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Sample records for contrasting seasonal dynamics

  1. Contrasting precipitation seasonality influences evapotranspiration dynamics in water-limited shrublands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, Samuel; Vargas, Rodrigo; Yepez, Enrico A.; Acosta, Jose S.; Castro, Angel; Escoto-Rodriguez, Martin; Lopez, Eulogio; Martínez-Osuna, Juan; Rodriguez, Julio C.; Smith, Stephen V.; Vivoni, Enrique R.; Watts, Christopher J.

    2016-02-01

    Water-limited ecosystems occupy nearly 30% of the Earth, but arguably, the controls on their ecosystem processes remain largely uncertain. We analyzed six site years of eddy covariance measurements of evapotranspiration (ET) from 2008 to 2010 at two water-limited shrublands: one dominated by winter precipitation (WP site) and another dominated by summer precipitation (SP site), but with similar solar radiation patterns in the Northern Hemisphere. We determined how physical forcing factors (i.e., net radiation (Rn), soil water content (SWC), air temperature (Ta), and vapor pressure deficit (VPD)) influence annual and seasonal variability of ET. Mean annual ET at SP site was 455 ± 91 mm yr-1, was mainly influenced by SWC during the dry season, by Rn during the wet season, and was highly sensitive to changes in annual precipitation (P). Mean annual ET at WP site was 363 ± 52 mm yr-1, had less interannual variability, but multiple variables (i.e., SWC, Ta, VPD, and Rn) were needed to explain ET among years and seasons. Wavelet coherence analysis showed that ET at SP site has a consistent temporal coherency with Ta and P, but this was not the case for ET at WP site. Our results support the paradigm that SWC is the main control of ET in water-limited ecosystems when radiation and temperature are not the limiting factors. In contrast, when P and SWC are decoupled from available energy (i.e., radiation and temperature), then ET is controlled by an interaction of multiple variables. Our results bring attention to the need for better understanding how climate and soil dynamics influence ET across these globally distributed ecosystems.

  2. Seasonal dynamics of carbon and nutrients from two contrasting tropical floodplain systems in the Zambezi River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuijdgeest, A. L.; Zurbrügg, R.; Blank, N.; Fulcri, R.; Senn, D. B.; Wehrli, B.

    2015-12-01

    Floodplains are important biogeochemical reactors during fluvial transport of carbon and nutrient species towards the oceans. In the tropics and subtropics, pronounced rainfall seasonality results in highly dynamic floodplain biogeochemistry. The massive construction of dams, however, has significantly altered the hydrography and chemical characteristics of many (sub)tropical rivers. In this study, we compare organic-matter and nutrient biogeochemistry of two large, contrasting floodplains in the Zambezi River basin in southern Africa: the Barotse Plains and the Kafue Flats. Both systems are of comparable size but differ in anthropogenic influence: while the Barotse Plains are still in large parts pristine, the Kafue Flats are bordered by two hydropower dams. The two systems exhibit different flooding dynamics, with a larger contribution of floodplain-derived water in the Kafue Flats and a stronger peak flow in the Barotse Plains. Distinct seasonal differences have been observed in carbon and nutrient concentrations, loads, and export and retention behavior in both systems. The simultaneous retention of particulate carbon and nitrogen and the net export of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon and nitrogen suggested that degradation of particulate organic matter was the dominant process influencing the river biogeochemistry during the wet season in the Barotse Plains and during the dry season in the Kafue Flats. Reverse trends during the dry season indicated that primary production was important in the Barotse Plains, whereas the Kafue Flats seemed to have both primary production and respiration occurring during the wet season, potentially occurring spatially separated in the main channel and on the floodplain. Carbon-to-nitrogen ratios of particulate organic matter showed that soil-derived material was dominant year-round in the Barotse Plains, whereas the Kafue Flats transported particulate organic matter that had been produced in the upstream reservoir during

  3. Contrasting distribution and seasonal dynamics of carbohydrate reserves in stem wood of adult ring-porous sessile oak and diffuse-porous beech trees.

    PubMed

    Barbaroux, C; Bréda, N

    2002-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that broad-leaved forest species with contrasting wood anatomy and hydraulic system (ring-porous versus diffuse-porous) also differ in distribution and seasonal dynamics of carbohydrate reserves in stem wood. Total nonstructural carbohydrate (TNC) reserves (starch and sugars) were measured enzymatically in the 10 youngest stem xylem rings of adult oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) and beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) trees during an annual cycle. Radial distribution of carbohydrates was investigated according to ring age. On all dates, oak trees had twofold higher TNC concentration than beech trees (41 versus 23 mg g(DM)(-1)), with starch accounting for the high TNC concentration in oak. Seasonal dynamics of TNC concentration were significantly (P < 0.05) more pronounced in oak (20-64 mg TNC g(DM)(-1)) than in beech (17-34 mg TNC g(DM)(-1)). A marked decrease in TNC concentration was observed in oak trees during bud burst and early wood growth, whereas seasonal fluctuations in TNC concentrations in beech trees were small. The radial distribution of TNC based on ring age differed between species: TNC was restricted to the sapwood rings in oak, whereas in beech, it was distributed throughout the wood from the outermost sapwood ring to the pith. Although the high TNC concentrations in the outermost rings accounted for most of the observed seasonal pattern, all of the 10 youngest xylem rings analyzed participated in the seasonal dynamics of TNC in beech trees. The innermost sapwood rings of oak trees had low TNC concentrations. Stem growth and accumulation of carbon reserves occurred concomitantly during the first part of the season, when there was no soil water deficit. When soil water content was depleted, stem growth ceased in both species, whereas TNC accumulation was negligibly affected and continued until leaf fall. The contrasting dynamics and distribution of carbohydrate reserves in oak and beech are discussed with reference to differences

  4. Seasonal dynamics of dissolved, particulate and microbial components of a tidal saltmarsh-dominated estuary under contrasting levels of freshwater discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittar, Thais B.; Berger, Stella A.; Birsa, Laura M.; Walters, Tina L.; Thompson, Megan E.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; Mann, Elizabeth L.; Stubbins, Aron; Frischer, Marc E.; Brandes, Jay A.

    2016-12-01

    Tidal Spartina-dominated saltmarshes and estuaries on the Southeast US coast are global hotspots of productivity. In coastal Georgia, tidal amplitudes and saltmarsh productivity are the highest along the Southeast US coast. Coastal Georgia is characterized by a humid subtropical seasonal climate, and inter-annual variability in precipitation, and freshwater discharge. The 2012-2013 timeframe encompassed contrasting levels of discharge for the Savannah River, a major Georgia river, with a 4.3-fold greater discharge in summer 2013 relative to summer 2012. In situ measurements of temperature, salinity, precipitation and Secchi depth, and water samples were collected weekly at high tide throughout 2012 and 2013 from the Skidaway River Estuary, a tidal saltmarsh-dominated estuary in coastal Georgia influenced by Savannah River hydrology. The effects of elevated discharge on the seasonal trends of water column components were evaluated. The shift from low discharge (2012) to high discharge (2013) led to decreased salinity in summer 2013, but no significant increases in inorganic nutrient (NH4, NOx, SiO2 and PO4) concentrations. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations decreased, and DIC stable isotopic signatures (δ13C-DIC values) were depleted in summer 2013 relative to summer 2012. In 2013 dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations, chromophoric and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (DOM: CDOM, FDOM) intensities, specific UV-absorbance (SUVA254) and relative humic-like fluorescence were all higher than in 2012, indicating that, as discharge increased in 2013, estuarine water became enriched in terrigenous DOM. Secchi depth and particulate organic carbon (POC) and nitrogen (PON) concentrations displayed clear seasonal patterns that were not significantly altered by discharge. However, δ13C-POC and δ15N-PON isotopic signatures indicated higher terrigenous contributions at elevated discharge. Discharge influenced cyanobacterial composition, but did not

  5. Contrasting Strategies of Tree Function in a Seasonal Amazon Rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. Y.; Oliveira, R.; Agee, E.; Brum, M., Jr.; Saleska, S. R.; Fatichi, S.; Ewing, G.

    2015-12-01

    The increased frequency and severity of drought conditions in the Amazon Basin region have emphasized the question of rainforest vulnerability and resilience to heat and drought-induced stresses. However, what emerges from much research is that the impacts of droughts, essential controlling factors of the rainforest function, and variability of tree-scale strategies are yet to be fully understood. We present here a preliminary analysis of hydraulic relations of a seasonal Amazon rainforest using a set of ecohydrologic data collected through the GoAmazon project over dry and wet seasons. Expressions of different hydraulic strategies are identified that convey different implications for tree resilience during short- (diurnal) and longer-term (seasonal) stress periods. These hydraulic strategies appear to be inter-related with the tree growth and non-structural carbohydrate dynamics, contributing to the understanding of trait coordination at the whole-plant scale. Integration of individual responses is conducted over a range of wood density and exposure conditions. The results of this research thus shed light on the implication of variations in the rainforest function for future stresses, vital for predictive models of ecosystem dynamics of next generation.

  6. Towards Dynamic Contrast Specific Ultrasound Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    We report on the first study demonstrating the ability of a recently-developed, contrast-enhanced, ultrasound imaging method, referred to as cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI), to image and quantify ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) kinetics. Unlike standard ultrasound tomography, which exploits changes in speed of sound and attenuation, CPDI is based on a marker specific to UCAs, thus enabling dynamic contrast-specific ultrasound tomography (DCS-UST). For breast imaging, DCS-UST will lead to a more practical, faster, and less operator-dependent imaging procedure compared to standard echo-contrast, while preserving accurate imaging of contrast kinetics. Moreover, a linear relation between CPD values and ultrasound second-harmonic intensity was measured (coefficient of determination = 0.87). DCS-UST can find clinical applications as a diagnostic method for breast cancer localization, adding important features to multi-parametric ultrasound tomography of the breast.

  7. Towards Dynamic Contrast Specific Ultrasound Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Demi, Libertario; Van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first study demonstrating the ability of a recently-developed, contrast-enhanced, ultrasound imaging method, referred to as cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI), to image and quantify ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) kinetics. Unlike standard ultrasound tomography, which exploits changes in speed of sound and attenuation, CPDI is based on a marker specific to UCAs, thus enabling dynamic contrast-specific ultrasound tomography (DCS-UST). For breast imaging, DCS-UST will lead to a more practical, faster, and less operator-dependent imaging procedure compared to standard echo-contrast, while preserving accurate imaging of contrast kinetics. Moreover, a linear relation between CPD values and ultrasound second-harmonic intensity was measured (coefficient of determination = 0.87). DCS-UST can find clinical applications as a diagnostic method for breast cancer localization, adding important features to multi-parametric ultrasound tomography of the breast. PMID:27703251

  8. Seasonal Contrasts in the Surface Energy Balance of the Sahel

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Ron; Slingo, A.; Barnard, James C.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.

    2009-03-14

    Over most of the world ocean, heating of the surface by sunlight is balanced predominately by evaporative cooling. Even over land, moisture for evaporation is available from vegetation or the soil reservoir. However, at the ARM Mobile Facility in Niamey, Niger, soil moisture is so depleted that evaporation makes a significant contribution to the surface energy balance only at the height of the rainy season, when precipitation has replenished the soil reservoir. Using observations at the Mobile Facility from late 2005 to early 2007, we describe how the surface balances radiative forcing. How the surface compensates time-averaged solar heating varies with seasonal changes in atmospheric water vapor, which modulates the greenhouse effect and the ability of the surface to radiate thermal energy directly to space. During the dry season, sunlight is balanced mainly by longwave radiation and the turbulent flux of sensible heat. The ability of longwave radiation to cool the surface drops after the onset of the West African summer monsoon, when moist, oceanic air flows onshore, increasing local column moisture and atmospheric opacity at these wavelengths. After the monsoon onset, but prior to significant rainfall, solar heating is compensated mainly by the sensible heat flux. During the rainy season, the magnitude of evaporation is initially controlled by the supply of moisture from precipitation. However, by the height of the rainy season, sufficient precipitation has accumulated at the surface that evaporation is related to the flux demanded by solar radiation, and radiative forcing of the surface is balanced comparably by the latent, sensible, and longwave fluxes. Radiative forcing of the surface also varies on a subseasonal time scale due to fluctuations in water vapor, clouds, and aerosol concentration. Except at the height of the rainy season, subseasonal forcing is balanced mainly by sensible heating and longwave anomalies. The efficacy of the sensible heat flux

  9. Contrasting patterns of litterfall seasonality and seasonal changes in litter decomposability in a tropical rainforest region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, S. A.; Valdez-Ramirez, V.; Congdon, R. A.; Williams, S. E.

    2014-09-01

    The seasonality of litter inputs in forests has important implications for understanding ecosystem processes and biogeochemical cycles. We quantified the drivers of seasonality in litterfall and leaf decomposability using plots throughout the Australian wet tropical region. Litter fell mostly in the summer (wet, warm) months in the region, but other peaks occurred throughout the year. Litterfall seasonality was modelled well with the level of deciduousness of the site (plots with more deciduous species had lower seasonality than evergreen plots), temperature (higher seasonality in the uplands), disturbance (lower seasonality with more early secondary species) and soil fertility (higher seasonality with higher N : P/P limitation) (SL total litterfall model 1 = deciduousness + soil N : P + early secondary sp.: r2 = 0.63, n = 30; model 2 = temperature + early secondary sp. + soil N : P: r2 = 0.54, n = 30; SL leaf = temperature + early secondary sp. + rainfall seasonality: r2 = 0.39, n = 30). Leaf litter decomposability was lower in the dry season than in the wet season, driven by higher phenolic concentrations in the dry, with the difference exacerbated particularly by lower dry season moisture. Our results are contrary to the global trend for tropical rainforests; in that seasonality of litterfall input was generally higher in wetter, cooler, evergreen forests, compared to generally drier, warmer, semi-deciduous sites that had more uniform monthly inputs. We consider this due to more diverse litter shedding patterns in semi-deciduous and raingreen rainforest sites, and an important consideration for ecosystem modellers. Seasonal changes in litter quality are likely to have impacts on decomposition and biogeochemical cycles in these forests due to the litter that falls in the dry season being more recalcitrant to decay.

  10. Contrasting patterns of litterfall seasonality and seasonal changes in litter decomposability in a tropical rainforest region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, S. A.; Valdez-Ramirez, V.; Congdon, R. A.; Williams, S. E.

    2014-06-01

    The seasonality of litter inputs in forests has important implications for understanding ecosystem processes and biogeochemical cycles. We quantified the drivers of seasonality in litterfall and leaf decomposability, using plots throughout the Australian wet tropical region. Litter fell mostly in the summer (wet, warm) months in the region, but other peaks occurred throughout the year. Litterfall seasonality was modelled well with the level of deciduousness of the site (plots with more deciduous species had lower seasonality than evergreen plots), temperature (higher seasonality in the uplands), disturbance (lower seasonality with more early secondary species) and soil fertility (higher seasonality with higher N : P/P limitation) (SL total litterfall model 1 = deciduousness + soil N : P + early secondary sp: r2 = 0.63, n = 30 plots; model 2 = temperature + early secondary sp. + soil N : P: r2 = 0.54, n = 30; SL leaf = temperature + early secondary sp. + rainfall seasonality: r2 = 0.39, n = 30). Leaf litter decomposability was lower in the dry season than in the wet season, driven by higher phenolic concentrations in the dry, with the difference exacerbated particularly by lower dry season moisture. Our results are contrary to the global trend for tropical rainforests; in that seasonality of litterfall inputs were generally higher in wetter, cooler, evergreen forests, compared to generally drier, warmer, semi-deciduous sites that had more uniform monthly inputs. We consider this due to more diverse litter shedding patterns in semi-deciduous and raingreen rainforest sites, and an important consideration for ecosystem modellers. Seasonal changes in litter quality are likely to have impacts on decomposition and biogeochemical cycles in these forests due to the litter that falls in the dry being more recalcitrant to decay.

  11. Contrasting the epidemiological and evolutionary dynamics of influenza spatial transmission

    PubMed Central

    Viboud, Cécile; Nelson, Martha I.; Tan, Yi; Holmes, Edward C.

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, rapid increases in the availability of high-resolution molecular and epidemiological data, combined with developments in statistical and computational methods to simulate and infer migration patterns, have provided key insights into the spatial dynamics of influenza A viruses in humans. In this review, we contrast findings from epidemiological and molecular studies of influenza virus transmission at different spatial scales. We show that findings are broadly consistent in large-scale studies of inter-regional or inter-hemispheric spread in temperate regions, revealing intense epidemics associated with multiple viral introductions, followed by deep troughs driven by seasonal bottlenecks. However, aspects of the global transmission dynamics of influenza viruses are still debated, especially with respect to the existence of tropical source populations experiencing high levels of genetic diversity and the extent of prolonged viral persistence between epidemics. At the scale of a country or community, epidemiological studies have revealed spatially structured diffusion patterns in seasonal and pandemic outbreaks, which were not identified in molecular studies. We discuss the role of sampling issues in generating these conflicting results, and suggest strategies for future research that may help to fully integrate the epidemiological and evolutionary dynamics of influenza virus over space and time. PMID:23382422

  12. A contrastive view of Irish language dynamics.

    PubMed

    Giollagáin, Conchúr O

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the linguistic anthropology which underpins the language dynamics of two Gaeltacht (Irish-speaking) areas, Ros Muc in Conamara, Co. Galway and Ráth Cairn in Co. Meath. This research highlights what could be considered a socio-linguistic paradox: the community (Ráth Cairn) which engages more vigorously in language maintenance endeavors, and exhibits a greater awareness of language policy and of linguistic ideology among members of the community, fares less favorably in socio-linguistic terms to the contrasting community (Ros Muc) which has to endure a more challenging socio-economic climate than that of Ráth Cairn. The relative socio-economic success of the Ráth Cairn community appears to be masking a greater malaise of socio-cultural fragility and language endangerment. In contrast, the language obsolescence issues faced by the Ros Muc community, though superficially not as severe, are enmeshed in what would be considered more pressing issues of socio-economic marginalization.

  13. Seasonal PM 10 dynamics in Kathmandu Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Rupak Kumar; Lee, Byeong-Kyu; Karki, Rahul; Gurung, Anup; Kandasamy, Jaya; Pathak, Bipin Kumar; Sharma, Suman; Giri, Nirita

    Data on ambient PM 10 levels from six locations in the Kathmandu Valley recorded by means of continuous sampling using low volume air samplers from October 2002 to March 2007 were used to investigate PM 10 concentration dynamics in the valley. Monthly average data of the urban areas, which have much higher concentrations than the rural areas, even exceeded the daily standard level of PM 10, in Nepal, 120 μm m -3. Repetitive peaks and troughs each year indicated annual patterns. Monthly average showed seasonal patterns are different between rural area and urban sites. The highest monthly average concentration was observed in February, the end of winter in urban areas where as in rural found in spring, and the lowest concentration was observed in July (monsoon period). The continuous increase in PM 10 concentration from December to February in urban areas showed accumulation of PM 10 in the ambient air during the wintertime. Rainfall in June and September, during the monsoon period, caused a PM 10 concentration decrease, demonstrating that precipitation is effective in removing PM 10 from the valley. Cross correlation analyses among the PM 10 levels measured simultaneously at the sampling stations showed a poor relationship in winter; however, there were good relationships in the monsoon and post-monsoon seasons. Both the PM 10 concentration and the air-mixing environment in the valley were closely associated with the temperature and wind speed.

  14. [Contrastive study on dynamic spectrum extraction method].

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Zhou, Mei; Wang, Hui-quan; Xiong, Chan; Lin, Ling

    2012-05-01

    Dynamic spectrum method extracts the absorbance of the artery pulse blood with some wavelengths. The method can reduce some influence such as measurement condition, individual difference and spectrum overlap. It is a new way for noninvasive blood components detection However, how to choose a dynamic spectrum extraction method is one of the key links for the weak ingredient spectrum signal. Now there are two methods to extract the dynamic spectral signal-frequency domain analysis and single-trial estimation in time domain In the present research, comparison analysis and research on the two methods were carrued out completely. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the two methods extract the dynamic spectrum from different angles. But they are the same in essence--the basic principle of dynamic spectrum, the signal statistical and average properties. With the pulse wave of relative stable period and amplitude, high precision dynamic spectrum can be obtained by the two methods. With the unstable pulse wave due to the influence of finger shake and contact-pressure change, the dynamic spectrum extracted by single-trial estimation is more accurate than the one by frequecy domain analysis.

  15. Diversity and seasonal dynamics of airborne archaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Ruzene Nespoli, C.; Pickersgill, D. A.; Galand, P. E.; Müller-Germann, I.; Nunes, T.; Gomes Cardoso, J.; Almeida, S. M.; Pio, C.; Andreae, M. O.; Conrad, R.; Pöschl, U.; Després, V. R.

    2014-11-01

    Archaea are widespread and abundant in many terrestrial and aquatic environments, and are thus outside extreme environments, accounting for up to ~10% of the prokaryotes. Compared to bacteria and other microorganisms, however, very little is known about the abundance, diversity, and dispersal of archaea in the atmosphere. By means of DNA analysis and Sanger sequencing targeting the 16S rRNA (435 sequences) and amoA genes in samples of air particulate matter collected over 1 year at a continental sampling site in Germany, we obtained first insights into the seasonal dynamics of airborne archaea. The detected archaea were identified as Thaumarchaeota or Euryarchaeota, with soil Thaumarchaeota (group I.1b) being present in all samples. The normalized species richness of Thaumarchaeota correlated positively with relative humidity and negatively with temperature. This together with an increase in bare agricultural soil surfaces may explain the diversity peaks observed in fall and winter. The detected Euryarchaeota were mainly predicted methanogens with a low relative frequency of occurrence. A slight increase in their frequency during spring may be linked to fertilization processes in the surrounding agricultural fields. Comparison with samples from the Cape Verde islands (72 sequences) and from other coastal and continental sites indicates that the proportions of Euryarchaeota are enhanced in coastal air, which is consistent with their suggested abundance in marine surface waters. We conclude that air transport may play an important role in the dispersal of archaea, including assumed ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota and methanogens.

  16. Diversity and seasonal dynamics of airborne Archaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Ruzene Nespoli, C.; Pickersgill, D. A.; Galand, P. E.; Müller-Germann, I.; Nunes, T.; Gomes Cardoso, J.; Marta Almeida, S.; Pio, C.; Andreae, M. O.; Conrad, R.; Pöschl, U.; Després, V. R.

    2014-05-01

    Archaea are widespread and abundant in many terrestrial and aquatic environments, accounting for up to ∼10% of the prokaryotes. Compared to Bacteria and other microorganisms, however, very little is known about the abundance, diversity, and dispersal of Archaea in the atmosphere. By DNA analysis targeting the 16S rRNA and amoA genes in samples of air particulate matter collected over one year at a continental sampling site in Germany, we obtained first insights into the seasonal dynamics of airborne Archaea. The detected Archaea were identified as Thaumarchaeota or Euryarchaeota, with soil Thaumarchaeota (group I.1b) being present in all samples. The normalized species richness of Thaumarchaeota correlated positively with relative humidity and negatively with temperature. This together with an increase of bare agricultural soil surfaces may explain the diversity peaks observed in fall and winter. The detected Euryarchaeota were mainly methanogens with a low relative frequency of occurrence. A slight increase in their frequency during spring may be linked to fertilization processes in the surrounding agricultural fields. Comparison with samples from the Cape Verde islands and from other coastal and continental sites indicates that the proportions of Euryarchaeota are enhanced in coastal air, which is consistent with their suggested abundance in marine surface waters. We conclude that air transport may play an important role for the dispersal of Archaea, including ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota and methanogens. Also, anthropogenic activities might influence the atmospheric abundance and diversity of Archaea.

  17. Motility Contrast Imaging and Tissue Dynamics Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, David D.; An, Ran; Turek, John

    Motion is the defining physiological characteristic of living matter. If we are interested in how things function, then the way they move is most informative. Motion provides an endogenous and functional suite of biomarkers that are sensitive to subtle changes that occur under applied pharmacological doses or cellular stresses. This chapter reviews the application of biodynamic imaging to measure cellular dynamics in three-dimensional tissue culture for drug screening applications. Nanoscale and microscale motions are detected through statistical fluctuations in dynamic speckle across an ensemble of cells within each resolution voxel. Tissue dynamics spectroscopy generates drug-response spectrograms that serve as phenotypic fingerprints of drug action and can differentiate responses from heterogeneous regions of tumor tissue.

  18. Hormonal dynamics contributes to divergence in seasonal stomatal behaviour in a monsoonal plant community.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Scott A M; Brodribb, Timothy J

    2015-03-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a primary regulator of plant transpiration, but its influence in determining seasonal stomatal behaviour in natural plant communities is poorly understood. We examined distantly related vascular plants growing together in a seasonally dry, monsoonal environment to determine whether ABA dynamics contributed to contrasting water use patterns in this natural setting. Regular sampling of angiosperm, cycad, conifer and fern species revealed characteristic seasonal patterns in ABA production, but these were highly distinct among species. Although no general relationship was observed between ABA levels, plant hydration or stomatal conductance among species, the seasonal dynamics in stomatal behaviour within species were predictable functions of either ABA or leaf water potential. Strong divergence in the seasonal role of ABA among species suggests that modification in ABA-stomatal interactions represents an important evolutionary pathway for adaptation in plant water use.

  19. Modeling seasonal interactions in the population dynamics of migratory birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runge, M.C.; Marra, P.P.; Greenberg, Russell; Marra, Peter P.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the population dynamics of migratory birds requires understanding the relevant biological events that occur during breeding, migratory, and overwintering periods. The few available population models for passerine birds focus on breeding-season events, disregard or oversimplify events during nonbreeding periods, and ignore interactions that occur between periods of the annual cycle. Identifying and explicitly incorporating seasonal interactions into population models for migratory birds could provide important insights about when population limitation actually occurs in the annual cycle. We present a population model for the annual cycle of a migratory bird, based on the American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) but more generally applicable, that examines the importance of seasonal interactions by incorporating: (1) density dependence during the breeding and winter seasons, (2) a carry-over effect of winter habitat on breeding-season productivity, and (3) the effects of behavioral dominance on seasonal and habitat specific demographic rates. First, we show that habitat availability on both the wintering and breeding grounds can strongly affect equilibrium population size and sex ratio. Second, sex ratio dynamics, as mediated by behavioral dominance, can affect all other aspects of population dynamics. Third, carry-over effects can be strong, especially when winter events are limiting. These results suggest that understanding the population dynamics of migratory birds may require more consideration of the seasonal interactions induced by carry-over effects and density dependence in multiple seasons. This model provides a framework in which to explore more fully these seasonal dynamics and a context for estimation of life history parameters.

  20. Seasonal sediment dynamics shape temperate bedrock reef communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Figurski, Jared D.; Freiwald, Jan; Lonhart, Steve I.; Storlazzi, Curt

    2016-01-01

    Mobilized seafloor sediment can impact benthic reef communities through burial, scour, and turbidity. These processes are ubiquitous in coastal oceans and, through their influence on the survival, fitness, and interactions of species, can alter the structure and function of benthic communities. In northern Monterey Bay, California, USA, as much as 30% of the seafloor is buried or exposed seasonally, making this an ideal location to test how subtidal temperate rocky reef communities vary in the presence and absence of chronic sediment-based disturbances. Designated dynamic plots were naturally inundated by sediment in summer (50 to 100% cover) and swept clean in winter, whereas designated stable plots remained free of sediment during our study. Multivariate analyses indicated significant differences in the structure of sessile and mobile communities between dynamic and stable reef habitats. For sessile species, community structure in disturbed plots was less variable in space and time than in stable plots due to the maintenance of an early successional state. In contrast, community structure of mobile species varied more in disturbed plots than in stable plots, reflecting how mobile species distribute in response to sediment dynamics. Some species were found only in these disturbed areas, suggesting that the spatial mosaic of disturbance could increase regional diversity. We discuss how the relative ability of species to tolerate disturbance at different life history stages and their ability to colonize habitat translate into community-level differences among habitats, and how this response varies between mobile and sessile communities.

  1. Modelling Seasonal Carbon Dynamics on Fen Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giebels, Michael; Beyer, Madlen; Augustin, Jürgen; Roppel, Mario; Juszczak, Radoszlav; Serba, Tomasz

    2010-05-01

    In Germany more than 99 % of fens have lost their carbon and nutrient sink function due to heavy drainage and agricultural land use especially during the last decades and thus resulted in compression and heavy peat loss (CHARMAN 2002; JOOSTEN & CLARKE 2002; SUCCOW & JOOSTEN 2001; AUGUSTIN et al. 1996; KUNTZE 1993). Therefore fen peatlands play an important part (4-5 %) in the national anthropogenic trace gas budget. But only a small part of drained and agricultural used fens in NE Germany can be restored. Knowledge of the influence of land use to trace gas exchange is important for mitigation of the climate impact of the anthropogenic peatland use. We study carbon exchanges between soil and atmosphere on several fen peatland use areas at different sites in NE-Germany. Our research covers peatlands of supposed strongly climate forcing land use (cornfield and intensive pasture) and of probably less forcing, alternative types (meadow and extensive pasture) as well as rewetted (formerly drained) areas and near-natural sites like a low-degraded fen and a wetted alder woodland. We measured trace gas fluxes with manual and automatic chambers in periodic routines since spring 2007. The used chamber technique bases on DROESLER (2005). In total we now do research at 22 sites situated in 5 different locations covering agricultural, varying states of rewetted and near-natural treatments. We present results of at least 2 years of measurements on our site of varying types of agricultural land use. There we found significant differences in the annual carbon balances depending on the genesis of the observed sites and the seasonal dynamics. Annual balances were constructed by applying single respiration and photosynthesis CO2 models for each measurement campaign. These models were based on LLOYD-TAYLOR (1994) and Michaelis-Menten-Kinetics respectively. Crosswise comparison of different site treatments combined with the seasonal environmental observations give good hints for the

  2. Contrasts in Sea Ice Deformation and Production in the Arctic Seasonal and Perennial Ice Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, K.

    2006-01-01

    Four years (1997-2000) of RADARSAT Geophysical Processor System (RGPS) data are used to contrast the sea ice deformation and production regionally, and in the seasonal (SIZ) and perennial (PIZ) ice zones. Ice production is of seasonal ice in openings during the winter. Three-day estimates of these quantities are provided within Lagrangian elements initially 10 km on a side. A distinct seasonal cycle is seen in both zones with these estimates highest in the late fall and with seasonal minimums in the midwinter. Regional divergence over the winter could be up to 30%. Spatially, the highest deformation is seen in the SIZ north of coastal Alaska. Both ice deformation and production are higher in the SIZ: deformation-related ice production in the SIZ (approx.0.5 m) is 1.5-2.3 times that of the PIZ (approx.0.3 m): this is connected to ice strength and thickness. Atmospheric forcing and boundary layer structure contribute to only the seasonal and interannual variability. Seasonal ice growth in ice fractures accounts for approx.25-40% of the total ice production of the Arctic Ocean. Uncertainties in these estimates are discussed. By itself, this deformation-ice production relationship could be considered a negative feedback when thickness is perturbed. However, the overall effect on ice production in the face of increasing seasonal and thinner/weaker ice coverage could be modified by local destabilization of the water column promoting overturning of warmer water due to increased brine rejection; and the upwelling of the pynocline associated with increased occurrence of large shear motion in sea ice. Divergence is shown to be negligibly correlated to cyclonic motion in summer and winter in both ice zones.

  3. Contrasts in Sea Ice Formation and Production in the Arctic Seasonal and Perennial Ice Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, R.

    2006-01-01

    Four years (1997-2000) of RADARSAT Geophysical Processor System (RGPS) data are used to contrast the sea ice deformation and production regionally, and in the seasonal (SIZ) and perennial (PIZ) ice zones. Ice production is of seasonal ice in openings during the winter. 3-day estimates of these quantities are provided within Lagrangian elements initially 10 km on a side. A distinct seasonal cycle is seen in both zones with these estimates highest in the late fall and with seasonal minimums in the mid-winter. Regional divergence over the winter could be up to 30%. Spatially, the highest deformation is in the SIZ north of coastal Alaska. Both ice deformation and production are higher in the SIZ: deformation-related ice production in the SIZ (approx.0.5 m) is 1.5-2.3 times that of the PIZ (approx.0.3 m) - this is connected to ice strength and thickness. Atmospheric forcing and boundary layer structure contribute to only the seasonal and interannual variability. Seasonal ice growth in ice fractures accounts for approx.25-40% of the total ice production of the Arctic Ocean. By itself, this deformation-ice production relationship could be considered a negative feedback when thickness is perturbed. However, the overall effect on ice production in the face of increasing seasonal and thinner/weaker ice coverage could be modified by: local destabilization of the water column promoting overturning of warmer water due to increased brine rejection; and, the upwelling of the pynocline associated with increased occurrence of large shear motion in sea ice.

  4. Number size distribution measurements of biological aerosols under contrasting environments and seasons from southern tropical India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsan, Aswathy; Cv, Biju; Krishna, Ravi; Huffman, Alex; Poschl, Ulrich; Gunthe, Sachin

    2016-04-01

    Biological aerosols constitute a wide range of dead and alive biological materials and structures that are suspended in the atmosphere. They play an important role in the atmospheric physical, chemical and biological processes and health of living being by spread of diseases among humans, plants, and, animals. The atmospheric abundance, sources, physical properties of PBAPs as compared to non-biological aerosols, however, is poorly characterized. Though omnipresent, their concentration and composition exhibit large spatial and temporal variations depending up on their sources, land-use, and local meteorology. The Indian tropical region, which constitutes approximately 18% of the world's total population exhibits vast geographical extend and experiences a distinctive meteorological phenomenon by means of Indian Summer Monsoon (IMS). Thus, the sources, properties and characteristics of biological aerosols are also expected to have significant variations over the Indian subcontinent depending upon the location and seasons. Here we present the number concentration and size distribution of Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAP) from two contrasting locations in Southern tropical India measured during contrasting seasons using Ultra Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS). Measurements were carried out at a pristine high altitude continental site, Munnar (10.09 N, 77.06 E; 1605 m asl) during two contrasting seasons, South-West Monsoon (June-August, 2014) and winter (Jan - Feb, 2015) and in Chennai, a coastal urban area, during July - November 2015. FBAP concentrations at both the locations showed large variability with higher concentrations occurring at Chennai. Apart from regional variations, the FBAP concentrations also exhibited variations over two different seasons under the same environmental condition. In Munnar the FBAP concentration increased by a factor of four from South-West Monsoon to winter season. The average size distribution of FBAP at both

  5. Seasonal Biophysical Dynamics of the Amazon from Space Using MODIS Vegetation Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huete, A. R.; Didan, K.; Ratana, P.; Ferreira, L.

    2002-12-01

    We utilized the Terra- Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Vegetation Index (VI) products to analyze the seasonal and spatial patterns of photosynthetic vegetation activity over the Amazon Basin and surrounding regions of Brazil. The seasonal patterns of vegetation activity were studied along two, eco-climatic transects extending from (1) the cerrado region (Brasilia National Park) to the seasonal tropical forest (Tapajos National Forest) and (2) the caatinga biome to the seasonal and per-humid tropical forests. In addition to the climatic transects, we also investigated the seasonal dynamics of altered, land conversion areas associated with pastures and clearcutting land use activities. Both the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) at 250-m, 500-m, and 1-km were used to extract seasonal profile curves. The quality assurance (QA) information of the output products was used in noise removal and data filtering prior to the generation of the seasonal profiles. Histogram analyses were also performed at coarse (biome) scale and fine, site intensive (flux towers) scale. The seasonal patterns of the cerrado and caatinga were very pronounced with distinct dry and wet seasonal trends. We observed decreasing dry-wet seasonal patterns in the transitional areas near Araguaia National Park. In contrast, the seasonal behavior of the tropical forests were much harder to assess, but indicated slight seasonal trends that ran counter to rainfall activity. This may be attributed to new leaf growth in the dry season. We further found MODIS VI seasonal patterns to vary significantly in land converted and land degraded areas.

  6. Modeling seasonal canopy dynamics for tropical evergreen forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Weirdt, M.; Verbeeck, H.; Maignan, F.; Poulter, B.; Peylin, P.; Ciais, P.; Moreau, I.; Hanert, E.; Defourny, P.; Steppe, K.

    2011-12-01

    The role of seasonal phenology in tropical humid forests on canopy photosynthesis remains poorly understood and its representation in global vegetation models highly simplified, typically with no seasonal and interannual variability of canopy leaf area properties taken into account. However, recent flux tower and remote sensing studies suggest that seasonal phenology in tropical rainforests exerts a large influence over carbon and water fluxes, with feedbacks that can significantly influence climate dynamics. A more realistic description of the underlying mechanisms that drive seasonal tropical forest photosynthesis and phenology could possibly improve the correspondence of global vegetation model outputs with the wet-dry season biogeochemical patterns measured at flux tower sites. Here, we introduce a leaf phenology and radiation based canopy dynamics scheme for evergreen tropical forests in the global terrestrial ecosystem model ORCHIDEE and validated this new scheme against in-situ carbon flux measurements. Two different model formulations were introduced and tested separately: the first mechanism was a radiation based seasonal change in photosynthetic capacity of the canopy, and the second mechanism consisted of a seasonal leaf litterfall module, that induces a seasonal change in photosynthetic capacity via leaf age. Modeled gross primary productivity (GPP) patterns are analyzed in detail for a flux tower site in French Guiana, in a forest where the dry season is short and where the vegetation is considered to have developed adaptive mechanisms against drought stress. By including tropical forest leaf litterfall and a subsequent light-driven leaf flush in ORCHIDEE, modeled carbon and water fluxes more accurately represented observations. The fit to GPP flux data was substantially improved and the results confirm that by modifying canopy dynamics to benefit from increased light conditions, a better representation of the seasonal carbon flux patterns is made.

  7. Spatial and seasonal contrasts of sedimentary organic matter in floodplain lakes of the central Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobrinho, R. L.; Bernardes, M. C.; Abril, G.; Kim, J.-H.; Zell, C. I.; Mortillaro, J.-M.; Meziane, T.; Moreira-Turcq, P.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the seasonal and spatial pattern of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) in five floodplain lakes of the central Amazon basin (Cabaliana, Janauaca, Canaçari, Mirituba and Curuai) which have different morphologies, hydrodynamics and vegetation coverages. Surface sediments were collected in four hydrological seasons: low water (LW), rising water (RW), high water (HW) and falling water (FW) in 2009 and 2010. We investigated commonly used bulk geochemical tracers such as the C : N ratio and the stable isotopic composition of organic carbon (δ13Corg). These results were compared with lignin phenol parameters as an indicator of vascular plant detritus and branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) to trace the input of soil organic matter (OM) from land to the aquatic settings. We also applied the crenarchaeol as an indicator of aquatic (rivers and lakes) OM. Our data showed that during the RW and FW seasons, the surface sediments were enriched in lignin and brGDGTs in comparison to other seasons. Our study also indicated that floodplain lake sediments primarily consisted of allochthonous, C3 plant-derived OM. However, a downstream increase in C4 macrophyte-derived OM contribution was observed along the gradient of increasing open waters - i.e., from upstream to downstream. Accordingly, we attribute the temporal and spatial difference in SOM composition to the hydrological dynamics between the floodplain lakes and the surrounding flooded forests.

  8. Seasonally forced disease dynamics explored as switching between attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeling, Matt J.; Rohani, Pejman; Grenfell, Bryan T.

    2001-01-01

    Biological phenomena offer a rich diversity of problems that can be understood using mathematical techniques. Three key features common to many biological systems are temporal forcing, stochasticity and nonlinearity. Here, using simple disease models compared to data, we examine how these three factors interact to produce a range of complicated dynamics. The study of disease dynamics has been amongst the most theoretically developed areas of mathematical biology; simple models have been highly successful in explaining the dynamics of a wide variety of diseases. Models of childhood diseases incorporate seasonal variation in contact rates due to the increased mixing during school terms compared to school holidays. This ‘binary’ nature of the seasonal forcing results in dynamics that can be explained as switching between two nonlinear spiral sinks. Finally, we consider the stability of the attractors to understand the interaction between the deterministic dynamics and demographic and environmental stochasticity. Throughout attention is focused on the behaviour of measles, whooping cough and rubella.

  9. Nonlinear dynamic phase contrast microscopy for microfluidic and microbiological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denz, C.; Holtmann, F.; Woerdemann, M.; Oevermann, M.

    2008-08-01

    In live sciences, the observation and analysis of moving living cells, molecular motors or motion of micro- and nano-objects is a current field of research. At the same time, microfluidic innovations are needed for biological and medical applications on a micro- and nano-scale. Conventional microscopy techniques are reaching considerable limits with respect to these issues. A promising approach for this challenge is nonlinear dynamic phase contrast microscopy. It is an alternative full field approach that allows to detect motion as well as phase changes of living unstained micro-objects in real-time, thereby being marker free, without contact and non destructive, i.e. fully biocompatible. The generality of this system allows it to be combined with several other microscope techniques such as conventional bright field or fluorescence microscopy. In this article we will present the dynamic phase contrast technique and its applications in analysis of micro organismic dynamics, micro flow velocimetry and micro-mixing analysis.

  10. Fundamentals of tracer kinetics for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Koh, Tong San; Bisdas, Sotirios; Koh, Dow Mu; Thng, Choon Hua

    2011-12-01

    Tracer kinetic methods employed for quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) share common roots with earlier tracer studies involving arterial-venous sampling and other dynamic imaging modalities. This article reviews the essential foundation concepts and principles in tracer kinetics that are relevant to DCE MRI, including the notions of impulse response and convolution, which are central to the analysis of DCE MRI data. We further examine the formulation and solutions of various compartmental models frequently used in the literature. Topics of recent interest in the processing of DCE MRI data, such as the account of water exchange and the use of reference tissue methods to obviate the measurement of an arterial input, are also discussed. Although the primary focus of this review is on the tracer models and methods for T(1) -weighted DCE MRI, some of these concepts and methods are also applicable for analysis of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI data.

