, but simulations for fixed Ts and Tacq were found to provide a practical tool for studying the error behaviour to be expected from a given experimental set-up and for comparing measurement protocols. At the level of an individual DCE exam, a bootstrap version of the simulation approach was shown to lead to a useful estimate of the errors on the fitted parameters.

  6. A study on cerebral hemodynamic analysis of moyamoya disease by using perfusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the clinical applications of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with moyamoya disease (MMD). Twenty-two patients with moyamoya disease (9 men and 13 women) with a mean age of 9.3 years (range: 4-22 years) were enrolled in this study. Perfusion MRI was performed by scanning the patients7.5 cm upward from the base of the cerebellum before their being process for post-treatment. The scan led to the acquisition of the following four map images: the cerebral blood volume (CBV), the cerebral blood flow (CBF), the mean transit time (MTT) for the contrast medium, and the time to peak (TTP) for the contrast medium. The lesions were assessed using the CBV, the CBF, the MTT and the TTP maps of perfusion MRI; the MTT and the TTP were measured in the lesion areas, as well as in the normal and the symmetric areas. Perfusion defects were recognizable in all four perfusion MRI maps, and the MTT and the TTP showed a conspicuous delay in the parts where perfusion defects were recognized. The MTT and the TTP images of perfusion MRI reflected a significant correlation between the degrees of stenosis and occlusion in the posterior cerebral artery (PCA), as well as the development of collateral vessels. The four perfusion MRI maps could be used to predict the degrees of stenosis and occlusion in the posterior circulation, as well as the development of the collateral vessels, which enabled a hemodynamic evaluation of the parts with perfusion defects. Overall, perfusion MRI is useful for the diagnosis and the treatment of moyamoya disease and can be applied to clinical practice.

  7. Assessment of pulmonary parenchyma perfusion with FAIR in comparison with DCE-MRI--initial results.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Liu, Shi-yuan; Sun, Fei; Xiao, Xiang-sheng

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess pulmonary parenchyma perfusion with flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) in comparison with 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging in healthy volunteers and in patients with pulmonary embolism or lung cancer. Sixteen healthy volunteers and 16 patients with pulmonary embolism (5 cases) or lung cancer (11 cases) were included in this study. Firstly, the optimized inversion time of FAIR (TI) was determined in 12 healthy volunteers. Then, FAIR imaging with the optimized TI was performed followed by DCE-MRI on the other 4 healthy volunteers and 16 patients. Tagging efficiency of lung and SNR of perfusion images were calculated with different TI values. In the comparison of FAIR with DCE-MRI, the homogeneity of FAIR and DCE-MRI perfusion was assessed. In the cases of perfusion abnormality, the contrast between normal lung and perfusion defects was quantified by calculating a normalized signal intensity ratio. One thousand milliseconds was the optimal TI, which generated the highest lung tagging efficiency and second highest PBF SNR. In the volunteers, the signal intensity of perfusion images acquired with both FAIR and DCE-MRI was homogeneous. Wedged-shaped or triangle perfusion defects were visualized in five pulmonary embolisms and three lung cancer cases. There was no significant statistical difference in signal intensity ratio between FAIR and DCE-MRI (P>0.05). In the rest of eight lung cancers, all the lesions showed low perfusion against the higher perfused pulmonary parenchyma in both FAIR and DCE-MRI. Pulmonary parenchyma perfusion imaging with FAIR was feasible, consistent and could obtain similar functional information to that from DCE-MRI.

  8. Quantitative pixelwise myocardial perfusion maps from first-pass perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Weng, A M; Ritter, C O; Beer, M; Hahn, D; Köstler, H

    2014-07-01

    To calculate and evaluate absolute quantitative myocardial perfusion maps from rest first-pass perfusion MRI. 10 patients after revascularization of myocardial infarction underwent cardiac rest first-pass perfusion MRI. Additionally, perfusion examinations were performed in 12 healthy volunteers. Quantitative myocardial perfusion maps were calculated by using a deconvolution technique, and results were compared were the findings of a sector-based quantification. Maps were typically calculated within 3 min per slice. For the volunteers, myocardial blood flow values of the maps were 0.51 ± 0.16 ml g(-1) per minute, whereas sector-based evaluation delivered 0.52 ± 0.15 ml g(-1) per minute. A t-test revealed no statistical difference between the two sets of values. For the patients, all perfusion defects visually detected in the dynamic perfusion series could be correctly reproduced in the maps. Calculation of quantitative perfusion maps from myocardial perfusion MRI examinations is feasible. The absolute quantitative maps provide additional information on the transmurality of perfusion defects compared with the visual evaluation of the perfusion series and offer a convenient way to present perfusion MRI findings. Voxelwise analysis of myocardial perfusion helps clinicians to assess the degree of tissue damage, and the resulting maps are a good tool to present findings to patients.

  9. Perfusion MRI: The Five Most Frequently Asked Technical Questions

    PubMed Central

    Essig, Marco; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Nguyen, Thanh Binh; Saake, Marc; Provenzale, James M.; Enterline, David; Anzalone, Nicoletta; Dörfler, Arnd; Rovira, Àlex; Wintermark, Max; Law, Meng

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This and its companion article address the 10 most frequently asked questions that radiologists face when planning, performing, processing, and interpreting different MR perfusion studies in CNS imaging. CONCLUSION Perfusion MRI is a promising tool in assessing stroke, brain tumors, and patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Most of the impediments that have limited the use of perfusion MRI can be overcome to allow integration of these methods into modern neuroimaging protocols. PMID:23255738

  10. Unenhanced and Contrast-Enhanced MR Angiography and Perfusion Imaging for Suspected Pulmonary Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Kishida, Yuji; Seki, Shinichiro; Karabulut, Nevzat

    2017-03-01

    This article discusses the basics of unenhanced MR angiography (MRA) and MR venography (MRV), time-resolved contrast-enhanced (CE) MRA and dynamic first-pass CE perfusion MRI, and unenhanced and CE MRV, in addition to assessing the clinical relevance of these techniques for evaluating patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis. Since the 1990s, the efficacy of MRA or MRV and dynamic perfusion MRI for patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis has been evaluated. On the basis of the results of single-center trials, comprehensive MRI protocols, including pulmonary unenhanced and CE MRA, perfusion MRI, and MRV, promise to be safe and time effective for assessing patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism, although future multicenter trials are required to assess the real clinical value of MRI.

  11. Myocardial perfusion assessment with contrast echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desco, Manuel; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria J.; Santos, Andres; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel A.; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Malpica, Norberto; Antoranz, Jose C.; Garcia-Barreno, Pedro

    2001-05-01

    Assessment of intramyocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography is a promising new technique that allows to obtain quantitative parameters for the assessment of ischemic disease. In this work, a new methodology and a software prototype developed for this task are presented. It has been validated with Coherent Contrast Imaging (CCI) images acquired with an Acuson Sequoia scanner. Contrast (Optison microbubbles) is injected continuously during the scan. 150 images are acquired using low mechanical index U/S pulses. A burst of high mechanical index pulses is used to destroy bubbles, thus allowing to detect the contrast wash-in. The stud is performed in two conditions: rest and pharmacologically induced stress. The software developed allows to visualized the study (cine) and to select several ROIs within the heart wall. The position of these ROIs along the cardiac cycle is automatically corrected on the basis of the gradient field, and they can also be manually corrected in case the automatic procedure fails. Time curves are analyzed according to a parametric model that incorporates both contrast inflow rate and cyclic variations. Preliminary clinical results on 80 patients have allowed us to identify normal and pathological patterns and to establish the correlation of quantitative parameters with the real diagnosis.

  12. Resolution and reproducibility of BOLD and perfusion functional MRI at 3.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    van Gelderen, Peter; W H Wu, Carolyn; de Zwart, Jacco A; Cohen, Leonardo; Hallett, Mark; Duyn, Jeff H

    2005-09-01

    Visual and somatosensory activation studies were performed on normal subjects to compare the spatial discrimination and reproducibility between functional MRI (fMRI) methods based on blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) and perfusion contrast. To allow simultaneous measurement of BOLD and perfusion contrast, a dedicated MRI acquisition technique was developed. Repeated experiments of sensory stimulation of single digits of the right hand showed an average variability of activation amplitude of 25% for BOLD data, and a significantly lower variability of 21% for perfusion data. No significant difference in the variability of the locus of activity was observed between the BOLD and perfusion data. In somatotopy experiments, digits II and V were subjected to passive sensory stimulation. Both the BOLD and perfusion data showed substantial overlap in the activation patterns from the two digits. In a retinotopy study, two stimuli were alternated to excite different patches of V1. Again there was substantial overlap between the activation patterns from both stimuli, although the perfusion performed somewhat better than the BOLD method. Particularly for the visual studies, the overlap in activation patterns was more than expected based on the fine-scale retinotopic mapping of cortical activity, suggesting that both BOLD and perfusion contrast mechanisms contribute substantially to the point-spread function (PSF).

  13. Correlation analysis of dual-energy CT iodine maps with quantitative pulmonary perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hansmann, Jan; Apfaltrer, Paul; Zoellner, Frank G; Henzler, Thomas; Meyer, Mathias; Weisser, Gerald; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Attenberger, Ulrike I

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To correlate dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) pulmonary angiography derived iodine maps with parameter maps of quantitative pulmonary perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: Eighteen patients with pulmonary perfusion defects detected on DECT derived iodine maps were included in this prospective study and additionally underwent time-resolved contrast-enhanced pulmonary MRI [dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI]. DCE-MRI data were quantitatively analyzed using a pixel-by-pixel deconvolution analysis calculating regional pulmonary blood flow (PBF), pulmonary blood volume (PBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in visually normal lung parenchyma and perfusion defects. Perfusion parameters were correlated to mean attenuation values of normal lung and perfusion defects on DECT iodine maps. Two readers rated the concordance of perfusion defects in a visual analysis using a 5-point Likert-scale (1 = no correlation, 5 = excellent correlation). RESULTS: In visually normal pulmonary tissue mean DECT and MRI values were: 22.6 ± 8.3 Hounsfield units (HU); PBF: 58.8 ± 36.0 mL/100 mL per minute; PBV: 16.6 ± 8.5 mL; MTT: 17.1 ± 10.3 s. In areas with restricted perfusion mean DECT and MRI values were: 4.0 ± 3.9 HU; PBF: 10.3 ± 5.5 mL/100 mL per minute, PBV: 5 ± 4 mL, MTT: 21.6 ± 14.0 s. The differences between visually normal parenchyma and areas of restricted perfusion were statistically significant for PBF, PBV and DECT (P < 0.0001). No linear correlation was found between MRI perfusion parameters and attenuation values of DECT iodine maps (PBF: r = 0.35, P = 0.15; PBV: r = 0.34, P = 0.16; MTT: r = 0.41, P = 0.08). Visual analysis revealed a moderate correlation between perfusion defects on DECT iodine maps and the parameter maps of DCE-MRI (mean score 3.6, κ 0.45). CONCLUSION: There is a moderate visual but not statistically significant correlation between DECT iodine maps and perfusion parameter maps of DCE-MRI. PMID:23805370

  14. Correlation analysis of dual-energy CT iodine maps with quantitative pulmonary perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Hansmann, Jan; Apfaltrer, Paul; Zoellner, Frank G; Henzler, Thomas; Meyer, Mathias; Weisser, Gerald; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Attenberger, Ulrike I

    2013-05-28

    To correlate dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) pulmonary angiography derived iodine maps with parameter maps of quantitative pulmonary perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Eighteen patients with pulmonary perfusion defects detected on DECT derived iodine maps were included in this prospective study and additionally underwent time-resolved contrast-enhanced pulmonary MRI [dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI]. DCE-MRI data were quantitatively analyzed using a pixel-by-pixel deconvolution analysis calculating regional pulmonary blood flow (PBF), pulmonary blood volume (PBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in visually normal lung parenchyma and perfusion defects. Perfusion parameters were correlated to mean attenuation values of normal lung and perfusion defects on DECT iodine maps. Two readers rated the concordance of perfusion defects in a visual analysis using a 5-point Likert-scale (1 = no correlation, 5 = excellent correlation). In visually normal pulmonary tissue mean DECT and MRI values were: 22.6 ± 8.3 Hounsfield units (HU); PBF: 58.8 ± 36.0 mL/100 mL per minute; PBV: 16.6 ± 8.5 mL; MTT: 17.1 ± 10.3 s. In areas with restricted perfusion mean DECT and MRI values were: 4.0 ± 3.9 HU; PBF: 10.3 ± 5.5 mL/100 mL per minute, PBV: 5 ± 4 mL, MTT: 21.6 ± 14.0 s. The differences between visually normal parenchyma and areas of restricted perfusion were statistically significant for PBF, PBV and DECT (P < 0.0001). No linear correlation was found between MRI perfusion parameters and attenuation values of DECT iodine maps (PBF: r = 0.35, P = 0.15; PBV: r = 0.34, P = 0.16; MTT: r = 0.41, P = 0.08). Visual analysis revealed a moderate correlation between perfusion defects on DECT iodine maps and the parameter maps of DCE-MRI (mean score 3.6, κ 0.45). There is a moderate visual but not statistically significant correlation between DECT iodine maps and perfusion parameter maps of DCE-MRI.

  15. Cerebral perfusion alterations in epileptic patients during peri-ictal and post-ictal phase: PASL vs DSC-MRI.

    PubMed

    Pizzini, Francesca B; Farace, Paolo; Manganotti, Paolo; Zoccatelli, Giada; Bongiovanni, Luigi G; Golay, Xavier; Beltramello, Alberto; Osculati, Antonio; Bertini, Giuseppe; Fabene, Paolo F

    2013-07-01

    Non-invasive pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) MRI is a method to study brain perfusion that does not require the administration of a contrast agent, which makes it a valuable diagnostic tool as it reduces cost and side effects. The purpose of the present study was to establish the viability of PASL as an alternative to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC-MRI) and other perfusion imaging methods in characterizing changes in perfusion patterns caused by seizures in epileptic patients. We evaluated 19 patients with PASL. Of these, the 9 affected by high-frequency seizures were observed during the peri-ictal period (within 5hours since the last seizure), while the 10 patients affected by low-frequency seizures were observed in the post-ictal period. For comparison, 17/19 patients were also evaluated with DSC-MRI and CBF/CBV. PASL imaging showed focal vascular changes, which allowed the classification of patients in three categories: 8 patients characterized by increased perfusion, 4 patients with normal perfusion and 7 patients with decreased perfusion. PASL perfusion imaging findings were comparable to those obtained by DSC-MRI. Since PASL is a) sensitive to vascular alterations induced by epileptic seizures, b) comparable to DSC-MRI for detecting perfusion asymmetries, c) potentially capable of detecting time-related perfusion changes, it can be recommended for repeated evaluations, to identify the epileptic focus, and in follow-up and/or therapy-response assessment.

  16. Technical Pitfalls of Signal Truncation in Perfusion MRI of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kelvin K.; Fung, Steve H.; New, Pamela Z.; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) is widely used in clinical settings for the radiological diagnosis of brain tumor. The signal change in brain tissue in gradient echo-based DSC PWI is much higher than in spin echo-based DSC PWI. Due to its exquisite sensitivity, gradient echo-based sequence is the preferred method for imaging of all tumors except those near the base of the skull. However, high sensitivity also comes with a dynamic range problem. It is not unusual for blood volume to increase in gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy-treated glioblastoma patients. The increase of fractional blood volume sometimes saturates the MRI signal during first-pass contrast bolus arrival and presents signal truncation artifacts of various degrees in the tumor when a significant amount of blood exists in the image pixels. It presents a hidden challenge in PWI, as this signal floor can be either close to noise level or just above and can go no lower. This signal truncation in the signal intensity time course is a significant issue that deserves attention in DSC PWI. In this paper, we demonstrate that relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) are underestimated due to signal truncation in DSC perfusion, in glioblastoma patients. We propose the use of second-pass tissue residue function in rCBF calculation using least-absolute-deviation deconvolution to avoid the underestimation problem. PMID:27531989

  17. Technical Pitfalls of Signal Truncation in Perfusion MRI of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin K; Fung, Steve H; New, Pamela Z; Wong, Stephen T C

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) is widely used in clinical settings for the radiological diagnosis of brain tumor. The signal change in brain tissue in gradient echo-based DSC PWI is much higher than in spin echo-based DSC PWI. Due to its exquisite sensitivity, gradient echo-based sequence is the preferred method for imaging of all tumors except those near the base of the skull. However, high sensitivity also comes with a dynamic range problem. It is not unusual for blood volume to increase in gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy-treated glioblastoma patients. The increase of fractional blood volume sometimes saturates the MRI signal during first-pass contrast bolus arrival and presents signal truncation artifacts of various degrees in the tumor when a significant amount of blood exists in the image pixels. It presents a hidden challenge in PWI, as this signal floor can be either close to noise level or just above and can go no lower. This signal truncation in the signal intensity time course is a significant issue that deserves attention in DSC PWI. In this paper, we demonstrate that relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) are underestimated due to signal truncation in DSC perfusion, in glioblastoma patients. We propose the use of second-pass tissue residue function in rCBF calculation using least-absolute-deviation deconvolution to avoid the underestimation problem.

  18. Evolution of pulmonary perfusion defects demonstrated with contrast-enhanced dynamic MR perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Howarth, N R; Beziat, C; Berthezène, Y

    1999-01-01

    Pulmonary perfusion defects can be demonstrated with contrast-enhanced dynamic MR perfusion imaging. We present the case of a patient with a pulmonary artery sarcoma who presented with a post-operative pulmonary embolus and was followed in the post-operative period with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR perfusion imaging. This technique allows rapid imaging of the first passage of contrast material through the lung after bolus injection in a peripheral vein. To our knowledge, this case report is the first to describe the use of this MR technique in showing the evolution of peripheral pulmonary perfusion defects associated with pulmonary emboli.

  19. New imaging technology: measurement of myocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging has long been a goal for the non-invasive echocardiographic assessment of the heart. However, many factors at play in perfusion imaging have made this goal elusive. Harmonic imaging and triggered imaging with newer contrast agents have made myocardial perfusion imaging potentially practical in the very near future. The application of indicator dilution theory to the coronary circulation and bubble contrast agents is fraught with complexities and sources of error. Therefore, quantification of myocardial perfusion by non-invasive echocardiographic imaging requires further investigation in order to make this technique clinically viable.

  20. New imaging technology: measurement of myocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging has long been a goal for the non-invasive echocardiographic assessment of the heart. However, many factors at play in perfusion imaging have made this goal elusive. Harmonic imaging and triggered imaging with newer contrast agents have made myocardial perfusion imaging potentially practical in the very near future. The application of indicator dilution theory to the coronary circulation and bubble contrast agents is fraught with complexities and sources of error. Therefore, quantification of myocardial perfusion by non-invasive echocardiographic imaging requires further investigation in order to make this technique clinically viable.

  1. Delineation of Tumor Habitats based on Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Cherng Channing; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Tschudi, Yohann; Jimenez, Bryan; Foltz, Warren; Fisher, Carl; Lilge, Lothar; Cho, HyungJoon; Carlin, Sean; Gillies, Robert J; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Yechieli, Raphael L; Subhawong, Ty; Turkbey, Baris; Pollack, Alan; Stoyanova, Radka

    2017-08-29

    Tumor heterogeneity can be elucidated by mapping subregions of the lesion with differential imaging characteristics, called habitats. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE-)MRI can depict the tumor microenvironments by identifying areas with variable perfusion and vascular permeability, since individual tumor habitats vary in the rate and magnitude of the contrast uptake and washout. Of particular interest is identifying areas of hypoxia, characterized by inadequate perfusion and hyper-permeable vasculature. An automatic procedure for delineation of tumor habitats from DCE-MRI was developed as a two-part process involving: (1) statistical testing in order to determine the number of the underlying habitats; and (2) an unsupervised pattern recognition technique to recover the temporal contrast patterns and locations of the associated habitats. The technique is examined on simulated data and DCE-MRI, obtained from prostate and brain pre-clinical cancer models, as well as clinical data from sarcoma and prostate cancer patients. The procedure successfully identified habitats previously associated with well-perfused, hypoxic and/or necrotic tumor compartments. Given the association of tumor hypoxia with more aggressive tumor phenotypes, the obtained in vivo information could impact management of cancer patients considerably.

  2. Accuracy and feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D MR imaging in the assessment of lung perfusion: comparison with Tc-99 MAA perfusion scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, E; Akkoclu, A; Degirmenci, B; Cooper, R A; Sengun, B; Gulcu, A; Osma, E; Ucan, E S

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate findings of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and perfusion scintigraphy in cases where there was a suspicion of abnormal pulmonary vasculature, and to evaluate the usefulness of MRI in the detection of perfusion deficits of the lung. In all, 17 patients with suspected abnormality of the pulmonary vasculature underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. T1-weighted 3D fast-field echo pulse sequences were obtained (TR/TE 3.3/1.58 ms; flip angle 30 degrees; slice thickness 12 to 15 mm). The dynamic study was acquired in the coronal plane following administration of 0.1 mmol/kg gadopentetate dimeglumine. A total of 8 to 10 sections repeated 20 to 25 times at intervals of 1s were performed. Perfusion lung scintigraphy was carried out a maximum of 48 h before the MR examination in all cases. Two radiologists, who were blinded to the clinical data and results of other imaging methods, reviewed all coronal sections. MR perfusion images were independently assessed in terms of segmental or lobar perfusion defects in the 85 lobes of the 17 individuals, and the findings were compared with the results of scintigraphy. Of the 17 patients, 8 were found to have pulmonary emboli, 2 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with emphysema, 2 bullous emphysema, 2 Takayasu arteritis and 1 had a hypoplastic pulmonary artery. Pulmonary perfusion was completely normal in 2 cases. In 35 lobes, perfusion defects were detected using both methods, in 4 with MR alone and in 9 only with scintigraphy. There was good agreement between MRI and scintigraphy findings (kappa=0.695). Pulmonary perfusion MRI is a new alternative to scintigraphy in the evaluation of pulmonary perfusion for various lung disorders. In addition, this technique allows measurement and quantification of pulmonary perfusion abnormalities.

  3. Experimental design and the relative sensitivity of BOLD and perfusion fMRI.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, G K; Detre, J A; Zarahn, E; Alsop, D C

    2002-03-01

    This paper compares the statistical power of BOLD and arterial spin labeling perfusion fMRI for a variety of experimental designs within and across subjects. Based on theory and simulations, we predict that perfusion data are composed of independent observations in time under the null hypothesis, in contrast to BOLD data, which possess marked autocorrelation. We also present a method (sinc subtraction) of generating perfusion data from its raw source signal that minimizes the presence of oxygen-sensitive signal changes and can be used with any experimental design. Empirically, we demonstrate the absence of autocorrelation in perfusion noise, examine the shape of the hemodynamic response function for BOLD and perfusion, and obtain a measure of signal to noise for each method. This information is then used to generate a model of relative sensitivity of the BOLD and perfusion methods for within-subject experimental designs of varying temporal frequency. It is determined that perfusion fMRI provides superior sensitivity for within-subject experimental designs that concentrate their power at or below approximately 0.009 Hz (corresponding to a "blocked" experimental design of 60-s epochs). Additionally, evidence is presented that across-subject hypothesis tests may be more sensitive when conducted using perfusion imaging, despite the better within-subject signal to noise obtained in some cases with BOLD. ©2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  4. Tracer kinetic modelling in MRI: estimating perfusion and capillary permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourbron, S. P.; Buckley, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    The tracer-kinetic models developed in the early 1990s for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) have since become a standard in numerous applications. At the same time, the development of MRI hardware has led to increases in image quality and temporal resolution that reveal the limitations of the early models. This in turn has stimulated an interest in the development and application of a second generation of modelling approaches. They are designed to overcome these limitations and produce additional and more accurate information on tissue status. In particular, models of the second generation enable separate estimates of perfusion and capillary permeability rather than a single parameter Ktrans that represents a combination of the two. A variety of such models has been proposed in the literature, and development in the field has been constrained by a lack of transparency regarding terminology, notations and physiological assumptions. In this review, we provide an overview of these models in a manner that is both physically intuitive and mathematically rigourous. All are derived from common first principles, using concepts and notations from general tracer-kinetic theory. Explicit links to their historical origins are included to allow for a transfer of experience obtained in other fields (PET, SPECT, CT). A classification is presented that reveals the links between all models, and with the models of the first generation. Detailed formulae for all solutions are provided to facilitate implementation. Our aim is to encourage the application of these tools to DCE-MRI by offering researchers a clearer understanding of their assumptions and requirements.

  5. The Effects of Propofol on Cerebral Perfusion MRI in Children

    PubMed Central

    Harreld, Julie H.; Helton, Kathleen J.; Kaddoum, Roland N.; Reddick, Wilburn E.; Li, Yimei; Glass, John O.; Sansgiri, Rakhee; Ji, Qing; Feng, Tianshu; Parish, Mary Edna; Gajjar, Amar; Patay, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The effects of anesthesia are infrequently considered when interpreting pediatric perfusion MRI. The objectives of this study were to test for measurable differences in MR measures of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) between non-sedated and propofol-sedated children, and to identify influential factors. Methods Supratentorial cortical CBF and CBV measured by dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI in 37 children (1.8–18 years) treated for infratentorial brain tumors receiving propofol (IV, n=19) or no sedation (NS, n=18) were compared between groups and correlated with age, hematocrit, end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2), dose, weight, and history of radiation therapy (RT). The model most predictive of CBF and CBV was identified by multiple linear regression. Results Anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory CBF were significantly lower, and MCA territory CBV greater (p=0.03), in IV than NS patients (p=0.01, 0.04). The usual trend of decreasing CBF with age was reversed with propofol in ACA and MCA territories (r=0.53, r=0.47; p<0.05). ACA and MCA CBF (r=0.59, 0.49; p<0.05) and CBV in ACA, MCA and posterior cerebral artery (PCA) territories (r=0.73, 0.80, 0.52; p<0.05) increased with weight in propofol-sedated children, with no significant additional influence from age, ETCO2, hematocrit, or RT. Conclusion In propofol-sedated children, usual age-related decreases in CBF were reversed, and increases in CBF and CBV were weight-dependent, not previously described. Weight-dependent increases in propofol clearance may diminish suppression of CBF and CBV. Prospective study is required to establish anesthetic-specific models of CBF and CBV in children. PMID:23673874

  6. Salicylic acid analogues as chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI contrast agents for the assessment of brain perfusion territory and blood-brain barrier opening after intra-arterial infusion.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaolei; Walczak, Piotr; He, Xiaowei; Yang, Xing; Pearl, Monica; Bulte, Jeff Wm; Pomper, Martin G; McMahon, Michael T; Janowski, Mirosław

    2016-07-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle for drug delivery to the brain. Predicted, focal opening of the BBB through intra-arterial infusion of hyperosmolar mannitol is feasible, but there is a need to facilitate imaging techniques (e.g. MRI) to guide interventional procedures and assess the outcomes. Here, we show that salicylic acid analogues (SAA) can depict the brain territory supplied by the catheter and detect the BBB opening, through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI. Hyperosmolar SAA solutions themselves are also capable of opening the BBB, and, when multiple SAA agents were co-injected, their locoregional perfusion could be differentiated. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Review of laser speckle contrast techniques for visualizing tissue perfusion.

    PubMed

    Draijer, Matthijs; Hondebrink, Erwin; van Leeuwen, Ton; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2009-07-01

    When a diffuse object is illuminated with coherent laser light, the backscattered light will form an interference pattern on the detector. This pattern of bright and dark areas is called a speckle pattern. When there is movement in the object, the speckle pattern will change over time. Laser speckle contrast techniques use this change in speckle pattern to visualize tissue perfusion. We present and review the contribution of laser speckle contrast techniques to the field of perfusion visualization and discuss the development of the techniques.

  8. UMMPerfusion: an open source software tool towards quantitative MRI perfusion analysis in clinical routine.

    PubMed

    Zöllner, Frank G; Weisser, Gerald; Reich, Marcel; Kaiser, Sven; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Sourbron, Steven P; Schad, Lothar R

    2013-04-01

    To develop a generic Open Source MRI perfusion analysis tool for quantitative parameter mapping to be used in a clinical workflow and methods for quality management of perfusion data. We implemented a classic, pixel-by-pixel deconvolution approach to quantify T1-weighted contrast-enhanced dynamic MR imaging (DCE-MRI) perfusion data as an OsiriX plug-in. It features parallel computing capabilities and an automated reporting scheme for quality management. Furthermore, by our implementation design, it could be easily extendable to other perfusion algorithms. Obtained results are saved as DICOM objects and directly added to the patient study. The plug-in was evaluated on ten MR perfusion data sets of the prostate and a calibration data set by comparing obtained parametric maps (plasma flow, volume of distribution, and mean transit time) to a widely used reference implementation in IDL. For all data, parametric maps could be calculated and the plug-in worked correctly and stable. On average, a deviation of 0.032 ± 0.02 ml/100 ml/min for the plasma flow, 0.004 ± 0.0007 ml/100 ml for the volume of distribution, and 0.037 ± 0.03 s for the mean transit time between our implementation and a reference implementation was observed. By using computer hardware with eight CPU cores, calculation time could be reduced by a factor of 2.5. We developed successfully an Open Source OsiriX plug-in for T1-DCE-MRI perfusion analysis in a routine quality managed clinical environment. Using model-free deconvolution, it allows for perfusion analysis in various clinical applications. By our plug-in, information about measured physiological processes can be obtained and transferred into clinical practice.

  9. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: fundamentals and application to the evaluation of the peripheral perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Yaron; Partovi, Sasan; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Amarteifio, Erick; Bäuerle, Tobias; Weber, Marc-André; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The ability to ascertain information pertaining to peripheral perfusion through the analysis of tissues’ temporal reaction to the inflow of contrast agent (CA) was first recognized in the early 1990’s. Similar to other functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques such as arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) was at first restricted to studies of the brain. Over the last two decades the spectrum of ailments, which have been studied with DCE-MRI, has been extensively broadened and has come to include pathologies of the heart notably infarction, stroke and further cerebral afflictions, a wide range of neoplasms with an emphasis on antiangiogenic treatment and early detection, as well as investigations of the peripheral vascular and musculoskeletal systems. Applications to peripheral perfusion DCE-MRI possesses an unparalleled capacity to quantitatively measure not only perfusion but also other diverse microvascular parameters such as vessel permeability and fluid volume fractions. More over the method is capable of not only assessing blood flowing through an organ, but in contrast to other noninvasive methods, the actual tissue perfusion. These unique features have recently found growing application in the study of the peripheral vascular system and most notably in the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). Review outline The first part of this review will elucidate the fundamentals of data acquisition and interpretation of DCE-MRI, two areas that often remain baffling to the clinical and investigating physician because of their complexity. The second part will discuss developments and exciting perspectives of DCE-MRI regarding the assessment of perfusion in the extremities. Emerging clinical applications of DCE-MRI will be reviewed with a special focus on investigation of physiology and pathophysiology of the microvascular and

  10. Perfusion imaging with non-contrast ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, Jaime E.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Byram, Brett C.

    2016-04-01

    A Doppler ultrasound clutter filter that enables estimation of low velocity blood flow could considerably improve ultrasound as a tool for clinical diagnosis and monitoring, including for the evaluation of vascular diseases and tumor perfusion. Conventional Doppler ultrasound is currently used for visualizing and estimating blood flow. However, conventional Doppler is limited by frame rate and tissue clutter caused by involuntary movement of the patient or sonographer. Spectral broadening of the clutter due to tissue motion limits ultrasound's ability to detect blood flow less than about 5mm/s at an 8MHz center frequency. We propose a clutter filtering technique that may increase the sensitivity of Doppler measurements to at least as low as 0.41mm/s. The proposed filter uses an adaptive demodulation scheme that decreases the bandwidth of the clutter. To test the performance of the adaptive demodulation method at removing sonographer hand motion, six volunteer subjects acquired data from a basic quality assurance phantom. Additionally, to test initial in vivo feasibility, an arterial occlusion reactive hyperemia study was performed to assess the efficiency of the proposed filter at preserving signals from blood velocities 2mm/s or greater. The hand motion study resulted in initial average bandwidths of 577Hz (28.5mm/s), which were decreased to 7.28Hz (0.36mm/s) at -60 dB at 3cm using our approach. The in vivo power Doppler study resulted in 15.2dB and 0.15dB dynamic ranges between the lowest and highest blood flow time points for the proposed filter and conventional 50Hz high pass filter, respectively.

  11. Noninvasive stress testing of myocardial perfusion defects: head-to-head comparison of thallium-201 SPECT to MRI perfusion.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, Gabriella; Nkoulou, René; Steiner, Charles; Imperiano, Hestia; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Mach, François; Ratib, Osman; Vallee, Jean-Paul; Schindler, Thomas H

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of myocardial perfusion in the assessment of flow-limiting epicardial stenosis in a head-to-head comparison with abnormal thallium-201 ((201)TI) single photon emission tomography (SPECT) studies in patients with predominantly known coronary artery disease (CAD). Twenty-one patients (mean age 65 +/- 10 years) with reversible myocardial perfusion defects on (201)TI-SPECT images during dipyridamole-stimulated hyperemia were recruited for study purpose. Within 5 days of the (201)TI-SPECT study, myocardial perfusion was studied again with MRI during dipyridamole stimulation and at rest. Overall, (201)TI-SPECT identified 30 reversible regional perfusion defects. The sensitivity to detect hypoperfused segments was 70% (21/30) with the GRE-MRI perfusion analysis with (201)TI-SPECT as reference. When patients were subgrouped according to the extent of regional reversible perfusion defects on (201)TI-SPECT, mild- (SDS: 2-4), moderate- (SDS: 5-8), and severe- (SDS > 8) perfusion defects were also identified by GRE-MRI perfusion analysis in 75% (6/8), in 56% (9/16) and 100% (6/6), respectively. GRE-MRI first-pass stress perfusion imaging may not identify up to 30% of mild-to-moderate perfusion defects in a group of preselected patients with predominantly known CAD and abnormal (201)TI-SPECT studies.

  12. Differentiation of breast cancer from fibroadenoma with dual-echo dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiwei; Delproposto, Zachary; Wang, Haoyu; Ding, Xuewei; Ji, Conghua; Wang, Bei; Xu, Maosheng

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) of the breast is a routinely used imaging method which is highly sensitive for detecting breast malignancy. Specificity, though, remains suboptimal. Dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC MRI), an alternative dynamic contrast imaging technique, evaluates perfusion-related parameters unique from DCE MRI. Previous work has shown that the combination of DSC MRI with DCE MRI can improve diagnostic specificity, though an additional administration of intravenous contrast is required. Dual-echo MRI can measure both T1W DCE MRI and T2*W DSC MRI parameters with a single contrast bolus, but has not been previously implemented in breast imaging. We have developed a dual-echo gradient-echo sequence to perform such simultaneous measurements in the breast, and use it to calculate the semi-quantitative T1W and T2*W related parameters such as peak enhancement ratio, time of maximal enhancement, regional blood flow, and regional blood volume in 20 malignant lesions and 10 benign fibroadenomas in 38 patients. Imaging parameters were compared to surgical or biopsy obtained tissue samples. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and area under the ROC curves were calculated for each parameter and combination of parameters. The time of maximal enhancement derived from DCE MRI had a 90% sensitivity and 69% specificity for predicting malignancy. When combined with DSC MRI derived regional blood flow and volume parameters, sensitivity remained unchanged at 90% but specificity increased to 80%. In conclusion, we show that dual-echo MRI with a single administration of contrast agent can simultaneously measure both T1W and T2*W related perfusion and kinetic parameters in the breast and the combination of DCE MRI and DSC MRI parameters improves the diagnostic performance of breast MRI to differentiate breast cancer from benign fibroadenomas.

  13. 3D pulmonary perfusion MRI with radial ultra-short echo time and spatial-temporal constrained reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Grzegorz; Johnson, Kevin M.; Bell, Laura C.; Velikina, Julia V.; Samsonov, Alexey A.; Nagle, Scott K.; Fain, Sean B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the feasibility of spatial-temporal constrained reconstruction for accelerated regional lung perfusion using highly undersampled dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) 3D radial MRI with ultra-short echo time (UTE). Methods A combined strategy was used to accelerate DCE MRI for 3D pulmonary perfusion with whole lung coverage. A highly undersampled 3D radial UTE MRI acquisition was combined with an iterative constrained reconstruction exploiting principal component analysis and wavelet soft-thresholding for dimensionality reduction in space and time. The performance of the method was evaluated using a 3D fractal-based DCE digital lung phantom. Simulated perfusion maps and contrast enhancement curves were compared to ground truth using the structural similarity index (SSIM) to determine robust threshold and regularization levels. Feasibility studies were then performed in a canine and a human subject with 3D radial UTE (TE = 0.08 ms) acquisition to assess feasibility of mapping regional 3D perfusion. Results The method was able to accurately recover perfusion maps in the phantom with a nominal isotropic spatial resolution of 1.5 mm (SSIM of 0.949). The canine and human subject studies demonstrated feasibility for providing artifact-free perfusion maps in a simple 3D breath-held acquisition. Conclusion The proposed method is promising for fast and flexible 3D pulmonary perfusion imaging. PMID:24604452

  14. Perfusion and diffusion MRI of glioblastoma progression in a four-year prospective temozolomide clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Leimgruber, Antoine; Ostermann, Sandrine; Yeon, Eun Jo; Buff, Evelyn; Maeder, Philippe P.; Stupp, Roger; Meuli, Reto A. . E-mail: Reto.Meuli@chuv.ch

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to determine the impact of perfusion and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences on patients during treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Special emphasis has been given to these imaging technologies as tools to potentially anticipate disease progression, as progression-free survival is frequently used as a surrogate endpoint. Methods and Materials: Forty-one patients from a phase II temolozomide clinical trial were included. During follow-up, images were integrated 21 to 28 days after radiochemotherapy and every 2 months thereafter. Assessment of scans included measurement of size of lesion on T1 contrast-enhanced, T2, diffusion, and perfusion images, as well as mass effect. Classical criteria on tumor size variation and clinical parameters were used to set disease progression date. Results: A total of 311 MRI examinations were reviewed. At disease progression (32 patients), a multivariate Cox regression determined 2 significant survival parameters: T1 largest diameter (p < 0.02) and T2 size variation (p < 0.05), whereas perfusion and diffusion were not significant. Conclusion: Perfusion and diffusion techniques cannot be used to anticipate tumor progression. Decision making at disease progression is critical, and classical T1 and T2 imaging remain the gold standard. Specifically, a T1 contrast enhancement over 3 cm in largest diameter together with an increased T2 hypersignal is a marker of inferior prognosis.

  15. Comparison Between Perfusion Computed Tomography and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kierkels, Roel G.J.; Backes, Walter H.; Janssen, Marco H.M.; Buijsen, Jeroen; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido; Oellers, Michel C.; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To compare pretreatment scans with perfusion computed tomography (pCT) vs. dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in rectal tumors. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients diagnosed with rectal cancer were included in this prospective study. All patients underwent both pCT and DCE-MRI. Imaging was performed on a dedicated 40-slice CT-positron emission tomography system and a 3-T MRI system. Dynamic contrast enhancement was measured in tumor tissue and the external iliac artery. Tumor perfusion was quantified in terms of pharmacokinetic parameters: transfer constant K{sup trans}, fractional extravascular-extracellular space v{sub e}, and fractional plasma volume v{sub p}. Pharmacokinetic parameter values and their heterogeneity (by 80% quantile value) were compared between pCT and DCE-MRI. Results: Tumor K{sup trans} values correlated significantly for the voxel-by-voxel-derived median (Kendall's tau correlation, tau = 0.81, p < 0.001) and 80% quantile (tau = 0.54, p = 0.04), as well as for the averaged uptake (tau = 0.58, p = 0.03). However, no significant correlations were found for v{sub e} and v{sub p} derived from the voxel-by-voxel-derived median and 80% quantile and derived from the averaged uptake curves. Conclusions: This study demonstrated for the first time that pCT provides K{sup trans} values comparable to those of DCE-MRI. However, no correlation was found for the v{sub e} and v{sub p} parameters between CT and MRI. Computed tomography can serve as an alternative modality to MRI for the in vivo evaluation of tumor angiogenesis in terms of the transfer constant K{sup trans}.

  16. Comparison of Myocardial Perfusion Estimates From Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Four Quantitative Analysis Methods

    PubMed Central

    Pack, Nathan A.; DiBella, Edward V. R.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI has been used to quantify myocardial perfusion in recent years. Published results have varied widely, possibly depending on the method used to analyze the dynamic perfusion data. Here, four quantitative analysis methods (two-compartment modeling, Fermi function modeling, model-independent analysis, and Patlak plot analysis) were implemented and compared for quantifying myocardial perfusion. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data were acquired in 20 human subjects at rest with low-dose (0.019 ± 0.005 mmol/kg) bolus injections of gadolinium. Fourteen of these subjects were also imaged at adenosine stress (0.021 ± 0.005 mmol/kg). Aggregate rest perfusion estimates were not significantly different between all four analysis methods. At stress, perfusion estimates were not significantly different between two-compartment modeling, model-independent analysis, and Patlak plot analysis. Stress estimates from the Fermi model were significantly higher (~20%) than the other three methods. Myocardial perfusion reserve values were not significantly different between all four methods. Model-independent analysis resulted in the lowest model curve-fit errors. When more than just the first pass of data was analyzed, perfusion estimates from two-compartment modeling and model-independent analysis did not change significantly, unlike results from Fermi function modeling. PMID:20577976

  17. Prematurity and brain perfusion: Arterial spin labeling MRI.

    PubMed

    Tortora, Domenico; Mattei, Peter Angelo; Navarra, Riccardo; Panara, Valentina; Salomone, Rita; Rossi, Andrea; Detre, John A; Caulo, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal brain perfusion is a critical mechanism in neonatal brain injury. The aim of the present study was to compare Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) evaluated with ASL MRI in three groups of neonates: preterms without brain lesions on MRI (PN), preterms with periventricular white matter lesions (PNp) and term neonates with normal MRI (TN). The correlation between CBF and clinical outcome was explored. The institutional review board approved this prospective study and waived informed consent. The perfusion ASL data from 49 consecutive preterm neonates (PN) studied at term-equivalent age and 15 TN were evaluated. Statistically significant differences in gray matter CBF were evaluated by using a linear mixed-model analysis and Mann-Whitney U test. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relation between CBF and neuromotor outcome at 12 months. Comparison of means indicated that the CBF of the whole brain were significantly higher in PN compared to TN (P = 0.011). This difference remained significant when considering the frontal (P = 0.038), parietal (P = 0.002), temporal (P = 0.030), occipital (P = 0.041) and cerebellar (P = 0.010) gray matter. In the PN group, lower CBF in basal ganglia was associated with a worse neuromotor outcome (P = 0.012). ASL MRI demonstrated differences in brain perfusion of the basal ganglia between PN and TN. In PN, a positive correlation between CBF and neuromotor outcome was demonstrated in this area.

  18. Tissue Necrosis Monitoring for HIFU Ablation with T1 Contrast MRI Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, San-Chao; Yao, Ching; Kuo, Ih-Yuan; Tsai, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Hsu

    2011-09-01

    In MR-guided HIFU ablation, MTC (Magnetization Transfer Contrast) or perfusion imaging is usually used after ablation to evaluate the ablated area based on the thermally induced necrosis contrast. In our MR-guided HIFU ablation study, a T1 contrast MRI scan sequence has been used to distinguish between necrotic and non-necrotic tissue. The ablation of porcine meat in-vitro and in-vivo pig leg muscle show that the necrotic area of T1 contrast MRI image coincides with the photographs of sliced specimen. The sequence is considerably easier to apply than MTC or perfusion imaging, while giving good necrosis contrast. In addition, no injection of contrast agent is needed, allowing multiple scans to be applied throughout the entire ablation procedure.

  19. Medial tibial pain: a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI study.

    PubMed

    Mattila, K T; Komu, M E; Dahlström, S; Koskinen, S K; Heikkilä, J

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity of different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences to depict periosteal edema in patients with medial tibial pain. Additionally, we evaluated the ability of dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging (DCES) to depict possible temporal alterations in muscular perfusion within compartments of the leg. Fifteen patients with medial tibial pain were examined with MRI. T1-, T2-weighted, proton density axial images and dynamic and static phase post-contrast images were compared in ability to depict periosteal edema. STIR was used in seven cases to depict bone marrow edema. Images were analyzed to detect signs of compartment edema. Region-of-interest measurements in compartments were performed during DCES and compared with controls. In detecting periosteal edema, post-contrast T1-weighted images were better than spin echo T2-weighted and proton density images or STIR images, but STIR depicted the bone marrow edema best. DCES best demonstrated the gradually enhancing periostitis. Four subjects with severe periosteal edema had visually detectable pathologic enhancement during DCES in the deep posterior compartment of the leg. Percentage enhancement in the deep posterior compartment of the leg was greater in patients than in controls. The fast enhancement phase in the deep posterior compartment began slightly slower in patients than in controls, but it continued longer. We believe that periosteal edema in bone stress reaction can cause impairment of venous flow in the deep posterior compartment. MRI can depict both these conditions. In patients with medial tibial pain, MR imaging protocol should include axial STIR images (to depict bone pathology) with T1-weighted axial pre and post-contrast images, and dynamic contrast enhanced imaging to show periosteal edema and abnormal contrast enhancement within a compartment.

  20. Tumor Metabolism and Perfusion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Pretreatment Multimodality Imaging With {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Jacobus F.A.; Schoeder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Stambuk, Hilda E.; Wang Ya; Fury, Matthew G.; Patel, Senehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), and {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG PET) of nodal metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for assessment of tumor biology. Additionally, pretreatment multimodality imaging was evaluated for its efficacy in predicting short-term response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Metastatic neck nodes were imaged with {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET in 16 patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC, before treatment. Short-term patient radiological response was evaluated at 3 to 4 months. Correlations among {sup 1}H-MRS (choline concentration relative to water [Cho/W]), DCE-MRI (volume transfer constant [K{sup trans}]; volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space [v{sub e}]; and redistribution rate constant [k{sub ep}]), and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET (standard uptake value [SUV] and total lesion glycolysis [TLG]) were calculated using nonparametric Spearman rank correlation. To predict short-term responses, logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between Cho/W and TLG ({rho} = 0.599; p = 0.031). Cho/W correlated negatively with heterogeneity measures of standard deviation std(v{sub e}) ({rho} = -0.691; p = 0.004) and std(k{sub ep}) ({rho} = -0.704; p = 0.003). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) values correlated strongly with MRI tumor volume ({rho} = 0.643; p = 0.007). Logistic regression indicated that std(K{sup trans}) and SUVmean were significant predictors of short-term response (p < 0.07). Conclusion: Pretreatment multimodality imaging using {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET is feasible in HNSCC patients with nodal metastases. Additionally, combined DCE-MRI and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET parameters were predictive of short-term response to treatment.

  1. MRI contrast enhancement using Magnetic Carbon Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Rakesh P.; Kangasniemi, Kim; Takahashi, Masaya; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Koymen, Ali R.; Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington Team; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Team

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, nanotechnology has become one of the most exciting forefront fields in cancer diagnosis and therapeutics such as drug delivery, thermal therapy and detection of cancer. Here, we report development of core (Fe)-shell (carbon) nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for contrast enhancement in MRI imaging. These new classes of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs) are synthesized using a bottom-up approach in various organic solvents, using the electric plasma discharge generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. Gradient echo MRI images of well-dispersed MCNP-solutions (in tube) were acquired. For T2 measurements, a multi echo spin echo sequence was performed. From the slope of the 1/T2 versus concentration plot, the R2 value for different CMCNP-samples was measured. Since MCNPs were found to be extremely non-reactive, and highly absorbing in NIR regime, development of carbon-based MRI contrast enhancement will allow its simultaneous use in biomedical applications. We aim to localize the MCNPs in targeted tissue regions by external DC magnetic field, followed by MRI imaging and subsequent photothermal therapy.

  2. Perfusion deconvolution in DSC-MRI with dispersion-compliant bases.

    PubMed

    Pizzolato, Marco; Boutelier, Timothé; Deriche, Rachid

    2017-02-01

    Perfusion imaging of the brain via Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) allows tissue perfusion characterization by recovering the tissue impulse response function and scalar parameters such as the cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV), and mean transit time (MTT). However, the presence of bolus dispersion causes the data to reflect macrovascular properties, in addition to tissue perfusion. In this case, when performing deconvolution of the measured arterial and tissue concentration time-curves it is only possible to recover the effective, i.e. dispersed, response function and parameters. We introduce Dispersion-Compliant Bases (DCB) to represent the response function in the presence and absence of dispersion. We perform in silico and in vivo experiments, and show that DCB deconvolution outperforms oSVD and the state-of-the-art CPI+VTF techniques in the estimation of effective perfusion parameters, regardless of the presence and amount of dispersion. We also show that DCB deconvolution can be used as a pre-processing step to improve the estimation of dispersion-free parameters computed with CPI+VTF, which employs a model of the vascular transport function to characterize dispersion. Indeed, in silico results show a reduction of relative errors up to 50% for dispersion-free CBF and MTT. Moreover, the DCB method recovers effective response functions that comply with healthy and pathological scenarios, and offers the advantage of making no assumptions about the presence, amount, and nature of dispersion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Vascular flow and perfusion imaging with ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Matthew; Averkiou, Mike; Tiemann, Klaus; Lohmaier, Stefan; Powers, Jeff; Beach, Kirk

    2004-06-01

    Current techniques for imaging ultrasound (US) contrast agents (UCA) make no distinction between low-velocity microbubbles in the microcirculation and higher-velocity microbubbles in the larger vasculature. A combination of radiofrequency (RF) and Doppler filtering on a low mechanical index (MI) pulse inversion acquisition is presented that differentiates low-velocity microbubbles (on the order of mm/s) associated with perfusion, from the higher-velocity microbubbles (on the order of cm/s) in larger vessels. In vitro experiments demonstrate the ability to separate vascular flow using both harmonic and fundamental Doppler signals. Fundamental and harmonic Doppler signals from microbubbles using a low-MI pulse-inversion acquisition are compared with conventional color Doppler signals in vivo. Due to the lower transmit amplitude and enhanced backscatter from microbubbles, the in vivo signal to clutter ratios for both the fundamental (-11 dB) and harmonic (-4 dB) vascular flow signals were greater than with conventional power Doppler (-51 dB) without contrast agent. The processing investigated here, in parallel with conventional pulse-inversion processing, enables the simultaneous display of both perfusion and vascular flow. In vivo results demonstrating the feasibility and potential utility of the real-time display of both perfusion and vascular flow using US contrast agents are presented and discussed.

  4. Assessment of myocardial perfusion and viability from routine contrast-enhanced 16-detector-row computed tomography of the heart: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Konstantin; Sanz, Javier; Poon, Michael; Wintersperger, Bernd J; Ohnesorge, Bernd; Rius, Teresa; Fayad, Zahi A; Reiser, Maximilian F; Becker, Christoph R

    2005-05-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of 16-detector-row computed tomography (16DCT) of the heart in the assessment of myocardial perfusion and viability in comparison to stress perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (SP-MRI) and delayed-enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI). A number of 30 patients underwent both 16DCT and MRI of the heart. Contrast-enhanced 16DCT data sets were reviewed for areas of myocardium with reduced attenuation. Both CT and MRI data were examined by independent reviewers for the presence of myocardial perfusion defects or myocardial infarctions (MI). Volumetric analysis of the hypoperfusion areas in CT and the infarct sizes in DE-MRI were performed. According to MRI, myocardial infarctions were detected in 11 of 30 cases, and perfusion defects not corresponding to an MI were detected in six of 30 patients. CTA was able to detect ten of 11 MI correctly (sensitivity 91%, specificity 79%, accuracy 83%), and detected three of six hypoperfusions correctly (sensitivity 50%, specificity 92%, accuracy 79%). Assessing the volume of perfusion defects correlating to history of MI on the CT images, a systematic underestimation of the true infarct size as compared to the results of DE-MRI was found (P<0.01). Routine, contrast-enhanced 16-detector row CT of the heart can detect chronic myocardial infarctions in the majority of cases, but ischemic perfusion defects are not reliably detected under resting conditions.

  5. 1D.09: APPLICABILITY OF MEASUREMENT OF RENAL PERFUSION USING 1.5 TESLA MRI ARTERIAL SPIN LABELLING.

    PubMed

    Kistner, I; Ott, C; Jumar, A; Friedrich, S; Grosso, R; Siegl, C; Schmieder, R E; Janka, R

    2015-06-01

    Renal perfusion is a key parameter of kidney function and the decrement of renal perfusion is a marker of target organ damage caused by hypertension. Detecting these changes in renal perfusion could help to manage antihypertensive therapy and evaluate patients[Combining Acute Accent] prognosis. Measurement of renal perfusion by MRI arterial spin labelling (ASL) is a non-invasive and non-time-consuming method without the need to inject any contrast agent. This study examined reproducibility of renal perfusion measured by 1.5 Tesla MRI. Renal perfusion was measured by ASL technique using an 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. Subjects were scanned 3 times at two different days in an interval of two weeks to assess the test-retest reproducibility. Renal perfusion was automatically calculated for the cortex and medulla of the kidney by dedicated software. 14 patients were included with mean age 48.9 ± 12.7 and mean office blood pressure 132 ± 16/82 ± 10mmHg and estimated glomerular filtration rate> 60 ml/min/1.73m. The change of the mean total, cortical and medullary renal perfusion from the first examination to the second examination was 0.37 ± 13/0.62 ± 18/0.00 ± 12 ml/min/100 g kidney weight (p = 0.915/p = 0.898/p = 0.998), respectively. There was also no significant difference between the three renal perfusion measurements at one time point. For clinical trials these data indicate that to detect a 5% (10%) difference of cortical renal perfusion due to an intervention (vs placebo) only 38 (14) patients are required in face of the observed standard deviation for the change in renal perfusion. The inter and intra-session reproducibility of cortical renal perfusion assessed by MRI ASL 1.5 Tesla is excellent and small study cohorts can be used for examination of renal perfusion.

  6. Influence of pulmonary regurgitation inequality on differential perfusion of the lungs in tetralogy of Fallot after repair: a phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and perfusion scintigraphy study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Ting; Huang, Yi-Luan; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Huang, Ju-Tung; Peng, Nan-Jing; Pan, Jun-Yen; Huang, Jer-Shyung; Yang, Tsung-Lung

    2007-05-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of pulmonary regurgitation inequality on differential perfusion of the lungs in tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) after repair. Asymmetry of lung perfusion is one of the best predictors of outcome in TOF after repair. A recent phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) study found prominent regurgitation inequality between the bilateral pulmonary arteries in TOF after repair. Forty-three TOF post-repair patients (median age = 51 months, 31 men) received PC-MRI and 99mTc-labeled macroaggregates of albumin perfusion scintigraphy (PS) in the same day. We took PC-MRI measurements of forward flow volume (FFV), backward flow volume (BFV), and net flow volume (NFV) (NFV = FFV - BFV) and regurgitation fraction (RF) (RF = BFV/FFV) at the left and right pulmonary arteries (LPA and RPA). The differential perfusion of the left lung (L%) (L% = left lung/left + right lung) as calculated by NFV ratio, by FFV ratio of PC-MRI, and by PS were compared. The discrepancy between L% by NFV versus L% by PS was affected by the severity of RF of LPA (r = -0.51, p = 0.001); agreement between L% by NFV versus L% by PS was good (intraclass correlation coefficient [Ri] = 0.87) if RF of LPA <0.4 (n = 23) but downgraded (Ri = 0.51) and underestimated the L% (median of error = -14%, range = -25.3% to 5.5%) if RF of LPA > or =0.4 (n = 20). In contrast, agreement between L% by FFV versus L% by PS was high and unaffected by RF of LPA (Ri = 0.94, 0.92, respectively). While integrating PC-MRI of pulmonary artery as a comprehensive MRI evaluation of TOF after repair, conventional NFV ratio method tended to underestimate the left lung perfusion and may lead to unnecessary intervention. The FFV ratio method should be used for precise assessment of differential lung perfusion.

  7. Principles of T2 *-weighted dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI technique in brain tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Shiroishi, Mark S; Castellazzi, Gloria; Boxerman, Jerrold L; D'Amore, Francesco; Essig, Marco; Nguyen, Thanh B; Provenzale, James M; Enterline, David S; Anzalone, Nicoletta; Dörfler, Arnd; Rovira, Àlex; Wintermark, Max; Law, Meng

    2015-02-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) is used to track the first pass of an exogenous, paramagnetic, nondiffusible contrast agent through brain tissue, and has emerged as a powerful tool in the characterization of brain tumor hemodynamics. DSC-MRI parameters can be helpful in many aspects, including tumor grading, prediction of treatment response, likelihood of malignant transformation, discrimination between tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis, and differentiation between true early progression and pseudoprogression. This review aims to provide a conceptual overview of the underlying principles of DSC-MRI of the brain for clinical neuroradiologists, scientists, or students wishing to improve their understanding of the technical aspects, pitfalls, and controversies of DSC perfusion MRI of the brain. Future consensus on image acquisition parameters and postprocessing of DSC-MRI will most likely allow this technique to be evaluated and used in high-quality multicenter studies and ultimately help guide clinical care. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Arterial Spin Labeling - Fast Imaging with Steady-State Free Precession (ASL-FISP): A Rapid and Quantitative Perfusion Technique for High Field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Goodnough, Candida L.; Erokwu, Bernadette O.; Farr, George W.; Darrah, Rebecca; Lu, Lan; Dell, Katherine M.; Yu, Xin; Flask, Chris A.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is a valuable non-contrast perfusion MRI technique with numerous clinical applications. Many previous ASL MRI studies have utilized either Echo-Planar Imaging (EPI) or True Fast Imaging with Steady-State Free Precession (True FISP) readouts that are prone to off-resonance artifacts on high field MRI scanners. We have developed a rapid ASL-FISP MRI acquisition for high field preclinical MRI scanners providing perfusion-weighted images with little or no artifacts in less than 2 seconds. In this initial implementation, a FAIR (Flow-Sensitive Alternating Inversion Recovery) ASL preparation was combined with a rapid, centrically-encoded FISP readout. Validation studies on healthy C57/BL6 mice provided consistent estimation of in vivo mouse brain perfusion at 7 T and 9.4 T (249±38 ml/min/100g and 241±17 ml/min/100g, respectively). The utility of this method was further demonstrated in detecting significant perfusion deficits in a C57/BL6 mouse model of ischemic stroke. Reasonable kidney perfusion estimates were also obtained for a healthy C57/BL6 mouse exhibiting differential perfusion in the renal cortex and medulla. Overall, the ASL-FISP technique provides a rapid and quantitative in vivo assessment of tissue perfusion for high field MRI scanners with minimal image artifacts. PMID:24891124

  9. Arterial spin labeling-fast imaging with steady-state free precession (ASL-FISP): a rapid and quantitative perfusion technique for high-field MRI.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Goodnough, Candida L; Erokwu, Bernadette O; Farr, George W; Darrah, Rebecca; Lu, Lan; Dell, Katherine M; Yu, Xin; Flask, Chris A

    2014-08-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a valuable non-contrast perfusion MRI technique with numerous clinical applications. Many previous ASL MRI studies have utilized either echo-planar imaging (EPI) or true fast imaging with steady-state free precession (true FISP) readouts, which are prone to off-resonance artifacts on high-field MRI scanners. We have developed a rapid ASL-FISP MRI acquisition for high-field preclinical MRI scanners providing perfusion-weighted images with little or no artifacts in less than 2 s. In this initial implementation, a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL preparation was combined with a rapid, centrically encoded FISP readout. Validation studies on healthy C57/BL6 mice provided consistent estimation of in vivo mouse brain perfusion at 7 and 9.4 T (249 ± 38 and 241 ± 17 mL/min/100 g, respectively). The utility of this method was further demonstrated in the detection of significant perfusion deficits in a C57/BL6 mouse model of ischemic stroke. Reasonable kidney perfusion estimates were also obtained for a healthy C57/BL6 mouse exhibiting differential perfusion in the renal cortex and medulla. Overall, the ASL-FISP technique provides a rapid and quantitative in vivo assessment of tissue perfusion for high-field MRI scanners with minimal image artifacts. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Diagnostic Performance of Dual-Energy CT Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: Direct Comparison With Cardiovascular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sung Min; Song, Meong Gun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Hwang, Hweung Kon; Feuchtner, Gudrun Maria; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of stress perfusion dual-energy CT (DECT) and its incremental value when used with coronary CT angiography (CTA) for identifying hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. SUBJECTS AND METHODS One hundred patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease without chronic myocardial infarction detected with coronary CTA underwent stress perfusion DECT, stress cardiovascular perfusion MRI, and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Stress perfusion DECT and cardiovascular stress perfusion MR images were used for detecting perfusion defects. Coronary CTA and ICA were evaluated in the detection of ≥ 50% coronary stenosis. The diagnostic performance of coronary CTA for detecting hemodynamically significant stenosis was assessed before and after stress perfusion DECT on a pervessel basis with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI as the reference standard. RESULTS The performance of stress perfusion DECT compared with cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI on a per-vessel basis in the detection of perfusion defects was sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 74%; positive predictive value, 73%; negative predictive value, 90%. Per segment, these values were sensitivity, 76%; specificity, 80%; positive predictive value, 63%; and negative predictive value, 88%. Compared with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI per vessel territory the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of coronary CTA were 95%, 61%, 61%, and 95%. The values for stress perfusion DECT were 92%, 72%, 68%, and 94%. The values for coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT were 88%, 79%, 73%, and 91%. The ROC AUC increased from 0.78 to 0.84 (p = 0.02) with the use of coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT compared with coronary CTA alone. CONCLUSION Stress perfusion DECT plays a complementary role in enhancing the accuracy of coronary CTA for identifying hemodynamically

  11. Evaluation of Perfusion Quantification Methods with Ultrasound Contrast Agents in a Machine-Perfused Pig Liver.

    PubMed

    Averkiou, M; Keravnou, C P; Izamis, M L; Leen, E

    2016-05-03

    Purpose: To evaluate dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCEUS) as a tool for measuring blood flow in the macro- and microcirculation of an ex-vivo machine-perfused pig liver and to confirm the ability of DCEUS to accurately detect induced flow rate changes so that it could then be used clinically for monitoring flow changes in liver tumors. Materials and Methods: Bolus injections of contrast agents in the hepatic artery (HA) and portal vein (PV) were administered to 3 machine-perfused pig livers. Flow changes were induced by the pump of the machine perfusion system. The induced flow rates were of clinical relevance (150 - 400 ml/min for HA and 400 - 1400 ml/min for PV). Quantification parameters from time-intensity curves [rise time (RT), mean transit time (MTT), area under the curve (AUC) and peak intensity (PI)] were extracted in order to evaluate whether the induced flow changes were reflected in these parameters. Results: A linear relationship between the image intensity and the microbubble concentration was confirmed first, while time parameters (RT and MMT) were found to be independent of concentration. The induced flow changes which propagated from the larger vessels to the parenchyma were reflected in the quantification parameters. Specifically, RT, MTT and AUC correlated with flow rate changes. Conclusion Machine-perfused pig liver is an excellent test bed for DCEUS quantification approaches for the study of the hepatic vascular networks. DCEUS quantification parameters (RT, MTT, and AUC) can measure relative flow changes of about 20 % and above in the liver vasculature. DCEUS quantification is a promising tool for real-time monitoring of the vascular network of tumors. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Perfusion Imaging with a Freely Diffusible Hyperpolarized Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Aaron K.; Vinogradov, Elena; Wang, Xiaoen; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Alsop, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents that can diffuse freely into or within tissue have numerous attractive features for perfusion imaging. Here we present preliminary data illustrating the suitability of hyperpolarized 13C labeled 2-methylpropan-2-ol (also known as dimethylethanol, tertiary butyl alcohol and tert-butanol) as a freely diffusible contrast agent for magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. Dynamic 13C images acquired in rat brain with a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence following administration of hyperpolarized 2-methylpropan-2-ol show that this agent can be imaged with 2–4s temporal resolution, 2mm slice thickness, and 700 micron in-plane resolution while retaining adequate signal-to-noise ratio. 13C relaxation measurements on 2-methylpropan-2-ol in blood at 9.4T yield T1=46±4s and T2=0.55±0.03s. In the rat brain at 4.7T, analysis of the temporal dynamics of the bSSFP image intensity in tissue and venous blood indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol has a T2 of roughly 2–4s and a T1 of 43±24s. In addition, the images indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is freely diffusible in brain and hence has a long residence time in tissue; this in turn makes it possible to image the agent continuously for tens of seconds. These characteristics show that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is a promising agent for robust and quantitative perfusion imaging in the brain and body. PMID:21432901

  13. Pulmonary perfusion quantification with flow-sensitive inversion recovery (FAIR) UTE MRI in small animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Tibiletti, Marta; Bianchi, Andrea; Stiller, Detlef; Rasche, Volker

    2016-12-01

    Blood perfusion in lung parenchyma is an important property for assessing lung function. In small animals, its quantitation is limited even with radioactive isotopes or dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI techniques. In this study, the feasibility flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) for the quantification of blood flow in lung parenchyma in free breathing rats at 7 T has been investigated. In order to obtain sufficient signal from the short T2 * lung parenchyma, a 2D ultra-short echo time (UTE) Look-Locker read-out has been implemented. Acquisitions were segmented to maintain acquisition time within an acceptable range. A method to perform retrospective respiratory gating (DC-SG) has been applied to investigate the impact of respiratory movement. Reproducibilities within and between sessions were estimated, and the ability of FAIR-UTE to identify the decrease of lung perfusion under hyperoxic conditions was tested. The implemented technique allowed for the visualization of lung parenchyma with excellent SNR and no respiratory artifact even in ungated acquisitions. Lung parenchyma perfusion was obtained as 32.54 ± 2.26 mL/g/min in the left lung, and 34.09 ± 2.75 mL/g/min in the right lung. Application of retrospective gating significantly but minimally changes the perfusion values, implying that respiratory gating may not be necessary with this center-our acquisition method. A decrease of 10% in lung perfusion was found between normoxic and hyperoxic conditions, proving the feasibility of the FAIR-UTE approach to quantify lung perfusion changes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Stepwise heterogeneity analysis of breast tumors in perfusion DCE-MRI datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohajer, Mojgan; Schmid, Volker J.; Engels, Nina A.; Noel, Peter B.; Rummeny, Ernst; Englmeier, Karl-Hans

    2012-03-01

    The signal curves in perfusion dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) of cancerous breast tissue reveal valuable information about tumor angiogenesis. Pathological studies have illustrated that breast tumors consist of different subregions, especially with more homogeneous properties during their growth. Differences should be identifiable in DCEMRI signal curves if the characteristics of these sub-regions are related to the perfusion and angiogenesis. We introduce a stepwise clustering method which in a first step uses a new similarity measure. The new similarity measure (PM) compares how parallel washout phases of two curves are. To distinguish the starting point of the washout phase, a linear regression method is partially fitted to the curves. In the next step, the minimum signal value of the washout phase is normalized to zero. Finally, PM is calculated according to maximal variation among the point wise differences during washout phases. In the second step of clustering the groups of signal curves with parallel washout are clustered using Euclidean distance. The introduced method is evaluated on 15 DCE-MRI breast datasets with different types of breast tumors. The use of our new heterogeneity analysis is feasible in single patient examination and improves breast MR diagnostics.

