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Sample records for contrasting infection strategies

  1. Contrasting life strategies of viruses that infect photo- and heterotrophic bacteria, as revealed by viral tagging.

    PubMed

    Deng, Li; Gregory, Ann; Yilmaz, Suzan; Poulos, Bonnie T; Hugenholtz, Philip; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2012-10-30

    Ocean viruses are ubiquitous and abundant and play important roles in global biogeochemical cycles by means of their mortality, horizontal gene transfer, and manipulation of host metabolism. However, the obstacles involved in linking viruses to their hosts in a high-throughput manner bottlenecks our ability to understand virus-host interactions in complex communities. We have developed a method called viral tagging (VT), which combines mixtures of host cells and fluorescent viruses with flow cytometry. We investigated multiple viruses which infect each of two model marine bacteria that represent the slow-growing, photoautotrophic genus Synechococcus (Cyanobacteria) and the fast-growing, heterotrophic genus Pseudoalteromonas (Gammaproteobacteria). Overall, viral tagging results for viral infection were consistent with plaque and liquid infection assays for cyanobacterial myo-, podo- and siphoviruses and some (myo- and podoviruses) but not all (four siphoviruses) heterotrophic bacterial viruses. Virus-tagged Pseudoalteromonas organisms were proportional to the added viruses under varied infection conditions (virus-bacterium ratios), while no more than 50% of the Synechococcus organisms were virus tagged even at viral abundances that exceeded (5 to 10×) that of their hosts. Further, we found that host growth phase minimally impacts the fraction of virus-tagged Synechococcus organisms while greatly affecting phage adsorption to Pseudoalteromonas. Together these findings suggest that at least two contrasting viral life strategies exist in the oceans and that they likely reflect adaptation to their host microbes. Looking forward to the point at which the virus-tagging signature is well understood (e.g., for Synechococcus), application to natural communities should begin to provide population genomic data at the proper scale for predictively modeling two of the most abundant biological entities on Earth. Viral study suffers from an inability to link viruses to hosts en

  2. Contrasting Life Strategies of Viruses that Infect Photo- and Heterotrophic Bacteria, as Revealed by Viral Tagging

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Li; Gregory, Ann; Yilmaz, Suzan; Poulos, Bonnie T.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ocean viruses are ubiquitous and abundant and play important roles in global biogeochemical cycles by means of their mortality, horizontal gene transfer, and manipulation of host metabolism. However, the obstacles involved in linking viruses to their hosts in a high-throughput manner bottlenecks our ability to understand virus-host interactions in complex communities. We have developed a method called viral tagging (VT), which combines mixtures of host cells and fluorescent viruses with flow cytometry. We investigated multiple viruses which infect each of two model marine bacteria that represent the slow-growing, photoautotrophic genus Synechococcus (Cyanobacteria) and the fast-growing, heterotrophic genus Pseudoalteromonas (Gammaproteobacteria). Overall, viral tagging results for viral infection were consistent with plaque and liquid infection assays for cyanobacterial myo-, podo- and siphoviruses and some (myo- and podoviruses) but not all (four siphoviruses) heterotrophic bacterial viruses. Virus-tagged Pseudoalteromonas organisms were proportional to the added viruses under varied infection conditions (virus-bacterium ratios), while no more than 50% of the Synechococcus organisms were virus tagged even at viral abundances that exceeded (5 to 10×) that of their hosts. Further, we found that host growth phase minimally impacts the fraction of virus-tagged Synechococcus organisms while greatly affecting phage adsorption to Pseudoalteromonas. Together these findings suggest that at least two contrasting viral life strategies exist in the oceans and that they likely reflect adaptation to their host microbes. Looking forward to the point at which the virus-tagging signature is well understood (e.g., for Synechococcus), application to natural communities should begin to provide population genomic data at the proper scale for predictively modeling two of the most abundant biological entities on Earth. PMID:23111870

  3. Contrasting Infection Strategies in Generalist and Specialist Wasp Parasitoids of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Schlenke, Todd A; Morales, Jorge; Govind, Shubha; Clark, Andrew G

    2007-01-01

    Although host–parasitoid interactions are becoming well characterized at the organismal and cellular levels, much remains to be understood of the molecular bases for the host immune response and the parasitoids' ability to defeat this immune response. Leptopilina boulardi and L. heterotoma, two closely related, highly infectious natural parasitoids of Drosophila melanogaster, appear to use very different infection strategies at the cellular level. Here, we further characterize cellular level differences in the infection characteristics of these two wasp species using newly derived, virulent inbred strains, and then use whole genome microarrays to compare the transcriptional response of Drosophila to each. While flies attacked by the melanogaster group specialist L. boulardi (strain Lb17) up-regulate numerous genes encoding proteolytic enzymes, components of the Toll and JAK/STAT pathways, and the melanization cascade as part of a combined cellular and humoral innate immune response, flies attacked by the generalist L. heterotoma (strain Lh14) do not appear to initiate an immune transcriptional response at the time points post-infection we assayed, perhaps due to the rapid venom-mediated lysis of host hemocytes (blood cells). Thus, the specialist parasitoid appears to invoke a full-blown immune response in the host, but suppresses and/or evades downstream components of this response. Given that activation of the host immune response likely depletes the energetic resources of the host, the specialist's infection strategy seems relatively disadvantageous. However, we uncover the mechanism for one potentially important fitness tradeoff of the generalist's highly immune suppressive infection strategy. PMID:17967061

  4. Geographic distribution of non-clinical Theileria parva infection among indigenous cattle populations in contrasting agro-ecological zones of Uganda: implications for control strategies.

    PubMed

    Kabi, Fredrick; Masembe, Charles; Muwanika, Vincent; Kirunda, Halid; Negrini, Riccardo

    2014-09-01

    Non-clinical Theileria parva infection among indigenous cattle occurs upon recovery from primary disease during the first year of life. Continuous exposure to infection through contaminated tick infestations with absence of clinical disease gives rise to endemic stability. Endemic stable populations may become sources of infection if contaminated tick vectors are shared with susceptible exotic cattle. This study aimed at establishing a nationwide distribution of non-clinical T. parva infection among indigenous cattle populations to inform novel control strategies. The occurrence of non-clinical T. parva infection among apparently healthy 925 indigenous cattle from 209 herds spread out in 10 agro-ecological zones (AEZs) was determined using a nested PCR assay. The influence of AEZ, breed, sex, age and farmers' ranking of ECF importance were interrogated for influence of non-clinical parasite occurrence. The overall prevalence of non-clinical T. parva infection was 30% (278/925). A gradual increase of non-clinical T. parva infection was observed ranging from 17% (95% CI: 0.03-0.23) to 43% (95% CI: 0.3-0.55) in the North Eastern Savannah Grasslands (NESG) to the Western Highland Ranges (WHR) respectively. A similarly associated 18% (95% CI: 0.07-0.28) and 35% (95% CI: 0.3-0.39) non-clinical parasite prevalence was observed among the East African shorthorn Zebu (EASZ) and Ankole cattle respectively. Average herd level non-clinical T. parva prevalence was 28%, ranging from zero to 100%. The likelihood of non-clinical T. parva infection was 35.5% greater in the western highlands compared to the northeastern semi-arid AEZs. Non-clinical T. parva occurs countrywide, structured along patterns of AEZ and breed gradients. These findings may guide policy formulation, deployment of integrated control strategies and local cattle improvement programs.

  5. The Value of Contrast: Contrasting the Value of Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Erica C.; Putte, F. C. M. V.

    1988-01-01

    Analyzes the differences in usage of the Spanish preterite and imperfect by native speakers of Spanish and by nonnative speakers of Spanish whose first language is Dutch. Teaching strategies to enhance the learner's awareness of context and sequencing are suggested. (LMO)

  6. Functional foods and strategies contrasting bacterial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Signoretto, Caterina; Canepari, Pietro; Stauder, Monica; Vezzulli, Luigi; Pruzzo, Carla

    2012-04-01

    Antibacterial strategies targeting bacterial adhesion to substrates are considered a valuable alternative to traditional antibiotic therapy, in view of the great advantage they bring in combating the infectious process at the very early stage without selecting for drug resistant cells. Amongst bioactive compounds with activity against bacterial adhesion, several are found in natural food and beverages, such as cranberry, tea, coffee, wine and milk. For the analysis of their anti-infective potential, successful experimental models can be conducted using different substrates from the oral cavity. Studies conducted so far in this field allowed the discovery of a variety of anti-adhesive fractions and compounds proven to be effective against bacterial traits involved in the development of oral pathologies such as caries and gingivitis/periodontitis. Discovering new anti-adhesive compounds from natural products, unravelling and testing their prophylactic and therapeutic values, and improving their use in the general population are promising new frontiers in the global fight against human infectious diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Instruction in a Strategy for Compare-Contrast Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacArthur, Charles A.; Philippakos, Zoi

    2010-01-01

    Students learned a strategy for planning, writing, and evaluating compare-contrast essays. Instruction followed the principles of self-regulated strategy development, which aims to improve knowledge about writing, strategic writing processes, self-regulation, and motivation. Six adolescent students, 3 with learning disabilities in writing and 3…

  8. Photochemotherapeutic strategy against Acanthamoeba infections.

    PubMed

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Anwar, Ayaz; Shah, Muhammad Raza; Khoja, Shahrukh; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a protist pathogen that can cause serious human infections, including blinding keratitis and a granulomatous amoebic encephalitis that almost always results in death. The current treatment for these infections includes a mixture of drugs, and even then, a recurrence can occur. Photochemotherapy has shown promise in the treatment of Acanthamoeba infections; however, the selective targeting of pathogenic Acanthamoeba has remained a major concern. The mannose-binding protein is an important adhesin expressed on the surface membranes of pathogenic Acanthamoeba organisms. To specifically target Acanthamoeba, the overall aim of this study was to synthesize a photosensitizing compound (porphyrin) conjugated with mannose and test its efficacy in vitro. The synthesis of mannose-conjugated porphyrin was achieved by mixing benzaldehyde and pyrrole, yielding tetraphenylporphyrin. Tetraphenylporphyrin was then converted into mono-nitrophenylporphyrin by selectively nitrating the para position of the phenyl rings, as confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The mono-nitrophenylporphyrin was reduced to mono-aminophenylporphyrin in the presence of tin dichloride and confirmed by a peak at m/z 629. Finally, mono-aminoporphyrin was conjugated with mannose, resulting in the formation of an imine bond. Mannose-conjugated porphyrin was confirmed through spectroscopic analysis and showed that it absorbed light of wavelengths ranging from 425 to 475 nm. To determine the antiacanthamoebic effects of the derived product, amoebae were incubated with mannose-conjugated porphyrin for 1 h and washed 3 times to remove extracellular compound. Next, the amoebae were exposed to light of the appropriate wavelength for 1 h. The results revealed that mannose-conjugated porphyrin produced potent trophicidal effects and blocked excystation. In contrast, Acanthamoeba castellanii incubated with mannose alone and porphyrin alone did not exhibit an antiamoebic effect

  9. Photochemotherapeutic Strategy against Acanthamoeba Infections

    PubMed Central

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Anwar, Ayaz; Shah, Muhammad Raza; Khoja, Shahrukh

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a protist pathogen that can cause serious human infections, including blinding keratitis and a granulomatous amoebic encephalitis that almost always results in death. The current treatment for these infections includes a mixture of drugs, and even then, a recurrence can occur. Photochemotherapy has shown promise in the treatment of Acanthamoeba infections; however, the selective targeting of pathogenic Acanthamoeba has remained a major concern. The mannose-binding protein is an important adhesin expressed on the surface membranes of pathogenic Acanthamoeba organisms. To specifically target Acanthamoeba, the overall aim of this study was to synthesize a photosensitizing compound (porphyrin) conjugated with mannose and test its efficacy in vitro. The synthesis of mannose-conjugated porphyrin was achieved by mixing benzaldehyde and pyrrole, yielding tetraphenylporphyrin. Tetraphenylporphyrin was then converted into mono-nitrophenylporphyrin by selectively nitrating the para position of the phenyl rings, as confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The mono-nitrophenylporphyrin was reduced to mono-aminophenylporphyrin in the presence of tin dichloride and confirmed by a peak at m/z 629. Finally, mono-aminoporphyrin was conjugated with mannose, resulting in the formation of an imine bond. Mannose-conjugated porphyrin was confirmed through spectroscopic analysis and showed that it absorbed light of wavelengths ranging from 425 to 475 nm. To determine the antiacanthamoebic effects of the derived product, amoebae were incubated with mannose-conjugated porphyrin for 1 h and washed 3 times to remove extracellular compound. Next, the amoebae were exposed to light of the appropriate wavelength for 1 h. The results revealed that mannose-conjugated porphyrin produced potent trophicidal effects and blocked excystation. In contrast, Acanthamoeba castellanii incubated with mannose alone and porphyrin alone did not exhibit an antiamoebic effect

  10. Nonpharmacological Strategies to Prevent Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Eiam-Ong, Somchai

    2014-01-01

    Contrast-induced AKI (CI-AKI) has been one of the leading causes for hospital-acquired AKI and is associated with independent risk for adverse clinical outcomes including morbidity and mortality. The aim of this review is to provide a brief summary of the studies that focus on nonpharmacological strategies to prevent CI-AKI, including routine identification of at-risk patients, use of appropriate hydration regimens, withdrawal of nephrotoxic drugs, selection of low-osmolar contrast media or isoosmolar contrast media, and using the minimum volume of contrast media as possible. There is no need to schedule dialysis in relation to injection of contrast media or injection of contrast agent in relation to dialysis program. Hemodialysis cannot protect the poorly functioning kidney against CI-AKI. PMID:24795882

  11. Pharmacological Strategies to Prevent Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tasanarong, Adis

    2014-01-01

    Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is the most common iatrogenic cause of acute kidney injury after intravenous contrast media administration. In general, the incidence of CI-AKI is low in patients with normal renal function. However, the rate is remarkably elevated in patients with preexisting chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, old age, high volume of contrast agent, congestive heart failure, hypotension, anemia, use of nephrotoxic drug, and volume depletion. Consequently, CI-AKI particularly in high risk patients contributes to extended hospitalizations and increases long-term morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of CI-AKI involves at least three mechanisms; contrast agents induce renal vasoconstriction, increase of oxygen free radicals through oxidative stress, and direct tubular toxicity. Several strategies to prevent CI-AKI have been evaluated in experimental studies and clinical trials. At present, intravascular volume expansion with either isotonic saline or sodium bicarbonate solutions has provided more consistent positive results and was recommended in the prevention of CI-AKI. However, the proportion of patients with risk still develops CI-AKI. This review critically evaluated the current evidence for pharmacological strategies to prevent CI-AKI in patients with a risk of developing CI-AKI. PMID:24719848

  12. Contrast enhanced exposure strategy in multi-beam mask writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belic, Nikola; Hofmann, Ulrich; Klikovits, Jan; Martens, Stephan

    2013-03-01

    Since multi electron beam exposure has become a serious contender for next generation mask making, proximity- and process effect corrections (PEC) need to be adapted to this technology. With feature sizes in the order of the short-range blurs (resist and tool), contrast enhancements need to be combined with standard linearity corrections. Different PEC strategies are reviewed and compared with respect to their suitability for multi-beam exposure. This analysis recommends a hybrid approach that combines the benefits of shape- and dose PEC and is optimally applicable for multibeam exposure. Exposure results on the proof-of-concept 50keV electron multi-beam mask exposure tool (eMET POC) and a standard 50 kV vector shaped beam tool (VSB) are shown to verify that the combined PEC with overdose contrast enhancement covers the whole pattern range from isolated to opaque.

  13. Mosquito defense strategies against viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gong; Liu, Yang; Wang, Penghua; Xiao, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    Mosquito-borne viral diseases are a major concern of global health and result in significant economic losses in many countries. As natural vectors, mosquitoes are very permissive to and allow systemic and persistent arbovirus infection. Intriguingly, persistent viral propagation in mosquito tissues neither results in dramatic pathological sequelae nor impairs the vectorial behavior or lifespan, indicating that mosquitoes have evolved mechanisms to tolerate persistent infection and developed efficient antiviral strategies to restrict viral replication to non-pathogenic levels. Here, we provide an overview of recent progress in understanding mosquito antiviral immunity and advances in the strategies by which mosquitoes control viral infection in specific tissues. PMID:26626596

  14. Novel strategies to fight Candida species infection.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Maria Elisa; Silva, Sónia; Azeredo, Joana; Henriques, Mariana

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the incidence of human fungal infections. The increase in cases of infection caused by Candida species, and the consequent excessive use of antimicrobials, has favored the emergence of resistance to conventional antifungal agents over the past decades. Consequently, Candida infections morbidity and mortality are also increasing. Therefore, new approaches are needed to improve the outcome of patients suffering from Candida infections, because it seems unlikely that the established standard treatments will drastically lower the morbidity of mucocutaneous Candida infections and the high mortality associated with invasive candidiasis. This review aims to present the last advances in the traditional antifungal therapy, and present an overview of novel strategies that are being explored for the treatment of Candida infections, with a special focus on combined antifungal agents, antifungal therapies with alternative compounds (plant extracts and essential oils), adjuvant immunotherapy, photodynamic therapy and laser therapy.

  15. Two unlike cousins: Candida albicans and C. glabrata infection strategies

    PubMed Central

    Brunke, Sascha; Hube, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans and C. glabrata are the two most common pathogenic yeasts of humans, yet they are phylogenetically, genetically and phenotypically very different. In this review, we compare and contrast the strategies of C. albicans and C. glabrata to attach to and invade into the host, obtain nutrients and evade the host immune response. Although their strategies share some basic concepts, they differ greatly in their outcome. While C. albicans follows an aggressive strategy to subvert the host response and to obtain nutrients for its survival, C. glabrata seems to have evolved a strategy which is based on stealth, evasion and persistence, without causing severe damage in murine models. However, both fungi are successful as commensals and as pathogens of humans. Understanding these strategies will help in finding novel ways to fight Candida, and fungal infections in general. PMID:23253282

  16. Immunization strategies for Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Rebeaud, Fabien; Bachmann, Martin F

    2012-04-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is a major cause of nosocomial disease in Western countries. The recent emergence of hypervirulent strains resistant to most antibiotics correlates with increasing disease incidence, severity and lethal outcomes. Current treatments rely on metronidazol and vancomycin, but the limited ability of these antibiotics to cure infection and prevent relapse highlights the need for new strategies. A better knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of the disease, the host immune response and identification of key virulence factors of Clostridium difficile now permits the development of new products specifically targeting the pathogen. Immune-based strategies relying on active vaccination or passive administration of antibody products are the focus of intense research and, today, the efficacy of monoclonal antibodies and of two vaccines are evaluated clinically. This review presents recent data, discusses the different strategies and highlights the challenges linked to the development of immunization strategies against this emerging threat.

  17. Periprosthetic Knee Infection: Ten Strategies That Work

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, Priscilla Ku; Diaz-Ledezma, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the most serious complications following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The demand for TKA is rapidly increasing, resulting in a subsequent increase in infections involving knee prosthesis. Despite the existence of common management practices, the best approach for several aspects in the management of periprosthetic knee infection remains controversial. This review examines the current understanding in the management of the following aspects of PJI: preoperative risk stratification, preoperative antibiotics, preoperative skin preparation, outpatient diagnosis, assessing for infection in revision cases, improving culture utility, irrigation and debridement, one and two-stage revision, and patient prognostic information. Moreover, ten strategies for the management of periprosthetic knee infection based on available literature, and experience of the authors were reviewed. PMID:24368992

  18. Contrasting drought-response strategies in California redwoods.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Anthony R; Baxter, Wendy L; Wong, Christopher S; Næsborg, Rikke R; Williams, Cameron B; Dawson, Todd E

    2015-05-01

    We compared the physiology and growth of seedlings originating from different Sequoia sempervirens (D. Don.) Endl. (coast redwood) and Sequoiadendron giganteum (Lindl.) Buchh. (giant sequoia) populations subjected to progressive drought followed by a recovery period in a controlled greenhouse experiment. Our objective was to examine how multiple plant traits interact to influence the response of seedlings of each species and seed population to a single drought and recovery cycle. We measured soil and plant water status, leaf gas exchange, stem embolism and growth of control (well-watered) and drought-stressed (water withheld) seedlings from each population at the beginning, middle and end of a 6-week drought period and again 2 weeks after re-watering. The drought had a significant effect on many aspects of seedling performance, but water-stressed seedlings regained most physiological functioning by the end of the recovery period. Sequoiadendron seedlings exhibited a greater degree of isohydry (water status regulation), lower levels of stem embolism, higher biomass allocation to roots and lower sensitivity of growth to drought compared with Sequoia. Only minor intra-specific differences were observed among populations. Our results show that seedlings of the two redwood species exhibit contrasting drought-response strategies that align with the environmental conditions these trees experience in their native habitats, and demonstrate trade-offs and coordination among traits affecting plant water use, carbon gain and growth under drought. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. [Strategies for prevention of healthcare associated infection].

    PubMed

    Kramer, Axel; Assadian, Ojan; Exner, Martin

    2011-10-01

    In light of the hazard of healthcare associated infection (HAI) and pandemic increase of multiresistant pathogens the prevention and control of HAI by implementing infection control strategies in a structured and systemic manner are becoming increasingly important in order to assure patient safety.A well balanced implementation of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention in the format of a multibarrier concept together with surveillance of outcome measures are critical elements for a good hygiene practice. Criteria for structure-quality are optimal planned facility interieur supporting the clinical work-flow, adequate staffing of infection control practitioners and nurses, management of processes supporting infection prevention measures together with facility specific SOPs, and Surveillance and monitoring of the outcome together with feed-back to staff. Finally, any healthcare facility must be prepared for acute crisis such as outbreak management or management of critical incidences related to HAIs. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Establishment of Chronic Infection: Brucella's Stealth Strategy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Waqas; Zheng, Ke; Liu, Zheng-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Brucella is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes zoonotic infection known as brucellosis which results in abortion and infertility in natural host. Humans, especially in low income countries, can acquire infection by direct contact with infected animal or by consumption of animal products and show high morbidity, severe economic losses and public health problems. However for survival, host cells develop complex immune mechanisms to defeat and battle against attacking pathogens and maintain a balance between host resistance and Brucella virulence. On the other hand as a successful intracellular pathogen, Brucella has evolved multiple strategies to evade immune response mechanisms to establish persistent infection and replication within host. In this review, we mainly summarize the "Stealth" strategies employed by Brucella to modulate innate and the adaptive immune systems, autophagy, apoptosis and possible role of small noncoding RNA in the establishment of chronic infection. The purpose of this review is to give an overview for recent understanding how this pathogen evades immune response mechanisms of host, which will facilitate to understanding the pathogenesis of brucellosis and the development of novel, more effective therapeutic approaches to treat brucellosis.

  1. Establishment of Chronic Infection: Brucella's Stealth Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Waqas; Zheng, Ke; Liu, Zheng-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Brucella is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes zoonotic infection known as brucellosis which results in abortion and infertility in natural host. Humans, especially in low income countries, can acquire infection by direct contact with infected animal or by consumption of animal products and show high morbidity, severe economic losses and public health problems. However for survival, host cells develop complex immune mechanisms to defeat and battle against attacking pathogens and maintain a balance between host resistance and Brucella virulence. On the other hand as a successful intracellular pathogen, Brucella has evolved multiple strategies to evade immune response mechanisms to establish persistent infection and replication within host. In this review, we mainly summarize the “Stealth” strategies employed by Brucella to modulate innate and the adaptive immune systems, autophagy, apoptosis and possible role of small noncoding RNA in the establishment of chronic infection. The purpose of this review is to give an overview for recent understanding how this pathogen evades immune response mechanisms of host, which will facilitate to understanding the pathogenesis of brucellosis and the development of novel, more effective therapeutic approaches to treat brucellosis. PMID:27014640

  2. Alternative strategies for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Martijn P; van Dissel, Jaap T

    2009-03-01

    Although antibiotics are generally effective in achieving symptomatic recovery from Clostridium difficile infection, the disease frequently relapses, partly because antibiotics not only kill C. difficile, but also disrupt colonisation resistance of the gut microflora. Non-antibiotic strategies for the prevention and treatment of the infection include probiotics, deliberate colonisation by non-toxigenic C. difficile strains, toxin-binding agents, active immunisation, passive immunotherapy with intravenous immunoglobulin, monoclonal antibodies or bovine anti-C. difficile whey concentrate, and faecal transplantation. None of these alternative therapies has proven benefit in therapy or prevention, and prospective randomised trials are urgently needed.

  3. Combinatorial strategies for combating invasive fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Michaela; Robbins, Nicole; Wright, Gerard D

    2017-02-17

    Invasive fungal infections are an important cause of human mortality and morbidity, particularly for immunocompromised populations. However, there remains a paucity of antifungal drug treatments available to combat these fungal pathogens. Further, antifungal compounds are plagued with problems such as host toxicity, fungistatic activity, and the emergence of drug resistance in pathogen populations. A promising therapeutic strategy to increase drug effectiveness and mitigate the emergence of drug resistance is through the use of combination drug therapy. In this review we describe the current arsenal of antifungals in medicine and elaborate on the benefits of combination therapy to expand our current antifungal drug repertoire. We examine those antifungal combinations that have shown potential against fungal pathogens and discuss strategies being employed to discover novel combination therapeutics, in particular combining antifungal agents with non-antifungal bioactive compounds. The findings summarized in this review highlight the promise of combinatorial strategies in combatting invasive mycoses.

  4. Immunotherapeutic strategies to combat staphylococcal infections.

    PubMed

    Ohlsen, Knut; Lorenz, Udo

    2010-08-01

    Antibiotic-resistant staphylococci are the leading cause of nosocomial infections in many hospitals around the world. Meanwhile, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) spread also in the community where highly virulent strains infect healthy adults that have no predisposing risk factors. Although a few novel antibiotics have been recently introduced into clinical practice, the search for alternative strategies to efficiently combat staphylococcal infections is urgently demanded to decrease the enormous burden caused by pathogenic staphylococci. In particular, immunological strategies based on vaccine development or therapeutic antibodies may significantly enhance the efficiency of anti-staphylococcal therapy. Most approaches are directed against surface components of staphylococci such as cell wall-linked adhesins, teichoic acids, capsule, the biofilm component PIA/PNAG, or soluble virulence determinants such as alpha-toxin, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, or superantigenic enterotoxins. Although 2 recent clinical trials have failed, several novel promising vaccines and therapeutic antibodies are currently in preclinical and clinical development. Copyright 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Contrasting Strategies of Tree Function in a Seasonal Amazon Rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. Y.; Oliveira, R.; Agee, E.; Brum, M., Jr.; Saleska, S. R.; Fatichi, S.; Ewing, G.

    2015-12-01

    The increased frequency and severity of drought conditions in the Amazon Basin region have emphasized the question of rainforest vulnerability and resilience to heat and drought-induced stresses. However, what emerges from much research is that the impacts of droughts, essential controlling factors of the rainforest function, and variability of tree-scale strategies are yet to be fully understood. We present here a preliminary analysis of hydraulic relations of a seasonal Amazon rainforest using a set of ecohydrologic data collected through the GoAmazon project over dry and wet seasons. Expressions of different hydraulic strategies are identified that convey different implications for tree resilience during short- (diurnal) and longer-term (seasonal) stress periods. These hydraulic strategies appear to be inter-related with the tree growth and non-structural carbohydrate dynamics, contributing to the understanding of trait coordination at the whole-plant scale. Integration of individual responses is conducted over a range of wood density and exposure conditions. The results of this research thus shed light on the implication of variations in the rainforest function for future stresses, vital for predictive models of ecosystem dynamics of next generation.

  6. Metabolic profiles of sunflower genotypes with contrasting response to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum infection.

    PubMed

    Peluffo, Lucila; Lia, Verónica; Troglia, Carolina; Maringolo, Carla; Norma, Paniego; Escande, Alberto; Esteban Hopp, H; Lytovchenko, Anna; Fernie, Alisdair R; Heinz, Ruth; Carrari, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    We report a comprehensive primary metabolite profiling of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) genotypes displaying contrasting behavior to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum infection. Applying a GC-MS-based metabolite profiling approach, we were able to identify differential patterns involving a total of 63 metabolites including major and minor sugars and sugar alcohols, organic acids, amino acids, fatty acids and few soluble secondary metabolites in the sunflower capitulum, the main target organ of pathogen attack. Metabolic changes and disease incidence of the two contrasting genotypes were determined throughout the main infection period (R5.2-R6). Both point-by-point and non-parametric statistical analyses showed metabolic differences between genotypes as well as interaction effects between genotype and time after inoculation. Network correlation analyses suggested that these metabolic changes were synchronized in a time-dependent manner in response to the pathogen. Concerted differential metabolic changes were detected to a higher extent in the susceptible, rather than the resistant genotype, thereby allowing differentiation of modules composed by intermediates of the same pathway which are highly interconnected in the susceptible line but not in the resistant one. Evaluation of these data also demonstrated a genotype specific regulation of distinct metabolic pathways, suggesting the importance of detection of metabolic patterns rather than specific metabolite changes when looking for metabolic markers differentially responding to pathogen infection. In summary, the GC-MS strategy developed in this study was suitable for detection of differences in carbon primary metabolism in sunflower capitulum, a tissue which is the main entry point for this and other pathogens which cause great detrimental impact on crop yield.

  7. Contrasting movement strategies among juvenile albatrosses and petrels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grissac, Sophie; Börger, Luca; Guitteaud, Audrey; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2016-05-01

    Animal movement is a fundamental eco-evolutionary process yet the behaviour of juvenile animals is largely unknown for many species, especially for soaring seabirds which can range widely over the oceans at low cost. We present an unprecedented dataset of 98 juvenile albatrosses and petrels (nine species), tracked for the first three months after independence. There was a startling diversity within and among species in the type and scale of post-natal movement strategies, ranging from area-restricted to nomadic patterns. Spatial scales were clustered in three groups that ranged from <3000 km to >6000 km from the natal nest. In seven of the nine species, the orientation of flight paths and other movement statistics showed strong similarities between juveniles and adults, providing evidence for innate orientation abilities. Our results have implications for understanding the development of foraging behaviour in naïve individuals and the evolution of life history traits such as survival, lifespan and breeding strategy.

  8. Contrasting movement strategies among juvenile albatrosses and petrels

    PubMed Central

    de Grissac, Sophie; Börger, Luca; Guitteaud, Audrey; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Animal movement is a fundamental eco-evolutionary process yet the behaviour of juvenile animals is largely unknown for many species, especially for soaring seabirds which can range widely over the oceans at low cost. We present an unprecedented dataset of 98 juvenile albatrosses and petrels (nine species), tracked for the first three months after independence. There was a startling diversity within and among species in the type and scale of post-natal movement strategies, ranging from area-restricted to nomadic patterns. Spatial scales were clustered in three groups that ranged from <3000 km to >6000 km from the natal nest. In seven of the nine species, the orientation of flight paths and other movement statistics showed strong similarities between juveniles and adults, providing evidence for innate orientation abilities. Our results have implications for understanding the development of foraging behaviour in naïve individuals and the evolution of life history traits such as survival, lifespan and breeding strategy. PMID:27189182

  9. Contrasting movement strategies among juvenile albatrosses and petrels.

    PubMed

    de Grissac, Sophie; Börger, Luca; Guitteaud, Audrey; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2016-05-18

    Animal movement is a fundamental eco-evolutionary process yet the behaviour of juvenile animals is largely unknown for many species, especially for soaring seabirds which can range widely over the oceans at low cost. We present an unprecedented dataset of 98 juvenile albatrosses and petrels (nine species), tracked for the first three months after independence. There was a startling diversity within and among species in the type and scale of post-natal movement strategies, ranging from area-restricted to nomadic patterns. Spatial scales were clustered in three groups that ranged from <3000 km to >6000 km from the natal nest. In seven of the nine species, the orientation of flight paths and other movement statistics showed strong similarities between juveniles and adults, providing evidence for innate orientation abilities. Our results have implications for understanding the development of foraging behaviour in naïve individuals and the evolution of life history traits such as survival, lifespan and breeding strategy.

  10. Implementing best practice strategies to prevent infection in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Aragon, Daleen; Sole, Mary Lou

    2006-12-01

    Critically ill patients are at high risk for infection because of many factors. Quality and regulatory groups have published guidelines regarding infection prevention in the ICU. A multifaceted, multiprofessional team approach is necessary to develop and implement strategies to prevent infection in the critically ill patient. Bundles of intervention along with daily rounds an assessment are essential program components. Ongoing surveillance and re- education and reinforcement are also part of a strong infection prevention program.

  11. Root colonization dynamics of two ectomycorrhizal fungi of contrasting life history strategies are mediated by

    Treesearch

    Erik A. Lilleskov; Thomas D. Bruns

    2003-01-01

    -Here we investigated whether root colonization dynamics of ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) of contrasting life history strategies (i.e. early vs late successional dominants) were affected by resource availability, as mediated either directly via the soil, or indirectly via host nutrition. -In a two phase experiment, Pinusm muricata seedlings were co-...

  12. Contrasting water strategies of two Mediterranean shrubs of limited distribution: uncertain future under a drier climate.

    PubMed

    Lázaro-Nogal, Ana; Forner, Alicia; Traveset, Anna; Valladares, Fernando

    2013-12-01

    Plants have evolved different strategies to cope with drought, involving alternative ecophysiologies and different levels of plasticity. These strategies are critical for species of limited distribution, which are especially vulnerable to the current rates of rapid environmental change. The aim of this study was to assess the water strategy of two species with limited distribution, Cneorum tricoccon L. and Rhamnus ludovici-salvatoris Chodat., and evaluate their interpopulation variability along an aridity gradient to estimate their vulnerability to a drier climate. We measured different ecophysiological traits influenced by drought--stomatal conductance, maximum photochemical efficiency of photosynthesis II, carbon isotope ratio and chlorophyll concentration--in two climatically contrasting years, before and during summer drought. Both species were vulnerable to drought at the aridity limit of the gradient, but showed contrasting water strategies: while C. tricoccon was consistent in its water conservation strategy across the aridity gradient, R. ludovici-salvatoris was not, displaying higher and more variable stomatal conductances and being able to increase water-use efficiency at the most xeric sites. Changes in length and intensity of drought events may favor one species' strategy to the detriment of the other: C. tricoccon is more vulnerable to chronic and prolonged droughts, whereas short but acute droughts might have a stronger effect on R. ludovici-salvatoris. In those communities where these two species coexist, such different strategies might lead to changes in community structure under climate change scenarios, with unknown cascade effects on ecosystem functioning.

  13. Planning strategies for nosocomial infection control.

    PubMed

    Lacanna, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    According to the American Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 99,000 deaths per year in the United States are caused or impacted on by multiple hospital-acquired infections (HAIs), which are roughly estimated to be around 1.7 million cases. In Europe, there are 25,000 deaths per year from the same cause, 17.000 of which are linked to nosocomial infections. Patient safety is a core issue in today's health care settings. There is a growing consensus, supported by scientific investigation, that the role of the built environment is central towards minimizing and controlling the level of such infections. The contribution of architectural solutions and planning choices becomes crucial at this stage. This paper outlines the most common measures to adopt at the architectural and planning level, to combat HAI, focusing on the most critical areas of the hospital: wards, intensive care units and operating theatres.

  14. Radiographic Contrast-Media-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: Pathophysiology and Prophylactic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is one of the most widely discussed and debated topics in cardiovascular medicine. With increasing number of contrast-media- (CM-) enhanced imaging studies being performed and growing octogenarian population with significant comorbidities, incidence of CI-AKI remains high. In this review, pathophysiology of CI-AKI, its relationship with different types of CM, role of serum and urinary biomarkers for diagnosing CI-AKI, and various prophylactic strategies used for nephroprotection against CI-AKI are discussed in detail. PMID:24967281

  15. Adaptation strategies to climate change and climate variability: a comparative study between seven contrasting river basins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droogers, P.

    2003-04-01

    Climate change and climate variability is and will have a tremendous impact on hydrology and consequently on food security and environmental protection. From the four major components in climate change and climate variability studies, projection, mitigation, impact and adaptation, has the latter so far received less attention than the other three. An international collaboration of ten institutions is comparing adaptation strategies between contrasting basins ranging from wet to dry and from poor to rich. Basins included are: Mekong, Walawe (Sri Lanka), Rhine, Sacramento, Syr Darya, Volta, and Zayandeh (Iran). Simulation models at basin and field scale have been set up and possible adaptation strategies are explored by these models. Preliminary results indicate that appropriate adaptation strategies are different between these seven contrasting basins. It is also clear that these adaptation strategies should focus on increased variability rather than on the overall change of the mean. The focus was hereby not only on an increase in variation but especially on the number of successive dry and wet years. Results show that the studies on these adaptation strategies could not be performed only at one scale, but that a combination of field scale as well as basin scale analysis is essential.

  16. Synergy between twisted conformation and effective intermolecular interactions: strategy for efficient mechanochromic luminogens with high contrast.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wang Zhang; Tan, Yeqiang; Gong, Yongyang; Lu, Ping; Lam, Jacky W Y; Shen, Xiao Yuan; Feng, Cunfang; Sung, Herman H-Y; Lu, Yawei; Williams, Ian D; Sun, Jing Zhi; Zhang, Yongming; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2013-05-28

    A strategy towards efficient mechanochromic luminogens with high contrast is developed. The twisted propeller-like conformations and effective intermolecular interactions not only endow the luminogens with AIE characteristics and high efficiency in the crystalline state, but also render them to undergo conformational planarization and disruption in intermolecular interactions upon mechanical stimuli, resulting in remarkable changes in emission wavelength and efficiency. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Is nitrogen transfer among plants enhanced by contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies?

    PubMed

    Teste, François P; Veneklaas, Erik J; Dixon, Kingsley W; Lambers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) transfer among plants has been found where at least one plant can fix N2 . In nutrient-poor soils, where plants with contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies (without N2 fixation) co-occur, it is unclear if N transfer exists and what promotes it. A novel multi-species microcosm pot experiment was conducted to quantify N transfer between arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM), ectomycorrhizal (EM), dual AM/EM, and non-mycorrhizal cluster-rooted plants in nutrient-poor soils with mycorrhizal mesh barriers. We foliar-fed plants with a K(15) NO3 solution to quantify one-way N transfer from 'donor' to 'receiver' plants. We also quantified mycorrhizal colonization and root intermingling. Transfer of N between plants with contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies occurred at both low and high soil nutrient levels with or without root intermingling. The magnitude of N transfer was relatively high (representing 4% of donor plant N) given the lack of N2 fixation. Receiver plants forming ectomycorrhizas or cluster roots were more enriched compared with AM-only plants. We demonstrate N transfer between plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies, and a preferential enrichment of cluster-rooted and EM plants compared with AM plants. Nutrient exchanges among plants are potentially important in promoting plant coexistence in nutrient-poor soils.

  18. Contrasting clinical outcomes in two cohorts of cats naturally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)

    PubMed Central

    Bęczkowski, Paweł M.; Litster, Annette; Lin, Tsang Long; Mellor, Dominic J.; Willett, Brian J.; Hosie, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite over 25 years of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) research, relatively little is known about the longitudinal course of FIV infection following natural infection. In contrast to published reports of experimental infections using lethal strains of the virus, clinical signs of naturally acquired FIV infection can be mild or inapparent, rather than life-threatening. In this prospective, longitudinal controlled study, based in Chicago, IL (n = 17) and Memphis, TN (n = 27), we investigated two cohorts of privately owned, naturally infected cats kept under different housing conditions. Cats in the Chicago cohort (Group 1) were kept in households of ≤2 cats, while the Memphis cohort (Group 2) comprised part of a large multi-cat household of over 60 cats kept indoors only, with unrestricted access to one another. The majority of cats from Group 1 did not display clinical signs consistent with immunodeficiency during the 22-month observation period. In contrast, the outcome of infection in Group 2 was dramatically different; 17/27 (63%) of cats lost a median of 51.3% of their bodyweight (P < 0.0005) and died during the study period, with lymphoma being the most common cause of mortality. Although the decrease in CD4+ T cell count between enrolment and terminal disease was significant (P = 0.0017), the CD4:CD8 ratio at the time of enrolment did not reliably distinguish FIV-positive cats classified as ‘healthy’ and ‘not healthy’ at either cohort. FIV load at enrolment was significantly lower in Group 1 than in Group 2 (P < 0.0001), but there were no significant differences at enrolment between healthy and not healthy cats at either group. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that management and housing conditions impact on disease progression and survival times of FIV-positive cats. PMID:25595267

  19. Current drug discovery strategies against arenavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Pasquato, Antonella; Burri, Dominique J; Kunz, Stefan

    2012-11-01

    Arenaviruses are a large group of emerging viruses including several causative agents of severe hemorrhagic fevers with high mortality in man. Considering the number of people affected and the currently limited therapeutic options, novel efficacious therapeutics against arenaviruses are urgently needed. Over the past decade, significant advances in knowledge about the basic virology of arenaviruses have been accompanied by the development of novel therapeutics targeting different steps of the arenaviral life cycle. High-throughput, small-molecule screens identified potent and broadly active inhibitors of arenavirus entry that were instrumental for the dissection of unique features of arenavirus fusion. Novel inhibitors of arenavirus replication have been successfully tested in animal models and hold promise for application in humans. Late in the arenavirus life cycle, the proteolytic processing of the arenavirus envelope glycoprotein precursor and cellular factors critically involved virion assembly and budding provide further promising 'druggable' targets for novel therapeutics to combat human arenavirus infection.

  20. [Individualized treatment strategies for Clostridium difficile infections].

    PubMed

    Solbach, P; Dersch, P; Bachmann, O

    2017-07-01

    Upon hospitalization, up to 15.5% of patients are already colonized with a toxigenic Clostridium difficile strain (TCD). The rate of asymptomatic colonization is 0-3% in healthy adults and up to 20-40% in hospitalized patients. The incidence and mortality of C. difficile infection (CDI) has significantly increased during recent years. Mortality lies between 3 and 14%. CDI is generally caused by intestinal dysbiosis, which can be triggered by various factors, including antibiotics or immune suppressants. If CDI occurs, ongoing antibiotic therapy should be discontinued. The choice of treatment is guided by the clinical situation: Mild courses of CDI should be treated with metronidazole. Oral vancomycin is suitable as a first-line therapy of mild CDI occurring during pregnancy and lactation, as well as in cases of intolerance or allergy to metronidazole. Severe courses should be treated with vancomycin. Recurrence should be treated with vancomycin or fidaxomicin. Multiple recurrences should be treated with vancomycin or fidaxomicin; if necessary, a vancomycin taper regimen may also be used. An alternative is fecal microbiota transplant (FMT), with healing rates of more than 80%. Bezlotoxumab is the first available monoclonal antibody which neutralizes the C. difficile toxin B, and in combination with an antibiotic significantly reduces the rate of a new C. difficile infection compared to placebo. A better definition of clinical and microbiota-associated risk factors and the ongoing implementation of molecular diagnostics are likely to lead to optimized identification of patients at risk, and an increasing individualization of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches.

  1. Photonics-based strategies for minimally invasive cancer diagnosis using endogenous and molecular contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiantang

    Optical- and spectroscopic-based screening and imaging strategies possess unique advantages for minimally invasive cancer diagnosis. In this dissertation, we investigated how diagnostic results based on such techniques can be improved by the utilization of both endogenous and nanotechnology-facilitated molecular contrast. First, a diffusion-theory-based inversion reflectance model was constructed for the extraction of intrinsic tissue optical properties from the shape of normalized tissue diffusion reflectance spectra. The accuracy of our diffusion-based inversion algorithm was systematically assessed against Monte Carlo simulation as a function of probe geometry and tissue optical property combinations. By using this method, the spectral absorption and scattering coefficients of normal and cancerous tissue were efficiently retrieved within the center-to-center source-detector fiber separation of 0.5 mm ˜3 mm, which is compatible with endoscopic specifications. The presented inversion approach is computationally viable for eventual real-time in vivo tissue diagnostic applications. Second, novel quantum dot nanoparticle-based contrast agents were developed for molecular and tissue imaging applications in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) spectral ranges. Specifically, lead sulfide quantum dot bioconjugates were explored as NIR contrast agents for targeted molecular imaging; a protease-activated quantum dot probe was developed to monitor specific molecular targets and pathways through optical strategies; and a phantom study was conducted to assess the utilization of lead sulfide NIR quantum dots as fluorescent contrast agents for deep tissue imaging applications. These nanoengineered exogenous probes were shown to have the potential to significantly improve the implementation of optical/spectroscopic cancer imaging techniques. Taken together, the goal of the combined projects in this dissertation was to demonstrate that photonics-based minimally invasive cancer

  2. Biofilm infections, their resilience to therapy and innovative treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Römling, U; Balsalobre, C

    2012-12-01

    Biofilm formation of microorganisms causes persistent tissue and foreign body infections resistant to treatment with antimicrobial agents. Up to 80% of human bacterial infections are biofilm associated; such infections are most frequently caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacteria such as Escherichia coli. The accurate diagnosis of biofilm infections is often difficult, which prevents the appropriate choice of treatment. As biofilm infections significantly contribute to patient morbidity and substantial healthcare costs, novel strategies to treat these infections are urgently required. Nucleotide second messengers, c-di-GMP, (p)ppGpp and potentially c-di-AMP, are major regulators of biofilm formation and associated antibiotic tolerance. Consequently, different components of these signalling networks might be appropriate targets for antibiofilm therapy in combination with antibiotic treatment strategies. In addition, cyclic di-nucleotides are microbial-associated molecular patterns with an almost universal presence. Their conserved structures sensed by the eukaryotic host have a widespread effect on the immune system. Thus, cyclic di-nucleotides are also potential immunotherapeutic agents to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.

  3. Contrasting relatedness patterns in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) with different alliance strategies.

    PubMed

    Krützen, Michael; Sherwin, William B; Connor, Richard C; Barré, Lynne M; Van de Casteele, Tom; Mann, Janet; Brooks, Robert

    2003-03-07

    Male bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) in Shark Bay have one of the most complex male societies outside humans. Two broad mating strategies have been identified in males. In the first strategy, there are two types of alliances: stable 'first-order' pairs and trios that herd individual females in reproductive condition, and 'second-order' teams of two first-order alliances (five or six individuals) that join forces against rivals in contests for females. In the alternative strategy, a 'super-alliance' of ca. 14 individuals, males form pairs or trios to herd females, but in contrast to the stable alliances, these pairs and trios are highly labile. Here, we show that males in stable first-order alliances and the derived second-order alliances are often strongly related, so that they may gain inclusive fitness benefits from alliance membership. By contrast, members of the super-alliance are no more closely related than expected by chance. Further, the strength of the association of alliance partners within the super-alliance, as measured by an index of joint participation in consorting a female, was not correlated with their genetic relatedness. Thus, within one population and one sex, it appears that there may be simultaneous operation of more than one mode of group formation.

  4. Preston M. Hickey memorial lecture. Ionic and nonionic iodinated contrast media: evolution and strategies for use.

    PubMed

    McClennan, B L

    1990-08-01

    The search for better radiopaque iodinated contrast material for intravascular use is continuing, but the recent development of new lower osmolality contrast media (LOCM), both ionic and nonionic, has dramatically affected the practice of radiology. The major issue retarding the introduction of LOCM into clinical practice in this country has been the increased cost of the media. Numerous preliminary assumptions and probabilities about the tolerance, efficacy, and overall safety of LOCM have been documented in scientific studies. The lower osmolality, reduced chemotoxicity, and high hydrophilicity of new compounds, particularly the nonionic variety compared with conventional high osmolality ionic agents (HOCM), offer a significant margin of safety to patients with known risk factors. Mounting data suggest that low or no risk patients are benefited as well, perhaps to an even greater degree. Costly trade-offs to the universal use of LOCM exist, therefore careful consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of LOCM for intravascular administration is required. This article, presented as the Preston M. Hickey Memorial Lecture to the Michigan Radiological Society in March of 1990, explores the historical development of iodinated intravascular contrast media, especially LOCM, and cites existing data that form the basis for various strategies for their use, that is, selective, universal, or nonvascular use. Better, safer, and less expensive contrast media are a realistic expectation in this new decade of technological promise. Reducing adverse side effects from the use of any new drug or technology must be our continued, collective goal.

  5. Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) varieties adopt strongly contrasting strategies in response to drought.

    PubMed

    Ogbaga, Chukwuma C; Stepien, Piotr; Johnson, Giles N

    2014-10-01

    Sorghum is one of the most drought tolerant crops but surprisingly, little is known about the mechanisms achieving this. We have compared physiological and biochemical responses to drought in two sorghum cultivars with contrasting drought tolerance. These closely related cultivars have starkly contrasting responses to water deficit. In the less tolerant Samsorg 40, drought induced progressive loss of photosynthesis. The more drought tolerant Samsorg 17 maintained photosynthesis, transpiration and chlorophyll content until the most extreme conditions. In Samsorg 40, there was a highly specific down-regulation of selected proteins, with loss of PSII and Rubisco but maintenance of PSI and cytochrome b6 f, allowing plants to maintain ATP synthesis. The nitrogen released allows for accumulation of glycine betaine and proline. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of specific reengineering of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to drought. In contrast, in Samsorg 17 we detected no substantial change in the photosynthetic apparatus. Rather, plants showed constitutively high soluble sugar concentration, enabling them to maintain transpiration and photosynthesis, even in extremely dry conditions. The implications for these strikingly contrasted strategies are discussed in relation to agricultural and natural systems.

  6. Novel Prevention Strategies for Bacterial Infections in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Kathleen; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bacterial infections are a serious complication of cirrhosis, as they can lead to decompensation, multiple organ failure, and/or death. Preventing infections is therefore very relevant. Because gut bacterial translocation is their main pathogenic mechanism, prevention of infections is mostly based on the use of orally administered poorly absorbed antibiotics such as norfloxacin (selective intestinal decontamination). However, antibiotic prophylaxis leads to antibiotic resistance, limiting therapy and increasing morbidity and mortality. Prevention of bacterial infections in cirrhosis should therefore move away from antibiotics. Areas Covered This review focuses on various potentially novel methods to prevent infections in cirrhosis focusing on non-antibiotic strategies. The use of probiotics, nonselective intestinal decontamination with rifaximin, prokinetics and beta-blockers or fecal microbiota transplant as means of targeting altered gut microbiota, bile acids and FXR agonists are all potential alternatives to selective intestinal decontamination. Prokinetics and beta-blockers can improve intestinal motility, while bile acids and FXR agonists help by improving the intestinal barrier. Finally, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and statins are emerging therapeutic strategies that may improve immune dysfunction in cirrhosis. Expert Opinion Evidence for these strategies has been restricted to animal studies and proof-of concept studies but we expect this to change in coming years. PMID:26799197

  7. Zernike Phase Contrast Electron Cryo-Tomography Applied to Marine Cyanobacteria Infected with Cyanophages

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wei; Fu, Caroline; Khant, Htet A.; Ludtke, Steven J.; Schmid, Michael F.; Chiu, Wah

    2015-01-01

    Advances in electron cryo-tomography have provided a new opportunity to visualize the internal 3D structures of a bacterium. An electron microscope equipped with Zernike phase contrast optics produces images with dramatically increased contrast compared to images obtained by conventional electron microscopy. Here we describe a protocol to apply Zernike phase plate technology for acquiring electron tomographic tilt series of cyanophage-infected cyanobacterial cells embedded in ice, without staining or chemical fixation. We detail the procedures for aligning and assessing phase plates for data collection, and methods to obtain 3D structures of cyanophage assembly intermediates in the host, by subtomogram alignment, classification and averaging. Acquiring three to four tomographic tilt series takes approximately 12 h on a JEM2200FS electron microscope. We expect this time requirement to decrease substantially as the technique matures. Time required for annotation and subtomogram averaging varies widely depending on the project goals and data volume. PMID:25321408

  8. Contrastive prevalence of feline retrovirus infections between northern and southern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Miyazawa, T; Ikeda, Y; Sato, E; Nishimura, Y; Nguyen, N T; Takahashi, E; Mochizuki, M; Mikami, T

    2000-08-01

    The prevalence of infections with three feline retroviruses; feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline foamy virus (FeFV), was examined in domestic cats (Felis catus) and leopard cats (Felis bengalensis) in southern Vietnam in 1998. We then compared this data with our previous study in northern Vietnam in 1997. None of the cats had FeLV antigens in both the northern and southern areas. In contrast, there is a great distinction in the seropositivity of FIV. Twenty-two percent of domestic cats had FIV antibodies whereas no FIV positive cats were detected in northern area. FIV may have entered southern Vietnam recently and spread rapidly. FeFV infections were found in both areas, suggesting that FeFV might be present in the cat populations in Vietnam from the earliest time.

  9. The role of carbohydrates in infection strategies of enteric pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kentaro; Ishiwa, Akiko

    2015-03-01

    Enteric pathogens cause considerable public health concerns worldwide including tropical regions. Here, we review the roles of carbohydrates in the infection strategies of various enteric pathogens including viruses, bacteria and protozoa, which infect the epithelial lining of the human and animal intestine. At host cell entry, enteric viruses, including norovirus, recognize mainly histo-blood group antigens. At the initial step of bacterial infections, carbohydrates also function as receptors for attachment. Here, we describe the function of carbohydrates in infection by Salmonella enterica and several bacterial species that produce a variety of fimbrial adhesions. During invasion by enteropathogenic protozoa, apicomplexan parasites utilize sialic acids or sulfated glycans. Carbohydrates serve as receptors for infection by these microbes; however, their usage of carbohydrates varies depending on the microbe. On the surface of the mucosal tissues of the gastrointestinal tract, various carbohydrate moieties are present and play a crucial role in infection, representing the site of infection or route of access for most microbes. During the infection and/or invasion process of the microbes, carbohydrates function as receptors for various microbes, but they can also function as a barrier to infection. One approach to develop effective prophylactic and therapeutic antimicrobial agents is to modify the drug structure. Another approach is to modify the mode of inhibition of infection depending on the individual pathogen by using and mimicking the interactions with carbohydrates. In addition, similarities in mode of infection may also be utilized. Our findings will be useful in the development of new drugs for the treatment of enteric pathogens.

  10. Adaptive strategies in nocturnally migrating insects and songbirds: contrasting responses to wind.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Jason W; Nilsson, Cecilia; Lim, Ka S; Bäckman, Johan; Reynolds, Don R; Alerstam, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Animals that use flight as their mode of transportation must cope with the fact that their migration and orientation performance is strongly affected by the flow of the medium they are moving in, that is by the winds. Different strategies can be used to mitigate the negative effects and benefit from the positive effects of a moving flow. The strategies an animal can use will be constrained by the relationship between the speed of the flow and the speed of the animal's own propulsion in relation to the surrounding air. Here we analyse entomological and ornithological radar data from north-western Europe to investigate how two different nocturnal migrant taxa, the noctuid moth Autographa gamma and songbirds, deal with wind by analysing variation in resulting flight directions in relation to the wind-dependent angle between the animal's heading and track direction. Our results, from fixed locations along the migratory journey, reveal different global strategies used by moths and songbirds during their migratory journeys. As expected, nocturnally migrating moths experienced a greater degree of wind drift than nocturnally migrating songbirds, but both groups were more affected by wind in autumn than in spring. The songbirds' strategies involve elements of both drift and compensation, providing some benefits from wind in combination with destination and time control. In contrast, moths expose themselves to a significantly higher degree of drift in order to obtain strong wind assistance, surpassing the songbirds in mean ground speed, at the cost of a comparatively lower spatiotemporal migratory precision. Moths and songbirds show contrasting but adaptive responses to migrating through a moving flow, which are fine-tuned to the respective flight capabilities of each group in relation to the wind currents they travel within.

  11. Marriage Strategy of Structure and Composition Designs for Intensifying Ultrasound & MR & CT Trimodal Contrast Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Chen, Hangrong; Li, Pei; Bo, Xiaowan; Li, Xiaolong; Zeng, Zeng; Xu, Huixiong

    2015-08-26

    Despite great efforts having been devoted to the design of multimodal imaging probe, almost all design principles of nanotheranostic agents subordinate to simple assemblies of building blocks, resulting in complex preparation process and discounted ability, that is, 1 + 1 < 2. In this report, a novel design strategy, marriage of structure design and composition design that can maximize imaging ability of each building block, ultimately achieving 1 + 1 ≥ 2, has been established. Moreover, a high-efficient ultrasound (US) & MR & CT trimodal contrast agent acts as model to instantiate this design strategy, wherein nanoparticles-induced nonlinear scattering and rattle-type structure-induced double scattering enhancing US imaging, and uniform distribution of Mn(2+) paramagentic centers and "core-satellite" structure of Au atoms favoring enhanced MR imaging and CT imaging, respectively have been validated, achieving optimization of structure design. Importantly, the selected components, silica, Au and MnO are endowed with excellent biocompatibility, displaying the marriage strategy of composition design with aforementioned structure optimization. In in vivo evaluations, such a biocompatible trimodal probe is demonstrated of excellent performance in intensifying CT, MR and US imaging in vivo, especially after positively charged modification by PEI promoting more probes retained in tumor. More importantly, as a universal design strategy, the involved principles in constructing such a US&MR&CT trimodal imaging probe promise great potentials in guiding designs of other materials-based multimodal imaging probe.

  12. Isotopes reveal contrasting water use strategies among coexisting plant species in a Mediterranean ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Gutiérrez, Cristina; Dawson, Todd E; Nicolás, Emilio; Querejeta, José Ignacio

    2012-10-01

    Variation in the stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition (δ13C, Δ18O) of co-occurring plant species may reflect the functional diversity of water use strategies present in natural plant communities. We investigated the patterns of water use among 10 coexisting plant species representing diverse taxonomic groups and life forms in semiarid southeast Spain by measuring their leaf δ13C and Δ18O, the oxygen isotope ratio of stem water and leaf gas exchange rates. Across species, Δ18O was tightly negatively correlated with stomatal conductance (gs), whereas δ13C was positively correlated with intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi). Broad interspecific variation in Δ18O, δ13C and WUEi was largely determined by differences in gs, as indicated by a strong positive correlation between leaf δ13C and Δ18O across species The 10 co-occurring species segregated along a continuous ecophysiological gradient defined by their leaf δ13C and Δ18O, thus revealing a wide spectrum of stomatal regulation intensity and contrasting water use strategies ranging from 'profligate/opportunistic' (high gs, low WUEi) to 'conservative' (low gs, high WUEi). Coexisting species maintained their relative isotopic rankings in 2 yr with contrasting rainfall, suggesting the existence of species-specific 'isotopic niches' that reflect ecophysiological niche segregation in dryland plant communities. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Targeted Screening Strategies to Detect Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Children

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael Z.; Kawai, Vivian; Bowman, Natalie M.; Waller, Lance A.; Cabrera, Lilia; Pinedo-Cancino, Viviana V.; Seitz, Amy E.; Steurer, Frank J.; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan G.; Cordova-Benzaquen, Eleazar; Maguire, James H.; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

    2007-01-01

    Background Millions of people are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. Anti-trypanosomal drug therapy can cure infected individuals, but treatment efficacy is highest early in infection. Vector control campaigns disrupt transmission of T. cruzi, but without timely diagnosis, children infected prior to vector control often miss the window of opportunity for effective chemotherapy. Methods and Findings We performed a serological survey in children 2–18 years old living in a peri-urban community of Arequipa, Peru, and linked the results to entomologic, spatial and census data gathered during a vector control campaign. 23 of 433 (5.3% [95% CI 3.4–7.9]) children were confirmed seropositive for T. cruzi infection by two methods. Spatial analysis revealed that households with infected children were very tightly clustered within looser clusters of households with parasite-infected vectors. Bayesian hierarchical mixed models, which controlled for clustering of infection, showed that a child's risk of being seropositive increased by 20% per year of age and 4% per vector captured within the child's house. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) plots of best-fit models suggest that more than 83% of infected children could be identified while testing only 22% of eligible children. Conclusions We found evidence of spatially-focal vector-borne T. cruzi transmission in peri-urban Arequipa. Ongoing vector control campaigns, in addition to preventing further parasite transmission, facilitate the collection of data essential to identifying children at high risk of T. cruzi infection. Targeted screening strategies could make integration of diagnosis and treatment of children into Chagas disease control programs feasible in lower-resource settings. PMID:18160979

  14. Contrasting strategies for anoxic brain survival--glycolysis up or down.

    PubMed

    Lutz, P L; Nilsson, G E

    1997-01-01

    Anoxia-tolerant turtles and carp (Carassius) exhibit contrasting strategies for anoxic brain survival. In the turtle brain, the energy consumption is deeply depressed to the extent of producing a comatose-like state. Brain metabolic depression is brought about by activating channel arrest to reduce ion flux and through the release of inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the upregulation of GABAA receptors. Key glycolytic enzymes are down-regulated during prolonged anoxia. The result is a suppression of neurotransmission and a substantial depression in brain electrical activity. By contrast, Carassius remain active during anoxia, though at a reduced level. As in the turtle, there is an adenosine-mediated increase in brain blood flow but, in contrast to the turtle, this increase is sustained throughout the anoxic period. Key glycolytic enzymes are up-regulated and anaerobic glycolysis is enhanced. There is no evidence of channel arrest in Carassius brain. The probable result is that electrical activity in the brain is not suppressed but instead maintained at a level sufficient to regulate and control the locomotory and sensory activities of the anoxic carp. The key adaptations permitting the continued high level of glycolysis in Carassius are the production and excretion of ethanol as the glycolytic end-product, which avoids self-pollution by lactate produced during glycolysis that occurs in other vertebrates.

  15. Tuberculosis and HIV co-infection: screening and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Kartik K; Swaminathan, Soumya; Andrews, Jason R; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2011-06-18

    Globally, tuberculosis (TB) and HIV interact in deadly synergy. The high burden of TB among HIV-infected individuals underlies the importance of TB diagnosis, treatment and prevention for clinicians involved in HIV care. Despite expanding access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) to treat HIV infection in resource-limited settings, many individuals in need of therapy initiate ART too late and have already developed clinically significant TB by the time they present for care. Many co-infected individuals are in need of concurrent ART and anti-TB therapy, which dramatically improves survival, but also raises several management challenges, including drug interactions, shared drug toxicities and TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). Due to the survival benefits of promptly initiating ART among all HIV-infected individuals, including those with TB, it is recommended that co-infected individuals receive treatment for both diseases, regardless of CD4+ cell count. We review current screening and treatment strategies for TB and HIV co-infection. Recent findings and ongoing studies will assist clinicians in managing the prevention and treatment of TB and HIV co-infection, which remains a major global health challenge.

  16. Saprolegnia diclina IIIA and S. parasitica employ different infection strategies when colonizing eggs of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L.

    PubMed

    Songe, M M; Willems, A; Wiik-Nielsen, J; Thoen, E; Evensen, Ø; van West, P; Skaar, I

    2016-03-01

    Here, we address the morphological changes of eyed eggs of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L. infected with Saprolegnia from a commercial hatchery and after experimental infection. Eyed eggs infected with Saprolegnia spp. from 10 Atlantic salmon females were obtained. Egg pathology was investigated by light and scanning electron microscopy. Eggs from six of ten females were infected with S. parasitica, and two females had infections with S. diclina clade IIIA; two Saprolegnia isolates remained unidentified. Light microscopy showed S. diclina infection resulted in the chorion in some areas being completely destroyed, whereas eggs infected with S. parasitica had an apparently intact chorion with hyphae growing within or beneath the chorion. The same contrasting pathology was found in experimentally infected eggs. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that S. parasitica grew on the egg surface and hyphae were found penetrating the chorion of the egg, and re-emerging on the surface away from the infection site. The two Saprolegnia species employ different infection strategies when colonizing salmon eggs. Saprolegnia diclina infection results in chorion destruction, while S. parasitica penetrates intact chorion. We discuss the possibility these infection mechanisms representing a necrotrophic (S. diclina) vs. a facultative biotrophic strategy (S. parasitica).

  17. Therapeutic and prevention strategies against human enterovirus 71 infection

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Chee Choy

    2015-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (HEV71) is the cause of hand, foot and mouth disease and associated neurological complications in children under five years of age. There has been an increase in HEV71 epidemic activity throughout the Asia-Pacific region in the past decade, and it is predicted to replace poliovirus as the extant neurotropic enterovirus of highest global public health significance. To date there is no effective antiviral treatment and no vaccine is available to prevent HEV71 infection. The increase in prevalence, virulence and geographic spread of HEV71 infection over the past decade provides increasing incentive for the development of new therapeutic and prevention strategies against this emerging viral infection. The current review focuses on the potential, advantages and disadvantages of these strategies. Since the explosion of outbreaks leading to large epidemics in China, research in natural therapeutic products has identified several groups of compounds with anti-HEV71 activities. Concurrently, the search for effective synthetic antivirals has produced promising results. Other therapeutic strategies including immunotherapy and the use of oligonucleotides have also been explored. A sound prevention strategy is crucial in order to control the spread of HEV71. To this end the ultimate goal is the rapid development, regulatory approval and widespread implementation of a safe and effective vaccine. The various forms of HEV71 vaccine designs are highlighted in this review. Given the rapid progress of research in this area, eradication of the virus is likely to be achieved. PMID:25964873

  18. Coping With Stress Strategies in HIV-infected Iranian Patients.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Maryam; Dehdari, Tahereh; Shojaeezadeh, Davoud; Abbasian, Ladan

    2015-01-01

    Stress has significant adverse impacts on health outcomes of HIV-infected patients. Our study explored coping with stress strategies by HIV-infected Iranian patients. A qualitative content analysis study was conducted at the Consultation Clinic of HIV at the Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran in 2012. Twenty-six semi-structured in-depth interviews were done. Participants were asked about coping strategies for stress. After the first interview, continuous analysis of data was started and continued up to data saturation. Results showed that participants used two categories of strategies (emotion-based coping and problem-based coping) to cope with stress. Emotion-based coping had two sub-themes: adaptive and maladaptive. The problem-based coping category had three sub-themes: participation in education sessions, adherence to medication, and efforts to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Explanations of different strategies available to HIV-infected patients to cope with stress may help develop tailored interventions to improve the psychological conditions of people living with HIV. Copyright © 2015 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment Strategies for Human Arboviral Infections Applicable to Veterinary Medicine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-16

    0 Lf Reprintod from Tropical Veterinary Medicine : Current Issues and Perspectives 1• • Volume 653 of the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences...June 16, 1992 _ Treatment Strategies for Human = __ Arboviral Infections Applicable to I= ’ Veterinary Medicine = ! Chlh. MEIR KENDE (A) U •Department...A 3 0. C . U. 2 * >. U u U>1 it 020 ce*. 0. , -,r- 8 C- ed U a - .; U~u0.M KENDE: HUMAN ARBOVIRAL INFECTIONS AND VETERINARY MEDICINE 299 TABLE 2

  20. Genetic strategy to prevent influenza virus infections in animals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianzhu; Chen, Steve C-Y; Stern, Patrick; Scott, Benjamin B; Lois, Carlos

    2008-02-15

    The natural reservoirs of influenza viruses are aquatic birds. After adaptation, avian viruses can acquire the ability to infect humans and cause severe disease. Because domestic poultry serves as a key link between the natural reservoir of influenza viruses and epidemics and pandemics in human populations, an effective measure to control influenza would be to eliminate or reduce influenza virus infection in domestic poultry. The development and distribution of influenza-resistant poultry represents a proactive strategy for controlling the origin of influenza epidemics and pandemics in both poultry and human populations. Recent developments in RNA interference and transgenesis in birds should facilitate the development of influenza-resistant poultry.

  1. Ecosystem service benefits of contrasting conservation strategies in a human-dominated region.

    PubMed

    Eigenbrod, Felix; Anderson, Barbara J; Armsworth, Paul R; Heinemeyer, Andreas; Jackson, Sarah F; Parnell, Mark; Thomas, Chris D; Gaston, Kevin J

    2009-08-22

    The hope among policy-makers and scientists alike is that conservation strategies designed to protect biodiversity also provide direct benefits to people by protecting other vital ecosystem services. The few studies that have examined the delivery of ecosystem services by existing conservation efforts have concentrated on large, 'wilderness'-style biodiversity reserves. However, such reserves are not realistic options for densely populated regions. Here, we provide the first analyses that compare representation of biodiversity and three other ecosystem services across several contrasting conservation strategies in a human-dominated landscape (England). We show that small protected areas and protected landscapes (restrictive zoning) deliver high carbon storage and biodiversity, while existing incentive payment (agri-environment) schemes target areas that offer little advantage over other parts of England in terms of biodiversity, carbon storage and agricultural production. A fourth ecosystem service-recreation-is under-represented by all three strategies. Our findings are encouraging as they illustrate that restrictive zoning can play a major role in protecting natural capital assets in densely populated regions. However, trade-offs exist even among the four ecosystem services we considered, suggesting that a portfolio of conservation and sustainability investments will be needed to deliver both biodiversity and the other ecosystem services demanded by society.

  2. Contrasting energy allocation strategies of two sympatric Merluccius species in an upwelling system.

    PubMed

    Rey, J; Fernandez-Peralta, L; Quintanilla, L F; Hidalgo, M; Presas, C; Salmeron, F; Puerto, M A

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the somatic growth and energy allocation strategy of two sympatric hake species (Merluccius polli and Merluccius senegalensis), coexisting under the strong influence of the Mauritanian upwelling. The results revealed that ontogeny, bathymetry, geography and reproduction shaped the differences found between the condition dynamics of the two species. Aside from species-specific differences, individuals were observed in better condition in the northernmost area (more influenced by the permanent upwelling) and in the deepest waters, probably the most favourable habitat for Merluccius spp. Both species also displayed contrasting trade-offs in energy allocation probably due to the dissimilarity of their habitats, which favours the existence of divergent adaptive strategies in response to different ontogenic requirements. It was hypothesized that M. polli invests in mass and energy reserves while sacrificing growth, as larger sizes may not provide an ecological advantage in a deeper and more stable environment. Moreover, M. senegalensis capitalizes on a steady growth without major disruptions, enabling earlier spawning at the expense of a lower somatic mass, which is fitting to a less stable shallower environment. This study sheds new light on differences in the biological traits and life strategies of Merluccius spp., which permit their overlap in a complex upwelling system and may contribute to the long-lasting scientific-based management of these species.