  11. Seasonality Impact on the Transmission Dynamics of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yali; Guo, Chenping; Liu, Luju; Zhang, Tianhua; Liu, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    The statistical data of monthly pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) incidence cases from January 2004 to December 2012 show the seasonality fluctuations in Shaanxi of China. A seasonality TB epidemic model with periodic varying contact rate, reactivation rate, and disease-induced death rate is proposed to explore the impact of seasonality on the transmission dynamics of TB. Simulations show that the basic reproduction number of time-averaged autonomous systems may underestimate or overestimate infection risks in some cases, which may be up to the value of period. The basic reproduction number of the seasonality model is appropriately given, which determines the extinction and uniform persistence of TB disease. If it is less than one, then the disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable; if it is greater than one, the system at least has a positive periodic solution and the disease will persist. Moreover, numerical simulations demonstrate these theorem results.

  12. Medial tibial pain: a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI study.

    PubMed

    Mattila, K T; Komu, M E; Dahlström, S; Koskinen, S K; Heikkilä, J

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity of different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences to depict periosteal edema in patients with medial tibial pain. Additionally, we evaluated the ability of dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging (DCES) to depict possible temporal alterations in muscular perfusion within compartments of the leg. Fifteen patients with medial tibial pain were examined with MRI. T1-, T2-weighted, proton density axial images and dynamic and static phase post-contrast images were compared in ability to depict periosteal edema. STIR was used in seven cases to depict bone marrow edema. Images were analyzed to detect signs of compartment edema. Region-of-interest measurements in compartments were performed during DCES and compared with controls. In detecting periosteal edema, post-contrast T1-weighted images were better than spin echo T2-weighted and proton density images or STIR images, but STIR depicted the bone marrow edema best. DCES best demonstrated the gradually enhancing periostitis. Four subjects with severe periosteal edema had visually detectable pathologic enhancement during DCES in the deep posterior compartment of the leg. Percentage enhancement in the deep posterior compartment of the leg was greater in patients than in controls. The fast enhancement phase in the deep posterior compartment began slightly slower in patients than in controls, but it continued longer. We believe that periosteal edema in bone stress reaction can cause impairment of venous flow in the deep posterior compartment. MRI can depict both these conditions. In patients with medial tibial pain, MR imaging protocol should include axial STIR images (to depict bone pathology) with T1-weighted axial pre and post-contrast images, and dynamic contrast enhanced imaging to show periosteal edema and abnormal contrast enhancement within a compartment.

  13. Contrasting Responses of Arctic Tussock Tundra to Early Season Snow Melt: Growth Acceleration Versus Frost Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberbauer, S. F.; Starr, G.; Pop, E. W.; Ahlquist, L. E.; Parker, I. C.

    2003-12-01

    Climate warming scenarios for the Arctic include early snow melt marking the beginning of the growing season. From the perspective of the vegetation, early snow melt may have advantageous or disadvantageous effects. With warm weather following snow melt, bud break and flowering will occur early providing a longer period for growth and photosynthesis. However, if very cold weather follows snowmelt, plants will be exposed directly to freezing conditions that plants under the snow would not. Such exposed plants may suffer freeze damage and delayed bud break. We have been experimentally manipulating snow cover at Toolik Lake, Alaska, since 1995. In 9 years of early snow removal treatments, in only two years has the second scenario occurred, in 2001 and 2002. Here we document the effects of very cold conditions following snow removal on green biomass as assessed by NDVI of treatment plots relative to controls. In 2001 evergreens shrubs were killed, bud break was delayed, and NDVI was lower on treatment plots relative to controls. In contrast, in a year with warm spring temperatures following snow melt, 1999, NDVI on treatment plots was significantly greater than that of controls. Cold conditions following snow melt may lead to death of shrubs and delayed budbreak, effects that will carry over throughout the growing season and ultimately, affect community composition and ecosystem function.

  14. Seasonal dynamics of soil micronutrients in compost-amended bermudagrass turf.

    PubMed

    Provin, Tony L; Wright, Alan L; Hons, Frank M; Zuberer, David A; White, Richard H

    2008-05-01

    Compost application to turfgrasses can increase plant-available nutrient concentrations in soil and improve growth, but may alter micronutrient dynamics and increase leaching and runoff losses. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of compost on the seasonal dynamics of plant-available Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn in soil after a single application to bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] turf. Extractable Mn increased from 270 to 670 mg kg(-1) and Cu from 0.36 to 9.89 mg kg(-1) from 0 to 29 months. In contrast, extractable Fe and Zn decreased by 52% and 57% during the same time period. Seasonal trends in extractable Mn and Cu were closely related to dissolved organic C (DOC), and appeared influenced by bermudagrass growth and dormancy patterns and subsequent impacts on DOC. Losses of Mn and Cu from the soil surface occurred after high levels of precipitation during winter dormancy but not during the growing season, while Fe and Zn exhibited an opposite pattern. Thus, seasonal variation of soil micronutrients was likely related to seasonal patterns of bermudagrass growth and dormancy and their effects on DOC, and precipitation events which probably leached DOC and complexed nutrients from surface soil. Composts only influenced the magnitude of changes in micronutrient concentrations, as similar seasonal trends occurred for both compost-amended and unamended soils.

  15. Dynamic contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound: A quantification method

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F.; Dong, Yi; Froehlich, Eckhart; Hocke, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) has been recently standardized by guidelines and recommendations. The European Federation of Societies for US in Medicine and Biology position paper describes the use for DCE-US. Comparatively, little is known about the use of contrast-enhanced endoscopic US (CE-EUS). This current paper reviews and discusses the clinical use of CE-EUS and DCE-US. The most important clinical use of DCE-US is the prediction of tumor response to new drugs against vascular angioneogenesis. PMID:28218195

  16. Evaluation of microbubble contrast agents for dynamic imaging with x-ray phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Millard, T P; Endrizzi, M; Everdell, N; Rigon, L; Arfelli, F; Menk, R H; Stride, E; Olivo, A

    2015-07-29

    X-rays are commonly used as a means to image the inside of objects opaque to visible light, as their short wavelength allows penetration through matter and the formation of high spatial resolution images. This physical effect has found particular importance in medicine where x-ray based imaging is routinely used as a diagnostic tool. Increasingly, however, imaging modalities that provide functional as well as morphological information are required. In this study the potential to use x-ray phase based imaging as a functional modality through the use of microbubbles that can be targeted to specific biological processes is explored. We show that the concentration of a microbubble suspension can be monitored quantitatively whilst in flow using x-ray phase contrast imaging. This could provide the basis for a dynamic imaging technique that combines the tissue penetration, spatial resolution, and high contrast of x-ray phase based imaging with the functional information offered by targeted imaging modalities.

  17. Dynamic Studies of Lung Fluid Clearance with Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Williams, Ivan; Irvine, Sarah C.; Morgan, Michael J.; Paganin, David M.; Lewis, Rob A.; Pavlov, Konstantin; Hooper, Stuart B.; Wallace, Megan J.; Siu, Karen K. W.; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2007-01-19

    Clearance of liquid from the airways at birth is a poorly understood process, partly due to the difficulties of observing and measuring the distribution of air within the lung. Imaging dynamic processes within the lung in vivo with high contrast and spatial resolution is therefore a major challenge. However, phase contrast X-ray imaging is able to exploit inhaled air as a contrast agent, rendering the lungs of small animals visible due to the large changes in the refractive index at air/tissue interfaces. In concert with the high spatial resolution afforded by X-ray imaging systems (<100 {mu}m), propagation-based phase contrast imaging is ideal for studying lung development. To this end we have utilized intense, monochromatic synchrotron radiation, together with a fast readout CCD camera, to study fluid clearance from the lungs of rabbit pups at birth. Local rates of fluid clearance have been measured from the dynamic sequences using a single image phase retrieval algorithm.

  18. Flow Dynamics of Contrast Dispersion in the Aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Parastou; Seo, Jung-Hee; Chen, Marcus; Mittal, Rajat

    2016-11-01

    The time profile of the contrast concentration or arterial input function (AIF) has many fundamental clinical implications and is of importance for many imaging modalities and diagnosis such as MR perfusion, CT perfusion and CT angiography (CTA). Contrast dispersion in CTA has been utilized to develop a novel method- Transluminal Attenuation Flow Encoding (TAFE)- to estimate coronary blood flow (CBF). However, in clinical practice, AIF is only available in the descending aorta and is used as a surrogate of the AIF at the coronary ostium. In this work we use patient specific computational models of the complete aorta to investigate the fluid dynamics of contrast dispersion in the aorta. The simulation employs a realistic kinematic model of the aortic valve and the dispersion patterns are correlated with the complex dynamics of the pulsatile flow in the curved aorta. The simulations allow us to determine the implications of using the descending aorta AIF as a surrogate for the AIF at the coronary ostium. PE is supported by the NIH Individual Partnership Program. -/abstract- Category: 4.7.1: Biological fluid dynamics: Physiological - Cardiovasc This work was done at Johns Hopkins University.

  19. Successional dynamics in the seasonally forced diamond food web.

    PubMed

    Klausmeier, Christopher A; Litchman, Elena

    2012-07-01

    Plankton seasonal succession is a classic example of nonequilibrium community dynamics. Despite the fact that it has been well studied empirically, it lacks a general quantitative theory. Here we investigate a food web model that includes a resource, two phytoplankton, and a shared grazer-the diamond food web-in a seasonal environment. The model produces a number of successional trajectories that have been widely discussed in the context of the verbal Plankton Ecology Group model of succession, such as a spring bloom of a good competitor followed by a grazer-induced clear-water phase, setting the stage for the late-season dominance of a grazer-resistant species. It also predicts a novel, counterintuitive trajectory where the grazer-resistant species has both early- and late-season blooms. The model often generates regular annual cycles but sometimes produces multiyear cycles or chaos, even with identical forcing each year. Parameterizing the model, we show how the successional trajectory depends on nutrient supply and the length of the growing season, two key parameters that vary among water bodies. This model extends nonequilibrium theory to food webs and is a first step toward a quantitative theory of plankton seasonal succession.

  20. Seasonal contrast in aerosol abundance over northern south Asia using a chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, C.; Sadavarte, P.; Madhavan, B. L.; Kulkarni, S.; Carmichael, G. R.; Adhikary, B.; D'Allura, A.; Cherian, R.; Das, S.; Gupta, T.; Streets, D. G.; Wei, C.; Zhang, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Northern South-Asia, home to about half a billion people, experiences large aerosol abundances almost all year around. There are gaps in our understanding of seasonal variations in regional aerosol emissions, abundance and radiative effects. The present study uses chemical transport model simulations (at ~ 60km resolution), with regionally estimated emissions, to investigate the contrast in aerosol surface and columnar abundance during pre-monsoon transition, monsoon and inter-monsoon transition periods over than Gangetic plain (GP) and Tibetan plateau. The interplay between aerosol emissions and atmospheric transport is examined to explain the variability. Model predictions were evaluated with available in-situ measurements and AOD from AERONET and MODIS level-2 retrievals (at 10 km resolution) processed with quality weighting to the model resolution. During April, AOD was dominated by dust at most sites across the GP and Tibet. However, AOD from organic carbon (emitted from agricultural residue burning) is also significant at several sites (Pantnagar, Godavari, Kolkata, Dhaka, and at high altitude Pyramid and Lhasa sites), consistent with recently reported MISR climatology in this region. In contrast, during July and September, AOD was dominated by sulfate at all sites. In April, aerosols over the GP could be attributed to emissions from large industrial sources (thermal power plant, cement industries, iron & steel and other industries) and agricultural residue burning transported from the northwest, along with forest burning emissions transported from the east. Large fluxes of open burning emissions in the east GP, along with prevailing easterly wind flow into the GP led to an east-west gradient in anthropogenic aerosols. During July, there was little open burning, so aerosol concentrations were largely from industrial emissions transported out through the north. In the Tibet region, dust was predominant during both April and July. During September

  1. Skill improvement of dynamical seasonal Arctic sea ice forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krikken, Folmer; Schmeits, Maurice; Vlot, Willem; Guemas, Virginie; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2016-05-01

    We explore the error and improve the skill of the outcome from dynamical seasonal Arctic sea ice reforecasts using different bias correction and ensemble calibration methods. These reforecasts consist of a five-member ensemble from 1979 to 2012 using the general circulation model EC-Earth. The raw model reforecasts show large biases in Arctic sea ice area, mainly due to a differently simulated seasonal cycle and long term trend compared to observations. This translates very quickly (1-3 months) into large biases. We find that (heteroscedastic) extended logistic regressions are viable ensemble calibration methods, as the forecast skill is improved compared to standard bias correction methods. Analysis of regional skill of Arctic sea ice shows that the Northeast Passage and the Kara and Barents Sea are most predictable. These results show the importance of reducing model error and the potential for ensemble calibration in improving skill of seasonal forecasts of Arctic sea ice.

  2. Seasonal variation in diel carbon dynamics, Beaver Creek, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornblaser, M.; Striegl, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    Aquatic carbon (C) dynamics are relatively well studied for boreal river systems at basin and catchment scales, but are less well know for intermediate tributaries as they transform, transport, and degas C. Lack of easy access to remote northern rivers and streams hinders the collection of high frequency data that can shed light on short time scale C dynamics. However, recent advances in sensor technology have improved our ability to gather such information. We present sensor data for Beaver Creek, Alaska, an intermediate-sized tributary to the Yukon River, focusing on diel time scale patterns that would be unattainable through discrete sampling alone. Dissolved carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) exhibited a diel pattern throughout the open water season, with the greatest amplitude in mid-summer. In early summer, pCO2 peaked in early evening, possibly due to a concentration effect. Coincidentally, this early season was the only period when discharge (Q) exhibited a diel pattern, with flow maxima in early morning and minima in early evening. This suggests an evapotranspiration (ET) signal during this period. In mid and late-summer, pCO2 peaked near 6:00 am, fitting with expected photosynthesis/respiration (P/R) effects. However, while oxygen also exhibited a diel pattern consistent with P/R, the daily amplitude was small, and stream metabolism rates were low, suggesting that pCO2 was largely driven by physical factors. Fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) also exhibited diel patterns throughout the open water season, with greatest amplitude occurring in early summer. For much of the season, FDOM exhibited minima in early evening, suggesting photo degradation. In addition to the diel pattern, FDOM exhibited a response to changing Q, with lag times ranging from about 6 hours (early season) to 24 hours (late season).

  3. Seasonal soil moisture patterns in contrasting habitats in the Willamette Valley, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changing seasonal soil moisture regimes caused by global warming may alter plant community composition in sensitive habitats such as wetlands and oak savannas. To evaluate such changes, an understanding of typical seasonal soil moisture regimes is necessary. The primary objective...

  4. Seasonal dynamics and diversity of bacteria in retail oyster tissues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dapeng; Zhang, Qian; Cui, Yan; Shi, Xianming

    2014-03-03

    Oysters are one of the important vehicles for the transfer of foodborne pathogens. It was reported that bacteria could be bio-accumulated mainly in the gills and digestive glands. In artificially treated oysters, bacterial communities have been investigated by culture-independent methods after harvest. However, little information is available on the seasonal dynamics of bacterial accumulation in retail oyster tissues. In this study, retail oysters were collected from local market in different seasons. The seasonal dynamics and diversity of bacteria in oyster tissues, including the gills, digestive glands and residual tissues, were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). It was interesting that the highest bacterial diversity appeared in the Fall season, not in summer. Our results indicated that Proteobacteria was the predominant member (23/46) in oyster tissues. Our results also suggested that bacterial diversity in gills was higher than that in digestive glands and other tissues. In addition, not all the bacteria collected from surrounding water by gills were transferred to digestive glands. On the other hand, few bacteria were found in oyster tissues except in the gills. Therefore, the gills could be the best candidate target tissue for monitoring of pathogenic bacteria either to human or to oyster.

  5. Detection of suspicious lesions in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI data.

    PubMed

    Twellmann, T; Saalbach, A; Müller, C; Nattkemper, T W; Wismüller, A

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnet resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has become an important source of information to aid breast cancer diagnosis. Nevertheless, next to the temporal sequence of 3D volume data from the DCE-MRI technique, the radiologist commonly adducts information from other modalities for his final diagnosis. Thus, the diagnosis process is time consuming and tools are required to support the human expert. We investigate an automatic approach that detects the location and delineates the extent of suspicious masses in multi-temporal DCE-MRI data sets. It applies the state-of-the-art support vector machine algorithm to the classification of the short-time series associated with each voxel. The ROC analysis shows an increased specificity in contrast to standard evaluations techniques.

  6. Identification of contrasting seasonal sea ice conditions during the Younger Dryas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabedo-Sanz, P.; Belt, S. T.; Knies, J.

    2012-12-01

    The presence of the sea ice diatom biomarker IP25 in Arctic marine sediments has been used in previous studies as a proxy for past spring sea ice occurrence and as an indicator of wider palaeoenvironmental conditions for different regions of the Arctic over various timescales [e.g. 1, 2]. The current study focuses on high-resolution palaeo sea ice reconstructions for northern Norway during the last ca. 15 cal. kyr BP. Within this study, particular emphasis has been placed on the identification of the sea ice conditions during the Younger Dryas and the application of different biomarker-based proxies to both identify and quantify seasonal sea ice conditions. Firstly, the appearance of the specific sea ice diatom proxy IP25 at ca. 12.9 cal. kyr BP in a marine sediment core (JM99-1200) obtained from Andfjorden has provided an unambiguous but qualitative measure of seasonal sea ice and thus the onset of the Younger Dryas stadial. The near continuous occurrence of IP25 for the next ca. 1400 yr demonstrates seasonal sea ice during this interval, although variable abundances suggest that the recurrent conditions in the early-mid Younger Dryas (ca. 12.9 - 11.9 cal. kyr BP) changed significantly from stable to highly variable sea ice conditions at ca. 11.9 cal. kyr BP and this instability in sea ice prevailed for the subsequent ca. 400 yr. At ca. 11.5 cal. kyr BP, IP25 disappeared from the record indicating ice-free conditions that signified the beginning of the Holocene. Similarly, a high resolution record from the Kveithola Through, western Barents Sea, showed clearly higher IP25 concentrations during the Younger Dryas stadial compared to the Holocene. For both marine records, the IP25 concentrations were also combined with those of the open water phytoplankton biomarker brassicasterol to generate PBIP25 data from which more quantitative measurements of sea ice were determined. The contrasting seasonal sea ice conditions during the Younger Dryas were further verified

  7. Seasonal dynamics of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in differing wetland habitats.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, Kelly E; Friese, Carl F; Amon, James P

    2004-10-01

    The dynamics and role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have been well described in terrestrial ecosystems; however, little is known about how the dynamics of AMF are related to the ecology of wetland ecosystems. The seasonal dynamics of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization within different wetland habitats were examined in this study to determine the factors that influence AM associations and to further assess the ecological role of AMF in wetlands. Fen and marsh habitats of four wetlands in west central Ohio were sampled monthly from March to September. AMF were found at all four sites for each month sampled and were present in all of the dominant plant species. A significant effect of month (P<0.001) on AM colonization did occur and was attributable to maximum colonization levels in the spring and minimum levels in late summer. This trend existed in all four wetlands in both fen and marsh habitats,regardless of variation in water levels, percent soil moisture, or available phosphorus levels. Because abiotic factors had minimal influence on AM colonization variation and the level of AM colonization paralleled plant growth patterns, we conclude that the AM seasonal dynamic was in response to plant phenology. Our data suggest that AM associations in temperate fen and marsh habitats are prevalent in the spring during new root and vegetative growth, even for plants experiencing flooded conditions. Evidence of an overriding AM seasonal trend indicates that future studies should include a seasonal component to better assess the role and distribution ofAMF in wetland ecosystems.

  8. Seasonal plankton dynamics along a cross-shelf gradient

    PubMed Central

    Stenseth, Nils Chr; Llope, Marcos; Anadón, Ricardo; Ciannelli, Lorenzo; Chan, Kung-Sik; Hjermann, Dag Ø; Bagøien, Espen; Ottersen, Geir

    2006-01-01

    Much interest has recently been devoted to reconstructing the dynamic structure of ecological systems on the basis of time-series data. Using 10 years of monthly data on phyto- and zooplankton abundance from the Bay of Biscay (coastal to shelf-break sites), we demonstrate that the interaction between these two plankton components is approximately linear, whereas the effects of environmental factors (nutrients, temperature, upwelling and photoperiod) on these two plankton population growth rates are nonlinear. With the inclusion of the environmental factors, the main observed seasonal and inter-annual dynamic patterns within the studied plankton assemblage also indicate the prevalence of bottom-up regulatory control. PMID:17015313

  9. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Twellmann, Thorsten; Saalbach, Axel; Gerstung, Olaf; Leach, Martin O; Nattkemper, Tim W

    2004-01-01

    Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA) by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation. PMID:15494072

  10. Contrasting Public Opinion Dynamics and Emotional Response during Crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Volkova, Svitlana; Chetviorkin, Ilia; Arendt, Dustin L.; Van Durme, Ben

    2016-11-15

    We propose an approach for contrasting spatiotemporal dynamics of public opinions expressed toward targeted entities, also known as stance detection task, in Russia and Ukraine during crisis. Our analysis relies on a novel corpus constructed from posts on the VKontakte social network, centered on local public opinion of the ongoing Russian-Ukrainian crisis, along with newly annotated resources for predicting expressions of fine-grained emotions including joy, sadness, disgust, anger, surprise and fear. Akin to prior work on sentiment analysis we align traditional public opinion polls with aggregated automatic predictions of sentiments for contrastive geo-locations. We report interesting observations on emotional response and stance variations across geo-locations. Some of our findings contradict stereotypical misconceptions imposed by media, for example, we found posts from Ukraine that do not support Euromaidan but support Putin, and posts from Russia that are against Putin but in favor USA. Furthermore, we are the first to demonstrate contrastive stance variations over time across geo-locations using storyline visualization technique.

  11. Seasonal dynamics of meroplankton in a high-latitude fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelsen, Helena Kling; Svensen, Camilla; Reigstad, Marit; Nilssen, Einar Magnus; Pedersen, Torstein

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge on the seasonal timing and composition of pelagic larvae of many benthic invertebrates, referred to as meroplankton, is limited for high-latitude fjords and coastal areas. We investigated the seasonal dynamics of meroplankton in the sub-Arctic Porsangerfjord (70°N), Norway, by examining their seasonal changes in relation to temperature, chlorophyll a and salinity. Samples were collected at two stations between February 2013 and August 2014. We identified 41 meroplanktonic taxa belonging to eight phyla. Multivariate analysis indicated different meroplankton compositions in winter, spring, early summer and late summer. More larvae appeared during spring and summer, forming two peaks in meroplankton abundance. The spring peak was dominated by cirripede nauplii, and late summer peak was dominated by bivalve veligers. Moreover, spring meroplankton were the dominant component in the zooplankton community this season. In winter, low abundances and few meroplanktonic taxa were observed. Timing for a majority of meroplankton correlated with primary production and temperature. The presence of meroplankton in the water column through the whole year and at times dominant in the zooplankton community, suggests that they, in addition to being important for benthic recruitment, may play a role in the pelagic ecosystem as grazers on phytoplankton and as prey for other organisms.

  12. [Population dynamics of thrushes and seasonal resource partition].

    PubMed

    Burskiĭ, O V; Demidova, E Iu; Morkovin, A A

    2014-01-01

    We studied seasonal population dynamics in birds using four thrush species from the Yenisei middle taiga region as an example. Long-term data on bird route censuses, capture-mark-recapture, and nest observa- tions were incorporated in the analysis. Particularly, methodological problems that complicate a direct comparison between assessed numbers at different phases of the annual cycle are considered. The integrated analysis of the results allowed comparing changes in numbers, energy expenditure, age structure, migrating status, and density distribution of selected populations during the snowless period and relating them to seasonal changes in food resource abundance. Thrush population numbers within the breeding range, and their energy consumption in the Yenisei middle taiga proportionately reflect the seasonal change in abundance of food resources. The compliance between resource intake and carrying capacity of the environment is attained by: timing of arrival and departure regarding to the species' range of tolerance; change in numbers as a result of reproduction and mortality; change in numbers due to habitat changes and long-distance movements; increasing energetic expenditures during reproduction and molt; timing, intensity and replication of nesting attempts; timing of molt and proportion of molting individuals in a population; individual variations of the annual cycle. Reproductive growth of local bird populations is not fast enough to catch up with seasonal growth of ecosystems productivity. Superabundance of invertebrates at the peak of the season offers a temporal niche which, on the one hand, is suitable for species capable of diet switching, while, on the other hand, may be used by specialized consumers, namely tropical migrants for whom, at high resource level, a shortened breeding period suffices.

  13. Seasonality of the submesoscale dynamics in the Gulf Stream region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensa, Jean Alberto; Garraffo, Zulema; Griffa, Annalisa; Özgökmen, Tamay Mehmet; Haza, Angelique; Veneziani, Milena

    2013-08-01

    Frontogenesis and frontal instabilities in the mixed layer are known to be important processes in the formation of submesoscale features. We study the seasonality of such processes in the Gulf Stream (GS) region. To approach this problem, a realistic simulation with the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model is integrated for 18 months at two horizontal resolutions: a high-resolution (1/48°) simulation able to resolve part of the submesoscale regime and the full range of mesoscale dynamics, and a coarser resolution (1/12°) case, in which submesoscales are not resolved. Results provide an insight into submesoscale dynamics in the complex GS region. A clear seasonal cycle is observed, with submesoscale features mostly present during winter. The submesoscale field is quantitatively characterized in terms of deviation from geostrophy and 2D dynamics. The limiting and controlling factor in the occurrence of submesoscales appears to be the depth of the mixed layer, which controls the reservoir of available potential energy available at the mesoscale fronts that are present most of the year. Atmospheric forcings are the main energy source behind submesoscale formation, but mostly indirectly through mixed layer deepening. The mixed layer instability scaling suggested in the (Fox-Kemper et al., J Phys Oceanogr 38:1145-1165, 2008) parametrization appears to hold, indicating that the parametrization is appropriate even in this complex and mesoscale dominated area.

  14. Remotely sensed seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton in the Ligurian Sea in 1997-1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezlin, Nikolay P.; Lacroix, Genevieve; Kostianoy, Andrey G.; Djenidi, Salim

    2004-07-01

    Remotely sensed data and a one-dimensional hydrophysical model were used to study the seasonal dynamics of surface plant pigments concentration in the Ligurian-Provençal basin. The variations of phytoplankton biomass were estimated from the observations of the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (1978-1986) and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) (September 1997 to October 1999) radiometers. The factors of physical environment analyzed included remotely sensed sea surface temperature (from advanced very high resolution radiometers), wind, air temperature, and atmospheric precipitation. The Geohydrodynamics and Environment Research (GHER) model was used to explain the observed correlations between the physical forcing and the response of phytoplankton biomass. The general pattern of phytoplankton seasonal dynamics was typical to subtropical areas: maximum biomass during cold season from October to April and low biomass during summer months. The intensity of winter/spring bloom significantly varied during different years. The correlation was revealed between the summer/autumn air temperature contrast (expressed as the difference between the air temperatures in August and in November) and the maximum monthly averaged surface chlorophyll concentration during the subsequent winter/spring bloom. The features of seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton are regulated by the physical impacts influencing water stratification. The difference between two seasonal cycles (from September 1997 to October 1999) illustrates the response of phytoplankton growth to local meteorological conditions. In March-April 1999 the vernal bloom was much more pronounced; it resulted from deeper winter cooling and more intensive winter convection. Heating of surface water layer, wind mixing, and freshwater load with rains and river discharge either stimulate or depress the development of phytoplankton, depending on what limiting environmental factor (light or nutrient limitation) prevailed.

  15. The pollen season dynamics and the relationship among some season parameters (start, end, annual total, season phases) in Kraków, Poland, 1991-2008.

    PubMed

    Myszkowska, D; Jenner, B; Stępalska, D; Czarnobilska, E

    2011-09-01

    The dynamics of 15 taxa pollen seasons in Kraków, in 1991-2008 was monitored using a Burkard volumetric spore trap of the Hirst design. The highest daily pollen concentrations were achieved in the first half of May, and they were caused mainly by Betula and Pinus pollen. The second period of the high concentrations took place from the middle of July to the end of August (mainly Urtica pollen). Tree pollen seasons were shorter (18-24 days) in comparison with the most herbaceous pollen seasons (73-89 days), except at Artemisia and Ambrosia seasons (30 and 24 days, respectively). The season phases (percentyles) of the spring and late-summer taxa were the most variable in the consecutive years. The highest annual sums were noted for Urtica, Poaceae (herbaceous pollen seasons) and for Betula, Pinus, Alnus (tree pollen seasons), and the highest variability of annual totals was stated for Urtica, Populus, Fraxinus and the lowest for Ambrosia, Corylus, Poaceae. For the plants that pollinate in the middle of the pollen season (Quercus, Pinus and Rumex), the date of the season start seems not to be related to the season end, while for late pollen seasons, especially for Ambrosia and Artemisia, the statistically negative correlation between the start and the end season dates was found. Additionally, for the most studied taxa, the increase in annual pollen totals was observed. The presented results could be useful for the allergological practice and general botanical knowledge.

  16. Seasonal Inundation Dynamics on the Barrow Peninsula, AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahana, G.; Wilson, C. J.; Muster, S.; Chen, M.; Rowland, J. C.; Hinzman, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    It is important to know how surface evapotranspiration and change in inundated areas are correlated, especially in flat Arctic wetlands such as the tundra region near Barrow, Alaska, as their underlying frozen ground and low hydrological gradient due to flat relief confine the lateral runoff of their standing water. Moreover, knowledge regarding seasonal dynamics of inundated areas is expected to be an essential and controlling factor in modeling regional energy and hydrological balance, which are related closely to frozen ground stability, in Arctic wetlands. However, the seasonal change and spatial distribution of inundated areas have not yet been well explored and quantified. Here we've deployed high spatial resolution (WorldView2 and QuickBird) images of Barrow area on eight dates from 2006-2014, to investigate seasonal change of inundated areas for a 4700 ha wetland, including the Barrow Ecosystem Observatory. Inundation dynamics were measured in the field in 2014 using DGPS. These ground truth data was used to develop a classification algorithm for discriminating between open water, overgrown water (mixed vegetation and standing water), and dry surfaces in the high-resolution images. The inundation index is created by combining NIR band, NDVI, and stack mean of BGR and NIR bands, and shown to be capable for mapping the extent of open water, dry, and overgrown water surfaces. In order to explore the relationship between water balance and changes in the inundated area, the estimated seasonal change in the inundated areas was compared with the daily surface water balance (rainfall - evaporation) calculated using available micrometeorological data for the years 2006-2014. Our results suggest that inundation dynamics correlated with the surface water balance during mid-late summer (July-September), though this relationship was not valid in the early summer (June), when surface hydrology is governed mainly by surface runoff above the shallow thawing front of the

  17. Identification of Seasonal to Decadal Controls on Phenology by Contrasting and Integrating Models, Datasets and Detection Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkel, M.; Carvalhais, N.; Migliavacca, M.; Thonicke, K.; Schaphoff, S.; von Bloh, W.; Thurner, M.; Reichstein, M.

    2014-12-01

    Global land surface phenology regulates the climate system through the exchange of carbon, water and energy. Unfortunately, the climatic and ecosystem controls for seasonal, inter-annual and decadal dynamics of phenology are poorly understood. This lack of understanding is reflected in current dynamic global vegetation models that misrepresent vegetation phenology in comparison to satellite datasets of vegetation greenness. However, uncertainties on the spatial patterns and temporal dynamics of land surface phenology arise from the variety of datasets, and methods for time series smoothing and extraction of phenological events. Consequently, the application of dynamic global vegetation models to identify seasonal to decadal controls on phenology requires firstly model improvement, and secondly the consideration of uncertainties from datasets and detection methods. Here, we improved the LPJmL dynamic global vegetation model by implementing a new phenology scheme and by optimizing the model parameters against satellite datasets of vegetation greenness, albedo and gross primary production. We evaluated the phenology of LPJmL globally against three satellite datasets of FAPAR (fraction of absorbed photosynthetic active radiation) and by using ten methods for time series smoothing and phenology detection. Our results (1) demonstrate an improved performance of LPJmL with the new and optimized phenology model over the previous model version, and (2) show that the agreement between estimated start and end of season dates from LPJmL and the different satellite datasets is higher than the agreement between different datasets. Based on the improved LPJmL phenology, we quantify the effect of seasonal temperature, light and water controls and of processes as land use and land cover change, permafrost dynamics, fire disturbance and CO2 fertilization on the timing of start and end of the growing season. Our results demonstrate that water availability is an important seasonal

  18. Contrasting "Fish" Diversity Dynamics between Marine and Freshwater Environments.

    PubMed

    Guinot, Guillaume; Cavin, Lionel

    2015-08-31

    Two theoretical models have been proposed to describe long-term dynamics of diversification: the equilibrium model considers the Earth as a closed system with a fixed maximum biological carrying capacity, whereas the expansion model hypothesizes a continuously increasing diversification of life. Based on the analysis of the fossil record of all organisms, Benton suggested contrasting models of diversity dynamics between marine and continental realms. Diversity in marine environments is characterized by phases of rapid diversification followed by plateaux, i.e., an equilibrium model directly derived from insular biogeography theories, whereas diversity in continental environments is characterized by exponential growth. Previous studies that aimed at testing these models with empirical data were based on datasets extracted directly from the reading of the vagaries of the raw fossil record, without correcting for common fossil record biases (preservation and sampling). Although correction of datasets for the incompleteness of the fossil record is now commonly performed for addressing long-term biodiversity variations, only a few attempts have been made to produce diversity curves corrected by phylogenetic data from extant and extinct taxa. Here we show that phylogenetically corrected diversity curves for "fish" (actinopterygians and elasmobranchs) during the last 200 million years fit an equilibrium model in the marine realm and an expansion model in the freshwater realm. These findings demonstrate that the rate of diversification has decreased for marine fish over the Cenozoic but is in sharp expansion for freshwater fish.

  19. Contrasting dynamics of Bartonella spp. in cyclic field vole populations: the impact of vector and host dynamics.

    PubMed

    Telfer, S; Begon, M; Bennett, M; Bown, K J; Burthe, S; Lambin, X; Telford, G; Birtles, R

    2007-03-01

    Many zoonotic disease agents are transmitted between hosts by arthropod vectors, including fleas, but few empirical studies of host-vector-microparasite dynamics have investigated the relative importance of hosts and vectors. This study investigates the dynamics of 4 closely related Bartonella species and their flea vectors in cyclic populations of field voles (Microtus agrestis) over 3 years. The probability of flea infestation was positively related to field vole density 12 months previously in autumn, but negatively related to more recent host densities, suggesting a dilution effect. The 4 Bartonella species exhibited contrasting dynamics. Only B. grahamii, showed a distinct seasonal pattern. Infection probability increased with field vole density for B. doshiae, B. taylorii and BGA (a previously unidentified species) and with density of coexisting wood mice for B. doshiae and B. grahamii. However, only the infection probability of BGA in spring was related to flea prevalence. B. doshiae and BGA were most common in older animals, but the other 2 were most common in non-reproductive hosts. Generally, host density rather than vector abundance appears most important for the dynamics of flea-transmitted Bartonella spp., possibly reflecting the importance of flea exchange between hosts. However, even closely related species showed quite different dynamics, emphasising that other factors such as population age structure can impact on zoonotic risk.

  20. Seasonal Phytoplankton Dynamics in the Eastern Tropical Atlantic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monger, Bruce; McClain, Charles; Murtugudde, Ragu

    1997-01-01

    The coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) that operated aboard the Nimbus 7 satellite provided extensive coverage of phytoplankton pigment concentrations in the surface waters of the eastern tropical Atlantic (ETA) from March 1979 to February 1980 and coincided with four major research cruises to this region. Total primary production within the ETA (5 deg N-10 deg S, 25 deg W-10 deg E) was determined from CZCS pigment estimates and an empirical algorithm derived from concurrent in situ data taken along 4 deg W that relates near-surface chlorophyll concentration and integrated primary production. We estimated an average annual production for the ETA of 2.3 Gt C/yr with an associated 3.5-fold seasonal variation in the magnitude of this production. We describe the principal physical mechanisms controlling seasonal phytoplankton dynamics within the ETA and propose that in addition to seasonal change in the thermocline depth, one must also consider changes in the depth of the equatorial under current. An extensive validation effort indicates that the standard CZCS global products are a conservative estimate of pigment concentrations in ETA surface waters. Significant underestimates by the CZCS global products were observed in June and July which we attributed, in part, to aerosol correction errors and, more importantly, to errors caused by a significant reduction in the concentration of near-surface dissolved organic matter that resulted from strong equatorial upwelling.

  1. Seasonal patterns of leaf gas exchange and water relations in dry rain forest trees of contrasting leaf phenology.

    PubMed

    Choat, Brendan; Ball, Marilyn C; Luly, Jon G; Donnelly, Christine F; Holtum, Joseph A M

    2006-05-01

    Diurnal and seasonal patterns of leaf gas exchange and water relations were examined in tree species of contrasting leaf phenology growing in a seasonally dry tropical rain forest in north-eastern Australia. Two drought-deciduous species, Brachychiton australis (Schott and Endl.) A. Terracc. and Cochlospermum gillivraei Benth., and two evergreen species, Alphitonia excelsa (Fenzal) Benth. and Austromyrtus bidwillii (Benth.) Burret. were studied. The deciduous species had higher specific leaf areas and maximum photosynthetic rates per leaf dry mass in the wet season than the evergreens. During the transition from wet season to dry season, total canopy area was reduced by 70-90% in the deciduous species and stomatal conductance (g(s)) and assimilation rate (A) were markedly lower in the remaining leaves. Deciduous species maintained daytime leaf water potentials (Psi(L)) at close to or above wet season values by a combination of stomatal regulation and reduction in leaf area. Thus, the timing of leaf drop in deciduous species was not associated with large negative values of daytime Psi(L) (greater than -1.6 MPa) or predawn Psi(L) (greater than -1.0 MPa). The deciduous species appeared sensitive to small perturbations in soil and leaf water status that signalled the onset of drought. The evergreen species were less sensitive to the onset of drought and g(s) values were not significantly lower during the transitional period. In the dry season, the evergreen species maintained their canopies despite increasing water-stress; however, unlike Eucalyptus species from northern Australian savannas, A and g(s) were significantly lower than wet season values.

  2. Seasonal contrasts in the response of coffee ants to agroforestry shade-tree management.

    PubMed

    Teodoro, A V; Sousa-Souto, L; Klein, A-M; Tscharntke, T

    2010-12-01

    In many tropical landscapes, agroforestry systems are the last forested ecosystems, providing shade, having higher humidity, mitigating potential droughts, and possessing more species than any other crop system. Here, we tested the hypothesis that higher levels of shade and associated humidity in agroforestry enhance coffee ant richness more during the dry than rainy season, comparing ant richness in 22 plots of three coffee agroforestry types in coastal Ecuador: simple-shade agroforests (intensively managed with low tree species diversity), complex-shade agroforests (extensively managed with intermediate tree species diversity) and abandoned coffee agroforests (abandoned for 10-15 yr and resembling secondary forests). Seasonality affected responses of ant richness but not composition to agroforestry management, in that most species were observed in abandoned coffee agroforests in the dry season. In the rainy season, however, most species were found in simple-shade agroforests, and complex agroforestry being intermediate. Foraging coffee ants species composition did not change differently according to agroforestry type and season. Results show that shade appears to be most important in the dry seasons, while a mosaic of different land-use types may provide adequate environmental conditions to ant species, maximizing landscape-wide richness throughout the year.

  3. Inference of seasonal and pandemic influenza transmission dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wan; Lipsitch, Marc; Shaman, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The inference of key infectious disease epidemiological parameters is critical for characterizing disease spread and devising prevention and containment measures. The recent emergence of surveillance records mined from big data such as health-related online queries and social media, as well as model inference methods, permits the development of new methodologies for more comprehensive estimation of these parameters. We use such data in conjunction with Bayesian inference methods to study the transmission dynamics of influenza. We simultaneously estimate key epidemiological parameters, including population susceptibility, the basic reproductive number, attack rate, and infectious period, for 115 cities during the 2003–2004 through 2012–2013 seasons, including the 2009 pandemic. These estimates discriminate key differences in the epidemiological characteristics of these outbreaks across 10 y, as well as spatial variations of influenza transmission dynamics among subpopulations in the United States. In addition, the inference methods appear to compensate for observational biases and underreporting inherent in the surveillance data. PMID:25730851

  4. Trace metals dynamics under contrasted land uses: contribution of statistical, isotopic, and EXAFS approaches.

    PubMed

    Bonnot, Caroline A; Gélabert, Alexandre; Louvat, Pascale; Morin, Guillaume; Proux, Olivier; Benedetti, Marc F

    2016-05-24

    Three sub-basins of the Seine River (France) under contrasted land uses (i.e., forested, agricultural, and urban) have been investigated in order to assess the origin and seasonal variation of trace metals, and evaluate their geochemical background and dynamics. Our results highlight a high anthropogenic impact on all elements for both the dissolved and particulate fractions. The main source for each element in the dissolved phase was determined and shows that transition and post-transition metals mainly originate from forested areas, while alkali and alkaline earth elements, metalloids, and halogens rather originate from agricultural land use. Conversely, for the particulate phase, most of the elements cannot be associated with a specific land use. Seasonal variation of elements was assessed according to the forested and agricultural land uses, and geochemical backgrounds were determined using average export rates, highlighting that the geochemical background for the forested land use is higher than the agricultural one for most of the elements. Finally, to confirm those results, Zn dynamics in the three characteristic sub-basins and between the different land uses was investigated using a combination of Zn speciation, Zn isotopic ratio, and Zn export rates.