  15. Groupwise registration of cardiac perfusion MRI sequences using normalized mutual information in high dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamrouni, Sameh; Rougon, Nicolas; Pr"teux, Françoise

    2011-03-01

    In perfusion MRI (p-MRI) exams, short-axis (SA) image sequences are captured at multiple slice levels along the long-axis of the heart during the transit of a vascular contrast agent (Gd-DTPA) through the cardiac chambers and muscle. Compensating cardio-thoracic motions is a requirement for enabling computer-aided quantitative assessment of myocardial ischaemia from contrast-enhanced p-MRI sequences. The classical paradigm consists of registering each sequence frame on a reference image using some intensity-based matching criterion. In this paper, we introduce a novel unsupervised method for the spatio-temporal groupwise registration of cardiac p-MRI exams based on normalized mutual information (NMI) between high-dimensional feature distributions. Here, local contrast enhancement curves are used as a dense set of spatio-temporal features, and statistically matched through variational optimization to a target feature distribution derived from a registered reference template. The hard issue of probability density estimation in high-dimensional state spaces is bypassed by using consistent geometric entropy estimators, allowing NMI to be computed directly from feature samples. Specifically, a computationally efficient kth-nearest neighbor (kNN) estimation framework is retained, leading to closed-form expressions for the gradient flow of NMI over finite- and infinite-dimensional motion spaces. This approach is applied to the groupwise alignment of cardiac p-MRI exams using a free-form Deformation (FFD) model for cardio-thoracic motions. Experiments on simulated and natural datasets suggest its accuracy and robustness for registering p-MRI exams comprising more than 30 frames.

  16. Using Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI to Quantitatively Characterize Maternal Vascular Organization in the Primate Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Frias, A.E.; Schabel, M.C.; Roberts, V.H.J.; Tudorica, A.; Grigsby, P.L.; Oh, K.Y.; Kroenke, C. D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The maternal microvasculature of the primate placenta is organized into 10-20 perfusion domains that are functionally optimized to facilitate nutrient exchange to support fetal growth. This study describes a dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) method for identifying vascular domains, and quantifying maternal blood flow in them. Methods A rhesus macaque on the 133rd day of pregnancy (G133, term=165 days) underwent Doppler ultrasound (US) procedures, DCE-MRI, and Cesarean-section delivery. Serial T1-weighted images acquired throughout intravenous injection of a contrast reagent (CR) bolus were analyzed to obtain CR arrival time maps of the placenta. Results Watershed segmentation of the arrival time map identified 16 perfusion domains. The number and location of these domains corresponded to anatomical cotyledonary units observed following delivery. Analysis of the CR wave front through each perfusion domain enabled determination of volumetric flow, which ranged from 9.03 to 44.9 mL/sec (25.2 ± 10.3 mL/sec). These estimates are supported by Doppler US results. Conclusions The DCE-MRI analysis described here provides quantitative estimates of the number of maternal perfusion domains in a primate placenta, and estimates flow within each domain. Anticipated extensions of this technique are to the study placental function in nonhuman primate models of obstetric complications. PMID:24753177

  17. Quantitative myocardial perfusion magnetic resonance imaging: the impact of pulsatile flow on contrast agent bolus dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graafen, Dirk; Hamer, Julia; Weber, Stefan; Schreiber, Laura M.

    2011-08-01

    Myocardial blood flow (MBF) can be quantified using T1-weighted first-pass magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with a tracer-kinetic model, like MMID4. This procedure requires the knowledge of an arterial input function which is usually estimated from the left ventricle (LV). Dispersion of the contrast agent bolus may occur between the LV and the tissue of interest. The aim of this study was to investigate the dispersion under conditions of physiological pulsatile blood flow, and to simulate its effect on MBF quantification. The dispersion was simulated in coronary arteries using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. Simulations were accomplished on straight vessels with stenosis of different degrees and shapes. The results show that dispersion is more pronounced under resting conditions than during hyperemia. Stenosis leads to a reduction of dispersion. In consequence, dispersion results in a systematic MBF underestimation between -0.4% and -9.3%. The relative MBF error depends not only on the dispersion but also on the actual MBF itself. Since MBF under rest is more underestimated than under stress, myocardial perfusion reserve is overestimated between 0.1% and 4.5%. Considering other sources of errors in myocardial perfusion MRI, systematic errors of MBF by bolus dispersion are relatively small.

  18. Standardized perfusion value: universal CT contrast enhancement scale that correlates with FDG PET in lung nodules.

    PubMed

    Miles, K A; Griffiths, M R; Fuentes, M A

    2001-08-01

    The standardized enhancement value and standardized perfusion value allow comparison between different methods for quantification of contrast enhancement during computed tomography (CT). Standard perfusion values calculated from CT measurements of perfusion within pulmonary nodules compared favorably with those derived from previously reported enhancement data and correlated with standardized uptake values obtained from positron emission tomographic images (r = 0.8, P <.01).

  19. Viral capsids as MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Liepold, Lars; Anderson, Stasia; Willits, Deborah; Oltrogge, Luke; Frank, Joseph A; Douglas, Trevor; Young, Mark

    2007-11-01

    Viral capsids have the potential for combined cell/tissue targeting, drug delivery, and imaging. Described here is the development of a viral capsid as an efficient and potentially relevant MRI contrast agent. Two approaches are outlined to fuse high affinity Gd(3+) chelating moieties to the surface of the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) capsid. In the first approach, a metal binding peptide has been genetically engineered into the subunit of CCMV. In a second approach gadolinium-tetraazacyclododecane tetraacetic acid (GdDOTA) was attached to CCMV by reactions with endogenous lysine residues on the surface of the viral capsid. T(1) and T(2) ionic relaxivity rates for the genetic fusion particle were R1 = 210 and R2 = 402 mM(-1)s(-1) (R2 at 56 MHz) and for CCMV functionalized with GdDOTA were R1 = 46 and R2 = 142 mM(-1)s(-1) at 61 MHz. The relaxivities per intact capsid for the genetic fusion were R1 = 36,120 and R2 = 69,144 mM(-1)s(-1) (R2 at 56 MHz) and for the GdDOTA CCMV construct were R1 = 2,806 and R2 = 8,662 mM(-1)s(-1) at 61 MHz. The combination of high relaxivity, stable Gd(3+) binding, and large Gd(3+) payloads indicates the potential of viral capsids as high-performance contrast agents. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Technical Note: Quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of a 3-dimensional artificial capillary network.

    PubMed

    Gaass, Thomas; Schneider, Moritz Jörg; Dietrich, Olaf; Ingrisch, Michael; Dinkel, Julien

    2017-04-01

    Variability across devices, patients, and time still hinders widespread recognition of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) as quantitative biomarker. The purpose of this work was to introduce and characterize a dedicated microchannel phantom as a model for quantitative DCE-MRI measurements. A perfusable, MR-compatible microchannel network was constructed on the basis of sacrificial melt-spun sugar fibers embedded in a block of epoxy resin. Structural analysis was performed on the basis of light microscopy images before DCE-MRI experiments. During dynamic acquisition the capillary network was perfused with a standard contrast agent injection system. Flow-dependency, as well as inter- and intrascanner reproducibility of the computed DCE parameters were evaluated using a 3.0 T whole-body MRI. Semi-quantitative and quantitative flow-related parameters exhibited the expected proportionality to the set flow rate (mean Pearson correlation coefficient: 0.991, P < 2.5e-5). The volume fraction was approximately independent from changes of the applied flow rate through the phantom. Repeatability and reproducibility experiments yielded maximum intrascanner coefficients of variation (CV) of 4.6% for quantitative parameters. All evaluated parameters were well in the range of known in vivo results for the applied flow rates. The constructed phantom enables reproducible, flow-dependent, contrast-enhanced MR measurements with the potential to facilitate standardization and comparability of DCE-MRI examinations. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  1. Interobserver variability in the radiological assessment of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including perfusion MRI in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Kerkhof, M; Hagenbeek, R E; van der Kallen, B F W; Lycklama À Nijeholt, G J; Dirven, L; Taphoorn, M J B; Vos, M J

    2016-10-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has limited value for differentiation of true tumor progression and pseudoprogression in treated glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) may be helpful in the differentiation of these two phenomena. Here interobserver variability in routine radiological evaluation of GBM patients is assessed using MRI, including PWI. Three experienced neuroradiologists evaluated MR scans of 28 GBM patients during temozolomide chemoradiotherapy at three time points: preoperative (MR1) and postoperative (MR2) MR scan and the follow-up MR scan after three cycles of adjuvant temozolomide (MR3). Tumor size was measured both on T1 post-contrast and T2 weighted images according to the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology criteria. PW images of MR3 were evaluated by visual inspection of relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) color maps and by quantitative rCBV measurements of enhancing areas with highest rCBV. Image interpretability of PW images was also scored. Finally, the neuroradiologists gave a conclusion on tumor status, based on the interpretation of both T1 and T2 weighted images (MR1, MR2 and MR3) in combination with PWI (MR3). Interobserver agreement on visual interpretation of rCBV maps was good (κ = 0.63) but poor on quantitative rCBV measurements and on interpretability of perfusion images (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.37 and κ = 0.23, respectively). Interobserver agreement on the overall conclusion of tumor status was moderate (κ = 0.48). Interobserver agreement on the visual interpretation of PWI color maps was good. However, overall interpretation of MR scans (using both conventional and PW images) showed considerable interobserver variability. Therefore, caution should be applied when interpreting MRI results during chemoradiation therapy. © 2016 EAN.

  2. Spiral Perfusion Imaging With Consecutive Echoes (SPICE™) for the Simultaneous Mapping of DSC- and DCE-MRI Parameters in Brain Tumor Patients: Theory and Initial Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Eric S.; Prah, Douglas E.; Schmainda, Kathleen M.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the perfusion imaging techniques most frequently used to probe the angiogenic character of brain neoplasms. With these methods, T1- and T2/T2*-weighted imaging sequences are used to image the distribution of gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents. However, it is well known that Gd exhibits combined T1, T2, and T2* shortening effects in tissue, and therefore, the results of both DCE- and DSC-MRI can be confounded by these opposing effects. In particular, residual susceptibility effects compete with T1 shortening, which can confound DCE-MRI parameters, whereas dipolar T1 and T2 leakage and residual susceptibility effects can confound DSC-MRI parameters. We introduce here a novel perfusion imaging acquisition and postprocessing method termed Spiral Perfusion Imaging with Consecutive Echoes (SPICE) that can be used to simultaneously acquire DCE- and DSC-MRI data, which requires only a single dose of the Gd contrast agent, does not require the collection of a precontrast T1 map for DCE-MRI processing, and eliminates the confounding contrast agent effects due to contrast extravasation. A detailed mathematical description of SPICE is provided here along with a demonstration of its utility in patients with high-grade glioma. PMID:28090589

  3. Spiral Perfusion Imaging With Consecutive Echoes (SPICE™) for the Simultaneous Mapping of DSC- and DCE-MRI Parameters in Brain Tumor Patients: Theory and Initial Feasibility.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Eric S; Prah, Douglas E; Schmainda, Kathleen M

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the perfusion imaging techniques most frequently used to probe the angiogenic character of brain neoplasms. With these methods, T1- and T2/T2*-weighted imaging sequences are used to image the distribution of gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents. However, it is well known that Gd exhibits combined T1, T2, and T2* shortening effects in tissue, and therefore, the results of both DCE- and DSC-MRI can be confounded by these opposing effects. In particular, residual susceptibility effects compete with T1 shortening, which can confound DCE-MRI parameters, whereas dipolar T1 and T2 leakage and residual susceptibility effects can confound DSC-MRI parameters. We introduce here a novel perfusion imaging acquisition and postprocessing method termed Spiral Perfusion Imaging with Consecutive Echoes (SPICE) that can be used to simultaneously acquire DCE- and DSC-MRI data, which requires only a single dose of the Gd contrast agent, does not require the collection of a precontrast T1 map for DCE-MRI processing, and eliminates the confounding contrast agent effects due to contrast extravasation. A detailed mathematical description of SPICE is provided here along with a demonstration of its utility in patients with high-grade glioma.

  4. MRI-based assessment of liver perfusion and hepatocyte injury in the murine model of acute hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Byk, Katarzyna; Jasinski, Krzysztof; Bartel, Zaneta; Jasztal, Agnieszka; Sitek, Barbara; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Chlopicki, Stefan; Skorka, Tomasz

    2016-12-01

    To assess alterations in perfusion and liver function in the concanavalin A (ConA)-induced mouse model of acute liver failure (ALF) using two magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based methods: dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) with Gd-EOB-DTPA contrast agent and arterial spin labelling (ASL). BALB/c mice were studied using a 9.4 T MRI system. The IntraGateFLASH(TM) and FAIR-EPI pulse sequences were used for optimum mouse abdomen imaging. The average perfusion values for the liver of the control and ConA group were equal to 245 ± 20 and 200 ± 32 ml/min/100 g (p = 0.008, respectively). DCE-MRI showed that the time to the peak of the image enhancement was 6.14 ± 1.07 min and 9.72 ± 1.69 min in the control and ConA group (p < 0.001, respectively), while the rate of the contrast wash-out in the control and ConA group was 0.037 ± 0.008 and 0.021 ± 0.008 min(-1) (p = 0.004, respectively). These results were consistent with hepatocyte injury in the ConA-treated mice as confirmed by histopathological staining. Both the ASL and DCE-MRI techniques represent a reliable methodology to assess alterations in liver perfusion and hepatocyte integrity in murine hepatitis.

  5. The precision of DCE-MRI using the tissue homogeneity model with continuous formulation of the perfusion parameters.

    PubMed

    Bartoš, Michal; Jiřík, Radovan; Kratochvíla, Jiří; Standara, Michal; Starčuk, Zenon; Taxt, Torfinn

    2014-06-01

    The present trend in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is to increase the number of estimated perfusion parameters using complex pharmacokinetic models. However, less attention is given to the precision analysis of the parameter estimates. In this paper, the distributed capillary adiabatic tissue homogeneity pharmacokinetic model is extended by the bolus arrival time formulated as a free continuous parameter. With the continuous formulation of all perfusion parameters, it is possible to use standard gradient-based optimization algorithms in the approximation of the tissue concentration time sequences. This new six-parameter model is investigated by comparing Monte-Carlo simulations with theoretically derived covariance matrices. The covariance-matrix approach is extended from the usual analysis of the primary perfusion parameters of the pharmacokinetic model to the analysis of the perfusion parameters derived from the primary ones. The results indicate that the precision of the estimated perfusion parameters can be described by the covariance matrix for signal-to-noise ratio higher than~20dB. The application of the new analysis model on a real DCE-MRI data set is also presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Perfusion imaging of the brain using Z-score and dynamic images obtained by subtracting images from before and after contrast injection.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunseob; Liu, Haiying; Shin, Tae Beom; Lee, Jin Hwa; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Oh, Jong Young; Lee, Young-Il

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of perfusion imaging of the brain using the Z-score and subtraction dynamic images obtained from susceptibility contrast MR images. Five patients, each with a normal MRI, Moya-moya, a middle cerebral artery occlusion, post-trauma syndrome, and a metastatic brain tumor, were selected for a presentation. A susceptibility-contrast echo-planar image after a routine MRI was taken as the source image with a rapid manual injection of 0.1 mmol/kg of Gd-DTPA. The inflow and washout patterns were observed from the time-signal intensity curve of the serial scans using the standard program of an MRI machine. The repeated Z-score images of the peak and late phases were made using the threshold Z-score values between 1.4 and 2.0 in four to five studies of the pre-contrast, peak, and late phases. Dynamic subtraction images were produced by subtracting sequential post-contrast images from a pre-contrast image and coloring these images using a pseudocolor mapping method. In the diseases with perfusion abnormalities, the Z-score images revealed information about the degree of perfusion during the peak and late phases. However, the quality varied with the Z-score threshold and the studies selected in a group. The dynamic subtraction images were of sufficient quality with no background noise and more clearly illustrated the temporal changes in perfusion and delayed perfusion. The Z-scores and dynamic subtraction images illustrated the degree of perfusion and sequential changes in the pattern of perfusion, respectively. These images can be used as a new complimentary method for observing the perfusion patterns in brain diseases.

  7. Simulation of phase contrast MRI of turbulent flow.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Sven; Dyverfeldt, Petter; Gårdhagen, Roland; Karlsson, Matts; Ebbers, Tino

    2010-10-01

    Phase contrast MRI is a powerful tool for the assessment of blood flow. However, especially in the highly complex and turbulent flow that accompanies many cardiovascular diseases, phase contrast MRI may suffer from artifacts. Simulation of phase contrast MRI of turbulent flow could increase our understanding of phase contrast MRI artifacts in turbulent flows and facilitate the development of phase contrast MRI methods for the assessment of turbulent blood flow. We present a method for the simulation of phase contrast MRI measurements of turbulent flow. The method uses an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach, in which spin particle trajectories are computed from time-resolved large eddy simulations. The Bloch equations are solved for each spin for a frame of reference moving along the spins trajectory. The method was validated by comparison with phase contrast MRI measurements of velocity and intravoxel velocity standard deviation (IVSD) on a flow phantom consisting of a straight rigid pipe with a stenosis. Turbulence related artifacts, such as signal drop and ghosting, could be recognized in the measurements as well as in the simulations. The velocity and the IVSD obtained from the magnitude of the phase contrast MRI simulations agreed well with the measurements.

  8. Effects on resting cerebral blood flow and functional connectivity induced by metoclopramide: a perfusion MRI study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Seara, María A; Aznárez-Sanado, Maite; Mengual, Elisa; Irigoyen, Jaione; Heukamp, Franz; Pastor, María A

    2011-08-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The substituted benzamide, metoclopramide, is a dopamine receptor antagonist and is widely prescribed in the symptomatic treatment of nausea and vomiting, although it can cause adverse motor and non-motor side effects. The effects of metoclopramide on brain metabolism have not been investigated to date. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH To determine the effects of metoclopramide on brain function, cerebral perfusion changes after a single oral dose were assessed in healthy volunteers using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion MRI was used to measure cerebral blood flow before and after metoclopramide. Blood haemodynamics in the vertebral and internal carotid arteries were evaluated using phase-contrast MRI. KEY RESULTS Metoclopramide altered haemodynamics in the carotid arteries and the cerebral perfusion. Perfusion increased bilaterally in the putamen, consistent with antagonism of dopamine D(2) receptors by metoclopramide and possibly related to its motor side effects. In contrast, reduced perfusion was observed in the insular cortices and anterior temporal lobes. In addition, functional connectivity between the insular cortex and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was decreased. These cortical changes affecting neural circuits between high-order association areas may underlie certain neuropsychiatric conditions occasionally reported after metoclopramide administration. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The present results show the sensitivity of ASL to detect small changes in regional blood flow, closely related to brain function, after a single pharmacological challenge, highlighting the potential of this technique for human pharmacological studies. © 2011 FUNDACIÓN PARA LA INVESTIGACIÓN MÉDICA APLICADA. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Effects on resting cerebral blood flow and functional connectivity induced by metoclopramide: a perfusion MRI study in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Seara, María A; Aznárez-Sanado, Maite; Mengual, Elisa; Irigoyen, Jaione; Heukamp, Franz; Pastor, María A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The substituted benzamide, metoclopramide, is a dopamine receptor antagonist and is widely prescribed in the symptomatic treatment of nausea and vomiting, although it can cause adverse motor and non-motor side effects. The effects of metoclopramide on brain metabolism have not been investigated to date. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH To determine the effects of metoclopramide on brain function, cerebral perfusion changes after a single oral dose were assessed in healthy volunteers using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion MRI was used to measure cerebral blood flow before and after metoclopramide. Blood haemodynamics in the vertebral and internal carotid arteries were evaluated using phase-contrast MRI. KEY RESULTS Metoclopramide altered haemodynamics in the carotid arteries and the cerebral perfusion. Perfusion increased bilaterally in the putamen, consistent with antagonism of dopamine D2 receptors by metoclopramide and possibly related to its motor side effects. In contrast, reduced perfusion was observed in the insular cortices and anterior temporal lobes. In addition, functional connectivity between the insular cortex and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was decreased. These cortical changes affecting neural circuits between high-order association areas may underlie certain neuropsychiatric conditions occasionally reported after metoclopramide administration. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The present results show the sensitivity of ASL to detect small changes in regional blood flow, closely related to brain function, after a single pharmacological challenge, highlighting the potential of this technique for human pharmacological studies. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Imaging. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-8BJP has previously published an Imaging in Pharmacology themed section, edited by A Davenport and C

  10. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Quantitative Perfusion in Cerebral Cavernous Angiomas

    PubMed Central

    Mikati, Abdul Ghani; Tan, Huan; Shenkar, Robert; Li, Luying; Zhang, Lingjiao; Guo, Xiaodong; Shi, Changbin; Liu, Tian; Wang, Yi; Shah, Akash; Edelman, Robert; Christoforidis, Gregory; Awad, Issam

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyperpermeability and iron deposition are two central pathophysiological phenomena in human cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) disease. Here we used two novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to establish a relationship between these phenomena. Methods Subjects with CCM disease (4 sporadic and 18 familial) underwent MRI imaging using the Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Quantitative Perfusion (DCEQP) and Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM) techniques that measure hemodynamic factors of vessel leak and iron deposition respectively, previously demonstrated in CCM disease. Regions of interest encompassing the CCM lesions were analyzed using these techniques Results Susceptibility measured by QSM was positively correlated with permeability of lesions measured using DCEQP (r=0.49, p=<0.0001). The correlation was not affected by factors including familial predisposition, lesion volume, the contrast agent and the use of statin medication. Susceptibility was correlated with lesional blood volume (r=0.4, p=0.0001), but not with lesional blood flow. Conclusion The correlation between QSM and DCEQP suggests that the phenomena of permeability and iron deposition are related in CCM; hence “more leaky lesions” also manifest a more cumulative iron burden. These techniques might be used as biomarkers to monitor the course of this disease and the effect of therapy. PMID:24302484

  11. Comparison between perfusion computed tomography and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in assessing glioblastoma microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhong Zheng; Shi, Wei; Shi, Jin Long; Shen, Dan Dan; Gu, Hong Mei; Zhou, Xue Jun

    2017-02-01

    Perfusion computed tomography (PCT) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) provide independent measurements of biomarkers related to tumor perfusion. The aim of this study was to compare the two techniques in assessing glioblastoma microvasculature. Twenty-five patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (14 males and 11 females; 51±11years old, ranging from 33 to 70 years) were includede in this prospective study. All patients underwent both PCT and DCE-MRI. Imaging was performed on a 256-slice CT scanner and a 3-T MRI system. PCT yielded permeability surface-area product (PS) using deconvolution physiological models; meanwhile, DCE-MRI determined volume transfer constant (K(trans)) using the Tofts-Kermode compartment model. All cases were submitted to surgical intervention, and CD105-microvascular density (CD105-MVD) was measured in each glioblastoma specimen. Then, Spearman's correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots were obtained for PS, K(trans) and CD105-MVD. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Tumor PS and K(trans) values were correlated with CD105-MVD (r=0.644, P<0.001; r=0.683, P<0.001). In addition, PS was correlated with K(trans) in glioblastoma (r=0.931, P<0.001). Finally, Bland-Altman plots showed no significant differences between PS and K(trans) (P=0.063). PCT and DCE-MRI measurements of glioblastoma perfusion biomarkers have similar results, suggesting that both techniques may have comparable utility. Therefore, PCT may serve as an alternative modality to DCE-MRI for the in vivo evaluation of glioblastoma microvasculature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Inter-operator variability in perfusion assessment of tumors in MRI using automated AIF detection.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Edward; McShane, Teresa; Evelhoch, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    A method is presented for the calculation of perfusion parameters in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI. This method requires identification of enhancement curves for both tumor tissue and plasma. Inter-operator variability in the derived rate constant between plasma and extra-cellular extra-vascular space is assessed in both canine and human subjects using semi-automated tumor margin identification with both manual and automated arterial input function (AIF) identification. Experimental results show a median coefficient of variability (CV) for parameter measurement with manual AIF identification of 21.5% in canines and 11% in humans, with a median CV for parameter measurement with automated AIF identification of 6.7% in canines and 6% in humans.

  13. Perfusion MRI as the predictive/prognostic and pharmacodynamic biomarkers in recurrent malignant glioma treated with bevacizumab: a systematic review and a time-to-event meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sang Hyun; Jung, Seung Chai; Kim, Kyung Won; Lee, Ja Youn; Choi, Yoonseok; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Ho Sung

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the value of perfusion MRI as a predictive/prognostic biomarker and a pharmacodynamic biomarker in patients with recurrent glioma treated with a bevacizumab-based regimen. We identified thirteen literature reports that investigated dynamic susceptibility-contrast (DSC) MRI or dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI for predicting the patient outcome and analyzing the anti-angiogenic effect of bevacizumab by performing a systematic search of MEDLINE and EMBASE. The relative cerebral volume (rCBV) of DSC-MRI is currently the most common perfusion MRI parameter used as a predictive/prognostic biomarker. Pooled hazard ratios between responders and non-responders, as determined by rCBV, were 0.46 (95 % CI 0.28-0.76) for progression-free survival from five articles with a total 226 patients and 0.47 (95 % CI 0.29-0.76) for overall survival from six articles with a total 247 patients, and thus indicating that rCBV is helpful for predicting disease progression and the eventual outcome after treatment. Regarding the pharmacodynamic value of perfusion MRI parameters derived from either DSC-MRI or DCE-MRI, most perfusion MRI parameters (rCBV, Ktrans, CBVmax, Kpsmax, fpv, Ve and Kep) demonstrated a consistent decrease on the follow-up MRI after treatment, indicating that perfusion MRI may be helpful for evaluating the anti-angiogenic effect of a bevacizumab-based treatment regimen. However, the lack of standardization of imaging acquisition and analysis techniques for various perfusion MRI parameters needs to be resolved in the future. Despite these unsolved issues, the current evidence favoring the use of perfusion MRI as a predictive/prognostic or pharmacodynamic biomarker should be considered in patients with glioma treated using a bevacizumab-based regimen.

  14. Assesment of perfusion in glial tumors with arterial spin labeling; comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast method.

    PubMed

    Cebeci, H; Aydin, O; Ozturk-Isik, E; Gumus, C; Inecikli, F; Bekar, A; Kocaeli, H; Hakyemez, B

    2014-10-01

    Arterial spin labeling perfusion imaging (ASL-PI) is a non-invasive perfusion imaging method that can be used for evaluation and quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Aim of our study was to evaluating the efficiency of ASL in histopathological grade estimation of glial tumors and comparing findings with dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion imaging (DSC-PI) method. This study involved 33 patients (20 high-grade and 13 low-grade gliomas). Multiphase multislice pulsed ASL MRI sequence and a first-passage gadopentetate dimeglumine T2*-weighted gradient-echo single-shot echo-planar sequence were acquired for all the patients. For each patient, perfusion relative signal intensity (rSI), CBF and relative CBF (rCBF) on ASL-PI and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) values on DSC-PI were determined. The relative signal intensity of each tumor was determined as the maximal SI within the tumor divided by SI within symetric region in the contralateral hemisphere on ASL-PI. rCBV and rCBF were calculated by deconvolution of an arterial input function. Relative values of the lesions were obtained by dividing the values to the normal appearing symmetric region on the contralateral hemisphere. For statistical analysis, Mann-Whitney ranksum test was carried out. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the relationship between the rCBF-ASL, rSI-ASL, rCBV and rCBF ratios and grade of gliomas. Their cut-off values permitting best discrimination was calculated. The correlation between rCBV, rCBF, rSI-ASL and rCBF-ASL and glioma grade was assessed using Spearman correlation analysis. There was a statistically significant difference between low and high-grade tumors for all parameters. Correlation analyses revealed significant positive correlations between rCBV and rCBF-ASL (r=0.81, p<0.001). However correlation between rCBF and rCBF-ASL was weaker (r=0.64, p<0.001). Arterial spin labeling is an

  15. Fundamentals of tracer kinetics for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Koh, Tong San; Bisdas, Sotirios; Koh, Dow Mu; Thng, Choon Hua

    2011-12-01

    Tracer kinetic methods employed for quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) share common roots with earlier tracer studies involving arterial-venous sampling and other dynamic imaging modalities. This article reviews the essential foundation concepts and principles in tracer kinetics that are relevant to DCE MRI, including the notions of impulse response and convolution, which are central to the analysis of DCE MRI data. We further examine the formulation and solutions of various compartmental models frequently used in the literature. Topics of recent interest in the processing of DCE MRI data, such as the account of water exchange and the use of reference tissue methods to obviate the measurement of an arterial input, are also discussed. Although the primary focus of this review is on the tracer models and methods for T(1) -weighted DCE MRI, some of these concepts and methods are also applicable for analysis of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI data.

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted perfusion MRI (DSC-MRI) in a glioma model of the rat brain using a conventional receive-only surface coil with a inner diameter of 47 mm at a clinical 1.5 T scanner.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, Stephan; Reeh, Matthias; Krause, Joerg; Herdegen, Thomas; Heldt-Feindt, Janka; Jansen, Olav; Rohr, Axel

    2008-07-30

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in animal models is usually performed in expensive dedicated small bore animal scanners of limited availability. In the present study a standard clinical 1.5 T MR scanner was used for morphometric and dynamic contrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted MR imaging (DSC-MRI) of a glioma model of the rat brain. Ten male Wistar rats were examined with coronal T2-weighted, and T1-weighted images (matrix 128 x 128, FOV 64 mm) after implantation of an intracerebral tumor xenografts (C6) using a conventional surface coil. For DSC-MRI a T2*-weighted sequence (TR/TE=30/14 ms, matrix 64 x 64, FOV 90 mm; slice thickness of 1.5mm) was performed. Regions of interest were defined within the tumor and the non-affected contralateral hemisphere and the mean transit time (MTT) was determined. Tumor dimensions in MR predicted well its real size as proven by histology. The MTT of contrast agent passing through the brain was significantly decelerated in the tumor compared to the unaffected hemisphere (p<0.001, paired t-test), which is most likely due to the leakage of contrast agent through the disrupted blood brain barrier. This setup offers advanced MR imaging of small animals without the need for dedicated animal scanners or dedicated custom-made coils.

  17. Perfusion MRI in hips with metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Anwander, H.; Cron, G. O.; Rakhra, K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hips with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MoM THA) have a high rate of adverse local tissue reactions (ALTR), often associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) measures tissue perfusion with the parameter Ktrans (volume transfer constant of contrast agent). Our purpose was 1) to evaluate the feasibility of DCE-MRI in patients with THA and 2) to compare DCE-MRI in patients with MoM bearings with metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) bearings, hypothesising that the perfusion index Ktrans in hips with MoM THA is higher than in hips with MoP THA. Methods In this pilot study, 16 patients with primary THA were recruited (eight MoM, eight MoP). DCE-MRI of the hip was performed at 1.5 Tesla (T). For each patient, Ktrans was computed voxel-by-voxel in all tissue lateral to the bladder. The mean Ktrans for all voxels was then calculated. These values were compared with respect to implant type and gender, and further correlated with clinical parameters. Results There was no significant difference between the two bearing types with both genders combined. However, dividing patients by THA bearing and gender, women with MoM bearings had the highest Ktrans values, exceeding those of women with MoP bearings (0.067 min−1 versus 0.053 min−1; p-value < 0.05) and men with MoM bearings (0.067 min−1 versus 0.034 min−1; p-value < 0.001). Considering only the men, patients with MoM bearings had lower Ktrans than those with MoP bearings (0.034 min−1 versus 0.046 min−1; p < 0.05). Conclusion DCE-MRI is feasible to perform in tissues surrounding THA. Females with MoM THA show high Ktrans values in DCE-MRI, suggesting altered tissue perfusion kinematics which may reflect relatively greater inflammation. Cite this article: Dr P. E. Beaule. Perfusion MRI in hips with metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty: A pilot stud. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:73–79. DOI: 10

  18. Exceedingly small iron oxide nanoparticles as positive MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Wei, He; Bruns, Oliver T; Kaul, Michael G; Hansen, Eric C; Barch, Mariya; Wiśniowska, Agata; Chen, Ou; Chen, Yue; Li, Nan; Okada, Satoshi; Cordero, Jose M; Heine, Markus; Farrar, Christian T; Montana, Daniel M; Adam, Gerhard; Ittrich, Harald; Jasanoff, Alan; Nielsen, Peter; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2017-02-28

    Medical imaging is routine in the diagnosis and staging of a wide range of medical conditions. In particular, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is critical for visualizing soft tissue and organs, with over 60 million MRI procedures performed each year worldwide. About one-third of these procedures are contrast-enhanced MRI, and gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are the mainstream MRI contrast agents used in the clinic. GBCAs have shown efficacy and are safe to use with most patients; however, some GBCAs have a small risk of adverse effects, including nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), the untreatable condition recently linked to gadolinium (Gd) exposure during MRI with contrast. In addition, Gd deposition in the human brain has been reported following contrast, and this is now under investigation by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To address a perceived need for a Gd-free contrast agent with pharmacokinetic and imaging properties comparable to GBCAs, we have designed and developed zwitterion-coated exceedingly small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (ZES-SPIONs) consisting of ∼3-nm inorganic cores and ∼1-nm ultrathin hydrophilic shell. These ZES-SPIONs are free of Gd and show a high T1 contrast power. We demonstrate the potential of ZES-SPIONs in preclinical MRI and magnetic resonance angiography.

  19. Exceedingly small iron oxide nanoparticles as positive MRI contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Wei, He; Bruns, Oliver T.; Kaul, Michael G.; Hansen, Eric C.; Barch, Mariya; Wiśniowska, Agata; Chen, Ou; Chen, Yue; Li, Nan; Okada, Satoshi; Cordero, Jose M.; Heine, Markus; Farrar, Christian T.; Montana, Daniel M.; Adam, Gerhard; Ittrich, Harald; Jasanoff, Alan; Nielsen, Peter; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2017-01-01

    Medical imaging is routine in the diagnosis and staging of a wide range of medical conditions. In particular, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is critical for visualizing soft tissue and organs, with over 60 million MRI procedures performed each year worldwide. About one-third of these procedures are contrast-enhanced MRI, and gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are the mainstream MRI contrast agents used in the clinic. GBCAs have shown efficacy and are safe to use with most patients; however, some GBCAs have a small risk of adverse effects, including nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), the untreatable condition recently linked to gadolinium (Gd) exposure during MRI with contrast. In addition, Gd deposition in the human brain has been reported following contrast, and this is now under investigation by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To address a perceived need for a Gd-free contrast agent with pharmacokinetic and imaging properties comparable to GBCAs, we have designed and developed zwitterion-coated exceedingly small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (ZES-SPIONs) consisting of ∼3-nm inorganic cores and ∼1-nm ultrathin hydrophilic shell. These ZES-SPIONs are free of Gd and show a high T1 contrast power. We demonstrate the potential of ZES-SPIONs in preclinical MRI and magnetic resonance angiography. PMID:28193901

  20. Qualitative and semi-quantitative evaluation of myocardium perfusion with 3 T stress cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chun-Ho; Tsai, Jui-Peng; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Mok, Greta S P; Sun, Jing-Yi; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Huang, Wu-Ta; Yang, Fei-Shih; Lee, Jason Jeun-Shenn; Cury, Ricardo C; Fares, Anas; Nshisso, Lemba Dina; Bezerra, Hiram G

    2015-12-07

    3 T MRI has been adopted by some centers as the primary choice for assessment of myocardial perfusion over conventional 1.5 T MRI. However, there is no data published on the potential additional value of incorporating semi-quantitative data from 3 T MRI. This study sought to determine the performance of qualitative 3 T stress magnetic resonance myocardial perfusion imaging (3 T-MRMPI) and the potential incremental benefit of using a semi-quantitative perfusion technique in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Fifty eight patients (41 men; mean age: 59 years) referred for elective diagnostic angiography underwent stress 3 T MRMPI with a 32-channel cardiac receiver coil. The MR protocol included gadolinium-enhanced stress first-pass perfusion (0.56 mg/kg, dipyridamole), rest perfusion, and delayed enhancement (DE). Visual analysis was performed in two steps. Ischemia was defined as a territory with perfusion defect at stress study but no DE or a territory with DE but additional peri-infarcted perfusion defect at stress study. Semi-quantitative analysis was calculated by using the upslope of the signal intensity-time curve during the first pass of contrast medium during dipyridamole stress and at rest. ROC analysis was used to determine the MPRI threshold that maximized sensitivity. Quantitative coronary angiography served as the reference standard with significant stenosis defined as >70 % diameter stenosis. Diagnostic performance was determined on a per-patient and per-vessel basis. Qualitative assessment had an overall sensitivity and specificity for detecting significant stenoses of 77 % and 80 %, respectively. By adding MPRI analysis, in cases with negative qualitative assessment, the overall sensitivity increased to 83 %. The impact of MPRI differed depending on the territory; with the sensitivity for detection of left circumflex (LCx) stenosis improving the most after semi-quantification analysis, (66 % versus 83 %). Pure

  1. Estimation of contrast agent bolus arrival delays for improved reproducibility of liver DCE MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, Manil D.; Bainbridge, Alan; Atkinson, David; Punwani, Shonit; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P.; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Taylor, Stuart A.

    2016-10-01

    Delays between contrast agent (CA) arrival at the site of vascular input function (VIF) sampling and the tissue of interest affect dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI pharmacokinetic modelling. We investigate effects of altering VIF CA bolus arrival delays on liver DCE MRI perfusion parameters, propose an alternative approach to estimating delays and evaluate reproducibility. Thirteen healthy volunteers (28.7  ±  1.9 years, seven males) underwent liver DCE MRI using dual-input single compartment modelling, with reproducibility (n  =  9) measured at 7 days. Effects of VIF CA bolus arrival delays were assessed for arterial and portal venous input functions. Delays were pre-estimated using linear regression, with restricted free modelling around the pre-estimated delay. Perfusion parameters and 7 days reproducibility were compared using this method, freely modelled delays and no delays using one-way ANOVA. Reproducibility was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis of agreement. Maximum percent change relative to parameters obtained using zero delays, were  -31% for portal venous (PV) perfusion, +43% for total liver blood flow (TLBF), +3247% for hepatic arterial (HA) fraction, +150% for mean transit time and  -10% for distribution volume. Differences were demonstrated between the 3 methods for PV perfusion (p  =  0.0085) and HA fraction (p  <  0.0001), but not other parameters. Improved mean differences and Bland-Altman 95% Limits-of-Agreement for reproducibility of PV perfusion (9.3 ml/min/100 g, ±506.1 ml/min/100 g) and TLBF (43.8 ml/min/100 g, ±586.7 ml/min/100 g) were demonstrated using pre-estimated delays with constrained free modelling. CA bolus arrival delays cause profound differences in liver DCE MRI quantification. Pre-estimation of delays with constrained free modelling improved 7 days reproducibility of perfusion parameters in volunteers.

  2. Non-ECG-gated myocardial perfusion MRI using continuous magnetization-driven radial sampling.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Behzad; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Arsanjani, Reza; Thomson, Louise; Bairey Merz, C Noel; Berman, Daniel S; Li, Debiao

    2014-12-01

    Establishing a high-resolution non-ECG-gated first-pass perfusion (FPP) cardiac MRI technique may improve accessibility and diagnostic capability of FPP imaging. We propose a non-ECG-gated FPP imaging technique using continuous magnetization-driven golden-angle radial acquisition. The main purpose of this preliminary study is to evaluate whether, in the simple case of single-slice two-dimensional imaging, adequate myocardial contrast can be obtained for accurate visualization of hypoperfused territories in the setting of myocardial ischemia. A T1-weighted pulse sequence with continuous golden-angle radial sampling was developed for non-ECG-gated FPP imaging. A sliding-window scheme with no temporal acceleration was used to reconstruct 8 frames/s. Canines were imaged at 3T with and without coronary stenosis using the proposed scheme and a conventional magnetization-prepared ECG-gated FPP method. Our studies showed that the proposed non-ECG-gated method is capable of generating high-resolution (1.7 × 1.7 × 6 mm(3) ) artifact-free FPP images of a single slice at high heart rates (92 ± 21 beats/min), while matching the performance of conventional FPP imaging in terms of hypoperfused-to-normal myocardial contrast-to-noise ratio (proposed: 5.18 ± 0.70, conventional: 4.88 ± 0.43). Furthermore, the detected perfusion defect areas were consistent with the conventional FPP images. Non-ECG-gated FPP imaging using optimized continuous golden-angle radial acquisition achieves desirable image quality (i.e., adequate myocardial contrast, high spatial resolution, and minimal artifacts) in the setting of ischemia. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Non-ECG-Gated Myocardial Perfusion MRI Using Continuous Magnetization-Driven Radial Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Behzad; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Arsanjani, Reza; Thomson, Louise; Merz, C. Noel Bairey; Berman, Daniel S.; Li, Debiao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Establishing a high-resolution non-ECG-gated first-pass perfusion (FPP) cardiac MRI technique may improve accessibility and diagnostic capability of FPP imaging. We propose a non-ECG-gated FPP imaging technique using continuous magnetization-driven golden-angle radial acquisition. The main purpose of this preliminary study is to evaluate whether, in the simple case of single-slice 2D imaging, adequate myocardial contrast can be obtained for accurate visualization of hypoperfused territories in the setting of myocardial ischemia. Methods A T1-weighted pulse sequence with continuous golden-angle radial sampling was developed for non-ECG-gated FPP imaging. A sliding-window scheme with no temporal acceleration was used to reconstruct 8 frames/second. Canines were imaged at 3T with and without coronary stenosis using the proposed scheme and a conventional magnetization-prepared ECG-gated FPP method. Results Our studies showed that the proposed non-ECG-gated method is capable of generating high-resolution (1.7×1.7×6 mm3) artifact-free FPP images of a single slice at high heart rates (92±21 beats/minute), while matching the performance of conventional FPP imaging in terms of hypoperfused-to-normal myocardial contrast-to-noise ratio (proposed: 5.18±0.70, conventional: 4.88±0.43). Furthermore, the detected perfusion defect areas were consistent with the conventional FPP images. Conclusion Non-ECG-gated FPP imaging using optimized continuous golden-angle radial acquisition achieves desirable image quality (i.e., adequate myocardial contrast, high spatial resolution, and minimal artifacts) in the setting of ischemia. PMID:24443160

  4. Optimized time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS) in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in small animal tumor models.

    PubMed

    Haeck, Joost; Bol, Karin; Bison, Sander; van Tiel, Sandra; Koelewijn, Stuart; de Jong, Marion; Veenland, Jifke; Bernsen, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor efficacy of targeted peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) relies on several factors, including functional tumor vasculature. Little is known about the effect of PRRT on tumor vasculature. With dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI, functional vasculature is imaged and quantified using contrast agents. In small animals DCE-MRI is a challenging application. We optimized a clinical sequence for fast hemodynamic acquisitions, time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS), to obtain DCE-MRI images at both high spatial and high temporal resolution in mice and rats. Using TRICKS, functional vasculature was measured prior to PRRT and longitudinally to investigate the effect of treatment on tumor vascular characteristics. Nude mice bearing H69 tumor xenografts and rats bearing syngeneic CA20948 tumors were used to study perfusion following PRRT administration with (177) lutetium octreotate. Both semi-quantitative and quantitative parameters were calculated. Treatment efficacy was measured by tumor-size reduction. Optimized TRICKS enabled MRI at 0.032 mm(3) voxel size with a temporal resolution of less than 5 s and large volume coverage, a substantial improvement over routine pre-clinical DCE-MRI studies. Tumor response to therapy was reflected in changes in tumor perfusion/permeability parameters. The H69 tumor model showed pronounced changes in DCE-derived parameters following PRRT. The rat CA20948 tumor model showed more heterogeneity in both treatment outcome and perfusion parameters. TRICKS enabled the acquisition of DCE-MRI at both high temporal resolution (Tres ) and spatial resolutions relevant for small animal tumor models. With the high Tres enabled by TRICKS, accurate pharmacokinetic data modeling was feasible. DCE-MRI parameters revealed changes over time and showed a clear relationship between tumor size and Ktrans .

  5. An Arterial Spin Labeling MRI Perfusion Study of Migraine without Aura Attacks.

    PubMed

    Gil-Gouveia, Raquel; Pinto, Joana; Figueiredo, Patricia; Vilela, Pedro Ferro; Martins, Isabel Pavão

    2017-01-01

    Studies of brain perfusion during migraine without aura attacks have inconsistent results. Arterial spin labeling MRI, a non-invasive quantitative perfusion technique, was used to prospectively study a spontaneous untreated migraine without aura attack and a headache-free period. Image analysis used FSL and MATLAB software; Group analysis used permutation methods for perfusion differences between sessions. Thirteen women (age 35.7) were scanned during an attack of an average intensity of 6.8 (on 0-10 Visual Analog Scale) and 16 h duration. No global or regional perfusion differences were identified when comparing migraine and migraine-free sessions. Our findings suggest that the painful phase of migraine without aura attacks is not associated with brain perfusion abnormalities.

  6. Evaluation of Feline Renal Perfusion with Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography and Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Vanderperren, Katrien; Bosmans, Tim; Dobbeleir, André; Duchateau, Luc; Hesta, Myriam; Lybaert, Lien; Peremans, Kathelijne; Vandermeulen, Eva; Saunders, Jimmy

    2016-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is an emerging technique to evaluate tissue perfusion. Promising results have been obtained in the evaluation of renal perfusion in health and disease, both in human and veterinary medicine. Renal scintigraphy using 99mTc-Mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) is another non-invasive technique that can be used to evaluate renal perfusion. However, no data are available on the ability of CEUS or 99mTc- MAG3 scintigraphy to detect small changes in renal perfusion in cats. Therefore, both techniques were applied in a normal feline population to evaluate detection possibilities of perfusion changes by angiotensin II (AT II). Contrast-enhanced ultrasound using a bolus injection of commercially available contrast agent and renal scintigraphy using 99mTc-MAG3 were performed in 11 healthy cats after infusion of 0,9% NaCl (control) and AT II. Angiotensin II induced changes were noticed on several CEUS parameters. Mean peak enhancement, wash-in perfusion index and wash-out rate for the entire kidney decreased significantly after AT II infusion. Moreover, a tendency towards a lower wash-in area-under-the curve was present. Renal scintigraphy could not detect perfusion changes induced by AT II. This study shows that CEUS is able to detect changes in feline renal perfusion induced by AT II infusion. PMID:27736928

  7. Continuous ASL (CASL) perfusion MRI with an array coil and parallel imaging at 3T.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ze; Wang, Jiongjiong; Connick, Thomas J; Wetmore, Gabriel S; Detre, John A

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of using an array coil and parallel imaging in continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) perfusion MRI. An 8-channel receive-only array head coil was used in conjunction with a surrounding detunable volume transmit coil. The signal to noise ratio (SNR), temporal stability, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and perfusion image coverage were measured from steady state CASL scans using: a standard volume coil, array coil, and array coil with 2- and 3-fold accelerated parallel imaging. Compared to the standard volume coil, the array coil provided 3 times the average SNR increase and higher temporal stability for the perfusion weighted images, even with threefold acceleration. Although perfusion images of the array coil were affected by the inhomogeneous coil sensitivities, this effect was invisible in the quantitative CBF images, which showed highly reproducible perfusion values compared to the standard volume coil. The unfolding distortions of parallel imaging were suppressed in the perfusion images by pairwise subtraction, though they sharply degraded the raw EPI images. Moreover, parallel imaging provided the potential of acquiring more slices due to the shortened acquisition time and improved coverage in brain regions with high static field inhomogeneity. Such results highlight the potential utility of array coils and parallel imaging in ASL perfusion MRI. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Optimization of flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) for perfusion functional MRI of rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Fatima A; Lee, Eugene L Q; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang

    2012-11-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI provides a noninvasive method to image perfusion, and has been applied to map neural activation in the brain. Although pulsed labeling methods have been widely used in humans, continuous ASL with a dedicated neck labeling coil is still the preferred method in rodent brain functional MRI (fMRI) to maximize the sensitivity and allow multislice acquisition. However, the additional hardware is not readily available and hence its application is limited. In this study, flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) pulsed ASL was optimized for fMRI of rat brain. A practical challenge of FAIR is the suboptimal global inversion by the transmit coil of limited dimensions, which results in low effective labeling. By using a large volume transmit coil and proper positioning to optimize the body coverage, the perfusion signal was increased by 38.3% compared with positioning the brain at the isocenter. An additional 53.3% gain in signal was achieved using optimized repetition and inversion times compared with a long TR. Under electrical stimulation to the forepaws, a perfusion activation signal change of 63.7 ± 6.3% can be reliably detected in the primary somatosensory cortices using single slice or multislice echo planar imaging at 9.4 T. This demonstrates the potential of using pulsed ASL for multislice perfusion fMRI in functional and pharmacological applications in rat brain.

  9. Validation of Perfusion Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Blood Pool Contrast Agent in Skeletal Swine Muscle.

    PubMed

    Hindel, Stefan; Sauerbrey, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Maderwald, Stefan; Schlamann, Marc; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to validate perfusion quantification in a low-perfused tissue by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with shared k-space sampling using a blood pool contrast agent. Perfusion measurements were performed in a total of seven female pigs. An ultrasonic Doppler probe was attached to the right femoral artery to determine total flow in the hind leg musculature. The femoral artery was catheterized for continuous local administration of adenosine to increase blood flow up to four times the baseline level. Three different stable perfusion levels were induced. The MR protocol included a 3D gradient-echo sequence with a temporal resolution of approximately 1.5 seconds. Before each dynamic sequence, static MR images were acquired with flip angles of 5°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Both static and dynamic images were used to generate relaxation rate and baseline magnetization maps with a flip angle method. 0.1 mL/kg body weight of blood pool contrast medium was injected via a central venous catheter at a flow rate of 5 mL/s. The right hind leg was segmented in 3D into medial, cranial, lateral, and pelvic thigh muscles, lower leg, bones, skin, and fat. The arterial input function (AIF) was measured in the aorta. Perfusion of the different anatomic regions was calculated using a one- and a two-compartment model with delay- and dispersion-corrected AIFs. The F-test for model comparison was used to decide whether to use the results of the one- or two-compartment model fit. Total flow was calculated by integrating volume-weighted perfusion values over the whole measured region. The resulting values of delay, dispersion, blood volume, mean transit time, and flow were all in physiologically and physically reasonable ranges. In 107 of 160 ROIs, the blood signal was separated, using a two-compartment model, into a capillary and an arteriolar signal contribution, decided by the F-test. Overall flow in hind leg muscles, as measured by the

  10. Validation of Perfusion Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Blood Pool Contrast Agent in Skeletal Swine Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hindel, Stefan; Sauerbrey, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Maderwald, Stefan; Schlamann, Marc; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to validate perfusion quantification in a low-perfused tissue by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with shared k-space sampling using a blood pool contrast agent. Perfusion measurements were performed in a total of seven female pigs. An ultrasonic Doppler probe was attached to the right femoral artery to determine total flow in the hind leg musculature. The femoral artery was catheterized for continuous local administration of adenosine to increase blood flow up to four times the baseline level. Three different stable perfusion levels were induced. The MR protocol included a 3D gradient-echo sequence with a temporal resolution of approximately 1.5 seconds. Before each dynamic sequence, static MR images were acquired with flip angles of 5°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Both static and dynamic images were used to generate relaxation rate and baseline magnetization maps with a flip angle method. 0.1 mL/kg body weight of blood pool contrast medium was injected via a central venous catheter at a flow rate of 5 mL/s. The right hind leg was segmented in 3D into medial, cranial, lateral, and pelvic thigh muscles, lower leg, bones, skin, and fat. The arterial input function (AIF) was measured in the aorta. Perfusion of the different anatomic regions was calculated using a one- and a two-compartment model with delay- and dispersion-corrected AIFs. The F-test for model comparison was used to decide whether to use the results of the one- or two-compartment model fit. Total flow was calculated by integrating volume-weighted perfusion values over the whole measured region. The resulting values of delay, dispersion, blood volume, mean transit time, and flow were all in physiologically and physically reasonable ranges. In 107 of 160 ROIs, the blood signal was separated, using a two-compartment model, into a capillary and an arteriolar signal contribution, decided by the F-test. Overall flow in hind leg muscles, as measured by the

  11. Estimating myocardial perfusion from dynamic contrast-enhanced CMR with a model-independent deconvolution method

    PubMed Central

    Pack, Nathan A; DiBella, Edward VR; Rust, Thomas C; Kadrmas, Dan J; McGann, Christopher J; Butterfield, Regan; Christian, Paul E; Hoffman, John M

    2008-01-01

    Background Model-independent analysis with B-spline regularization has been used to quantify myocardial blood flow (perfusion) in dynamic contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) studies. However, the model-independent approach has not been extensively evaluated to determine how the contrast-to-noise ratio between blood and tissue enhancement affects estimates of myocardial perfusion and the degree to which the regularization is dependent on the noise in the measured enhancement data. We investigated these questions with a model-independent analysis method that uses iterative minimization and a temporal smoothness regularizer. Perfusion estimates using this method were compared to results from dynamic 13N-ammonia PET. Results An iterative model-independent analysis method was developed and tested to estimate regional and pixelwise myocardial perfusion in five normal subjects imaged with a saturation recovery turboFLASH sequence at 3 T CMR. Estimates of myocardial perfusion using model-independent analysis are dependent on the choice of the regularization weight parameter, which increases nonlinearly to handle large decreases in the contrast-to-noise ratio of the measured tissue enhancement data. Quantitative perfusion estimates in five subjects imaged with 3 T CMR were 1.1 ± 0.8 ml/min/g at rest and 3.1 ± 1.7 ml/min/g at adenosine stress. The perfusion estimates correlated with dynamic 13N-ammonia PET (y = 0.90x + 0.24, r = 0.85) and were similar to results from other validated CMR studies. Conclusion This work shows that a model-independent analysis method that uses iterative minimization and temporal regularization can be used to quantify myocardial perfusion with dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion CMR. Results from this method are robust to choices in the regularization weight parameter over relatively large ranges in the contrast-to-noise ratio of the tissue enhancement data. PMID:19014509

  12. Comparison of Different Post-Processing Algorithms for Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion Imaging of Cerebral Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Kohsuke; Uwano, Ikuko; Hirai, Toshinori; Murakami, Ryuji; Nakamura, Hideo; Fujima, Noriyuki; Yamashita, Fumio; Goodwin, Jonathan; Higuchi, Satomi; Sasaki, Makoto

    2017-04-10

    The purpose of the present study was to compare different software algorithms for processing DSC perfusion images of cerebral tumors with respect to i) the relative CBV (rCBV) calculated, ii) the cutoff value for discriminating low- and high-grade gliomas, and iii) the diagnostic performance for differentiating these tumors. Following approval of institutional review board, informed consent was obtained from all patients. Thirty-five patients with primary glioma (grade II, 9; grade III, 8; and grade IV, 18 patients) were included. DSC perfusion imaging was performed with 3-Tesla MRI scanner. CBV maps were generated by using 11 different algorithms of four commercially available software and one academic program. rCBV of each tumor compared to normal white matter was calculated by ROI measurements. Differences in rCBV value were compared between algorithms for each tumor grade. Receiver operator characteristics analysis was conducted for the evaluation of diagnostic performance of different algorithms for differentiating between different grades. Several algorithms showed significant differences in rCBV, especially for grade IV tumors. When differentiating between low- (II) and high-grade (III/IV) tumors, the area under the ROC curve (Az) was similar (range 0.85-0.87), and there were no significant differences in Az between any pair of algorithms. In contrast, the optimal cutoff values varied between algorithms (range 4.18-6.53). rCBV values of tumor and cutoff values for discriminating low- and high-grade gliomas differed between software packages, suggesting that optimal software-specific cutoff values should be used for diagnosis of high-grade gliomas.

  13. Brain/language relationships identified with diffusion and perfusion MRI: Clinical applications in neurology and neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Hillis, Argye E

    2005-12-01

    Diffusion and perfusion MRI have contributed to stroke management by identifying patients with tissue "at risk" for further damage in acute stroke. However, the potential usefulness of these imaging modalities, along with diffusion tensor imaging, can be expanded by using these imaging techniques with concurrent assessment of language and other cognitive skills to identify the specific cognitive deficits that are associated with diffusion and perfusion abnormalities in particular brain regions. This paper illustrates how this combined behavioral and imaging methodology can yield information that is useful for predicting specific positive effects of intervention to restore blood flow in hypoperfused regions of brain identified with perfusion MRI, and for predicting negative effects of resection of particular brain regions or fiber bundles. Such data allow decisions about neurological and neurosurgical interventions to be based on specific risks and benefits in terms of functional consequences.

  14. Biophysical mechanisms of MRI signal frequency contrast in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.; Luo, Jie; Sukstanskii, Alexander L.; Iyer, Aditi; Cross, Anne H.

    2012-01-01

    Phase images obtained with gradient echo MRI provide image contrast distinct from T1- and T2-weighted images. It is commonly assumed that the local contribution to MRI signal phase directly relates to local bulk tissue magnetic susceptibility. Here, we use Maxwell’s equations and Monte Carlo simulations to provide theoretical background to the hypothesis that the local contribution to MRI signal phase does not depend on tissue bulk magnetic susceptibility but tissue magnetic architecture—distribution of magnetic susceptibility inclusions (lipids, proteins, iron, etc.) at the cellular and subcellular levels. Specifically, we show that the regular longitudinal structures forming cylindrical axons (myelin sheaths and neurofilaments) can be locally invisible in phase images. Contrary to an expectation that the phase contrast in multiple sclerosis lesions should always increase in degree along with worsening of lesion severity (which happens for all known MR magnitude-based contrast mechanisms), we show that phase contrast can actually disappear with extreme tissue destruction. We also show that the phase contrast in multiple sclerosis lesions could be altered without loss of nervous system tissue, which happens in mild injury to the myelin sheaths or axonal neurofilaments. Moreover, we predict that the sign of phase contrast in multiple sclerosis lesions indicates the predominant type of tissue injury—myelin damage (positive sign) vs. axonal neurofilament damage (negative sign). Therefore, our theoretical and experimental results shed light on understanding the relationship between gradient echo MRI signal phase and multiple sclerosis pathology. PMID:22891307

  15. Contrast-enhanced MRI of murine myocardial infarction - part II.

    PubMed

    Coolen, Bram F; Paulis, Leonie E M; Geelen, Tessa; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2012-08-01

    Mouse models are increasingly used to study the pathophysiology of myocardial infarction in vivo. In this area, MRI has become the gold standard imaging modality, because it combines high spatial and temporal resolution functional imaging with a large variety of methods to generate soft tissue contrast. In addition, (target-specific) MRI contrast agents can be employed to visualize different processes in the cascade of events following myocardial infarction. Here, the MRI sequence has a decisive role in the detection sensitivity of a contrast agent. However, a straightforward translation of clinically available protocols for human cardiac imaging to mice is not feasible, because of the small size of the mouse heart and its extremely high heart rate. This has stimulated intense research in the development of cardiac MRI protocols specifically tuned to the mouse with regard to timing parameters, acquisition strategies, and ECG- and respiratory-triggering methods to find an optimal trade-off between sensitivity, scan time, and image quality. In this review, a detailed analysis is given of the pros and cons of different mouse cardiac MR imaging methodologies and their application in contrast-enhanced MRI of myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Validation of diffuse correlation spectroscopy for muscle blood flow with concurrent arterial spin labeled perfusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guoqiang; Floyd, Thomas F.; Durduran, Turgut; Zhou, Chao; Wang, Jiongjiong; Detre, John A.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2007-02-01

    Calf blood flow was measured simultaneously in healthy human subjects (n = 7) during cuff inflation and deflation using near-infrared diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) and arterial spin labeled perfusion MRI (ASL-MRI). The DCS and ASL-MRI data exhibited highly correlated absolute and relative dynamic flow responses in each individual (p < 0.001). Peak flow variations during hyperemia were also significantly correlated, though more for relative (p = 0.003) than absolute (p = 0.016) flow. Repeated measurement variation was less than 8% for both modalities. The results provide much needed quantitative blood flow validation of the diffuse optical correlation method in humans.