  3. Strategies for Optimizing Water-Exchange Rates of Lanthanide-Based Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardena-Mahanama, Buddhima N.; Allen, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    This review describes recent advances in strategies for tuning the water-exchange rates of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Water-exchange rates play a critical role in determining the efficiency of contrast agents; consequently, optimization of water-exchange rates, among other parameters, is necessary to achieve high efficiencies. This need has resulted in extensive research efforts to modulate water-exchange rates by chemically altering the coordination environments of the metal complexes that function as contrast agents. The focus of this review is coordination-chemistry-based strategies used to tune the water-exchange rates of lanthanide(III)-based contrast agents for MRI. Emphasis will be given to results published in the 21st century, as well as implications of these strategies on the design of contrast agents. PMID:23921796

  4. Contemporary Diagnostic Strategies for the Detection of Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Elfant, Adam B.; Howden, Colin W.; Stollman, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is highly prevalent, affecting approximately half of the world’s population. While the majority of infected individuals are asymptomatic, H. pylori infection is associated with certain diseases, including peptic ulcers (either duodenal or gastric), gastritis, and 2 malignancies—gastric cancer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Many of the epidemiologic associations between these diseases and H. pylori infection have been further validated by treatment studies, which show that effective eradication therapy correlates with a decreased risk of disease. A variety of testing strategies are used to detect H. pylori infection. Serologic techniques are widely available and inexpensive, but they are no longer preferred as they have low sensitivities and specificities, and they may show a positive result for a long period following effective therapy. The remaining testing methods are divided into 2 categories: invasive tests (which require endoscopy) and noninvasive tests. Noninvasive test methods such as the urea breath test and stool antigen test have gained popularity due to their high sensitivities and specificities. Further, both of these methods may be used to confirm the absence of infection following eradication therapy. Due to the increasing incidence of treatment failure (caused in part by antibiotic resistance), post-treatment testing is recommended to confirm H. pylori eradication. PMID:24847180

  5. Epidemic spreading on random surfer networks with infected avoidance strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yun; Ding, Li; Huang, Yun-Han; Guan, Zhi-Hong

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we study epidemic spreading on random surfer networks with infected avoidance (IA) strategy. In particular, we consider that susceptible individuals’ moving direction angles are affected by the current location information received from infected individuals through a directed information network. The model is mainly analyzed by discrete-time numerical simulations. The results indicate that the IA strategy can restrain epidemic spreading effectively. However, when long-distance jumps of individuals exist, the IA strategy’s effectiveness on restraining epidemic spreading is heavily reduced. Finally, it is found that the influence of the noises from information transferring process on epidemic spreading is indistinctive. Project supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61403284, 61272114, 61673303, and 61672112) and the Marine Renewable Energy Special Fund Project of the State Oceanic Administration of China (Grant No. GHME2013JS01).

  6. Model-Based Simulation and Prediction of an Antiviral Strategy against Influenza A Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Kye-Yeon; Moon, Joon-Young; Kim, Seung-Hwan; Yoo, Joo-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    There is a strong need to develop novel strategies in using antiviral agents to efficiently treat influenza infections. Thus, we constructed a rule-based mathematical model that reflects the complicated interactions of the host immunity and viral life cycle and analyzed the key controlling steps of influenza infections. The main characteristics of the pandemic and seasonal influenza strains were estimated using parameter values derived from cells infected with Influenza A/California/04/2009 and Influenza A/NewCaledonia/20/99, respectively. The quantitative dynamics of the infected host cells revealed a more aggressive progression of the pandemic strain than the seasonal strain. The perturbation of each parameter in the model was then tested for its effects on viral production. In both the seasonal and pandemic strains, the inhibition of the viral release (kC), the reinforcement of viral attachment (kV), and an increased transition rate of infected cells into activated cells (kI) exhibited significant suppression effects on the viral production; however, these inhibitory effects were only observed when the numerical perturbations were performed at the early stages of the infection. In contrast, combinatorial perturbations of both the inhibition of viral release and either the reinforcement of the activation of infected cells or the viral attachment exhibited a significant reduction in the viral production even at a later stage of infection. These results suggest that, in addition to blocking the viral release, a combination therapy that also enhances either the viral attachment or the transition of the infected cells might provide an alternative for effectively controlling progressed influenza infection. PMID:23874556

  7. Infective endocarditis in patients on haemodialysis - possible strategies for prevention.

    PubMed

    Oun, Hadi A; Price, Andrew J; Traynor, Jamie P

    2016-05-01

    Infective endocarditis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients receiving haemodialysis for established renal failure. We carried out a prospective audit of patients developing infective endocarditis in a single renal unit. From 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2013, we collected data on all cases of endocarditis occurring in patients receiving haemodialysis at Monklands Hospital, Airdrie. Twenty-nine patients developed endocarditis during our audit period. Twenty-three (79.3%) of the patients had pre-existing cardiac valve abnormalities such as regurgitation or calcification. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common microorganism cultured from the blood of 22 patients (75.9%). MRSA bacteraemia was identified in eight of these patients and all eight patients died during that first presentation. Different strategies were introduced within the unit during the audit period aiming to reduce the rate of bacteraemia. Since 2011, a successful strategy has been introduced under the auspices of the Scottish Patient Safety Programme. This led to our Staph aureus bacteraemia rate related to non-tunnelled venous catheters going from an average of 15 days between episodes to having had no episodes between 2 December 2011 and the end of the study period (760 days). This also appears to have had a positive impact on reducing the rate of endocarditis. Infective endocarditis remains a devastating consequence of bacteraemia in patients receiving haemodialysis. An effective strategy aimed at reducing the rate of bacteraemia appears to have a similar effect on the rate of endocarditis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. A New Imaging Strategy Using Wideband Transient Response of Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Dustin E.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution clinical systems operating near 15 MHz are becoming more available; however, they lack sensitive harmonic imaging modes for ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) detection, primarily due to limited bandwidth. When an UCA is driven to nonlinear oscillation, a very wideband acoustic transient response is produced that extends beyond 15 MHz. We propose a novel strategy using two separate transducers at widely separated frequencies and arranged confocally to simultaneously excite and receive acoustic transients from UCAs. Experiments were performed to demonstrate that this new mode shows similar resolution, higher echo amplitudes, and greatly reduced attenuation compared to transmission at a higher frequency, and superior resolution compared to transmission and reception at a lower frequency. The proposed method is shown to resolve two 200 μm tubes with centers separated by 400 μm. Strong acoustic transients were detected for rarefaction-first 1-cycle pulses with peak-negative pressures above 300 kPa. The results of this work may lead to uses in flow and/or targeted imaging in applications requiring very high sensitivity to contrast agents. PMID:16245601

  9. Contrasting plasma free amino acid patterns in elite athletes: association with fatigue and infection

    PubMed Central

    Kingsbury, K. J.; Kay, L.; Hjelm, M.

    1998-01-01

    lower plasma creatine kinase activity in group C than in group B (p<0.05) and a low neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio in the athletes with viral infections (1.2 (0.17)), were found. (2) During post-Olympic light training, group A showed no significant amino acid changes. In contrast, group B recovered normal amino acid levels (glutamine 528 (41.4) micromol/l, histidine 76 (5.3) micromol/l, and total amino acids 2772 (165) micromol/l) (p<0.05 to p<0.001) to give a pattern comparable with that of group A, whereas, in group C, valine and threonine had increased (p<0.05), but glutamine (441 (24.5) micromol/l) and histidine (58 (5.3) micromol/l) remained low. Thus none in group A, two in group B, but ten (53%) in group C still had plasma glutamine levels below 450 micromol/l, including eight of the 11 athletes who had presented with infection. (3) With the additional protein intake, virtually all persisting low glutamine levels increased to above 500 micromol/l. Plasma glutamine rose to 592 (35.1) micromol/l and histidine to 86 (6.0) micromol/l. Total amino acids increased to 2761 (128) micromol/l (p<0.05 to p<0.001) and the amino acid pattern normalised. Six of the ten athletes on this protein intake returned to increased training within the three weeks. CONCLUSION: Analysis of these results provided contrasting plasma amino acid patterns: (a) a normal pattern in those without lasting fatigue; (b) marked but temporary changes in those with acute fatigue; (c) a persistent decrease in plasma amino acids, mainly glutamine, in those with chronic fatigue and infection, for which an inadequate protein intake appeared to be a factor. 


 PMID:9562160

  10. Variations in Strategies to Prevent Ventriculostomy-Related Infections

    PubMed Central

    Czeisler, Barry M.; Lord, Aaron S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The ideal strategy to prevent infections in patients with external ventricular drains (EVDs) is unclear. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of members of the Neurocritical Care Society on infection prevention practices for patients with EVDs between April and July 2015. Results: The survey was completed by 52 individuals (5% response rate). Catheter selection, use of prolonged prophylactic systemic antibiotics (PPSAs), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection policies, location of EVD placement, and performance of routine EVD exchanges varied. Antibiotic-impregnated catheters (AICs) and conventional catheters (CCs) were used with similar frequency, but no respondents reported routine use of silver-impregnated catheters (SICs). The majority of respondents were either neutral or disagreed with the need for PPSA with all catheter types (CC: 75%, AIC: 85%, and SIC: 87%). Despite this, 55% of the respondents reported PPSAs were routinely administered to patients with EVDs at their institutions. The majority (80%) of the respondents reported CSF collection only on an as-needed basis. The EVD placement was restricted to the operating room at 27% of the respondents’ institutions. Only 2 respondents (4%) reported that routine EVD exchanges were performed at their institution. Conclusion: Practice patterns demonstrate that institutions use varying strategies to prevent ventriculostomy-related infections. Identification and further study of optimum care for these patients are essential to decrease the risk of complications and to aid development of practice standards. PMID:28042365

  11. [Strategies for avoiding hepatitis B infection recurrence following liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Prieto, Martín; García-Eliz, María

    2014-07-01

    Hepatitis B is currently an excellent indication for liver transplantation due to the highly effective strategies of prophylaxis and treatment for recurrent hepatitis B infection. The combined administration of low-dose hepatitis B hyperimmune gamma globulin and a nucleoside/nucleotide analogue with a high genetic barrier to resistance, such as entecavir (except for patients with lamivudine resistance) or tenofovir, represents the standard for the prophylaxis of recurrent hepatitis B infection and is used in most centers. The drawbacks of long-term administration of hyperimmune gamma globulin have led to research on regimens in which this agent is withdrawn after a certain amount of time in combination treatment, a strategy that appears to be safe in patients with undetectable viremia at the time of liver transplantation if the patients adhere to the treatment. In recent years, there has also been research into regimens of gamma-globulin-free prophylaxis, based only on the administration of oral antiviral drugs, which appear to be safe if antivirals with a high genetic barrier to resistance are used. Hepatitis B prophylaxis should be maintained indefinitely; therefore, the total withdrawal of prophylaxis is not an accepted strategy at present in daily clinical practice if not in the context of a clinical trial. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Hatching strategies in monogenean (platyhelminth) parasites that facilitate host infection.

    PubMed

    Whittington, Ian D; Kearn, Graham C

    2011-07-01

    In parasites, environmental cues may influence hatching of eggs and enhance the success of infections. The two major endoparasitic groups of parasitic platyhelminths, cestodes (tapeworms) and digeneans (flukes), typically have high fecundity, infect more than one host species, and transmit trophically. Monogeneans are parasitic flatworms that are among the most host specific of all parasites. Most are ectoparasites with relatively low fecundity and direct life cycles tied to water. They infect a single host species, usually a fish, although some are endoparasites of amphibians and aquatic chelonian reptiles. Monogenean eggs have strong shells and mostly release ciliated larvae, which, against all odds, must find, identify, and infect a suitable specific host. Some monogeneans increase their chances of finding a host by greatly extending the hatching period (possible bet-hedging). Others respond to cues for hatching such as shadows, chemicals, mechanical disturbance, and osmotic changes, most of which may be generated by the host. Hatching may be rhythmical, larvae emerging at times when the host is more vulnerable to invasion, and this may be combined with responses to other environmental cues. Different monogenean species that infect the same host species may adopt different strategies of hatching, indicating that tactics may be more complex than first thought. Control of egg assembly and egg-laying, possibly by host hormones, has permitted colonization of frogs and toads by polystomatid monogeneans. Some monogeneans further improve the chances of infection by attaching eggs to the host or by retaining eggs on, or in, the body of the parasite. The latter adaptation has led ultimately to viviparity in gyrodactylid monogeneans.

  13. Competition between the invasive macrophyte Caulerpa taxifolia and the seagrass Posidonia oceanica: contrasting strategies

    PubMed Central

    Pergent, Gérard; Boudouresque, Charles-François; Dumay, Olivier; Pergent-Martini, Christine; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy

    2008-01-01

    Background Plant defense strategy is usually a result of trade-offs between growth and differentiation (i.e. Optimal Defense Theory – ODT, Growth Differentiation Balance hypothesis – GDB, Plant Apparency Theory – PAT). Interaction between the introduced green alga Caulerpa taxifolia and the endemic seagrass Posidonia oceanica in the Mediterranean Sea offers the opportunity to investigate the plausibility of these theories. We have accordingly investigated defense metabolite content and growth year-round, on the basis of an interaction gradient. Results When in competition with P. oceanica, C. taxifolia exhibits increased frond length and decreased Caulerpenyne – CYN content (major terpene compound). In contrast, the length of P. oceanica leaves decreases when in competition with C. taxifolia. However, the turnover is faster, resulting in a reduction of leaf longevity and an increase on the number of leaves produced per year. The primary production is therefore enhanced by the presence of C. taxifolia. While the overall concentration of phenolic compounds does not decline, there is an increase in some phenolic compounds (including ferulic acid and a methyl 12-acetoxyricinoleate) and the density of tannin cells. Conclusion Interference between these two species determines the reaction of both, confirming that they compete for space and/or resources. C. taxifolia invests in growth rather than in chemical defense, more or less matching the assumptions of the ODT and/or PAT theories. In contrast, P. oceanica apparently invests in defense rather than growth, as predicted by the GDB hypothesis. However, on the basis of closer scrutiny of our results, the possibility that P. oceanica is successful in finding a compromise between more growth and more defense cannot be ruled out. PMID:19077242

  14. Automated identification of retinal vessels using a multiscale directional contrast quantification (MDCQ) strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, Yi; Zhang, Xinyuan; Wang, Ningli E-mail: puj@upmc.edu; Gu, Suicheng; Meng, Xin; Zheng, Bin; Pu, Jiantao E-mail: puj@upmc.edu

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: A novel algorithm is presented to automatically identify the retinal vessels depicted in color fundus photographs. Methods: The proposed algorithm quantifies the contrast of each pixel in retinal images at multiple scales and fuses the resulting consequent contrast images in a progressive manner by leveraging their spatial difference and continuity. The multiscale strategy is to deal with the variety of retinal vessels in width, intensity, resolution, and orientation; and the progressive fusion is to combine consequent images and meanwhile avoid a sudden fusion of image noise and/or artifacts in space. To quantitatively assess the performance of the algorithm, we tested it on three publicly available databases, namely, DRIVE, STARE, and HRF. The agreement between the computer results and the manual delineation in these databases were quantified by computing their overlapping in both area and length (centerline). The measures include sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Results: For the DRIVE database, the sensitivities in identifying vessels in area and length were around 90% and 70%, respectively, the accuracy in pixel classification was around 99%, and the precisions in terms of both area and length were around 94%. For the STARE database, the sensitivities in identifying vessels were around 90% in area and 70% in length, and the accuracy in pixel classification was around 97%. For the HRF database, the sensitivities in identifying vessels were around 92% in area and 83% in length for the healthy subgroup, around 92% in area and 75% in length for the glaucomatous subgroup, around 91% in area and 73% in length for the diabetic retinopathy subgroup. For all three subgroups, the accuracy was around 98%. Conclusions: The experimental results demonstrate that the developed algorithm is capable of identifying retinal vessels depicted in color fundus photographs in a relatively reliable manner.

  15. Towards a new strategy for the diagnosis of congenital Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Abras, Alba; Muñoz, Carmen; Ballart, Cristina; Berenguer, Pere; Llovet, Teresa; Herrero, Mercedes; Tebar, Silvia; Pinazo, María-Jesús; Posada, Elizabeth; Martí, Carmen; Fumadó, Victoria; Bosch, Jordi; Coll, Oriol; Juncosa, Teresa; Ginovart, Gemma; Armengol, Josep; Gascón, Joaquim; Portús, Montserrat; Gállego, Montserrat

    2017-02-15

    The immigration of Latin American women of childbearing age has spread the congenital transmission of Chagas disease to non-endemic areas, and the disease is now a worldwide problem. Some European health authorities have implemented screening programs to prevent vertical transmission, but the lack of a uniform protocol calls for the urgent establishment of a new strategy, common for all laboratories. Our aims were (i) to analyze the trend of passive IgG antibodies in the newborn by means of five serological tests for the diagnosis and follow-up of congenital Trypanosoma cruzi infection, (ii) to assess the utility of these techniques for diagnosing a congenital transmission, and (iii) to propose a strategy for a prompt, efficient and cost-effective diagnosis of T. cruzi infection. In non-infected newborns, a continuous decreasing trend of passive IgG antibodies was observed, but none of the serological assays seroreverted in all the infants before 12 months. From 12 months onwards, serological tests achieved negative results in all the samples analyzed, with the exception of the highly sensitive chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA). In contrast, in congenitally infected infants, the antibody decline was only detected after treatment initiation. In order to improve the diagnosis of congenital T. cruzi infection, we propose a new strategy involving fewer tests that allows significant cost savings. The protocol could start 1 month after birth with a parasitological test and/or a PCR. If negative, a serological test would be carried out at 9 months, which if positive, would be followed by another at around 12 months for confirmation.

  16. Infection Strategies of Intestinal Parasite Pathogens and Host Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Di Genova, Bruno M.; Tonelli, Renata R.

    2016-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium sp., and Entamoeba histolytica are important pathogenic intestinal parasites and are amongst the leading causes worldwide of diarrheal illness in humans. Diseases caused by these organisms, giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, and amoebiasis, respectively, are characterized by self-limited diarrhea but can evolve to long-term complications. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of diarrhea associated with these three pathogens are being unraveled, with knowledge of both the strategies explored by the parasites to establish infection and the methods evolved by hosts to avoid it. Special attention is being given to molecules participating in parasite–host interaction and in the mechanisms implicated in the diseases’ pathophysiologic processes. This review focuses on cell mechanisms that are modulated during infection, including gene transcription, cytoskeleton rearrangements, signal transduction pathways, and cell death. PMID:26973630

  17. Contrasting drought tolerance strategies in two desert annuals of hybrid origin.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, David M; Stiller, Volker; Sperry, John S; Donovan, Lisa A

    2010-06-01

    Woody plants native to mesic habitats tend to be more vulnerable to drought-induced cavitation than those in xeric habitats. Cavitation resistance in herbaceous plants, however, is rarely studied and whether or not annual plants in arid habitats conform to the trends observed in woody plants is unknown. This question is addressed by comparing the hydraulic properties of annual plants endemic to relatively mesic and seasonally xeric habitats in the Great Basin Desert, in both native and experimental settings. Vulnerability to cavitation between species differed as predicted when vulnerability curves of similar-sized native individuals were compared. Contrary to expectations, Helianthus anomalus from the relatively mesic dune sites, on average, exhibited higher native embolism, lower soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance (k(L)) and lower transpiration rates, than its xeric analogue, H. deserticola. In transplant gardens, H. anomalus' vulnerability to cavitation was unaffected by transplant location or watering treatment. In H. deserticola, however, vulnerability to cavitation varied significantly in response to watering in transplant gardens and varied as a function of stem water potential (Psi(stem)). H. deserticola largely avoided cavitation through its higher water status and generally more resistant xylem, traits consistent with a short life cycle and typical drought-escape strategy. By contrast, H. anomalus' higher native embolism is likely to be adaptive by lowering plant conductance and transpiration rate, thus preventing the loss of root-to-soil hydraulic contact in the coarse sand dune soils. For H. anomalus this dehydration avoidance strategy is consistent with its relatively long 3-4 month life cycle and low-competition habitat. We conclude that variance of hydraulic parameters in herbaceous plants is a function of soil moisture heterogeneity and is consistent with the notion that trait plasticity to fine-grained environmental variation can be adaptive.

  18. Production and robustness of a Cacao agroecosystem: effects of two contrasting types of management strategies.

    PubMed

    Sabatier, Rodolphe; Wiegand, Kerstin; Meyer, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Ecological intensification, i.e. relying on ecological processes to replace chemical inputs, is often presented as the ideal alternative to conventional farming based on an intensive use of chemicals. It is said to both maintain high yield and provide more robustness to the agroecosystem. However few studies compared the two types of management with respect to their consequences for production and robustness toward perturbation. In this study our aim is to assess productive performance and robustness toward diverse perturbations of a Cacao agroecosystem managed with two contrasting groups of strategies: one group of strategies relying on a high level of pesticides and a second relying on low levels of pesticides. We conducted this study using a dynamical model of a Cacao agroecosystem that includes Cacao production dynamics, and dynamics of three insects: a pest (the Cacao Pod Borer, Conopomorpha cramerella) and two characteristic but unspecified beneficial insects (a pollinator of Cacao and a parasitoid of the Cacao Pod Borer). Our results showed two opposite behaviors of the Cacao agroecosystem depending on its management, i.e. an agroecosystem relying on a high input of pesticides and showing low ecosystem functioning and an agroecosystem with low inputs, relying on a high functioning of the ecosystem. From the production point of view, no type of management clearly outclassed the other and their ranking depended on the type of pesticide used. From the robustness point of view, the two types of managements performed differently when subjected to different types of perturbations. Ecologically intensive systems were more robust to pest outbreaks and perturbations related to pesticide characteristics while chemically intensive systems were more robust to Cacao production and management-related perturbation.

  19. Contrasting drought tolerance strategies in two desert annuals of hybrid origin

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, David M.; Stiller, Volker; Sperry, John S.; Donovan, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Woody plants native to mesic habitats tend to be more vulnerable to drought-induced cavitation than those in xeric habitats. Cavitation resistance in herbaceous plants, however, is rarely studied and whether or not annual plants in arid habitats conform to the trends observed in woody plants is unknown. This question is addressed by comparing the hydraulic properties of annual plants endemic to relatively mesic and seasonally xeric habitats in the Great Basin Desert, in both native and experimental settings. Vulnerability to cavitation between species differed as predicted when vulnerability curves of similar-sized native individuals were compared. Contrary to expectations, Helianthus anomalus from the relatively mesic dune sites, on average, exhibited higher native embolism, lower soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance (kL) and lower transpiration rates, than its xeric analogue, H. deserticola. In transplant gardens, H. anomalus’ vulnerability to cavitation was unaffected by transplant location or watering treatment. In H. deserticola, however, vulnerability to cavitation varied significantly in response to watering in transplant gardens and varied as a function of stem water potential (Ψstem). H. deserticola largely avoided cavitation through its higher water status and generally more resistant xylem, traits consistent with a short life cycle and typical drought-escape strategy. By contrast, H. anomalus’ higher native embolism is likely to be adaptive by lowering plant conductance and transpiration rate, thus preventing the loss of root-to-soil hydraulic contact in the coarse sand dune soils. For H. anomalus this dehydration avoidance strategy is consistent with its relatively long 3–4 month life cycle and low-competition habitat. We conclude that variance of hydraulic parameters in herbaceous plants is a function of soil moisture heterogeneity and is consistent with the notion that trait plasticity to fine-grained environmental variation can be adaptive. PMID

  20. Production and Robustness of a Cacao Agroecosystem: Effects of Two Contrasting Types of Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Sabatier, Rodolphe; Wiegand, Kerstin; Meyer, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Ecological intensification, i.e. relying on ecological processes to replace chemical inputs, is often presented as the ideal alternative to conventional farming based on an intensive use of chemicals. It is said to both maintain high yield and provide more robustness to the agroecosystem. However few studies compared the two types of management with respect to their consequences for production and robustness toward perturbation. In this study our aim is to assess productive performance and robustness toward diverse perturbations of a Cacao agroecosystem managed with two contrasting groups of strategies: one group of strategies relying on a high level of pesticides and a second relying on low levels of pesticides. We conducted this study using a dynamical model of a Cacao agroecosystem that includes Cacao production dynamics, and dynamics of three insects: a pest (the Cacao Pod Borer, Conopomorpha cramerella) and two characteristic but unspecified beneficial insects (a pollinator of Cacao and a parasitoid of the Cacao Pod Borer). Our results showed two opposite behaviors of the Cacao agroecosystem depending on its management, i.e. an agroecosystem relying on a high input of pesticides and showing low ecosystem functioning and an agroecosystem with low inputs, relying on a high functioning of the ecosystem. From the production point of view, no type of management clearly outclassed the other and their ranking depended on the type of pesticide used. From the robustness point of view, the two types of managements performed differently when subjected to different types of perturbations. Ecologically intensive systems were more robust to pest outbreaks and perturbations related to pesticide characteristics while chemically intensive systems were more robust to Cacao production and management-related perturbation. PMID:24312469

  1. Immunotherapeutic strategies in the treatment of HIV infection and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Birx, D L; Redfield, R R

    1993-08-01

    The immune response against HIV does not result in complete viral clearance. Recent interventions have focused on novel strategies to modify human anti-HIV immunity. Active vaccination of patients with HIV infection (vaccine therapy) safely alters the immune repertoire against HIV. This unique approach will provide insight into the immunoregulatory consequences of HIV-specific innate and adaptive immune responses, and hopefully define the immunological Achilles heel of HIV. Once defined, researchers, aided by current biotechnological techniques, can rationally design future vaccines and immune based therapeutic products.

  2. New molecular strategies for reducing implantable medical devices associated infections.

    PubMed

    Holban, Alina Maria; Gestal, Monica Cartelle; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2014-01-01

    Due to the great prevalence of persistent and recurrent implanted device associated-infections novel and alternative therapeutic approaches are intensely investigated. For reducing complications and antibiotic resistance development, one major strategy is using natural or synthetic modulators for targeting microbial molecular pathways which are not related with cell multiplication and death, as Quorum Sensing, virulence and biofilm formation. The purpose of this review paper is to discuss the most recent in vitro approaches, investigating the efficiency of some novel antimicrobial products and the nano-technologic progress performed in order to increase their effect and stability.

  3. Provoking "Eureka" moments for effective infection control strategies.

    PubMed

    Pittet, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Safety is now a fundamental principle of patient care and a critical component of quality management. Health care-associated infection prevention strategies need to be constantly revisited and updated to be effective. The "Geneva hand hygiene model" is a typical example of a breakthrough innovatory campaign that caught fire and went viral worldwide, thanks to its adoption by the World Health Organization (WHO) as the First Global Patient Safety Challenge. The campaign remains an inspiration for further innovation. To encourage new and disruptive technologies with the potential to improve patient safety through the successful implementation of the WHO multimodal strategy, the University of Geneva Hospitals/WHO Collaborating Centre on Patient Safety, together with the Aesculap Academy, have created a series of "Hand Hygiene Excellence Awards" and "Hand Hygiene Innovation Awards" worldwide.

  4. Contrasting strategies to cope with drought conditions by two tropical forage C4 grasses

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Juan Andrés; Pineda, Marcela; Jiménez, Juan de la Cruz; Vergara, Manuel Fernando; Rao, Idupulapati M.

    2015-01-01

    Drought severely limits forage productivity of C4 grasses across the tropics. The avoidance of water deficit by increasing the capacity for water uptake or by controlling water loss are common responses in forage C4 grasses. Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum) and Brachiaria hybrid cv. Mulato II are tropical C4 grasses used for livestock production due to their reputed resistance to drought conditions. However, there is scant information on the mechanisms used by these grasses to overcome water-limited conditions. Therefore, assessments of cumulative transpired water, shoot growth, leaf rolling, leaf gas exchange, dry mass production and a number of morpho-physiological traits were recorded over a period of 21 days under well-watered or drought conditions. Drought reduced shoot dry mass of both grasses by 35 %, yet each grass exhibited contrasting strategies to cope with water shortage. Napier grass transpired most available water by the end of the drought treatment, whereas a significant amount of water was still available for Mulato II. Napier grass maintained carbon assimilation until the soil was fairly dry, whereas Mulato II restricted water loss by early stomatal closure at relatively wet soil conditions. Our results suggest that Napier grass exhibits a ‘water-spending’ behaviour that might be targeted to areas with intermittent drought stress, whereas Mulato II displays a ‘water-saving’ nature that could be directed to areas with longer dry periods. PMID:26333827

  5. Genetic connectivity in the Florida reef system: comparative phylogeography of commensal invertebrates with contrasting reproductive strategies.

    PubMed

    Richards, Vincent P; Thomas, James D; Stanhope, Michael J; Shivji, Mahmood S

    2007-01-01

    Effective spatial management of coral reefs including design of marine protected areas requires an understanding of interpopulation genetic connectivity. We assessed gene flow along 355 km of the Florida reef system and between Florida and Belize in three commensal invertebrates occupying the same host sponge (Callyspongia vaginalis) but displaying contrasting reproductive dispersal strategies: the broadcast-spawning brittle star Ophiothrix lineata and two brooding amphipods Leucothoe kensleyi and Leucothoe ashleyae. Multiple analytical approaches to sequence variation in the mitochondrial COI gene demonstrated a high degree of overall connectivity for all three species along the Florida reef system. Ophiothrix lineata showed significant genetic structuring between Florida and Belize, and a pattern of isolation by distance but no significant genetic structuring along the Florida coastline. Bayesian estimates of migration detected a strong southerly dispersal bias for O. lineata along the Florida reef system, contrary to the general assumption of northerly gene flow in this region based on the direction of the Florida Current. Both amphipods, despite direct development, also showed high gene flow along the Florida reef system. Multiple inferences of long-distance dispersal from a nested clade analysis support the hypothesis that amphipod transport, possibly in detached sponge fragments, could generate the high levels of overall gene flow observed. However, this transport mechanism appears much less effective across deep water as connectivity between Florida and Belize (1072 km) is highly restricted.

  6. Andes virus infections in the rodent reservoir and in humans vary across contrasting landscapes in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Pérez, Fernando; Palma, R. Eduardo; Hjelle, Brian; Ferres, Marcela; Cook, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) is an emerging infectious disease first reported in Chile in 1995. Andes hantavirus (ANDV) is responsible for the more than 500 cases of HCPS reported in Chile. Previous work showed that ANDV is genetically differentiated in Chile across contrasting landscapes. To determine whether the reservoir rodent (Oligoryzomys longicaudatus) populations are also geographically segregated, we conducted range-wide spatial genetic analyses of O. longicaudatus in Chile using the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene. Given that landscape structure influences the incidence of hantavirus infections, we also tested 772 O. longicaudatus specimens for antibodies to ANDV captured during the period 2000 − 2006. Population genetic analyses of O. longicaudatus are largely congruent with those reported for ANDV, with the host primarily differentiated according to three defined ecoregions, Mediterranean, Valdivian rain forest and North Patagonian rain forest. Significant differences in the relative prevalence of anti-ANDV antibodies in rodent samples also were found across the three ecoregions. We relate these results to the number of reported human HCPS cases in Chile, and discuss the importance of landscape differences in light of ANDV transmission to humans and among rodent populations. PMID:19632357

  7. Sexually Transmitted Infections: Compelling Case for an Improved Screening Strategy.

    PubMed

    Hull, Stephen; Kelley, Seán; Clarke, Janice L

    2017-09-01

    Sexually Transmitted Infections: Compelling Case for an Improved Screening Strategy Stephen Hull, MHS, Seán Kelley, MD, MSc, and Janice L. Clarke, RN, BBA Editorial: Sexually Transmitted Infections-A Fixable Problem: David B. Nash, MD, MBA   S-3 Introduction   S-3 Rising Prevalence of Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STIs)   S-4 Current Screening Rates for Chlamydia and Gonorrhea   S-4 The Human Toll and Economic Burden of STI-Related Illness   S-5 Current Screening Guidelines for Chlamydia and Gonorrhea   S-5 Factors Contributing to Inadequate Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment for STIs   S-6 Methods Used to Improve Screening Rates   S-7 Benefits of Opt-Out Screening Strategies for STIs   S-8 Cost-Effectiveness of Screening for STIs   S-8 Discussion   S-9 Conclusion   S-10.

  8. Grapevine Pathogenic Microorganisms: Understanding Infection Strategies and Host Response Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Armijo, Grace; Schlechter, Rudolf; Agurto, Mario; Muñoz, Daniela; Nuñez, Constanza; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2016-01-01

    Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) is one of the most important fruit crop worldwide. Commercial cultivars are greatly affected by a large number of pathogenic microorganisms that cause diseases during pre- and/or post-harvest periods, affecting production, processing and export, along with fruit quality. Among the potential threats, we can find bacteria, fungi, oomycete, or viruses with different life cycles, infection mechanisms and evasion strategies. While plant–pathogen interactions are cycles of resistance and susceptibility, resistance traits from natural resources are selected and may be used for breeding purposes and for a sustainable agriculture. In this context, here we summarize some of the most important diseases affecting V. vinifera together with their causal agents. The aim of this work is to bring a comprehensive review of the infection strategies deployed by significant types of pathogens while understanding the host response in both resistance and susceptibility scenarios. New approaches being used to uncover grapevine status during biotic stresses and scientific-based procedures needed to control plant diseases and crop protection are also addressed. PMID:27066032

  9. Pestilence, persistence and pathogenicity: infection strategies of Bartonella

    PubMed Central

    Minnick, Michael F; Battisti, James M

    2009-01-01

    It has been nearly two decades since the discovery of Bartonella as an agent of bacillary angiomatosis in AIDS patients and persistent bacteremia and ‘nonculturable’ endocarditis in homeless people. Since that time, the number of Bartonella species identified has increased from one to 24, and 10 of these bacteria are associated with human disease. Although Bartonella is the only genus that infects human erythrocytes and triggers pathological angiogenesis in the vascular bed, the group remains understudied compared with most other bacterial pathogens. Numerous questions regarding Bartonella's molecular pathogenesis and epidemiology remain unanswered. Virtually every mammal harbors one or more Bartonella species and their transmission typically involves a hematophagous arthropod vector. However, many details regarding epidemiology and the public health threat imposed by these animal reservoirs is unclear. A handful of studies have shown that bartonellae are highly-adapted pathogens whose parasitic strategy has evolved to cause persistent infections of the host. To this end, virulence attributes of Bartonella include the subversion of host cells with effector molecules delivered via a type IV secretion system, induction of pathological angiogenesis through various means, including inhibition of apoptosis and activation of hypoxia-inducing factor 1, use of afimbrial adhesins that are orthologs of Yersinia adhesin A, incorporation of lipopolysaccharides with low endotoxic potency in the outer membrane, and several other virulence factors that help Bartonella infect and persist in erythrocytes and endothelial cells of the host circulatory system. PMID:19659429

  10. Strategies used by helicobacter pylori to establish persistent infection

    PubMed Central

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram-negative and motile bacterium that colonizes the hostile microniche of the human stomach, then persists for the host’s entire life, if not effectively treated. Clinically, H. pylori plays a causative role in the development of a wide spectrum of diseases including chronic active gastritis, peptic ulceration, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Due to the global distribution of H. pylori, it is no exaggeration to conclude that smart strategies are contributing to adaptation of the bacterium to its permanent host. Thirty-four years after the discovery of this bacterium, there are still many unanswered questions. For example, which strategies help the bacterium to survive in this inhospitable microniche? This question is slightly easier to answer if we presume the same clinical concept for both persistent infection and disease. Understanding the mechanisms governing H. pylori persistence will improve identification of the increased risk of diseases such as gastric cancer in patients infected with this bacterium. A well-defined and long-term equilibrium between the human host and H. pylori allows bacterial persistence in the gastric microniche; although this coexistence leads to a high risk of severe diseases such as gastric cancer. To escape the bactericidal activity of stomach acid, H. pylori secretes large amounts of surface-associated and cytosolic urease. The potential to avoid acidic conditions and immune evasion are discussed in order to explain the persistence of H. pylori colonization in the gastric mucosa, and data on bacterial genetic diversity are included. Information on the mechanisms related to H. pylori persistence can also provide the direction for future research concerning effective therapy and management of gastroduodenal disorders. The topics presented in the current review are important for elucidating the strategies used by H. pylori to help the bacterium

  11. Different patterns of oviposition learning in two closely related ectoparasitoid wasps with contrasting reproductive strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasakawa, Kôji; Uchijima, Kenta; Shibao, Harunobu; Shimada, Masakazu

    2013-02-01

    Many parasitoid wasps learn host-associated cues and use them in subsequent host-searching behavior. This associative learning, namely "oviposition learning," has been investigated in many studies. However, few studies have compared multiple species, and no comparative study has previously been conducted on ectoparasitoid species. We compared the effects of oviposition learning on host preference and offspring sex ratio in two closely related ectoparasitoid wasps with contrasting reproductive strategies, Anisopteromalus calandrae (r-strategist) and its sibling species (K-strategist). Using two bruchine hosts, Callosobruchus chinensis and Callosobruchus maculatus larvae infesting the cowpea Vigna unguiculata, oviposition choice experiments were performed at high and low host densities. In both species, no conspicuous effect on the offspring sex ratio was detected, but effects on host preference were found to differ between the species. In A. calandrae, the effects were detected only at high host density, suggesting that oviposition learning plays a role in host discrimination from a short distance but not from a long distance. In the sibling species, those effects were not detected in any of the cases, suggesting the absence of oviposition learning. These results are compatible with those of previous comparative studies of endoparasitoid wasps in that few lifetime oviposition experiences and/or low reward per foraging decision result in low or absent oviposition learning ability. This finding may indicate that ecological traits contributing to learning ability are similar between endoparasitoid and ectoparasitoid wasps. Thus, our species comparison of ectoparasitoids provides another model system for investigating learning and memory dynamics in parasitoid wasps.

  12. Different patterns of oviposition learning in two closely related ectoparasitoid wasps with contrasting reproductive strategies.

    PubMed

    Sasakawa, Kôji; Uchijima, Kenta; Shibao, Harunobu; Shimada, Masakazu

    2013-02-01

    Many parasitoid wasps learn host-associated cues and use them in subsequent host-searching behavior. This associative learning, namely "oviposition learning," has been investigated in many studies. However, few studies have compared multiple species, and no comparative study has previously been conducted on ectoparasitoid species. We compared the effects of oviposition learning on host preference and offspring sex ratio in two closely related ectoparasitoid wasps with contrasting reproductive strategies, Anisopteromalus calandrae (r-strategist) and its sibling species (K-strategist). Using two bruchine hosts, Callosobruchus chinensis and Callosobruchus maculatus larvae infesting the cowpea Vigna unguiculata, oviposition choice experiments were performed at high and low host densities. In both species, no conspicuous effect on the offspring sex ratio was detected, but effects on host preference were found to differ between the species. In A. calandrae, the effects were detected only at high host density, suggesting that oviposition learning plays a role in host discrimination from a short distance but not from a long distance. In the sibling species, those effects were not detected in any of the cases, suggesting the absence of oviposition learning. These results are compatible with those of previous comparative studies of endoparasitoid wasps in that few lifetime oviposition experiences and/or low reward per foraging decision result in low or absent oviposition learning ability. This finding may indicate that ecological traits contributing to learning ability are similar between endoparasitoid and ectoparasitoid wasps. Thus, our species comparison of ectoparasitoids provides another model system for investigating learning and memory dynamics in parasitoid wasps.

  13. Different biomechanical design and ecophysiological strategies in juveniles of two liana species with contrasting growth habit.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Jun; Bongers, Frans; Zhang, Jiao-Lin; Liu, Jin-Yu; Cao, Kun-Fang

    2014-06-01

    • Premise of the study: Lianas constitute a major functional type in tropical zones. While some liana species start climbing immediately after germination (shade-avoidance), others have a long self-supporting phase (shade-tolerance). The morphophysiological characteristics of these two growth habits are unknown.• Methods: We quantified growth traits, biomass allocation, mechanics, anatomy, and hydraulics for saplings of Ventilago calyculata (an immediate obligate climber) and Ziziphus attopensis (having a long self-supporting phase), both in the family Rhamnaceae. The mechanics, anatomy, and hydraulics for the mature individuals of the two species were also evaluated.• Key results: In the juvenile stage, V. calyculata had a higher slenderness ratio, height growth rate, and photosynthetic rate but similar biomass growth rate compared with Z. attopensis. In contrast, Z. attopensis had a higher leaf area growth rate, specific leaf area, and leaf mass fraction. Ziziphus attopensis had stiffer, but less conductive stems than V. calyculata. Stem rigidity of saplings decreased from base to apex in Z. attopensis, but increased in V. calyculata. Both species had similar resistance to xylem embolism. However, the leaves of V. calyculata were able to resist greater water deficits. At the mature stage, wider and longer vessels emerged in the xylem, and both species increased stem specific conductivity and drought resistance in stems and leaves. Ventilago calyculata had significantly higher specific conductivity and was more drought tolerant than Z. attopensis.• Conclusions: The two lianas differed significantly in growth, biomass allocation, anatomy, mechanics, ecophysiology, and hydraulic properties in line with their growth habits and shade adaptation strategies.

  14. Monitoring strategies of stream phosphorus under contrasting climate-driven flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyenola, G.; Meerhoff, M.; Teixeira-de Mello, F.; González-Bergonzoni, I.; Graeber, D.; Fosalba, C.; Vidal, N.; Mazzeo, N.; Ovesen, N. B.; Jeppesen, E.; Kronvang, B.

    2015-10-01

    Climate and hydrology are relevant control factors determining the timing and amount of nutrient losses from land to downstream aquatic systems, in particular of phosphorus (P) from agricultural lands. The main objective of the study was to evaluate the differences in P export patterns and the performance of alternative monitoring strategies in streams under contrasting climate-driven flow regimes. We compared a set of paired streams draining lowland micro-catchments under temperate climate and stable discharge conditions (Denmark) and under sub-tropical climate and flashy conditions (Uruguay). We applied two alternative nutrient sampling programs (high-frequency composite sampling and low-frequency instantaneous-grab sampling) and estimated the contribution derived from point and diffuse sources fitting a source apportionment model. We expected to detect a pattern of higher total and particulate phosphorus export from diffuse sources in streams in Uruguay streams, mostly as a consequence of higher variability in flow regime (higher flashiness). Contrarily, we found a higher contribution of dissolved P in flashy streams. We did not find a notably poorer performance of the low-frequency sampling program to estimate P exports in flashy streams compared to the less variable streams. We also found signs of interaction between climate/hydrology and land use intensity, in particular in the presence of point sources of P, leading to a bias towards underestimation of P in hydrologically stable streams and overestimation of P in flashy streams. Based on our findings, we suggest that the evaluation and use of more accurate monitoring methods, such as automatized flow-proportional water samplers and automatized bankside analyzers, should be prioritized whenever logistically possible. However, it seems particularly relevant in currently flashy systems and also in systems where climate change predictions suggest an increase in stream flashiness.

  15. Carbon rhizodeposition by plants of contrasting strategies for resource acquisition: responses to various nitrogen fertility regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptist, Florence; Aranjuelo, I.; Lopez-Sangil, L.; Rovia, P.; Nogués, S.

    2010-05-01

    Rhizodeposition by plants is one of the most important physiological mechanisms related to carbon and nitrogen cycling which is also believed to vary along the acquisition-conservation continuum. However, owing to methodological difficulties (i.e. narrow zone of soil around roots and rapid assimilation by soil microbes), root exudation and variations between species are one of the most poorly understood belowground process. Although previous approaches such as hydroponic culture based system, permit the chemical analysis of exudates, the fact that this protocol is qualitative, conditions its utility (see review in Phillips et al. 2008). Others techniques based on pulse-labelling approach have been developed to quantify rhizodeposition but are rarely sufficient to uniformly label all plant inputs to soil. Consequently with this typical pulse chase methods, recent assimilates are labeled but the recalcitrant carbon will not be labeled and therefore the contribution of this carbon will not be considered. Hence, traditional pulse labelling is not a quantitative means of tracing carbon due to inhomogeneous labelling and so limits greatly comparative studies of rhizodeposition fluxes at the interspecific level. In this study we developped a new protocole based on a long-term (3 months) steady state 13C labelling in order (1) to quantify rhizodeposition fluxes for six graminoid species caracterized by contrasted nutrient acquisition strategies and (2) to investigate to what extent various level of nitrogen fertility regimes modulate rhizodeposition fluxes. This method will enable to quantify under natural soil conditions both the accumulation of 13C in the soil but also the quantity that has been respired by the microorganisms during a given time and so will give an integrated picture of rhizodeposition fluxes for each species under each nitrogen fertility level. Results are currently being processed and will be presented at the conference. References: Phillips RP, Erlitz

  16. Comparing ecosystem engineering efficiency of two plant species with contrasting growth strategies.

    PubMed

    Bouma, T J; De Vries, M B; Herman, P M J

    2010-09-01

    Many ecosystems are greatly affected by ecosystem engineering, such as coastal salt marshes, where macrophytes trap sediment by reducing hydrodynamic energy. Nevertheless, little is known about the costs and benefits that are imposed on engineering species by the traits that underlie their ecosystem engineering capacity. We addressed this topic by comparing ecosystem engineering efficiency defined as the benefit-cost ratio per unit of biomass investment for two species from the intertidal habitat: the stiff grass Spartina anglica and the flexible grass Puccinellia maritima. These species were selected for their ability to modify their habitat by trapping large quantities of sediment despite their contrasting growth form. On a biomass basis, dissipation of hydrodynamic energy from waves (a proxy for benefits associated with ecosystem engineering capability as it relates to the sediment trapping capability) was strikingly similar for both salt marsh species, indicating that both species are equally effective in modifying their habitat. The drag forces per unit biomass (a proxy for costs associated with ecosystem engineering ability as it relates to the requirements on tissue construction and shoot anchoring to prevent breaking and/or washing away) were slightly higher in the species with flexible shoots. As a result, stiff Spartina vegetation had slightly higher ecosystem engineering efficiency, due to lower engineering costs rather than to a higher engineering effect. Thus, Spartina is a slightly more efficient rather than a more effective ecosystem engineer. Ecosystem engineering efficiency was found to be a species-specific characteristic, independent of vegetation density and relatively constant in space. Analyzing ecosystem engineering by quantifying trade-offs offers a useful way toward developing a better understanding of different engineering strategies.

  17. Drought stress tolerance strategies revealed by RNA-Seq in two sorghum genotypes with contrasting WUE.

    PubMed

    Fracasso, Alessandra; Trindade, Luisa M; Amaducci, Stefano

    2016-05-21

    Drought stress is the major environmental stress that affects plant growth and productivity. It triggers a wide range of responses detectable at molecular, biochemical and physiological levels. At the molecular level the response to drought stress results in the differential expression of several metabolic pathways. For this reason, exploring the subtle differences in gene expression of drought sensitive and drought tolerant genotypes enables the identification of drought-related genes that could be used for selection of drought tolerance traits. Genome-wide RNA-Seq technology was used to compare the drought response of two sorghum genotypes characterized by contrasting water use efficiency. The physiological measurements carried out confirmed the drought sensitivity of IS20351 and the drought tolerance of IS22330 genotypes, as previously studied. The expression of drought-related genes was more abundant in the drought sensitive genotype IS20351 compared to the tolerant genotype IS22330. Under drought stress Gene Ontology enrichment highlighted a massive increase in transcript abundance in the sensitive genotype IS20351 in "response to stress" and "abiotic stimulus", as well as for "oxidation-reduction reaction". "Antioxidant" and "secondary metabolism", "photosynthesis and carbon fixation process", "lipids" and "carbon metabolism" were the pathways most affected by drought in the sensitive genotype IS20351. In addition, genotype IS20351 showed a lower constitutive expression level of "secondary metabolic process" (GO:0019748) and "glutathione transferase activity" (GO:000004364) under well-watered conditions. RNA-Seq analysis proved to be a very useful tool to explore differences between sensitive and tolerant sorghum genotypes. Transcriptomics analysis results supported all the physiological measurements and were essential to clarify the tolerance of the two genotypes studied. The connection between differential gene expression and physiological response to

  18. Preventive strategy for BVDV infection in North America.

    PubMed

    Ridpath, Julia

    2012-02-01

    Despite 60 years of vaccination, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections remain a source of significant economic loss for producers in the United States. Control program design in the United States varies by region based on the incidence of BVDV, density of animal populations, animal movement, contact with wildlife populations, level of producer compliance, variation among circulating BVDV strains, prevalent type of production unit or industry and support offered by state institutions. The Upper Peninsula BVDV Eradication Program in Michigan, the Montana BVD-PI Herd Biosecurity Project, the Washington State BVDV Testing program and the Alabama Voluntary BVD Control Program illustrates four different regional approaches. All four programs are voluntary rather than government mandated and a large component of each was the identification and removal of animals persistently infected with BVDV. The Washington, Montana and Alabama programs focus on herd screening to eliminate PI's but did not have eradication as a goal. The Michigan program was unique in that its goal was to eradicate BVDV from a defined geographic region. While the Washington, Alabama and Montana programs were beneficial to individual producers they did not have a significant impact on the prevalence of BVDV. In contrast, the Michigan program has reduced incidence of herds harboring PI animals in the region. Organizers of all four programs noted that compliance with control programs was directly linked to education and the presence of a support network composed of fellow producers, engaged veterinarians and knowledgeable diagnosticians.

  19. Contrasting Transcriptional Responses of a Virulent and an Attenuated Strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infecting Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hinds, Jason; Malloff, Chad A.; Bains, Manjeet; Hancock, Robert E.; Lam, Wan L.

    2010-01-01

    Background H37Rv and H37Ra are well-described laboratory strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis derived from the same parental strain, H37, that show dramatically different pathogenic phenotypes. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, the transcriptomes of the two strains during axenic growth in broth and during intracellular growth within murine bone-marrow macrophages were compared by whole genome expression profiling. We identified and compared adaptations of either strain upon encountering an intracellular environment, and also contrasted the transcriptomes of the two strains while inside macrophages. In the former comparison, both strains induced genes that would facilitate intracellular survival including those involved in mycobactin synthesis and fatty acid metabolism. However, this response was stronger and more extensive for H37Rv than for H37Ra. This was manifested as the differential expression of a greater number of genes and an increased magnitude of expression for these genes in H37Rv. In comparing intracellular transcriptional signatures, fifty genes were found to be differentially expressed between the strains. Of these fifty, twelve were under control of the PhoPR regulon. Further differences between strains included genes whose products were members of the ESAT-6 family of proteins, or were associated with their secretion. Conclusions/Significance Along with the recent identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms in H37Ra when compared to H37Rv, our demonstration of differential expression of PhoP-regulated and ESX-1 region-related genes during macrophage infection further highlights the significance of these genes in the attenuation of H37Ra. PMID:20548782

  20. A Conserved Potential Development Framework Applies to Shoots of Legume Species with Contrasting Morphogenetic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Faverjon, Lucas; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Abraham J.; Litrico, Isabelle; Louarn, Gaëtan

    2017-01-01

    A great variety of legume species are used for forage production and grown in multi-species grasslands. Despite their close phylogenetic relationship, they display a broad range of morphologies that markedly affect their competitive abilities and persistence in mixtures. Little is yet known about the component traits that control the deployment of plant architecture in most of these species. During the present study, we compared the patterns of shoot organogenesis and shoot organ growth in contrasting forage species belonging to the four morphogenetic groups previously identified in herbaceous legumes (i.e., stolon-formers, rhizome-formers, crown-formers tolerant to defoliation and crown-formers intolerant to defoliation). To achieve this, three greenhouse experiments were carried out using plant species from each group (namely alfalfa, birdsfoot trefoil, sainfoin, kura clover, red clover, and white clover) which were grown at low density under non-limiting water and soil nutrient availability. The potential morphogenesis of shoots characterized under these conditions showed that all the species shared a number of common morphogenetic features. All complied with a generalized classification of shoot axes into three types (main axis, primary and secondary axes). A common quantitative framework for vegetative growth and development involved: (i) the regular development of all shoot axes in thermal time and a deterministic branching pattern in the absence of stress; (ii) a temporal coordination of organ growth at the phytomer level that was highly conserved irrespective of phytomer position, and (iii) an identical allometry determining the surface area of all the leaves. The species differed in their architecture as a consequence of the values taken by component traits of morphogenesis. Assessing the relationships between the traits studied showed that these species were distinct from each other along two main PCA axes which explained 68% of total variance: the first

  1. Strategies for prevention of ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy infections

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Diane D; Raman, Jay D

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in male patients and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in males. To confirm the diagnosis of prostate cancer, an ultrasound-guided needle biopsy is necessary to obtain prostate tissue sufficient for histologic analysis by pathologists. Ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy can be accomplished via a transperineal or transrectal approach. The latter biopsy technique involves placing an ultrasound probe into the rectum, visualizing the prostate located just anterior to it, and then obtaining 12–14 biopsies. Each biopsy core requires piercing of the rectal mucosa which can inherently contribute to infection. The increasing infectious risk of prostate needle biopsy requires refinement and re-evaluation of the process in which the technique is performed. Such processes include (but are not limited to) prebiopsy risk stratification, antibiotic prophylaxis, use of rectal preparations, and equipment processing. In the subsequent review, we highlight the current available information on different strategies to reduce the risk of infection following prostate needle biopsy. PMID:27468242

  2. Delivery strategies to enhance oral vaccination against enteric infections.

    PubMed

    Davitt, Christopher J H; Lavelle, Ed C

    2015-08-30

    While the majority of human pathogens infect the body through mucosal sites, most licensed vaccines are injectable. In fact the only mucosal vaccine that has been widely used globally for infant and childhood vaccination programs is the oral polio vaccine (OPV) developed by Albert Sabin in the 1950s. While oral vaccines against Cholera, rotavirus and Salmonella typhi have also been licensed, the development of additional non-living oral vaccines against these and other enteric pathogens has been slow and challenging. Mucosal vaccines can elicit protective immunity at the gut mucosa, in part via antigen-specific secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA). However, despite their advantages over the injectable route, oral vaccines face many hurdles. A key challenge lies in design of delivery strategies that can protect antigens from degradation in the stomach and intestine, incorporate appropriate immune-stimulatory adjuvants and control release at the appropriate gastrointestinal site. A number of systems including micro and nanoparticles, lipid-based strategies and enteric capsules have significant potential either alone or in advanced combined formulations to enhance intestinal immune responses. In this review we will outline the opportunities, challenges and potential delivery solutions to facilitate the development of improved oral vaccines for infectious enteric diseases.

  3. Novel agents and strategies to treat herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Kleymann, Gerald

    2003-02-01

    The quiet pandemic of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection has plagued humanity since ancient times, causing mucocutaneous infection, such as herpes labialis and herpes genitalis. Disease symptoms often interfere with everyday activities and occasionally HSV infections are the cause of life-threatening or sight-impairing disease, especially in neonates and the immunocompromised patient population. After primary or initial infection the virus persists for life in a latent form in neurons of the host, periodically reactivating and often resulting in significant psychosocial distress for the patient. Currently, no cure is available. In the mid-1950s the first antiviral, idoxuridine, was developed for topical treatment of herpes disease and, in 1978, vidarabine was licensed for systemic use to treat HSV encephalitis. Acyclovir (Zovirax), a potent, specific and tolerable nucleosidic inhibitor of the herpes DNA polymerase, was a milestone in the development of antiviral drugs in the late 1970s. In the mid-1990s, when acyclovir became a generic drug, valacyclovir (Valtrex) and famciclovir (Famvir), prodrugs of the gold standard and penciclovir (Denavir), Vectavir), a close analogue, were launched. Though numerous approaches and strategies were tested and considerable effort was expended in the search of the next generation of an antiherpetic therapy, it proved difficult to outperform acyclovir. Notable in this regard was the award of a Nobel Prize in 1988 for the elucidation of mechanistic principles which resulted in the development of new drugs such as acyclovir. Vaccines, interleukins, interferons, therapeutic proteins, antibodies, immunomodulators and small-molecule drugs with specific or nonspecific modes of action lacked either efficacy or the required safety profile to replace the nucleosidic drugs acyclovir, valacyclovir, penciclovir and famciclovir as the first choice of treatment. Recently though, new inhibitors of the HSV helicase-primase with potent in vitro

  4. [Me-too pharmaceuticals -- marketing-strategies of drug producers and drug purchasers. Example: non-ionic contrast media].

    PubMed

    Wild, C; Puig, S

    2004-11-01

    In the context of increasing economic pressure upon on hospital budgets, it is inevitable that central and standardized purchasing of pharmaceuticals must be considered. It was the aim of this assessment to analyse the many different non-ionic contrast media/CM products on the actual "clinical relevance of the differences" in order to give advice for a more concerted purchasing of CM. The assessment was commissioned by a large scale Austrian hospital cooperation; it can be regarded as the beginning of a broad strategy against the many new, only rarely innovative, but nevertheless patent-protected pharmaceuticals. Eight different non-ionic contrast media - used in routine care - were compared for their physico-chemical characteristics: osmolality, nephrotoxicity, viscosity, hydrophilicity and electric charge. In a systematic review 193 publications were analysed. The examined CM show similar pharmacokinetic and -dynamic attributes, and no differences of clinical relevance. An optimisation of purchasing pharmaceuticals by standardisation of the range of products takes place in the context of common strategies of producers and buying agents in marketing-economies. The strategies of the pharmaceutical industry (patent protection of me-too drugs, high-price-policy, extensive marketing of up to 40 % of revenue) and the counter-strategies of the central hospital purchasers (market concentration, drug commissions, institutional measures to disentangle interests) are presented - exemplified by contrast media - in this article.

  5. Transfer of Learning Strategies: Contrast of Self-Instructional and Traditional Training Formats with EMR Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borkowski, John G.; Varnhagen, Connie Kendall

    1984-01-01

    Twelve mentally retarded children were taught anticipation and paraphase strategies imbedded in either a self-instructional format or a traditional didactic training format. Six Ss in a control condition received no explicit strategy instructions. Although no differences were found for self-instructional vs. traditional training formats, both…

  6. Data for evaluation of fast kurtosis strategies, b-value optimization and exploration of diffusion MRI contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Brian; Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj

    2016-08-01

    Here we describe and provide diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) data that was acquired in neural tissue and a physical phantom. Data acquired in biological tissue includes: fixed rat brain (acquired at 9.4 T) and spinal cord (acquired at 16.4 T) and in normal human brain (acquired at 3 T). This data was recently used for evaluation of diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) contrasts and for comparison to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameter contrast. The data has also been used to optimize b-values for ex vivo and in vivo fast kurtosis imaging. The remaining data was obtained in a physical phantom with three orthogonal fiber orientations (fresh asparagus stems) for exploration of the kurtosis fractional anisotropy. However, the data may have broader interest and, collectively, may form the basis for image contrast exploration and simulations based on a wide range of dMRI analysis strategies.

  7. Data for evaluation of fast kurtosis strategies, b-value optimization and exploration of diffusion MRI contrast

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Brian; Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe and provide diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) data that was acquired in neural tissue and a physical phantom. Data acquired in biological tissue includes: fixed rat brain (acquired at 9.4 T) and spinal cord (acquired at 16.4 T) and in normal human brain (acquired at 3 T). This data was recently used for evaluation of diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) contrasts and for comparison to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameter contrast. The data has also been used to optimize b-values for ex vivo and in vivo fast kurtosis imaging. The remaining data was obtained in a physical phantom with three orthogonal fiber orientations (fresh asparagus stems) for exploration of the kurtosis fractional anisotropy. However, the data may have broader interest and, collectively, may form the basis for image contrast exploration and simulations based on a wide range of dMRI analysis strategies. PMID:27576023

  8. Delayed antibiotic prescribing strategies for respiratory tract infections in primary care: pragmatic, factorial, randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Little, Paul; Moore, Michael; Kelly, Jo; Williamson, Ian; Leydon, Geraldine; McDermott, Lisa; Mullee, Mark; Stuart, Beth

    2014-03-06

    To estimate the effectiveness of different strategies involving delayed antibiotic prescription for acute respiratory tract infections. Open, pragmatic, parallel group, factorial, randomised controlled trial. Primary care in the United Kingdom. 889 patients aged 3 years and over with acute respiratory tract infection, recruited between 3 March 2010 and 28 March 2012 by 53 health professionals in 25 practices. Patients judged not to need immediate antibiotics were randomised to undergo four strategies of delayed prescription: recontact for a prescription, post-dated prescription, collection of the prescription, and be given the prescription (patient led). During the trial, a strategy of no antibiotic prescription was added as another randomised comparison. Analysis was intention to treat. Mean symptom severity (0-6 scale) at days 2-4 (primary outcome), antibiotic use, and patients' beliefs in the effectiveness of antibiotic use. Secondary analysis included comparison with immediate use of antibiotics. Mean symptom severity had minimal differences between the strategies involving no prescription and delayed prescription (recontact, post-date, collection, patient led; 1.62, 1.60, 1.82, 1.68, 1.75, respectively; likelihood ratio test χ(2) 2.61, P=0.625). Duration of symptoms rated moderately bad or worse also did not differ between no prescription and delayed prescription strategies combined (median 3 days v 4 days; 4.29, P=0.368). There were modest and non-significant differences in patients very satisfied with the consultation between the randomised groups (79%, 74%, 80%, 88%, 89%, respectively; likelihood ratio test χ(2) 2.38, P=0.667), belief in antibiotics (71%, 74%, 73%, 72%, 66%; 1.62, P=0.805), or antibiotic use (26%, 37%, 37%, 33%, 39%; 4.96, P=0.292). By contrast, most patients given immediate antibiotics used antibiotics (97%) and strongly believed in them (93%), but with no benefit for symptom severity (score 1.76) or duration (median 4 days). Strategies

  9. Contrastive Lexical Pragmatics as an Effective Strategy in Teaching Pragmatics: A Review Article

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaemi, Farid; Ziafar, Meisam

    2011-01-01

    Pragmatic aspect of formulaic language must be emphasized and employed in second language acquisition. Translation of formulaic speech can help learners better understand the pragmatic nature of L2 prefabricated language through comparing them with their L1 (first language) equivalents. This study proposes a contrastive lexical pragmatic approach…

  10. Contrastive Lexical Pragmatics as an Effective Strategy in Teaching Pragmatics: A Review Article

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaemi, Farid; Ziafar, Meisam

    2011-01-01

    Pragmatic aspect of formulaic language must be emphasized and employed in second language acquisition. Translation of formulaic speech can help learners better understand the pragmatic nature of L2 prefabricated language through comparing them with their L1 (first language) equivalents. This study proposes a contrastive lexical pragmatic approach…

  11. Dispersal in a patchy landscape reveals contrasting determinants of infection in a wild avian malaria system.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Sarah C L; Wood, Matthew J; Alves, Ricardo; Sheldon, Ben C

    2014-03-01

    Understanding exactly when, where and how hosts become infected with parasites is critical to understanding host-parasite co-evolution in natural populations. However, for host-parasite systems in which hosts or parasites are mobile, for example in vector-borne diseases, the spatial location of infection and the relative importance of parasite exposure at successive host life-history stages are often uncertain. Here, using a 6-year longitudinal data set from a spatially referenced population of blue tits, we test the extent to which infection by avian malaria parasites is determined by conditions experienced at natal or breeding sites, as well as by postnatal dispersal between the two. We show that the location and timing of infection differs markedly between two sympatric malaria parasite species. For one species (Plasmodium circumflexum), our analyses indicate that infection occurs after birds have settled on breeding territories, and because the distribution of this parasite is temporally stable across years, hosts born in malarious areas could in principle alter their exposure and potentially avoid infection through postnatal dispersal. Conversely, the spatial distribution of another parasite species (Plasmodium relictum) is unpredictable and infection probability is positively associated with postnatal dispersal distance, potentially indicating that infection occurs during this major dispersal event. These findings suggest that hosts in this population may be subject to divergent selection pressures from these two parasites, potentially acting at different life-history stages. Because this implies parasite species-specific predictions for many coevolutionary processes, they also illustrate the complexity of predicting such processes in multi-parasite systems. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2013 British Ecological Society.

  12. A bundle strategy including patient hand hygiene to decrease clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Pokrywka, Marian; Feigel, Jody; Douglas, Barbara; Grossberger, Susan; Hensler, Amelia; Hensler, Amelia; Weber, David

    2014-01-01

    Prevention strategies for Clostridium difficile infection traditionally have addressed barrier precautions, environmental disinfection, and health care worker hand hygiene. When applied as a bundle, this approach has been used widely as an evidence-based strategy to prevent hospital-acquired C. difficile infection. Expanding the bundle to include patient hand hygiene is a nurse-driven approach to prevent C. difficile transmission.

  13. Stratified premedication strategy for the prevention of contrast media hypersensitivity in high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suh-Young; Yang, Min Suk; Choi, Young-Hoon; Park, Chang Min; Park, Heung-Woo; Cho, Sang Heon; Kang, Hye-Ryun

    2017-03-01

    Although the severity of hypersensitivity reactions to iodinated contrast media varies, it is well correlated with the severity of recurrent reactions; however, prophylaxis protocols are not severity-stratified. To assess the outcomes of tailored prophylaxis according to the severity of hypersensitivity reactions to iodinated contrast media. Our premedication protocols were stratified based on the severity of previous reactions: (1) 4 mg of chlorpheniramine for mild reactions, (2) adding 40 mg of methylprednisolone for moderate reactions, and (3) adding multiple doses of 40 mg of methylprednisolone for severe index reactions. Cases of reexposure in patients with a history of hypersensitivity reactions were routinely monitored and mandatorily recorded. Among a total of 850 patients who underwent enhanced computed tomography after severity-tailored prophylaxis, breakthrough reactions occurred in 17.1%, but most breakthrough reactions (89.0%) were mild and did not require medical treatment. Additional corticosteroid use did not reduce the breakthrough reaction rate in cases with a mild index reaction (16.8% vs 17.2%, P = .70). However, underpremedication with a single dose of corticosteroid revealed significantly higher rates of breakthrough reaction than did double doses of corticosteroid in cases with a severe index reaction (55.6% vs 17.4%, P = .02). Changing the iodinated contrast media resulted in an additional reduction of the breakthrough reaction rate overall (14.9% vs 32.1%, P = .001). In a total severity-based stratified prophylaxis regimens and changing iodinated contrast media can be considered in patients with a history of previous hypersensitivity reaction to iodinated contrast media to reduce the risk of breakthrough reactions. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Quasispecies spatial models for RNA viruses with different replication modes and infection strategies.

    PubMed

    Sardanyés, Josep; Elena, Santiago F

    2011-01-01

    Empirical observations and theoretical studies suggest that viruses may use different replication strategies to amplify their genomes, which impact the dynamics of mutation accumulation in viral populations and therefore, their fitness and virulence. Similarly, during natural infections, viruses replicate and infect cells that are rarely in suspension but spatially organized. Surprisingly, most quasispecies models of virus replication have ignored these two phenomena. In order to study these two viral characteristics, we have developed stochastic cellular automata models that simulate two different modes of replication (geometric vs stamping machine) for quasispecies replicating and spreading on a two-dimensional space. Furthermore, we explored these two replication models considering epistatic fitness landscapes (antagonistic vs synergistic) and different scenarios for cell-to-cell spread, one with free superinfection and another with superinfection inhibition. We found that the master sequences for populations replicating geometrically and with antagonistic fitness effects vanished at low critical mutation rates. By contrast, the highest critical mutation rate was observed for populations replicating geometrically but with a synergistic fitness landscape. Our simulations also showed that for stamping machine replication and antagonistic epistasis, a combination that appears to be common among plant viruses, populations further increased their robustness by inhibiting superinfection. We have also shown that the mode of replication strongly influenced the linkage between viral loci, which rapidly reached linkage equilibrium at increasing mutations for geometric replication. We also found that the strategy that minimized the time required to spread over the whole space was the stamping machine with antagonistic epistasis among mutations. Finally, our simulations revealed that the multiplicity of infection fluctuated but generically increased along time.

  15. New Biomedical Technologies and Strategies for Prevention of HIV and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections remain to be of public health concern in many developing countries. Their control is important, considering the high incidence of acute infections, complications and sequelae, and their socioeconomic impact. This article discusses the new biomedical technologies and strategies for the prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. PMID:27703837

  16. [Extravasation of contrast media at the puncture site: Strategies for managment].

    PubMed

    Pacheco Compaña, F J; Gago Vidal, B; Méndez Díaz, C

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of contrast medium extravasation at the venipuncture site has increased with the generalized use of automatic injectors. Most extravasations only cause slight edema and erythema. Nevertheless, in some cases extravasation can result in severe skin lesions or even in compartment syndrome. Lesions caused by extravasation usually resolve spontaneously with conservative treatment. Although the complications of extravasation are well known, institutional protocols are normally lacking and the criteria for taking action and the type of treatment, whether based on the literature or personal preferences, tend to vary. In this article, we review the incidence, risk factors, clinical manifestations, and options for preventing and treating contrast medium extravasation in soft tissues. Finally, we present the protocol we use to manage extravasation at our hospital.