  5. Assessing Seasonal Lake Dynamics in Arctic Alaska: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, K. M.; Beck, R. A.; Healey, N.; Jones, S.; Lenters, J.; Lyons, E. A.; Shah, C. A.; Sheng, Y.; Smith, L. C.; Winston, B. S.; Jones, B. M.

    2008-12-01

    Lakes on the coastal plain of arctic Alaska have developed atop continuous permafrost. Recent research suggests that lake levels, rates of bank erosion and drainage, and depth of the thaw bulb in sediments beneath the lake may increase in response to a warmer and wetter climate. Assessment of lake dynamics entails separating seasonal and interannual fluctuations from the long-term response. A program to study lake dynamics was initiated in 2008 and includes: (1) analysis of both long-term lake changes and seasonal/ interannual fluctuations using high-resolution satellite imagery and aerial photographs, (2) repeated high- resolution mapping of shoreline configuration in spring and late summer using differential GPS combined with water level sensors, (3) conducting bathymetric surveys to determine basin shape and water volume, (4) evaluating the relation between wind vectors and surface water currents with real-time satellite networked GPS-enabled floats and a wide-area wireless network, and (5) quantifying the energy and water balance on a representative lake using data collected from a fully instrumented buoy. Lake basins surveyed near Barrow, Alaska have a maximum depth of 1.5-3.0 m and are characterized by a steep drop-off near the shore and very gradual deepening toward the center. Seasonal shoreline fluctuations are observed in most lakes, with the maximum effect noted in low-lying regions of the lake margin as the water level gradually falls through summer. Preliminary analysis of the lake energy and water balance is presented, including measurements of incoming and outgoing radiation, latent and sensible heat flux, and associated lake temperature and atmospheric parameters. In subsequent years, measurements will be made on lakes further inland where the surficial geology and climate differs from the coastal environment.

  6. Role of seasonality on predator-prey-subsidy population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Levy, Dorian; Harrington, Heather A; Van Gorder, Robert A

    2016-05-07

    The role of seasonality on predator-prey interactions in the presence of a resource subsidy is examined using a system of non-autonomous ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The problem is motivated by the Arctic, inhabited by the ecological system of arctic foxes (predator), lemmings (prey), and seal carrion (subsidy). We construct two nonlinear, nonautonomous systems of ODEs named the Primary Model, and the n-Patch Model. The Primary Model considers spatial factors implicitly, and the n-Patch Model considers space explicitly as a "Stepping Stone" system. We establish the boundedness of the dynamics, as well as the necessity of sufficiently nutritional food for the survival of the predator. We investigate the importance of including the resource subsidy explicitly in the model, and the importance of accounting for predator mortality during migration. We find a variety of non-equilibrium dynamics for both systems, obtaining both limit cycles and chaotic oscillations. We were then able to discuss relevant implications for biologically interesting predator-prey systems including subsidy under seasonal effects. Notably, we can observe the extinction or persistence of a species when the corresponding autonomous system might predict the opposite.

  7. Seasonal drought predictability in Portugal using statistical-dynamical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, A. F. S.; Pires, C. A. L.

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric forecasting and predictability are important to promote adaption and mitigation measures in order to minimize drought impacts. This study estimates hybrid (statistical-dynamical) long-range forecasts of the regional drought index SPI (3-months) over homogeneous regions from mainland Portugal, based on forecasts from the UKMO operational forecasting system, with lead-times up to 6 months. ERA-Interim reanalysis data is used for the purpose of building a set of SPI predictors integrating recent past information prior to the forecast launching. Then, the advantage of combining predictors with both dynamical and statistical background in the prediction of drought conditions at different lags is evaluated. A two-step hybridization procedure is performed, in which both forecasted and observed 500 hPa geopotential height fields are subjected to a PCA in order to use forecasted PCs and persistent PCs as predictors. A second hybridization step consists on a statistical/hybrid downscaling to the regional SPI, based on regression techniques, after the pre-selection of the statistically significant predictors. The SPI forecasts and the added value of combining dynamical and statistical methods are evaluated in cross-validation mode, using the R2 and binary event scores. Results are obtained for the four seasons and it was found that winter is the most predictable season, and that most of the predictive power is on the large-scale fields from past observations. The hybridization improves the downscaling based on the forecasted PCs, since they provide complementary information (though modest) beyond that of persistent PCs. These findings provide clues about the predictability of the SPI, particularly in Portugal, and may contribute to the predictability of crops yields and to some guidance on users (such as farmers) decision making process.

  8. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Rie Ø; Strauch, Louise S; Sandgaard, Michael; Kristensen, Thomas S; Nielsen, Michael B; Lauridsen, Carsten A

    2016-09-06

    The aim of this systematic review is to provide an overview of the use of Dynamic Contrast-enhanced Computed Tomography (DCE-CT) in patients with pancreatic cancer. This study was composed according to the PRISMA guidelines 2009. The literature search was conducted in PubMed, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases to identify all relevant publications. The QUADAS-2 tool was implemented to assess the risk of bias and applicability concerns of each included study. The initial literature search yielded 483 publications. Thirteen articles were included. Articles were categorized into three groups: nine articles concerning primary diagnosis or staging, one article about tumor response to treatment, and three articles regarding scan techniques. In exocrine pancreatic tumors, measurements of blood flow in eight studies and blood volume in seven studies were significantly lower in tumor tissue, compared with measurements in pancreatic tissue outside of tumor, or normal pancreatic tissue in control groups of healthy volunteers. The studies were heterogeneous in the number of patients enrolled and scan protocols. Perfusion parameters measured and analyzed by DCE-CT might be useful in the investigation of characteristic vascular patterns of exocrine pancreatic tumors. Further clinical studies are desired for investigating the potential of DCE-CT in pancreatic tumors.

  9. Nitrogen dynamics and foodweb interactions in two contrasting Arctic streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, H.; Sanzone, D. M.; Peterson, B. J.; Benstead, J. P.; Deegan, L. A.; Bowden, W. B.; Parker, S. M.; Huryn, A. D.; Green, A. C.

    2005-05-01

    We used a 15N tracer addition to quantify nitrogen dynamics and foodweb interactions in two contrasting tributaries of the Ivishak River in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska. We added 15NH4Cl simultaneously to spring and mountain streams for 4 weeks in summer of 2002 and measured 15N: 14N ratios in inorganic and biomass compartments over distance and time. 15N labeling was rapid in both streams despite low temperatures and higher than expected discharge. Compartment-specific ammonium uptake lengths (Sw) in the flashy mountain stream were initially high (7 km) due to elevated discharge, but decreased significantly thereafter (200-400 m). Uptake lengths in the hydrologically stable spring stream were similar throughout the release, but varied slightly between compartments (80-150 m). Most of the added 15N-NH4 in the spring stream was taken up by bryophytes, whereas active uptake of N in the mountain stream was by filamentous algae. Chironomids (Diamesinae and Orthocladiinae) appeared to be feeding primarily on epilithon and filamentous algae, whereas simuliids were feeding on seston in both streams. Our data show that nitrogen retention in the two streams differed and depended on turnover of organism biomass, which was controlled by physical conditions such as temperature and discharge variability.

  10. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eriksen, Rie Ø.; Strauch, Louise S.; Sandgaard, Michael; Kristensen, Thomas S.; Nielsen, Michael B.; Lauridsen, Carsten A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to provide an overview of the use of Dynamic Contrast-enhanced Computed Tomography (DCE-CT) in patients with pancreatic cancer. This study was composed according to the PRISMA guidelines 2009. The literature search was conducted in PubMed, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases to identify all relevant publications. The QUADAS-2 tool was implemented to assess the risk of bias and applicability concerns of each included study. The initial literature search yielded 483 publications. Thirteen articles were included. Articles were categorized into three groups: nine articles concerning primary diagnosis or staging, one article about tumor response to treatment, and three articles regarding scan techniques. In exocrine pancreatic tumors, measurements of blood flow in eight studies and blood volume in seven studies were significantly lower in tumor tissue, compared with measurements in pancreatic tissue outside of tumor, or normal pancreatic tissue in control groups of healthy volunteers. The studies were heterogeneous in the number of patients enrolled and scan protocols. Perfusion parameters measured and analyzed by DCE-CT might be useful in the investigation of characteristic vascular patterns of exocrine pancreatic tumors. Further clinical studies are desired for investigating the potential of DCE-CT in pancreatic tumors. PMID:27608045

  11. Impact of seasonality upon the dynamics of a novel pathogen in a seabird colony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, S. M.

    2008-11-01

    A seasonally perturbed variant of the basic Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model in epidemiology is considered in this paper. The effect of seasonality on an IR system of ordinary differential equations describing the dynamics of a novel pathogen, e.g., highly pathogenic avian influenza, in a seabird colony is investigated. The method of Lyapunov functions is used to determine the long-term behaviour of this system. Numerical simulations of the seasonally perturbed IR system indicate that the system exhibits complex dynamics as the amplitude of the seasonal perturbation term is increased. These findings suggest that seasonality may exert a considerable effect on the dynamics of epidemics in a seabird colony.

  12. Amount, composition and seasonality of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen export from agriculture in contrasting climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeber, Daniel; Meerhof, Mariana; Zwirnmann, Elke; Ovesen, Niels; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Teixeira de Mello, Franco; González-Bergonzoni, Ivan; Jeppesen, Erik; Kronvang, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Agricultural catchments are potentially important but often neglected sources of dissolved organic matter (DOM), of which a large part is dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON). DOC is an important source of aquatic microbial respiration and DON may be an important source of nitrogen to aquatic ecosystems. However, there is still a lack of comprehensive studies on the amount, composition and seasonality of DOM export from agricultural catchments in different climates. The aim of our study was to assess the amount, composition and seasonality of DOM in a total of four streams in the wet-temperate and subtropical climate of Denmark and Uruguay, respectively. In each climate, we investigated one stream with extensive agriculture (mostly pasture) and one stream with intensive agriculture (mostly intensively used arable land) in the catchment. We sampled each stream taking grab samples fortnightly for two years and measured DOC and DON concentration, as well as molecular composition by size-exclusion chromatography. We used absorbance, fluorescence and parallel factor analysis to gather additional information on the sources and composition of the DOM. The results were coupled to measurements of precipitation, water temperature, discharge, water residence time and physicochemical data measured at each study site to investigate the effects these environmental variables have on the amount and composition of DOM in the streams. Average annual DOM concentration and seasonality were highest in the stream with intensive agriculture in Uruguay and lowest in the stream with extensive agriculture in Denmark. In all streams, the molecular-size composition of DOC and DON were similar and most DOC and DON were exported as humic substances with low C:N ratio, which indicates high bioavailability. Moreover, DON was of higher relative importance in the Uruguayan streams than in the Danish streams, as can be seen from the lower dissolved inorganic to total dissolved nitrogen

  13. Seasonal coastal sea level prediction using a dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Peter C.; Church, John A.; Miles, Elaine R.; Ridgway, Ken; Spillman, Claire M.

    2015-08-01

    Sea level varies on a range of time scales from tidal to decadal and centennial change. To date, little attention has been focussed on the prediction of interannual sea level anomalies. Here we demonstrate that forecasts of coastal sea level anomalies from the dynamical Predictive Ocean Atmosphere Model for Australia (POAMA) have significant skill throughout the equatorial Pacific and along the eastern boundaries of the Pacific and Indian Oceans at lead times out to 8 months. POAMA forecasts for the western Pacific generally have greater skill than persistence, particularly at longer lead times. POAMA also has comparable or greater skill than previously published statistical forecasts from both a Markov model and canonical correlation analysis. Our results indicate the capability of physically based models to address the challenge of providing skillful forecasts of seasonal sea level fluctuations for coastal communities over a broad area and at a range of lead times.

  14. Seasonal meridional energy balance and thermal structure of the atmosphere of Uranus - A radiative-convective-dynamical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedson, James; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    1987-01-01

    A model is presented for the thermodynamics of the seasonal meridional energy balance and thermal structure of the Uranian atmosphere. The model considers radiation and small-scale convection, and dynamical heat fluxes due to large-scale baroclinic eddies. Phase oscillations with a period of 0.5 Uranian year are discerned in the total internal power and global enthalpy storage. The variations in the identity of the main transport agent with the magnitude of the internal heat source are discussed. It is shown that meridional heat transport in the atmosphere is sufficient to lower seasonal horizontal temperature contrasts below those predicted with radiative-convection models.

  15. Seasonal Variation in the Fate of Seeds under Contrasting Logging Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Marina; Rodrigues, Ricardo R.; do Couto, Hilton T. Z.; Galetti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Seed predators and dispersers may drive the speed and structure of forest regeneration in natural ecosystems. Rodents and ants prey upon and disperse seeds, yet empirical studies on the magnitude of these effects are lacking. Here, we examined the role of ants and rodents on seed predation in 4 plant species in a successional gradient on a tropical rainforest island. We found that (1) seeds are mostly consumed rather than dispersed; (2) rates of seed predation vary by habitat, season, and species; (3) seed size, shape, and hardness do not affect the probability of being depredated. Rodents were responsible for 70% of seed predation and were negligible (0.14%) seed dispersers, whereas ants were responsible for only 2% of seed predation and for no dispersal. We detected seasonal and habitat effects on seed loss, with higher seed predation occurring during the wet season and in old-growth forests. In the absence of predators regulating seed-consumer populations, the densities of these resilient animals explode to the detriment of natural regeneration and may reduce diversity and carrying capacity for consumers and eventually lead to ecological meltdown. PMID:24614500

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI evaluation of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Hart, Blaine L; Taheri, Saeid; Rosenberg, Gary A; Morrison, Leslie A

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the behavior of CNS cavernous malformations (CCMs) using a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI) technique sensitive for slow transfer rates of gadolinium. The prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and was HIPPA compliant. Written informed consent was obtained from 14 subjects with familial CCMs (4 men and 10 women, ages 22-76 years, mean 48.1 years). Following routine anatomic MRI of the brain, DCEMRI was performed for six slices, using T1 mapping with partial inversion recovery (TAPIR) to calculate T1 values, following administration of 0.025 mmol/kg gadolinium DTPA. The transfer rate (Ki) was calculated using the Patlak model, and Ki within CCMs was compared to normal-appearing white matter as well as to 17 normal control subjects previously studied. All subjects had typical MRI appearance of CCMs. Thirty-nine CCMs were studied using DCEMRI. Ki was low or normal in 12 lesions and elevated from 1.4 to 12 times higher than background in the remaining 27 lesions. Ki ranged from 2.1E-6 to 9.63E-4 min(-1), mean 3.55E-4. Normal-appearing white matter in the CCM patients had a mean Ki of 1.57E-4, not statistically different from mean WM Ki of 1.47E-4 in controls. TAPIR-based DCEMRI technique permits quantifiable assessment of CCMs in vivo and reveals considerable differences not seen with conventional MRI. Potential applications include correlation with biologic behavior such as lesion growth or hemorrage, and measurement of drug effects.

  17. Contrasting seasonal responses of sulfate aerosols to declining SO2 emissions in the Eastern U.S.: Implications for the efficacy of SO2 emission controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulot, F.; Fan, S.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2017-01-01

    Stringent controls have reduced U.S. SO2 emissions by over 60% since the late 1990s. These controls have been more effective at reducing surface SO42- in summer (June, July, and August) than in winter (December, January, and February (DJF)), a seasonal contrast that is not robustly captured by Climate Model Intercomparison Project 5 global models. We use the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory AM3 chemistry-climate model to show that oxidant limitation during winter causes SO42- (DJF) to be sensitive to primary SO42- emissions, in-cloud titration of H2O2, and in-cloud oxidation by O3. The observed contrast in the seasonal response of SO42- to decreasing SO2 emissions is best explained by the O3 reaction, whose rate coefficient has increased over the past decades as a result of increasing NH3 emissions and decreasing SO2 emissions, both of which lower cloud water acidity. The fraction of SO2 oxidized to SO42- is projected to keep increasing in future decades, delaying improvements in wintertime air quality.

  18. Disentangling seasonal bacterioplankton population dynamics by high-frequency sampling.

    PubMed

    Lindh, Markus V; Sjöstedt, Johanna; Andersson, Anders F; Baltar, Federico; Hugerth, Luisa W; Lundin, Daniel; Muthusamy, Saraladevi; Legrand, Catherine; Pinhassi, Jarone

    2015-07-01

    Multiyear comparisons of bacterioplankton succession reveal that environmental conditions drive community shifts with repeatable patterns between years. However, corresponding insight into bacterioplankton dynamics at a temporal resolution relevant for detailed examination of variation and characteristics of specific populations within years is essentially lacking. During 1 year, we collected 46 samples in the Baltic Sea for assessing bacterial community composition by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing (nearly twice weekly during productive season). Beta-diversity analysis showed distinct clustering of samples, attributable to seemingly synchronous temporal transitions among populations (populations defined by 97% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity). A wide spectrum of bacterioplankton dynamics was evident, where divergent temporal patterns resulted both from pronounced differences in relative abundance and presence/absence of populations. Rates of change in relative abundance calculated for individual populations ranged from 0.23 to 1.79 day(-1) . Populations that were persistently dominant, transiently abundant or generally rare were found in several major bacterial groups, implying evolution has favoured a similar variety of life strategies within these groups. These findings suggest that high temporal resolution sampling allows constraining the timescales and frequencies at which distinct populations transition between being abundant or rare, thus potentially providing clues about physical, chemical or biological forcing on bacterioplankton community structure.

  19. Dynamic hysteresis between gradient echo and spin echo attenuations in dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Kiselev, Valerij G; Möller, Harald E; Fiebach, Jochen B

    2013-04-01

    Perfusion measurements using dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging provide additional information about the mean vessel size of microvasculature when supplemented with a dual gradient echo (GE) - spin echo (SE) contrast. Dynamic increase in the corresponding transverse relaxation rate constant changes, ΔR2GE and ΔR2SE , forms a loop on the (Δ R2SE3/2, ΔR2GE ) plane, rather than a reversible line. The shape of the loop and the direction of its passage differentiate between healthy brain and pathological tissue, such as tumour and ischemic tissue. By considering a tree model of microvasculature, the direction of the loop is found to be influenced mainly by the relative arterial and venous blood volume, as well as the tracer bolus dispersion. A parameter Λ is proposed to characterize the direction and shape of the loop, which might be considered as a novel imaging marker for describing the pathology of cerebrovascular network.

  20. Contrasting seasonal leaf habits of canopy trees between tropical dry-deciduous and evergreen forests in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Atsushi; Diloksumpun, Sapit; Ladpala, Phanumard; Staporn, Duriya; Panuthai, Samreong; Gamo, Minoru; Yazaki, Kenichi; Ishizuka, Moriyoshi; Puangchit, Ladawan

    2006-05-01

    We compared differences in leaf properties, leaf gas exchange and photochemical properties between drought-deciduous and evergreen trees in tropical dry forests, where soil nutrients differed but rainfall was similar. Three canopy trees (Shorea siamensis Miq., Xylia xylocarpa (Roxb.) W. Theob. and Vitex peduncularis Wall. ex Schauer) in a drought-deciduous forest and a canopy tree (Hopea ferrea Lanessan) in an evergreen forest were selected. Soil nutrient availability is lower in the evergreen forest than in the deciduous forest. Compared with the evergreen tree, the deciduous trees had shorter leaf life spans, lower leaf masses per area, higher leaf mass-based nitrogen (N) contents, higher leaf mass-based photosynthetic rates (mass-based P(n)), higher leaf N-based P(n), higher daily maximum stomatal conductance (g(s)) and wider conduits in wood xylem. Mass-based P(n) decreased from the wet to the dry season for all species. Following onset of the dry season, daily maximum g(s) and sensitivity of g(s) to leaf-to-air vapor pressure deficit remained relatively unchanged in the deciduous trees, whereas both properties decreased in the evergreen tree during the dry season. Photochemical capacity and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of photosystem II (PSII) also remained relatively unchanged in the deciduous trees even after the onset of the dry season. In contrast, photochemical capacity decreased and NPQ increased in the evergreen tree during the dry season, indicating that the leaves coped with prolonged drought by down-regulating PSII. Thus, the drought-avoidant deciduous species were characterized by high N allocation for leaf carbon assimilation, high water use and photoinhibition avoidance, whereas the drought-tolerant evergreen was characterized by low N allocation for leaf carbon assimilation, conservative water use and photoinhibition tolerance.

  1. Contrasting cesium dynamics in neighboring deep and shallow warm-water reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Pinder, John E; Hinton, T G; Whicker, F W

    2010-09-01

    To measure the long term retention and seasonal dynamics of an initial 4 kg addition of (133)Cs into an 11.4-ha, 157,000 m(3) reservoir (Pond 4, near Aiken, South Carolina, USA), the concentrations and inventories of (133)Cs in the water column were measured at periodical intervals for 522 days following the 1 August, 1999 release. After rapid declines in concentrations and inventories during the first 90 days, the (133)Cs concentrations in the water column declined at an average proportional rate of 0.004 d(-1). However, there were periods of less rapid and more rapid rates of declines, and these were correlated with periods of increasing and decreasing K concentrations in the water column. The decline rates were less and the K concentrations greater in the winter than in the summer. In the deeper, neighboring monomictic reservoirs of Par Pond and Pond B, a yearly cycle of increasing and decreasing (137)Cs concentrations in the water column is driven by anoxic remobilization of Cs from the sediments into a persistent summer hypolimnion. In Pond 4, whose mean depth of 1.6 m is too shallow to support a persistent anoxic hypolimnion, the pattern of yearly dynamics for K and Cs appear to be related to the accumulation and release of these elements from the extensive, seasonal macrophyte communities. The contrasting results between Pond 4 and Pond B suggest that a full appreciation of the relative importance of 1) anoxic remobilization and 2) accumulation and release by macrophytes in these systems remains to be established.

  2. Use of computational fluid dynamics in the design of dynamic contrast enhanced imaging phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharan, Prasanna; Freed, Melanie; Myers, Matthew R.

    2013-09-01

    Phantoms for dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging modalities such as DCE computed tomography (DCE-CT) and DCE magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) are valuable tools for evaluating and comparing imaging systems. It is important for the contrast-agent distribution within the phantom to possess a time dependence that replicates a curve observed clinically, known as the ‘tumor-enhancement curve’. It is also important for the concentration field within the lesion to be as uniform as possible. This study demonstrates how computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be applied to achieve these goals within design constraints. The distribution of the contrast agent within the simulated phantoms was investigated in relation to the influence of three factors of the phantom design. First, the interaction between the inlets and the uniformity of the contrast agent within the phantom was modeled. Second, pumps were programmed using a variety of schemes and the resultant dynamic uptake curves were compared to tumor-enhancement curves obtained from clinical data. Third, the effectiveness of pulsing the inlet flow rate to produce faster equilibration of the contrast-agent distribution was quantified. The models employed a spherical lesion and design constraints (lesion diameter, inlet-tube size and orientation, contrast-agent flow rates and fluid properties) taken from a recently published DCE-MRI phantom study. For DCE-MRI in breast cancer detection, where the target tumor-enhancement curve varies on the scale of hundreds of seconds, optimizing the number of inlet tubes and their orientation was found to be adequate for attaining concentration uniformity and reproducing the target tumor-enhancement curve. For DCE-CT in liver tumor detection, where the tumor-enhancement curve varies on a scale of tens of seconds, the use of an iterated inlet condition (programmed into the pump) enabled the phantom to reproduce the target tumor-enhancement curve within a few per cent beyond about

  3. Dynamic contrast-enhanced diffuse optical tomography (DCE-DOT): experimental validation with a dynamic phantom

    PubMed Central

    Unlu, Mehmet Burcin; Lin, Yuting; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced diffuse optical tomography (DCE-DOT) can provide spatially resolved enhancement kinetics of an optical contrast agent. We undertook a systematic phantom study to evaluate the effects of the geometrical parameters such as the depth and size of the inclusion as well as the optical parameters of the background on the recovered enhancement kinetics of the most commonly used optical contrast agent, indocyanine green (ICG). For this purpose a computer-controlled dynamic phantom was constructed. An ICG–intralipid–water mixture was circulated through the inclusions while the DCE-DOT measurements were acquired with a temporal resolution of 16 s. The same dynamic study was repeated using inclusions of different sizes located at different depths. In addition to this, the effect of non-scattering regions was investigated by placing a second inclusion filled with water in the background. The phantom studies confirmed that although the peak enhancement varied substantially for each case, the recovered injection and dilution rates obtained from the percentage enhancement maps agreed within 15% independent of not only the depth and the size of the inclusion but also the presence of a non-scattering region in the background. Although no internal structural information was used in these phantom studies, it may be necessary to use it for small objects buried deep in tissue. However, the different contrast mechanisms of optical and other imaging modalities as well as imperfect co-registration between both modalities may lead to potential errors in the structural a priori. Therefore, the effect of erroneous selection of structural priors was investigated as the final step. Again, the injection and dilution rates obtained from the percentage enhancement maps were also immune to the systematic errors introduced by erroneous selection of the structural priors, e.g. choosing the diameter of the inclusion 20% smaller increased the peak enhancement 60% but

  4. Seasonal and spatial contrasts of sedimentary organic carbon in floodplain lakes of the central Amazon basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobrinho, Rodrigo; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Abril, Gwenaël; Zell, Claudia; Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Mortillaro, Jean-Michel; Meziane, Tarik; Damsté, Jaap; Bernardes, Marcelo

    2014-05-01

    Three-quarters of the area of flooded land in the world are temporary wetlands (Downing, 2009), which play a significant role in the global carbon cycle(Einsele et al., 2001; Cole et al., 2007; Battin et al., 2009; Abril et al., 2013). Previous studies of the Amazonian floodplain lakes (várzeas), one important compartment of wetlands, showed that the sedimentation of organic carbon (OC) in the floodplain lakes is strongly linked to the periodical floods and to the biogeography from upstream to downstream(Victoria et al., 1992; Martinelli et al., 2003). However, the main sources of sedimentary OC remain uncertain. Hence, the study of the sources of OC buried in floodplain lake sediments can enhance our understanding of the carbon balance of the Amazon ecosystems. In this study, we investigated the seasonal and spatial pattern of sedimentary organic matter in five floodplain lakes of the central Amazon basin (Cabaliana, Janauaca, Canaçari, Miratuba, and Curuai) which have different morphologies, hydrodynamics and vegetation coverage. Surface sediments were collected in four hydrological seasons: low water (LW), rising water (RW), high water (HW) and falling water (FW) in 2009 and 2010. We investigated commonly used bulk geochemical tracers such as C:N ratio and stable isotopic composition of organic carbon (δ13COC). These results were compared with lignin-phenol parameters as an indicator of vascular plant detritus (Hedges and Ertel, 1982) and branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) to trace the soil OC from land to the aquatic settings (Hopmans et al., 2004). Our data showed that during the RW and FW seasons, the concentration of lignin and brGDGTs were higher in comparison to other seasons. Our study also indicated that floodplain lake sediments primarily consisted of a mixture of C3 plant detritus and soil OC. However, a downstream increase in C4 plant-derived OC contribution was observed along the gradient of increasingly open waters, i

  5. Dynamic fractal signature dissimilarity analysis for therapeutic response assessment using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunhao; Subashi, Ergys; Yin, Fang-Fang; Chang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a dynamic fractal signature dissimilarity (FSD) method as a novel image texture analysis technique for the quantification of tumor heterogeneity information for better therapeutic response assessment with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. Methods: A small animal antiangiogenesis drug treatment experiment was used to demonstrate the proposed method. Sixteen LS-174T implanted mice were randomly assigned into treatment and control groups (n = 8/group). All mice received bevacizumab (treatment) or saline (control) three times in two weeks, and one pretreatment and two post-treatment DCE-MRI scans were performed. In the proposed dynamic FSD method, a dynamic FSD curve was generated to characterize the heterogeneity evolution during the contrast agent uptake, and the area under FSD curve (AUCFSD) and the maximum enhancement (MEFSD) were selected as representative parameters. As for comparison, the pharmacokinetic parameter Ktrans map and area under MR intensity enhancement curve AUCMR map were calculated. Besides the tumor’s mean value and coefficient of variation, the kurtosis, skewness, and classic Rényi dimensions d1 and d2 of Ktrans and AUCMR maps were evaluated for heterogeneity assessment for comparison. For post-treatment scans, the Mann–Whitney U-test was used to assess the differences of the investigated parameters between treatment/control groups. The support vector machine (SVM) was applied to classify treatment/control groups using the investigated parameters at each post-treatment scan day. Results: The tumor mean Ktrans and its heterogeneity measurements d1 and d2 values showed significant differences between treatment/control groups in the second post-treatment scan. In contrast, the relative values (in reference to the pretreatment value) of AUCFSD and MEFSD in both post-treatment scans showed significant differences between treatment/control groups. When using AUCFSD and MEFSD as SVM input for treatment/control classification

  6. Seasonal dynamics of tuberculosis epidemics and implications for multidrug-resistant infection risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y-J; Liao, C-M

    2014-02-01

    Understanding how seasonality shapes the dynamics of tuberculosis (TB) is essential in determining risks of transmission and drug resistance in (sub)tropical regions. We developed a relative fitness-based multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB model incorporated with seasonality and a probabilistic assessment model to assess infection risk in Taiwan regions. The model accurately captures the seasonal transmission and population dynamics of TB incidence during 2006-2008 and MDR TB in high TB burden areas during 2006-2010 in Taiwan. There is ~3% probability of having exceeded 50% of the population infected attributed to MDR TB. Our model not only provides insight into the understanding of the interactions between seasonal dynamics of TB and environmental factors but is also capable of predicting the seasonal patterns of TB incidence associated with MDR TB infection risk. A better understanding of the mechanisms of TB seasonality will be critical in predicting the impact of public control programmes.

  7. Seasonal variations in suspended-sediment dynamics in the tidal reach of an estuarine tributary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Downing-Kunz, Maureen A.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying sediment supply from estuarine tributaries is an important component of developing a sediment budget, and common techniques for estimating supply are based on gages located above tidal influence. However, tidal interactions near tributary mouths can affect the magnitude and direction of sediment supply to the open waters of the estuary. We investigated suspended-sediment dynamics in the tidal reach of Corte Madera Creek, an estuarine tributary of San Francisco Bay, using moored acoustic and optical instruments. Flux of both water and suspended-sediment were calculated from observed water velocity and turbidity for two periods in each of wet and dry seasons during 2010. During wet periods, net suspended-sediment flux was seaward; tidally filtered flux was dominated by the advective component. In contrast, during dry periods, net flux was landward; tidally filtered flux was dominated by the dispersive component. The mechanisms generating this landward flux varied; during summer we attributed wind–wave resuspension in the estuary and subsequent transport on flood tides, whereas during autumn we attributed increased spring tide flood velocity magnitude leading to local resuspension. A quadrant analysis similar to that employed in turbulence studies was developed to summarize flux time series by quantifying the relative importance of sediment transport events. These events are categorized by the direction of velocity (flood vs. ebb) and the magnitude of concentration relative to tidally averaged conditions (relatively turbid vs. relatively clear). During wet periods, suspended-sediment flux was greatest in magnitude during relatively turbid ebbs, whereas during dry periods it was greatest in magnitude during relatively turbid floods. A conceptual model was developed to generalize seasonal differences in suspended-sediment dynamics; model application to this study demonstrated the importance of few, relatively large events on net suspended-sediment flux

  8. Seasonality of submesoscale dynamics in the Kuroshio Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Cesar B.; Gille, Sarah T.; Chereskin, Teresa K.; Menemenlis, Dimitris

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies show that the vigorous seasonal cycle of the mixed layer modulates upper ocean submesoscale turbulence. Here we provide model-based evidence that the seasonally changing upper ocean stratification in the Kuroshio Extension also modulates submesoscale (here 10-100 km) inertia-gravity waves. Summertime restratification weakens submesoscale turbulence but enhances inertia-gravity waves near the surface. Thus, submesoscale turbulence and inertia-gravity waves undergo vigorous out-of-phase seasonal cycles. These results imply a strong seasonal modulation of the accuracy of geostrophic velocity diagnosed from submesoscale sea surface height delivered by the Surface Water and Ocean Topography satellite mission.

  9. Do dynamic global vegetation models capture the seasonality of carbon fluxes in the Amazon basin? A data-model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Restrepo-Coupe, Natalia; Levine, Naomi M.; Christoffersen, Bradley O.; Albert, Loren P.; Wu, Jin; Costa, Marcos H.; Galbraith, David; Imbuzeiro, Hewlley; Martins, Giordane; da Araujo, Alessandro C.; Malhi, Yadvinder S.; Zeng, Xubin; Moorcroft, Paul; Saleska, Scott R.

    2016-08-29

    To predict forest response to long-term climate change with high confidence requires that dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) be successfully tested against ecosystem response to short-term variations in environmental drivers, including regular seasonal patterns. Here, we used an integrated dataset from four forests in the Brasil flux network, spanning a range of dry-season intensities and lengths, to determine how well four state-of-the-art models (IBIS, ED2, JULES, and CLM3.5) simulated the seasonality of carbon exchanges in Amazonian tropical forests. We found that most DGVMs poorly represented the annual cycle of gross primary productivity (GPP), of photosynthetic capacity (Pc), and of other fluxes and pools. Models simulated consistent dry-season declines in GPP in the equatorial Amazon (Manaus K34, Santarem K67, and Caxiuanã CAX); a contrast to observed GPP increases. Model simulated dry-season GPP reductions were driven by an external environmental factor, ‘soil water stress’ and consequently by a constant or decreasing photosynthetic infrastructure (Pc), while observed dry-season GPP resulted from a combination of internal biological (leaf-flush and abscission and increased Pc) and environmental (incoming radiation) causes. Moreover, we found models generally overestimated observed seasonal net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and respiration (Re) at equatorial locations. In contrast, a southern Amazon forest (Jarú RJA) exhibited dry-season declines in GPP and Re consistent with most DGVMs simulations. While water limitation was represented in models and the primary driver of seasonal photosynthesis in southern Amazonia, changes in internal biophysical processes, light-harvesting adaptations (e.g., variations in leaf area index (LAI) and increasing leaf-level assimilation rate related to leaf demography), and allocation lags between leaf and wood, dominated equatorial Amazon carbon flux dynamics and were deficient or absent from current model

  10. Do dynamic global vegetation models capture the seasonality of carbon fluxes in the Amazon basin? A data-model intercomparison

    DOE PAGES

    Restrepo-Coupe, Natalia; Levine, Naomi M.; Christoffersen, Bradley O.; ...

    2016-08-29

    To predict forest response to long-term climate change with high confidence requires that dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) be successfully tested against ecosystem response to short-term variations in environmental drivers, including regular seasonal patterns. Here, we used an integrated dataset from four forests in the Brasil flux network, spanning a range of dry-season intensities and lengths, to determine how well four state-of-the-art models (IBIS, ED2, JULES, and CLM3.5) simulated the seasonality of carbon exchanges in Amazonian tropical forests. We found that most DGVMs poorly represented the annual cycle of gross primary productivity (GPP), of photosynthetic capacity (Pc), and of othermore » fluxes and pools. Models simulated consistent dry-season declines in GPP in the equatorial Amazon (Manaus K34, Santarem K67, and Caxiuanã CAX); a contrast to observed GPP increases. Model simulated dry-season GPP reductions were driven by an external environmental factor, ‘soil water stress’ and consequently by a constant or decreasing photosynthetic infrastructure (Pc), while observed dry-season GPP resulted from a combination of internal biological (leaf-flush and abscission and increased Pc) and environmental (incoming radiation) causes. Moreover, we found models generally overestimated observed seasonal net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and respiration (Re) at equatorial locations. In contrast, a southern Amazon forest (Jarú RJA) exhibited dry-season declines in GPP and Re consistent with most DGVMs simulations. While water limitation was represented in models and the primary driver of seasonal photosynthesis in southern Amazonia, changes in internal biophysical processes, light-harvesting adaptations (e.g., variations in leaf area index (LAI) and increasing leaf-level assimilation rate related to leaf demography), and allocation lags between leaf and wood, dominated equatorial Amazon carbon flux dynamics and were deficient or absent from current model

  11. Do dynamic global vegetation models capture the seasonality of carbon fluxes in the Amazon basin? A data-model intercomparison.

    PubMed

    Restrepo-Coupe, Natalia; Levine, Naomi M; Christoffersen, Bradley O; Albert, Loren P; Wu, Jin; Costa, Marcos H; Galbraith, David; Imbuzeiro, Hewlley; Martins, Giordane; da Araujo, Alessandro C; Malhi, Yadvinder S; Zeng, Xubin; Moorcroft, Paul; Saleska, Scott R

    2017-01-01

    To predict forest response to long-term climate change with high confidence requires that dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) be successfully tested against ecosystem response to short-term variations in environmental drivers, including regular seasonal patterns. Here, we used an integrated dataset from four forests in the Brasil flux network, spanning a range of dry-season intensities and lengths, to determine how well four state-of-the-art models (IBIS, ED2, JULES, and CLM3.5) simulated the seasonality of carbon exchanges in Amazonian tropical forests. We found that most DGVMs poorly represented the annual cycle of gross primary productivity (GPP), of photosynthetic capacity (Pc), and of other fluxes and pools. Models simulated consistent dry-season declines in GPP in the equatorial Amazon (Manaus K34, Santarem K67, and Caxiuanã CAX); a contrast to observed GPP increases. Model simulated dry-season GPP reductions were driven by an external environmental factor, 'soil water stress' and consequently by a constant or decreasing photosynthetic infrastructure (Pc), while observed dry-season GPP resulted from a combination of internal biological (leaf-flush and abscission and increased Pc) and environmental (incoming radiation) causes. Moreover, we found models generally overestimated observed seasonal net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and respiration (Re ) at equatorial locations. In contrast, a southern Amazon forest (Jarú RJA) exhibited dry-season declines in GPP and Re consistent with most DGVMs simulations. While water limitation was represented in models and the primary driver of seasonal photosynthesis in southern Amazonia, changes in internal biophysical processes, light-harvesting adaptations (e.g., variations in leaf area index (LAI) and increasing leaf-level assimilation rate related to leaf demography), and allocation lags between leaf and wood, dominated equatorial Amazon carbon flux dynamics and were deficient or absent from current model

  12. Hydrological niche separation explains seasonal and inter-annual variations of vegetation dynamics in seasonally dry tropical forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Medvigy, D.; Powers, J. S.; Becknell, J. M.; Guan, K.

    2015-12-01

    Despite ample water supply, vegetation dynamics are subject to seasonal water stress in large fraction of tropical forests. These seasonally dry tropical forests (SDTFs) account for over 40% of tropical forests, harbor high biodiversity, have large potential carbon sink due to forest recovery from human disturbance and also play a critical role in global carbon budget and inter-annual variations. Plants in this biome display notably diverse responses to seasonal and inter-annual variations of water availability, especially inter-specific variations in canopy seasonality and biomass growth. Current process-based dynamic vegetation models cannot represent these diversities and are shown to perform poorly on simulating drought responses of tropical forests, calling into question of their ability to accurately simulate future changes in SDTFs. Accumulated field observations, suggest that hydrological niche separation driven by coordinated plant functional traits is associated with plants' performance under drought. Yet, it remains not clear whether the physiology-level hydrological niche separation can explain the ecosystem-level diversity observed in SDTFs. Here, we test the theory with a model-data fusion approach. We implemented a new plant hydrodynamic module that is able to track leaf water potential at sub-daily scale in ED2 model. We further incorporated a hydrological niche separation scheme based on a meta-data analysis of key functional traits in SDTFs. Simulated ecological patterns with and without hydrological niche separation were then compared with remote-sensing and long-term field observations from an SDTF site in Palo Verde, Costa Rica. Using several numerical experiments, we specifically examine the following questions: (i) Whether hydrological niche separation can explain the diversity in canopy seasonality and biomass growth? (ii) How important are the yet uncertain belowground functional traits, especially root profile in determining canopy

  13. Spatial contrasts of seasonal and intraflock broiler litter trace gas emissions, physical and chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Miles, D M; Brooks, J P; Sistani, K

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive mitigation strategies for gaseous emissions from broiler operations requires knowledge of the litters' physical and chemical properties, gas evolution, bird effects, as well as broiler house management and structure. This research estimated broiler litter surface fluxes for ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O), and carbon dioxide (CO2). Ancillary measurements of litter temperature, litter total N, ammonium (NH4+), total C content, moisture, and pH were also made. Grid sampling was imposed over the floor area of two commercial broiler houses at the beginning (Day 1), middle (Day 23), and end (Day 43) of a winter and subsequent summer flock housed on reused pine shavings litter. The grid was composed of 36 points, three locations across the width, and 12 locations down the length of the houses. To observe feeder and waterer (F/W) influences on the parameters, eight additional sample locations were added in a crisscross pattern among these automated supply lines. Color variograms illustrate the nature of parameter changes within each flock and between seasons. Overall trends for the NH3, N2O, and CO2 gas fluxes indicate an increase in magnitude with bird age during a flock for both summer and winter, but flux estimates were reduced in areas where compacted litter (i.e., caked litter or cake) formed at the end of the flocks (at F/W locations and in the fan area). End of flock gas fluxes were estimated at 1040 mg NH3 m(-2) h(-1), 20 mg N2O m(-2) h(-1), and 24,200 mg CO2 m(-2) h(-1) in winter; and 843 mg NH3 m(-2) h(-1), 18 mg N2O m(-2) h(-1)), and 27,200 mg CO2 m(-2) h(-1) in summer. The results of intensive sample efforts during winter and summer flocks, reported visually using contour plots, offer a resource to the poultry industry and researchers for creating new management strategies for improving production and controlling gas evolution. Particularly, efforts could focus on designing housing systems that minimize extremes in litter compaction. The

  14. Contrasting the seasonal variability of halogenated natural products and anthropogenic hexachlorocyclohexanes in the southern Norwegian atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Melcher, Joachim; Schlabach, Martin; Andersen, Martin Strand; Vetter, Walter

    2008-11-01

    Halogenated natural products (HNPs) are increasingly recognized as compounds of marine environmental samples. In this study, we explored whether the annual course of the concentrations of HNPs in ambient air samples was different from those of anthropogenic pollutants. For this purpose, air samples taken weekly at Lista, southern Norway, were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for anthropogenic aaeeee- (alpha-HCH) and aaaeee-hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma-HCH, lindane) isomers, as well as the HNPs 2,3,3',4,4',5,5'-heptachloro-1'-methyl-1,2'-bipyrrole (Q1), 2,4-di- and 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (24-DBA, 246-TBA), and 2,4,6-tribromophenol (246-TBP). Concentrations of HCH isomers were higher in the warmer summer months than in winter. By contrast, Q1, 24-DBA, 246-TBA, and 246-TBP showed much higher concentrations at the end of the year. Correlations between the concentrations of the compounds and air mass trajectories as well as further meteorological data are discussed. An unknown mixed halogenated substance was detected at high abundance during the summer months. High-resolution mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometric techniques were used to unravel the molecular structure, which was found to be C(7)H(8)Br(3)Cl, an elemental composition never reported before in the scientific literature.