  17. DCE-MRI Perfusion and Permeability Parameters as predictors of tumor response to CCRT in Patients with locally advanced NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xiuli; Wang, Lvhua; Hui, Zhouguang; Liu, Li; Ye, Feng; Song, Ying; Tang, Yu; Men, Yu; Lambrou, Tryphon; Su, Zihua; Xu, Xiao; Ouyang, Han; Wu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    In this prospective study, 36 patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), who underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) before concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) were enrolled. Pharmacokinetic analysis was carried out after non-rigid motion registration. The perfusion parameters [including Blood Flow (BF), Blood Volume (BV), Mean Transit Time (MTT)] and permeability parameters [including endothelial transfer constant (Ktrans), reflux rate (Kep), fractional extravascular extracellular space volume (Ve), fractional plasma volume (Vp)] were calculated, and their relationship with tumor regression was evaluated. The value of these parameters on predicting responders were calculated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to find the independent variables. Tumor regression rate is negatively correlated with Ve and its standard variation Ve_SD and positively correlated with Ktrans and Kep. Significant differences between responders and non-responders existed in Ktrans, Kep, Ve, Ve_SD, MTT, BV_SD and MTT_SD (P < 0.05). ROC indicated that Ve < 0.24 gave the largest area under curve of 0.865 to predict responders. Multivariate logistic regression analysis also showed Ve was a significant predictor. Baseline perfusion and permeability parameters calculated from DCE-MRI were seen to be a viable tool for predicting the early treatment response after CCRT of NSCLC. PMID:27762331

  18. Functional Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the Assessment of Myocardial Viability and Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness safety and cost-effectiveness of using functional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction. Results Functional MRI has become increasingly investigated as a noninvasive method for assessing myocardial viability and perfusion. Most patients in the published literature have mild to moderate impaired LV function. It is possible that the severity of LV dysfunction may be an important factor that can alter the diagnostic accuracy of imaging techniques. There is some evidence of comparable or better performance of functional cardiac MRI for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion compared with other imaging techniques. However limitations to most of the studies included: Functional cardiac MRI studies that assess myocardial viability and perfusion have had small sample sizes. Some studies assessed myocardial viability/perfusion in patients who had already undergone revascularization, or excluded patients with a prior MI (Schwitter et al., 2001). Lack of explicit detail of patient recruitment. Patients with LVEF >35%. Interstudy variability in post MI imaging time(including acute or chronic MI), when patients with a prior MI were included. Poor interobserver agreement (kappa statistic) in the interpretation of the results. Traditionally, 0.80 is considered “good”. Cardiac MRI measurement of myocardial perfusion to as an adjunct tool to help diagnose CAD (prior to a definitive coronary angiography) has also been examined in some studies, with methodological limitations, yielding comparable results. Many studies examining myocardial viability and perfusion report on the accuracy of imaging methods with limited data on long-term patient outcome and management. Kim et al. (2000) revealed that the transmural

  19. A review of responsive MRI contrast agents: 2005–2014

    PubMed Central

    Hingorani, Dina V.; Bernstein, Adam S.; Pagel, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on MRI contrast agents that are responsive to a change in a physiological biomarker. The response mechanisms are dependent on six physicochemical characteristics, including the accessibility of water to the agent, tumbling time, proton exchange rate, electron spin state, MR frequency, or superparamagnetism of the agent. These characteristics can be affected by changes in concentrations or activities of enzymes, proteins, nucleic acids, metabolites, or metal ions, or changes in redox state, pH, temperature, or light. A total of 117 examples are presented, including examples that employ nuclei other than 1H, which attests to the creativity of multidisciplinary research efforts to develop responsive MRI contrast agents. PMID:25355685

  20. [Method for Extracting Vascular Perfusion Region Based on Ultrasound Contrast Agent].

    PubMed

    Shan, Xin; Wen, Yingang; Lin, Tao; Zhu, Xinjian

    2015-10-01

    Vascular perfusion distribution in fibroids contrast-enhanced ultrasound images provides useful pathological and physiological information, because the extraction of the vascular perfusion area can be helpful to quantitative evaluation of uterine fibroids blood supply. The pixel gray scale in vascular perfusion area of fibroids contrast-enhanced ultrasound image sequences is different from that in other regions, and, based on this, we proposed a method of extracting vascular perfusion area of fibroids. Firstly, we denoised the image sequence, and then we used Brox optical flow method to estimate motion of two adjacent frames, based on the results of the displacement field for motion correction. Finally, we extracted vascular perfusion region from the surrounding background based on the differences in gray scale for the magnitude of the rich blood supply area and lack of blood supply area in ultrasound images sequence. The experimental results showed that the algorithm could accurately extract the vascular perfusion area, reach the precision of identification of clinical perfusion area, and only small amount of calculation was needed and the process was fairly simple.

  1. Uncertainty in the analysis of tracer kinetics using dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI.

    PubMed

    Buckley, David L

    2002-03-01

    In recent years a number of physiological models have gained prominence in the analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI data. However, there remains little evidence to support their use in estimating the absolute values of tissue physiological parameters such as perfusion, capillary permeability, and blood volume. In an attempt to address this issue, data were simulated using a distributed pathway model of tracer kinetics, and three published models were fitted to the resultant concentration-time curves. Parameter estimates obtained from these fits were compared with the parameters used for the simulations. The results indicate that the use of commonly accepted models leads to systematic overestimation of the transfer constant, Ktrans, and potentially large underestimates of the blood plasma volume fraction, Vp. In summary, proposals for a practical approach to physiological modeling using MRI data are outlined.

  2. Tumor classification using perfusion volume fractions in breast DCE-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Jong Hyo; Park, Jeong Seon; Park, Sang Joon; Jung, Yun Sub; Song, Jung Joo; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2008-03-01

    This study was designed to classify contrast enhancement curves using both three-time-points (3TP) method and clustering approach at full-time points, and to introduce a novel evaluation method using perfusion volume fractions for differentiation of malignant and benign lesions. DCE-MRI was applied to 24 lesions (12 malignant, 12 benign). After region growing segmentation for each lesion, hole-filling and 3D morphological erosion and dilation were performed for extracting final lesion volume. 3TP method and k-means clustering at full-time points were applied for classifying kinetic curves into six classes. Intratumoral volume fraction for each class was calculated. ROC and linear discriminant analyses were performed with distributions of the volume fractions for each class, pairwise and whole classes, respectively. The best performance in each class showed accuracy (ACC), 84.7% (sensitivity (SE), 100%; specificity (SP), 66.7% to a single class) to 3TP method, whereas ACC, 73.6% (SE, 41.7%; SP, 100% to a single class) to k-means clustering. The best performance in pairwise classes showed ACC, 75% (SE, 83.3%; SP, 66.7% to four class pairs and SE, 58.3%; SP, 91.7% to a single class pair) to 3TP method and ACC, 75% (SE, 75%; SP, 75% to a single class pair and SE, 66.7%; SP, 83.3% to three class pairs) to k-means clustering. The performance in whole classes showed ACC, 75% (SE, 83.3%; SP, 66.7%) to 3TP method and ACC, 75% (SE, 91.7%; 58.3%) to k-means clustering. The results indicate that tumor classification using perfusion volume fractions is helpful in selecting meaningful kinetic patterns for differentiation of malignant and benign lesions, and that two different classification methods are complementary to each other.

  3. Multiwalled carbon nanotube hybrids as MRI contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Tomczyk, Mateusz Michał

    2016-01-01

    Summary Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the most commonly used tomography techniques in medical diagnosis due to the non-invasive character, the high spatial resolution and the possibility of soft tissue imaging. Contrast agents, such as gadolinium complexes and superparamagnetic iron oxides, are administered to spotlight certain organs and their pathologies. Many new models have been proposed that reduce side effects and required doses of these already clinically approved contrast agents. These new candidates often possess additional functionalities, e.g., the possibility of bioactivation upon action of particular stimuli, thus serving as smart molecular probes, or the coupling with therapeutic agents and therefore combining both a diagnostic and therapeutic role. Nanomaterials have been found to be an excellent scaffold for contrast agents, among which carbon nanotubes offer vast possibilities. The morphology of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), their magnetic and electronic properties, the possibility of different functionalization and the potential to penetrate cell membranes result in a unique and very attractive candidate for a new MRI contrast agent. In this review we describe the different issues connected with MWCNT hybrids designed for MRI contrast agents, i.e., their synthesis and magnetic and dispersion properties, as well as both in vitro and in vivo behavior, which is important for diagnostic purposes. An introduction to MRI contrast agent theory is elaborated here in order to point to the specific expectations regarding nanomaterials. Finally, we propose a promising, general model of MWCNTs as MRI contrast agent candidates based on the studies presented here and supported by appropriate theories. PMID:27547627

  4. Multiwalled carbon nanotube hybrids as MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Kuźnik, Nikodem; Tomczyk, Mateusz Michał

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the most commonly used tomography techniques in medical diagnosis due to the non-invasive character, the high spatial resolution and the possibility of soft tissue imaging. Contrast agents, such as gadolinium complexes and superparamagnetic iron oxides, are administered to spotlight certain organs and their pathologies. Many new models have been proposed that reduce side effects and required doses of these already clinically approved contrast agents. These new candidates often possess additional functionalities, e.g., the possibility of bioactivation upon action of particular stimuli, thus serving as smart molecular probes, or the coupling with therapeutic agents and therefore combining both a diagnostic and therapeutic role. Nanomaterials have been found to be an excellent scaffold for contrast agents, among which carbon nanotubes offer vast possibilities. The morphology of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), their magnetic and electronic properties, the possibility of different functionalization and the potential to penetrate cell membranes result in a unique and very attractive candidate for a new MRI contrast agent. In this review we describe the different issues connected with MWCNT hybrids designed for MRI contrast agents, i.e., their synthesis and magnetic and dispersion properties, as well as both in vitro and in vivo behavior, which is important for diagnostic purposes. An introduction to MRI contrast agent theory is elaborated here in order to point to the specific expectations regarding nanomaterials. Finally, we propose a promising, general model of MWCNTs as MRI contrast agent candidates based on the studies presented here and supported by appropriate theories.

  5. Resting State Brain Function Analysis Using Concurrent BOLD in ASL Perfusion fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Senhua; Fang, Zhuo; Hu, Siyuan; Wang, Ze; Rao, Hengyi

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has seen astounding discoveries about resting-state brain activity patterns in normal brain as well as their alterations in brain diseases. While the vast majority of resting-state studies are based on the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion fMRI can simultaneously capture BOLD and cerebral blood flow (CBF) signals, providing a unique opportunity for assessing resting brain functions with concurrent BOLD (ccBOLD) and CBF signals. Before taking that benefit, it is necessary to validate the utility of ccBOLD signal for resting-state analysis using conventional BOLD (cvBOLD) signal acquired without ASL modulations. To address this technical issue, resting cvBOLD and ASL perfusion MRI were acquired from a large cohort (n = 89) of healthy subjects. Four widely used resting-state brain function analyses were conducted and compared between the two types of BOLD signal, including the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) seed-based functional connectivity (FC) analysis, independent component analysis (ICA), analysis of amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF), and analysis of regional homogeneity (ReHo). Consistent default mode network (DMN) as well as other resting-state networks (RSNs) were observed from cvBOLD and ccBOLD using PCC-FC analysis and ICA. ALFF from both modalities were the same for most of brain regions but were different in peripheral regions suffering from the susceptibility gradients induced signal drop. ReHo showed difference in many brain regions, likely reflecting the SNR and resolution differences between the two BOLD modalities. The DMN and auditory networks showed highest CBF values among all RSNs. These results demonstrated the feasibility of ASL perfusion MRI for assessing resting brain functions using its concurrent BOLD in addition to CBF signal, which provides a potentially useful way to maximize the utility of ASL perfusion MRI. PMID:23750275

  6. [Contrast-enhanced Ultrasound in Diagnostic Imaging of Muscle Injuries: Perfusion Imaging in the Early Arterial Phase].

    PubMed

    Hotfiel, T; Carl, H D; Swoboda, B; Engelhardt, M; Heinrich, M; Strobel, D; Wildner, D

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound is a standard procedure widely used in the diagnostic investigation of muscle injuries and widely described in the literature. Its advantages include rapid availability, cost effectiveness and the possibility to perform a real-time dynamic examination with the highest possible spatial resolution. In the diagnostic work-up of minor lesions (muscle stiffness, muscle strain), plain ultrasound has so far been inferior to MRI. The case presented by us is an example of the possibilities offered by contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in the imaging of muscle injuries compared with plain B-mode image ultrasound and MRI imaging of the affected region. This case report is about a high-performance football player who sustained a muscle injury. He underwent an ultrasound examination (S 2000, 9L4 Probe, Siemens, Germany), which was performed simultaneously in the conventional and contrast-enhanced mode at the level of the lesion. An intravenous bolus injection of 4.8 ml of intravascular contrast agent (SonoVue(®), Bracco, Italy) was given via a cubital intravenous line. After that, the distribution of contrast agent was visualised in the early arterial phase. In addition, a plain magnetic resonance imaging scan of both thighs was performed for reference. On conventional ultrasound, the lesion was not clearly distinguishable from neighbouring tissue, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound demonstrated a well delineated, circumscribed area of impaired perfusion with hypoenhancement compared with the surrounding muscles at the clinical level of the lesion in the arterial wash-in phase (0-30 sec, after intravenous administration). The MRI scan revealed an edema signal with perifascial fluid accumulation in the corresponding site. The use of intravascular contrast agent enabled the sensitive detection of a minor injury by ultrasound for the first time. An intramuscular edema seen in the MRI scan showed a functional arterial perfusion impairment on ultrasound, which was

  7. Reproducibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI in the study of brain gliomas: a comparison of data obtained using different commercial software.

    PubMed

    Conte, Gian Marco; Castellano, Antonella; Altabella, Luisa; Iadanza, Antonella; Cadioli, Marcello; Falini, Andrea; Anzalone, Nicoletta

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE) are useful tools in the diagnosis and follow-up of brain gliomas; nevertheless, both techniques leave the open issue of data reproducibility. We evaluated the reproducibility of data obtained using two different commercial software for perfusion maps calculation and analysis, as one of the potential sources of variability can be the software itself. DSC and DCE analyses from 20 patients with gliomas were tested for both the intrasoftware (as intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility) and the intersoftware reproducibility, as well as the impact of different postprocessing choices [vascular input function (VIF) selection and deconvolution algorithms] on the quantification of perfusion biomarkers plasma volume (Vp), volume transfer constant (K (trans)) and rCBV. Data reproducibility was evaluated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis. For all the biomarkers, the intra- and interobserver reproducibility resulted in almost perfect agreement in each software, whereas for the intersoftware reproducibility the value ranged from 0.311 to 0.577, suggesting fair to moderate agreement; Bland-Altman analysis showed high dispersion of data, thus confirming these findings. Comparisons of different VIF estimation methods for DCE biomarkers resulted in ICC of 0.636 for K (trans) and 0.662 for Vp; comparison of two deconvolution algorithms in DSC resulted in an ICC of 0.999. The use of single software ensures very good intraobserver and interobservers reproducibility. Caution should be taken when comparing data obtained using different software or different postprocessing within the same software, as reproducibility is not guaranteed anymore.

  8. Clinical evaluation of contrast-enhanced digital mammography and contrast enhanced tomosynthesis--Comparison to contrast-enhanced breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chen-Pin; Lewin, John M; Chiang, Chia-Ling; Hung, Bao-Hui; Yang, Tsung-Lung; Huang, Jer-Shyung; Liao, Jia-Bin; Pan, Huay-Ben

    2015-12-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) and contrast-enhanced tomosynthesis (CET) to dynamic contrast enhanced breast MRI (DCE-MRI) using a multireader-multicase study. Institutional review board approval and informed consents were obtained. Total 185 patients (mean age 51.3) with BI-RADS 4 or 5 lesions were evaluated before biopsy with mammography, tomosynthesis, CEDM, CET and DCE-MRI. Mediolateral-oblique and cranio-caudal views of the target breast CEDM and CET were acquired at 2 and 4 min after contrast agent injection. A mediolateral-oblique view of the non-target breast was taken at 6 min. Each lesion was scored with forced BI-RADS categories by three readers. Each reader interpreted lesions in the following order: mammography, tomosynthesis, CEDM, CET, and DCE-MRI during a single reading session. Histology showed 81 cancers and 144 benign lesions in the study. Of the 81 malignant lesions, 44% (36/81) were invasive and 56% (45/81) were non-invasive. Areas under the ROC curve, averaged for the 3 readers, were as follows: 0.897 for DCE-MRI, 0.892 for CET, 0.878 for CEDM, 0.784 for tomosynthesis and 0.740 for mammography. Significant differences in AUC were found between the group of contrast enhanced modalities (CEDM, CET, DCE-MRI) and the unenhanced modalities (all p<0.05). No significant differences were found in AUC between DCE-MRI, CET and CEDM (all p>0.05). CET and CEDM may be considered as an alternative modality to MRI for following up women with abnormal mammography. All three contrast modalities were superior in accuracy to conventional digital mammography with or without tomosynthesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Perfusion kinetics in human brain tumor with DCE-MRI derived model and CFD analysis.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, A; Bansal, A; Singh, A; Sinha, N

    2017-07-05

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death all over the world. Among the strategies that are used for cancer treatment, the effectiveness of chemotherapy is often hindered by factors such as irregular and non-uniform uptake of drugs inside tumor. Thus, accurate prediction of drug transport and deposition inside tumor is crucial for increasing the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic treatment. In this study, a computational model of human brain tumor is developed that incorporates dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data into a voxelized porous media model. The model takes into account realistic transport and perfusion kinetics parameters together with realistic heterogeneous tumor vasculature and accurate arterial input function (AIF), which makes it patient specific. The computational results for interstitial fluid pressure (IFP), interstitial fluid velocity (IFV) and tracer concentration show good agreement with the experimental results. The computational model can be extended further for predicting the deposition of chemotherapeutic drugs in tumor environment as well as selection of the best chemotherapeutic drug for a specific patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantitative assessment of placental perfusion by contrast-enhanced ultrasound in macaques and human subjects.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Victoria H J; Lo, Jamie O; Salati, Jennifer A; Lewandowski, Katherine S; Lindner, Jonathan R; Morgan, Terry K; Frias, Antonio E

    2016-03-01

    The uteroplacental vascular supply is a critical determinant of placental function and fetal growth. Current methods for the in vivo assessment of placental blood flow are limited. We demonstrate the feasibility of the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging to visualize and quantify perfusion kinetics in the intervillous space of the primate placenta. Pregnant Japanese macaques were studied at mid second trimester and in the early third trimester. Markers of injury were assessed in placenta samples from animals with or without contrast-enhanced ultrasound exposure (n = 6/group). Human subjects were recruited immediately before scheduled first-trimester pregnancy termination. All studies were performed with maternal intravenous infusion of lipid-shelled octofluoropropane microbubbles with image acquisition with a multipulse contrast-specific algorithm with destruction-replenishment analysis of signal intensity for assessment of perfusion. In macaques, the rate of perfusion in the intervillous space was increased with advancing gestation. No evidence of microvascular hemorrhage or acute inflammation was found in placental villous tissue and expression levels of caspase-3, nitrotyrosine and heat shock protein 70 as markers of apoptosis, nitrative, and oxidative stress, respectively, were unchanged by contrast-enhanced ultrasound exposure. In humans, placental perfusion was visualized at 11 weeks gestation, and preliminary data reveal regional differences in intervillous space perfusion within an individual placenta. By electron microscopy, we demonstrate no evidence of ultrastructure damage to the microvilli on the syncytiotrophoblast after first-trimester ultrasound studies. Use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound did not result in placental structural damage and was able to identify intervillous space perfusion rate differences within a placenta. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging may offer a safe clinical tool for the identification of pregnancies that are at

  11. Medullary hemangioblastoma in a child with von Hippel-Lindau disease: vascular tumor perfusion depicted by arterial spin labeling and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Ra, Young-Shin

    2015-07-01

    Medullary hemangioblastoma is very rare in children. Based on small nodular enhancement with peritumoral edema and without dilated feeding arteries on conventional MRI, hemangioblastoma, pilocytic astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, and ganglioglioma were included in the differential diagnosis of the medullary tumor. In this case report, the authors emphasize the diagnostic value of arterial spin labeling and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in demonstrating vascular tumor perfusion of hemangioblastoma in a 12-year-old boy who was later found to have von Hippel-Lindau disease.

  12. Manganese-based MRI contrast agents: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Schmieder, Anne H.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Lanza, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    Paramagnetic and superparamagnetic metals are used as contrast materials for magnetic resonance (MR) based techniques. Lanthanide metal gadolinium (Gd) has been the most widely explored, predominant paramagnetic contrast agent until the discovery and association of the metal with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a rare but serious side effects in patients with renal or kidney problems. Manganese was one of the earliest reported examples of paramagnetic contrast material for MRI because of its efficient positive contrast enhancement. In this review, manganese based contrast agent approaches are discussed with a particular emphasis on their synthetic approaches. Both small molecules based typical blood pool contrast agents and more recently developed novel nanometer sized materials are reviewed focusing on a number of successful molecular imaging examples. PMID:22043109

  13. Can Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and Diffusion-Weighted MRI (DW-MRI) Evaluate Inflammation Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianguo; Zhang, Faming; Luan, Yun; Cao, Peng; Liu, Fei; He, Wenwen; Wang, Dehang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate diagnosis efficacy of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in Crohn's disease (CD). To find out the correlations between functional MRI parameters including Ktrans, Kep, Ve, Vp, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with a serologic biomarker. The relationships between pharmacokinetic parameters and ADC were also studied. Thirty-two patients with CD (22 men, 10 women; mean age: 30.5 years) and 18 healthy volunteers without any inflammatory disease (10 men, 8 women; mean age, 34.11 years) were enrolled into this approved prospective study. Pearson analysis was used to evaluate the correlation between Ktrans, Kep, Ve, Vp, and C-reactive protein (CRP), ADC, and CRP respectively. The diagnostic efficacy of the functional MRI parameters in terms of sensitivity and specificity were analyzed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. Optimal cut-off values of each functional MRI parameters for differentiation of inflammatory from normal bowel were determined according to the Youden criterion. Mean value of Ktrans in the CD group was significantly higher than that of normal control group. Similar results were observed for Kep and Ve. On the contrary, the ADC value was lower in the CD group than that in the control group. Ktrans and Ve were shown to be correlated with CRP (r = 0.725, P < 0.001; r = 0.533, P = 0.002), meanwhile ADC showed negative correlation with CRP (r = −0.630, P < 0.001). There were negative correlations between the pharmacokinetic parameters and ADC, such as Ktrans to ADC (r = −0.856, P < 0.001), and Ve to ADC (r = −0.451, P = 0.01). The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.994 for Ktrans (P < 0.001), 0.905 for ADC (P < 0.001), 0.806 for Ve (P < 0.001), and 0.764 for Kep (P = 0.002). The cut-off point of the Ktrans was found to be 0.931 min–1. This value provided the best trade-off between

  14. Perfusion and pH MRI in familial hemiplegic migraine with prolonged aura.

    PubMed

    Blicher, Jakob Udby; Tietze, Anna; Donahue, Manus J; Smith, Seth A; Østergaard, Leif

    2016-03-01

    To investigate tissue flow disturbance and hypoxia during migraine aura, we studied a case of familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) using novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. A 44-year-old male was admitted with suspected stroke because of confusion and aphasia. Initial gadolinium-based perfusion MRI showed a decrease in cerebral blood flow and an increase in capillary flow disturbances within the left hemisphere. Later during the prolonged aura phase, chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI indicated a drop in pH in the affected area. The patient was diagnosed with an R908Q mutation in the ATP1A2 gene causing FHM type 2. During prolonged aura in FHM, MRI shows reduced CBF, capillary flow disturbances and a possible pH drop that could indicate tissue hypoxia. © International Headache Society 2015.

  15. Mapping Tumor Hypoxia In Vivo Using Pattern Recognition of Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MRI Data12

    PubMed Central

    Stoyanova, Radka; Huang, Kris; Sandler, Kiri; Cho, HyungJoon; Carlin, Sean; Zanzonico, Pat B; Koutcher, Jason A; Ackerstaff, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    In solid tumors, hypoxia contributes significantly to radiation and chemotherapy resistance and to poor outcomes. The “gold standard” pO2 electrode measurements of hypoxia in vivo are unsatisfactory because they are invasive and have limited spatial coverage. Here, we present an approach to identify areas of tumor hypoxia using the signal versus time curves of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data as a surrogate marker of hypoxia. We apply an unsupervised pattern recognition (PR) technique to determine the differential signal versus time curves associated with different tumor microenvironmental characteristics in DCE-MRI data of a preclinical cancer model. Well-perfused tumor areas are identified by rapid contrast uptake followed by rapid washout; hypoxic areas, which are regions of reduced vascularization, are identified by delayed contrast signal buildup and washout; and necrotic areas exhibit slow or no contrast uptake and no discernible washout over the experimental observation. The strength of the PR concept is that it captures the pixel-enhancing behavior in its entirety—during both contrast agent uptake and washout—and thus, subtleties in the temporal behavior of contrast enhancement related to features of the tumor microenvironment (driven by vascular changes) may be detected. The assignment of the tumor compartments/microenvironment to well vascularized, hypoxic, and necrotic is validated by comparison to data previously obtained using complementary imaging modalities. The proposed novel analysis approach has the advantage that it can be readily translated to the clinic, as DCE-MRI is used routinely for the identification of tumors in patients, is widely available, and easily implemented on any clinical magnet. PMID:23326621

  16. Ultrasound Contrast Materials in Cardiovascular Medicine: from Perfusion Assessment to Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Klibanov, Alexander L

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is widely used in cardiovascular diagnostics. Contrast agents expand the range of tasks that ultrasound can perform. In the clinic in US, endocardial border delineation and left ventricle opacification have been an approved indication for more than a decade. However, myocardial perfusion contrast ultrasound studies are still at the clinical trials stage. Blood pool contrast and perfusion in other tissues might be an easier indication to achieve: general blood pool ultrasound contrast is in wider use in Europe, Canada, Japan, and China. Targeted (molecular) contrast microbubbles will be the next generation of ultrasound imaging probes, capable of specific delineation of the areas of disease by adherence to molecular targets. The shell of targeted microbubbles (currently in the preclinical research and early stage clinical trials) is decorated with the ligands (antibodies, peptides or mimetics, hormones, carbohydrates) that ensure firm binding to the molecular markers of disease. PMID:23913363

  17. Assessment of Skeletal Muscle Perfusion using Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Saleem, Muhammad A.; Aytac, Emrah; Wallery, Shawn S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Intravenous contrast-enhanced ultrasonography is a recently developed technique for assessment of tissue perfusion, but has not been used for assessment of skeletal muscle perfusion. Methods We studied a 42-year-old woman in whom myonecrosis was suspected due to systemic vasculitis and ischemia. The biceps brachii (right) and quadriceps femoris (vastus medialis) on right-hand side and subsequently left-hand side were imaged. Intravenous bolus of activated perflutren lipid microspheres was injected and B-Flow color mode (brown color) was used within a selected region of interest to image the passage of contrast through muscle parenchyma throughout three cardiac cycles. Results Visual interpretation of muscle perfusion was performed based on the maximal intensity of contrast in the muscle, and the speed of contrast replenishment. No deficits were noted in the perfusion pattern. The arterial phase demonstrated stellate vascularity, centrifugal filling, and homogeneous hypervascularity at peak enhancement. Conclusions The bolus of contrast resulted in good signal persistence and satisfactory imaging for multiple muscle groups. PMID:28243350

  18. Dynamic subcortical blood flow during male sexual activity with ecological validity: a perfusion fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, Janniko R; Farrell, Michael J; Boessen, Ruud; Denton, Derek A; Gavrilescu, Maria; Kortekaas, Rudie; Renken, Remco J; Hoogduin, Johannes M; Egan, Gary F

    2010-03-01

    This study used arterial spin labeling (ASL) fMRI to measure brain perfusion in a group of healthy men under conditions that closely resembled customary sexual behavior. Serial perfusion measures for 30 min during two self-limited periods of partnered penis stimulation, and during post-stimulatory periods, revealed novel sexual activity-related cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes, mainly in subcortical parts of the brain. Ventral pallidum rCBF was highest during the onset of penile erection, and lowest after the termination of penis stimulation. The perceived level of sexual arousal showed the strongest positive association with rCBF in the right basal forebrain. In addition, our results demonstrate that distinct subregions of the hypothalamus and cingulate cortex subserve opposite functions during human male sexual behavior. The lateral hypothalamus and anterior part of the middle cingulate cortex showed increased rCBF correlated with penile erection. By contrast, the anteroventral hypothalamus and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex exhibited rCBF changes correlated with penile detumescence after penile stimulation. Continuous rapid and high-resolution brain perfusion imaging during normal sexual activity has provided novel insights into the central mechanisms that control male sexual arousal. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Separating blood and water: Perfusion and free water elimination from diffusion MRI in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Rydhög, Anna S; Szczepankiewicz, Filip; Wirestam, Ronnie; Ahlgren, André; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Knutsson, Linda; Pasternak, Ofer

    2017-08-01

    The assessment of the free water fraction in the brain provides important information about extracellular processes such as atrophy and neuroinflammation in various clinical conditions as well as in normal development and aging. Free water estimates from diffusion MRI are assumed to account for freely diffusing water molecules in the extracellular space, but may be biased by other pools of molecules in rapid random motion, such as the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) of blood, where water molecules perfuse in the randomly oriented capillary network. The goal of this work was to separate the signal contribution of the perfusing blood from that of free-water and of other brain diffusivities. The influence of the vascular compartment on the estimation of the free water fraction and other diffusivities was investigated by simulating perfusion in diffusion MRI data. The perfusion effect in the simulations was significant, especially for the estimation of the free water fraction, and was maintained as long as low b-value data were included in the analysis. Two approaches to reduce the perfusion effect were explored in this study: (i) increasing the minimal b-value used in the fitting, and (ii) using a three-compartment model that explicitly accounts for water molecules in the capillary blood. Estimation of the model parameters while excluding low b-values reduced the perfusion effect but was highly sensitive to noise. The three-compartment model fit was more stable and additionally, provided an estimation of the volume fraction of the capillary blood compartment. The three-compartment model thus disentangles the effects of free water diffusion and perfusion, which is of major clinical importance since changes in these components in the brain may indicate different pathologies, i.e., those originating from the extracellular space, such as neuroinflammation and atrophy, and those related to the vascular space, such as vasodilation, vasoconstriction and capillary density

  20. What We Can Really Do with Bioresponsive MRI Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Angelovski, Goran

    2016-06-13

    Bioresponsive MRI contrast agents hold great promise for monitoring major physiological and pathological processes in a non-invasive manner. They are capable of altering the acquired MRI signal as a consequence of changes in their microenvironment, thus allowing real-time functional reporting in living organisms. Importantly, chemistry offers diverse solutions for the design of agents which respond to a great number of specific targets. However, the path to the successful utilization of these biomarkers in the desired functional MRI studies involves careful consideration of multiple scientific, technical, and practical issues across various research disciplines. This Minireview highlights the critical steps for planning and executing such multidisciplinary projects with an aim to substantially improve our knowledge of essential biological processes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Influence of perfusion on high-intensity focused ultrasound prostate ablation: a first-pass MRI study.

    PubMed

    Wiart, Marlène; Curiel, Laura; Gelet, Albert; Lyonnet, Denis; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier

    2007-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the influence of regional prostate blood flow (rPBF) on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment outcome. A total of 48 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were examined by dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI prior to HIFU therapy. A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir threshold of 0.2 ng/ml was used to define the populations of responders and nonresponders. A dedicated tracer kinetic model, namely "monoexponential plus constant" (MPC) deconvolution, was implemented to provide quantitative estimates of rPBF. The results were compared with those obtained by semiquantitative (steepest slope, mean gradient) and quantitative (Fermi deconvolution) approaches. Of the four methods studied, quantitative rPBF obtained by MPC deconvolution proved the most sensitive to the perfusion changes encountered in this study. Furthermore, blood-flow values obtained with MPC deconvolution in the prostate and muscle (12 +/- 8 and 5 +/- 3 ml/min/100 g, respectively) were in good agreement with literature data. The mean pretreatment rPBF obtained with MPC deconvolution was significantly higher in nonresponders compared to responders (16 +/- 9 vs. 10 +/- 6 ml/min/100 g), suggesting a correlation between baseline perfusion and treatment outcome. The present work describes and validates the use of dynamic MRI to estimate rPBF in patients, which in the future may help to refine the conduct of HIFU therapy.

  2. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound: A promising method for renal microvascular perfusion evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Mohan, Chandra

    2016-09-01

    This article reviews the application of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in gauging renal microvascular perfusion in diverse renal diseases. The unique nature of the contrast agents used in CEUS provides real-time and quantitative imaging of the vasculature. In addition to the traditional use of CEUS for evaluation of kidney masses, it also emerges as a safe and effective imaging approach to assess microvascular perfusion in diffuse renal lesions, non-invasively. Although the precise CEUS parameters that may best predict disease still warrant systematic evaluation, animal models and limited clinical trials in humans raise hopes that CEUS could outcompete competing modalities as a first-line tool for assessing renal perfusion non-invasively, even in ailments such as acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease.

  3. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound: A promising method for renal microvascular perfusion evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article reviews the application of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in gauging renal microvascular perfusion in diverse renal diseases. The unique nature of the contrast agents used in CEUS provides real-time and quantitative imaging of the vasculature. In addition to the traditional use of CEUS for evaluation of kidney masses, it also emerges as a safe and effective imaging approach to assess microvascular perfusion in diffuse renal lesions, non-invasively. Although the precise CEUS parameters that may best predict disease still warrant systematic evaluation, animal models and limited clinical trials in humans raise hopes that CEUS could outcompete competing modalities as a first-line tool for assessing renal perfusion non-invasively, even in ailments such as acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease. PMID:28191530

  4. DNA surface modified gadolinium phosphate nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Matthieu F; Baligand, Celine; Li, Yichen; Knowles, Elisabeth S; Meisel, Mark W; Walter, Glenn A; Talham, Daniel R

    2012-05-16

    Oligonucleotide modified gadolinium phosphate nanoparticles have been prepared and their magnetic resonance relaxivity properties measured. Nanoparticles of GdPO4·H2O were synthesized in a water/oil microemulsion using IGEPAL CO-520 as surfactant, resulting in 50 to 100 nm particles that are highly dispersible and stable in water. Using surface modification chemistry previously established for zirconium phosphonate surfaces, the particles are directly modified with 5'-phosphate terminated oligonucleotides, and the specific interaction of the divalent phosphate with Gd(3+) sites at the surface is demonstrated. The ability of the modified nanoparticles to act as MRI contrast agents was determined by performing MR relaxivity measurements at 14.1 T. Solutions of nanopure water, Feridex, and Omniscan (FDA approved contrast agents) in 0.25% agarose were used for comparison and control purposes. MRI data confirm that GdPO4·H2O nanoparticles have relaxivities (r1, r2) comparable to those of commercially available contrast agents. In addition, the data suggest that biofunctionalization of the surface of the nanoparticles does not prevent their function as MRI contrast agents.

  5. Surface Modified Gadolinium Phosphate Nanoparticles as MRI Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Matthieu F.; Baligand, Celine; Knowles, Elisabeth S.; Meisel, Mark W.; Walter, Glenn A.; Talham, Daniel R.

    2012-02-01

    Nanoparticles of GdPO4H2O were synthesized in a water/oil microemulsion using IGEPAL CO-520 as surfactant resulting in 50 nm to 100 nm particles that are dispersible and stable in water. Using surface modification chemistry previously established for zirconium phosphonate surfaces,ootnotetext J. Monot et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130 (2008) 6243. the particles are directly modified with 5'-phosphate terminated oligonucleotides, and the specific interaction of the divalent phosphate with Gd^3+ sites at the surface is demonstrated. The ability of the modified nanoparticles to act as MRI contrast agents was determined by performing MR relaxivity measurements at 14 T. Solutions of nanopure water, Feridex and Omniscan (FDA cleared contrast agents) in 0.25% agarose were used for comparison and control purposes. MRI data confirm that GdPO4H2O nanoparticles have relaxivities (r1,r2) comparable to commercially available contrast agents.ootnotetext H. Hifumi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128 (2006) 15090. In addition, biofunctionalization of the surface of the nanoparticles does not prevent their function as MRI contrast agents.

  6. Practical Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Small Animal Models of Cancer: Data Acquisition, Data Analysis, and Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Stephanie L.; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Loveless, Mary E.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) consists of the continuous acquisition of images before, during, and after the injection of a contrast agent. DCE-MRI allows for noninvasive evaluation of tumor parameters related to vascular perfusion and permeability and tissue volume fractions, and is frequently employed in both preclinical and clinical investigations. However, the experimental and analytical subtleties of the technique are not frequently discussed in the literature, nor are its relationships to other commonly used quantitative imaging techniques. This review aims to provide practical information on the development, implementation, and validation of a DCE-MRI study in the context of a preclinical study (though we do frequently refer to clinical studies that are related to these topics). PMID:23105959

  7. Low contrast medium and radiation dose for hepatic computed tomography perfusion of rabbit VX2 tumor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cai-Yuan; Cui, Yan-Fen; Guo, Chen; Cai, Jing; Weng, Ya-Fang; Wang, Li-Jun; Wang, Deng-Bin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of low contrast medium and radiation dose for hepatic computed tomography (CT) perfusion of rabbit VX2 tumor. METHODS: Eleven rabbits with hepatic VX2 tumor underwent perfusion CT scanning with a 24-h interval between a conventional tube potential (120 kVp) protocol with 350 mgI/mL contrast medium and filtered back projection, and a low tube potential (80 kVp) protocol with 270 mgI/mL contrast medium with iterative reconstruction. Correlation and agreement among perfusion parameters acquired by the conventional and low dose protocols were assessed for the viable tumor component as well as whole tumor. Image noise and tumor-to-liver contrast to noise ratio during arterial and portal venous phases were evaluated. RESULTS: A 38% reduction in contrast medium dose (360.1 ± 13.3 mgI/kg vs 583.5 ± 21.5 mgI/kg, P < 0.001) and a 73% decrease in radiation dose (1898.5 mGy • cm vs 6951.8 mGy • cm) were observed. Interestingly, there was a strong positive correlation in hepatic arterial perfusion (r = 0.907, P < 0.001; r = 0.879, P < 0.001), hepatic portal perfusion (r = 0.819, P = 0.002; r = 0.831, P = 0.002), and hepatic blood flow (r = 0.945, P < 0.001; r = 0.930, P < 0.001) as well as a moderate correlation in hepatic perfusion index (r = 0.736, P = 0.01; r = 0.636, P = 0.035) between the low dose protocol with iterative reconstruction and the conventional protocol for the viable tumor component and the whole tumor. These two imaging protocols provided a moderate but acceptable agreement for perfusion parameters and similar tumor-to-liver CNR during arterial and portal venous phases (5.63 ± 2.38 vs 6.16 ± 2.60, P = 0.814; 4.60 ± 1.27 vs 5.11 ± 1.74, P = 0.587). CONCLUSION: Compared with the conventional protocol, low contrast medium and radiation dose with iterative reconstruction has no significant influence on hepatic perfusion parameters for rabbits VX2 tumor. PMID:25954099

  8. Sub-band denoising and spline curve fitting method for hemodynamic measurement in perfusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong-Dun; Huang, Hsiao-Ling; Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Chen, Chi-Chen; Chen, Ing-Yi; Wu, Liang-Chi; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Lin, Kang-Ping

    2003-05-01

    In clinical research, non-invasive MR perfusion imaging is capable of investigating brain perfusion phenomenon via various hemodynamic measurements, such as cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and mean trasnit time (MTT). These hemodynamic parameters are useful in diagnosing brain disorders such as stroke, infarction and periinfarct ischemia by further semi-quantitative analysis. However, the accuracy of quantitative analysis is usually affected by poor signal-to-noise ratio image quality. In this paper, we propose a hemodynamic measurement method based upon sub-band denoising and spline curve fitting processes to improve image quality for better hemodynamic quantitative analysis results. Ten sets of perfusion MRI data and corresponding PET images were used to validate the performance. For quantitative comparison, we evaluate gray/white matter CBF ratio. As a result, the hemodynamic semi-quantitative analysis result of mean gray to white matter CBF ratio is 2.10 +/- 0.34. The evaluated ratio of brain tissues in perfusion MRI is comparable to PET technique is less than 1-% difference in average. Furthermore, the method features excellent noise reduction and boundary preserving in image processing, and short hemodynamic measurement time.

  9. The diagnostic performance of perfusion MRI for differentiating glioma recurrence from pseudoprogression

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Bing; Wang, Siqi; Tu, Mengqi; Wu, Bo; Han, Ping; Xu, Haibo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The purpose of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a method for differentiating glioma recurrence from pseudoprogression. Methods: The PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Chinese Biomedical databases were searched comprehensively for relevant studies up to August 3, 2016 according to specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. The quality of the included studies was assessed according to the quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS-2). After performing heterogeneity and threshold effect tests, pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, and diagnostic odds ratio were calculated. Publication bias was evaluated visually by a funnel plot and quantitatively using Deek funnel plot asymmetry test. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was calculated to demonstrate the diagnostic performance of perfusion MRI. Results: Eleven studies covering 416 patients and 418 lesions were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, and diagnostic odds ratio were 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84–0.92), 0.77 (95% CI 0.69–0.84), 3.93 (95% CI 2.83–5.46), 0.16 (95% CI 0.11–0.22), and 27.17 (95% CI 14.96–49.35), respectively. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.8899. There was no notable publication bias. Sensitivity analysis showed that the meta-analysis results were stable and credible. Conclusion: While perfusion MRI is not the ideal diagnostic method for differentiating glioma recurrence from pseudoprogression, it could improve diagnostic accuracy. Therefore, further research on combining perfusion MRI with other imaging modalities is warranted. PMID:28296759

  10. Local perfusion and metabolic demand during exercise: a noninvasive MRI method of assessment.

    PubMed

    Richardson, R S; Haseler, L J; Nygren, A T; Bluml, S; Frank, L R

    2001-10-01

    A noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method to assess the distribution of perfusion and metabolic demand (Q/VO(2)) in exercising human skeletal muscle is described. This method combines two MRI techniques that can provide accurate multiple localized measurements of Q/VO(2) during steady-state plantar flexion exercise. The first technique, (31)P chemical shift imaging, permits the acquisition of comparable phosphorus spectra from multiple voxels simultaneously. Because phosphocreatine (PCr) depletion is directly proportional to ATP hydrolysis, its relative depletion can be used as an index of muscle O(2) uptake (VO(2)). The second MRI technique allows the measurement of both spatially and temporally resolved muscle perfusion in vivo by using arterial spin labeling. Promising validity and reliability data are presented for both MRI techniques. Initial results from the combined method provide evidence of a large variation in Q/VO(2), revealing areas of apparent under- and overperfusion for a given metabolic turnover. Analysis of these data in a similar fashion to that employed in the assessment of ventilation-to-perfusion matching in the lungs revealed a similar second moment of the perfusion distribution and PCr distribution on a log scale (log SD(Q) and log SD(PCr)) (0.47). Modeling the effect of variations in log SD(Q) and log SD(PCr) in terms of attainable VO(2), assuming no diffusion limits, indicates that the log SD(Q) and log SD(PCr) would allow only 92% of the target VO(2) to be achieved. This communication documents this novel, noninvasive method for assessing Q/VO(2), and initial data suggest that the mismatch in Q/VO(2) may play a significant role in determining O(2) transport and utilization during exercise.

  11. ASFNR recommendations for clinical performance of MR dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion imaging of the brain.

    PubMed

    Welker, K; Boxerman, J; Kalnin, A; Kaufmann, T; Shiroishi, M; Wintermark, M

    2015-06-01

    MR perfusion imaging is becoming an increasingly common means of evaluating a variety of cerebral pathologies, including tumors and ischemia. In particular, there has been great interest in the use of MR perfusion imaging for both assessing brain tumor grade and for monitoring for tumor recurrence in previously treated patients. Of the various techniques devised for evaluating cerebral perfusion imaging, the dynamic susceptibility contrast method has been employed most widely among clinical MR imaging practitioners. However, when implementing DSC MR perfusion imaging in a contemporary radiology practice, a neuroradiologist is confronted with a large number of decisions. These include choices surrounding appropriate patient selection, scan-acquisition parameters, data-postprocessing methods, image interpretation, and reporting. Throughout the imaging literature, there is conflicting advice on these issues. In an effort to provide guidance to neuroradiologists struggling to implement DSC perfusion imaging in their MR imaging practice, the Clinical Practice Committee of the American Society of Functional Neuroradiology has provided the following recommendations. This guidance is based on review of the literature coupled with the practice experience of the authors. While the ASFNR acknowledges that alternate means of carrying out DSC perfusion imaging may yield clinically acceptable results, the following recommendations should provide a framework for achieving routine success in this complicated-but-rewarding aspect of neuroradiology MR imaging practice. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  12. ASFNR Recommendations for Clinical Performance of MR Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion Imaging of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Welker, K.; Boxerman, J.; Kalnin, A.; Kaufmann, T.; Shiroishi, M.; Wintermark, M.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY MR perfusion imaging is becoming an increasingly common means of evaluating a variety of cerebral pathologies, including tumors and ischemia. In particular, there has been great interest in the use of MR perfusion imaging for both assessing brain tumor grade and for monitoring for tumor recurrence in previously treated patients. Of the various techniques devised for evaluating cerebral perfusion imaging, the dynamic susceptibility contrast method has been employed most widely among clinical MR imaging practitioners. However, when implementing DSC MR perfusion imaging in a contemporary radiology practice, a neuroradiologist is confronted with a large number of decisions. These include choices surrounding appropriate patient selection, scan-acquisition parameters, data-postprocessing methods, image interpretation, and reporting. Throughout the imaging literature, there is conflicting advice on these issues. In an effort to provide guidance to neuroradiologists struggling to implement DSC perfusion imaging in their MR imaging practice, the Clinical Practice Committee of the American Society of Functional Neuroradiology has provided the following recommendations. This guidance is based on review of the literature coupled with the practice experience of the authors. While the ASFNR acknowledges that alternate means of carrying out DSC perfusion imaging may yield clinically acceptable results, the following recommendations should provide a framework for achieving routine success in this complicated-but-rewarding aspect of neuroradiology MR imaging practice. PMID:25907520

  13. Perfusion estimation using contrast enhanced three-dimensional subharmonic ultrasound imaging: an in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R.; Liu, Ji-Bin; Machado, Priscilla; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G.; Dave, Jaydev K.; Zhao, Hongjia; He, Yu; Park, Suhyun; Dianis, Scott; Wallace, Kirk; Thomenius, Kai E.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The ability to estimate tissue perfusion (in mL/min/g) in vivo using contrast-enhanced three-dimensional (3D) harmonic and subharmonic ultrasound imaging was investigated. Materials and Methods A Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) equipped with a 4D10L probe was modified to perform 3D harmonic imaging (HI; ftransmit = 5 MHz and freceive = 10 MHz) and subharmonic imaging (SHI; ftransmit= 5.8 MHz and freceive= 2.9 MHz). In vivo imaging was performed in the lower pole of both kidneys in five open-abdomen canines after injection of the ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA). The canines received a 5 μL/kg bolus injection of Definity for HI and a 20 μL/kg bolus for SHI in triplicate for each kidney. Ultrasound data acquisition was started just prior to injection of UCA (in order to capture the wash-in) and continued until washout. A microvascular staining technique based on stable (non-radioactive) isotope-labeled microspheres (Biophysics Assay Laboratory Inc, Worcester, MA) was used to quantify the degree of perfusion in each kidney (the reference standard). Ligating a surgically exposed branch of the renal arteries induced lower perfusion rates. This was followed by additional contrast-enhanced imaging and microsphere injections to measure post-ligation perfusion. Slice data were extracted from the 3D ultrasound volumes and used to generate time-intensity curves off-line in the regions corresponding to the tissue samples used for microvascular staining. The mid-line plane was also selected from the 3D volume (as a quasi-2D image) and compared to the 3D imaging modes. Perfusion was estimated from the initial slope of the fractional blood volume uptake (for both HI and SHI) and compared to the reference standard using linear regression analysis. Results Both 3D HI and SHI were able to provide visualization of flow and, thus, perfusion in the kidneys. However, SHI provided near complete tissue

  14. Simultaneous segmentation and registration of contrast-enhanced breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Xiaohua, Chen; Brady, Michael; Lo, Jonathan Lok-Chuen; Moore, Niall

    2005-01-01

    Breast Contrast-Enhanced MRI (ce-MRI) requires a series of images to be acquired before, and repeatedly after, intravenous injection of a contrast agent. Breast MRI segmentation based on the differential enhancement of image intensities can assist the clinician detect suspicious regions. Image registration between the temporal data sets is necessary to compensate for patient motion, which is quite often substantial. Although segmentation and registration are usually treated as separate problems in medical image analysis, they can naturally benefit a great deal from each other. In this paper, we propose a scheme for simultaneous segmentation and registration of breast ce-MRI. It is developed within a Bayesian framework, based on a maximum a posteriori estimation method. A pharmacokinetic model and Markov Random Field model have been incorporated into the framework in order to improve the performance of our algorithm. Our method has been applied to the segmentation and registration of clinical ce-MR images. The results show the potential of our methodology to extract useful information for breast cancer detection.

  15. Redox- and hypoxia-responsive MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Do, Quyen N; Ratnakar, James S; Kovács, Zoltán; Sherry, A Dean

    2014-06-01

    The development of responsive or "smart" magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that can report specific biomarker or biological events has been the focus of MRI contrast agent research over the past 20 years. Among various biological hallmarks of interest, tissue redox and hypoxia are particularly important owing to their roles in disease states and metabolic consequences. Herein we review the development of redox-/hypoxia-sensitive T1 shortening and paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) MRI contrast agents. Traditionally, the relaxivity of redox-sensitive Gd(3+) -based complexes is modulated through changes in the ligand structure or molecular rotation, while PARACEST sensors exploit the sensitivity of the metal-bound water exchange rate to electronic effects of the ligand-pendant arms and alterations in the coordination geometry. Newer designs involve complexes of redox-active metal ions in which the oxidation states have different magnetic properties. The challenges of translating redox- and hypoxia-sensitive agents in vivo are also addressed.

  16. Redox- and Hypoxia-Responsive MRI Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Do, Quyen N.; Ratnakar, James S.; Kovács, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    The development of responsive or “smart” magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that can report specific biomarker or biological events has been the focus of MRI contrast agent research over the past 20 years. Among various biological hallmarks of interest, tissue redox and hypoxia are particularly important owing to their roles in disease states and metabolic consequences. Herein we review the development of redox-/hypoxia-sensitive T1 shortening and paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) MRI contrast agents. Traditionally, the relaxivity of redox-sensitive Gd3+-based complexes is modulated through changes in the ligand structure or molecular rotation, while PARACEST sensors exploit the sensitivity of the metal-bound water exchange rate to electronic effects of the ligand-pendant arms and alterations in the coordination geometry. Newer designs involve complexes of redox-active metal ions in which the oxidation states have different magnetic properties. The challenges of translating redox- and hypoxia-sensitive agents in vivo are also addressed. PMID:24825674

  17. Quantitative diagnosis of stress-induced myocardial ischemia using analysis of contrast echocardiographic parametric perfusion images.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Eran; Jacobs, Lawrence D; Lodato, Joseph A; DeCara, Jeanne M; Coon, Patrick; Mor-Avi, Victor; Lang, Roberto M

    2006-06-01

    Parametric imaging of myocardial perfusion provides useful visual information for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). We developed a technique for automated detection of perfusion defects based on quantitative analysis of parametric perfusion images and validated it against coronary angiography. Contrast-enhanced, apical 2-, 3- and 4-chamber images were obtained at rest and with dipyridamole in 34 patients with suspected CAD. Images were analyzed to generate parametric perfusion images of the standard contrast-replenishment model parameters A, beta and A.beta. Each parametric image was divided into six segments, and mean parameter value (MPV) was calculated for each segment. Segmental MPV ratio between stress and rest was defined as a flow reserve index (FRI). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was used in a Study group (N=17) to optimize FRI threshold and the minimal number of abnormal segments per vascular territory (LAD and non-LAD), required for automated detection of stress-induced perfusion defects. The optimized detection algorithm was then tested prospectively in the remaining 17 patients (Test group). LAD and non-LAD stenosis >70% was found in 19 and 17 patients, respectively. In the Study group, FRI threshold was: LAD=0.95 and non-LAD=0.68, minimal number of abnormal segments was four and two, correspondingly. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in the Test group were: 75%, 67% and 71% in the LAD, and 75%, 75% and 75% in the non-LAD territories. Automated quantitative analysis of contrast echocardiographic parametric perfusion images is feasible and may aid in the objective detection of CAD.

  18. The effect of the sample size and location on contrast ultrasound measurement of perfusion parameters.

    PubMed

    Leinonen, Merja R; Raekallio, Marja R; Vainio, Outi M; Ruohoniemi, Mirja O; O'Brien, Robert T

    2011-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound can be used to quantify tissue perfusion based on region of interest (ROI) analysis. The effect of the location and size of the ROI on the obtained perfusion parameters has been described in phantom, ex vivo and in vivo studies. We assessed the effects of location and size of the ROI on perfusion parameters in the renal cortex of 10 healthy, anesthetized cats using Definity contrast-enhanced ultrasound to estimate the importance of the ROI on quantification of tissue perfusion with contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Three separate sets of ROIs were placed in the renal cortex, varying in location, size or depth. There was a significant inverse association between increased depth or increased size of the ROI and peak intensity (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in the peak intensity between the ROIs placed in a row in the near field cortex. There was no significant difference in the ROIs with regard to arrival time, time to peak intensity and wash-in rate. When comparing two different ROIs in a patient with focal lesions, such as suspected neoplasia or infarction, the ROIs should always be placed at same depth and be as similar in size as possible.

  19. Repeatability and reproducibility of quantitative contrast-enhanced ultrasonography for assessing duodenal perfusion in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Nisa, Khoirun; Lim, Sue Yee; Shinohara, Masayoshi; Nagata, Noriyuki; Sasaoka, Kazuyoshi; Dermlim, Angkhana; Leela-Arporn, Rommaneeya; Morita, Tomoya; Yokoyama, Nozomu; Osuga, Tatsuyuki; Sasaki, Noboru; Morishita, Keitaro; Nakamura, Kensuke; Ohta, Hiroshi; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-09-29

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with microbubbles as a contrast agent allows the visualization and quantification of tissue perfusion. The assessment of canine intestinal perfusion by quantitative CEUS may provide valuable information for diagnosing and monitoring chronic intestinal disorders. This study aimed to assess the repeatability (intraday variability) and reproducibility (interday variability) of quantitative duodenal CEUS in healthy dogs. Six healthy beagles underwent CEUS three times within one day (4-hr intervals) and on two different days (1-week interval). All dogs were sedated with a combination of butorphanol (0.2 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.1 mg/kg) prior to CEUS. The contrast agent (Sonazoid(®)) was administered using the intravenous bolus method (0.01 ml/kg) for imaging of the duodenum. Time-intensity curves (TIC) were created by drawing multiple regions of interest (ROIs) in the duodenal mucosa, and perfusion parameters, including the time-to-peak (TTP), peak intensity (PI), area under the curve (AUC), and wash-in and wash-out rates (WiR and WoR, respectively), were generated. Intraday and interday coefficients of variation (CVs) for TTP, PI, AUC, WiR and WoR were <25% (range, 2.27-23.41%), which indicated that CEUS was feasible for assessing duodenal perfusion in healthy sedated dogs. A further study of CEUS in dogs with chronic intestinal disorders is necessary to evaluate its clinical applicability.

  20. Comparison of Indocyanine Green Angiography and Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging for the Assessment of Vasculature Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Towle, Erica L.; Richards, Lisa M.; Kazmi, S. M. Shams; Fox, Douglas J.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Assessment of the vasculature is critical for overall success in cranial vascular neurological surgery procedures. Although several methods of monitoring cortical perfusion intraoperatively are available, not all are appropriate or convenient in a surgical environment. Recently, 2 optical methods of care have emerged that are able to obtain high spatial resolution images with easily implemented instrumentation: indocyanine green (ICG) angiography and laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). OBJECTIVE To evaluate the usefulness of ICG and LSCI in measuring vessel perfusion. METHODS An experimental setup was developed that simultaneously collects measurements of ICG fluorescence and LSCI in a rodent model. A 785-nm laser diode was used for both excitation of the ICG dye and the LSCI illumination. A photothrombotic clot model was used to occlude specific vessels within the field of view to enable comparison of the 2 methods for monitoring vessel perfusion. RESULTS The induced blood flow change demonstrated that ICG is an excellent method for visualizing the volume and type of vessel at a single point in time; however, it is not always an accurate representation of blood flow. In contrast, LSCI provides a continuous and accurate measurement of blood flow changes without the need of an external contrast agent. CONCLUSION These 2 methods should be used together to obtain a complete understanding of tissue perfusion. PMID:22843129

  1. Collateral circulation formation determines the characteristic profiles of contrast-enhanced MRI in the infarcted myocardium of pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Xiang, Bo; Lin, Hung-yu; Liu, Hong-yu; Freed, Darren; Arora, Rakesh C; Tian, Gang-hong

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the relationship between the collateral circulation and contrast-enhanced MR signal change for myocardial infarction (MI) in pigs. Methods: Pigs underwent permanent ligation of two diagonal branches of the left anterior descending artery. First-pass perfusion (FPP) MRI (for detecting myocardial perfusion abnormalities) and delayed enhancement (DE) MRI (for estimating myocardial infarction) using Gd-DTPA were performed at 2 h, 7 d and 4 weeks after the coronary occlusion. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was evaluated using nonradioactive red-colored microspheres. Histological examination was performed to characterize the infarcts. Results: Acute MI performed at 2 h afterwards was characterized by hypoenhancement in both FPP- and DE-MRI, with small and almost unchanged FPP-signal intensity (SI) and DE-SI due to negligible MBF. Subacute MI detected 7 d afterwards showed small but significantly increaseing FPP-SI, and was visible as a sluggish hyperenhancement in DE-MRI with considerably higher DE-SI compared to the normal myocardium; the MBF approached the half-normal value. Chronic MI detected at 4 weeks afterwards showed increasing FPP-SI comparable to the normal myocardium, and a rapid hyperenhancement in DE-MRI with even higher DE-SI; the MBF was close to the normal value. The MBF was correlated with FPP-SI (r=+0.94, P<0.01) and with the peak DE-SI (r=+0.92, P<0.01) at the three MI stages. Remodeled vessels were observed at intra-infarction and peri-infarction zones during the subacute and chronic periods. Conclusion: Progressive collateral recovery determines the characteristic profiles of contrast-enhanced MRI in acute, subacute and chronic myocardial infarction in pigs. The FPP- and DE-MRI signal profiles not only depend on the loss of tissue viability and enlarged interstitial space, but also on establishing a collateral circulation. PMID:25832427

  2. Collateral circulation formation determines the characteristic profiles of contrast-enhanced MRI in the infarcted myocardium of pigs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Xiang, Bo; Lin, Hung-yu; Liu, Hong-yu; Freed, Darren; Arora, Rakesh C; Tian, Gang-hong

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the relationship between the collateral circulation and contrast-enhanced MR signal change for myocardial infarction (MI) in pigs. Pigs underwent permanent ligation of two diagonal branches of the left anterior descending artery. First-pass perfusion (FPP) MRI (for detecting myocardial perfusion abnormalities) and delayed enhancement (DE) MRI (for estimating myocardial infarction) using Gd-DTPA were performed at 2 h, 7 d and 4 weeks after the coronary occlusion. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was evaluated using nonradioactive red-colored microspheres. Histological examination was performed to characterize the infarcts. Acute MI performed at 2 h afterwards was characterized by hypoenhancement in both FPP- and DE-MRI, with small and almost unchanged FPP-signal intensity (SI) and DE-SI due to negligible MBF. Subacute MI detected 7 d afterwards showed small but significantly increaseing FPP-SI, and was visible as a sluggish hyperenhancement in DE-MRI with considerably higher DE-SI compared to the normal myocardium; the MBF approached the half-normal value. Chronic MI detected at 4 weeks afterwards showed increasing FPP-SI comparable to the normal myocardium, and a rapid hyperenhancement in DE-MRI with even higher DE-SI; the MBF was close to the normal value. The MBF was correlated with FPP-SI (r=+0.94, P<0.01) and with the peak DE-SI (r=+0.92, P<0.01) at the three MI stages. Remodeled vessels were observed at intra-infarction and peri-infarction zones during the subacute and chronic periods. Progressive collateral recovery determines the characteristic profiles of contrast-enhanced MRI in acute, subacute and chronic myocardial infarction in pigs. The FPP- and DE-MRI signal profiles not only depend on the loss of tissue viability and enlarged interstitial space, but also on establishing a collateral circulation.

  3. Motion correction of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI of the liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Mariëlle J. A.; Veldhuis, Wouter B.; van Leeuwen, Maarten S.; Pluim, Josien P. W.

    2017-02-01

    Motion correction of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images (DCE-MRI) is a challenging task, due to changes in image appearance. In this study a groupwise registration, using a principle component analysis (PCA) based metric, is evaluated for clinical DCE MRI of the liver. The groupwise registration transforms the images to a common space, rather than to a reference volume as conventional pairwise methods do, and computes the similarity metric on all volumes simultaneously. This groupwise registration method is compared to a pairwise approach using a mutual information metric. Clinical DCE MRI of the abdomen of eight patients were included. Per patient one lesion in the liver was manually segmented in all temporal images (N=16). The registered images were compared for accuracy, spatial and temporal smoothness after transformation, and lesion volume change. Compared to a pairwise method or no registration, groupwise registration provided better alignment. In our recently started clinical study groupwise registered clinical DCE MRI of the abdomen of nine patients were scored by three radiologists. Groupwise registration increased the assessed quality of alignment. The gain in reading time for the radiologist was estimated to vary from no difference to almost a minute. A slight increase in reader confidence was also observed. Registration had no added value for images with little motion. In conclusion, the groupwise registration of DCE MR images results in better alignment than achieved by pairwise registration, which is beneficial for clinical assessment.