  17. Contrasting reproductive strategies of triploid hybrid males in vertebrate mating systems.

    PubMed

    Pruvost, N B M; Mikulíček, P; Choleva, L; Reyer, H-U

    2015-01-01

    The scarcity of parthenogenetic vertebrates is often attributed to their 'inferior' mode of clonal reproduction, which restricts them to self-reproduce their own genotype lineage and leaves little evolutionary potential with regard to speciation and evolution of sexual reproduction. Here, we show that for some taxa, such uniformity does not hold. Using hybridogenetic water frogs (Pelophylax esculentus) as a model system, we demonstrate that triploid hybrid males from two geographic regions exhibit very different reproductive modes. With an integrative data set combining field studies, crossing experiments, flow cytometry and microsatellite analyses, we found that triploid hybrids from Central Europe are rare, occur in male sex only and form diploid gametes of a single clonal lineage. In contrast, triploid hybrids from north-western Europe are widespread, occur in both sexes and produce recombined haploid gametes. These differences translate into contrasting reproductive roles between regions. In Central Europe, triploid hybrid males sexually parasitize diploid hybrids and just perpetuate their own genotype--which is the usual pattern in parthenogens. In north-western Europe, on the other hand, the triploid males are gamete donors for diploid hybrids, thereby stabilizing the mixed 2n-3n hybrid populations. By demonstrating these contrasting roles in male reproduction, we draw attention to a new significant evolutionary potential for animals with nonsexual reproduction, namely reproductive plasticity. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  18. Child and Adult Reports of Graphic Strategies Used to Portray Figures with Contrasting Emotional Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkitt, Esther; Barrett, Martyn

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed children's graphic flexibility and their ability to report on their use of drawing strategies when drawing characterized figures. 253 children (129 boys, 124 girls) aged between 4 years 3 months and 11 year 10 months formed three groups, either drawing a man, a dog or a tree. Each group was asked to draw three emotionally…

  19. Dendritic Cell Subtypes from Lymph Nodes and Blood Show Contrasted Gene Expression Programs upon Bluetongue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ruscanu, Suzana; Jouneau, Luc; Urien, Céline; Bourge, Mickael; Lecardonnel, Jérôme; Moroldo, Marco; Loup, Benoit; Dalod, Marc; Elhmouzi-Younes, Jamila; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Hope, Jayne; Vitour, Damien; Zientara, Stéphan; Meyer, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Human and animal hemorrhagic viruses initially target dendritic cells (DCs). It has been proposed, but not documented, that both plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and conventional DCs (cDCs) may participate in the cytokine storm encountered in these infections. In order to evaluate the contribution of DCs in hemorrhagic virus pathogenesis, we performed a genome-wide expression analysis during infection by Bluetongue virus (BTV), a double-stranded RNA virus that induces hemorrhagic fever in sheep and initially infects cDCs. Both pDCs and cDCs accumulated in regional lymph nodes and spleen during BTV infection. The gene response profiles were performed at the onset of the disease and markedly differed with the DC subtypes and their lymphoid organ location. An integrative knowledge-based analysis revealed that blood pDCs displayed a gene signature related to activation of systemic inflammation and permeability of vasculature. In contrast, the gene profile of pDCs and cDCs in lymph nodes was oriented to inhibition of inflammation, whereas spleen cDCs did not show a clear functional orientation. These analyses indicate that tissue location and DC subtype affect the functional gene expression program induced by BTV and suggest the involvement of blood pDCs in the inflammation and plasma leakage/hemorrhage during BTV infection in the real natural host of the virus. These findings open the avenue to target DCs for therapeutic interventions in viral hemorrhagic diseases. PMID:23785206

  20. Dendritic cell subtypes from lymph nodes and blood show contrasted gene expression programs upon Bluetongue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ruscanu, Suzana; Jouneau, Luc; Urien, Céline; Bourge, Mickael; Lecardonnel, Jérôme; Moroldo, Marco; Loup, Benoit; Dalod, Marc; Elhmouzi-Younes, Jamila; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Hope, Jayne; Vitour, Damien; Zientara, Stéphan; Meyer, Gilles; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2013-08-01

    Human and animal hemorrhagic viruses initially target dendritic cells (DCs). It has been proposed, but not documented, that both plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and conventional DCs (cDCs) may participate in the cytokine storm encountered in these infections. In order to evaluate the contribution of DCs in hemorrhagic virus pathogenesis, we performed a genome-wide expression analysis during infection by Bluetongue virus (BTV), a double-stranded RNA virus that induces hemorrhagic fever in sheep and initially infects cDCs. Both pDCs and cDCs accumulated in regional lymph nodes and spleen during BTV infection. The gene response profiles were performed at the onset of the disease and markedly differed with the DC subtypes and their lymphoid organ location. An integrative knowledge-based analysis revealed that blood pDCs displayed a gene signature related to activation of systemic inflammation and permeability of vasculature. In contrast, the gene profile of pDCs and cDCs in lymph nodes was oriented to inhibition of inflammation, whereas spleen cDCs did not show a clear functional orientation. These analyses indicate that tissue location and DC subtype affect the functional gene expression program induced by BTV and suggest the involvement of blood pDCs in the inflammation and plasma leakage/hemorrhage during BTV infection in the real natural host of the virus. These findings open the avenue to target DCs for therapeutic interventions in viral hemorrhagic diseases.

  1. Infection and prematurity and the role of preventive strategies.

    PubMed

    Romero, Roberto; Espinoza, Jimmy; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Kalache, Karim

    2002-08-01

    This article reviews the role of infection in spontaneous premature parturition, the pathways of ascending intrauterine infection, microbiology, and the frequency of intra-amniotic infection in obstetrical complications leading to premature delivery. The evidence that infection is causally linked to premature birth is critically examined, as is the relationship between urogenital tract infection/colonization with microorganisms and the risk of preterm birth. The effect of antibiotic administration in perinatal outcome in patients with preterm labor and intact membranes, preterm premature rupture of membranes, asymptomatic bacteriuria, Group B streptococcus and genital mycoplasmas of the lower genital tract, and bacterial vaginosis are critically examined.

  2. Serological Evidence of Contrasted Exposure to Arboviral Infections between Islands of the Union of Comoros (Indian Ocean).

    PubMed

    Dellagi, Koussay; Salez, Nicolas; Maquart, Marianne; Larrieu, Sophie; Yssouf, Amina; Silaï, Rahamatou; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Tortosa, Pablo; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2016-12-01

    A cross sectional serological survey of arboviral infections in humans was conducted on the three islands of the Union of Comoros, Indian Ocean, in order to test a previously suggested contrasted exposure of the three neighboring islands to arthropod-borne epidemics. Four hundred human sera were collected on Ngazidja (Grande Comore), Mwali (Mohéli) and Ndzouani (Anjouan), and were tested by ELISA for IgM and/or IgG antibodies to Dengue (DENV), Chikungunya (CHIKV), Rift Valley fever (RVFV), West Nile (WNV), Tick borne encephalitis (TBEV) and Yellow fever (YFV) viruses and for neutralizing antibodies to DENV serotypes 1-4. Very few sera were positive for IgM antibodies to the tested viruses indicating that the sero-survey was performed during an inter epidemic phase for the investigated arbovirus infections, except for RVF which showed evidence of recent infections on all three islands. IgG reactivity with at least one arbovirus was observed in almost 85% of tested sera, with seropositivity rates increasing with age, indicative of an intense and long lasting exposure of the Comorian population to arboviral risk. Interestingly, the positivity rates for IgG antibodies to DENV and CHIKV were significantly higher on Ngazidja, confirming the previously suggested prominent exposure of this island to these arboviruses, while serological traces of WNV infection were detected most frequently on Mwali suggesting some transmission specificities associated with this island only. The study provides the first evidence for circulation of RVFV in human populations from the Union of Comoros and further suggests that the virus is currently circulating on the three islands in an inconspicuous manner. This study supports contrasted exposure of the islands of the Comoros archipelago to arboviral infections. The observation is discussed in terms of ecological factors that may affect the abundance and distribution of vector populations on the three islands as well as concurring

  3. Serological Evidence of Contrasted Exposure to Arboviral Infections between Islands of the Union of Comoros (Indian Ocean)

    PubMed Central

    Dellagi, Koussay; Salez, Nicolas; Maquart, Marianne; Larrieu, Sophie; Yssouf, Amina; Silaï, Rahamatou; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Tortosa, Pablo; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    A cross sectional serological survey of arboviral infections in humans was conducted on the three islands of the Union of Comoros, Indian Ocean, in order to test a previously suggested contrasted exposure of the three neighboring islands to arthropod-borne epidemics. Four hundred human sera were collected on Ngazidja (Grande Comore), Mwali (Mohéli) and Ndzouani (Anjouan), and were tested by ELISA for IgM and/or IgG antibodies to Dengue (DENV), Chikungunya (CHIKV), Rift Valley fever (RVFV), West Nile (WNV), Tick borne encephalitis (TBEV) and Yellow fever (YFV) viruses and for neutralizing antibodies to DENV serotypes 1–4. Very few sera were positive for IgM antibodies to the tested viruses indicating that the sero-survey was performed during an inter epidemic phase for the investigated arbovirus infections, except for RVF which showed evidence of recent infections on all three islands. IgG reactivity with at least one arbovirus was observed in almost 85% of tested sera, with seropositivity rates increasing with age, indicative of an intense and long lasting exposure of the Comorian population to arboviral risk. Interestingly, the positivity rates for IgG antibodies to DENV and CHIKV were significantly higher on Ngazidja, confirming the previously suggested prominent exposure of this island to these arboviruses, while serological traces of WNV infection were detected most frequently on Mwali suggesting some transmission specificities associated with this island only. The study provides the first evidence for circulation of RVFV in human populations from the Union of Comoros and further suggests that the virus is currently circulating on the three islands in an inconspicuous manner. This study supports contrasted exposure of the islands of the Comoros archipelago to arboviral infections. The observation is discussed in terms of ecological factors that may affect the abundance and distribution of vector populations on the three islands as well as concurring

  4. Infection patterns of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.) by two helminth species with contrasting life styles.

    PubMed

    Akoll, Peter; Konecny, Robert; Mwanja, Wilson W; Schiemer, Fritz

    2012-04-01

    The larval stages of Bolbophorus sp. (digenean) and Amirthalingamia macracantha (cestode) are frequently reported in Oreochromis niloticus in Uganda. Little, however, is known about their infection patterns. This study examined the influence of habitat type, host size, and sex and weather patterns on the parasite populations in Uganda. A total of 650 fish were collected between January and November 2008 from a reservoir, cages, fishponds and a stream. The prevalence and intensity of A. macracantha and the prevalence of Bolbophorus sp. differed across the water bodies reflecting the effect of habitat characteristics on parasite transmission. Host sex did not significantly influence the infection patterns, although female fish were slightly more parasitized than male and sexually undifferentiated individuals. The fish size was positively correlated with helminth infections demonstrating accumulation and prolonged exposure of larger (older) fish to the parasites. The metacercariae population did not vary significantly across months, while monthly A. macracantha infection fluctuated markedly. With regard to rain seasons, higher prevalence and intensity of A. macracantha were recorded in wet season. For Bolbophorus sp., only the prevalence varied with seasons, with higher prevalence recorded in the dry season than in wet season. Generally, Bolbophorus sp. responded weakly to changes in water body, host sex and size and weather patterns. Rainfall appears to be an essential cue for coracidia hatching.

  5. Scaffold-based Anti-infection Strategies in Bone Repair

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Christopher T.; García, Andrés J.

    2014-01-01

    Bone fractures and non-union defects often require surgical intervention where biomaterials are used to correct the defect, and approximately 10% of these procedures are compromised by bacterial infection. Currently, treatment options are limited to sustained, high doses of antibiotics and surgical debridement of affected tissue, leaving a significant, unmet need for the development of therapies to combat device-associated biofilm and infections. Engineering implants to prevent infection is a desirable material characteristic. Tissue engineered scaffolds for bone repair provide a means to both regenerate bone and serve as a base for adding antimicrobial agents. Incorporating anti-infection properties into regenerative medicine therapies could improve clinical outcomes and reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with biomaterial implant-associated infections. This review focuses on current animal models and technologies available to assess bone repair in the context of infection, antimicrobial agents to fight infection, the current state of antimicrobial scaffolds, and future directions in the field. PMID:25476163

  6. Strategies for the prevention of asthmatic, anaphylactic and anaphylactoid reactions during the administration of anesthetics and/or contrast media.

    PubMed

    Liccardi, G; Lobefalo, G; Di Florio, E; Di Iorio, C; Occhiochiuso, L; Romano, L; Savoia, G; Massa, R M; D'Amato, G

    2008-01-01

    General anesthetics and contrast media can cause anaphylactic as well as anaphylactoid reactions. These events are of great concern to radiologists and anesthesiologists because of their relatively high prevalence, possible threat to life, and medical-legal consequences. Points discussed in this review are the critical evaluation of risk factors affecting prevention strategies, the need to be aware of pathogenic mechanisms relevant to prevention strategies, the use of alternative products if a culprit agent is known, the recognition of early signs of a reaction, the need to keep records of reactions on a patient's medical chart, the planning of prophylactic therapy, recommended actions after a reaction to an anesthetic or contrast medium, and the suggested establishment of allergy-anesthesiology centers to improve cooperation, and medical-legal issues. As any drug or contrast medium administered during general anesthesia or a diagnostic procedure can induce a potentially life-threatening or fatal event even in the absence of any evident risk factor in the patient's medical history or clinical status, we usually premedicate susceptible individuals at least to attenuate the severity of an unpredictable reaction, although we cannot rely on the efficacy of premedication to completely prevent a severe event. These recommendations, which are based on the literature and on the experience of our working group, aim to provide useful information for physicians and other specialists who operate in the absence of an allergy consultant.

  7. Contrasting Adult and Infant Immune Responses to HIV Infection and Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, David R.; Permar, Sallie R.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive studies have demonstrated that infant immune responses are distinct from those of adults. Despite these differences, infant immunization can elicit protective immune responses at levels comparable to or, in some cases, higher than adult immune responses to many vaccines. To date, only a few HIV vaccine candidates have been tested in infant populations, and none of them evaluated vaccine efficacy. Recent exciting studies showing that HIV-infected infants can develop broad neutralizing antibody responses and that some HIV vaccine regimens can elicit high levels of potentially protective antibodies in infants provide support for the development and testing of HIV vaccines in pediatric populations. In this review, we discuss the differences in adult and infant immune responses in the setting of HIV infection and vaccination. PMID:26656117

  8. Sequential Isotopic Signature Along Gladius Highlights Contrasted Individual Foraging Strategies of Jumbo Squid (Dosidicus gigas)

    PubMed Central

    Lorrain, Anne; Argüelles, Juan; Alegre, Ana; Bertrand, Arnaud; Munaron, Jean-Marie; Richard, Pierre; Cherel, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Background Cephalopods play a major role in marine ecosystems, but knowledge of their feeding ecology is limited. In particular, intra- and inter-individual variations in their use of resources has not been adequatly explored, although there is growing evidence that individual organisms can vary considerably in the way they use their habitats and resources. Methodology/Principal Findings Using δ13C and δ15N values of serially sampled gladius (an archival tissue), we examined high resolution variations in the trophic niche of five large (>60 cm mantle length) jumbo squids (Dosidicus gigas) that were collected off the coast of Peru. We report the first evidence of large inter-individual differences in jumbo squid foraging strategies with no systematic increase of trophic level with size. Overall, gladius δ13C values indicated one or several migrations through the squid's lifetime (∼8–9 months), during which δ15N values also fluctuated (range: 1 to 5‰). One individual showed an unexpected terminal 4.6‰ δ15N decrease (more than one trophic level), thus indicating a shift from higher- to lower-trophic level prey at that time. The data illustrate the high diversity of prey types and foraging histories of this species at the individual level. Conclusions/Significance The isotopic signature of gladii proved to be a powerful tool to depict high resolution and ontogenic variations in individual foraging strategies of squids, thus complementing traditional information offered by stomach content analysis and stable isotopes on metabolically active tissues. The observed differences in life history strategies highlight the high degree of plasticity of the jumbo squid and its high potential to adapt to environmental changes. PMID:21779391

  9. Sequential isotopic signature along gladius highlights contrasted individual foraging strategies of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas).

    PubMed

    Lorrain, Anne; Argüelles, Juan; Alegre, Ana; Bertrand, Arnaud; Munaron, Jean-Marie; Richard, Pierre; Cherel, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Cephalopods play a major role in marine ecosystems, but knowledge of their feeding ecology is limited. In particular, intra- and inter-individual variations in their use of resources has not been adequatly explored, although there is growing evidence that individual organisms can vary considerably in the way they use their habitats and resources. Using δ(13)C and δ(15)N values of serially sampled gladius (an archival tissue), we examined high resolution variations in the trophic niche of five large (>60 cm mantle length) jumbo squids (Dosidicus gigas) that were collected off the coast of Peru. We report the first evidence of large inter-individual differences in jumbo squid foraging strategies with no systematic increase of trophic level with size. Overall, gladius δ(13)C values indicated one or several migrations through the squid's lifetime (∼8-9 months), during which δ(15)N values also fluctuated (range: 1 to 5‰). One individual showed an unexpected terminal 4.6‰ δ(15)N decrease (more than one trophic level), thus indicating a shift from higher- to lower-trophic level prey at that time. The data illustrate the high diversity of prey types and foraging histories of this species at the individual level. The isotopic signature of gladii proved to be a powerful tool to depict high resolution and ontogenic variations in individual foraging strategies of squids, thus complementing traditional information offered by stomach content analysis and stable isotopes on metabolically active tissues. The observed differences in life history strategies highlight the high degree of plasticity of the jumbo squid and its high potential to adapt to environmental changes.

  10. A comparison of stable caesium uptake by six grass species of contrasting growth strategy.

    PubMed

    Willey, N J; Martin, M H

    1997-01-01

    Six plant species in the family Gramineae were used to investigate the relationship between Cs uptake, nutrient regime and plant growth strategy sensu Grime (1979: Plant Growth Strategies and Vegetation Processes, John Wiley). The roots of 66 day old Elymus repens (L.) Gould., Bromus sterilis L., Agrostis stolonifera L., Anthoxanthum odoratum L., Festuca ovina L. and Nardus stricta L. plants grown in acid-washed sand at high and low nutrient levels were exposed to a 96 h pulse of stable Cs at 0.05 mM, 0.15 mM, 0.3 mM, 1.0 mM and 3.0 mM concentrations. Different nutrient regimes induced large differences in dry wt in E. repens, B. sterilis and A. stolonifera plants but only small differences in N. stricta and F. ovina plants. At high nutrient concentrations, A. stolonifera, A. odoratum, F. ovina and N. stricta shoots showed significantly greater increases in internal Cs concentration with rising external Cs concentrations than did E. repens and B. sterilis shoots. The relationship between increases in shoot and external Cs concentrations was statistically indistinguishable between species in plants grown at the low nutrient concentration. These patterns of Cs uptake ensured that with long-term high K concentrations the more competitive plants (E. repens and B. sterilis) accumulated higher concentrations of Cs from low external concentrations than did non-competitive plants or competitive plants grown at low nutrient levels. It is suggested that the relationship between plant growth strategy sensu Grime (1979) and Cs accumulation patterns may help to explain the different concentrations to which species accumulate radiocaesium from the soil.

  11. Contrasting drought survival strategies of sympatric willows (genus: Salix): consequences for coexistence and habitat specialization.

    PubMed

    Savage, Jessica A; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine M

    2011-06-01

    Many willow species (genus: Salix) co-occur within habitats (α-diversity) and across the landscape (β-diversity) throughout North America. This high diversity is challenging to explain because closely related species often share similar functional traits and thus experience heightened competition and shared pest and pathogen susceptibility. To investigate whether traits related to drought survival are important in maintaining diversity, we conducted an experimental dry-down on six willow species in a greenhouse. We compared species' growth rates, stem and leaf hydraulics, leaf function and dieback and examined potential associations between their drought responses and habitat affinities. Habitat affinities were characterized based on species occurrence in randomly established field plots in central Minnesota. Overall, species that occur in drier, more seasonally variable habitats tended to have higher water-use efficiency, and faster growth rates than species from wetter habitats. However, the greatest difference in drought survival strategies was found between two species with similar habitat affinities. We conclude that differences in willow species could be important in both driving habitat differentiation and permitting temporal differentiation in resource utilization within habitats. Therefore, species' water-use strategies could be important in maintaining both α- and β-diversity across the landscape.

  12. Complementary strategies for developing Gd-free high-field T₁ MRI contrast agents based on Mn(III) porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weiran; Haedicke, Inga E; Nofiele, Joris; Martinez, Francisco; Beera, Kiran; Scholl, Timothy J; Cheng, Hai-Ling Margaret; Zhang, Xiao-An

    2014-01-23

    Mn(III) porphyrin (MnP) holds the promise of addressing the emerging challenges associated with Gd-based clinical MRI contrast agents (CAs), namely, Gd-related adverse effect and decreasing sensitivity at high clinical magnetic fields. Two complementary strategies for developing new MnPs as Gd-free CAs with optimized biocompatibility were established to improve relaxivity or clearance rate. MnPs with distinct and tunable pharmacokinetic properties can consequently be constructed for different in vivo applications at clinical field of 3 T.

  13. Strategies for the prevention of hospital-acquired infections in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Borghesi, A; Stronati, M

    2008-04-01

    Nosocomial infections are among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in neonatal intensive care units. Prevention of healthcare-associated infections is based on strategies that aim to limit susceptibility to infections by enhancing host defences, interrupting transmission of organisms by healthcare workers and by promoting the judicious use of antimicrobials. Several strategies are available and include: hand hygiene practices; prevention of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections; judicious use of antimicrobials for therapy and prophylaxis; enhancement of host defences; skin care; and early enteral feeding with human milk.

  14. Plasticity in N uptake among sympatric species with contrasting nutrient acquisition strategies in a tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kelly M; Mayor, Jordan R; Turner, Benjamin L

    2017-03-06

    Nitrogen (N) availability influences the productivity and distribution of plants in tropical montane forests. Strategies to acquire soil N, such as direct uptake of organic compounds or associations with root symbionts to enhance N acquisition in exchange for carbon (C), may facilitate plant species coexistence and ecosystem N retention. Alternatively, rapid microbial turnover of soil N forms in tropical soils might promote flexible plant N-uptake strategies and mediate species coexistence. We tested whether sympatric plant species with divergent root symbiont associations, and therefore potentially different nutrient acquisition strategies, partition chemical forms of N or show plasticity in N uptake in a tropical pre-montane forest in Panama. We traced the movement of three (15) N forms into soil pools, microbes, and seedlings of eleven species differing in root traits. Seedlings were grown in a split-plot field transplant experiment, with plots receiving equimolar mixtures of ammonium, nitrate, and glycine, with one form isotopically labeled in each block. After 48-hours, more (15) N was recovered in microbes than in plants, while all pools (extractable organic and inorganic N, microbial biomass, and leaves) contained greater amounts of (15) N from nitrate than from ammonium or glycine. Furthermore, (13) C from dual-labeled glycine was not recovered in the leaves of any seedlings, suggesting the studied species do not directly take up organic N or transform organic N prior to translocation to leaves. Nitrogen uptake differed by root symbiont group only for nitrate, with greater (15) N recovery in plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) associations or proteoid roots compared to orchids. Some root trait groups differed in (15) N recovery among N forms, with greater nitrate uptake than ammonium or glycine by AM-associated and N2 -fixing plants. However, only five of eleven species showed differences in uptake among N forms. Our results indicate flexibility in

  15. Multi-frequency accelerating strategy for the contrast source inversion method of ultrasound waveform tomography using pulse data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hongxiang; Azuma, Takashi; Qu, Xiaolei; Takagi, Shu

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we construct a multi-frequency accelerating strategy for the contrast source inversion (CSI) method using pulse data in the time domain. CSI is a frequency-domain inversion method for ultrasound waveform tomography that does not require the forward solver through the process of reconstruction. Several prior researches show that the CSI method has a good performance of convergence and accuracy in the low-center-frequency situation. In contrast, utilizing the high-center-frequency data leads to a high-resolution reconstruction but slow convergence on large numbers of grid. Our objective is to take full advantage of all low frequency components from pulse data with the high-center-frequency data measured by the diagnostic device. First we process the raw data in the frequency domain. Then multi-frequency accelerating strategy helps restart CSI in the current frequency using the last iteration result obtained from the lower frequency component. The merit of multi- frequency accelerating strategy is that computational burden decreases at the first few iterations. Because the low frequency component of dataset computes on the coarse grid with assuming a fixed number of points per wavelength. In the numerical test, the pulse data were generated by the K-wave simulator and have been processed to meet the computation of the CSI method. We investigate the performance of the multi-frequency and single-frequency reconstructions and conclude that the multi-frequency accelerating strategy significantly enhances the quality of the reconstructed image and simultaneously reduces the average computational time for any iteration step.

  16. Automated Analysis and Classification of Infected Macrophages Using Bright-Field Amplitude Contrast Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    foreground pixels  in  the  binary   image are  assigned a corresponding  marker  label.    In  spite  of  all  the  efforts  to  avoid multiple  markers ...25 Figure 6. (A) Original Image (B) Pre-Processed Image (C) Binary Mask by Minimum Error...GFP) integrated onto the chromosome under the control of a constitutive promoter, at a multiplicity of infection (MOI, bacteria/ cell) of 100

  17. Seasonality directs contrasting food collection behavior and nutrient regulation strategies in ants.

    PubMed

    Cook, Steven C; Eubanks, Micky D; Gold, Roger E; Behmer, Spencer T

    2011-01-01

    Long-lived animals, including social insects, often display seasonal shifts in foraging behavior. Foraging is ultimately a nutrient consumption exercise, but the effect of seasonality per se on changes in foraging behavior, particularly as it relates to nutrient regulation, is poorly understood. Here, we show that field-collected fire ant colonies, returned to the laboratory and maintained under identical photoperiod, temperature, and humidity regimes, and presented with experimental foods that had different protein (p) to carbohydrate (c) ratios, practice summer- and fall-specific foraging behaviors with respect to protein-carbohydrate regulation. Summer colonies increased the amount of food collected as the p:c ratio of their food became increasingly imbalanced, but fall colonies collected similar amounts of food regardless of the p:c ratio of their food. Choice experiments revealed that feeding was non-random, and that both fall and summer ants preferred carbohydrate-biased food. However, ants rarely ate all the food they collected, and their cached or discarded food always contained little carbohydrate relative to protein. From a nutrient regulation strategy, ants consumed most of the carbohydrate they collected, but regulated protein consumption to a similar level, regardless of season. We suggest that varied seasonal food collection behaviors and nutrient regulation strategies may be an adaptation that allows long-lived animals to meet current and future nutrient demands when nutrient-rich foods are abundant (e.g. spring and summer), and to conserve energy and be metabolically more efficient when nutritionally balanced foods are less abundant.

  18. Seasonality Directs Contrasting Food Collection Behavior and Nutrient Regulation Strategies in Ants

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Steven C.; Eubanks, Micky D.; Gold, Roger E.; Behmer, Spencer T.

    2011-01-01

    Long-lived animals, including social insects, often display seasonal shifts in foraging behavior. Foraging is ultimately a nutrient consumption exercise, but the effect of seasonality per se on changes in foraging behavior, particularly as it relates to nutrient regulation, is poorly understood. Here, we show that field-collected fire ant colonies, returned to the laboratory and maintained under identical photoperiod, temperature, and humidity regimes, and presented with experimental foods that had different protein (p) to carbohydrate (c) ratios, practice summer- and fall-specific foraging behaviors with respect to protein-carbohydrate regulation. Summer colonies increased the amount of food collected as the p:c ratio of their food became increasingly imbalanced, but fall colonies collected similar amounts of food regardless of the p:c ratio of their food. Choice experiments revealed that feeding was non-random, and that both fall and summer ants preferred carbohydrate-biased food. However, ants rarely ate all the food they collected, and their cached or discarded food always contained little carbohydrate relative to protein. From a nutrient regulation strategy, ants consumed most of the carbohydrate they collected, but regulated protein consumption to a similar level, regardless of season. We suggest that varied seasonal food collection behaviors and nutrient regulation strategies may be an adaptation that allows long-lived animals to meet current and future nutrient demands when nutrient-rich foods are abundant (e.g. spring and summer), and to conserve energy and be metabolically more efficient when nutritionally balanced foods are less abundant. PMID:21966522

  19. Understanding strategies for seed dispersal by wind under contrasting atmospheric conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wright, S. Joseph; Trakhtenbrot, Ana; Bohrer, Gil; Detto, Matteo; Katul, Gabriel G.; Horvitz, Nir; Muller-Landau, Helene C.; Jones, Frank A.; Nathan, Ran

    2008-01-01

    Traits associated with seed dispersal vary tremendously among sympatric wind-dispersed plants. We used two contrasting tropical tree species, seed traps, micrometeorology, and a mechanistic model to evaluate how variation in four key traits affects seed dispersal by wind. The conceptual framework of movement ecology, wherein external factors (wind) interact with internal factors (plant traits) that enable movement and determine when and where movement occurs, fully captures the variable inputs and outputs of wind dispersal models and informs their interpretation. We used model calculations to evaluate the spatial pattern of dispersed seeds for the 16 factorial combinations of four traits. The study species differed dramatically in traits related to the timing of seed release, and a strong species by season interaction affected most aspects of the spatial pattern of dispersed seeds. A rich interplay among plant traits and seasonal differences in atmospheric conditions caused this interaction. Several of the same plant traits are crucial for both seed dispersal and other aspects of life history variation. Observed traits that limit dispersal are likely to be constrained by their life history consequences. PMID:19060189

  20. Carbon source-sink limitations differ between two species with contrasting growth strategies.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Angela C; Rogers, Alistair; Rees, Mark; Osborne, Colin P

    2016-11-01

    Understanding how carbon source and sink strengths limit plant growth is a critical knowledge gap that hinders efforts to maximize crop yield. We investigated how differences in growth rate arise from source-sink limitations, using a model system comparing a fast-growing domesticated annual barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. NFC Tipple) with a slow-growing wild perennial relative (Hordeum bulbosum). Source strength was manipulated by growing plants at sub-ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations ([CO2 ]). Limitations on vegetative growth imposed by source and sink were diagnosed by measuring relative growth rate, developmental plasticity, photosynthesis and major carbon and nitrogen metabolite pools. Growth was sink limited in the annual but source limited in the perennial. RGR and carbon acquisition were higher in the annual, but photosynthesis responded weakly to elevated [CO2 ] indicating that source strength was near maximal at current [CO2 ]. In contrast, photosynthetic rate and sink development responded strongly to elevated [CO2 ] in the perennial, indicating significant source limitation. Sink limitation was avoided in the perennial by high sink plasticity: a marked increase in tillering and root:shoot ratio at elevated [CO2 ], and lower non-structural carbohydrate accumulation. Alleviating sink limitation during vegetative development could be important for maximizing growth of elite cereals under future elevated [CO2 ]. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Two Hymenophyllaceae species from contrasting natural environments exhibit a homoiochlorophyllous strategy in response to desiccation stress.

    PubMed

    Flores-Bavestrello, Alejandra; Król, Marianna; Ivanov, Alexander G; Hüner, Norman P A; García-Plazaola, José Ignacio; Corcuera, Luis J; Bravo, León A

    2016-02-01

    Hymenophyllaceae is a desiccation tolerant family of Pteridophytes which are poikilohydric epiphytes. Their fronds are composed by a single layer of cells and lack true mesophyll cells and stomata. Although they are associated with humid and shady environments, their vertical distribution varies along the trunk of the host plant with some species inhabiting the drier sides with a higher irradiance. The aim of this work was to compare the structure and function of the photosynthetic apparatus during desiccation and rehydration in two species, Hymenophyllum dentatum and Hymenoglossum cruentum, isolated from a contrasting vertical distribution along the trunk of their hosts. Both species were subjected to desiccation and rehydration kinetics to analyze frond phenotypic plasticity, as well as the structure, composition and function of the photosynthetic apparatus. Minimal differences in photosynthetic pigments were observed upon dehydration. Measurements of ϕPSII (effective quantum yield of PSII), ϕNPQ (quantum yield of the regulated energy dissipation of PSII), ϕNO (quantum yield of non-regulated energy dissipation of PSII), and TL (thermoluminescence) indicate that both species convert a functional photochemical apparatus into a structure which exhibits maximum quenching capacity in the dehydrated state with minimal changes in photosynthetic pigments and polypeptide compositions. This dehydration-induced conversion in the photosynthetic apparatus is completely reversible upon rehydration. We conclude that H. dentatum and H. cruentum are homoiochlorophyllous with respect to desiccation stress and exhibited no correlation between inherent desiccation tolerance and the vertical distribution along the host tree trunk.

  2. Contrasting regulation of macrophage iron homeostasis in response to infection with Listeria monocytogenes depending on localization of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Haschka, David; Nairz, Manfred; Demetz, Egon; Wienerroither, Sebastian; Decker, Thomas; Weiss, Günter

    2015-06-01

    Due to its multiple roles for the proliferation and pathogenicity of many microbes on the one hand and via modulation of immune effector functions on the other hand the control over iron homeostasis is thought to play a decisive role in the course of infections. Diversion of cellular iron traffic is considered as an important defense mechanism of macrophages to reduce metal availability for intracellular bacteria residing in the phagosome. However, evidence is lacking whether such alterations of iron homeostasis also become evident upon infection with bacteria gaining access to the cytosol like Listeria monocytogenes. Here we show that infection of macrophages with L. monocytogenes triggers the expression of the major cellular iron exporter ferroportin1 and induces cellular iron egress. As the growth of Listeria within macrophages is promoted by iron, stimulation of ferroportin1 functionality limits the availability of the metal for Listeria residing in the cytoplasm, whereas ferroportin1 degradation upon hepcidin treatment increases intracellular bacterial growth. In parallel to an increase of ferroportin1 expression, infected macrophages induce anti-microbial immune effector mechanisms such as TNFα formation or NO expression which are aggravated upon iron deficiency. These adaptive changes of iron homeostasis and immune response pathways are only found in macrophages infected with Listeria which express listeriolysin O and are therefore able to escape from the phagosome to the cytoplasm. Listeriolysin O deficient Listeria which are restricted to the phagosome are even killed by excess iron which may be based on "iron intoxification" via macrophage radical formation, because iron supplementation in that setting is paralleled by increased ROS formation. Our results indicate that ferroportin1 mediated iron export is a nutritional immune effector pathway to control infection with Listeria residing in the cytoplasm, whereas a different strategy is observed in mutant

  3. Trace Metal Acquisition by Marine Heterotrophic Bacterioplankton with Contrasting Trophic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Barbeau, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria in the SAR11 and Roseobacter lineages shape the marine carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, and sulfur cycles, yet they do so having adopted divergent ecological strategies. Currently, it is unknown whether these globally significant groups partition into specific niches with respect to micronutrients (e.g., trace metals) and how that may affect marine trace metal cycling. Here, we used comparative genomics to identify diverse iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, and zinc uptake capabilities in SAR11 and Roseobacter genomes and uncover surprising unevenness within and between lineages. The strongest predictors for the extent of the metal uptake gene content are the total number of transporters per genome, genome size, total metal transporters, and GC content, but numerous exceptions exist in both groups. Taken together, our results suggest that SAR11 have strongly minimized their trace metal uptake versatility, with high-affinity zinc uptake being a unique exception. The larger Roseobacter genomes have greater trace metal uptake versatility on average, but they also appear to have greater plasticity, resulting in phylogenetically similar genomes having largely different capabilities. Ultimately, phylogeny is predictive of the diversity and extent of 20 to 33% of all metal uptake systems, suggesting that specialization in metal utilization mostly occurred independently from overall lineage diversification in both SAR11 and Roseobacter. We interpret these results as reflecting relatively recent trace metal niche partitioning in both lineages, suggesting that concentrations and chemical forms of metals in the marine environment are important factors shaping the gene content of marine heterotrophic Alphaproteobacteria of the SAR11 and Roseobacter lineages. PMID:26729720

  4. Ubiquitination as an Efficient Molecular Strategy Employed in Salmonella Infection

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Lakshmi A.; Edelmann, Mariola J.

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin modification has various functions in the host innate immune system in response to the bacterial infection. To counteract the host immunity, Salmonella can specifically target ubiquitin pathways by its effector proteins. In this review, we describe the multiple facets of ubiquitin function during infection with Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and hypothesize how these studies on the host–pathogen interactions can help to understand the general function of the ubiquitination pathway in the host cell. PMID:25505465

  5. Ubiquitination as an efficient molecular strategy employed in salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Lakshmi A; Edelmann, Mariola J

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin modification has various functions in the host innate immune system in response to the bacterial infection. To counteract the host immunity, Salmonella can specifically target ubiquitin pathways by its effector proteins. In this review, we describe the multiple facets of ubiquitin function during infection with Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and hypothesize how these studies on the host-pathogen interactions can help to understand the general function of the ubiquitination pathway in the host cell.

  6. Different leaf cost–benefit strategies of ferns distributed in contrasting light habitats of sub-tropical forests

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shi-Dan; Li, Rong-Hua; Song, Juan; He, Peng-Cheng; Liu, Hui; Berninger, Frank; Ye, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Ferns are abundant in sub-tropical forests in southern China, with some species being restricted to shaded understorey of natural forests, while others are widespread in disturbed, open habitats. To explain this distribution pattern, we hypothesize that ferns that occur in disturbed forests (FDF) have a different leaf cost–benefit strategy compared with ferns that occur in natural forests (FNF), with a quicker return on carbon investment in disturbed habitats compared with old-growth forests. Methods We chose 16 fern species from contrasting light habitats (eight FDF and eight FNF) and studied leaf functional traits, including leaf life span (LLS), specific leaf area (SLA), leaf nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations (N and P), maximum net photosynthetic rates (A), leaf construction cost (CC) and payback time (PBT), to conduct a leaf cost–benefit analysis for the two fern groups. Key Results The two groups, FDF and FNF, did not differ significantly in SLA, leaf N and P, and CC, but FDF had significantly higher A, greater photosynthetic nitrogen- and phosphorus-use efficiencies (PNUE and PPUE), and shorter PBT and LLS compared with FNF. Further, across the 16 fern species, LLS was significantly correlated with A, PNUE, PPUE and PBT, but not with SLA and CC. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that leaf cost–benefit analysis contributes to understanding the distribution pattern of ferns in contrasting light habitats of sub-tropical forests: FDF employing a quick-return strategy can pre-empt resources and rapidly grow in the high-resource environment of open habitats; while a slow-return strategy in FNF allows their persistence in the shaded understorey of old-growth forests. PMID:26684751

  7. Different leaf cost-benefit strategies of ferns distributed in contrasting light habitats of sub-tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shi-Dan; Li, Rong-Hua; Song, Juan; He, Peng-Cheng; Liu, Hui; Berninger, Frank; Ye, Qing

    2016-03-01

    Ferns are abundant in sub-tropical forests in southern China, with some species being restricted to shaded understorey of natural forests, while others are widespread in disturbed, open habitats. To explain this distribution pattern, we hypothesize that ferns that occur in disturbed forests (FDF) have a different leaf cost-benefit strategy compared with ferns that occur in natural forests (FNF), with a quicker return on carbon investment in disturbed habitats compared with old-growth forests. We chose 16 fern species from contrasting light habitats (eight FDF and eight FNF) and studied leaf functional traits, including leaf life span (LLS), specific leaf area (SLA), leaf nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations (N and P), maximum net photosynthetic rates (A), leaf construction cost (CC) and payback time (PBT), to conduct a leaf cost-benefit analysis for the two fern groups. The two groups, FDF and FNF, did not differ significantly in SLA, leaf N and P, and CC, but FDF had significantly higher A, greater photosynthetic nitrogen- and phosphorus-use efficiencies (PNUE and PPUE), and shorter PBT and LLS compared with FNF. Further, across the 16 fern species, LLS was significantly correlated with A, PNUE, PPUE and PBT, but not with SLA and CC. Our results demonstrate that leaf cost-benefit analysis contributes to understanding the distribution pattern of ferns in contrasting light habitats of sub-tropical forests: FDF employing a quick-return strategy can pre-empt resources and rapidly grow in the high-resource environment of open habitats; while a slow-return strategy in FNF allows their persistence in the shaded understorey of old-growth forests. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Photodynamic therapy as a novel antimicrobial strategy against biofilm-based nosocomial infections: study protocols.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs), also known as nosocomial infections, are one of the most serious health-care issues currently influencing health-care costs. Among them, those sustained by microbial biofilm represent a major public health concern. Here, we describe the experimental protocols for microbial biofilm inactivation relying on antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) as a new strategy for the control of these kinds of infections.

  9. Root transcriptional responses of two melon genotypes with contrasting resistance to Monosporascus cannonballus (Pollack et Uecker) infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Monosporascus cannonballus is the main causal agent of melon vine decline disease. Several studies have been carried out mainly focused on the study of the penetration of this pathogen into melon roots, the evaluation of symptoms severity on infected roots, and screening assays for breeding programs. However, a detailed molecular view on the early interaction between M. cannonballus and melon roots in either susceptible or resistant genotypes is lacking. In the present study, we used a melon oligo-based microarray to investigate the gene expression responses of two melon genotypes, Cucumis melo ‘Piel de sapo’ (‘PS’) and C. melo ‘Pat 81’, with contrasting resistance to the disease. This study was carried out at 1 and 3 days after infection (DPI) by M. cannonballus. Results Our results indicate a dissimilar behavior of the susceptible vs. the resistant genotypes from 1 to 3 DPI. ‘PS’ responded with a more rapid infection response than ‘Pat 81’ at 1 DPI. At 3 DPI the total number of differentially expressed genes identified in ‘PS’ declined from 451 to 359, while the total number of differentially expressed transcripts in ‘Pat 81’ increased from 187 to 849. Several deregulated transcripts coded for components of Ca2+ and jasmonic acid (JA) signalling pathways, as well as for other proteins related to defence mechanisms. Transcriptional differences in the activation of the JA-mediated response in ‘Pat 81’ compared to ‘PS’ suggested that JA response might be partially responsible for their observed differences in resistance. Conclusions As a result of this study we have identified for the first time a set of candidate genes involved in the root response to the infection of the pathogen causing melon vine decline. This information is useful for understanding the disease progression and resistance mechanisms few days after inoculation. PMID:23134692

  10. Plant infection by two different viruses induce contrasting changes of vectors fitness and behavior.

    PubMed

    Chesnais, Quentin; Couty, Aude; Uzest, Maryline; Brault, Véronique; Ameline, Arnaud

    2017-07-21

    Insect-vectored plant viruses can induce changes in plant phenotypes, thus influencing plant-vector interactions in a way that may promote their dispersal according to their mode of transmission (i.e., circulative vs. noncirculative). This indirect vector manipulation requires host-virus-vector coevolution and would thus be effective solely in very specific plant-virus-vector species associations. Some studies suggest this manipulation may depend on multiple factors relative to various intrinsic characteristics of vectors such as transmission efficiency. In anintegrative study, we tested the effects of infection of the Brassicaceae Camelina sativa with the noncirculative Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) or the circulative Turnip yellows virus (TuYV) on the host-plant colonization of two aphid species differing in their virus transmission efficiency: the polyphagous Myzus persicae, efficient vector of both viruses, and the Brassicaceae specialist Brevicoryne brassicae, poor vector of TuYV and efficient vector of CaMV. Results confirmed the important role of virus mode of transmission as plant-mediated effects of CaMV on the two aphid species induced negative alterations of feeding behavior (i.e., decreased phloem sap ingestion) and performance that were both conducive for virus fitness by promoting dispersion after a rapid acquisition. In addition, virus transmission efficiency may also play a role in vector manipulation by viruses as only the responses of the efficient vector to plant-mediated effects of TuYV, that is, enhanced feeding behavior and performances, were favorable to their acquisition and further dispersal. Altogether, this work demonstrated that vector transmission efficiency also has to be considered when studying the mechanisms underlying vector manipulation by viruses. Our results also reinforce the idea that vector manipulation requires coevolution between plant, virus and vector. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  11. Serological response to Helicobacter pylori infection among Latin American populations with contrasting risks of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, M. Constanza; Beltran, Mauricio; Conde-Glez, Carlos; Harris, Paul R.; Michel, Angelika; Waterboer, Tim; Flórez, Astrid Carolina; Torres, Javier; Ferreccio, Catterina; Sampson, Joshua N.; Pawlita, Michael; Rabkin, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a rare outcome of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection. Serologic profiles may reveal bacterial, environmental and/or host factors associated with cancer risk. We therefore compared specific anti-H. pylori antibodies among populations with at least 2-fold differences in gastric cancer mortality from Mexico, Colombia and Chile. Our study included 1,776 adults (mean age 42 years) from three nationally representative surveys, equally divided between residents of high- and low-risk areas. Antibodies to 15 immunogenic H. pylori antigens were measured by fluorescent bead-based multiplex assays; results were summarized to identify overall H. pylori seropositivity. We used logistic regression to model associations between antibody seroreactivity and regional cancer risk (high vs. low), adjusting for country, age and sex. Both risk areas had similar H. pylori seroprevalence. Residents in high- and low-risk areas were seroreactive to a similar number of antigens (means 8.2 vs. 7.9, respectively; adjusted-odds ratio, OR: 1.02, p=0.05). Seroreactivities to Catalase and the known virulence proteins CagA and VacA were each significantly (p<0.05) associated with residence in high-risk areas, but ORs were moderate (1.26, 1.42, and 1.41, respectively) and their discriminatory power was low (ROC area under curve <0.6). The association of Catalase was independent from effects of either CagA or VacA. Sensitivity analyses for antibody associations restricted to H. pylori-seropositive individuals generally replicated significant associations. Our findings suggest that humoral responses to H. pylori are insufficient to distinguish high and low gastric cancer risk in Latin America. Factors determining population variation of gastric cancer burden remain to be identified. PMID:26178251

  12. Serological response to Helicobacter pylori infection among Latin American populations with contrasting risks of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Camargo, M Constanza; Beltran, Mauricio; Conde-Glez, Carlos J; Harris, Paul R; Michel, Angelika; Waterboer, Tim; Carolina Flórez, Astrid; Torres, Javier; Ferreccio, Catterina; Sampson, Joshua N; Pawlita, Michael; Rabkin, Charles S

    2015-12-15

    Gastric cancer is a rare outcome of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection. Serologic profiles may reveal bacterial, environmental and/or host factors associated with cancer risk. We therefore compared specific anti-H. pylori antibodies among populations with at least twofold differences in gastric cancer mortality from Mexico, Colombia and Chile. Our study included 1,776 adults (mean age 42 years) from three nationally representative surveys, equally divided between residents of high- and low-risk areas. Antibodies to 15 immunogenic H. pylori antigens were measured by fluorescent bead-based multiplex assays; results were summarized to identify overall H. pylori seropositivity. We used logistic regression to model associations between antibody seroreactivity and regional cancer risk (high vs. low), adjusting for country, age and sex. Both risk areas had similar H. pylori seroprevalence. Residents in high- and low-risk areas were seroreactive to a similar number of antigens (means 8.2 vs. 7.9, respectively; adjusted odds ratio, OR: 1.02, p = 0.05). Seroreactivities to Catalase and the known virulence proteins CagA and VacA were each significantly (p < 0.05) associated with residence in high-risk areas, but ORs were moderate (1.26, 1.42 and 1.41, respectively) and their discriminatory power was low (area under the curve < 0.6). The association of Catalase was independent from effects of either CagA or VacA. Sensitivity analyses for antibody associations restricted to H. pylori-seropositive individuals generally replicated significant associations. Our findings suggest that humoral responses to H. pylori are insufficient to distinguish high and low gastric cancer risk in Latin America. Factors determining population variation of gastric cancer burden remain to be identified. © 2015 UICC.

  13. Strategies for addressing restorative challenges in HIV-infected children.

    PubMed

    Abdelnur, Juliana Pires; Cerqueira, Daniella Ferraz; Castro, Gloria Fernanda; Maia, Lucianne Cople; de Souza, Ivete Pomarico Ribeiro

    2008-01-01

    The complete caries removal of deep/extensive dentin carious lesions with conventional procedures (high- and low-speed bur) may increase the risk of pulp exposure. In children with systemic diseases, such as HIV-infected children, the dental treatment proposed for the primary dentition with pulp involvement is tooth extraction once endodontic therapies cannot be guaranteed successfully. Therefore, the objective of this study was to describe 3 cases of alternative techniques for caries removal in extensive and/or deep dentin carious lesions in the primary dentition of HIV-infected children: (1) atraumatic restorative treatment (ART); (2) Carisolv; and (3) Papacarie.

  14. Strategies for fast and low-dose laboratory-based phase contrast tomography for microstructural scaffold analysis in tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Charlotte K.; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Totonelli, Giorgia; Diemoz, Paul C.; Endrizzi, Marco; Zamir, Anna; Coan, Paola; Bravin, Alberto; De Coppi, Paolo; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    The application of x-ray phase contrast computed tomography (PCT) to the field of tissue engineering is dis- cussed. Specific focus is on the edge illumination PCT method, which can be adapted to weakly coherent x-ray sources, permitting PCT imaging in standard (non-synchrotron) laboratory environments. The method was applied to a prominent research topic in tissue engineering, namely the development of effective and reliable decellularization protocols to derive scaffolds from native tissue. Results show that edge illumination PCT provides sufficient image quality to evaluate the microstructural integrity of scaffolds and, thus, to assess the performance of the used decellularization technique. In order to highlight that edge illumination PCT can ultimately comply with demands on a high specimen throughput and low doses of radiation, recently developed strategies for scan time and dose reduction are discussed.

  15. Estimating updraft velocity components over large spatial scales: contrasting migration strategies of golden eagles and turkey vultures.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, Gil; Brandes, David; Mandel, James T; Bildstein, Keith L; Miller, Tricia A; Lanzone, Michael; Katzner, Todd; Maisonneuve, Charles; Tremblay, Junior A

    2012-02-01

    Soaring birds migrate in massive numbers worldwide. These migrations are complex and dynamic phenomena, strongly influenced by meteorological conditions that produce thermal and orographic uplift as the birds traverse the landscape. Herein we report on how methods were developed to estimate the strength of thermal and orographic uplift using publicly available digital weather and topography datasets at continental scale. We apply these methods to contrast flight strategies of two morphologically similar but behaviourally different species: golden eagle, Aquila chrysaetos, and turkey vulture, Cathartes aura, during autumn migration across eastern North America tracked using GPS tags. We show that turkey vultures nearly exclusively used thermal lift, whereas golden eagles primarily use orographic lift during migration. It has not been shown previously that migration tracks are affected by species-specific specialisation to a particular uplift mode. The methods introduced herein to estimate uplift components and test for differences in weather use can be applied to study movement of any soaring species.

  16. Ubiquitination as an efficient molecular strategy employed in salmonella infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ubiquitin modification has various functions in the host innate immune system in response to the bacterial infection. To counteract the host immunity, Salmonella can specifically target ubiquitin pathways by its effector proteins. In this review, we describe the multiple facets of ubiquitin func...

  17. Strategies for the prevention of periprosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Adeli, B; Parvizi, J

    2012-11-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a devastating complication which can follow a total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Although rare, this ongoing threat undermines the success of TJA, a historically reputable procedure. It has haunted the orthopedic community for decades and several ongoing studies have provided insights and new approaches to effectively battle this multilayered problem.

  18. Clinical Appearance of Oral Candida Infection and Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S.; Majumdar, Barnali; Anil, Sukumaran

    2015-01-01

    Candida species present both as commensals and opportunistic pathogens of the oral cavity. For decades, it has enthralled the clinicians to investigate its pathogenicity and to improvise newer therapeutic regimens based on the updated molecular research. Candida is readily isolated from the oral cavity, but simple carriage does not predictably result in development of an infection. Whether it remains as a commensal, or transmutes into a pathogen, is usually determined by pre-existing or associated variations in the host immune system. The candida infections may range from non-life threatening superficial mucocutaneous disorders to invasive disseminated disease involving multiple organs. In fact, with the increase in number of AIDS cases, there is a resurgence of less common forms of oral candida infections. The treatment after confirmation of the diagnosis should include recognizing and eliminating the underlying causes such as ill-fitting oral appliances, history of medications (antibiotics, corticosteroids, etc.), immunological and endocrine disorders, nutritional deficiency states and prolonged hospitalization. Treatment with appropriate topical antifungal agents such as amphotericin, nystatin, or miconazole usually resolves the symptoms of superficial infection. Occasionally, administration of systemic antifungal agents may be necessary in immunocompromised patients, the selection of which should be based upon history of recent azole exposure, a history of intolerance to an antifungal agent, the dominant Candida species and current susceptibility data. PMID:26733948

  19. Preventive strategy for BVDV infection in North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite control efforts, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections remain a source of significant economic loss for producers in the United States. The success of control efforts in Scandinavia has demonstrated that BVDV eradication is possible. However, it is not possible to take a “one size fi...

  20. Combined off-resonance imaging and T2 relaxation in the rotating frame for positive contrast MR imaging of infection in a murine burn model

    PubMed Central

    Andronesi, Ovidiu C.; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Righi, Valeria; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Kesarwani, Meenu; He, Jianxin; Yasuhara, Shingo; Dai, George; Rahme, Laurence G.; Tzika, Aria A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To develop novel magnetic resonance (MR) imaging methods to monitor accumulation of macrophages in inflammation and infection. Positive-contrast MR imaging provides an alternative to negative-contrast MRI, exploiting the chemical shift induced by ultra-small superparamagnetic iron-oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles to nearby water molecules. We introduce a novel combination of off-resonance (ORI) positive-contrast MRI and T2ρ relaxation in the rotating frame (ORI-T2ρ) for positive-contrast MR imaging of USPIO. Materials and Methods We tested ORI-T2ρ in phantoms and imaged in vivo the accumulation of USPIO-labeled macrophages at the infection site in a mouse model of burn trauma and infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). PA infection is clinically important. The USPIO nanoparticles were injected directly in the animals in solution, and macrophage labeling occurred in vivo in the animal model. Results We observed a significant difference between ORI-T2ρ and ORI, which leads us to suggest that ORI-T2ρ is more sensitive in detecting USPIO signal. To this end, the ORI-T2ρ positive contrast method may prove to be of higher utility in future research. Conclusion Our results may have direct implications in the longitudinal monitoring of infection, and open perspectives for testing novel anti-infective compounds. PMID:21031524

  1. Multihospital infection prevention collaborative: informatics challenges and strategies to prevent MRSA.

    PubMed

    Doebbeling, Bradley N; Flanagan, Mindy E; Nall, Glenna; Hoke, Shawn; Rosenman, Marc; Kho, Abel

    2013-01-01

    We formed a collaborative to spread effective MRSA prevention strategies. We conducted a two-phase, multisite, quasi-experimental study of seven hospital systems (11 hospitals) in IN, MT, ME and Ontario, Canada over six years. Patients with prior MRSA were identified at admission using regional health information exchange data. We developed a system to return an alert message indicating a prior history of MRSA, directed to infection preventionists and admissions. Alerts indicated the prior anatomic site, and the originating institution. The combined approach of training and coaching, implementation of MRSA registries, notifying hospitals on admission of previously infected or colonized patients, and change strategies was effective in reducing MRSA infections over 80%. Further research and development of electronic surveillance tools is needed to better integrate the varied data source and support preventing MRSA infections. Our study supports the importance of hospitals collaborating to share data and implement effective strategies to prevent MRSA.

  2. Spontaneous strategy use protects against visual working memory deficits in older adults infected with HIV.

    PubMed

    Woods, Steven Paul; Weber, Erica; Cameron, Marizela V; Dawson, Matthew S; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Bondi, Mark W; Grant, Igor

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that older human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults are at particular risk for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), including dementia. Deficits in attention/working memory are posited to play a central role in the development of HAND among older adults. The aim of the present study was to examine the possible protective benefits of spontaneous strategy use during a visual working memory task in 46 older and 42 younger adults infected with HIV. Results revealed a significant interaction between age and strategy use, with older adults who used a meta-cognitive strategy demonstrating superior working memory performance versus non-strategy users. This effect was not observed in the younger HIV-infected sample and was not better explained by possible confounding factors, such as education, comorbid medical conditions, or HIV disease severity. Within the older group, strategy use was associated with better executive functions and higher estimated verbal intelligence. Findings from this study suggest that working memory declines in older HIV-infected adults are moderated by the use of higher-level mnemonic strategies and may inform cognitive neurorehabilitation efforts to improve cognitive and everyday functioning outcomes in older persons living with HIV infection.

  3. Spontaneous Strategy Use Protects Against Visual Working Memory Deficits in Older Adults Infected with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Steven Paul; Weber, Erica; Cameron, Marizela V.; Dawson, Matthew S.; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Bondi, Mark W.; Grant, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that older human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults are at particular risk for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), including dementia. Deficits in attention/working memory are posited to play a central role in the development of HAND among older adults. The aim of the present study was to examine the possible protective benefits of spontaneous strategy use during a visual working memory task in 46 older and 42 younger adults infected with HIV. Results revealed a significant interaction between age and strategy use, with older adults who used a meta-cognitive strategy demonstrating superior working memory performance versus non-strategy users. This effect was not observed in the younger HIV-infected sample and was not better explained by possible confounding factors, such as education, comorbid medical conditions, or HIV disease severity. Within the older group, strategy use was associated with better executive functions and higher estimated verbal intelligence. Findings from this study suggest that working memory declines in older HIV-infected adults are moderated by the use of higher-level mnemonic strategies and may inform cognitive neurorehabilitation efforts to improve cognitive and everyday functioning outcomes in older persons living with HIV infection. PMID:20876195

  4. Contrasting micro/nano architecture on termite wings: two divergent strategies for optimising success of colonisation flights.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gregory S; Cribb, Bronwen W; Watson, Jolanta A

    2011-01-01

    Many termite species typically fly during or shortly after rain periods. Local precipitation will ensure water will be present when establishing a new colony after the initial flight. Here we show how different species of termite utilise two distinct and contrasting strategies for optimising the success of the colonisation flight. Nasutitermes sp. and Microcerotermes sp. fly during rain periods and adopt hydrophobic structuring/'technologies' on their wings to contend with a moving canvas of droplets in daylight hours. Schedorhinotermes sp. fly after rain periods (typically at night) and thus do not come into contact with mobile droplets. These termites, in contrast, display hydrophilic structuring on their wings with a small scale roughness which is not dimensionally sufficient to introduce an increase in hydrophobicity. The lack of hydrophobicity allows the termite to be hydrophilicly captured at locations where water may be present in large quantities; sufficient for the initial colonization period. The high wettability of the termite cuticle (Schedorhinotermes sp.) indicates that the membrane has a high surface energy and thus will also have strong attractions with solid particles. To investigate this the termite wings were also interacted with both artificial and natural contaminants in the form of hydrophilic silicon beads of various sizes, 4 µm C(18) beads and three differently structured pollens. These were compared to the superhydrophobic surface of the planthopper (Desudaba psittacus) and a native Si wafer surface. The termite cuticle demonstrated higher adhesive interactions with all particles in comparison to those measured on the plant hopper.

  5. Contrasting Micro/Nano Architecture on Termite Wings: Two Divergent Strategies for Optimising Success of Colonisation Flights

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Gregory S.; Cribb, Bronwen W.; Watson, Jolanta A.

    2011-01-01

    Many termite species typically fly during or shortly after rain periods. Local precipitation will ensure water will be present when establishing a new colony after the initial flight. Here we show how different species of termite utilise two distinct and contrasting strategies for optimising the success of the colonisation flight. Nasutitermes sp. and Microcerotermes sp. fly during rain periods and adopt hydrophobic structuring/‘technologies’ on their wings to contend with a moving canvas of droplets in daylight hours. Schedorhinotermes sp. fly after rain periods (typically at night) and thus do not come into contact with mobile droplets. These termites, in contrast, display hydrophilic structuring on their wings with a small scale roughness which is not dimensionally sufficient to introduce an increase in hydrophobicity. The lack of hydrophobicity allows the termite to be hydrophilicly captured at locations where water may be present in large quantities; sufficient for the initial colonization period. The high wettability of the termite cuticle (Schedorhinotermes sp.) indicates that the membrane has a high surface energy and thus will also have strong attractions with solid particles. To investigate this the termite wings were also interacted with both artificial and natural contaminants in the form of hydrophilic silicon beads of various sizes, 4 µm C18 beads and three differently structured pollens. These were compared to the superhydrophobic surface of the planthopper (Desudaba psittacus) and a native Si wafer surface. The termite cuticle demonstrated higher adhesive interactions with all particles in comparison to those measured on the plant hopper. PMID:21935401

  6. Contrast-enhanced MRI-derived scar patterns and associated ventricular tachycardias in nonischemic cardiomyopathy: implications for the ablation strategy.

    PubMed

    Piers, Sebastiaan R D; Tao, Qian; van Huls van Taxis, Carine F B; Schalij, Martin J; van der Geest, Rob J; Zeppenfeld, Katja

    2013-10-01

    There are limited data on typical arrhythmogenic substrates and associated ventricular tachycardias (VT) in patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy. The substrate location may have implications for the ablation strategy. Nineteen consecutive patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy (age 58±14 years, 79% men, left ventricular ejection fraction 41±11%) who underwent contrast-enhanced MRI and VT ablation were included. On the basis of 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced MRI-derived scar reconstructions, 8 patients (42%) had predominant basal anteroseptal scar, 9 patients (47%) had predominant inferolateral scar, and 2 patients (11%) had other scar types. Three distinct VT morphologies (≥1 of 3 inducible in 16/19 patients) were associated with underlying scar type. In 9 patients with anteroseptal scar-related VT (8/9 predominant scar, 1/9 nonpredominant), ablation target sites (defined as sites with ≥11/12 pacemap, concealed entrainment or VT termination during ablation) were located in the aortic root and/or anteroseptal left ventricular endocardium in 8 patients (89%) and in the anterior cardiac vein in 1 patient (11%), with additional target sites at the right ventricular septum in 2 patients (22%) and at the epicardium in 1 patient (11%). In contrast, in 8 patients with predominant inferolateral scar-related VT, target sites were located at the epicardium in 5 patients (63%) and in the endocardial inferolateral left ventricle in 3 patients (37%). Two typical scar patterns (anteroseptal and inferolateral) account for 89% of arrhythmogenic substrates in patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Three distinct VT morphologies are highly suggestive of the presence of these scars. Anteroseptal scars were, in general, most effectively approached from the aortic root or anteroseptal left ventricular endocardium, whereas inferolateral scars frequently required an epicardial approach.

  7. Potential strategies for the eradication of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Huwaitat, Rawan; McCloskey, Alice P; Gilmore, Brendan F; Laverty, Garry

    2016-07-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is one of the leading threats to society. The increasing burden of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infection is particularly concerning as such bacteria are demonstrating resistance to nearly all currently licensed therapies. Various strategies have been hypothesized to treat multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections including: targeting the Gram-negative outer membrane; neutralization of lipopolysaccharide; inhibition of bacterial efflux pumps and prevention of protein folding. Silver and silver nanoparticles, fusogenic liposomes and nanotubes are potential strategies for extending the activity of licensed, Gram-positive selective, antibiotics to Gram-negatives. This may serve as a strategy to fill the current void in pharmaceutical development in the short term. This review outlines the most promising strategies that could be implemented to solve the threat of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections.

  8. Genomic innovations linked to infection strategies across emerging pathogenic chytrid fungi

    PubMed Central

    Farrer, Rhys A.; Martel, An; Verbrugghe, Elin; Abouelleil, Amr; Ducatelle, Richard; Longcore, Joyce E.; James, Timothy Y.; Pasmans, Frank; Fisher, Matthew C.; Cuomo, Christina A.

    2017-01-01

    To understand the evolutionary pathways that lead to emerging infections of vertebrates, here we explore the genomic innovations that allow free-living chytrid fungi to adapt to and colonize amphibian hosts. Sequencing and comparing the genomes of two pathogenic species of Batrachochytrium to those of close saprophytic relatives reveals that pathogenicity is associated with remarkable expansions of protease and cell wall gene families, while divergent infection strategies are linked to radiations of lineage-specific gene families. By comparing the host–pathogen response to infection for both pathogens, we illuminate the traits that underpin a strikingly different immune response within a shared host species. Our results show that, despite commonalities that promote infection, specific gene-family radiations contribute to distinct infection strategies. The breadth and evolutionary novelty of candidate virulence factors that we discover underscores the urgent need to halt the advance of pathogenic chytrids and prevent incipient loss of biodiversity. PMID:28322291

  9. Genomic innovations linked to infection strategies across emerging pathogenic chytrid fungi.

    PubMed

    Farrer, Rhys A; Martel, An; Verbrugghe, Elin; Abouelleil, Amr; Ducatelle, Richard; Longcore, Joyce E; James, Timothy Y; Pasmans, Frank; Fisher, Matthew C; Cuomo, Christina A

    2017-03-21

    To understand the evolutionary pathways that lead to emerging infections of vertebrates, here we explore the genomic innovations that allow free-living chytrid fungi to adapt to and colonize amphibian hosts. Sequencing and comparing the genomes of two pathogenic species of Batrachochytrium to those of close saprophytic relatives reveals that pathogenicity is associated with remarkable expansions of protease and cell wall gene families, while divergent infection strategies are linked to radiations of lineage-specific gene families. By comparing the host-pathogen response to infection for both pathogens, we illuminate the traits that underpin a strikingly different immune response within a shared host species. Our results show that, despite commonalities that promote infection, specific gene-family radiations contribute to distinct infection strategies. The breadth and evolutionary novelty of candidate virulence factors that we discover underscores the urgent need to halt the advance of pathogenic chytrids and prevent incipient loss of biodiversity.

  10. Beyond early infant diagnosis: case finding strategies for identification of HIV-infected infants and children

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Saeed; Kim, Maria H.; Sugandhi, Nandita; Phelps, B. Ryan; Sabelli, Rachael; Diallo, Mamadou O.; Young, Paul; Duncan, Dana; Kellerman, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    There are 3.4 million children infected with HIV worldwide, with up to 2.6 million eligible for treatment under current guidelines. However, roughly 70% of infected children are not receiving live-saving HIV care and treatment. Strengthening case finding through improved diagnosis strategies, and actively linking identified HIV-infected children to care and treatment is essential to ensuring that these children benefit from the care and treatment available to them. Without attention or advocacy, the majority of these children will remain undiagnosed and die from complications of HIV. In this article, we summarize the challenges of identifying HIV-infected infants and children, review currently available evidence and guidance, describe promising new strategies for case finding, and make recommendations for future research and interventions to improve identification of HIV-infected infants and children. PMID:24361633

  11. Looking into Candida albicans infection, host response, and antifungal strategies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans, a commonly encountered fungal pathogen, causes diseases varying from superficial mucosal complaints to life-threatening systemic disorders. Among the virulence traits of C. albicans, yeast-to-hypha transition is most widely acknowledged. Host innate immunity to C. albicans critically requires pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), and defence against C. albicans infection is provided by an exquisite interplay between the innate and adaptive arms of the host immune system.

  12. Looking into Candida albicans infection, host response, and antifungal strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans, a commonly encountered fungal pathogen, causes diseases varying from superficial mucosal complaints to life-threatening systemic disorders. Among the virulence traits of C. albicans, yeast-to-hypha transition is most widely acknowledged. Host innate immunity to C. albicans critically requires pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), and defence against C. albicans infection is provided by an exquisite interplay between the innate and adaptive arms of the host immune system. PMID:25590793

  13. Strategies for Prevention and Treatment of Trichomonas vaginalis Infections.

    PubMed

    Bouchemal, Kawthar; Bories, Christian; Loiseau, Philippe M

    2017-07-01

    The last estimated annual incidence of Trichomonas vaginalis worldwide exceeds that of chlamydia and gonorrhea combined. This critical review updates the state of the art on advances in T. vaginalis diagnostics and strategies for treatment and prevention of trichomoniasis. In particular, new data on treatment outcomes for topical administration of formulations are reviewed and discussed. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Drought responses of two gymnosperm species with contrasting stomatal regulation strategies under elevated [CO2] and temperature.

    PubMed

    Duan, Honglang; O'Grady, Anthony P; Duursma, Remko A; Choat, Brendan; Huang, Guomin; Smith, Renee A; Jiang, Yanan; Tissue, David T

    2015-07-01

    Future climate regimes characterized by rising [CO2], rising temperatures and associated droughts may differentially affect tree growth and physiology. However, the interactive effects of these three factors are complex because elevated [CO2] and elevated temperature may generate differential physiological responses during drought. To date, the interactive effects of elevated [CO2] and elevated temperature on drought-induced tree mortality remain poorly understood in gymnosperm species that differ in stomatal regulation strategies. Water relations and carbon dynamics were examined in two species with contrasting stomatal regulation strategies: Pinus radiata D. Don (relatively isohydric gymnosperm; regulating stomata to maintain leaf water potential above critical thresholds) and Callitris rhomboidea R. Br (relatively anisohydric gymnosperm; allowing leaf water potential to decline as the soil dries), to assess response to drought as a function of [CO2] and temperature. Both species were grown in two [CO2] (C(a) (ambient, 400 μl l(-1)) and C(e) (elevated, 640 μl l(-1))) and two temperature (T(a) (ambient) and T(e) (ambient +4 °C)) treatments in a sun-lit glasshouse under well-watered conditions. Drought plants were then exposed to a progressive drought until mortality. Prior to mortality, extensive xylem cavitation occurred in both species, but significant depletion of non-structural carbohydrates was not observed in either species. Te resulted in faster mortality in P. radiata, but it did not modify the time-to-mortality in C. rhomboidea. C(e) did not delay the time-to-mortality in either species under drought or T(e) treatments. In summary, elevated temperature (+4 °C) had greater influence than elevated [CO2] (+240 μl l(-1)) on drought responses of the two studied gymnosperm species, while stomatal regulation strategies did not generally affect the relative contributions of hydraulic failure and carbohydrate depletion to mortality under severe drought.

  15. Implementing quality improvement strategies to reduce healthcare-associated infections: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Barbara; Marbella, Anne; Pines, Elizabeth; Chopra, Ryan; Black, Edgar R; Aronson, Naomi

    2014-10-01

    Comprehensive incidence estimates indicate that 1.7 million healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and 99,000 HAI-associated deaths occur in US hospitals. Preventing HAIs could save $25.0 to $31.5 billion. Identifying effective quality improvement (QI) strategies for promoting adherence to evidence-based preventive interventions could reduce infections. We searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EMBASE from 2006-2012 for English-language articles with ≥ 100 patients that described an implementation strategy to increase adherence with evidence-based preventive interventions and that met study design criteria. One reviewer abstracted and appraised study quality, with verification by a second. QI strategies included audit and feedback; financial incentives, regulation, and policy; organizational change; patient education; provider education; and provider reminder systems. We evaluated data on HAIs from 30 articles reporting adherence and infection rates that accounted for confounding or secular trends. Many of the measures improved significantly, especially adherence. Results varied by QI strategy(s). Moderate strength of evidence supports improvement in adherence and infection rates when audit and feedback plus provider reminder systems or audit and feedback alone is added to organizational change and provider education. Strength of evidence is low when provider reminder systems alone are added to organizational change and provider education. There were no studies on HAIs in nonhospital settings that met the selection criteria. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Management strategies to reduce risk of postoperative infections.

    PubMed

    Galor, Anat; Goldhardt, Raquel; Wellik, Sarah R; Gregori, Ninel Z; Flynn, Harry W

    2013-12-01

    Postoperative infections, although rare, are still of great concern to the ophthalmologist. The incidence of post-cataract endophthalmitis is low, with a range of .28 per 1,000 to 2.99 per 1000. In addition to intraoperative considerations such as poor wound construction, vitreous loss, topical anesthesia, and prolonged surgical time, other risk factors include preoperative factors such as a diseased ocular surface and systemic immunosuppression. Potential methods of reducing risk of endophthalmitis after anterior segment surgery are discussed and available literature is summarized.

  17. Management strategies to reduce risk of postoperative infections

    PubMed Central

    Galor, Anat; Goldhardt, Raquel; Wellik, Sarah R.; Gregori, Ninel Z.; Flynn, Harry W.