  15. Interaction between seasonal density-dependence structures and length of the seasons explain the geographical structure of the dynamics of voles in Hokkaido: an example of seasonal forcing.

    PubMed Central

    Stenseth, Nils Chr; Kittilsen, Marte O; Hjermann, Dag Ø; Viljugrein, Hildegunn; Saitoh, Takashi

    2002-01-01

    The grey-sided vole (Clethrionomys rufocanus) is distributed over the entire island of Hokkaido, Japan, across which it exhibits multi-annual density cycles in only parts of the island (the north-eastern part); in the remaining part of the island, only seasonal density changes occur. Using annual sampling of 189 grey-sided vole populations, we deduced the geographical structure in their second-order density dependence. Building upon our earlier suggestion, we deduce the seasonal density-dependent structure for these populations. Strong direct and delayed density dependence is found to occur during winter, whereas no density dependence is seen during the summer period. The direct density dependence during winter may be seen as a result of food being limited during that season: the delayed density dependence during the winter is consistent with vole-specialized predators (e.g. the least weasel) responding to vole densities so as to have a negative effect on the net growth rate of voles in the following year. We conclude that the observed geographical structure of the population dynamics may be properly seen as a result of the length of the summer in interaction with the differential seasonal density-dependent structure. Altogether, this indicates that the geographical pattern in multi-annual density dynamics in the grey-sided vole may be a result of seasonal forcing. PMID:12350246

  16. Optical and acoustical dynamics of microbubble contrast agents inside neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Dayton, P A; Chomas, J E; Lum, A F; Allen, J S; Lindner, J R; Simon, S I; Ferrara, K W

    2001-01-01

    Acoustically active microbubbles are used for contrast-enhanced ultrasound assessment of organ perfusion. In regions of inflammation, contrast agents are captured and phagocytosed by activated neutrophils adherent to the venular wall. Using direct optical observation with a high-speed camera and acoustical interrogation of individual bubbles and cells, we assessed the physical and acoustical responses of both phagocytosed and free microbubbles. Optical analysis of bubble radial oscillations during insonation demonstrated that phagocytosed microbubbles experience viscous damping within the cytoplasm and yet remain acoustically active and capable of large volumetric oscillations during an acoustic pulse. Fitting a modified version of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation that describes mechanical properties of thin shells to optical radius-time data of oscillating bubbles provided estimates of the apparent viscosity of the intracellular medium. Phagocytosed microbubbles experienced a viscous damping approximately sevenfold greater than free microbubbles. Acoustical comparison between free and phagocytosed microbubbles indicated that phagocytosed microbubbles produce an echo with a higher mean frequency than free microbubbles in response to a rarefaction-first single-cycle pulse. Moreover, this frequency increase is predicted using the modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation. We conclude that contrast-enhanced ultrasound can detect distinct acoustic signals from microbubbles inside of neutrophils and may provide a unique tool to identify activated neutrophils at sites of inflammation. PMID:11222315

  17. Contrasting Metabolism in Perenniating Structures of Upland and Lowland Switchgrass Plants Late in the Growing Season

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Christian M.; Twigg, Paul; Xia, Yuannan; Vogel, Kenneth P.; Madhavan, Soundararajan; Sattler, Scott E.; Sarath, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Background Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is being developed as a bioenergy crop for many temperate regions of the world. One way to increase biomass yields is to move southern adapted lowland cultivars to more northern latitudes. However, many southerly adapted switchgrass germplasm can suffer significant winter kill in northerly climes. Materials and Methods Here, we have applied next-generation sequencing in combination with biochemical analyses to query the metabolism of crowns and rhizomes obtained from two contrasting switchgrass cultivars. Crowns and rhizomes from field-grown lowland (cv Kanlow) and upland (cv Summer) switchgrass cultivars were collected from three randomly selected post-flowering plants. Summer plants were senescing, whereas Kanlow plants were not at this harvest date. Results Principal component analysis (PCA) differentiated between both the Summer and Kanlow transcriptomes and metabolomes. Significant differences in transcript abundances were detected for 8,050 genes, including transcription factors such as WRKYs and those associated with phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. Gene-set enrichment analyses showed that a number of pathways were differentially up-regulated in the two populations. For both populations, protein levels and enzyme activities agreed well with transcript abundances for genes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway that were up-regulated in Kanlow crowns and rhizomes. The combination of these datasets suggests that dormancy-related mechanisms had been triggered in the crowns and rhizomes of the Summer plants, whereas the crowns and rhizomes of Kanlow plants had yet to enter dormancy. Conclusions Delayed establishment of dormancy at more northerly latitudes could be one factor that reduces winter-survival in the high-yielding Kanlow plants. Understanding the cellular signatures that accompany the transition to dormancy can be used in the future to select plants with improved winter hardiness. PMID:25133804

  18. Ocean time-series reveals recurring seasonal patterns of virioplankton dynamics in the northwestern Sargasso Sea

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Rachel J; Breitbart, Mya; Lomas, Michael W; Carlson, Craig A

    2012-01-01

    There are an estimated 1030 virioplankton in the world oceans, the majority of which are phages (viruses that infect bacteria). Marine phages encompass enormous genetic diversity, affect biogeochemical cycling of elements, and partially control aspects of prokaryotic production and diversity. Despite their importance, there is a paucity of data describing virioplankton distributions over time and depth in oceanic systems. A decade of high-resolution time-series data collected from the upper 300 m in the northwestern Sargasso Sea revealed recurring temporal and vertical patterns of virioplankton abundance in unprecedented detail. An annual virioplankton maximum developed between 60 and 100 m during periods of summer stratification and eroded during winter convective mixing. The timing and vertical positioning of this seasonal pattern was related to variability in water column stability and the dynamics of specific picophytoplankton and heterotrophic bacterioplankton lineages. Between 60 and 100 m, virioplankton abundance was negatively correlated to the dominant heterotrophic bacterioplankton lineage SAR11, as well as the less abundant picophytoplankton, Synechococcus. In contrast, virioplankton abundance was positively correlated to the dominant picophytoplankton lineage Prochlorococcus, and the less abundant alpha-proteobacteria, Rhodobacteraceae. Seasonally, virioplankton abundances were highly synchronous with Prochlorococcus distributions and the virioplankton to Prochlorococcus ratio remained remarkably constant during periods of water column stratification. The data suggest that a significant fraction of viruses in the mid-euphotic zone of the subtropical gyres may be cyanophages and patterns in their abundance are largely determined by Prochlorococcus dynamics in response to water column stability. This high-resolution, decadal survey of virioplankton abundance provides insight into the possible controls of virioplankton dynamics in the open ocean

  19. Ocean time-series reveals recurring seasonal patterns of virioplankton dynamics in the northwestern Sargasso Sea.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Rachel J; Breitbart, Mya; Lomas, Michael W; Carlson, Craig A

    2012-02-01

    There are an estimated 10(30) virioplankton in the world oceans, the majority of which are phages (viruses that infect bacteria). Marine phages encompass enormous genetic diversity, affect biogeochemical cycling of elements, and partially control aspects of prokaryotic production and diversity. Despite their importance, there is a paucity of data describing virioplankton distributions over time and depth in oceanic systems. A decade of high-resolution time-series data collected from the upper 300 m in the northwestern Sargasso Sea revealed recurring temporal and vertical patterns of virioplankton abundance in unprecedented detail. An annual virioplankton maximum developed between 60 and 100 m during periods of summer stratification and eroded during winter convective mixing. The timing and vertical positioning of this seasonal pattern was related to variability in water column stability and the dynamics of specific picophytoplankton and heterotrophic bacterioplankton lineages. Between 60 and 100 m, virioplankton abundance was negatively correlated to the dominant heterotrophic bacterioplankton lineage SAR11, as well as the less abundant picophytoplankton, Synechococcus. In contrast, virioplankton abundance was positively correlated to the dominant picophytoplankton lineage Prochlorococcus, and the less abundant alpha-proteobacteria, Rhodobacteraceae. Seasonally, virioplankton abundances were highly synchronous with Prochlorococcus distributions and the virioplankton to Prochlorococcus ratio remained remarkably constant during periods of water column stratification. The data suggest that a significant fraction of viruses in the mid-euphotic zone of the subtropical gyres may be cyanophages and patterns in their abundance are largely determined by Prochlorococcus dynamics in response to water column stability. This high-resolution, decadal survey of virioplankton abundance provides insight into the possible controls of virioplankton dynamics in the open ocean.

  20. Contrasting seasonal overlaps between primary and secondary growth are linked to wood anatomy in Mediterranean sub-shrubs.

    PubMed

    Camarero, J J; Palacio, S; Montserrat-Martí, G

    2013-09-01

    Whole-plant approaches allow quantification of the temporal overlap between primary and secondary growth. If the amount of time available to grow is short, there may be a high temporal overlap between shoot growth and wood formation. We hypothesise that such overlap depends on the duration of the growing season and relates to wood anatomy. We evaluated wood anatomy, shoot longitudinal and radial growth rates, fine root production and the concentrations of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) in the wood of six sub-shrub species growing in sites with contrasting climatic conditions (Lepidium subulatum, Linum suffruticosum, Salvia lavandulifolia, Satureja montana, Ononis fruticosa, Echinospartum horridum). Sub-shrub species living in sites with a short growing season displayed a high overlap between aboveground primary and secondary growth and formed wide vessels, whereas species from the warmest and driest sites presented the reverse characteristics. The highest overlap was linked to a rapid shoot extension and thickening through the enhanced hydraulic conductivity provided by wide vessels. The reductions in NSC concentrations when growth peaked were low or moderate, indicating that sub-shrubs accumulate NSC in excess, as do trees. The temporal overlap among primary and secondary growth in woody plants may be connected to the duration and rates of shoot and wood growth, which in turn depend on the vessel lumen area.

  1. Rapid Dynamics of Contrast Responses in the Cat Primary Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ming; Wang, Yong; Wang, Yi

    2011-01-01

    The visual information we receive during natural vision changes rapidly and continuously. The visual system must adapt to the spatiotemporal contents of the environment in order to efficiently process the dynamic signals. However, neuronal responses to luminance contrast are usually measured using drifting or stationary gratings presented for a prolonged duration. Since motion in our visual field is continuous, the signals received by the visual system contain an abundance of transient components in the contrast domain. Here using a modified reverse correlation method, we studied the properties of responses of neurons in the cat primary visual cortex to different contrasts of grating stimuli presented statically and transiently for 40 ms, and showed that neurons can effectively discriminate the rapidly changing contrasts. The change in the contrast response function (CRF) over time mainly consisted of an increment in contrast gain (CRF shifts to left) in the developing phase of temporal responses and a decrement in response gain (CRF shifts downward) in the decay phase. When the distribution range of stimulus contrasts was increased, neurons demonstrated decrement in contrast gain and response gain. Our results suggest that contrast gain control (contrast adaptation) and response gain control mechanisms are well established during the first tens of milliseconds after stimulus onset and may cooperatively mediate the rapid dynamic responses of visual cortical neurons to the continuously changing contrast. This fast contrast adaptation may play a role in detecting contrast contours in the context of visual scenes that are varying rapidly. PMID:21998655

  2. Seasonal leaf dynamics for tropical evergreen forests in a process based global ecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Weirdt, M.; Verbeeck, H.; Maignan, F.; Peylin, P.; Poulter, B.; Bonal, D.; Ciais, P.; Steppe, K.

    2012-02-01

    The influence of seasonal phenology in tropical humid forests on canopy photosynthesis remains poorly understood and its representation in global vegetation models highly simplified, typically with no seasonal variability of canopy leaf area properties taken into account. However, recent flux tower and remote sensing studies suggest that seasonal phenology in tropical rainforests exerts a large influence over carbon and water fluxes, with feedbacks that can significantly influence climate dynamics. A more realistic description of the underlying mechanisms that drive seasonal tropical forest photosynthesis and phenology could improve the correspondence of global vegetation model outputs with the wet-dry season biogeochemical patterns measured at flux tower sites. Here, we introduce a leaf Net Primary Production (NPP) based canopy dynamics scheme for evergreen tropical forests in the global terrestrial ecosystem model ORCHIDEE and validated the new scheme against in-situ carbon flux measurements. Modelled Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) patterns are analyzed in details for a flux tower site in French Guiana, in a forest where the dry season is short and where the vegetation is considered to have developed adaptive mechanisms against drought stress. By including leaf litterfall seasonality and a coincident light driven leaf flush and seasonal change in photosynthetic capacity in ORCHIDEE, modelled carbon and water fluxes more accurately represent the observations. The fit to GPP flux data was substantially improved and the results confirmed that by modifying canopy dynamics to benefit from increased light conditions, a better representation of the seasonal carbon flux patterns was made.

  3. Detailed dynamics and seasonal persistence of methane venting from lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandella, B. P.; Wood, H. G.; Ruppel, C. D.; Hemond, H.; Juanes, R.

    2012-12-01

    Lake-bottom sediments emit methane, a potent greenhouse gas, into the overlying water column and atmosphere. A large fraction of the methane is released as bubbles, but constraining the magnitude of this methane flux is challenging because ebullition is patchy in space and episodic in time. Extrapolating observations from individual methane seeps to a larger scale in time or space can result in severe over- or under-estimation of the methane flux, yet to date observations have not combined large, complete spatial coverage with multiple-season deployment periods. We present methane ebullition data from a fixed-location multibeam sonar, which observes a large area (420 m2) over a deployment period of over 6 months and with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to detect individual bubbles. The large amount of data generated by the system presents a challenge to identify bubble signals that are infrequent, short in duration, and spatially compact. Addressing this challenge yields processed ebullition signals, which are compared against vents detected in the water column and near-surface sediment during geophysical surveys that utilize a commercial fishfinder sonar and a 4-24 kHz chirp seismic towfish. The ebullition signals are then used to develop conceptual models relating distributed methanogenesis to ebullition at localized sites. In particular, the spacing and persistence of vents implies potential mechanisms for their creation and maintenance, while the ebullitive response to hydrostatic pressure variations is used to validate a conduit dilation model of methane venting. Finally, the level of synchronicity in activity between distant venting sites suggests the relative importance of the external hydrostatic forcing over internal dynamics of methane generation. The mechanistic understanding provided by this work is critical to upscaling gas flow measurements from individual vents to infer lake-wide fluxes to the water column and atmosphere. Map of maximum sonar

  4. Seasonal temperature and precipitation regulate brook trout young-of-the-year abundance and population dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kanno, Yoichiro; Pregler, Kasey C.; Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Hocking, Daniel; Wofford, John E.B.

    2015-01-01

    Our results indicate that YOY abundance is a key driver of brook trout population dynamics that is mediated by seasonal weather patterns. A reliable assessment of climate change impacts on brook trout needs to account for how alternations in seasonal weather patterns impact YOY abundance and how such relationships may differ across the range of brook trout distribution.

  5. PHYTOPLANKTON AND ZOOPLANKTON SEASONAL DYNAMICS IN A SUBTROPICAL ESTUARY: IMPORTANCE OF CYANOBACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Murrell, Michael C. and Emile M. Lores. 2004. Phytoplankton and Zooplankton Seasonal Dynamics in a Subtropical Estuary: Importance of Cyanobacteria. J. Plankton Res. 26(3):371-382. (ERL,GB 1190).

    A seasonal study of phytoplankton and zooplankton was conducted from 1999-20...

  6. Development of a dynamic flow imaging phantom for dynamic contrast-enhanced CT

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, B.; Keller, H.; Coolens, C.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) studies with modeling of blood flow and tissue perfusion are becoming more prevalent in the clinic, with advances in wide volume CT scanners allowing the imaging of an entire organ with sub-second image frequency and sub-millimeter accuracy. Wide-spread implementation of perfusion DCE-CT, however, is pending fundamental validation of the quantitative parameters that result from dynamic contrast imaging and perfusion modeling. Therefore, the goal of this work was to design and construct a novel dynamic flow imaging phantom capable of producing typical clinical time-attenuation curves (TACs) with the purpose of developing a framework for the quantification and validation of DCE-CT measurements and kinetic modeling under realistic flow conditions. Methods: The phantom is based on a simple two-compartment model and was printed using a 3D printer. Initial analysis of the phantom involved simple flow measurements and progressed to DCE-CT experiments in order to test the phantoms range and reproducibility. The phantom was then utilized to generate realistic input TACs. A phantom prediction model was developed to compute the input and output TACs based on a given set of five experimental (control) parameters: pump flow rate, injection pump flow rate, injection contrast concentration, and both control valve positions. The prediction model is then inversely applied to determine the control parameters necessary to generate a set of desired input and output TACs. A protocol was developed and performed using the phantom to investigate image noise, partial volume effects and CT number accuracy under realistic flow conditionsResults: This phantom and its surrounding flow system are capable of creating a wide range of physiologically relevant TACs, which are reproducible with minimal error between experiments ({sigma}/{mu} < 5% for all metrics investigated). The dynamic flow phantom was capable of producing input and output TACs using

  7. Seasonal frost effects on the dynamic behavior of a twenty-story office building

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, Z.; Dutta, U.; Xiong, F.; Biswas, N.; Benz, H.

    2008-01-01

    Studies have shown that seasonal frost can significantly affect the seismic behavior of a bridge foundation system in cold regions. However, little information could be found regarding seasonal frost effects on the dynamic behavior of buildings. Based on the analysis of building vibration data recorded by a permanent strong-motion instrumentation system, the objective of this paper is to show that seasonal frost can impact the building dynamic behavior and the magnitude of impact may be different for different structures. Ambient noise and seismic data recorded on a twenty-story steel-frame building have been analyzed to examine the building dynamic characteristics in relationship to the seasonal frost and other variables including ground shaking intensity. Subsequently, Finite Element modeling of the foundation-soil system and the building superstructure was conducted to verify the seasonal frost effects. The Finite Element modeling was later extended to a reinforced-concrete (RC) type building assumed to exist at a similar site as the steel-frame building. Results show that the seasonal frost has great impact on the foundation stiffness in the horizontal direction and a clear influence on the building dynamic behavior. If other conditions remain the same, the effects of seasonal frost on structural dynamic behavior may be much more prominent for RC-type buildings than for steel-frame buildings. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dynamical and statistical modeling of seasonal precipitation over Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Franco, R.; Coppola, E.; Giorgi, F.; Pavia, E. G.; Graef Ziehl, F.

    2012-12-01

    Simulated patterns of seasonal precipitation over Mexico (Pmex) by a statistical model and by the recently-released version of the Regional Climate Model (RegCM4) are compared. The European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis ERA-Interim is used to provide initial and lateral boundary conditions for the RegCM4 simulation over the CORDEX Central America region; while regions of high correlation between Pmex and global sea surface temperatures (SST) over the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans are used as predictors in the statistical model. Compared with observations, the RegCM4 simulation shows a wet bias in topographically complex regions and a dry bias over Yucatan and northwestern Mexico. The wet bias is probably caused by the model's convection scheme, but the dry bias may be due to a lack of topographical features (in Yucatan) and a weakened representation of the North American Monsoon (in northwestern Mexico). RegCM4 simulates quite well the seasonal precipitation patterns and also the inter-seasonal variability, reproducing well the observed wetter or drier than normal seasons. RegCM4 is also able to reproduce adequately well the mid-summer drought in the south of Mexico. The statistical model also reproduces well the inter-seasonal precipitation variability, simulating Pmex better over southern and central Mexico than over northern Mexico. This may suggest that Pmex over northern Mexico is less dependent on SST than over other regions of the country.

  9. Dynamically downscaled multi-model ensemble seasonal forecasts over Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asharaf, Shakeel; Fröhlich, Kristina; Fernandez, Jesus; Cardoso, Rita; Nikulin, Grigory; Früh, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Truthful and reliable seasonal rainfall predictions have an important social and economic value for the east African countries as their economy is highly dependent on rain-fed agriculture and pastoral systems. Only June to September (JJAS) seasonal rainfall accounts to more than 80% crop production in Ethiopia. Hence, seasonal foresting is a crucial concern for the region. The European Provision of Regional Impact Assessment on a seasonal to decadal timescale (EUPORIAS) project offers a common framework to understand hindcast uncertainties through the use of multi-model and multi-member simulations over east Africa. Under this program, the participating regional climate models (RCMs) were driven by the atmospheric-only version of the ECEARTH global climate model, which provides hindcasts of a five-months period (May to September) from 1991-2012. In this study the RCMs downscaled rainfall is evaluated with respect to the observed JJAS rainfall over Ethiopia. Both deterministic and probabilistic based forecast skills are assessed. Our preliminary results show the potential usefulness of multi-model ensemble simulations in forecasting the seasonal rainfall over the region.

  10. Influence of Seasonal Food Availability on the Dynamics of Seabird Feeding Flocks at a Coastal Upwelling Area

    PubMed Central

    Anguita, Cristóbal; Simeone, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The formation of multi-species feeding flocks (MSFFs) through visual recruitment is considered an important strategy for obtaining food in seabirds and its functionality has been ascribed to enhanced foraging efficiency. Its use has been demonstrated in much of the world's oceans and includes numerous species. However, there is scant information on the temporal stability of the composition and abundance of MSFFs as well as the effect of seasonal food availability on their dynamics. Between July 2006 and September 2014, we conducted monthly at-sea seabird counts at Valparaiso Bay (32°56′ to 33°01′S, 71°36′ to 71°46′W) within the area of influence of the Humboldt Current in central Chile. This area is characterized by a marked seasonality in primary and secondary production associated with upwelling, mainly during austral spring-summer. Based on studies that provide evidence that flocking is most frequent when food is both scarce and patchy, we hypothesized that seabird MSFF attributes (i.e. frequency of occurrence, abundance and composition) will be modified according to the seasonal availability of food. Using generalized linear models (GLMs), our results show that the contrasting seasonality in food availability of the study area (using chlorophyll-a concentration as a proxy) had no significant influence on MSFF attributes, sparsely explaining their variations (P>0.05). Rather than seasonal food availability, the observed pattern for MSFF attributes at Valparaiso Bay suggests a substantial influence of reproductive and migratory (boreal and austral migrants) habits of birds that modulates MSFF dynamics consistently throughout the whole year in this highly variable and patchy environment. We highlight the importance of visual recruitment as a mechanism by which migratory and resident birds interact. This would allow them to reduce resource unpredictability, which in turn has a major impact on structuring seabird’s MSFF dynamics. PMID:26125630

  11. Evolution of pulmonary perfusion defects demonstrated with contrast-enhanced dynamic MR perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Howarth, N R; Beziat, C; Berthezène, Y

    1999-01-01

    Pulmonary perfusion defects can be demonstrated with contrast-enhanced dynamic MR perfusion imaging. We present the case of a patient with a pulmonary artery sarcoma who presented with a post-operative pulmonary embolus and was followed in the post-operative period with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR perfusion imaging. This technique allows rapid imaging of the first passage of contrast material through the lung after bolus injection in a peripheral vein. To our knowledge, this case report is the first to describe the use of this MR technique in showing the evolution of peripheral pulmonary perfusion defects associated with pulmonary emboli.

  12. Seasonal leaf dynamics for tropical evergreen forests in a process-based global ecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Weirdt, M.; Verbeeck, H.; Maignan, F.; Peylin, P.; Poulter, B.; Bonal, D.; Ciais, P.; Steppe, K.

    2012-09-01

    The influence of seasonal phenology on canopy photosynthesis in tropical evergreen forests remains poorly understood, and its representation in global ecosystem models is highly simplified, typically with no seasonal variation of canopy leaf properties taken into account. Including seasonal variation in leaf age and photosynthetic capacity could improve the correspondence of global vegetation model outputs with the wet-dry season CO2 patterns measured at flux tower sites in these forests. We introduced a leaf litterfall dynamics scheme in the global terrestrial ecosystem model ORCHIDEE based on seasonal variations in net primary production (NPP), resulting in higher leaf turnover in periods of high productivity. The modifications in the leaf litterfall scheme induce seasonal variation in leaf age distribution and photosynthetic capacity. We evaluated the results of the modification against seasonal patterns of three long-term in-situ leaf litterfall datasets of evergreen tropical forests in Panama, French Guiana and Brazil. In addition, we evaluated the impact of the model improvements on simulated latent heat (LE) and gross primary productivity (GPP) fluxes for the flux tower sites Guyaflux (French Guiana) and Tapajós (km 67, Brazil). The results show that the introduced seasonal leaf litterfall corresponds well with field inventory leaf litter data and times with its seasonality. Although the simulated litterfall improved substantially by the model modifications, the impact on the modelled fluxes remained limited. The seasonal pattern of GPP improved clearly for the Guyaflux site, but no significant improvement was obtained for the Tapajós site. The seasonal pattern of the modelled latent heat fluxes was hardly changed and remained consistent with the observed fluxes. We conclude that we introduced a realistic and generic litterfall dynamics scheme, but that other processes need to be improved in the model to achieve better simulations of GPP seasonal patterns

  13. Seasonal variation of the radial brightness contrast of Saturn's rings viewed in mid-infrared by Subaru/COMICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Hideaki; Morishima, Ryuji; Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Yamashita, Takuya

    2017-02-01

    Aims: This paper investigates the mid-infrared (MIR) characteristics of Saturn's rings. Methods: We collected and analyzed MIR high spatial resolution images of Saturn's rings obtained in January 2008 and April 2005 with the COoled Mid-Infrared Camera and Spectrometer (COMICS) mounted on the Subaru Telescope, and investigated the spatial variation in the surface brightness of the rings in multiple bands in the MIR. We also composed the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the C, B, and A rings and the Cassini Division, and estimated the temperatures of the rings from the SEDs assuming the optical depths. Results: We found that the C ring and the Cassini Division were warmer than the B and A rings in 2008, which could be accounted for by their lower albedos, lower optical depths, and smaller self-shadowing effect. We also fonud that the C ring and the Cassini Division were considerably brighter than the B and A rings in the MIR in 2008 and the radial contrast of the ring brightness is the inverse of that in 2005, which is interpreted as a result of a seasonal effect with changing elevations of the Sun and observer above the ring plane. The reduced images (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A29

  14. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF THE DYNAMICS OF THERAPEUTIC ULTRASOUND CONTRAST AGENTS

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Lu, Xiaozhen; Chahine, Georges

    2010-01-01

    A 3-D thick-shell contrast agent dynamics model was developed by coupling a finite volume Navier-Stokes solver and a potential boundary element method flow solver to simulate the dynamics of thick-shelled contrast agents subjected to pressure waves. The 3-D model was validated using a spherical thick-shell model validated by experimental observations. We then used this model to study shell break-up during nonspherical deformations resulting from multiple contrast agent interaction or the presence of a nearby solid wall. Our simulations indicate that the thick viscous shell resists the contrast agent from forming a re-entrant jet, as normally observed for an air bubble oscillating near a solid wall. Instead, the shell thickness varies significantly from location to location during the dynamics, and this could lead to shell break-up caused by local shell thinning and stretching. PMID:20950929

  15. Seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton community in a tropical wetland.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Najeeb Ahmad; Wanganeo, Ashwani; Raina, Rajni

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton species composition and seasonal changes were investigated in the Bhoj wetland Bhopal. Taxonomic composition, diversity, and abundance of phytoplankton were studied at nine stations from March 2008 to February 2010, in relation to various physico-chemical factors. Total phytoplankton species composition in the Bhoj wetland was represented by 360 species. Among phytoplankton, diversity belonged to seven groups. Chlorophyceae was the dominant group (48%) followed by Bacillariophyceae (26%), Cyanophyceae (15%), and Euglenophyceae (9%), while Pyrophyceae, Chrysophyceae, and Xanthophyceae contributed 2% of the population. Phytoplankton on the basis of seasonal studies recorded 1651 units l(-1) during summer season which was contributed mainly by Chlorophyceae (39.3%), with Spirogyra sp. (14.2%) and Closteriopsis sp. (9.1%) contributing maximum to the total group in the first year, while during the second year of summer period, a total of 2095 units l(-1) was recorded which was contributed mainly by group Pyrophyceae (51%) with the main dominant species represented by Ceratium hirundinella (98.46%). The highest Shannon-Wiener diversity index (H') value (4.27) was recorded. Simpson values are approaching 1, signifying that sites have high relative diversity due to its supporting surrounding components. The trend of variation in evenness values was more or less the same as Shannon diversity index. Thus, the highest diversity indices recoded at all the stations in the present study justify the diverse nature of species inhabiting the different ecological niches in the ecosystem. The very high phosphate and nitrate concentrations in the wetland are indicators of pollution which may be due to the discharge of agricultural and sewage wastes enriched with nutrients as well as the human activities there. Our recommendation is to avoid as far as possible the discharge of sewage and agriculture wastes into the Bhoj wetland. The effects of various physicochemical

  16. Nonrigid registration and classification of the kidneys in 3D dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Ghafourian, Pegah; Sharma, Puneet; Salman, Khalil; Martin, Diego; Fei, Baowei

    2012-02-01

    We have applied image analysis methods in the assessment of human kidney perfusion based on 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI data. This approach consists of 3D non-rigid image registration of the kidneys and fuzzy C-mean classification of kidney tissues. The proposed registration method reduced motion artifacts in the dynamic images and improved the analysis of kidney compartments (cortex, medulla, and cavities). The dynamic intensity curves show the successive transition of the contrast agent through kidney compartments. The proposed method for motion correction and kidney compartment classification may be used to improve the validity and usefulness of further model-based pharmacokinetic analysis of kidney function.

  17. An improved coverage and spatial resolution--using dual injection dynamic contrast-enhanced (ICE-DICE) MRI: a novel dynamic contrast-enhanced technique for cerebral tumors.

    PubMed

    Li, Ka-Loh; Buonaccorsi, Giovanni; Thompson, Gerard; Cain, John R; Watkins, Amy; Russell, David; Qureshi, Salman; Evans, D Gareth; Lloyd, Simon K; Zhu, Xiaoping; Jackson, Alan

    2012-08-01

    A new dual temporal resolution-based, high spatial resolution, pharmacokinetic parametric mapping method is described--improved coverage and spatial resolution using dual injection dynamic contrast-enhanced (ICE-DICE) MRI. In a dual-bolus dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI acquisition protocol, a high temporal resolution prebolus is followed by a high spatial resolution main bolus to allow high spatial resolution parametric mapping for cerebral tumors. The measured plasma concentration curves from the dual-bolus data were used to reconstruct a high temporal resolution arterial input function. The new method reduces errors resulting from uncertainty in the temporal alignment of the arterial input function, tissue response function, and sampling grid. The technique provides high spatial resolution 3D pharmacokinetic maps (voxel size 1.0 × 1.0 × 2.0 mm(3)) with whole brain coverage and greater parameter accuracy than that was possible with the conventional single temporal resolution methods. High spatial resolution imaging of brain lesions is highly desirable for small lesions and to support investigation of heterogeneity within pathological tissue and peripheral invasion at the interface between diseased and normal brain. The new method has the potential to be used to improve dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI techniques in general.

  18. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI of Cervical Cancers: Temporal Percentile Screening of Contrast Enhancement Identifies Parameters for Prediction of Chemoradioresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Erlend K.F.; Hole, Knut Hakon; Lund, Kjersti V.; Sundfor, Kolbein; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Lyng, Heidi; Malinen, Eirik

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To systematically screen the tumor contrast enhancement of locally advanced cervical cancers to assess the prognostic value of two descriptive parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Methods and Materials: This study included a prospectively collected cohort of 81 patients who underwent DCE-MRI with gadopentetate dimeglumine before chemoradiotherapy. The following descriptive DCE-MRI parameters were extracted voxel by voxel and presented as histograms for each time point in the dynamic series: normalized relative signal increase (nRSI) and normalized area under the curve (nAUC). The first to 100th percentiles of the histograms were included in a log-rank survival test, resulting in p value and relative risk maps of all percentile-time intervals for each DCE-MRI parameter. The maps were used to evaluate the robustness of the individual percentile-time pairs and to construct prognostic parameters. Clinical endpoints were locoregional control and progression-free survival. The study was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Results: The p value maps of nRSI and nAUC showed a large continuous region of percentile-time pairs that were significantly associated with locoregional control (p < 0.05). These parameters had prognostic impact independent of tumor stage, volume, and lymph node status on multivariate analysis. Only a small percentile-time interval of nRSI was associated with progression-free survival. Conclusions: The percentile-time screening identified DCE-MRI parameters that predict long-term locoregional control after chemoradiotherapy of cervical cancer.

  19. Effects of drought - altered seasonality and low rainfall - in net ecosystem carbon exchange of three contrasting Mediterranean ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, J. S.; Mateus, J. A.; Aires, L. M.; Pita, G.; Pio, C.; Andrade, V.; Banza, J.; David, T. S.; Rodrigues, A.; David, J. S.

    2007-06-01

    Droughts cause reductions in gross primary production (GPP) and also in net ecosystem exchange (NEE), contributing to most of the inter-annual variability in terrestrial carbon sequestration. In seasonally dry climates (Mediterranean) droughts result from reductions in annual rainfall and from changes in rain seasonality. In western Iberia, the hydrological-year (i.e., from October to September) of 2004-2005 was extremely dry, with precipitation 50% below the long-term mean (691 mm in 1961-1990), but 2005-2006 was normal. We compared the carbon fluxes measured by the eddy covariance technique from three contrasting ecosystems in southern Portugal: an evergreen oak woodland (savannah-like) with ca. 21% tree cover; a Mediterranean C3/C4 grassland; and a coppiced eucalyptus plantation. During the dry hydrological-year of 2004-2005, NEE was lowest, the highest sink strength was in the eucalypt plantation (NEE = -399 g C m -2 year-1) as compared to the oak woodland (NEE = -88 g C m -2 year-1), and the grassland (NEE = +49 g C m -2 year -1). The latter was a source of carbon dioxide. The NEE values of the dry year were, however, much lower than those for wetter years, e.g. NEE = -861 g C m-2 year -1 in 2002-2003 in the eucalypt plantation. The NEE of the grassland and the oak savannah in the 2005-2006 hydrological-year, with annual precipitation above the long term mean, were -190 and -120 g C m -2 year-1, respectively. All ecosystems studied increased their rain-use efficiency (GPP per unit of rain volume) increased in dry years. In the case of annual vegetation - grassland and low tree density woodland, however &ndash, rain-use efficiency decreased with severe drought. However, this was more pronounced in the eucalypt plantation due to greater GPP and the use of deep soil water resources. Although both calendar years of 2004 and 2005 had equally low rainfall, the effect of drought on the eucalypt plantation was delayed until the second dry year. This suggests that the

  20. Phytoplankton dynamics in contrasting early stage North Atlantic spring blooms: composition, succession, and potential drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, C. J.; Poulton, A. J.; Esposito, M.; Paulsen, M. L.; Bellerby, R.; St John, M.; Martin, A. P.

    2015-04-01

    The spring bloom is a key annual event in the phenology of pelagic ecosystems, making a major contribution to the oceanic biological carbon pump through the production and export of organic carbon. However, there is little consensus as to the main drivers of spring bloom formation, exacerbated by a lack of in situ observations of the phytoplankton community composition and its evolution during this critical period. We investigated the dynamics of the phytoplankton community structure at two contrasting sites in the Iceland and Norwegian basins during the early stage (25 March-25 April) of the 2012 North Atlantic spring bloom. The plankton composition and characteristics of the initial stages of the bloom were markedly different between the two basins. The Iceland Basin (ICB) appeared well mixed down to >400 m, yet surface chlorophyll a (0.27-2.2 mg m-3) and primary production (0.06-0.66 mmol C m-3 d-1) were elevated in the upper 100 m. Although the Norwegian Basin (NWB) had a persistently shallower mixed layer (<100 m), chlorophyll a (0.58-0.93 mg m-3) and primary production (0.08-0.15 mmol C m-3 d-1) remained lower than in the ICB, with picoplankton (<2 μm) dominating chlorophyll a biomass. The ICB phytoplankton composition appeared primarily driven by the physicochemical environment, with periodic events of increased mixing restricting further increases in biomass. In contrast, the NWB phytoplankton community was potentially limited by physicochemical and/or biological factors such as grazing. Diatoms dominated the ICB, with the genus Chaetoceros (1-166 cells mL-1) being succeeded by Pseudo-nitzschia (0.2-210 cells mL-1). However, large diatoms (>10 μm) were virtually absent (<0.5 cells mL-1) from the NWB, with only small nano-sized (<5 μm) diatoms (i.e. Minidiscus spp.) present (101-600 cells mL-1). We suggest microzooplankton grazing, potentially coupled with the lack of a seed population of bloom-forming diatoms, was restricting diatom growth in the NWB

  1. Phytoplankton dynamics in contrasting early stage North Atlantic spring blooms: composition, succession, and potential drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, C. J.; Poulton, A. J.; Esposito, M.; Paulsen, M. L.; Bellerby, R.; St. John, M.; Martin, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    The spring bloom is a key annual event in the phenology of pelagic ecosystems, making a major contribution to the oceanic biological carbon pump through the production and export of organic carbon. However, there is little consensus as to the main drivers of spring bloom formation, exacerbated by a lack of in situ observations of the phytoplankton community composition and its evolution during this critical period. We investigated the dynamics of the phytoplankton community structure at two contrasting sites in the Iceland and Norwegian Basins during the early stage (25 March-25 April) of the 2012 North Atlantic spring bloom. The plankton composition and characteristics of the initial stages of the bloom were markedly different between the two basins. The Iceland Basin (ICB) appeared well mixed to > 400 m, yet surface chlorophyll a (0.27-2.2 mg m-3) and primary production (0.06-0.66 mmol C m-3 d-1) were elevated in the upper 100 m. Although the Norwegian Basin (NWB) had a persistently shallower mixed layer (< 100 m), chlorophyll a (0.58-0.93 mg m-3) and primary production (0.08-0.15 mmol C m-3 d-1) remained lower than in the ICB, with picoplankton (> 2 μm) dominating chlorophyll a biomass. The ICB phytoplankton composition appeared primarily driven by the physicochemical environment, with periodic events of increased mixing restricting further increases in biomass. In contrast, the NWB phytoplankton community was potentially limited by physicochemical and/or biological factors such as grazing. Diatoms dominated the ICB, with the genus Chaetoceros (1-166 cells mL-1) being succeeded by Pseudo-nitzschia (0.2-210 cells mL-1). However, large diatoms (> 10 μm) were virtually absent (< 0.5 cells mL-1) from the NWB, with only small nanno-sized (< 5 μm) diatoms present (101-600 cells mL-1). We suggest micro-zooplankton grazing, potentially coupled with the lack of a seed population of bloom forming diatoms, was restricting diatom growth in the NWB, and that large diatoms

  2. Effects of temperature seasonality on tundra vegetation productivity using a daily vegetation dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, H. E.; Erler, A.; Frazier, J.; Bhatt, U. S.

    2011-12-01

    Changes in the seasonality of air temperature will elicit interacting effects on the dynamics of snow cover, nutrient availability, vegetation growth, and other ecosystem properties and processes in arctic tundra. Simulation models often do not have the fine temporal resolution necessary to develop theory and propose hypotheses for the effects of daily and weekly timescale changes on ecosystem dynamics. We therefore developed a daily version of an arctic tundra vegetation dynamics model (ArcVeg) to simulate how changes in the seasonality of air temperatures influences the dynamics of vegetation growth and carbon sequestration across regions of arctic tundra. High temporal-resolution air and soil temperature data collected from field sites across the five arctic tundra bioclimate subzones were used to develop a daily weather generator operable for sites throughout the arctic tundra. Empirical relationships between temperature and soil nitrogen were used to generate daily dynamics of soil nitrogen availability, which drive the daily uptake of nitrogen and growth among twelve tundra plant functional types. Seasonal dynamics of the remotely sensed normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and remotely sensed land surface temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) GIMMS 3g dataset were used to investigate constraints on the start of the growing season, although there was no indication of any spatially consistent temperature or day-length controls on greening onset. Because of the exponential nature of the relationship between soil temperature and nitrogen mineralization, temperature changes during the peak of the growing season had greater effects on vegetation productivity than changes earlier in the growing season. However, early season changes in temperature had a greater effect on the relative productivities of different plant functional types, with potential influences on species composition.