  4. Biodegradable polydisulfide dendrimer nanoclusters as MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Hui; Nwe, Kido; Al Zaki, Ajlan; Brechbiel, Martin W; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2012-11-27

    Gadolinium-conjugated dendrimer nanoclusters (DNCs) are a promising platform for the early detection of disease; however, their clinical utility is potentially limited due to safety concerns related to nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). In this paper, biodegradable DNCs were prepared with polydisulfide linkages between the individual dendrimers to facilitate excretion. Further, DNCs were labeled with premetalated Gd chelates to eliminate the risk of free Gd becoming entrapped in dendrimer cavities. The biodegradable polydisulfide DNCs possessed a circulation half-life of >1.6 h in mice and produced significant contrast enhancement in the abdominal aorta and kidneys for as long as 4 h. The DNCs were reduced in circulation as a result of thiol-disulfide exchange, and the degradation products were rapidly excreted via renal filtration. These agents demonstrated effective and prolonged in vivo contrast enhancement and yet minimized Gd tissue retention. Biodegradable polydisulfide DNCs represent a promising biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agent for magnetic resonance angiography and can potentially be further developed into target-specific MRI contrast agents.

  5. Isoattenuating insulinomas at biphasic contrast-enhanced CT: frequency, clinicopathologic features and perfusion characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liang; Xue, Hua-Dan; Sun, Hao; Wang, Xuan; He, Yong-Lan; Jin, Zheng-Yu; Zhao, Yu-Pei

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to determine the frequency of isoattenuating insulinomas, to investigate their clinicopathological features and to assess their regional pancreatic perfusion characteristics. Institutional review board approval was obtained, and patient informed consent was waived. From July 2010 to June 2014, 170 patients (66 male, 104 female) with endogenous hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia underwent biphasic contrast-enhanced CT before surgery, and 129 of those patients also received preoperative whole-pancreas CT perfusion. A total of 181 tumours were proved histopathologically after surgery. Enhancement pattern and regional pancreatic perfusion characteristics were analyzed. Clinical features, tumour size and pathological grading were investigated. The frequency of isoattenuating tumours was 24.9 %. Tumour size and WHO grading was not significantly different between isoattenuating and hyperattenuating tumours. Tumour-free regions had identical blood flow (BF) regardless of their location (p = 0.35). Isoattenuating tumour-harbouring regions had lower BF compared with hyperattenuating tumour-harbouring regions; both showed higher BF compared with tumour-free neighbourhood regions (all p < 0.01). For patients with isoattenuating tumours, the overall hospital stay was longer (p < 0.01). A substantial subset of insulinomas were isoattenuating on biphasic CT. CT perfusion showed higher BF in tumour-harbouring regions compared to tumour-free regions, providing a clue for tumour regionalization. • About a quarter of all insulinomas were isoattenuating on biphasic contrast-enhanced CT. • CT perfusion finds tumour-harbouring regions have higher blood-flow compared to tumour-free regions. • CT perfusion provides important information for tumour regionalization, for isoattenuating tumours.

  6. The Paramagnetic Pillared Bentonites as Digestive Tract MRI Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojović, Miloš; Daković, Marko; Omerašević, Mia; Mojović, Zorica; Banković, Predrag; Milutinović-Nikolić, Aleksandra; Jovanović, Dušan

    The increased use of imaging techniques in diagnostic studies, such as MRI, has contributed to the development of the wide range of new materials which could be successfully used as image improving agents. However, there is a lack of such substances in the area of gastrointestinal tract MRI. Many of the traditionally popular relaxation altering agents show poor results and disadvantages provoking black bowel, side effects of diarrhea and the presence of artifacts arising from clumping. Paramagnetic species seem to be potentially suitable agents for these studies, but contrast opacification has been reported and less than 60% of the gastrointestinal tract magnetic resonance scans showed improved delineation of abdominal pathologies. The new solution has been proposed as zeolites or smectite clays (hectorite and montmorillonite) enclosing of paramagnetic metal ions obtained by ion-exchange methods. However, such materials have problems of leakage of paramagnetic ions causing the appearance of the various side-effects. In this study we show that Co+2 and Dy+3 paramagnetic-pillared bentonites could be successfully used as MRI digestive tract non-leaching contrast agents, altering the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of fluids in contact with the clay minerals.

  7. [Measurement of cerebral blood flow using phase-contrast MRI].

    PubMed

    Obata, T; Shishido, F; Koga, M; Ikehira, H; Kimura, F; Yoshida, K

    1997-07-01

    The development of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging(P-C MRI) provides a noninvasive method for measurement of volumetric blood flow(VFR). The VFR of the left and right internal carotid arteries and basilar artery were measured using P-C MRI, and total cerebral blood flow(tCBF) was calculated by summing up the VFR values in three vessels. We investigated the changes in these blood flows as influenced from age, head size, height, weight, body surface area and handedness. Moreover, regional CBF(rCBF) was measured by combining with the single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) of 123I. The blood flows were 142 +/- 58 mL/ min(mean +/- SD) in the basilar artery, 229 +/- 86 mL/min in the left, 223 +/- 58 mL/min in the right internal carotid artery, and tCBF was 617 +/- 128 mL/min(Ref. Magn Resn Imaging 14:P. 1143, 1996). Significant increases were observed in head-size-related change of VFR in the basilar artery and height-related change of tCBF. The value of rCBF was easily acquired in combination with SPECT. Phase-contrast MRI is useful for a noninvasive and rapid analysis of cerebral VFR and has potential for clinical use.

  8. 3D perfusion mapping in the intact mouse heart after myocardial infarction using myocardial contrast echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinbo; Yang, Zequan; French, Brent A.; Hossack, John A.

    2005-04-01

    An intact mouse model of surgically-induced myocardial infarction (MI) caused by permanent occlusion of the Left Anterior Descending (LAD) coronary artery was studied. Normal mice with no occlusion were also studied as controls. For each mouse, contrast enhanced ultrasound images of the heart were acquired in parallel cross-sections perpendicular to the sternum at millimeter increments. For accurate 3D reconstruction, ECG gating and a tri-axial adjustable micromanipulator were used for temporal and spatial registration. Ultrasound images at steady-state of blood refilling were color-coded in each slice to show relative perfusion. Myocardial perfusion defects and necrosis were also examined postmortem by staining with Phthalo blue and TTC red dyes. Good correlation (R>0.93) in perfused area size was observed between in vivo measurements and histological staining. A 3D multi-slice model and a 3D rendering of perfusion distribution were created and showed a promising match with postmortem results, lending further credence to its use as a more comprehensive and more reliable tool for in vivo assessment of myocardial perfusion than 2D tomographic analysis.

  9. Combination of Compressed Sensing and Parallel Imaging for Highly Accelerated First-Pass Cardiac Perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Otazo, Ricardo; Kim, Daniel; Axel, Leon; Sodickson, Daniel K.

    2010-01-01

    First-pass cardiac perfusion MRI is a natural candidate for compressed sensing acceleration since its representation in the combined temporal Fourier and spatial domain is sparse and the required incoherence can be effectively accomplished by k-t random undersampling. However, the required number of samples in practice (three to five times the number of sparse coefficients) limits the acceleration for compressed sensing alone. Parallel imaging may also be used to accelerate cardiac perfusion MRI, with acceleration factors ultimately limited by noise amplification. In this work, compressed sensing and parallel imaging are combined by merging the k-t SPARSE technique with SENSE reconstruction to substantially increase the acceleration rate for perfusion imaging. We also present a new theoretical framework for understanding the combination of k-t SPARSE with SENSE based on distributed compressed sensing theory. This framework, which identifies parallel imaging as a distributed multisensor implementation of compressed sensing, enables an estimate of feasible acceleration for the combined approach. We demonstrate feasibility of 8-fold acceleration in vivo with whole-heart coverage and high spatial and temporal resolution using standard coil arrays. The method is relatively insensitive to respiratory motion artifacts and presents similar temporal fidelity and image quality when compared to GRAPPA with 2-fold acceleration. PMID:20535813

  10. Alterations of the Blood-Brain Barrier and Regional Perfusion in Tumor Development: MRI Insights from a Rat C6 Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Huhndorf, Monika; Moussavi, Amir; Kramann, Nadine; Will, Olga; Hattermann, Kirsten; Stadelmann, Christine; Jansen, Olav

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Angiogenesis and anti-angiogenetic medications play an important role in progression and therapy of glioblastoma. In this context, in vivo characterization of the blood-brain-barrier and tumor vascularization may be important for individual prognosis and therapy optimization. Methods We analyzed perfusion and capillary permeability of C6-gliomas in rats at different stages of tumor-growth by contrast enhanced MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI at 7 Tesla. The analyses included maps of relative cerebral blood volume (CBV) and signal recovery derived from DSC data over a time period of up to 35 days after tumor cell injections. Results In all rats tumor progression was accompanied by temporal and spatial changes in CBV and capillary permeability. A leakage of the blood-brain barrier (slow contrast enhancement) was observed as soon as the tumor became detectable on T2-weighted images. Interestingly, areas of strong capillary permeability (fast signal enhancement) were predominantly localized in the center of the tumor. In contrast, the tumor rim was dominated by an increased CBV and showed the highest vessel density compared to the tumor center and the contralateral hemisphere as confirmed by histology. Conclusion Substantial regional differences in the tumor highlight the importance of parameter maps in contrast or in addition to region-of-interest analyses. The data vividly illustrate how MRI including contrast-enhanced and DSC-MRI may contribute to a better understanding of tumor development. PMID:28005983

  11. Perfusion MR imaging of enhancing brain tumors: Comparison of arterial spin labeling technique with dynamic susceptibility contrast technique.

    PubMed

    Soni, Neetu; Dhanota, Devender Pal S; Kumar, Sunil; Jaiswal, Awadhesh K; Srivastava, Arun K

    2017-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion is a noninvasive and repeatable method for quantitatively measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF). This study aims to compare measurements of ASL-derived CBF with dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI in the assessment of enhancing brain tumors (primary and metastatic), with an aim to use ASL as an alternative to DSC. Thirty patients with newly diagnosed brain tumors (16 meningiomas, 6 gliomas, 3 metastases, 2 cerebellopontine angle schwannoma, 1 central neurocytoma, and 2 low-grade gliomas) were examined using a 3T MR scanner. Values of CBF, regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) were determined in the tumor (T) as well as in the contralateral normal gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM). Tumor-to-GM or WM CBF, rCBF, and rCBV ratios were calculated to estimate normalized perfusion values (i.e., ASL normalized tumor blood flow [nTBF], DSC nTBF, and DSC normalized tumor blood volume [nTBV]) from the ASL and DSC techniques. ASL and DSC MRI derived perfusion parameters were compared using paired t-test and correlated using Pearson correlation coefficient. Mean values for ASL nTBF and DSC nTBF using contralateral GM as the reference point were 2.98 ± 1.67and 2.91 ± 1.43, respectively. A very strong correlation coefficient was found between ASL nTBF and DSC nTBF with contralateral GM as the reference region (r = 0.903; R2= 0.813). Mean DSC nTBF and DSC nTBV also showed strong correlation (r = 0.83; R2= 0.701). Our study results suggested that measurement of CBF from ASL possesses the potential for a noninvasive assessment of blood flow in intracranial tumors as an alternate to DSC MRI, in those patients requiring multiple follow-up imaging and in patients with impaired renal functions.

  12. MRI of the human eye using magnetization transfer contrast enhancement.

    PubMed

    Lizak, M J; Datiles, M B; Aletras, A H; Kador, P F; Balaban, R S

    2000-11-01

    To determine the feasibility of using magnetization transfer contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to track cataractous lens changes. A fast spin-echo sequence was modified to include a magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) preparation pulse train. This consisted of twenty 8.5-msec sinc pulses, 1200 Hz upfield from the water resonance and 1.2-Hz power. The MTC preparation pulse was followed by acquisition through fast spin-echo imaging. The imaging parameters were number of excitations (NEX) = 1, echo time (TE) = 14 msec, recovery time (TR) = 2 sec, echo train length of eight echos, and a matrix size of 256 x 160. To reduce motion artifacts, the volunteers were asked to fixate on a blinking LED. Normal and MTC-enhanced images were acquired from normal volunteers and volunteers with nuclear or cortical cataracts. The eye was adequately imaged, with few motion artifacts appearing. The lens was well resolved, despite the short T(2). The cornea and ciliary body were also clearly visible. In the lens, resolution of the epithelium and cortex were enhanced with MTC. In addition, contrast-to-noise ratios were measured for each image. Examination of the contrast-to-noise ratio confirmed that MTC increased the contrast between the nucleus and cortex. Unenhanced MRIs showed significant differences between the cortex of normal volunteers and volunteers with cataracts. MTC-enhanced images improved the sensitivity to changes in the nucleus. In this preliminary study, we were able to use MTC-enhanced MRI to obtain high-contrast images of the human lens. Regular and enhanced MRIs detected statistically significant differences between normal and cataractous lenses.

  13. A biomarker-responsive T2ex MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Daryaei, Iman; Randtke, Edward A; Pagel, Mark D

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated a fundamentally new type of responsive MRI contrast agent for molecular imaging that alters T2 exchange (T2ex ) properties after interacting with a molecular biomarker. The contrast agent Tm-DO3A-oAA was treated with nitric oxide (NO) and O2 . The R1 and R2 relaxation rates of the reactant and product were measured with respect to concentration, temperature, and pH. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) spectra of the reactant and product were acquired using a 7 Tesla (T) MRI scanner and analyzed to estimate the chemical exchange rates and r2ex relaxivities. The reaction of Tm-DO3A-oAA with NO and O2 caused a 6.4-fold increase in the r2 relaxivity of the agent, whereas r1 relaxivity remained unchanged, which demonstrated that Tm-DO3A-oAA is a responsive T2ex agent. The effects of pH and temperature on the r2 relaxivities of the reactant and product supported the conclusion that the product's benzimidazole ligand caused the agent to have a fast chemical exchange rate relative to the slow exchange rate of the reactant's ortho-aminoanilide ligand. T2ex MRI contrast agents are a new type of responsive agent that have good detection sensitivity and specificity for detecting a biomarker, which can serve as a new tool for molecular imaging. Magn Reson Med 77:1665-1670, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. Comparison of single- and dual-tracer pharmacokinetic modeling of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data using low, medium, and high molecular weight contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Orth, Robert C; Bankson, James; Price, Roger; Jackson, Edward F

    2007-10-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters corresponding to perfused microvascular volume determined from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI data were compared to immunohistochemical measures of microvascular density (MVD) and perfused microvascular density. DCE MRI data from human mammary tumors (MDA-MB-435) implanted in nude mice using low (Gd-DTPA, MW approximately equal 0.6 kDa), medium (Gadomer-17, MW(eff) approximately equal 35 kDa), and high (PG-Gd-DTPA, MW approximately equal 220 kDa) molecular weight contrast agents were analyzed with single- and dual-tracer pharmacokinetic models. MVD values were determined by two manual counting methods, "hot spot" and summed region of interest (SROI). Pharmacokinetic parameters determined using the single-tracer model (Gd-DTPA [n = 15] and Gadomer-17 [n = 13]) did not correlate with MVD measures using either manual counting method. For dual-tracer studies (Gadomer-17/Gd-DTPA [n = 15] and PG-Gd-DTPA/Gd-DTPA [n = 13]), pharmacokinetic parameters demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with MVD determined by the SROI method, but not the "hot spot" method. Ten mice successfully underwent intravital FITC-labeled lectin perfusion with the hemisphere of highest lectin labeling correlating with pharmacokinetic parameter values in 9 of 10 tumors (single-tracer Gd-DTPA [n = 2], single-tracer Gadomer-17 [n = 3], and dual-tracer Gadomer-17/Gd-DTPA [n = 5]). This study demonstrates that dual-tracer DCE MRI studies yield pharmacokinetic parameters that correlate with immunohistochemical measures of MVD.

  15. Free-breathing myocardial perfusion MRI using SW-CG-HYPR and motion correction.

    PubMed

    Ge, Lan; Kino, Aya; Griswold, Mark; Carr, James C; Li, Debiao

    2010-10-01

    First-pass perfusion MRI is a promising technique to detect ischemic heart disease. Sliding window (SW) conjugate-gradient (CG) highly constrained back-projection reconstruction (HYPR) (SW-CG-HYPR) has been proposed to increase spatial coverage, spatial resolution, and SNR. However, this method is sensitive to respiratory motion and thus requires breath-hold. This work presents a non-model-based motion correction method combined with SW-CG-HYPR to perform free-breathing myocardial MR imaging. Simulation studies were first performed to show the effectiveness of the proposed motion correction method and its independence from the pattern of the respiratory motion. After that, in vivo studies were performed in six healthy volunteers. From all of the volunteer studies, the image quality score of free breathing perfusion images with motion correction (3.11 ± 0.34) is improved compared with that of images without motion correction (2.27 ± 0.32), and is comparable with that of successful breath-hold images (3.12 ± 0.38). This result was further validated by a quantitative sharpness analysis. The left ventricle and myocardium signal changes in motion corrected free-breathing perfusion images were closely correlated to those observed in breath-hold images. The correlation coefficient is 0.9764 for myocardial signals. Bland-Altman analysis confirmed the agreement between the free-breathing SW-CG-HYPR method with motion correction and the breath-hold SW-CG-HYPR. This technique may allow myocardial perfusion MRI during free breathing.

  16. Noninvasive assessment of tumor microenvironment using dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and 18F- fluoromisonidazole PET imaging in neck nodal metastases

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Jacobus F. A.; Schöder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Wang, Ya; Pfister, David. G.; Fury, Matthew G.; Stambuk, Hilda. E.; Humm, John L.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Pretreatment multimodality imaging can provide useful anatomical and functional data about tumors, including perfusion and possibly hypoxia status. The purpose of our study was to assess non-invasively the tumor microenvironment of neck nodal metastases in patients with head and neck (HN) cancer by investigating the relationship between tumor perfusion measured using Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and hypoxia measured by 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO) PET. Methods and Materials Thirteen newly diagnosed HN cancer patients with metastatic neck nodes underwent DCE-MRI and 18F-FMISO PET imaging prior to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The matched regions of interests from both modalities were analyzed. To examine the correlations between DCE-MRI parameters and standard uptake value (SUV) measurements from 18F-FMISO PET, the non-parametric Spearman correlation coefficient was calculated. Furthermore, DCE-MRI parameters were compared between nodes with 18F-FMISO uptake and nodes with no 18F-FMISO uptake using Mann-Whitney U tests. Results For the 13 patients, a total of 18 nodes were analyzed. The nodal size strongly correlated with the 18F-FMISO SUV (ρ=0.74, p<0.001). There was a strong negative correlation between the median kep (ρ=−0.58, p=0.042) and the 18F-FMISO SUV. Hypoxic nodes (moderate to severe 18F-FMISO uptake) had significantly lower median Ktrans (p=0.049) and median kep (p=0.027) values than did non-hypoxic nodes (no 18F-FMISO uptake). Conclusion This initial evaluation of the preliminary results support the hypothesis that in metastatic neck lymph nodes, hypoxic nodes are poorly perfused (i.e., have significantly lower kep and Ktrans values) compared to non-hypoxic nodes. PMID:19906496

  17. Visualization and quantification of whole rat heart laminar structure using high-spatial resolution contrast-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Benoist, David; Benson, Alan P.; White, Ed; Tanner, Steven F.; Holden, Arun V.; Dobrzynski, Halina; Bernus, Olivier; Radjenovic, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown by histology that cardiac myocytes are organized into laminae and this structure is important in function, both influencing the spread of electrical activation and enabling myocardial thickening in systole by laminar sliding. We have carried out high-spatial resolution three-dimensional MRI of the ventricular myolaminae of the entire volume of the isolated rat heart after contrast perfusion [dimeglumine gadopentate (Gd-DTPA)]. Four ex vivo rat hearts were perfused with Gd-DTPA and fixative and high-spatial resolution MRI was performed on a 9.4T MRI system. After MRI, cryosectioning followed by histology was performed. Images from MRI and histology were aligned, described, and quantitatively compared. In the three-dimensional MR images we directly show the presence of laminae and demonstrate that these are highly branching and are absent from much of the subepicardium. We visualized these MRI volumes to demonstrate laminar architecture and quantitatively demonstrated that the structural features observed are similar to those imaged in histology. We showed qualitatively and quantitatively that laminar architecture is similar in the four hearts. MRI can be used to image the laminar architecture of ex vivo hearts in three dimensions, and the images produced are qualitatively and quantitatively comparable with histology. We have demonstrated in the rat that: 1) laminar architecture is consistent between hearts; 2) myolaminae are absent from much of the subepicardium; and 3) although localized orthotropy is present throughout the myocardium, tracked myolaminae are branching structures and do not have a discrete identity. PMID:22021329

  18. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI evaluation of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Hart, Blaine L; Taheri, Saeid; Rosenberg, Gary A; Morrison, Leslie A

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the behavior of CNS cavernous malformations (CCMs) using a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI) technique sensitive for slow transfer rates of gadolinium. The prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and was HIPPA compliant. Written informed consent was obtained from 14 subjects with familial CCMs (4 men and 10 women, ages 22-76 years, mean 48.1 years). Following routine anatomic MRI of the brain, DCEMRI was performed for six slices, using T1 mapping with partial inversion recovery (TAPIR) to calculate T1 values, following administration of 0.025 mmol/kg gadolinium DTPA. The transfer rate (Ki) was calculated using the Patlak model, and Ki within CCMs was compared to normal-appearing white matter as well as to 17 normal control subjects previously studied. All subjects had typical MRI appearance of CCMs. Thirty-nine CCMs were studied using DCEMRI. Ki was low or normal in 12 lesions and elevated from 1.4 to 12 times higher than background in the remaining 27 lesions. Ki ranged from 2.1E-6 to 9.63E-4 min(-1), mean 3.55E-4. Normal-appearing white matter in the CCM patients had a mean Ki of 1.57E-4, not statistically different from mean WM Ki of 1.47E-4 in controls. TAPIR-based DCEMRI technique permits quantifiable assessment of CCMs in vivo and reveals considerable differences not seen with conventional MRI. Potential applications include correlation with biologic behavior such as lesion growth or hemorrage, and measurement of drug effects.

  19. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Evaluation of Cerebral Cavernous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Hart, B. L.; Taheri, S.; Rosenberg, G. A.; Morrison, L. A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the behavior of CNS cavernous malformations (CCMs) using a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI) technique sensitive for slow transfer rates of gadolinium. The prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and was HIPPA compliant. Written informed consent was obtained from 14 subjects with familial CCMs (4 men and 10 women, ages 22–76 years, mean 48.1 years). Following routine anatomic MRI of the brain, DCEMRI was performed for six slices, using T1 mapping with partial inversion recovery (TAPIR) to calculate T1 values, following administration of 0.025 mmol/kg gadolinium DTPA. The transfer rate (Ki) was calculated using the Patlak model, and Ki within CCMs was compared to normal-appearing white matter as well as to 17 normal control subjects previously studied. All subjects had typical MRI appearance of CCMs. Thirty-nine CCMs were studied using DCEMRI. Ki was low or normal in 12 lesions and elevated from 1.4 to 12 times higher than background in the remaining 27 lesions. Ki ranged from 2.1E–6 to 9.63E–4 min−1, mean 3.55E–4. Normal-appearing white matter in the CCM patients had a mean Ki of 1.57E–4, not statistically different from mean WM Ki of 1.47E–4 in controls. TAPIR-based DCEMRI technique permits quantifiable assessment of CCMs in vivo and reveals considerable differences not seen with conventional MRI. Potential applications include correlation with biologic behavior such as lesion growth or hemorrage, and measurement of drug effects. PMID:24323376

  20. Synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticles as potential contrast agents in MRI.

    PubMed

    Van Roosbroeck, Ruben; Van Roy, Willem; Stakenborg, Tim; Trekker, Jesse; D'Hollander, Antoine; Dresselaers, Tom; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Lagae, Liesbet

    2014-03-25

    We present the top-down synthesis of a novel type of MRI T2 contrast agent with great control over size and shape using a colloidal lithography technique. The resulting synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticles (SAF-NPs) yield improved relaxivities compared to superparamagnetic iron oxide alternatives (SPIONs). For T2 weighted imaging, the outer sphere relaxation theory has shown that the sensitivity of a T2 contrast agent is dependent on the particle size with an optimal size that exceeds the superparamagnetic limit of SPIONs. With the use of the interlayer exchange coupling effect, the SAF-NPs presented here do not suffer from this limit. Adjusting the outer sphere relaxation theory for spherical particles to SAF-NPs, we show both theoretically and experimentally that the SAF-NP size can be optimized to reach the r2 maximum. With measured r2 values up to 355 s(-1) mM(-1), our SAF-NPs show better performance than commercial alternatives and are competitive with the state-of-the-art. This performance is confirmed in an in vitro MRI study on SKOV3 cells.

  1. Calculation of intravascular signal in dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI using adaptive complex independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Mehrabian, Hatef; Chopra, Rajiv; Martel, Anne L

    2013-04-01

    Assessing tumor response to therapy is a crucial step in personalized treatments. Pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling provides quantitative information about tumor perfusion and vascular permeability that are associated with prognostic factors. A fundamental step in most PK analyses is calculating the signal that is generated in the tumor vasculature. This signal is usually inseparable from the extravascular extracellular signal. It was shown previously using in vivo and phantom experiments that independent component analysis (ICA) is capable of calculating the intravascular time-intensity curve in dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI. A novel adaptive complex independent component analysis (AC-ICA) technique is developed in this study to calculate the intravascular time-intensity curve and separate this signal from the DCE-MR images of tumors. The use of the complex-valued DCE-MRI images rather than the commonly used magnitude images satisfied the fundamental assumption of ICA, i.e., linear mixing of the sources. Using an adaptive cost function in ICA through estimating the probability distribution of the tumor vasculature at each iteration resulted in a more robust and accurate separation algorithm. The AC-ICA algorithm provided a better estimate for the intravascular time-intensity curve than the previous ICA-based method. A simulation study was also developed in this study to realistically simulate DCE-MRI data of a leaky tissue mimicking phantom. The passage of the MR contrast agent through the leaky phantom was modeled with finite element analysis using a diffusion model. Once the distribution of the contrast agent in the imaging field of view was calculated, DCE-MRI data was generated by solving the Bloch equation for each voxel at each time point. The intravascular time-intensity curve calculation results were compared to the previously proposed ICA-based intravascular time-intensity curve calculation method that applied ICA to the magnitude of the DCE-MRI data

  2. Correlation of oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI with invasive micro probe measurements in healthy mice brain.

    PubMed

    Sedlacik, Jan; Reitz, Matthias; Bolar, Divya S; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Schmidt, Nils O; Fiehler, Jens

    2015-03-01

    The non-invasive assessment of (patho-)physiological parameters such as, perfusion and oxygenation, is of great importance for the characterization of pathologies e.g., tumors, which may be helpful to better predict treatment response and potential outcome. To better understand the influence of physiological parameters on the investigated oxygenation and perfusion sensitive MRI methods, MRI measurements were correlated with subsequent invasive micro probe measurements during free breathing conditions of air, air+10% CO2 and 100% O2 in healthy mice brain. MRI parameters were the irreversible (R2), reversible (R2') and effective (R2*) transverse relaxation rates, venous blood oxygenation level assessed by quantitative blood oxygenation level dependent (qBOLD) method and cerebral blood flow (CBF) assessed by arterial spin labeling (ASL) using a 7 T small animal MRI scanner. One to two days after MRI, tissue perfusion and pO2 were measured by Laser-Doppler flowmetry and fluorescence quenching micro probes, respectively. The tissue pO2 values were converted to blood oxygen saturation by using the Hill equation. The animals were anesthetized by intra peritoneal injection of ketamine-xylazine-acepromazine (10-2-0.3 mg/ml · kg). Results for normal/hypercapnia/hyperoxia conditions were: R2[s(∧)-1] = 20.7/20.4/20.1, R2*[s(∧)-1] = 31.6/29.6/25.9, R2'[s-(∧)1] = 10.9/9.2/5.7, qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level = 0.43/0.51/0.56, CBF[ml · min(∧)-1 · 100 g(∧)-1] = 70.6/105.5/81.8, Laser-Doppler flowmetry[a.u.] = 89.2/120.2/90.6 and pO2[mmHg] = 6.3/32.3/46.7. All parameters were statistically significantly different with P < 0.001 between all breathing conditions. All MRI and the corresponding micro probe measurements were also statistically significantly (P ≤ 0.03) correlated with each other. However, converting the tissue pO2 to blood oxygen saturation = 0.02/0.34/0.63, showed only very limited agreement with the qBOLD venous blood oxygenation level. We found

  3. Effects of Image Contrast on Functional MRI Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Castillo, Javier; Duthie, Kristen N.; Saad, Ziad S.; Chu, Carlton; Bandettini, Peter A.; Luh, Wen-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Lack of tissue contrast and existing inhomogeneous bias fields from multi-channel coils have the potential to degrade the output of registration algorithms; and consequently degrade group analysis and any attempt to accurately localize brain function. Non-invasive ways to improve tissue contrast in fMRI images include the use of low flip angles (FAs) well below the Ernst angle and longer repetition times (TR). Techniques to correct intensity inhomogeneity are also available in most mainstream fMRI data analysis packages; but are not used as part of the pre-processing pipeline in many studies. In this work, we use a combination of real data and simulations to show that simple-to-implement acquisition/pre-processing techniques can significantly improve the outcome of both functional-to-functional and anatomical-to-functional image registrations. We also emphasize the need of tissue contrast on EPI images to be able to appropriately evaluate the quality of the alignment. In particular, we show that the use of low FAs (e.g., θ≤40°), when physiological noise considerations permit such an approach, significantly improves accuracy, consistency and stability of registration for data acquired at relatively short TRs (TR≤2s). Moreover, we also show that the application of bias correction techniques significantly improves alignment both for array-coil data (known to contain high intensity inhomogeneity) as well as birdcage-coil data. Finally, improvements in alignment derived from the use of the first infinite-TR volumes (ITVs) as targets for registration are also demonstrated. For the purpose of quantitatively evaluating the different scenarios, two novel metrics were developed: Mean Voxel Distance (MVD) to evaluate registration consistency, and Deviation of Mean Voxel Distance (dMVD) to evaluate registration stability across successive alignment attempts. PMID:23128074

  4. Parkinson's disease-related perfusion and glucose metabolic brain patterns identified with PCASL-MRI and FDG-PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Teune, Laura K; Renken, Remco J; de Jong, Bauke M; Willemsen, Antoon T; van Osch, Matthias J; Roerdink, Jos B T M; Dierckx, Rudi A; Leenders, Klaus L

    2014-01-01

    Under normal conditions, the spatial distribution of resting cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose are closely related. A relatively new magnetic resonance (MR) technique, pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL), can be used to measure regional brain perfusion. We identified a Parkinson's disease (PD)-related perfusion and metabolic covariance pattern in the same patients using PCASL and FDG-PET imaging and assessed (dis)similarities in the disease-related pattern between perfusion and metabolism in PD patients. Nineteen PD patients and seventeen healthy controls underwent [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging. Of 14 PD patients and all healthy controls PCASL-MRI could be obtained. Data were analyzed using scaled subprofile model/principal component analysis (SSM/PCA). Unique Parkinson's disease-related perfusion and metabolic covariance patterns were identified using PCASL and FDG-PET in the same patients. The PD-related metabolic covariance brain pattern is in high accordance with previously reports. Also our disease-related perfusion pattern is comparable to the earlier described perfusion pattern. The most marked difference between our perfusion and metabolic patterns is the larger perfusion decrease in cortical regions including the insula. We identified PD-related perfusion and metabolic brain patterns using PCASL and FDG-PET in the same patients which were comparable with results of existing research. In this respect, PCASL appears to be a promising addition in the early diagnosis of individual parkinsonian patients.

  5. Parkinson's disease-related perfusion and glucose metabolic brain patterns identified with PCASL-MRI and FDG-PET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Teune, Laura K.; Renken, Remco J.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Willemsen, Antoon T.; van Osch, Matthias J.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Under normal conditions, the spatial distribution of resting cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose are closely related. A relatively new magnetic resonance (MR) technique, pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL), can be used to measure regional brain perfusion. We identified a Parkinson's disease (PD)-related perfusion and metabolic covariance pattern in the same patients using PCASL and FDG-PET imaging and assessed (dis)similarities in the disease-related pattern between perfusion and metabolism in PD patients. Methods Nineteen PD patients and seventeen healthy controls underwent [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging. Of 14 PD patients and all healthy controls PCASL-MRI could be obtained. Data were analyzed using scaled subprofile model/principal component analysis (SSM/PCA). Results Unique Parkinson's disease-related perfusion and metabolic covariance patterns were identified using PCASL and FDG-PET in the same patients. The PD-related metabolic covariance brain pattern is in high accordance with previously reports. Also our disease-related perfusion pattern is comparable to the earlier described perfusion pattern. The most marked difference between our perfusion and metabolic patterns is the larger perfusion decrease in cortical regions including the insula. Conclusion We identified PD-related perfusion and metabolic brain patterns using PCASL and FDG-PET in the same patients which were comparable with results of existing research. In this respect, PCASL appears to be a promising addition in the early diagnosis of individual parkinsonian patients. PMID:25068113

  6. Myocardial contrast echocardiography to assess perfusion in a mouse model of ischemia/reperfusion injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossack, John A.; Li, Yinbo; Christensen, Jonathan P.; Yang, Zequan; French, Brent A.

    2004-04-01

    Noninvasive approaches for measuring anatomical and physiological changes resulting from myocardial ischemia / reperfusion injury in the mouse heart have significant value since the mouse provides a practical, low-cost model for modeling human heart disease. In this work, perfusion was assessed before, during and after an induced closed- chest, coronary ischemic event. Ultrasound contrast agent, similar to MP1950, in a saline suspension, was injected via cannulated carotid artery as a bolus and imaged using a Siemens Sequoia 512 scanner and a 15L8 intraoperative transducer operating in second harmonic imaging mode. Image sequences were transferred from the scanner to a PC for analysis. Regions of interest were defined in septal and anterior segments of the myocardium. During the ischemic event, when perfusion was diminished in the anterior segment, mean video intensity in the affected segment was reduced by one half. Furthermore, following reperfusion, hyperemia (enhanced blood flow) was observed in the anterior segment. Specifically, the mean video intensity in the affected segment was increased by approximately 50% over the original baseline level prior to ischemia. Following the approach of Kaul et al., [1], gamma variate curves were fitted to the time varying level of mean video intensity. This foundation suggests the possibility of quantifying myocardial blood flow in ischemic regions of a mouse heart using automated analysis of contrast image data sets. An improved approach to perfusion assessment using the destruction-reperfusion approach [2] is also presented.

  7. Automated quantification of the spatial extent of perfusion defects and viability on myocardial contrast echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Micari, Antonio; Sklenar, Jiri; Belcik, Todd A; Kaul, Sanjiv; Lindner, Jonathan R

    2006-04-01

    The spatial extent of hypoperfusion or viability is important in the treatment of patients with coronary artery disease. We hypothesized that computerized pixel intensity threshold analysis (PITA) could be used for the automated analysis of perfusion defect size during myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE). For calibration studies, MCE was performed in 6 dogs undergoing ischemia and reperfusion. Infarct size was determined by PITA, which automatically calculates the percentage of pixels within the myocardium that fail to exceed a predetermined threshold of maximum contrast enhancement. A threshold of 10% of maximum yielded infarct sizes that most closely correlated with those determined by histologic staining. For clinical validation, MCE was performed in 30 patients with acute myocardial infarction before primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for measurement of risk area; and within 5 days and at 4 weeks after PCI to determine infarct size. The defect size by PITA with a 10% threshold value closely correlated with those measured by expert reader planimetry on background-subtracted color-coded image sets (r = 0.95, P < .001). We conclude that automated analysis of perfusion defect size on MCE is possible by PITA. This technique may be useful for rapid and objective analysis of the extent of ischemia and viability, and for clinical experimentation where accurate and sequential analysis of perfusion defect size is imperative.

  8. The in vivo relaxivity of MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuter, Borys

    1999-11-01

    Post-contrast clinical 1H Magnetic Resonance Images have to date been interpreted with little regard for possible variations in the in-vivo properties of injected magnetic pharmaceuticals (contrast agents), particularly in their relaxivity or ability to alter tissue relaxation rates, T2-1 and T 2-1, per unit concentration. The relaxivities of contrast agents have only rarely been measured in-vivo, measurements usually being performed on excised tissues and at magnetic field strengths lower than used in clinical practice. Some researchers have simply assumed that relaxivities determined in homogeneous tissue phantoms were applicable in-vivo. In this thesis, the relaxivities of two contrast agents, Gd-DTPA and Gd-EOB-DTPA, were measured in simple tissue phantoms and in the kidney and liver of intact, but sacrificed, Wistar rats using a clinical MR scanner with a magnetic field of 1.5 Tesla. T1 and T2 were determined from sets of images acquired using a standard clinical spin-echo pulse sequence. The contrast agent concentration in tissue was assessed by radioassay of 153Gd-DTPA or 153Gd-EOB-DTPA, mixed with the normal compound prior to injection. Relaxivity was taken as the slope of a linear regression fit of relaxation rate against Gd concentration. The relaxivities of Gd-EOB-DTPA were similarly determined in normal and biliary- obstructed guinea pigs. Relaxivities in tissue differed significantly from values obtained in simple phantoms. Kidney T1 relaxivity was reduced for both compounds in normal animals. Three days or more of biliary obstruction produced further reductions in kidney T1 relaxivity of Gd-EOB-DTPA, providing strong evidence that disease affects contrast agent relaxivity. Kidney T2 relaxivity was much greater than T1 relaxivity and was also depressed by biliary obstruction. Liver T1 and T 2 relaxivites were increased above phantom values, but were not affected by the biliary obstruction. Water compartmentalisation, macromolecular binding, proton

  9. Accelerating free breathing myocardial perfusion MRI using multi coil radial k-t SLR

    PubMed Central

    Lingala, Sajan Goud; DiBella, Edward; Adluru, Ganesh; McGann, Christopher; Jacob, Mathews

    2013-01-01

    The clinical utility of myocardial perfusion MR imaging (MPI) is often restricted by the inability of current acquisition schemes to simultaneously achieve high spatio-temporal resolution, good volume coverage, and high signal to noise ratio. Moreover, many subjects often find it difficult to hold their breath for sufficiently long durations making it difficult to obtain reliable MPI data. Accelerated acquisition of free breathing MPI data can overcome some of these challenges. Recently, an algorithm termed as k − t SLR has been proposed to accelerate dynamic MRI by exploiting sparsity and low rank properties of dynamic MRI data. The main focus of this paper is to further improve k − t SLR and demonstrate its utility in considerably accelerating free breathing MPI. We extend its previous implementation to account for multi-coil radial MPI acquisitions. We perform k − t sampling experiments to compare different radial trajectories and determine the best sampling pattern. We also introduce a novel augmented Lagrangian framework to considerably improve the algorithm's convergence rate. The proposed algorithm is validated using free breathing rest and stress radial perfusion data sets from two normal subjects and one patient with ischemia. k − t SLR was observed to provide faithful reconstructions at high acceleration levels with minimal artifacts compared to existing MPI acceleration schemes such as spatio-temporal constrained reconstruction (STCR) and k − t SPARSE/SENSE. PMID:24077063

  10. Diagnosis of pseudoprogression using MRI perfusion in patients with glioblastoma multiforme may predict improved survival

    PubMed Central

    Gahramanov, Seymur; Varallyay, Csanad; Tyson, Rose Marie; Lacy, Cynthia; Fu, Rongwei; Netto, Joao Prola; Nasseri, Morad; White, Tricia; Woltjer, Randy L; Gultekin, Sakir Humayun; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Aims This retrospective study determined the survival of glioblastoma patients with or without pseudoprogression. Methods A total of 68 patients were included. Overall survival was compared between patients showing pseudoprogression (in most cases diagnosed using perfusion MRI with ferumoxytol) and in patients without pseudoprogession. MGMT methylation status was also analyzed in the pseudoprogression cases. Results Median survival in 24 (35.3%) patients with pseudoprogression was 34.7 months (95% CI: 20.3–54.1), and 13.4 months (95% CI: 11.1–19.5) in 44 (64.7%) patients without pseudoprogression (p < 0.0001). The longest survival was a median of 54.1 months in patients with combination of pseudoprogression and (MGMT) promoter methylation. Conclusion Pseudoprogression is associated with better outcome, especially if concurring with MGMT promoter methylation. Patients never diagnosed with pseudoprogression had poor survival. This study emphasizes the importance of differentiating tumor progression and pseudoprogression using perfusion MRI. PMID:25438810

  11. Accelerating free breathing myocardial perfusion MRI using multi coil radial k - t SLR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goud Lingala, Sajan; DiBella, Edward; Adluru, Ganesh; McGann, Christopher; Jacob, Mathews

    2013-10-01

    The clinical utility of myocardial perfusion MR imaging (MPI) is often restricted by the inability of current acquisition schemes to simultaneously achieve high spatio-temporal resolution, good volume coverage, and high signal to noise ratio. Moreover, many subjects often find it difficult to hold their breath for sufficiently long durations making it difficult to obtain reliable MPI data. Accelerated acquisition of free breathing MPI data can overcome some of these challenges. Recently, an algorithm termed as k - t SLR has been proposed to accelerate dynamic MRI by exploiting sparsity and low rank properties of dynamic MRI data. The main focus of this paper is to further improve k - t SLR and demonstrate its utility in considerably accelerating free breathing MPI. We extend its previous implementation to account for multi-coil radial MPI acquisitions. We perform k - t sampling experiments to compare different radial trajectories and determine the best sampling pattern. We also introduce a novel augmented Lagrangian framework to considerably improve the algorithm’s convergence rate. The proposed algorithm is validated using free breathing rest and stress radial perfusion data sets from two normal subjects and one patient with ischemia. k - t SLR was observed to provide faithful reconstructions at high acceleration levels with minimal artifacts compared to existing MPI acceleration schemes such as spatio-temporal constrained reconstruction and k - t SPARSE/SENSE.

  12. [Experimental studies of ferrite as a MRI contrast agent].

    PubMed

    Aoki, F

    1992-02-01

    Using a 0.2 T permanent MR imaging system, the gradual changes of signal intensity after intravenous injection of Ferrite suspension were studied in liver of normal rabbits and those with intrahepatic VX2 tumor. After injection of Ferrite suspension, decreased signal intensities of liver were observed on both T1 and T2 weighted images. The decrease on T2 weighted images was more remarkable than that on the T1 weighted image. The image with 8 mg/kg (50 mumol/kg) dose of Ferrite suspension showed significant changes of signal intensity, while, the image with 24 mg/kg (150 mumol/kg) dose was hardly evaluated because of inducing intense artifacts. The decrease of signal intensity in liver was observed immediately after the injection and was lowest after 1 hour. After 48 hours, the signal intensity began to increase. However, a slight loss of signal intensity was visualized even after 4 weeks. A clear MRI of the intrahepatic tumor following injection of Ferrite suspension was acquired especially on T2 weighted image in comparison with MRI after Gd-DTPA administration. In addition, MRI using Ferrite suspension could detect the small intrahepatic tumors which had been unable to be visualized by plain CT or enhanced CT. It is of benefit, furthermore, that Ferrite suspension could be an useful tracer for observing the intrahepatic tumor growth by a first single injection. Histologically, Ferrite particles were accumulated in reticuloendothelial system of liver whereas no accumulated in intrahepatic tumor was verified. The particles produced changes in local magnetic field resulting that signal intensity of liver showed decrease on the image. Subsequently, relatively negative contrast enhancement of liver was displayed. As a result of the present investigation, the MR imaging following injection of Ferrite suspension was found to be useful for detection of intrahepatic tumors, particularly of metastatic tumors which were isointense or hypovascular to the surrounding tissue

  13. Perfusion MRI Indexes Variability in the Functional Brain Effects of Theta-Burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gratton, Caterina; Lee, Taraz G.; Nomura, Emi M.; D’Esposito, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an important tool for testing causal relationships in cognitive neuroscience research. However, the efficacy of TMS can be variable across individuals and difficult to measure. This variability is especially a challenge when TMS is applied to regions without well-characterized behavioral effects, such as in studies using TMS on multi-modal areas in intrinsic networks. Here, we examined whether perfusion fMRI recordings of Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF), a quantitative measure sensitive to slow functional changes, reliably index variability in the effects of stimulation. Twenty-seven participants each completed four combined TMS-fMRI sessions during which both resting state Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) and perfusion Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) scans were recorded. In each session after the first baseline day, continuous theta-burst TMS (TBS) was applied to one of three locations: left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (L dlPFC), left anterior insula/frontal operculum (L aI/fO), or left primary somatosensory cortex (L S1). The two frontal targets are components of intrinsic networks and L S1 was used as an experimental control. CBF changes were measured both before and after TMS on each day from a series of interleaved resting state and perfusion scans. Although TBS led to weak selective increases under the coil in CBF measurements across the group, individual subjects showed wide variability in their responses. TBS-induced changes in rCBF were related to TBS-induced changes in functional connectivity of the relevant intrinsic networks measured during separate resting-state BOLD scans. This relationship was selective: CBF and functional connectivity of these networks were not related before TBS or after TBS to the experimental control region (S1). Furthermore, subject groups with different directions of CBF change after TBS showed distinct modulations in the functional interactions of targeted networks. These results suggest

  14. Cardiac function and myocardial perfusion immediately following maximal treadmill exercise inside the MRI room

    PubMed Central

    Jekic, Mihaela; Foster, Eric L; Ballinger, Michelle R; Raman, Subha V; Simonetti, Orlando P

    2008-01-01

    Treadmill exercise stress testing is an essential tool in the prevention, detection, and treatment of a broad spectrum of cardiovascular disease. After maximal exercise, cardiac images at peak stress are typically acquired using nuclear scintigraphy or echocardiography, both of which have inherent limitations. Although CMR offers superior image quality, the lack of MRI-compatible exercise and monitoring equipment has prevented the realization of treadmill exercise CMR. It is critical to commence imaging as quickly as possible after exercise to capture exercise-induced cardiac wall motion abnormalities. We modified a commercial treadmill such that it could be safely positioned inside the MRI room to minimize the distance between the treadmill and the scan table. We optimized the treadmill exercise CMR protocol in 20 healthy volunteers and successfully imaged cardiac function and myocardial perfusion at peak stress, followed by viability imaging at rest. Imaging commenced an average of 30 seconds after maximal exercise. Real-time cine of seven slices with no breath-hold and no ECG-gating was completed within 45 seconds of exercise, immediately followed by stress perfusion imaging of three short-axis slices which showed an average time to peak enhancement within 57 seconds of exercise. We observed a 3.1-fold increase in cardiac output and a myocardial perfusion reserve index of 1.9, which agree with reported values for healthy subjects at peak stress. This study successfully demonstrates in-room treadmill exercise CMR in healthy volunteers, but confirmation of feasibility in patients with heart disease is still needed. PMID:18272005

  15. Photo-magnetic imaging: resolving optical contrast at MRI resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuting; Gao, Hao; Thayer, David; Luk, Alex L.; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we establish the mathematical framework of a novel imaging technique, namely photo-magnetic imaging (PMI). PMI uses a laser to illuminate biological tissues and measure the induced temperature variations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMI overcomes the limitation of conventional optical imaging and allows imaging of the optical contrast at MRI spatial resolution. The image reconstruction for PMI, using a finite-element-based algorithm with an iterative approach, is presented in this paper. The quantitative accuracy of PMI is investigated for various inclusion sizes, depths and absorption values. Then, a comparison between conventional diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and PMI is carried out to illustrate the superior performance of PMI. An example is presented showing that two 2 mm diameter inclusions embedded 4.5 mm deep and located side by side in a 25 mm diameter circular geometry medium are recovered as a single 6 mm diameter object with DOT. However, these two objects are not only effectively resolved with PMI, but their true concentrations are also recovered successfully.

  16. Photo-magnetic Imaging: Resolving Optical Contrast at MRI resolution

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuting; Gao, Hao; Thayer, David; Luk, Alex L.; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we establish the mathematical framework of a novel imaging technique, namely Photo-magnetic Imaging (PMI). PMI uses laser to illuminate biological tissues and measure the induced temperature variations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMI overcomes the limitation of conventional optical imaging and allows imaging of optical contrast at MRI spatial resolution. The image reconstruction for PMI, using a finite element-based algorithm with iterative approach, is presented in this paper. The quantitative accuracy of PMI is investigated for various inclusion sizes, depths and absorption values. Then, a comparison between conventional Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) and PMI is carried out to illustrate the superior performance of PMI. An example is presented showing that two 2 mm diameter inclusions embedded 4.5 mm deep and located side by side in a 25 mm diameter circular geometry medium is recovered as a single 6 mm diameter object with DOT. However, these two objects are not only effectively resolved with PMI, but their true concentration are also recovered successfully. PMID:23640084

  17. Type of MRI contrast, tissue gadolinium, and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Do, Catherine; Barnes, Jeffrey L; Tan, Chunyan; Wagner, Brent

    2014-10-01

    It has been presupposed that the thermodynamic stability constant (K(therm)) of gadolinium-based MRI chelates relate to the risk of precipitating nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. The present study compared low-K(therm) gadodiamide with high-K(therm) gadoteridol in cultured fibroblasts and rats with uninephrectomies. Gadolinium content was assessed using scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in paraffin-embedded tissues. In vitro, fibroblasts demonstrated dose-dependent fibronectin generation, transforming growth factor-β production, and expression of activated myofibroblast stress fiber protein α-smooth muscle actin. There were negligible differences with respect to toxicity or proliferation between the two contrast agents. In the rodent model, gadodiamide treatment led to greater skin fibrosis and dermal cellularity than gadoteridol. In the kidney, both contrast agents led to proximal tubule vacuolization and increased fibronectin accumulation. Despite large detectable gadolinium signals in the spleen, skin, muscle, and liver from the gadodiamide-treated group, contrast-induced fibrosis appeared to be limited to the skin and kidney. These findings support the hypothesis that low-K(therm) chelates have a greater propensity to elicit nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and demonstrate that certain tissues are resistant to these effects.

  18. Influence of amplitude-related perfusion parameters in the parotid glands by non-fat-saturated dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Su-Chin; Cheng, Cheng-Chieh; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Chiu, Hui-Chu; Liu, Yi-Jui; Hsu, Hsian-He; Juan, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: To verify whether quantification of parotid perfusion is affected by fat signals on non-fat-saturated (NFS) dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and whether the influence of fat is reduced with fat saturation (FS). Methods: This study consisted of three parts. First, a retrospective study analyzed DCE-MRI data previously acquired on different patients using NFS (n = 18) or FS (n = 18) scans. Second, a phantom study simulated the signal enhancements in the presence of gadolinium contrast agent at six concentrations and three fat contents. Finally, a prospective study recruited nine healthy volunteers to investigate the influence of fat suppression on perfusion quantification on the same subjects. Parotid perfusion parameters were derived from NFS and FS DCE-MRI data using both pharmacokinetic model analysis and semiquantitative parametric analysis. T tests and linear regression analysis were used for statistical analysis with correction for multiple comparisons. Results: NFS scans showed lower amplitude-related parameters, including parameter A, peak enhancement (PE), and slope than FS scans in the patients (all with P < 0.0167). The relative signal enhancement in the phantoms was proportional to the dose of contrast agent and was lower in NFS scans than in FS scans. The volunteer study showed lower parameter A (6.75 ± 2.38 a.u.), PE (42.12% ± 14.87%), and slope (1.43% ± 0.54% s{sup −1}) in NFS scans as compared to 17.63 ± 8.56 a.u., 104.22% ± 25.15%, and 9.68% ± 1.67% s{sup −1}, respectively, in FS scans (all with P < 0.005). These amplitude-related parameters were negatively associated with the fat content in NFS scans only (all with P < 0.05). Conclusions: On NFS DCE-MRI, quantification of parotid perfusion is adversely affected by the presence of fat signals for all amplitude-related parameters. The influence could be reduced on FS scans.

  19. Influence of amplitude-related perfusion parameters in the parotid glands by non-fat-saturated dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Su-Chin; Cheng, Cheng-Chieh; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Chiu, Hui-Chu; Liu, Yi-Jui; Hsu, Hsian-He; Juan, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    To verify whether quantification of parotid perfusion is affected by fat signals on non-fat-saturated (NFS) dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and whether the influence of fat is reduced with fat saturation (FS). This study consisted of three parts. First, a retrospective study analyzed DCE-MRI data previously acquired on different patients using NFS (n = 18) or FS (n = 18) scans. Second, a phantom study simulated the signal enhancements in the presence of gadolinium contrast agent at six concentrations and three fat contents. Finally, a prospective study recruited nine healthy volunteers to investigate the influence of fat suppression on perfusion quantification on the same subjects. Parotid perfusion parameters were derived from NFS and FS DCE-MRI data using both pharmacokinetic model analysis and semiquantitative parametric analysis. T tests and linear regression analysis were used for statistical analysis with correction for multiple comparisons. NFS scans showed lower amplitude-related parameters, including parameter A, peak enhancement (PE), and slope than FS scans in the patients (all with P < 0.0167). The relative signal enhancement in the phantoms was proportional to the dose of contrast agent and was lower in NFS scans than in FS scans. The volunteer study showed lower parameter A (6.75 ± 2.38 a.u.), PE (42.12% ± 14.87%), and slope (1.43% ± 0.54% s(-1)) in NFS scans as compared to 17.63 ± 8.56 a.u., 104.22% ± 25.15%, and 9.68% ± 1.67% s(-1), respectively, in FS scans (all with P < 0.005). These amplitude-related parameters were negatively associated with the fat content in NFS scans only (all with P < 0.05). On NFS DCE-MRI, quantification of parotid perfusion is adversely affected by the presence of fat signals for all amplitude-related parameters. The influence could be reduced on FS scans.

  20. A Manganese Alternative to Gadolinium for MRI Contrast.

    PubMed

    Gale, Eric M; Atanasova, Iliyana P; Blasi, Francesco; Ay, Ilknur; Caravan, Peter

    2015-12-16

    Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are routinely used to diagnose soft tissue and vascular abnormalities. However, safety concerns limit the use of iodinated and gadolinium (Gd)-based CT and MRI contrast media in renally compromised patients. With an estimated 14% of the US population suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD), contrast media compatible with renal impairment is sorely needed. We present the new manganese(II) complex [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) as a Gd alternative. [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) is among the most stable Mn(II) complexes at pH 7.4 (log KML = 11.40). In the presence of 25 mol equiv of Zn at pH 6.0, 37 °C, [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) is 20-fold more resistant to dissociation than [Gd(DTPA)(H2O)](2-). Relaxivity of [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) in blood plasma is comparable to commercial Gd contrast agents. Biodistribution analysis confirms that [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) clears via a mixed renal/hepatobiliary pathway with >99% elimination by 24 h. [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) was modified to form a bifunctional chelator and 4 chelates were conjugated to a fibrin-specific peptide to give Mn-FBP. Mn-FBP binds the soluble fibrin fragment DD(E) with Kd = 110 nM. Per Mn relaxivity of Mn-FBP is 4-fold greater than [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) and increases 60% in the presence of fibrin, consistent with binding. Mn-FBP provided equivalent thrombus enhancement to the state of the art Gd analogue, EP-2104R, in a rat model of arterial thrombosis. Mn metabolite analysis reveals no evidence of dechelation and the probe was >99% eliminated after 24 h. [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)](-) is a lead development candidate for an imaging probe that is compatible with renally compromised patients.

  1. A Manganese Alternative to Gadolinium for MRI Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Eric M.; Atanasova, Iliyana P.; Blasi, Francesco; Ay, Ilknur; Caravan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are routinely used to diagnose soft tissue and vascular abnormalities. However safety concerns limit the use of iodinated and gadolinium- (Gd) based CT and MRI contrast media in renally compromised patients. With an estimated 14% of the US population suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD), contrast media compatible with renal impairment is sorely needed. We present the new manganese(II) complex [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)]- as a Gd alternative. [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)]- is amongst the most stable Mn(II) complexes at pH 7.4 (log KML = 11.40). In the presence of 25 mol equiv. Zn at pH 6.0, 37 °C, [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)]- is 20-fold more resistant to dissociation than [Gd(DTPA)(H2O)]2-. Relaxivity of [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)]- in blood plasma is comparable to commercial Gd contrast agents. Biodistribution analysis confirms that [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)]- clears via a mixed renal/ hepatobiliary pathway with >99% elimination by 24h. [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)]- was modified to form a bifunctional chelator and 4 chelates were conjugated to a fibrin-specific peptide to give Mn-FBP. Mn-FBP binds the soluble fibrin fragment DD(E) with Kd = 110 nM. Per Mn relaxivity of Mn-FBP is 4-fold greater than [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)]- and increases 60% in the presence of fibrin, consistent with binding. Mn-FBP provided equivalent thrombus enhancement to the state of the art Gd analog, EP-2104R, in a rat model of arterial thrombosis. Mn metabolite analysis reveals no evidence of dechelation and the probe was >99% eliminated after 24 hr. [Mn(PyC3A)(H2O)]- is a lead development candidate for an imaging probe that is compatible with renally compromised patients. PMID:26588204

  2. Automatic assessment of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in an ischemic rat hindlimb model: an exploratory study of transplanted multipotent progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Yueh; Wragg, Andrew; Anderson, Stasia A; Balaban, Robert S; Boehm, Manfred; Arai, Andrew E

    2008-02-01

    This study presents computerized automatic image analysis for quantitatively evaluating dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in an ischemic rat hindlimb model. MRI at 7 T was performed on animals in a blinded placebo-controlled experiment comparing multipotent adult progenitor cell-derived progenitor cell (MDPC)-treated, phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-injected, and sham-operated rats. Ischemic and non-ischemic limb regions of interest were automatically segmented from time-series images for detecting changes in perfusion and late enhancement. In correlation analysis of the time-signal intensity histograms, the MDPC-treated limbs correlated well with their corresponding non-ischemic limbs. However, the correlation coefficient of the PBS control group was significantly lower than that of the MDPC-treated and sham-operated groups. In semi-quantitative parametric maps of contrast enhancement, there was no significant difference in hypo-enhanced area between the MDPC and PBS groups at early perfusion-dependent time frames. However, the late-enhancement area was significantly larger in the PBS than the MDPC group. The results of this exploratory study show that MDPC-treated rats could be objectively distinguished from PBS controls. The differences were primarily determined by late contrast enhancement of PBS-treated limbs. These computerized methods appear promising for assessing perfusion and late enhancement in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

  3. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI at 7 T: Tail-Scaling Analysis and Inferences About Field Strength Dependence.

    PubMed

    Knutsson, Linda; Xu, Xiang; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Barker, Peter B; Lind, Emelie; Sundgren, Pia C; van Zijl, Peter C M; Wirestam, Ronnie

    2017-06-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) following bolus injection of gadolinium contrast agent (CA) is widely used for the estimation of brain perfusion parameters such as cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and mean transit time (MTT) for both clinical and research purposes. Although it is predicted that DSC-MRI will have superior performance at high magnetic field strengths, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reports of 7 T DSC-MRI in the literature. It is plausible that the transfer of DSC-MRI to 7 T may be accompanied by increased [Formula: see text] relaxivity in tissue and a larger difference in [Formula: see text]-versus-concentration relationships between tissue and large vessels. If not accounted for, this will subsequently result in apparent CBV and CBF estimates that are higher than those reported previously at lower field strengths. The aims of this study were therefore to assess the feasibility of 7 T DSC-MRI and to investigate the apparent field-strength dependence of CBV and CBF estimates. In total, 8 healthy volunteers were examined using DSC-MRI at 7 T. A reduced CA dose of 0.05 mmol/kg was administered to decrease susceptibility artifacts. CBV, CBF, and MTT maps were calculated using standard DSC-MRI tracer-kinetic theory. Subject-specific arterial partial volume correction factors were obtained using a tail-scaling approach. Compared with literature values obtained using the tail-scaling approach at 1.5 T and 3 T, the CBV and CBF values of the present study were found to be further overestimated. This observation is potentially related to an inferred field-strength dependence of transverse relaxivities, although issues related to the CA dose must also be considered.

  4. Contrast MR of the brain after high-perfusion cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, T.M.; Yuh, W.T.C.; Hindman, B.J.; Embrey, R.P.; Halloran, J.I.; Behrendt, D.M. )

    1994-01-01

    To study the efficacy of contrast MR imaging in the evaluation of central nervous system complications in the cardiopulmonary bypass patient and attempt to explain their pathophysiology based on the MR appearance and the cardiopulmonary bypass protocol. Nineteen patients were prospectively studied with contrast MR examinations the day before and 3 to 7 days after cardiopulmonary bypass, to determine the nature, extent, and number of new postoperative MR abnormalities. Cardiopulmonary bypass parameters used in our institution included: membrane oxygenation, arterial filtration with a pore size of 25 [mu]m, and a relatively high perfusion rate to produce a cardiac index of 2.0 to 2.5 L min per m[sup 2]. The preoperative noncontrast MR examination showed age-related changes and/or signs of ischemia in 60% of patients on the day before surgery. However, there was no abnormal enhancement or new T2 abnormalities on any postoperative MR examination to suggest hypoperfusion or emboli. None of the 19 patients developed overt neurologic deficits postoperatively. Review of the cardiopulmonary bypass protocol used indicated significant variations in technique at different institutions. Contrast MR imaging demonstrated no new abnormalities in patients after cardiopulmonary bypass performed with strict in-line arterial filtration and relatively high perfusion. MR imaging is feasible in the early postoperative period after cardiopulmonary bypass and may offer a convenient method for evaluation of the neurologic impact of technical factors associated with cardiopulmonary bypass. 17 refs.