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative infections, although rare, are still of great concern to the ophthalmologist. The incidence of post-cataract endophthalmitis is low, with a range of .28 per 1,000 to 2.99 per 1000. In addition to intraoperative considerations such as poor wound construction, vitreous loss, topical anesthesia, and prolonged surgical time, other risk factors include preoperative factors such as a diseased ocular surface and systemic immunosuppression. Potential methods of reducing risk of endophthalmitis after anterior segment surgery are discussed and available literature is summarized. PMID:24319649

  18. Strategy for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Seiji; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    The eradication of Helicobacter pylori not only heals peptic ulcers but also prevents their recurrence and reduces the risk of development of gastric cancer and other H. pylori-associated disorders. H. pylori eradication heals gastritis and may prevent the spread of infection, reducing the future costs required for the treatment of subsequent H. pylori-associated diseases. There are various guidelines for the management of H. pylori infection worldwide, such as the guidelines of the American College of Gastroenterology, Maastricht IV, the Second Asia-Pacific Consensus Conference, and Japan. The Japanese health insurance system approved H. pylori eradication therapy for H. pylori-related chronic gastritis in 2013. Triple therapy regimens comprising 1 proton pump inhibitor and 2 antimicrobial agents such as amoxicillin, clarithromycin, metronidazole, levofloxacin, or tetracycline have been widely used to eradicate this bacterium. The rate of successful eradication has declined owing to the increased rate of drug resistance stemming from the wide usage of antibiotics. This issue is of particular relevance with regard to clarithromycin. In worldwide, clarithromycin-based triple therapy should be abandoned, as it is no longer effective. Quadruple therapy and sequential therapy are reasonable alternatives for initial therapy. First-line treatment should be recommended on the basis of an understanding of the local prevalence of H. pylori antimicrobial resistance.

  19. [Microbicides for preventing sexually transmitted infections: Current status and strategies for preclinical evaluation of new candidates].

    PubMed

    Fernández Romero, José A; Gil, Pedro I; Ré, Viviana; Robbiani, Melissa; Paglini, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Microbicides are a new tool, still under investigation, which could help prevent infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Increasing evidence shows that the complexity of sexual transmission of viral pathogens requires the identification of compounds able to block the early events during the cycle of viral infection. In this manuscript we provide a comprehensive review of the different microbicide strategies that have been studied or are currently being considered for STI prevention, particularly emphasizing those having the potential to block HIV infection. The manuscript also reviews the complex process that is required to conduct future clinical studies in humans and concludes with a brief discussion of the strategies that could be part of the immediate future in microbicide research.

  20. Advanced therapeutic and prophylactic strategies for Epstein-Barr virus infection in immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Okano, Motohiko; Gross, Thomas G

    2007-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an ubiquitous human herpesvirus. Primary infection is generally subclinical but in certain circumstances, such as in patients with either hereditary or secondary immunodeficiency, EBV infection may cause overt disease that is often lethal. Strategies for the prophylaxis and treatment of these potentially life-threatening complications of EBV infection have advanced dramatically. They include immunological-based approaches targeted at EBV-infected cells, as well as improvement in the treatment of the underlying and predisposing disease. This review will discuss EBV biology and immune events that occur in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals and introduce the novel prophylactic and therapeutic strategies for EBV-associated life-threatening diseases.

  1. Global strategies are required to cure and eliminate HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Revill, Peter; Testoni, Barbara; Locarnini, Stephen; Zoulim, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    Chronic HBV infection results in >1 million deaths per year from cirrhosis and liver cancer. No known cure for chronic HBV exists, due in part to the continued presence of transcriptionally active DNA in the nucleus that is not directly targeted by current antiviral therapies. A coordinated approach is urgently needed to advance an HBV cure worldwide, such as those established in the HIV field. We propose the establishment of an International Coalition to Eliminate Hepatitis B Virus (ICE-HBV) to facilitate the formation of international working groups on HBV virology, immunology, innovative tools and clinical trials: to promote awareness and education as well as to drive changes in government policy and ensure funds are channelled to HBV cure research and drug development. With the ICE-HBV in place, it should be possible to enable a HBV cure within the next decade.

  2. A Novel Strategy for Live Detection of Viral Infection in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Ekström, Jens-Ola; Hultmark, Dan

    2016-01-01

    We have created a transgenic reporter for virus infection, and used it to study Nora virus infection in Drosophila melanogaster. The transgenic construct, Munin, expresses the yeast transcription factor Gal4, tethered to a transmembrane anchor via a linker that can be cleaved by a viral protease. In infected cells, liberated Gal4 will then transcribe any gene that is linked to a promoter with a UAS motif, the target for Gal4 transcription. For instance, infected cells will glow red in the offspring of a cross between the Munin stock and flies with a UAS-RFPnls transgene (expressing a red fluorescent protein). In such flies we show that after natural infection, via the faecal-oral route, 5–15% of the midgut cells are infected, but there is little if any infection elsewhere. By contrast, we can detect infection in many other tissues after injection of virus into the body cavity. The same principle could be applied for other viruses and it could also be used to express or suppress any gene of interest in infected cells. PMID:27189868

  3. Real-time PCR strategy for parasite quantification in blood and tissue samples of experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Caldas, Sérgio; Caldas, Ivo Santana; Diniz, Lívia de Figueiredo; Lima, Wanderson Geraldo de; Oliveira, Riva de Paula; Cecílio, Alzira Batista; Ribeiro, Isabela; Talvani, André; Bahia, Maria Terezinha

    2012-09-01

    The lack of an accurate diagnosis has been a serious obstacle to the advancement of the anti-Trypanosoma cruzi chemotherapy and long-term infection can result in different health risks to human. PCRs are alternative methods, more sensitive than conventional parasitological techniques, which due to their low sensitivities are considered unsuitable for these purposes. The aim of this study was to investigate a sensitive diagnostic strategy to quantify blood and cardiac tissues parasites based on real-time PCR tools during acute and chronic phases of murine Chagas disease, as well as to monitor the evolution of infection in those mice under specific treatment. In parallel, fresh blood examination, immunological analysis and quantification of cardiac inflammation were also performed to confront and improve real-time PCR data. Similar profiles of parasitemia curves were observed in both quantification techniques during the acute phase of the infection. In contrast, parasites could be quantified only by real-time PCR at 60 and 120 days of infection. In cardiac tissue, real-time PCR detected T. cruzi DNA in 100% of infected mice, and using this tool a significant Pearson correlation between parasite load in peripheral blood and in cardiac tissue during acute and chronic phases was observed. Levels of serum CCL2, CCL5 and nitric oxide were coincident with parasite load but focal and diffuse mononuclear infiltrates was observed, even with significant (p<0.05) reduction of parasitism after 60 days of infection. Later, this methodology was used to monitor the evolution of infection in animals treated with itraconazole (Itz). Itz-treatment induced a reduction of parasite load in both blood and cardiac muscle at the treatment period, but after the end of chemotherapy an increase of parasitism was detected. Interestingly, inflammatory mediators levels and heart inflammation intensity had similar evolution to the parasite load, in the group of animals treated. Taken together, our

  4. The role of bacterial biofilm in persistent infections and control strategies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Wen, Yu-mei

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms can be viewed as a specific type of persistent bacterial infection. After initial invasion, microbes can attach to living and non-living surfaces, such as prosthetics and indwelling medical devices, and form a biofilm composed of extracellular polysaccharides, proteins, and other components. In hosts, biofilm formation may trigger drug resistance and inflammation, resulting in persistent infections. The clinical aspects of biofilm formation and leading strategies for biofilm inhibitors will be discussed in this mini-review. PMID:21485310

  5. Contrasting genetic structure of rear edge and continuous range populations of a parasitic butterfly infected by Wolbachia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Climatic oscillations are among the long-term factors shaping the molecular features of animals and plants and it is generally supposed that the rear edges (i.e., the low-latitude limits of distribution of any given specialised species) situated closer to glacial refugia are vital long-term stores of genetic diversity. In the present study, we compared the genetic structure of several populations of an endangered and obligate myrmecophilous butterfly (Maculinea arion) from two distinct and geographically distant parts of its European distribution (i.e., Italy and Poland), which fully represent the ecological and morphological variation occurring across the continent. Results We sequenced the COI mitochondrial DNA gene (the ‘barcoding gene’) and the EF-1α nuclear gene and found substantial genetic differentiation among M. arion Italian populations in both markers. Eleven mtDNA haplotypes were present in Italy. In contrast, almost no mtDNA polymorphisms was found in the Polish M. arion populations, where genetic differentiation at the nuclear gene was low to moderate. Interestingly, the within-population diversity levels in the EF-1α gene observed in Italy and in Poland were comparable. The genetic data did not support any subspecies divisions or any ecological specialisations. All of the populations studied were infected with a single strain of Wolbachia and our screening suggested 100% prevalence of the bacterium. Conclusions Differences in the genetic structure of M. arion observed in Italy and in Poland may be explained by the rear edge theory. Although we were not able to pinpoint any specific evolutionarily significant units, we suggest that the Italian peninsula should be considered as a region of special conservation concern and one that is important for maintaining the genetic diversity of M. arion in Europe. The observed pattern of mtDNA differentiation among the populations could not be explained by an endosymbiotic infection. PMID

  6. Comparative multilocus phylogeography of two Palaearctic spruce bark beetles: influence of contrasting ecological strategies on genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, François; Piel, Frédéric B; Cassel-Lundhagen, Anna; Kirichenko, Natalia; Grumiau, Laurent; Økland, Bjørn; Bertheau, Coralie; Grégoire, Jean-Claude; Mardulyn, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    While phylogeographic patterns of organisms are often interpreted through past environmental disturbances, mediated by climate changes, and geographic barriers, they may also be strongly influenced by species-specific traits. To investigate the impact of such traits, we focused on two Eurasian spruce bark beetles that share a similar geographic distribution, but differ in their ecology and reproduction. Ips typographus is an aggressive tree-killing species characterized by strong dispersal, whereas Dendroctonus micans is a discrete inbreeding species (sib mating is the rule), parasite of living trees and a poor disperser. We compared genetic variation between the two species over both beetles' entire range in Eurasia with five independent gene fragments, to evaluate whether their intrinsic differences could have an influence over their phylogeographic patterns. We highlighted widely divergent patterns of genetic variation for the two species and argue that the difference is indeed largely compatible with their contrasting dispersal strategies and modes of reproduction. In addition, genetic structure in I. typographus divides European populations in a northern and a southern group, as was previously observed for its host plant, and suggests past allopatric divergence. A long divergence time was estimated between East Asian and other populations of both species, indicating their long-standing presence in Eurasia, prior to the last glacial maximum. Finally, the strong population structure observed in D. micans for the mitochondrial locus provides insights into the recent colonization history of this species, from its native European range to regions where it was recently introduced.

  7. Oomycete Interactions with Plants: Infection Strategies and Resistance Principles

    PubMed Central

    Doumane, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The Oomycota include many economically significant microbial pathogens of crop species. Understanding the mechanisms by which oomycetes infect plants and identifying methods to provide durable resistance are major research goals. Over the last few years, many elicitors that trigger plant immunity have been identified, as well as host genes that mediate susceptibility to oomycete pathogens. The mechanisms behind these processes have subsequently been investigated and many new discoveries made, marking a period of exciting research in the oomycete pathology field. This review provides an introduction to our current knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms used by oomycetes, including elicitors and effectors, plus an overview of the major principles of host resistance: the established R gene hypothesis and the more recently defined susceptibility (S) gene model. Future directions for development of oomycete-resistant plants are discussed, along with ways that recent discoveries in the field of oomycete-plant interactions are generating novel means of studying how pathogen and symbiont colonizations overlap. PMID:26041933

  8. Negotiating hospital infections: The debate between ecological balance and eradication strategies in British hospitals, 1947-1969

    PubMed Central

    Condrau, Flurin; Kirk, Robert G. W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews and contrasts two strategies of infection control that emerged in response to the growing use of antibiotics within British hospitals, c.1946-1969. At this time, we argue, the hospital became an arena within which representatives of the medical sciences and clinical practices contested not so much the content of knowledge but the way that knowledge translated into practice. Key to our story are the conceptual assumptions about antibiotics put forward by clinicians, on the one hand, and microbiologists on the other. The former embraced antibiotics as the latest weapon in their fight to eradicate disease. For clinicians, the use of antibiotics were utilised within a conceptual frame that prioritised the value of the individual patient before them. Microbiologists, in contrast, understood antibiotics quite differently. They adopted a complex understanding of the way antibiotics functioned within the hospital environment that emphasised the relational and ecological aspects of their use. Despite their broader environmental focus, microbiologists focus on the ways in which bacteria travelled led to ever greater emphasis to be placed on the «healthy» body which, having been exposed to antibiotics, became a dangerous carrier of resistant staphylococcal strains. The surrounding debate regarding the appropriate use of antibiotics reveals the complex relationship between hospital, the medical sciences and clinical practice. We conclude that the history of hospital infections invites a more fundamental reflection on global hospital cultures, antibiotic prescription practices, and the fostering of an interdisciplinary spirit among the professional groups living and working in the hospital. PMID:22332465

  9. [Social marketing: applying commercial strategies to the prevention of nosocomial infections].

    PubMed

    Sax, Hugo; Longtin, Yves; Alvarez-Ceyssat, Raymonde; Bonfillon, Chantal; Cavallero, Sabrina; Dayer, Pierre; Ginet, Claude; Herrault, Pascale

    2009-04-01

    Although a large proportion of healthcare-associated infections are avoidable, healthcare workers do not always practice evidence-based preventive strategies. Marketing technologies might help to improve patient safety. This article presents the basic principles of marketing and its potential use to promote good infection control practices. The marketing mix (Product, Price, Place, and Promotion) should be taken into account to induce behaviour change. By placing the emphasis on the perceived "profits" for healthcare workers the approach might lose its moral aspect and gain in effectiveness. VigiGerme, a non-commercial registered trademark, applies social marketing techniques to infection control and prevention.

  10. Novel Strategies in the Prevention and Treatment of Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lüthje, Petra; Brauner, Annelie

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are one of the most common bacterial infections, especially in women and children, frequently treated with antibiotics. The alarming increase in antibiotic resistance is a global threat to future treatment of infections. Therefore, alternative strategies are urgently needed. The innate immune system plays a fundamental role in protecting the urinary tract from infections. Antimicrobial peptides form an important part of the innate immunity. They are produced by epithelial cells and neutrophils and defend the urinary tract against invading bacteria. Since efficient resistance mechanisms have not evolved among bacterial pathogens, much effort has been put into exploring the role of antimicrobial peptides and possibilities to utilize them in clinical practice. Here, we describe the impact of antimicrobial peptides in the urinary tract and ways to enhance the production by hormones like vitamin D and estrogen. We also discuss the potential of medicinal herbs to be used in the prophylaxis and the treatment of urinary tract infections. PMID:26828523

  11. New insight on antimicrobial therapy adjustment strategies for gram-negative bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Chen, Hong; Xiao, Shuzhen; Tang, Wei; Shi, Guochao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Gram-negative bacterial infections, especially multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infection, are becoming a serious threat to public health. Although it is widely accepted that both appropriate initial empirical therapy and targeted therapy are important, but for patients needing therapy adjustment, few studies have explored whether adjustment strategy based on microbiologic susceptibility test (MST) brings better outcome compared with empirical adjustment. A total of 320 patients with gram-negative bacterial infection (airway, blood, or pleural effusion) were selected and a prospective cohort study was conducted. Baseline characteristics and outcomes (microbiologic, clinical, and economic) were documented during follow-up. MDR and nosocomial infections were common among subjects. Initial therapies consistent with MST could result in reduced in-hospital mortality, treatment failure rate, infection-related death, percentages of patients needing therapy adjustment, and daily hospitalization cost with increased successful treatment rate compared with inconsistent with MST, and microbiologic outcomes were also better with appropriate therapies. For patients needing therapy adjustment, relying on MST gained no significant benefit on mortality, clinical, or microbiologic outcomes compared with depending on clinical experience. But for patients with MDR infection, adjustment relying on MST gained more benefit than non-MDR infection. Appropriate initial therapy significantly improved the prognosis of patients with gram-negative bacterial infections, but improvement was not that obvious for patients needing therapy adjustment which was based on MST compared with clinical experience, and more beneficial effects of adjustment relying on MST were obtained for patients with MDR bacterial infection. PMID:28353572

  12. Infection Strategies of Bacterial and Viral Pathogens through Pathogen–Human Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Durmuş Tekir, Saliha; Çakir, Tunahan; Ülgen, Kutlu Ö

    2012-01-01

    Since ancient times, even in today’s modern world, infectious diseases cause lots of people to die. Infectious organisms, pathogens, cause diseases by physical interactions with human proteins. A thorough analysis of these interspecies interactions is required to provide insights about infection strategies of pathogens. Here we analyzed the most comprehensive available pathogen–human protein interaction data including 23,435 interactions, targeting 5,210 human proteins. The data were obtained from the newly developed pathogen–host interaction search tool, PHISTO. This is the first comprehensive attempt to get a comparison between bacterial and viral infections. We investigated human proteins that are targeted by bacteria and viruses to provide an overview of common and special infection strategies used by these pathogen types. We observed that in the human protein interaction network the proteins targeted by pathogens have higher connectivity and betweenness centrality values than those proteins not interacting with pathogens. The preference of interacting with hub and bottleneck proteins is found to be a common infection strategy of all types of pathogens to manipulate essential mechanisms in human. Compared to bacteria, viruses tend to interact with human proteins of much higher connectivity and centrality values in the human network. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis of the human proteins targeted by pathogens indicates crucial clues about the infection mechanisms of bacteria and viruses. As the main infection strategy, bacteria interact with human proteins that function in immune response to disrupt human defense mechanisms. Indispensable viral strategy, on the other hand, is the manipulation of human cellular processes in order to use that transcriptional machinery for their own genetic material transcription. A novel observation about pathogen–human systems is that the human proteins targeted by both pathogens are enriched in the regulation of

  13. Antifungal Resistance and New Strategies to Control Fungal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Vandeputte, Patrick; Ferrari, Selene; Coste, Alix T.

    2012-01-01

    Despite improvement of antifungal therapies over the last 30 years, the phenomenon of antifungal resistance is still of major concern in clinical practice. In the last 10 years the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon were extensively unraveled. In this paper, after a brief overview of currently available antifungals, molecular mechanisms of antifungal resistance will be detailed. It appears that major mechanisms of resistance are essential due to the deregulation of antifungal resistance effector genes. This deregulation is a consequence of point mutations occurring in transcriptional regulators of these effector genes. Resistance can also follow the emergence of point mutations directly in the genes coding antifungal targets. In addition we further describe new strategies currently undertaken to discover alternative therapy targets and antifungals. Identification of new antifungals is essentially achieved by the screening of natural or synthetic chemical compound collections. Discovery of new putative antifungal targets is performed through genome-wide approaches for a better understanding of the human pathogenic fungi biology. PMID:22187560

  14. Quiescent Innate Response to Infective Filariae by Human Langerhans Cells Suggests a Strategy of Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Alexis; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Wang, Yuanyuan; Sanprasert, Vivornpun; Law, Melissa; Chaussabel, Damien; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Filarial infection is initiated by mosquito-derived third-stage larvae (L3) deposited on the skin that transit through the epidermis, which contains Langerhans cells (LC) and keratinocytes (KC), among other cells. This earliest interaction between L3 and the LC likely conditions the priming of the immune system to the parasite. To determine the nature of this interaction, human LC (langerin+ E-cadherin+ CD1a+) were generated in vitro and exposed to live L3. LC exposed to live L3 for 48 h showed no alterations in the cell surface markers CD14, CD86, CD83, CD207, E-cadherin, CD80, CD40, and HLA-DR or in mRNA expression of inflammation-associated genes, such as those for interleukin 18 (IL-18), IL-18BP, and caspase 1. In contrast to L3, live tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite, induced production of CXCL9, IP-10, and IL-6 in LC. Furthermore, preexposure of LC to L3 did not alter Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3)- or TLR4-mediated expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-6, or IL-10. Interestingly, cocultures of KC and LC produced significantly more IL-18, IL-1α, and IL-8 than did cultures of LC alone, although exposure of the cocultures to live L3 did not result in altered cytokine production. Microarray examination of ex vivo LC from skin blisters that were exposed to live L3 also showed few significant changes in gene expression compared with unexposed blisters, further underscoring the relatively muted response of LC to L3. Our data suggest that failure by LC to initiate an inflammatory response to the invasive stage of filarial parasites may be a strategy for immune evasion by the filarial parasite. PMID:23429540

  15. Strategies to prevent hepatitis B virus infection in China: immunization, screening, and standard medical practices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunyu; Zhong, Yuesi; Guo, Liping

    2013-02-01

    China has one of the world's highest rates of hepatitis B infection. Over the past 20 years, a series of strategies have been implemented to prevent infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) in China. These strategies include hepatitis B (hepB) immunization for susceptible populations such as infants and young children and for high-risk populations such as health care workers and patients, premarital health care for couples of childbearing age, and standard medical practices. A series of measures implemented by the Chinese government caused the HBV infection rate in China to decrease from 9.75% in 1992 to 7.2% in 2006. However, a report on infectious diseases indicated that more than 1 million people in China were infected with hepB in 2011. There is room for improvement. The current work analyzed the current status of and challenges for strategies to prevent HBV infection in China. This work also recommends clear guidance regarding hepB immunization for parents in rural areas, more flexible premarital health care, health education for both patients and health care workers, and routine HBV screening for high-risk health care workers.

  16. Host fishes and infection strategies of freshwater mussels in large Mobile Basin streams, USA

    Treesearch

    Wendell R. Haag; Melvin L. Warren

    2003-01-01

    We investigated host fishes, timing and modes of glochidial release, and host-attraction strategies for 7 species of freshwater mussels from the Buttahatchee and Sipsey rivers (Mobile Basin), Alabama and Mississippi, USA. We determined hosts as fish species that produced juvenile mussels from laboratory-induced glochidial infections. We established the following...

  17. Using mathematical modeling and control to develop structured treatment interruption strategies for HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Eric S.; Davidian, Marie; Banks, H. Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this article is to suggest that mathematical models describing biological processes taking place within a patient over time can be used to design adaptive treatment strategies. We demonstrate using the key example of treatment strategies for human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV) infection. Although there has been considerable progress in management of HIV infection using highly active antiretroviral therapies, continuous treatment with these agents involves significant cost and burden, toxicities, development of drug resistance, and problems with adherence; these latter complications are of particular concern in substanceabusing individuals. This has inspired interest in structured or supervised treatment interruption (STI) strategies, which involve cycles of treatment withdrawal and re-initiation. We argue that the most promising STI strategies are adaptive treatment strategies. We then describe how biological mechanisms governing the interaction over time between HIV and a patient’s immune system may be represented by mathematical models and how control methods applied to these models can be used to design adaptive STI strategies seeking to maintain long-term suppression of the virus. We advocate that, when such mathematical representations of processes underlying a disease or disorder are available, they can be an important tool for suggesting adaptive treatment strategies for clinical study. PMID:17276624

  18. Healthcare Outbreaks Associated With a Water Reservoir and Infection Prevention Strategies.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Hajime; Weber, David J; Rutala, William A

    2016-06-01

    Hospital water may serve as a reservoir of healthcare-associated pathogens, and contaminated water can lead to outbreaks and severe infections. The clinical features of waterborne outbreaks and infections as well as prevention strategies and control measures are reviewed. The common waterborne pathogens were bacteria, including Legionella and other gram-negative bacteria, and nontuberculous mycobacteria, although fungi and viruses were occasionally described. These pathogens caused a variety of infections, including bacteremia and invasive and disseminated diseases, particularly among immunocompromised hosts and critically ill adults as well as neonates. Waterborne outbreaks occurred in healthcare settings with emergence of new reported reservoirs, including electronic faucets (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Legionella), decorative water wall fountains (Legionella), and heater-cooler devices used in cardiac surgery (Mycobacterium chimaera). Advanced molecular techniques are useful for achieving a better understanding of reservoirs and transmission pathways of waterborne pathogens. Developing prevention strategies based on water reservoirs provides a practical approach for healthcare personnel.

  19. Prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infection: implementation strategies of international guidelines1

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Vera Lúcia Fonseca; Fernandes, Filipa Alexandra Veludo

    2016-01-01

    Objective to describe strategies used by health professionals on the implementation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for the prevention of urinary infection related to catheterism. Method systematic review on literature based on data from CINAHL(r), Nursing & Allied Health Collection, Cochrane Plus Collection, MedicLatina, MEDLINE(r), Academic Search Complete, ACS - American Chemical Society, Health Reference Center Academic, Nursing Reference Center, ScienceDirect Journals and Wiley Online Library. A sample of 13 articles was selected. Results studies have highlighted the decrease of urinary tract infection related to catheterism through reminder systems to decrease of people submitted to urinary catheterism, audits about nursing professionals practice and bundles expansion. Conclusion the present review systemizes the knowledge of used strategies by health professionals on introduction to international recommendations, describing a rate decrease of such infection in clinical practice. PMID:27027676

  20. The immunology of human cytomegalovirus latency: could latent infection be cleared by novel immunotherapeutic strategies?

    PubMed

    Wills, Mark R; Poole, Emma; Lau, Betty; Krishna, Ben; Sinclair, John H

    2015-03-01

    While the host immune response following primary human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is generally effective at stopping virus replication and dissemination, virus is never cleared by the host and like all herpesviruses, persists for life. At least in part, this persistence is known to be facilitated by the ability of HCMV to establish latency in myeloid cells in which infection is essentially silent with, importantly, a total lack of new virus production. However, although the viral transcription programme during latency is much suppressed, a number of viral genes are expressed during latent infection at the protein level and many of these have been shown to have profound effects on the latent cell and its environment. Intriguingly, many of these latency-associated genes are also expressed during lytic infection. Therefore, why the same potent host immune responses generated during lytic infection to these viral gene products are not recognized during latency, thereby allowing clearance of latently infected cells, is far from clear. Reactivation from latency is also a major cause of HCMV-mediated disease, particularly in the immune compromised and immune naive, and is also likely to be a major source of virus in chronic subclinical HCMV infection which has been suggested to be associated with long-term diseases such as atherosclerosis and some neoplasias. Consequently, understanding latency and why latently infected cells appear to be immunoprivileged is crucial for an understanding of the pathogenesis of HCMV and may help to design strategies to eliminate latent virus reservoirs, at least in certain clinical settings.

  1. The Rise and Fall of an Evolutionary Innovation: Contrasting Strategies of Venom Evolution in Ancient and Young Animals.

    PubMed

    Sunagar, Kartik; Moran, Yehu

    2015-10-01

    Animal venoms are theorized to evolve under the significant influence of positive Darwinian selection in a chemical arms race scenario, where the evolution of venom resistance in prey and the invention of potent venom in the secreting animal exert reciprocal selection pressures. Venom research to date has mainly focused on evolutionarily younger lineages, such as snakes and cone snails, while mostly neglecting ancient clades (e.g., cnidarians, coleoids, spiders and centipedes). By examining genome, venom-gland transcriptome and sequences from the public repositories, we report the molecular evolutionary regimes of several centipede and spider toxin families, which surprisingly accumulated low-levels of sequence variations, despite their long evolutionary histories. Molecular evolutionary assessment of over 3500 nucleotide sequences from 85 toxin families spanning the breadth of the animal kingdom has unraveled a contrasting evolutionary strategy employed by ancient and evolutionarily young clades. We show that the venoms of ancient lineages remarkably evolve under the heavy constraints of negative selection, while toxin families in lineages that originated relatively recently rapidly diversify under the influence of positive selection. We propose that animal venoms mostly employ a 'two-speed' mode of evolution, where the major influence of diversifying selection accompanies the earlier stages of ecological specialization (e.g., diet and range expansion) in the evolutionary history of the species-the period of expansion, resulting in the rapid diversification of the venom arsenal, followed by longer periods of purifying selection that preserve the potent toxin pharmacopeia-the period of purification and fixation. However, species in the period of purification may re-enter the period of expansion upon experiencing a major shift in ecology or environment. Thus, we highlight for the first time the significant roles of purifying and episodic selections in shaping animal

  2. Receptivity of female Neohelice granulata (Brachyura, Varunidae): different strategies to maximize their reproductive success in contrasting habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sal Moyano, María Paz; Luppi, Tomás; Gavio, María Andrea; Vallina, Micaela; McLay, Colin

    2012-12-01

    The extent of the receptive period may determine the mating strategies employed by female crabs to obtain mates. Here, we studied the receptivity of female Neohelice granulata (Dana, 1851) in the laboratory, including the form of the vulvae and the anatomy of the seminal receptacle (SR). We examined the factors that influence the duration of receptivity by comparing two populations inhabiting contrasting habitats: Mar Chiquita Coastal lagoon (MCL), which is an oligo-polyhaline estuary, and San Antonio Oeste (SAO), which is an eu-hyperhaline marine bay. Non-receptive females have immobile vulva opercula, while receptive females have mobile opercula. Histological sections of the SR showed that the degree of epithelium secretions was associated with the receptive stage of females, and they may be involved in the maintenance of viable sperm and in the dehiscence of spermatophores. The existence of a special tissue at the junction of the oviduct and the SR was described and proposed as an internal mechanism influencing the timing of ovulation. The duration of receptivity was dependent on the SR load and the capacity to lay eggs. Thus, females with empty SR exhibited longer receptivity and did not lay eggs, while those with full SR exhibited shorter receptivity and always laid eggs. Interpopulation differences showed that females from SAO had shorter receptivity and heavier SR and laid eggs more frequently than females from MCL. Based on our results, we suggest that N. granulata females can adjust the duration of their receptivity and control the moment of fertilization according to different internal mechanisms related to the morphology of the vulvae, the fullness of the SR and anatomical attributes of the SR. An important consequence of this control is greater sperm competition. The extent of the receptive period and the number of times that a female could become receptive in a single reproductive season may also depend on the habitat characteristics.

  3. The Rise and Fall of an Evolutionary Innovation: Contrasting Strategies of Venom Evolution in Ancient and Young Animals

    PubMed Central

    Sunagar, Kartik; Moran, Yehu

    2015-01-01

    Animal venoms are theorized to evolve under the significant influence of positive Darwinian selection in a chemical arms race scenario, where the evolution of venom resistance in prey and the invention of potent venom in the secreting animal exert reciprocal selection pressures. Venom research to date has mainly focused on evolutionarily younger lineages, such as snakes and cone snails, while mostly neglecting ancient clades (e.g., cnidarians, coleoids, spiders and centipedes). By examining genome, venom-gland transcriptome and sequences from the public repositories, we report the molecular evolutionary regimes of several centipede and spider toxin families, which surprisingly accumulated low-levels of sequence variations, despite their long evolutionary histories. Molecular evolutionary assessment of over 3500 nucleotide sequences from 85 toxin families spanning the breadth of the animal kingdom has unraveled a contrasting evolutionary strategy employed by ancient and evolutionarily young clades. We show that the venoms of ancient lineages remarkably evolve under the heavy constraints of negative selection, while toxin families in lineages that originated relatively recently rapidly diversify under the influence of positive selection. We propose that animal venoms mostly employ a ‘two-speed’ mode of evolution, where the major influence of diversifying selection accompanies the earlier stages of ecological specialization (e.g., diet and range expansion) in the evolutionary history of the species–the period of expansion, resulting in the rapid diversification of the venom arsenal, followed by longer periods of purifying selection that preserve the potent toxin pharmacopeia–the period of purification and fixation. However, species in the period of purification may re-enter the period of expansion upon experiencing a major shift in ecology or environment. Thus, we highlight for the first time the significant roles of purifying and episodic selections in

  4. Contrasting spatial distribution and risk factors for past infection with scrub typhus and murine typhus in Vientiane City, Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Vallée, Julie; Thaojaikong, Thaksinaporn; Moore, Catrin E; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Richards, Allen L; Souris, Marc; Fournet, Florence; Salem, Gérard; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul J; Newton, Paul N

    2010-12-07

    The aetiological diagnostic of fevers in Laos remains difficult due to limited laboratory diagnostic facilities. However, it has recently become apparent that both scrub and murine typhus are common causes of previous undiagnosed fever. Epidemiological data suggests that scrub typhus would be more common in rural areas and murine typhus in urban areas, but there is very little recent information on factors involved in scrub and murine typhus transmission, especially where they are sympatric - as is the case in Vientiane, the capital of the Lao PDR. We therefore determined the frequency of IgG seropositivity against scrub typhus (Orientia tsutsugamushi) and murine typhus (Rickettsia typhi), as indices of prior exposure to these pathogens, in randomly selected adults in urban and peri-urban Vientiane City (n = 2,002, ≥35 years). Anti-scrub and murine typhus IgG were detected by ELISA assays using filter paper elutes. We validated the accuracy of ELISA of these elutes against ELISA using serum samples. The overall prevalence of scrub and murine typhus IgG antibodies was 20.3% and 20.6%, respectively. Scrub typhus seropositivity was significantly higher among adults living in the periphery (28.4%) than in the central zone (13.1%) of Vientiane. In contrast, seroprevalence of murine typhus IgG antibodies was significantly higher in the central zone (30.8%) as compared to the periphery (14.4%). In multivariate analysis, adults with a longer residence in Vientiane were at significant greater risk of past infection with murine typhus and at lower risk for scrub typhus. Those with no education, living on low incomes, living on plots of land with poor sanitary conditions, living in large households, and farmers were at higher risk of scrub typhus and those living in neighborhoods with high building density and close to markets were at greater risk for murine typhus and at lower risk of scrub typhus past infection. This study underscores the intense circulation of both scrub

  5. Contrasting Spatial Distribution and Risk Factors for Past Infection with Scrub Typhus and Murine Typhus in Vientiane City, Lao PDR

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, Julie; Thaojaikong, Thaksinaporn; Moore, Catrin E.; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Richards, Allen L.; Souris, Marc; Fournet, Florence; Salem, Gérard; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul J.; Newton, Paul N.

    2010-01-01

    Background The aetiological diagnostic of fevers in Laos remains difficult due to limited laboratory diagnostic facilities. However, it has recently become apparent that both scrub and murine typhus are common causes of previous undiagnosed fever. Epidemiological data suggests that scrub typhus would be more common in rural areas and murine typhus in urban areas, but there is very little recent information on factors involved in scrub and murine typhus transmission, especially where they are sympatric - as is the case in Vientiane, the capital of the Lao PDR. Methodology and Principal Findings We therefore determined the frequency of IgG seropositivity against scrub typhus (Orientia tsutsugamushi) and murine typhus (Rickettsia typhi), as indices of prior exposure to these pathogens, in randomly selected adults in urban and peri-urban Vientiane City (n = 2,002, ≥35 years). Anti-scrub and murine typhus IgG were detected by ELISA assays using filter paper elutes. We validated the accuracy of ELISA of these elutes against ELISA using serum samples. The overall prevalence of scrub and murine typhus IgG antibodies was 20.3% and 20.6%, respectively. Scrub typhus seropositivity was significantly higher among adults living in the periphery (28.4%) than in the central zone (13.1%) of Vientiane. In contrast, seroprevalence of murine typhus IgG antibodies was significantly higher in the central zone (30.8%) as compared to the periphery (14.4%). In multivariate analysis, adults with a longer residence in Vientiane were at significant greater risk of past infection with murine typhus and at lower risk for scrub typhus. Those with no education, living on low incomes, living on plots of land with poor sanitary conditions, living in large households, and farmers were at higher risk of scrub typhus and those living in neighborhoods with high building density and close to markets were at greater risk for murine typhus and at lower risk of scrub typhus past infection

  6. The EPIICAL project: an emerging global collaboration to investigate immunotherapeutic strategies in HIV-infected children.

    PubMed

    Palma, P; Foster, C; Rojo, P; Zangari, P; Yates, A; Cotugno, N; Klein, N; Luzuriaga, K; Pahwa, S; Nastouli, E; Gibb, D M; Borkowsky, W; Bernardi, S; Calvez, V; Manno, E; Mora, Nadia; Compagnucci, A; Wahren, B; Muñoz-Fernández, Má; De Rossi, A; Ananworanich, J; Pillay, D; Giaquinto, C; Rossi, P

    The EPIICAL (Early-treated Perinatally HIV-infected Individuals: Improving Children's Actual Life with Novel Immunotherapeutic Strategies) project arises from the firm belief that perinatally infected children treated with suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) from early infancy represent the optimal population model in which to study novel immunotherapeutic strategies aimed at achieving ART-free remission. This is because HIV-infected infants treated within 2-3 months of life have a much reduced viral reservoir size, and rarely show HIV-specific immunity but preserve normal immune development. The goal of EPIICAL is the establishment of an international collaboration to develop a predictive platform using this model to select promising HIV therapeutic vaccine candidates, leading to prioritisation or deprioritisation of novel immunotherapeutic strategies. To establish this platform, the EPIICAL Consortium aims to: develop predictive models of virological and immunological dynamics associated with response to early ART and to treatment interruption using available data from existing cohorts/studies of early-treated perinatally HIV-infected children; optimise methodologies to better characterise immunological, virological and genomic correlates/profiles associated with viral control; test novel immunotherapeutic strategies using in vivo proof-of-concept (PoC) studies with the aim of inducing virological, immunological and transcriptomic correlates/profiles equivalent to those defined by the predictive model. This approach will strengthen the capacity for discovery, development and initial testing of new therapeutic vaccine strategies through the integrated efforts of leading international scientific groups, with the aim of improving the health of HIV-infected individuals.

  7. Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Podgorny, Kelly; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Bratzler, Dale W.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Greene, Linda; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Saiman, Lisa; Yokoe, Deborah S.; Maragakis, Lisa L.; Kaye, Keith S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Previously published guidelines are available that provide comprehensive recommendations for detecting and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The intent of this document is to highlight practical recommendations in a concise format designed to assist acute care hospitals in implementing and prioritizing their surgical site infection (SSI) prevention efforts. This document updates “Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals,”1 published in 2008. This expert guidance document is sponsored by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and is the product of a collaborative effort led by SHEA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise. The list of endorsing and supporting organizations is presented in the introduction to the 2014 updates.2 PMID:24799638

  8. Outcomes of co-infection by two potyviruses: implications for the evolution of manipulative strategies

    PubMed Central

    Salvaudon, Lucie; De Moraes, Consuelo M.; Mescher, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have documented effects of plant viruses on host plants that appear to enhance transmission by insect vectors. But, almost no empirical work has explored the implications of such apparent manipulation for interactions among co-infecting pathogens. We examined single and mixed infections of two potyviruses, watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) and zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), that frequently co-occur in cucurbitaceae populations and share the same aphid vectors. We found that ZYMV isolates replicated at similar rates in single and mixed infections, whereas WMV strains accumulated to significantly lower levels in the presence of ZYMV. Furthermore, ZYMV induced changes in leaf colour and volatile emissions that enhanced aphid (Aphis gossypii) recruitment to infected plants. By contrast, WMV did not elicit strong effects on plant–aphid interactions. Nevertheless, WMV was still readily transmitted from mixed infections, despite fairing poorly in in-plant competition. These findings suggest that pathogen effects on host–vector interactions may well influence competition among co-infecting pathogens. For example, if non-manipulative pathogens benefit from the increased vector traffic elicited by manipulative competitors, their costs of competition may be mitigated to some extent. Conversely, the benefits of manipulation may be limited by free-rider effects in systems where there is strong competition among pathogens for host resources and/or access to vectors. PMID:23407835

  9. Outcomes of co-infection by two potyviruses: implications for the evolution of manipulative strategies.

    PubMed

    Salvaudon, Lucie; De Moraes, Consuelo M; Mescher, Mark C

    2013-04-07

    Recent studies have documented effects of plant viruses on host plants that appear to enhance transmission by insect vectors. But, almost no empirical work has explored the implications of such apparent manipulation for interactions among co-infecting pathogens. We examined single and mixed infections of two potyviruses, watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) and zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), that frequently co-occur in cucurbitaceae populations and share the same aphid vectors. We found that ZYMV isolates replicated at similar rates in single and mixed infections, whereas WMV strains accumulated to significantly lower levels in the presence of ZYMV. Furthermore, ZYMV induced changes in leaf colour and volatile emissions that enhanced aphid (Aphis gossypii) recruitment to infected plants. By contrast, WMV did not elicit strong effects on plant-aphid interactions. Nevertheless, WMV was still readily transmitted from mixed infections, despite fairing poorly in in-plant competition. These findings suggest that pathogen effects on host-vector interactions may well influence competition among co-infecting pathogens. For example, if non-manipulative pathogens benefit from the increased vector traffic elicited by manipulative competitors, their costs of competition may be mitigated to some extent. Conversely, the benefits of manipulation may be limited by free-rider effects in systems where there is strong competition among pathogens for host resources and/or access to vectors.

  10. Host Life History Strategy, Species Diversity, and Habitat Influence Trypanosoma cruzi Vector Infection in Changing Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Gottdenker, Nicole L.; Chaves, Luis Fernando; Calzada, José E.; Saldaña, Azael; Carroll, C. Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Background Anthropogenic land use may influence transmission of multi-host vector-borne pathogens by changing diversity, relative abundance, and community composition of reservoir hosts. These reservoir hosts may have varying competence for vector-borne pathogens depending on species-specific characteristics, such as life history strategy. The objective of this study is to evaluate how anthropogenic land use change influences blood meal species composition and the effects of changing blood meal species composition on the parasite infection rate of the Chagas disease vector Rhodnius pallescens in Panama. Methodology/Principal Findings R. pallescens vectors (N = 643) were collected in different habitat types across a gradient of anthropogenic disturbance. Blood meal species in DNA extracted from these vectors was identified in 243 (40.3%) vectors by amplification and sequencing of a vertebrate-specific fragment of the 12SrRNA gene, and T. cruzi vector infection was determined by pcr. Vector infection rate was significantly greater in deforested habitats as compared to contiguous forests. Forty-two different species of blood meal were identified in R. pallescens, and species composition of blood meals varied across habitat types. Mammals (88.3%) dominated R. pallescens blood meals. Xenarthrans (sloths and tamanduas) were the most frequently identified species in blood meals across all habitat types. A regression tree analysis indicated that blood meal species diversity, host life history strategy (measured as rmax, the maximum intrinsic rate of population increase), and habitat type (forest fragments and peridomiciliary sites) were important determinants of vector infection with T. cruzi. The mean intrinsic rate of increase and the skewness and variability of rmax were positively associated with higher vector infection rate at a site. Conclusions/Significance In this study, anthropogenic landscape disturbance increased vector infection with T. cruzi, potentially

  11. Host life history strategy, species diversity, and habitat influence Trypanosoma cruzi vector infection in Changing landscapes.

    PubMed

    Gottdenker, Nicole L; Chaves, Luis Fernando; Calzada, José E; Saldaña, Azael; Carroll, C Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic land use may influence transmission of multi-host vector-borne pathogens by changing diversity, relative abundance, and community composition of reservoir hosts. These reservoir hosts may have varying competence for vector-borne pathogens depending on species-specific characteristics, such as life history strategy. The objective of this study is to evaluate how anthropogenic land use change influences blood meal species composition and the effects of changing blood meal species composition on the parasite infection rate of the Chagas disease vector Rhodnius pallescens in Panama. R. pallescens vectors (N = 643) were collected in different habitat types across a gradient of anthropogenic disturbance. Blood meal species in DNA extracted from these vectors was identified in 243 (40.3%) vectors by amplification and sequencing of a vertebrate-specific fragment of the 12SrRNA gene, and T. cruzi vector infection was determined by pcr. Vector infection rate was significantly greater in deforested habitats as compared to contiguous forests. Forty-two different species of blood meal were identified in R. pallescens, and species composition of blood meals varied across habitat types. Mammals (88.3%) dominated R. pallescens blood meals. Xenarthrans (sloths and tamanduas) were the most frequently identified species in blood meals across all habitat types. A regression tree analysis indicated that blood meal species diversity, host life history strategy (measured as r(max), the maximum intrinsic rate of population increase), and habitat type (forest fragments and peridomiciliary sites) were important determinants of vector infection with T. cruzi. The mean intrinsic rate of increase and the skewness and variability of r(max) were positively associated with higher vector infection rate at a site. In this study, anthropogenic landscape disturbance increased vector infection with T. cruzi, potentially by changing host community structure to favor hosts that are

  12. Effectiveness of nitrate addition and increased oil content as methane mitigation strategies for beef cattle fed two contrasting basal diets.

    PubMed

    Troy, S M; Duthie, C-A; Hyslop, J J; Roehe, R; Ross, D W; Wallace, R J; Waterhouse, A; Rooke, J A

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of (1) the addition of nitrate and (2) an increase in dietary oil on methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2) emissions from 2 breeds (cross-bred Charolais and purebred Luing) of finishing beef cattle receiving 2 contrasting basal diets consisting (grams per kilogram DM) of 500:500 (Mixed) and 80:920 (Concentrate) forage to concentrate ratios. Within each basal diet there were 3 treatments: (i) control treatments (mixed-CTL and concentrate-CTL) contained rapeseed meal as the protein source, which was replaced with either (ii) calcium nitrate (mixed-NIT and concentrate-NIT) supplying 21.5 g nitrate/kg DM, or (iii) rapeseed cake (mixed-RSC and concentrate-RSC) to increase dietary oil from 27 (CTL) to 53 g/kg DM (RSC). Following adaption to diets, CH4 and H2 emissions were measured on 1 occasion from each of the 76 steers over a 13-wk period. Dry matter intakes tended (P = 0.051) to be greater for the concentrate diet than the mixed diet; however, when expressed as grams DMI per kilogram BW, there was no difference between diets (P = 0.41). Dry matter intakes for NIT or RSC did not differ from CTL. Steers fed a concentrate diet produced less CH4 and H2 than those fed a mixed diet (P < 0.001). Molar proportions of acetate (P < 0.001) and butyrate (P < 0.01) were lower and propionate (P < 0.001) and valerate (P < 0.05) higher in the rumen fluid from steers fed the concentrate diet. For the mixed diet, CH4 yield (grams per kilogram DMI) was decreased by 17% when nitrate was added (P < 0.01), while H2 yield increased by 160% (P < 0.001). The addition of RSC to the mixed diet decreased CH4 yield by 7.5% (P = 0.18). However, for the concentrate diet neither addition of nitrate (P = 0.65) nor increasing dietary oil content (P = 0.46) decreased CH4 yield compared to concentrate-CTL. Molar proportions of acetate were higher (P < 0.001) and those of propionate lower (P < 0.01) in rumen fluid from NIT treatments compared to

  13. Evaluating vaccination strategies for reducing infant respiratory syncytial virus infection in low-income settings.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Piero; Merler, Stefano; Ajelli, Marco; Manfredi, Piero; Munywoki, Patrick K; Nokes, D; Melegaro, Alessia

    2015-03-10

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract disease and related hospitalization of young children in least developed countries. Individuals are repeatedly infected, but it is the first exposure, often in early infancy, that results in the vast majority of severe RSV disease. Unfortunately, due to immunological immaturity, infants are a problematic RSV vaccine target. Several trials are ongoing to identify a suitable candidate vaccine and target group, but no immunization program is yet in place. In this work, an individual-based model that explicitly accounts for the socio-demographic population structure is developed to investigate RSV transmission patterns in a rural setting of Kenya and to evaluate the potential effectiveness of alternative population targets in reducing RSV infant infection. We find that household transmission is responsible for 39% of infant infections and that school-age children are the main source of infection within the household, causing around 55% of cases. Moreover, assuming a vaccine-induced protection equivalent to that of natural infection, our results show that annual vaccination of students is the only alternative strategy to routine immunization of infants able to trigger a relevant and persistent reduction of infant infection (on average, of 35.6% versus 41.5% in 10 years of vaccination). Interestingly, if vaccination of pregnant women boosts maternal antibody protection in infants by an additional 4 months, RSV infant infection will be reduced by 31.5%. These preliminary evaluations support the efforts to develop vaccines and related strategies that go beyond targeting vaccines to those at highest risk of severe disease.

  14. Protective effect of a prime-boost strategy with plasmid DNA followed by recombinant adenovirus expressing TgAMA1 as vaccines against Toxoplasma gondii infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Longzheng; Yamagishi, Junya; Zhang, Shoufa; Jin, Chunmei; Aboge, Gabriel Oluga; Zhang, Houshuang; Zhang, Guohong; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Fujisaki, Kozo; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Xuan, Xuenan

    2012-09-01

    A heterologous prime-boost strategy with priming plasmid DNA followed by recombinant virus expressing relevant antigens is known to stimulate protective immunity against intracellular parasites. In this study, we have evaluated a heterologous prime-boost strategy for immunizing mice against Toxoplasma gondii infection. Our results revealed that the prime-boost strategy using both plasmid DNA and adenoviral vector encoding TgAMA1 may stimulate both humoral and Th1/Th2 cellular immune responses specific for TgAMA1. Moreover, C57BL/6 mice immunized with the pAMA1/Ad5Null, pNull/Ad5AMA1, and pAMA1/Ad5AMA1 constructs showed survival rates of 12.5%, 37.5%, and 50%, respectively. In contrast, all the pNull/Ad5Null immunized mice died after infection with the PLK-GFP strain of T. gondii. Brain cyst burden was reduced by 23% in mice immunized with pAMA1/Ad5AMA1 compared with the pNull/Ad5AMA1 immunized mice. These results demonstrate that the heterologous DNA priming and recombinant adenovirus boost strategy may provide protective immunity against T. gondii infection.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adapts its iron uptake strategies in function of the type of infections.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Pierre; Dingemans, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative γ-Proteobacterium which is known for its capacity to colonize various niches, including some invertebrate and vertebrate hosts, making it one of the most frequent bacteria causing opportunistic infections. P. aeruginosa is able to cause acute as well as chronic infections and it uses different colonization and virulence factors to do so. Infections range from septicemia, urinary infections, burn wound colonization, and chronic colonization of the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Like the vast majority of organisms, P. aeruginosa needs iron to sustain growth. P. aeruginosa utilizes different strategies to take up iron, depending on the type of infection it causes. Two siderophores are produced by this bacterium, pyoverdine and pyochelin, characterized by high and low affinities for iron respectively. P. aeruginosa is also able to utilize different siderophores from other microorganisms (siderophore piracy). It can also take up heme from hemoproteins via two different systems. Under microaerobic or anaerobic conditions, P. aeruginosa is also able to take up ferrous iron via its Feo system using redox-cycling phenazines. Depending on the type of infection, P. aeruginosa can therefore adapt by switching from one iron uptake system to another as we will describe in this short review.

  16. Emerging therapeutic strategies to prevent infection-related microvascular endothelial activation and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Ilyse; Liles, W Conrad

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that loss of endothelial barrier function and resulting microvascular leak play important mechanistic roles in the pathogenesis of infection-related end-organ dysfunction and failure. Several distinct therapeutic strategies, designed to prevent or limit infection-related microvascular endothelial activation and permeability, thereby mitigating end-organ injury/dysfunction, have recently been investigated in pre-clinical models. In this review, these potential therapeutic strategies, namely, VEGFR2/Src antagonists, sphingosine-1-phosphate agonists, fibrinopeptide Bβ15–42, slit2N, secinH3, angiopoietin-1/tie-2 agonists, angiopoietin-2 antagonists, statins, atrial natriuretic peptide, and mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells, are discussed in terms of their translational potential for the management of clinical infectious diseases. PMID:23863603

  17. Healthcare associated infection: novel strategies and antimicrobial implants to prevent surgical site infection

    PubMed Central

    Leaper, David; McBain, Andrew J; Kramer, Axel; Assadian, Ojan; Sanchez, Jose Luis Alfonso; Lumio, Jukka; Kiernan, Martin

    2010-01-01

    This report is based on a Hygienist Panel Meeting held at St Anne's Manor, Wokingham on 24–25 June 2009. The panel agreed that greater use should be made of antiseptics to reduce reliance on antibiotics with their associated risk of antibiotic resistance. When choosing an antiseptic for clinical use, the Biocompatibility Index, which considers both the microbiocidal activity and any cytotoxic effects of an antiseptic agent, was considered to be a useful tool. The need for longer and more proactive post-discharge surveillance of surgical patients was also agreed to be a priority, especially given the current growth of day-case surgery. The introduction of surgical safety checklists, such as the World Health Organization's Safe Surgery Saves Lives initiative, is a useful contribution to improving safety and prevention of SSIs and should be used universally. Considering sutures as ‘implants’, with a hard or non-shedding surface to which micro-organisms can form biofilm and cause surgical site infections, was felt to be a useful concept. PMID:20819330

  18. Loki-Infect 3 : a portable networked agent model for designing community-level containment strategies.

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Leland B.; Cannon, Daniel C.; Hobbs, Jacob A.; Davey, Victoria J.; Glass, Robert John, Jr.

    2010-12-01

    Loki-Infect 3 is a desktop application intended for use by community-level decision makers. It allows rapid construction of small-scale studies of emerging or hypothetical infectious diseases in their communities and evaluation of the potential effectiveness of various containment strategies. It was designed with an emphasis on modularity, portability, and ease of use. Our goal is to make this program freely available to community workers across the world.

  19. New Diagnostic Strategies for Detection of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Benjamin D.; Gilger, Mark A.; Czinn, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) is a common chronic bacterial infection that is an important cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastroduodenal disease in children. H pylori is also associated with extragastric manifestations, including growth reduction, iron-deficiency anemia, and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Current guidelines recommend endoscopy with biopsy for the definitive demonstration of H pylori infection. In contrast to serology, the fecal antigen test and the urea breath test provide reliable, sensitive, and specific results for detecting active H pylori infection in children before and after treatment. The first-line treatment option for pediatric patients is triple therapy with a proton pump inhibitor and 2 antibiotics, which include amoxicillin and clarithromycin or metronidazole. Decreasing eradication rates and the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of H pylori have led to the use of other treatments, such as sequential therapy or triple therapy with newer antibiotics, particularly in geographic areas with high rates of antibiotic resistance. Patients should be tested after treatment to confirm eradication, as the absence of symptoms does not necessarily mean that H pylori is no longer present. This clinical roundtable monograph provides an overview of H pylori infection, as well as expert insight into the diagnosis and management of H pylori infection in children. PMID:26491414

  20. YELLOW FEVER PREVENTION STRATEGIES AWARENESS AMONG HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS IN SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Avelino-Silva, Vivian Iida; Francelino, Hilario Sousa; Kallás, Esper Georges

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Vaccination is the main preventive strategy against Yellow Fever (YF), which is a public health concern in Brazil. However, HIV-infected patients might have insufficient knowledge regarding YF, YF prevention, and vaccines in general. Methods: In this questionnaire-based study, data from 158 HIV-infected individuals were addressed in three distinct outpatient clinics in São Paulo. Information was collected on demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as patients' knowledge of vaccines, YF and YF preventive strategies. In addition, individual YF vaccine recommendations and vaccine status were investigated. Results: Although most participants adequately ascertain the vaccine as the main prevention strategy against YF, few participants were aware of the severity and lack of specific treatment for YF. Discrepancy in YF vaccine (patients who should have taken the vaccine, but did not) was observed in 18.8% of participants. Conclusion: YF is an important and preventable public health concern, and these results demonstrate that more information is necessary for the HIV-infected population. PMID:25229222

  1. The immunology of human cytomegalovirus latency: could latent infection be cleared by novel immunotherapeutic strategies?

    PubMed Central

    Wills, Mark R; Poole, Emma; Lau, Betty; Krishna, Ben; Sinclair, John H

    2015-01-01

    While the host immune response following primary human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is generally effective at stopping virus replication and dissemination, virus is never cleared by the host and like all herpesviruses, persists for life. At least in part, this persistence is known to be facilitated by the ability of HCMV to establish latency in myeloid cells in which infection is essentially silent with, importantly, a total lack of new virus production. However, although the viral transcription programme during latency is much suppressed, a number of viral genes are expressed during latent infection at the protein level and many of these have been shown to have profound effects on the latent cell and its environment. Intriguingly, many of these latency-associated genes are also expressed during lytic infection. Therefore, why the same potent host immune responses generated during lytic infection to these viral gene products are not recognized during latency, thereby allowing clearance of latently infected cells, is far from clear. Reactivation from latency is also a major cause of HCMV-mediated disease, particularly in the immune compromised and immune naive, and is also likely to be a major source of virus in chronic subclinical HCMV infection which has been suggested to be associated with long-term diseases such as atherosclerosis and some neoplasias. Consequently, understanding latency and why latently infected cells appear to be immunoprivileged is crucial for an understanding of the pathogenesis of HCMV and may help to design strategies to eliminate latent virus reservoirs, at least in certain clinical settings. PMID:25132454

  2. Conflict between parasites with different transmission strategies infecting an amphipod host

    PubMed Central

    Haine, Eleanor R; Boucansaud, Karelle; Rigaud, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    Competition between parasites within a host can influence the evolution of parasite virulence and host resistance, but few studies examine the effects of unrelated parasites with conflicting transmission strategies infecting the same host. Vertically transmitted (VT) parasites, transmitted from mother to offspring, are in conflict with virulent, horizontally transmitted (HT) parasites, because healthy hosts are necessary to maximize VT parasite fitness. Resolution of the conflict between these parasites should lead to the evolution of one of two strategies: avoidance, or sabotage of HT parasite virulence by the VT parasite. We investigated two co-infecting parasites in the amphipod host, Gammarus roeseli: VT microsporidia have little effect on host fitness, but acanthocephala modify host behaviour, increasing the probability that the amphipod is predated by the acanthocephalan's definitive host. We found evidence for sabotage: the behavioural manipulation induced by the Acanthocephala Polymorphus minutus was weaker in hosts also infected by the microsporidia Dictyocoela sp. (roeselum) compared to hosts infected by P. minutus alone. Such conflicts may explain a significant portion of the variation generally observed in behavioural measures, and since VT parasites are ubiquitous in invertebrates, often passing undetected, conflict via transmission may be of great importance in the study of host–parasite relationships. PMID:16271976

  3. Arterial-phase three-dimensional gadolinium magnetic resonance angiography of the renal arteries. Strategies for timing and contrast media injection: original investigation.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, S O; Knopp, M V; Prince, M R; Londy, F; Knopp, M A

    1998-09-01

    The authors review different imaging and contrast-media infusion strategies for arterial-phase three-dimensional (3D) gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (Gd-MRA). The influence of physicochemical factors on the infusion of contrast media, including viscosity, flow rate, inline pressure, and cannula size, is assessed. The combination of manual or automated contrast-media administration with timing-dependent or -independent 3D Gd-MRA techniques is reviewed regarding the aspects of effectiveness, robustness, image quality, and costs. For effective bolus delivery with high flow rates, the type and temperature of the contrast media, the size of the cannula, and an immediate saline flush must be considered. Timing-dependent techniques based on a test bolus and using automated contrast-media infusion as well as timing independent techniques such as MR SmartPrep or multiphase 3D Gd-MRA by using a manual injection with a SmartSet tubing set, are all effective procedures for arterial phase 3D Gd-MRA. Manual contrast-media injection with a tubing set can be used for timing-independent MRA techniques. The multiphase 3D Gd-MRA approach seems to be favorable for different MR systems, robustness, and speed.

  4. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikejimba, Lynda; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Lin, Yuan; Chen, Baiyu; Ghate, Sujata V.; Zerhouni, Moustafa; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2012-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a novel x-ray imaging technique that provides 3D structural information of the breast. In contrast to 2D mammography, DBT minimizes tissue overlap potentially improving cancer detection and reducing number of unnecessary recalls. The addition of a contrast agent to DBT and mammography for lesion enhancement has the benefit of providing functional information of a lesion, as lesion contrast uptake and washout patterns may help differentiate between benign and malignant tumors. This study used a task-based method to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: contrast enhanced mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d', derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine contrast, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 5 mm lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d' was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. In general, higher dose gave higher d', but for the lowest iodine concentration and lowest dose, dual energy subtraction tomosynthesis and temporal subtraction tomosynthesis demonstrated the highest performance.

  5. Controlled Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice under treatment with anti-IL-17A or IL-17F antibodies, in contrast to TNFα neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Segueni, Noria; Tritto, Elaine; Bourigault, Marie-Laure; Rose, Stéphanie; Erard, François; Le Bert, Marc; Jacobs, Muazzam; Di Padova, Franco; Stiehl, Daniel P.; Moulin, Pierre; Brees, Dominique; Chibout, Salah-Dine; Ryffel, Bernhard; Kammüller, Michael; Quesniaux, Valerie F.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies targeting IL-17A or its receptor IL-17RA show unprecedented efficacy in the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis. These therapies, by neutralizing critical mediators of immunity, may increase susceptibility to infections. Here, we compared the effect of antibodies neutralizing IL-17A, IL-17F or TNFα on murine host responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by evaluating lung transcriptomic, microbiological and histological analyses. Coinciding with a significant increase of mycobacterial burden and pathological changes following TNFα blockade, gene array analyses of infected lungs revealed major changes of inflammatory and immune gene expression signatures 4 weeks post-infection. Specifically, gene expression associated with host-pathogen interactions, macrophage recruitment, activation and polarization, host-antimycobacterial activities, immunomodulatory responses, as well as extracellular matrix metallopeptidases, were markedly modulated by TNFα blockade. IL-17A or IL-17F neutralization elicited only mild changes of few genes without impaired host resistance four weeks after M. tuberculosis infection. Further, the absence of both IL-17RA and IL-22 pathways in genetically deficient mice did not profoundly compromise host control of M. tuberculosis over a 6-months period, ruling out potential compensation between these two pathways, while TNFα-deficient mice succumbed rapidly. These data provide experimental confirmation of the low clinical risk of mycobacterial infection under anti-IL-17A therapy, in contrast to anti-TNFα treatment. PMID:27853279

  6. Polyfunctional T Cell Responses in Children in Early Stages of Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Contrast with Monofunctional Responses of Long-term Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Albareda, María C.; De Rissio, Ana M.; Tomas, Gonzalo; Serjan, Alicia; Alvarez, María G.; Viotti, Rodolfo; Fichera, Laura E.; Esteva, Mónica I.; Potente, Daniel; Armenti, Alejandro; Tarleton, Rick L.; Laucella, Susana A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Adults with chronic Trypanosoma cruzi exhibit a poorly functional T cell compartment, characterized by monofunctional (IFN-γ-only secreting) parasite-specific T cells and increased levels of terminally differentiated T cells. It is possible that persistent infection and/or sustained exposure to parasites antigens may lead to a progressive loss of function of the immune T cells. Methodology/Principal Findings To test this hypothesis, the quality and magnitude of T. cruzi-specific T cell responses were evaluated in T. cruzi-infected children and compared with long-term T. cruzi-infected adults with no evidence of heart failure. The phenotype of CD4+ T cells was also assessed in T. cruzi-infected children and uninfected controls. Simultaneous secretion of IFN-γ and IL-2 measured by ELISPOT assays in response to T. cruzi antigens was prevalent among T. cruzi-infected children. Flow cytometric analysis of co-expression profiles of CD4+ T cells with the ability to produce IFN-γ, TNF-α, or to express the co-stimulatory molecule CD154 in response to T. cruzi showed polyfunctional T cell responses in most T. cruzi-infected children. Monofunctional T cell responses and an absence of CD4+TNF-α+-secreting T cells were observed in T. cruzi-infected adults. A relatively high degree of activation and differentiation of CD4+ T cells was evident in T. cruzi-infected children. Conclusions/Significance Our observations are compatible with our initial hypothesis that persistent T. cruzi infection promotes eventual exhaustion of immune system, which might contribute to disease progression in long-term infected subjects. PMID:24349591

  7. Introduced and native congeners use different resource allocation strategies to maintain performance during infection.

    PubMed

    Coon, Courtney A C; Brace, Amber J; McWilliams, Scott R; McCue, Marshall D; Martin, Lynn B

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hosts can manage parasitic infections using an array of tactics, which are likely to vary contingent on coevolutionary history between the host and the parasite. Here we asked whether coping ability of congeners that differ in host-parasite coevolutionary history differed in response to experimental infections with a coccidian parasite. House sparrows (Passer domesticus) and gray-headed sparrows (Passer griseus) are sympatric and ecologically similar, but house sparrows are recent colonizers of Kenya, the site of our comparison, whereas gray-headed sparrows are native. We evaluated three variables as barometers of infection coping ability: vertical flight, pectoral muscle size, and fat score. We also measured routing of a dose of (13)C-labeled leucine, an essential amino acid, among tissues to compare resource allocation strategies in response to infection. We found that burden effects on performance were minimal in both species, but house sparrows maintained considerably higher burdens than gray-headed sparrows regardless of exposure. House sparrows also had more exogeneous leucine tracer in all tissues after 24 h, demonstrating a difference in the way the two species allocate or distribute resources. We argue that house sparrows may be maintaining larger resource reserves to mitigate costs associated with exposure and infection. Additionally, in response to increased parasite exposure, gray-headed sparrows had less leucine tracer in their spleens and more in their gonads, whereas house sparrows did not change allocation, perhaps indicating a trade-off that is not experienced by the introduced species.

  8. Impact of a surgical site infection reduction strategy after colorectal resection.

    PubMed

    Connolly, T M; Foppa, C; Kazi, E; Denoya, P I; Bergamaschi, R

    2016-09-01

    This study was performed to determine the impact of a surgical site infection (SSI) reduction strategy on SSI rates following colorectal resection. American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) data from 2006-14 were utilized and supplemented by institutional review board-approved chart review. The primary end-point was superficial and deep incisional SSI. The inclusion criterion was colorectal resection. The SSI reduction strategy consisted of preoperative (blood glucose, bowel preparation, shower, hair removal), intra-operative (prophylactic antibiotics, antimicrobial incisional drape, wound protector, wound closure technique) and postoperative (wound dressing technique) components. The SSI reduction strategy was prospectively implemented and compared with historical controls (pre-SSI strategy arm). Statistical analysis included Pearson's chi-square test, and Student's t-test performed with spss software. Of 1018 patients, 379 were in the pre-SSI strategy arm, 311 in the SSI strategy arm and 328 were included to test durability. The study arms were comparable for all measured parameters. Preoperative wound class, operation time, resection type and stoma creation did not differ significantly. The SSI strategy arm demonstrated a significant decrease in overall SSI rates (32.19% vs 18.97%) and superficial SSI rates (23.48% vs 8.04%). Deep SSI and organ space rates did not differ. A review of patients testing durability demonstrated continued improvement in overall SSI rates (8.23%). The implementation of an SSI reduction strategy resulted in a 41% decrease in SSI rates following colorectal resection over its initial 3 years, and its durability as demonstrated by continuing improvement was seen over an additional 2 years. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  9. Evaluating Infection Prevention Strategies in Out-Patient Dialysis Units Using Agent-Based Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wares, Joanna R; Lawson, Barry; Shemin, Douglas; D'Agata, Erika M C

    2016-01-01

    Patients receiving chronic hemodialysis (CHD) are among the most vulnerable to infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO), which are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Current guidelines to reduce transmission of MDRO in the out-patient dialysis unit are targeted at patients considered to be high-risk for transmitting these organisms: those with infected skin wounds not contained by a dressing, or those with fecal incontinence or uncontrolled diarrhea. Here, we hypothesize that targeting patients receiving antimicrobial treatment would more effectively reduce transmission and acquisition of MDRO. We also hypothesize that environmental contamination plays a role in the dissemination of MDRO in the dialysis unit. To address our hypotheses, we built an agent-based model to simulate different treatment strategies in a dialysis unit. Our results suggest that reducing antimicrobial treatment, either by reducing the number of patients receiving treatment or by reducing the duration of the treatment, markedly reduces overall colonization rates and also the levels of environmental contamination in the dialysis unit. Our results also suggest that improving the environmental decontamination efficacy between patient dialysis treatments is an effective method for reducing colonization and contamination rates. These findings have important implications for the development and implementation of future infection prevention strategies.

  10. Immune surveillance mechanisms of the skin against the stealth infection strategy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-review.

    PubMed

    Andonova, Maria; Urumova, Valentina

    2013-09-01

    The present review aims to provide insight into the complex interactions between the host and Pseudomonas aeruginosa-an opportunistic microbial agent causing skin infections. Heat, humidity and skin pH are among the factors beneficial for the development of this Gram-negative agent. To cause infection, Pseudomonas aeruginosa should first overcome the primary mechanisms of defense including the cell elements and humoral factors of the skin, as well as non-specific responses-phagocytosis, inflammation, acute phase response. All they are analysed with emphasis on the fact that their detailed understanding would help revealing their potential and allow for their efficient control. The microorganism, being more alterable and more flexible than the host, uses stealth strategies and modes of life. The review goes over the arsenal of virulence factors, used by Pseudomonas aeruginosa to attack the host defense mechanisms. The bacterial pathogenic strategies for invasion, resulting in collapse of skin defense are analysed. Several novel therapeutic approached to Pseudomonas aeruginosa skin infections are briefly reviewed.

  11. Simple strategies to reduce healthcare associated infections in the neonatal intensive care unit: line, tube, and hand hygiene.

    PubMed

    Graham, Philip L

    2010-09-01

    This article describes strategies to prevent 2 important healthcare associated infections in the neonatal intensive care unit: central line-associated bloodstream infections and catheter-associated urinary tract infections. Hand hygiene is discussed as the cornerstone for prevention of all healthcare associated infections. Specific recommendations for education and training of health care personnel who insert and maintain central venous catheters and urinary tract catheters are made and best practices for insertion and maintenance of these catheters are discussed. Throughout this article, the emphasis is on prevention of these high morbidity and mortality healthcare associated infections.

  12. An alternative strategy to western blot as a confirmatory diagnostic test for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xia; Wang, Jibao; Gao, Zhiyun; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Ling; Chen, Huichao; Zhang, Tong; Xiao, Lin; Yao, Jun; Xing, Wenge; Qiu, Maofeng; Jiang, Yan

    2017-03-01

    In China, western blot (WB) is the recommended procedure for the diagnosis of HIV infection. However, this technique is time consuming and labor intensive, and its complexity restricts wide application in resource-limited regions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a dry blood spots (DBS)-urine paired enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test, instead of WB, for HIV antibody detection. Plasma, DBS, and urine samples were collected from 1213 subjects from different populations. Two diagnostic testing strategies were conducted in parallel. The equivalence of the paired ELISA and WB strategies was assessed. A diagnosis of HIV was determined in 250 subjects according to the paired ELISA test, and in 249 according to the WB strategy. The discordant case was judged HIV-positive during follow-up. In total, 18 subjects were diagnosed with possible HIV using the paired ELISA test, among whom, 11 subjects tested negative with WB, and one was confirmed to be HIV-positive during follow-up. For the remaining 945 subjects, both strategies indicated a negative result. The kappa test indicated good conformity (kappa=0.954) between the two diagnostic strategies. The DBS-urine paired ELISA could be applied as an alternative to WB in HIV diagnosis, which would be valuable in resource-limited regions owing to the associated affordability and ease of use. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular Profiles of Contrasting Shade Response Strategies in Wild Plants: Differential Control of Immunity and Shoot Elongation.