  3. Within-season variation in sexual selection in a fish with dynamic sex roles.

    PubMed

    Wacker, Sebastian; Amundsen, Trond; Forsgren, Elisabet; Mobley, Kenyon B

    2014-07-01

    The strength of sexual selection may vary between species, among populations and within populations over time. While there is growing evidence that sexual selection may vary between years, less is known about variation in sexual selection within a season. Here, we investigate within-season variation in sexual selection in male two-spotted gobies (Gobiusculus flavescens). This marine fish experiences a seasonal change in the operational sex ratio from male- to female-biased, resulting in a dramatic decrease in male mating competition over the breeding season. We therefore expected stronger sexual selection on males early in the season. We sampled nests and nest-holding males early and late in the breeding season and used microsatellite markers to determine male mating and reproductive success. We first analysed sexual selection associated with the acquisition of nests by comparing nest-holding males to population samples. Among nest-holders, we calculated the potential strength of sexual selection and selection on phenotypic traits. We found remarkable within-season variation in sexual selection. Selection on male body size related to nest acquisition changed from positive to negative over the season. The opportunity for sexual selection among nest-holders was significantly greater early in the season rather than late in the season, partly due to more unmated males. Overall, our study documents a within-season change in sexual selection that corresponds with a predictable change in the operational sex ratio. We suggest that many species may experience within-season changes in sexual selection and that such dynamics are important for understanding how sexual selection operates in the wild.

  4. Seasonal differences in aerosol abundance and radiative forcing in months of contrasting emissions and rainfall over northern South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadavarte, P.; Venkataraman, C.; Cherian, R.; Patil, N.; Madhavan, B. L.; Gupta, T.; Kulkarni, S.; Carmichael, G. R.; Adhikary, B.

    2016-01-01

    A modeling framework was used to examine gaps in understanding of seasonal and spatial heterogeneity in aerosol abundance and radiative forcing over northern South Asia, whose glimpses are revealed in observational studies. Regionally representative emissions were used in chemical transport model simulations at a spatial resolution of 60 × 60 km2, in April, July and September, chosen as months of contrasting emissions and rainfall. Modeled aerosol abundance in northern South Asia was predominantly found to be dust and carbonaceous in April, dust and sulfate in July and sulfate and carbonaceous in September. Anthropogenic aerosols arose from energy-use emissions (from industrial sources, residential biofuel cooking, brick kilns) in all months, additionally from field burning in April, and incursion from East Asia in September. In April, carbonaceous aerosols were abundant from open burning of agricultural fields even at high altitude locations (Godavari), and of forests in the eastern Gangetic Plain (Kolkata). Direct radiative forcing and heating rate, calculated from OPAC-SBDART, using modeled aerosol fields, and corrected by MODIS AOD observations, showed regionally uniform atmospheric forcing in April, compared to that in other months, influenced by both dust and black carbon abundance. A strong spatial heterogeneity of radiative forcing and heating rate was found, with factor of 2.5-3.5 lower atmospheric forcing over the Tibet plateau than that over the Ganga Plain and Northwest in July and September. However, even over the remote Tibet plateau, there was significant anthropogenic contribution to atmospheric forcing and heating rate (45% in Apr, 75% in Sep). Wind fields showed black carbon transport from south Asia in April and east Asia in September. Further evaluation of the transport of dust and anthropogenic emissions from various source regions and their deposition in the Himalaya and Tibet, is important in understanding regional air quality and climate

  5. Compared optical performances of multifocal and monofocal intraocular lenses (contrast sensitivity and dynamic visual acuity)

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, W; Poirier, L; Coulon, P; Verin, P

    1994-01-01

    The functional results (contrast sensitivity and dynamic visual acuity) of 19 multifocal (3M design) and 14 all polymethylmethacrylate biconvex monofocal intraocular lenses (IOLs), 6 mm in optical diameter were compared. Best corrected visual acuity was > or = 8/10 (Monoyer chart) Parinaud 2 in all cases. Major differences of functional performance in favour of monofocal IOLs were found outside standard conditions of vision (low contrast and illumination levels). A significant difference in contrast sensitivity was found for each spatial frequency in favour of multifocal IOLs (0.0016 < p < 0.05). Mesopic vision was statistically higher in the monofocal IOL group (p = 0.0015). Moreover, dynamic visual acuity allowed accurate evaluation of the difference in performance between these two models of implant. In view of these results multifocal IOLs should be reserved for patients with normal psychosensitive adaptation; an ocular pathology that could alter contrast sensitivity or mesopic vision is a contraindication for multifocal IOLs. PMID:8199107

  6. Contact line dynamics of electroosmotic flows of incompressible binary fluid system with density and viscosity contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Pranab Kumar; DasGupta, Debabrata; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-03-01

    We consider electrically driven dynamics of an incompressible binary fluid, with contrasting densities and viscosities of the two phases, flowing through narrow fluidic channel with walls with predefined surface wettabilities. Through phase field formalism, we describe the interfacial kinetics in the presence of electro-hydrodynamic coupling and address the contact line dynamics of the two-fluid system. We unveil the interplay of the substrate wettability and the contrast in the fluid properties culminating in the forms of two distinct regimes—interface breakup regime and a stable interface regime. Through a parametric study, we demarcate the effect of the density and viscosity contrasts along with the electrokinetic parameters such as the surface charge and ionic concentration on the underlying contact-line-dynamics over interfacial scales.

  7. Food web dynamics in a seasonally varying wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeAngelis, D.L.; Trexler, J.C.; Donalson, D.D.

    2008-01-01

    A spatially explicit model is developed to simulate the small fish community and its underlying food web, in the freshwater marshes of the Everglades. The community is simplified to a few small fish species feeding on periphyton and invertebrates. Other compartments are detritus, crayfish, and a piscivorous fish species. This unit food web model is applied to each of the 10,000 spatial cells on a 100 x 100 pixel landscape. Seasonal variation in water level is assumed and rules are assigned for fish movement in response to rising and falling water levels, which can cause many spatial cells to alternate between flooded and dry conditions. It is shown that temporal variations of water level on a spatially heterogeneous landscape can maintain at least three competing fish species. In addition, these environmental factors can strongly affect the temporal variation of the food web caused by top-down control from the piscivorous fish.

  8. Estimating dynamic transmission model parameters for seasonal influenza by fitting to age and season-specific influenza-like illness incidence.

    PubMed

    Goeyvaerts, Nele; Willem, Lander; Van Kerckhove, Kim; Vandendijck, Yannick; Hanquet, Germaine; Beutels, Philippe; Hens, Niel

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic transmission models are essential to design and evaluate control strategies for airborne infections. Our objective was to develop a dynamic transmission model for seasonal influenza allowing to evaluate the impact of vaccinating specific age groups on the incidence of infection, disease and mortality. Projections based on such models heavily rely on assumed 'input' parameter values. In previous seasonal influenza models, these parameter values were commonly chosen ad hoc, ignoring between-season variability and without formal model validation or sensitivity analyses. We propose to directly estimate the parameters by fitting the model to age-specific influenza-like illness (ILI) incidence data over multiple influenza seasons. We used a weighted least squares (WLS) criterion to assess model fit and applied our method to Belgian ILI data over six influenza seasons. After exploring parameter importance using symbolic regression, we evaluated a set of candidate models of differing complexity according to the number of season-specific parameters. The transmission parameters (average R0, seasonal amplitude and timing of the seasonal peak), waning rates and the scale factor used for WLS optimization, influenced the fit to the observed ILI incidence the most. Our results demonstrate the importance of between-season variability in influenza transmission and our estimates are in line with the classification of influenza seasons according to intensity and vaccine matching.

  9. Characterizing the Seasonal Dynamics of Plant Community Photosynthesis Across a Range of Vegetation Types

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Lianhong; Post, Wilfred M; Baldocchi, Dennis; Black, Andy; Suyker, A.E.,; Verma, Shashi; Vesala, Timo; Wofsy, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The seasonal cycle of plant community photosynthesis is one of the most important biotic oscillations to mankind. This study built upon previous efforts to develop a comprehensive framework to studying this cycle systematically with eddy covariance flux measurements. We proposed a new function to represent the cycle and generalized a set of phenological indices to quantify its dynamic characteristics. We suggest that the seasonal variation of plant community photosynthesis generally consists of five distinctive phases in sequence each of which results from the interaction between the inherent biological and ecological processes and the progression of climatic conditions and reflects the unique functioning of plant community at different stages of the growing season. We applied the improved methodology to seven vegetation sites ranging from evergreen and deciduous forests to crop to grasslands and covering both cool-season (vegetation active during cool months, e.g. Mediterranean climate grasslands) and warm-season (vegetation active during warm months, e.g. temperate and boreal forests) vegetation types. Our application revealed interesting phenomena that had not been reported before and pointed to new research directions. We found that for the warm-season vegetation type, the recovery of plant community photosynthesis at the beginning of the growing season was faster than the senescence at the end of the growing season while for the coolseason vegetation type, the opposite was true. Furthermore, for the warm-season vegetation type, the recovery was closely correlated with the senescence such that a faster photosynthetic recovery implied a speedier photosynthetic senescence and vice versa. There was evidence that a similar close correlation could also exist for the cool-season vegetation type, and furthermore, the recovery-senescence relationship may be invariant between the warm-season and cool-season vegetation types up to an offset in the intercept. We also

  10. Noninvasive assessment of pulmonary emphysema using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Morino, Shigeyuki; Toba, Toshinari; Araki, Masato; Azuma, Takashi; Tsutsumi, Sadami; Tao, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tatsuo; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Tagawa, Tsutomu

    2006-01-01

    Emphysema tends to be complicated by diffuse abnormalities in the pulmonary peripheral microvasculature. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could provide a valid assessment of pulmonary blood flow as an indicator of the severity of emphysema. To do this, the authors compared MRI data with the pathological findings in lung tissue. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is a noninvasive method and can be used to repeatedly monitor clinicopathological severity. Using MRI clear pulmonary vascular information can be obtained easily, and the relative pulmonary blood flow in the lung parenchyma can be quantified.

  11. Contrasting strategies of water use: seasonal root growth and soil water depletion in maize and sunflower under deficit irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying root growth and soil water depletion in response to deficit irrigation is key to understanding crop ET under deficit irrigation as well as modeling crop water use across the season. We examined seasonal root growth and distribution patterns using a minirhizotron camera in maize and sunf...

  12. Dynamical analysis of the nonlinear response of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Carroll, James M; Calvisi, Michael L; Lauderbaugh, Leal K

    2013-05-01

    The nonlinear response of spherical ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles is investigated to understand the effects of common shells on the dynamics. A compressible form of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation is combined with a thin-shell model developed by Lars Hoff to simulate the radial response of contrast agents subject to ultrasound. The responses of Albunex, Sonazoid, and polymer shells are analyzed through the application of techniques from dynamical systems theory such as Poincaré sections, phase portraits, and bifurcation diagrams to illustrate the qualitative dynamics and transition to chaos that occurs under certain changes in system parameters. Corresponding calculations of Lyapunov exponents provide quantitative data on the system dynamics. The results indicate that Albunex and polymer shells sufficiently stabilize the response to prevent transition to the chaotic regime throughout typical clinical ranges of ultrasound pressure and frequency. By contrast, Sonazoid shells delay the onset of chaos relative to an unshelled bubble but do not prevent it. A contour plot identifying regions of periodic and chaotic behavior over clinical ranges of ultrasound pressure and frequency is provided for Sonazoid. This work characterizes the nonlinear response of various ultrasound contrast agents, and shows that shell properties have a profound influence on the dynamics.

  13. Seasonal Variations of the James Webb Space Telescope Orbital Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jonathan; Petersen, Jeremy; Villac, Benjamin; Yu, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    While spacecraft orbital variations due to the Earth's tilt and orbital eccentricity are well-known phenomena, the implications for the James Webb Space Telescope present unique features. We investigate the variability of the observatory trajectory characteristics, and present an explanation of some of these effects using invariant manifold theory and local approximation of the dynamics in terms of the restricted three-body problem.

  14. Emission and Chemistry of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) as Observed at T3: Contrast of the Dry and Wet Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; McKinney, K. A.; Watson, T. B.; Springston, S. R.; Seco, R.; Park, J. H.; Kim, S.; Shilling, J. E.; Guenther, A. B.; Yee, L.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Wernis, R. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Brito, J.; Artaxo, P.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Manzi, A. O.; Martin, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical rainforests are vigorous emitters of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) year round. Despite the small seasonal variation expected for tropical rainforests, converging evidence has shown that, among other factors, there can be considerable differences between the wet and dry seasons in leaf coverage, species composition, leaf-level photosynthetic photo flux, and ozone and NOx levels, which are important controlling factors of VOC emission and chemistry. There have been, however, a limited number of studies on the seasonality of VOC concentrations over tropical rainforests. As part of the GoAmazon 2014/5 Experiment, two-month continuous measurements of VOC compounds were carried out using a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) at the T3 site in both the wet and dry seasons of 2014. During the dry season most biogenic VOC species and their oxidation products exhibited increased concentration. For some species, the diel pattern was also different between the two seasons. Implications of the seasonality of the emission and chemistry of biogenic VOCs, in particular isoprene and terpenes, are discussed.

  15. A Theoretical Approach to Understanding Population Dynamics with Seasonal Developmental Durations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yijun; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2017-04-01

    There is a growing body of biological investigations to understand impacts of seasonally changing environmental conditions on population dynamics in various research fields such as single population growth and disease transmission. On the other side, understanding the population dynamics subject to seasonally changing weather conditions plays a fundamental role in predicting the trends of population patterns and disease transmission risks under the scenarios of climate change. With the host-macroparasite interaction as a motivating example, we propose a synthesized approach for investigating the population dynamics subject to seasonal environmental variations from theoretical point of view, where the model development, basic reproduction ratio formulation and computation, and rigorous mathematical analysis are involved. The resultant model with periodic delay presents a novel term related to the rate of change of the developmental duration, bringing new challenges to dynamics analysis. By investigating a periodic semiflow on a suitably chosen phase space, the global dynamics of a threshold type is established: all solutions either go to zero when basic reproduction ratio is less than one, or stabilize at a positive periodic state when the reproduction ratio is greater than one. The synthesized approach developed here is applicable to broader contexts of investigating biological systems with seasonal developmental durations.

  16. Optical tracking of contrast medium bolus to optimize bolus shape and timing in dynamic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisa, Fabian; Brauweiler, Robert; Peetz, Alexander; Hupfer, Martin; Nowak, Tristan; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-05-01

    One of the biggest challenges in dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is the optimal synchronization of scan start and duration with contrast medium administration in order to optimize image contrast and to reduce the amount of contrast medium. We present a new optically based approach, which was developed to investigate and optimize bolus timing and shape. The time-concentration curve of an intravenously injected test bolus of a dye is measured in peripheral vessels with an optical sensor prior to the diagnostic CT scan. The curves can be used to assess bolus shapes as a function of injection protocols and to determine contrast medium arrival times. Preliminary results for phantom and animal experiments showed the expected linear behavior between dye concentration and absorption. The kinetics of the dye was compared to iodinated contrast medium and was found to be in good agreement. The contrast enhancement curves were reliably detected in three mice with individual bolus shapes and delay times of 2.1, 3.5 and 6.1 s, respectively. The optical sensor appears to be a promising approach to optimize injection protocols and contrast enhancement timing and is applicable to all modalities without implying any additional radiation dose. Clinical tests are still necessary.

  17. Monthly to seasonal low flow prediction: statistical versus dynamical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita-Scholz, Monica; Klein, Bastian; Meissner, Dennis; Rademacher, Silke

    2016-04-01

    While the societal and economical impacts of floods are well documented and assessable, the impacts of lows flows are less studied and sometimes overlooked. For example, over the western part of Europe, due to intense inland waterway transportation, the economical loses due to low flows are often similar compared to the ones due to floods. In general, the low flow aspect has the tendency to be underestimated by the scientific community. One of the best examples in this respect is the facts that at European level most of the countries have an (early) flood alert system, but in many cases no real information regarding the development, evolution and impacts of droughts. Low flows, occurring during dry periods, may result in several types of problems to society and economy: e.g. lack of water for drinking, irrigation, industrial use and power production, deterioration of water quality, inland waterway transport, agriculture, tourism, issuing and renewing waste disposal permits, and for assessing the impact of prolonged drought on aquatic ecosystems. As such, the ever-increasing demand on water resources calls for better a management, understanding and prediction of the water deficit situation and for more reliable and extended studies regarding the evolution of the low flow situations. In order to find an optimized monthly to seasonal forecast procedure for the German waterways, the Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG) is exploring multiple approaches at the moment. On the one hand, based on the operational short- to medium-range forecasting chain, existing hydrological models are forced with two different hydro-meteorological inputs: (i) resampled historical meteorology generated by the Ensemble Streamflow Prediction approach and (ii) ensemble (re-) forecasts of ECMWF's global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model, which have to be downscaled and bias corrected before feeding the hydrological models. As a second approach BfG evaluates in cooperation with

  18. Improvements in Diagnostic Accuracy with Quantitative Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U UU 15 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code )   Table of Contents...Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging as an imaging biomarker. J. Clin. Oncol. 2006;24: 3293 –8. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2006.06.8080. 15

  19. Comparison of the Specificity of MREIT and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    Method; EIS, Electrical Impedance Scanning; OPAMP, Operational Amplifier; SVD, Singular Value Decomposition; NEX, Number of Excitations ; CE- MRI ... simulate a low conductivity region (Fig. 1). The plane of the disk was placed perpendicular to the main static MRI field. Four copper electrodes each...and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ozlem Birgul, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION

  20. Requirements for dynamical differential phase contrast x-ray imaging with a laboratory source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macindoe, David; Kitchen, Marcus J.; Irvine, Sarah C.; Fouras, Andreas; Morgan, Kaye S.

    2016-12-01

    X-ray phase contrast enables weakly-attenuating structures to be imaged, with bright synchrotron sources adding the ability to capture time sequences and analyse sample dynamics. Here, we describe the translation of dynamical differential phase contrast imaging from the synchrotron to a compact x-ray source, in order to achieve this kind of time sequence imaging in the laboratory. We formulate broadly-applicable set-up guidelines for the single-grid, single-exposure imaging technique using a divergent source, exploring the experimental factors that restrict set-up size, imaging sensitivity and sample size. Experimental images are presented using the single-grid phase contrast technique with a steel attenuation grid and a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source, enabling exposure times as short as 0.5 s for dynamic imaging. Differential phase contrast images were retrieved from phantoms, incorporating noise filtering to improve the low-count images encountered when imaging dynamics using short exposures.

  1. Seasonality and Dynamic Spatial Contagion of Air Pollution in 42 Chinese Cities

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhanqiong; Sriboonchita, Songsak; He, Min

    2013-01-01

    To monitor and improve the urban air quality, the Chinese government has begun to make many efforts, and the interregional cooperation to cut and improve air quality has been required. In this paper, we focus on the seasonality of the first and second moments of the daily air pollution indexes (APIs) of 42 Chinese sample cities over 10 years, from June 5, 2000 to March 4, 2010, and investigate the dynamic correlation of air pollution indexes (APIs) between 42 Chinese cities and their corresponding regional and national levels; comparison with the model without seasonal consideration is made. By adopting a DCC-GARCH model that accounts for the seasonality, we found that (i) the transformed DCC-GARCH model including seasonality dummies improves the estimation result in this study; (ii) the seasonality feature of the second moment follows that of the first moment, with the condition mean and variance of the second and autumn significantly lower than spring, whereas that of winter is higher than spring; (iii) the correlation between local APIs and their corresponding regional and national levels is dynamic; (iv) comparing with the DCC-GARCH model estimation, the transformed model does not change the feature of the dynamic correlations very much. PMID:23533348

  2. Seasonality and dynamic spatial contagion of air pollution in 42 Chinese cities.

    PubMed

    He, Zhanqiong; Sriboonchita, Songsak; He, Min

    2013-01-01

    To monitor and improve the urban air quality, the Chinese government has begun to make many efforts, and the interregional cooperation to cut and improve air quality has been required. In this paper, we focus on the seasonality of the first and second moments of the daily air pollution indexes (APIs) of 42 Chinese sample cities over 10 years, from June 5, 2000 to March 4, 2010, and investigate the dynamic correlation of air pollution indexes (APIs) between 42 Chinese cities and their corresponding regional and national levels; comparison with the model without seasonal consideration is made. By adopting a DCC-GARCH model that accounts for the seasonality, we found that (i) the transformed DCC-GARCH model including seasonality dummies improves the estimation result in this study; (ii) the seasonality feature of the second moment follows that of the first moment, with the condition mean and variance of the second and autumn significantly lower than spring, whereas that of winter is higher than spring; (iii) the correlation between local APIs and their corresponding regional and national levels is dynamic; (iv) comparing with the DCC-GARCH model estimation, the transformed model does not change the feature of the dynamic correlations very much.

  3. Vertical and seasonal dynamics of fungal communities in boreal Scots pine forest soil.

    PubMed

    Santalahti, Minna; Sun, Hui; Jumpponen, Ari; Pennanen, Taina; Heinonsalo, Jussi

    2016-11-01

    Fungal communities are important for carbon (C) transformations in boreal forests that are one of the largest C pools in terrestrial ecosystems, warranting thus further investigation of fungal community dynamics in time and space. We investigated fungal diversity and community composition seasonally and across defined soil horizons in boreal Scots pine forest in Finland using 454 pyrosequencing. We collected a total of 120 samples from five vertical soil horizons monthly from March to October; in March, under snow. Boreal forest soil generally harbored diverse fungal communities across soil horizons. The communities shifted drastically and rapidly over time. In late winter, saprotrophs dominated the community and were replaced by ectomycorrhizal fungi during the growing season. Our studies are among the first to dissect the spatial and temporal dynamics in boreal forest ecosystems and highlights the ecological importance of vertically distinct communities and their rapid seasonal dynamics. As climate change is predicted to result in warmer and longer snow-free winter seasons, as well as increase the rooting depth of trees in boreal forest, the seasonal and vertical distribution of fungal communities may change. These changes are likely to affect the organic matter decomposition by the soil-inhabiting fungi and thus alter organic C pools.

  4. Diversity in plant hydraulic traits explains seasonal and inter-annual variations of vegetation dynamics in seasonally dry tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangtao; Medvigy, David; Powers, Jennifer S; Becknell, Justin M; Guan, Kaiyu

    2016-10-01

    We assessed whether diversity in plant hydraulic traits can explain the observed diversity in plant responses to water stress in seasonally dry tropical forests (SDTFs). The Ecosystem Demography model 2 (ED2) was updated with a trait-driven mechanistic plant hydraulic module, as well as novel drought-phenology and plant water stress schemes. Four plant functional types were parameterized on the basis of meta-analysis of plant hydraulic traits. Simulations from both the original and the updated ED2 were evaluated against 5 yr of field data from a Costa Rican SDTF site and remote-sensing data over Central America. The updated model generated realistic plant hydraulic dynamics, such as leaf water potential and stem sap flow. Compared with the original ED2, predictions from our novel trait-driven model matched better with observed growth, phenology and their variations among functional groups. Most notably, the original ED2 produced unrealistically small leaf area index (LAI) and underestimated cumulative leaf litter. Both of these biases were corrected by the updated model. The updated model was also better able to simulate spatial patterns of LAI dynamics in Central America. Plant hydraulic traits are intercorrelated in SDTFs. Mechanistic incorporation of plant hydraulic traits is necessary for the simulation of spatiotemporal patterns of vegetation dynamics in SDTFs in vegetation models.

  5. Skillful seasonal forecasts of Arctic sea ice retreat and advance dates in a dynamical forecast system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmond, M.; Reader, M. C.; Flato, G. M.; Merryfield, W. J.; Tivy, A.

    2016-12-01

    The need for skillful seasonal forecasts of Arctic sea ice is rapidly increasing. Technology to perform such forecasts with coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice systems has only recently become available, with previous skill evaluations mainly limited to area-integrated quantities. Here we show, based on a large set of retrospective ensemble model forecasts, that a dynamical forecast system produces skillful seasonal forecasts of local sea ice retreat and advance dates - variables that are of great interest to a wide range of end users. Advance dates can generally be skillfully predicted at longer lead times ( 5 months on average) than retreat dates ( 3 months). The skill of retreat date forecasts mainly stems from persistence of initial sea ice anomalies, whereas advance date forecasts benefit from longer time scale and more predictable variability in ocean temperatures. These results suggest that further investments in the development of dynamical seasonal forecast systems may result in significant socioeconomic benefits.

  6. Coccolithophore Dynamics In Alfonso Basin: Seasonal Variation And Species Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés, M. Y.; Urcádiz-Cázares, F. J.; Silverberg, N.; Aguirre-Bahena, F.; Bollmann, J.

    2007-05-01

    The production of organic and inorganic carbon by coccolithophores is considered to play a significant role in the global carbon cycle. Therefore, detailed knowledge of their vertical flux is needed. Here we present a time-series record of coccolithophore standing stock and vertical coccolith flux from Alfonso Basin, southwest coast of the Gulf of California. This location is of particular interest as it is very sensitive to changes in environmental conditions and these may be preserved in laminated underlying sediments. Coccolithophore standing stock and assemblage composition were obtained from plankton samples taken at 3- month intervals during 2002-2003. Furthermore, coccolith flux and species composition were determined in samples from a time-series sediment trap (sampling intervals 7-14 days) deployed at 350 m depth from January 2002 to October 2003. The coccolithophore standing stock and coccolith flux varied considerably between sampling periods but, in general, a seasonal pattern was apparent, with low fluxes in spring-summer and maximal values in autumn- winter. During 2002, fluxes ranged from 0.02x108 coccoliths m-2 d-1 in summer to 64.7x108 coccoliths m-2 d-1 in autumn. Values increased considerably during 2003: registering 52.4 x108 coccoliths m-2 d-1 in spring to the highest (128.8x108 coccoliths m-2 d-1) in late summer/autumn. The latter are related to hurricanes that occurred during the sampling period. In total 47 taxa were identified but only three species, Gephyrocapsa oceanica (43.6%), Emiliania huxleyi (28%) and Florisphera profunda (15.7%), constituted 88 percent of the total coccolith flux. This corresponds to the species composition observed in the water column. G. oceanica was always present and its flux pattern followed that of the total flux. The flux of E. huxleyi remained almost constant during the observed time period whereas F. profunda showed peak fluxes in autumn. Although the cosmopolitan species E. huxleyi has been considered the

  7. Tumor characterization in small animals using magnetic resonance-guided dynamic contrast enhanced diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuting; Thayer, Dave; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2011-10-01

    We present a magnetic resonance (MR)-guided near-infrared dynamic contrast enhanced diffuse optical tomography (DCE-DOT) system for characterization of tumors using an optical contrast agent (ICG) and a MR contrast agent [Gd-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)] in a rat model. Both ICG and Gd-DTPA are injected and monitored simultaneously using a combined MRI-DOT system, resulting in accurate co-registration between two imaging modalities. Fisher rats bearing R3230 breast tumor are imaged using this hybrid system. For the first time, enhancement kinetics of the exogenous contrast ICG is recovered from the DCE-DOT data using MR anatomical a priori information. As tumors grow, they undergo necrosis and the tissue transforms from viable to necrotic. The results show that the physiological changes between viable and necrotic tissue can be differentiated more accurately based on the ICG enhancement kinetics when MR anatomical information is utilized.

  8. Dynamic contrast-enhanced optical imaging of in vivo organ function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tracy; Bouchard, Matthew B.; McCaslin, Addason F. H.; Blaner, William S.; Levenson, Richard M.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Conventional approaches to optical small animal molecular imaging suffer from poor resolution, limited sensitivity, and unreliable quantitation, often reducing their utility in practice. We previously demonstrated that the in vivo dynamics of an injected contrast agent could be exploited to provide high-contrast anatomical registration, owing to the temporal differences in each organ’s response to the circulating fluorophore. This study extends this approach to explore whether dynamic contrast-enhanced optical imaging (DyCE) can allow noninvasive, in vivo assessment of organ function by quantifying the differing cellular uptake or wash-out dynamics of an agent in healthy and damaged organs. Specifically, we used DyCE to visualize and measure the organ-specific uptake dynamics of indocyanine green before and after induction of transient liver damage. DyCE imaging was performed longitudinally over nine days, and blood samples collected at each imaging session were analyzed for alanine aminotransferase (ALT), a liver enzyme assessed clinically as a measure of liver damage. We show that changes in DyCE-derived dynamics of liver and kidney dye uptake caused by liver damage correlate linearly with ALT concentrations, with an r2 value of 0.91. Our results demonstrate that DyCE can provide quantitative, in vivo, longitudinal measures of organ function with inexpensive and simple data acquisition. PMID:23085904

  9. Dynamic contrast-enhanced optical imaging of in vivo organ function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoozegar, Cyrus B.; Wang, Tracy; Bouchard, Matthew B.; McCaslin, Addason F. H.; Blaner, William S.; Levenson, Richard M.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.

    2012-09-01

    Conventional approaches to optical small animal molecular imaging suffer from poor resolution, limited sensitivity, and unreliable quantitation, often reducing their utility in practice. We previously demonstrated that the in vivo dynamics of an injected contrast agent could be exploited to provide high-contrast anatomical registration, owing to the temporal differences in each organ's response to the circulating fluorophore. This study extends this approach to explore whether dynamic contrast-enhanced optical imaging (DyCE) can allow noninvasive, in vivo assessment of organ function by quantifying the differing cellular uptake or wash-out dynamics of an agent in healthy and damaged organs. Specifically, we used DyCE to visualize and measure the organ-specific uptake dynamics of indocyanine green before and after induction of transient liver damage. DyCE imaging was performed longitudinally over nine days, and blood samples collected at each imaging session were analyzed for alanine aminotransferase (ALT), a liver enzyme assessed clinically as a measure of liver damage. We show that changes in DyCE-derived dynamics of liver and kidney dye uptake caused by liver damage correlate linearly with ALT concentrations, with an r2 value of 0.91. Our results demonstrate that DyCE can provide quantitative, in vivo, longitudinal measures of organ function with inexpensive and simple data acquisition.

  10. Dynamic illusory size contrast: A relative-size illusion modulated by stimulus motion and eye movements

    PubMed Central

    Mruczek, Ryan E. B.; Blair, Christopher D.; Caplovitz, Gideon P.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel size-contrast illusion that depends on the dynamic nature of the stimulus. In the dynamic illusory size-contrast (DISC) effect, the viewer perceives the size of a target bar to be shrinking when it is surrounded by an expanding box and when there are additional dynamic cues such as eye movements, changes in retinal eccentricity of the bar, or changes in the spatial position of the bar. Importantly, the expanding box was necessary but not sufficient to obtain an illusory percept, distinguishing the DISC effect from other size-contrast illusions. We propose that the visual system is weighting the different sources of information that contribute to size perception based on the level of uncertainty in the retinal image size of the object. Whereas the growing box normally has a weak influence on the perceived size of the target bar, this influence is enhanced when other dynamic changes in the environment (e.g., eye movements, changes in retinal eccentricity, and target motion) lead to uncertainty in the retinal size of the target bar. Given the compelling nature of the DISC effect and the inherently dynamic nature of our environment, these factors are likely to play an important role in everyday size judgments. PMID:24591567

  11. Quantifying Intracranial Plaque Permeability with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Vakil, P.; Elmokadem, A.H.; Syed, F.H.; Cantrell, C.G.; Dehkordi, F.H.; Carroll, T.J.; Ansari, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Intracranial atherosclerotic disease plaque hyperintensity and/or gadolinium contrast enhancement have been studied as imaging biomarkers of acutely symptomatic ischemic presentations using single static MR imaging measurements. However, the value in modeling the dynamics of intracranial plaque permeability has yet to be evaluated. The purpose of this study was to use dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging to quantify the contrast permeability of intracranial atherosclerotic disease plaques in symptomatic patients and to compare these parameters against existing markers of plaque volatility using black-blood MR imaging pulse sequences. MATERIALS AND METHODS We performed a prospective study of contrast uptake dynamics in the major intracranial vessels proximal and immediately distal to the circle of Willis using dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, specifically in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease. Using the Modified Tofts model, we extracted the volume transfer constant (Ktrans) and fractional plasma volume (Vp) parameters from plaque-enhancement curves. Using regression analyses, we compared these parameters against time from symptom onset as well as intraplaque hyperintensity and postcontrast enhancement derived from T1 SPACE, a black-blood MR vessel wall imaging sequence. RESULTS We completed analysis in 10 patients presenting with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease. Ktrans and Vp measurements were higher in plaques versus healthy white matter and similar or less than values in the choroid plexus. Only Ktrans correlated significantly with time from symptom onset (P = .02). Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging parameters were not found to correlate significantly with intraplaque enhancement or intraplaque hyperintensity (P = .4 and P = .17, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Elevated Ktrans and Vp values found in intracranial atherosclerotic disease plaques versus healthy white matter suggest that dynamic

  12. Peripartal rumination dynamics and health status in cows calving in hot and cool seasons.

    PubMed

    Paudyal, S; Maunsell, F; Richeson, J; Risco, C; Donovan, A; Pinedo, P

    2016-11-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effect of season of calving, associated with variable levels of heat stress, on the dynamics of rumination during the prepartum period and early lactation of cows that were healthy or affected by peripartal health disorders. Three weeks before the estimated due date, 210 multiparous Holstein cows at the University of Florida Dairy Unit were affixed with a neck collar containing rumination loggers, providing rumination time (RT) in 2-h periods. One blood sample was collected in a subpopulation of cows (n=76) at 12 to 48h postcalving to assess metabolic status by determining serum calcium, nonesterified fatty acid, and β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. The occurrence of peripartal health disorders (dystocia, clinical ketosis, clinical hypocalcemia, metritis, and mastitis) was assessed by University of Florida veterinarians and trained farm personnel. We analyzed the dynamics of daily RT over ± 14d relative to parturition in cows that were healthy or affected by specific health disorders by season of calving [hot season, June to September (n=77); cool season, November to April (n=118)] using repeated measures analysis and comparison of least squares means at different time points relative to calving. Rumination was consistently reduced on the day of calving in both healthy and sick cows in both the hot and cool seasons. Only hot-season calvings had shorter average daily RT prepartum and postpartum in cows affected by severe negative energy balance and subclinical ketosis. Dystocia during the hot season was associated with shorter daily RT prepartum; for cool-season calvings, cows with dystocia had reduced RT postpartum. We also observed reduced RT in cows with ketosis prepartum and postpartum in both the hot and cool seasons. Daily RT was reduced postpartum in cows with hypocalcemia and mastitis that calved during the cool season, and it was shorter in cows with metritis in both the hot and cool seasons. Our results indicated that

  13. Organic and inorganic carbon fluxes in a tropical river system (Tana River, Kenya) during contrasting wet seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geeraert, Naomi; Omengo, Fred O.; Bouillon, Steven; Borges, Alberto V.; Govers, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    Tropical river systems are often subjected to strong seasonality; in the Tana River (Kenya), for example, ~60% of the annual discharge takes place during a 4-month period. As different carbon pools are transported by the river, seasonal differences in carbon fluxes will also occur. This can furthermore be enhanced or attenuated due to changes in the intensity of carbon transformation processes, such as microbial respiration and primary production, during the wet season. Besides that, seasonal flooding of flood plains or flooded forest is known to be a major driver of the biogeochemical and ecological functioning of tropical rivers ("flood pulse concept") and has been shown to be one of the major drivers of the CO2 emissions from the Amazon River. We monitored the fluxes of different carbon pools at two sites spaced 385 km apart along the lower Tana River (Kenya), which is characterized by a highly seasonal flow regime. Water samples were taken at daily resolution during three wet seasons. During one of those seasons (May-June 2013), considerable flooding took place between both stations, while the other two wet seasons (Oct-Nov 2012 and April-May 2014) were characterised by several distinct discharge peaks, without leading to substantial overbank flooding. The flux of particulate organic carbon (POC) was observed to decrease in the downstream direction by 8 to 33% during all measurement periods. Fluxes of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) also decreased in the downstream direction during the wet seasons without flooding (by 10-38%) but increased drastically (increase of 231%) during the wet season with flooding. The dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) flux increased downstream (by 6% to 62%) during all measurement periods. The total carbon flux (POC+DOC+DIC) increased by 33% in the wet season with flooding (2013), but decreased by 23% and 3%, respectively, during the 2012 and 2014 wet seasons. Flooding thus affected the relative contribution of different C pools to the

  14. Numerical Modeling of 3-D Dynamics of Ultrasound Contrast Agent Microbubbles Using the Boundary Integral Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvisi, Michael; Manmi, Kawa; Wang, Qianxi

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are microbubbles stabilized with a shell typically of lipid, polymer, or protein and are emerging as a unique tool for noninvasive therapies ranging from gene delivery to tumor ablation. The nonspherical dynamics of contrast agents are thought to play an important role in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications, for example, causing the emission of subharmonic frequency components and enhancing the uptake of therapeutic agents across cell membranes and tissue interfaces. A three-dimensional model for nonspherical contrast agent dynamics based on the boundary integral method is presented. The effects of the encapsulating shell are approximated by adapting Hoff's model for thin-shell, spherical contrast agents to the nonspherical case. A high-quality mesh of the bubble surface is maintained by implementing a hybrid approach of the Lagrangian method and elastic mesh technique. Numerical analyses for the dynamics of UCAs in an infinite liquid and near a rigid wall are performed in parameter regimes of clinical relevance. The results show that the presence of a coating significantly reduces the oscillation amplitude and period, increases the ultrasound pressure amplitude required to incite jetting, and reduces the jet width and velocity.

  15. Myocardial physiology measurements using contrast enhanced dynamic computed tomography: simulation of beam hardening effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Minsong; Stantz, Keith M.; Liang, Yun

    2006-03-01

    Initial animal study for quantifying myocardial physiology through contrast-enhanced dynamic x-ray CT suggested that beam hardening is one of the limiting factors for accurate regional physiology measurement. In this study, a series of simulations were performed to investigate its deterioration effects and two correction algorithms were adapted to evaluate for their efficiency in improving the measurements. The simulation tool consists of a module simulating data acquisition of a real polyenergetic scanner system and a heart phantom consisting of simple geometric objects representing ventricles and myocardium. Each phantom component was modeled with time-varying attenuation coefficients determined by ideal iodine contrast dynamic curves obtained from experimental data or simulation. A compartment model was used to generate the ideal myocardium contrast curve using physiological parameters consistent with measured values. Projection data of the phantom were simulated and reconstructed to produce a sequence of simulated CT images. Simulated contrast dynamic curves were fitted to the compartmental model and the resultant physiological parameters were compared with ideal values to estimate the errors induced by beam hardening artifacts. The simulations yielded similar deterioration patterns of contrast dynamic curves as observed in the initial study. Significant underestimation of left ventricle curves and corruption of regional myocardium curves result in systematic errors of regional perfusion up to approximately 24% and overestimates of fractional blood volume (f iv) up to 13%. The correction algorithms lead to significant improvement with errors of perfusion reduced to 7% and errors of f iv within 2% which shows promise for more robust myocardial physiology measurement.

  16. Effect of speaking rate and contrastive stress on formant dynamics and vowel perception.

    PubMed

    Pitermann, M

    2000-06-01

    Vowel formants play an important role in speech theories and applications; however, the same formant values measured for the steady-state part of a vowel can correspond to different vowel categories. Experimental evidence indicates that dynamic information can also contribute to vowel characterization. Hence, dynamically modeling formant transitions may lead to quantitatively testable predictions in vowel categorization. Because the articulatory strategy used to manage different speaking rates and contrastive stress may depend on speaker and situation, the parameter values of a dynamic formant model may vary with speaking rate and stress. In most experiments speaking rate is rarely controlled, only two or three rates are tested, and most corpora contain just a few repetitions of each item. As a consequence, the dependence of dynamic models on those factors is difficult to gauge. This article presents a study of 2300 [iai] or [i epsilon i] stimuli produced by two speakers at nine or ten speaking rates in a carrier sentence for two contrastive stress patterns. The corpus was perceptually evaluated by naive listeners. Formant frequencies were measured during the steady-state parts of the stimuli, and the formant transitions were dynamically and kinematically modeled. The results indicate that (1) the corpus was characterized by a contextual assimilation instead of a centralization effect; (2) dynamic or kinematic modeling was equivalent as far as the analysis of the model parameters was concerned; (3) the dependence of the model parameter estimates on speaking rate and stress suggests that the formant transitions were sharper for high speaking rate, but no consistent trend was found for contrastive stress; (4) the formant frequencies measured in the steady-state parts of the vowels were sufficient to explain the perceptual results while the dynamic parameters of the models were not.

  17. Dynamical analysis of seasonal migrating population; the effect of regular hunting to the coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambas, T. J. M.; Khaliq, B. F.; Waluyo, D. S. Y. S.; Putra, P. S.; Soewono, E.

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal migration among wild populations is commonly seen especially in the wild life region. The migration takes place during a certain season where logistical condition and the existing territory can no longer support the life of the whole population. In this case portion of the population migrate to the better place as part of their survival, and returning back to the home place when the logistical condition is improved. Here we model the dynamic of North-South annual migration of Impala population in Zimbabwe, where portion of population in the Southern part move to the North in the beginning of the dry season and portion of them return back to the South in the wet season. Here the North area has a better environmental carrying capacity than the South. Different processes take place during the year, partial migration to the south (during the month of December and January), partial migration to the north (during the month of June and July), and birth process (during the month of November and December). We construct a discrete dynamical model for simulating the annual migrating process. It is found that a stable co-existence always occurs when no hunting takes place in all season. When hunting is allowed, the co-existence could be severely affected. We obtain here a threshold condition for co-existence and show numerical simulations for different hunting scenarios.