  5. DCE-MRI of hepatocellular carcinoma: perfusion quantification with Tofts model versus shutter-speed model—initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Jajamovich, Guido H.; Huang, Wei; Besa, Cecilia; Li, Xin; Afzal, Aneela; Dyvorne, Hadrien A.; Taouli, Bachir

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) perfusion and flow with the fast exchange regime-allowed Shutter-Speed model (SSM) compared to the Tofts model (TM). Materials and methods In this prospective study, 25 patients with HCC underwent DCE-MRI. ROIs were placed in liver parenchyma, portal vein, aorta and HCC lesions. Signal intensities were analyzed employing dual-input TM and SSM models. ART (arterial fraction), Ktrans (contrast agent transfer rate constant from plasma to extravascular extracellular space), ve (extravascular extracellular volume fraction), kep (contrast agent intravasation rate constant), and τi (mean intracellular water molecule lifetime) were compared between liver parenchyma and HCC, and ART, Ktrans, ve and kep were compared between models using Wilcoxon tests and limits of agreement. Test–retest reproducibility was assessed in 10 patients. Results ART and ve obtained with TM; ART, ve, ke and τi obtained with SSM were significantly different between liver parenchyma and HCC (p < 0.04). Parameters showed variable reproducibility (CV range 14.7–66.5 % for both models). Liver Ktrans and ve; HCC ve and kep were significantly different when estimated with the two models (p < 0.03). Conclusion Our results show differences when computed between the TM and the SSM. However, these differences are smaller than parameter reproducibilities and may be of limited clinical significance. PMID:26646522

  6. The complementary roles of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT for imaging of carotid atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Claudia; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Mani, Venkatesh; Millon, Antoine; Rosenbaum, David; Tawakol, Ahmed; Woodward, Mark; Bucerius, Jan; Moshier, Erin; Godbold, James; Kallend, David; Farkouh, Michael E; Fuster, Valentin; Rudd, James H F; Fayad, Zahi A

    2013-12-01

    Inflammation and neovascularization in vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques are key features for severe clinical events. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI and FDG PET are two noninvasive imaging techniques capable of quantifying plaque neovascularization and inflammatory infiltrate, respectively. However, their mutual role in defining plaque vulnerability and their possible overlap has not been thoroughly investigated. We studied the relationship between DCE-MRI and (18)F-FDG PET data from the carotid arteries of 40 subjects with coronary heart disease (CHD) or CHD risk equivalent, as a substudy of the dal-PLAQUE trial (NCT00655473). The dal-PLAQUE trial was a multicenter study that evaluated dalcetrapib, a cholesteryl ester transfer protein modulator. Subjects underwent anatomical MRI, DCE-MRI and (18)F-FDG PET. Only baseline imaging and biomarker data (before randomization) from dal-PLAQUE were used as part of this substudy. Our primary goal was to evaluate the relationship between DCE-MRI and (18)F-FDG PET data. As secondary endpoints, we evaluated the relationship between (a) PET data and whole-vessel anatomical MRI data, and (b) DCE-MRI and matching anatomical MRI data. All correlations were estimated using a mixed linear model. We found a significant inverse relationship between several perfusion indices by DCE-MRI and (18)F-FDG uptake by PET. Regarding our secondary endpoints, there was a significant relationship between plaque burden measured by anatomical MRI with several perfusion indices by DCE-MRI and (18)F-FDG uptake by PET. No relationship was found between plaque composition by anatomical MRI and DCE-MRI or (18)F-FDG PET metrics. In this study we observed a significant, weak inverse relationship between inflammation measured as (18)F-FDG uptake by PET and plaque perfusion by DCE-MRI. Our findings suggest that there may be a complex relationship between plaque inflammation and microvascularization during the different stages of plaque development. (18

  7. Perfusion and vascular permeability: basic concepts and measurement in DCE-CT and DCE-MRI.

    PubMed

    Cuenod, C A; Balvay, D

    2013-12-01

    The microvascular network formed by the capillaries supplies the tissues and permits their function. It provides a considerable surface area for exchanges between blood and tissues. All pathological conditions cause changes in the microcirculation. These changes can be used as imaging biomarkers for the diagnosis of lesions and optimisation of treatment. Among the many imaging techniques developed to study the microcirculation, the analysis of the tissue kinetics of intravenously injected contrast agents is the most widely used, either as positive enhancement for CT, T1-weighted MRI and ultrasound - dynamic contrast-enhanced-imaging (DCE-imaging) - or negative enhancement in T2*-weighted brain MRI - dynamic susceptibility contrast-MRI (DSC-MRI) -. Acquisition involves an injection of contrast agent during the acquisition of a dynamic series of images on a zone of interest. These kinetics may be analyzed visually, to define qualitative criteria, or with software using mathematical modelling, to extract quantitative physiological parameters. The results depend on the acquisition conditions (type of imaging device, imaging mode, frequency and total duration of acquisition), the type of contrast agent, the data pre-processing (motion correction, conversion of the signal into concentration) and the data analysis method. Because of these multiple choices it is necessary to understand the physiological processes involved and understand the advantages and limits of each strategy.

  8. Dynamic iterative beam hardening correction (DIBHC) in myocardial perfusion imaging using contrast-enhanced computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Stenner, Philip; Schmidt, Bernhard; Allmendinger, Thomas; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelrie, Marc

    2010-06-01

    In cardiac perfusion examinations with computed tomography (CT) large concentrations of iodine in the ventricle and in the descending aorta cause beam hardening artifacts that can lead to incorrect perfusion parameters. The aim of this study is to reduce these artifacts by performing an iterative correction and by accounting for the 3 materials soft tissue, bone, and iodine. Beam hardening corrections are either implemented as simple precorrections which cannot account for higher order beam hardening effects, or as iterative approaches that are based on segmenting the original image into material distribution images. Conventional segmentation algorithms fail to clearly distinguish between iodine and bone. Our new algorithm, DIBHC, calculates the time-dependent iodine distribution by analyzing the voxel changes of a cardiac perfusion examination (typically N approximately 15 electrocardiogram-correlated scans distributed over a total scan time up to T approximately 30 s). These voxel dynamics are due to changes in contrast agent. This prior information allows to precisely distinguish between bone and iodine and is key to DIBHC where each iteration consists of a multimaterial (soft tissue, bone, iodine) polychromatic forward projection, a raw data comparison and a filtered backprojection. Simulations with a semi-anthropomorphic dynamic phantom and clinical scans using a dual source CT scanner with 2 x 128 slices, a tube voltage of 100 kV, a tube current of 180 mAs, and a rotation time of 0.28 seconds have been carried out. The uncorrected images suffer from beam hardening artifacts that appear as dark bands connecting large concentrations of iodine in the ventricle, aorta, and bony structures. The CT-values of the affected tissue are usually underestimated by roughly 20 HU although deviations of up to 61 HU have been observed. For a quantitative evaluation circular regions of interest have been analyzed. After application of DIBHC the mean values obtained deviate by

  9. Hepatic Blood Perfusion Estimated by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography in Pigs Limitations of the Slope Method

    PubMed Central

    Winterdahl, Michael; Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Susanne; Mortensen, Frank V.; Alstrup, Aage K. O.; Hansen, Søren B.; Munk, Ole L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and the slope method can provide absolute measures of hepatic blood perfusion from hepatic artery (HA) and portal vein (PV) at experimentally varied blood flow rates. Materials and Methods Ten anesthetized 40-kg pigs underwent DCE-CT during periods of normocapnia (normal flow), hypocapnia (decreased flow), and hypercapnia (increased flow), which was induced by adjusting the ventilation. Reference blood flows in HA and PV were measured continuously by surgically-placed ultrasound transit-time flowmeters. For each capnic condition, the DCE-CT estimated absolute hepatic blood perfusion from HA and PV were calculated using the slope method and compared with flowmeter based absolute measurements of hepatic perfusions and relative errors were analyzed. Results The relative errors (mean±SEM) of the DCE-CT based perfusion estimates were −21±23% for HA and 81±31% for PV (normocapnia), 9±23% for HA and 92±42% for PV (hypocapnia), and 64±28% for HA and −2±20% for PV (hypercapnia). The mean relative errors for HA were not significantly different from zero during hypo- and normocapnia, and the DCE-CT slope method could detect relative changes in HA perfusion between scans. Infusion of contrast agent led to significantly increased hepatic blood perfusion, which biased the PV perfusion estimates. Conclusions Using the DCE-CT slope method, HA perfusion estimates were accurate at low and normal flow rates whereas PV perfusion estimates were inaccurate and imprecise. At high flow rate, both HA perfusion estimates were significantly biased. PMID:22836307

  10. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ogami, M; Kulkarni, R; Wang, H; Reif, R; Wang, R K

    2014-08-31

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing. (laser biophotonics)

  11. Laser speckle contrast imaging of skin blood perfusion responses induced by laser coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogami, M.; Kulkarni, R.; Wang, H.; Reif, R.; Wang, R. K.

    2014-08-01

    We report application of laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), i.e., a fast imaging technique utilising backscattered light to distinguish such moving objects as red blood cells from such stationary objects as surrounding tissue, to localise skin injury. This imaging technique provides detailed information about the acute perfusion response after a blood vessel is occluded. In this study, a mouse ear model is used and pulsed laser coagulation serves as the method of occlusion. We have found that the downstream blood vessels lacked blood flow due to occlusion at the target site immediately after injury. Relative flow changes in nearby collaterals and anastomotic vessels have been approximated based on differences in intensity in the nearby collaterals and anastomoses. We have also estimated the density of the affected downstream vessels. Laser speckle contrast imaging is shown to be used for highresolution and fast-speed imaging for the skin microvasculature. It also allows direct visualisation of the blood perfusion response to injury, which may provide novel insights to the field of cutaneous wound healing.

  12. Comparison of the Specificity of MREIT and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    Method; EIS, Electrical Impedance Scanning; OPAMP, Operational Amplifier; SVD, Singular Value Decomposition; NEX, Number of Excitations ; CE- MRI ... simulate a low conductivity region (Fig. 1). The plane of the disk was placed perpendicular to the main static MRI field. Four copper electrodes each...and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ozlem Birgul, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION

  13. Acute baclofen diminishes resting baseline blood flow to limbic structures: A perfusion fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Teresa R.; Shin, Joshua; Jagannathan, Kanchana; Suh, Jesse J.; Detre, John A.; O’Brien, Charles P.; Childress, Anna Rose

    2012-01-01

    Background Preclinical and clinical evidence show that the GABA B agonist, baclofen is a promising treatment for addictive disorders; however, until recently its mechanism of action in the human brain was unknown. In previous work we utilized a laboratory model that included a medication versus placebo regimen to examine baclofen’s actions on brain circuitry. Perfusion fMRI [measure of cerebral blood flow (CBF)] data acquired ‘at rest’ before and on the last day of the 21-day medication regimen showed that baclofen diminished CBF bilaterally in the VS, insula and medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC). In the present study, we hypothesized that a single dose of baclofen would have effects similar to repeated dosing. Methods To test our hypothesis, in a crossover design, CBF data were acquired using pseudo continuous arterial spin labeled (pCASL) perfusion fMRI. Subjects were either un-medicated or were administered a 20 mg dose of baclofen approximately 110 min prior to scanning. Results Acute baclofen diminished mOFC, amygdala, and ventral anterior insula CBF without causing sedation (family-wise error corrected at p = 0.001). Conclusions Results demonstrate that similar to repeated dosing, an acute dose of baclofen blunts the ‘limbic’ substrate that is hyper-responsive to drugs and drug cues. Smokers often manage their craving and can remain abstinent for extended periods after quitting, however the risk of eventual relapse approaches 90%. Given that chronic medication may not be a practical solution to the long-term risk of relapse, acute baclofen may be useful on an ‘as-needed’ basis to block craving during ‘at risk’ situations. PMID:22513380

  14. Resting Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations in Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury: An Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, John; Patel, Sunil; Avants, Brian; Europa, Eduardo; Wang, Jiongjiong; Slattery, John; Gee, James C.; Coslett, H. Branch; Detre, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Non-invasive measurement of resting state cerebral blood flow (CBF) may reflect alterations of brain structure and function after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, previous imaging studies of resting state brain in chronic TBI have been limited by several factors, including measurement in relative rather than absolute units, use of crude spatial registration methods, exclusion of subjects with substantial focal lesions, and exposure to ionizing radiation, which limits repeated assessments. This study aimed to overcome those obstacles by measuring absolute CBF with an arterial spin labeling perfusion fMRI technique, and using an image preprocessing protocol that is optimized for brains with mixed diffuse and focal injuries characteristic of moderate and severe TBI. Resting state CBF was quantified in 27 individuals with moderate to severe TBI in the chronic stage, and 22 demographically matched healthy controls. In addition to global CBF reductions in the TBI subjects, more prominent regional hypoperfusion was found in the posterior cingulate cortices, the thalami, and multiple locations in the frontal cortices. Diffuse injury, as assessed by tensor-based morphometry, was mainly associated with reduced CBF in the posterior cingulate cortices and the thalami, where the greatest volume losses were detected. Hypoperfusion in superior and middle frontal cortices, in contrast, was associated with focal lesions. These results suggest that structural lesions, both focal and diffuse, are the main contributors to the absolute CBF alterations seen in chronic TBI, and that CBF may serve as a tool to assess functioning neuronal volume. We also speculate that resting reductions in posterior cingulate perfusion may reflect alterations in the default-mode network, and may contribute to the attentional deficits common in TBI. PMID:20528163

  15. The Complementary Roles of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI and 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT for Imaging of Carotid Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, Claudia; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Mani, Venkatesh; Millon, Antoine; Rosenbaum, David; Tawakol, Ahmed; Woodward, Mark; Bucerius, Jan; Moshier, Erin; Godbold, James; Kallend, David; Farkouh, Michael E; Fuster, Valentin; Rudd, James HF; Fayad, Zahi A

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammation and neovascularization in vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques are key risk factors for severe clinical events. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) are two non-invasive imaging techniques capable of quantifying plaque neovascularization and inflammatory infiltrate respectively. However, their mutual role in defining plaque vulnerability and their possible overlap has not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we study the relationship between DCE-MRI and 18F-FDG PET in the carotid arteries of 40 subjects with coronary heart disease (CHD) or CHD equivalent, recruited as a substudy of the dal-PLAQUE trial (NCT00655473). Methods The dal-PLAQUE trial was a multicenter study that evaluated dalcetrapib, a cholesteryl ester transfer protein modulator. Subjects underwent anatomical MRI, DCE-MRI and 18F-FDG PET. Only baseline imaging and biomarkers data (before randomization) from dal-PLAQUE were used as part of this substudy. Our primary goal was to evaluate the relationship between DCE-MRI and 18F-FDG PET data. As secondary endpoints, we evaluated the relationship between a) PET data and whole vessel anatomical MRI data, and b) DCE-MRI and matching anatomical MRI data. All correlations were estimated using a mixed linear model. Results We found a significant inverse relationship between several perfusion indices by DCE-MRI and 18F-FDG uptake by PET. Regarding our secondary endpoints, there was a significant relationship between plaque burden measured by anatomical MRI with several perfusion indices by DCE-MRI and 18F-FDG uptake by PET. No relationship was found between plaque composition by anatomical MRI with DCEMRI or 18F-FDG PET metrics. Conclusions In this study we observed a significant, weak inverse relationship between inflammation measured as 18F-FDG uptake by PET and plaque perfusion by DCE-MRI. Our findings suggest that there may be a complex

  16. Quantification of myocardium at risk in myocardial perfusion SPECT by co-registration and fusion with delayed contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging--an experimental ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Ugander, Martin; Soneson, Helen; Engblom, Henrik; van der Pals, Jesper; Erlinge, David; Heiberg, Einar; Arheden, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (MPS) can be used to assess myocardium at risk in occlusive coronary ischaemia. The aim was to develop a method to quantify myocardium at risk as perfusion defect size on ex vivo MPS using co-registration and fusion with ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Pigs (n = 19) were injected 99mTc-tetrofosmin prior to concluding 40 min of coronary artery occlusion, followed by reperfusion and MRI contrast injection. The excised heart was imaged with T1-weighted MRI and MPS, and images were co-registered using freely available software (Segment v1.8, http://segment.heiberg.se). The left ventricle was semi-automatically delineated in MRI and copied to MPS. The threshold for a MPS perfusion defect was defined as the mean counts in the MPS image at the MRI-determined border between remote myocardium and air. The threshold was measured using count maxima set to the 100th-95th percentile of counts within the myocardium. The count maximum that gave the lowest threshold variability (SD) was considered the most robust. A count maximum using the 100th percentile yielded a threshold of (mean ± SD) 55 ± 6·2%. This method showed the lowest SD compared to 99th-95th percentile count maxima (6·6-7·2%). We describe a method for objective quantification of myocardium at risk as perfusion defect size on MPS using knowledge of the anatomy of the myocardium from co-registered MRI. This enables simultaneous quantification of myocardium at risk by MPS and infarct size by MRI for the evaluation of treatments for myocardial infarction. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging © 2011 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.

  17. Consistency of flow quantifications in tridirectional phase-contrast MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unterhinninghofen, R.; Ley, S.; Dillmann, R.

    2009-02-01

    Tridirectionally encoded phase-contrast MRI is a technique to non-invasively acquire time-resolved velocity vector fields of blood flow. These may not only be used to analyze pathological flow patterns, but also to quantify flow at arbitrary positions within the acquired volume. In this paper we examine the validity of this approach by analyzing the consistency of related quantifications instead of comparing it with an external reference measurement. Datasets of the thoracic aorta were acquired from 6 pigs, 1 healthy volunteer and 3 patients with artificial aortic valves. Using in-house software an elliptical flow quantification plane was placed manually at 6 positions along the descending aorta where it was rotated to 5 different angles. For each configuration flow was computed based on the original data and data that had been corrected for phase offsets. Results reveal that quantifications are more dependent on changes in position than on changes in angle. Phase offset correction considerably reduces this dependency. Overall consistency is good with a maximum variation coefficient of 9.9% and a mean variation coefficient of 7.2%.

  18. Quantification of tumor perfusion using dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound: impact of mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doury, Maxime; Dizeux, Alexandre; de Cesare, Alain; Lucidarme, Olivier; Pellot-Barakat, Claire; Bridal, S. Lori; Frouin, Frédérique

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound has been proposed to monitor tumor therapy, as a complement to volume measurements. To assess the variability of perfusion parameters in ideal conditions, four consecutive test-retest studies were acquired in a mouse tumor model, using controlled injections. The impact of mathematical modeling on parameter variability was then investigated. Coefficients of variation (CV) of tissue blood volume (BV) and tissue blood flow (BF) based-parameters were estimated inside 32 sub-regions of the tumors, comparing the log-normal (LN) model with a one-compartment model fed by an arterial input function (AIF) and improved by the introduction of a time delay parameter. Relative perfusion parameters were also estimated by normalization of the LN parameters and normalization of the one-compartment parameters estimated with the AIF, using a reference tissue (RT) region. A direct estimation (rRTd) of relative parameters, based on the one-compartment model without using the AIF, was also obtained by using the kinetics inside the RT region. Results of test-retest studies show that absolute regional parameters have high CV, whatever the approach, with median values of about 30% for BV, and 40% for BF. The positive impact of normalization was established, showing a coherent estimation of relative parameters, with reduced CV (about 20% for BV and 30% for BF using the rRTd approach). These values were significantly lower (p  <  0.05) than the CV of absolute parameters. The rRTd approach provided the smallest CV and should be preferred for estimating relative perfusion parameters.

  19. Comparison of dual-echo DSC-MRI- and DCE-MRI-derived contrast agent kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Quarles, C Chad; Gore, John C; Xu, Lei; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2012-09-01

    The application of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI methods to assess brain tumors is often confounded by the extravasation of contrast agent (CA). Disruption of the blood-brain barrier allows CA to leak out of the vasculature leading to additional T(1), T(2) and T(2) relaxation effects in the extravascular space, thereby affecting the signal intensity time course in a complex manner. The goal of this study was to validate a dual-echo DSC-MRI approach that separates and quantifies the T(1) and T(2) contributions to the acquired signal and enables the estimation of the volume transfer constant, K(trans), and the volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space, v(e). To test the validity of this approach, DSC-MRI- and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI-derived K(trans) and v(e) estimates were spatially compared in both 9L and C6 rat brain tumor models. A high degree of correlation (concordance correlation coefficients >0.83, Pearson's r>0.84) and agreement was found between the DSC-MRI- and DCE-MRI-derived measurements. These results indicate that dual-echo DSC-MRI can be used to simultaneously extract reliable DCE-MRI kinetic parameters in brain tumors in addition to conventional blood volume and blood flow metrics.

  20. Combined Contrast-Enhanced MRI and Fluorescence Molecular Tomography for Breast Tumor Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    accomplishments follows. Imaging system 4 The fluorescence imaging system is coupled into a Philips 3T MRI and is shown schematically in Fig. 1, which...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0367 TITLE: Combined Contrast-Enhanced MRI and...CONTRACT NUMBER Combined Contrast-Enhanced MRI and Fluorescence Molecular Tomography for Breast Tumor Imaging 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0367 5c

  1. An Interventional MRI Technique for the Molecular Characterization of Heterogeneous Intra-Prostatic Dynamic Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    angiogenesis. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of precisely co-localizing DCE-MRI data with the genomic and proteomic profiles of underlying biopsy tissue...using a novel MRI-guided biopsy technique in a patient with prostate cancer. Abbreviations: DCE-MRI – Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic...to provide more complete information on a tumor’s microvascular biology, in contrast to information obtained from a biopsy , which may be subject to

  2. How influential is the duration of contrast material bolus injection in perfusion CT? evaluation in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Sonja M; Meyer, Henning; Boehnert, Markus; Hoppel, Bernice; Paul, Narinder Singh; Rogalla, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the effect of the duration of contrast material bolus injection on perfusion values in a swine model by using the maximum slope method. This study was approved by the institutional animal care committee. Twenty pigs (weight range, 63-77 kg) underwent dynamic volume computed tomography (CT) of the kidneys during suspended respiration. Before the CT examination, a miniature cuff-shaped ultrasonographic flow probe encircling the right renal artery was surgically implanted in each pig to obtain true perfusion values. Two sequential perfusion CT series were performed in 30 seconds, each comprising 30 volumes with identical parameters (100 kV, 200 mAs, 0.5 sec rotation time). The duration of contrast material bolus (0.5 mL/kg of body weight) was 3.8 seconds in the first series (short bolus series) and 11.5 seconds in the second series (long bolus series), and the injection flow rate was adapted accordingly. In each pig, cortical kidney volume was determined by using the volume with the highest cortical enhancement. CT perfusion values were calculated for both series by using the maximum slope method and were statistically compared and correlated with the true perfusion values from the flow probe by using linear regression analysis. Mean true perfusion and CT perfusion values (in minutes(-1)) for the short bolus series were 1.95 and 2.03, respectively (P = .22), and for the long bolus series, they were 2.02 and 1.92, respectively (P = .12). CT perfusion showed very good correlation with true perfusion in both the short (slope, 1.01; 95% confidence interval: 0.91, 1.11) and long (slope, 0.92; 95% confidence interval: 0.78, 1.04) series. On the basis of the regression analysis, CT perfusion values in the short bolus series were overestimated by 1% and those in the long bolus series were underestimated by 8%. Duration of contrast material bolus injection does not influence CT perfusion values substantially. The longer, clinically preferred intravenous injection

  3. High resolution 3D MRI of mouse mammary glands with intra-ductal injection of contrast media.

    PubMed

    Markiewicz, Erica; Fan, Xiaobing; Mustafi, Devkumar; Zamora, Marta; Roman, Brian B; Jansen, Sanaz A; Macleod, Kay; Conzen, Suzanne D; Karczmar, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use high resolution three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study mouse mammary gland ductal architecture based on intra-ductal injection of contrast agents. Female FVB/N mice age 12-20 weeks (n=12), were used in this study. A 34G, 45° tip Hamilton needle with a 25μL Hamilton syringe was inserted into the tip of the nipple. Approximately 20-25μL of a Gadodiamide/Trypan blue/saline solution was injected slowly over one minute into the nipple and duct. To prevent washout of contrast media from ducts due to perfusion, and maximize the conspicuity of ducts on MRI, mice were sacrificed one minute after injection. High resolution 3D T1-weighted images were acquired on a 9.4T Bruker scanner after sacrifice to eliminate motion artifacts and reduce contrast media leakage from ducts. Trypan blue staining was well distributed throughout the ductal tree. MRI showed the mammary gland ductal structure clearly. In spoiled gradient echo T1-weighted images, the signal-to-noise ratio of regions identified as enhancing mammary ducts following contrast injection was significantly higher than that of muscle (p<0.02) and significantly higher than that of contralateral mammary ducts that were not injected with contrast media (p<0.0001). The methods described here could be adapted for injection of specialized contrast agents to measure metabolism or target receptors in normal ducts and ducts with in situ cancers.

  4. High resolution 3D MRI of mouse mammary glands with intra-ductal injection of contrast media

    PubMed Central

    Markiewicz, Erica; Fan, Xiaobing; Mustafi, Devkumar; Zamora, Marta; Roman, Brian B.; Jansen, Sanaz A.; Macleod, Kay; Conzen, Suzanne D.; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use high resolution 3D MRI to study mouse mammary gland ductal architecture based on intra-ductal injection of contrast agents. Female FVB/N mice age 12–20 weeks (n = 12), were used in this study. A 34G, 45° tip Hamilton needle with a 25uL Hamilton syringe was inserted into the tip of the nipple. Approximately 20–25uL of a Gadodiamide/Trypan blue/saline solution was injected slowly over one minute into the nipple and duct. To prevent washout of contrast media from ducts due to perfusion, and maximize the conspicuity of ducts on MRI, mice were sacrificed one minute after injection. High resolution 3D T1-weighted images were acquired on a 9.4T Bruker scanner after sacrifice to eliminate motion artifacts and reduce contrast media leakage from ducts. Trypan blue staining was well distributed throughout the ductal tree. MRI showed the mammary gland ductal structure clearly. In spoiled gradient echo T1-weighted images, the signal-to-noise ratio of regions identified as enhancing mammary ducts following contrast injection was significantly higher than that of muscle (p < 0.02) and significantly higher than that of contralateral mammary ducts that were not injected with contrast media (p < 0.0001). The methods described here could be adapted for injection of specialized contrast agents to measure metabolism or target receptors in normal ducts and ducts with in situ cancers. PMID:25179139

  5. Perfusion-weighted MRI to evaluate cerebral autoregulation in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hattingen, Elke; Blasel, Stella; Dettmann, Edgar; Vatter, Hartmut; Pilatus, Ulrich; Seifert, Volker; Zanella, Friedhelm E; Weidauer, Stefan

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate autoregulatory mechanisms in different vascular territories within the first week after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) by perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (PW-MRI). For this purpose, regional cerebral blood flow and volume (rCVF and rCBV) were measured in relation to different degrees of angiographically visible cerebral vasospasm (CVS). In 51 SAH patients, PW-MRI and digital subtraction angiography were performed about 5 days after onset of SAH. Regional CBF and rCBV were analysed in the territories of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA), the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and the basal ganglia of each hemisphere in relationship to the degree of CVS in the particular territory. Correlations between rCBF, rCBV and CVS were analysed. CVS was found in 22 out of 51 patients in at least one territory. In all territories, rCBV decreased with increasing degree of CVS, correlated with a decrease of rCBF. In the ACA territories, SAH patients with severe CVS had significantly lower rCBF compared to healthy subjects and to SAH patients without CVS. In the basal ganglia, rCBF and rCBV of the control group were significantly higher compared to the patients without and with moderate vasospasms. PW-MRI showed simultaneous decrease of rCBF and rCBV in patients with SAH. The fact that rCBV did not increase in territories with CVS to maintain rCBF reveals dysfunctional vascular autoregulation. Vasospasms in the microvasculature are most evident in the basal ganglia, showing decreased rCBV and rCBF even in SAH patients without CVS.

  6. High Resolution Ultrasound Superharmonic Perfusion Imaging: In Vivo Feasibility and Quantification of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Acoustic Angiography.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Brooks D; Shelton, Sarah E; Martin, K Heath; Ozgun, Kathryn A; Rojas, Juan D; Foster, F Stuart; Dayton, Paul A

    2017-04-01

    Mapping blood perfusion quantitatively allows localization of abnormal physiology and can improve understanding of disease progression. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound is a low-cost, real-time technique for imaging perfusion dynamics with microbubble contrast agents. Previously, we have demonstrated another contrast agent-specific ultrasound imaging technique, acoustic angiography, which forms static anatomical images of the superharmonic signal produced by microbubbles. In this work, we seek to determine whether acoustic angiography can be utilized for high resolution perfusion imaging in vivo by examining the effect of acquisition rate on superharmonic imaging at low flow rates and demonstrating the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced superharmonic perfusion imaging for the first time. Results in the chorioallantoic membrane model indicate that frame rate and frame averaging do not affect the measured diameter of individual vessels observed, but that frame rate does influence the detection of vessels near and below the resolution limit. The highest number of resolvable vessels was observed at an intermediate frame rate of 3 Hz using a mechanically-steered prototype transducer. We also demonstrate the feasibility of quantitatively mapping perfusion rate in 2D in a mouse model with spatial resolution of ~100 μm. This type of imaging could provide non-invasive, high resolution quantification of microvascular function at penetration depths of several centimeters.

  7. Genetically controlled MRI contrast mechanisms and their prospects in systems neuroscience research.

    PubMed

    Westmeyer, Gil G; Jasanoff, Alan

    2007-07-01

    Application of MRI contrast agents to neural systems research is complicated by the need to deliver agents past the blood-brain barrier or into cells, and the difficulty of targeting agents to specific brain structures or cell types. In the future, these barriers may be wholly or partially overcome using genetic methods for producing and directing MRI contrast. Here we review MRI contrast mechanisms that have used gene expression to manipulate MRI signal in cultured cells or in living animals. We discuss both fully genetic systems involving endogenous biosynthesis of contrast agents, and semi-genetic systems in which expressed proteins influence the localization or activity of exogenous contrast agents. We close by considering which contrast-generating mechanisms might be most suitable for applications in neuroscience, and we ask how genetic control machinery could be productively combined with existing molecular agents to enable next-generation neuroimaging experiments.

  8. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound and computerized tomography perfusion imaging of a liver fibrosis-early cirrhosis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanghui; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Yaqin; Liao, Jian; Tong, Qiongjuan; Gao, Feng; Hu, Yuequn; Wang, Wei

    2016-09-01

    To assess liver fibrosis stages in a liver fibrosis-early cirrhosis model in dogs, the clinical efficiency of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging were compared. Hepatic vein arriving time (HVAT), hepatic artery arriving time, and hepatic artery to vein transit time (HA-VTT) were measured on CEUS. Total liver perfusion (TLP), portal vein perfusion (PVP), hepatic artery perfusion, and hepatic perfusion index (HPI) were measured on CT perfusion imaging. Histologic examination of liver specimens of the animals was performed to assess the fibrosis stage. For assessment of liver fibrosis, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of CEUS indexes HVAT and HA-VTT were 0.865 and 0.930, respectively; the perfusion CT indexes TLP, PVP, and HPI were 0.797, 0.800, and 0.220, respectively; the serological index hyaluronic acid was 0.793. While for assessment of early cirrhosis, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of CEUS indexes HVAT and HA-VTT were 0.915 and 0.948, respectively; the perfusion CT indexes TLP, PVP, and HPI were 0.737, 0.765, and 0.218, respectively; the serological index hyaluronic acid was 0.627. This study showed that both CEUS and CT perfusion imaging have the potential to be complementary imaging tools in the evaluation of liver fibrosis. While CEUS is the better choice and the index HA-VTT can be considered as non-invasive semi-quantitative indexes for diagnosing liver fibrosis and early cirrhosis. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Dissociative Part-Dependent Resting-State Activity in Dissociative Identity Disorder: A Controlled fMRI Perfusion Study

    PubMed Central

    Schlumpf, Yolanda R.; Reinders, Antje A. T. S.; Nijenhuis, Ellert R. S.; Luechinger, Roger; van Osch, Matthias J. P.; Jäncke, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Background In accordance with the Theory of Structural Dissociation of the Personality (TSDP), studies of dissociative identity disorder (DID) have documented that two prototypical dissociative subsystems of the personality, the “Emotional Part” (EP) and the “Apparently Normal Part” (ANP), have different biopsychosocial reactions to supraliminal and subliminal trauma-related cues and that these reactions cannot be mimicked by fantasy prone healthy controls nor by actors. Methods Arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI was used to test the hypotheses that ANP and EP in DID have different perfusion patterns in response to rest instructions, and that perfusion is different in actors who were instructed to simulate ANP and EP. In a follow-up study, regional cerebral blood flow of DID patients was compared with the activation pattern of healthy non-simulating controls. Results Compared to EP, ANP showed elevated perfusion in bilateral thalamus. Compared to ANP, EP had increased perfusion in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, and motor-related areas. Perfusion patterns for simulated ANP and EP were different. Fitting their reported role-play strategies, the actors activated brain structures involved in visual mental imagery and empathizing feelings. The follow-up study demonstrated elevated perfusion in the left temporal lobe in DID patients, whereas non-simulating healthy controls had increased activity in areas which mediate the mental construction of past and future episodic events. Conclusion DID involves dissociative part-dependent resting-state differences. Compared to ANP, EP activated brain structures involved in self-referencing and sensorimotor actions more. Actors had different perfusion patterns compared to genuine ANP and EP. Comparisons of neural activity for individuals with DID and non-DID simulating controls suggest that the resting-state features of ANP and EP in DID are not due to imagination. The findings are

  10. Measurement of myocardial perfusion and infarction size using computer-aided diagnosis system for myocardial contrast echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Du, Guo-Qing; Xue, Jing-Yi; Guo, Yanhui; Chen, Shuang; Du, Pei; Wu, Yan; Wang, Yu-Hang; Zong, Li-Qiu; Tian, Jia-Wei

    2015-09-01

    Proper evaluation of myocardial microvascular perfusion and assessment of infarct size is critical for clinicians. We have developed a novel computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) approach for myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) to measure myocardial perfusion and infarct size. Rabbits underwent 15 min of coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion (group I, n = 15) or 60 min of coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion (group II, n = 15). Myocardial contrast echocardiography was performed before and 7 d after ischemia/reperfusion, and images were analyzed with the CAD system on the basis of eliminating particle swarm optimization clustering analysis. The myocardium was quickly and accurately detected using contrast-enhanced images, myocardial perfusion was quantitatively calibrated and a color-coded map calibrated by contrast intensity and automatically produced by the CAD system was used to outline the infarction region. Calibrated contrast intensity was significantly lower in infarct regions than in non-infarct regions, allowing differentiation of abnormal and normal myocardial perfusion. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis documented that -54-pixel contrast intensity was an optimal cutoff point for the identification of infarcted myocardium with a sensitivity of 95.45% and specificity of 87.50%. Infarct sizes obtained using myocardial perfusion defect analysis of original contrast images and the contrast intensity-based color-coded map in computerized images were compared with infarct sizes measured using triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Use of the proposed CAD approach provided observers with more information. The infarct sizes obtained with myocardial perfusion defect analysis, the contrast intensity-based color-coded map and triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining were 23.72 ± 8.41%, 21.77 ± 7.8% and 18.21 ± 4.40% (% left ventricle) respectively (p > 0.05), indicating that computerized myocardial contrast echocardiography can

  11. Expanding the potential of MRI contrast agents through multifunctional polymeric nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Ioana; Gunkel-Grabole, Gesine; Belluati, Andrea; Palivan, Cornelia G; Meier, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    MRI is a sought-after, noninvasive tool in medical diagnostics, yet the direct application of contrast agents to tissue suffers from several drawbacks. Hosting the contrast agents in polymeric nanocarriers can solve many of these issues while creating additional benefit through exploitation of the intrinsic characteristics of the polymeric carriers. In this report, the versatility is highlighted with recent examples of dendritic and hyperbranched polymers, polymer nanoparticles and micelles, and polymersomes as multifunctional bioresponsive nanocarriers for MRI contrast agents.

  12. MO-G-18C-05: Real-Time Prediction in Free-Breathing Perfusion MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Song, H; Liu, W; Ruan, D; Jung, S; Gach, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The aim is to minimize frame-wise difference errors caused by respiratory motion and eliminate the need for breath-holds in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences with long acquisitions and repeat times (TRs). The technique is being applied to perfusion MRI using arterial spin labeling (ASL). Methods: Respiratory motion prediction (RMP) using navigator echoes was implemented in ASL. A least-square method was used to extract the respiratory motion information from the 1D navigator. A generalized artificial neutral network (ANN) with three layers was developed to simultaneously predict 10 time points forward in time and correct for respiratory motion during MRI acquisition. During the training phase, the parameters of the ANN were optimized to minimize the aggregated prediction error based on acquired navigator data. During realtime prediction, the trained ANN was applied to the most recent estimated displacement trajectory to determine in real-time the amount of spatial Results: The respiratory motion information extracted from the least-square method can accurately represent the navigator profiles, with a normalized chi-square value of 0.037±0.015 across the training phase. During the 60-second training phase, the ANN successfully learned the respiratory motion pattern from the navigator training data. During real-time prediction, the ANN received displacement estimates and predicted the motion in the continuum of a 1.0 s prediction window. The ANN prediction was able to provide corrections for different respiratory states (i.e., inhalation/exhalation) during real-time scanning with a mean absolute error of < 1.8 mm. Conclusion: A new technique enabling free-breathing acquisition during MRI is being developed. A generalized ANN development has demonstrated its efficacy in predicting a continuum of motion profile for volumetric imaging based on navigator inputs. Future work will enhance the robustness of ANN and verify its effectiveness with human

  13. Functional MRI for characterization of renal perfusion impairment and edema formation due to acute kidney injury in different mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rongjun; Gutberlet, Marcel; Jang, Mi-Sun; Meier, Martin; Mengel, Michael; Hartung, Dagmar; Wacker, Frank; Rong, Song; Hueper, Katja

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to characterize acute kidney injury (AKI) in C57BL/6 (B6)- and 129/Sv (Sv)-mice by noninvasive measurement of renal perfusion and tissue edema using functional MRI. Methods Different severities of AKI were induced in B6- and Sv-mice by renal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Unilateral clamping of the renal pedicle for 35 min (moderate AKI) or 45 min (severe AKI) was done. MRI (7-Tesla) was performed 1, 7 and 28 days after surgery using a flow alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequence. Maps of perfusion and T1-relaxation time were calculated. Relative MRI-parameters of the IRI kidney compared to the contralateral not-clipped kidney were compared between AKI severities and between mouse strains using unpaired t-tests. In addition, fibrosis was assessed by Masson Trichrome and collagen IV staining. Results After moderate AKI relative perfusion impairment was significantly higher in B6- than in Sv-mice at d7 (55±7% vs. 82±8%, p<0.05) and d28 (76±7% vs. 102±3%, p<0.01). T1-values increased in the early phase after AKI in both mouse strains. T1-increase was more severe after prolonged ischemia times of 45 min compared to 35 min in both mouse strains, measured in the renal cortex and outer stripe of outer medulla. Kidney volume loss (compared to the contralateral kidney) occurred already after 7 days but proceeded markedly towards 4 weeks in severe AKI. Early renal perfusion impairment was predictive for later kidney volume loss. The progression to chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the severe AKI model was similar in both mouse strains as revealed by histology. Conclusion Quantification of renal perfusion and tissue edema by functional MRI allows characterization of strain differences upon AKI. Renal perfusion impairment was stronger in B6- compared to Sv-animals following moderate AKI. Prolonged ischemia times were associated with more severe perfusion impairment and edema formation in the early phase and

  14. Differentiation of recurrent spinal ependymoma from postradiation treatment necrosis through multiparametric PET-MR and perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Hojjati, Mojgan; Garg, Vasant; Badve, Chaitra A; Abboud, Salim E; Sloan, Andrew E; Wolansky, Leo J

    A 67-year-old male presented with papilledema and back pain localized to the T10 level. Initial workup revealed multifocal spinal ependymoma which was resected and treated with external beam radiotherapy. Nine years after treatment, the patient had a relapse of back pain, and MRI was inconclusive in distinguishing posttreatment radiation necrosis from recurrent tumor. We present the first described report with the utilization of multiparametric positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging and perfusion MRI to distinguish recurrent spinal ependymoma from radiation necrosis.

  15. A component based noise correction method (CompCor) for BOLD and perfusion based fMRI.

    PubMed

    Behzadi, Yashar; Restom, Khaled; Liau, Joy; Liu, Thomas T

    2007-08-01

    A component based method (CompCor) for the reduction of noise in both blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) and perfusion-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data is presented. In the proposed method, significant principal components are derived from noise regions-of-interest (ROI) in which the time series data are unlikely to be modulated by neural activity. These components are then included as nuisance parameters within general linear models for BOLD and perfusion-based fMRI time series data. Two approaches for the determination of the noise ROI are considered. The first method uses high-resolution anatomical data to define a region of interest composed primarily of white matter and cerebrospinal fluid, while the second method defines a region based upon the temporal standard deviation of the time series data. With the application of CompCor, the temporal standard deviation of resting-state perfusion and BOLD data in gray matter regions was significantly reduced as compared to either no correction or the application of a previously described retrospective image based correction scheme (RETROICOR). For both functional perfusion and BOLD data, the application of CompCor significantly increased the number of activated voxels as compared to no correction. In addition, for functional BOLD data, there were significantly more activated voxels detected with CompCor as compared to RETROICOR. In comparison to RETROICOR, CompCor has the advantage of not requiring external monitoring of physiological fluctuations.

  16. Simultaneous myocardial strain and dark-blood perfusion imaging using a displacement-encoded MRI pulse sequence.

    PubMed

    Le, Yuan; Stein, Ashley; Berry, Colin; Kellman, Peter; Bennett, Eric E; Taylor, Joni; Lucas, Katherine; Kopace, Rael; Chefd'Hotel, Christophe; Lorenz, Christine H; Croisille, Pierre; Wen, Han

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a displacement-encoded pulse sequence for simultaneous perfusion and strain imaging. Displacement-encoded images in two to three myocardial slices were repeatedly acquired using a single-shot pulse sequence for 3 to 4 min, which covers a bolus infusion of Gadolinium contrast. The magnitudes of the images were T(1) weighted and provided quantitative measures of perfusion, while the phase maps yielded strain measurements. In an acute coronary occlusion swine protocol (n = 9), segmental perfusion measurements were validated against microsphere reference standard with a linear regression (slope 0.986, R(2) = 0.765, Bland-Altman standard deviation = 0.15 mL/min/g). In a group of ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients (n = 11), the scan success rate was 76%. Short-term contrast washout rate and perfusion are highly correlated (R(2) = 0.72), and the pixelwise relationship between circumferential strain and perfusion was better described with a sigmoidal Hill curve than linear functions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring strain and perfusion from a single set of images.

  17. Quantifying fluctuations of resting state networks using arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Gopal; Scheidegger, Rachel; Alsop, David C

    2015-01-01

    Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used to investigate spontaneous low-frequency signal fluctuations across brain resting state networks. However, BOLD only provides relative measures of signal fluctuations. Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) MRI holds great potential for quantitative measurements of resting state network fluctuations. This study systematically quantified signal fluctuations of the large-scale resting state networks using ASL data from 20 healthy volunteers by separating them from global signal fluctuations and fluctuations caused by residual noise. Global ASL signal fluctuation was 7.59% ± 1.47% relative to the ASL baseline perfusion. Fluctuations of seven detected resting state networks vary from 2.96% ± 0.93% to 6.71% ± 2.35%. Fluctuations of networks and residual noise were 6.05% ± 1.18% and 6.78% ± 1.16% using 4-mm resolution ASL data applied with Gaussian smoothing kernel of 6mm. However, network fluctuations were reduced by 7.77% ± 1.56% while residual noise fluctuation was markedly reduced by 39.75% ± 2.90% when smoothing kernel of 12 mm was applied to the ASL data. Therefore, global and network fluctuations are the dominant structured noise sources in ASL data. Quantitative measurements of resting state networks may enable improved noise reduction and provide insights into the function of healthy and diseased brain. PMID:26661226

  18. Comparison of Partial Volume Effects in Arterial and Venous Contrast Curves in CT Brain Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Alan J.; Bennink, Edwin; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Viergever, Max A.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Smit, Ewoud J.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In brain CT perfusion (CTP), the arterial contrast bolus is scaled to have the same area under the curve (AUC) as the venous outflow to correct for partial volume effects (PVE). This scaling is based on the assumption that large veins are unaffected by PVE. Measurement of the internal carotid artery (ICA), usually unaffected by PVE due to its large diameter, may avoid the need for partial volume correction. The aims of this work are to examine i) the assumptions behind PVE correction and ii) the potential of selecting the ICA obviating correction for PVE. Methods The AUC of the ICA and sagittal sinus were measured in CTP datasets from 52 patients. The AUCs were determined by i) using commercial CTP software based on a Gaussian curve-fitting to the time attenuation curve, and ii) by simple integration of the time attenuation curve over a time interval. In addition, frames acquired up to 3 minutes after first bolus passage were used to examine the ratio of arterial and venous enhancement. The impact of selecting the ICA without PVE correction was illustrated by reporting cerebral blood volume (CBV) measurements. Results In 49 of 52 patients, the AUC of the ICA was significantly larger than that of the sagittal sinus (p = 0.017). Measured after the first pass bolus, contrast enhancement remained 50% higher in the ICA just after the first pass bolus, and 30% higher 3 minutes later. CBV measurements were significantly lowered when the ICA was used without PVE correction. Conclusions Contradicting the assumptions underlying PVE correction, contrast in the ICA was significantly higher than in the sagittal sinus, even 3 minutes after the first pass of the contrast bolus. PVE correction might lead to overestimation of CBV if the CBV is calculated using the AUC of the time attenuation curves. PMID:24858308

  19. Combined assessment of myocardial perfusion and regional left ventricular function by analysis of contrast-enhanced power modulation images.

    PubMed

    Mor-Avi, V; Caiani, E G; Collins, K A; Korcarz, C E; Bednarz, J E; Lang, R M

    2001-07-17

    Echocardiographic contrast media have been used to assess myocardial perfusion and to enhance endocardial definition for improved assessment of left ventricular (LV) function. These methodologies, however, have been qualitative or have required extensive offline image analysis. Power modulation is a recently developed imaging technique that provides selective enhancement of microbubble-generated reflections. Our goal was to test the feasibility of using power modulation for combined quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion and regional LV function in an animal model of acute ischemia. Coronary balloon occlusions were performed in 18 anesthetized pigs. Transthoracic power modulation images (Agilent 5500) were obtained during continuous intravenous infusion of the contrast agent Definity (DuPont) at baseline and during brief coronary occlusion and reperfusion and were analyzed with custom software. At each phase, myocardial perfusion was assessed by calculation, in 6 myocardial regions of interest, of mean pixel intensity and the rate of contrast replenishment after high-power ultrasound impulses. LV function was assessed by calculation of regional fractional area change from semiautomatically detected endocardial borders. All ischemic episodes caused detectable and reversible changes in perfusion and function. Perfusion defects, validated with fluorescent microspheres, were visualized in real time and confirmed by a significant decrease in pixel intensity in the left anterior descending coronary artery territory after balloon inflation and reduced rate of contrast replenishment. Fractional area change decreased significantly in ischemic segments and was restored with reperfusion. Power modulation allows simultaneous online assessment of myocardial perfusion and regional LV wall motion, which may improve the echocardiographic diagnosis of myocardial ischemia.

  20. Changes in transmural distribution of myocardial perfusion assessed by quantitative intravenous myocardial contrast echocardiography in humans

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, S; Muro, T; Hozumi, T; Watanabe, H; Shimada, K; Yoshiyama, M; Takeuchi, K; Yoshikawa, J

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To clarify whether changes in transmural distribution of myocardial perfusion under significant coronary artery stenosis can be assessed by quantitative intravenous myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) in humans. Methods: 31 patients underwent dipyridamole stress MCE and quantitative coronary angiography. Intravenous MCE was performed by continuous infusion of Levovist. Images were obtained from the apical four chamber view with alternating pulsing intervals both at rest and after dipyridamole infusion. Images were analysed offline by placing regions of interest over both endocardial and epicardial sides of the mid-septum. The background subtracted intensity versus pulsing interval plots were fitted to an exponential function, y = A (1 − e−βt), where A is plateau level and β is rate of rise. Results: Of the 31 patients, 16 had significant stenosis (> 70%) in the left anterior descending artery (group A) and 15 did not (group B). At rest, there were no differences in the A endocardial to epicardial ratio (A-EER) and β-EER between the two groups (mean (SD) 1.2 (0.6) v 1.2 (0.8) and 1.2 (0.7) v 1.1 (0.6), respectively, NS). During hyperaemia, β-EER in group A was significantly lower than that in group B (1.0 (0.5) v 1.4 (0.5), p < 0.05) and A-EER did not differ between the two groups (1.0 (0.5) v 1.2 (0.4), NS). Conclusions: Changes in transmural distribution of myocardial perfusion under significant coronary artery stenosis can be assessed by quantitative intravenous MCE in humans. PMID:12231594

  1. Neural Substrates Associated with Weather-Induced Mood Variability: An Exploratory Study Using ASL Perfusion fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Gillihan, Seth J.; Detre, John A.; Farah, Martha J.; Rao, Hengyi

    2013-01-01

    Daily variations in weather are known to be associated with variations in mood. However, little is known about the specific brain regions that instantiate weather-related mood changes. We used a data-driven approach and ASL perfusion fMRI to assess the neural substrates associated with weather-induced mood variability. The data-driven approach was conducted with mood ratings under various weather conditions (N = 464). Forward stepwise regression was conducted to develop a statistical model of mood as a function of weather conditions. The model results were used to calculate the mood-relevant weather index which served as the covariate in the regression analysis of the resting CBF (N = 42) measured by ASL perfusion fMRI under various weather conditions. The resting CBF activities in the left insula-prefrontal cortex and left superior parietal lobe were negatively correlated (corrected p<0.05) with the weather index, indicating that better mood-relevant weather conditions were associated with lower CBF in these regions within the brain’s emotional network. The present study represents a first step toward the investigation of the effect of natural environment on baseline human brain function, and suggests the feasibility of ASL perfusion fMRI for such study. PMID:24834022

  2. Delayed Contrast Extravasation MRI for Depicting Tumor and Non-Tumoral Tissues in Primary and Metastatic Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zach, Leor; Guez, David; Last, David; Daniels, Dianne; Grober, Yuval; Nissim, Ouzi; Hoffmann, Chen; Nass, Dvora; Talianski, Alisa; Spiegelmann, Roberto; Cohen, Zvi R.; Mardor, Yael

    2012-01-01

    The current standard of care for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is resection followed by radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide. Recent studies suggest that nearly half of the patients with early radiological deterioration post treatment do not suffer from tumor recurrence but from pseudoprogression. Similarly, a significant number of patients with brain metastases suffer from radiation necrosis following radiation treatments. Conventional MRI is currently unable to differentiate tumor progression from treatment-induced effects. The ability to clearly differentiate tumor from non-tumoral tissues is crucial for appropriate patient management. Ten patients with primary brain tumors and 10 patients with brain metastases were scanned by delayed contrast extravasation MRI prior to surgery. Enhancement subtraction maps calculated from high resolution MR images acquired up to 75 min after contrast administration were used for obtaining stereotactic biopsies. Histological assessment was then compared with the pre-surgical calculated maps. In addition, the application of our maps for prediction of progression was studied in a small cohort of 13 newly diagnosed GBM patients undergoing standard chemoradiation and followed up to 19.7 months post therapy. The maps showed two primary enhancement populations: the slow population where contrast clearance from the tissue was slower than contrast accumulation and the fast population where clearance was faster than accumulation. Comparison with histology confirmed the fast population to consist of morphologically active tumor and the slow population to consist of non-tumoral tissues. Our maps demonstrated significant correlation with perfusion-weighted MR data acquired simultaneously, although contradicting examples were shown. Preliminary results suggest that early changes in the fast volumes may serve as a predictor for time to progression. These preliminary results suggest that our high resolution

  3. Preliminary Results on Different Impedance Contrast Agents for Pulmonary Perfusion Imaging with Electrical Impedance Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, D. T.; Kosobrodov, R.; Barry, M. A.; Chik, W.; Pouliopoulos, J.; Oh, T. I.; Thiagalingam, A.; McEwan, A.

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies in animal models suggest that the use of small volume boluses of NaCl as an impedance contrast agent can significantly improve pulmonary perfusion imaging by Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). However, these studies used highly concentrated NaCl solution (20%) which may have adverse effects on the patients. In a pilot experiment, we address this problem by comparing a number of different Impedance Contrast Boluses (ICBs). Conductivity changes in the lungs of a sheep after the injection of four different ICBs were compared, including three NaCl-based ICBs and one glucose-based ICB. The following procedure was followed for each ICB. Firstly, ventilation was turned off to provide an apneic window of approximately 40s to image the conductivity changes due to the ICB. Each ICB was then injected through a pig-tail catheter directly into the right atrium. EIT images were acquired throughout the apnea to capture the conductivity change. For each ICB, the experiment was repeated three times. The three NaCl-based ICB exhibited similar behaviour in which following the injection of each of these ICBs, the conductivity of each lung predictably increased. The effect of the ICB of 5% glucose solution was inconclusive. A small decrease in conductivity in the left lung was observed in two out of three cases and none was discernible in the right lung.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of perfusion measurements in dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: development, validation and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peladeau-Pigeon, M.; Coolens, C.

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is an imaging tool that aids in evaluating functional characteristics of tissue at different stages of disease management: diagnostic, radiation treatment planning, treatment effectiveness, and monitoring. Clinical validation of DCE-derived perfusion parameters remains an outstanding problem to address prior to perfusion imaging becoming a widespread standard as a non-invasive quantitative measurement tool. One approach to this validation process has been the development of quality assurance phantoms in order to facilitate controlled perfusion ex vivo. However, most of these systems fail to establish and accurately replicate physiologically relevant capillary permeability and exchange performance. The current work presents the first step in the development of a prospective suite of physics-based perfusion simulations based on coupled fluid flow and particle transport phenomena with the goal of enhancing the understanding of clinical contrast agent kinetics. Existing knowledge about a controllable, two-compartmental fluid exchange phantom was used to validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation model presented herein. The sensitivity of CFD-derived contrast uptake curves to contrast injection parameters, including injection duration and flow rate, were quantified and found to be within 10% accuracy. The CFD model was employed to evaluate two commonly used clinical kinetic algorithms used to derive perfusion parameters: Fick's principle and the modified Tofts model. Neither kinetic model was able to capture the true transport phenomena it aimed to represent but if the overall contrast concentration after injection remained identical, then successive DCE-CT evaluations could be compared and could indeed reflect differences in regional tissue flow. This study sets the groundwork for future explorations in phantom development and pharmaco-kinetic modelling, as well as the development of novel contrast

  5. MRI findings in multifetal pregnancies complicated by twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence (TRAP).

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Carolina V A; Kline-Fath, Beth M; Linam, Leann E; Garcia, Maria A Calvo; Rubio, Eva I; Lim, Foong-Yen

    2011-06-01

    Twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence (TRAP) is a rare complication in multifetal monochorionic pregnancies in which a normal "pump" twin provides circulation to an abnormal acardiac co-twin, resulting in high-output cardiac dysfunction in the pump twin. To define fetal MRI findings of TRAP sequence. Fetal MR images were retrospectively reviewed in 35 pregnancies complicated by TRAP sequence. Abnormalities of the pump twin, acardiac twin, umbilical cord, placenta and amniotic fluid were reviewed. Acardiac twins were classified as: acephalus (51%), anceps (40%), amorphus (9%), acormus (0%). Common findings in acardiac twins include subcutaneous edema (77%), absent cardiac structures (86%), absent or abnormal thoracic cavity (100%), abnormal abdominal organs (100%), superior limbs absent (46%) or abnormal (51%), and inferior limbs present but abnormal (83%). There were pump twin findings of cardiac dysfunction in 43% and intracranial ischemic changes in 3%. Umbilical cord anomalies were present in 97%. Acardiac twins present with a predictable pattern of malformation with poorly developed superior structures, more normally formed inferior structures and absent or rudimentary heart. Although usually absent, abnormal heart structures can be seen and do not exclude TRAP sequence. Pump twins are commonly normal with exception of findings of cardiac dysfunction and possible brain ischemia.

  6. Perfusion functional MRI reveals cerebral blood flow pattern under psychological stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiongjiong; Rao, Hengyi; Wetmore, Gabriel S.; Furlan, Patricia M.; Korczykowski, Marc; Dinges, David F.; Detre, John A.

    2005-12-01

    Despite the prevalence of stress in everyday life and its impact on happiness, health, and cognition, little is known about the neural substrate of the experience of everyday stress in humans. We use a quantitative and noninvasive neuroimaging technique, arterial spin-labeling perfusion MRI, to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes associated with mild to moderate stress induced by a mental arithmetic task with performance monitoring. Elicitation of stress was verified by self-report of stress and emotional state and measures of heart rate and salivary-cortisol level. The change in CBF induced by the stress task was positively correlated with subjective stress rating in the ventral right prefrontal cortex (RPFC) and left insula/putamen area. The ventral RPFC along with right insula/putamen and anterior cingulate showed sustained activation after task completion in subjects reporting a high stress level during arithmetic tasks. Additionally, variations of baseline CBF in the ventral RPFC and right orbitofrontal cortex were found to correlate with changes in salivary-cortisol level and heart rate caused by undergoing stress tasks. We further demonstrated that the observed right prefrontal activation could not be attributed to increased cognitive demand accompanying stress tasks and extended beyond neural pathways associated with negative emotions. Our results provide neuroimaging evidence that psychological stress induces negative emotion and vigilance and that the ventral RPFC plays a key role in the central stress response. anterior cingulate cortex | arterial spin labeling | right prefrontal cortex

  7. Nocardia brain abscess mimicking high-grade necrotic tumor on perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Cianfoni, Alessandro; Calandrelli, Rosalinda; De Bonis, Pasquale; Pompucci, Angelo; Lauriola, Libero; Colosimo, Cesare

    2010-08-01

    Differentiating a pyogenic cerebral abscess from a cystic brain tumor can be a challenge when using morphological and functional imaging techniques. Several studies on MRI perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) have demonstrated that enhancing abscess capsules have lower cerebral blood volume ratios (rCBV) than the enhancing rims of necrotic tumors. We report a 67-year-old male with a Nocardia cerebral abscess showing restricted diffusion in the necrotic center, but high values for rCBV in the enhancing capsule on PWI, therefore mimicking a high-grade necrotic tumor. Differential diagnosis between cerebral abscesses and necrotic tumors is greatly improved by the adjunct of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and PWI to the morphological magnetic resonance findings; yet there is still overlap. That an abscess may show increased rCBV along the capsule, therefore mimicking a hypervascular brain tumor on PWI, should be considered when attempting a radiological diagnosis of a ring-enhancing brain lesion. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound for Assessing Renal Perfusion Impairment and Predicting Acute Kidney Injury to Chronic Kidney Disease Progression.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Cui, Shuang; Yang, Li; Wu, Chunyi; Liu, Jian; Yang, Fang; Liu, Youhua; Bin, Jianping; Hou, Fan Fan

    2017-08-22

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly recognized as a major risk factor leading to progression to chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the diagnostic tools for predicting AKI to CKD progression are particularly lacking. Here, we tested the utility of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) for predicting progression to CKD after AKI by using both mild (20-min) and severe (45-min) bilateral renal ischemia-reperfusion injury mice. Renal perfusion measured by CEUS reduced to 25% ± 7% and 14% ± 6% of the pre-ischemic levels in mild and severe AKI 1 h after ischemia (p < 0.05). Renal perfusion returned to pre-ischemic levels 1 day after mild AKI followed by restoration of kidney function. However, severe AKI caused persistent renal perfusion impairment (60% ± 9% of baseline levels) accompanied by progressive renal fibrosis and sustained decrease in renal function. Renal perfusion at days 1-21 significantly correlated with tubulointerstitial fibrosis 42 days after AKI. For predicting renal fibrosis at day 42, the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of renal perfusion impairment at day 1 was 0.84. Similar changes in the renal image of CEUS were observed in patients with AKI-CKD progression. This study demonstrates that CEUS enables dynamic and noninvasive detection of renal perfusion impairment after ischemic AKI and the perfusion abnormalities shown by CEUS can early predict the progression to CKD after AKI. These results indicate that CEUS enables the evaluation of renal perfusion impairment associated with CKD after ischemic AKI and may serve as a noninvasive technique for assessing AKI-CKD progression. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  9. Perfusion quantification in contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS)--ready for research projects and routine clinical use.

    PubMed

    Tranquart, F; Mercier, L; Frinking, P; Gaud, E; Arditi, M

    2012-07-01

    With contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) now established as a valuable imaging modality for many applications, a more specific demand has recently emerged for quantifying perfusion and using measured parameters as objective indicators for various disease states. However, CEUS perfusion quantification remains challenging and is not well integrated in daily clinical practice. The development of VueBox™ alleviates existing limitations and enables quantification in a standardized way. VueBox™ operates as an off-line software application, after dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) is performed. It enables linearization of DICOM clips, assessment of perfusion using patented curve-fitting models, and generation of parametric images by synthesizing perfusion information at the pixel level using color coding. VueBox™ is compatible with most of the available ultrasound platforms (nonlinear contrast-enabled), has the ability to process both bolus and disruption-replenishment kinetics loops, allows analysis results and their context to be saved, and generates analysis reports automatically. Specific features have been added to VueBox™, such as fully automatic in-plane motion compensation and an easy-to-use clip editor. Processing time has been reduced as a result of parallel programming optimized for multi-core processors. A long list of perfusion parameters is available for each of the two administration modes to address all possible demands currently reported in the literature for diagnosis or treatment monitoring. In conclusion, VueBox™ is a valid and robust quantification tool to be used for standardizing perfusion quantification and to improve the reproducibility of results across centers.

  10. Immobilized contrast-enhanced MRI: Gadolinium-based long-term MR contrast enhancement of the vein graft vessel wall.

    PubMed

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Yu, Peng; Tao, Ming; Nguyen, Binh T; Campagna, Christina M; Karp, Jeffrey M; Mulkern, Robert V; Ozaki, C Keith; Rybicki, Frank J

    2011-01-01

    An implantable MR contrast agent that can be covalently immobilized on tissue during surgery has been developed. The rationale is that a durable increase in tissue contrast using an implantable contrast agent can enhance postsurgical tissue differentiation using MRI. For small-vessel (e.g., vein graft) MRI, the direct benefit of such permanent "labeling" of the vessel wall by modification of its relaxation properties is to achieve more efficient imaging. This efficiency can be realized as either increased contrast leading to more accurate delineation of vessel wall and lesion tissue boundaries, or, faster imaging without penalizing contrast-to-noise ratio, or a combination thereof. We demonstrate, for the first time, stable long-term MRI enhancement using such an exogenous contrast mechanism based on immobilizing a modified diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid gadolinium(3+) dihydrogen complex on a human vein using a covalent amide bond. Signal enhancement due to the covalently immobilized contrast agent is demonstrated for excised human vein specimens imaged at 3 T, and its long-term stability is demonstrated during a 4-month incubation period.

  11. Prostate Cancer Evaluation: Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Enzyme-Activated Proton MRI Contrast Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    tissues have determined the widespread success of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in clinical diagnosis.[40] The contrast in an MR image is the... MR images of M9 and M10 with lacZ transfected prostate tumor cells, yielding obvious MRI contrast changes between in WT and lacZ transfected PC3...agent for MR angiography , Radiology, 207, 529-538. 44. Rudin M, Mueggler T, Allegrini PR, Baumann D, Rausch M, 2003, Characterization of CNS disorders

  12. Emerging role of contrast-enhanced MRI in diagnosing vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Turley, Ryan S; Lidsky, Michael E; Markovic, Jovan N; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2014-07-01

    Vascular malformations comprise a diverse and rare group of lesions which generally pose a formidable treatment challenge. Requisite for optimal surgical planning are imaging modalities capable of delineating involved anatomy and malformation flow characteristics. In this regard, we and others have purported the advantages of contrast-enhanced MRI. Here, we review the current body of literature regarding the emerging of role of contrast enhanced MRI for the management of vascular malformations.

  13. Simultaneous Myocardial Strain and Dark-Blood Perfusion Imaging Using a Displacement-Encoded MRI Pulse Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Le, Yuan; Stein, Ashley; Berry, Colin; Kellman, Peter; Bennett, Eric E.; Taylor, Joni; Lucas, Katherine; Kopace, Rael; Chefd’Hotel, Christophe; Lorenz, Christine H.; Croisille, Pierre; Wen, Han

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a displacement-encoded pulse sequence for simultaneous perfusion and strain imaging. Displacement-encoded images in 2–3 myocardial slices were repeatedly acquired using a single shot pulse sequence for 3 to 4 minutes, which covers a bolus infusion of Gd. The magnitudes of the images were T1 weighted and provided quantitative measures of perfusion, while the phase maps yielded strain measurements. In an acute coronary occlusion swine protocol (n=9), segmental perfusion measurements were validated against microsphere reference standard with a linear regression (slope 0.986, R2 = 0.765, Bland-Altman standard deviation = 0.15 ml/min/g). In a group of ST-elevation myocardial infarction(STEMI) patients (n=11), the scan success rate was 76%. Short-term contrast washout rate and perfusion are highly correlated (R2=0.72), and the pixel-wise relationship between circumferential strain and perfusion was better described with a sigmoidal Hill curve than linear functions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring strain and perfusion from a single set of images. PMID:20544714

  14. Myocardial perfusion: near-automated evaluation from contrast-enhanced MR images obtained at rest and during vasodilator stress.