    PubMed

    Gommers, Charlotte M M; Keuskamp, Diederik H; Buti, Sara; van Veen, Hans; Koevoets, Iko T; Reinen, Emilie; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Pierik, Ronald

    2017-02-01

    Plants growing at high densities elongate their shoots to reach for light, a response known as the shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). Phytochrome-mediated detection of far-red light reflection from neighboring plants activates growth-promoting molecular pathways leading to SAS However, it is unknown how plants that complete their life cycle in the forest understory and are shade tolerant prevent SAS when exposed to shade. Here, we show how two wild Geranium species from different native light environments regulate contrasting responses to light quality cues. A comparative RNA sequencing approach unveiled the molecular underpinnings of their contrasting growth responses to far-red light enrichment. It also identified differential phytochrome control of plant immunity genes and confirmed that far-red enrichment indeed contrastingly affects resistance against Botrytis cinerea between the two species. Furthermore, we identify a number of candidate regulators of differential shade avoidance. Three of these, the receptor-like kinases FERONIA and THESEUS1 and the non-DNA binding bHLH protein KIDARI, are functionally validated in Arabidopsis thaliana through gene knockout and/or overexpression studies. We propose that these components may be associated with either showing or not showing shade avoidance responses.

  14. Molecular Profiles of Contrasting Shade Response Strategies in Wild Plants: Differential Control of Immunity and Shoot Elongation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Keuskamp, Diederik H.; Buti, Sara; van Veen, Hans; Reinen, Emilie; Voesenek, Laurentius A.C.J.

    2017-01-01

    Plants growing at high densities elongate their shoots to reach for light, a response known as the shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). Phytochrome-mediated detection of far-red light reflection from neighboring plants activates growth-promoting molecular pathways leading to SAS. However, it is unknown how plants that complete their life cycle in the forest understory and are shade tolerant prevent SAS when exposed to shade. Here, we show how two wild Geranium species from different native light environments regulate contrasting responses to light quality cues. A comparative RNA sequencing approach unveiled the molecular underpinnings of their contrasting growth responses to far-red light enrichment. It also identified differential phytochrome control of plant immunity genes and confirmed that far-red enrichment indeed contrastingly affects resistance against Botrytis cinerea between the two species. Furthermore, we identify a number of candidate regulators of differential shade avoidance. Three of these, the receptor-like kinases FERONIA and THESEUS1 and the non-DNA binding bHLH protein KIDARI, are functionally validated in Arabidopsis thaliana through gene knockout and/or overexpression studies. We propose that these components may be associated with either showing or not showing shade avoidance responses. PMID:28138015

  15. Contrasting expression of immune genes in scaled and scaleless skin of Atlantic salmon infected with young stages of Lepeophtheirus salmonis.

    PubMed

    Holm, H Jodaa; Skugor, S; Bjelland, A K; Radunovic, S; Wadsworth, S; Koppang, E O; Evensen, Ø

    2017-02-01

    Atlantic salmon skin tissues with and without scales were taken from two preferred sites of salmon louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) attachment, behind the dorsal fin (scaled) and from the top of the head (scaleless), respectively. Tissues were profiled by qPCR of 32 genes to study responses to copepodids, 4 days post infection (dpi), and during the moult of copepodids to the chalimus stage, at 8 dpi. Basal/constitutive differences were found for many immune-related genes between the two skin sites; e.g., mannose binding protein C was over 100 fold higher expressed in the scaled skin from the back in comparison to the skin without scales from the head. With lice-infection, at 4 dpi most genes in both tissues showed lower values than in the non-infected control. By 8 dpi, the majority of responses increased towards the control levels, including cytokines of Th1, Th17 and Th2 pathways. Immunohistochemistry of three immune factors revealed an even distribution of MHC class II positive cells throughout epidermis, including the top layer of keratinocytes, marked compartmentalization of Mx(+) and CD8α(+) cells close to stratum basale, and an increase in numbers of CD8α(+) cells in response to infection. In conclusion, suppression of immune genes during the copepodid stage likely sets off a beneficial situation for the parasite. At the moult to chalimus stage 8 dpi, only few genes surpassed the non-infected control levels, including CD8α. The gene expression pattern was reflected in the increased number of CD8α expressing cells, thus revealing a relatively minor activation of skin T-cell defenses in Atlantic salmon in response to L. salmonis infection.

  16. Melanocortin agonism as a viable strategy to control alveolar bone loss induced by oral infection.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Mila F M; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Werneck, Silvia M C; Corrêa, Jôice D; Soriani, Frederico M; Garlet, Gustavo P; Souza, Daniele G; Teixeira, Mauro M; Silva, Tarcilia A; Perretti, Mauro

    2016-12-01

    Alveolar bone loss is a result of an aggressive form of periodontal disease (PD) associated with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) infection. PD is often observed with other systemic inflammatory conditions, including arthritis. Melanocortin peptides activate specific receptors to exert antiarthritic properties, avoiding excessing inflammation and modulating macrophage function. Recent work has indicated that melanocortin can control osteoclast development and function, but whether such protection takes place in infection-induced alveolar bone loss has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of melanocortin in Aa-induced PD. Mice were orally infected with Aa and treated with the melanocortin analog DTrp(8)-γMSH or vehicle daily for 30 d. Then, periodontal tissue was collected and analyzed. Aa-infected mice treated with DTrp(8)-γMSH presented decreased alveolar bone loss and a lower degree of neutrophil infiltration in the periodontium than vehicle-treated animals; these actions were associated with reduced periodontal levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-17A. In vitro experiments with cells differentiated into osteoclasts showed that osteoclast formation and resorptive activity were attenuated after treatment with DTrp(8)-γMSH. Thus, melanocortin agonism could represent an innovative way to tame overexuberant inflammation and, at the same time, preserve bone physiology, as seen after Aa infection.-Madeira, M. F. M., Queiroz-Junior, C. M., Montero-Melendez, T., Werneck, S. M. C., Corrêa, J. D., Soriani, F. M., Garlet, G. P., Souza, D. G., Teixeira, M. M., Silva, T. A., Perretti, M. Melanocortin agonism as a viable strategy to control alveolar bone loss induced by oral infection. © FASEB.

  17. Spore Density Determines Infection Strategy by the Plant Pathogenic Fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Necrotrophic and biotrophic pathogens are resisted by different plant defenses. While necrotrophic pathogens are sensitive to jasmonic acid (JA)-dependent resistance, biotrophic pathogens are resisted by salicylic acid (SA)- and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent resistance. Although many pathogens switch from biotrophy to necrotrophy during infection, little is known about the signals triggering this transition. This study is based on the observation that the early colonization pattern and symptom development by the ascomycete pathogen Plectosphaerella cucumerina (P. cucumerina) vary between inoculation methods. Using the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) defense response as a proxy for infection strategy, we examined whether P. cucumerina alternates between hemibiotrophic and necrotrophic lifestyles, depending on initial spore density and distribution on the leaf surface. Untargeted metabolome analysis revealed profound differences in metabolic defense signatures upon different inoculation methods. Quantification of JA and SA, marker gene expression, and cell death confirmed that infection from high spore densities activates JA-dependent defenses with excessive cell death, while infection from low spore densities induces SA-dependent defenses with lower levels of cell death. Phenotyping of Arabidopsis mutants in JA, SA, and ROS signaling confirmed that P. cucumerina is differentially resisted by JA- and SA/ROS-dependent defenses, depending on initial spore density and distribution on the leaf. Furthermore, in situ staining for early callose deposition at the infection sites revealed that necrotrophy by P. cucumerina is associated with elevated host defense. We conclude that P. cucumerina adapts to early-acting plant defenses by switching from a hemibiotrophic to a necrotrophic infection program, thereby gaining an advantage of immunity-related cell death in the host. PMID:26842622

  18. An insight into a combination of ELISA strategies to diagnose small ruminant lentivirus infections.

    PubMed

    de Andrés, X; Ramírez, H; Bertolotti, L; San Román, B; Glaria, I; Crespo, H; Jáuregui, P; Minguijón, E; Juste, R; Leginagoikoa, I; Pérez, M; Luján, L; Badiola, J J; Polledo, L; García-Marín, J F; Riezu, J I; Borrás-Cuesta, F; de Andrés, D; Rosati, S; Reina, R; Amorena, B

    2013-04-15

    A single broadly reactive standard ELISA is commonly applied to control small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV) spread, but type specific ELISA strategies are gaining interest in areas with highly prevalent and heterogeneous SRLV infections. Short (15-residue) synthetic peptides (n=60) were designed in this study using deduced amino acid sequence profiles of SRLV circulating in sheep from North Central Spain and SRLV described previously. The corresponding ELISAs and two standard ELISAs were employed to analyze sera from sheep flocks either controlled or infected with different SRLV genotypes. Two outbreaks, showing SRLV-induced arthritis (genotype B2) and encephalitis (genotype A), were represented among the infected flocks. The ELISA results revealed that none of the assays detected all the infected animals in the global population analyzed, the assay performance varying according to the genetic type of the strain circulating in the area and the test antigen. Five of the six highly reactive (57-62%) single peptide ELISAs were further assessed, revealing that the ELISA based on peptide 98M (type A ENV-SU5, consensus from the neurological outbreak) detected positives in the majority of the type-A specific sera tested (Se: 86%; Sp: 98%) and not in the arthritic type B outbreak. ENV-TM ELISAs based on peptides 126M1 (Se: 82%; Sp: 95%) and 126M2 0,65 0.77 (Se: 68%; Sp: 88%) detected preferentially caprine arthritis encephalitis (CAEV, type B) and visna/maedi (VMV, type A) virus infections respectively, which may help to perform a preliminary CAEV vs. VMV-like typing of the flock. The use of particular peptide ELISAs and standard tests individually or combined may be useful in the different areas under study, to determine disease progression, diagnose/type infection and prevent its spread.

  19. Evaluation of testing strategies to identify infected animals at a single round of testing within dairy herds known to be infected with Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    More, S J; Cameron, A R; Strain, S; Cashman, W; Ezanno, P; Kenny, K; Fourichon, C; Graham, D

    2015-08-01

    As part of a broader control strategy within herds known to be infected with Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP), individual animal testing is generally conducted to identify infected animals for action, usually culling. Opportunities are now available to quantitatively compare different testing strategies (combinations of tests) in known infected herds. This study evaluates the effectiveness, cost, and cost-effectiveness of different testing strategies to identify infected animals at a single round of testing within dairy herds known to be MAP infected. A model was developed, taking account of both within-herd infection dynamics and test performance, to simulate the use of different tests at a single round of testing in a known infected herd. Model inputs included the number of animals at different stages of infection, the sensitivity and specificity of each test, and the costs of testing and culling. Testing strategies included either milk or serum ELISA alone or with fecal culture in series. Model outputs included effectiveness (detection fraction, the proportion of truly infected animals in the herd that are successfully detected by the testing strategy), cost, and cost-effectiveness (testing cost per true positive detected, total cost per true positive detected). Several assumptions were made: MAP was introduced with a single animal and no management interventions were implemented to limit within-herd transmission of MAP before this test. In medium herds, between 7 and 26% of infected animals are detected at a single round of testing, the former using the milk ELISA and fecal culture in series 5 yr after MAP introduction and the latter using fecal culture alone 15 yr after MAP introduction. The combined costs of testing and culling at a single round of testing increases with time since introduction of MAP infection, with culling costs being much greater than testing costs. The cost-effectiveness of testing varied by testing strategy. It was also

  20. [Cost-effectiveness of diagnostic strategies of severe bacterial infection in infants with fever without a source].

    PubMed

    Buendía, Jefferson Antonio; Sánchez-Villamil, Juana Patricia; Urman, Gabriela

    2016-09-01

    Serious bacterial infections in infants under 2-years-of-age with fever without a source remains, despite advances in vaccination, a matter of concern for both physicians and parents. Having cost-effectiveness information is relevant to guide decision making in clinical practice in this scenario. Objective: To determine the cost-effectiveness of four different strategies of screening in Argentina for serious bacterial infection in children presenting with fever without a source. Materials and methods: We designed a decision tree to model a hypothetical cohort of 10,000 children with fever without a source. We compared the incremental cost-effectiveness of four strategies to detect serious bacterial infection: Rochester criteria + C reactive protein test, Rochester criteria + procalcitonin test, Rochester criteria, and expectant observation. Results: Rochester criteria + C reactive protein test was the most cost-effective strategy with USD$ 784 for each correctly diagnosed case versus USD$ 839 of Rochester criteria + procalcitonin test, USD$ 1,116 of expectant observation or USD$ 1,193 of Rochester criteria. When the probability of serious bacterial infections was equal or less than 14%, the strategy of choice was expectant observation. Conclusions: The Rochester criteria + C reactive protein test was the most cost-effective strategy to detect serious bacterial infection in one to three months old children with fever without a source. However, in low risk settings for such infection, the strategy of choice is expectant observation.

  1. A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Updates

    PubMed Central

    Yokoe, Deborah S.; Anderson, Deverick J.; Berenholtz, Sean M.; Calfee, David P.; Dubberke, Erik R.; Ellingson, Katherine D.; Gerding, Dale N.; Haas, Janet P.; Kaye, Keith S.; Klompas, Michael; Lo, Evelyn; Marschall, Jonas; Mermel, Leonard A.; Nicolle, Lindsay E.; Salgado, Cassandra D.; Bryant, Kristina; Classen, David; Crist, Katrina; Deloney, Valerie M.; Fishman, Neil O.; Foster, Nancy; Goldmann, Donald A.; Humphreys, Eve; Jernigan, John A.; Padberg, Jennifer; Perl, Trish M.; Podgorny, Kelly; Septimus, Edward J.; VanAmringe, Margaret; Weaver, Tom; Weinstein, Robert A.; Wise, Robert; Maragakis, Lisa L.

    2014-01-01

    Since the publication of “A Compendium of Strategies to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals” in 2008, prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) has become a national priority. Despite improvements, preventable HAIs continue to occur. The 2014 updates to the Compendium were created to provide acute care hospitals with up-to-date, practical, expert guidance to assist in prioritizing and implementing their HAI prevention efforts. They are the product of a highly collaborative effort led by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), the Society for Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), the Society for Hospital Medicine (SHM), and the Surgical Infection Society (SIS). PMID:25026611

  2. Strategies for managing systemic fungal infection and the place of itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Potter, Michael

    2005-09-01

    Systemic fungal infections are an increasing cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with haematological malignancies and certain other conditions associated with profound immunosuppression. The majority of such infections are caused by Aspergillus and Candida species. In recent years, the number of available drugs effective in the therapy of these difficult infections has expanded. Large clinical trials have been performed in different settings such as prophylaxis, empirical and first-line therapy. For prophylaxis, the azoles fluconazole and itraconazole have been most widely studied. These azoles are available in both oral and intravenous formulations. Itraconazole has a wide spectrum of activity including Aspergillus, Candida albicans and non-albicans species. Two large studies comparing the use of itraconazole with fluconazole for primary prophylaxis in high-risk patients who were recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplants have recently been reported. These have confirmed that itraconazole is effective in this setting in reducing the rate of systemic fungal infections. However, there are concerns with regard to increased toxicity and the potential for drug interactions with itraconazole compared with fluconazole. In the empirical setting, large randomized studies support the use of caspofungin and liposomal amphotericin B. Voriconazole and lipid-associated amphotericin B have been shown to be effective in first-line therapy and caspofungin for salvage. New approaches to management include efforts at improving diagnosis, combination antifungal therapy and treatment strategies for emerging moulds.

  3. Heat shock protein-based therapeutic strategies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, B G; Wainberg, M A

    1999-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (hsps) and cyclophilins (CypA) are intracellular chaperone molecules that facilitate protein folding and assembly. These proteins are selectively expressed in cells following exposure to a range of stress stimuli, including viral infection. Hsp species are highly immunogenic, eliciting humoral, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), and natural killer (NK) cell responses against viruses, tumours, and infectious diseases. This review discusses the roles of stress proteins in immunity and viral life cycles, vis-à-vis the development of Hsp-based therapeutic strategies against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection. Cumulative findings are cited implicating the requirement of CypA in HIV-1 replication and formation of infectious virions. Studies by our group show the upregulated expression of hsp27 and hsp70 during single-cycle HIV infections. These species redistribute to the cell surface following HIV-infection and heat stress, serving as targets for NK and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Co-immunoprecipitation and Western blot studies show that hsp27, hsp70, and hsp78 complex with HIV-1 viral proteins intracellularly. Hsp70, hsp56, and CypA are assembled into HIV-1 virions. The ability of hsps to interact with HIV-1 viral proteins, combined with their inherent adjuvant and immunogenic properties, indicates that hsps may serve as vehicles for antigen delivery and the design of vaccines against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:10231014

  4. Quantitative assessment of organizational culture within hospitals and its relevance to infection prevention and control strategies.

    PubMed

    Borg, M A; Waisfisz, B; Frank, U

    2015-05-01

    It has been suggested that organizational culture (OC) is an important driver of infection prevention and control (IPC) behaviour among healthcare workers. This study examined OC in seven European hospitals using a validated assessment tool based on Hofstede's model, and identified significant variations in OC scores. Hospitals with low prevalence of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) exhibited high scores for change facilitation and change readiness, whereas hospitals with high prevalence of MRSA exhibited low scores for these determinants. It is possible to use tools, available outside health care, to study OC within hospitals and gain better insight into IPC behaviour change strategies. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: A Review of Current Direct-Acting Antiviral Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Johnathan; Nguyen, Douglas; Hu, Ke-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection carries a significant clinical burden in the United States, affecting more than 4.6 million Americans. Untreated chronic HCV infection can result in cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Previous interferon based treatment carried low rates of success and significant adverse effects. The advent of new generation oral antiviral therapy has led to major improvements in efficacy and tolerability but has also resulted in an explosion of data with increased treatment choice complexity. Treatment guidelines are constantly evolving due to emerging regimens and real world treatment data. There also still remain subpopulations for whom current treatments are lacking or unclearly defined. Thus, the race for development of HCV treatment regimens still continues. This review of the current literature will discuss the current recommended treatment strategies and briefly overview next generation agents. PMID:27293521

  6. Understanding HIV infection for the design of a therapeutic vaccine. Part II: Vaccination strategies for HIV.

    PubMed

    de Goede, A L; Vulto, A G; Osterhaus, A D M E; Gruters, R A

    2015-05-01

    HIV infection leads to a gradual loss CD4(+) T lymphocytes comprising immune competence and progression to AIDS. Effective treatment with combined antiretroviral drugs (cART) decreases viral load below detectable levels but is not able to eliminate the virus from the body. The success of cART is frustrated by the requirement of expensive lifelong adherence, accumulating drug toxicities and chronic immune activation resulting in increased risk of several non-AIDS disorders, even when viral replication is suppressed. Therefore, there is a strong need for therapeutic strategies as an alternative to cART. Immunotherapy, or therapeutic vaccination, aims to increase existing immune responses against HIV or induce de novo immune responses. These immune responses should provide a functional cure by controlling viral replication and preventing disease progression in the absence of cART. The key difficulty in the development of an HIV vaccine is our ignorance of the immune responses that control of viral replication, and thus how these responses can be elicited and how they can be monitored. Part one of this review provides an extensive overview of the (patho-) physiology of HIV infection. It describes the structure and replication cycle of HIV, the epidemiology and pathogenesis of HIV infection and the innate and adaptive immune responses against HIV. Part two of this review discusses therapeutic options for HIV. Prevention modalities and antiretroviral therapy are briefly touched upon, after which an extensive overview on vaccination strategies for HIV is provided, including the choice of immunogens and delivery strategies. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Global burden of Shigella infections: implications for vaccine development and implementation of control strategies.

    PubMed Central

    Kotloff, K. L.; Winickoff, J. P.; Ivanoff, B.; Clemens, J. D.; Swerdlow, D. L.; Sansonetti, P. J.; Adak, G. K.; Levine, M. M.

    1999-01-01

    Few studies provide data on the global morbidity and mortality caused by infection with Shigella spp.; such estimates are needed, however, to plan strategies of prevention and treatment. Here we report the results of a review of the literature published between 1966 and 1997 on Shigella infection. The data obtained permit calculation of the number of cases of Shigella infection and the associated mortality occurring worldwide each year, by age, and (as a proxy for disease severity) by clinical category, i.e. mild cases remaining at home, moderate cases requiring outpatient care, and severe cases demanding hospitalization. A sensitivity analysis was performed to estimate the high and low range of morbid and fatal cases in each category. Finally, the frequency distribution of Shigella infection, by serogroup and serotype and by region of the world, was determined. The annual number of Shigella episodes throughout the world was estimated to be 164.7 million, of which 163.2 million were in developing countries (with 1.1 million deaths) and 1.5 million in industrialized countries. A total of 69% of all episodes and 61% of all deaths attributable to shigellosis involved children under 5 years of age. The median percentages of isolates of S. flexneri, S. sonnei, S. boydii, and S. dysenteriae were, respectively, 60%, 15%, 6%, and 6% (30% of S. dysenteriae cases were type 1) in developing countries; and 16%, 77%, 2%, and 1% in industrialized countries. In developing countries, the predominant serotype of S. flexneri is 2a, followed by 1b, 3a, 4a, and 6. In industrialized countries, most isolates are S. flexneri 2a or other unspecified type 2 strains. Shigellosis, which continues to have an important global impact, cannot be adequately controlled with the existing prevention and treatment measures. Innovative strategies, including development of vaccines against the most common serotypes, could provide substantial benefits. PMID:10516787

  8. Substance use of disorders in HIV-infected patients: impact and new treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Fiellin, David A

    2004-01-01

    Substance use of disorders--including alcohol, cocaine, and opiod dependencies--are common in HIV-infected patients. Untreated substance use disorders result in poor HIV disease treatment outcomes; however, several new treatment strategies have emerged in recent years. Combined medication and counseling therapies are effective for alcohol and opioid dependencies, and counseling treatments are effective for cocaine dependence. Office-based treatment with buprenorphine offers the opportunity for coordinated treatment of HIV disease and opioid dependence. This article summarizes a presentation by David A. Fiellin, MD, in March 2004 at the International AIDS Society-USA New York course.

  9. CD4+ T-cell Count may not be a Useful Strategy to Monitor Antiretroviral Therapy Response in HTLV-1/HIV Co-infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Vandormael, Alain; Rego, Filipe; Danaviah, Siva; Carlos Junior Alcantara, Luiz; Boulware, David R; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2017-01-01

    HTLV-1/HIV co-infection is known to elevate the CD4+ T-cell counts of treatment-naïve persons. We investigated whether HTLV-1/HIV co-infected patients continued to have elevated CD4+ T-cell counts after developing virologic failure on antiretroviral therapy (ART). The data is taken from a drug resistance study located in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa. All participants (N=383) presented for repeated CD4+ T-cell count and HIV viral load level testing between January 2006 and March 2014. We used a random-coefficient model to estimate the change in CD4+ T-cell count and HIV viral load level by HTLV-1/HIV co-infection status over time, adjusting for age, sex, and duration of virologic failure. HTLV-1/HIV co-infected participants (n=8) had higher CD4+ T-cell counts, with a positive difference of 117.2 cells/μL at the ART initiation date (p-value=0.001), 114.7 cells/μL (pvalue< 0.001) 12 months after this date, and 112.3 cells/μL (p-value=0.005) 24 months after this date, holding all else constant. In contrast, there was no difference in the HIV viral load level by HTLV-1/HIV co-infected status throughout the observation period. We show that HTLV-1/HIV co-infected participants continued to have elevated CD4+ T-cell counts after developing virologic failure on ART, despite no difference in their HIV viral load levels when compared with HIV mono-infected participants. Our results indicate that CD4+ T-cell count testing may not be a useful strategy to monitor ART response in the presence of HTLV-1/HIV co-infection. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Contrasting phenotypic plasticity in the photoprotective strategies of the invasive species Carpobrotus edulis and the coexisting native species Crithmum maritimum.

    PubMed

    Fenollosa, Erola; Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Pintó-Marijuan, Marta

    2017-01-05

    Photoprotective strategies vary greatly within the plant kingdom and reflect a plant's physiological status and capacity to cope with environment variations. The plasticity and intensity of these responses may determine plant success. Invasive species are reported to show increased vigor to displace native species. Describing the mechanisms that confer such vigor is essential to understanding the success of invasive species. We performed an experiment whereby two species were monitored: Carpobrotus edulis, an aggressive invasive species in the Mediterranean basin, and Crithmum maritimum, a coexisting native species in the Cap de Creus Natural Park (NE Spain). We analyzed their photoprotective responses to seasonal environmental dynamics by comparing the capacity of the invader to respond to the local environmental stresses throughout the year. Our study analyses ecophysiological markers and photoprotective strategies to gain an insight into the success of invaders. We found that both species showed completely different but effective photoprotective strategies: in summer, C. edulis took special advantage of the xanthophyll cycle, whereas the success of C. maritimum in summer stemmed from morphological changes and alterations on β-carotene content. Winter also presented differences between the species, as the native showed reduced Fv /Fm ratios. Our experimental design allowed us to introduce a new approach to compare phenotypic plasticity: the integrated phenotypic plasticity index (PPint ), defined as the maximum Euclidian distance between phenotypes, using a combination of different variables to describe them. This index revealed significantly greater phenotypic plasticity in the invasive species compared to the native species.

  11. Phage therapy as an alternative or complementary strategy to prevent and control biofilm-related infections.

    PubMed

    Pires, D P; Melo, Ldr; Vilas Boas, D; Sillankorva, S; Azeredo, J

    2017-09-28

    The complex heterogeneous structure of biofilms confers to bacteria an important survival strategy. Biofilms are frequently involved in many chronic infections in consequence of their low susceptibility to antibiotics as well as resistance to host defences. The increasing need of novel and effective treatments to target these complex structures has led to a growing interest on bacteriophages (phages) as a strategy for biofilm control and prevention. Phages can be used alone, as a cocktail to broaden the spectra of activity, or in combination with other antimicrobials to improve their efficacy. Here, we summarize the studies involving the use of phages for the treatment or prevention of bacterial biofilms, highlighting the biofilm features that can be tackled with phages or combined therapy approaches. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Predictive models of control strategies involved in containing indoor airborne infections.

    PubMed

    Chen, S-C; Chang, C-F; Liao, C-M

    2006-12-01

    Recently developed control measure modeling approaches for containing airborne infections, including engineering controls with respiratory protection and public health interventions, are readily amenable to an integrated-scale analysis. Here we show that such models can be derived from an integrated-scale analysis generated from three different types of functional relationship: Wells-Riley mathematical model, competing-risks model, and Von Foerster equation, both of the key epidemiological determinants involved and of the functional connections between them. We examine mathematically the impact of engineering control measures such as enhanced air exchange and air filtration rates with personal masking combined with public health interventions such as vaccination, isolation, and contact tracing in containing the spread of indoor airborne infections including influenza, chickenpox, measles, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). If enhanced engineering controls could reduce the basic reproductive number (R0) below 1.60 for chickenpox and 3 for measles, our simulations show that in such a prepared response with public health interventions would have a high probability of containing the indoor airborne infections. Combinations of engineering control measures and public health interventions could moderately contain influenza strains with an R0 as high as 4. Our analysis indicates that effective isolation of symptomatic patients with low-efficacy contact tracing is sufficient to control a SARS outbreak. We suggest that a valuable added dimension to public health inventions could be provided by systematically quantifying transmissibility and proportion of asymptomatic infection of indoor airborne infection. Practical Implications We have developed a flexible mathematical model that can help determine the best intervention strategies for containing indoor airborne infections. The approach presented here is scalable and can be extended to include additional control

  13. Resistance and Susceptibility to Malarial Infection: A Host Defense Strategy against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    BAKIR, Hanaa; YONES, Doaa; GALAL, Lamia; HUSEEIN, Enas

    2015-01-01

    Background: In an effort to understand what limits the virulence of malaria parasites in relation to the host genetic and immunogenic background, we investigated the possibility that the parasite and host genotype crossover interactions constrain virulence. Methods: Two groups of mice from different genotypes were used (C57BL/6 (B6) and DBA/2 mice). The mice were infected with a virulent parasite line Plasmodium yoelii 17XL (P. yoelii 17XL). Parasitemia, hematocrit value and lymphocytes yielded by livers and spleens were evaluated. Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) analysis illustrated phenotypic characterization of lymphocytes. Results: Infection with P. yoelii 17XL did not result in the death of DBA/2 mice. In contrast, B6 mice developed significantly high parasitemia and succumbed to death. Using (FACS) analysis, DBA/2 mice were found to experience a marked expansion of interleukin (IL)-2Rβ+ CD3int cells and γδ T cells in the liver, especially in the recovery phase. The expansion of unconventional T cells (i.e. B220+ T cells) was also marked in DBA/2 mice. Conclusion: The outcome of murine malaria infections depends on the dynamic interplay between the immune-mediator and the genotype of the host. PMID:26811732

  14. Evaluating Surveillance Strategies for the Early Detection of Low Pathogenicity Avian Influenza Infections

    PubMed Central

    Comin, Arianna; Stegeman, Arjan; Marangon, Stefano; Klinkenberg, Don

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the early detection of low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) viruses in poultry has become increasingly important, given their potential to mutate into highly pathogenic viruses. However, evaluations of LPAI surveillance have mainly focused on prevalence and not on the ability to act as an early warning system. We used a simulation model based on data from Italian LPAI epidemics in turkeys to evaluate different surveillance strategies in terms of their performance as early warning systems. The strategies differed in terms of sample size, sampling frequency, diagnostic tests, and whether or not active surveillance (i.e., routine laboratory testing of farms) was performed, and were also tested under different epidemiological scenarios. We compared surveillance strategies by simulating within-farm outbreaks. The output measures were the proportion of infected farms that are detected and the farm reproduction number (Rh). The first one provides an indication of the sensitivity of the surveillance system to detect within-farm infections, whereas Rh reflects the effectiveness of outbreak detection (i.e., if detection occurs soon enough to bring an epidemic under control). Increasing the sampling frequency was the most effective means of improving the timeliness of detection (i.e., it occurs earlier), whereas increasing the sample size increased the likelihood of detection. Surveillance was only effective in preventing an epidemic if actions were taken within two days of sampling. The strategies were not affected by the quality of the diagnostic test, although performing both serological and virological assays increased the sensitivity of active surveillance. Early detection of LPAI outbreaks in turkeys can be achieved by increasing the sampling frequency for active surveillance, though very frequent sampling may not be sustainable in the long term. We suggest that, when no LPAI virus is circulating yet and there is a low risk of virus introduction, a

  15. Interferon response following infection with genetically similar isolates of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) exhibiting contrasting virulence in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Campbell, S; McBeath, A; Secombes, C; Snow, M; Collet, B

    2011-01-01

    Isolates of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) were identified which are genetically similar yet, based on their isolation history were considered likely to differ in virulence in juvenile rainbow trout. An experimental infection study was performed in order to verify this hypothesis and provide an experimental infectivity model with which to investigate the basis for susceptibility of rainbow trout to this commercially important virus. Significant differences in mortality were obtained following both intraperitoneal (IP) injection and immersion challenges with an early marine (DK-M.Rhabdo) and early rainbow trout VHSV isolate (DK-F1) respectively. Expression of Type I IFN, Mx1 (an IFN-inducible protein), and viral genes (encoding nucleo-, phospho-, matrix, glyco- and non-viron proteins) was studied in sequential tissue samples using real-time quantitative PCR (QPCR). Resulting data revealed a significant increase in IFN and Mx1 expression detected in fish challenged by IP injection with both isolates. Expression levels of these genes were directly related to the degree of viral replication as measured by the expression of VHSV RNAs. In immersion-challenged fish a significant increase in Mx1 was observed only when using the virulent isolate DK-F1; however no elevated host response was detectable in fish challenged with the marine isolate DK-M.Rhabdo. Quintessentially the inability to detect any virus in trout challenged with the marine isolate via immersion suggests the virus was incapable of establishing infection. The mechanisms for this appear to be more related to initial cellular entry and replication rather than due to the overcoming of initial infection via an elevated host innate immune response.

  16. Contrasting patterns in the small-scale heterogeneity of human helminth infections in urban and rural environments in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Brooker, Simon; Alexander, Neal; Geiger, Stefan; Moyeed, Rana A; Stander, Julian; Fleming, Fiona; Hotez, Peter J; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Bethony, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    Marked heterogeneity exists in the patterns of parasitic infection between individuals, households and communities. Analysis of parasite distributions within populations is complicated by the fact that parasite distributions are highly aggregated, and few studies have explicitly incorporated this distribution when investigating small-scale spatial heterogeneities. This study aimed to quantify the small-scale (within and between household) heterogeneity of helminth infection in an area of Minas Gerais State, Brazil with rural and urban sectors. Parasitological data from a cross-sectional survey of 1,249 individuals aged 0-86 years from 242 households were analysed. Within household clustering of infection was assessed using random effect logistic regression models and between household spatial heterogeneity was assessed using a Bayesian negative binomial spatial model. The overall prevalence of hookworm (Necator americanus) was 66.9%, the prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni was 44.9%, and the prevalence of Ascaris lumbricoides was 48.8%. Statistical analysis indicated significant (within) household and (between household) spatial clustering of hookworm in both rural and urban areas and of S. mansoni in rural areas. There was no evidence of either household or spatial clustering of S. mansoni in urban areas. The spatial correlation of S. mansoni was estimated to reduce by half over a distance of 700m in the rural area. Rural hookworm had a much smaller half-distance and urban hookworm showed an even smaller half-distance (12m). We suggest that such species-specific differences in patterns of infection by environment are primarily due to variation in exposure and parasite life cycle, although host genetic factors cannot be ruled out. PMID:16814294

  17. Contrasting patterns in the small-scale heterogeneity of human helminth infections in urban and rural environments in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Brooker, Simon; Alexander, Neal; Geiger, Stefan; Moyeed, Rana A; Stander, Julian; Fleming, Fiona; Hotez, Peter J; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Bethony, Jeffrey

    2006-09-01

    Marked heterogeneity exists in the patterns of parasitic infection between individuals, households and communities. Analysis of parasite distributions within populations is complicated by the fact that parasite distributions are highly aggregated and few studies have explicitly incorporated this distribution when investigating small-scale spatial heterogeneities. This study aimed to quantify the small-scale (within- and between-household) heterogeneity of helminth infection in an area of Minas Gerais State, Brazil, with rural and urban sectors. Parasitological data from a cross-sectional survey of 1,249 individuals aged 0-86 years from 242 households were analysed. Within-household clustering of infection was assessed using random effect logistic regression models and between-household spatial heterogeneity was assessed using a Bayesian negative binomial spatial model. The overall prevalence of hookworm (Necator americanus) was 66.9%, the prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni was 44.9% and the prevalence of Ascaris lumbricoides was 48.8%. Statistical analysis indicated significant (within) household and (between household) spatial clustering of hookworm in both rural and urban areas and of S. mansoni in rural areas. There was no evidence of either household or spatial clustering of S. mansoni in urban areas. The spatial correlation of S. mansoni was estimated to reduce by half over a distance of 700 m in the rural area. Rural hookworm had a much smaller half-distance (28 m) and urban hookworm showed an even smaller half-distance (12 m). We suggest that such species-specific differences in patterns of infection by environment are primarily due to variation in exposure and parasite life cycle, although host genetic factors cannot be ruled out.

  18. A Simulation-Based Assessment of Strategies to Control Clostridium Difficile Transmission and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Michael A.; Jones, Makoto; Leecaster, Molly; Khader, Karim; Ray, Willy; Huttner, Angela; Huttner, Benedikt; Toth, Damon; Sablay, Theodore; Borotkanics, Robert J.; Gerding, Dale N.; Samore, Matthew H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is one of the most common and important nosocomial pathogens, causing severe gastrointestinal disease in hospitalized patients. Although "bundled" interventions have been proposed and promoted, optimal control strategies remain unknown. Methods We designed an agent-based computer simulation of nosocomial C. difficile transmission and infection, which included components such as: patients and health care workers, and their interactions; room contamination via C. difficile shedding; C. difficile hand carriage and removal via hand hygiene; patient acquisition of C. difficile via contact with contaminated rooms or health care workers; and patient antimicrobial use. We then introduced six interventions, alone and "bundled" together: aggressive C. difficile testing; empiric isolation and treatment of symptomatic patients; improved adherence to hand hygiene and contact precautions; improved use of soap and water for hand hygiene; and improved environmental cleaning. All interventions were tested using values representing base-case, typical intervention, and optimal intervention scenarios. Findings In the base-case scenario, C. difficile infection rates ranged from 8–21 cases/10,000 patient-days, with a case detection fraction between 32%–50%. Implementing the "bundle" at typical intervention levels had a large impact on C. difficile acquisition and infection rates, although intensifying the intervention to optimal levels had much less additional impact. Most of the impact came from improved hand hygiene and empiric isolation and treatment of suspected C. difficile cases. Conclusion A "bundled" intervention is likely to reduce nosocomial C. difficile infection rates, even under typical implementation conditions. Real-world implementation of the "bundle" should focus on those components of the intervention that are likely to produce the greatest impact on C. difficile infection rates, such as hand hygiene and empiric isolation and

  19. [An ultrastructural study of the cervix epitelium infected with the human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 before and after treatment with contrasting thermo-laser therapy].

    PubMed

    Manykin, A A; Ezhov, V V; Belov, S V; Danileĭko, Iu K; Saliuk, V A; Dymkovets, V P; Gushchina, E A; Lisitsyn, F V

    2014-01-01

    The results of the ultrastructural study of the epithelium of the patient cervix infected by the human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 before and after treatment by contrasting thermo-laser therapy (CTLT) are presented. It was shown in this work that 1.5 and 6 months after treatment HPV DNA was not detected in the biopsy and the smear of the cervix using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the ultrathin sections, the structure of the epithelial cells from the biopsy after treatment corresponded to norm. There was effective elimination of HPV types 16 and 18 as Induces by CTLT method.

  20. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: Analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ikejimba, Lynda C.; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Ghate, Sujata V.; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Methods: Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d{sup ′}, derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d{sup ′} was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. Results: For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d{sup ′}, while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d{sup ′} values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. Conclusions: At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of

  1. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: Analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ikejimba, Lynda C.; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Ghate, Sujata V.; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Methods: Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d′, derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d′ was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. Results: For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d′, while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d′ values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. Conclusions: At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of inplane structures and

  2. Opt-out screening strategy for HIV infection among patients attending emergency departments: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Henriquez-Camacho, C; Villafuerte-Gutierrez, P; Pérez-Molina, J A; Losa, J; Gotuzzo, E; Cheyne, N

    2017-07-01

    International health agencies have promoted nontargeted universal (opt-out) HIV screening tests in different settings, including emergency departments (EDs). We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the testing uptake of strategies (opt-in targeted, opt-in nontargeted and opt-out) to detect new cases of HIV infection in EDs. We searched the Pubmed and Embase databases, from 1984 to April 2015, for opt-in and opt-out HIV diagnostic strategies used in EDs. Randomized controlled or quasi experimental studies were included. We assessed the percentage of positive individuals tested for HIV infection in each programme (opt-in and opt-out strategies). The mean percentage was estimated by combining studies in a random-effect meta-analysis. The percentages of individuals tested in the programmes were compared in a random-effect meta-regression model. Data were analysed using stata version 12. Quality assessments were performed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Of the 90 papers identified, 28 were eligible for inclusion. Eight trials used opt-out, 18 trials used opt-in, and two trials used both to detect new cases of HIV infection. The test was accepted and taken by 75 155 of 172 237 patients (44%) in the opt-out strategy, and 73 581 of 382 992 patients (19%) in the opt-in strategy. The prevalence of HIV infection detected by the opt-out strategy was 0.40% (373 cases), that detected by the opt-in nontargeted strategy was 0.52% (419 cases), and that detected by the opt-in targeted strategy was 1.06% (52 cases). In this meta-analysis, the testing uptake of the opt-out strategy was not different from that of the opt-in strategy to detect new cases of HIV infection in EDs. © 2016 British HIV Association.

  3. Insight into HIV-2 latency may disclose strategies for a cure for HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Suha; Vranckx, Lenard; Gijsbers, Rik; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 and HIV-2 originate from two distinct zoonotic transmissions of simian immunodeficiency viruses from primate to human. Although both share similar modes of transmission and can result in the development of AIDS with similar clinical manifestations, HIV-2 infection is generally milder and less likely to progress to AIDS. HIV is currently incurable due to the presence of HIV provirus integrated into the host DNA of long-lived memory cells of the immune system without active replication. As such, the latent virus is immunologically inert and remains insensitive to the administered antiviral drugs targeting active viral replication steps. Recent evidence suggests that persistent HIV replication may occur in anatomical sanctuaries such as the lymphoid tissue due to low drug penetration. At present, different strategies are being evaluated either to completely eradicate the virus from the patient (sterilising cure) or to allow treatment interruption without viral rebound (functional cure). Because HIV-2 is naturally less pathogenic and displays a more latent phenotype than HIV-1, it may represent a valuable model that provides elementary information to cure HIV-1 infection. Insight into the viral and cellular determinants of HIV-2 replication may therefore pave the way for alternative strategies to eradicate HIV-1 or promote viral remission.

  4. [Strategies for preventing de novo hepatitis B infection after liver transplantation (II)].

    PubMed

    Fernández Castroagudín, Javier

    2014-07-01

    Although active immunization against the hepatitis B virus (HBV) through vaccination constitutes a fundamental strategy in the prevention of infection by this virus, it is not effective in isolation for preventing de novo HBV infections in recipients of liver grafts from core antigen antibody (anti-HBc) positive donors. In this situation, the risk of developing de novo hepatitis B depends on the recipient's serological status. It has been shown that, for vaccinated patients and in the absence of prophylaxis with nucleoside/nucleotide analogues and/or hyperimmune gamma globulin, the prevalence and cumulative incidence of HBV infection after transplantation is an intermediate risk. The absence of a surface antigen antibody (anti-HBs) titer cutoff considered protective, the gradual reduction of these titers after vaccination, the presence of false positives for anti-HBs in patients undergoing infusion of blood products and escape mutations of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) could explain this lack of efficacy. For this reason, it is recommended that vaccination protocols be implemented universally, along with the follow-up of the level of protection in patients with cirrhosis, adding prophylaxis with analogues when receiving a graft from an anti-HBc-positive donor. Clinical and serological surveillance alone can be considered for patients with anti-HBs levels greater than 200 mUI/mL after vaccination.

  5. Strategies for Controlling Non-Transmissible Infection Outbreaks Using a Large Human Movement Data Set

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Penelope A.; Rehman, Yasmin; Hall, Ian M.; Edeghere, Obaghe; Danon, Leon; House, Thomas A.; Keeling, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Prediction and control of the spread of infectious disease in human populations benefits greatly from our growing capacity to quantify human movement behavior. Here we develop a mathematical model for non-transmissible infections contracted from a localized environmental source, informed by a detailed description of movement patterns of the population of Great Britain. The model is applied to outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease, a potentially life-threatening form of pneumonia caused by the bacteria Legionella pneumophilia. We use case-report data from three recent outbreaks that have occurred in Great Britain where the source has already been identified by public health agencies. We first demonstrate that the amount of individual-level heterogeneity incorporated in the movement data greatly influences our ability to predict the source location. The most accurate predictions were obtained using reported travel histories to describe movements of infected individuals, but using detailed simulation models to estimate movement patterns offers an effective fast alternative. Secondly, once the source is identified, we show that our model can be used to accurately determine the population likely to have been exposed to the pathogen, and hence predict the residential locations of infected individuals. The results give rise to an effective control strategy that can be implemented rapidly in response to an outbreak. PMID:25211122

  6. Strategies for controlling non-transmissible infection outbreaks using a large human movement data set.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Penelope A; Rehman, Yasmin; Hall, Ian M; Edeghere, Obaghe; Danon, Leon; House, Thomas A; Keeling, Matthew J

    2014-09-01

    Prediction and control of the spread of infectious disease in human populations benefits greatly from our growing capacity to quantify human movement behavior. Here we develop a mathematical model for non-transmissible infections contracted from a localized environmental source, informed by a detailed description of movement patterns of the population of Great Britain. The model is applied to outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease, a potentially life-threatening form of pneumonia caused by the bacteria Legionella pneumophilia. We use case-report data from three recent outbreaks that have occurred in Great Britain where the source has already been identified by public health agencies. We first demonstrate that the amount of individual-level heterogeneity incorporated in the movement data greatly influences our ability to predict the source location. The most accurate predictions were obtained using reported travel histories to describe movements of infected individuals, but using detailed simulation models to estimate movement patterns offers an effective fast alternative. Secondly, once the source is identified, we show that our model can be used to accurately determine the population likely to have been exposed to the pathogen, and hence predict the residential locations of infected individuals. The results give rise to an effective control strategy that can be implemented rapidly in response to an outbreak.

  7. Contrasting behavioral and feeding strategies recorded by tidal-flat bivalve trace fossils from the Upper Carboniferous of eastern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangano, M.G.; Buatois, L.A.; West, R.R.; Maples, C.G.

    1998-01-01

    Upper Carboniferous tidal-flat deposits near Waverly, eastern Kansas (Stull Shale Member, Kanwaka Shale Formation), host abundant and very well-preserved trace fossils attributed to the activity of burrowing bivalves. Thin shell lenses with an abundant bivalve fauna area associated with the ichnofossil-bearing beds and afford an unusual opportunity to relate trace fossils to their makers. Two distinctive life and feeding strategies can be reconstructed on the basis of trace fossil analysis and functional morphology. Lockeria siliquaria hyporeliefs commonly are connected with vertical to inclined, truncated endichnial shafts in the absence of horizontal locomotion traces. These structures record vertical and oblique displacement through the sediment, and suggest relatively stable domiciles rather than temporary resting traces as typically considered. Crowded bedding surfaces displaying cross-cutting relationships between specimens of L. siliquaria and differential preservation at the top (concave versus convex epireliefs) record a complex history of successive events of colonization, erosion, deposition, and recolonization (time-averaged assemblages). Irregujlar contours of some large hypichnia indicate the cast of the foot, while other outlines closely match the anterior area of Wilkingia, its suggested tracemaker. Relatively stable, vertical to inclined life positions and dominanit vertical mobility suggest a filter-feeding strategy. Moreover, the elongate shell and pallial sinus of Wilkingia providfe a strong independent line of evidence for an opisthosiphonate, moderately deep-tier inhabitant. Wilingia may represent a pioneer attempt at siphon-feeding in the late Paleozoic, preceding the outcome of the Mesozoic infaunal radiation. A second strategy is represented by Lockeia ornata and association locomotionm and locomotion/feding structures. Lockeia ornata is commonly connected with chevron locomotion traces that record the bifurcated foot of a protobranch

  8. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Flood Control Strategies in Contrasting Urban Watersheds and Implications for Houston's Future Flood Vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, A.; Juan, A.; Bass, B. J.; Bedient, P. B.

    2016-12-01

    In recent years the Greater Houston Region has been hit by a series of severe storms that exceeded the 100-yr recurrence interval. Most notable are the 2015 Memorial Day (May 25-26) and the 2016 Tax Day (April 18) storms, which caused widespread riverine flooding that damaged thousands of properties and debilitated the region's traffic and commercial activities for extended periods. This situation is discouraging, considering that further urban development in the Houston Region will likely exacerbate the flooding impact of future severe storms. Questions arise regarding the efficacy of implemented flood control solutions and the long-term viability of current flood management strategies, especially in heavily impacted watersheds such as Brays Bayou and Cypress Creek. To better understand the effectiveness and limitations of current flood reduction solutions in the Greater Houston Region, this study evaluates the hydrodynamic responses and flood impacts of Brays Bayou watershed and Cypress Creek watershed from the afore-mentioned storm events. Brays Bayou watershed is fully developed with extremely limited options for future flood control projects, while Cypress Creek still has significant portions of undeveloped land that could be utilized for flood mitigation purposes. In order to simulate watershed responses at the time of the storms, the hydrologic model HEC-HMS and unsteady hydraulic model HEC-RAS are used. Additionally, this study evaluates the effectiveness of recently-completed flood control projects in Brays Bayou watershed and proposed flood control strategies in Cypress Creek watershed by conducting a scenario analysis of each watershed. This analysis includes a pre- and post-implementation scenario that represents watershed conditions prior to and after implementation of flood control measures for each watershed. This study demonstrates the benefits and shortcomings of current implemented and proposed flood control projects, and identifies vulnerable

  9. Different stress responsive strategies to drought and heat in two durum wheat cultivars with contrasting water use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Aprile, Alessio; Havlickova, Lenka; Panna, Riccardo; Marè, Caterina; Borrelli, Grazia M; Marone, Daniela; Perrotta, Carla; Rampino, Patrizia; De Bellis, Luigi; Curn, Vladislav; Mastrangelo, Anna M; Rizza, Fulvia; Cattivelli, Luigi

    2013-11-22

    Durum wheat often faces water scarcity and high temperatures, two events that usually occur simultaneously in the fields. Here we report on the stress responsive strategy of two durum wheat cultivars, characterized by different water use efficiency, subjected to drought, heat and a combination of both stresses. The cv Ofanto (lower water use efficiency) activated a large set of well-known drought-related genes after drought treatment, while Cappelli (higher water use efficiency) showed the constitutive expression of several genes induced by drought in Ofanto and a modulation of a limited number of genes in response to stress. At molecular level the two cvs differed for the activation of molecular messengers, genes involved in the regulation of chromatin condensation, nuclear speckles and stomatal closure. Noteworthy, the heat response in Cappelli involved also the up-regulation of genes belonging to fatty acid β-oxidation pathway, glyoxylate cycle and senescence, suggesting an early activation of senescence in this cv. A gene of unknown function having the greatest expression difference between the two cultivars was selected and used for expression QTL analysis, the corresponding QTL was mapped on chromosome 6B. Ofanto and Cappelli are characterized by two opposite stress-responsive strategies. In Ofanto the combination of drought and heat stress led to an increased number of modulated genes, exceeding the simple cumulative effects of the two single stresses, whereas in Cappelli the same treatment triggered a number of differentially expressed genes lower than those altered in response to heat stress alone. This work provides clear evidences that the genetic system based on Cappelli and Ofanto represents an ideal tool for the genetic dissection of the molecular response to drought and other abiotic stresses.

  10. Is closure of entire wards necessary to control norovirus outbreaks in hospital? Comparing the effectiveness of two infection control strategies.

    PubMed

    Illingworth, E; Taborn, E; Fielding, D; Cheesbrough, J; Diggle, P J; Orr, D

    2011-09-01

    The standard approach for norovirus control in hospitals in the UK, as outlined by the Health Protection Agency guidance and implemented previously by Lancashire Teaching Hospitals, involves the early closure of affected wards. However, this has a major impact on bed-days lost and cancelled admissions. In 2008, a new strategy was introduced in the study hospital, key elements of which included closure of affected ward bays (rather than wards), installation of bay doors, enhanced cleaning, a rapid in-house molecular test and an enlarged infection control team. The impact of these changes was assessed by comparing two norovirus seasons (2007-08 and 2009-10) before and after implementation of the new strategy, expressing the contrast between seasons as a ratio (r) of expected counts in the two seasons. There was a significant decrease in the ratio of confirmed hospital outbreaks to community outbreaks (r = 0.317, P = 0.025), the number of days of restricted admissions on hospital wards per outbreak (r = 0.742, P = 0.041), and the number of hospital bed-days lost per outbreak (r = 0.344, P <0.001). However, there was no significant change in the number of patients affected per hospital outbreak (r = 1.080, P = 0.517), or the number of hospital staff affected per outbreak (r = 0.651, P = 0.105). Closure of entire wards during norovirus outbreaks is not always necessary. The changes implemented at the study hospital resulted in a significant reduction in the number of bed-days lost per outbreak, and this, together with a reduction in outbreak frequency, resulted in considerable cost savings.

  11. NOD1 in contrast to NOD2 functional polymorphism influence Chlamydia trachomatis infection and the risk of tubal factor infertility

    PubMed Central

    Branković, Ivan; van Ess, Eleanne F.; Noz, Marlies P.; Wiericx, Wilhelmina (Anke) J.; Spaargaren, Joke; Morré, Servaas A.; Ouburg, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular pattern-recognition receptors NOD1 and NOD2 are capable of sensing common structural units of bacterial walls. Recognition triggers specific immune signalling pathways and leads to pro-inflammatory cytokine upregulation and adequate immune response. We investigated whether two functional polymorphisms in NOD1 and NOD2 exert an effect on susceptibility to (STD patients) and severity of (female patients visiting the fertility clinic) Chlamydia trachomatis infection in 807 Dutch Caucasian women. A significant association of the NOD1 +32656 GG insertion variant with protection against infection with C. trachomatis has been detected [p: 0.0057; OR: 0.52]. When comparing C. trachomatis-positive women without symptoms to C. trachomatis-positive women with symptoms, and to C. trachomatis-positive women with TFI, we observed an increasing trend in carriage of the GG allele [Ptrend: 0.0003]. NOD2 1007fs failed to reveal an association. We hypothesize that the underlying mechanism might be a functional effect of the GG insertion on IFN-beta-dependent regulation of immune response in the genital tract. The research is part of an ongoing effort of identifying key polymorphisms that determine the risk of TFI and effectively translating them into the clinical setting for the purpose of optimizing diagnostic management of women at risk for developing TFI. PMID:25854006

  12. Transcriptional and metabolic changes associated to the infection by Fusarium verticillioides in maize inbreds with contrasting ear rot resistance.

    PubMed

    Campos-Bermudez, Valeria A; Fauguel, Carolina M; Tronconi, Marcos A; Casati, Paula; Presello, Daniel A; Andreo, Carlos S

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium verticillioides causes ear rot and grain mycotoxins in maize (Zea mays L.), which are harmful to human and animal health. Breeding and growing less susceptible plant genotypes is one alternative to reduce these detrimental effects. A better understanding of the resistance mechanisms would facilitate the implementation of strategic molecular agriculture to breeding of resistant germplasm. Our aim was to identify genes and metabolites that may be related to the Fusarium reaction in a resistant (L4637) and a susceptible (L4674) inbred. Gene expression data were obtained from microarray hybridizations in inoculated and non-inoculated kernels from both inbreds. Fungal inoculation did not produce considerable changes in gene expression and metabolites in L4637. Defense-related genes changed in L4674 kernels, responding specifically to the pathogen infection. These results indicate that L4637 resistance may be mainly due to constitutive defense mechanisms preventing fungal infection. These mechanisms seem to be poorly expressed in L4674; and despite the inoculation activate a defense response; this is not enough to prevent the disease progress in this susceptible line. Through this study, a global view of differential genes expressed and metabolites accumulated during resistance and susceptibility to F. verticillioides inoculation has been obtained, giving additional information about the mechanisms and pathways conferring resistance to this important disease in maize.

  13. Transcriptional and Metabolic Changes Associated to the Infection by Fusarium verticillioides in Maize Inbreds with Contrasting Ear Rot Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Bermudez, Valeria A.; Fauguel, Carolina M.; Tronconi, Marcos A.; Casati, Paula; Presello, Daniel A.; Andreo, Carlos S.

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium verticillioides causes ear rot and grain mycotoxins in maize (Zea mays L.), which are harmful to human and animal health. Breeding and growing less susceptible plant genotypes is one alternative to reduce these detrimental effects. A better understanding of the resistance mechanisms would facilitate the implementation of strategic molecular agriculture to breeding of resistant germplasm. Our aim was to identify genes and metabolites that may be related to the Fusarium reaction in a resistant (L4637) and a susceptible (L4674) inbred. Gene expression data were obtained from microarray hybridizations in inoculated and non-inoculated kernels from both inbreds. Fungal inoculation did not produce considerable changes in gene expression and metabolites in L4637. Defense-related genes changed in L4674 kernels, responding specifically to the pathogen infection. These results indicate that L4637 resistance may be mainly due to constitutive defense mechanisms preventing fungal infection. These mechanisms seem to be poorly expressed in L4674; and despite the inoculation activate a defense response; this is not enough to prevent the disease progress in this susceptible line. Through this study, a global view of differential genes expressed and metabolites accumulated during resistance and susceptibility to F. verticillioides inoculation has been obtained, giving additional information about the mechanisms and pathways conferring resistance to this important disease in maize. PMID:23637860

  14. Antibiotic susceptibility, heteroresistance, and updated treatment strategies in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Mascellino, Maria Teresa; Porowska, Barbara; De Angelis, Massimiliano; Oliva, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the problem of antibiotic resistance, heteroresistance, the utility of cultures and antibiotic susceptibility tests in Helicobacter pylori (Hp) eradication, as well as the updated treatment strategies for this infection. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is increasing all over the world, especially for metronidazole and clarithromycin, because of their heavy use in some geographical areas. Heteroresistance (simultaneous presence of both susceptible and resistant strains in different sites of a single stomach) is another important issue, as an isolate could be mistakenly considered susceptible if a single biopsy is used for antimicrobial tests. We also examined literature data regarding eradication success rates of culture-guided and empiric therapies. The empiric therapy and the one based on susceptibility testing, in Hp eradication, may depend on several factors such as concomitant diseases, the number of previous antibiotic treatments, differences in bacterial virulence in individuals with positive or negative cultures, together with local antibiotic resistance patterns in real-world settings. Updated treatment strategies in Hp infection presented in the guidelines of the Toronto Consensus Group (2016) are reported. These suggest to prolong eradication therapy up to 14 days, replacing the old triple therapy with a quadruple therapy based on proton pump inhibitor (PPI), bismuth, metronidazole, and tetracycline for most of the patients, or as an alternative quadruple therapy without bismuth, based on the use of PPI, amoxicillin, metronidazole, and clarithromycin. The new drug vonoprazan, a first-in-class potassium-competitive acid blocker recently approved in Japan, is also considered to be a promising solution for Hp eradication, even for clarithromycin-resistant strains. Furthermore, there is growing interest in finding new therapeutic strategies, such as the development of vaccines or the use of natural resources, including

  15. Deuterium Labeling Strategies for Creating Contrast in Structure-Function Studies of Model Bacterial Outer Membranes Using Neutron Reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Le Brun, Anton P; Clifton, Luke A; Holt, Stephen A; Holden, Peter J; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2016-01-01

    Studying the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is challenging due to the complex nature of its structure. Therefore, simplified models are required to undertake structure-function studies of processes that occur at the outer membrane/fluid interface. Model membranes can be created by immobilizing bilayers to solid supports such as gold or silicon surfaces, or as monolayers on a liquid support where the surface pressure and fluidity of the lipids can be controlled. Both model systems are amenable to having their structure probed by neutron reflectometry, a technique that provides a one-dimensional depth profile through a membrane detailing its thickness and composition. One of the strengths of neutron scattering is the ability to use contrast matching, allowing molecules containing hydrogen and those enriched with deuterium to be highlighted or matched out against the bulk isotopic composition of the solvent. Lipopolysaccharides, a major component of the outer membrane, can be isolated for incorporation into model membranes. Here, we describe the deuteration of lipopolysaccharides from rough strains of Escherichia coli for incorporation into model outer membranes, and how the use of deuterated materials enhances structural analysis of model membranes by neutron reflectometry. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Is Staphylococcal Screening and Suppression an Effective Interventional Strategy for Reduction of Surgical Site Infection?

    PubMed

    Edmiston, Charles E; Ledeboer, Nathan A; Buchan, Blake W; Spencer, Maureen; Seabrook, Gary R; Leaper, David

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has been recognized as a major microbial pathogen for over 100 y, having the capacity to produce a variety of suppurative and toxigenic disease processes. Many of these infections are life-threatening, with particularly enhanced virulence in hospitalized patients with selective risk factors. Strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have rapidly spread throughout the healthcare environment such that approximately 20% of S. aureus isolates recovered from surgical site infections are methicillin-resistant, (although this is now reducing following national screening and suppression programs and high impact interventions). Widespread nasal screening to identify MRSA colonization in surgical patients prior to admission are controversial, but selective, evidence-based studies have documented a reduction of surgical site infection (SSI) after screening and suppression. Culture methods used to identify MRSA colonization involve selective, differential, or chromogenic media. These methods are the least expensive, but turnaround time is 24-48 h. Although real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technology provides rapid turnaround (1-2 h) with exceptional testing accuracy, the costs can range from three to 10 times more than conventional culture methodology. Topical mupirocin, with or without pre-operative chlorhexidine showers or skin wipes, is the current "gold-standard" for nasal decolonization, but inappropriate use of mupirocin is associated with increasing staphylococcal resistance. Selection of an effective active universal or targeted surveillance strategy should be based upon the relative risk of MSSA or MRSA surgical site infection in patients undergoing orthopedic or cardiothoracic device related surgical procedures.

  17. Root foraging for Patchy Phosphorus of Plant Species with Contrasting Foraging Strategy - Role of Roots and Mycorrhiza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felderer, B.; Robinson, B. H.; Jansa, J.; Vontobel, P.; Frossard, E.; Schulin, R.

    2009-04-01

    Plant nutrients are distributed heterogeneously in soil. Thus the nutrient distribution together with nutrient availability, temporal and spatial development of roots determine nutrient uptake by the plants. Plants have developed several strategies to cope with the patchy nutrient distribution. Preferential root development within nutrient-enriched patches is a prominent response to heterogeneous nutrient distribution. This capacity to precisely allocate roots is called morphological plasticity and is highly variable between plant species. Another strategy is the increased nutrient uptake per unit of root surface in the nutrient-rich patches as compared to root zones outside such patches, so-called physiological plasticity . Additionally, enhanced nutrient uptake from nutrient-rich patches might be supported by increased production of mycorrhizal extraradical hyphae. We refer to this phenomenon as plastic response of the mycorrhiza-plant association. Relative importance for nutrient acquisition of these responses to heterogeneous nutrient distribution might vary between plant species. However, quantitative data are very rare. We will investigate nutrient acquisition and root development over time in sandy substrate with heterogeneous phosphorus (P) distribution of two model plant species with different nutrient foraging strategies (Lotus corniculatus, Trifolium arvense). These plant species are characterized by high and low morphological plasticity, respectively (according to results of preliminary experiments). We follow three main goals in a single mesocosm experiment, where P is to be homogeneously or patchily distributed in a sandy substrate: 1. - Imaging of root architecture of Lotus corniculatus and Trifolium arvense on a time line. 2. - Assessment of the physiological plasticity of Lotus corniculatus and Trifolium arvense 3. - Determination of the plasticity of mycorrhiza-plant association of Lotus corniculatus and Trifolium arvense associated with either of

  18. Responses of serpentine plants to pine invasion: Vegetation diversity and nickel accumulation in species with contrasting adaptive strategies.

    PubMed

    Selvi, Federico; Carrari, Elisa; Colzi, Ilaria; Coppi, Andrea; Gonnelli, Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Introduction of non-native trees is one of the major threats to ecosystem integrity and biodiversity. Stands of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.) introduced decades ago represent a threat to the specialized plant communities of serpentine outcrops in Italy. This study investigates the effects of such invasions at the community and species level, based on vegetation sampling in three selected sites with comparable environmental conditions. Pine cover caused a decrease of α-diversity by lowering the species evenness of the community, though species richness was not negatively affected. Compositional changes between the two habitats were significant but not clearly associated with a decrease in taxonomic distinctness in the pine stands. As many as nine indicator species were found in the open vegetation, along with the obligate endemics Odontarrhena bertolonii and Armeria denticulata. Both of them declined in the pine stands. Here, an increase in the phytoavailable nickel fraction was associated with a decrease in total nickel concentration in the soil, via mobilization of the metal caused by lowering of pH induced by the conifer litter. The nickel-hyperaccumulator O. bertolonii was able to maintain high metal concentrations in the shoots despite a decrease in root concentration, resulting in a higher shoot/root ratio in the pine stands (~20). Conversely, shoot/root ratio in the non-accumulator Plantago holosteum was <1 and not affected by the conifer, as well as its abundance in this anthropogenic habitat. Contrasting responses of the two species were likely due to their different sensitivity to modified light and soil conditions, whereas stability of shoot nickel-concentration in O. bertolonii did not support increased predation by natural enemies as one of the causes for its decline under the conifer. Progressive thinning of these stands is advocated to limit soil nickel mobilization and to restore a unique ecosystem with its endemic metallophytes.

  19. Alterations in Kernel Proteome after Infection with Fusarium culmorum in Two Triticale Cultivars with Contrasting Resistance to Fusarium Head Blight

    PubMed Central

    Perlikowski, Dawid; Wiśniewska, Halina; Kaczmarek, Joanna; Góral, Tomasz; Ochodzki, Piotr; Kwiatek, Michał; Majka, Maciej; Augustyniak, Adam; Kosmala, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Highlight: The level of pathogen alpha-amylase and plant beta-amylase activities could be components of plant-pathogen interaction associated with the resistance of triticale to Fusarium head blight. Triticale was used here as a model to recognize new components of molecular mechanism of resistance to Fusarium head blight (FHB) in cereals. Fusarium-damaged kernels (FDK) of two lines distinct in levels of resistance to FHB were applied into a proteome profiling using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to create protein maps and mass spectrometry (MS) to identify the proteins differentially accumulated between the analyzed lines. This proteomic research was supported by a measurement of alpha- and beta-amylase activities, mycotoxin content, and fungal biomass in the analyzed kernels. The 2-DE analysis indicated a total of 23 spots with clear differences in a protein content between the more resistant and more susceptible triticale lines after infection with Fusarium culmorum. A majority of the proteins were involved in a cell carbohydrate metabolism, stressing the importance of this protein group in a plant response to Fusarium infection. The increased accumulation levels of different isoforms of plant beta-amylase were observed for a more susceptible triticale line after inoculation but these were not supported by a total level of beta-amylase activity, showing the highest value in the control conditions. The more resistant line was characterized by a higher abundance of alpha-amylase inhibitor CM2 subunit and simultaneously a lower activity of alpha-amylase after inoculation. We suggest that the level of pathogen alpha-amylase and plant beta-amylase activities could be components of plant-pathogen interaction associated with the resistance of triticale to FHB. PMID:27582751

  20. C3 and C4 biomass allocation responses to elevated CO2 and nitrogen: contrasting resource capture strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, K.P.; Langley, J.A.; Cahoon, D.R.; Megonigal, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Plants alter biomass allocation to optimize resource capture. Plant strategy for resource capture may have important implications in intertidal marshes, where soil nitrogen (N) levels and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are changing. We conducted a factorial manipulation of atmospheric CO2 (ambient and ambient + 340 ppm) and soil N (ambient and ambient + 25 g m-2 year-1) in an intertidal marsh composed of common North Atlantic C3 and C4 species. Estimation of C3 stem turnover was used to adjust aboveground C3 productivity, and fine root productivity was partitioned into C3-C4 functional groups by isotopic analysis. The results suggest that the plants follow resource capture theory. The C3 species increased aboveground productivity under the added N and elevated CO2 treatment (P 2 alone. C3 fine root production decreased with added N (P 2 (P = 0.0481). The C4 species increased growth under high N availability both above- and belowground, but that stimulation was diminished under elevated CO2. The results suggest that the marsh vegetation allocates biomass according to resource capture at the individual plant level rather than for optimal ecosystem viability in regards to biomass influence over the processes that maintain soil surface elevation in equilibrium with sea level.

  1. Carbon source-sink limitations differ between two species with contrasting growth strategies: Source-sink limitations vary with growth strategy

    DOE PAGES

    Burnett, Angela C.; Rogers, A.; Rees, M.; ...

    2016-09-22

    When we understand how carbon source and sink strengths limit plant growth we realized how critical the knowledge gap is in hindering efforts to maximize crop yield. Here, we investigated how differences in growth rate arise from source–sink limitations, using a model system comparing a fast-growing domesticated annual barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. NFC Tipple) with a slow-growing wild perennial relative (Hordeum bulbosum). Source strength was manipulated by growing plants at sub-ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations ([CO2]). Limitations on vegetative growth imposed by source and sink were diagnosed by measuring relative growth rate, developmental plasticity, photosynthesis and major carbon and nitrogenmore » metabolite pools. Growth was sink limited in the annual but source limited in the perennial. RGR and carbon acquisition were higher in the annual, but photosynthesis responded weakly to elevated [CO2] indicating that source strength was near maximal at current [CO2]. In contrast, photosynthetic rate and sink development responded strongly to elevated [CO2] in the perennial, indicating significant source limitation. Sink limitation was avoided in the perennial by high sink plasticity: a marked increase in tillering and root:shoot ratio at elevated [CO2], and lower non-structural carbohydrate accumulation. Finally, by alleviating sink limitation during vegetative development could be important for maximizing growth of elite cereals under future elevated [CO2].« less

  2. Carbon source-sink limitations differ between two species with contrasting growth strategies: Source-sink limitations vary with growth strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, Angela C.; Rogers, A.; Rees, M.; Osborne, Colin P.

    2016-09-22

    When we understand how carbon source and sink strengths limit plant growth we realized how critical the knowledge gap is in hindering efforts to maximize crop yield. Here, we investigated how differences in growth rate arise from source–sink limitations, using a model system comparing a fast-growing domesticated annual barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. NFC Tipple) with a slow-growing wild perennial relative (Hordeum bulbosum). Source strength was manipulated by growing plants at sub-ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations ([CO2]). Limitations on vegetative growth imposed by source and sink were diagnosed by measuring relative growth rate, developmental plasticity, photosynthesis and major carbon and nitrogen metabolite pools. Growth was sink limited in the annual but source limited in the perennial. RGR and carbon acquisition were higher in the annual, but photosynthesis responded weakly to elevated [CO2] indicating that source strength was near maximal at current [CO2]. In contrast, photosynthetic rate and sink development responded strongly to elevated [CO2] in the perennial, indicating significant source limitation. Sink limitation was avoided in the perennial by high sink plasticity: a marked increase in tillering and root:shoot ratio at elevated [CO2], and lower non-structural carbohydrate accumulation. Finally, by alleviating sink limitation during vegetative development could be important for maximizing growth of elite cereals under future elevated [CO2].

  3. Carbon source-sink limitations differ between two species with contrasting growth strategies: Source-sink limitations vary with growth strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, Angela C.; Rogers, A.; Rees, M.; Osborne, Colin P.