  18. Seasonal dynamics of tick species in an urban park of Rome.

    PubMed

    Di Luca, Marco; Toma, Luciano; Bianchi, Riccardo; Quarchioni, Elisa; Marini, Luca; Mancini, Fabiola; Ciervo, Alessandra; Khoury, Cristina

    2013-12-01

    Regular collections were obtained in the Natural Reserve of the Insugherata of Rome during 2011 in order to obtain the tick species composition and the respective seasonal dynamics of the area. A total of 325 ticks was collected in selected sites by means of drag sampling. Among the identified species, Rhipicephalus turanicus was the most abundant (72.3%), followed by Ixodes ricinus (19.7%), Dermacentor marginatus (6.5%), Haemaphysalis punctata (1.2%), and Rhipicephalus bursa (0.3%). R. turanicus occurred mainly in pastures, showing a mono-modal seasonal activity pattern from spring to early summer. Questing I. ricinus were prevalent in woodland from October to May, and the seasonal trend of specimens showed a weak peak in winter. Although adult D. marginatus exhibited seasonal dynamics similar to I. ricinus, with an activity period from October to April, this species occurred in a different environment (pasture) and with considerably lower densities. Haemaphysalis punctata and R. bursa were rare, with an apparent autumn and autumn-winter seasonal activity, respectively. While the species diversity recorded appears as an unequivocal consequence of the natural state of the park, the remarkable R. turanicus density could be a direct effect of the recent introduction of wild boar, as carriers, from the close Veio Park. The presence of the species, a proven vector of various diseases in humans and domestic animals, is discussed in the light of the possible risk of tick-bite exposure of park workers and visitors.

  19. Predicting the evolutionary dynamics of seasonal adaptation to novel climates in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Perry, Emily O; Wang, Jonathan A; Braun, Peter T; Migneault, Andrew; Cooper, Martha D; Metcalf, C Jessica E; Schmitt, Johanna

    2016-05-17

    Predicting whether and how populations will adapt to rapid climate change is a critical goal for evolutionary biology. To examine the genetic basis of fitness and predict adaptive evolution in novel climates with seasonal variation, we grew a diverse panel of the annual plant Arabidopsis thaliana (multiparent advanced generation intercross lines) in controlled conditions simulating four climates: a present-day reference climate, an increased-temperature climate, a winter-warming only climate, and a poleward-migration climate with increased photoperiod amplitude. In each climate, four successive seasonal cohorts experienced dynamic daily temperature and photoperiod variation over a year. We measured 12 traits and developed a genomic prediction model for fitness evolution in each seasonal environment. This model was used to simulate evolutionary trajectories of the base population over 50 y in each climate, as well as 100-y scenarios of gradual climate change following adaptation to a reference climate. Patterns of plastic and evolutionary fitness response varied across seasons and climates. The increased-temperature climate promoted genetic divergence of subpopulations across seasons, whereas in the winter-warming and poleward-migration climates, seasonal genetic differentiation was reduced. In silico "resurrection experiments" showed limited evolutionary rescue compared with the plastic response of fitness to seasonal climate change. The genetic basis of adaptation and, consequently, the dynamics of evolutionary change differed qualitatively among scenarios. Populations with fewer founding genotypes and populations with genetic diversity reduced by prior selection adapted less well to novel conditions, demonstrating that adaptation to rapid climate change requires the maintenance of sufficient standing variation.

  20. Human birth seasonality: latitudinal gradient and interplay with childhood disease dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Bakker, Micaela; Bakker, Kevin M.; King, Aaron A.; Rohani, Pejman

    2014-01-01

    More than a century of ecological studies have demonstrated the importance of demography in shaping spatial and temporal variation in population dynamics. Surprisingly, the impact of seasonal recruitment on infectious disease systems has received much less attention. Here, we present data encompassing 78 years of monthly natality in the USA, and reveal pronounced seasonality in birth rates, with geographical and temporal variation in both the peak birth timing and amplitude. The timing of annual birth pulses followed a latitudinal gradient, with northern states exhibiting spring/summer peaks and southern states exhibiting autumn peaks, a pattern we also observed throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Additionally, the amplitude of United States birth seasonality was more than twofold greater in southern states versus those in the north. Next, we examined the dynamical impact of birth seasonality on childhood disease incidence, using a mechanistic model of measles. Birth seasonality was found to have the potential to alter the magnitude and periodicity of epidemics, with the effect dependent on both birth peak timing and amplitude. In a simulation study, we fitted an susceptible-exposed-infected-recovered model to simulated data, and demonstrated that ignoring birth seasonality can bias the estimation of critical epidemiological parameters. Finally, we carried out statistical inference using historical measles incidence data from New York City. Our analyses did not identify the predicted systematic biases in parameter estimates. This may be owing to the well-known frequency-locking between measles epidemics and seasonal transmission rates, or may arise from substantial uncertainty in multiple model parameters and estimation stochasticity. PMID:24695423

  1. Human birth seasonality: latitudinal gradient and interplay with childhood disease dynamics.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Bakker, Micaela; Bakker, Kevin M; King, Aaron A; Rohani, Pejman

    2014-05-22

    More than a century of ecological studies have demonstrated the importance of demography in shaping spatial and temporal variation in population dynamics. Surprisingly, the impact of seasonal recruitment on infectious disease systems has received much less attention. Here, we present data encompassing 78 years of monthly natality in the USA, and reveal pronounced seasonality in birth rates, with geographical and temporal variation in both the peak birth timing and amplitude. The timing of annual birth pulses followed a latitudinal gradient, with northern states exhibiting spring/summer peaks and southern states exhibiting autumn peaks, a pattern we also observed throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Additionally, the amplitude of United States birth seasonality was more than twofold greater in southern states versus those in the north. Next, we examined the dynamical impact of birth seasonality on childhood disease incidence, using a mechanistic model of measles. Birth seasonality was found to have the potential to alter the magnitude and periodicity of epidemics, with the effect dependent on both birth peak timing and amplitude. In a simulation study, we fitted an susceptible-exposed-infected-recovered model to simulated data, and demonstrated that ignoring birth seasonality can bias the estimation of critical epidemiological parameters. Finally, we carried out statistical inference using historical measles incidence data from New York City. Our analyses did not identify the predicted systematic biases in parameter estimates. This may be owing to the well-known frequency-locking between measles epidemics and seasonal transmission rates, or may arise from substantial uncertainty in multiple model parameters and estimation stochasticity.

  2. Predicting the evolutionary dynamics of seasonal adaptation to novel climates in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Perry, Emily O.; Wang, Jonathan A.; Braun, Peter T.; Migneault, Andrew; Cooper, Martha D.; Metcalf, C. Jessica E.; Schmitt, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Predicting whether and how populations will adapt to rapid climate change is a critical goal for evolutionary biology. To examine the genetic basis of fitness and predict adaptive evolution in novel climates with seasonal variation, we grew a diverse panel of the annual plant Arabidopsis thaliana (multiparent advanced generation intercross lines) in controlled conditions simulating four climates: a present-day reference climate, an increased-temperature climate, a winter-warming only climate, and a poleward-migration climate with increased photoperiod amplitude. In each climate, four successive seasonal cohorts experienced dynamic daily temperature and photoperiod variation over a year. We measured 12 traits and developed a genomic prediction model for fitness evolution in each seasonal environment. This model was used to simulate evolutionary trajectories of the base population over 50 y in each climate, as well as 100-y scenarios of gradual climate change following adaptation to a reference climate. Patterns of plastic and evolutionary fitness response varied across seasons and climates. The increased-temperature climate promoted genetic divergence of subpopulations across seasons, whereas in the winter-warming and poleward-migration climates, seasonal genetic differentiation was reduced. In silico “resurrection experiments” showed limited evolutionary rescue compared with the plastic response of fitness to seasonal climate change. The genetic basis of adaptation and, consequently, the dynamics of evolutionary change differed qualitatively among scenarios. Populations with fewer founding genotypes and populations with genetic diversity reduced by prior selection adapted less well to novel conditions, demonstrating that adaptation to rapid climate change requires the maintenance of sufficient standing variation. PMID:27140640

  3. The Seasonal Dynamics of Artificial Nest Predation Rates along Edges in a Mosaic Managed Reedbed.

    PubMed

    Malzer, Iain; Helm, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Boundaries between different habitats can be responsible for changes in species interactions, including modified rates of encounter between predators and prey. Such 'edge effects' have been reported in nesting birds, where nest predation rates can be increased at habitat edges. The literature concerning edge effects on nest predation rates reveals a wide variation in results, even within single habitats, suggesting edge effects are not fixed, but dynamic throughout space and time. This study demonstrates the importance of considering dynamic mechanisms underlying edge effects and their relevance when undertaking habitat management. In reedbed habitats, management in the form of mosaic winter reed cutting can create extensive edges which change rapidly with reed regrowth during spring. We investigate the seasonal dynamics of reedbed edges using an artificial nest experiment based on the breeding biology of a reedbed specialist. We first demonstrate that nest predation decreases with increasing distance from the edge of cut reed blocks, suggesting edge effects have a pivotal role in this system. Using repeats throughout the breeding season we then confirm that nest predation rates are temporally dynamic and decline with the regrowth of reed. However, effects of edges on nest predation were consistent throughout the season. These results are of practical importance when considering appropriate habitat management, suggesting that reed cutting may heighten nest predation, especially before new growth matures. They also contribute directly to an overall understanding of the dynamic processes underlying edge effects and their potential role as drivers of time-dependent habitat use.

  4. The Seasonal Dynamics of Artificial Nest Predation Rates along Edges in a Mosaic Managed Reedbed

    PubMed Central

    Malzer, Iain; Helm, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Boundaries between different habitats can be responsible for changes in species interactions, including modified rates of encounter between predators and prey. Such ‘edge effects’ have been reported in nesting birds, where nest predation rates can be increased at habitat edges. The literature concerning edge effects on nest predation rates reveals a wide variation in results, even within single habitats, suggesting edge effects are not fixed, but dynamic throughout space and time. This study demonstrates the importance of considering dynamic mechanisms underlying edge effects and their relevance when undertaking habitat management. In reedbed habitats, management in the form of mosaic winter reed cutting can create extensive edges which change rapidly with reed regrowth during spring. We investigate the seasonal dynamics of reedbed edges using an artificial nest experiment based on the breeding biology of a reedbed specialist. We first demonstrate that nest predation decreases with increasing distance from the edge of cut reed blocks, suggesting edge effects have a pivotal role in this system. Using repeats throughout the breeding season we then confirm that nest predation rates are temporally dynamic and decline with the regrowth of reed. However, effects of edges on nest predation were consistent throughout the season. These results are of practical importance when considering appropriate habitat management, suggesting that reed cutting may heighten nest predation, especially before new growth matures. They also contribute directly to an overall understanding of the dynamic processes underlying edge effects and their potential role as drivers of time-dependent habitat use. PMID:26448338

  5. Seasonal and interannual litter dynamics of a tropical semideciduous forest of the southern Amazon Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanches, Luciana; Valentini, Carla Maria Abido; Júnior, Osvaldo Borges Pinto; de Souza Nogueira, José; Vourlitis, George Louis; Biudes, Marcelo Sacardi; da Silva, Carlos José; Bambi, Paulino; de Almeida Lobo, Francisco

    2008-12-01

    This study analyzed how seasonal and interannual variations in climate alter litter dynamics, including production, decomposition, and accumulation. Monthly measurements of leaf, stem, and reproductive (flower plus fruit) litter and the forest floor litter mass were combined with a mass balance model to determine rates of litter decomposition for a semideciduous tropical forest located in the rain forest-savanna ecotone of the southern Amazon Basin for 2001-2007. Annual rates of litter production varied between 8 and 10.5 Mg ha-1 a-1, and leaf litter production accounted for the majority (˜70%) of the total litter production. Leaf litter production peaked at the end of the May-August dry season while stem litter production peaked during the wet season and reproductive litter production peaked during the dry-wet season transition. Forest floor litter mass ranged between 5 and 8 Mg ha-1 over the study period and generally declined as litter inputs declined. Litter decomposition rates were remarkably stable from year-to-year and varied between 10.8 and 12.4 Mg ha-1 a-1. On average, rates of litter decomposition were highest during the dry-wet season transition. Overall, our results suggest that rainfall variability directly altered litter production dynamics and indirectly altered forest floor litter mass and decomposition kinetics through its effect on litter production. Future changes in seasonal and/or interannual rainfall patterns, whether in response to El Niño or to anthropogenic climate change, will likely have important consequences for the litter dynamics of Amazonian semideciduous forest.

  6. Vibrational dynamics of zero-field-splitting hamiltonian in gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents from ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lasoroski, Aurélie; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Pollet, Rodolphe

    2014-07-07

    The electronic relaxation of gadolinium complexes used as MRI contrast agents was studied theoretically by following the short time evolution of zero-field-splitting parameters. The statistical analysis of ab initio molecular dynamics trajectories provided a clear separation between static and transient contributions to the zero-field-splitting. For the latter, the correlation time was estimated at approximately 0.1 ps. The influence of the ligand was also probed by replacing one pendant arm of our reference macrocyclic complex by a bulkier phosphonate arm. In contrast to the transient contribution, the static zero-field-splitting was significantly influenced by this substitution.

  7. Seasonal diversity and dynamics of haptophytes in the Skagerrak, Norway, explored by high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Egge, Elianne Sirnæs; Johannessen, Torill Vik; Andersen, Tom; Eikrem, Wenche; Bittner, Lucie; Larsen, Aud; Sandaa, Ruth-Anne; Edvardsen, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae in the division Haptophyta play key roles in the marine ecosystem and in global biogeochemical processes. Despite their ecological importance, knowledge on seasonal dynamics, community composition and abundance at the species level is limited due to their small cell size and few morphological features visible under the light microscope. Here, we present unique data on haptophyte seasonal diversity and dynamics from two annual cycles, with the taxonomic resolution and sampling depth obtained with high-throughput sequencing. From outer Oslofjorden, S Norway, nano- and picoplanktonic samples were collected monthly for 2 years, and the haptophytes targeted by amplification of RNA/cDNA with Haptophyta-specific 18S rDNA V4 primers. We obtained 156 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), from c. 400.000 454 pyrosequencing reads, after rigorous bioinformatic filtering and clustering at 99.5%. Most OTUs represented uncultured and/or not yet 18S rDNA-sequenced species. Haptophyte OTU richness and community composition exhibited high temporal variation and significant yearly periodicity. Richness was highest in September–October (autumn) and lowest in April–May (spring). Some taxa were detected all year, such as Chrysochromulina simplex, Emiliania huxleyi and Phaeocystis cordata, whereas most calcifying coccolithophores only appeared from summer to early winter. We also revealed the seasonal dynamics of OTUs representing putative novel classes (clades HAP-3–5) or orders (clades D, E, F). Season, light and temperature accounted for 29% of the variation in OTU composition. Residual variation may be related to biotic factors, such as competition and viral infection. This study provides new, in-depth knowledge on seasonal diversity and dynamics of haptophytes in North Atlantic coastal waters. PMID:25893259

  8. A spatial analysis of seasonal variation in dissolved nutrients and greenhouse gasses along two river networks draining watersheds of contrasting land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dee, Martha; Tank, Jennifer; Marzadri, Alessandra; Tonina, Daniele; Bellin, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Widespread human activity such as agriculture and urban land use has increased the availability of dissolved reactive nutrients in river networks. As such, the biogeochemical processing of these nutrients in streams and rivers may make them significant sources of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) gasses which are responsible for the majority of heat trapping capacity in the modern atmosphere. We replicated a synoptic sampling regime across seasons to measure dissolved inorganic nutrients and gasses at 80 stream/river sites in two contrasting U.S. watersheds, the Manistee River Basin (MI) which is ~83% forested and the Tippecanoe River Basin (IN) is 82% agricultural land use. We used Spatial Stream Network (SSN) geostatistical modeling to differentiate the spatial heterogeneity of dissolved nutrients and greenhouse gasses among seasons and between watersheds of contrasting land use. We modeled the spatial distribution of dissolved nutrients in each basin to separate the effects of catchment and in-stream processes compounded with fine-scale versus broad-scale gradients of stream water chemistry. Preliminary results suggest that dissolved nutrient and gas concentrations in both river networks during winter and spring were strongly influenced by land use type, exhibiting an "accumulating" broad-scale gradient. In contrast, during the primary growing season of summer and early autumn we found that networks displayed an array of "hotspots" or small-scale spatial dependence. As the world's land area undergoes continued development, high-resolution datasets will be critical in understanding the seasonal heterogeneity of spatial patterns along river networks and will allow us to predict the future impact of land use in a changing climate.

  9. Late Quaternary vegetation and lake system dynamics in north-eastern Siberia: Implications for seasonal climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biskaborn, B. K.; Subetto, D. A.; Savelieva, L. A.; Vakhrameeva, P. S.; Hansche, A.; Herzschuh, U.; Klemm, J.; Heinecke, L.; Pestryakova, L. A.; Meyer, H.; Kuhn, G.; Diekmann, B.

    2016-09-01

    Although the climate development over the Holocene in the Northern Hemisphere is well known, palaeolimnological climate reconstructions reveal spatiotemporal variability in northern Eurasia. Here we present a multi-proxy study from north-eastern Siberia combining sediment geochemistry, and diatom and pollen data from lake-sediment cores covering the last 38,000 cal. years. Our results show major changes in pyrite content and fragilarioid diatom species distributions, indicating prolonged seasonal lake-ice cover between ∼13,500 and ∼8900 cal. years BP and possibly during the 8200 cal. years BP cold event. A pollen-based climate reconstruction generated a mean July temperature of 17.8 °C during the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM) between ∼8900 and ∼4500 cal. years BP. Naviculoid diatoms appear in the late Holocene indicating a shortening of the seasonal ice cover that continues today. Our results reveal a strong correlation between the applied terrestrial and aquatic indicators and natural seasonal climate dynamics in the Holocene. Planktonic diatoms show a strong response to changes in the lake ecosystem due to recent climate warming in the Anthropocene. We assess other palaeolimnological studies to infer the spatiotemporal pattern of the HTM and affirm that the timing of its onset, a difference of up to 3000 years from north to south, can be well explained by climatic teleconnections. The westerlies brought cold air to this part of Siberia until the Laurentide ice-sheet vanished 7000 years ago. The apparent delayed ending of the HTM in the central Siberian record can be ascribed to the exceedance of ecological thresholds trailing behind increases in winter temperatures and decreases in contrast in insolation between seasons during the mid to late Holocene as well as lacking differentiation between summer and winter trends in paleolimnological reconstructions.

  10. Dynamic contrast enhanced CT in nodule characterization: How we review and report.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Nagmi R; Shah, Andrew; Eaton, Rosemary J; Miles, Ken; Gilbert, Fiona J

    2016-07-18

    Incidental indeterminate solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN) that measure less than 3 cm in size are an increasingly common finding on computed tomography (CT) worldwide. Once identified there are a number of imaging strategies that can be performed to help with nodule characterization. These include interval CT, dynamic contrast enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT), (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET-CT). To date the most cost effective and efficient non-invasive test or combination of tests for optimal nodule characterization has yet to be determined.DCE-CT is a functional test that involves the acquisition of a dynamic series of images of a nodule before and following the administration of intravenous iodinated contrast medium. This article provides an overview of the current indications and limitations of DCE- CT in nodule characterization and a systematic approach to how to perform, analyse and interpret a DCE-CT scan.

  11. On the Dark Rim Artifact in Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Myocardial Perfusion Studies

    PubMed Central

    Di Bella, E.V.R.; Parker, D.L.; Sinusas, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    A dark band or rim along parts of the subendocardial border of the left ventricle (LV) and the myocardium has been noticed in some dynamic contrast-enhanced MR perfusion studies. The artifact is thought to be due to susceptibility effects from the gadolinium bolus, motion, or resolution, or a combination of these. Here motionless ex vivo hearts in which the cavity was filled with gadolinium are used to show that dark rim artifacts can be consistent with resolution effects alone. PMID:16200553

  12. A Novel Mouse Segmentation Method Based on Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Micro-CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dongmei; Zhang, Zhihong; Luo, Qingming; Yang, Xiaoquan

    2017-01-01

    With the development of hybrid imaging scanners, micro-CT is widely used in locating abnormalities, studying drug metabolism, and providing structural priors to aid image reconstruction in functional imaging. Due to the low contrast of soft tissues, segmentation of soft tissue organs from mouse micro-CT images is a challenging problem. In this paper, we propose a mouse segmentation scheme based on dynamic contrast enhanced micro-CT images. With a homemade fast scanning micro-CT scanner, dynamic contrast enhanced images were acquired before and after injection of non-ionic iodinated contrast agents (iohexol). Then the feature vector of each voxel was extracted from the signal intensities at different time points. Based on these features, the heart, liver, spleen, lung, and kidney could be classified into different categories and extracted from separate categories by morphological processing. The bone structure was segmented using a thresholding method. Our method was validated on seven BALB/c mice using two different classifiers: a support vector machine classifier with a radial basis function kernel and a random forest classifier. The results were compared to manual segmentation, and the performance was assessed using the Dice similarity coefficient, false positive ratio, and false negative ratio. The results showed high accuracy with the Dice similarity coefficient ranging from 0.709 ± 0.078 for the spleen to 0.929 ± 0.006 for the kidney. PMID:28060917

  13. Combined Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Liver MRI and MRA Using Interleaved Variable Density Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Mahdi Salmani; Korosec, Frank R.; Wang, Kang; Holmes, James H.; Motosugi, Utaroh; Bannas, Peter; Reeder, Scott B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate a method for volumetric contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the liver, with high spatial and temporal resolutions, for combined dynamic imaging and MR angiography using a single injection of contrast. Methods An interleaved variable density (IVD) undersampling pattern was implemented in combination with a real-time-triggered, time-resolved, dual-echo 3D spoiled gradient echo sequence. Parallel imaging autocalibration lines were acquired only once during the first time-frame. Imaging was performed in ten subjects with focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) and compared with their clinical MRI. The angiographic phase of the proposed method was compared to a dedicated MR angiogram acquired during a second injection of contrast. Results A total of 21 FNH, 3 cavernous hemangiomas, and 109 arterial segments were visualized in 10 subjects. The temporally-resolved images depicted the characteristic arterial enhancement pattern of the lesions with a 4 s update rate. Images were graded as having significantly higher quality compared to the clinical MRI. Angiograms produced from the IVD method provided non-inferior diagnostic assessment compared to the dedicated MRA. Conclusion Using an undersampled IVD imaging method, we have demonstrated the feasibility of obtaining high spatial and temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging and simultaneous MRA of the liver. PMID:24639130

  14. Classification of cardiac-related artifacts in dynamic contrast breast MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegbauer, Keith C.; Smith, Justin P.; Niemeyer, Tanya L.; Wood, Chris

    2004-05-01

    Dynamic contrast breast MRI is becoming an important adjunct in screening women at high risk for breast cancer, determining extent of disease (staging) and monitoring response to therapy. In dynamic contrast breast MRI, regions of rapid contrast uptake indicate increases in vascularity which can be associated with abnormal tissue, sometimes significant for malignant disease. To show these areas of enhancement, subtractions between the pre and post contrast images and maximum intensity projections (MIPs) are computed. Many projections are obscured by normally enhancing anatomy (heart, aorta, pulmonary vessels). Identification of these structures allows their removal from MIPs, which improves image quality, diagnostic utility and the conspicuity of the enhancing regions. In this study, a fully automated classifier is presented which uses the spatial location of enhancing regions to separate those that occur inside the chest wall from those occurring in the tissue of interest (breast, axilla, chest wall). The classifier was trained on 21 studies each acquired at a different institution (699 clusters of pixels), and tested on 7 studies (231 clusters of pixels) that were not part of the training set. Multiple cost functions for training were examined. The measurements for the peak performance of the classifier were sensitivity 97.0%, specificity 99.4%, PPV 99.9%, NPV 78.8%.

  15. Dynamical seasonal prediction of summer sea surface temperatures in the Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillman, C. M.; Alves, O.

    2009-03-01

    Coral bleaching is a serious problem threatening the world coral reef systems, triggered by high sea surface temperatures (SST) which are becoming more prevalent as a result of global warming. Seasonal forecasts from coupled ocean-atmosphere models can be used to predict anomalous SST months in advance. In this study, we assess the ability of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology seasonal forecast model (POAMA) to forecast SST anomalies in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, with particular focus on the major 1998 and 2002 bleaching events. Advance warning of potential bleaching events allows for the implementation of management strategies to minimise reef damage. This study represents the first attempt to apply a dynamical seasonal model to the problem of coral bleaching and predict SST over a reef system for up to 6 months lead-time, a potentially invaluable tool for reef managers.

  16. Bulk volumetric liquid water content in a seasonal snowpack: modeling its dynamics in different climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzi, Francesco; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Hirashima, Hiroyuki; De Michele, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    We focus on the dynamics of volumetric liquid water content in seasonal snow covers. This is a key variable describing the fate of snowpacks during the melting season. However, its measurement and/or prediction by means of models at high spatial and temporal resolutions is still difficult due to both practical and theoretical reasons. To overcome these limitations in operational applications, we test the capability of a one-dimensional model to predict the dynamics of bulk volumetric liquid water content during a snow season. Multi-year data collected in three experimental sites in Japan are used as an evaluation. These sites are subjected to different climatic conditions. The model requires the calibration of one or two parameters, according to the degree of detail used. Either a simple temperature-index or a coupled melt-freeze temperature-index approach are considered to predict melting and/or melt-freeze dynamics of liquid water. Results show that, if melt-freeze dynamics are modeled, median absolute differences between data and predictions are consistently lower than 1 vol% at the sites where data of liquid water content are available. In addition, we find also that the model predicts correctly a dry condition in 80% of the observed cases at a site where calibration data are scarce. At the same site, observed isothermal conditions of the snow cover at 0 °C correspond to predictions of bulk volumetric liquid water content that are greater than 0.

  17. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of perfusion measurements in dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: development, validation and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peladeau-Pigeon, M.; Coolens, C.

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is an imaging tool that aids in evaluating functional characteristics of tissue at different stages of disease management: diagnostic, radiation treatment planning, treatment effectiveness, and monitoring. Clinical validation of DCE-derived perfusion parameters remains an outstanding problem to address prior to perfusion imaging becoming a widespread standard as a non-invasive quantitative measurement tool. One approach to this validation process has been the development of quality assurance phantoms in order to facilitate controlled perfusion ex vivo. However, most of these systems fail to establish and accurately replicate physiologically relevant capillary permeability and exchange performance. The current work presents the first step in the development of a prospective suite of physics-based perfusion simulations based on coupled fluid flow and particle transport phenomena with the goal of enhancing the understanding of clinical contrast agent kinetics. Existing knowledge about a controllable, two-compartmental fluid exchange phantom was used to validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation model presented herein. The sensitivity of CFD-derived contrast uptake curves to contrast injection parameters, including injection duration and flow rate, were quantified and found to be within 10% accuracy. The CFD model was employed to evaluate two commonly used clinical kinetic algorithms used to derive perfusion parameters: Fick's principle and the modified Tofts model. Neither kinetic model was able to capture the true transport phenomena it aimed to represent but if the overall contrast concentration after injection remained identical, then successive DCE-CT evaluations could be compared and could indeed reflect differences in regional tissue flow. This study sets the groundwork for future explorations in phantom development and pharmaco-kinetic modelling, as well as the development of novel contrast

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling of contrast transport in basilar aneurysms following flow-altering surgeries.

    PubMed

    Vali, Alireza; Abla, Adib A; Lawton, Michael T; Saloner, David; Rayz, Vitaliy L

    2017-01-04

    In vivo measurement of blood velocity fields and flow descriptors remains challenging due to image artifacts and limited resolution of current imaging methods; however, in vivo imaging data can be used to inform and validate patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. Image-based CFD can be particularly useful for planning surgical interventions in complicated cases such as fusiform aneurysms of the basilar artery, where it is crucial to alter pathological hemodynamics while preserving flow to the distal vasculature. In this study, patient-specific CFD modeling was conducted for two basilar aneurysm patients considered for surgical treatment. In addition to velocity fields, transport of contrast agent was simulated for the preoperative and postoperative conditions using two approaches. The transport of a virtual contrast passively following the flow streamlines was simulated to predict post-surgical flow regions prone to thrombus deposition. In addition, the transport of a mixture of blood with an iodine-based contrast agent was modeled to compare and verify the CFD results with X-ray angiograms. The CFD-predicted patterns of contrast flow were qualitatively compared to in vivo X-ray angiograms acquired before and after the intervention. The results suggest that the mixture modeling approach, accounting for the flow rates and properties of the contrast injection, is in better agreement with the X-ray angiography data. The virtual contrast modeling assessed the residence time based on flow patterns unaffected by the injection procedure, which makes the virtual contrast modeling approach better suited for prediction of thrombus deposition, which is not limited to the peri-procedural state.

  19. Downscaling and extrapolating dynamic seasonal marine forecasts for coastal ocean users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhatalo, Jarno; Hobday, Alistair J.; Little, L. Richard; Spillman, Claire M.

    2016-04-01

    Marine weather and climate forecasts are essential in planning strategies and activities on a range of temporal and spatial scales. However, seasonal dynamical forecast models, that provide forecasts in monthly scale, often have low offshore resolution and limited information for inshore coastal areas. Hence, there is increasing demand for methods capable of fine scale seasonal forecasts covering coastal waters. Here, we have developed a method to combine observational data with dynamical forecasts from POAMA (Predictive Ocean Atmosphere Model for Australia; Australian Bureau of Meteorology) in order to produce seasonal downscaled, corrected forecasts, extrapolated to include inshore regions that POAMA does not cover. We demonstrate the method in forecasting the monthly sea surface temperature anomalies in the Great Australian Bight (GAB) region. The resolution of POAMA in the GAB is approximately 2° × 1° (lon. × lat.) and the resolution of our downscaled forecast is approximately 1° × 0.25°. We use data and model hindcasts for the period 1994-2010 for forecast validation. The predictive performance of our statistical downscaling model improves on the original POAMA forecast. Additionally, this statistical downscaling model extrapolates forecasts to coastal regions not covered by POAMA and its forecasts are probabilistic which allows straightforward assessment of uncertainty in downscaling and prediction. A range of marine users will benefit from access to downscaled and nearshore forecasts at seasonal timescales.

  20. Seasonal dynamics of zooplankton in the southern Chukchi Sea revealed from acoustic backscattering strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Minoru; Amakasu, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Takashi; Nishino, Shigeto

    2017-02-01

    To understand the seasonal dynamics of zooplankton in the southern Chukchi Sea, we use observations from a moored multi-frequency echo-sounder from July 2012 to July 2014. Zooplankton biomass, as indicated by area backscattering strength, was high during autumn and low in early spring; the seasonal peak in zooplankton biomass did not coincide with the spring phytoplankton bloom. This suggests that the seasonal zooplankton dynamics in the southern Chukchi Sea are less influenced by local growth of zooplankton during the spring phytoplankton bloom and more influenced by advection of zooplankton from the Bering Sea. The differences between volume backscattering strengths at 200 and 125 kHz suggest that the main acoustic scatterers are large zooplankton (euphausiids and Neocalanus cristatus) in late summer and autumn and small zooplankton (other copepods) in other seasons. The decrease in acoustic backscatter from large zooplankton from winter to early summer also suggests the unsuccessful overwintering of advected Pacific zooplankton. The temporal mismatch between zooplankton and phytoplankton production suggests that there is still tight pelagic-benthic coupling in the southern Chukchi Sea.

  1. Dynamics of insulin release by perfused edible dormouse (Glis glis) pancreas. Seasonal variations.

    PubMed

    Castex, C; Sutter, B C

    1981-04-01

    In order to characterize seasonal variations of beta cell function in the edible dormouse (Glis glis), the dynamics of insulin release were examined during perfusion of the isolated pancreas. The B cells exhibited biphasic insulin secretion; however, the dynamic response differed from that of the rat in that there was a steady-state second release phase. Glucose-induced insulin release changed according to the seasons. With 16.8 mmol/l glucose, the average insulin release of the late phase was 30.8 +/- 12.6 ng/min in winter, 7.4 +/- 3.2 ng/min in spring, 13.1 +/- 3 ng/min in summer and 23.3 +/- 4.4 ng/min in autumn. The glucose-induced insulin release, expressed as percent of the insulin content of the pancreas, varied according to the season: it represented 2.23 +/- 0.31% in winter, 1.28 +/- 0.10% in spring, 1.56 +/- 0.15 in summer and 2.6 +/- 0.11 in autumn. It is suggested that in spring and summer, the edible dormouse B cell secretion mechanism is less sensitive to glucose than in the other seasons.

  2. Gamma, Gaussian and logistic distribution models for airborne pollen grains and fungal spore season dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kasprzyk, I; Walanus, A

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of a pollen season, such as timing and magnitude, depend on a number of factors such as the biology of the plant and environmental conditions. The main aim of this study was to develop mathematical models that explain dynamics in atmospheric concentrations of pollen and fungal spores recorded in Rzeszów (SE Poland) in 2000-2002. Plant taxa with different characteristics in the timing, duration and curve of their pollen seasons, as well as several fungal taxa were selected for this analysis. Gaussian, gamma and logistic distribution models were examined, and their effectiveness in describing the occurrence of airborne pollen and fungal spores was compared. The Gaussian and differential logistic models were very good at describing pollen seasons with just one peak. These are typically for pollen types with just one dominant species in the flora and when the weather, in particular temperature, is stable during the pollination period. Based on s parameter of the Gaussian function, the dates of the main pollen season can be defined. In spite of the fact that seasonal curves are often characterised by positive skewness, the model based on the gamma distribution proved not to be very effective.

  3. Seasonal Dynamics of Marine Microbial Community in the South Sea of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Sung-Suk; Park, Mirye; Hwang, Jinik; Kil, Eui-Joon; Jung, Seung Won; Lee, Sukchan; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution 16S rRNA tag pyrosequencing was used to obtain seasonal snapshots of the bacterial diversity and community structure at two locations in Gosung Bay (South Sea, Korea) over a one year period. Seasonal sampling from the water column at each site revealed highly diverse bacterial communities containing up to 900 estimated Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs). The Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were the most abundant groups, and the most frequently recorded OTUs were members of Pelagibacter and Glaciecola. In particular, it was observed that Arcobacter, a genus of the Epsilonproteobacteria, dominated during summer. In addition, Psedoalteromonadaceae, Vibrionaceae and SAR11-1 were predominant members of the OTUs found in all sampling seasons. Environmental factors significantly influenced the bacterial community structure among season, with the phosphate and nitrate concentrations contributing strongly to the spatial distribution of the Alphaproteobacteria; the Gammaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria, and Actinobacteria all showed marked negative correlations with all measured nutrients, particularly silicon dioxide and chlorophyll-a. The results suggest that seasonal changes in environmental variables contribute to the dynamic structure of the bacterial community in the study area. PMID:26121668

  4. Potential Negative Effects of Groundwater Dynamics on Dry Season Convection in the Amazon River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. H.; Lo, M. H.; Chou, C.

    2014-12-01

    Adding a groundwater component to land surface models affects modeled precipitation because the additional water supply from the subsurface contributes to increased water vapor in the atmosphere, resulting in modifications of atmospheric convection. This study focused on how groundwater dynamics affect atmospheric convection in the Amazon River Basin (ARB) during July, typically the driest month. Coupled groundwater-land-atmosphere model simulations show that groundwater storage increases evapotranspiration rates (latent heat fluxes) and lowers surface temperatures, which increases the surface pressure gradient and thus, anomalous surface divergence. Therefore, the convection over the Southern Hemispheric ARB during the dry season becomes weaker when groundwater dynamics are included in the model. In addition, the changes in atmospheric vertical water vapor advection are associated with decreases in precipitation resulting from downward transport anomalies. The results of this study highlight the importance of subsurface hydrological processes in the Amazon climate system, which have implications for precipitation changes during the dry season observed in most current climate models.

  5. Potential negative effects of groundwater dynamics on dry season convection in the Amazon River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Heng; Lo, Min-Hui; Chou, Chia

    2016-02-01

    Adding a groundwater component to land surface models affects modeled precipitation. The additional water supply from the subsurface contributes to increased water vapor in the atmosphere, resulting in modifications of atmospheric convection. This study focuses on how groundwater dynamics affect atmospheric convection in the Amazon River basin (ARB) during July, typically the driest month. Coupled groundwater-land-atmosphere model simulations show that groundwater storage increases evapotranspiration rates (latent heat fluxes) and lowers surface temperatures, which increases the surface pressure gradient and thus, anomalous surface divergence. Therefore, the convection over the Southern Hemispheric ARB during the dry season becomes weaker when groundwater dynamics are included in the model. Additionally, the changes in atmospheric vertical water vapor advection are associated with decreases in precipitation that results from downwelling transport anomalies. The results of this study highlight the importance of subsurface hydrological processes in the Amazon climate system, with implications for precipitation changes during the dry season, observed in most current climate models.

  6. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Enterography and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography in Crohn’s Disease: An Observational Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Rune; Peters, David A.; Nielsen, Agnete H.; Hovgaard, Valeriya P.; Glerup, Henning; Krogh, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Purpose e Cross-sectional imaging methods are important for objective evaluationof small intestinal inflammationinCrohn’sdisease(CD).The primary aim was to compare relative parameters of intestinal perfusion between contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance enterography (DCE-MRE) in CD. Furthermore, we aimed at testing the repeatability of regions of interest (ROIs) for CEUS. Methods This prospective study included 25 patients: 12 females (age: 37, range: 19–66) with moderate to severe CD and a bowel wall thickness>3mm evaluated with DCE-MRE and CEUS. CEUS bolus injection was performed twice for repeatability and analyzed in VueBox®. Correlations between modalities were described with Spearman’s rho, limits of agreement(LoA) and intraclass correlation coefficient(ICC). ROIrepeatability for CEUS was assessed. Results s The correlation between modalities was good and very good for bowel wall thickness (ICC=0.71, P<0.001) and length of the inflamed segment (ICC=0.89, P<0.001). Moderate-weak correlations were found for the time-intensity curve parameters: peak intensity (r=0.59, P=0.006), maximum wash-in-rate (r=0.62, P=0.004), and wash-in perfusion index (r=0.47, P=0.036). Best CEUS repeatability for peak enhancement was a mean difference of 0.73 dB (95% CI: 0.17 to 1.28, P=0.01) and 95% LoA from −3.8 to 5.3 dB. Good quality of curve fit improved LoA to −2.3 to 2.8 dB. Conclusion The relative perfusion of small intestinal CD assessed with DCE-MRE and CEUS shows only a moderate correlation. Applying strict criteria for ROIs is important and allows for good CEUS repeatability PMID:28286879

  7. Dynamical component of seasonal and year-to-year changes in Antarctic and global ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tung, Ka Kit; Yang, HU

    1988-01-01

    The dynamics of the ozone concetration components of the Antarctic ozone hole as related to seasonal and year-to-year temperature changes in August, September, October, and November during the 1979-1985 period is studied using a zonally averaged model in which all transport fields are fixed by input temperature data. The results suggest that, prior to 1984, both the seasonal and year-to year variability of the zonal-mean Antarctic ozone minimum and the surrounding maximum can be accounted for by temperature dynamics without invoking changes in chemical composition (e.g., chlorine content) or special chemistry. The same dynamical mechanism also accounts for the good simulation of the observed seasonal and latitudinal structure of column ozone in other parts of the world. However, chemical depletion of ozone may have become more important after 1984. The model also appears to underpredict the September ozone decline in years, leading to an underprediction of the recent minimum values in the Antarctic ozone hole.

  8. Seasonal dynamics of total flavonoid contents and antioxidant activity of Dryopteris erythrosora.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yinghua; Zheng, Yunxia; Dai, Xiling; Wang, Quanxi; Cao, Jianguo; Xiao, Jianbo

    2015-11-01

    The seasonal dynamics of the total flavonoid contents in various parts of Dryopteris erythrosora, a traditional Chinese medicinal fern, and their antioxidant activity were investigated. The total flavonoids content in various parts of D. erythrosora showed an obvious seasonal dynamic change. The total flavonoid contents in stems (from 4.3% to 12.5%) were much higher than that in leaves with an average content of 2.01%. In spring, the total flavonoid contents in stems were relatively low, but increased rapidly from summer to winter. However, the seasonal dynamics of total flavonoid contents in leaves showed different model. The total flavonoid contents in the stems showed a negative correlation with that in the leaves from January to July. The correlation coefficient of about -0.7 was obtained. The antioxidant activity of the extracts also altered in proportion to the change of total flavonoid contents. In general, the extracts from stems always showed highest antioxidant potentials and it was suggested that the stems can be used as crude medicine.