    PubMed

    Tarroni, Giacomo; Corsi, Cristiana; Antkowiak, Patrick F; Veronesi, Federico; Kramer, Christopher M; Epstein, Frederick H; Walter, James; Lamberti, Claudio; Lang, Roberto M; Mor-Avi, Victor; Patel, Amit R

    2012-11-01

    To develop and validate a technique for near-automated definition of myocardial regions of interest suitable for perfusion evaluation during vasodilator stress cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The institutional review board approved the study protocol, and all patients provided informed consent. Image noise density distribution was used as a basis for endocardial and epicardial border detection combined with nonrigid registration. This method was tested in 42 patients undergoing contrast material-enhanced cardiac MR imaging (at 1.5 T) at rest and during vasodilator (adenosine or regadenoson) stress, including 15 subjects with normal myocardial perfusion and 27 patients referred for coronary angiography. Contrast enhancement-time curves were near-automatically generated and were used to calculate perfusion indexes. The results were compared with results of conventional manual analysis, using quantitative coronary angiography results as a reference for stenosis greater than 50%. Statistical analyses included the Student t test, linear regression, Bland-Altman analysis, and κ statistics. Analysis of one sequence required less than 1 minute and resulted in high-quality contrast enhancement curves both at rest and stress (mean signal-to-noise ratios, 17±7 [standard deviation] and 22±8, respectively), showing expected patterns of first-pass perfusion. Perfusion indexes accurately depicted stress-induced hyperemia (increased upslope, from 6.7 sec(-1)±2.3 to 15.6 sec(-1)±5.9; P<.0001). Measured segmental pixel intensities correlated highly with results of manual analysis (r=0.95). The derived perfusion indexes also correlated highly with (r up to 0.94) and showed the same diagnostic accuracy as manual analysis (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, up to 0.72 vs 0.73). Despite the dynamic nature of contrast-enhanced image sequences and respiratory motion, fast near-automated detection of myocardial segments and accurate quantification of

  15. Assessment of renal perfusion with contrast-enhanced ultrasound: Preliminary results in early diabetic nephropathies.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yi; Wang, Wen-Ping; Lin, Pan; Fan, Peili; Mao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    We performed a prospective study to evaluate the value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in quantitative evaluation of renal cortex perfusion in patients suspected of early diabetic nephropathies (DN), with the estimated GFR (MDRD equation) as the gold standard. The study protocol was approved by the hospital review board; each patient gave written informed consent. Our study included 46 cases (21 males and 25 females, mean age 55.6 ± 4.14 years) of clinical confirmed early DN patients. After intravenous bolus injection of 1 ml sulfur hexafluoride microbubbles of ultrasound contrast agent, real time CEUS of renal cortex was performed successively using a 2-5 MHz convex probe. Time-intensity curves (TICs) and quantitative indexes were created with Qlab software. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to predict the diagnostic criteria of CEUS quantitative indexes, and their diagnostic efficiencies were compared with resistance index (RI) and peak systolic velocity (PSV) of renal segmental arteries by chi square test. Our control group included forty-five healthy volunteers. Difference was considered statistically significant with P <  0.05. Changes of area under curve (AUC), derived peak intensity (DPI) were statistically significant (P <  0.05). DPI less than 12 and AUC greater than 1400 had high utility in DN, with 71.7% and 67.3% sensitivity, 77.8% and 80.0% specificity. These results were significantly better than those obtained with RI and PSV which had no significant difference in early stage of DN (P > 0.05). CEUS might be helpful to improve early diagnosis of DN by quantitative analyses. AUC and DPI might be valuable quantitative indexes.

  16. Is correction necessary when clinically determining quantitative cerebral perfusion parameters from multi-slice dynamic susceptibility contrast MR studies?

    PubMed

    Salluzzi, M; Frayne, R; Smith, M R

    2006-01-21

    Several groups have modified the standard singular value decomposition (SVD) algorithm to produce delay-insensitive cerebral blood flow (CBF) estimates from dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion studies. However, new dependences of CBF estimates on bolus arrival times and slice position in multi-slice studies have been recently recognized. These conflicting findings can be reconciled by accounting for several experimental and algorithmic factors. Using simulation and clinical studies, the non-simultaneous measurement of arterial and tissue concentration curves (relative slice position) in a multi-slice study is shown to affect time-related perfusion parameters, e.g. arterial-tissue-delay measurements. However, the current clinical impact of relative slice position on amplitude-related perfusion parameters, e.g. CBF, can be expected to be small unless any of the following conditions are present individually or in combination: (a) high concentration curve signal-to-noise ratios, (b) small tissue mean transit times, (c) narrow arterial input functions or (d) low temporal resolution of the DSC image sequence. Recent improvements in magnetic resonance (MR) technology can easily be expected to lead to scenarios where these effects become increasingly important sources of inaccuracy for all perfusion parameter estimates. We show that using Fourier interpolated (high temporal resolution) residue functions reduces the systematic error of the perfusion parameters obtained from multi-slice studies.

  17. Synthetic Ni3S2/Ni hybrid architectures as potential contrast agents in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Chen, K.

    2016-04-01

    Traditional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents mainly include superparamagnetic (SPM) iron oxide nanoparticle as T 2 contrast agent for liver and paramagnetic Gd (III)-chelate as T 1 contrast agent for all organs. In this work, weak ferromagnetic kale-like and SPM cabbage-like Ni3S2@Ni hybrid architectures were synthesized and evaluated as potential T 1 MRI contrast agents. Their relatively small r 2/r 1 ratios of 2.59 and 2.38, and high r 1 values of 11.27 and 4.89 mmol-1 L s-1 (for the kale-like and cabbage-like Ni3S2@Ni, respectively) will shed some light on the development of new-type MRI contrast agents.

  18. Superparamagnetic bifunctional bisphosphonates nanoparticles: a potential MRI contrast agent for osteoporosis therapy and diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Lalatonne, Y; Monteil, M; Jouni, H; Serfaty, J M; Sainte-Catherine, O; Lièvre, N; Kusmia, S; Weinmann, P; Lecouvey, M; Motte, L

    2010-06-15

    A bone targeting nanosystem is reported here which combined magnetic contrast agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and a therapeutic agent (bisphosphonates) into one drug delivery system. This new targeting nanoplatform consists of superparamagnetic γFe(2)O(3) nanoparticles conjugated to 1,5-dihydroxy-1,5,5-tris-phosphono-pentyl-phosphonic acid (di-HMBPs) molecules with a bisphosphonate function at the outer of the nanoparticle surface for bone targeting. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were evaluated as a specific MRI contrast agent by adsorption study onto hydroxyapatite and MRI measurment. The strong adsorption of the bisphosphonates nanoparticles to hydroxyapatite and their use as MRI T2(∗) contrast agent were demonstrated. Cellular tests performed on human osteosarcoma cells (MG63) show that γFe(2)O(3)@di-HMBP hybrid nanomaterial has no citoxity effect in cell viability and may act as a diagnostic and therapeutic system.

  19. Superparamagnetic Bifunctional Bisphosphonates Nanoparticles: A Potential MRI Contrast Agent for Osteoporosis Therapy and Diagnostic

    PubMed Central

    Lalatonne, Y.; Monteil, M.; Jouni, H.; Serfaty, J. M.; Sainte-Catherine, O.; Lièvre, N.; Kusmia, S.; Weinmann, P.; Lecouvey, M.; Motte, L.

    2010-01-01

    A bone targeting nanosystem is reported here which combined magnetic contrast agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and a therapeutic agent (bisphosphonates) into one drug delivery system. This new targeting nanoplatform consists of superparamagnetic γFe2O3 nanoparticles conjugated to 1,5-dihydroxy-1,5,5-tris-phosphono-pentyl-phosphonic acid (di-HMBPs) molecules with a bisphosphonate function at the outer of the nanoparticle surface for bone targeting. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were evaluated as a specific MRI contrast agent by adsorption study onto hydroxyapatite and MRI measurment. The strong adsorption of the bisphosphonates nanoparticles to hydroxyapatite and their use as MRI T2∗ contrast agent were demonstrated. Cellular tests performed on human osteosarcoma cells (MG63) show that γFe2O3@di-HMBP hybrid nanomaterial has no citoxity effect in cell viability and may act as a diagnostic and therapeutic system. PMID:20981332

  20. 25 Years of Contrast-Enhanced MRI: Developments, Current Challenges and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lohrke, Jessica; Frenzel, Thomas; Endrikat, Jan; Alves, Filipe Caseiro; Grist, Thomas M; Law, Meng; Lee, Jeong Min; Leiner, Tim; Li, Kun-Cheng; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Prince, Martin R; Schild, Hans H; Weinreb, Jeffrey C; Yoshikawa, Kohki; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2016-01-01

    In 1988, the first contrast agent specifically designed for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), gadopentetate dimeglumine (Magnevist(®)), became available for clinical use. Since then, a plethora of studies have investigated the potential of MRI contrast agents for diagnostic imaging across the body, including the central nervous system, heart and circulation, breast, lungs, the gastrointestinal, genitourinary, musculoskeletal and lymphatic systems, and even the skin. Today, after 25 years of contrast-enhanced (CE-) MRI in clinical practice, the utility of this diagnostic imaging modality has expanded beyond initial expectations to become an essential tool for disease diagnosis and management worldwide. CE-MRI continues to evolve, with new techniques, advanced technologies, and novel contrast agents bringing exciting opportunities for more sensitive, targeted imaging and improved patient management, along with associated clinical challenges. This review aims to provide an overview on the history of MRI and contrast media development, to highlight certain key advances in the clinical development of CE-MRI, to outline current technical trends and clinical challenges, and to suggest some important future perspectives. Bayer HealthCare.

  1. Perfusion Estimated With Rapid Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Correlates Inversely With Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression and Pimonidazole Staining in Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, Stephanie B.; Betts, Guy; Bonington, Suzanne C.; Homer, Jarrod J.; Slevin, Nick J.; Kershaw, Lucy E.; Valentine, Helen; West, Catharine M.L.; Buckley, David L.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze, in a pilot study, rapidly acquired dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI data with a general two-compartment exchange tracer kinetic model and correlate parameters obtained with measurements of hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Eight patients were scanned before surgery. The DCE-MRI data were acquired with 1.5-s temporal resolution and analyzed using the two-compartment exchange tracer kinetic model to obtain estimates of parameters including perfusion and permeability surface area. Twelve to 16 h before surgery, patients received an intravenous injection of pimonidazole. Samples taken during surgery were used to determine the level of pimonidazole staining using immunohistochemistry and VEGF expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Correlations between the biological and imaging data were examined. Results: Of the seven tumors fully analyzed, those that were poorly perfused tended to have high levels of pimonidazole staining (r = -0.79, p = 0.03) and VEGF expression (r = -0.82, p = 0.02). Tumors with low permeability surface area also tended to have high levels of hypoxia (r = -0.75, p = 0.05). Hypoxic tumors also expressed higher levels of VEGF (r = 0.82, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Estimates of perfusion obtained with rapid DCE-MRI data in patients with head-and-neck cancer correlate inversely with pimonidazole staining and VEGF expression.

  2. Automated analysis of perfusion weighted MRI using asymmetry in vascular territories

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Neil R.; Ansari, Sameer A; Vakil, Parmede; Prabhakaran, Shyam; Carroll, Timothy J; Hurley, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the feasibility of automatic vascular territory region of interest (ROI) construction as a method for standardized quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) images. Materials and Methods An algorithm for automatic construction of vascular territory ROIs was performed on 10 healthy controls and 25 patients with perfusion abnormalities identified by retrospective chart review. The ROIs were used to quantify perfusion asymmetry for each territory, and perfusion asymmetry was compared in the two cohorts and against blinded neuroradiologist interpretation. The algorithm was additionally applied to a separate cohort of 23 prospectively enrolled patients and perfusion asymmetry was correlated against clinical variables. Results There was significantly greater perfusion asymmetry in territories graded by neuroradiologists as hypoperfused compared to those graded as normally perfused (p<.05) and compared to healthy volunteers (p<.01). An ROC analysis showed that perfusion asymmetry was sensitive and specific for identifying hypoperfusion in vascular territories (84.9% sensitivity and 90.5% specificity for a threshold asymmetry index of .829). In the prospective cohort, perfusion asymmetry was correlated with initial NIH stroke scale (NIHSS) (p<.01) and length of stay (p<.05). Conclusions Automatic construction of vascular territory ROIs and calculation of perfusion asymmetry is a feasible method for analyzing CBF images. Because the technique is rapid and minimizes bias, it can facilitate analysis of larger scale research studies. PMID:25601529

  3. Characterizing growth patterns in longitudinal MRI using image contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardhan, Avantika; Prastawa, Marcel; Vachet, Clement; Piven, Joseph; Gerig, Guido

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the growth patterns of the early brain is crucial to the study of neuro-development. In the early stages of brain growth, a rapid sequence of biophysical and chemical processes take place. A crucial component of these processes, known as myelination, consists of the formation of a myelin sheath around a nerve fiber, enabling the effective transmission of neural impulses. As the brain undergoes myelination, there is a subsequent change in the contrast between gray matter and white matter as observed in MR scans. In this work, gray-white matter contrast is proposed as an effective measure of appearance which is relatively invariant to location, scanner type, and scanning conditions. To validate this, contrast is computed over various cortical regions for an adult human phantom. MR (Magnetic Resonance) images of the phantom were repeatedly generated using different scanners, and at different locations. Contrast displays less variability over changing conditions of scan compared to intensity-based measures, demonstrating that it is less dependent than intensity on external factors. Additionally, contrast is used to analyze longitudinal MR scans of the early brain, belonging to healthy controls and Down's Syndrome (DS) patients. Kernel regression is used to model subject-specific trajectories of contrast changing with time. Trajectories of contrast changing with time, as well as time-based biomarkers extracted from contrast modeling, show large differences between groups. The preliminary applications of contrast based analysis indicate its future potential to reveal new information not covered by conventional volumetric or deformation-based analysis, particularly for distinguishing between normal and abnormal growth patterns.

  4. Iron Oxide as an MRI Contrast Agent for Cell Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Korchinski, Daniel J.; Taha, May; Yang, Runze; Nathoo, Nabeela; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide contrast agents have been combined with magnetic resonance imaging for cell tracking. In this review, we discuss coating properties and provide an overview of ex vivo and in vivo labeling of different cell types, including stem cells, red blood cells, and monocytes/macrophages. Furthermore, we provide examples of applications of cell tracking with iron contrast agents in stroke, multiple sclerosis, cancer, arteriovenous malformations, and aortic and cerebral aneurysms. Attempts at quantifying iron oxide concentrations and other vascular properties are examined. We advise on designing studies using iron contrast agents including methods for validation. PMID:26483609

  5. Blood perfusion of the contralateral testis evaluated with contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rabbits with unilateral testicular torsion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Zhan, Wei-Wei; Shen, Zhou-Jun; Rui, Wen-Bin; Lv, Chen; Chen, Man; Zhou, Jian-Qiao; Zhou, Ping; Zhou, Mi; Zhu, Ying

    2009-03-01

    The changes of blood perfusion of contralateral testis after unilateral testicular torsion remain controversial. In this study, 28 New Zealand white male rabbits were randomly divided into five groups. Group A (n = 8), the control group, underwent a sham operation on the unilateral testis without inducing testicular torsion. In groups B, C, and D (n = 5 each), unilateral testicular torsion was induced, and, after 3, 6 or 24 h, respectively, detorsion was performed. In group E (n = 5), permanent unilateral testicular torsion was applied. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound was used to observe the blood perfusion of the contralateral testis at the following stages: pre-torsion (preopration), immediately post-torsion (postopration), pre-detorsion, immediately post-detorsion, and late-stage post-detorsion (6-12 h post-detorsion in groups B-D) or at a similar time point (15-21 h post-torsion in group E). Time-intensity curves were generated, and the following parameters were derived and analyzed: arrival time, time to peak intensity, peak intensity, and half-time of the descending peak intensity. The analysis revealed that blood perfusion of the contralateral testis increased immediately after testicular torsion on the opposite side (P < 0.05), which increased with prolonged testicular torsion of the other testis. This research demonstrated that contrast-enhanced ultrasound was valuable in evaluating blood perfusion of the contralateral testis after unilateral testicular torsion.

  6. Contrast enhanced ultrasound with quantitative perfusion analysis for objective characterization of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Mirko; Canestrini, Stefano; Crosara, Stefano; De Robertis, Riccardo; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto

    2014-03-28

    The aim of this study was to determine whether contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) quantitative perfusion analysis allows an objective characterization of ductal adenocarcinoma (ADK) of the pancreas. Patients with pancreatic ADK underwent CEUS. All examinations were performed on an Acuson S2000 system (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) after the iv administration of 2.4 mL contrast agent (SonoVue(®), Bracco, Milan, Italy). All lesions were pathologically proved. An operator manually drew different regions of interest within the tumor and the adjacent parenchyma to allow the quantitative perfusion analysis. The mean values of peak of enhancement, time to peak and ascending curve were calculated and compared using the Student's t test. The quantitative perfusion analysis was possible in all lesions. The mean values of the peak of enhancement, time to peak and ascending curve were 17.19%, 7.97 s and 159.52% s within the tumor and 33.57%, 8.89 s and 355.29% s within the adjacent parenchyma. The peak of enhancement and the ascending curve values were significantly different within the tumor and the adjacent parenchyma. Thus, CEUS allows the quantitative perfusion analysis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

  7. Bench-to-bedside review: Contrast enhanced ultrasonography - a promising technique to assess renal perfusion in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in critically ill patients and associated with important morbidity and mortality. Although alterations in renal perfusion are thought to play a causative role in the pathogenesis of AKI, there is, to date, no reliable technique that allows the assessment of renal perfusion that is applicable in the ICU. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is an ultrasound imaging technique that makes use of microbubble-based contrast agents. These microbubbles, when injected into the bloodstream, allow visualization of vascular structures and, with contrast-specific imaging modes, detection of blood flow at the capillary level. Some recent CEUS-derived approaches allow quantification of blood flow in several organs, including the kidney. Current generation ultrasound contrast agents have strong stability and safety profiles. Along with post-marketing surveillance, numerous studies report safe administration of these agents, including in critically ill patients. This review presents information on the physical principles underlying CEUS, the methods allowing blood flow quantification and the potential applications of CEUS in critical care nephrology, currently as a research tool but perhaps in the future as a way of monitoring renal perfusion. PMID:21586101

  8. Increased cortical capillary transit time heterogeneity in Alzheimer's disease: a DSC-MRI perfusion study.

    PubMed

    Eskildsen, Simon F; Gyldensted, Louise; Nagenthiraja, Kartheeban; Nielsen, Rune B; Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Dalby, Rikke B; Frandsen, Jesper; Rodell, Anders; Gyldensted, Carsten; Jespersen, Sune N; Lund, Torben E; Mouridsen, Kim; Brændgaard, Hans; Østergaard, Leif

    2017-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau and neurotoxic Aβ in the brain parenchyma. Hypoxia caused by microvascular changes and disturbed capillary flows could stimulate this build-up of AD-specific proteins in the brain. In this study, we compared cerebral microcirculation in a cohort of AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients with that of age-matched controls, all without a history of diabetes or of hypertension for more than 2 years, using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI). Vascular flow disturbances were quantified using a parametric model and mapped to the mid-cortical surface for group-wise statistical analysis. We found widespread hypoperfusion in patients compared with controls and identified areas of increased relative capillary transit time heterogeneity (RTH), consistent with low tissue oxygen tension. Notably, RTH was positively correlated with white matter hyperintensities and positively correlated with symptom severity in the patient cohort. These correlations extended over large parts of the temporal, parietal, and frontal cortices. The results support the hypothesis of disturbed capillary flow patterns in AD and suggest that DSC-MRI may provide imaging biomarkers of impaired cerebral microcirculation in AD.

  9. A multi-contrast MRI study of microstructural brain damage in patients with mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Granziera, C.; Daducci, A.; Donati, A.; Bonnier, G.; Romascano, D.; Roche, A.; Bach Cuadra, M.; Schmitter, D.; Klöppel, S.; Meuli, R.; von Gunten, A.; Krueger, G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate pathological mechanisms underlying brain tissue alterations in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) using multi-contrast 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods Forty-two MCI patients and 77 healthy controls (HC) underwent T1/T2* relaxometry as well as Magnetization Transfer (MT) MRI. Between-groups comparisons in MRI metrics were performed using permutation-based tests. Using MRI data, a generalized linear model (GLM) was computed to predict clinical performance and a support-vector machine (SVM) classification was used to classify MCI and HC subjects. Results Multi-parametric MRI data showed microstructural brain alterations in MCI patients vs HC that might be interpreted as: (i) a broad loss of myelin/cellular proteins and tissue microstructure in the hippocampus (p ≤ 0.01) and global white matter (p < 0.05); and (ii) iron accumulation in the pallidus nucleus (p ≤ 0.05). MRI metrics accurately predicted memory and executive performances in patients (p ≤ 0.005). SVM classification reached an accuracy of 75% to separate MCI and HC, and performed best using both volumes and T1/T2*/MT metrics. Conclusion Multi-contrast MRI appears to be a promising approach to infer pathophysiological mechanisms leading to brain tissue alterations in MCI. Likewise, parametric MRI data provide powerful correlates of cognitive deficits and improve automatic disease classification based on morphometric features. PMID:26236628

  10. Contrast-enhanced synthetic MRI for the detection of brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Akifumi; Hori, Masaaki; Suzuki, Michimasa; Andica, Christina; Nakazawa, Misaki; Tsuruta, Kouhei; Takano, Nao; Sato, Shuji; Hamasaki, Nozomi; Yoshida, Mariko; Kumamaru, Kanako Kunishima; Ohtomo, Kuni; Aoki, Shigeki

    2016-02-01

    Synthetic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a technique that enables creation of various contrast-weighted images from a single MRI quantification scan, is a useful clinical tool. However, there are currently no reports examining the use of contrast-enhanced synthetic MRI for detecting brain metastases. To assess whether contrast-enhanced synthetic MRI is suitable for detecting brain metastases. Ten patients with a combined total of 167 brain metastases who underwent quantitative MRI and conventional T1-weighted inversion recovery fast spin-echo (conventional T1IR) MRI before and after administration of a contrast agent were included in the study. Synthetic T1IR and T1-weighted (synthetic T1W) images were produced after parameter quantification. Lesion-to-white matter contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio were calculated for each image. The number of visible lesions in each image was determined by two neuroradiologists. The mean lesion-to-white matter contrast and mean contrast-to-noise ratio of the synthetic T1IR images were significantly higher than those of the synthetic T1W (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively) and conventional T1IR (P = 0.04 and P = 0.002, respectively) images. Totals of 130 and 124 metastases were detected in the synthetic T1IR images by the first and second radiologists, respectively. The corresponding numbers were 91 and 85 in the synthetic T1W images and 119 and 119 in the conventional T1IR images. Statistical significance was not found among detected numbers of lesions. Synthetic T1IR imaging created better contrast compared with synthetic T1W or conventional T1IR imaging. The ability to detect brain metastases was comparable among these imaging.

  11. Three-dimensional contrasted visualization of pancreas in rats using clinical MRI and CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ting; Coudyzer, Walter; Peeters, Ronald; Liu, Yewei; Cona, Marlein Miranda; Feng, Yuanbo; Xia, Qian; Yu, Jie; Jiang, Yansheng; Dymarkowski, Steven; Huang, Gang; Chen, Feng; Oyen, Raymond; Ni, Yicheng

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to visualize the pancreas in post-mortem rats with local contrast medium infusion by three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) using clinical imagers. A total of 16 Sprague Dawley rats of about 300 g were used for the pancreas visualization. Following the baseline imaging, a mixed contrast medium dye called GadoIodo-EB containing optimized concentrations of Gd-DOTA, iomeprol and Evens blue was infused into the distally obstructed common bile duct (CBD) for post-contrast imaging with 3.0 T MRI and 128-slice CT scanners. Images were post-processed with the MeVisLab software package. MRI findings were co-registered with CT scans and validated with histomorphology, with relative contrast ratios quantified. Without contrast enhancement, the pancreas was indiscernible. After infusion of GadoIodo-EB solution, only the pancreatic region became outstandingly visible, as shown by 3D rendering MRI and CT and proven by colored dissection and histological examinations. The measured volume of the pancreas averaged 1.12 ± 0.04 cm(3) after standardization. Relative contrast ratios were 93.28 ± 34.61% and 26.45 ± 5.29% for MRI and CT respectively. We have developed a multifunctional contrast medium dye to help clearly visualize and delineate rat pancreas in situ using clinical MRI and CT scanners. The topographic landmarks thus created with 3D demonstration may help to provide guidelines for the next in vivo pancreatic MRI research in rodents. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Design and characterization of a new irreversible responsive PARACEST MRI contrast agent that detects nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanshu; Li, Yuguo; Pagel, Mark D

    2007-12-01

    Irreversible responsive PARAmagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (PARACEST) MRI contrast agents constitute a new type of agent for molecular imaging. To investigate the utility of this approach, a novel PARACEST MRI contrast agent, Yb(III)-(1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-triacetic acid)-orthoaminoanilide (Yb-DO3A-oAA), was developed that detects nitric oxide (NO). The agent exhibited two CEST effects at -11 ppm and +8 ppm, which were assigned to chemical exchange from amide and amine functional groups, respectively. The effects of pH, temperature, and concentration were investigated to characterize the complex and to optimize PARACEST detection. This responsive PARACEST MRI contrast agent incurred an irreversible covalent change in the presence of NO and O(2), which caused an irreversible disappearance of both PARACEST effects from MR images. The NO-dependent response of a relaxivity-based MRI contrast agent, Gd-DO3A-oAA, was investigated for comparison. This report highlights the advantages of irreversible MRI contrast agents, demonstrates that large changes in PARACEST can be used to create a highly responsive agent, and indicates challenges that must be overcome to apply this type of contrast agent to in vivo biomedical applications in molecular imaging. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Model-based reconstruction for undersampled dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felsted, Ben K.; Whitaker, Ross T.; Schabel, Matthias; DiBella, Edward V. R.

    2009-02-01

    This paper describes a method for estimating, from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI raw k-space data of the breast, parameter maps that model tissue properties associated with a compartmental model of contrast exchange. The contrast agent kinetics, as represented by these parameter maps, are important in distinguishing benign and malignant tumors. The proposed model-based reconstruction algorithm estimates tissue parameter maps directly from MRI k-space data, thereby allowing a new and improved set of spatiotemporal resolution and noise tradeoffs. Realistic noise levels and an undersampling factor of R=4 appeared to provide reasonable accuracy for the kinetic parameters of interest.

  14. Gd-HOPO Based High Relaxivity MRI Contrast Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Ankona; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-11-06

    Tris-bidentate HOPO-based ligands developed in our laboratory were designed to complement the coordination preferences of Gd{sup 3+}, especially its oxophilicity. The HOPO ligands provide a hexadentate coordination environment for Gd{sup 3+} in which all he donor atoms are oxygen. Because Gd{sup 3+} favors eight or nine coordination, this design provides two to three open sites for inner-sphere water molecules. These water molecules rapidly exchange with bulk solution, hence affecting the relaxation rates of bulk water olecules. The parameters affecting the efficiency of these contrast agents have been tuned to improve contrast while still maintaining a high thermodynamic stability for Gd{sup 3+} binding. The Gd- HOPO-based contrast agents surpass current commercially available agents ecause of a higher number of inner-sphere water molecules, rapid exchange of inner-sphere water molecules via an associative mechanism, and a long electronic relaxation time. The contrast enhancement provided by these agents is at least twice that of commercial contrast gents, which are based on polyaminocarboxylate ligands.

  15. Using Perfusion fMRI to Measure Continuous Changes in Neural Activity with Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Ingrid R.; Rao, Hengyi; Moore, Katherine Sledge; Wang, Jiongjiong; Detre, John A.; Aguirre, Geoffrey K.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we examine the suitability of a relatively new imaging technique, "arterial spin labeled perfusion imaging," for the study of continuous, gradual changes in neural activity. Unlike BOLD imaging, the perfusion signal is stable over long time-scales, allowing for accurate assessment of continuous performance. In addition, perfusion…

  16. Using Perfusion fMRI to Measure Continuous Changes in Neural Activity with Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Ingrid R.; Rao, Hengyi; Moore, Katherine Sledge; Wang, Jiongjiong; Detre, John A.; Aguirre, Geoffrey K.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we examine the suitability of a relatively new imaging technique, "arterial spin labeled perfusion imaging," for the study of continuous, gradual changes in neural activity. Unlike BOLD imaging, the perfusion signal is stable over long time-scales, allowing for accurate assessment of continuous performance. In addition, perfusion…

  17. MRI contrast agent for molecular imaging of the HER2/neu receptor using targeted magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasaneh, Samira; Rajabi, Hossein; Babaei, Mohammad Hossein; Akhlaghpoor, Shahram

    2011-06-01

    In this study, Trastuzumab modified Magnetic Nanoparticles (TMNs) were prepared as a new contrast agent for detecting HER2 (Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2) expression tumors by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). TMNs were prepared based on iron oxide nanoparticles core and Trastuzumab modified dextran coating. The TMNs core and hydrodynamic size were determined by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. TMNs stability and cytotoxicity were investigated. The ability of TMNs for HER2 detection were evaluated in breast carcinoma cell lines (SKBr3 and MCF7 cells) and tumor-bearing mice by MRI and iron uptake determination. The particles core and hydrodynamic size were 9 ± 2.5 and 41 ± 15 nm (size range: 15-87 nm), respectively. The molar antibody/nanoparticle ratio was 3.1-3.5. TMNs were non-toxic to the cells below the 30 μg (Fe)/mL concentration and good stable up to 8 weeks in PBS buffer. TMNs could detect HER2 oncogenes in the cells surface with imagable contrast by MRI. The invivo study in mice bearing tumors indicated that TMNs possessed a good diagnostic ability as HER2 specific contrast agent by MRI. TMNs were demonstrated to be able to selectively accumulate in the tumor cells, with a proper signal enhancement in MRI T2 images. So, the complex may be considered for further investigations as an MRI contrast agent for detection of HER2 expression tumors in human.

  18. Association between penile dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI-derived quantitative parameters and self-reported sexual function in patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Donati, Olivio F; Wibmer, Andreas; Goldman, Debra A; Mulhall, John P; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig

    2014-10-01

    The high incidence of prostate cancer, coupled with excellent prostate cancer control rates, has resulted in growing interest in nononcological survivorship issues such as sexual function. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly being performed for local staging of prostate cancer, and due to the close anatomical relationship to the prostate, penile enhancement is often depicted in prostate MRI. To evaluate the associations between quantitative perfusion-related parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI of the penis and self-reported sexual function in patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer. This retrospective study included 50 patients who underwent DCE-MRI for prostate cancer staging before prostatectomy. The following perfusion-related parameters were calculated: volume transfer constant (K(trans)), rate constant (k(ep)), extracellular-extravascular volume fraction (v(e)), contrast enhancement ratio (CER), area under the gadolinium curve after 180 seconds (AUC180), and slope of the time/signal intensity curve of the corpora cavernosa. Associations between perfusion-related parameters and self-reported sexual function were evaluated using the Wilcoxon Rank-Sum test. Patient responses to the sexual function domain of the Prostate Quality of Life survey. Five of the six DCE-MRI parameters (K(trans), v(e), CER, AUC180, and slope) were significantly associated with the overall score from the sexual domain of the survey (P = 0.0020-0.0252). CER, AUC180, and slope were significantly associated with the answers to all six questions (P = 0.0020-0.0483), ve was significantly associated with the answers to five of six questions (P = 0.0036-0.1029), and K(trans) was significantly associated with the answers to three of six questions (P = 0.0252-0.1023). k(ep) was not significantly associated with the overall survey score (P = 0.7665) or the answers to any individual questions (P = 0

  19. Longitudinal assessment of renal perfusion and oxygenation in transplant donor-recipient pairs using ASL and BOLD MRI

    PubMed Central

    Niles, David J; Artz, Nathan S; Djamali, Arjang; Sadowski, Elizabeth A; Grist, Thomas M; Fain, Sean B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess renal function in kidney transplant recipients and their respective donors over two years using arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI, and to prospectively evaluate the effect of losartan on functional MRI measures in recipients. Materials and Methods The study included 15 matched pairs of renal transplant donors and recipients. ASL and BOLD MRI of the kidneys were performed on donors prior to transplant surgery (baseline) and on both donors and recipients at 3 months, 1 year and 2 years post-transplant. After 3 months, seven of the 15 recipients were prescribed 25–50 mg/day losartan for the remainder of the study. A linear mixed-effects model was used to evaluate perfusion, R2*, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and fractional excretion of sodium (FENa) for changes across time or associated with losartan treatment. Results In donors, cortical perfusion in the remaining kidney decreased by 50 ± 19 ml/min/100g (11.8%) between baseline and 2 years (P < 0.05), while cortical R2* declined modestly by 0.7 ± 0.3 s−1 (5.6%; P < 0.05). In transplanted kidneys, cortical perfusion decreased markedly by 141 ± 21 ml/min/100g (34.2%) between baseline and 2 years (P < 0.001), while medullary R2* declined by 1.5 ± 0.8 s−1 (8.3%; P = 0.06). Single-kidney eGFR increased between baseline and 2 years by 17.7 ± 2.7 ml/min/1.73m2 (40.3%; P < 0.0001) in donors and to 14.6 ± 4.3 ml/min/1.73m2 (33.3%; P < 0.01) in recipients. Cortical perfusion at 1 and 2 years in recipients receiving 25–50 mg/day losartan was 62 ± 24 ml/min/100g higher than recipients not receiving the drug (P < 0.05). No significant effects of losartan were observed for any other markers of renal function. Conclusions The results suggest an important role for non-invasive functional monitoring with ASL and BOLD MRI in kidney transplant recipients and donors, and they indicate a potentially beneficial effect of losartan in recipients. PMID

  20. The Interface Between Iron Metabolism and Gene-Based Iron Contrast for MRI.

    PubMed

    Goldhawk, Donna E; Gelman, Neil; Sengupta, Anindita; Prato, Frank S

    2015-01-01

    Using a gene-based approach to track cellular and molecular activity with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has many advantages. The strong correlation between transverse relaxation rates and total cellular iron content provides a basis for developing sensitive and quantitative detection of MRI reporter gene expression. In addition to biophysical concepts, general features of mammalian iron regulation add valuable context for interpreting molecular MRI predicated on gene-based iron labeling. With particular reference to the potential of magnetotactic bacterial gene expression as a magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent for mammalian cell tracking, studies in different cell culture models highlight the influence of intrinsic iron regulation on the MRI signal. The interplay between dynamic regulation of mammalian iron metabolism and expression systems designed to sequester iron biominerals for MRI is presented from the perspective of their potential influence on MR image interpretation.

  1. The Interface Between Iron Metabolism and Gene-Based Iron Contrast for MRI

    PubMed Central

    Goldhawk, Donna E.; Gelman, Neil; Sengupta, Anindita; Prato, Frank S.

    2015-01-01

    Using a gene-based approach to track cellular and molecular activity with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has many advantages. The strong correlation between transverse relaxation rates and total cellular iron content provides a basis for developing sensitive and quantitative detection of MRI reporter gene expression. In addition to biophysical concepts, general features of mammalian iron regulation add valuable context for interpreting molecular MRI predicated on gene-based iron labeling. With particular reference to the potential of magnetotactic bacterial gene expression as a magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent for mammalian cell tracking, studies in different cell culture models highlight the influence of intrinsic iron regulation on the MRI signal. The interplay between dynamic regulation of mammalian iron metabolism and expression systems designed to sequester iron biominerals for MRI is presented from the perspective of their potential influence on MR image interpretation. PMID:26483608

  2. Pulmonary MRI contrast using Surface Quadrupolar Relaxation (SQUARE) of hyperpolarized (83)Kr.

    PubMed

    Six, Joseph S; Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Lilburn, David M L; Dorkes, Alan C; Stupic, Karl F; Shaw, Dominick E; Morris, Peter G; Hall, Ian P; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (83)Kr has previously been demonstrated to enable MRI contrast that is sensitive to the chemical composition of the surface in a porous model system. Methodological advances have lead to a substantial increase in the (83)Kr hyperpolarization and the resulting signal intensity. Using the improved methodology for spin exchange optical pumping of isotopically enriched (83)Kr, internal anatomical details of ex vivo rodent lung were resolved with hyperpolarized (83)Kr MRI after krypton inhalation. Different (83)Kr relaxation times were found between the main bronchi and the parenchymal regions in ex vivo rat lungs. The T1 weighted hyperpolarized (83)Kr MRI provided a first demonstration of surface quadrupolar relaxation (SQUARE) pulmonary MRI contrast.

  3. Main applications of hybrid PET-MRI contrast agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Kiani, A; Esquevin, A; Lepareur, N; Bourguet, P; Le Jeune, F; Gauvrit, Jy

    2016-01-01

    In medical imaging, the continuous quest to improve diagnostic performance and optimize treatment strategies has led to the use of combined imaging modalities. Positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) is a hybrid imaging existing already for many years. The high spatial and contrast resolution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the high sensitivity and molecular information from PET imaging are leading to the development of this new hybrid imaging along with hybrid contrast agents. To create a hybrid contrast agent for PET-MRI device, a PET radiotracer needs to be combined with an MRI contrast agent. The most common approach is to add a radioactive isotope to the surface of a small superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particle. The resulting agents offer a wide range of applications, such as pH variation monitoring, non-invasive angiography and early imaging diagnosis of atherosclerosis. Oncology is the most promising field with the detection of sentinel lymph nodes and the targeting of tumor neoangiogenesis. Oncology and cardiovascular imaging are thus major areas of development for hybrid PET-MRI imaging systems and hybrid contrast agents. The aim is to combine high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, morphological and functional information. Future prospects include the use of specific antibodies and hybrid multimodal PET-MRI-ultrasound-fluorescence imaging with the potential to provide overall pre-, intra- and postoperative patient care.

  4. Development of contrast agents targeted to macrophage scavenger receptors for MRI of vascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Björn; Youens, Susan; Louie, Angelique Y.

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of death in the U.S. Because there is a potential to prevent coronary and arterial diseases through early diagnosis, there is a need for methods to image arteries in the sub-clinical stage as well as clinical stage using various non-invasive techniques, including Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). We describe a development of a novel MRI contrast agent targeted to plaques that will allow imaging of lesion formation. The contrast agent is directed to macrophages, one of the earliest components of developing plaques. Macrophages are labeled through the macrophage scavenger receptor A, a macrophage specific cell surface protein, using an MRI contrast agent derived from scavenger receptor ligands. We have synthesized and characterized these contrast agents with a range of relaxivities. In vitro studies show that the targeted contrast agent accumulates in macrophages and solution studies indicate that micromolar concentrations are sufficient to produce contrast in an MR image. Cell toxicity and initial biodistribution studies indicate low toxicity, no detectable retention in normal blood vessels, and rapid clearance from blood. The promising performance of this contrast agent targeted towards vascular inflammation opens doors to tracking of other inflammatory diseases such as tumor immunotherapy and transplant acceptance using MRI. PMID:16536488

  5. Ex vivo assessment of polyol coated-iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI diagnosis applications: toxicological and MRI contrast enhancement effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomati-Miguel, Oscar; Miguel-Sancho, Nuria; Abasolo, Ibane; Candiota, Ana Paula; Roca, Alejandro G.; Acosta, Milena; Schwartz, Simó; Arus, Carles; Marquina, Clara; Martinez, Gema; Santamaria, Jesus

    2014-03-01

    Polyol synthesis is a promising method to obtain directly pharmaceutical grade colloidal dispersion of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). Here, we study the biocompatibility and performance as T2-MRI contrast agents (CAs) of high quality magnetic colloidal dispersions (average hydrodynamic aggregate diameter of 16-27 nm) consisting of polyol-synthesized SPIONs (5 nm in mean particle size) coated with triethylene glycol (TEG) chains (TEG-SPIONs), which were subsequently functionalized to carboxyl-terminated meso-2-3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) coated-iron oxide nanoparticles (DMSA-SPIONs). Standard MTT assays on HeLa, U87MG, and HepG2 cells revealed that colloidal dispersions of TEG-coated iron oxide nanoparticles did not induce any loss of cell viability after 3 days incubation with dose concentrations below 50 μg Fe/ml. However, after these nanoparticles were functionalized with DMSA molecules, an increase on their cytotoxicity was observed, so that particles bearing free terminal carboxyl groups on their surface were not cytotoxic only at low concentrations (<10 μg Fe/ml). Moreover, cell uptake assays on HeLa and U87MG and hemolysis tests have demonstrated that TEG-SPIONs and DMSA-SPIONs were well internalized by the cells and did not induce any adverse effect on the red blood cells at the tested concentrations. Finally, in vitro relaxivity measurements and post mortem MRI studies in mice indicated that both types of coated-iron oxide nanoparticles produced higher negative T2-MRI contrast enhancement than that measured for a similar commercial T2-MRI CAs consisting in dextran-coated ultra-small iron oxide nanoparticles (Ferumoxtran-10). In conclusion, the above attributes make both types of as synthesized coated-iron oxide nanoparticles, but especially DMSA-SPIONs, promising candidates as T2-MRI CAs for nanoparticle-enhanced MRI diagnosis applications.

  6. Contrast-Enhanced Abdominal MRI for Suspected Appendicitis: How We Do It

    PubMed Central

    Kinner, Sonja; Repplinger, Michael D.; Pickhardt, Perry J.; Reeder, Scott B.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this article is to describe our approach to contrast-enhanced abdominal MRI in patients with nontraumatic abdominal pain and suspected appendicitis. We aim to share our experience on the advantages, pearls, and pitfalls of MRI in this clinical setting, in comparison with CT and ultrasound. CONCLUSION We present some typical cases of appendicitis and alternative diagnoses in patients presenting with acute nontraumatic abdominal pain. PMID:27065072

  7. GADOLINIUM(Gd)-BASED and Ion Oxide Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Pre-Clinical and Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (mri) Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Thian C.

    2012-06-01

    It is known that one strength of MRI is its excellent soft tissue discrimination. It naturally provides sufficient contrast between the structural differences of normal and pathological tissues, their spatial extent and progression. However, to further extend its applications and enhance even more contrast for clinical studies, various Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents have been developed for different organs (brain strokes, cancer, cardio-MRI, etc). These Gd-based contrast agents are paramagnetic compounds that have strong T1-effect for enhancing the contrast between tissue types. Gd-contrast can also enhance magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) for studying stenosis and for measuring perfusion, vascular susceptibility, interstitial space, etc. Another class of contrast agents makes use of ferrite iron oxide nanoparticles (including Superparamagnetic Ion Oxide (SPIO) and Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide (USPIO)). These nanoparticles have superior magnetic susceptibility effect and produce a drop in signal, namely in T2*-weighted images, useful for the determination of lymph nodes metastases, angiogenesis and arteriosclerosis plaques.

  8. Imaging transplanted stem cells in real time using an MRI dual-contrast method

    PubMed Central

    Ngen, Ethel J.; Wang, Lee; Kato, Yoshinori; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Zhu, Wenlian; Gandhi, Nishant; Smith, Barbara; Armour, Michael; Wong, John; Gabrielson, Kathleen; Artemov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapies are currently being investigated for the repair of brain injuries. Although exogenous stem cell labelling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) prior to transplantation provides a means to noninvasively monitor stem cell transplantation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), monitoring cell death is still a challenge. Here, we investigate the feasibility of using an MRI dual-contrast technique to detect cell delivery, cell migration and cell death after stem cell transplantation. Human mesenchymal stem cells were dual labelled with SPIONs and gadolinium-based chelates (GdDTPA). The viability, proliferation rate, and differentiation potential of the labelled cells were then evaluated. The feasibility of this MRI technique to distinguish between live and dead cells was next evaluated using MRI phantoms, and in vivo using both immune-competent and immune-deficient mice, following the induction of brain injury in the mice. All results were validated with bioluminescence imaging. In live cells, a negative (T2/T2*) MRI contrast predominates, and is used to track cell delivery and cell migration. Upon cell death, a diffused positive (T1) MRI contrast is generated in the vicinity of the dead cells, and serves as an imaging marker for cell death. Ultimately, this technique could be used to manage stem cell therapies. PMID:26330231

  9. Positive-contrast cellular MRI of embryonic stem cells for tissue regeneration using a highly efficient T1 MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Loai, Sadi; Haedicke, Inga; Mirzaei, Zahra; Simmons, Craig A; Zhang, Xiao-An; Cheng, Hai Ling

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the feasibility of high-sensitivity cellular MRI of embryonic stem (ES) cells using a novel cell permeable and cell retentive T1 contrast agent. Mouse ES cells were labeled with a novel manganese porphyrin contrast agent, MnAMP, at 0.1 mM over 2 to 24 h and retained in contrast-free medium for up to 24 h postlabeling. MRI was performed on a 3 Tesla clinical scanner; T1 and T2 relaxation times were measured. Quantification of manganese content was performed using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Viability and proliferation assays were done for the longest labeling interval. Differentiation capacity was assessed using the hanging drop method to direct differentiation toward cardiomyocytes. MnAMP-labeled ES cells exhibited over a fourfold decrease in T1 compared with unlabeled cells, and maintained up to a threefold decrease 24 h postlabeling. Viability and proliferation were not affected. Most importantly, labeled ES cells differentiated into functional cardiomyocytes that exhibited normal contractility patterns. MnAMP-based cellular MRI is a very high sensitivity T1 approach for cellular imaging. It has the potential for noninvasive in vivo monitoring of stem cell therapy in cardiac regeneration and other tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1456-1463. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. fMRI analysis of contrast polarity in face-selective cortex in humans and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiaomin; Nasr, Shahin; Devaney, Kathryn J; Holt, Daphne J; Tootell, Roger B H

    2013-08-01

    Recognition is strongly impaired when the normal contrast polarity of faces is reversed. For instance, otherwise-familiar faces become very difficult to recognize when viewed as photographic negatives. Here, we used fMRI to demonstrate related properties in visual cortex: 1) fMRI responses in the human Fusiform Face Area (FFA) decreased strongly (26%) to contrast-reversed faces across a wide range of contrast levels (5.3-100% RMS contrast), in all subjects tested. In a whole brain analysis, this contrast polarity bias was largely confined to the Fusiform Face Area (FFA; p<0.0001), with possible involvement of a left occipital face-selective region. 2) It is known that reversing facial contrast affects three image properties in parallel (absorbance, shading, and specular reflection). Here, comparison of FFA responses to those in V1 suggests that the contrast polarity bias is produced in FFA only when all three component properties were reversed simultaneously, which suggests a prominent non-linearity in FFA processing. 3) Across a wide range (180°) of illumination source angles, 3D face shapes without texture produced response constancy in FFA, without a contrast polarity bias. 4) Consistent with psychophysics, analogous fMRI biases for normal contrast polarity were not produced by non-face objects, with image statistics similar to the face stimuli. 5) Using fMRI, we also demonstrated a contrast polarity bias in awake behaving macaque monkeys, in the cortical region considered homologous to human FFA. Thus common cortical mechanisms may underlie facial contrast processing across ~25 million years of primate evolution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Preparation of Magnetite Nanoemulsion Stabilized by Tween 81 for MRI Contrast Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, Boris P.; Eliseev, Oleg V.; Marchenko, Yaroslav Yu.; Yakovleva, Liudmila Yu.; Zimina, Tatiana M.; Soloviev, Alexei V.; Luchinin, Victor V.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetite nanoemulsions (NE) were synthesized via procedure of heterophase synthesis in a ternary system: Tween 81/pentadecane/water. Prepared NEs were studied by dynamic light scattering and NMR spectroscopy. Their size was of the order of 10 nm and they revealed superparamagnetic properties. MRI efficiency of the NEs was demonstrated by measuring magnetic spin-spin relaxation rates, which complied with the properties of negative contrast agents. MRI of agar phantom demonstrates high grade of contrast enhancement in vitro. Toxicity of the preparations was studied on murine model. Studies revealed no signs of acute or short-term (within 30 days) toxicity in mice. Synthesized magnetite NEs have potential for in vivo MRI contrast enhancement applications.

  12. Oligoethylenimine-grafted chitosan as enhanced T1 contrast agent for in vivo targeted tumor MRI.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xiaoyan; Liu, Min; Zhang, Kunchi; Cao, Yi; Dong, Jingjin; Jiang, Bin; Lu, Bo; Zheng, Hua; Zhang, Hailu; Pei, Renjun

    2016-07-01

    To synthesize and characterize an effective macromolecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on oligoethylenimine-grafted chitosan with targeting capability. In this study we synthesized and characterized oligoethylenimine-grafted chitosan copolymers, followed by conjugating with Gd-DTPA and folic acid. The toxicity was evaluated by WST assay, and in vitro MRI studies were performed in comparison with Gd-DTPA. Finally, the contrast enhancement of the new macromolecular MRI contrast agent was then evaluated in the mice bearing KB xenografts. Compared to Gd-DTPA (4.3 mM(-1) s(-1) ), this macromolecular contrast agent (mCA) exhibited much higher T1 relaxivity (14.4 mM(-1) s(-1) ), up to 3.3 times higher. Meanwhile, the WST assay illustrated that the viability of KB cells remained at 90% even when the Gd concentration was 1 mM. During the in vivo study, the image contrast produced by FA-mCA was higher than one produced by mCA, up to 2.5 times higher. Our results showed this macromolecular contrast agent has potential for developing sensitive and biocompatible MRI probe with targeting capability. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:23-29. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Implementation and evaluation of a new workflow for registration and segmentation of pulmonary MRI data for regional lung perfusion assessment.

    PubMed

    Böttger, T; Grunewald, K; Schöbinger, M; Fink, C; Risse, F; Kauczor, H U; Meinzer, H P; Wolf, Ivo

    2007-03-07

    Recently it has been shown that regional lung perfusion can be assessed using time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Quantification of the perfusion images has been attempted, based on definition of small regions of interest (ROIs). Use of complete lung segmentations instead of ROIs could possibly increase quantification accuracy. Due to the low signal-to-noise ratio, automatic segmentation algorithms cannot be applied. On the other hand, manual segmentation of the lung tissue is very time consuming and can become inaccurate, as the borders of the lung to adjacent tissues are not always clearly visible. We propose a new workflow for semi-automatic segmentation of the lung from additionally acquired morphological HASTE MR images. First the lung is delineated semi-automatically in the HASTE image. Next the HASTE image is automatically registered with the perfusion images. Finally, the transformation resulting from the registration is used to align the lung segmentation from the morphological dataset with the perfusion images. We evaluated rigid, affine and locally elastic transformations, suitable optimizers and different implementations of mutual information (MI) metrics to determine the best possible registration algorithm. We located the shortcomings of the registration procedure and under which conditions automatic registration will succeed or fail. Segmentation results were evaluated using overlap and distance measures. Integration of the new workflow reduces the time needed for post-processing of the data, simplifies the perfusion quantification and reduces interobserver variability in the segmentation process. In addition, the matched morphological data set can be used to identify morphologic changes as the source for the perfusion abnormalities.

  14. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI of Cervical Cancers: Temporal Percentile Screening of Contrast Enhancement Identifies Parameters for Prediction of Chemoradioresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Erlend K.F.; Hole, Knut Hakon; Lund, Kjersti V.; Sundfor, Kolbein; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Lyng, Heidi; Malinen, Eirik

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To systematically screen the tumor contrast enhancement of locally advanced cervical cancers to assess the prognostic value of two descriptive parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Methods and Materials: This study included a prospectively collected cohort of 81 patients who underwent DCE-MRI with gadopentetate dimeglumine before chemoradiotherapy. The following descriptive DCE-MRI parameters were extracted voxel by voxel and presented as histograms for each time point in the dynamic series: normalized relative signal increase (nRSI) and normalized area under the curve (nAUC). The first to 100th percentiles of the histograms were included in a log-rank survival test, resulting in p value and relative risk maps of all percentile-time intervals for each DCE-MRI parameter. The maps were used to evaluate the robustness of the individual percentile-time pairs and to construct prognostic parameters. Clinical endpoints were locoregional control and progression-free survival. The study was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Results: The p value maps of nRSI and nAUC showed a large continuous region of percentile-time pairs that were significantly associated with locoregional control (p < 0.05). These parameters had prognostic impact independent of tumor stage, volume, and lymph node status on multivariate analysis. Only a small percentile-time interval of nRSI was associated with progression-free survival. Conclusions: The percentile-time screening identified DCE-MRI parameters that predict long-term locoregional control after chemoradiotherapy of cervical cancer.

  15. Contrast agent influences MRI phase-contrast flow measurements in small vessels.

    PubMed

    Lagerstrand, Kerstin M; Vikhoff-Baaz, Barbro; Starck, Göran; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2010-07-01

    Contrast-enhanced MR angiography is often combined with phase contrast (PC) flow measurement to answer a particular clinical question. The contrast agent that is administered during contrast-enhanced MR angiography may still be present in the blood during the consecutive PC flow measurement. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of contrast agent on PC flow measurements in small vessels. For that purpose, both in vivo measurements and computer simulations were performed. The dependence of the PC flow quantification on the signal amplitude difference between blood and stationary background tissue for various vessel sizes was characterized. Results show that the partial-volume effect strongly affects the accuracy of the PC flow quantification when the imaged vessel is small compared to the spatial resolution. A higher blood-to-background-contrast level during imaging significantly increases the partial-volume effect and thereby reduces the accuracy of the flow quantification. On the other hand, a higher blood-to-background-contrast level facilitated the segmentation of the vessel for flow rate determination. PC flow measurements should therefore be performed after contrast agent administration in large vessels, but before contrast agent administration in small vessels.

  16. Radiation protection issues in dynamic contrast-enhanced (perfusion) computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Brix, Gunnar; Lechel, Ursula; Nekolla, Elke; Griebel, Jürgen; Becker, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT studies are increasingly used in both medical care and clinical trials to improve diagnosis and therapy management of the most common life-threatening diseases: stroke, coronary artery disease and cancer. It is thus the aim of this review to briefly summarize the current knowledge on deterministic and stochastic radiation effects relevant for patient protection, to present the essential concepts for determining radiation doses and risks associated with DCE-CT studies as well as representative results, and to discuss relevant aspects to be considered in the process of justification and optimization of these studies. For three default DCE-CT protocols implemented at a latest-generation CT system for cerebral, myocardial and cancer perfusion imaging, absorbed doses were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters at an anthropomorphic body phantom and compared with thresholds for harmful (deterministic) tissue reactions. To characterize stochastic radiation risks of patients from these studies, life-time attributable cancer risks (LAR) were estimated using sex-, age-, and organ-specific risk models based on the hypothesis of a linear non-threshold dose-response relationship. For the brain, heart and pelvic cancer studies considered, local absorbed doses in the imaging field were about 100-190 mGy (total CTDI(vol), 200 mGy), 15-30 mGy (16 mGy) and 80-270 mGy (140 mGy), respectively. According to a recent publication of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP Publication 118, 2012), harmful tissue reactions of the cerebro- and cardiovascular systems as well as of the lenses of the eye become increasingly important at radiation doses of more than 0.5 Gy. The LARs estimated for the investigated cerebral and myocardial DCE-CT scenarios are less than 0.07% for males and 0.1% for females at an age of exposure of 40 years. For the considered tumor location and protocol, the corresponding LARs are more than 6 times as high

  17. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI for the Detection of Prostate Cancer: Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cher Heng; Hobbs, Brian Paul; Wei, Wei; Kundra, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to systematically review and meta-analyze dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) for the detection of prostate cancer in comparison with standard evaluation with T2-weighted imaging. Materials and Methods A PubMed electronic database search for the terms “dynamic contrast-enhanced,” “prostate,” and “MRI” was completed for articles up to September 17, 2013. All included studies had histopathologic correlation. Two by two contingency data were constructed for each study. A binormal bayesian ROC model was used to estimate and compare sensitivity, specificity, and AUC among eligible modalities. Results Both DCE-MRI (0.82–0.86) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) (0.84–0.88) yielded significantly better AUC than T2-weighted imaging (0.68–0.77). Moreover, partial AUC for the combination of DCE-MRI, DWI, and T2-weighted imaging was improved significantly (0.111; 0.103–0.119) when compared with DCE-MRI alone (0.079; 0.072–0.085) and T2-weighted imaging alone (0.079; 0.074–0.084) but not DWI alone (0.099; 0.091–0.108). Sensitivity and specificity were similar among the four modalities. Conclusion DCE-MRI improves AUC of tumor detection overall compared with T2-weighted imaging alone. Methods for DCE-MRI analysis require standardization, but visual analysis performs similar to semiquantitative methods. A two-parameter approach using DCE-MRI and T2-weighted imaging or DWI and T2-weighted imaging may be sufficient, and the latter may be more favorable for most routine prostate cancer imaging. PMID:25794093

  18. A Janus Chelator Enables Biochemically Responsive MRI Contrast with Exceptional Dynamic Range

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Eric M.; Jones, Chloe M.; Ramsay, Ian; Farrar, Christian T.; Caravan, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a new biochemically responsive Mn-based MRI contrast agent that provides a 9-fold change in relaxivity via switching between the Mn3+ and Mn2+ oxidation states. Interchange between oxidation states is promoted by a “Janus” ligand that isomerizes between binding modes that favor Mn3+ or Mn2+. It is the only ligand that supports stable complexes of Mn3+ and Mn2+ in biological milieu. Rapid interconversion between oxidation states is mediated by peroxidase activity (oxidation) and L-cysteine (reduction). This Janus system provides a new paradigm for the design of biochemically responsive MRI contrast agents. PMID:27960350

  19. Synergistic enhancement of iron oxide nanoparticle and gadolinium for dual-contrast MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Huang, Xinglu; Qian, Chunqi; Zhu, Lei; Hida, Naoki; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MR contrast agents exert influence on T{sub 1} or T{sub 2} relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combined use of iron oxide and Gd-DTPA can improve the sensitivity/specificity of lesion detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dual contrast MRI enhances the delineation of tumor borders and small lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of DC-MRI can come from the high paramagnetic susceptibility of Gd{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of DC-MRI can also come from the distinct pharmacokinetic distribution of SPIO and Gd-DTPA. -- Abstract: Purpose: The use of MR contrast agents allows accurate diagnosis by exerting an influence on the longitudinal (T{sub 1}) or transverse (T{sub 2}) relaxation time of the surrounding tissue. In this study, we combined the use of iron oxide (IO) particles and nonspecific extracellular gadolinium chelate (Gd) in order to further improve the sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection. Procedures: With a 7-Tesla scanner, pre-contrasted, IO-enhanced and dual contrast agent enhanced MRIs were performed in phantom, normal animals, and animal models of lymph node tumor metastases and orthotopic brain tumor. For the dual-contrast (DC) MRI, we focused on the evaluation of T{sub 2} weighted DC MRI with IO administered first, then followed by the injection of a bolus of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Results: Based on the C/N ratios and MRI relaxometry, the synergistic effect of coordinated administration of Gd-DTPA and IO was observed and confirmed in phantom, normal liver and tumor models. At 30 min after administration of Feridex, Gd-DTPA further decreased T{sub 2} relaxation in liver immediately after the injection. Additional administration of Gd-DTPA also immediately increased the signal contrast between tumor and brain parenchyma and maximized the C/N ratio to -4.12 {+-} 0.71. Dual contrast MRI also enhanced the

  20. Gd-doped BNNTs as T2-weighted MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciofani, Gianni; Boni, Adriano; Calucci, Lucia; Forte, Claudia; Gozzi, Alessandro; Mazzolai, Barbara; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2013-08-01

    This work describes, for the first time, doping of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) with gadolinium (Gd@BNNTs), a stable functionalization that permits non-invasive BNNT tracking via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We report the structure, Gd loading, and relaxometric properties in water suspension at 7 T of Gd@BNNTs, and show the behaviour of these nanostructures as promising T2-weighted contrast agents. Finally, we demonstrate their complete biocompatibility in vitro on human neuroblastoma cells, together with their ability to effectively label and affect contrast in MRI images at 7 T.

  1. Quantification of myocardial perfusion based on signal intensity of flow sensitized MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeykoon, Sumeda B.

    The quantitative assessment of perfusion is important for early recognition of a variety of heart diseases, determination of disease severity and their cure. In conventional approach of measuring cardiac perfusion by arterial spin labeling, the relative difference in the apparent T1 relaxation times in response to selective and non-selective inversion of blood entering the region of interest is related to perfusion via a two-compartment tissue model. But accurate determination of T1 in small animal hearts is difficult and prone to errors due to long scan times. The purpose of this study is to develop a fast, robust and simple method to quantitatively assess myocardial perfusion using arterial spin labeling. The proposed method is based on signal intensities (SI) of inversion recovery slice-select, non-select and steady-state images. Especially in this method data are acquired at a single inversion time and at short repetition times. This study began by investigating the accuracy of assessment of perfusion using a two compartment system. First, determination of perfusion by T1 and SI were implemented to a simple, two-compartment phantom model. Mathematical model developed for full spin exchange models (in-vivo experiments) by solving a modified Bloch equation was modified to develop mathematical models (T1 and SI) for a phantom (zero spin exchange). The phantom result at different flow rates shows remarkable evidence of accuracy of the two-compartment model and SI, T1 methods: the SI method has less propagation error and less scan time. Next, twelve healthy C57BL/6 mice were scanned for quantitative perfusion assessment and three of them were repeatedly scanned at three different time points for a reproducibility test. The myocardial perfusion of healthy mice obtained by the SI-method, 5.7+/-1.6 ml/g/min, was similar (p=0.38) to that obtained by the conventional T1 method, 5.6+/- 2.3 ml/g/min. The reproducibility of the SI method shows acceptable results: the

  2. Anisotropic MRI contrast reveals enhanced ionic transport in plastic crystals.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Konstantin; Jin, Liyu; Madsen, Louis A; Pringle, Jennifer M; O'Dell, Luke A; Forsyth, Maria

    2014-11-05

    Organic ionic plastic crystals (OIPCs) are attractive as solid-state electrolytes for electrochemical devices such as lithium-ion batteries and solar and fuel cells. OIPCs offer high ionic conductivity, nonflammability, and versatility of molecular design. Nevertheless, intrinsic ion transport behavior of OIPCs is not fully understood, and their measured properties depend heavily on thermal history. Solid-state magnetic resonance imaging experiments reveal a striking image contrast anisotropy sensitive to the orientation of grain boundaries in polycrystalline OIPCs. Probing triethyl(methyl)phosphonium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (P1222FSI) samples with different thermal history demonstrates vast variations in microcrystallite alignment. Upon slow cooling from the melt, microcrystallites exhibit a preferred orientation throughout the entire sample, leading to an order of magnitude increase in conductivity as probed using impedance spectroscopy. This investigation describes both a new conceptual window and a new characterization method for understanding polycrystalline domain structure and transport in plastic crystals and other solid-state conductors.