    2016-09-22

    When we understand how carbon source and sink strengths limit plant growth we realized how critical the knowledge gap is in hindering efforts to maximize crop yield. Here, we investigated how differences in growth rate arise from source–sink limitations, using a model system comparing a fast-growing domesticated annual barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. NFC Tipple) with a slow-growing wild perennial relative (Hordeum bulbosum). Source strength was manipulated by growing plants at sub-ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations ([CO2]). Limitations on vegetative growth imposed by source and sink were diagnosed by measuring relative growth rate, developmental plasticity, photosynthesis and major carbon and nitrogen metabolite pools. Growth was sink limited in the annual but source limited in the perennial. RGR and carbon acquisition were higher in the annual, but photosynthesis responded weakly to elevated [CO2] indicating that source strength was near maximal at current [CO2]. In contrast, photosynthetic rate and sink development responded strongly to elevated [CO2] in the perennial, indicating significant source limitation. Sink limitation was avoided in the perennial by high sink plasticity: a marked increase in tillering and root:shoot ratio at elevated [CO2], and lower non-structural carbohydrate accumulation. Finally, by alleviating sink limitation during vegetative development could be important for maximizing growth of elite cereals under future elevated [CO2].

  4. Antimicrobial and host-defense peptides as new anti-infective therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Robert E W; Sahl, Hans-Georg

    2006-12-01

    Short cationic amphiphilic peptides with antimicrobial and/or immunomodulatory activities are present in virtually every life form, as an important component of (innate) immune defenses. These host-defense peptides provide a template for two separate classes of antimicrobial drugs. Direct-acting antimicrobial host-defense peptides can be rapid-acting and potent, and possess an unusually broad spectrum of activity; consequently, they have prospects as new antibiotics, although clinical trials to date have shown efficacy only as topical agents. But for these compounds to fulfill their therapeutic promise and overcome clinical setbacks, further work is needed to understand their mechanisms of action and reduce the potential for unwanted toxicity, to make them more resistant to protease degradation and improve serum half-life, as well as to devise means of manufacturing them on a large scale in a consistent and cost-effective manner. In contrast, the role of cationic host-defense peptides in modulating the innate immune response and boosting infection-resolving immunity while dampening potentially harmful pro-inflammatory (septic) responses gives these peptides the potential to become an entirely new therapeutic approach against bacterial infections.

  5. Tailored enrichment strategy detects low abundant small noncoding RNAs in HIV-1 infected cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The various classes of small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression across divergent types of organisms. While a rapidly increasing number of sncRNAs has been identified over recent years, the isolation of sncRNAs of low abundance remains challenging. Virally encoded sncRNAs, particularly those of RNA viruses, can be expressed at very low levels. This is best illustrated by HIV-1 where virus encoded sncRNAs represent approximately 0.1-1.0% of all sncRNAs in HIV-1 infected cells or were found to be undetected. Thus, we applied a novel, sequence targeted enrichment strategy to capture HIV-1 derived sncRNAs in HIV-1 infected primary CD4+ T-lymphocytes and macrophages that allows a greater than 100-fold enrichment of low abundant sncRNAs. Results Eight hundred and ninety-two individual HIV-1 sncRNAs were cloned and sequenced from nine different sncRNA libraries derived from five independent experiments. These clones represent up to 90% of all sncRNA clones in the generated libraries. Two hundred and sixteen HIV-1 sncRNAs were distinguishable as unique clones. They are spread throughout the HIV-1 genome, however, forming certain clusters, and almost 10% show an antisense orientation. The length of HIV-1 sncRNAs varies between 16 and 89 nucleotides with an unexpected peak at 31 to 50 nucleotides, thus, longer than cellular microRNAs or short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Exemplary HIV-1 sncRNAs were also generated in cells infected with different primary HIV-1 isolates and can inhibit HIV-1 replication. Conclusions HIV-1 infected cells generate virally encoded sncRNAs, which might play a role in the HIV-1 life cycle. Furthermore, the enormous capacity to enrich low abundance sncRNAs in a sequence specific manner highly recommends our selection strategy for any type of investigation where origin or target sequences of the sought-after sncRNAs are known. PMID:22458358

  6. Can Soil Seed Banks Serve as Genetic Memory? A Study of Three Species with Contrasting Life History Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Mandák, Bohumil; Zákravský, Petr; Mahelka, Václav; Plačková, Ivana

    2012-01-01

    We attempted to confirm that seed banks can be viewed as an important genetic reservoir by testing the hypothesis that standing (aboveground) plants represent a nonrandom sample of the seed bank. We sampled multilocus allozyme genotypes from three species with different life history strategies: Amaranthus retroflexus, Carduus acanthoides, Pastinaca sativa. In four populations of each species we analysed the extent to which allele and genotype frequencies vary in consecutive life history stages including the summer seed bank, which has been overlooked up to now. We compared the winter seed bank (i.e., seeds collected before the spring germination peak), seedlings, rosettes, the summer seed bank (i.e., seeds collected after the spring germination peak) and fruiting plants. We found that: (1) All three species partitioned most of their genetic diversity within life history stages and less among stages within populations and among populations. (2) All genetic diversity parameters, except for allele frequencies, were similar among all life history stages across all populations in different species. (3) There were differences in allele frequencies among life history stages at all localities in Amaranthus retroflexus and at three localities in both Carduus acanthoides and Pastinaca sativa. (4) Allele frequencies did not differ between the winter and summer seed bank in most Carduus acanthoides and Pastinaca sativa populations, but there was a marked difference in Amaranthus retroflexus. In conclusion, we have shown that the summer seed bank is not genetically depleted by spring germination and that a majority of genetic diversity remains in the soil through summer. We suggest that seed banks in the species investigated play an important role by maintaining genetic diversity sufficient for recovery rather than by accumulating new genetic diversity at each locality. PMID:23185340

  7. Can soil seed banks serve as genetic memory? A study of three species with contrasting life history strategies.

    PubMed

    Mandák, Bohumil; Zákravský, Petr; Mahelka, Václav; Plačková, Ivana

    2012-01-01

    We attempted to confirm that seed banks can be viewed as an important genetic reservoir by testing the hypothesis that standing (aboveground) plants represent a nonrandom sample of the seed bank. We sampled multilocus allozyme genotypes from three species with different life history strategies: Amaranthus retroflexus, Carduus acanthoides, Pastinaca sativa. In four populations of each species we analysed the extent to which allele and genotype frequencies vary in consecutive life history stages including the summer seed bank, which has been overlooked up to now. We compared the winter seed bank (i.e., seeds collected before the spring germination peak), seedlings, rosettes, the summer seed bank (i.e., seeds collected after the spring germination peak) and fruiting plants. We found that: (1) All three species partitioned most of their genetic diversity within life history stages and less among stages within populations and among populations. (2) All genetic diversity parameters, except for allele frequencies, were similar among all life history stages across all populations in different species. (3) There were differences in allele frequencies among life history stages at all localities in Amaranthus retroflexus and at three localities in both Carduus acanthoides and Pastinaca sativa. (4) Allele frequencies did not differ between the winter and summer seed bank in most Carduus acanthoides and Pastinaca sativa populations, but there was a marked difference in Amaranthus retroflexus. In conclusion, we have shown that the summer seed bank is not genetically depleted by spring germination and that a majority of genetic diversity remains in the soil through summer. We suggest that seed banks in the species investigated play an important role by maintaining genetic diversity sufficient for recovery rather than by accumulating new genetic diversity at each locality.

  8. Contrasting reproductive strategies in three deep-sea octocorals from eastern Canada: Primnoa resedaeformis, Keratoisis ornata, and Anthomastus grandiflorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, A.; Hamel, J.-F.

    2011-06-01

    Various aspects of reproduction were studied in three deep-sea octocorals belonging to the order Alcyonacea that co-occur at bathyal depths on the continental edge and the slope of eastern Canada. The main goals were to expand knowledge of deep-water heterotrophic corals and ascertain whether reproductive strategies could explain the known patterns of occurrence. Anthomastus grandiflorus is a gonochoric species with a female-biased sex ratio that exhibits internal fertilization and brooding of planula larvae. Conversely, Primnoa resedaeformis and Keratoisis ornata rely on broadcast spawning and external fertilization; their sexuality remains undetermined as spermatocysts were not found. In P. resedaeformis, the presence of mixed size classes of oocytes in samples from all months, depths, and locations studied suggests continuous oogenesis or overlapping development of oocyte cohorts, indicative of a gametogenic cycle spanning more than a year. No evidence of periodicity was found in this species, although it could have been masked by the striking bathymetric variation in potential relative fecundity (oocytes polyp-1). The two other octocorals displayed a clear annual breeding pattern. Spawning in K. ornata and larval release in A. grandiflorus occurred in late summer and fall, respectively, possibly in response to environmental factors, as supported by shifts in the reproductive peak of A. grandiflorus across latitudes. The three species are presumed to share a nonfeeding larval mode, and data on their reproductive potential do not present any striking disparities. Published data on bycatches and video surveys in Atlantic Canada indicate that the gonochoric brooder A. grandiflorus is more widely distributed than the two free spawners, P. resedaeformis and K. ornata, which is contrary to common dispersal potential paradigms.

  9. Contrasting adaptive strategies to terminal drought-stress gradients in Mediterranean legumes: phenology, productivity, and water relations in wild and domesticated Lupinus luteus L.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, J. D.; Ludwig, C.

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of within-species annual plant adaptation to rainfall gradients is fragmented. Broad-scale ecological applications of Grime’s C-S-R triangle are often superficial, while detailed drought physiology tends to be narrow, focusing on elite cultivars. The former lack the detail to explain how plants respond, while the latter provide little context to investigate trade-offs among traits, to explain where/why these might be adaptive. Ecophysiology, combining the breadth of the former with the detail of the latter, can resolve this disconnect and is applied here to describe adaptive strategies in the Mediterranean legume Lupinus luteus. Wild and domesticated material from low- and high-rainfall environments was evaluated under contrasting terminal drought. These opposing environments have selected for contrasting, integrated, adaptive strategies. Long-season, high-rainfall habitats select for competitive (C) traits: delayed phenology, high above- and below-ground biomass, productivity, and fecundity, leading to high water-use and early stress onset. Terminal drought-prone environments select for the opposite: ruderal (R) traits that facilitate drought escape/avoidance but limit reproductive potential. Surprisingly, high-rainfall ecotypes generate lower critical leaf water potentials under water deficit, maintaining higher relative water content than the latter. Given that L. luteus evolved in sandy, low-water-holding capacity soils, this represents a bet-hedging response to intermittent self-imposed water-deficits associated with a strongly C-selected adaptive strategy that is therefore redundant in R-selected low-rainfall ecotypes. Domesticated L. luteus is even more R-selected, reflecting ongoing selection for early maturity. Introgression of appropriate C-selected adaptive traits from wild germplasm may widen the crop production range. PMID:24591050

  10. Contrasting adaptive strategies to terminal drought-stress gradients in Mediterranean legumes: phenology, productivity, and water relations in wild and domesticated Lupinus luteus L.

    PubMed

    Berger, J D; Ludwig, C

    2014-11-01

    Our understanding of within-species annual plant adaptation to rainfall gradients is fragmented. Broad-scale ecological applications of Grime's C-S-R triangle are often superficial, while detailed drought physiology tends to be narrow, focusing on elite cultivars. The former lack the detail to explain how plants respond, while the latter provide little context to investigate trade-offs among traits, to explain where/why these might be adaptive. Ecophysiology, combining the breadth of the former with the detail of the latter, can resolve this disconnect and is applied here to describe adaptive strategies in the Mediterranean legume Lupinus luteus. Wild and domesticated material from low- and high-rainfall environments was evaluated under contrasting terminal drought. These opposing environments have selected for contrasting, integrated, adaptive strategies. Long-season, high-rainfall habitats select for competitive (C) traits: delayed phenology, high above- and below-ground biomass, productivity, and fecundity, leading to high water-use and early stress onset. Terminal drought-prone environments select for the opposite: ruderal (R) traits that facilitate drought escape/avoidance but limit reproductive potential. Surprisingly, high-rainfall ecotypes generate lower critical leaf water potentials under water deficit, maintaining higher relative water content than the latter. Given that L. luteus evolved in sandy, low-water-holding capacity soils, this represents a bet-hedging response to intermittent self-imposed water-deficits associated with a strongly C-selected adaptive strategy that is therefore redundant in R-selected low-rainfall ecotypes. Domesticated L. luteus is even more R-selected, reflecting ongoing selection for early maturity. Introgression of appropriate C-selected adaptive traits from wild germplasm may widen the crop production range. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  11. Effect of Control Strategies on Prevalence, Incidence and Re-infection of Clonorchiasis in Endemic Areas of China

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Min-Ho; Park, Sue K.; Li, Zhimin; Ji, Zhuo; Yu, Gui; Feng, Zheng; Xu, Longqi; Cho, Seung-Yull; Rim, Han-Jong; Lee, Soon-Hyung; Hong, Sung-Tae

    2010-01-01

    Background A pilot clonorchiasis control project was implemented to evaluate the efficacies of various chemotherapy strategies on prevalence, incidence and re-infection in Heilongjiang Province, China. Methods and Findings Seven intervention groups (14,139 residents, about 2000 in each group) in heavily or moderately endemic areas were subjected to repeated praziquantel administration from 2001 to 2004. In the selective chemotherapy groups, residents were examined for fecal eggs, and those who tested positive were treated with three doses of 25 mg/kg praziquantel at 5-hour-intervals in one day. However, all residents were treated in the mass chemotherapy groups. In heavily endemic areas, two mass treatments of all residents in 2001 and 2003 reduced the prevalence from 69.5% to 18.8%, while four annual mass treatments reduced the prevalence from 48.0% in 2001 to 8.4% in 2004. Selective annual treatments for egg-positive subjects reduced the egg-positive rates from 54.9% in 2001 to 15.0% in 2004 or from 73.2% in 2001 to 12.3% in 2004. Selective treatments every 6 months significantly reduced the prevalence from 59.5% in 2001 to 7.5% in 2004. All of the repeated treatments reduced EPG (eggs per gram of feces) significantly. The annual mass treatment and selective treatment every 6 months produced lower prevalence and re-infection rates and higher egg reduction rate than annual selective treatments did. In the moderate endemic areas, egg positive rates were 24.8% and 29.7% in 2001 but were 1.9% and 1.3% after 2 or 3 selective treatments. The prevalence, incidence, re-infection rates in a moderately endemic area were significantly lower than those of heavy endemic areas. Conclusions Repeated mass treatment or selective treatment with praziquantel every 6 to 12 months is highly effective for clonorchiasis control in heavily endemic areas. In contrast, one or two selective treatments with health education is effective in moderately endemic areas. PMID:20169061

  12. Increase of Transmitted Drug Resistance among HIV-Infected Sub-Saharan Africans Residing in Spain in Contrast to the Native Population

    PubMed Central

    Yebra, Gonzalo; de Mulder, Miguel; Pérez-Elías, María Jesús; Pérez-Molina, José Antonio; Galán, Juan Carlos; Llenas-García, Jara; Moreno, Santiago; Holguín, África

    2011-01-01

    Background The prevalence of transmitted HIV drug resistance (TDR) is stabilizing or decreasing in developed countries. However, this trend is not specifically evaluated among immigrants from regions without well-implemented antiretroviral strategies. Methods TDR trends during 1996–2010 were analyzed among naïve HIV-infected patients in Spain, considering their origin and other factors. TDR mutations were defined according to the World Health Organization list. Results Pol sequence was available for 732 HIV-infected patients: 292 native Spanish, 226 sub-Saharan Africans (SSA), 114 Central-South Americans (CSA) and 100 from other regions. Global TDR prevalence was 9.7% (10.6% for Spanish, 8.4% for SSA and 7.9% for CSA). The highest prevalences were found for protease inhibitors (PI) in Spanish (3.1%), for non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) in SSA (6.5%) and for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) in both Spanish and SSA (6.5%). The global TDR rate decreased from 11.3% in 2004–2006 to 8.4% in 2007–2010. Characteristics related to a decreasing TDR trend in 2007-10 were Spanish and CSA origin, NRTI- and NNRTI-resistance, HIV-1 subtype B, male sex and infection through injection drug use. TDR remained stable for PI-resistance, in patients infected through sexual intercourse and in those carrying non-B variants. However, TDR increased among SSA and females. K103N was the predominant mutation in all groups and periods. Conclusion TDR prevalence tended to decrease among HIV-infected native Spanish and Central-South Americans, but it increased up to 13% in sub-Saharan immigrants in 2007–2010. These results highlight the importance of a specific TDR surveillance among immigrants to prevent future therapeutic failures, especially when administering NNRTIs. PMID:22046345

  13. Pathogenesis of and strategies for preventing Edwardsiella tarda infection in fish

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda is one of the serious fish pathogens, infecting both cultured and wild fish species. Research on edwardsiellosis has revealed that E. tarda has a broad host range and geographic distribution, and contains important virulence factors that enhance bacterial survival and pathogenesis in hosts. Although recent progress in edwardsiellosis research has enabled the development of numerous, highly effective vaccine candidates, these efforts have not been translated into a commercialized vaccine. The present review aims to provide an overview of the identification, pathology, diagnosis and virulence factors of E. tarda in fish, and describe recent strategies for developing vaccines against edwardsiellosis. The hope is that this presentation will be useful not only from the standpoint of understanding the pathogenesis of E. tarda, but also from the perspective of facilitating the development of effective vaccines. PMID:23035843

  14. [Multidimensional Strategy Regarding the Reduction of Central-Line Associated Infection in Pediatric Intensive Care].

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Jorge; Dias, Andrea; Oliveira, Guiomar; Farela Neves, José

    2016-06-01

    To determine the central-line associated bloodstream infection rate after implementation of central venous catheter-care practice bundles and guidelines and to compare it with the previous central-line associated bloodstream infection rate. A prospective, longitudinal, observational descriptive study with an exploratory component was performed in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit during five months. The universe was composed of every child admitted to Pediatric Intensive Care Unit who inserted a central venous catheter. A comparative study with historical controls was performed to evaluate the result of the intervention (group 1 versus group 2). Seventy five children were included, with a median age of 23 months: 22 (29.3%) newborns; 28 (37.3%) with recent surgery and 32 (43.8%) with underlying illness. A total of 105 central venous catheter were inserted, the majority a single central venous catheter (69.3%), with a mean duration of 6.8 ± 6.7 days. The most common type of central venous catheter was the short-term, non-tunneled central venous catheter (45.7%), while the subclavian and brachial flexure veins were the most frequent insertion sites (both 25.7%). There were no cases of central-line associated bloodstream infection reported during this study. Comparing with historical controls (group 1), both groups were similar regarding age, gender, department of origin and place of central venous catheter insertion. In the current study (group 2), the median length of stay was higher, while the mean duration of central venous catheter (excluding peripherally inserted central line) was similar in both groups. There were no statistical differences regarding central venous catheter caliber and number of lumens. Fewer children admitted to Pediatric Intensive Care Unit had central venous catheter inserted in group 2, with no significant difference between single or multiple central venous catheter. After multidimensional strategy implementation there was no reported

  15. New Strategy for Rapid Diagnosis and Characterization of Fungal Infections: The Example of Corneal Scrapings

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Pablo; Degorge, Sandrine; Che Sarria, Patricia; Benallaoua, Djida; Semoun, Oudy; Borderie, Vincent; Laroche, Laurent; Chaumeil, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The prognosis of people infected with Fungi especially immunocompromised depends on rapid and accurate diagnosis to capitalize on time administration of specific treatments. However, cultures produce false negative results and nucleic-acid amplification techniques require complex post-amplification procedures to differentiate relevant fungal types. The objective of this work was to develop a new diagnostic strategy based on real-time polymerase-chain reaction high-resolution melting analysis (PCR-HRM) that a) detects yeasts and filamentous Fungi, b) differentiates yeasts from filamentous Fungi, and c) discriminates among relevant species of yeasts. Methods PCR-HRM detection limits and specificity were assessed with a) isolated strains; b) human blood samples experimentally infected with Fungi; c) blood experimentally infected with other infectious agents; d) corneal scrapings from patients with suspected fungal keratitis (culture positive and negative) and e) scrapings from patients with suspected bacterial, viral or Acanthamoeba infections. The DNAs were extracted and mixed with primers diluted in the MeltDoctor® HRM Master Mix in 2 tubes, the first for yeasts, containing the forward primer CandUn (5'CATGCCTGTTTGAGCGTC) and the reverse primer FungUn (5'TCCTCCGCTT ATTGATATGCT) and the second for filamentous Fungi, containing the forward primer FilamUn (5'TGCCTGTCCGAGCGTCAT) and FungUn. Molecular probes were not necessary. The yields of DNA extraction and the PCR inhibitors were systematically monitored. Results PCR-HRM detected 0.1 Colony Forming Units (CFU)/µl of yeasts and filamentous Fungi, differentiated filamentous Fungi from yeasts and discriminated among relevant species of yeasts. PCR-HRM performances were higher than haemoculture and sensitivity and specificity was 100% for culture positive samples, detecting and characterizing Fungi in 7 out 10 culture negative suspected fungal keratitis. Conclusions PCR-HRM appears as a new, sensitive, specific

  16. Dynamics of defense-related components in two contrasting genotypes of tomato upon infection with Tomato Leaf Curl New Delhi Virus.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Pranav Pankaj; Rai, Neeraj Kumar; Puranik, Swati; Roy, Anirban; Khan, Moinuddin; Prasad, Manoj

    2012-10-01

    Tomato leaf curl virus (ToLCV) disease is a serious threat for tomato cultivation in the tropics and subtropics. Despite serious efforts no immune commercial varieties or F(1) hybrids are available till date. In this study, the interaction between Solanum lycopersicum and ToLCV was characterized on molecular and biochemical basis. RNA silencing mediated by short interfering RNA (siRNA) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been proposed as central components of plant adaptation to several stresses. A comparative RNA interference study between two contrasting tomato genotypes, LA1777 (tolerant) and 15SBSB (susceptible) infected with Tomato Leaf Curl New Delhi Virus (ToLCNDV) revealed relatively higher accumulation of siRNA in the leaves of tolerant genotype. In LA1777, ToLCNDV produced chlorotic as well as necrotic areas at the inoculation sites 5-10 days post-inoculation. Caspase-9- and caspase-3-like activities were significantly increased in response to ToLCNDV infection in LA1777 at inoculated region. Activities of antioxidant enzymes involved in the detoxification of ROS were examined in both systemic and localized area of infection, and their expression level was further validated through quantitative real-time PCR of the corresponding transcripts. Expression patterns of three genes encoding pathogenesis-related proteins showed higher accumulation in tolerant genotype. Tolerance against the ToLCNDV in LA1777 can be attributed to the higher siRNA accumulation, localized cell death, altered levels of antioxidant enzymes and activation of pathogenesis-related genes at different durations of virus infection. Based on these direct and indirect evidences, we have proposed a putative mechanism for ToLCNDV tolerance in the tolerant genotype.

  17. Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Infections Pinkeye (Conjunctivitis) Styes Fungal Infections (Ringworm, Yeast, etc.) Diaper Rash Infections That Pets Carry Oral ... Pneumonia Tinea (Ringworm, Jock Itch, Athlete's Foot) Vaginal Yeast Infections Immunizations Do My Kids Need Vaccines Before ...

  18. Allelic diversity in the transcriptomes of contrasting rust-infected genotypes of Lathyrus sativus, a lasting resource for smart breeding.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Nuno Felipe; Leitão, Susana Trindade; Krezdorn, Nicolas; Rotter, Björn; Winter, Peter; Rubiales, Diego; Vaz Patto, Maria Carlota

    2014-12-19

    Grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) is a valuable resource for potentially durable partial resistance to rust. To gain insight into the resistance mechanism and identify potential resistance genes, we generated the first comprehensive transcriptome assemblies from control and Uromyces pisi inoculated leafs of a susceptible and a partially rust-resistant grass pea genotype by RNA-seq. 134,914 contigs, shared by both libraries, were used to analyse their differential expression in response to rust infection. Functional annotation grouped 60.4% of the contigs present in plant databases (37.8% of total) to 33 main functional categories, being "protein", "RNA", "signalling", "transport" and "stress" the most represented. Transcription profiles revealed considerable differences in regulation of major phytohormone signalling pathways: whereas Salicylic and Abscisic Acid pathways were up-regulated in the resistant genotype, Jasmonate and Ethylene pathways were down-regulated in the susceptible one. As potential Resistance-genes we identified a mildew resistance locus O (MLO)-like gene, and MLO-related transcripts. Also, several pathogenesis-related genes were up-regulated in the resistant and exclusively down regulated in the susceptible genotype. Pathogen effectors identified in both inoculated libraries, as e.g. the rust Rtp1 transcript, may be responsible for the down-regulation of defence-related transcripts. The two genotypes contained 4,892 polymorphic contigs with SNPs unevenly distributed between different functional categories. Protein degradation (29.7%) and signalling receptor kinases (8.2%) were the most diverged, illustrating evolutionary adaptation of grass pea to the host/pathogens arms race. The vast array of novel, resistance-related genomic information we present here provides a highly valuable resource for future smart breeding approaches in this hitherto under-researched, valuable legume crop.

  19. Immunological efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine strategies in HIV-infected adults: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sadlier, C; O'Dea, S; Bennett, K; Dunne, J; Conlon, N; Bergin, C

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the immunologic response to a prime-boost immunization strategy combining the 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) with the 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPSV23) versus the PPSV23 alone in HIV-infected adults. HIV-infected adults were randomized to receive PCV13 at week 0 followed by PPSV23 at week 4 (n = 31, prime-boost group) or PPSV23 alone at week 4 (n = 33, PPSV23-alone group). Serotype specific IgG geometric mean concentration (GMC) and functional oposonophagocytic (OPA) geometric mean titer (GMT) were compared for 12 pneumococcal serotypes shared by both vaccines at week 8 and week 28. The prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥2-fold increase in IgG GMC and a GMC >1 ug/ml at week 8 (odds ratio (OR) 2.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.46-2.74, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.40-2.70, p < 0.01). Similarly, the prime-boost vaccine group were more likely to achieve a ≥4-fold increase in GMT at week 8 (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.22-2.39, p < 0.01) and week 28 (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.15-2.3, p < 0.01). This study adds to evidence supporting current pneumococcal vaccination recommendations combining the conjugate and polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccines in the United States and Europe for HIV-infected individuals.

  20. Optimizing Antibiotic Dosing Strategies for the Treatment of Gram-negative Infections in the Era of Resistance.

    PubMed

    Monogue, Marguerite L; Kuti, Joseph L; Nicolau, David P

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative organisms are an increasing source of concern within the healthcare setting due to their common presence as a cause of infection and emerging resistance to current therapies. However, current antimicrobial dosing recommendations may be insufficient for the treatment of gram-negative infections. Applying knowledge of an antibiotic's pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile when designing a dosing regimen leads to a greater likelihood of achieving optimal exposure, including against gram-negative pathogens with higher MICs. Additionally, administering antibiotics directly to the site of infection, such as via aerosolization for pneumonia, is another method to achieve optimized drug exposure at the site of infection. Incorporating these treatment strategies into clinical practice will assist antimicrobial stewardship programs in successfully treating gram-negative infections.

  1. Diagnostic strategy and timing of intervention in infected necrotizing pancreatitis: an international expert survey and case vignette study

    PubMed Central

    van Grinsven, Janneke; van Brunschot, Sandra; Bakker, Olaf J.; Bollen, Thomas L.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Bruno, Marco J.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G.; van Eijck, Casper H.; Fockens, Paul; van Goor, Harry; Gooszen, Hein G.; Horvath, Karen D.; van Lienden, Krijn P.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Besselink, Marc G.; Abdelhafez, M.; Andersson, R.; Andren-Sandberg, A.; Ashley, S.; van Baal, M.; Baron, T.; Bassi, C.; Bradley, E.; Buchler, M.; Cappendijk, V.; Carter, R.; Charnley, R.; Coelho, D.; Connor, S.; Dellinger, P.; Dervenis, C.; Deviere, J.; Doctor, N.; Dudeja, V.; En-qiang, M.; Escourrou, J.; Fagenholz, P.; Farkas, G.; Forsmark, C.; Freeman, M.; Freeny, P.; French, J.; Friess, H.; Gardner, T.; Goetzinger, P.; Haveman, J.; Hofker, S.; Imrie, C.; Isaji, S.; Isenmann, R.; Klar, E.; Laméris, J.; Lerch, M.; Lévy, P.; Lillemoe, K.; Löhr, M.; Mayerle, J.; Mayumi, T.; Mittal, A.; Moessner, J.; Morgan, D.; Mortele, K.; Nealon, W.; Neoptolemos, J.; Nieuwenhuijs, V.; Nordback, I.; Olah, A.; Oppong, K.; Padbury, R.; Papachristou, G.; Parks, R.; Poley, J.; Radenkovic, D.; Raraty, M.; Rau, B.; Rebours, V.; Rische, S.; Runzi, M.; Sainani, N.; Sarr, M.; Schaapherder, S.; Seewald, S.; Seifert, H.; Shimosegawa, T.; Silverman, S.; Singh, V.; Siriwardena, A.; Steinberg, W.; Sutton, R.; Takeda, K.; Timmer, R.; Vege, S.; Voermans, R.; de Waele, J.; Wang, Ch.; Warshaw, A.; Werner, J.; Weusten, B.; Whitcomb, D.; Wig, J.; Windsor, J.; Zyromski, N.

    2015-01-01

    Background The optimal diagnostic strategy and timing of intervention in infected necrotizing pancreatitis is subject to debate. We performed a survey on these topics amongst a group of international expert pancreatologists. Methods An online survey including case vignettes was sent to 118 international pancreatologists. We evaluated the use and timing of fine needle aspiration (FNA), antibiotics, catheter drainage and (minimally invasive) necrosectomy. Results The response rate was 74% (N = 87). None of the respondents use FNA routinely, 85% selectively and 15% never. Most respondents (87%) use a step-up approach in patients with infected necrosis. Walled-off necrosis (WON) is considered a prerequisite for endoscopic drainage and percutaneous drainage by 66% and 12%, respectively. After diagnosing infected necrosis, 55% routinely postpone invasive interventions, whereas 45% proceed immediately to intervention. Lack of consensus about timing of intervention was apparent on day 14 with proven infected necrosis (58% intervention vs. 42% non-invasive) as well as on day 20 with only clinically suspected infected necrosis (59% intervention vs. 41% non-invasive). Discussion The step-up approach is the preferred treatment strategy in infected necrotizing pancreatitis amongst expert pancreatologists. There is no uniformity regarding the use of FNA and timing of intervention in the first 2–3 weeks of infected necrotizing pancreatitis. PMID:26776851

  2. [Fluid resuscitation strategy in septic shock following urinary infection with severe pulmonary capillary leakage].

    PubMed

    Chang, Ping; Peng, Sheng; Zhou, Jian; Xie, Hai-ting; Liu, Zhan-guo; Wang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    To characterize septic shock following urinary infection with severe pulmonary capillary leakage, and to evaluate the fluid therapy on treatment of hypovolemic shock and the role of transpulmonary thermodilution technique with pulse induced continuous cardiac output (PiCCO) monitoring. A retrospective study was conducted. Eight patients surviving septic shock following urinary infection with severe pulmonary capillary leakage were enrolled, and all of them underwent PiCCO monitoring in the intensive care unit (ICU) when the diagnosis was established. The monitoring started at admission, and ended when shock was corrected or transferred from ICU. The clinical data including general end diastolic volume index (GEDVI), extravascular lung water index (EVLWI), input and output volume of fluid, net fluid balance, oxygenation index (PaO2/FiO2), the level of arterial blood lactic acid, and chest X ray were collected and analyzed retrospectively the characteristics of septic shock following urinary infection, and the role of PiCCO monitoring in fluid resuscitation. Septic shock following urinary infection occurred in a median of 4.5 days in 8 patients after renal and ureteric calculi lithotripsy, accompanied with severe pulmonary vessel effusion and hypoxemia in different degrees. The mean value of EVLWI was (22±7) ml/kg, and the PaO2/FiO2 (164±82) mm Hg at the time of admission to ICU. Conservative fluid resuscitation strategy was adopted in management of septic shock with severe pulmonary capillary leakage, the mean fluid input in 8 patients was (2412±1121) ml/d, and the net fluid balance -553 ml/d, and the central venous pressure (CVP) and GEDVI were maintained at levels of (9±3) mm Hg and (749±236) ml/m(2) respectively. Diuretics were administered to 6 patients and the mean dosage of fursemide was (264±133) mg. Norepinephrine and dobutamine infusion were given to 7 patients to maintain blood pressure at normal range for (4±1) days. Seven patients were

  3. Contrasting Strategies of Alfalfa Stem Elongation in Response to Fall Dormancy in Early Growth Stage: The Tradeoff between Internode Length and Internode Number

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zongli; Sun, Qizhong

    2015-01-01

    Fall dormancy (FD) in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) can be described using 11 FD ratings, is widely used as an important indicator of stress resistance, productive performance and spring growth. However, the contrasting growth strategies in internode length and internode number in alfalfa cultivars with different FD rating are poorly understood. Here, a growth chamber study was conducted to investigate the effect of FD on plant height, aboveground biomass, internode length, and internode number in alfalfa individuals in the early growth stages. In order to simulate the alfalfa growth environment in the early stage, 11 alfalfa cultivars with FD ratings from one to 11 were chosen and seeded at the greenhouse, and then were transplanted into an artificial growth chamber. The experimental design was a randomized complete block in a split-plot arrangement with three replicates. Plant height, above-ground biomass, internode length, and internode number were measured in early growth stage in all individuals. Our findings showed that plant height and the aboveground biomass of alfalfa did not significantly differ among 11 different FD rated cultivars. Also, internode length and internode number positively affected plant height and the aboveground biomass of alfalfa individuals and the average internode length significantly increased with increasing FD rating. However, internode number tended to sharply decline when the FD rating increased. Moreover, there were no correlations, slightly negative correlations, and strongly negative correlations between internode length and internode number in alfalfa individuals among the three scales, including within-FD ratings, within-FD categories and inter-FD ratings, respectively. Therefore, our results highlighted that contrasting growth strategies in stem elongation were adopted by alfalfa with different FD ratings in the early growth stage. Alfalfa cultivars with a high FD rating have longer internodes, whereas more dormant alfalfa

  4. Optimizing strategies for population-based chlamydia infection screening among young women: an age-structured system dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yu; Kong, Nan; Tu, Wanzhu

    2015-07-11

    Chlamydia infection (CT) is one of the most commonly reported sexually transmitted diseases. It is often referred to as a "silent" disease with the majority of infected people having no symptoms. Without early detection, it can progress to serious reproductive and other health problems. Economical identification of asymptomatically infected is a key public health challenge. Increasing evidence suggests that CT infection risk varies over the range of adolescence. Hence, age-dependent screening strategies with more frequent testing for certain age groups of higher risk may be cost-saving in controlling the disease. We study the optimization of age-dependent screening strategies for population-based chlamydia infection screening among young women. We develop an age-structured compartment model for CT natural progress, screening, and treatment. We apply parameter optimization on the resultant PDE-based system dynamical models with the objective of minimizing the total care spending, including screening and treatment costs during the program period and anticipated costs of treating the sequelae afterwards). For ease of practical implementation, we also search for the best screening initiation age for strategies with a constant screening frequency. The optimal age-dependent strategies identified outperform the current CDC recommendations both in terms of total care spending and disease prevalence at the termination of the program. For example, the age-dependent strategy that allows monthly screening rate changes can save about 5% of the total spending. Our results suggest early initiation of CT screening is likely beneficial to the cost saving and prevalence reduction. Finally, our results imply that the strategy design may not be sensitive to accurate quantification of the age-specific CT infection risk if screening initiation age and screening rate are the only decisions to make. Our research demonstrates the potential economic benefit of age-dependent screening

  5. Strategies for transformation of naturally-occurring amphibian antimicrobial peptides into therapeutically valuable anti-infective agents.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Al-Ghaferi, Nadia; Abraham, Bency; Leprince, Jérôme

    2007-08-01

    The emergence of strains of pathogenic microorganisms with resistance to commonly used antibiotics has necessitated a search for novel types of antimicrobial agents. Many frog species produce amphipathic alpha-helical peptides with broad spectrum antimicrobial activity in the skin but their therapeutic potential is limited by varying degrees of cytolytic activity towards eukaryotic cells. Methods for development of such peptides into anti-infective drugs are illustrated by the example of temporin-1DRa (HFLGTLVNLAK KIL.NH(2)). Studies with model alpha-helical peptides have shown that increase in cationicity promotes antimicrobial activity whereas increases in hydrophobicity, helicity and amphipathicity promote hemolytic activity and loss of selectivity for microorganisms. Analogs of temporin-1DRa in which each amino acid is replaced by L-lysine and D-lysine were synthesized and their cytolytic activities tested against a range of microorganisms and human erythrocytes. Small changes in structure produced marked changes in conformation, as determined by retention time on reversed-phase HPLC, and in biological activity. However, peptides containing the substitutions (Val(7) -->L-Lys), (Thr(5)-->D-Lys) and (Asn(8)-->D-Lys) retained the high solubility and potent, broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of the naturally occurring peptide but were appreciably (up to 10-fold) less hemolytic. In contrast, analogs in which Leu(9) and Ile(13) were replaced by the more hydrophobic cyclohexylglycine residue showed slightly increased antimicrobial potencies (up to 2-fold) but a 4-fold increase in hemolytic activity. The data suggest a strategy of selective increases in cationicity concomitant with decreases in helicity and hydrophobicity in the transformation of naturally-occurring antimicrobial peptides into non-toxic therapeutic agents.

  6. Economic and clinical contributions of an antimicrobial barrier dressing: a strategy for the reduction of surgical site infections.

    PubMed

    Leaper, David; Nazir, Jameel; Roberts, Chris; Searle, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In patients at risk of surgical site infection (SSI), there is evidence that an antimicrobial barrier dressing (Acticoat* ) applied immediately post-procedure is effective in reducing the incidence of infection. The objective of this study was to assess when it is appropriate to use an antimicrobial barrier dressing rather than a post-operative film dressing, by evaluating the net cost and budget impact of the two strategies. An economic model was developed, which estimates expected expenditure on dressings and the expected costs of surgical site infection during the initial inpatient episode, based on published literature on the pre-discharge costs of surgical infection and the efficacy of an antimicrobial barrier dressing in preventing SSI. At an SSI risk of 10%, an antimicrobial barrier dressing strategy is cost neutral if the incidence of infection is reduced by at least 9% compared with a post-operative film dressing. At 35% efficacy, expenditure on dressings would be higher by £30,760 per 1000 patients, and the cost of treating infection would be lower by £111,650, resulting in a net cost saving of £80,890. The break-even infection risk for cost neutrality is 2.6%. Although this cost analysis is based on published data, there are limitations in methodology: the model is dependent on and subject to the limitations of the data used to populate it. Further studies would be useful to increase the robustness of the conclusions, particularly in a broader range of surgical specialties. A strategy involving the use of an antimicrobial barrier dressing in patients at moderate (5-10%) or high (>10%) risk of infection appears reasonable and cost saving in light of the available clinical evidence.

  7. Regulated CRISPR Modules Exploit a Dual Defense Strategy of Restriction and Abortive Infection in a Model of Prokaryote-Phage Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M. Senthil; Plotkin, Joshua B.; Hannenhalli, Sridhar

    2015-01-01

    CRISPRs offer adaptive immunity in prokaryotes by acquiring genomic fragments from infecting phage and subsequently exploiting them for phage restriction via an RNAi-like mechanism. Here, we develop and analyze a dynamical model of CRISPR-mediated prokaryote-phage coevolution that incorporates classical CRISPR kinetics along with the recently discovered infection-induced activation and autoimmunity side effects. Our analyses reveal two striking characteristics of the CRISPR defense strategy: that both restriction and abortive infections operate during coevolution with phages, driving phages to much lower densities than possible with restriction alone, and that CRISPR maintenance is determined by a key dimensionless combination of parameters, which upper bounds the activation level of CRISPRs in uninfected populations. We contrast these qualitative observations with experimental data on CRISPR kinetics, which offer insight into the spacer deletion mechanism and the observed low CRISPR prevalence in clinical isolates. More generally, we exploit numerical simulations to delineate four regimes of CRISPR dynamics in terms of its host, kinetic, and regulatory parameters. PMID:26544847

  8. Evaluation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft-tissue infection prevention strategies at a military training center.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Stephanie M; Blaesing, Carl R; Millar, Eugene V; Chukwuma, Uzo; Schlett, Carey D; Wilkins, Kenneth J; Tribble, David R; Ellis, Michael W

    2013-08-01

    Military trainees are at high risk for skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs), especially those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A multicomponent hygiene-based SSTI prevention strategy was implemented at a military training center. After implementation, we observed 30% and 64% reductions in overall and MRSA-associated SSTI rates, respectively.

  9. Gene expression profiling and identification of resistance genes to aspergillus flavus infection in peanut through EST and microarray strategies.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus infect peanut seeds and produce aflatoxins, which are associated with various diseases in domestic animals and humans throughout the world. The most cost-effective strategy to minimize aflatoxin contamination involves the development of peanut cultivars that are...

  10. Strategies for decreasing multidrug antibiotic resistance: role of ototopical agents for treatment of middle ear infections.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jerome O

    2002-10-01

    Change in the susceptibility of bacterial pathogens to antimicrobial agents is constant. The efficacy of a new drug may change as it is used in clinical settings, and resistant bacterial clones result from the encounter of drug and organism. Soon after the introduction of the sulfonamides in the mid-1930s, the first effective agents of the antimicrobial era, resistance of pneumococci and group A streptococci was evident. In each of the following decades, a different problem in multidrug resistance occurred among common bacterial pathogens: beta-lactamase-producing staphylococci in the 1950s; highly resistant gram-negative enteric bacteria in the 1960s; beta-lactamase-producing Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis in the 1970s; and multidrug-resistant pneumococci in the 1980s. Antimicrobial resistance among respiratory pathogens is now a common clinical problem throughout the world, and its management is a part of routine office practice. Currently in the United States, about 25% of pneumococci are resistant to penicillin, and 25% of H influenzae and 90% of M catarrhalis produce beta-lactamase and would be inactivated by organisms producing the enzyme. The emergence of penicillin and multidrug-resistant pneumococci and beta-lactamase-producing strains of H influenzae and M catarrhalis have special importance for the management of infections of the middle ear. The widespread use of oral and parenteral antimicrobial drugs for appropriate and inappropriate uses has driven the emergence and spread of resistant organisms. This article discusses current susceptibility patterns of organisms involved in middle ear infections, risk factors associated with development of resistant strains, strategies for limiting the incidence and spread of resistant organisms and, as part of the strategy, use of ototopical rather than systemic antimicrobial drugs for chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) and acute otitis media (AOM) in children with tympanostomy tubes. Although

  11. Multi-disciplinary antimicrobial strategies for improving orthopaedic implants to prevent prosthetic joint infections in hip and knee.

    PubMed

    Getzlaf, Matthew A; Lewallen, Eric A; Kremers, Hilal M; Jones, Dakota L; Bonin, Carolina A; Dudakovic, Amel; Thaler, Roman; Cohen, Robert C; Lewallen, David G; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2016-02-01

    Like any foreign object, orthopaedic implants are susceptible to infection when introduced into the human body. Without additional preventative measures, the absolute number of annual prosthetic joint infections will continue to rise, and may exceed the capacity of health care systems in the near future. Bacteria are difficult to eradicate from synovial joints due to their exceptionally diverse taxonomy, complex mechanistic attachment capabilities, and tendency to evolve antibiotic resistance. When a primary orthopaedic implant fails from prosthetic joint infection, surgeons are generally challenged by limited options for intervention. In this review, we highlight the etiology and taxonomic groupings of bacteria known to cause prosthetic joint infections, and examine their key mechanisms of attachment. We propose that antimicrobial strategies should focus on the most harmful bacteria taxa within the context of occurrence, taxonomic diversity, adhesion mechanisms, and implant design. Patient-specific identification of organisms that cause prosthetic joint infections will permit assessment of their biological vulnerabilities. The latter can be targeted using a range of antimicrobial techniques that exploit different colonization mechanisms including implant surface attachment, biofilm formation, and/or hematogenous recruitment. We anticipate that customized strategies for each patient, joint, and prosthetic component will be most effective at reducing prosthetic joint infections, including those caused by antibiotic-resistant and polymicrobial bacteria.

  12. Multi-Disciplinary Antimicrobial Strategies for Improving Orthopaedic Implants to Prevent Prosthetic Joint Infections in Hip and Knee

    PubMed Central

    Getzlaf, Matthew A.; Lewallen, Eric A.; Kremers, Hilal M.; Jones, Dakota L.; Bonin, Carolina A.; Dudakovic, Amel; Thaler, Roman; Cohen, Robert C.; Lewallen, David G.; van Wijnen, Andre J.

    2016-01-01

    Like any foreign object, orthopaedic implants are susceptible to infection when introduced into the human body. Without additional preventative measures, the absolute number of annual prosthetic joint infections will continue to rise, and may exceed the capacity of health care systems in the near future. Bacteria are difficult to eradicate from synovial joints due to their exceptionally diverse taxonomy, complex mechanistic attachment capabilities, and tendency to evolve antibiotic resistance. When a primary orthopaedic implant fails from prosthetic joint infection, surgeons are generally challenged by limited options for intervention. In this review, we highlight the etiology and taxonomic groupings of bacteria known to cause prosthetic joint infections, and examine their key mechanisms of attachment. We propose that antimicrobial strategies should focus on the most harmful bacteria taxa within the context of occurrence, taxonomic diversity, adhesion mechanisms, and implant design. Patient-specific identification of organisms that cause prosthetic joint infections will permit assessment of their biological vulnerabilities. The latter can be targeted using a range of antimicrobial techniques that exploit different colonization mechanisms including implant surface attachment, biofilm formation, and/or hematogenous recruitment. We anticipate that customized strategies for each patient, joint, and prosthetic component will be most effective at reducing prosthetic joint infections, including those caused by antibiotic-resistant and polymicrobial bacteria. PMID:26449208

  13. Conceptual framework for analysing farm-specific economic effects of helminth infections in ruminants and control strategies.

    PubMed

    van der Voort, Mariska; Charlier, Johannes; Lauwers, Ludwig; Vercruysse, Jozef; Van Huylenbroeck, Guido; Van Meensel, Jef

    2013-05-01

    Helminth infections are considered to be an important constraint on livestock productivity worldwide. The economic impact of these infections or their control strategies has traditionally been assessed by their effect on animal performance indicators or traditional economic calculation methods (e.g. budgeting and cost-benefit analysis). Because the impact of helminth infections has become more subtle and is farm-specific, one needs more refined economic evaluations of actions meant to increase or maintain the health of livestock on individual farms. This paper proposes an interdisciplinary framework that combines the developments in the veterinary control of helminth infections with economic performance measurements to identify farm-specific and profitable anthelmintic management decisions. Our framework positions individual farms' performance against performance benchmarks and is based on the farms' efficiency in transforming input(s) into output(s). We show how this positioning makes it possible to establish a linkage between input and output transformation, helminth infection levels and effects of control strategies. Furthermore, the framework allows for the identification of improvement paths that are not necessarily related to the helminth infection, but which may lead to other management improvements. We discuss the epidemiological information required and which complementary methods (e.g. efficiency analysis and budgeting techniques) can be used to make the framework operational.

  14. Alternative antiretroviral monitoring strategies for HIV-infected patients in east Africa: opportunities to save more lives?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Updated World Health Organization guidelines have amplified debate about how resource constraints should impact monitoring strategies for HIV-infected persons on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We estimated the incremental benefit and cost effectiveness of alternative monitoring strategies for east Africans with known HIV infection. Methods Using a validated HIV computer simulation based on resource-limited data (USAID and AMPATH) and circumstances (east Africa), we compared alternative monitoring strategies for HIV-infected persons newly started on cART. We evaluated clinical, immunologic and virologic monitoring strategies, including combinations and conditional logic (e.g., only perform virologic testing if immunologic testing is positive). We calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) in units of cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY), using a societal perspective and a lifetime horizon. Costs were measured in 2008 US dollars, and costs and benefits were discounted at 3%. We compared the ICER of monitoring strategies with those of other resource-constrained decisions, in particular earlier cART initiation (at CD4 counts of 350 cells/mm3 rather than 200 cells/mm3). Results Monitoring strategies employing routine CD4 testing without virologic testing never maximized health benefits, regardless of budget or societal willingness to pay for additional health benefits. Monitoring strategies employing virologic testing conditional upon particular CD4 results delivered the most benefit at willingness-to-pay levels similar to the cost of earlier cART initiation (approximately $2600/QALY). Monitoring strategies employing routine virologic testing alone only maximized health benefits at willingness-to-pay levels (> $4400/QALY) that greatly exceeded the ICER of earlier cART initiation. Conclusions CD4 testing alone never maximized health benefits regardless of resource limitations. Programmes routinely performing virologic testing but

  15. [Strategies for Mycobacterium avium complex infection control in Japan: how do they improve the present situation?].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kenji; Sano, Chiaki

    2013-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) were the most frequently isolated (about 80%) and most common cause of lung nontuberculosis. Its rate of infection is globally increasing, especially in Japan. In this situation, it is urgently needed to provide scientific evidences and develop therapeutic interventions in MAC infections. Recently, more and more patients are elderly women with no history of smoking, and they have reticulonodular infiltrates and patchy bilateral bronchiectasis. However the prognostic and intractable factors of MAC infections are poorly known. In this symposium, we address five novel strategies for MAC infection, concerning the more accurate incidence and prevalence rates compared with other countries, host defense associated with Th1/Th17 balance, route of MAC infection related soil exposure, MAC IgA antibody as a diagnosis maker, and improved chemotherapy including aminoglycoside or new quinolone. Appropriate clinical intervention may help to reduce the prolongation of MAC infection or enhance the activity of chemotherapy for the improved control of MAC. Below are the abstracts for each of the five speakers. 1. Review of current epidemiological study of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease in Japan and the rest of the world: Kozo MORIMOTO (Respiratory Center, Fukujuji Hospital, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association) The studies on pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease prevalence were started in early 1970s in Japan by the Mycobacteriosis Research Group of National Chest Hospitals. They were followed by a questionnaire survey in 1990s, by the National Tuberculosis and NTM Survey in late 1990s, and recently by the questionnaire surveys conducted by the NTM Disease Research Committee. The latest data in Japan (from 2007) indicated a morbidity rate of 5.7 per 100,000 population. Deaths from NTM disease were reported for the first time in 1970 and showed a marked, steady increase until 2007, with 912 deaths in that year. We

  16. A nonenzymatic optical immunoassay strategy for detection of Salmonella infection based on blue silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qian; Zhao, Guangying; Dou, Wenchao

    2015-10-22

    A novel nonenzymatic optical immunoassay strategy was for the first time designed and utilized for sensitive detection of antibody to Salmonella pullorum and Salmonella gallinarum (S. pullorum and S. gallinarum) in serum. The optical immunoassay strategy was based on blue silica nanoparticles (Blue-SiNps) and magnetic beads (MB). To construct such an optical immunoassay system, the Blue-SiNPs were first synthesized by inverse microemulsion method, characterized by SEM, Zeta potential and FTIR. Two nanostructures including Blue-SiNPs and MB were both functionalized with antibody against S. pullorum and S. gallinarum (anti-PG) without using enzyme labeled antibody. Anti-PG functionalized blue silica nanoparticles (IgG-Blue-SiNps) were used as signal transduction labels, while anti-PG functionalized magnetic beads (IgG-MB) were selected to separate and enrich the final sandwich immune complexes. In the process of detecting negative serum, a sandwich immunocomplex is formed between the IgG-MB and IgG-Blue-SiNPs. With the separation of the immunocomplex using an external magnetic field, the final plaque displayed bright blue color. While in the detection of infected serum, IgG-MB and anti-PG formed sandwich immunocomplexes, IgG-Blue-SiNPs were unable to bind to the limited sites of the antigen, and a light brown plaque was displayed in the bottom of microplate well. Stable results were obtained with an incubation time of 60 min at room temperature, and different colors corresponding to different results can be directly detected with naked eye. The reaction of IgG-Blue-SiNPs with S. pullorum was inhibited by 1:100 dilution of positive chicken serum. Such a simple immunoassay holds great potential as sensitive, selective and point-of-care (POC) tool for diagnosis of other biological molecules.

  17. Influence of a multidisciplinary alert strategy on mortality due to left-sided infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Chinchilla, Fernando; Sánchez-Espín, Gemma; Ruiz-Morales, Josefa; Rodríguez-Bailón, Isabel; Melero-Tejedor, Jose M; Ivanova-Georgieva, Rada; García-López, Victoria; Muñoz-García, Antonio; Gómez-Doblas, Juan J; de Teresa-Galván, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    Mortality from left-sided infective endocarditis remains very high. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of a multidisciplinary alert strategy (AMULTEI), based on clinical, echocardiographic and microbiological findings, implemented in 2008 in a tertiary hospital. Cohort study comparing our historical data series (1996-2007) with the number of patients diagnosed with left-sided endocarditis from 2008-2011 (AMULTEI). The AMULTEI cohort included 72 patients who were compared with 155 patients in the historical cohort. AMULTEI patients were significantly older (62.5 vs 57.9 years in the historical cohort; P=.047) and had higher comorbidity (Charlson index, 3.33 vs 2.58 in the historical cohort; P=.023). There was also a trend toward more enterococcal etiology in the AMULTEI group (20.8% vs 11.6% in the historical cohort; P=.067). In the AMULTEI group, early surgery was more frequently performed (48.6% vs 23.2%; P<.001) during hospitalization, the incidence of septic shock was significantly lower (9.7% vs 24.5%; P=.009) and there was a trend toward reductions in neurological complications (19.4% vs 29.0%; P=.25) and severe heart failure (12.5% vs 18.7%; P=.24). In-hospital mortality and mortality during the first month of follow-up were significantly lower in the AMULTEI group (16.7% vs 36.1%; P=.003). Despite the trend toward older age and more comorbidity measured by the Charlson index, early mortality was significantly lower in patients treated with the AMULTEI strategy. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Contrast Materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... veins of the body, including vessels in the brain, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis and legs soft tissues of the body, including the muscles, fat and skin brain breast Microbubble Contrast Materials Microbubble contrast materials are ...

  19. Contrast Materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... of page Side effects and adverse and allergic reactions Barium Sulfate Contrast Materials You should tell your ... You are at greater risk of an adverse reaction to barium-sulfate contrast materials if: you have ...

  20. Mapping the distribution of Anopheles funestus across Benin highlights a sharp contrast of susceptibility to insecticides and infection rate to Plasmodium between southern and northern populations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Malaria remains an important public health issue in Benin, with Anopheles gambiae s.l. and Anopheles funestus s.s being the predominant vectors. This study was designed to generate information on An. funestus distribution, molecular speciation, Plasmodium infection rate and insecticide susceptibility status across Benin. Methods. Mosquito samples were collected from December 2014 to January 2016 in 46 localities in Benin. These samples were mapped and An. funestus collected were speciated to the molecular level. Plasmodium infection rate was determined using a Taqman assay and susceptibility to insecticides was assessed using the WHO guidelines. The genotyping of the L119F- Gste2 mutation was also carried out.  Results.  An. funestus was found in 8 out of the 46 localities surveyed with a high presence in Tanongou (wet Sudanese ecological zone), Kpome, Doukonta and Pahou (sub-equatorial ecological zone). Molecular identifications revealed that only An. funestus s.s was present in southern Benin, whereas in Tanongou (northern Benin) An. funestus s.s. and An. leesoni were found in sympatry at proportions of 77.7% and 22.3% respectively. Plasmodium infection rate of An. funestus was higher in southern Benin at a range of 13 to 18% compared to 5.6% recorded in Tanongou. High DDT (8±0.5%) and permethrin (11±0.5%) resistance were observed in Doukonta, Kpome and Pahou, contrasting with relatively low resistance profiles: mortality-DDT=90±3.18% and mortality-permethrin=100% in Tanongou. Genotyping analysis revealed  high frequency  of the resistant 119F allele in the South (Kpome and Doukonta) compared to the North (Tanongou).  Discussion and Conclusion. The high presence of   An. funestus in the South compared to the North  could be due to favorable environmental and climatic conditions found in both regions. A significant Plasmodium infection rate was recorded across the country. A high resistance profile was recorded in the southern Benin; this

  1. Patients with urinary tract infection: proposed management strategies of general practitioners, microbiologists and urologists.

    PubMed Central

    Olesen, F; Oestergaard, I

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND. It is difficult to implement change in general practice. It is not known how best to conduct effective continuing medical education in general practice. General practitioners' criteria for good clinical practice vary and it is unknown whether systematic education by hospital specialists could be expected to reduce variation between general practitioners. AIM. A study was undertaken to describe general practitioners', microbiologists' and urologists' strategies for diagnosis, treatment, and follow up of female patients with symptoms of urinary tract infection, a common reason for consultation in general practice. The findings of the study were to be used as a base upon which to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using hospital specialists as a resource in general practitioners' peer group based continuing medical education. METHOD. Three vignettes together with several proposals for diagnosis, treatment and follow up were presented in a questionnaire to general practitioners, microbiologists and urologists in Denmark. The case histories concerned three female patients (aged 10, 30 and 60 years) who consulted their general practitioner for advice. The female patients were otherwise healthy and well known to the practice. General practitioners', microbiologists' and urologists' recommendations for good clinical practice were compared. RESULTS. A total of 154 general practitioners (77%), 45 microbiologists (51%) and 54 urologists (61%) who were eligible for the study responded to the questionnaire. There was considerable variation in the management strategies proposed by doctors within each specialty and between the specialties. Microbiologists and urologists were more likely to suggest treating the 30-year-old woman by giving advice and a prescription by telephone compared with their general practitioner colleagues. Conversely, the microbiologists and urologists were more likely to suggest asking the 10- and 60-year-old patients to attend the

  2. Co-ordination of growth, gas exchange and hydraulics define the carbon safety margin in tree species with contrasting drought strategies.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, P J; O'Grady, A P; Tissue, D T; Worledge, D; Pinkard, E A

    2014-05-01

    Gas exchange, growth, water transport and carbon (C) metabolism diminish during drought according to their respective sensitivities to declining water status. The timing of this sequence of declining physiological functions may determine how water and C relations compromise plant survival. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that the degree of asynchrony between declining C supply (photosynthesis) and C demand (growth and respiration) determines the rate and magnitude of changes in whole-plant non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) during drought. Two complementary experiments using two tree species (Eucalyptus globulus Labill. and Pinus radiata D. Don) with contrasting drought response strategies were performed to (i) assess changes in radial stem growth, transpiration, leaf water potential and gas exchange in response to chronic drought, and (ii) evaluate the concomitant impacts of these drought responses on the temporal patterns of NSC during terminal drought. The three distinct phases of water stress were delineated by thresholds of growth cessation and stomatal closure that defined the 'carbon safety margin' (i.e., the difference between leaf water potential when growth is zero and leaf water potential when net photosynthesis is zero). A wider C safety margin in E. globulus was defined by an earlier cessation of growth relative to photosynthesis that reduced the demand for NSC while maintaining C acquisition. By contrast, the narrower C safety margin in P. radiata was characterized by a synchronous decline in growth and photosynthesis, whereby growth continued under a declining supply of NSC from photosynthesis. The narrower C safety margin in P. radiata was associated with declines in starch concentrations after ∼ 90 days of chronic drought and significant depletion of starch in all organs at mortality. The observed divergence in the sensitivity of drought responses is indicative of a potential trade-off between maintaining hydraulic safety and adequate C

  3. Challenges in linking preclinical anti-microbial research strategies with clinical outcomes for device-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, T F; Grainger, D W; Richards, R G

    2014-09-12

    Infections related to implanted medical devices have become a significant health care issue in recent decades. Increasing numbers of medical devices are in use, often in an aging population, and these devices are implanted against a background of increasing antibiotic-resistant bacterial populations. Progressively more antibiotic resistant infections, requiring ever more refined treatment options, are therefore predicted to emerge with greater frequency in the coming decades. Improvements in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of these device-associated infections will remain priority targets both for clinicians and the translational research community charged with addressing these challenges. Preclinical strategies, predictive of ultimate clinical efficacy, should serve as a control point for effective translation of new technologies to clinical applications. The development of new anti-infective medical devices requires a validated preclinical testing protocol; however, reliable validation of experimental and preclinical antimicrobial methodologies currently suffers from a variety of technical limitations. These include the lack of agreement or standardisation of experimental protocols, a general lack of correlation between in vitro and in vivo preclinical results and lack of validation between in vivo preclinical implant infection models and clinical (human) results. Device-associated infections pose additional challenges to practicing clinicians concerning diagnosis and treatment, both of which are complicated by the biofilms formed on the medical device. The critical challenges facing both preclinical research and clinical laboratories in improving both diagnosis and treatment of medical device-associated infections are the focus of this review.

  4. A Novel Non-Replication-Competent Cytomegalovirus Capsid Mutant Vaccine Strategy Is Effective in Reducing Congenital Infection

    PubMed Central

    Choi, K. Yeon; Root, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a leading cause of mental retardation and deafness in newborns. The guinea pig is the only small animal model for congenital CMV infection. A novel CMV vaccine was investigated as an intervention strategy against congenital guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) infection. In this disabled infectious single-cycle (DISC) vaccine strategy, a GPCMV mutant virus was used that lacked the ability to express an essential capsid gene (the UL85 homolog GP85) except when grown on a complementing cell line. In vaccinated animals, the GP85 mutant virus (GP85 DISC) induced an antibody response to important glycoprotein complexes considered neutralizing target antigens (gB, gH/gL/gO, and gM/gN). The vaccine also generated a T cell response to the pp65 homolog (GP83), determined via a newly established guinea pig gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay. In a congenital infection protection study, GP85 DISC-vaccinated animals and a nonvaccinated control group were challenged during pregnancy with wild-type GPCMV (105 PFU). The pregnant animals carried the pups to term, and viral loads in target organs of pups were analyzed. Based on live pup births in the vaccinated and control groups (94.1% versus 63.6%), the vaccine was successful in reducing mortality (P = 0.0002). Additionally, pups from the vaccinated group had reduced CMV transmission, with 23.5% infected target organs versus 75.9% in the control group. Overall, these preliminary studies indicate that a DISC CMV vaccine strategy has the ability to induce an immune response similar to that of natural virus infection but has the increased safety of a non-replication-competent virus, which makes this approach attractive as a CMV vaccine strategy. IMPORTANCE Congenital CMV infection is a leading cause of mental retardation and deafness in newborns. An effective vaccine against CMV remains an elusive goal despite over 50 years of CMV research. The guinea pig, with

  5. A Novel Non-Replication-Competent Cytomegalovirus Capsid Mutant Vaccine Strategy Is Effective in Reducing Congenital Infection.

    PubMed

    Choi, K Yeon; Root, Matthew; McGregor, Alistair

    2016-09-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a leading cause of mental retardation and deafness in newborns. The guinea pig is the only small animal model for congenital CMV infection. A novel CMV vaccine was investigated as an intervention strategy against congenital guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) infection. In this disabled infectious single-cycle (DISC) vaccine strategy, a GPCMV mutant virus was used that lacked the ability to express an essential capsid gene (the UL85 homolog GP85) except when grown on a complementing cell line. In vaccinated animals, the GP85 mutant virus (GP85 DISC) induced an antibody response to important glycoprotein complexes considered neutralizing target antigens (gB, gH/gL/gO, and gM/gN). The vaccine also generated a T cell response to the pp65 homolog (GP83), determined via a newly established guinea pig gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay. In a congenital infection protection study, GP85 DISC-vaccinated animals and a nonvaccinated control group were challenged during pregnancy with wild-type GPCMV (10(5) PFU). The pregnant animals carried the pups to term, and viral loads in target organs of pups were analyzed. Based on live pup births in the vaccinated and control groups (94.1% versus 63.6%), the vaccine was successful in reducing mortality (P = 0.0002). Additionally, pups from the vaccinated group had reduced CMV transmission, with 23.5% infected target organs versus 75.9% in the control group. Overall, these preliminary studies indicate that a DISC CMV vaccine strategy has the ability to induce an immune response similar to that of natural virus infection but has the increased safety of a non-replication-competent virus, which makes this approach attractive as a CMV vaccine strategy. Congenital CMV infection is a leading cause of mental retardation and deafness in newborns. An effective vaccine against CMV remains an elusive goal despite over 50 years of CMV research. The guinea pig, with a placenta

  6. Late Presentation of HIV Infection: Prevalence, Trends, and the Role of HIV Testing Strategies in Guangzhou, China, 2008–2013

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Weibin; Tang, Weiming; Han, Zhigang; Tangthanasup, Thitikarn May; Zhong, Fei; Qin, Faju

    2016-01-01

    Background. The prevalence, trends, and the role of different HIV testing strategies in late presentation of HIV infection in China were unknown. Methods. Data of newly reported HIV cases in Guangzhou between 2008 and 2013 was analyzed to examine the prevalence, trends, and characteristics of late presentation of HIV infection by three types of HIV testing strategies. Results. Overall, 53.2% (1412/2653) and 27.3% (724/2653) met the criteria of late presentation and presentation with advanced HIV disease. The overall trend of late presentation of HIV infection within the study period was declining. Late presentation was 62.9% in 2008 and dropped to 43.3% in 2013 (P < 0.001); presentation with advanced HIV disease was 40.3% in 2008 and dropped to 15.2% in 2013 (P < 0.001). Of the three testing strategies, PITC presented higher odds of both late presentation [AOR (95% CI): PITC versus VCT: 1.37 (1.09, 1.73); PITC versus MHT: 3.09 (2.16, 4.42)] and presentation with advanced HIV disease [AOR (95% CI): PITC versus VCT: 1.65 (1.29, 2.11); PITC versus MHT: 13.14 (8.47, 20.39)]. Conclusions. Although the late presentation of HIV infection was declining, it was still high in Guangzhou. The worse situation among PITC cases urges the policy adjustment in medical settings to increase early HIV diagnosis. PMID:27761466

  7. Late Presentation of HIV Infection: Prevalence, Trends, and the Role of HIV Testing Strategies in Guangzhou, China, 2008-2013.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weibin; Tang, Weiming; Han, Zhigang; Tangthanasup, Thitikarn May; Zhong, Fei; Qin, Faju; Xu, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    Background. The prevalence, trends, and the role of different HIV testing strategies in late presentation of HIV infection in China were unknown. Methods. Data of newly reported HIV cases in Guangzhou between 2008 and 2013 was analyzed to examine the prevalence, trends, and characteristics of late presentation of HIV infection by three types of HIV testing strategies. Results. Overall, 53.2% (1412/2653) and 27.3% (724/2653) met the criteria of late presentation and presentation with advanced HIV disease. The overall trend of late presentation of HIV infection within the study period was declining. Late presentation was 62.9% in 2008 and dropped to 43.3% in 2013 (P < 0.001); presentation with advanced HIV disease was 40.3% in 2008 and dropped to 15.2% in 2013 (P < 0.001). Of the three testing strategies, PITC presented higher odds of both late presentation [AOR (95% CI): PITC versus VCT: 1.37 (1.09, 1.73); PITC versus MHT: 3.09 (2.16, 4.42)] and presentation with advanced HIV disease [AOR (95% CI): PITC versus VCT: 1.65 (1.29, 2.11); PITC versus MHT: 13.14 (8.47, 20.39)]. Conclusions. Although the late presentation of HIV infection was declining, it was still high in Guangzhou. The worse situation among PITC cases urges the policy adjustment in medical settings to increase early HIV diagnosis.

  8. Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    standing, diagnosis, and treatment of musculoskeletal infections. Key Words: musculoskeletal infection, biofilm , bacteria, biomaterial (J Orthop Trauma...form a biofilm , or slime layer.1 The recurrence of infections is often the result of microbial biofilm formation on the implant, enabling the persistence...Klebsiella pneumoniae). Staphylococcus species is by far the most studied pathogen in musculoskeletal infections and can produce a multilayered biofilm

  9. Alternative fluorescent labeling strategies for characterizing gram-positive pathogenic bacteria: Flow cytometry supported counting, sorting, and proteome analysis of Staphylococcus aureus retrieved from infected host cells.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Petra; Surmann, Kristin; Salazar, Manuela Gesell; Normann, Nicole; Völker, Uwe; Schmidt, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive opportunistic pathogen that is able to cause a broad range of infectious diseases in humans. Furthermore, S. aureus is able to survive inside nonprofessional phagocytic host cell which serve as a niche for the pathogen to hide from the immune system and antibiotics therapies. Modern OMICs technologies provide valuable tools to investigate host-pathogen interactions upon internalization. However, these experiments are often hampered by limited capabilities to retrieve bacteria from such an experimental setting. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop a labeling strategy allowing fast detection and quantitation of S. aureus in cell lysates or infected cell lines by flow cytometry for subsequent proteome analyses. Therefore, S. aureus cells were labeled with the DNA stain SYTO(®) 9, or Vancomycin BODIPY(®) FL (VMB), a glycopeptide antibiotic binding to most Gram-positive bacteria which was conjugated to a fluorescent dye. Staining of S. aureus HG001 with SYTO 9 allowed counting of bacteria from pure cultures but not in cell lysates from infection experiments. In contrast, with VMB it was feasible to stain bacteria from pure cultures as well as from samples of infection experiments. VMB can also be applied for histocytochemistry analysis of formaldehyde fixed cell layers grown on coverslips. Proteome analyses of S. aureus labeled with VMB revealed that the labeling procedure provoked only minor changes on proteome level and allowed cell sorting and analysis of S. aureus from infection settings with sensitivity similar to continuous gfp expression. Furthermore, VMB labeling allowed precise counting of internalized bacteria and can be employed for downstream analyses, e.g., proteomics, of strains not easily amendable to genetic manipulation such as clinical isolates. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  10. Global Scale Transcriptional Profiling of Two Contrasting Barley Genotypes Exposed to Moderate Drought Conditions: Contribution of Leaves and Crowns to Water Shortage Coping Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Svoboda, Pavel; Janská, Anna; Spiwok, Vojtěch; Prášil, Ilja T.; Kosová, Klára; Vítámvás, Pavel; Ovesná, Jaroslava

    2016-01-01

    Drought is a serious threat for sustainable agriculture. Barley represents a species well adapted to environmental stresses including drought. To elucidate the adaptive mechanism of barley on transcriptional level we evaluated transcriptomic changes of two contrasting barley cultivars upon drought using the microarray technique on the level of leaves and crowns. Using bioinformatic tools, differentially expressed genes in treated vs. non-treated plants were identified. Both genotypes revealed tissue dehydration under drought conditions as shown at water saturation deficit and osmotic potential data; however, dehydration was more severe in Amulet than in drought-resistant Tadmor under the same ambient conditions. Performed analysis showed that Amulet enhanced expression of genes related to active plant growth and development, while Tadmor regarding the stimulated genes revealed conservative, water saving strategy. Common reactions of both genotypes and tissues included an induction of genes encoding several stress-responsive signaling proteins, transcription factors as well as effector genes encoding proteins directly involved in stress acclimation. In leaf, tolerant cultivar effectively stimulated mainly the expression of genes encoding proteins and enzymes involved in protein folding, sulfur metabolism, ROS detoxification or lipid biosynthesis and transport. The crown specific reaction of tolerant cultivar was an enhanced expression of genes encoding proteins and enzymes involved in cell wall lignification, ABRE-dependent abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, nucleosome remodeling, along with genes for numerous jasmonate induced proteins. PMID:28083001

  11. Global Scale Transcriptional Profiling of Two Contrasting Barley Genotypes Exposed to Moderate Drought Conditions: Contribution of Leaves and Crowns to Water Shortage Coping Strategies.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Pavel; Janská, Anna; Spiwok, Vojtěch; Prášil, Ilja T; Kosová, Klára; Vítámvás, Pavel; Ovesná, Jaroslava

    2016-01-01

    Drought is a serious threat for sustainable agriculture. Barley represents a species well adapted to environmental stresses including drought. To elucidate the adaptive mechanism of barley on transcriptional level we evaluated transcriptomic changes of two contrasting barley cultivars upon drought using the microarray technique on the level of leaves and crowns. Using bioinformatic tools, differentially expressed genes in treated vs. non-treated plants were identified. Both genotypes revealed tissue dehydration under drought conditions as shown at water saturation deficit and osmotic potential data; however, dehydration was more severe in Amulet than in drought-resistant Tadmor under the same ambient conditions. Performed analysis showed that Amulet enhanced expression of genes related to active plant growth and development, while Tadmor regarding the stimulated genes revealed conservative, water saving strategy. Common reactions of both genotypes and tissues included an induction of genes encoding several stress-responsive signaling proteins, transcription factors as well as effector genes encoding proteins directly involved in stress acclimation. In leaf, tolerant cultivar effectively stimulated mainly the expression of genes encoding proteins and enzymes involved in protein folding, sulfur metabolism, ROS detoxification or lipid biosynthesis and transport. The crown specific reaction of tolerant cultivar was an enhanced expression of genes encoding proteins and enzymes involved in cell wall lignification, ABRE-dependent abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, nucleosome remodeling, along with genes for numerous jasmonate induced proteins.