  9. Living on the Edge: Contrasted Wood-Formation Dynamics in Fagus sylvatica and Pinus sylvestris under Mediterranean Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Martinez del Castillo, Edurne; Longares, Luis A.; Gričar, Jožica; Prislan, Peter; Gil-Pelegrín, Eustaquio; Čufar, Katarina; de Luis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Wood formation in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) was intra-annually monitored to examine plastic responses of the xylem phenology according to altitude in one of the southernmost areas of their distribution range, i.e., in the Moncayo Natural Park, Spain. The monitoring was done from 2011 to 2013 at 1180 and 1580 m a.s.l., corresponding to the lower and upper limits of European beech forest in this region. Microcores containing phloem, cambium and xylem were collected biweekly from twenty-four trees from the beginning of March to the end of November to assess the different phases of wood formation. The samples were prepared for light microscopy to observe the following phenological phases: onset and end of cell production, onset and end of secondary wall formation in xylem cells and onset of cell maturation. The temporal dynamics of wood formation widely differed among years, altitudes and tree species. For Fagus sylvatica, the onset of cambial activity varied between the first week of May and the third week of June. Cambial activity then slowed down and stopped in summer, resulting in a length of growing season of 48–75 days. In contrast, the growing season for P. sylvestris started earlier and cambium remained active in autumn, leading to a period of activity varying from 139-170 days. The intra-annual wood-formation pattern is site and species-specific. Comparison with other studies shows a clear latitudinal trend in the duration of wood formation, positive for Fagus sylvatica and negative for P. sylvestris. PMID:27047534

  10. Dynamic contrast enhancement in widefield microscopy using projector-generated illumination patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo Samson, Edward; Mar Blanca, Carlo

    2007-10-01

    We present a simple and cost-effective optical protocol to realize contrast-enhancement imaging (such as dark-field, optical-staining and oblique illumination microscopy) of transparent samples on a conventional widefield microscope using commercial multimedia projectors. The projector functions as both light source and mask generator implemented by creating slideshows of the filters projected along the illumination planes of the microscope. The projected optical masks spatially modulate the distribution of the incident light to selectively enhance structures within the sample according to spatial frequency thereby increasing the image contrast of translucent biological specimens. Any amplitude filter can be customized and dynamically controlled so that switching from one imaging modality to another involves a simple slide transition and can be executed at a keystroke with no physical filters and no moving optical parts. The method yields an image contrast of 89 96% comparable with standard enhancement techniques. The polarization properties of the projector are then utilized to discriminate birefringent and non-birefringent sites on the sample using single-shot, simultaneous polarization and optical-staining microscopy. In addition to dynamic pattern generation and polarization, the projector also provides high illumination power and spectral excitation selectivity through its red-green-blue (RGB) channels. We exploit this last property to explore the feasibility of using video projectors to selectively excite stained samples and perform fluorescence imaging in tandem with reflectance and polarization reflectance microscopy.

  11. Assessing tumor physiology by dynamic contrast-enhanced near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdecchia, Kyle; Elliott, Jonathan; Diop, Mamadou; Hoffman, Lisa; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique to characterize tumor physiology. Dynamic data were acquired using two contrast agents of different molecular weights, indocyanine green (ICG) and IRDye 800CW carboxylate (IRDcxb). The DCE curves were analyzed using a kinetic model capable of extracting estimates of tumor blood flow (F), capillary transit time (tc) and the amount of dye that leaked into the extravascular space (EVS) - characterized by the extraction fraction (E). Data were acquired from five nude rats with tumor xenografts (>10mm) implanted in the neck. Four DCE-NIR datasets (two from each contrast agent) were acquired for each rat. The dye concentration curve in arterial blood, which is required to quantify the model parameters, was measured non-invasively by dye densitometry. A modification to the kinetic model to characterize tc as a distribution of possible values, rather than finite, improved the fit of acquired tumor concentration curves, resulting in more reliable estimates. This modified kinetic model identified a difference between the extracted fraction of IRDcxb, 15 +/- 6 %, and ICG, 1.6 +/- 0.6 %, in the tumor, which can be explained by the difference in molecular weight: 67 kDa for ICG since it binds to albumin and 1.17 kDa for IRD. This study demonstrates the ability of DCENIRS to quantify tumor physiology. The next step is to adapt this approach with a dual-receptor approach.

  12. Seasonal bacterial community dynamics in a full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal plant.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Jason J; Cadkin, Tracey A; McMahon, Katherine D

    2013-12-01

    Activated sludge is one of the most abundant and effective wastewater treatment process used to treat wastewater, and has been used in developed countries for nearly a century. In all that time, several hundreds of studies have explored the bacterial communities responsible for treatment, but most studies were based on a handful of samples and did not consider temporal dynamics. In this study, we used the DNA fingerprinting technique called automated ribosomal intergenic spacer region analysis (ARISA) to study bacterial community dynamics over a two-year period in two different treatment trains. We also used quantitative PCR to measure the variation of five phylogenetically-defined clades within the Accumulibacter lineage, which is a model polyphosphate accumulating organism. The total bacterial community exhibited seasonal patterns of change reminiscent of those observed in lakes and oceans. Surprisingly, all five Accumulibacter clades were present throughout the study, and the total Accumulibacter community was relatively stable. However, the abundance of each clade did fluctuate through time. Clade IIA dynamics correlated positively with temperature (ρ = 0.65, p < 0.05) while Clade IA dynamics correlated negatively with temperature (ρ = -0.35, p < 0.05). This relationship with temperature hints at the mechanisms that may be driving the seasonal patterns in overall bacterial community dynamics and provides further evidence for ecological differentiation among clades within the Accumulibacter lineage. This work provides a valuable baseline for activated sludge bacterial community variation.

  13. Digestive organ sizes and enzyme activities of refueling western sandpipers (Calidris mauri): contrasting effects of season and age.

    PubMed

    Stein, R Will; Place, Allen R; Lacourse, Terri; Guglielmo, Christopher G; Williams, Tony D

    2005-01-01

    We examined seasonal and age-related variation in digestive organ sizes and enzyme activities in female western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) refueling at a coastal stopover site in southern British Columbia. Adult sandpipers exhibited seasonal variation in pancreatic and intestinal enzyme activities but not in digestive system or organ sizes. Spring migrants had 22% higher total and 67% higher standardized pancreatic lipase activities but 37% lower total pancreatic amylase activity than fall migrants, which suggests that the spring diet was enriched with lipids but low in glycogen. Spring migrants also had 47% higher total intestinal maltase activity as well as 56% higher standardized maltase and 13% higher standardized aminopeptidase-N activities. Spring migrants had higher total enzymic capacity than fall migrants, due primarily to higher total lipase and maltase activities. During fall migration, the juvenile's digestive system was 10% larger than the adult's, and it was composed differently: juveniles had a 16% larger small intestine but a 27% smaller proventriculus. The juvenile's larger digestive system was associated with lower total enzymic capacity than the adult's due to 20% lower total chitinase and 23% lower total lipase activities. These results suggest that juvenile western sandpipers may process food differently from adults and/or have a lower-quality diet.

  14. Migration phenology and seasonal fidelity of an Arctic marine predator in relation to sea ice dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Seth G; Derocher, Andrew E; Thiemann, Gregory W; Lunn, Nicholas J

    2013-07-01

    Understanding how seasonal environmental conditions affect the timing and distribution of synchronized animal movement patterns is a central issue in animal ecology. Migration, a behavioural adaptation to seasonal environmental fluctuations, is a fundamental part of the life history of numerous species. However, global climate change can alter the spatiotemporal distribution of resources and thus affect the seasonal movement patterns of migratory animals. We examined sea ice dynamics relative to migration patterns and seasonal geographical fidelity of an Arctic marine predator, the polar bear (Ursus maritimus). Polar bear movement patterns were quantified using satellite-linked telemetry data collected from collars deployed between 1991-1997 and 2004-2009. We showed that specific sea ice characteristics can predict the timing of seasonal polar bear migration on and off terrestrial refugia. In addition, fidelity to specific onshore regions during the ice-free period was predicted by the spatial pattern of sea ice break-up but not by the timing of break-up. The timing of migration showed a trend towards earlier arrival of polar bears on shore and later departure from land, which has been driven by climate-induced declines in the availability of sea ice. Changes to the timing of migration have resulted in polar bears spending progressively longer periods of time on land without access to sea ice and their marine mammal prey. The links between increased atmospheric temperatures, sea ice dynamics, and the migratory behaviour of an ice-dependent species emphasizes the importance of quantifying and monitoring relationships between migratory wildlife and environmental cues that may be altered by climate change.

  15. QIN: Practical Considerations in T1 Mapping of Prostate for Dynamic Contrast Enhancement Pharmacokinetic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Fennessy, Fiona M; Fedorov, Andriy; Gupta, Sandeep N; Schmidt, Ehud J; Tempany, Clare M; Mulkern, Robert V

    2012-01-01

    There are many challenges in developing robust imaging biomarkers that can be reliably applied in a clinical trial setting. In the case of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) MRI, one such challenge is to obtain accurate pre-contrast T1 maps for subsequent use in two-compartment pharmacokinetic models commonly used to fit the MR enhancement time courses. In the prostate, a convenient and common approach for this task has been to use the same 3D SPGR sequence used to collect the DCE data, but with variable flip angles (VFA’s) to collect data suitable for T1 mapping prior to contrast injection. However, inhomogeneous radiofrequency conditions within the prostate have been found to adversely affect the accuracy of this technique. Herein we demonstrate the sensitivity of DCE pharmacokinetic parameters to pre-contrast T1 values and examine methods to improve the accuracy of T1 mapping with flip angle corrected VFA SPGR methods, comparing T1 maps from such methods with reference T1 maps generated with saturation recovery experiments performed with fast spin echo (FSE) sequences. PMID:22898681

  16. Dynamic full field OCT: metabolic contrast at subcellular level (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apelian, Clement; Harms, Fabrice; Thouvenin, Olivier; Boccara, Claude A.

    2016-03-01

    Cells shape or density is an important marker of tissues pathology. However, individual cells are difficult to observe in thick tissues frequently presenting highly scattering structures such as collagen fibers. Endogenous techniques struggle to image cells in these conditions. Moreover, exogenous contrast agents like dyes, fluorophores or nanoparticles cannot always be used, especially if non-invasive imaging is required. Scatterers motion happening down to the millisecond scale, much faster than the still and highly scattering structures (global motion of the tissue), allowed us to develop a new approach based on the time dependence of the FF-OCT signals. This method reveals hidden cells after a spatiotemporal analysis based on singular value decomposition and wavelet analysis concepts. It does also give us access to local dynamics of imaged scatterers. This dynamic information is linked with the local metabolic activity that drives these scatterers. Our technique can explore subcellular scales with micrometric resolution and dynamics ranging from the millisecond to seconds. By this mean we studied a wide range of tissues, animal and human in both normal and pathological conditions (cancer, ischemia, osmotic shock…) in different organs such as liver, kidney, and brain among others. Different cells, undetectable with FF-OCT, were identified (erythrocytes, hepatocytes…). Different scatterers clusters express different characteristic times and thus can be related to different mechanisms that we identify with metabolic functions. We are confident that the D-FFOCT, by accessing to a new spatiotemporal metabolic contrast, will be a leading technique on tissue imaging and for better medical diagnosis.

  17. Intramolecular Force Contrast and Dynamic Current-Distance Measurements at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, F.; Matencio, S.; Weymouth, A. J.; Ocal, C.; Barrena, E.; Giessibl, F. J.

    2015-08-01

    Scanning probe microscopy can be used to probe the internal atomic structure of flat organic molecules. This technique requires an unreactive tip and has, until now, been demonstrated only at liquid helium and liquid nitrogen temperatures. We demonstrate intramolecular and intermolecular force contrast at room temperature on PTCDA molecules adsorbed on a Ag /Si (111 )-(√{3 }×√{3 }) surface. The oscillating force sensor allows us to dynamically measure the vertical decay constant of the tunneling current. The precision of this method is increased by quantifying the transimpedance of the current to voltage converter and accounting for the tip oscillation. This measurement yields a clear contrast between neighboring molecules, which we attribute to the different charge states.

  18. High-dynamic-range cross-correlator for shot-to-shot measurement of temporal contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kon, Akira; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Ogura, Koichi; Mori, Michiaki; Sakaki, Hironao; Kando, Masaki; Kondo, Kiminori

    2017-01-01

    The temporal contrast of an ultrahigh-intensity laser is a crucial parameter for laser plasma experiments. We have developed a multichannel cross-correlator (MCCC) for single-shot measurements of the temporal contrast in a high-power laser system. The MCCC is based on third-order cross-correlation, and has four channels and independent optical delay lines. We have experimentally demonstrated that the MCCC system achieves a high dynamic range of ˜1012 and a large temporal window of ˜1 ns. Moreover, we were able to measure the shot-to-shot fluctuations of a short-prepulse intensity at -26 ps and long-pulse (amplified spontaneous emission, ASE) intensities at -30, -450, and -950 ps before the arrival of the main pulse at the interaction point.

  19. Long-Term and Seasonal Dynamics of Dengue in Iquitos, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Stoddard, Steven T.; Wearing, Helen J.; Reiner, Robert C.; Morrison, Amy C.; Astete, Helvio; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Alvarez, Carlos; Ramal-Asayag, Cesar; Sihuincha, Moises; Rocha, Claudio; Halsey, Eric S.; Scott, Thomas W.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Forshey, Brett M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Long-term disease surveillance data provide a basis for studying drivers of pathogen transmission dynamics. Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease caused by four distinct, but related, viruses (DENV-1-4) that potentially affect over half the world's population. Dengue incidence varies seasonally and on longer time scales, presumably driven by the interaction of climate and host susceptibility. Precise understanding of dengue dynamics is constrained, however, by the relative paucity of laboratory-confirmed longitudinal data. Methods We studied 10 years (2000–2010) of laboratory-confirmed, clinic-based surveillance data collected in Iquitos, Peru. We characterized inter and intra-annual patterns of dengue dynamics on a weekly time scale using wavelet analysis. We explored the relationships of case counts to climatic variables with cross-correlation maps on annual and trimester bases. Findings Transmission was dominated by single serotypes, first DENV-3 (2001–2007) then DENV-4 (2008–2010). After 2003, incidence fluctuated inter-annually with outbreaks usually occurring between October and April. We detected a strong positive autocorrelation in case counts at a lag of ∼70 weeks, indicating a shift in the timing of peak incidence year-to-year. All climatic variables showed modest seasonality and correlated weakly with the number of reported dengue cases across a range of time lags. Cases were reduced after citywide insecticide fumigation if conducted early in the transmission season. Conclusions Dengue case counts peaked seasonally despite limited intra-annual variation in climate conditions. Contrary to expectations for this mosquito-borne disease, no climatic variable considered exhibited a strong relationship with transmission. Vector control operations did, however, appear to have a significant impact on transmission some years. Our results indicate that a complicated interplay of factors underlie DENV transmission in contexts such as Iquitos. PMID

  20. The Effect of Contrast Material on Radiation Dose at CT: Part I-Incorporation of Contrast Material Dynamics in Anthropomorphic Phantoms.

    PubMed

    Sahbaee, Pooyan; Segars, W Paul; Marin, Daniele; Nelson, Rendon C; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-01-13

    Purpose To develop a method to incorporate the propagation of contrast material into computational anthropomorphic phantoms for estimation of organ dose at computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods A patient-specific physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of the human cardiovascular system was incorporated into 58 extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) patient phantoms. The PBPK model comprised compartmental models of vessels and organs unique to each XCAT model. For typical injection protocols, the dynamics of the contrast material in the body were described according to a series of patient-specific iodine mass-balance differential equations, the solutions to which provided the contrast material concentration time curves for each compartment. Each organ was assigned to a corresponding time-varying iodinated contrast agent to create the contrast material-enhanced five-dimensional XCAT models, in which the fifth dimension represents the dynamics of contrast material. To validate the accuracy of the models, simulated aortic and hepatic contrast-enhancement results throughout the models were compared with previously published clinical data by using the percentage of discrepancy in the mean, time to 90% peak, peak value, and slope of enhancement in a paired t test at the 95% significance level. Results The PBPK model allowed effective prediction of the time-varying concentration curves of various contrast material administrations in each organ for different patient models. The contrast-enhancement results were in agreement with results of previously published clinical data, with mean percentage, time to 90% peak, peak value, and slope of less than 10% (P > .74), 4%, 7%, and 14% for uniphasic and 12% (P > .56), 4%, 12%, and 14% for biphasic injection protocols, respectively. The exception was hepatic enhancement results calculated for a uniphasic injection protocol for which the discrepancy was less than 25%. Conclusion A technique to model the propagation of

  1. Nutrient Dynamics of Estuarine Invertebrates Are Shaped by Feeding Guild Rather than Seasonal River Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Cisneros, Kelly; Scharler, Ursula M.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the variability of carbon and nitrogen elemental content, stoichiometry and diet proportions of invertebrates in two sub-tropical estuaries in South Africa experiencing seasonal changes in rainfall and river inflow. The elemental ratios and stable isotopes of abiotic sources, zooplankton and macrozoobenthos taxa were analyzed over a dry/wet seasonal cycle. Nutrient content (C, N) and stoichiometry of suspended particulate matter exhibited significant spatio-temporal variations in both estuaries, which were explained by the variability in river inflow. Sediment particulate matter (%C, %N and C:N) was also influenced by the variability in river flow but to a lesser extent. The nutrient content and ratios of the analyzed invertebrates did not significantly vary among seasons with the exception of the copepod Pseudodiaptomus spp. (C:N) and the tanaid Apseudes digitalis (%N, C:N). These changes did not track the seasonal variations of the suspended or sediment particulate matter. Our results suggest that invertebrates managed to maintain their stoichiometry independent of the seasonality in river flow. A significant variability in nitrogen content among estuarine invertebrates was recorded, with highest % N recorded from predators and lowest %N from detritivores. Due to the otherwise general lack of seasonal differences in elemental content and stoichiometry, feeding guild was a major factor shaping the nutrient dynamics of the estuarine invertebrates. The nutrient richer suspended particulate matter was the preferred food source over sediment particulate matter for most invertebrate consumers in many, but not all seasons. The most distinct preference for suspended POM as a food source was apparent from the temporarily open/closed system after the estuary had breached, highlighting the importance of river flow as a driver of invertebrate nutrient dynamics under extreme events conditions. Moreover, our data showed that estuarine

  2. Nutrient Dynamics of Estuarine Invertebrates Are Shaped by Feeding Guild Rather than Seasonal River Flow.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Cisneros, Kelly; Scharler, Ursula M

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the variability of carbon and nitrogen elemental content, stoichiometry and diet proportions of invertebrates in two sub-tropical estuaries in South Africa experiencing seasonal changes in rainfall and river inflow. The elemental ratios and stable isotopes of abiotic sources, zooplankton and macrozoobenthos taxa were analyzed over a dry/wet seasonal cycle. Nutrient content (C, N) and stoichiometry of suspended particulate matter exhibited significant spatio-temporal variations in both estuaries, which were explained by the variability in river inflow. Sediment particulate matter (%C, %N and C:N) was also influenced by the variability in river flow but to a lesser extent. The nutrient content and ratios of the analyzed invertebrates did not significantly vary among seasons with the exception of the copepod Pseudodiaptomus spp. (C:N) and the tanaid Apseudes digitalis (%N, C:N). These changes did not track the seasonal variations of the suspended or sediment particulate matter. Our results suggest that invertebrates managed to maintain their stoichiometry independent of the seasonality in river flow. A significant variability in nitrogen content among estuarine invertebrates was recorded, with highest % N recorded from predators and lowest %N from detritivores. Due to the otherwise general lack of seasonal differences in elemental content and stoichiometry, feeding guild was a major factor shaping the nutrient dynamics of the estuarine invertebrates. The nutrient richer suspended particulate matter was the preferred food source over sediment particulate matter for most invertebrate consumers in many, but not all seasons. The most distinct preference for suspended POM as a food source was apparent from the temporarily open/closed system after the estuary had breached, highlighting the importance of river flow as a driver of invertebrate nutrient dynamics under extreme events conditions. Moreover, our data showed that estuarine

  3. Modeling of the dynamics of microbubble contrast agents in ultrasonic medicine: Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doinikov, A. A.; Bouakaz, A.

    2013-11-01

    The survey is devoted to a new field of bubble dynamics that studies the behavior of ultrasound contrast agents. This name denotes man-made encapsulated microbubbles applied in diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasonic medicine to enhance the quality of ultrasonic images and to deliver drugs to target sites in the human body. The survey analyzes theoretical models that are currently applied for the description of the bubble shell, the interaction of bubbles with blood vessel walls, and the acoustical action of bubbles on the cell membrane.

  4. Quantifying seasonal population fluxes driving rubella transmission dynamics using mobile phone data.

    PubMed

    Wesolowski, Amy; Metcalf, C J E; Eagle, Nathan; Kombich, Janeth; Grenfell, Bryan T; Bjørnstad, Ottar N; Lessler, Justin; Tatem, Andrew J; Buckee, Caroline O

    2015-09-01

    Changing patterns of human aggregation are thought to drive annual and multiannual outbreaks of infectious diseases, but the paucity of data about travel behavior and population flux over time has made this idea difficult to test quantitatively. Current measures of human mobility, especially in low-income settings, are often static, relying on approximate travel times, road networks, or cross-sectional surveys. Mobile phone data provide a unique source of information about human travel, but the power of these data to describe epidemiologically relevant changes in population density remains unclear. Here we quantify seasonal travel patterns using mobile phone data from nearly 15 million anonymous subscribers in Kenya. Using a rich data source of rubella incidence, we show that patterns of population travel (fluxes) inferred from mobile phone data are predictive of disease transmission and improve significantly on standard school term time and weather covariates. Further, combining seasonal and spatial data on travel from mobile phone data allows us to characterize seasonal fluctuations in risk across Kenya and produce dynamic importation risk maps for rubella. Mobile phone data therefore offer a valuable previously unidentified source of data for measuring key drivers of seasonal epidemics.

  5. On the Dynamics of the North-South Seasonal Migration of Global Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satori, G.; Williams, E. R.; Boccippio, D. J.

    2003-12-01

    The daily Schumann resonance (SR) frequency patterns are mainly determined by the lightning source-observer configuration consequently their variations are indicative for the changes of global lightning position. Four basic types of daily frequency patterns have been distinguished corresponding to the four seasons observed for each SR mode at Nagycenk, Hungary. The number of days with daily frequency patterns characteristic for a season were very different. Similar daily frequency patterns have been observed during 160-165 consecutive days from the beginning of November to the first part of April in any year of SR observations at Nagycenk. The same time sequences (four seasons with different lengths) can be recognized in the global lightning distribution observed by OTD (Optical Transient Detector) (Christian et al., 2003) as it was shown in the seasonal distributions of the daily frequency patterns of Shumann resonances. The land/ocean ratio is smaller in the Southern Hemisphere than in the Northern Hemisphere. It seems that oceanic thermodynamical properties (large thermal inertia) are manifested in the dynamics (speed) of the north-south lightning migration identified by the long lasting (160-165 days) southern position of global lightning in the Southern Hemisphere summer and by the time lag of the northward lightning migration in spring. The spring-fall asymmetry of the migration speed is attributed to the different thermodynamical properties of land and ocean.

  6. Seasonal timing of first rain storms affects rare plant population dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levine, J.M.; McEachern, A.K.; Cowan, C.

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in forecasting the ecological consequences of climate change is understanding the relative importance of changes to mean conditions vs. changes to discrete climatic events, such as storms, frosts, or droughts. Here we show that the first major storm of the growing season strongly influences the population dynamics of three rare and endangered annual plant species in a coastal California (USA) ecosystem. In a field experiment we used moisture barriers and water addition to manipulate the timing and temperature associated with first major rains of the season. The three focal species showed two- to fivefold variation in per capita population growth rates between the different storm treatments, comparable to variation found in a prior experiment imposing eightfold differences in season-long precipitation. Variation in germination was a major demographic driver of how two of three species responded to the first rains. For one of these species, the timing of the storm was the most critical determinant of its germination, while the other showed enhanced germination with colder storm temperatures. The role of temperature was further supported by laboratory trials showing enhanced germination in cooler treatments. Our work suggests that, because of species-specific cues for demographic transitions such as germination, changes to discrete climate events may be as, if not more, important than changes to season-long variables.

  7. Subharmonic contrast microbubble signals for noninvasive pressure estimation under static and dynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Dave, Jaydev K; Leodore, Lauren M; Eisenbrey, John R; Park, Suhyun; Hall, Anne L; Thomenius, Kai; Forsberg, Flemming

    2011-07-01

    Our group has proposed the concept of subharmonic aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) utilizing microbubble-based ultrasound contrast agent signals for the noninvasive estimation of hydrostatic blood pressures. An experimental system for in vitro SHAPE was constructed based on two single-element transducers assembled confocally at a 60 degree angle to each other. Changes in the first, second and subharmonic amplitudes of five different ultrasound contrast agents were measured in vitro at static hydrostatic pressures from 0-186 mmHg, acoustic pressures from 0.35-0.60 MPa peak-to-peak and frequencies of 2.5-6.6 MHz. The most sensitive agent and optimal parameters for SHAPE were determined using linear regression analysis and implemented on a Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI). This implementation of SHAPE was then tested under dynamic-flow conditions and compared to pressure-catheter measurements. Over the pressure range studied, the first and second harmonic amplitudes reduced approximately 2 dB for all contrast agents. Over the same pressure range, the subharmonic amplitudes decreased by 9-14 dB and excellent linear regressions were achieved with the hydrostatic pressure variations (r = 0.98, p < 0.001). Optimal sensitivity was achieved at a transmit frequency of 2.5 MHz and acoustic pressure of 0.35 MPa using Sonazoid (GE Healthcare, Oslo, Norway). A Logiq 9 scanner was modified to implement SHAPE on a convex transducer with a frequency range from 1.5-4.5 MHz and acoustic pressures from 0-3.34 MPa. Results matched the pressure catheter (r2 = 0.87). In conclusion, subharmonic contrast signals are a good indicator of hydrostatic pressure. Out of the five ultrasound contrast agents tested, Sonazoid was the most sensitive for subharmonic pressure estimation. Real-time SHAPE has been implemented on a commercial scanner and offers the possibility of allowing pressures in the heart and elsewhere to be obtained noninvasively.

  8. Dynamics of Magnetic Nanoparticle-Based Contrast Agents in Tissues Tracked Using Magnetomotive Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    John, Renu; Chaney, Eric J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetomotive optical coherence tomography (MM-OCT) is an important tool for the visualization and quantitative assessment of magnetic nanoparticles in tissues. In this study, we demonstrate the use of MM-OCT for quantitative measurement of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle transport and concentration in ex vivo muscle, lung, and liver tissues. The effect of temperature on the dynamics of these nanoparticles is also analyzed. We observe that the rate of transport of nanoparticles in tissues is directly related to the elasticity of tissues, and describe how the origin of the MM-OCT signal is associated with nanoparticle binding. These results improve our understanding of how iron oxide nanoparticles behave dynamically in biological tissues, which has direct implications for medical and biological applications of targeted nanoparticles for contrast enhancement and therapy. PMID:25378895

  9. Image contrast mechanisms in dynamic friction force microscopy: Antimony particles on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Felix; Göddenhenrich, Thomas; Dietzel, Dirk; Schirmeisen, Andre

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic Friction Force Microscopy (DFFM) is a technique based on Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) where resonance oscillations of the cantilever are excited by lateral actuation of the sample. During this process, the AFM tip in contact with the sample undergoes a complex movement which consists of alternating periods of sticking and sliding. Therefore, DFFM can give access to dynamic transition effects in friction that are not accessible by alternative techniques. Using antimony nanoparticles on graphite as a model system, we analyzed how combined influences of friction and topography can effect different experimental configurations of DFFM. Based on the experimental results, for example, contrast inversion between fractional resonance and band excitation imaging strategies to extract reliable tribological information from DFFM images are devised.

  10. Seasonal dynamics and age of stemwood nonstructural carbohydrates in temperate forest trees.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Andrew D; Carbone, Mariah S; Keenan, Trevor F; Czimczik, Claudia I; Hollinger, David Y; Murakami, Paula; Schaberg, Paul G; Xu, Xiaomei

    2013-02-01

    Nonstructural carbohydrate reserves support tree metabolism and growth when current photosynthates are insufficient, offering resilience in times of stress. We monitored stemwood nonstructural carbohydrate (starch and sugars) concentrations of the dominant tree species at three sites in the northeastern United States. We estimated the mean age of the starch and sugars in a subset of trees using the radiocarbon ((14) C) bomb spike. With these data, we then tested different carbon (C) allocation schemes in a process-based model of forest C cycling. We found that the nonstructural carbohydrates are both highly dynamic and about a decade old. Seasonal dynamics in starch (two to four times higher in the growing season, lower in the dormant season) mirrored those of sugars. Radiocarbon-based estimates indicated that the mean age of the starch and sugars in red maple (Acer rubrum) was 7-14 yr. A two-pool (fast and slow cycling reserves) model structure gave reasonable estimates of the size and mean residence time of the total NSC pool, and greatly improved model predictions of interannual variability in woody biomass increment, compared with zero- or one-pool structures used in the majority of existing models. This highlights the importance of nonstructural carbohydrates in the context of forest ecosystem carbon cycling.

  11. A dynamic programming approach to water allocation for seasonally dry area, based on stochastic soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Porporato, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    seasonally dry areas, which are widely distributed in the world, are usually facing an intensive disparity between the lack of natural resource and the great demand of social development. In dry seasons of such areas, the distribution/allocation of water resource is an extremely critical and sensitive issue, and conflicts often occur due to lack of appropriate water allocation scheme. Among the many uses of water, the need of agricultural irrigation water is highly elastic, but this factor has not yet been made full use to free up water from agriculture use. The primary goal of this work is to design an optimal distribution scheme of water resource for dry seasons to maximize benefits from precious water resources, considering the high elasticity of agriculture water demand due to the dynamic of soil moisture affected by the uncertainty of precipitation and other factors like canopy interception. A dynamic programming model will be used to figure out an appropriate allocation of water resources among agricultural irrigation and other purposes like drinking water, industry, and hydropower, etc. In this dynamic programming model, we analytically quantify the dynamic of soil moisture in the agricultural fields by describing the interception with marked Poisson process and describing the rainfall depth with exponential distribution. Then, we figure out a water-saving irrigation scheme, which regulates the timetable and volumes of water in irrigation, in order to minimize irrigation water requirement under the premise of necessary crop yield (as a constraint condition). And then, in turn, we provide a scheme of water resource distribution/allocation among agriculture and other purposes, taking aim at maximizing benefits from precious water resources, or in other words, make best use of limited water resource.

  12. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Protocol of the Normal Canine Brain

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Krystina L.; Pease, Anthony P.; Ballegeer, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically dynamic susceptibility MRI (DSC-MRI) is routinely performed as a supplement to conventional MRI in human medicine for patients with intracranial neoplasia and cerebrovascular events. There is minimal data on the use of DSC-MRI in veterinary patients and a DSC-MRI protocol in the veterinary patient has not been described. Sixteen normal dogs, 6 years or older were recruited for this study. The sample population included 11 large dogs (>11 kg) and 5 small dogs (<11 kg). DSC-MRI was performed on a 1.5-T MRI using an adjusted protocol inherent to the MRI. Contrast media was injected using an automatic power injector. Injections were made after five MR measurements were obtained. Following image acquisition, an arterial input function (AIF) graph mapping the transit time of contrast within the cerebral arteries was generated. The manually selected time points along this graph were used to compute perfusion maps. A dose and rate of 0.1 mmol/kg gadolinium-based contrast media at 3 ml/s followed by 10 ml saline flush at 3 ml/s was used in all dogs greater than 11 kg. In all dogs >11 kg, a useable AIF and perfusion map was generated. One dog less than 11 kg received the same contrast dose and rate. In this patient, the protocol did not generate a useable AIF. The remainder of the dogs less than 11 kg followed a protocol of 0.2 mmol/kg gadolinium-based contrast media at 1.5 ml/s with a 10 ml saline flush at 1.5 ml/s. A useable AIF and perfusion map was generated in the remaining dogs <11 kg using the higher contrast dose and slower rate protocol. This study establishes a contrast dose and administration rate for canine DSC-MRI imaging that is different in dogs greater than 11 kg compared to dogs less than 11 kg. These protocols may be used for future applications to evaluate hemodynamic disturbances in canine intracranial pathology. PMID:28377923

  13. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Protocol of the Normal Canine Brain.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Krystina L; Pease, Anthony P; Ballegeer, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-01

    Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically dynamic susceptibility MRI (DSC-MRI) is routinely performed as a supplement to conventional MRI in human medicine for patients with intracranial neoplasia and cerebrovascular events. There is minimal data on the use of DSC-MRI in veterinary patients and a DSC-MRI protocol in the veterinary patient has not been described. Sixteen normal dogs, 6 years or older were recruited for this study. The sample population included 11 large dogs (>11 kg) and 5 small dogs (<11 kg). DSC-MRI was performed on a 1.5-T MRI using an adjusted protocol inherent to the MRI. Contrast media was injected using an automatic power injector. Injections were made after five MR measurements were obtained. Following image acquisition, an arterial input function (AIF) graph mapping the transit time of contrast within the cerebral arteries was generated. The manually selected time points along this graph were used to compute perfusion maps. A dose and rate of 0.1 mmol/kg gadolinium-based contrast media at 3 ml/s followed by 10 ml saline flush at 3 ml/s was used in all dogs greater than 11 kg. In all dogs >11 kg, a useable AIF and perfusion map was generated. One dog less than 11 kg received the same contrast dose and rate. In this patient, the protocol did not generate a useable AIF. The remainder of the dogs less than 11 kg followed a protocol of 0.2 mmol/kg gadolinium-based contrast media at 1.5 ml/s with a 10 ml saline flush at 1.5 ml/s. A useable AIF and perfusion map was generated in the remaining dogs <11 kg using the higher contrast dose and slower rate protocol. This study establishes a contrast dose and administration rate for canine DSC-MRI imaging that is different in dogs greater than 11 kg compared to dogs less than 11 kg. These protocols may be used for future applications to evaluate hemodynamic disturbances in canine intracranial pathology.

  14. Nonlinear dynamic analysis and characteristics diagnosis of seasonally perturbed predator-prey systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huayong; Huang, Tousheng; Dai, Liming

    2015-05-01

    Predator-prey interaction widely exists in nature and the research on predator-prey systems is an important field in ecology. The nonlinear dynamic characteristics of a seasonally perturbed predator-prey system are studied in this research. To study the nonlinear characteristics affected by a wide variety of system parameters, the PR approach is employed and periodic, quasiperiodic, chaotic behaviors and the behaviors between period and quasiperiod are found in the system. Periodic-quasiperiodic-chaotic region diagrams are generated for analyzing the global characteristics of the predator-prey system with desired ranges of system parameters. The ecological significances of the dynamical characteristics are discussed and compared with the theoretical research results existing in the literature. The approach of this research demonstrates effectiveness and efficiency of PR method in analyzing the complex dynamical characteristics of nonlinear ecological systems.

  15. Dynamic susceptibility contrast and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI characteristics to distinguish microcystic meningiomas from traditional Grade I meningiomas and high-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Namath S; Moisi, Marc D; Keogh, Bart; McCullough, Brendan J; Rostad, Steven; Newell, David; Gwinn, Ryder; Foltz, Gregory; Mayberg, Marc; Aguedan, Brian; Good, Valerie; Fouke, Sarah J

    2016-06-10

    OBJECTIVE Microcystic meningioma (MM) is a meningioma variant with a multicystic appearance that may mimic intrinsic primary brain tumors and other nonmeningiomatous tumor types. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI techniques provide imaging parameters that can differentiate these tumors according to hemodynamic and permeability characteristics with the potential to aid in preoperative identification of tumor type. METHODS The medical data of 18 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of MM were identified through a retrospective review of procedures performed between 2008 and 2012; DSC imaging data were available for 12 patients and DCE imaging data for 6. A subcohort of 12 patients with Grade I meningiomas (i.e., of meningoepithelial subtype) and 54 patients with Grade IV primary gliomas (i.e., astrocytomas) was also included, and all preoperative imaging sequences were analyzed. Clinical variables including patient sex, age, and surgical blood loss were also included in the analysis. Images were acquired at both 1.5 and 3.0 T. The DSC images were acquired at a temporal resolution of either 1500 msec (3.0 T) or 2000 msec (1.5 T). In all cases, parameters including normalized cerebral blood volume (CBV) and transfer coefficient (kTrans) were calculated with region-of-interest analysis of enhancing tumor volume. The normalized CBV and kTrans data from the patient groups were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA, and post hoc statistical comparisons among groups were conducted with the Bonferroni adjustment. RESULTS Preoperative DSC imaging indicated mean (± SD) normalized CBVs of 5.7 ± 2.2 ml for WHO Grade I meningiomas of the meningoepithelial subtype (n = 12), 4.8 ± 1.8 ml for Grade IV astrocytomas (n = 54), and 12.3 ± 3.8 ml for Grade I meningiomas of the MM subtype (n = 12). The normalized CBV measured within the enhancing portion of the tumor was significantly higher in the MM subtype than in typical meningiomas and Grade

  16. Seasonal dynamics of threshold friction velocity and dust emission in Central Asia

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xin; Sokolik, Irina N

    2015-01-01

    An improved model representation of mineral dust cycle is critical to reducing the uncertainty of dust-induced environmental and climatic impact. Here we present a mesoscale model study of the seasonal dust activity in the semiarid drylands of Central Asia, focusing on the effects of wind speed, soil moisture, surface roughness heterogeneity, and vegetation phenology on the threshold friction velocity (u*t) and dust emission during the dust season of 1 March to 31 October 2001. The dust model WRF-Chem-DuMo allows us to examine the uncertainties in seasonal dust emissions due to the selection of dust emission scheme and soil grain size distribution data. To account for the vegetation effects on the u*t, we use the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer monthly normalized difference vegetation index to derive the dynamic surface roughness parameters required by the physically based dust schemes of Marticorena and Bergametti (1995, hereinafter MB) and Shao et al. (1996, hereinafter Shao). We find the springtime u*t is strongly enhanced by the roughness effects of temperate steppe and desert ephemeral plants and, to less extent, the binding effects of increased soil moisture. The u*t decreases as the aboveground biomass dies back and soil moisture depletes during summer. The u*t dynamics determines the dust seasonality by causing more summer dust emission, despite a higher frequency of strong winds during spring. Due to the presence of more erodible materials in the saltation diameter range of 60–200 µm, the dry-sieved soil size distribution data lead to eight times more season-total dust emission than the soil texture data, but with minor differences in the temporal distribution. On the other hand, the Shao scheme produces almost the same amount of season-total dust emission as the MB scheme, but with a strong shift toward summer due to the strong sensitivity of the u*t to vegetation. By simply averaging the MB and Shao model experiments, we obtain a mean

  17. Synchrony, compensatory dynamics, and the functional trait basis of phenological diversity in a tropical dry forest tree community: effects of rainfall seasonality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasky, Jesse R.; Uriarte, María; Muscarella, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Interspecific variation in phenology is a key axis of functional diversity, potentially mediating how communities respond to climate change. The diverse drivers of phenology act across multiple temporal scales. For example, abiotic constraints favor synchronous reproduction (positive covariance among species), while biotic interactions can favor synchrony or compensatory dynamics (negative covariance). We used wavelet analyses to examine phenology of community flower and seed production for 45 tree species across multiple temporal scales in a tropical dry forest in Puerto Rico with marked rainfall seasonality. We asked three questions: (1) do species exhibit synchronous or compensatory temporal dynamics in reproduction, (2) do interspecific differences in phenology reflect variable responses to rainfall, and (3) is interspecific variation in phenology and response to a major drought associated with functional traits that mediate responses to moisture? Community-level flowering was synchronized at seasonal scales (˜5-6 mo) and at short scales (˜1 mo, following rainfall). However, seed rain exhibited significant compensatory dynamics at intraseasonal scales (˜3 mo), suggesting interspecific variation in temporal niches. Species with large leaves (associated with sensitivity to water deficit) peaked in reproduction synchronously with the peak of seasonal rainfall (˜5 mo scale). By contrast, species with high wood specific gravity (associated with drought resistance) tended to flower in drier periods. Flowering of tall species and those with large leaves was most tightly linked to intraseasonal (˜2 mo scale) rainfall fluctuations. Although the 2015 drought dramatically reduced community-wide reproduction, functional traits were not associated with the magnitude of species-specific declines. Our results suggest opposing drivers of synchronous versus compensatory dynamics at different temporal scales. Phenology associations with functional traits indicated that

  18. Contrasting diversity dynamics of phoretic mites and beetles associated with vertebrate carrion.

    PubMed

    Barton, Philip S; Weaver, Haylee J; Manning, Adrian D

    2014-05-01

    Carrion is an ephemeral and nutrient-rich resource that attracts a diverse array of arthropods as it decomposes. Carrion-associated mites often disperse between animal carcasses using phoresy, the transport of one species by another. Yet few studies have contrasted the dynamics of mite assemblages with other insect taxa present at carrion. We examined and compared the changes in abundance, species richness and composition of mite and beetle assemblages sampled at kangaroo carcasses in a grassy eucalypt woodland at four different times over a 6-month period. We found that the majority of mites were phoretic, with the mesostigmatid genera Uroseius (Uropodidae), Macrocheles (Macrochelidae) and Parasitus (Parasitidae) the most abundant taxa (excluding astigmatid mites). Abundance and richness patterns of mites and beetles were very different, with mites reaching peak abundance and richness at weeks 6 and 12, and beetles at weeks 1 and 6. Both mites and beetles showed clear successional patterns via changes in species presence and relative abundance. Our study shows that mesostigmatid mite assemblages have a delay in peak abundance and richness relative to beetle assemblages. This suggests that differences in dispersal and reproductive traits of arthropods may contribute to the contrasting diversity dynamics of carrion arthropod communities, and further highlights the role of carrion as a driver of diversity and heterogeneity in ecosystems.

  19. Material characterization of poly-lactic acid shelled ultrasound contrast agent and their dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Shirshendu; Russakow, Daniel; Rodgers, Tyler; Sarkar, Kausik; Cochran, Michael; Wheatley, Margaret

    2011-11-01

    Micron-size gas bubbles encapsulated with lipids and proteins are used as contrast enhancing agents for ultrasound imaging. Biodegradable polymer poly-lactic acid (PLA) has recently been suggested as a possible means of encapsulation. Here, we report in vitro measurement of attenuation and scattering of ultrasound through an emulsion of PLA agent as well as theoretical modeling of the encapsulated bubble dynamics. The attenuation measured with three different transducers of central frequencies 2.25, 3.5 and 5 MHz, shows a peak around 2-3 MHz. These bubbles also show themselves to possess excellent scattering characteristics including strong non-linear response that can be used for harmonic and sub-harmonic contrast imaging. Our recently developed interfacial rheological models are applied to describe the dynamics of these bubbles; rheological model properties are estimated using measured attenuation data. The model is then applied to predict nonlinear scattered response, and the prediction is compared against experimental observation. Partially supported by NSF and NIH.