  3. Investigation of the mechanisms mediating MDMA "Ecstasy"-induced increases in cerebro-cortical perfusion determined by btASL MRI.

    PubMed

    Rouine, J; Kelly, M E; Jennings-Murphy, C; Duffy, P; Gorman, I; Gormley, S; Kerskens, C M; Harkin, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Acute administration of the recreational drug of abuse 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; Ecstasy) has previously been shown to increase cerebro-cortical perfusion as determined by bolus-tracking arterial spin labelling (btASL) MRI. The purpose of the current study was to assess the mechanisms mediating these changes following systemic administration of MDMA to rats. Pharmacological manipulation of serotonergic, dopaminergic and nitrergic transmission was carried out to determine the mechanism of action of MDMA-induced increases in cortical perfusion using btASL MRI. Fenfluramine (10 mg/kg), like MDMA (20 mg/kg), increased cortical perfusion. Increased cortical perfusion was not obtained with the 5-HT2 receptor agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl-aminopropane hydrochloride (DOI) (1 mg/kg). Depletion of central 5-HT following systemic administration of the tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) produced effects similar to those observed with MDMA. Pre-treatment with the 5-HT receptor antagonist metergoline (4 mg/kg) or with the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor citalopram (30 mg/kg), however, failed to produce any effect alone or influence the response to MDMA. Pre-treatment with the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 (1 mg/kg) failed to influence the changes in cortical perfusion obtained with MDMA. Treatment with the neuronal nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) (25 mg/kg) provoked no change in cerebral perfusion alone yet attenuated the MDMA-related increase in cortical perfusion. Cortical 5-HT depletion is associated with increases in perfusion although this mechanism alone does not account for MDMA-related changes. A role for NO, a key regulator of cerebrovascular perfusion, is implicated in MDMA-induced increases in cortical perfusion.

  4. In Vivo Evaluation of the Visual Pathway in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes by Diffusion Tensor MRI and Contrast Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kancherla, Swarupa; Kohler, William J.; van der Merwe, Yolandi

    2016-01-01

    Visual function has been shown to deteriorate prior to the onset of retinopathy in some diabetic patients and experimental animal models. This suggests the involvement of the brain's visual system in the early stages of diabetes. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by examining the integrity of the visual pathway in a diabetic rat model using in vivo multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ten-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into an experimental diabetic group by intraperitoneal injection of 65 mg/kg streptozotocin in 0.01 M citric acid, and a sham control group by intraperitoneal injection of citric acid only. One month later, diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) was performed to examine the white matter integrity in the brain, followed by chromium-enhanced MRI of retinal integrity and manganese-enhanced MRI of anterograde manganese transport along the visual pathway. Prior to MRI experiments, the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats showed significantly smaller weight gain and higher blood glucose level than the control rats. DTI revealed significantly lower fractional anisotropy and higher radial diffusivity in the prechiasmatic optic nerve of the diabetic rats compared to the control rats. No apparent difference was observed in the axial diffusivity of the optic nerve, the chromium enhancement in the retina, or the manganese enhancement in the lateral geniculate nucleus and superior colliculus between groups. Our results suggest that streptozotocin-induced diabetes leads to early injury in the optic nerve when no substantial change in retinal integrity or anterograde transport along the visual pathways was observed in MRI using contrast agent enhancement. DTI may be a useful tool for detecting and monitoring early pathophysiological changes in the visual system of experimental diabetes non-invasively. PMID:27768755

  5. Coregistration of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy for characterizing breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsiang, David; Shah, Natasha; Yu, Hon; Su, Min-Ying; Cerussi, Albert; Butler, John; Baick, Choong; Mehta, Rita; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Tromberg, Bruce

    2005-10-01

    A hand-held scanning probe based on broadband Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy (DOS) was used in combination with dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) to quantitatively characterize locally-advanced breast cancers in six patients. Measurements were performed sequentially using external fiducial markers for co-registration. Tumor patterns were categorized according to MRI morphological data, and 3D DCE-MRI slices were converted into a volumetric matrix with isotropic voxels to generate views that coincided with the DOS scanning plane. Tumor volume and depth at each DOS measurement site were determined, and a tissue optical index (TOI) that reflects both angiogenic and stromal characteristics was derived from broadband DOS data. In all six cases, optical scans showed significant TOI contrast corresponding to MRI morphological information. Sharp TOI peaks were recovered for well-circumscribed masses. A reduction in TOI was found inside a tumor with a necrotic center. A broadened peak was observed for a diffuse tumor pattern, and an inflammatory septal case provided two TOI peaks that correlated qualitatively with MRI enhancement. These results provide qualitative confirmation of the common signal origin and complementary information content that can be achieved by combining optical and MR imaging for breast cancer detection and clinical management.

  6. Defining a local arterial input function for perfusion MRI using independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Calamante, Fernando; Mørup, Morten; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2004-10-01

    Quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) using dynamic-susceptibility contrast MRI relies on the deconvolution of the arterial input function (AIF), which is commonly estimated from the signal changes in a major artery. However, it has been shown that the presence of bolus delay/dispersion between the artery and the tissue of interest can be a significant source of error. These effects could be minimized if a local AIF were used, although the measurement of a local AIF can be problematic. This work describes a new methodology to define a local AIF using independent component analysis (ICA). The methodology was tested on data from patients with various cerebrovascular abnormalities and compared to the conventional approach of using a global AIF. The new methodology produced higher CBF and shorter mean transit time values (compared to the global AIF case) in areas with distorted AIFs, suggesting that the effects of delay/dispersion are minimized. The minimization of these effects using the calculated local AIF should lead to a more accurate quantification of CBF, which can have important implications for diagnosis and management of patients with cerebral ischemia.

  7. A patient-specific visualization tool for comprehensive analysis of coronary CTA and perfusion MRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirisli, H. A.; Gupta, V.; Kirschbaum, S.; Neefjes, L.; van Geuns, R. J.; Mollet, N.; Lelieveldt, B. P. F.; Reiber, J. H. C.; van Walsum, T.; Niessen, W. J.

    2011-03-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion imaging (CMR) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) are widely used to assess heart disease. CMR is used to measure the global and regional myocardial function and to evaluate the presence of ischemia; CTA is used for diagnosing coronary artery disease, such as coronary stenoses. Nowadays, the hemodynamic significance of coronary artery stenoses is determined subjectively by combining information on myocardial function with assumptions on coronary artery territories. As the anatomy of coronary arteries varies greatly between individuals, we developed a patient-specific tool for relating CTA and perfusion CMR data. The anatomical and functional information extracted from CTA and CMR data are combined into a single frame of reference. Our graphical user interface provides various options for visualization. In addition to the standard perfusion Bull's Eye Plot (BEP), it is possible to overlay a 2D projection of the coronary tree on the BEP, to add a 3D coronary tree model and to add a 3D heart model. The perfusion BEP, the 3D-models and the CTA data are also interactively linked. Using the CMR and CTA data of 14 patients, our tool directly established a spatial correspondence between diseased coronary artery segments and myocardial regions with abnormal perfusion. The location of coronary stenoses and perfusion abnormalities were visualized jointly in 3D, thereby facilitating the study of the relationship between the anatomic causes of a blocked artery and the physiological effects on the myocardial perfusion. This tool is expected to improve diagnosis and therapy planning of early-stage coronary artery disease.

  8. [CT evaluation of extravascular perfusion of contrast medium and its potential to a new method of diagnosis: an experimental study using macro, micro-molecular contrast media].

    PubMed

    Sako, M; Sugimoto, K; Matsumoto, S; Hirota, S; Fujita, Y; Hasegawa, Y; Kuwata, Y; Tomita, M; Murakami, T; Kono, M

    1994-03-25

    To evaluate the dynamics of extravascular perfusion, dynamic CT with two different molecular sized contrast media was performed on VX2 tumor of rabbit. The first dynamic CT was performed with a bolus injection of iopamidol (IP:120 mgI/ml, 5 ml). After ascertaining that the tumor attenuation had returned to the pre-contrast level, the second dynamic CT was performed on the same slice with bolus injection of iodoethylated starch (IES:120 mgI/ml). The time-density (T-D) curves of the same tumor area on the images obtained by two contrast media were compared. The T-D curve with IP showed definitely higher level than that with IES. This occurrence can be explained that IP, 13 A in size, has higher permeability distributing not only in the intravascular space, but also into the extravascular space. On the other hand, IES, 200 A in size, will stay mostly in the intravascular space. From this, we consider that the attenuation difference between the two curves will be an indicator for the dynamics of extravascular perfusion, suggesting to become a new method for CT diagnosis.

  9. Evaluation of liver parenchyma and perfusion using dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in captive green iguanas (Iguana iguana) under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Contrast-enhanced diagnostic imaging techniques are considered useful in veterinary and human medicine to evaluate liver perfusion and focal hepatic lesions. Although hepatic diseases are a common occurrence in reptile medicine, there is no reference to the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) to evaluate the liver in lizards. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the pattern of change in echogenicity and attenuation of the liver in green iguanas (Iguana iguana) after administration of specific contrast media. Results An increase in liver echogenicity and density was evident during CEUS and CECT, respectively. In CEUS, the mean ± SD (median; range) peak enhancement was 19.9% ± 7.5 (18.3; 11.7-34.6). Time to peak enhancement was 134.0 ± 125.1 (68.4; 59.6-364.5) seconds. During CECT, first visualization of the contrast medium was at 3.6 ± 0.5 (4; 3-4) seconds in the aorta, 10.7 ± 2.2 (10.5; 7-14) seconds in the hepatic arteries, and 15 ± 4.5 (14.5; 10-24) seconds in the liver parenchyma. Time to peak was 14.1 ± 3.4 (13; 11-21) and 31 ± 9.6 (29; 23-45) seconds in the aorta and the liver parenchyma, respectively. Conclusion CEUS and dynamic CECT are practical means to determine liver hemodynamics in green iguanas. Distribution of contrast medium in iguana differed from mammals. Specific reference ranges of hepatic perfusion for diagnostic evaluation of the liver in iguanas are necessary since the use of mammalian references may lead the clinician to formulate incorrect diagnostic suspicions. PMID:24885935

  10. Detection of transplant renal artery stenosis in the early postoperative period with analysis of parenchymal perfusion with ultrasound contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Grzelak, Piotr; Kurnatowska, Ilona; Nowicki, Michał; Muras, Katarzyna; Podgórski, Michał; Strzelczyk, Janusz; Stefańczyk, Ludomir

    2013-04-26

    Transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) is a serious vascular complication due to non-specific clinical manifestations, causing serious diagnostic difficulties. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CE-US) can complement standard sonographic examination in evaluation of TRAS. Standard ultrasound B presentation, extended with color Doppler assessment of the flow spectrum and CE-US, was carried out in the early postoperative period in a group of 180 patients who underwent kidney transplantation. In CE-US analysis, the maximum contrast agent perfusion to the cortex and renal pyramids was evaluated. In 15 patients with sonographically diagnosed TRAS, magnetic resonance angiography and computer tomography angiography were performed to confirm the diagnosis. In patients with TRAS, significantly longer time of contrast agent (CE) inflow was observed in comparison to patients without perfusion disturbances (3.47 s vs. 1.5 s, p<0.000 for cortex; 6.01 vs. 2.09 s for pyramids, p<0.000). The rate of CE inflow was strongly positively correlated with severity of stenosis assessed on the basis of CTA/MRA examination (R=0.97 for cortex and 0.9 for pyramids; p<0.001). Six months after kidney transplantation, patients with a history of TRAS had significantly higher serum creatinine level than recipients with normal renal artery blood flow (1.76 mg/dL vs. 1.53 mg/dl, p<0.02). Estimated GFR was decreased to 35.9 ml/min vs. 46.5 ml/min, respectively (p<0.05). Contrast-enhanced ultrasound allows for quick and non-invasive assessment of parenchymal kidney graft perfusion. It enables confirmation of TRAS diagnosis in the early postoperative period and helps assess the degree of stenosis.

  11. Extending Local Canonical Correlation Analysis to Handle General Linear Contrasts for fMRI Data

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Mingwu; Nandy, Rajesh; Curran, Tim; Cordes, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    Local canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is a multivariate method that has been proposed to more accurately determine activation patterns in fMRI data. In its conventional formulation, CCA has several drawbacks that limit its usefulness in fMRI. A major drawback is that, unlike the general linear model (GLM), a test of general linear contrasts of the temporal regressors has not been incorporated into the CCA formalism. To overcome this drawback, a novel directional test statistic was derived using the equivalence of multivariate multiple regression (MVMR) and CCA. This extension will allow CCA to be used for inference of general linear contrasts in more complicated fMRI designs without reparameterization of the design matrix and without reestimating the CCA solutions for each particular contrast of interest. With the proper constraints on the spatial coefficients of CCA, this test statistic can yield a more powerful test on the inference of evoked brain regional activations from noisy fMRI data than the conventional t-test in the GLM. The quantitative results from simulated and pseudoreal data and activation maps from fMRI data were used to demonstrate the advantage of this novel test statistic. PMID:22461786

  12. Transient enlargement of contrast uptake on MRI after linear accelerator (linac) stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Huber, P E; Hawighorst, H; Fuss, M; van Kaick, G; Wannenmacher, M F; Debus, J

    2001-04-01

    With the increasing number of patients successfully treated with stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases, decision making after therapy based on follow-up imaging findings becomes more and more important. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most sensitive means for follow-up studies. The objective of this study was to investigate the treatment outcome of our radiosurgery program and to describe the response of brain metastases to contrast-enhanced MRI after linear accelerator (linac) stereotactic radiosurgery and identify factors to distinguish among local control and local failure. Using serial MRI, we followed the course of 87 brain metastases in 48 consecutive patients treated between September 1996 and November 1997 with linac-based radiosurgery with 15-MV photons. Treatment planning was performed on an MR data cube. For spherical metastases, radiosurgery was delivered using a 9 noncoplanar arc technique with circular-shaped collimators. For irregularly shaped targets, radiosurgery was delivered using a manually driven multi-leaf collimator with a leaf width of 1.5 mm projected to the isocenter. Median radiosurgery dose was 20 Gy prescribed to the 80% isodose. Together with whole brain radiotherapy (20 x 2 Gy, 5/w), a median radiosurgical dose of 15 Gy was delivered. Median follow-up was 8 (range 2--36) months. Factors influencing local control and survival rates were analyzed with respect to MRI response, and Kaplan-Meier curves were calculated. Actuarial local tumor control was 91% at one and two years. Patient survival at one and two years was 30% and 18%. Median survival was 9 months. During follow-up in 70 (81%) of the 87 treated metastases, the contrast-enhancing volumes on T1W images were stable or disappeared partly or completely. A transient enlargement of contrast-enhancing volumes was observed in 11 (12%) of the 87 lesions treated, while a progressive enlargement due to local treatment failure was observed in 6 (7%) of the 87 treated

  13. Phase Contrast MRI is an Early Marker of Micrometastatic Breast Cancer Development in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Budde, Matthew D; Gold, Eric; Jordan, E. Kay; Smith-Brown, Melissa; Frank, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    The early growth of micrometastatic breast cancer in the brain often occurs through vessel co-option and is independent of angiogenesis. Remodeling of the existing vasculature is an important step in the evolution of co-opting micrometastases into angiogenesis-dependent solid tumor masses. The purpose of this study was to determine if phase contrast MRI, an intrinsic source of contrast exquisitely sensitive to the magnetic susceptibility properties of deoxygenated hemoglobin, could detect vascular changes occurring independent of angiogenesis in a rat model of breast cancer metastases to the brain. Twelve nude rats were administered with 106 MDA-MB-231BRL “brain seeking” breast cancer cells through intracardiac injection. Serial, multiparametric MRI of the brain was performed weekly until metastatic disease was detected. The results demonstrate that images of the signal phase were more sensitive to metastatic brain lesions (area under receiver operating characteristic curve, AUC = 0.97) compared to T2* gradient echo magnitude images, (AUC = 0.73). The difference between the two techniques was likely the result of the confounding effects of edema on the magnitude signal. A region of interest analysis revealed that vascular abnormalities detected with phase contrast MRI preceded tumor permeability as measured with contrast-enhanced MRI by 1 to 2 weeks. Tumor size was correlated with permeability (R2 = 0.23, p < 0.01), but phase contrast was independent of tumor size (R2 = 0.03). Histopathological analysis demonstrated that capillary endothelial cells coopted by tumor cells were significantly enlarged, but less dense, compared to the normal brain vasculature. Whereas co-opted vessels were VEGF-negative, vessels within larger tumor masses were VEGF-positive. In conclusion, phase contrast MRI is believed to be sensitive to vascular remodeling in co-opting brain tumor metastases independent of sprouting angiogenesis and may therefore aid in pre-clinical studies of

  14. Model-based reconstruction for real-time phase-contrast flow MRI: Improved spatiotemporal accuracy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhengguo; Roeloffs, Volkert; Voit, Dirk; Joseph, Arun A; Untenberger, Markus; Merboldt, K Dietmar; Frahm, Jens

    2017-03-01

    To develop a model-based reconstruction technique for real-time phase-contrast flow MRI with improved spatiotemporal accuracy in comparison to methods using phase differences of two separately reconstructed images with differential flow encodings. The proposed method jointly computes a common image, a phase-contrast map, and a set of coil sensitivities from every pair of flow-compensated and flow-encoded datasets obtained by highly undersampled radial FLASH. Real-time acquisitions with five and seven radial spokes per image resulted in 25.6 and 35.7 ms measuring time per phase-contrast map, respectively. The signal model for phase-contrast flow MRI requires the solution of a nonlinear inverse problem, which is accomplished by an iteratively regularized Gauss-Newton method. Aspects of regularization and scaling are discussed. The model-based reconstruction was validated for a numerical and experimental flow phantom and applied to real-time phase-contrast MRI of the human aorta for 10 healthy subjects and 2 patients. Under all conditions, and compared with a previously developed real-time flow MRI method, the proposed method yields quantitatively accurate phase-contrast maps (i.e., flow velocities) with improved spatial acuity, reduced phase noise and reduced streaking artifacts. This novel model-based reconstruction technique may become a new tool for clinical flow MRI in real time. Magn Reson Med 77:1082-1093, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Acute Pyelonephritis Focusing on Perfusion Defects on Contrast Enhansed Computerized Tomography(CT) Scans and Its Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sung-Kyu; Seo, Jung-Kun; Kim, Seung-Jung; Park, Seung-Ho; Park, Chong-Hoon; Lee, Ho-Yung; Han, Dae-Suk; Kim, Ki-Whang

    1997-01-01

    Objectives Many cases of acute pyelonephritis show renal perfusion defects on contrast enhanced computerized tomography (CT) imaging studies. The purpose of this study is to show the frequency of renal perfusion defects in uncomplicated acute pyelonephritis and to compare the clinical responses of patients who had perfusion defects or not. Methods We studied patients who had symptoms and signs of acute pyelonephritis through CT examinations with contrast enhancement. We identified 21 cases who had perfusion defects among 35 patients who had undergone CT imaging studies and compared the clinical data in the two groups of patients who had perfusion defects on CT (group 1) and who had not (group 2). Results Nearly all patients had typical symptoms and signs of acute pyelonephritis such as high fever and chill, flank pain and costovertebral angle tenderness. Combined clinical problems were septic shock (one case, 4.8%) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) (one case, 4.8%) in group 1. Laboratory findings were not different between the two groups. All patients were treated with antibiotics and had successful recoveries. The duration of recovery of pyuria in group 1 (5.2±9.6 days) was not longer than that in group 2(3.1±2.9 days) (p>0.05). The length of defeverscence in group 1 (7.0±4.6 days) was longer than in group 2 (3.5±2.7 days) (p<0.05). There were no differences between group 1 and group 2 in the rate of predisposing factors. Thirteen of 21 cases (61.9%) in group 1 and five of 14 cases (35.7%) in group 2 had positive urine culture results which are relatively low probably due to the administration of antibiotics prior to our emergency room visit. Perfusion defects on CT were very frequent findings (60.0% of the clinical acute pyelonephritis patients). We classified CT findings of group 1 as focal unilateral (2 cases, 9.5%), multifocal unilateral (14 cases, 66.7%) and multifocal bilateral (5 cases, 23.8%), and there were no differences between the

  16. Flow versus permeability weighting in estimating the forward volumetric transfer constant (K(trans)) obtained by DCE-MRI with contrast agents of differing molecular sizes.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-He; Chen, Fang-Hsin; Schellingerhout, Dawid; Lin, Yu-Shi; Hong, Ji-Hong; Liu, Ho-Ling

    2017-02-01

    To quantify the differential plasma flow- (Fp-) and permeability surface area product per unit mass of tissue- (PS-) weighting in forward volumetric transfer constant (K(trans)) estimates by using a low molecular (Gd-DTPA) versus high molecular (Gadomer) weight contrast agent in dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI. DCE MRI was performed using a 7T animal scanner in 14 C57BL/6J mice syngeneic for TRAMP tumors, by administering Gd-DTPA (0.9kD) in eight mice and Gadomer (35kD) in the remainder. The acquisition time was 10min with a sampling rate of one image every 2s. Pharmacokinetic modeling was performed to obtain K(trans) by using Extended Tofts model (ETM). In addition, the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneity (AATH) model was employed to obtain the relative contributions of Fp and PS. The K(trans) values derived from DCE-MRI with Gd-DTPA showed significant correlations with both PS (r(2)=0.64, p=0.009) and Fp (r(2)=0.57, p=0.016), whereas those with Gadomer were found only significantly correlated with PS (r(2)=0.96, p=0.0003) but not with Fp (r(2)=0.34, p=0.111). A voxel-based analysis showed that K(trans) approximated PS (<30% difference) in 78.3% of perfused tumor volume for Gadomer, but only 37.3% for Gd-DTPA. The differential contributions of Fp and PS in estimating K(trans) values vary with the molecular weight of the contrast agent used. The macromolecular contrast agent resulted in K(trans) values that were much less dependent on flow. These findings support the use of macromolecular contrast agents for estimating tumor vessel permeability with DCE-MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Photoacoustic imaging of brain perfusion on albino rats by using evans blue as contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Pilatou, M C; Marani, E; de Mul, F F M; Steenbergen, W

    2003-10-01

    The visualization of the brain vascular system could be of great importance for studying its functionality and for diagnosing possible disorders. In this paper we report the use of photoacoustics for imaging brain perfusion on Albino rats in vivo and post mortem. The measurements on the animals were direct on the skin surface. The blood perfusion on skull cartilage was imaged and 2D slices were constructed by using a beamforming algorithm. From the images representation the Interactive Data Language (IDL, Research System Inc.) was used. We also investigated the possibility of using the Evans Blue dye as a substitute of blood for imaging brain structures in vitro. The breakdown of the dye under pulsed laser irradiation was studied and the energy under which this effect occurs was calculated for the wavelength of 532 nm.

  18. Regional and voxel-wise comparisons of blood flow measurements between dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    White, Carissa M; Pope, Whitney B; Zaw, Taryar; Qiao, Joe; Naeini, Kourosh M; Lai, Albert; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Wang, J J; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Ellingson, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the regional and voxel-wise correlation between dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with brain tumors. Thirty patients with histologically verified brain tumors were evaluated in the current study. DSC-MRI was performed by first using a preload dose of gadolinium contrast, then collecting a dynamic image acquisition during a bolus of contrast, followed by posthoc contrast agent leakage correction. Pseudocontinuous ASL was collected using 30 pairs of tag and control acquisition using a 3-dimensional gradient-echo spin-echo (GRASE) acquisition. All images were registered to a high-resolution anatomical atlas. Average CBF measurements within regions of contrast-enhancement and T2 hyperintensity were evaluated between the two modalities. Additionally, voxel-wise correlation between CBF measurements obtained with DSC and ASL were assessed. Results demonstrated a positive linear correlation between DSC and ASL measurements of CBF when regional average values were compared; however, a statistically significant voxel-wise correlation was only observed in around 30-40% of patients. These results suggest DSC and ASL may provide regionally similar, but spatially different measurements of CBF.

  19. Power modulation contrast enhanced ultrasound for postoperative perfusion monitoring following free tissue transfer in head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Anand, R; Hickman, M; Senior, R; Walji, S; Ramchandani, P L; Culliford, D; Ilankovan, V; Greaves, K

    2010-12-01

    This feasibility study evaluated whether contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEU) was able to assess free flap perfusion following free tissue transfer in the head and neck region. Thirty-six patients underwent standard clinical monitoring (SCM) and CEU postoperatively. The time taken for each technique to detect flap failure was recorded. Qualitative CEU analysis by visual assessment predicted survival in 30/30 (100%) and failure in 5/6 (83%) flaps with sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values of 100, 86, 97 and 100%, respectively. Quantitative CEU measurement of blood volume (α) values within healthy perfused flaps was over 60 times higher than in failing flaps (8.25±2.82dB vs. 0.12±0.17dB, respectively, P<0.0001). If a cut-off α value of <1.5dB was used to predict future flap failure, the accuracy of the test was 100% (sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV). If a cut-off α value of >1.9dB indicated flap success, the PPV and NPV are 100%. Following surgery, SCM took 76 (±15) h to detect flap failure compared with 18 (±38) h with CEU (P<0.05). CEU is highly accurate in its ability to distinguish between perfused and failing flaps. The technique is quick (<10min) and capable of imaging all flap types.

  20. Correlation between myocardial dysfunction and perfusion impairment in diabetic rats with velocity vector imaging and myocardial contrast echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhangrui; Zhang, Haibin; Su, Haili; Zhu, Ting; Zhu, Yongsheng; Zhang, Jun

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether myocardial systolic dysfunction and perfusion impairment occur in diabetic rats, and to assess their relationship using velocity vector imaging (VVI) and myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE). Forty-six rats were randomly divided into either control or the diabetes mellitus (DM) groups. DM was induced by intraperitoneal administration of streptozotocin. Twelve weeks later, 39 survival rats underwent VVI and MCE in short-axis view at the middle level of the left ventricle, both at rest and after dipyridamole stress. VVI-derived contractile parameters included peak systolic velocity (Vs ), circumferential strain (εc ), strain rate (SRc ), and their reserves. MCE-derived perfusion parameters consisted of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR). At rest, SRc in the DM group was significantly lower than in the control group, Vs , εc , and MBF did not differ significantly between groups. After dipyridamole stress, all VVI parameters and their reserves in the DM group were significantly lower than those in the control group, MBF and MFR were substantially lower than those in the control group, too. Meanwhile, significant correlations between VVI parameter reserves and MFR were observed in the DM group. Both myocardial systolic function and perfusion were impaired in DM rats. Decreased MFR could be an important contributor to the reduction in myocardial contractile reserve.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of luxury perfusion of the optic nerve head in anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yovel, Oren S; Katz, Miriam; Leiba, Hana

    2012-09-01

    A 49-year-old woman with painless reduction in visual acuity in her left eye was found to have nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). Fluorescein angiography revealed optic disc capillary leakage consistent with "luxury perfusion." Contrast-enhanced FLAIR magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed marked enhancement of the left optic disc. Resolution of the optic disc edema and the MRI abnormalities followed a similar time course. This report appears unique in documenting the MRI findings of luxury perfusion in NAION.

  2. Ultrashort Echo Time for Improved Positive-Contrast Manganese-Enhanced MRI of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nofiele, Joris Tchouala; Cheng, Hai-Ling Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Objective Manganese (Mn) is a positive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent that has been used to obtain physiological, biochemical, and molecular biological information. There is great interest to broaden its applications, but a major challenge is to increase detection sensitivity. Another challenge is distinguishing regions of Mn-related signal enhancement from background tissue with inherently similar contrast. To overcome these limitations, this study investigates the use of ultrashort echo time (UTE) and subtraction UTE (SubUTE) imaging for more sensitive and specific determination of Mn accumulation. Materials and Methods Simulations were performed to investigate the feasibility of UTE and SubUTE for Mn-enhanced MRI and to optimize imaging parameters. Phantoms containing aqueous Mn solutions were imaged on a MRI scanner to validate simulations predictions. Breast cancer cells that are very aggressive (MDA-MB-231 and a more aggressive variant LM2) and a less aggressive cell line (MCF7) were labeled with Mn and imaged on MRI. All imaging was performed on a 3 Tesla scanner and compared UTE and SubUTE against conventional T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) imaging. Results Simulations and phantom imaging demonstrated that UTE and SubUTE provided sustained and linearly increasing positive contrast over a wide range of Mn concentrations, whereas conventional SPGR displayed signal plateau and eventual decrease. Higher flip angles are optimal for imaging higher Mn concentrations. Breast cancer cell imaging demonstrated that UTE and SubUTE provided high sensitivity, with SubUTE providing background suppression for improved specificity and eliminating the need for a pre-contrast baseline image. The SubUTE sequence allowed the best distinction of aggressive breast cancer cells. Conclusions UTE and SubUTE allow more sensitive and specific positive-contrast detection of Mn enhancement. This imaging capability can potentially open many new doors for Mn

  3. Endovascular thrombolysis and stenting of a middle cerebral artery occlusion beyond 6 hours post-attack: special reference to the usefulness of diffusion-perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jung Yong; Han, In Bo; Chung, Sang Sup; Chung, Young Sun; Kim, Sang Heum; Yoon, Pyeong Ho

    2006-12-01

    Intra-arterial thrombolysis and percutaneous angioplasty is feasible in patients with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion limited to 6 hours post-ictus, but there are some limitations such as reocclusion or hemorrhagic complications. In this report, we describe a stent placement in the treatment of a refractory artherothrombotic MCA occlusion beyond 6 hours of symptom onset. A 57-year-old man presented with a progressive left-sided weakness and verbal disturbance resulting from an acute thrombotic occlusion of the right MCA superimposed on severe proximal atheromatous stenosis. Diffusion-perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated the significant diffusion-perfusion mismatch. After chemical and mechanical thrombolysis of the clot, balloon angioplasty of the underlying MCA stenosis was performed 2 days post-attack, without significant angiographic improvement. Percutaneous endovascular deployment of a stent (Driver 2.5 x 12 mm, MTI, Irvine, CA) was subsequently performed, with excellent angiographic results. Follow-up diffusion-perfusion MRI showed improved perfusion in the hypoperfused area. The patient's National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score was increased from 12 to 3. Clot thrombolysis and subsequent stenting in patients with refractory proximal MCA occlusion is feasible and allows for a significant reduction in the amount of thrombolytic drug required. In selective patients with acute MCA occlusion, the therapeutic window for recanalization procedures can be safely and effectively extended beyond the 'traditional 6 hours'. Diffusion-perfusion MRI in acute MCA occlusion is important for indication of therapy.

  4. A method to expedite data acquisition for multiple spatial-temporal analyses of tissue perfusion by contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Christian; Hüttebräuker, Nils; Wilkening, Wilko; Ermert, Helmut

    2009-03-01

    For semiquantitative analyses of tissue perfusion using contrast-enhanced ultrasound the acquisition and processing of time intensity curves (TIC) is required. These TICs can be computed for each pixel of an image plane, yielding parametric images of classification numbers like "blood volume" and "flow rate." The expenditure of time for data acquisition and analysis typically limits semiquantitative perfusion imaging to a single image plane in 2-D. 3-D techniques, however, provide a higher diagnostic value since more information (e.g., of an entire lesion) is obtained. Moreover, spatial compounding, being a 2-D-technique where an object is imaged from different viewing angles, is known to improve image quality by reducing artifacts and speckle noise. Both techniques, 3-D and compounding, call for optimized acquisition and processing of TICs in several image planes (3-D) or in several (overlapping) sections of the same image plane (compounding) to decrease the time needed for data acquisition. Here, an approach of interleaved imaging is presented which is applicable, among others, to contrast perfusion imaging using the replenishment method. The total acquisition time is decreased by sequentially scanning image planes twice for short time spans - first, immediately after microbubble destruction to record the initial rise of the TICs, and second, a sufficient time thereafter to assess final values of the TIC. Data from both periods are combined to fit a model function from which parameters are extracted such as perfusion rate and blood volume. This approach was evaluated by in vitro measurements on a perfusion-mimicking phantom for both, individual images such as would be used for volume reconstruction in 3-D and compound images obtained from full angle spatial compounding (FASC, 360 degrees ). An error analysis is conducted to derive the deviation of the extracted parameters of the proposed method compared with the conventional one. These deviations are entailed by

  5. Abdominal parametric perfusion imaging with respiratory motion-compensation based on contrast-enhanced ultrasound: In-vivo validation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Diya; Xiao, Mengnan; Zhang, Yu; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-06-22

    Parametric perfusion imaging (PPI) based on dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCEUS) is a multi-parametric functional method that is increasingly used to characterize the hemodynamic features of abdominal tumors. Periodic respiratory kinetics adversely affects the signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) and accuracy of abdominal PPI. This study proposed respiratory motion-compensation (rMoCo) employing non-negative matrix factorization combined with fast block matching algorithm to effectively remove these disturbances on abdominal PPI, which was validated through in-vivo perfusion experiments. The mean calculation efficiency of rMoCo was improved by 83.6% when the algorithm was accelerated in a unique matching sequence, which was formed from dozens of DCEUS subsequences at the same respiratory phase. The horizontal and vertical displacements induced by respiratory kinetics were estimated to correct the extraction of time-intensity curves and the peak SNR remained at 22.58±2.90dB. Finally, the abdominal PPIs of four perfusion parameters were formed with non-negative rMoCo, and their SCR was improved by 3.99±0.49dB (p<0.05). Compared with the results without rMoCo, the continuity and visualization of abdominal arterioles were clearly enhanced, and their perfusion details were accurately characterized by PPIs with non-negative rMoCo. The proposed method benefits clinicians in providing accurate diagnoses and in developing appropriate therapeutic strategies for abdominal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Small-bowel MRI in children and young adults with Crohn disease: retrospective head-to-head comparison of contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MRI.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Henning; Pabst, Thomas; Dick, Anke; Machann, Wolfram; Evangelista, Laura; Wirth, Clemens; Köstler, Herbert; Hahn, Dietbert; Beer, Meinrad

    2013-01-01

    Small-bowel MRI based on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences has been challenged by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for detection of inflammatory bowel lesions and complications in patients with Crohn disease. To evaluate free-breathing DWI, as compared to contrast-enhanced MRI, in children, adolescents and young adults with Crohn disease. This retrospective study included 33 children and young adults with Crohn disease ages 17 ± 3 years (mean ± standard deviation) and 27 matched controls who underwent small-bowel MRI with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences and DWI at 1.5 T. The detectability of Crohn manifestations was determined. Concurrent colonoscopy as reference was available in two-thirds of the children with Crohn disease. DWI and contrast-enhanced MRI correctly identified 32 and 31 patients, respectively. All 22 small-bowel lesions and all Crohn complications were detected. False-positive findings (two on DWI, one on contrast-enhanced MRI), compared to colonoscopy, were a result of large-bowel lumen collapse. Inflammatory wall thickening was comparable on DWI and contrast-enhanced MRI. DWI was superior to contrast-enhanced MRI for detection of lesions in 27% of the assessed bowel segments and equal to contrast-enhanced MRI in 71% of segments. DWI facilitates fast, accurate and comprehensive workup in Crohn disease without the need for intravenous administration of contrast medium. Contrast-enhanced MRI is superior in terms of spatial resolution and multiplanar acquisition.

  7. Decreased Cerebral Blood Flow in Chronic Pediatric Mild TBI: An MRI Perfusion Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; West, John D.; Bailey, Jessica N.; Westfall, Daniel R.; Xiao, Hui; Arnold, Todd W.; Kersey, Patrick A.; Saykin, Andrew J.; McDonald, Brenna C.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated cerebral blood flow (CBF) in chronic pediatric mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) using arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging perfusion. mTBI patients showed lower CBF than controls in bilateral frontotemporal regions, with no between-group cognitive differences. Findings suggest ASL may be useful to assess functional abnormalities in pediatric mTBI. PMID:25649779

  8. MRI-based quantification of renal perfusion in mice: Improving sensitivity and stability in FAIR ASL.

    PubMed

    Gutjahr, Fabian Tobias; Günster, Stephan Michael; Kampf, Thomas; Winter, Patrick; Herold, Volker; Bauer, Wolfgang Rudolf; Jakob, Peter Michael

    2017-04-18

    The importance of the orientation of the selective inversion slice in relation to the anatomy in flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery arterial spin labeling (FAIR ASL) kidney perfusion measurements is demonstrated by comparing the standard FAIR scheme to a scheme with an improved slice selective control experiment. A FAIR ASL method is used. The selective inversion preparation slice is set perpendicular to the measurement slice to decrease the unintended labeling of arterial spins in the control experiment. A T1(*)-based quantification method compensates for the effects of the imperfect inversion on the edge of the selective inversion slice. The quantified perfusion values are compared to the standard experiment with parallel orientation of imaging and selective inversion slice. Perfusion maps acquired with the perpendicular inversion slice orientation show higher sensitivity compared to the parallel orientation. The T1(*)-based quantification method removes artifacts arising from imperfect inversion slice profiles. The stability is improved. Adjusting the labeling technique to the anatomy is of high importance. Improved sensitivity and reproducibility could be demonstrated. The proposed method provides a solution to the problem of FAIR ASL measurements of renal perfusion in coronal view. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  9. Contrast-enhanced, real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging of tissue perfusion: preliminary results in a rabbit model of testicular torsion.

    PubMed

    Paltiel, H J; Padua, H M; Gargollo, P C; Cannon, G M; Alomari, A I; Yu, R; Clement, G T

    2011-04-07

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) imaging is potentially applicable to the clinical investigation of a wide variety of perfusion disorders. Quantitative analysis of perfusion is not widely performed, and is limited by the fact that data are acquired from a single tissue plane, a situation that is unlikely to accurately reflect global perfusion. Real-time perfusion information from a tissue volume in an experimental rabbit model of testicular torsion was obtained with a two-dimensional matrix phased array US transducer. Contrast-enhanced imaging was performed in 20 rabbits during intravenous infusion of the microbubble contrast agent Definity® before and after unilateral testicular torsion and contralateral orchiopexy. The degree of torsion was 0° in 4 (sham surgery), 180° in 4, 360° in 4, 540° in 4, and 720° in 4. An automated technique was developed to analyze the time history of US image intensity in experimental and control testes. Comparison of mean US intensity rate of change and of ratios between mean US intensity rate of change in experimental and control testes demonstrated good correlation with testicular perfusion and mean perfusion ratios obtained with radiolabeled microspheres, an accepted 'gold standard'. This method is of potential utility in the clinical evaluation of testicular and other organ perfusion.

  10. Contrast-enhanced, real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging of tissue perfusion: preliminary results in a rabbit model of testicular torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paltiel, H. J.; Padua, H. M.; Gargollo, P. C.; Cannon, G. M., Jr.; Alomari, A. I.; Yu, R.; Clement, G. T.

    2011-04-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) imaging is potentially applicable to the clinical investigation of a wide variety of perfusion disorders. Quantitative analysis of perfusion is not widely performed, and is limited by the fact that data are acquired from a single tissue plane, a situation that is unlikely to accurately reflect global perfusion. Real-time perfusion information from a tissue volume in an experimental rabbit model of testicular torsion was obtained with a two-dimensional matrix phased array US transducer. Contrast-enhanced imaging was performed in 20 rabbits during intravenous infusion of the microbubble contrast agent Definity® before and after unilateral testicular torsion and contralateral orchiopexy. The degree of torsion was 0° in 4 (sham surgery), 180° in 4, 360° in 4, 540° in 4, and 720° in 4. An automated technique was developed to analyze the time history of US image intensity in experimental and control testes. Comparison of mean US intensity rate of change and of ratios between mean US intensity rate of change in experimental and control testes demonstrated good correlation with testicular perfusion and mean perfusion ratios obtained with radiolabeled microspheres, an accepted 'gold standard'. This method is of potential utility in the clinical evaluation of testicular and other organ perfusion.

  11. Characteristics of a new MRI contrast agent prepared from polypropyleneimine dendrimers, generation 2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Steven J; Brechbiel, Martin; Wiener, Erik C

    2003-10-01

    Dendrimer-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents offer many advantages including high levels of amplification. The objective of this research was to test the adequacy and viability of a new family of dendrimers for use as MRI contrast agents in vitro and in vivo. Dendrimers based on 1,4-diaminobutane core polypropyleneimine (PPI) generation 2 and ammonia core polyamidoamine dendrimers had the free surface amines conjugated to a diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid derivative followed by complex formation with gadolinium. Relaxivity measurements were made on an IBM Field Cycling Relaxometer. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic studies were examined with the radiotracer 153Gd in rats and a counting window of 95 to 105 keV. MRI images were conducted at 4.7 T. The relaxivity of the PPI agent exceeded that of the corresponding generation polyamidoamine (PAMAM) agent. Uptake occurred in the liver, spleen, and kidney. Pharmacokinetic studies showed a biexponential decay with excretion half-lives of 3 hours and 33.6 days respectively. The agent increased the contrast enhancement, 1 hour after injection, of T1-weighted images by 52%. This PPI agent resulted in significant contrast signal enhancement. This family of agent may also provide a valuable contrast agent backbone.

  12. Perfusion of subchondral bone marrow in knee osteoarthritis: A dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Budzik, Jean-François; Ding, Juliette; Norberciak, Laurène; Pascart, Tristan; Toumi, Hechmi; Verclytte, Sébastien; Coursier, Raphaël

    2017-03-01

    The role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis is being given major interest, and inflammation is closely linked with vascularization. It was recently demonstrated that dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) could identify the subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes occurring in osteoarthritis in animals. These changes appeared before cartilage lesions were visible and were correlated with osteoarthritis severity. Thus the opportunity to obtain an objective assessment of bone vascularization in non-invasive conditions in humans might help better understanding osteoarthritis pathophysiology and finding new biomarkers. We hypothesized that, as in animals, DCE-MRI has the ability to identify subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes in human osteoarthritis. We performed knee MRI in 19 patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis. We assessed subchondral bone marrow vascularization in medial and lateral femorotibial compartments with DCE-MRI and graded osteoarthritis lesions on MR images. Statistical analysis assessed intra- and inter-observer agreement, compared DCE-MRI values between the different subchondral zones, and sought for an influence of age, sex, body mass index, and osteoarthritis garde on these values. The intra- and inter-observer agreement for DCE-MRI values were excellent. These values were significantly higher in the femorotibial compartment the most affected by osteoarthritis, both in femur and tibia (p<0.0001) and were significantly and positively correlated with cartilage lesions (p=0.02) and bone marrow oedema grade (p<0.0001) after adjustment. We concluded that, as in animals, subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes assessed with DCE-MRI were correlated with osteoarthritis severity in humans.

  13. Design of a Modular Protein-Based MRI Contrast Agent for Targeted Application

    PubMed Central

    Kraff, Oliver; Heider, Dominik; Schramm, Alexander; Hoffmann, Daniel; Bayer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a non-radioactive alternative for the non-invasive detection of tumours. Low molecular weight MRI contrast agents currently in clinical use suffer either from a lack of specificity for tumour tissue or from low relaxivity and thus low contrast amplification. In this study, we present the newly designed two domain fusion protein Zarvin, which is able to bind to therapeutic IgG antibodies suitable for targeting, while facilitating contrast enhancement through high affinity binding sites for Gd3+. We show that the Zarvin fold is stable under serum conditions, specifically targets a cancer cell-line when bound to the Cetuximab IgG, and allows for imaging with high relaxivity, a property that would be advantageous for the detection of small tumours and metastases at 1.5 or 3 T. PMID:23762349

  14. Hepatic metastases of hemangiopericytoma: contrast-enhanced MRI, contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and angiography findings

    PubMed Central

    Aliberti, Camillo; Benea, Giorgio; Kopf, Barbara; De Giorgi, Ugo

    2006-01-01

    Hemangiopericytoma is a rare and characteristically hypervascular tumour. We report a case of hepatic metastases of hemangiopericytoma for which there was correlative imaging by ultrasonography, ultrasonography with second-generation contrast agent (BR1), computed tomography, gadolinium-enhanced, Gd-BOPTA-enhanced and ferumoxides-enhanced magnetic resonance, and angiography. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case in which all these modalities were used in the diagnostic evaluation. PMID:16766270

  15. Saline as the Sole Contrast Agent for Successful MRI-guided Epidural Injections

    SciTech Connect

    Deli, Martin; Mateiescu, Serban Busch, Martin; Becker, Jan Garmer, Marietta Groenemeyer, Dietrich

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To assess the performance of sterile saline solution as the sole contrast agent for percutaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided epidural injections at 1.5 T. Methods. A retrospective analysis of two different techniques of MRI-guided epidural injections was performed with either gadolinium-enhanced saline solution or sterile saline solution for documentation of the epidural location of the needle tip. T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FLASH) images or T2-weighted single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) images visualized the test injectants. Methods were compared by technical success rate, image quality, table time, and rate of complications. Results. 105 MRI-guided epidural injections (12 of 105 with gadolinium-enhanced saline solution and 93 of 105 with sterile saline solution) were performed successfully and without complications. Visualization of sterile saline solution and gadolinium-enhanced saline solution was sufficient, good, or excellent in all 105 interventions. For either test injectant, quantitative image analysis demonstrated comparable high contrast-to-noise ratios of test injectants to adjacent body substances with reliable statistical significance levels (p < 0.001). The mean table time was 22 {+-} 9 min in the gadolinium-enhanced saline solution group and 22 {+-} 8 min in the saline solution group (p = 0.75). Conclusion. Sterile saline is suitable as the sole contrast agent for successful and safe percutaneous MRI-guided epidural drug delivery at 1.5 T.

  16. Copper oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents for MRI and ultrasound dual-modality imaging.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Or; Weitz, Iris S; Azhari, Haim

    2015-08-07

    Multimodal medical imaging is gaining increased popularity in the clinic. This stems from the fact that data acquired from different physical phenomena may provide complementary information resulting in a more comprehensive picture of the pathological state. In this context, nano-sized contrast agents may augment the potential sensitivity of each imaging modality and allow targeted visualization of physiological points of interest (e.g. tumours). In this study, 7 nm copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) were synthesized and characterized. Then, in vitro and phantom specimens containing CuO NPs ranging from 2.4 to 320 μg · mL(-1) were scanned, using both 9.4 T MRI and through-transmission ultrasonic imaging. The results show that the CuO NPs induce shortening of the magnetic T1 relaxation time on the one hand, and increase the speed of sound and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient on the other. Moreover, these visible changes are NP concentration-dependent. The change in the physical properties resulted in a substantial increase in the contrast-to-noise ratio (3.4-6.8 in ultrasound and 1.2-19.3 in MRI). In conclusion, CuO NPs are excellent candidates for MRI-ultrasound dual imaging contrast agents. They offer radiation-free high spatial resolution scans by MRI, and cost-effective high temporal resolution scans by ultrasound.

  17. Preparation and initial characterization of biodegradable particles containing gadolinium-DTPA contrast agent for enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Amber L; Chu, Kevin; Ali, Adeel; Brannon-Peppas, Lisa

    2008-11-11

    Accurate imaging of atherosclerosis is a growing necessity for timely treatment of the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising technique for plaque imaging. The goal of this study was to create polymeric particles of a small size with high loading of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid gadolinium (III) (Gd-DTPA) and demonstrate their usefulness for MRI. A water-in-oil-in-oil double emulsion solvent evaporation technique was used to encapsulate the MRI agent in a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or polylactide-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-PEG) particle for the purpose of concentrating the agent at an imaging site. PLGA particles with two separate average sizes of 1.83 microm and 920 nm, and PLA-PEG particles with a mean diameter of 952 nm were created. Loading of up to 30 wt % Gd-DTPA was achieved, and in vitro release occurred over 5 h. PLGA particles had highly negative zeta potentials, whereas the particles incorporating PEG had zeta potentials closer to neutral. Cytotoxicity of the particles on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was shown to be minimal. The ability of the polymeric contrast agent formulation to create contrast was similar to that of Gd-DTPA alone. These results demonstrate the possible utility of the contrast agent-loaded polymeric particles for plaque detection with MRI.

  18. Novel double contrast MRI technique for intramyocardial detection of percutaneously transplanted autologous cells.

    PubMed

    Baklanov, Dmitri V; Demuinck, Ebo D; Thompson, Craig A; Pearlman, Justin D

    2004-12-01

    Bone marrow cells (BMC) labeled with iron particles can be injected into the heart and detected with MRI. Improvement in conspicuity of labelled cells would be advantageous. This study examined if double contrast with iron oxide and Gd-DTPA enhances cell MRI after transvascular transplantation in myocardial infarction. Ten pigs with week-old myocardial infarction had transvascular peri-infarct delivery of microspheres alone (Group I, n = 3) or mixed with iron-labeled BMCs (Group II, n = 7). Gradient-echo MRI before and 1 min after systemic Gd-DTPA administration produced regions of interest with hypoenhancement that were compared to contralateral regions for contrast-to-noise (CNR) and signal-to-noise (SNR) ratios. All hearts were harvested for gross and microscopic analysis. Areas of focal hypoenhancement corresponding to the BMCs were detected in the myocardium in Group II. Early after administration of Gd-DTPA CNR increased from 17.58 +/- 8.5 to 27.25 +/- 15.8 (P < 0.05) and SNR from 24.87 +/- 9.6 to 35.08 +/- 15.5 (P < 0.05). There was no hypoenhancement in Group I. Tissue examination confirmed presence of iron-containing cells and microspheres in corresponding segments of the heart. The distribution of microspheres was similar between the groups. Double contrast with cellular iron and Gd-DTPA in surrounding myocardium resulted in improved cell localization by MRI.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as calcium-responsive MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Pengfei; Shen, Zhiwei; Zhang, Baolin; Wang, Jun; Wu, Renhua

    2016-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as T2 contrast agents have great potential to sense calcium ion (Ca2+) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here we prepared calcium-responsive SPIONs for MRI, formed by combining poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and polyethylenimine (PEI) coated iron oxide nanoparticle (PEI/PEG-SPIONs) contrast agents with the straightforward calcium-sensing compound EGTA (ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid). EGTA was conjugated onto PEI/PEG-SPIONs using EDC/sulfo-NHS method. EGTA-SPIONs were characterized using TEM, XPS, DSL, TGA and SQUIID. DSL results show that the SPIONs aggregate in the presence of Ca2+. MRI analyses indicate that the water proton T2 relaxation rates in HEPES suspensions of the EGTA-SPIONs significantly increase with the calcium concentration because the SPIONs aggregate in the presence of Ca2+. The T2 values decreased 25% when Ca2+ concentration decreased from 1.2 to 0.8 mM. The aggregation of EGTA-SPIONs could be reversed by EDTA. EGTA-SPIONs have potential as smart contrast agents for Ca2+-sensitive MRI.

  20. Blood flow computation in phase-contrast MRI by minimal paths in anisotropic media.

    PubMed

    Schwenke, Michael; Hennemuth, Anja; Fischer, Bernd; Friman, Ola

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, anisotropic Fast Marching is employed to compute blood flow trajectories as minimal paths in 3D phase-contrast MRI images. Uncertainty in the estimated blood flow vectors is incorporated in a tensor which is used as metric for the anisotropic Fast Marching. A flow connectivity distribution is computed simultaneously to the Fast Marching. Based on the connectivity distribution the most likely flow trajectories can be identified. Results are presented for several PC MRI data sets and the capability of the method to indicate uncertainty of the flow trajectories is shown.

  1. A methodology for generating normal and pathological brain perfusion SPECT images for evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods: application in epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grova, C.; Jannin, P.; Biraben, A.; Buvat, I.; Benali, H.; Bernard, A. M.; Scarabin, J. M.; Gibaud, B.

    2003-12-01

    Quantitative evaluation of brain MRI/SPECT fusion methods for normal and in particular pathological datasets is difficult, due to the frequent lack of relevant ground truth. We propose a methodology to generate MRI and SPECT datasets dedicated to the evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods and illustrate the method when dealing with ictal SPECT. The method consists in generating normal or pathological SPECT data perfectly aligned with a high-resolution 3D T1-weighted MRI using realistic Monte Carlo simulations that closely reproduce the response of a SPECT imaging system. Anatomical input data for the SPECT simulations are obtained from this 3D T1-weighted MRI, while functional input data result from an inter-individual analysis of anatomically standardized SPECT data. The method makes it possible to control the 'brain perfusion' function by proposing a theoretical model of brain perfusion from measurements performed on real SPECT images. Our method provides an absolute gold standard for assessing MRI/SPECT registration method accuracy since, by construction, the SPECT data are perfectly registered with the MRI data. The proposed methodology has been applied to create a theoretical model of normal brain perfusion and ictal brain perfusion characteristic of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. To approach realistic and unbiased perfusion models, real SPECT data were corrected for uniform attenuation, scatter and partial volume effect. An anatomic standardization was used to account for anatomic variability between subjects. Realistic simulations of normal and ictal SPECT deduced from these perfusion models are presented. The comparison of real and simulated SPECT images showed relative differences in regional activity concentration of less than 20% in most anatomical structures, for both normal and ictal data, suggesting realistic models of perfusion distributions for evaluation purposes. Inter-hemispheric asymmetry coefficients measured on simulated data were found within

  2. A methodology for generating normal and pathological brain perfusion SPECT images for evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods: application in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Grova, C; Jannin, P; Biraben, A; Buvat, I; Benali, H; Bernard, A M; Scarabin, J M; Gibaud, B

    2003-12-21

    Quantitative evaluation of brain MRI/SPECT fusion methods for normal and in particular pathological datasets is difficult, due to the frequent lack of relevant ground truth. We propose a methodology to generate MRI and SPECT datasets dedicated to the evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods and illustrate the method when dealing with ictal SPECT. The method consists in generating normal or pathological SPECT data perfectly aligned with a high-resolution 3D T1-weighted MRI using realistic Monte Carlo simulations that closely reproduce the response of a SPECT imaging system. Anatomical input data for the SPECT simulations are obtained from this 3D T1-weighted MRI, while functional input data result from an inter-individual analysis of anatomically standardized SPECT data. The method makes it possible to control the 'brain perfusion' function by proposing a theoretical model of brain perfusion from measurements performed on real SPECT images. Our method provides an absolute gold standard for assessing MRI/SPECT registration method accuracy since, by construction, the SPECT data are perfectly registered with the MRI data. The proposed methodology has been applied to create a theoretical model of normal brain perfusion and ictal brain perfusion characteristic of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. To approach realistic and unbiased perfusion models, real SPECT data were corrected for uniform attenuation, scatter and partial volume effect. An anatomic standardization was used to account for anatomic variability between subjects. Realistic simulations of normal and ictal SPECT deduced from these perfusion models are presented. The comparison of real and simulated SPECT images showed relative differences in regional activity concentration of less than 20% in most anatomical structures, for both normal and ictal data, suggesting realistic models of perfusion distributions for evaluation purposes. Inter-hemispheric asymmetry coefficients measured on simulated data were found within

  3. Relative diffusion of paramagnetic metal complexes of MRI contrast agents in an isotropic hydrogel medium.

    PubMed

    Weerakoon, Bimali Sanjeevani; Osuga, Toshiaki

    2017-03-01

    The observation of molecular diffusion by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is significant in the evaluation of the metabolic activity of living tissues. Series of MRI examinations were conducted on a diffusion model to study the behaviour of the diffusion process of different-molecular-weight (MW) paramagnetic MRI contrast agents in an isotropic agar hydrogel medium. The model consisted of a solidified 1 % agar gel with an initial concentration of 0.5 mmol/L contrast solution layered on top of the gel. The diffusion process was monitored at pre-determined time intervals of immediately, 1, 6, 9, 23, and 48 h after introduction of the contrast agents onto the agar gel with a T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) pulse sequence. Three types of paramagnetic contrast agents, Gd-DTPA with a MW of 547.57 g/mol, Prohance with a MW of 558.69 g/mol and MnCl2 with a MW of 125.84 g/mol, resulted in an approximate average diffusional displacement ratio of 1:1:2 per hour, respectively, within 48 h of the experiment. Therefore, the results of this study supported the hypothesis that the rate of the diffusion process of MRI contrast agents in the agar hydrogel medium is inversely related to their MWs. However, more repetitions are necessary under various types of experimental conditions and also with various types of contrast media of different MWs for further confirmation and validation of these results.

  4. Soft-Tissue Tumor Contrast Enhancement Patterns: Diagnostic Value and Comparison Between Ultrasound and MRI.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Leonhard; Loizides, Alexander; Luger, Anna K; Glodny, Bernhard; Moser, Patrizia; Henninger, Benjamin; Gruber, Hannes

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and compare contrast-enhanced ultrasound and MRI patterns in the diagnosis of soft-tissue masses. Two hundred fifty-five consecutively registered patients with histologically confirmed soft-tissue masses were included in this retrospective study. The diagnostic properties of four predefined contrast enhancement (CE) patterns were assessed, and logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the correlation between diagnosis and CE pattern, lesion size, and patient age and sex. The influence of lesion size on the occurrence of inhomogeneous CE patterns in malignancies was also determined. Homogeneous CE patterns were highly specific for benignity, and inhomogeneous CE was moderately specific for malignancy in both ultrasound and MRI. A combination of homogeneous and inhomogeneous CE patterns led to 88.3% and 88.7% sensitivity, 66.7% and 59.7% specificity, 73.4% and 68.2% correct classification, 54.6% and 47.8% positive predictive value, 92.6% and 92.7% negative predictive value, 2.65 and 2.20 positive likelihood ratio, and 0.18 and 0.19 negative likelihood ratio for contrast-enhanced ultrasound and contrast-enhanced MRI. Cases with homogeneous CE in either ultrasound or MRI also were predominantly benign. The occurrence of inhomogeneous CE in malignant lesions increased with size. CE patterns in ultrasound and MRI offer additional information about the differentiation of an unknown soft-tissue mass. The results of this study showed that homogeneous or absent CE was specific for benign differentiation and that heterogeneous CE was linked to malignancy. The routine analysis of CE patterns should increase diagnostic reliability in unclear soft-tissue masses.

  5. Tracer kinetic analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and CT bladder cancer data: A preliminary comparison to assess the magnitude of water exchange effects.

    PubMed

    Bains, Lauren J; McGrath, Deirdre M; Naish, Josephine H; Cheung, Susan; Watson, Yvonne; Taylor, M Ben; Logue, John P; Parker, Geoffrey J M; Waterton, John C; Buckley, David L

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of water exchange on tracer kinetic parameter estimates derived from T(1)-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI data using a direct quantitative comparison with DCE-CT. Data were acquired from 12 patients with bladder cancer who underwent DCE-CT followed by DCE-MRI within a week. A two-compartment tracer kinetic model was fitted to the CT data, and two versions of the same model with modifications to account for the fast exchange and no exchange limits of water exchange were fitted to the MR data. The two-compartment tracer kinetic model provided estimates of the fractional plasma volume (v(p)), the extravascular extracellular space fraction (v(e)), plasma perfusion (F(p)), and the microvascular permeability surface area product. Our findings suggest that DCE-CT is an appropriate reference for DCE-MRI in bladder cancers as the only significant difference found between CT and MR parameter estimates were the no exchange limit estimates of v(p) (P = 0.002). These results suggest that although water exchange between the intracellular and extravascular-extracellular space has a negligible effect on DCE-MRI, vascular-extravascular-extracellular space water exchange may be more important.

  6. Assessment of cerebral blood perfusion reserve with acetazolamide using 3D spiral ASL MRI: Preliminary experience in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Hu, Houchun H; Li, Zhiqiang; Pokorney, Amber L; Chia, Jonathan M; Stefani, Niccolo; Pipe, James G; Miller, Jeffrey H

    2017-01-01

    To demonstrate the clinical feasibility of a new non-Cartesian cylindrically-distributed spiral 3D pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequence in pediatric patients in quantifying cerebral blood flow (CBF) response to an acetazolamide (ACZ) vasodilator challenge. MRI exams were performed on two 3 Tesla Philips Ingenia systems using 32 channel head coil arrays. After local institutional review board approval, the 3D spiral-based pCASL technique was added to a standard brain MRI exam and evaluated in 13 pediatric patients (average age: 11.7±6.4years, range: 1.4-22.2years). All patients were administered ACZ for clinically indicated reasons. Quantitative whole-brain CBF measurements were computed pre- and post-ACZ to assess cerebrovascular reserve. 3D spiral pCASL data were successfully reconstructed in all 13 cases. In 11 patients, CBF increased 2.8% to 93.2% after administration of ACZ. In the two remaining patients, CBF decreased by 2.4 to 6.0% after ACZ. The group average change in CBF due to ACZ was approximately 25.0% and individual changes were statistically significant (p<0.01) in all patients using a paired t-test analysis. CBF perfusion data were diagnostically useful in supporting conventional MR angiography and clinical findings. 3D cylindrically-distributed spiral pCASL MRI provides a robust approach to assess cerebral blood flow and reserve in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Ventilation and Perfusion in the Lung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, Gordon Kim (Inventor); Hopkins, Susan Roberta (Inventor); Buxton, Richard Bruce (Inventor); Pereira De Sa, Rui Carlos (Inventor); Theilmann, Rebecca Jean (Inventor); Cronin, Matthew Vincent (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Methods, devices, and systems are disclosed for implementing a fully quantitative non-injectable contrast proton MRI technique to measure spatial ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) matching and spatial distribution of ventilation and perfusion. In one aspect, a method using MRI to characterize ventilation and perfusion in a lung includes acquiring an MR image of the lung having MR data in a voxel and obtaining a breathing frequency parameter, determining a water density value, a specific ventilation value, and a perfusion value in at least one voxel of the MR image based on the MR data and using the water density value to determine an air content value, and determining a ventilation-perfusion ratio value that is the product of the specific ventilation value, the air content value, the inverse of the perfusion value, and the breathing frequency.

  8. Optimal control design of preparation pulses for contrast optimization in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Reeth, Eric; Ratiney, Hélène; Tesch, Michael; Grenier, Denis; Beuf, Olivier; Glaser, Steffen J.; Sugny, Dominique

    2017-06-01

    This work investigates the use of MRI radio-frequency (RF) pulses designed within the framework of optimal control theory for image contrast optimization. The magnetization evolution is modeled with Bloch equations, which defines a dynamic system that can be controlled via the application of the Pontryagin Maximum Principle (PMP). This framework allows the computation of optimal RF pulses that bring the magnetization to a given state to obtain the desired contrast after acquisition. Creating contrast through the optimal manipulation of Bloch equations is a new way of handling contrast in MRI, which can explore the theoretical limits of the system. Simulation experiments carried out on-resonance quantify the contrast improvement when compared to standard T1 or T2 weighting strategies. The use of optimal pulses is also validated for the first time in both in vitro and in vivo experiments on a small-animal 4.7 T MR system. Results demonstrate their robustness to static field inhomogeneities as well as the fact that they can be embedded in standard imaging sequences without affecting standard parameters such as slice selection or echo type. In vivo results on rat and mouse brains illustrate the ability of optimal contrast pulses to create non-trivial contrasts on well-studied structures (white matter versus gray matter).