  12. Contrasting strategies used by lichen microalgae to cope with desiccation-rehydration stress revealed by metabolite profiling and cell wall analysis.

    PubMed

    Centeno, Danilo C; Hell, Aline F; Braga, Marcia R; Del Campo, Eva M; Casano, Leonardo M

    2016-05-01

    Most lichens in general, and their phycobionts in particular, are desiccation tolerant, but their mechanisms of desiccation tolerance (DT) remain obscure. The physiological responses and cell wall features of two putatively contrasting lichen-forming microalgae, Trebouxia sp. TR9 (TR9), isolated from Ramalina farinacea (adapted to frequent desiccation-rehydration cycles), and Coccomyxa solorina-saccatae (Csol), obtained from Solorina saccata (growing in usually humid limestone crevices, subjected to seasonal dry periods) was characterized. Microalgal cultures were desiccated under 25%-30% RH and then rehydrated. Under these conditions, RWC and ψw decreased faster and simultaneously during dehydration in Csol, whereas TR9 maintained its ψw until 70% RWC. The metabolic profile indicated that polyols played a key role in DT of both microalgae. However, TR9 constitutively accumulated higher amounts of polyols, whereas Csol induced the polyol synthesis under desiccation-rehydration. Csol also accumulated ascorbic acid, while TR9 synthesized protective raffinose-family oligosaccharides (RFOs) and increased its content of phenolics. Additionally, TR9 exhibited thicker and qualitatively different cell wall and extracellular polymeric layer compared with Csol, indicating higher water retention capability. The findings were consistent with the notion that lichen microalgae would have evolved distinct strategies to cope with desiccation-rehydration stress in correspondence with the water regime of their respective habitats. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Amphotericin B-conjugated biogenic silver nanoparticles as an innovative strategy for fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aftab; Wei, Yun; Syed, Fatima; Tahir, Kamran; Taj, Raheela; Khan, Arif Ullah; Hameed, Muhammad Usman; Yuan, Qipeng

    2016-10-01

    New strategies are required to improve the efficacy of drugs and to treat the emerging microbial resistance. An effective strategy is to combine drugs with metal nanoparticles for the control of microbial infections and resistance. Keeping in view this fact, we developed a facile and eco-friendly protocol for the synthesis of amphotericin B-conjugated silver nanoparticles and their assessment as an antifungal agent. Phytochemicals from the aqueous extract of Maytenus royleanus and amphotericin B were used as capping agents to prepare two types of silver nanoparticles i.e. (i) biogenic silver nanoparticles (b-AgNPs) and (ii) amphotericin B-conjugated biogenic silver nanoparticles (Amp-bAgNPs). UV-Vis spectroscopy was used to detect the characteristic surface Plasmon resonance peaks (SPR) for the prepared nanoparticles (424-433 nm). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study revealed the formation of well dispersed and spherical silver nanoparticles and Amp-bAgNPs with an average particles size of 10 and 15 nm. EDX and FTIR studies confirmed the elemental composition and surface adhered biomolecules in the prepared nanoparticles respectively. Biogenic silver nanoparticles revealed low to moderate antifungal activity (4-8 mm ± 0.2), however, the amphotericin B conjugated silver nanoparticles exhibited significant activity against Candida albicans (16 mm ± 1.4) and Candida tropicalis (18 mm ± 1.5). In conclusion, the enhanced antifungal activity of the Amp-AgNPs conjugate system is due to the synergy between the antifungal activity of amphotericin B and the antimicrobial property of silver. The findings of this study suggest that the conjugated nanoparticles could be used as efficient antifungal agents and drug delivery vehicles. Furthermore, this is the first report describing the synthesis of silver nanoparticles using the aqueous extract of Maytenus royleanus and the conjugation of amphotericin B, an antifungal drug, to the

  14. Contrastive Lexicology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, R. R. K.

    This paper deals with the relation between etymologically related words in different languages. A survey is made of seven stages in the development of contrastive lexicology. These are: prelinguistic word studies, semantics, lexicography, translation, foreign language learning, bilingualism, and finally contrastive analysis. Concerning contrastive…

  15. Contrastive Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Carl

    Contrastive analysis is viewed as an interlinguistic, bidirectional phenomenon which is concerned with both the form and function of language. As such, contrastive analysis must view language psycholinguistically and sociolinguistically as a system to be both described and acquired. Due to the need for a psychological component in the analysis,…

  16. Towards a preventive strategy for neosporosis: challenges and future perspectives for vaccine development against infection with Neospora caninum

    PubMed Central

    NISHIKAWA, Yoshifumi

    2017-01-01

    Neosporosis is caused by the intracellular protozoan parasite Neospora caninum. This major disease-causing pathogen is responsible for inducing abortion in cattle, and these adverse events occur sporadically all over the world, including Japan. Currently, there are no vaccines on the market against infection with N. caninum. Because live and attenuated vaccines against N. caninum have had safety and effectiveness issues, development of a next-generation vaccine is urgently required. To develop a vaccine against neosporosis, my laboratory has been focused on the following: 1) understanding the host immune responses against Neospora infection, 2) identifying vaccine antigens and 3) developing an effective antigen-delivery system. The research strategy taken in my laboratory will have strong potential to progress current understanding of the pathogenesis of N. caninum infection and promote development of a novel subunit vaccine based on the specific vaccine antigen with an antigen-delivery system for controlling neosporosis. PMID:28690279

  17. Noninvasive screening for genital chlamydial infections in asymptomatic men: Strategies and costs using a urine PCR assay

    PubMed Central

    Peeling, Rosanna W; Toye, Baldwin; Jessamine, Peter; Gemmill, Ian

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cost saving strategies to screen for genital chlamydial infection in men using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology. METHODS: Men with no urethral symptoms presenting to a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic were recruited. Study participants underwent a questionnaire interview. Urethral swabs were taken to perform a smear for polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) and for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis by culture and PCR. First-catch urine was collected for a leukocyte esterase test (LET) and PCR. RESULTS: C trachomatis infection was detected in 36 of 463 (7.8%) men. LET and PMN were positive in 10 (28%) and 12 (33%) infected men, respectively. Risk factors for chlamydial infection were younger than age 25 years, LET-positive, PMN-positive and STD contact (P<0.001). The direct cost of genital chlamydial infection in men in Canada has been previously estimated at $381/case. Based on a sensitivity of 90% for urine PCR, the estimated direct cost of testing all participants to detect 32 cases was $453/case. Using risk factors recommended in the Canadian STD Guidelines (age younger than 25 years, new partner, STD contact or unprotected sex), the same number of cases would have been detected by testing only 384 men at $376/case. Using age younger than 25 years or STD contact as the screening criterion, 78% of those infected would have been detected at $259/case, and no new cases would have been detected by adding LET-positive or PMN-positive as risk factors. CONCLUSION: Targeted screening for chlamydial infection using urine PCR assay and risk factors recommended in the Canadian guidelines could substantially reduce the cost of screening at a STD clinic setting. LET and PMN smear did not appear to be useful indicators of chlamydial infection in this population. PMID:22346549

  18. [Current problems and strategies in the management of intra-abdominal infection].

    PubMed

    Ren, Jian-An

    2011-07-01

    The incidence of intra-abdominal infection increases annually. The current management of intra-abdominal infection includes immediate resuscitation, prompt source control and appropriate usage of antibiotics. For patients with septic shock, fluid resuscitation should begin immediately when hypotension is present. Fluid resuscitation should be combined with vasoactive drugs. Damage control surgery promotes the development of ultrasound or CT guided percutaneous abscess drainage and open abdomen therapy. Rational use of anti-infective drugs could prevent prevalence of multiple antibiotics resistant bacteria and pan-resistant bacteria. The gut rehabilitation measures can improve the recovery of gut function and restore of enteral nutrition, and thus prevents bacterial translocation in intra-abdominal infection patients. Monitoring and modulations of immune function may further improve the successful rate of treatment of intra-abdominal infections. Non-thyroidal illness syndrome may develop in the severe intra-abdominal infection patients and should be promptly corrected.

  19. Recurrence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Bolivian children and adults after a population-based "screen and treat" strategy.

    PubMed

    Sivapalasingam, Sumathi; Rajasingham, Anu; Macy, Jonathan T; Friedman, Cindy R; Hoekstra, Robert M; Ayers, Tracy; Gold, Benjamin; Quick, Robert E

    2014-10-01

    Strategies to prevent gastric cancer by decreasing Helicobacter pylori infections in high-prevalence, low-income countries could include a population-based "screen and treat" eradication program. We tested residents of two rural villages for H. pylori infection using urea breath test (UBT), treated infected persons using directly observed therapy (DOT), retested for cure, and retested after 1 year later for H. pylori infection. We tested 1,065 (92%) of 1153 residents from two villages in rural Bolivia. Baseline H. pylori prevalence was 80% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 78-84). Age-specific cure rates were similar (≥92%) after DOT. Among those cured, 12% (95% CI: 8-15) had recurrent infection. Age-specific annual H. pylori recurrence rates for combined villages were 20% (95% CI: 10-29) in persons <5 years, 20% (95% CI: 10-29) in 5-9 years, 8% (95% CI: 1-15) in 10-14 years, and 8% (95% CI: 4-12) in persons ≥15 years. Compared with the referent population, those ≥15 years, recurrent infections were significantly more likely in children <5 years (odds ratios [OR] 2.7, 95% CI: 1.2-5.8) and 5-9 years (OR 2.7, 95% CI: 1.4-5.1). Children <10 years had high H. pylori recurrence rates following a population-based screen and treat program; this H. pylori eradication strategy may not be feasible in high-prevalence, low-income settings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The global swine flu pandemic 2: infection control measures and preparedness strategies.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Robert J

    This second in a two-part unit on swine flu looks at infection control measures for nurses. During late spring and early summer, increasing numbers of people became infected with novel swine origin influenza type A virus (influenza A(H1N1)v 2009) and a global pandemic started. Part 1 of this unit explored the biology of influenza viruses and the origins and characteristics of flu pandemics. This part reviews viral transmission, infection prevention and control and pandemic preparedness.

  1. Building and Strengthening Infection Control Strategies to Prevent Tuberculosis - Nigeria, 2015.

    PubMed

    Dokubo, E Kainne; Odume, Bethrand; Lipke, Virginia; Muianga, Custodio; Onu, Eugene; Olutola, Ayodotun; Ukachukwu, Lucy; Igweike, Patricia; Chukwura, Nneka; Ubochioma, Emperor; Aniaku, Everistus; Ezeudu, Chinyere; Agboeze, Joseph; Iroh, Gabriel; Orji, Elvina; Godwin, Okezue; Raji, Hasiya Bello; Aboje, S A; Osakwe, Chijioke; Debem, Henry; Bello, Mustapha; Onotu, Dennis; Maloney, Susan

    2016-03-18

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of infectious disease mortality worldwide, accounting for more than 1.5 million deaths in 2014, and is the leading cause of death among persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (1). Nigeria has the fourth highest annual number of TB cases among countries, with an estimated incidence of 322 per 100,000 population (1), and the second highest prevalence of HIV infection, with 3.4 million infected persons (2). In 2014, 100,000 incident TB cases and 78,000 TB deaths occurred among persons living with HIV infection in Nigeria (1). Nosocomial transmission is a significant source of TB infection in resource-limited settings (3), and persons with HIV infection and health care workers are at increased risk for TB infection because of their routine exposure to patients with TB in health care facilities (3-5). A lack of TB infection control in health care settings has resulted in outbreaks of TB and drug-resistant TB among patients and health care workers, leading to excess morbidity and mortality. In March 2015, in collaboration with the Nigeria Ministry of Health (MoH), CDC implemented a pilot initiative, aimed at increasing health care worker knowledge about TB infection control, assessing infection control measures in health facilities, and developing plans to address identified gaps. The approach resulted in substantial improvements in TB infection control practices at seven selected facilities, and scale-up of these measures across other facilities might lead to a reduction in TB transmission in Nigeria and globally.

  2. [Strategies for management of difficult to treat Gram-negative infections: focus on Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Bassetti, Matteo

    2007-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is often involved in the aetiology of numerous infections, particularly those occurring in hospital. The infections in which P. aeruginosa most frequently has a pathogenic role include respiratory tract infections, particularly those occurring in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), nosocomial pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and cystic fibrosis, as well as those developing in patients with AIDS, bacteraemia, sepsis, urinary tract infections, especially those related to catheterisation or kidney transplants, infections in neutropenic patients, and skin infections, particular those developing in surgical wounds or in burns. Thus, in practice, P. aeruginosa is ubiquitously present in all body districts. Particular attention should also be given to the presence of P. aeruginosa in the community setting, for example when it causes community-acquired pneumonia in the elderly or pneumonia in patients with advanced stage COPD. The mortality rate of patients with severe P. aeruginosa infections is very high. Treatment should be initiated very promptly with the most suitable drug, perhaps making use of combination therapy with a beta-lactam and a fluoroquinolone when indicated, and continued for a sufficiently long period. As far as concerns future therapeutic options for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections, the only two new molecules that will probably become available are doripenem and ceftobiprole. Given this prospective, trust must be placed in the already known drugs, exploiting them more appropriately.

  3. Management of urinary tract infections: historical perspective and current strategies: Part 2--Modern management.

    PubMed

    Nickel, J Curtis

    2005-01-01

    An understanding of the microbial origin of infectious diseases and the introduction of antimicrobial therapy stimulated more advances in the management of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in the 20th century than had occurred in the previous 5 centuries. Numerous resources were used to collect the information described in this review. Medical texts from the 19th and 20th century contain information regarding the traditional contemporary treatment of UTI during those eras. Early volumes of the Journal of Urology from the beginning of the 20th century describe the first attempts at chemotherapy for UTI. MEDLINE searches were used to collect appropriate information after 1969. Modern medical journals and modern medical texts were used to collect information on antimicrobial therapy since the late 1960s through today. Numerous advances in the diagnosis and management of UTI were made during the 20th century. Advances in microbiological and chemical assays have facilitated the development of historical uroscopy into modern day urinalysis and culture techniques, which are the cornerstone of UTI diagnosis. Imaging technologies, including x-ray, ultrasound, nuclear imaging, magnetic resonance and computerized tomography, have been particularly helpful in the diagnosis of complicated or recurrent UTIs. Major innovations in nonpharmacological therapy include noninvasive shock wave lithotripsy and percutaneous drainage of kidney abscesses. The most profound advance in UTI management during the 20th century was the discovery of antimicrobial agents. Nitrofurantoin was the first truly effective and safe antimicrobial therapy for UTI but its spectrum of activity is limited. Broad use of amoxicillin (and other beta-lactams) after its introduction in the 1970s led to the development of resistance to this antimicrobial, prompting a gradual change to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) as first line therapy for UTI. However, wide use of TMP/SMX also resulted in the progressive

  4. Positive deviance as a strategy to prevent and control bloodstream infections in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Francimar Tinoco de; Ferreira, Maria Manuela Frederico; Araújo, Silvia Teresa Carvalho de; Bessa, Amanda Trindade Teixeira de; Moraes, Advi Catarina Barbachan; Stipp, Marluci Andrade Conceição

    2017-04-03

    To describe the application of positive deviance as a strategy to prevent and control bloodstream infections. An intervention study with nursing and medical team members working in an intensive care unit in a university hospital, between June and December 2014. The four steps of the positive defiance methodology were applied: to define, to determine, to discover and to design. In 90 days, 188 actions were observed, of these, 36.70% (n=69) were related to catheter dressing. In 81.15% (n=56) of these dressings, the professionals most adhered to the use of flexible sterile cotton-tipped swabs to perform antisepsis at catheter entry sites and fixation dressing. Positive deviance contributed to the implementation of proposals to improve work processes and team development related to problems identified in central venous catheter care. Descrever a aplicação do Positive Deviance como estratégia na prevenção e no controle da infecção de corrente sanguínea. Estudo de intervenção realizado na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva de um hospital universitário, com os membros das equipes de enfermagem e médica, de junho a dezembro de 2014. Foram aplicados os quatro passos da metodologia Positive Deviance: Definir, Determinar, Descobrir e Desenhar. Em 90 dias 188 ações foram observadas, destas, 36,70% (n=69) estavam relacionadas aos curativos dos cateteres. Em 81,15% (n=56) desses curativos, o uso da haste flexível estéril para realização da antissepsia do local de inserção do cateter e de sua placa de fixação foi a ação de maior adesão. O Positive Deviance auxiliou na implementação de propostas de melhorias de processo de trabalho e no desenvolvimento da equipe para os problemas identificados no cuidado com o cateter venoso central.

  5. RNA-guided endonuclease provides a therapeutic strategy to cure latent herpesviridae infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbin; Quake, Stephen R

    2014-09-09

    Latent viral infection is a persistent cause of human disease. Although standard antiviral therapies can suppress active viral replication, no existing treatment can effectively eradicate latent infection and therefore a cure is lacking for many prevalent viral diseases. The prokaryotic immune system clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas evolved as a natural response to phage infections, and we demonstrate here that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be adapted for antiviral treatment in human cells by specifically targeting the genomes of latent viral infections. Patient-derived cells from a Burkitt's lymphoma with latent Epstein-Barr virus infection showed dramatic proliferation arrest and a concomitant decrease in viral load after exposure to a CRISPR/Cas9 vector targeted to the viral genome.

  6. Evolving New Strategies for the Medical Management of Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tianlun; Anbarasan, Nikhil; Gish, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Is a cure for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection possible? Hepatitis C virus infection is now routinely cured medically. There is a growing expectation that new drugs for the management of chronic HBV infection should provide substantial benefit over and above that of current chronic HBV medications, if not be curative. Although the definition of medically induced cure for chronic HBV infection varies, most include sustained off-drug absence of viremia and negativity for other virologic markers. There are currently more than 29 drugs in the pipeline being tested for the management of chronic HBV infection. This article discusses the potential drugs with respect to their possible contributions to achieving medically induced cure. PMID:28035197

  7. RNA-guided endonuclease provides a therapeutic strategy to cure latent herpesviridae infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianbin; Quake, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Latent viral infection is a persistent cause of human disease. Although standard antiviral therapies can suppress active viral replication, no existing treatment can effectively eradicate latent infection and therefore a cure is lacking for many prevalent viral diseases. The prokaryotic immune system clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas evolved as a natural response to phage infections, and we demonstrate here that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can be adapted for antiviral treatment in human cells by specifically targeting the genomes of latent viral infections. Patient-derived cells from a Burkitt’s lymphoma with latent Epstein–Barr virus infection showed dramatic proliferation arrest and a concomitant decrease in viral load after exposure to a CRISPR/Cas9 vector targeted to the viral genome. PMID:25157128

  8. Latent M. tuberculosis infection--pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment and prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Druszczyńska, Magdalena; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Fol, Marek; Włodarczyk, Marcin; Rudnicka, Wiesława

    2012-01-01

    One third of the earths population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), but only 5-10% of the infected individuals develop active tuberculosis (TB) over their lifetime. The remaining 90-95% stay healthy and are called latently infected individuals. They are the biggest reservoir of the tubercle bacilli and identifying the cases of latent TB is a part of the global plan of TB control. From the clinical point of view detection of latent TB infections (LTBI) in individuals with the highest active TB risk including cases of HIV infection, autoimmune inflammatory diseases or cancer, is a priority. This review summarizes the recent findings in the pathogenesis of latent TB, its diagnosis, treatment and prevention.

  9. Use of alcohol hand sanitizer as an infection control strategy in an acute care facility.

    PubMed

    Hilburn, Jessica; Hammond, Brian S; Fendler, Eleanor J; Groziak, Patricia A

    2003-04-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major problem in health care facilities, resulting in extended durations of care, substantial morbidity and mortality, and excess costs. Since alcohol gel hand sanitizers combine high immediate antimicrobial efficacy with ease of use, this study was carried out to determine the effect of the use of an alcohol gel hand sanitizer by caregivers on infection types and rates in an acute care facility. Patients were educated about the study through a poster on the unit, and teachable patients were given portable bottles of the alcohol hand gel for bedside use, along with an educational brochure explaining how and why to practice good hand hygiene. Infection rate and type data were collected in 1 unit of a 498-bed acute care facility for 16 months (February 2000 to May 2001). An alcohol gel hand sanitizer was provided and used by caregivers in the orthopedic surgical unit of the facility during this period. The primary infection types (more than 80%) found were urinary tract (UTI) and surgical site (SSI) infections. Infection types and rates for the unit during the period the alcohol hand sanitizer (intervention) was used were compared with the infection types and rates for the same unit when the alcohol hand sanitizer was not used (baseline); the results demonstrated a 36.1% decrease in infection rates for the 10-month period that the hand sanitizer was used. This study indicates that use of an alcohol gel hand sanitizer can decrease infection rates and provide an additional tool for an effective infection control program in acute care facilities.

  10. The timing of TNF and IFN-γ signaling affects macrophage activation strategies during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Ray, J. Christian J.; Wang, Jian; Chan, John; Kirschnera, Denise E.

    2008-01-01

    During most infections, the population of immune cells known as macrophages are key to taking up and killing bacteria as an integral part of the immune response. However, during infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), host macrophages serve as the preferred environment for mycobacterial growth. Further, killing of Mtb by macrophages is impaired unless they become activated. Activation is induced by stimulation from bacterial antigens and inflammatory cytokines derived from helper T cells. The key macrophage-activating cytokines in Mtb infection are tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) and interferon (IFN)-γ. Due to differences in cellular sources and secretion pathways for TNF and IFN- γ, the possibility of heterogeneous cytokine distributions exists, suggesting that the timing of macrophage activation from these signals may affect activation kinetics and thus impact the outcome of Mtb infection. Here we use a mathematical model to show that negative feedback from production of nitric oxide (the key mediator of mycobacterial killing) that typically optimizes macrophage responses to activating stimuli may reduce effective killing of Mtb. Statistical sensitivity analysis predicts that if TNF and IFN-γ signals precede infection, the level of negative feedback may have a strong effect on how effectively macrophages kill Mtb. However, this effect is relaxed when IFN-γ or TNF + IFN-γ signals are received coincident with infection. Under these conditions, the model suggests that negative feedback induces fast responses and an initial overshoot of nitric oxide production for given doses of TNF and IFN-γ, favoring killing of Mtb. Together, our results suggest that direct entry of macrophages into a granuloma site (and not distal to it) from lung vascular sources represents a preferred host strategy for mycobacterial control. We examine implications of these results in establishment of latent Mtb infection. PMID:18321531

  11. Impact of different strategies to control Plasmodium infection and anaemia on the island of Bioko (Equatorial Guinea)

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, Gema; Angel Descalzo, Miguel; Molina, Laura; Custodio, Estefanía; Lwanga, Magdalena; Mangue, Catalina; Obono, Jaquelina; Nchama, Araceli; Roche, Jesús; Benito, Agustín; Cano, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    Background On the island of Bioko (Equatorial Guinea), insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) have been the main tool used to control malaria over the last 13 years. In 2004, started an indoor residual spraying (IRS) campaign to control malaria. The purpose of this study is to asses the impact of the two control strategies on the island of Bioko (Equatorial Guinea), with regards to Plasmodium infection and anaemia in the children under five years of age. Methods Two transversal studies, the first one prior to the start of the IRS campaign and the second one year later. Sampling was carried out by stratified clusters. Malaria infection was measured by means of thick and thin film, and the packed cell volume (PCV) percentage. Data related to ITN use and information regarding IRS were collected. The Pearson's chi-square and logistic regression statistical tests were used to calculate odds ratios (OR) Results In the first survey, 168 children were sampled and 433 children in the second one. The prevalence of infection was 40% in 2004, and significantly lower at 21.7% in 2005. PCV was 41% and 39%, respectively. 58% of the children surveyed in 2004 and 44.3% in 2005 had slept under an ITN. 78% of the dwellings studied in 2005 had been sprayed. In the 2005 survey, sleeping without a mosquito net meant a risk of infection 3 times greater than sleeping protected with a net hanged correctly and with no holes (p < 0.05). Conclusion IRS and ITNs have proven to be effective control strategies on the island of Bioko. The choice of one or other strategy is, above all, a question of operational feasibility and availability of local resources. PMID:16460558

  12. Therapeutic strategies for a functional cure of chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jinhong; Guo, Fang; Zhao, Xuesen; Guo, Ju-Tao

    2014-08-01

    Treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection with the viral DNA polymerase inhibitors or pegylated alpha-interferon has led to a significant retardation in HBV-related disease progression and reduction in mortality related to chronic hepatitis B associated liver decompensation and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, chronic HBV infection remains not cured. The reasons for the failure to eradicate HBV infection by long-term antiviral therapy are not completely understood. However, clinical studies suggest that the intrinsic stability of the nuclear form of viral genome, the covalently closed circular (ccc) DNA, sustained low level viral replication under antiviral therapy and homeostatic proliferation of hepatocytes are the critical virological and pathophysiological factors that affect the persistence and therapeutic outcomes of HBV infection. More importantly, despite potent suppression of HBV replication in livers of the treated patients, the dysfunction of HBV-specific antiviral immunity persists. The inability of the immune system to recognize cells harboring HBV infection and to cure or eliminate cells actively producing virus is the biggest challenge to finding a cure. Unraveling the complex virus-host interactions that lead to persistent infection should facilitate the rational design of antivirals and immunotherapeutics to cure chronic HBV infection.

  13. Infection risk in systemic lupus erythematosus patients: susceptibility factors and preventive strategies.

    PubMed

    Danza, A; Ruiz-Irastorza, G

    2013-10-01

    Infection is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Bacterial infections are most frequent, followed by viral and fungal infections. The impaired cellular and humoral immune functions seen in patients with SLE are predisposing conditions, whilst disease activity, prednisone doses over 7.5-10 mg/day, high doses of methylprednisolone or cyclophosphamide are well-recognised risk factors for infection. The first six months after rituximab treatment and the use of more than three courses are also associated with an increased susceptibility for infection. It has not been established whether belimumab, azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil increase the risk of serious infections. Most vaccines are effective and safe in SLE patients, although vaccination should be avoided during periods of active disease. Live virus vaccines are contraindicated for immunosuppressed patients. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccines are universally recommended. Tuberculosis prophylaxis should be considered in selected cases. Therefore, it is advisable not to exceed doses of 5 mg/day of prednisone in chronic treatment. Methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide should be used in low-dose regimens. Antimalarials have a well-known protective role against infection, in addition to other beneficial properties, thus, hydroxychloroquine is recommended for all SLE patients where no contraindication exists.

  14. Multiplicity of Mathematical Modeling Strategies to Search for Molecular and Cellular Insights into Bacteria Lung Infection.

    PubMed

    Cantone, Martina; Santos, Guido; Wentker, Pia; Lai, Xin; Vera, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Even today two bacterial lung infections, namely pneumonia and tuberculosis, are among the 10 most frequent causes of death worldwide. These infections still lack effective treatments in many developing countries and in immunocompromised populations like infants, elderly people and transplanted patients. The interaction between bacteria and the host is a complex system of interlinked intercellular and the intracellular processes, enriched in regulatory structures like positive and negative feedback loops. Severe pathological condition can emerge when the immune system of the host fails to neutralize the infection. This failure can result in systemic spreading of pathogens or overwhelming immune response followed by a systemic inflammatory response. Mathematical modeling is a promising tool to dissect the complexity underlying pathogenesis of bacterial lung infection at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels, and also at the interfaces among levels. In this article, we introduce mathematical and computational modeling frameworks that can be used for investigating molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying bacterial lung infection. Then, we compile and discuss published results on the modeling of regulatory pathways and cell populations relevant for lung infection and inflammation. Finally, we discuss how to make use of this multiplicity of modeling approaches to open new avenues in the search of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying bacterial infection in the lung.

  15. Functional genomic analysis of constitutive and inducible defense responses to Fusarium verticillioides infection in maize genotypes with contrasting ear rot resistance.

    PubMed

    Lanubile, Alessandra; Ferrarini, Alberto; Maschietto, Valentina; Delledonne, Massimo; Marocco, Adriano; Bellin, Diana

    2014-08-25

    Fusarium verticillioides causes ear rot in maize (Zea mays L.) and accumulation of mycotoxins, that affect human and animal health. Currently, chemical and agronomic measures to control Fusarium ear rot are not very effective and selection of more resistant genotypes is a desirable strategy to reduce contaminations. A deeper knowledge of molecular events and genetic basis underlying Fusarium ear rot is necessary to speed up progress in breeding for resistance. A next-generation RNA-sequencing approach was used for the first time to study transcriptional changes associated with F. verticillioides inoculation in resistant CO441 and susceptible CO354 maize genotypes at 72 hours post inoculation. More than 100 million sequence reads were generated for inoculated and uninoculated control plants and analyzed to measure gene expression levels. Comparison of expression levels between inoculated vs. uninoculated and resistant vs. susceptible transcriptomes revealed a total number of 6,951 differentially expressed genes. Differences in basal gene expression were observed in the uninoculated samples. CO441 genotype showed a higher level of expression of genes distributed over all functional classes, in particular those related to secondary metabolism category. After F. verticillioides inoculation, a similar response was observed in both genotypes, although the magnitude of induction was much greater in the resistant genotype. This response included higher activation of genes involved in pathogen perception, signaling and defense, including WRKY transcription factors and jasmonate/ethylene mediated defense responses. Interestingly, strong differences in expression between the two genotypes were observed in secondary metabolism category: pathways related to shikimate, lignin, flavonoid and terpenoid biosynthesis were strongly represented and induced in the CO441 genotype, indicating that selection to enhance these traits is an additional strategy for improving resistance

  16. Microbial Biofilms in Urinary Tract Infections and Prostatitis: Etiology, Pathogenicity, and Combating strategies

    PubMed Central

    Delcaru, Cristina; Alexandru, Ionela; Podgoreanu, Paulina; Grosu, Mirela; Stavropoulos, Elisabeth; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Lazar, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most important causes of morbidity and health care spending affecting persons of all ages. Bacterial biofilms play an important role in UTIs, responsible for persistent infections leading to recurrences and relapses. UTIs associated with microbial biofilms developed on catheters account for a high percentage of all nosocomial infections and are the most common source of Gram-negative bacteremia in hospitalized patients. The purpose of this mini-review is to present the role of microbial biofilms in the etiology of female UTI and different male prostatitis syndromes, their consequences, as well as the challenges for therapy. PMID:27916925

  17. Microbial Biofilms in Urinary Tract Infections and Prostatitis: Etiology, Pathogenicity, and Combating strategies.

    PubMed

    Delcaru, Cristina; Alexandru, Ionela; Podgoreanu, Paulina; Grosu, Mirela; Stavropoulos, Elisabeth; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Lazar, Veronica

    2016-11-30

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most important causes of morbidity and health care spending affecting persons of all ages. Bacterial biofilms play an important role in UTIs, responsible for persistent infections leading to recurrences and relapses. UTIs associated with microbial biofilms developed on catheters account for a high percentage of all nosocomial infections and are the most common source of Gram-negative bacteremia in hospitalized patients. The purpose of this mini-review is to present the role of microbial biofilms in the etiology of female UTI and different male prostatitis syndromes, their consequences, as well as the challenges for therapy.

  18. Surgical strategy for impending rupture of an infected anastomotic pseudoaneurysm of the aorta 9 years after a Bentall procedure: radical surgery involving en bloc resection of the infected sternum, pseudoaneurysm, and artificial vascular graft.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Yuji; Minato, Naoki; Kawasaki, Hiromitsu; Sakaguchi, Masayuki

    2008-12-01

    Infection of the sternum and anterior mediastinitis after open heart surgery are serious complications that are intractable with high case fatality rates. Frequently, infection spreads to an artificial foreign body in the mediastinum, causing difficulties with treatment. We report a case of infected pseudoaneurysm of the aorta at the anastomotic site of the artificial vascular graft. The infection spread from sternal osteomyelitis 9 years 5 months after aortic root replacement (Bentall procedure) for acute aortic dissection. We performed radical surgery that included en bloc resection of the infected sternum, pseudoaneurysm, and artificial vascular graft, with successful results. We report here the surgical strategy including the approach.

  19. Control strategies to prevent total hip replacement-related infections: a systematic review and mixed treatment comparison

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Henry; Barnett, Adrian G; Merollini, Katharina; Sutton, Alex; Cooper, Nicola; Berendt, Tony; Wilson, Jennie; Graves, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Objective To synthesise the available evidence and estimate the comparative efficacy of control strategies to prevent total hip replacement (THR)-related surgical site infections (SSIs) using a mixed treatment comparison. Design Systematic review and mixed treatment comparison. Setting Hospital and other healthcare settings. Participants Patients undergoing THR. Primary and secondary outcome measures The number of THR-related SSIs occurring following the surgical operation. Results 12 studies involving 123 788 THRs and 9 infection control strategies were identified. The strategy of ‘systemic antibiotics+antibiotic-impregnated cement+conventional ventilation’ significantly reduced the risk of THR-related SSI compared with the referent strategy (no systemic antibiotics+plain cement+conventional ventilation), OR 0.13 (95% credible interval (CrI) 0.03–0.35), and had the highest probability (47–64%) and highest median rank of being the most effective strategy. There was some evidence to suggest that ‘systemic antibiotics+antibiotic-impregnated cement+laminar airflow’ could potentially increase infection risk compared with ‘systemic antibiotics+antibiotic-impregnated cement+conventional ventilation’, 1.96 (95% CrI 0.52–5.37). There was no high-quality evidence that antibiotic-impregnated cement without systemic antibiotic prophylaxis was effective in reducing infection compared with plain cement with systemic antibiotics, 1.28 (95% CrI 0.38–3.38). Conclusions We found no convincing evidence in favour of the use of laminar airflow over conventional ventilation for prevention of THR-related SSIs, yet laminar airflow is costly and widely used. Antibiotic-impregnated cement without systemic antibiotics may not be effective in reducing THR-related SSIs. The combination with the highest confidence for reducing SSIs was ‘systemic antibiotics+antibiotic-impregnated cement+conventional ventilation’. Our evidence synthesis underscores the need to review

  20. A review of strategies to prevent mother-to-infant transmission of hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wan-Hsin; Lai, Ming-Wei; Chang, Mei-Hwei

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection causes long-term, life-threatening liver diseases worldwide. HBV is transmitted through either the horizontal or mother-to-infant route, which is the major route of transmission in endemic areas. Administration of hepatitis B immunoglobulin and hepatitis B vaccine to newborns of infected mothers prevents mother-to-infant transmission. Implementation of a universal hepatitis B vaccination program has proven successful in eliminating the infection and related complications. Nevertheless, efforts are still needed to improve global coverage of the hepatitis B vaccine. Infants born to highly viremic mothers are still at risk of infection despite current immunoprophylaxis. An increasing number of reports have shown promising efficacy and safety profiles with the use of nucleoside/nucleotide analogues in highly viremic pregnant women to prevent mother-to-infant transmission.

  1. Prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections in patients on hemodialysis: challenges and management strategies

    PubMed Central

    Soi, Vivek; Moore, Carol L; Kumbar, Lalathakasha; Yee, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the end-stage renal disease population. Although alternative accesses to undergoing renal replacement therapy exist, many patients begin hemodialysis with a dialysis catheter due to logistic and physiologic factors involved in arteriovenous fistula creation and maturation. Colonization of catheters via skin flora leads to the production of biofilm, which acts as a reservoir for virulent bacteria. Preventative therapies center on appropriate catheter maintenance, infection control measures, and early removal of devices as patients transition to other access. Despite best efforts, when conservative measures fail to prevent infections in a high-risk population, antimicrobial lock therapy should be considered as an option to combat catheter-related bloodstream infections. PMID:27143948

  2. Prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections in patients on hemodialysis: challenges and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Soi, Vivek; Moore, Carol L; Kumbar, Lalathakasha; Yee, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the end-stage renal disease population. Although alternative accesses to undergoing renal replacement therapy exist, many patients begin hemodialysis with a dialysis catheter due to logistic and physiologic factors involved in arteriovenous fistula creation and maturation. Colonization of catheters via skin flora leads to the production of biofilm, which acts as a reservoir for virulent bacteria. Preventative therapies center on appropriate catheter maintenance, infection control measures, and early removal of devices as patients transition to other access. Despite best efforts, when conservative measures fail to prevent infections in a high-risk population, antimicrobial lock therapy should be considered as an option to combat catheter-related bloodstream infections.

  3. Management strategies for controlling endemic and seasonal mouse parvovirus infection in a barrier facility.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Jon D; Livingston, Robert; Leblanc, Mathias

    2011-05-01

    Despite improved diagnostic and rederivation capabilities, research facilities still struggle to manage parvovirus infections (e.g., mouse parvovirus (MPV) and minute virus of mice) in mouse colonies. Multi-faceted approaches are needed to prevent adventitious organisms such as MPV from breaching a barrier facility. In this article, the authors document recent changes to the Salk Institute's animal care program that were intended to help manage mouse parvovirus in the barrier facility. Specifically, the Institute started to use a new disinfectant and to give mice irradiated feed. The authors found an association between these modifications and a reduction in MPV incidence and prevalence in endemically infected colonies. These data suggest that using irradiated feed and appropriate disinfectants with contemporary management practices can be an effective plan for eradicating or controlling MPV infection in a research facility. The authors recommend further study of the environmental risk factors for parvovirus infection and of potential biological interactions associated with the use of irradiated feed.

  4. Immediate adenoidectomy vs initial watchful waiting strategy in children with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections: an economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Boonacker, Chantal W B; van den Aardweg, Maaike T A; Broos, Pieter H; Hoes, Arno W; Schilder, Anne G M; Rovers, Maroeska M

    2013-02-01

    To compare the costs associated with 2 clinical strategies in children with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs): immediate adenoidectomy vs an initial watchful waiting strategy. A cost-minimization analysis from a societal perspective including both direct and indirect costs, alongside an open randomized controlled trial with a 2-year follow-up. Multicenter study, including 11 general and 2 university hospitals in the Netherlands. The study population comprised 111 children aged 1 through 6 years, selected for adenoidectomy for recurrent URTIs according to current clinical practice. A strategy of immediate adenoidectomy with or without myringotomy or a strategy of initial watchful waiting. Difference in median costs during the 2-year follow-up. The median total of direct and indirect costs in the adenoidectomy and watchful waiting group were €1385 (US $1995) and €844 (US $1216) per patient, respectively. The extra costs in the adenoidectomy group are primarily attributable to surgery and visits to the otorhinolaryngologist. Other costs did not differ significantly between the groups. In children selected for adenoidectomy for recurrent URTIs, immediate adenoidectomy results in an increase in costs, whereas it confers no clinical benefit over an initial watchful waiting strategy. trialregister.nl Identifier:NTR968; isrctn.org Identifier:ISRCTN03720485.

  5. The Strategy to Survive Primary Malaria Infection: An Experimental Study on Behavioural Changes in Parasitized Birds

    PubMed Central

    Mukhin, Andrey; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Platonova, Elena; Kobylkov, Dmitry; Vakoliuk, Irina; Valkiūnas, Gediminas

    2016-01-01

    Avian malaria parasites (Haemosporida, Plasmodium) are of cosmopolitan distribution, and they have a significant impact on vertebrate host fitness. Experimental studies show that high parasitemia often develops during primary malaria infections. However, field studies only occasionally reveal high parasitemia in free-living birds sampled using the traditional methods of mist-netting or trapping, and light chronic infections predominate. The reason for this discrepancy between field observation and experimental data remains insufficiently understood. Since mist-netting is a passive capture method, two main parameters determine its success in sampling infected birds in wildlife, i. e. the presence of parasitized birds at a study site and their mobility. In other words, the trapping probability depends on the survival rate of birds and their locomotor activity during infection. Here we test (1) the mortality rate of wild birds infected with Plasmodium relictum (the lineage pSGS1), (2) the changes in their behaviour during presence of an aerial predator, and (3) the changes in their locomotor activity at the stage of high primary parasitemia.We show that some behavioural features which might affect a bird's survival during a predator attack (time of reaction, speed of flush flight and take off angle) did not change significantly during primary infection. However, the locomotor activity of infected birds was almost halved compared to control (non-infected) birds during the peak of parasitemia. We report (1) the markedly reduced mobility and (2) the 20% mortality rate caused by P. relictum and conclude that these factors are responsible for the underrepresentation of birds in mist nets and traps during the stage of high primary parasitemia in wildlife. This study indicates that the widespread parasite, P. relictum (pSGS1) influences the behaviour of birds during primary parasitemia. Experimental studies combined with field observations are needed to better understand the

  6. The Strategy to Survive Primary Malaria Infection: An Experimental Study on Behavioural Changes in Parasitized Birds.

    PubMed

    Mukhin, Andrey; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Platonova, Elena; Kobylkov, Dmitry; Vakoliuk, Irina; Valkiūnas, Gediminas

    2016-01-01

    Avian malaria parasites (Haemosporida, Plasmodium) are of cosmopolitan distribution, and they have a significant impact on vertebrate host fitness. Experimental studies show that high parasitemia often develops during primary malaria infections. However, field studies only occasionally reveal high parasitemia in free-living birds sampled using the traditional methods of mist-netting or trapping, and light chronic infections predominate. The reason for this discrepancy between field observation and experimental data remains insufficiently understood. Since mist-netting is a passive capture method, two main parameters determine its success in sampling infected birds in wildlife, i. e. the presence of parasitized birds at a study site and their mobility. In other words, the trapping probability depends on the survival rate of birds and their locomotor activity during infection. Here we test (1) the mortality rate of wild birds infected with Plasmodium relictum (the lineage pSGS1), (2) the changes in their behaviour during presence of an aerial predator, and (3) the changes in their locomotor activity at the stage of high primary parasitemia.We show that some behavioural features which might affect a bird's survival during a predator attack (time of reaction, speed of flush flight and take off angle) did not change significantly during primary infection. However, the locomotor activity of infected birds was almost halved compared to control (non-infected) birds during the peak of parasitemia. We report (1) the markedly reduced mobility and (2) the 20% mortality rate caused by P. relictum and conclude that these factors are responsible for the underrepresentation of birds in mist nets and traps during the stage of high primary parasitemia in wildlife. This study indicates that the widespread parasite, P. relictum (pSGS1) influences the behaviour of birds during primary parasitemia. Experimental studies combined with field observations are needed to better understand the

  7. Prevention and treatment strategy in pregnant women with group B streptococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Tevdorashvili, G; Tevdorashvili, D; Andghuladze, M; Tevdorashvili, M

    2015-04-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS; Streptococcus agalactiae) are encapsulated gram-positive cocci belonging to Lancefield group B, that frequently colonizes the human genital and gastrointestinal tracts. It is an important cause of illness in three categories of population: infants, pregnant women, and adults with underlying medical conditions. In pregnant women and postpartum women, GBS is a frequent cause of asymptomatic bacteriuria, urinary tract infection, upper genital tract infection (i.e. intraamniotic infection or chorioamnionitis), postpartum endometritis (8%), pneumonia (2%), puerperal sepsis (2%), and bacteremia without a focal site (31%). It also can cause focal infections such as pneumonia, meningitis, and endocarditis, albeit rarely. Invasive maternal infection with GBS is associated with pregnancy loss and preterm delivery. Prior to the widespread use of maternal intrapartum chemoprophylaxis, maternal colonization with GBS conferred an increased risk of chorioamnionitis, and early postpartum infection. The serotype distribution of invasive GBS infection in pregnant women is similar to that of early-onset neonatal disease. The most common GBS serotypes causing invasive disease in adults and neonates are Ia, Ib, III, and V. Vaccination of adolescent women is considered an ideal solution. However, recent reports (April 2015) have shown that serotype IV GBS is emerging in pregnant carriers and causing infections in neonates and adults. This emergence is of concern because GBS conjugate vaccines that are being developed to prevent invasive disease may protect only against serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III, and V, or combinations thereof. Though research for the development of such a vaccine is underway, a good candidate vaccine has yet to surface.

  8. Necrotizing soft tissue infections. Risk factors for mortality and strategies for management.

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, D C; Kufera, J A; Myers, R A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors evaluate in a retrospective fashion the factors influencing outcome in a large group of patients presenting with necrotizing soft tissue infections, and, based on this analysis, propose a plan for optimal care of such patients. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: In many smaller series of patients with necrotizing soft tissue infections, similar analyses of risk factors for mortality have been performed, producing conflicting conclusions regarding optimal care. In particular, debate exists regarding the impact of concurrent physiologic derangements, type and extent of infection, and the role of hyperbaric oxygen in treatment. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of 198 consecutive patients with documented necrotizing soft tissue infections, treated at a single institution during an 8-year period, was conducted. Using a model for logistic regression analysis, characteristics of each patient and his/her clinical course were tested for impact on outcome. RESULTS: The mortality rate among the 198 patients was 25.3%. The most common sites of origin of infection were the perineum (Fournier's disease; 36% of cases) and the foot (in diabetics; 15.2%). By logistic regression analysis, risk factors for death included age, female gender, extent of infection, delay in first debridement, elevated serum creatinine level, elevated blood lactate level, and degree of organ system dysfunction at admission. Diabetes mellitus did not predispose patients to death, except in conjunction with renal dysfunction or peripheral vascular disease. Myonecrosis, noted in 41.4% of the patients who underwent surgery, did not influence mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Necrotizing soft tissue infections represent a group of highly lethal infections best treated by early and repeated extensive debridement and broad-spectrum antibiotics. Hyperbaric oxygen appears to offer the advantage of early wound closure. Certain markers predict those individuals at increased risk for multiple-organ failure

  9. A persistent hotspot of Schistosoma mansoni infection in a five-year randomized trial of praziquantel preventative chemotherapy strategies.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Ryan E; Mwinzi, Pauline N M; Montgomery, Susan P; Chan, YuYen L; Andiego, Kennedy; Omedo, Martin; Muchiri, Geoffrey; Ogutu, Michael O; Rawago, Fredrick; Odiere, Maurice R; Karanja, Diana M S; Secor, W Evan

    2017-09-16

    Persistent hotspots have been described following mass drug administration (MDA) for the control of schistosomiasis, but have not been studied during the course of a multi-year MDA program. In data from a five-year study of school-based and village-wide preventive chemotherapy strategies for Schistosoma mansoni, spatial scan statistics were used to find infection hotspots in three populations: 5-8 year olds, 9-12 year olds, and adults. Negative binomial regression was used to analyze changes from baseline and ROC analyses were used to predict which villages would reach prevalence and intensity endpoints. We identified a persistent hotspot, not associated with study arm, where S. mansoni infection prevalence and intensity did not decrease as much as in villages outside the hotspot. Significant differences from baseline were realized after one year of MDA; we did not identify factors that moderated this relationship. Villages meeting specified endpoints at year 5 were predicted from prior year data with moderately high sensitivity and specificity. MDA strategies were less effective at reducing prevalence and intensity in the hotspot compared to other villages. Villages that reached year 5 endpoints could be detected earlier providing the opportunity to amend intervention strategies.

  10. Contrast lipocryolysis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Hernán; Melamed, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Alternative crystal structures are possible for all lipids and each different crystal structure is called a polymorphic form. Inter-conversion between polymorphisms would imply the possibility of leaning crystal formation toward the most effective polymorphism for adipocyte destruction. Food industry has been tempering lipids for decades. Tempering technology applied to lipocryolysis gave birth to “contrast lipocryolysis”, which involves pre- and post-lipocryolysis fat layer heating as part of a specific tempering protocol. In this study, we evaluated the skinfold thickness of 10 subjects after a single contrast lipocryolysis session and witnessed important and fast reductions. PMID:25068088

  11. Saving our children: strategies to empower African-American adolescents to reduce their risk for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Jemmott, L S

    2000-01-01

    Adolescence is normally a healthy period of life. For some young people it is a period of experimentation with risky behavior. For others, it marks the development of habitual risk behaviors that persist into adulthood. Of special concern is adolescent involvement with sexual behaviors that increase the risk of infection with HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Nurses who work with adolescents are seeing an increase in STDs, including HIV infection occurring disproportionately among African-American adolescents. Although the use of condoms can reduce the risk of these sexually transmitted diseases, most sexually active adolescents do not consistently use condoms. This paper will discuss the scope of the problem of STDs, especially HIV infection among African-American adolescents. It will describe the Theory of Planned Behavior as a framework for designing interventions to reduce the sexual transmission of HIV and other STDs. Finally, it will provide strategies for nurses to intervene by empowering African-American adolescents to reduce their risk for sexually transmitted HIV infection.

  12. Operative strategies in aortic graft infections: is complete graft excision always necessary?

    PubMed

    Hart, Joseph P; Eginton, Mark T; Brown, Kellie R; Seabrook, Gary R; Lewis, Brian D; Edmiston, Charles E; Towne, Jonathan B; Cambria, Robert A

    2005-03-01

    The classic approach to aortic graft infections involves complete excision of the graft material with remote reconstruction of the distal circulation. Certain patients may not be well suited for this approach for physiologic or anatomic reasons. This study was undertaken to determine the outcome of partial graft excision in selected patients with aortic graft infection who were not felt to be candidates for complete graft excision. Retrospective analysis of 30 consecutive patients treated with infected grafts arising from the aorta over the past 10 years was performed. Mean interval between graft placement and infection was 5.5 years. Complete graft excision with bypass via clean tissue planes was achieved in 15 patients (group A), and partial or complete graft salvage or in situ graft replacement was performed at the discretion of the surgeon in 15 patients (group B). Perioperative mortality occurred in eight subjects (27%), including six in group A (40%) and two in group B (13%; p = NS). Six patients (20%) developed recurrent infection following graft excision, two (13%) in group A and four (27%) in group B (p = NS). Microorganisms were recovered from 24 of 30 (80%) graft cultures: 13 (43%) were gram positive, 4 (13%) were gram negative, and both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms were recovered from 7 (23%). Identification of culture isolates did not influence either perioperative mortality or the development of recurrent infection. Long-term survival was no different between the groups. We conclude that in certain high-risk patients who may not tolerate complete graft excision, local resection of infected graft segments may be preferable and leads to similar short- and long-term outcome.

  13. A Mouse Model of Latent Tuberculosis Infection to Study Intervention Strategies to Prevent Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Kupz, Andreas; Zedler, Ulrike; Stäber, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the leading cause of death in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)+ individuals, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Management of this deadly co-infection is a significant global health challenge that is exacerbated by the lack of efficient vaccines against both Mtb and HIV, as well as the lack of reliable and robust animal models for Mtb/HIV co-infection. Here we describe a tractable and reproducible mouse model to study the reactivation dynamics of latent Mtb infection following the loss of CD4+ T cells as it occurs in HIV-co-infected individuals. Whereas intradermally (i.d.) infected C57BL/6 mice contained Mtb within the local draining lymph nodes, depletion of CD4+ cells led to progressive systemic spread of the bacteria and induction of lung pathology. To interrogate whether reactivation of Mtb after CD4+ T cell depletion can be reversed, we employed interleukin (IL)-2/anti-IL-2 complex-mediated cell boost approaches. Although populations of non-CD4 lymphocytes, such as CD8+ memory T cells, natural killer (NK) cells and double-negative (DN) T cells significantly expanded after IL-2/anti-IL-2 complex treatment, progressive development of bacteremia and pathologic lung alterations could not be prevented. These data suggest that the failure to reverse Mtb reactivation is likely not due to anergy of the expanded cell subsets and rather indicates a limited potential for IL-2-complex-based therapies in the management of Mtb/HIV co-infection. PMID:27391012

  14. Association of genotypes with infection types and antifungal susceptibilities in Candida albicans as revealed by recent molecular typing strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Feng-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal microorganism in the mucosa of healthy individuals, but is also the most common opportunistic fungal pathogen of humans. It causes from benign infections such as oral and vaginal candidiasis to fatal, systematic diseases in immunocompromised or critically ill patients. In addition to improved therapy, the rapid and accurate identification of the disease-causing strains is crucial for diagnosis, clinical treatment and epidemiological studies of candidiasis. A variety of methods for strain typing of C. albicans have been developed. The most commonly used methods with the focus on recently developed molecular typing or DNA-fingerprinting strategies and the recent findings in the association of specific and genetically similar genotypes with certain infection types and the correlation between azole susceptibilities and certain genotypes of C. albicans from China are reviewed. PMID:24772369

  15. Neonatology in the emerging countries: the strategies and health-economics challenges related to prevention of neonatal and infant infections.

    PubMed

    Vain, N E; Fariña, D; Vázquez, L N

    2012-05-01

    The prevalence of neonatal and infant infections is higher in emerging countries when compared to the developed world. Major factors associated to this increased frequency include the scarcity of trained health personnel, overcrowding of the neonatal units, late onset and slow advance of feeding, use of formula instead of breastfeeding, failure to comply with handwashing recommendations, and excessive use of antibiotics, resulting in the emergence of resistant strains. Infants discharged home frequently share rooms with a large number of siblings and other cohabitants, increasing the risk of infection by respiratory viruses. Several strategies are described that could decrease these serious problems which impact increasing significantly neonatal and infant mortality rates in developing countries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Optimal Population-Level Infection Detection Strategies for Malaria Control and Elimination in a Spatial Model of Malaria Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Gerardin, Jaline; Bever, Caitlin A.; Hamainza, Busiku; Miller, John M.; Eckhoff, Philip A.; Wenger, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Mass campaigns with antimalarial drugs are potentially a powerful tool for local elimination of malaria, yet current diagnostic technologies are insufficiently sensitive to identify all individuals who harbor infections. At the same time, overtreatment of uninfected individuals increases the risk of accelerating emergence of drug resistance and losing community acceptance. Local heterogeneity in transmission intensity may allow campaign strategies that respond to index cases to successfully target subpatent infections while simultaneously limiting overtreatment. While selective targeting of hotspots of transmission has been proposed as a strategy for malaria control, such targeting has not been tested in the context of malaria elimination. Using household locations, demographics, and prevalence data from a survey of four health facility catchment areas in southern Zambia and an agent-based model of malaria transmission and immunity acquisition, a transmission intensity was fit to each household based on neighborhood age-dependent malaria prevalence. A set of individual infection trajectories was constructed for every household in each catchment area, accounting for heterogeneous exposure and immunity. Various campaign strategies—mass drug administration, mass screen and treat, focal mass drug administration, snowball reactive case detection, pooled sampling, and a hypothetical serological diagnostic—were simulated and evaluated for performance at finding infections, minimizing overtreatment, reducing clinical case counts, and interrupting transmission. For malaria control, presumptive treatment leads to substantial overtreatment without additional morbidity reduction under all but the highest transmission conditions. Compared with untargeted approaches, selective targeting of hotspots with drug campaigns is an ineffective tool for elimination due to limited sensitivity of available field diagnostics. Serological diagnosis is potentially an effective tool for

  17. Strategies to increase the activity of microglia as efficient protectors of the brain against infections

    PubMed Central

    Nau, Roland; Ribes, Sandra; Djukic, Marija; Eiffert, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    In healthy individuals, infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are comparatively rare. Based on the ability of microglial cells to phagocytose and kill pathogens and on clinical findings in immunocompromised patients with CNS infections, we hypothesize that an intact microglial function is crucial to protect the brain from infections. Phagocytosis of pathogens by microglial cells can be stimulated by agonists of receptors of the innate immune system. Enhancing this pathway to increase the resistance of the brain to infections entails the risk of inducing collateral damage to the nervous tissue. The diversity of microglial cells opens avenue to selectively stimulate sub-populations responsible for the defence against pathogens without stimulating sub-populations which are responsible for collateral damage to the nervous tissue. Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), an endogenous lipid, increased phagocytosis of bacteria by microglial cells in vitro without a measurable proinflammatory effect. It was tested clinically apparently without severe side effects. Glatiramer acetate increased phagocytosis of latex beads by microglia and monocytes, and dimethyl fumarate enhanced elimination of human immunodeficiency virus from infected macrophages without inducing a release of proinflammatory compounds. Therefore, the discovery of compounds which stimulate the elimination of pathogens without collateral damage of neuronal structures appears an achievable goal. PEA and, with limitations, glatiramer acetate and dimethyl fumarate appear promising candidates. PMID:24904283

  18. Catheter-related infections in patients with haematological malignancies: novel preventive and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Zakhour, Ramia; Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Raad, Issam I

    2016-11-01

    Central venous catheters are essential for the treatment of patients with haematological malignancies and the recipients of stem-cell transplant. This patient population is, however, at high risk for catheter-related bloodstream infections that can result in substantial morbidity, mortality, and health-care-associated costs. Efficient prevention, early diagnosis, and effective treatment are essential to providing the best care to these patients. Although confirming the catheter as a source of infection remains challenging, the Infectious Diseases Society of America definition of catheter-related bloodstream infection remains the most precise definition to use in these patients. Gram-positive bacteria, particularly coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp, remain the leading cause of catheter-related bloodstream infection, although an increase in Gram-negative bacteria as the causative agent has been noted. Although removal of the line and appropriate intravenous antibiotics remain the mainstay of treatment in most cases, novel technologies, including exchange with antibiotic-coated catheters and treatment with lock solutions, are particularly relevant in this patient population. In this Review we present the types of central venous catheters used in this patient population and analyse the different definitions of catheter-related infections, with an overview of their prevention and management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Strategies for management of resistant Gram-positive infections: from S. pneumoniae to MRSA].

    PubMed

    Cristini, Francesco

    2007-09-01

    S. pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant S. aureus are the main Gram-positive pathogens responsible for severe infections. In the context of community infections S. pneumoniae is the leading Gram-positive pathogen causing severe infections such as purulent meningitis and pneumonia. The typical pattern of antibiotic sensitivity of this bacterium, frequently resistant to macrolides and with significantly reduced sensitivity to penicillin, is only a relative therapeutic problem in that the preserved sensitivity to third-generation cephalosporins and respiratory fluoroquinolones is sufficient to make these antibiotics valid therapeutic solutions without having to use the latest generation of drugs. On the other hand, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, one of the main bacteria responsible for nosocomial infections such as bacteraemia and respiratory tract infections in severely ill patients, is a more challenging therapeutic problem since, historically, the therapeutic options available in clinical practice have been fewer and essentially limited to glycopeptides. The recent availability of oxazolidinones and the pharmacologically more rational and appropriate use of the glycopeptides have undoubtedly brought substantial benefits; the imminent introduction of new molecules active against Gram-positive pathogens will certainly make an important contribution, although their use in clinical practice will need to be monitored.

  20. Contemporary HIV Vaccines: Tissue Resident T-Cells and Strategies to Prevent Mucosal Infection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hyon-Xhi; Kent, Stephen J; De Rose, Robert

    2016-01-01

    HIV is primarily transmitted to women via the cervicovaginal mucosa, with the infection remaining localized for several days prior to systemic dissemination and irreversible damage to the immune system. The early phase during which HIV infection is localized and exhibits little or no viral diversity presents a vantage point for HIV vaccines that stimulate T-cell mediated clearance. CD(8+) resident memory T-cells (TRM) are positioned at mucosal entry sites and are established upon resolution of infection by mucosal pathogens. TRM cells are long-lived and locally patrol mucosal tissues. Upon antigenic reactivation, the sentinel-like functions of TRM cells mediate rapid clearance of subsequent infection by recruitment of additional immune cells from circulation and initiate a tissue-wide antiviral state, thus preventing the recurrence of disease. These properties are ideally suited for an HIV vaccine aimed at halting the infection cycle of HIV during the earliest phases. In this review, we summarize recent vaccine developments from parallel research areas incorporating the use of live mucosal vectors complemented with chemokine-regulating compounds, which can induce the seeding of the vaginal mucosa with TRM cells. We present the proposition that similar novel vaccine regimens can be translated into approaches for future HIV vaccines aimed at inducing heightened immunity in vaginal tissues against HIV.

  1. Prevention of Immune Cell Apoptosis as Potential Therapeutic Strategy for Severe Infections

    PubMed Central

    Parrino, Janie; Hotchkiss, Richard S.

    2007-01-01

    Some labile cell types whose numbers are normally controlled through programmed cell death are subject to markedly increased destruction during some severe infections. Lymphocytes, in particular, undergo massive and apparently unregulated apoptosis in human patients and laboratory animals with sepsis, potentially playing a major role in the severe immunosuppression that characterizes the terminal phase of fatal illness. Extensive lymphocyte apoptosis has also occurred in humans and animals infected with several exotic agents, including Bacillus anthracis, the cause of anthrax; Yersinia pestis, the cause of plague; and Ebola virus. Prevention of lymphocyte apoptosis, through either genetic modification of the host or treatment with specific inhibitors, markedly improves survival in murine sepsis models. These findings suggest that interventions aimed at reducing the extent of immune cell apoptosis could improve outcomes for a variety of severe human infections, including those caused by emerging pathogens and bioterrorism agents. PMID:17479879

  2. The Human Stomach in Health and Disease: Infection Strategies by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Karen; Letley, Darren P; Kaneko, Kazuyo

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a bacterial pathogen which commonly colonizes the human gastric mucosa from early childhood and persists throughout life. In the vast majority of cases, the infection is asymptomatic. H. pylori is the leading cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, however, and these outcomes occur in 10-15% of those infected. Gastric adenocarcinoma is the third most common cause of cancer-associated death, and peptic ulcer disease is a significant cause of morbidity. Disease risk is related to the interplay of numerous bacterial host and environmental factors, many of which influence chronic inflammation and damage to the gastric mucosa. This chapter summarizes what is known about health and disease in H. pylori infection, and highlights the need for additional research in this area.

  3. Management strategies for cytomegalovirus infection and disease in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Razonable, Raymund R

    2013-06-01

    Cytomegalovirus is the most common viral pathogen that affects solid organ transplant recipients. It directly causes fever, myelosuppression, and tissue-invasive disease, and indirectly, it negatively impacts allograft and patient survival. Nucleic acid amplification testing is the preferred method to confirm the diagnosis of CMV infection. Prevention of CMV disease using antiviral prophylaxis or preemptive therapy is critical in the management of transplant patients. Intravenous ganciclovir and oral valganciclovir are the first line drugs for antiviral treatment. This article provides a comprehensive review of the current epidemiology, diagnosis, prevention and treatment of CMV infection in solid organ transplant recipients.

  4. Current strategies for the prevention and management of central line-associated bloodstream infections

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhuolin; Liang, Stephen Y; Marschall, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    Central venous catheters are an invaluable tool for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in today’s medicine, but their use can be complicated by bloodstream infections (BSIs). While evidence-based preventive measures are disseminated by infection control associations, the optimal management of established central line-associated BSIs has been summarized in infectious diseases guidelines. We prepared an overview of the state-of-the-art of prevention and management of central line-associated BSIs and included topics such as the role of antibiotic-coated catheters, the role of catheter removal in the management, and a review of currently used antibiotic compounds and the duration of treatment. PMID:21694903

  5. [The strategy for the control of the spread of HIV infection in the city of Novorossiysk].

    PubMed

    Petunin, E I

    2000-01-01

    The results of the work of the center for controlling the spread of HIV infection are discussed. The analysis of the epidemiological situation and the work on the projects, envisaging preventive measures among intravenous drug users permitted the realization of educational and behavior-changing programs in the city in 1999. The results of this work demonstrate the effect of various preventive measures, manifested by a decrease in the rate of the spread of HIV infection in the city not only among drug users, but also among other groups of the population.

  6. Simulating the impact of four control strategies on the population dynamics of Neospora caninum infection in Swiss dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Häsler, Barbara; Stärk, Katharina D C; Sager, Heinz; Gottstein, Bruno; Reist, Martin

    2006-12-18

    A dynamic deterministic simulation model was developed to assess the impact of different putative control strategies on the seroprevalence of Neospora caninum in female Swiss dairy cattle. The model structure comprised compartments of "susceptible" and "infected" animals (SI-model) and the cattle population was divided into 12 age classes. A reference model (Model 1) was developed to simulate the current (status quo) situation (present seroprevalence in Switzerland 12%), taking into account available demographic and seroprevalence data of Switzerland. Model 1 was modified to represent four putative control strategies: testing and culling of seropositive animals (Model 2), discontinued breeding with offspring from seropositive cows (Model 3), chemotherapeutic treatment of calves from seropositive cows (Model 4), and vaccination of susceptible and infected animals (Model 5). Models 2-4 considered different sub-scenarios with regard to the frequency of diagnostic testing. Multivariable Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis was used to assess the impact of uncertainty in input parameters. A policy of annual testing and culling of all seropositive cattle in the population reduced the seroprevalence effectively and rapidly from 12% to <1% in the first year of simulation. The control strategies with discontinued breeding with offspring from all seropositive cows, chemotherapy of calves and vaccination of all cattle reduced the prevalence more slowly than culling but were still very effective (reduction of prevalence below 2% within 11, 23 and 3 years of simulation, respectively). However, sensitivity analyses revealed that the effectiveness of these strategies depended strongly on the quality of the input parameters used, such as the horizontal and vertical transmission factors, the sensitivity of the diagnostic test and the efficacy of medication and vaccination. Finally, all models confirmed that it was not possible to completely eradicate N. caninum as long as the

  7. Economic evaluation of a preemptive treatment strategy for invasive fungal infection in neutropenic patients with hematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Kimura, S-I; Murata, T; Akahoshi, Y; Nakano, H; Ugai, T; Wada, H; Yamasaki, R; Ishihara, Y; Kawamura, K; Sakamoto, K; Ashizawa, M; Sato, M; Terasako-Saito, K; Nakasone, H; Kikuchi, M; Yamazaki, R; Kako, S; Kanda, J; Tanihara, A; Nishida, J; Kanda, Y

    2015-05-01

    We compared the expected medical costs of empirical and preemptive treatment strategies for invasive fungal infection in neutropenic patients with hematological diseases. Based on the results of two clinical trials with different backgrounds reported by Oshima et al. [J Antimicrob Chemother 60(2):350-355; Oshima study] and Cordonnier et al. [Clin Infect Dis 48(8):1042-1051; PREVERT study], we developed a decision tree model that represented the outcomes of empirical and preemptive treatment strategies, and estimated the expected medical costs of medications and examinations in the two strategies. We assumed that micafungin was started in the empirical group at 5 days after fever had developed, while voriconazole was started in the preemptive group only when certain criteria, such as positive test results of imaging studies and/or serum markers, were fulfilled. When we used an incidence of positive test results of 6.7 % based on the Oshima study, the expected medical costs of the empirical and preemptive groups were 288,198 and 150,280 yen, respectively. Even in the case of the PREVERT study, in which the incidence of positive test results was 32.9 %, the expected medical costs in the empirical and preemptive groups were 291,871 and 284,944 yen, respectively. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the expected medical costs in the preemptive group would exceed those in the empirical group when the incidence of positive test results in the former was over 34.4 %. These results suggest that a preemptive treatment strategy can be expected to reduce medical costs compared with empirical therapy in most clinical settings.

  8. Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... or articles contaminated by them is an important component of infection control and isolation precautions. To help protect exposure to infectious materials, wash your hands: Wear gloves: In addition to ...

  9. [Therapeutics strategies for the management of urinary tract infection in children].

    PubMed

    Launay, E; Bingen, E; Cohen, R

    2012-11-01

    Urinary tract infections is one of the most common bacterial infections in pediatrics The increasing involvement of multiresistant bacteria including E. coli producing extended spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL) makes its management difficult. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the state of the art and to propose ways of thinking about the management of E. coli urinary tract infection in children. The current percentage (less than 10%) of E. coli strains resistant to third generation cephalosporins and the relative efficiency of the latter, should not led to an immediate change of our protocols. Nevertheless, we should verify as soon as possible susceptibility of E. coli responsible for urinary tract infections and consider other therapeutic options for initial therapy and adaptation after obtaining antibiogram. The use of an aminoglycosid as initial treatment seems very interesting. Aminoglycosides have a very good distribution in the renal parenchyma and are still working on the majority of ESBL-producing bacteria. A rapid oral relay after 48 to 72 hours may be proposed according to the results of the susceptibility with either cotrimoxazole, cefixime, ciprofloxacin or an association cefixime-amoxicilline/clavulanate. The treatment of cystitis due to ESBL E. coli is much less problematic given the good urinary beta-lactam antibiotics diffusion. If clinical improvement occurs, even if antibiogram shows that the strain is resistant to the antibiotic prescribed, it is usually unnecessary to change treatment.

  10. DNA Persistence and Relapses Questions on the Treatment Strategies of Enterococcus Infections of Prosthetic Valves

    PubMed Central

    Casalta, Jean-Paul; Thuny, Franck; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Lepidi, Hubert; Habib, Gilbert; Grisoli, Dominique; Raoult, Didier

    2012-01-01

    We used amplification of the 16S rRNA gene followed by sequencing to evaluate the persistence of bacterial DNA in explanted heart valve tissue as part of the routine work of a clinical microbiology laboratory, and we analyzed the role of this persistence in the relapses observed in our center. We enrolled 286 patients treated for infective endocarditis (IE) who had valve replacement surgery and were diagnosed according to the modified Duke’s criteria described by Li et al. from a total of 579 IE cases treated in our center. The patients were grouped based on the infecting bacteria, and we considered the 4 most common bacterial genus associated with IE separately (144 were caused by Streptococcus spp., 52 by Enterococcus spp., 58 by Staphylococcus aureus and 32 by coagulase-negative Staphylococcus). Based on our cohort, the risk of relapse in patients with enterococcal prosthetic valve infections treated with antibiotics alone was 11%. Bacterial DNA is cleared over time, but this might be a very slow process, especially with Enterococcus spp. Based on a comprehensive review of the literature performed on Medline, most reports still advise combined treatment with penicillin and an aminoglycoside for as long as 4–6 weeks, but there has been no consensus for the treatment of enterococcal infection of prostheses in IE patients. PMID:23300913

  11. Strategies for Coping with Educational and Social Consequences of Chronic Ear Infections in Rural Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillai, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    Children with chronic ear infections experience a lag time in understanding speech, which inhibits classroom participation and the ability to make friends, and ultimately reduces self-esteem. Difficulty in hearing affects speech and vocabulary development, reading and writing proficiency, and academic performance, and could lead to placement in…

  12. Strategies for the Prevention of Recurrent Hepatitis B Virus Infection After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Vignan; Allen, Ruby M.; Saab, Sammy

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is an international public health concern, and chronic infection can lead to the development of cirrhosis, liver failure, or hepatocellular carcinoma as well as the need for liver transplantation. The recurrence of HBV infection following liver transplantation was disproportionately high prior to the introduction of proper prophylactic treatment. Risk factors associated with the recurrence of HBV infection post-transplant include hepatitis B e antigen positivity, high levels of serum HBV DNA, and the presence of an antiviral drug-resistant strain prior to transplantation. The prevention of HBV recurrence began with the introduction of hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) in the early 1 990s. Nucleos(t)ide analog (NA) antiviral drugs were next to be introduced and, in combination with HBIG, are considered to be extremely effective for the prevention of recurrence. Because of concerns with HBIG, whether HBIG can be used for a short time or discontinued altogether is under debate. All of the NA antiviral drugs have been proven to be effective against HBV, at least in the pretransplant setting, and can be used safely posttransplant. Further investigation is still needed to standardize treatment in the posttransplant setting. PMID:24829544

  13. Agents and strategies in development for improved management of herpes simplex virus infection and disease.

    PubMed

    Kleymann, Gerald

    2005-02-01

    The quiet pandemic of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections has plagued humanity since ancient times, causing mucocutaneous infection such as herpes labialis and herpes genitalis. Disease symptoms often interfere with every-day activities and occasionally HSV infections are the cause of life-threatening or sight-impairing disease, especially in neonates and the immuno-compromised patient population. After infection the virus persists for life in neurons of the host in a latent form, periodically reactivating and often resulting in significant psychosocial distress for the patient. Currently no cure is available. So far, vaccines, ILs, IFNs, therapeutic proteins, antibodies, immunomodulators and small-molecule drugs with specific or non-specific modes of action lacked either efficacy or the required safety profile to replace the nucleosidic drugs acyclovir, valacyclovir, penciclovir and famciclovir as the first choice of treatment. The recently discovered inhibitors of the HSV helicase-primase are the most potent development candidates today. These antiviral agents act by a novel mechanism of action and display low resistance rates in vitro and superior efficacy in animal models. This review summarises the current therapeutic options, discusses the potential of preclinical or investigational drugs and provides an up-to-date interpretation of the challenge to establish novel treatments for herpes simplex disease.

  14. Treating periprosthetic joint infections as biofilms: key diagnosis and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Alice; Tzeng, Tony H; Vasdev, Sonia; Korth, Kyle; Healey, Travis; Parvizi, Javad; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-03-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that microbial biofilms play an important role in periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) pathogenesis. Compared to free-floating planktonic bacteria, biofilm bacteria are more difficult to culture and possess additional immune-evasive and antibiotic resistance mechanisms, making infections harder to detect and eradicate. This article reviews cutting-edge advances in biofilm-associated infection diagnosis and treatment in the context of current PJI guidelines and highlights emerging technologies that may improve the efficacy and reduce costs associated with PJI. Promising PJI diagnostic tools include culture-independent methods based on sequence comparisons of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene, which offer higher throughput and greater sensitivity than culture-based methods. For therapy, novel methods based on disrupting biofilm-specific properties include quorum quenchers, bacteriophages, and ultrasound/electrotherapy. Since biofilm infections are not easily detected or treated by conventional approaches, molecular diagnostic techniques and next-generation antibiofilm treatments should be integrated into PJI clinical practice guidelines in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluating Clonal Expansion of HIV-Infected Cells: Optimization of PCR Strategies to Predict Clonality

    PubMed Central

    Laskey, Sarah B.; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W.; Bruner, Katherine M.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    In HIV-infected individuals receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy, the virus persists indefinitely in a reservoir of latently infected cells. The proliferation of these cells may contribute to the stability of the reservoir and thus to the lifelong persistence of HIV-1 in infected individuals. Because the HIV-1 replication process is highly error-prone, the detection of identical viral genomes in distinct host cells provides evidence for the clonal expansion of infected cells. We evaluated alignments of unique, near-full-length HIV-1 sequences to determine the relationship between clonality in a short region and clonality in the full genome. Although it is common to amplify and sequence short, subgenomic regions of the viral genome for phylogenetic analysis, we show that sequence identity of these amplicons does not guarantee clonality across the full viral genome. We show that although longer amplicons capture more diversity, no subgenomic region can recapitulate the diversity of full viral genomes. Consequently, some identical subgenomic amplicons should be expected even from the analysis of completely unique viral genomes, and the presence of identical amplicons alone is not proof of clonally expanded HIV-1. We present a method for evaluating evidence of clonal expansion in the context of these findings. PMID:27494508

  16. Strategies for Coping with Educational and Social Consequences of Chronic Ear Infections in Rural Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillai, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    Children with chronic ear infections experience a lag time in understanding speech, which inhibits classroom participation and the ability to make friends, and ultimately reduces self-esteem. Difficulty in hearing affects speech and vocabulary development, reading and writing proficiency, and academic performance, and could lead to placement in…

  17. Cochlear implantation: strategies to protect the implanted cochlea from middle ear infection.

    PubMed

    Jackler, R K; O'Donoghue, G M; Schindler, R A

    1986-01-01

    A cochlear implant for use in children must take into account the high incidence of middle ear infection in this age group. A scala tympani electrode that traverses the middle ear and round window will likely act as a conduit by which infection can spread to the inner ear and potentially to the CNS. In this study an attempt was made to reestablish a separation of the cochlea from the middle ear by developing a seal around the implant at the level of the round window. A series of cats were implanted with simulated cochlear prostheses consisting of either a plain Silastic cylinder, a Silastic cylinder wrapped with autogenous fascia, or a Silastic cylinder with a cuff of bioactive ceramic. Middle ear infection was induced, followed by histologic examination. Bioactive ceramic appears to have some merit as a round window sealing material, while fascia was shown to be of no value. Intracochlear infection, when it did occur, was limited to the basal regions of the cochlea.

  18. Impact of a multidimensional infection control strategy on catheter-associated urinary tract infection rates in the adult intensive care units of 15 developing countries: findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC).

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, V D; Todi, S K; Álvarez-Moreno, C; Pawar, M; Karlekar, A; Zeggwagh, A A; Mitrev, Z; Udwadia, F E; Navoa-Ng, J A; Chakravarthy, M; Salomao, R; Sahu, S; Dilek, A; Kanj, S S; Guanche-Garcell, H; Cuéllar, L E; Ersoz, G; Nevzat-Yalcin, A; Jaggi, N; Medeiros, E A; Ye, G; Akan, Ö A; Mapp, T; Castañeda-Sabogal, A; Matta-Cortés, L; Sirmatel, F; Olarte, N; Torres-Hernández, H; Barahona-Guzmán, N; Fernández-Hidalgo, R; Villamil-Gómez, W; Sztokhamer, D; Forciniti, S; Berba, R; Turgut, H; Bin, C; Yang, Y; Pérez-Serrato, I; Lastra, C E; Singh, S; Ozdemir, D; Ulusoy, S

    2012-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate the impact of a multidimensional infection control strategy for the reduction of the incidence of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) in patients hospitalized in adult intensive care units (AICUs) of hospitals which are members of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC), from 40 cities of 15 developing countries: Argentina, Brazil, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, India, Lebanon, Macedonia, Mexico, Morocco, Panama, Peru, Philippines, and Turkey. We conducted a prospective before-after surveillance study of CAUTI rates on 56,429 patients hospitalized in 57 AICUs, during 360,667 bed-days. The study was divided into the baseline period (Phase 1) and the intervention period (Phase 2). In Phase 1, active surveillance was performed. In Phase 2, we implemented a multidimensional infection control approach that included: (1) a bundle of preventive measures, (2) education, (3) outcome surveillance, (4) process surveillance, (5) feedback of CAUTI rates, and (6) feedback of performance. The rates of CAUTI obtained in Phase 1 were compared with the rates obtained in Phase 2, after interventions were implemented. We recorded 253,122 urinary catheter (UC)-days: 30,390 in Phase 1 and 222,732 in Phase 2. In Phase 1, before the intervention, the CAUTI rate was 7.86 per 1,000 UC-days, and in Phase 2, after intervention, the rate of CAUTI decreased to 4.95 per 1,000 UC-days [relative risk (RR) 0.63 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.55-0.72)], showing a 37% rate reduction. Our study showed that the implementation of a multidimensional infection control strategy is associated with a significant reduction in the CAUTI rate in AICUs from developing countries.

  19. Antiretroviral Treatment Strategies in Highly Treatment Experienced Perinatally HIV-Infected Youth

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Frances L.; Hsu, Alice J.; Pham, Paul A.; Siberry, George K.; Hutton, Nancy; Agwu, Allison L.

    2013-01-01

    Background : There is limited information on antiretroviral (ARV) regimens and outcomes in perinatally HIV (PHIV) -infected youth. Substantial drug resistance after long-term ARV use and non-adherence hinder efforts to design suppressive regimens for PHIV-infected youth. This study compares clinical outcomes by expected activity of the prescribed ARV regimens. Methods A retrospective cohort study of 13-24 year-old PHIV-infected youth on stable ARV regimens for ≥ 6 months was conducted at a pediatric HIV clinic. ARV regimens were retrospectively categorized as optimal or suboptimal based on accumulated genotypic resistance prior to study regimen initiation. Results Fifty-two patients with similar baseline characteristics met inclusion criteria (21 optimal and 31 suboptimal regimens). Patients on optimal regimens had significantly higher increases in CD4 than those on suboptimal regimens by week 48 of treatment (+62 vs. +8 cells/mm3, respectively; p = 0.04) and by the end of study period (+93 vs. –1 cells/mm3, respectively; p = 0.03). There were no significant differences between the groups in decline of viral load, frequency of opportunistic infections or hospitalizations, or accumulation of resistance mutations. Overall, 60% of the optimal and 45% of the suboptimal groups had non-adherence during the study regimen (p = 0.3). Conclusions PHIV-infected youth receiving optimal regimens had greater CD4 improvements but no difference in virologic outcomes compared to those on suboptimal regimens. In a patient population with significant non-adherence, providers must weigh the immunologic benefits of initiating an optimal regimen vs. the potential risks of further resistance accumulation limiting future treatment options. PMID:22926213

  20. Zika plasma viral dynamics in nonhuman primates provides insights into early infection and antiviral strategies.

    PubMed

    Best, Katharine; Guedj, Jeremie; Madelain, Vincent; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Lim, So-Yon; Osuna, Christa E; Whitney, James B; Perelson, Alan S

    2017-08-15

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) has been associated with fetal abnormalities and neurological complications, prompting global concern. Here we present a mathematical analysis of the within-host dynamics of plasma ZIKV burden in a nonhuman primate model, allowing for characterization of the growth and clearance of ZIKV within individual macaques. We estimate that the eclipse phase for ZIKV, the time between cell infection and viral production, is most likely short (∼4 h), the median within-host basic reproductive number R0 is 10.7, the rate of viral production is rapid (>25,000 virions d(-1)), and the lifetime of an infected cell while producing virus is ∼5 h. We also estimate that the minimum number of virions produced by an infected cell over its lifetime is ∼5,500. We assess the potential effect of an antiviral treatment that blocks viral replication, showing that the median time to undetectable plasma viral load (VL) can be reduced from ∼5 d to ∼3 d with a drug concentration ∼15 times the drug's EC50 when treatment is given prophylactically starting at the time of infection. In the case of favipiravir, a polymerase inhibitor with activity against ZIKV, we predict a dose of 150 mg/kg given twice a day initiated at the time of infection can reduce the peak median VL by ∼3 logs and shorten the time to undetectable median VL by ∼2 d, whereas treatment given 2 d postinfection is mostly ineffective in accelerating plasma VL loss in macaques.

  1. Prime-boost vaccine strategy against viral infections: Mechanisms and benefits.

    PubMed

    Kardani, Kimia; Bolhassani, Azam; Shahbazi, Sepideh

    2016-01-20

    The essential goal of vaccination is to generate potent and long-term protection against diseases. Among different vaccine modalities, prime-boost vaccine strategies could enhance cellular and also humoral immunity in several animal models. These strategies have been applied for the development of vaccines against important infectious diseases such as HIV, SIV, HCV, HSV, and HBV indicating promising results even in clinical trials. Several factors including selection of antigen, type of vector, delivery route, dose, adjuvant, boosting regimen, the order of vector injection, and the intervals between different vaccinations influence the outcome of prime-boost immunization approaches. The reported data suggest that the prime-boost strategy as a combination of vaccines (i.e., heterologous prime-boost) may be better than a single vaccine for protection against infectious diseases. Indeed, in many cases, heterologous prime-boost can be more immunogenic than homologous prime-boost strategy. This review discusses the recent advances in prime-boost immunization strategies as well as their benefits and mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of scatter mitigation strategies for x-ray cone-beam CT: impact of scatter subtraction and anti-scatter grids on contrast-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazos, Dimitrios; Lasio, Giovanni; Evans, Joshua; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2007-03-01

    The large contribution of scatter to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) x-ray projections significantly degrades image quality, both through streaking and cupping artifacts and by loss of low contrast boundary detectability. The goal of this investigation is to compare the efficacy of three widely used scatter mitigation methods: subtractive scatter correction (SSC); anti-scatter grids (ASG); and beam modulating with bowtie filters; for improving signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and cupping artifacts. A simple analytic model was developed to predict scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) and CNR as a function of cylindrical phantom thickness. In addition, CBCT x-ray projections of a CatPhan QA phantom were measured, using a Varian CBCT imaging system, and computed, using an inhouse Monte Carlo photon-transport code to more realistically evaluate the impact of scatter mitigation techniques. Images formed with uncorrected sinograms acquired without ASGs and bow-tie filter show pronounced cupping artifacts and loss of contrast. Subtraction of measured scatter profiles restores image uniformity and CT number accuracy, but does not improve CNR, since the improvement in contrast almost exactly offset by the increase in relative x-ray noise. ASGs were found to modestly improve CNR (up to 20%, depending ASG primary transmission and selectivity) only in body scans, while they can reduce CNR for head phantoms where SPR is low.

  3. The biogeography of polymicrobial infection

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, Apollo; McNally, Luke; Darch, Sophie E.; Brown, Sam P.; Whiteley, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Microbial communities are spatially organized in both the environment and the human body. Although patterns exhibited by these communities are described by microbial biogeography this discipline has previously only considered large-scale, global patterns. By contrast, the fine-scale positioning of a pathogen within an infection site can greatly alter its virulence potential. In this Review, we highlight the importance of considering spatial positioning in the study of polymicrobial infections and discuss targeting biogeography as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:26714431

  4. Screening strategies to identify new chemical diversity for drug development to treat kinetoplastid infections.

    PubMed

    Don, Rob; Ioset, Jean-Robert

    2014-01-01

    The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) has defined and implemented an early discovery strategy over the last few years, in fitting with its virtual R&D business model. This strategy relies on a medium- to high-throughput phenotypic assay platform to expedite the screening of compound libraries accessed through its collaborations with partners from the pharmaceutical industry. We review the pragmatic approaches used to select compound libraries for screening against kinetoplastids, taking into account screening capacity. The advantages, limitations and current achievements in identifying new quality series for further development into preclinical candidates are critically discussed, together with attractive new approaches currently under investigation.

  5. [HTLV 1/2 infection: prenatal performance as a disease control strategy in State of Mato Grosso do Sul].

    PubMed

    Dal Fabbro, Márcia Maria Ferrairo Janini; Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio da; Bóia, Márcio Neves; Portela, Patrícia; Botelho, Carlos Augusto; Freitas, Gisele Maria Brandão de; Soares, Joana; Ferri, Juliana; Lupion, Juliana

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the prevalence of HTLV 1/2 infection among pregnant women in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul was estimated by means of the ELISA, Western Blot and PCR techniques, in blood samples collected by peripheral venous puncture. 116,689 pregnant women were examined and 153 were diagnosed as presenting HTLV 1/2 infection, with prevalence of 0.13%. Among these 153 pregnant women, 133 (86.9%) had type 1 and 20 (11.1%) had type 2; 73.2% were black, brown or indigenous; about 90% performed domestic activities; and 75.8% (116/153) had been to school for seven years or less. The 153 pregnant women had 172 pregnancies during the study period and 164 pregnancies were followed. Out of pregnancies that were followed, 6.7% (11/164) evolved to abortion, 26.8% (41/153) reported previous abortions and 31.7% (13/41) had had more than two abortions. Comorbidities were found in 17% (26/153), among whom 3.3% (5/153) had HIV (p<0.000002). The authors emphasize the importance of identifying pregnant women with HTLV 1/2 infection, as a strategy for disease control and prevention.

  6. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: perspectives on novel therapeutic compounds and strategies for the treatment of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Buckheit, R W

    2001-08-01

    At present, the nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors and protease inhibitors (PI) have dominated the therapeutic options for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. From the initial monotherapeutic strategies, to the widely accepted multi-drug cocktails of today, the use of these two classes of compounds has successfully prolonged patient survival following infection with HIV. The efficacy of the multi-drug cocktails has delayed the onset of disease and generated hope that long-term therapy might allow the natural immune response to HIV infection to control both virus replication and pathogenesis within the context of an intact immune system despite the continuing presence of virus in various reservoirs within the body and the inability of these therapies to completely eradicate virus. However, the use of antiretroviral compounds for prolonged periods of time has also resulted in the appearance of significant drug-induced toxicity and metabolic abnormalities, as well as drug-induced variations in disease progression. Thus, continued research and development to identify new and improved antiretroviral agents will be a critical requirement in the foreseeable future. This ongoing research and development should also consider the challenges of defining more effective use of existing therapeutic agents, including the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs).

  7. Tobramycin Inhalation Powder (TIP): An Efficient Treatment Strategy for the Management of Chronic Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infection in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lam, John; Vaughan, Steven; Parkins, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Repeated bouts of acute and chronic lung infections are responsible for progressive pulmonary function decline in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), ultimately leading to respiratory failure and death. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the archetypical CF pathogen, causes chronic infection in 70% of individuals, and is associated with an accelerated clinical decline. The management of P. aeruginosa in CF has been revolutionized with the development and widespread use of inhaled antibiotics. Aerosol delivery of antimicrobial compounds in CF enables extremely high concentrations of antibiotics to be reached directly at the site of infection potentially overcoming adaptive resistance and avoiding the potential for cumulative systemic toxicities. Tobramycin inhalation powder (TIP) represents the first dry powder inhaled (DPI) antibiotic available for use in CF. DPIs are notable for a markedly reduced time for administration, ease of portability, and increased compliance. TIP has been developed as a therapeutic alternative to tobramycin inhalation solution (TIS), the standard of care for the past 20 years within CF. Relative to TIS 300 mg nebulized twice daily in on-and-off cycles of 28 days duration, TIP 112 mg twice daily via the T-326 inhaler administered on the same schedule is associated with marked time savings, increased patient satisfaction, and comparable clinical end points. TIP represents an innovative treatment strategy for those individuals with CF and holds the promise of increased patient compliance and thus the potential for improved clinical outcomes. PMID:24324354

  8. UroPathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) Infections: Virulence Factors, Bladder Responses, Antibiotic, and Non-antibiotic Antimicrobial Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Terlizzi, Maria E.; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Maffei, Massimo E.

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common pathological conditions in both community and hospital settings. It has been estimated that about 150 million people worldwide develop UTI each year, with high social costs in terms of hospitalizations and medical expenses. Among the common uropathogens associated to UTIs development, UroPathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause. UPEC strains possess a plethora of both structural (as fimbriae, pili, curli, flagella) and secreted (toxins, iron-acquisition systems) virulence factors that contribute to their capacity to cause disease, although the ability to adhere to host epithelial cells in the urinary tract represents the most important determinant of pathogenicity. On the opposite side, the bladder epithelium shows a multifaceted array of host defenses including the urine flow and the secretion of antimicrobial substances, which represent useful tools to counteract bacterial infections. The fascinating and intricate dynamics between these players determine a complex interaction system that needs to be revealed. This review will focus on the most relevant components of UPEC arsenal of pathogenicity together with the major host responses to infection, the current approved treatment and the emergence of resistant UPEC strains, the vaccine strategies, the natural antimicrobial compounds along with innovative anti-adhesive and prophylactic approaches to prevent UTIs. PMID:28861072

  9. Pathogenicity and infection strategies of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora in Rosaceae: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Vrancken, K; Holtappels, M; Schoofs, H; Deckers, T; Valcke, R

    2013-05-01

    Plants are host to a large amount of pathogenic bacteria. Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, is an important disease in Rosaceae. Pathogenicity of E. amylovora is greatly influenced by the production of exopolysaccharides, such as amylovoran, and the use of the type III secretion system, which enables bacteria to penetrate host tissue and cause disease. When infection takes place, plants have to rely on the ability of each cell to recognize the pathogen and the signals emanating from the infection site in order to generate several defence mechanisms. These mechanisms consist of physical barriers and the production of antimicrobial components, both in a preformed and an inducible manner. Inducible defence responses are activated upon the recognition of elicitor molecules by plant cell receptors, either derived from invading micro-organisms or from pathogen-induced degradation of plant tissue. This recognition event triggers a signal transduction cascade, leading to a range of defence responses [reactive oxygen species (ROS), plant hormones, secondary metabolites, …] and redeployment of cellular energy in a fast, efficient and multiresponsive manner, which prevents further pathogen ingress. This review highlights the research that has been performed during recent years regarding this specific plant-pathogen interaction between Erwinia amylovora and Rosaceae, with a special emphasis on the pathogenicity and the infection strategy of E. amylovora and the possible defence mechanisms of the plant against this disease.

  10. Successful Visna/maedi control in a highly infected ovine dairy flock using serologic segregation and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M; Muñoz, J A; Biescas, E; Salazar, E; Bolea, R; de Andrés, D; Amorena, B; Badiola, J J; Reina, R; Luján, L

    2013-11-01

    A control system for Visna/maedi virus (VMV) infection based on serologic segregation and management strategies was applied in an infected Spanish dairy Manchega breed sheep flock (n=670) that was affected by a severe respiratory process associated to VMV. The control started in 2004 and consisted on the serological study of animals, segregation in two different flocks (seropositive and seronegative), separate management of flocks, selection of young female lambs for replacement only from seronegative ewes offspring, immediate removal of seropositive animals detected in the seronegative flock and a management tending toward the reduction and final culling of the seropositive flock. The serological control was repeated yearly or twice a year, approximately. Initial VMV seroprevalence of the undivided flock was 66.4% (January 2004) that descended to 47.3%, 12.8%, 2.2% and 0.2% between July 2004 and May 2006. Residual seroprevalence fluctuated slightly thereafter with a peak of 2.2% in April 2008. After segregation, number of animals in the seronegative flock was 378 that descended to 323 in October 2005. Since then, this number has increased steadily reaching 650 sheep in December 2011. The seropositive flock was progressively reduced by culling until its total disappearance in June 2010. This work presents the detailed results obtained in the control strategy against VMV in a single dairy sheep flock by implementing a segregation system based on serologic testing. The system is highly successful, as it reduces to residual levels VMV infection in about two years without the need of culling a high number of animals, as required by other methods. Moreover, the original size flock was been recovered within 8 years and has led to a subjective improvement of animal health and welfare in the flock. The residual seroprevalence could be eliminated at this stage by applying more sensitive molecular or other serological techniques to reach eradication.

  11. Helicobacter Pylori Infection: Diagnostic Strategies in Primary Diagnosis and After Therapy.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Nathan S S; Braden, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection pre- and post-treatment is mandatory in the current era of decreasing prevalence and increasing antibiotic resistance. The diagnostic performance of most tests is poorer in clinical situations with low bacterial density which is seen in conditions such as atrophic gastritis or intake of antisecretory and antibiotic medications. Noninvasive tests require less cost and resource but provide excellent accuracy; however, endoscopy with testing of gastric biopsy specimens is indicated where alarming symptoms are present or antibiotic susceptibility testing by culture is desired. Newer modalities such as polymerase chain reaction testing provide additional virulence and antibiotic sensitivity profiling. This article outlines new developments and the key parameters of each test, as careful selection of test modality within the clinical context is required for adequate management of infected symptomatic patients.

  12. A multivalent vaccination strategy for the prevention of Old World arenavirus infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Botten, Jason; Whitton, J Lindsay; Barrowman, Polly; Sidney, John; Whitmire, Jason K; Alexander, Jeff; Kotturi, Maya F; Sette, Alessandro; Buchmeier, Michael J

    2010-10-01

    Arenaviruses cause severe human disease ranging from aseptic meningitis following lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection to hemorrhagic fever syndromes following infection with Guanarito virus (GTOV), Junin virus (JUNV), Lassa virus (LASV), Machupo virus (MACV), Sabia virus (SABV), or Whitewater Arroyo virus (WWAV). Cellular immunity, chiefly the CD8(+) T-cell response, plays a critical role in providing protective immunity following infection with the Old World arenaviruses LASV and LCMV. In the current study, we evaluated whether HLA class I-restricted epitopes that are cross-reactive among pathogenic arenaviruses could be identified for the purpose of developing an epitope-based vaccination approach that would cross-protect against multiple arenaviruses. We were able to identify a panel of HLA-A*0201-restricted peptides derived from the same region of the glycoprotein precursor (GPC) of LASV (GPC spanning residues 441 to 449 [GPC(441-449)]), LCMV (GPC(447-455)), JUNV (GPC(429-437)), MACV (GPC(444-452)), GTOV (GPC(427-435)), and WWAV (GPC(428-436)) that displayed high-affinity binding to HLA-A*0201 and were recognized by CD8(+) T cells in a cross-reactive manner following LCMV infection or peptide immunization of HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. Immunization of HLA-A*0201 mice with the Old World peptide LASV GPC(441-449) or LCMV GPC(447-455) induced high-avidity CD8(+) T-cell responses that were able to kill syngeneic target cells pulsed with either LASV GPC(441-449) or LCMV GPC(447-455) in vivo and provided significant protection against viral challenge with LCMV. Through this study, we have demonstrated that HLA class I-restricted, cross-reactive epitopes exist among diverse arenaviruses and that individual epitopes can be utilized as effective vaccine determinants for multiple pathogenic arenaviruses.

  13. Microbiome manipulation with faecal microbiome transplantation as a therapeutic strategy in Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Mullish, B H; Marchesi, J R; Thursz, M R; Williams, H R T

    2015-05-01

    Faecal microbiome transplantation (FMT) has generated huge recent interest as it presents a potential solution to a significant clinical problem--the increasing incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). In the short term, however, there remain many practical questions regarding its use, including the optimal selection of donors, material preparation and the mechanics of delivery. In the longer term, enhanced understanding of the mechanisms of action of FMT may potentiate novel therapies, such as targeted manipulation of the microbiome in CDI and beyond.

  14. Management strategies for infected total hip arthroplasty. A critical appreciation of problems and techniques.

    PubMed

    Karachalios, Theofilos; Koutalos, Antonios; Komnos, George

    2014-10-02

    Infection is a devastating complication of total hip arthroplasty (THA). Risk factors have been recognised and prevention is possible. The nature of the disease is heterogeneous and for satisfactory management one has to weigh factors related to pathogen, host, local soft tissue, bone stock, surgeon experience and financial resources. Available data in the current literature is of poor quality and there is a lack of data comparing different techniques. Referral of patients to dedicated departments with the appropriate facilities may be more appropriate.

  15. Efficacy of oral ribavirin in hematologic disease patients with paramyxovirus infection: analytic strategy using propensity scores.

    PubMed

    Park, So-Youn; Baek, Seunghee; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee; Sung, Heungsup; Kim, Mi-Na; Kim, Dae-Young; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Kim, Sung-Han

    2013-02-01

    Few antiviral agents are available for treating paramyxovirus infections, such as those involving respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza virus (PIV), and human metapneumovirus (hMPV). We evaluated the effect of oral ribavirin on clinical outcomes of paramyxovirus infections in patients with hematological diseases. All adult patients with paramyxovirus were retrospectively reviewed over a 2-year period. Patients who received oral ribavirin were compared to those who received supportive care without ribavirin therapy. A propensity-matched case-control study and a logistic regression model with inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) were performed to reduce the effect of selection bias in assignment for oral ribavirin therapy. A total of 145 patients, including 64 (44%) with PIV, 60 (41%) with RSV, and 21 (15%) with hMPV, were analyzed. Of these 145 patients, 114 (78%) received oral ribavirin and the remaining 31 (21%) constituted the nonribavirin group. Thirty-day mortality and underlying respiratory death rates were 31% (35/114) and 12% (14/114), respectively, for the oral ribavirin group versus 19% (6/31) and 16% (5/31), respectively, for the nonribavirin group (P = 0.21 and P = 0.56). In the case-control study, the 30-day mortality rate in the ribavirin group was 24% (5/21) versus 19% (4/21) in the nonribavirin group (P = 0.71). In addition, the logistic regression model with IPTW revealed no significant difference in 30-day mortality (adjusted hazard ratio of 1.3; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] of 0.3 to 5.8) between the two groups. Steroid use (adjusted odds ratio, 5.67; P = 0.01) and upper respiratory tract infection (adjusted odds ratio, 0.07; P = 0.001) was independently associated with mortality. Our data suggest that oral ribavirin therapy may not improve clinical outcomes in hematologic disease patients infected with paramyxovirus.

  16. Contrast cystography.

    PubMed

    Essman, Stephanie C

    2005-02-01

    Cystography is a radiographic study performed to aid in evaluation of the urinary bladder for extramural, mural, or intraluminal lesions. These lesions may primarily involve the urinary bladder or may be an extension of disease from adjacent organs. Cystography is easy to perform with relatively few complications. Different types of cystography (positive versus negative contrast) may be used depending on the type of information that the clinician hopes to obtain. Although a valuable technique, it is important to correlate the findings on cystography with other clinical information to arrive at the final diagnosis.

  17. Psychological Stressors and Coping Strategies Used by Adolescents Living with and Not Living with Hiv Infection in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Folayan, Morenike O; Cáceres, Carlos F; Sam-Agudu, Nadia A; Odetoyinbo, Morolake; Stockman, Jamila K; Harrison, Abigail

    2016-09-07

    Little is known about stressful triggers and coping strategies of Nigerian adolescents and whether or not, and how, HIV infection modulates these sources of stress and coping. This study evaluated differences in stressors and coping strategies among Nigerian adolescents based on HIV status. We analysed the data of six hundred 10-19 year old adolescents recruited through a population-based survey from 12 States of Nigeria who self-reported their HIV status. Data on stressors and coping strategies were retrieved by self-report from participants, using a validated structured questionnaire. We compared results between adolescents with and without HIV with respect to identification of specific life events as stressors, and use of specific coping strategies to manage stress. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age and sex. Adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV) had significantly increased odds of identifying 'having to visit the hospital regularly' (AOR: 5.85; 95 % CI: 2.11-16.20; P = 0.001), and 'having to take drugs regularly' (AOR: 9.70; 95 % CI: 4.13-22.81; P < 0.001) as stressors; and 'Seeking social support' (AOR: 3.14; 95 % CI: 1.99-4.93; p < 0.001) and 'using mental disengagement' (OR: 1.64; 95 % CI: 0.49-1.84; p = 0.001) as coping strategies. Adolescents not living with HIV had significantly increased odds of identifying 'argument with a friend or family member' as a stressor (AOR: 6.59; 95 % CI: 3.62-11.98; P < 0.001). Life events related to adolescents' HIV positive status were significant stressors for ALHIV. Providing targeted psychosocial support could help reduce the impact of such HIV status-related stressors on ALHIV.

  18. Vaccine and antiviral strategies against infections caused by human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Wainberg, M A; Kendall, O; Gilmore, N

    1988-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been clearly associated with a variety of new illnesses, including profound immunodeficiency (acquired immune deficiency syndrome [AIDS]), wasting syndromes (formerly termed AIDS-related complex [ARC]) and neurologic syndromes, including neuropathy, myelopathy and encephalopathy (often termed subacute encephalitis or AIDS dementia complex). HIV-1 preferentially infects T lymphocytes by binding to a membrane receptor protein, CD4, associated with helper function. The virus can also attack macrophages and, possibly, other cells such as neuronal cells, colonic epithelial cells and B lymphocytes. Infection of macrophages or monocytes may be involved in neurologic disease. Knowledge about HIV-1 has rapidly increased, and investigators have characterized its structure, ways in which it infects cells, replicates and is cytopathic for certain cells, and how the immune system responds to it. The ideal vaccine would prevent adsorption of the virus into the cell, but it is difficult to develop stable resistance because the virus has many antigenic patterns and mutates frequently. The results of vaccine trials in animals have not been promising, but work is being done with monoclonal antibodies. Antiviral therapies being investigated include those to prevent virus binding and entry, to inhibit reverse transcription, to inhibit the virus's life cycle and to restore immune competence in immunocompromised patients. PMID:3282628

  19. Strategies to manage hepatitis C virus infection disease burden - volume 3.

    PubMed

    Alfaleh, F Z; Nugrahini, N; Matičič, M; Tolmane, I; Alzaabi, M; Hajarizadeh, B; Valantinas, J; Kim, D Y; Hunyady, B; Abaalkhail, F; Abbas, Z; Abdou, A; Abourached, A; Al Braiki, F; Al Hosani, F; Al Jaberi, K; Al Khatry, M; Al Mulla, M A; Al Quraishi, H; Al Rifai, A; Al Serkal, Y; Alam, A; Alashgar, H I; Alavian, S M; Alawadhi, S; Al-Dabal, L; Aldins, P; Alghamdi, A S; Al-Hakeem, R; Aljumah, A A; Almessabi, A; Alqutub, A N; Alswat, K A; Altraif, I; Andrea, N; Assiri, A M; Babatin, M A; Baqir, A; Barakat, M T; Bergmann, O M; Bizri, A R; Chaudhry, A; Choi, M S; Diab, T; Djauzi, S; El Hassan, E S; El Khoury, S; Estes, C; Fakhry, S; Farooqi, J I; Fridjonsdottir, H; Gani, R A; Ghafoor Khan, A; Gheorghe, L; Goldis, A; Gottfredsson, M; Gregorcic, S; Gunter, J; Hamid, S; Han, K H; Hasan, I; Hashim, A; Horvath, G; Husni, R; Jafri, W; Jeruma, A; Jonasson, J G; Karlsdottir, B; Kim, Y S; Koutoubi, Z; Lesmana, L A; Liakina, V; Lim, Y S; Löve, A; Maimets, M; Makara, M; Malekzadeh, R; Memon, M S; Merat, S; Mokhbat, J E; Mourad, F H; Muljono, D H; Nawaz, A; Olafsson, S; Priohutomo, S; Qureshi, H; Rassam, P; Razavi, H; Razavi-Shearer, D; Razavi-Shearer, K; Rozentale, B; Sadik, M; Saeed, K; Salamat, A; Salupere, R; Sanai, F M; Sanityoso Sulaiman, A; Sayegh, R A; Schmelzer, J D; Sharara, A I; Sibley, A; Siddiq, M; Siddiqui, A M; Sigmundsdottir, G; Sigurdardottir, B; Speiciene, D; Sulaiman, A; Sultan, M A; Taha, M; Tanaka, J; Tarifi, H; Tayyab, G; Ud Din, M; Umar, M; Videčnik-Zorman, J; Yaghi, C; Yunihastuti, E; Yusuf, M A; Zuberi, B F; Blach, S

    2015-12-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) epidemic was forecasted through 2030 for 15 countries in Europe, the Middle East and Asia, and the relative impact of two scenarios was considered: increased treatment efficacy while holding the annual number of treated patients constant and increased treatment efficacy and an increased annual number of treated patients. Increasing levels of diagnosis and treatment, in combination with improved treatment efficacy, were critical for achieving substantial reductions in disease burden. A 90% reduction in total HCV infections within 15 years is feasible in most countries studied, but it required a coordinated effort to introduce harm reduction programmes to reduce new infections, screening to identify those already infected and treatment with high cure rate therapies. This suggests that increased capacity for screening and treatment will be critical in many countries. Birth cohort screening is a helpful tool for maximizing resources. Among European countries, the majority of patients were born between 1940 and 1985. A wider range of birth cohorts was seen in the Middle East and Asia (between 1925 and 1995). © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Innate gamma/delta T-cells during HIV infection: Terra relatively Incognita in novel vaccination strategies?

    PubMed

    Agrati, Chiara; D'Offizi, Gianpiero; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Malkovsky, Miroslav; Sacchi, Alessandra; Casetti, Rita; Bordoni, Veronica; Cimini, Eleonora; Martini, Federico

    2011-01-01

    Despite a long-lasting global effort, the Holy Grail quest for a protective vaccine, able to confer prevention to HIV infection, did not reach the hoped for results, nor seems able to do so in the near future. Since mucosal surfaces of the host serve as the main entry point for HIV, it seems now logical to switch from a systemic to a localized view of events, in order to reveal critical steps useful in designing new and different vaccination strategies. In this context, the recent description of the very early phases of infection, from the eclipse to the viremia peak phase, seems to define a point-of-no-return threshold after which the main HIV infection steps, i.e. the massive destruction of the CD4+CCR5+ cell pool, the destruction of the mucosal physical barrier, and the establishment of reservoir sanctuaries, have already been accomplished. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms, the timing, and the consequences of evasion mechanisms exploited by HIV are still under scrutiny. Innate immunity, as part of a rapid lymphoid stress surveillance system, is known to play a central role in host responses to many infectious agents. In particular, Vγ9Vδ2 T-cells are able to quickly respond to danger signals without the need for classical major histocompatibility complex presentation, and may act as a bridge between innate and acquired arms of immune response, being able to kill infected/transformed cells, release antimicrobial soluble factors, and increase the deployment of other innate and acquired responses. Many experimental evidences suggest a direct role of circulating Vγ9Vδ2 T-cells during HIV disease. They may exert a direct anti-HIV role by secreting chemokines competing for HIV entry coreceptors as well as other soluble antiviral factors, and by killing infected cells by cytotoxic natural killer-like mechanisms. Moreover, they were found progressively depleted and anergic in advanced stages of HIV disease, this effect being directly linked to uncontrolled

  1. Comparing different maize supplementation strategies to improve resilience and resistance against gastrointestinal nematode infections in browsing goats

    PubMed Central

    Gárate-Gallardo, Leslie; Torres-Acosta, Juan Felipe de Jesús; Aguilar-Caballero, Armando Jacinto; Sandoval-Castro, Carlos Alfredo; Cámara-Sarmiento, Ramón; Canul-Ku, Hilda Lorena

    2015-01-01

    The effect of maize grain supplementation on the resilience and resistance of browsing Criollo goat kids against gastrointestinal nematodes was evaluated. Five-month-old kids (n = 42), raised worm-free, were allocated to five groups: infected + not supplemented (I-NS; n = 10), infected + maize supplement at 108 g/d (I-S108; n = 8), maize supplement at 1% of body weight (BW) (I-S1%; n = 8), maize supplement at 1.5% BW (I-S1.5%; n = 8), or infected + supplemented (maize supplement 1.5% BW) + moxidectin (0.2 mg/kg BW subcutaneously every 28 d) (T-S1.5%; n = 8). Kids browsed daily (7 h) in a tropical forest for 112 days during the rainy season. Kids were weighed weekly to adjust supplementary feeding. Hematocrit (Ht), hemoglobin (Hb), and eggs per gram of feces were determined fortnightly. On day 112, five goat kids were slaughtered per group to determine worm burdens. Kids of the I-S1.5% group showed similar body-weight change, Ht and Hb, compared to kids without gastrointestinal nematodes (T-S1.5%), as well as lower eggs per gram of feces and Trichostrongylus colubriformis worm burden compared to the I-NS group (P > 0.05). Thus, among the supplement levels tested, increasing maize supplementation at 1.5% BW of kids was the best strategy to improve their resilience and resistance against natural gastrointestinal nematode infections under the conditions of forage from the tropical forest. PMID:26071051

  2. Comparing different maize supplementation strategies to improve resilience and resistance against gastrointestinal nematode infections in browsing goats.

    PubMed

    Gárate-Gallardo, Leslie; Torres-Acosta, Juan Felipe de Jesús; Aguilar-Caballero, Armando Jacinto; Sandoval-Castro, Carlos Alfredo; Cámara-Sarmiento, Ramón; Canul-Ku, Hilda Lorena

    2015-01-01

    The effect of maize grain supplementation on the resilience and resistance of browsing Criollo goat kids against gastrointestinal nematodes was evaluated. Five-month-old kids (n = 42), raised worm-free, were allocated to five groups: infected + not supplemented (I-NS; n = 10), infected + maize supplement at 108 g/d (I-S108; n = 8), maize supplement at 1% of body weight (BW) (I-S1%; n = 8), maize supplement at 1.5% BW (I-S1.5%; n = 8), or infected + supplemented (maize supplement 1.5% BW) + moxidectin (0.2 mg/kg BW subcutaneously every 28 d) (T-S1.5%; n = 8). Kids browsed daily (7 h) in a tropical forest for 112 days during the rainy season. Kids were weighed weekly to adjust supplementary feeding. Hematocrit (Ht), hemoglobin (Hb), and eggs per gram of feces were determined fortnightly. On day 112, five goat kids were slaughtered per group to determine worm burdens. Kids of the I-S1.5% group showed similar body-weight change, Ht and Hb, compared to kids without gastrointestinal nematodes (T-S1.5%), as well as lower eggs per gram of feces and Trichostrongylus colubriformis worm burden compared to the I-NS group (P > 0.05). Thus, among the supplement levels tested, increasing maize supplementation at 1.5% BW of kids was the best strategy to improve their resilience and resistance against natural gastrointestinal nematode infections under the conditions of forage from the tropical forest.

  3. Technical innovation in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of musculoskeletal tumors: an MR angiographic sequence using a sparse k-space sampling strategy.

    PubMed

    Fayad, Laura M; Mugera, Charles; Soldatos, Theodoros; Flammang, Aaron; del Grande, Filippo

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate the clinical use of an MR angiography sequence performed with sparse k-space sampling (MRA), as a method for dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI, and apply it to the assessment of sarcomas for treatment response. Three subjects with sarcomas (2 with osteosarcoma, 1 with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas) underwent MRI after neoadjuvant therapy/prior to surgery, with conventional MRI (T1-weighted, fluid-sensitive, static post-contrast T1-weighted sequences) and DCE-MRI (MRA, time resolution = 7-10 s, TR/TE 2.4/0.9 ms, FOV 40 cm(2)). Images were reviewed by two observers in consensus who recorded image quality (1 = diagnostic, no significant artifacts, 2 = diagnostic, <25 % artifacts, 3 = nondiagnostic) and contrast enhancement characteristics by static MRI (presence/absence of contrast enhancement, percentage of enhancement) and DCE-MRI (presence/absence of arterial enhancement with time-intensity curves). Results were compared with histological response (defined as <5 % viable tumor [soft tissue sarcoma] or <10 % [bone sarcoma] following resection). Diagnostic quality for all conventional and DCE-MRI sequences was rated as 1. In 2 of the 3 sarcomas, there was good histological response (≤5 % viable tumor); in 1 there was poor response (50 % viable tumor). By static post-contrast T1-weighted sequences, there was enhancement in all sarcomas, regardless of response (up to >75 % with good response, >75 % with poor response). DCE-MRI findings were concordant with histological response (arterial enhancement with poor response, no arterial enhancement with good response). Unlike conventional DCE-MRI sequences, an MRA sequence with sparse k-space sampling is easily integrated into a routine musculoskeletal tumor MRI protocol, with high diagnostic quality. In this preliminary work, tumor enhancement characteristics by DCE-MRI were used to assess treatment response.

  4. New integrated strategy emphasizing infection source control to curb Schistosomiasis japonica in a marshland area of Hubei Province, China: findings from an eight-year longitudinal survey.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Yan; Liu, Jian-Bing; Huang, Xi-Bao; Cai, Shun-Xiang; Su, Zheng-Ming; Zhong, Rong; Zou, Li; Miao, Xiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis remains a major public health problem in China. The major endemic foci are the lake and marshland regions of southern China, particularly the regions along the middle and lower reach of the Yangtze River in four provinces (Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, and Anhui). The purpose of our study is to assess the effect of a new integrated strategy emphasizing infection source control to curb schistosomiasis in marshland regions. In a longitudinal study, we implemented an integrated control strategy emphasizing infection source control in 16 villages from 2005 through 2012 in marshland regions of Hubei province. The interventions included removing cattle from snail-infested grasslands, providing farmers with mechanized farm equipment, improving sanitation by supplying tap water, building lavatories and latrines, praziquantel chemotherapy, controlling snails, and environmental modification. Following the integrated control strategy designed to reduce the role of bovines and humans as sources of Schistosoma japonicum infection, the prevalence of human S. japonicum infection declined from 1.7% in 2005 to 0.4% in 2012 (P<0.001). Reductions were also observed in both sexes, across all age groups, and among high risk occupations. Moreover, the prevalence of bovine S. japonicum infection decreased from 11.7% in 2005 to 0.6% in 2012 (P<0.001). In addition, all the 16 villages achieved the national criteria of infection control in 2008. Our findings indicate that the integrated strategy was likely effective in controlling the transmission of S. japonicum in marshland regions in China.

  5. New Integrated Strategy Emphasizing Infection Source Control to Curb Schistosomiasis japonica in a Marshland Area of Hubei Province, China: Findings from an Eight-Year Longitudinal Survey

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan-Yan; Liu, Jian-Bing; Huang, Xi-Bao; Cai, Shun-Xiang; Su, Zheng-Ming; Zhong, Rong; Zou, Li; Miao, Xiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis remains a major public health problem in China. The major endemic foci are the lake and marshland regions of southern China, particularly the regions along the middle and lower reach of the Yangtze River in four provinces (Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, and Anhui). The purpose of our study is to assess the effect of a new integrated strategy emphasizing infection source control to curb schistosomiasis in marshland regions. Methods In a longitudinal study, we implemented an integrated control strategy emphasizing infection source control in 16 villages from 2005 through 2012 in marshland regions of Hubei province. The interventions included removing cattle from snail-infested grasslands, providing farmers with mechanized farm equipment, improving sanitation by supplying tap water, building lavatories and latrines, praziquantel chemotherapy, controlling snails, and environmental modification. Results Following the integrated control strategy designed to reduce the role of bovines and humans as sources of Schistosoma japonicum infection, the prevalence of human S. japonicum infection declined from 1.7% in 2005 to 0.4% in 2012 (P<0.001). Reductions were also observed in both sexes, across all age groups, and among high risk occupations. Moreover, the prevalence of bovine S. japonicum infection decreased from 11.7% in 2005 to 0.6% in 2012 (P<0.001). In addition, all the 16 villages achieved the national criteria of infection control in 2008. Conclusion Our findings indicate that the integrated strategy was likely effective in controlling the transmission of S. japonicum in marshland regions in China. PMID:24587030

  6. Tomato Infection by Whitefly-Transmitted Circulative and Non-Circulative Viruses Induce Contrasting Changes in Plant Volatiles and Vector Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Fereres, Alberto; Peñaflor, Maria Fernanda G. V.; Favaro, Carla F.; Azevedo, Kamila E. X.; Landi, Carolina H.; Maluta, Nathalie K. P.; Bento, José Mauricio S.; Lopes, Joao R.S.

    2016-01-01

    Virus infection frequently modifies plant phenotypes, leading to changes in behaviour and performance of their insect vectors in a way that transmission is enhanced, although this may not always be the case. Here, we investigated Bemisia tabaci response to tomato plants infected by Tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV), a non-circulative-transmitted crinivirus, and Tomato severe rugose virus (ToSRV), a circulative-transmitted begomovirus. Moreover, we examined the role of visual and olfactory cues in host plant selection by both viruliferous and non-viruliferous B. tabaci. Visual cues alone were assessed as targets for whitefly landing by placing leaves underneath a Plexiglas plate. A dual-choice arena was used to assess whitefly response to virus-infected and mock-inoculated tomato leaves under light and dark conditions. Thereafter, we tested the whitefly response to volatiles using an active air-flow Y-tube olfactometer, and chemically characterized the blends using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Visual stimuli tests showed that whiteflies, irrespective of their infectious status, always preferred to land on virus-infected rather than on mock-inoculated leaves. Furthermore, whiteflies had no preference for either virus-infected or mock-inoculated leaves under dark conditions, but preferred virus-infected leaves in the presence of light. ToSRV-infection promoted a sharp decline in the concentration of some tomato volatiles, while an increase in the emission of some terpenes after ToCV infection was found. ToSRV-viruliferous whiteflies preferred volatiles emitted from mock-inoculated plants, a conducive behaviour to enhance virus spread, while volatiles from ToCV-infected plants were avoided by non-viruliferous whiteflies, a behaviour that is likely detrimental to the secondary spread of the virus. In conclusion, the circulative persistent begomovirus, ToSRV, seems to have evolved together with its vector B. tabaci to optimise its own spread. However

  7. Tomato Infection by Whitefly-Transmitted Circulative and Non-Circulative Viruses Induce Contrasting Changes in Plant Volatiles and Vector Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Fereres, Alberto; Peñaflor, Maria Fernanda G V; Favaro, Carla F; Azevedo, Kamila E X; Landi, Carolina H; Maluta, Nathalie K P; Bento, José Mauricio S; Lopes, Joao R S

    2016-08-11

    Virus infection frequently modifies plant phenotypes, leading to changes in behaviour and performance of their insect vectors in a way that transmission is enhanced, although this may not always be the case. Here, we investigated Bemisia tabaci response to tomato plants infected by Tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV), a non-circulative-transmitted crinivirus, and Tomato severe rugose virus (ToSRV), a circulative-transmitted begomovirus. Moreover, we examined the role of visual and olfactory cues in host plant selection by both viruliferous and non-viruliferous B. tabaci. Visual cues alone were assessed as targets for whitefly landing by placing leaves underneath a Plexiglas plate. A dual-choice arena was used to assess whitefly response to virus-infected and mock-inoculated tomato leaves under light and dark conditions. Thereafter, we tested the whitefly response to volatiles using an active air-flow Y-tube olfactometer, and chemically characterized the blends using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Visual stimuli tests showed that whiteflies, irrespective of their infectious status, always preferred to land on virus-infected rather than on mock-inoculated leaves. Furthermore, whiteflies had no preference for either virus-infected or mock-inoculated leaves under dark conditions, but preferred virus-infected leaves in the presence of light. ToSRV-infection promoted a sharp decline in the concentration of some tomato volatiles, while an increase in the emission of some terpenes after ToCV infection was found. ToSRV-viruliferous whiteflies preferred volatiles emitted from mock-inoculated plants, a conducive behaviour to enhance virus spread, while volatiles from ToCV-infected plants were avoided by non-viruliferous whiteflies, a behaviour that is likely detrimental to the secondary spread of the virus. In conclusion, the circulative persistent begomovirus, ToSRV, seems to have evolved together with its vector B. tabaci to optimise its own spread. However

  8. Infection prevention and control of Clostridium difficile: a global review of guidelines, strategies, and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Balsells, Evelyn; Filipescu, Teodora; Kyaw, Moe H; Wiuff, Camilla; Campbell, Harry; Nair, Harish

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of health care-associated infections. Given the high incidence of C. difficile infection (CDI) and the lack of primary prevention through immunization, health care professionals should be aware of the most current guidance, as well as strengths and limitations of the evidence base underpinning this guidance. We identified publicly available national or organizational guidelines related to CDI infection and prevention control (IPC) published between 2000 and 2015 and for any health care setting through an internet search using the Google search engine. We reviewed CDI-targeted IPC recommendations and describe the assessment of evidence in available guidelines. We identified documents from 28 countries/territories, mainly from acute care hospitals in North America, the Western Pacific, and Europe (18 countries). We identified only a few specific recommendations for long-term care facilities (LTCFs) and from countries in South America (Uruguay and Chile), South East Asia (Thailand), and none for Africa or Eastern Mediterranean. Of 10 IPC areas, antimicrobial stewardship was universally recognized as essential and supported by high quality evidence. Five other widely reported "strong" recommendations were: effective environment cleaning (including medical equipment), case isolation, use of personal protective equipment, surveillance, and education. Several unresolved and emerging issues were documented and currently available evidence was classified mainly as of mixed quality. Our review underlines the need for targeted CDI IPC guidelines in several countries and for LTCFs. International harmonisation on the assessment of the evidence for best practices is needed as well as more robust evidence to support targeted recommendations.

  9. Infection prevention and control of Clostridium difficile: a global review of guidelines, strategies, and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Balsells, Evelyn; Filipescu, Teodora; Kyaw, Moe H.; Wiuff, Camilla; Campbell, Harry; Nair, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of health care–associated infections. Given the high incidence of C. difficile infection (CDI) and the lack of primary prevention through immunization, health care professionals should be aware of the most current guidance, as well as strengths and limitations of the evidence base underpinning this guidance. Methods We identified publicly available national or organizational guidelines related to CDI infection and prevention control (IPC) published between 2000 and 2015 and for any health care setting through an internet search using the Google search engine. We reviewed CDI–targeted IPC recommendations and describe the assessment of evidence in available guidelines. Results We identified documents from 28 countries/territories, mainly from acute care hospitals in North America, the Western Pacific, and Europe (18 countries). We identified only a few specific recommendations for long–term care facilities (LTCFs) and from countries in South America (Uruguay and Chile), South East Asia (Thailand), and none for Africa or Eastern Mediterranean. Of 10 IPC areas, antimicrobial stewardship was universally recognized as essential and supported by high quality evidence. Five other widely reported “strong” recommendations were: effective environment cleaning (including medical equipment), case isolation, use of personal protective equipment, surveillance, and education. Several unresolved and emerging issues were documented and currently available evidence was classified mainly as of mixed quality. Conclusion Our review underlines the need for targeted CDI IPC guidelines in several countries and for LTCFs. International harmonisation on the assessment of the evidence for best practices is needed as well as more robust evidence to support targeted recommendations. PMID:28028434

  10. Disseminated Nocardiosis: A Successful Blind Strategy of Treatment in an HIV Infected Patient

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Ana C.; Aleixo, Maria J.; Saraiva, Paulo; Aguas, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Nocardiosis is a rare disease that mainly affects severely immunocompromised patients. Symptoms are nonspecific and microbiological isolation is difficult, hiding the diagnosis. Treatment should be guided by species and susceptibility testing. Findings. We report a clinical case of a disseminated nocardiosis in a patient with HIV and HVB infections. Interpretation. Diagnosis should be presumed early and microbiological conditions should be optimized, in order to identify the species and achieve antibiotic susceptibility testing. This is a very important step to choose an effective therapeutic regimen or alternative options. PMID:25821611

  11. Disseminated Nocardiosis: A Successful Blind Strategy of Treatment in an HIV Infected Patient.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Ana C; Batista, Dário; Aleixo, Maria J; Saraiva, Paulo; Aguas, Maria J

    2015-01-01

    Background. Nocardiosis is a rare disease that mainly affects severely immunocompromised patients. Symptoms are nonspecific and microbiological isolation is difficult, hiding the diagnosis. Treatment should be guided by species and susceptibility testing. Findings. We report a clinical case of a disseminated nocardiosis in a patient with HIV and HVB infections. Interpretation. Diagnosis should be presumed early and microbiological conditions should be optimized, in order to identify the species and achieve antibiotic susceptibility testing. This is a very important step to choose an effective therapeutic regimen or alternative options.

  12. TU-G-204-04: A Unified Strategy for Bi-Factorial Optimization of Radiation Dose and Contrast Dose in CT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sahbaee, P; Zhang, Y; Solomon, J; Becchetti, M; Segars, P; Samei, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To substantiate the interdependency of contrast dose, radiation dose, and image quality in CT towards the patient- specific optimization of the imaging protocols Methods: The study deployed two phantom platforms. A variable sized (12, 18, 23, 30, 37 cm) phantom (Mercury-3.0) containing an iodinated insert (8.5 mgI/ml) was imaged on a representative CT scanner at multiple CTDI values (0.7–22.6 mGy). The contrast and noise were measured from the reconstructed images for each phantom diameter. Linearly related to iodine-concentration, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), were calculated for 16 iodine-concentration levels (0–8.5 mgI/ml). The analysis was extended to a recently developed suit of 58 virtual human models (5D XCAT) with added contrast dynamics. Emulating a contrast-enhanced abdominal image procedure and targeting a peak-enhancement in aorta, each XCAT phantom was “imaged” using a simulation platform (CatSim, GE). 3D surfaces for each patient/size established the relationship between iodine-concentration, dose, and CNR. The ratios of change in iodine-concentration versus dose (IDR) to yield a constant change in CNR were calculated for each patient size. Results: Mercury phantom results show the image-quality size- dependence on CTDI and IC levels. For desired image-quality values, the iso-contour-lines reflect the trade off between contrast-material and radiation doses. For a fixed iodine-concentration (4 mgI/mL), the IDR values for low (1.4 mGy) and high (11.5 mGy) dose levels were 1.02, 1.07, 1.19, 1.65, 1.54, and 3.14, 3.12, 3.52, 3.76, 4.06, respectively across five sizes. The simulation data from XCAT models confirmed the empirical results from Mercury phantom. Conclusion: The iodine-concentration, image quality, and radiation dose are interdependent. The understanding of the relationships between iodine-concentration, image quality, and radiation dose will allow for a more comprehensive optimization of CT imaging devices and techniques

  13. The new national integrated strategy emphasizing infection sources control for schistosomiasis control in China has made remarkable achievements.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Dong, Hui-Fen; Jiang, Ming-Sen

    2013-04-01

    Schistosomiasis japonica remains one important public health concern that cause great loss of humans' health and social-economic development in the Peoples' Republic of China. At the end of 1990s and the beginning of 2000s, there were still about 0.8 million patients and nearly 85 million people living in the epidemic areas around China. We undertook full analysis of the epidemiological data of schistosomiasis taken from the report of schistosomiasis status in People's Republic of China from 1999 to 2010 for effectiveness assessment of China's new strategy for schistosomiasis control nationwide after its implementation since the beginning the 21st century. The schistosomiasis-endemic uncontrolled counties or towns decreased in number from 1,149 in 2002 to 643 in 2010 at a rate of 44%. The number of schistosomiasis patients decreased from nearly 800,000 to less than 326,000 in 2010 at a decrease rate of more than 50%. The number of acute schistosomiasis patients also decreased significantly, and only 43 cases were reported in 2010. The infection rates of cattle in the endemic uncontrolled provinces decreased greatly though the number of cattle and the actual snail habitat areas remained large with no obvious decline. The schistosome infection rates of human and cattle both decreased significantly by more than 64% and 75%. However, most of the uncontrolled schistosomiasis-endemic areas, schistosomiasis patients, and acute cases are generally located in the four provinces (Hunan, Hubei, Jiangxi, and Anhui) of the lake regions in the middle and lower reach of the Yangtze River, and the egg-positive rates in diagnosed human in endemic Hunan and Hubei remained higher than 10%. Therefore, the new strategy of schistosomiasis control via integrated measures emphasizing infection source control is scientific and successful around China, though it is essential to explore an effective and sustainable strategy for schistosomiasis control in the tough lake and marshland regions

  14. Strategies for efficient and fast wave optics simulation of coded-aperture and other x-ray phase-contrast imaging methods.

    PubMed

    Vittoria, Fabio A; Diemoz, Paul C; Endrizzi, Marco; Rigon, Luigi; Lopez, Frances C; Dreossi, Diego; Munro, Peter R T; Olivo, Alessandro

    2013-10-01

    We derive a Fourier formulation of coded-aperture x-ray phase-contrast imaging, based on the wave theory of optics in the Fresnel approximation. We use this model to develop a flexible, efficient, and general simulation algorithm that can be easily adapted to other implementations of x-ray phase contrast imaging. Likewise, the algorithm enables a simple extension to 2D aperture designs, different acquisition schemes, etc. Problems related to numerical implementation of the algorithm are analyzed in detail, and simple rules are derived that enable us to avoid or at least mitigate them. Finally, comparisons with experimental data and data obtained with a different simulation algorithm are presented to validate the model and demonstrate its advantages in practical implementations. This also enabled us to demonstrate an increase in computational speed of more than one order of magnitude over a previous algorithm.

  15. Molecular and Cellular Pathobiology of Ehrlichia Infection: Targets for New Therapeutics and Immunomodulation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Jere W.; Walker, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Ehrlichia are small gram-negative obligately intracellular bacteria in the order Rickettsiales that are transmitted by ticks and associated with emerging life-threatening human zoonoses. Vaccines are not available for human ehrlichiosis, and therapeutic options are limited to a single antibiotic class. Ehrlichia are able to subvert both innate and adaptive host defenses, and advances in understanding molecular Ehrlichia-eukaryotic host cell interactions and the cellular and immunologic basis of disease are important for developing effective next generation therapies. New technologies for exploring host-pathogen interactions have yielded recent advances in understanding the molecular interactions between these intracellular pathogens and host cell components and identified new targets for therapeutic and vaccine development including those that target pathogen virulence mechanisms or disrupt the processes associated with ehrlichial effector proteins. Animal models have also provided insight into immunopathologic mechanisms that contribute significantly to understanding severe disease manifestations that will lead to the development of immunomodulatory approaches for treating patients nearing or experiencing severe disease states. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of molecular and cellular pathobiology and the immunobiology of Ehrlichia infection. We identify new molecular host-pathogen interactions that can be targets of new therapeutics and prospects for treating immunologic dysregulation that occurs during acute infection leading to life-threatening complications. PMID:21276277

  16. A comparison of ionic versus nonionic contrast medium during primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction (GUSTO IIb). Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries in Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, W B; Granger, C B; Kleiman, N S; Phillips, H R; Ellis, S G; Betriu, A; Criger, D A; Stebbins, A L; Topol, E J; Califf, R M

    2000-03-15

    The clinical impact of contrast medium selection during primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has not been studied. We compared the clinical outcomes of patients who received ionic versus nonionic low osmolar contrast medium in the setting of primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty for AMI in the second Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries in Acute Coronary Syndromes (GUSTO IIb) trial. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to assess the relation between contrast medium selection and clinical outcome (death, reinfarction, or refractory ischemia) at 30 days. Although baseline clinical and angiographic characteristics were generally similar between the 2 groups, patients who received ionic, low osmolar contrast were less likely to have been enrolled at a US site (23% vs 43%, p = 0.001) and less likely to have occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (34% vs 47%, p = 0.03) or a history of prior AMI (8% vs 16%, p = 0.02). The triple composite end point of death, reinfarction, or refractory ischemia occurred less frequently in the ionic group, both in the hospital (4.4% vs 11%, p = 0.018) and at 30 days (5.5% vs 11%, p = 0.044). Although the trend favoring ionic contrast persisted, the differences were no longer statistically significant after adjustment for imbalances in baseline characteristics using a risk model developed from the study sample (n = 454, adjusted odds ratio for ionic contrast 0.48 [0.22 to 1.02], p = 0.055), and using a model developed from the entire GUSTO IIb study cohort (n = 12,142, adjusted odds ratio for ionic contrast 0.50 [0.23 to 1.06], p = 0.072). The results of this observational study warrant further elucidation by a randomized study design in this setting.

  17. Reducing unnecessary urinary catheter use and other strategies to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Meddings, Jennifer; Rogers, Mary A M; Krein, Sarah L; Fakih, Mohamad G; Olmsted, Russell N; Saint, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Background Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) are costly, common and often preventable by reducing unnecessary urinary catheter (UC) use. Methods To summarise interventions to reduce UC use and CAUTIs, we updated a prior systematic review (through October 2012), and a meta-analysis regarding interventions prompting UC removal by reminders or stop orders. A narrative review summarises other CAUTI prevention strategies including aseptic insertion, catheter maintenance, antimicrobial UCs, and bladder bundle implementation. Results 30 studies were identified and summarised with interventions to prompt removal of UCs, with potential for inclusion in the meta-analyses. By meta-analysis (11 studies), the rate of CAUTI (episodes per 1000 catheter-days) was reduced by 53% (rate ratio 0.47; 95% CI 0.30 to 0.64, p<0.001) using a reminder or stop order, with five studies also including interventions to decrease initial UC placement. The pooled (nine studies) standardised mean difference (SMD) in catheterisation duration (days) was −1.06 overall (p=0.065) including a statistically significant decrease in stop-order studies (SMD −0.37; p<0.001) but not in reminder studies (SMD, −1.54; p=0.071). No significant harm from catheter removal strategies is supported. Limited research is available regarding the impact of UC insertion and maintenance technique. A recent randomised controlled trial indicates antimicrobial catheters provide no significant benefit in preventing symptomatic CAUTIs. Conclusions UC reminders and stop orders appear to reduce CAUTI rates and should be used to improve patient safety. Several evidence-based guidelines have evaluated CAUTI preventive strategies as well as emerging evidence regarding intervention bundles. Implementation strategies are important because reducing UC use involves changing well-established habits. PMID:24077850

  18. In the United States, negligible rates of zoonotic sarcocystosis occur in feral swine that, by contrast, frequently harbour infections with Sarcocystis miescheriana, a related parasite contracted from canids.

    PubMed

    Calero-Bernal, R; Verma, S K; Oliveira, S; Yang, Y; Rosenthal, B M; Dubey, J P

    2015-04-01

    Transmission of pathogens between domestic and wild life animals plays an important role in epidemiology. Feral pig populations are increasing and expanding in the USA, and may constitute a risk to non-biosecure domestic pig facilities by serving as reservoirs for pathogens. We surveyed, for Sarcocystis infection, the myocardium of 1006 feral pigs (Sus scrofa) trapped or hunted in 29 states during the Comprehensive Feral Swine Disease Surveillance Program of the USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services unit during 2012-2014. Sarcocysts were detected in histological sections of 25% (251/1006) of myocardium with an average parasitic load/intensity of infection of 3.03 sarcocysts/section (1.5×0.7 cm), and higher prevalence of myocarditis in severe infections. Microscopic examination of pepsin digests of 147 hearts revealed a higher prevalence of Sarcocystis bradyzoites (49%, 72/147) than when diagnosed by histology. A fragment of Sarcocystis 18S rRNA was amplified and digested with a restriction endonuclease, revealing a pattern consistent with Sarcocystis miescheriana in all 44 selected samples. Sequencing 31 of these 44 isolates confirmed their correspondence to S. miescheriana. Thus, S. miescheriana infection, but not the zoonotic parasite Sarcocystis suihominis, appears to be prevalent and widespread in feral pigs in the USA.

  19. Avian influenza viruses that cause highly virulent infections in humans exhibit distinct replicative properties in contrast to human H1N1 viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Philippe F.; de La Vega, Marc-Antoine; Paradis, Éric; Mendoza, Emelissa; Coombs, Kevin M.; Kobasa, Darwyn; Beauchemin, Catherine A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Avian influenza viruses present an emerging epidemiological concern as some strains of H5N1 avian influenza can cause severe infections in humans with lethality rates of up to 60%. These have been in circulation since 1997 and recently a novel H7N9-subtyped virus has been causing epizootics in China with lethality rates around 20%. To better understand the replication kinetics of these viruses, we combined several extensive viral kinetics experiments with mathematical modelling of in vitro infections in human A549 cells. We extracted fundamental replication parameters revealing that, while both the H5N1 and H7N9 viruses replicate faster and to higher titers than two low-pathogenicity H1N1 strains, they accomplish this via different mechanisms. While the H7N9 virions exhibit a faster rate of infection, the H5N1 virions are produced at a higher rate. Of the two H1N1 strains studied, the 2009 pandemic H1N1 strain exhibits the longest eclipse phase, possibly indicative of a less effective neuraminidase activity, but causes infection more rapidly than the seasonal strain. This explains, in part, the pandemic strain’s generally slower growth kinetics and permissiveness to accept mutations causing neuraminidase inhibitor resistance without significant loss in fitness. Our results highlight differential growth properties of H1N1, H5N1 and H7N9 influenza viruses.

  20. Avian influenza viruses that cause highly virulent infections in humans exhibit distinct replicative properties in contrast to human H1N1 viruses

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Philippe F.; de La Vega, Marc-Antoine; Paradis, Éric; Mendoza, Emelissa; Coombs, Kevin M.; Kobasa, Darwyn; Beauchemin, Catherine A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses present an emerging epidemiological concern as some strains of H5N1 avian influenza can cause severe infections in humans with lethality rates of up to 60%. These have been in circulation since 1997 and recently a novel H7N9-subtyped virus has been causing epizootics in China with lethality rates around 20%. To better understand the replication kinetics of these viruses, we combined several extensive viral kinetics experiments with mathematical modelling of in vitro infections in human A549 cells. We extracted fundamental replication parameters revealing that, while both the H5N1 and H7N9 viruses replicate faster and to higher titers than two low-pathogenicity H1N1 strains, they accomplish this via different mechanisms. While the H7N9 virions exhibit a faster rate of infection, the H5N1 virions are produced at a higher rate. Of the two H1N1 strains studied, the 2009 pandemic H1N1 strain exhibits the longest eclipse phase, possibly indicative of a less effective neuraminidase activity, but causes infection more rapidly than the seasonal strain. This explains, in part, the pandemic strain’s generally slower growth kinetics and permissiveness to accept mutations causing neuraminidase inhibitor resistance without significant loss in fitness. Our results highlight differential growth properties of H1N1, H5N1 and H7N9 influenza viruses. PMID:27080193