  9. Matrix pencil decomposition of time-resolved proton MRI for robust and improved assessment of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Grzegorz; Bieri, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    To present an improved and robust method of pulmonary function assessment from time-resolved proton MRI using a matrix pencil (MP) method in combination with a linear least squares analysis. Simulations of the signal time course in lung parenchyma were performed to compare the accuracy of Fourier decomposition (FD) and MP methods for the estimation of respiratory and cardiac amplitudes. Series of two-dimensional time-resolved lung images were acquired in healthy volunteers at 1.5 T using ultra-fast steady-state free precession. Qualitative lung ventilation- and perfusion-weighted images as well as a quantitative map of fractional ventilation, perfusion, and blood arrival time were calculated using the proposed MP method and compared with the contemporary FD technique. A region-of-interest analysis was performed on the quantitative data. The signal analysis performed using MP decomposition resulted in reduced variability of the estimated respiratory and cardiac amplitudes in comparison with FD for both simulated and in vivo data. MP decomposition provides an automatic, robust, and more accurate estimation of amplitudes of respiratory and cardiac signal modulations in the lung parenchyma than the contemporary FD technique. Magn Reson Med 77:336-342, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Methylphenidate modulates sustained attention and cortical activation in survivors of traumatic brain injury: A perfusion fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghoon; Whyte, John; Patel, Sunil; Europa, Eduardo; Wang, Jiongjiong; Coslett, H. Branch; Detre, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Methylphenidate (MPH), the most widely prescribed psychostimulant to treat many neuropsychiatric conditions, is reported to improve attention and speed of processing in survivors of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The neural correlate of this efficacy, however, remains unclear. Objective Using perfusion fMRI as a biomarker of regional neural activity, the current study aimed to examine the neural correlates of single-dose (0.3 mg/kg) MPH administration in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study design. Methods Twenty-three individuals with moderate to severe TBI were tested on two occasions approximately one week apart. Perfusion fMRI scanning was carried out at rest and while participants performed cognitive tasks requiring sustained attention and working memory. Results Behaviorally, MPH significantly improved both accuracy and reaction time (RT) in the sustained attention task, but only RT in the working memory task. A trend of global reduction of cerebral blood flow by MPH was observed in all task conditions including resting. Voxel-wise whole-brain analysis revealed an interaction effect of drug by condition (MPH-placebo X task-rest) for the sustained attention task in the left posterior superior parietal cortex and parieto-occipital junction (BA 7/19). The magnitude of drug-related deactivation of this area during task performance was correlated with improvement in RT. Conclusion Suppression of activity in this area during task performance may reflect a compensatory mechanism by which MPH ameliorates attention impairments in TBI. PMID:22203319

  11. Respiratory motion prediction and prospective correction for free-breathing arterial spin-labeled perfusion MRI of the kidneys.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Ruan, Dan; Liu, Wenyang; Stenger, V Andrew; Pohmann, Rolf; Fernández-Seara, Maria A; Nair, Tejas; Jung, Sungkyu; Luo, Jingqin; Motai, Yuichi; Ma, Jingfei; Hazle, John D; Gach, H Michael

    2017-03-01

    Respiratory motion prediction using an artificial neural network (ANN) was integrated with pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) MRI to allow free-breathing perfusion measurements in the kidney. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the ANN to accurately predict the location of the kidneys during image acquisition. A pencil-beam navigator was integrated with a pCASL sequence to measure lung/diaphragm motion during ANN training and the pCASL transit delay. The ANN algorithm ran concurrently in the background to predict organ location during the 0.7-s 15-slice acquisition based on the navigator data. The predictions were supplied to the pulse sequence to prospectively adjust the axial slice acquisition to match the predicted organ location. Additional navigators were acquired immediately after the multislice acquisition to assess the performance and accuracy of the ANN. The technique was tested in eight healthy volunteers. The root-mean-square error (RMSE) and mean absolute error (MAE) for the eight volunteers were 1.91 ± 0.17 mm and 1.43 ± 0.17 mm, respectively, for the ANN. The RMSE increased with transit delay. The MAE typically increased from the first to last prediction in the image acquisition. The overshoot was 23.58% ± 3.05% using the target prediction accuracy of ± 1 mm. Respiratory motion prediction with prospective motion correction was successfully demonstrated for free-breathing perfusion MRI of the kidney. The method serves as an alternative to multiple breathholds and requires minimal effort from the patient. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. Modulation of resting brain cerebral blood flow by the GABA B agonist, baclofen: A longitudinal perfusion fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Teresa R.; Wang, Ze; Sciortino, Nathan; Harper, Derek; Li, Yin; Hakun, Jonathan; Kildea, Susan; Kampman, Kyle; Ehrman, Ron; Detre, John A.; O’Brien, Charles P.; Childress, Anna Rose

    2011-01-01

    Background Preclinical studies confirm that the GABA B agonist, baclofen blocks dopamine release in the reward-responsive ventral striatum (VS) and medial prefrontal cortex, and consequently, blocks drug motivated behavior. Its mechanism in humans is unknown. Here, we used continuous arterial spin labeled (CASL) perfusion fMRI to examine baclofen’s effects on blood flow in the human brain. Methods Twenty-one subjects (all smokers, 12 females) were randomized to receive either baclofen (80 mg/day; N = 10) or placebo (N = 11). A five minute quantitative perfusion fMRI resting baseline (RB) scan was acquired at two time points; prior to the dosing regimen (Time 1) and on the last day of 21 days of drug administration (Time 2). SPM2 was employed to compare changes in RB from Time 1 to 2. Results Baclofen diminished cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the VS and mOFC and increased it in the lateral OFC, a region involved in suppressing previously rewarded behavior. CBF in bilateral insula was also blunted by baclofen (T values ranged from −11.29 to 15.3 at p = 0.001, 20 contiguous voxels). CBF at Time 2 was unchanged in placebo subjects. There were no differences between groups in side effects or cigarettes smoked per day (at either time point). Conclusions Baclofen’s modulatory actions on regions involved in motivated behavior in humans are reflected in the resting state and provide insight into the underlying mechanism behind its potential to block drug-motivated behavior, in preclinical studies, and its putative effectiveness as an anti-craving/anti-relapse agent in humans. PMID:21333466

  13. A new formalism for the quantification of tissue perfusion by the destruction-replenishment method in contrast ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Arditi, Marcel; Frinking, Peter J A; Zhou, Xiang; Rognin, Nicolas G

    2006-06-01

    A new formalism is presented for the destruction-replenishment perfusion quantification approach at low mechanical index. On the basis of physical considerations, best-fit methods should be applied using perfusion functions with S-shape characteristics. These functions are first described for the case of a geometry with a single flow velocity, then extended to the case of vascular beds with blood vessels having multiple flow velocity values and directions. The principles guiding the analysis are, on one hand, a linearization of video echo signals to overcome the log-compression of the imaging instrument, and, on the other hand, the spatial distribution of the transmit-receive ultrasound beam in the elevation direction. An in vitro model also is described; it was used to confirm experimentally the validity of the approach using a commercial contrast agent. The approach was implemented in the form of a computer program, taking as input a sequence of contrast-specific images, as well as parameters related to the ultrasound imaging equipment used. The generated output is either flow-parameter values computed in regions-of-interest, or parametric flow-images (e.g., mean velocity, mean transit time, mean flow, flow variance, or skewness). This approach thus establishes a base for extracting information about the morphology of vascular beds in vivo, and could allow absolute quantification provided that appropriate instrument calibration is implemented.

  14. Engineered atherosclerosis-specific zinc ferrite nanocomplex-based MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Rajneesh; Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder Kaur; Walder, Ken; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh

    2016-01-16

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality affecting millions of people globally. The most effective way to counter cardiovascular complications is early diagnosis and the safest non-invasive diagnostic approach is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, superparamagnetic ferrite nanoparticles doped with zinc, exhibiting highly enhanced saturation magnetization and T2 and computed tomography (CT) contrast were synthesized. These nanoparticles have been strategically engineered using bovine lactoferrin (Lf), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and heat shock protein (Hsp)-70 antibody specifically targeting atherosclerosis with potential therapeutic value. The nanocomplexes were further validated in vitro to assess their cytotoxicity, internalization efficiency, effects on cellular proliferation and were assessed for MRI as well as X-ray CT in ex vivo Psammomys obesus rat model. Optimized zinc doped ferrite nanoparticles (Zn0.4Fe2.6O4) with enhanced value of maximum saturation magnetization value on 108.4 emu/g and an average diameter of 24 ± 2 nm were successfully synthesized. Successfully incorporation with bovine lactoferrin, PEG and Hsp-70 (70 kDa) antibody led to synthesis of spherical nanocomplexes (size 224.8 nm, PDI 0.398). A significantly higher enhancement in T2 (p < 0.05, 1.22-fold) and slightly higher T1 (1.09-fold) and CT (1.08-fold) contrast compared to commercial ferrite nanoparticles was observed. The nanocomplexes exhibited effective cellular internalization within 2 h in both THP-1 and Jurkat cells. MRI scans of contrast agent injected animal revealed significant arterial narrowing and a significantly higher T2 (p < 0.05, 1.71-fold) contrast in adult animals when compared to juvenile and control animals. The excised heart and aorta agar phantoms exhibited weak MRI contrast enhancement in juvenile animal but significant contrast enhancement in adult animal specifically at the aortic arch, descending

  15. Assessment of blood–brain barrier disruption using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Heye, Anna K.; Culling, Ross D.; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Thrippleton, Michael J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the importance of blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption in aging, dementia, stroke and multiple sclerosis in addition to more commonly-studied pathologies such as tumors. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) is a method for studying BBB disruption in vivo. We review pathologies studied, scanning protocols and data analysis procedures to determine the range of available methods and their suitability to different pathologies. We systematically review the existing literature up to February 2014, seeking studies that assessed BBB integrity using T1-weighted DCE-MRI techniques in animals and humans in normal or abnormal brain tissues. The literature search provided 70 studies that were eligible for inclusion, involving 417 animals and 1564 human subjects in total. The pathologies most studied are intracranial neoplasms and acute ischemic strokes. There are large variations in the type of DCE-MRI sequence, the imaging protocols and the contrast agents used. Moreover, studies use a variety of different methods for data analysis, mainly based on model-free measurements and on the Patlak and Tofts models. Consequently, estimated KTrans values varied widely. In conclusion, DCE-MRI is shown to provide valuable information in a large variety of applications, ranging from common applications, such as grading of primary brain tumors, to more recent applications, such as assessment of subtle BBB dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease. Further research is required in order to establish consensus-based recommendations for data acquisition and analysis and, hence, improve inter-study comparability and promote wider use of DCE-MRI. PMID:25379439

  16. Three-dimensional MRI perfusion maps: a step beyond volumetric analysis in mental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fabene, Paolo F; Farace, Paolo; Brambilla, Paolo; Andreone, Nicola; Cerini, Roberto; Pelizza, Luisa; Versace, Amelia; Rambaldelli, Gianluca; Birbaumer, Niels; Tansella, Michele; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    A new type of magnetic resonance imaging analysis, based on fusion of three-dimensional reconstructions of time-to-peak parametric maps and high-resolution T1-weighted images, is proposed in order to evaluate the perfusion of selected volumes of interest. Because in recent years a wealth of data have suggested the crucial involvement of vascular alterations in mental diseases, we tested our new method on a restricted sample of schizophrenic patients and matched healthy controls. The perfusion of the whole brain was compared with that of the caudate nucleus by means of intrasubject analysis. As expected, owing to the encephalic vascular pattern, a significantly lower time-to-peak was observed in the caudate nucleus than in the whole brain in all healthy controls, indicating that the suggested method has enough sensitivity to detect subtle perfusion changes even in small volumes of interest. Interestingly, a less uniform pattern was observed in the schizophrenic patients. The latter finding needs to be replicated in an adequate number of subjects. In summary, the three-dimensional analysis method we propose has been shown to be a feasible tool for revealing subtle vascular changes both in normal subjects and in pathological conditions. PMID:17229290

  17. Bayesian optimization of perfusion and transit time estimation in PASL-MRI.

    PubMed

    Santos, Nuno; Sanches, João; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2010-01-01

    Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling (PASL) techniques potentially allow the absolute, non-invasive quantification of brain perfusion and arterial transit time. This can be achieved by fitting a kinetic model to the data acquired at a number of inversion time points (TI). The intrinsically low SNR of PASL data, together with the uncertainty in the model parameters, can hinder the estimation of the parameters of interest. Here, a two-compartment kinetic model is used to estimate perfusion and transit time, based on a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) criterion. A priori information concerning the physiological variation of the multiple model parameters is used to guide the solution. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to compare the accuracy of our proposed Bayesian estimation method with a conventional Least Squares (LS) approach, using four different sets of TI points. Each set is obtained either with a uniform distribution or an optimal sampling strategy designed based on the same MAP criterion. We show that the estimation errors are minimized when our proposed Bayesian estimation method is employed in combination with an optimal set of sampling points. In conclusion, our results indicate that PASL perfusion and transit time measurements would benefit from a Bayesian approach for the optimization of both the sampling strategy and the estimation algorithm, whereby prior information on the parameters is used.

  18. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of MRI with and Without Contrast in Diagnosis of Traumatic Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Ahmad; Haddadi, Kaveh; Shad, Ali Ahmadi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the most common causes of severe disability and mortality after trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can identify different levels of SCI, but sometimes unable to detect the associated soft tissue injuries. The role of MRI with contrast in patients with SCI has not been studied. This is the first study in human to compare the efficacy of MRI with and without contrast in diagnosis and prognosis evaluation of SCIs. In this cross-sectional diagnostic study, MRI with and without contrast was performed on 40 patients with acute spinal injury. In these patients, 3 different types of MRI signal patterns were detected and compared. The most common cases of spinal injuries were accident (72.5%) and the after fall (27.5%). The prevalence of lesions detected includes spine fracture (70%), spinal stenosis (32.5%), soft tissue injuries (30%), and tearing of the spinal cord (2.5%). A classification was developed using 3 patterns of SCIs. Type I, seen in 2 (5.0%) of the patients, demonstrated a decreased signal intensity consistent with acute intraspinal hemorrhage. Type II, seen in 8 (20.0%) of the patients, demonstrated a bright signal intensity consistent with acute cord edema. Type III, seen in 1 (2.5%) of the patients, demonstrated a mixed signal of hypointensity centrally and hyperintensity peripherally consistent with contusion. In the diagnosis of all injuries, MRI with contrast efficacy comparable to noncontrast MRI, except in the diagnosis of soft tissue, which was significantly higher sensitivity (P < 0.05). So given that is not significant differences between noncontrast and contrast-enhanced MRI in the diagnosis of major injuries (hematoma, edema, etc.) and contrast-enhanced MRI just better in soft tissues. We recommend to the MRI with contrast only used in cases of suspected severe soft tissue injury, which have been ignored by detection MRI without contrast. PMID:26512624

  19. Assessment of brain iron and neuronal integrity in patients with Parkinson's disease using novel MRI contrasts.

    PubMed

    Michaeli, Shalom; Oz, Gülin; Sorce, Dennis J; Garwood, Michael; Ugurbil, Kamil; Majestic, Stacy; Tuite, Paul

    2007-02-15

    Postmortem demonstration of increased iron in the substantia nigra (SN) is a well-appreciated finding in Parkinson's disease (PD). Iron facilitates generation of free radicals, which are thought to play a role in dopamine neuronal loss. To date, however, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has failed to show significant in vivo differences in SN iron levels in subjects with PD versus control subjects. This finding may be due to the limitations in tissue contrasts achievable with conventional T(1)- and T(2)-weighted MRI sequences that have been used. With the recent development of novel rotating frame transverse (T(2rho)) and longitudinal (T(1rho)) relaxation MRI methods that appear to be sensitive to iron and neuronal loss, respectively, we embarked on a study of 8 individuals with PD (Hoehn & Yahr, Stage II) and 8 age-matched control subjects. Using these techniques with a 4T MRI magnet, we assessed iron deposits and neuronal integrity in the SN. First, T(2rho) MRI, which is reflective of iron-related dynamic dephasing mechanisms (e.g., chemical exchange and diffusion in the locally different magnetic susceptibilities), demonstrated a statistically significant difference between the PD and control group, while routine T(2) MRI did not. Second, T(1rho) measurements, which appear to reflect upon neuronal count, indicated neuronal loss in the SN in PD. We show here that sub-millimeter resolution T(1rho) and T(2rho) MRI relaxation methods can provide a noninvasive measure of iron content as well as evidence of neuronal loss in the midbrain of patients with PD.

  20. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in clinical trials of antivascular therapies.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, James P B; Jackson, Alan; Parker, Geoff J M; Roberts, Caleb; Jayson, Gordon C

    2012-02-14

    About 100 early-phase clinical trials and investigator-led studies of targeted antivascular therapies--both anti-angiogenic and vascular-targeting agents--have reported data derived from T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. However, the role of DCE-MRI for decision making during the drug-development process remains controversial. Despite well-documented guidelines on image acquisition and analysis, several key questions concerning the role of this technique in early-phase trial design remain unanswered. This Review describes studies of single-agent antivascular therapies, in which DCE-MRI parameters are incorporated as pharmacodynamic biomarkers. We discuss whether these parameters, such as volume transfer constant (K(trans)), are reproducible and reliable biomarkers of both drug efficacy and proof of concept, and whether they assist in dose selection and drug scheduling for subsequent phase II trials. Emerging evidence indicates that multiparametric analysis of DCE-MRI data offers greater insight into the mechanism of drug action than studies measuring a single parameter, such as K(trans). We also provide an overview of current data and appraise the future directions of this technique in oncology trials. Finally, major hurdles in imaging biomarker development, validation and qualification that hinder a wide application of DCE-MRI techniques in clinical trials are addressed.

  1. Hyaluronic acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes as tumor-targeting MRI contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Lin; Zhang, Huijuan; Wang, Yating; Wang, Lili; Yang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2015-01-01

    A tumor-targeting carrier, hyaluronic acid (HA)-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), was explored to deliver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (CAs) targeting to the tumor cells specifically. In this system, HA surface modification for SWCNTs was simply accomplished by amidation process and could make this nanomaterial highly hydrophilic. Cellular uptake was performed to evaluate the intracellular transport capabilities of HA-SWCNTs for tumor cells and the uptake rank was HA-SWCNTs> SWCNTs owing to the presence of HA, which was also evidenced by flow cytometry. The safety evaluation of this MRI CAs was investigated in vitro and in vivo. It revealed that HA-SWCNTs could stand as a biocompatible nanocarrier and gadolinium (Gd)/HA-SWCNTs demonstrated almost no toxicity compared with free GdCl3. Moreover, GdCl3 bearing HA-SWCNTs could significantly increase the circulation time for MRI. Finally, to investigate the MRI contrast enhancing capabilities of Gd/HA-SWCNTs, T1-weighted MR images of tumor-bearing mice were acquired. The results suggested Gd/HA-SWCNTs had the highest tumor-targeting efficiency and T1-relaxivity enhancement, indicating HA-SWCNTs could be developed as a tumor-targeting carrier to deliver the CAs, GdCl3, for the identifiable diagnosis of tumor. PMID:26213465

  2. Polydisulfide Manganese(II) Complexes as Non-Gadolinium Biodegradable Macromolecular MRI Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhen; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Wu, Xueming; Tan, Mingqian; Yin, Shouyu; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To develop safe and effective manganese(II) based biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agents. Materials and Methods In this study, we synthesized and characterized two polydisulfide manganese(II) complexes, Mn-DTPA cystamine copolymers and Mn-EDTA cystamine copolymers, as new biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agents. The contrast enhancement of the two manganese based contrast agents were evaluated in mice bearing MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma xenografts, in comparison with MnCl2. Results The T1 and T2 relaxivities were 4.74 and 10.38 mM−1s−1 per manganese at 3T for Mn-DTPA cystamine copolymers (Mn=30.50 kDa) and 6.41 and 9.72 mM−1s−1 for Mn-EDTA cystamine copolymers (Mn= 61.80 kDa). Both polydisulfide Mn(II) complexes showed significant liver, myocardium and tumor enhancement. Conclusion The manganese based polydisulfide contrast agents have a potential to be developed as alternative non-gadolinium contrast agents for MR cancer and myocardium imaging. PMID:22031457

  3. Clustered breast microcalcifications: Evaluation by dynamic contrast-enhanced subtraction MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles, R.; Tardivon, A.A.; Vanel, D.; Guinebretiere, J.M.; Arriagada, R.

    1996-01-01

    Our goal was to evaluate dynamic contrast-enhanced subtraction MRI in the diagnosis of isolated clustered calcifications of the breast. One hundred seventy-two patients underwent surgical biopsy for isolated clustered breast calcifications. Their mammograms showed round (n = 88) or linear/irregular (n = 84) microcalcifications. All patients had a preoperative Gd-DOTA-enhanced subtraction dynamic study. Any early contrast enhancement in the breast parenchyma concomitant with early enhancement of normal vessels was considered positive. Fifty-eight in situ carcinomas, 22 invasive carcinomas, and 92 benign lesions were found at histological analysis. Dynamic MR sequences showed early contrast enhancement in 76 of 80 malignant lesions (sensitivity 95%) and in 45 of 92 benign lesions (specificity 51%). Two invasive and two intraductal carcinomas did not show early contrast enhancement. Three independent observers agreed in rating early contrast enhancement in 143 of 172 lesions. Poor specificity limits the diagnostic accuracy of dynamic contrast-enhanced subtraction MRI in distinguishing benign from malignant microcalcifications on mammography. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. The dynamic of FUS-induced BBB Opening in Mouse Brain assessed by contrast enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenne, Jürgen W.; Krafft, Axel J.; Maier, Florian; Krause, Marie N.; Kleber, Susanne; Huber, Peter E.; Martin-Villalba, Ana; Bock, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in combination with the administration of gas-filled microbubbles, can induce a localized and reversible opening of the blood brain barrier (BBB). Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been demonstrated as a precise tool to monitor such a local BBB disruption. However, the opening/closing mechanisms of the BBB with FUS are still largely unknown. In this ongoing project, we study the BBB opening dynamics in mouse brain comparing an interstitial and an intravascular MR contrast agent (CA). FUS in mouse brain was performed with an MRI compatible treatment setup (1.7 MHz fix-focus US transducer, f' = 68 mm, NA = 0.44; focus: 8.1 mm length; O/ = 1.1 mm) in a 1.5 T whole body MRI system. For BBB opening, forty 10 ms-long FUS-pulses were applied at a repetition rate of 1 Hz at 1 MPa. The i.v. administration of the micro bubbles (50 μl SonoVue®) was started simultaneously with FUS exposure. To analyze the BBB opening process, short-term and long-term MRI signal dynamics of the interstitial MR contrast agent Magnevist® and the intravascular CA Vasovist® (Bayer-Schering) were studied. To assess short-term signal dynamics, T1-weighted inversion recovery turbo FLASH images (1s) were repeatedly acquired. Repeated 3D FLASH acquisitions (90 s) were used to assess long-term MRI signal dynamics. The short-term MRI signal enhancements showed comparable time constants for both types of MR contrast agents: 1.1 s (interstitial) vs. 0.8 s (intravascular). This time constant may serve as a time constant of the BBB opening process with the given FUS exposure parameters. For the long-term signal dynamics the intravascular CA (62±10 min) showed a fife times greater time constant as the interstitial contrast agent (12±10 min). This might be explained by the high molecular weight (˜60 kDa) of the intravascular Vasovist due to its reversible binding to blood serum albumin resulting in a prolonged half-life in the blood stream compared to the

  5. Non-ischemic perfusion defects due to delayed arrival of contrast material on stress perfusion cardiac magnetic resonance imaging after coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeo Koon; Park, Eun-Ah; Park, Sang Joon; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2014-01-01

    Herein we report about the adenosine stress perfusion MR imaging findings of a 50-year-old man who exhibited two different perfusion defects resulting from two different mechanisms after a coronary artery bypass surgery. An invasive coronary angiography confirmed that one perfusion defect at the mid-anterior wall resulted from an ischemia due to graft stenosis. However, no stenosis was detected on the graft responsible for the mid-inferior wall showing the other perfusion defect. It was assumed that the perfusion defect at the mid-inferior wall resulted from delayed perfusion owing to the long pathway of the bypass graft. The semiquantitative analysis of corrected signal-time curves supported our speculation, demonstrating that the rest-to-stress ratio index of the maximal slope of the myocardial territory in question was similar to those of normal myocardium, whereas that of myocardium with the stenotic graft showed a typical ischemic pattern. A delayed perfusion during long graft pathway in a post-bypass graft patient can mimick a true perfusion defect on myocardial stress MR imaging. Radiologists should be aware of this knowledge to avoid misinterpretation of graft and myocardial status in post bypass surgery patients.

  6. Synthesis of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as liver targeting MRI contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Farshad; Fattahi, Bahare; Azizi, Najmodin

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this research was the preparation of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as a liver targeting contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For this purpose, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles were coated with silica via the Stober method and finally the coated nanoparticles were functionalized with mebrofenin. Formation of crystalline magnetite particles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX) of the final product showed that silica had been effectively bonded onto the surface of the magnetite nanoparticles and the coated nanoparticles functionalized with mebrofenin. The magnetic resonance imaging of the functional nanoparticles showed that the Fe3O4-SiO2-mebrofenin composite is an effective MRI contrast agent for liver targeting.

  7. Preclinical animal acute toxicity studies of new developed MRI contrast agent based on gadolinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, I. F.; Zhuk, V. V.

    2015-04-01

    Acute toxicity test of new developed MRI contrast agent based on disodium salt of gadopentetic acid complex were carried out on Mus musculus and Sprague Dawley rats according to guidelines of preclinical studies [1]. Groups of six animals each were selected for experiment. Death and clinical symptoms of animals were recorded during 14 days. As a result the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) for female mice is 2.8 mM/kg of body weight, male mice - 1.4 mM/kg, female rats - 2.8 mM/kg, male rats - 5.6 mM/kg of body weight. No Observed Adverse Effect Dose (NOAEL) for female mice is 1.4 mM/kg, male mice - 0.7 mM/kg, male and female rats - 0.7 mM/kg. According to experimental data new developed MRI contrast agent based on Gd-DTPA complex is low-toxic.

  8. Improving cerebral blood flow quantification for arterial spin labeled perfusion MRI by removing residual motion artifacts and global signal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ze

    2012-12-01

    Denoising is critical to improving the quality and stability of cerebral blood flow (CBF) quantification in arterial spin labeled (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) due to the intrinsic low signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) of ASL data. Previous studies have been focused on reducing the spatial or temporal noise using standard filtering techniques, and less attention has been paid to two global nuisance effects, the residual motion artifacts and the global signal fluctuations. Since both nuisances affect the whole brain, removing them in advance should enhance the CBF quantification quality for ASL MRI. The purpose of this paper was to assess this potential benefit. Three methods were proposed to suppress each or both of the two global nuisances. Their performances for CBF quantification were validated using ASL data acquired from 13 subjects. Evaluation results showed that covarying out both global nuisances significantly improved temporal SNR and test-retest stability of CBF measurement. Although the concept of removing both nuisances is not technically novel per se, this paper clearly showed the benefits for ASL CBF quantification. Dissemination of the proposed methods in a free ASL data processing toolbox should be of interest to a broad range of ASL users.

  9. Casein-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for high MRI contrast enhancement and efficient cell targeting.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Wang, Liya; Lin, Run; Wang, Andrew Y; Yang, Lily; Kuang, Min; Qian, Weiping; Mao, Hui

    2013-06-12

    Surface properties, as well as inherent physicochemical properties, of the engineered nanomaterials play important roles in their interactions with the biological systems, which eventually affect their efficiency in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here we report a new class of MRI contrast agent based on milk casein protein-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (CNIOs) with a core size of 15 nm and hydrodynamic diameter ~30 nm. These CNIOs exhibited excellent water-solubility, colloidal stability, and biocompatibility. Importantly, CNIOs exhibited prominent T2 enhancing capability with a transverse relaxivity r2 of 273 mM(-1) s(-1) at 3 tesla. The transverse relaxivity is ~2.5-fold higher than that of iron oxide nanoparticles with the same core but an amphiphilic polymer coating. CNIOs showed pH-responsive properties, formed loose and soluble aggregates near the pI (pH ~4.0). The aggregates could be dissociated reversibly when the solution pH was adjusted away from the pI. The transverse relaxation property and MRI contrast enhancing effect of CNIOs remained unchanged in the pH range of 2.0-8.0. Further functionalization of CNIOs can be achieved via surface modification of the protein coating. Bioaffinitive ligands, such as a single chain fragment from the antibody of epidermal growth factor receptor (ScFvEGFR), could be readily conjugated onto the protein coating, enabling specific targeting to MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells overexpressing EGFR. T2-weighted MRI of mice intravenously administered with CNIOs demonstrated strong contrast enhancement in the liver and spleen. These favorable properties suggest CNIOs as a class of biomarker targeted magnetic nanoparticles for MRI contrast enhancement and related biomedical applications.

  10. Gadolinium Contrast Enhancement Improves Confidence in Diagnosing Recurrent Soft Tissue Sarcoma by MRI.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shinn-Huey S; Hippe, Daniel S; Lee, Amie Y; Scherer, Kurt; Porrino, Jack A; Davidson, Darin J; Chew, Felix S; Ha, Alice S

    2017-05-01

    To determine how utilization of postgadolinium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) influenced reader accuracy and confidence at identifying postoperative soft tissue sarcoma (STS) recurrence among readers with various levels of expertise. This retrospective study was institutional review board approved and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant. Postoperative MRI from 26 patients with prior STS resection (13 patients with confirmed recurrence, 13 without recurrence) was reviewed. Four blinded readers of varying expertise (radiology resident, fellow, attending, and orthopedic oncologist) initially evaluated only the precontrast images and rated each MRI for recurrence on a 5-point confidence scale. Assessment was repeated with the addition of contrast-enhanced sequences. Diagnostic accuracy based on confidence ratings was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Changes in confidence ratings were calculated using Wilcoxon signed-rank test. All readers demonstrated good diagnostic accuracy both with and without contrast-enhanced images (AUC >0.98 for each reader). When contrast-enhanced images were made available, the resident recorded improved confidence with both assigning (P = 0.031) and excluding recurrence (P = 0.006); the fellow showed improved confidence only with assigning recurrence (P = 0.015); and the surgeon showed improved confidence in excluding recurrence (P = 0.003). The addition of contrast-enhanced images did not significantly influence the diagnostic confidence of the attending radiologist. Diagnostic accuracy of MRI was excellent in evaluating postoperative STS recurrence, and reader confidence improved depending on expertise when postgadolinium imaging was included in the assessment. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Abnormal cerebral blood flow distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus in three pediatric patients measured by arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Keiko; Fukuda, Tokiko

    2016-05-01

    The ability to visualize brain perfusion is important for identifying epileptic foci. We present three pediatric cases showing asymmetrical cerebral blood flow (CBF) distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus measured by arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion MRI. During the acute phase, regional CBF measurements in the areas considered including epileptic foci were higher than in the corresponding area of the contralateral hemisphere, though the exact quantitative value varied between cases. We could not identify the correct epileptogenic foci, because those ASL images were taken after the prolonged and extraordinary activation of neurons in the affected area. During the recovery phase, the differences reduced and the average regional CBF measurement was 54.6 ± 6.1 ml/100 g per minute, which was a little less than the number of previous ASL studies. ASL perfusion MRI imaging provides a method for evaluating regional CBF by using magnetically labeled arterial blood water as an endogenous tracer. With this technique, we can repeatedly evaluate both the brain structure and the level of perfusion at the same time. ASL is noninvasive and easily accessible, and therefore it could become a routine tool for assessment of perfusion in daily practice of pediatric neurology.

  12. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of myocardial perfusion using the paramagnetic contrast agent manganese gluconate.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, S; Lange, R A; Kulkarni, P V; Katz, J; Parkey, R W; Willerson, J T; Peshock, R M

    1989-08-01

    Previous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging studies have indicated that coronary occlusion does not produce sufficient changes in standard tissue relaxation times to allow the detection of acute ischemia. To identify acute myocardial perfusion abnormalities, the use of the paramagnetic agent manganese gluconate combined with calcium gluconate (MnGlu/CaGlu) was investigated in canine models of acute coronary artery occlusion. In vitro studies showed that MnGlu/CaGlu was a more efficient relaxing agent than gadolinium-DTPA (relaxivity of 7.8 versus 5.1 s-1 mM-1) and demonstrated affinity for normal myocardium. The distribution of MnGlu/CaGlu as measured by manganese-54 tracer studies was proportional to myocardial blood flow in both normal and ischemic tissue. Hearts excised from dogs after coronary artery occlusion and administration of 0.035 mM/kg MnGlu/CaGlu were imaged ex vivo using a relatively spin-lattice relaxation time (T1)-weighted gradient reversal technique (repetition time [TR] 50 ms and echo time [TE] 9 ms). These images showed increased signal intensity in the normally perfused myocardium with a mean signal intensity ratio of hypoperfused to normal myocardium of 0.55 +/- 0.12 (mean +/- SD). In vivo images obtained in nine dogs after coronary artery occlusion and administration of the same dose of MnGlu/CaGlu demonstrated the region of hypoperfused myocardium in six dogs with a signal intensity ratio of hypoperfused to normal myocardium of 0.64 +/- 0.23 (p less than 0.05 versus control). When a higher dose of 0.1 mM/kg MnGlu/CaGlu was utilized and in vivo imaging was performed using a relatively spin-spin relaxation time (T2)-weighted (TR gated, TE 60 ms) spin-echo sequence in six dogs, the signal intensity of normal myocardium was decreased.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Hemodynamic Measurement Using Four-Dimensional Phase-Contrast MRI: Quantification of Hemodynamic Parameters and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Ha, Hojin; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Young-Hak; Lee, Deok Hee; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kim, Namkug

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements have been made to the use of time-resolved, three-dimensional phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is also named four-dimensional (4D) PC-MRI or 4D flow MRI, in the investigation of spatial and temporal variations in hemodynamic features in cardiovascular blood flow. The present article reviews the principle and analytical procedures of 4D PC-MRI. Various fluid dynamic biomarkers for possible clinical usage are also described, including wall shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy, and relative pressure. Lastly, this article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D PC-MRI in various cardiovascular regions.

  14. Hemodynamic Measurement Using Four-Dimensional Phase-Contrast MRI: Quantification of Hemodynamic Parameters and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Hojin; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Young-Hak; Lee, Deok Hee

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements have been made to the use of time-resolved, three-dimensional phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is also named four-dimensional (4D) PC-MRI or 4D flow MRI, in the investigation of spatial and temporal variations in hemodynamic features in cardiovascular blood flow. The present article reviews the principle and analytical procedures of 4D PC-MRI. Various fluid dynamic biomarkers for possible clinical usage are also described, including wall shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy, and relative pressure. Lastly, this article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D PC-MRI in various cardiovascular regions. PMID:27390537

  15. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound assessment of muscle blood perfusion of extremities that underwent crush injury: an animal experiment.

    PubMed

    Lv, Faqin; Tang, Jie; Luo, Yukun; Ban, Yu; Wu, Rong; Tian, Jiangke; Yu, Tengfei; Xie, Xia; Li, Tanshi

    2013-01-01

    This research aimed to study the assessment of local muscle microcirculation perfusion of extremities that underwent crush injuries by using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS). A total of 28 New Zealand rabbits were anesthetized by using intramuscular pentobarbital sodium (30 mg/kg). A balloon cuff device was used to create crush injuries to the left hind leg of each rabbit with a force of 18.6 kPa. CEUS was performed at the 0.5th, 2nd, 6th,24th, and 72nd hour after the release of the crush pressure. Peak intensity (PI) of the crushed regions was compared with those of the uncrushed regions and before the creation of crush injury. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to determine the diagnostic value of PI for the crushed region. During the 72nd hour after the release of the crush pressure, 5 of the 28 rabbits died, and thus, their statistics were eliminated from the experiment. At different time points after the release of the crush pressure, the crushed regions in all 23 survivals showed quick and high enhancement, and their intensities were higher than those of the un crushed region in the arterial phase. The time-intensity curves of the crushed regions all appeared as rapid lift-gradual drop. PIs were obviously higher in the crushed regions than in the uncrushed regions and than those before the creation of crush injury ( p G 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curves showed that extremity crush injury was diagnosed by using PI value. CEUS presents that the microcirculation perfusion of the crushed muscle increased obviously after the release of the crush pressure.PIs evaluated quantitatively the microcirculation perfusion changes. It may suggest a potential alternative for evaluating microcirculation abnormality of the muscle crush injury to the extremities.

  16. Phase contrast MRI is an early marker of micrometastatic breast cancer development in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Budde, Matthew D; Gold, Eric; Jordan, E Kay; Smith-Brown, Melissa; Frank, Joseph A

    2012-05-01

    The early growth of micrometastatic breast cancer in the brain often occurs through vessel co-option and is independent of angiogenesis. Remodeling of the existing vasculature is an important step in the evolution of co-opting micrometastases into angiogenesis-dependent solid tumor masses. The purpose of this study was to determine whether phase contrast MRI, an intrinsic source of contrast exquisitely sensitive to the magnetic susceptibility properties of deoxygenated hemoglobin, could detect vascular changes occurring independent of angiogenesis in a rat model of breast cancer metastases to the brain. Twelve nude rats were administered 10(6) MDA-MB-231BRL 'brain-seeking' breast cancer cells through intracardiac injection. Serial, multiparametric MRI of the brain was performed weekly until metastatic disease was detected. The results demonstrated that images of the signal phase (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.97) were more sensitive than T(2)* gradient echo magnitude images (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.73) to metastatic brain lesions. The difference between the two techniques was probably the result of the confounding effects of edema on the magnitude of the signal. A region of interest analysis revealed that vascular abnormalities detected with phase contrast MRI preceded tumor permeability measured with contrast-enhanced MRI by 1-2  weeks. Tumor size was correlated with permeability (R(2)= 0.23, p < 0.01), but phase contrast was independent of tumor size (R(2)= 0.03). Histopathologic analysis demonstrated that capillary endothelial cells co-opted by tumor cells were significantly enlarged, but less dense, relative to the normal brain vasculature. Although co-opted vessels were vascular endothelial growth factor-negative, vessels within larger tumor masses were vascular endothelial growth factor-positive. In conclusion, phase contrast MRI is believed to be sensitive to vascular remodeling in co

  17. A corrole nanobiologic elicits tissue-activated MRI contrast enhancement and tumor-targeted toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sims, Jessica D; Hwang, Jae Youn; Wagner, Shawn; Alonso-Valenteen, Felix; Hanson, Chris; Taguiam, Jan Michael; Polo, Richard; Harutyunyan, Ira; Karapetyan, Gevorg; Sorasaenee, Karn; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Marban, Eduardo; Moats, Rex; Gray, Harry B; Gross, Zeev; Medina-Kauwe, Lali K

    2015-11-10

    Water-soluble corroles with inherent fluorescence can form stable self-assemblies with tumor-targeted cell penetration proteins, and have been explored as agents for optical imaging and photosensitization of tumors in pre-clinical studies. However, the limited tissue-depth of excitation wavelengths limits their clinical applicability. To examine their utility in more clinically-relevant imaging and therapeutic modalities, here we have explored the use of corroles as contrast enhancing agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and evaluated their potential for tumor-selective delivery when encapsulated by a tumor-targeted polypeptide. We have found that a manganese-metallated corrole exhibits significant T1 relaxation shortening and MRI contrast enhancement that is blocked by particle formation in solution but yields considerable MRI contrast after tissue uptake. Cell entry but not low pH enables this. Additionally, the corrole elicited tumor-toxicity through the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytoskeletal breakdown when delivered by the targeted polypeptide. The protein-corrole particle (which we call HerMn) exhibited improved therapeutic efficacy compared to current targeted therapies used in the clinic. Taken together with its tumor-preferential biodistribution, our findings indicate that HerMn can facilitate tumor-targeted toxicity after systemic delivery and tumor-selective MR imaging activatable by internalization.

  18. Statistical comparison of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI pharmacokinetic models in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Welch, E Brian; Chakravarthy, A Bapsi; Xu, Lei; Arlinghaus, Lori R; Farley, Jaime; Mayer, Ingrid A; Kelley, Mark C; Meszoely, Ingrid M; Means-Powell, Julie; Abramson, Vandana G; Grau, Ana M; Gore, John C; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2012-07-01

    By fitting dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data to an appropriate pharmacokinetic model, quantitative physiological parameters can be estimated. In this study, we compare four different models by applying four statistical measures to assess their ability to describe dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data obtained in 28 human breast cancer patient sets: the chi-square test (χ(2)), Durbin-Watson statistic, Akaike information criterion, and Bayesian information criterion. The pharmacokinetic models include the fast exchange limit model with (FXL_v(p)) and without (FXL) a plasma component, and the fast and slow exchange regime models (FXR and SXR, respectively). The results show that the FXL_v(p) and FXR models yielded the smallest χ(2) in 45.64 and 47.53% of the voxels, respectively; they also had the smallest number of voxels showing serial correlation with 0.71 and 2.33%, respectively. The Akaike information criterion indicated that the FXL_v(p) and FXR models were preferred in 42.84 and 46.59% of the voxels, respectively. The Bayesian information criterion also indicated the FXL_v(p) and FXR models were preferred in 39.39 and 45.25% of the voxels, respectively. Thus, these four metrics indicate that the FXL_v(p) and the FXR models provide the most complete statistical description of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI time courses for the patients selected in this study.

  19. A self-calibrating PARACEST MRI contrast agent that detects esterase enzyme activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuguo; Sheth, Vipul R.; Liu, Guanshu; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    The CEST effect of many PARACEST MRI contrast agents changes in response to a molecular biomarker. However, other molecular biomarkers or environmental factors can influence CEST, so that a change in CEST is not conclusive proof for detecting the biomarker. To overcome this problem, a second control CEST effect may be included in the same PARACEST agent, which is responsive to all factors that alter the first CEST effect except for the biomarker to be measured. To investigate this approach, a PARACEST MRI contrast agent was developed with one CEST effect that is responsive to esterase enzyme activity and a second control CEST effect. The ratio of the two CEST effects was independent of concentration and T1 relaxation, so that this agent was self-calibrating with respect to these factors. This ratiometric method was dependent on temperature and was influenced by MR coalescence as the chemical exchange rates approached the chemical shifts of the exchangable protons as temperature was increased. The two CEST effects also showed evidence of having different pH dependencies, so that this agent was not self-calibrating with respect to pH. Therefore, a self-calibrating PARACEST MRI contrast agent can more accurately detect a molecular biomarker such as esterase enzyme activity, as long as temperature and pH are within an acceptable physiological range and remain constant. PMID:21861282

  20. Prostate Cancer Evaluation: Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Novel Enzyme-Activated Proton MRI Contrast Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    stable complex , to restrict motion of the GD(III) chelates enhancing relaxivity and providing local contrast accumulation. We plan to synthesize 8...imaging (MRI) in clinical diagnosis.[40] The contrast in an MR image is the result of a complex interplay of numerous factors, including the... complex , as shown in Figure 1, the relaxivity increased 145% at 20MHz and 37°C from 5.1mM-1s-1 per Gd(III) in Gd(phen)HDO3A form to 12.2 mM-1s-1 in the

  1. Prostate Cancer Evaluation: Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Enzyme-Activated Proton MRI Contrast Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    highly stable complex , to restrict motion of the Gd(III) chelates enhancing relaxivity and providing local contrast accumulation. We plan to synthesize...widespread success of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in clinical diagnosis.[40] The contrast in an MR image is the result of a complex interplay of...II) to form a highly stable tris- complex , as shown in Figure 1, the relaxivity increased 145% at 20MHz and 37°C from 5.1mM-1s-1 per Gd(III) in Gd

  2. Combining phase and magnitude information for contrast agent quantification in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using statistical modeling.

    PubMed

    Brynolfsson, Patrik; Yu, Jun; Wirestam, Ronnie; Karlsson, Mikael; Garpebring, Anders

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate, using simulations, a method for improved contrast agent (CA) quantification in DCE-MRI. We developed a maximum likelihood estimator that combines the phase signal in the DCE-MRI image series with an additional CA estimate, e.g. the estimate obtained from magnitude data. A number of simulations were performed to investigate the ability of the estimator to reduce bias and noise in CA estimates. Noise levels ranging from that of a body coil to that of a dedicated head coil were investigated at both 1.5T and 3T. Using the proposed method, the root mean squared error in the bolus peak was reduced from 2.24 to 0.11 mM in the vessels and 0.16 to 0.08 mM in the tumor rim for a noise level equivalent of a 12-channel head coil at 3T. No improvements were seen for tissues with small CA uptake, such as white matter. Phase information reduces errors in the estimated CA concentrations. A larger phase response from higher field strengths or higher CA concentrations yielded better results. Issues such as background phase drift need to be addressed before this method can be applied in vivo. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of blood flow regularized by 3D phase contrast MRI.

    PubMed

    Rispoli, Vinicius C; Nielsen, Jon F; Nayak, Krishna S; Carvalho, Joao L A

    2015-11-26

    Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) is used clinically for quantitative assessment of cardiovascular flow and function, as it is capable of providing directly-measured 3D velocity maps. Alternatively, vascular flow can be estimated from model-based computation fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. CFD provides arbitrarily high resolution, but its accuracy hinges on model assumptions, while velocity fields measured with PC-MRI generally do not satisfy the equations of fluid dynamics, provide limited resolution, and suffer from partial volume effects. The purpose of this study is to develop a proof-of-concept numerical procedure for constructing a simulated flow field that is influenced by both direct PC-MRI measurements and a fluid physics model, thereby taking advantage of both the accuracy of PC-MRI and the high spatial resolution of CFD. The use of the proposed approach in regularizing 3D flow fields is evaluated. The proposed algorithm incorporates both a Newtonian fluid physics model and a linear PC-MRI signal model. The model equations are solved numerically using a modified CFD algorithm. The numerical solution corresponds to the optimal solution of a generalized Tikhonov regularization, which provides a flow field that satisfies the flow physics equations, while being close enough to the measured PC-MRI velocity profile. The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated on data from the carotid bifurcation of one healthy volunteer, and also from a pulsatile carotid flow phantom. The proposed solver produces flow fields that are in better agreement with direct PC-MRI measurements than CFD alone, and converges faster, while closely satisfying the fluid dynamics equations. For the implementation that provided the best results, the signal-to-error ratio (with respect to the PC-MRI measurements) in the phantom experiment was 6.56 dB higher than that of conventional CFD; in the in vivo experiment, it was 2.15 dB higher. The proposed approach

  4. [The actions of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in differentiating breast tumors].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yi; Yu, Jianqun; Chen, Dongdong; Xu, Zhongzi; Zeng, Hanjiang

    2013-12-01

    We studied the actions of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in differentiating breast tumors. From January 2010 to February 2012, we retrospectively analyzed data of 95 cases with breast tumor pathologically confirmed from DWI and DCE-MRI. We compared the ADC value, time-intensity curve (TIC) and DCE-MRI parameters between breast tumors, and calculated the sensitivity and specificity for differentiating breast tumors. The results were as follows: (1) On DWI, mean ADC value of malignant tumor was lower than that of benign tumor (P < 0.05). For differentiating breast malignant tumors from benign neoplasm, a cut-off ADC value of 1.2 x 10(-3) mm2/s achieved a sensitivity of 74.1% and specificity of 70.3%. (2) On DCE-MRI, early enhancement ratio (EER) value of malignant tumor was higher than that of benign tumor whereas value of time to peak (Tpeak) and maximal enhancement ratio (SImax) were lower than that of benign tumor (all P < 0.05). As for TIC, type II and III were more frequently seen in malignant tumor than in benign tumor whereas type I was more common in benign tumor than in malignant tumor (all P < 0.05). For differentiating breast malignant tumors from benign neoplasm, DCE-MRI obtained a sensitivity of 89.7% and specificity of 70.3%. (3) For differentiating breast malignant tumors from benign neoplasm, ADC value together with TIC obtained a sensitivity of 79.3% and specificity of 78.4%. Malignant or benign breast tumors could have their own unique characteristics on DWI and DCE-MRI. These characteristics might be helpful for differentiating these tumors.

  5. Multi-atlas segmentation enables robust multi-contrast MRI spleen segmentation for splenomegaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Yuankai; Liu, Jiaqi; Xu, Zhoubing; Harrigan, Robert L.; Assad, Albert; Abramson, Richard G.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2017-02-01

    Non-invasive spleen volume estimation is essential in detecting splenomegaly. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to facilitate splenomegaly diagnosis in vivo. However, achieving accurate spleen volume estimation from MR images is challenging given the great inter-subject variance of human abdomens and wide variety of clinical images/modalities. Multi-atlas segmentation has been shown to be a promising approach to handle heterogeneous data and difficult anatomical scenarios. In this paper, we propose to use multi-atlas segmentation frameworks for MRI spleen segmentation for splenomegaly. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that integrates multi-atlas segmentation for splenomegaly as seen on MRI. To address the particular concerns of spleen MRI, automated and novel semi-automated atlas selection approaches are introduced. The automated approach interactively selects a subset of atlases using selective and iterative method for performance level estimation (SIMPLE) approach. To further control the outliers, semi-automated craniocaudal length based SIMPLE atlas selection (L-SIMPLE) is proposed to introduce a spatial prior in a fashion to guide the iterative atlas selection. A dataset from a clinical trial containing 55 MRI volumes (28 T1 weighted and 27 T2 weighted) was used to evaluate different methods. Both automated and semi-automated methods achieved median DSC > 0.9. The outliers were alleviated by the L-SIMPLE (≍1 min manual efforts per scan), which achieved 0.9713 Pearson correlation compared with the manual segmentation. The results demonstrated that the multi-atlas segmentation is able to achieve accurate spleen segmentation from the multi-contrast splenomegaly MRI scans.

  6. Multi-atlas Segmentation Enables Robust Multi-contrast MRI Spleen Segmentation for Splenomegaly.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yuankai; Liu, Jiaqi; Xu, Zhoubing; Harrigan, Robert L; Assad, Albert; Abramson, Richard G; Landman, Bennett A

    2017-02-11

    Non-invasive spleen volume estimation is essential in detecting splenomegaly. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to facilitate splenomegaly diagnosis in vivo. However, achieving accurate spleen volume estimation from MR images is challenging given the great inter-subject variance of human abdomens and wide variety of clinical images/modalities. Multi-atlas segmentation has been shown to be a promising approach to handle heterogeneous data and difficult anatomical scenarios. In this paper, we propose to use multi-atlas segmentation frameworks for MRI spleen segmentation for splenomegaly. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that integrates multi-atlas segmentation for splenomegaly as seen on MRI. To address the particular concerns of spleen MRI, automated and novel semi-automated atlas selection approaches are introduced. The automated approach interactively selects a subset of atlases using selective and iterative method for performance level estimation (SIMPLE) approach. To further control the outliers, semi-automated craniocaudal length based SIMPLE atlas selection (L-SIMPLE) is proposed to introduce a spatial prior in a fashion to guide the iterative atlas selection. A dataset from a clinical trial containing 55 MRI volumes (28 T1 weighted and 27 T2 weighted) was used to evaluate different methods. Both automated and semi-automated methods achieved median DSC > 0.9. The outliers were alleviated by the L-SIMPLE (≈1 min manual efforts per scan), which achieved 0.9713 Pearson correlation compared with the manual segmentation. The results demonstrated that the multi-atlas segmentation is able to achieve accurate spleen segmentation from the multi-contrast splenomegaly MRI scans.

  7. Multi-atlas Segmentation Enables Robust Multi-contrast MRI Spleen Segmentation for Splenomegaly

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiaqi; Xu, Zhoubing; Harrigan, Robert L.; Assad, Albert; Abramson, Richard G.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive spleen volume estimation is essential in detecting splenomegaly. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to facilitate splenomegaly diagnosis in vivo. However, achieving accurate spleen volume estimation from MR images is challenging given the great inter-subject variance of human abdomens and wide variety of clinical images/modalities. Multi-atlas segmentation has been shown to be a promising approach to handle heterogeneous data and difficult anatomical scenarios. In this paper, we propose to use multi-atlas segmentation frameworks for MRI spleen segmentation for splenomegaly. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that integrates multi-atlas segmentation for splenomegaly as seen on MRI. To address the particular concerns of spleen MRI, automated and novel semi-automated atlas selection approaches are introduced. The automated approach interactively selects a subset of atlases using selective and iterative method for performance level estimation (SIMPLE) approach. To further control the outliers, semi-automated craniocaudal length based SIMPLE atlas selection (L-SIMPLE) is proposed to introduce a spatial prior in a fashion to guide the iterative atlas selection. A dataset from a clinical trial containing 55 MRI volumes (28 T1 weighted and 27 T2 weighted) was used to evaluate different methods. Both automated and semi-automated methods achieved median DSC > 0.9. The outliers were alleviated by the L-SIMPLE (≈1 min manual efforts per scan), which achieved 0.9713 Pearson correlation compared with the manual segmentation. The results demonstrated that the multi-atlas segmentation is able to achieve accurate spleen segmentation from the multi-contrast splenomegaly MRI scans. PMID:28649156

  8. Effects of two different anesthetic protocols on cardiac flow measured by two dimensional phase contrast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Drees, Randi; Johnson, Rebecca A; Stepien, Rebecca L; Del Rio, Alejandro Munoz; François, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Companion animals are anesthetized or heavily sedated to comply for cardiac MRI and different anesthetic protocols are expected to have variable effects on functional parameters measured. This study compared two anesthetic protocols (Protocol A: Midazolam, fentanyl; Protocol B: Dexmedetomidine) for their effect on quantitative and qualitative analysis of blood flow through the aortic, pulmonic, mitral and tricuspid valves using 2D phase contrast (PC) MRI in dogs. Mean flow per heartbeat through the pulmonary artery (Qp) and aorta (Qs) was compared to right (RVSV) and left (LVSV) ventricular stroke volumes determined using 2D Cine balanced steady-state free precession MRI as a reference standard. Pulmonary to systemic flow ratio (Qp/Qs) was also calculated. Differences in flow and Qp/Qs values generated using 2D PC MRI were not different between the two anesthetic protocols (P=1). Mean differences between Qp and right ventricular stroke volume (RVSV) were 3.82 (95% limits of agreement: 3.62, −11.26) ml/beat and 1.9 (−7.86, 11.66) ml/beat for anesthesia protocols A and B, respectively. Mean differences between Qs and left ventricular stroke volume (LVSV) were 1.65 (−5.04, 8.34) ml/beat and 0.03 (−4.65, 4.72) ml/beat for anesthesia protocols A and B, respectively. Mild tricuspid or mitral reflux was seen in 2/10 dogs using 2D PC MRI. No aortic or pulmonic insufficiency was observed. This study provides baseline data for evaluation of cardiac blood flow using 2D PC MRI in dogs. Where as no significant difference of cardiac blood flow was found for the anesthetic protocols used, verification in clinically affected patients is desirable. PMID:25124271

  9. Assessment of MRI Contrast Agent Kinetics via Retro-Orbital Injection in Mice: Comparison with Tail Vein Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Nojima, Masanori; Inoue, Yusuke; Ohtomo, Kuni; Kiryu, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    It is not known whether administration of contrast agent via retro-orbital injection or the tail vein route affects the efficiency of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore, we compared the effects of retro-orbital and tail vein injection on the kinetics of the contrast agent used for MRI in mice. The same group of nine healthy female mice received contrast agent via either route. An extracellular contrast agent was infused via the tail vein and retro-orbital vein, in random order. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed before and after administering the contrast agent. The contrast effects in the liver, kidney, lung, and myocardium were assessed. The average total times of venous puncture and mounting of the injection system were about 10 and 4 min for the tail vein and retro-orbital route, respectively. For all organs assessed, the maximum contrast ratio occurred 30 s after administration and the time course of the contrast ratio was similar with either routes. For each organ, the contrast ratios correlated strongly; the contrast ratios were similar. The retro-orbital and tail vein routes afforded similar results in terms of the kinetics of the contrast agent. The retro-orbital route can be used as a simple efficient alternative to tail vein injection for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of mice. PMID:26060990

  10. CONTRAST-ENHANCED ULTRASOUND ASSESSMENT OF IMPAIRED ADIPOSE TISSUE AND MUSCLE PERFUSION IN INSULIN-RESISTANT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Belcik, J. Todd; Davidson, Brian P.; Foster, Ted; Qi, Yue; Zhao, Yan; Peters, Dawn; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background In diabetes mellitus reduced perfusion and capillary surface area in skeletal muscle, which is a major glucose storage site, contributes to abnormal glucose homeostasis. Using contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) we investigated whether abdominal adipose tissue perfusion is abnormal in insulin resistance (IR) and correlates with glycemic control. Methods and Results Abdominal adipose tissue and skeletal muscle CEU perfusion imaging was performed in obese IR (db/db) mice at 11-12 or 14-16 weeks of age, and in control lean mice. Time-intensity data were analyzed to quantify microvascular blood flow (MBF) and capillary blood volume (CBV). Blood glucose response over one hour was measured after insulin challenge (1 u/Kg, I.P.). Compared to control mice, db/db mice at 11-12 and 14-16 weeks had a higher glucose concentration area-under-the-curve after insulin (11.8±2.8, 20.6±4.3, and 28.4±5.9 mg·min/dL [×1000], respectively, p=0.0002), and also had lower adipose MBF (0.094±0.038, 0.035±0.010, and 0.023±0.01 mL/min/g, p=0.0002) and CBV (1.6±0.6, 1.0±0.3, and 0.5±0.1 mL/100 g, p=0.0017). The glucose area-under-the-curve correlated in a non-linear fashion with both adipose and skeletal muscle MBF and CBV. There were significant linear correlations between adipose and muscle MBF (r=0.81) and CBV (r=0.66). Adipocyte cell volume on histology was 25-fold higher in 14-16 week db/db versus control mice. Conclusions Abnormal adipose MBF and CBV in IR can be detected by CEU and correlates with the degree of impairment in glucose storage. Abnormalities in adipose tissue and muscle appear to be coupled. Impaired adipose tissue perfusion is in part explained by an increase in adipocyte size without proportional vascular response. PMID:25855669

  11. Breast MRI contrast enhancement kinetics of normal parenchyma correlate with presence of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shandong; Berg, Wendie A; Zuley, Margarita L; Kurland, Brenda F; Jankowitz, Rachel C; Nishikawa, Robert; Gur, David; Sumkin, Jules H

    2016-07-22

    We investigated dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) contrast enhancement kinetic variables quantified from normal breast parenchyma for association with presence of breast cancer, in a case-control study. Under a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant and Institutional Review Board-approved protocol, DCE-MRI scans of the contralateral breasts of 51 patients with cancer and 51 controls (matched by age and year of MRI) with biopsy-proven benign lesions were retrospectively analyzed. Applying fully automated computer algorithms on pre-contrast and multiple post-contrast MR sequences, two contrast enhancement kinetic variables, wash-in slope and signal enhancement ratio, were quantified from normal parenchyma of the contralateral breasts of both patients with cancer and controls. Conditional logistic regression was employed to assess association between these two measures and presence of breast cancer, with adjustment for other imaging factors including mammographic breast density and MRI background parenchymal enhancement (BPE). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to assess the ability of the kinetic measures to distinguish patients with cancer from controls. When both kinetic measures were included in conditional logistic regression analysis, the odds ratio for breast cancer was 1.7 (95 % CI 1.1, 2.8; p = 0.017) for wash-in slope variance and 3.5 (95 % CI 1.2, 9.9; p = 0.019) for signal enhancement ratio volume, respectively. These odds ratios were similar on respective univariate analysis, and remained significant after adjustment for menopausal status, family history, and mammographic density. While percent BPE was associated with an odds ratio of 3.1 (95 % CI 1.2, 7.9; p = 0.018), in multivariable analysis of the three measures, percent BPE was non-significant (p = 0.897) and the two kinetics measures remained significant. For the differentiation of patients

  12. Protein corona affects the relaxivity and MRI contrast efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Houshang; Bordonali, Lorenzo; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Wan, Sha; Monopoli, Marco P; Lynch, Iseult; Laurent, Sophie; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2013-09-21

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly being considered for use in biomedical applications such as biosensors, imaging contrast agents and drug delivery vehicles. In a biological fluid, proteins associate in a preferential manner with NPs. The small sizes and high curvature angles of NPs influence the types and amounts of proteins present on their surfaces. This differential display of proteins bound to the surface of NPs can influence the tissue distribution, cellular uptake and biological effects of NPs. To date, the effects of adsorption of a protein corona (PC) on the magnetic properties of NPs have not been considered, despite the fact that some of their potential applications require their use in human blood. Here, to investigate the effects of a PC (using fetal bovine serum) on the MRI contrast efficiency of superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (SPIONs), we have synthesized two series of SPIONs with variation in the thickness and functional groups (i.e. surface charges) of the dextran surface coating. We have observed that different physico-chemical characteristics of the dextran coatings on the SPIONs lead to the formation of PCs of different compositions. (1)H relaxometry was used to obtain the longitudinal, r1, and transverse, r2, relaxivities of the SPIONs without and with a PC, as a function of the Larmor frequency. The transverse relaxivity, which determines the efficiency of negative contrast agents (CAs), is very much dependent on the functional group and the surface charge of the SPIONs' coating. The presence of the PC did not alter the relaxivity of plain SPIONs, while it slightly increased the relaxivity of the negatively charged SPIONs and dramatically decreased the relaxivity of the positively charged ones, which was coupled with particle agglomeration in the presence of the proteins. To confirm the effect of the PC on the MRI contrast efficiency, in vitro MRI experiments at ν = 8.5 MHz were performed using a low-field MRI scanner. The MRI

  13. Three-dimensional MR pulmonary perfusion imaging and angiography with an injection of a new blood pool contrast agent B-22956/1.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Carr, J; Harris, K; Saker, M B; Cavagna, F M; Maggioni, F; Laub, G; Li, D; Finn, J P

    2001-10-01

    Initial evaluation of a new blood pool agent, B-22956/1, for pulmonary imaging was performed in five domestic pigs with artificial embolism. Pre-embolism 3D pulmonary perfusion images were first acquired by injecting an extravascular agent, gadoteridol. The pulmonary arteries of the pigs were then occluded by the artificial emboli. Post-embolism perfusion scans were subsequently performed by injecting B-22956/1. Additional post-embolism high-spatial-resolution angiograms were also acquired. Parenchyma perfusion deficits were well depicted in the post-embolism perfusion maps. The post-embolism angiography clearly revealed the location and extent of the filling defects in the pulmonary vessels. Signal intensities of perfusion maps on the normal parenchyma were significantly improved (30%) by using B-22956/1, in comparison with perfusion images using gadoteridol (P < 0.01). Many pulmonary angiograms with approximately equal contrast could be obtained even at 22 minutes after the injection of B-22956/1. Our initial results indicate that blood pool agent B-22956/1 may provide opportunities for whole-lung-coverage perfusion mapping and additional high-resolution target angiograms after a single injection.

  14. Evaluation of motion correction for clinical dynamic contrast enhanced MRI of the liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, M. J. A.; Kuijf, H. J.; Veldhuis, W. B.; Wessels, F. J.; van Leeuwen, M. S.; Pluim, J. P. W.

    2017-10-01

    Motion correction of 4D dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) series is required for diagnostic evaluation of liver lesions. The registration, however, is a challenging task, owing to rapid changes in image appearance. In this study, two different registration approaches are compared; a conventional pairwise method applying mutual information as metric and a groupwise method applying a principal component analysis based metric, introduced by Huizinga et al (2016). The pairwise method transforms the individual 3D images one by one to a reference image, whereas the groupwise registration method computes the metric on all the images simultaneously, exploiting the temporal information, and transforms all 3D images to a common space. The performance of the two registration methods was evaluated using 70 clinical 4D DCE-