  20. [Seasonal dynamics of infecting ability of the flea Citellophilus tesquorum altaicus in the Tuva natural focus of the plague].

    PubMed

    Bazanova, L P; Popkov, A F; Galatsevich, N F

    2004-01-01

    The infecting ability of the fleas Citellophilus tesquorum altaicus loff, 1936, the main plague vectors in the Tuva natural focus, was experimentally studied in different periods of the epizootic season. Seasonal dynamics in the efficiency of infecting the long-tailed Siberian souslik with the plague causative agent through flea bites was noticed. Seasonal differences in infectivity of the "blocked" flea bites are revealed. An increase of infected experimental animals with a generalization of infection process in the period of epizooty activation in the natural focus was observed. A resistance of the long-tailed Siberian souslik to the plague agent infection through flea bites in the spring season was registered.

  1. Linking activity, composition and seasonal dynamics of atmospheric methane oxidizers in a meadow soil

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Kammann, Claudia; Lenhart, Katharina; Dam, Bomba; Liesack, Werner

    2012-01-01

    Microbial oxidation is the only biological sink for atmospheric methane. We assessed seasonal changes in atmospheric methane oxidation and the underlying methanotrophic communities in grassland near Giessen (Germany), along a soil moisture gradient. Soil samples were taken from the surface layer (0–10 cm) of three sites in August 2007, November 2007, February 2008 and May 2008. The sites showed seasonal differences in hydrological parameters. Net uptake rates varied seasonally between 0 and 70 μg CH4 m−2 h−1. Greatest uptake rates coincided with lowest soil moisture in spring and summer. Over all sites and seasons, the methanotrophic communities were dominated by uncultivated methanotrophs. These formed a monophyletic cluster defined by the RA14, MHP and JR1 clades, referred to as upland soil cluster alphaproteobacteria (USCα)-like group. The copy numbers of pmoA genes ranged between 3.8 × 105–1.9 × 106 copies g−1 of soil. Temperature was positively correlated with CH4 uptake rates (P<0.001), but had no effect on methanotrophic population dynamics. The soil moisture was negatively correlated with CH4 uptake rates (P<0.001), but showed a positive correlation with changes in USCα-like diversity (P<0.001) and pmoA gene abundance (P<0.05). These were greatest at low net CH4 uptake rates during winter times and coincided with an overall increase in bacterial 16S rRNA gene abundances (P<0.05). Taken together, soil moisture had a significant but opposed effect on CH4 uptake rates and methanotrophic population dynamics, the latter being increasingly stimulated by soil moisture contents >50 vol% and primarily related to members of the MHP clade. PMID:22189499

  2. Dynamics of Chytridiomycosis during the Breeding Season in an Australian Alpine Amphibian

    PubMed Central

    Brannelly, Laura A.; Hunter, David A.; Lenger, Daniel; Scheele, Ben C.; Skerratt, Lee F.; Berger, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Understanding disease dynamics during the breeding season of declining amphibian species will improve our understanding of how remnant populations persist with endemic infection, and will assist the development of management techniques to protect disease-threatened species from extinction. We monitored the endangered Litoria verreauxii alpina (alpine treefrog) during the breeding season through capture-mark-recapture (CMR) studies in which we investigated the dynamics of chytridiomycosis in relation to population size in two populations. We found that infection prevalence and intensity increased throughout the breeding season in both populations, but infection prevalence and intensity was higher (3.49 and 2.02 times higher prevalence and intensity, respectively) at the site that had a 90-fold higher population density. This suggests that Bd transmission is density-dependent. Weekly survival probability was related to disease state, with heavily infected animals having the lowest survival. There was low recovery from infection, especially when animals were heavily infected with Bd. Sympatric amphibian species are likely to be reservoir hosts for the disease and can play an important role in the disease ecology of Bd. Although we found 0% prevalence in crayfish (Cherax destructor), we found that a sympatric amphibian (Crinia signifera) maintained 100% infection prevalence at a high intensity throughout the season. Our results demonstrate the importance of including infection intensity into CMR disease analysis in order to fully understand the implications of disease on the amphibian community. We recommend a combined management approach to promote lower population densities and ensure consistent progeny survival. The most effective management strategy to safeguard the persistence of this susceptible species might be to increase habitat area while maintaining a similar sized suitable breeding zone and to increase water flow and area to reduce drought. PMID:26629993

  3. Interaction of herbivory and seasonality on the dynamics of Caribbean macroalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Renata; Gonzalez-Rivero, Manuel; Ortiz, Juan Carlos; Mumby, Peter J.

    2012-09-01

    Many Caribbean coral reefs are undergoing a phase shift from coral to macroalgal dominance. Understanding the processes driving changes in algal abundance and community structure requires clarification of the relative effects of top-down (e.g., herbivory) and bottom-up processes (e.g., light, temperature, and nutrients). To date, a number of studies have examined the relative effects of grazing versus nutrification but interactions between herbivory and natural, seasonal fluctuations in temperature and light have not been investigated. This study considered the dynamics of three Caribbean macroalgal species [ Lobophora variegata (Lamouroux), Dictyota pulchella (Hörnig and Schnetter), and Halimeda opuntia (Linnaeus)] and algal turf. A field experiment was established to measure species-specific algal dynamics (changes in abundance) over 13 months in the presence and absence of herbivory. Both herbivory and seasonal changes were important processes controlling macroalgal and turf abundance. Water temperature and light had a key role on D. pulchella; this species' abundance significantly increased in the summer, when water temperature and light were the highest, and decreased during winter. Surprisingly, herbivory did not seem to control D. pulchella directly. However, herbivory was the most important process controlling the abundance of L. variegata, H. opuntia, and turf . The abundance of both algal species was correlated with seasonal changes in the environment, but was depleted outside cages throughout the year. The abundance of H. opuntia was positively correlated with temperature and light, but there was no statistical interaction between drivers. The statistical interaction between temperature and light was significant for the abundance of L. variegata and turf, but algal abundance declined as both factors increased. Overall, macroalgal and turf cover were mainly controlled by herbivory, while community structure (which species contributed to the overall cover

  4. Seasonal Dynamics and Metagenomic Characterization of Marine Viruses in Goseong Bay, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jinik; Park, So Yun; Park, Mirye; Lee, Sukchan; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities in the oceans, and account for a significant amount of the genetic diversity of marine ecosystems. However, there is little detailed information about the biodiversity of viruses in marine environments. Rapid advances in metagenomics have enabled the identification of previously unknown marine viruses. We performed metagenomic profiling of seawater samples collected at 6 sites in Goseong Bay (South Sea, Korea) during the spring, summer, autumn, and winter of 2014. The results indicated the presence of highly diverse virus communities. The DNA libraries from samples collected during four seasons were sequenced using Illumina HiSeq 2000. The number of viral reads was 136,850 during March, 70,651 during June, 66,165 during September, and 111,778 during December. Species identification indicated that Pelagibacter phage HTVC010P, Ostreococcus lucimarinus OIV5 and OIV1, and Roseobacter phage SIO1 were the most common species in all samples. For viruses with at least 10 reads, there were 204 species during March, 189 during June, 170 during September, and 173 during December. Analysis of virus families indicated that the Myoviridae was the most common during all four seasons, and viruses in the Polyomaviridae were only present during March. Viruses in the Iridoviridae were only present during three seasons. Additionally, viruses in the Iridoviridae, Herpesviridae, and Poxviridae, which may affect fish and marine animals, appeared during different seasons. These results suggest that seasonal changes in temperature contribute to the dynamic structure of the viral community in the study area. The information presented here will be useful for comparative analyses with other marine viral communities. PMID:28122030

  5. Seasonal Dynamics and Metagenomic Characterization of Marine Viruses in Goseong Bay, Korea.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jinik; Park, So Yun; Park, Mirye; Lee, Sukchan; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities in the oceans, and account for a significant amount of the genetic diversity of marine ecosystems. However, there is little detailed information about the biodiversity of viruses in marine environments. Rapid advances in metagenomics have enabled the identification of previously unknown marine viruses. We performed metagenomic profiling of seawater samples collected at 6 sites in Goseong Bay (South Sea, Korea) during the spring, summer, autumn, and winter of 2014. The results indicated the presence of highly diverse virus communities. The DNA libraries from samples collected during four seasons were sequenced using Illumina HiSeq 2000. The number of viral reads was 136,850 during March, 70,651 during June, 66,165 during September, and 111,778 during December. Species identification indicated that Pelagibacter phage HTVC010P, Ostreococcus lucimarinus OIV5 and OIV1, and Roseobacter phage SIO1 were the most common species in all samples. For viruses with at least 10 reads, there were 204 species during March, 189 during June, 170 during September, and 173 during December. Analysis of virus families indicated that the Myoviridae was the most common during all four seasons, and viruses in the Polyomaviridae were only present during March. Viruses in the Iridoviridae were only present during three seasons. Additionally, viruses in the Iridoviridae, Herpesviridae, and Poxviridae, which may affect fish and marine animals, appeared during different seasons. These results suggest that seasonal changes in temperature contribute to the dynamic structure of the viral community in the study area. The information presented here will be useful for comparative analyses with other marine viral communities.

  6. Porcine Ex Vivo Liver Phantom for Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography: Development and Initial Results

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Scott M.; Giraldo, Juan C. Ramirez; Knudsen, Bruce; Grande, Joseph P.; Christner, Jodie A.; Xu, Man; Woodrum, David A.; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Callstrom, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To demonstrate the feasibility of developing a fixed, dual-input, biological liver phantom for dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) imaging and to report initial results of use of the phantom for quantitative CT perfusion imaging. Materials and Methods Porcine livers were obtained from completed surgical studies and perfused with saline and fixative. The phantom was placed in a body-shaped, CT-compatible acrylic container and connected to a perfusion circuit fitted with a contrast injection port. Flow-controlled contrast-enhanced imaging experiments were performed using a 128-slice and 64 slice, dual-source multidetector CT scanners. CT angiography protocols were employed to obtain portal venous and hepatic arterial vascular enhancement, reproduced over a period of four to six months. CT perfusion protocols were employed at different input flow rates to correlate input flow with calculated tissue perfusion, to test reproducibility and demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous dual input liver perfusion. Histologic analysis of the liver phantom was also performed. Results CT angiogram 3D reconstructions demonstrated homogenous tertiary and quaternary branching of the portal venous system out to the periphery of all lobes of the liver as well as enhancement of the hepatic arterial system to all lobes of the liver and gallbladder throughout the study period. For perfusion CT, the correlation between the calculated mean tissue perfusion in a volume of interest and input pump flow rate was excellent (R2 = 0.996) and color blood flow maps demonstrated variations in regional perfusion in a narrow range. Repeat perfusion CT experiments demonstrated reproducible time-attenuation curves and dual-input perfusion CT experiments demonstrated that simultaneous dual input liver perfusion is feasible. Histologic analysis demonstrated that the hepatic microvasculature and architecture appeared intact and well preserved at the completion of four to six

  7. High speed X-ray phase contrast imaging of energetic composites under dynamic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parab, Niranjan D.; Roberts, Zane A.; Harr, Michael H.; Mares, Jesus O.; Casey, Alex D.; Gunduz, I. Emre; Hudspeth, Matthew; Claus, Benjamin; Sun, Tao; Fezzaa, Kamel; Son, Steven F.; Chen, Weinong W.

    2016-09-01

    Fracture of crystals and frictional heating are associated with the formation of "hot spots" (localized heating) in energetic composites such as polymer bonded explosives (PBXs). Traditional high speed optical imaging methods cannot be used to study the dynamic sub-surface deformation and the fracture behavior of such materials due to their opaque nature. In this study, high speed synchrotron X-ray experiments are conducted to visualize the in situ deformation and the fracture mechanisms in PBXs composed of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) crystals and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene binder doped with iron (III) oxide. A modified Kolsky bar apparatus was used to apply controlled dynamic compression on the PBX specimens, and a high speed synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) setup was used to record the in situ deformation and failure in the specimens. The experiments show that synchrotron X-ray PCI provides a sufficient contrast between the HMX crystals and the doped binder, even at ultrafast recording rates. Under dynamic compression, most of the cracking in the crystals was observed to be due to the tensile stress generated by the diametral compression applied from the contacts between the crystals. Tensile stress driven cracking was also observed for some of the crystals due to the transverse deformation of the binder and superior bonding between the crystal and the binder. The obtained results are vital to develop improved understanding and to validate the macroscopic and mesoscopic numerical models for energetic composites so that eventually hot spot formation can be predicted.

  8. Subcellular metabolic contrast in living tissue using dynamic full field OCT (D-FFOCT) (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apelian, Clement; Harms, Fabrice; Thouvenin, Olivier; Boccara, Claude A.

    2016-03-01

    Cells shape or density is an important marker of tissues pathology. However, individual cells are difficult to observe in thick tissues frequently presenting highly scattering structures such as collagen fibers. Endogenous techniques struggle to image cells in these conditions. Moreover, exogenous contrast agents like dyes, fluorophores or nanoparticles cannot always be used, especially if non-invasive imaging is required. Scatterers motion happening down to the millisecond scale, much faster than the fix and highly scattering structures (global motion of the tissue), allowed us to develop a new approach based on the time dependence of the FF-OCT signals. This method reveals hidden cells after a spatiotemporal analysis based on singular value decomposition and wavelet analysis concepts. It does also give us access to local dynamics of imaged scatterers. This dynamic information is linked with the local metabolic activity that drives these scatterers. Our technique can explore subcellular scales with micrometric resolution and dynamics ranging from the millisecond to seconds. By this mean we studied a wide range of tissues, animal and human in both normal and pathological conditions (cancer, ischemia, osmotic shock…) in different organs such as liver, kidney, and brain among others. Different cells, undetectable with FF-OCT, were identified (erythrocytes, hepatocytes…). Different scatterer clusters express different characteristic times and thus can be related to different mechanisms that we identify with metabolic functions. We are confident that the D-FFOCT, by accessing to a new spatiotemporal metabolic contrast, will be a leading technique on tissue imaging and could lead to better medical diagnosis.

  9. Comparison of the Specificity of MR-EIT and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    used in classification. Current conductivity imaging techniques can only provide low-resolution images and fail in extreme cases. Magnetic resonance ...procedures for dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) that will be used in the comparative studies in the last year of the...tomography (EIT), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), breast cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION

  10. Active layer dynamics in three sites with contrasted topography in the Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, Marc; Ruiz-Fernández, Jesús; Vieira, Gonçalo

    2015-04-01

    Topography exerts a key role on permafrost distribution in areas where mean annual temperatures are slightly negative. This is the case of low-altitude environments in Maritime Antarctica, namely in the South Shetland Islands, where permafrost is marginal to discontinuous until elevations of 20-40 m asl turning to continuous at higher areas. Consequently, the active layer dynamics is also strongly conditioned by the geomorphological setting. In January 2014 we installed three sites for monitoring the active layer dynamics across the Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands) in different geomorphological environments at elevations between 60 and 100 m. The purpose was to examine the role of the topography and microclimatic conditions on the active layer dynamics. At each site a set of loggers was set up to monitor: air temperatures, snow thickness, ground temperatures until 80 cm together with the coupling atmosphere-ground temperatures. During the first year of monitoring the mean annual air temperatures show similar values in the three sites, in all cases slightly below freezing. The snowy conditions during this year in this archipelago have resulted in a late melting of snow, which has also conditioned the duration of frozen conditions in the uppermost soil layers. Topography has a strong influence on snow cover duration, which in turn affects frozen ground conditions. The Domo site is located in a higher position with respect to the central plateau of Byers; here, the wind is stronger and snow cover thinner, which has conditioned a longer thawing season than in the other two sites (Cerro Negro, Escondido). These two sites are located in topographically protected areas favouring snow accumulation. The longer persistence of snow conditions a longer duration of negative temperatures in the active layer of the permafrost. This research was financially supported by the HOLOANTAR project (Portuguese Science Foundation) and the AXA Research Fund.

  11. Biophysical controls on cluster dynamics and architectural differentiation of microbial biofilms in contrasting flow environments.

    PubMed

    Hödl, Iris; Mari, Lorenzo; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Suweis, Samir; Besemer, Katharina; Rinaldo, Andrea; Battin, Tom J

    2014-03-01

    Ecology, with a traditional focus on plants and animals, seeks to understand the mechanisms underlying structure and dynamics of communities. In microbial ecology, the focus is changing from planktonic communities to attached biofilms that dominate microbial life in numerous systems. Therefore, interest in the structure and function of biofilms is on the rise. Biofilms can form reproducible physical structures (i.e. architecture) at the millimetre-scale, which are central to their functioning. However, the spatial dynamics of the clusters conferring physical structure to biofilms remains often elusive. By experimenting with complex microbial communities forming biofilms in contrasting hydrodynamic microenvironments in stream mesocosms, we show that morphogenesis results in 'ripple-like' and 'star-like' architectures--as they have also been reported from monospecies bacterial biofilms, for instance. To explore the potential contribution of demographic processes to these architectures, we propose a size-structured population model to simulate the dynamics of biofilm growth and cluster size distribution. Our findings establish that basic physical and demographic processes are key forces that shape apparently universal biofilm architectures as they occur in diverse microbial but also in single-species bacterial biofilms.

  12. Biophysical controls on cluster dynamics and architectural differentiation of microbial biofilms in contrasting flow environments

    PubMed Central

    Hödl, Iris; Mari, Lorenzo; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Suweis, Samir; Besemer, Katharina; Rinaldo, Andrea; Battin, Tom J

    2014-01-01

    Ecology, with a traditional focus on plants and animals, seeks to understand the mechanisms underlying structure and dynamics of communities. In microbial ecology, the focus is changing from planktonic communities to attached biofilms that dominate microbial life in numerous systems. Therefore, interest in the structure and function of biofilms is on the rise. Biofilms can form reproducible physical structures (i.e. architecture) at the millimetre-scale, which are central to their functioning. However, the spatial dynamics of the clusters conferring physical structure to biofilms remains often elusive. By experimenting with complex microbial communities forming biofilms in contrasting hydrodynamic microenvironments in stream mesocosms, we show that morphogenesis results in ‘ripple-like’ and ‘star-like’ architectures – as they have also been reported from monospecies bacterial biofilms, for instance. To explore the potential contribution of demographic processes to these architectures, we propose a size-structured population model to simulate the dynamics of biofilm growth and cluster size distribution. Our findings establish that basic physical and demographic processes are key forces that shape apparently universal biofilm architectures as they occur in diverse microbial but also in single-species bacterial biofilms. PMID:23879839

  13. The Dynamics of Halite Precipitation in the Dead Sea: Seasonal and Spatial Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lensky, Nadav G.; Sirota, Ido; Arnon, Ali

    2016-04-01

    The Dead Sea is a deep hypersaline terminal lake that actively precipitates halite as a response to the negative water balance of the lake (evaporation > inflows). From mass balance consideration, a uniform ~3 m thick halite sequence is expected to cover the lake floor following the ~30 m level drop; however such a massive layer does not exist in the shallow water. In this talk we present new insights on the dynamics of halite precipitation and dissolution in a seasonally stratified lake, based on field observations. In situ monthly observations include the depth profile of the following: (i) halite precipitation rate, (ii) temperature, (iii) salinity, (iv) halite saturation, and (v) underwater photography of the sea floor and the water column - documentation of active halite precipitation/dissolution. We found a clear relation between the thermohaline stratification of the water column and halite precipitation/dissolution. The epilimnion experiences seasonal dissolution/precipitation cycle, while the hypolimnion continuously precipitates halite. We discuss the seasonal variations of the atmospheric forcing - the heat and water fluxes, and the response of the lake - thermohaline stratification and the precipitation/dissolution of halite along the water column and lake floor. We also discuss the role of diapycnal flux on the precipitation of halite and the salt fluxes. Geological implications on the lateral extent and thickness variations of evaporitic layers in evaporitic environments are also discussed.

  14. Dynamics of the seasonal variation of the North Equatorial Current bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaohui; Wu, Lixin

    2011-02-01

    The dynamics of the seasonal variation of the North Equatorial Current (NEC) bifurcation is studied using a 1.5-layer nonlinear reduced-gravity Pacific basin model and a linear, first-mode baroclinic Rossby wave model. The model-simulated bifurcation latitude exhibits a distinct seasonal cycle with the southernmost latitude in June and the northernmost latitude in November, consistent with observational analysis. It is found that the seasonal migration of the NEC bifurcation latitude (NBL) not only is determined by wind locally in the tropics, as suggested in previous studies, but is also significantly intensified by the extratropical wind through coastal Kelvin waves. The model further demonstrates that the amplitude of the NEC bifurcation is also associated with stratification. A strong (weak) stratification leads to a fast (slow) phase speed of first-mode baroclinic Rossby waves, and thus large (small) annual range of the bifurcation latitude. Therefore, it is expected that in a warm climate the NBL should have a large range of annual migration.

  15. Seasonal dynamics of extremely halophilic microbial communities in three Argentinian salterns.

    PubMed

    Di Meglio, Leonardo; Santos, Fernando; Gomariz, María; Almansa, Cristina; López, Cristina; Antón, Josefa; Nercessian, Débora

    2016-12-01

    Seasonal sampling was carried out at three Argentinian salterns, Salitral Negro (SN), Colorada Grande (CG) and Guatraché (G), to analyze abiotic parameters and microbial diversity and dynamics. Microbial assemblages were correlated to environmental factors by statistical analyses. Principal component analysis of the environmental data grouped SN and CG samples separately from G samples owing to G's higher pH values and sulfate concentration. Differences in microbial assemblages were also found. Many archaeal sequences belonged to uncultured members of Haloquadratum and Haloquadratum-related genera, with different environmental optima. Notably, nearly half of the archaeal sequences were affiliated to the recently described 'Candidatus Haloredividus' (phylum Nanohaloarchaeota), not previously detected in salt-saturated environments. Most bacterial sequences belonged to Salinibacter representatives, while sequences affiliated to the recently described genus Spiribacter were also found. Seasonal analysis showed at least 40% of the microbiota from the three salterns was prevalent through the year, indicating they are well adapted to environmental fluctuations. On the other hand, a minority of archaeal and bacterial sequences were found to be seasonally distributed. Five viral morphotypes and also eukaryal predators were detected, suggesting different mechanisms for controlling prokaryotic numbers. Notably, Guatraché was the saltern that harbored the highest virus-to-cell ratios reported to date for hypersaline environments.

  16. Seasonal dynamics of threshold friction velocity and dust emission in Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Xin; Sokolik, Irina N.

    2015-02-01

    An improved model representation of mineral dust cycle is critical to reducing the uncertainty of dust-induced environmental and climatic impact. Here we present a mesoscale model study of the seasonal dust activity in the semiarid drylands of Central Asia, focusing on the effects of wind speed, soil moisture, surface roughness heterogeneity, and vegetation phenology on the threshold friction velocity (u*t) and dust emission during the dust season of 1 March to 31 October 2001. The dust model WRF-Chem-DuMo allows us to examine the uncertainties in seasonal dust emissions due to the selection of dust emission scheme and soil grain size distribution data. To account for the vegetation effects on the u*t, we use the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer monthly normalized difference vegetation index to derive the dynamic surface roughness parameters required by the physically based dust schemes of Marticorena and Bergametti (1995, hereinafter MB) and Shao et al. (1996, hereinafter Shao). We find the springtime u*t is strongly enhanced by the roughness effects of temperate steppe and desert ephemeral plants and, to less extent, the binding effects of increased soil moisture. The u*t decreases as the aboveground biomass dies back and soil moisture depletes during summer. The u*t dynamics determines the dust seasonality by causing more summer dust emission, despite a higher frequency of strong winds during spring. Due to the presence of more erodible materials in the saltation diameter range of 60-200 µm, the dry-sieved soil size distribution data lead to eight times more season-total dust emission than the soil texture data, but with minor differences in the temporal distribution. On the other hand, the Shao scheme produces almost the same amount of season-total dust emission as the MB scheme, but with a strong shift toward summer due to the strong sensitivity of the u*t to vegetation. By simply averaging the MB and Shao model experiments, we obtain a mean

  17. Seasonal dynamics of threshold friction velocity and dust emission in Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Xi, Xin; Sokolik, Irina N

    2015-02-27

    An improved model representation of mineral dust cycle is critical to reducing the uncertainty of dust-induced environmental and climatic impact. Here we present a mesoscale model study of the seasonal dust activity in the semiarid drylands of Central Asia, focusing on the effects of wind speed, soil moisture, surface roughness heterogeneity, and vegetation phenology on the threshold friction velocity (u*t ) and dust emission during the dust season of 1 March to 31 October 2001. The dust model WRF-Chem-DuMo allows us to examine the uncertainties in seasonal dust emissions due to the selection of dust emission scheme and soil grain size distribution data. To account for the vegetation effects on the u*t , we use the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer monthly normalized difference vegetation index to derive the dynamic surface roughness parameters required by the physically based dust schemes of Marticorena and Bergametti (1995, hereinafter MB) and Shao et al. (1996, hereinafter Shao). We find the springtime u*t is strongly enhanced by the roughness effects of temperate steppe and desert ephemeral plants and, to less extent, the binding effects of increased soil moisture. The u*t decreases as the aboveground biomass dies back and soil moisture depletes during summer. The u*t dynamics determines the dust seasonality by causing more summer dust emission, despite a higher frequency of strong winds during spring. Due to the presence of more erodible materials in the saltation diameter range of 60-200 µm, the dry-sieved soil size distribution data lead to eight times more season-total dust emission than the soil texture data, but with minor differences in the temporal distribution. On the other hand, the Shao scheme produces almost the same amount of season-total dust emission as the MB scheme, but with a strong shift toward summer due to the strong sensitivity of the u*t to vegetation. By simply averaging the MB and Shao model experiments, we obtain a mean

  18. Seasonal Oxygen Dynamics in a Thermokarst Bog in Interior Alaska: Implications for Rates of Methane Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, R. B.; Moorberg, C.; Wong, A.; Waldrop, M. P.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, and wetlands represent the largest natural source of methane to the atmosphere. However, much of the methane generated in anoxic wetlands never gets emitted to the atmosphere; up to >90% of generated methane can get oxidized to carbon dioxide. Thus, oxidation is an important methane sink and changes in the rate of methane oxidation can affect wetland methane emissions. Most methane is aerobically oxidized at oxic-anoxic interfaces where rates of oxidation strongly depend on methane and oxygen concentrations. In wetlands, oxygen is often the limiting substrate. To improve understanding of belowground oxygen dynamics and its impact on methane oxidation, we deployed two planar optical oxygen sensors in a thermokarst bog in interior Alaska. Previous work at this site indicated that, similar to other sites, rates of methane oxidation decrease over the growing season. We used the sensors to track spatial and temporal patterns of oxygen concentrations over the growing season. We coupled these in-situ oxygen measurements with periodic oxygen injection experiments performed against the sensor to quantify belowground rates of oxygen consumption. We found that over the season, the thickness of the oxygenated water layer at the peatland surface decreased. Previous research has indicated that in sphagnum-dominated peatlands, like the one studied here, rates of methane oxidation are highest at or slightly below the water table. It is in these saturated but oxygenated locations that both methane and oxygen are available. Thus, a seasonal reduction in the thickness of the oxygenated water layer could restrict methane oxidation. The decrease in thickness of the oxygenated layer coincided with an increase in the rate of oxygen consumption during our oxygen injection experiments. The increase in oxygen consumption was not explained by temperature; we infer it was due to an increase in substrate availability for oxygen consuming reactions and

  19. Relation between the contrast in time integrated dynamic speckle patterns an the power spectral density of their temporal intensity fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Draijer, Matthijs J; Hondebrink, Erwin; Larsson, Marcus; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2010-10-11

    Scattering fluid flux can be quantified with coherent light, either from the contrast of speckle patterns, or from the moments of the power spectrum of intensity fluctuations. We present a theory connecting these approaches for the general case of mixed static-dynamic patterns of boiling speckles without prior assumptions regarding the particle dynamics. An expression is derived and tested relating the speckle contrast to the intensity power spectrum. Our theory demonstrates that in speckle contrast the concentration of moving particles dominates over the contribution of speed to the particle flux. Our theory provides a basis for comparison of both approaches when used for studying tissue perfusion.

  20. Dynamics of the Water Circulations in the Southern South China Sea and Its Seasonal Transports

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, See Hai; Samah, Azizan Abu; Akbari, Abolghasem

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional Regional Ocean Modeling System is used to study the seasonal water circulations and transports of the Southern South China Sea. The simulated seasonal water circulations and estimated transports show consistency with observations, e.g., satellite altimeter data set and re-analysis data of the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation. It is found that the seasonal water circulations are mainly driven by the monsoonal wind stress and influenced by the water outflow/inflow and associated currents of the entire South China Sea. The intrusion of the strong current along the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia and the eddies at different depths in all seasons are due to the conservation of the potential vorticity as the depth increases. Results show that the water circulation patterns in the northern part of the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia are generally dominated by the geostrophic currents while those in the southern areas are due solely to the wind stress because of negligible Coriolis force there. This study clearly shows that individual surface freshwater flux (evaporation minus precipitation) controls the sea salinity balance in the Southern South China Sea thermohaline circulations. Analysis of climatological data from a high resolution Regional Ocean Modeling System reveals that the complex bathymetry is important not only for water exchange through the Southern South China Sea but also in regulating various transports across the main passages in the Southern South China Sea, namely the Sunda Shelf and the Strait of Malacca. Apart from the above, in comparision with the dynamics of the Sunda Shelf, the Strait of Malacca reflects an equally significant role in the annual transports into the Andaman Sea. PMID:27410682

  1. Dynamical-statistical seasonal prediction for western North Pacific typhoons based on APCC multi-models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ok-Yeon; Kim, Hye-Mi; Lee, Myong-In; Min, Young-Mi

    2017-01-01

    This study aims at predicting the seasonal number of typhoons (TY) over the western North Pacific with an Asia-Pacific Climate Center (APCC) multi-model ensemble (MME)-based dynamical-statistical hybrid model. The hybrid model uses the statistical relationship between the number of TY during the typhoon season (July-October) and the large-scale key predictors forecasted by APCC MME for the same season. The cross validation result from the MME hybrid model demonstrates high prediction skill, with a correlation of 0.67 between the hindcasts and observation for 1982-2008. The cross validation from the hybrid model with individual models participating in MME indicates that there is no single model which consistently outperforms the other models in predicting typhoon number. Although the forecast skill of MME is not always the highest compared to that of each individual model, the skill of MME presents rather higher averaged correlations and small variance of correlations. Given large set of ensemble members from multi-models, a relative operating characteristic score reveals an 82 % (above-) and 78 % (below-normal) improvement for the probabilistic prediction of the number of TY. It implies that there is 82 % (78 %) probability that the forecasts can successfully discriminate between above normal (below-normal) from other years. The forecast skill of the hybrid model for the past 7 years (2002-2008) is more skillful than the forecast from the Tropical Storm Risk consortium. Using large set of ensemble members from multi-models, the APCC MME could provide useful deterministic and probabilistic seasonal typhoon forecasts to the end-users in particular, the residents of tropical cyclone-prone areas in the Asia-Pacific region.

  2. Seasonal Dynamics of Ant Community Structure in the Moroccan Argan Forest

    PubMed Central

    Keroumi, Abderrahim El; Naamani, Khalid; Soummane, Hassna; Dahbi, Abdallah

    2012-01-01

    In this study we describe the structure and composition of ant communities in the endemic Moroccan Argan forest, using pitfall traps sampling technique throughout the four seasons between May 2006 and February 2007. The study focused on two distinct climatic habitats within the Essaouira Argan forest, a semi-continental site at Lahssinate, and a coastal site at Boutazarte. Thirteen different ant species were identified, belonging to seven genera. Monomorium subopacum Smith and Tapinoma simrothi Krausse-Heldrungen (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) were the most abundant and behaviorally dominant ant species in the arganeraie. In addition, more specimens were captured in the semi-continental site than in the coastal area. However, no significant difference was observed in species richness, evenness, or diversity between both sites. Composition and community structure showed clear seasonal dynamics. The number of species, their abundance, their diversity, and their evenness per Argan tree were significantly dissimilar among seasons. The richness (except between summer and autumn), and the abundance and the evenness of ant species among communities, showed a significant difference between the dry period (summer and spring) and the rainy period (winter and autumn). Higher abundance and richness values occurred in the dry period of the year. Ant species dominance and seasonal climatic variations in the arganeraie might be among the main factors affecting the composition, structure, and foraging activity of ant communities. This study, together with recent findings on ant predation behavior below Argan trees, highlights the promising use of dominant ant species as potential agents of Mediterranean fruit fly bio-control in the Argan forest and surrounding ecosystems. PMID:23421815

  3. Dynamics of the Water Circulations in the Southern South China Sea and Its Seasonal Transports.

    PubMed

    Daryabor, Farshid; Ooi, See Hai; Samah, Azizan Abu; Akbari, Abolghasem

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional Regional Ocean Modeling System is used to study the seasonal water circulations and transports of the Southern South China Sea. The simulated seasonal water circulations and estimated transports show consistency with observations, e.g., satellite altimeter data set and re-analysis data of the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation. It is found that the seasonal water circulations are mainly driven by the monsoonal wind stress and influenced by the water outflow/inflow and associated currents of the entire South China Sea. The intrusion of the strong current along the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia and the eddies at different depths in all seasons are due to the conservation of the potential vorticity as the depth increases. Results show that the water circulation patterns in the northern part of the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia are generally dominated by the geostrophic currents while those in the southern areas are due solely to the wind stress because of negligible Coriolis force there. This study clearly shows that individual surface freshwater flux (evaporation minus precipitation) controls the sea salinity balance in the Southern South China Sea thermohaline circulations. Analysis of climatological data from a high resolution Regional Ocean Modeling System reveals that the complex bathymetry is important not only for water exchange through the Southern South China Sea but also in regulating various transports across the main passages in the Southern South China Sea, namely the Sunda Shelf and the Strait of Malacca. Apart from the above, in comparision with the dynamics of the Sunda Shelf, the Strait of Malacca reflects an equally significant role in the annual transports into the Andaman Sea.

  4. Seasonal dynamics of ant community structure in the Moroccan Argan Forest.

    PubMed

    El Keroumi, Abderrahim; Naamani, Khalid; Soummane, Hassna; Dahbi, Abdallah

    2012-01-01

    In this study we describe the structure and composition of ant communities in the endemic Moroccan Argan forest, using pitfall traps sampling technique throughout the four seasons between May 2006 and February 2007. The study focused on two distinct climatic habitats within the Essaouira Argan forest, a semi-continental site at Lahssinate, and a coastal site at Boutazarte. Thirteen different ant species were identified, belonging to seven genera. Monomorium subopacum Smith and Tapinoma simrothi Krausse-Heldrungen (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) were the most abundant and behaviorally dominant ant species in the arganeraie. In addition, more specimens were captured in the semi-continental site than in the coastal area. However, no significant difference was observed in species richness, evenness, or diversity between both sites. Composition and community structure showed clear seasonal dynamics. The number of species, their abundance, their diversity, and their evenness per Argan tree were significantly dissimilar among seasons. The richness (except between summer and autumn), and the abundance and the evenness of ant species among communities, showed a significant difference between the dry period (summer and spring) and the rainy period (winter and autumn). Higher abundance and richness values occurred in the dry period of the year. Ant species dominance and seasonal climatic variations in the arganeraie might be among the main factors affecting the composition, structure, and foraging activity of ant communities. This study, together with recent findings on ant predation behavior below Argan trees, highlights the promising use of dominant ant species as potential agents of Mediterranean fruit fly bio-control in the Argan forest and surrounding ecosystems.

  5. Seasonal patterns of water quality and phytoplankton dynamics in surface waters in Guangzhou and Foshan, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanggui; Li, Adela Jing; Qin, Junhao; Li, Qi; Ho, Jonathan G; Li, Huashou

    2017-03-10

    During 2015, we studied the temporal patterns of nutrient concentrations and turbidity in water bodies with different degrees of agricultural and urban pressures across Guangzhou and Foshan (China). Data and observations were made by trained citizen scientists and professional researchers. Our study shows that all monitored water bodies, with the exception of Qiandeng Lake and Fengjiang River, had elevated NO3(-)-N concentrations, which ranged from 0.10 to 6.83mg/L and peaked in late winter and early spring and reached a minimum in summer and mid-autumn. PO43-P concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 0.25mg/L and peaked during the winter, late-summer and late autumn. Turbidity values were highest at sites with agricultural activities, with maximums in the late winter and autumn, and the highest frequency (16% and 25%) of algae presence occurred in the spring and autumn. To better understand the characteristics and drivers of the algae occurrences, measurements of phytoplankton composition and physicochemical characteristics were conducted in three key seasons in the agricultural process, fallow, sowing and rainy season in 2016. Our focused study found that the occurrence of Bacillariophyta, Euglenophyta, Xanthophyta, Cryptophyta, Chrysophyta were positively correlated with dissolved oxygen and phosphorus concentrations, while Chlorophyta and Cyanophyta had positive correlations with turbidity, oxygen demand and nitrogen concentrations. Bacillariophyceae counted for the highest proportion of phytoplankton during the fallow season, comprising up to 60+% of the phytoplankton among the sites. During the rainy season, Chlorophyceae species were the majority, comprising up to 90+% of phytoplankton among the sampled sites. Our results pointed to the complexity of nutrient and phytoplankton dynamics in water bodies under multiple pressures, and to the value of using citizen scientists to determine contextual information to benefit more focused studies.

  6. Uncertainty in the analysis of tracer kinetics using dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI.

    PubMed

    Buckley, David L

    2002-03-01

    In recent years a number of physiological models have gained prominence in the analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI data. However, there remains little evidence to support their use in estimating the absolute values of tissue physiological parameters such as perfusion, capillary permeability, and blood volume. In an attempt to address this issue, data were simulated using a distributed pathway model of tracer kinetics, and three published models were fitted to the resultant concentration-time curves. Parameter estimates obtained from these fits were compared with the parameters used for the simulations. The results indicate that the use of commonly accepted models leads to systematic overestimation of the transfer constant, Ktrans, and potentially large underestimates of the blood plasma volume fraction, Vp. In summary, proposals for a practical approach to physiological modeling using MRI data are outlined.

  7. Hemodynamic analysis of intracranial aneurysms using phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuemei; Li, Rui; Chen, Yu; Sia, Sheau Fung; Li, Donghai; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Aihua

    2017-03-01

    Additional hemodynamic parameters are highly desirable in the clinical management of intracranial aneurysm rupture as static medical images cannot demonstrate the blood flow within aneurysms. There are two ways of obtaining the hemodynamic information—by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PCMRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In this paper, we compared PCMRI and CFD in the analysis of a stable patient's specific aneurysm. The results showed that PCMRI and CFD are in good agreement with each other. An additional CFD study of two stable and two ruptured aneurysms revealed that ruptured aneurysms have a higher statistical average blood velocity, wall shear stress, and oscillatory shear index (OSI) within the aneurysm sac compared to those of stable aneurysms. Furthermore, for ruptured aneurysms, the OSI divides the positive and negative wall shear stress divergence at the aneurysm sac.

  8. Phenomenological universalities: a novel tool for the analysis of dynamic contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliozzi, A. S.; Mazzetti, S.; Delsanto, P. P.; Regge, D.; Stasi, M.

    2011-02-01

    Dynamic contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a promising tool for the clinical diagnosis of tumors, whose implementation may be improved through the use of suitable hemodynamic models. If one prefers to avoid assumptions about the tumor physiology, empirical fitting functions may be adopted. For this purpose, in this paper we discuss the exploitation of a recently proposed phenomenological universalities (PUN) formalism. In fact, we show that a novel PUN class may be used to describe the time-signal intensity curves in both healthy and tumoral tissues, discriminating between the two cases and thus potentially providing a convenient diagnostic tool. The proposed approach is applied to analysis of the DCE-MRI data relative to a study group composed of ten patients with spine tumors.

  9. Seasonal Differences in Extinction and Colonization Drive Occupancy Dynamics of an Imperilled Amphibian

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Lea A.; Smith, Des H. V.; Jones, Breana L.; Prescott, David R. C.; Moehrenschlager, Axel

    2015-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the population dynamics of many amphibian species is lacking despite concerns about declining amphibian biodiversity and abundance. This paper explores temporal patterns of occupancy and underlying extinction and colonization dynamics in a regionally imperiled amphibian species, the Northern leopard frog (Lithobates pipiens) in Alberta. Our study contributes to elucidating regional occupancy dynamics at northern latitudes, where climate extremes likely have a profound effect on seasonal occupancy. The primary advantage of our study is its wide geographic scale (60,000 km2) and the use of repeat visual surveys each spring and summer from 2009–2013. We find that occupancy varied more dramatically between seasons than years, with low spring and higher summer occupancy. Between spring and summer, colonization was high and extinction low; inversely, colonization was low and extinction high over the winter. The dynamics of extinction and colonization are complex, making conservation management challenging. Our results reveal that Northern leopard frog occupancy was constant over the last five years and thus there is no evidence of decline or recovery within our study area. Changes to equilibrium occupancy are most sensitive to increasing colonization in the spring or declining extinction in the summer. Therefore, conservation and management efforts should target actions that are likely to increase spring colonization; this could be achieved through translocations or improving the quality or access to breeding habitat. Because summer occupancy is already high, it may be difficult to improve further. Nevertheless, summer extinction could be reduced by predator control, increasing water quality or hydroperiod of wetlands, or increasing the quality or quantity of summer habitat. PMID:25993256

  10. Comparison Between Perfusion Computed Tomography and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kierkels, Roel G.J.; Backes, Walter H.; Janssen, Marco H.M.; Buijsen, Jeroen; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido; Oellers, Michel C.; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To compare pretreatment scans with perfusion computed tomography (pCT) vs. dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in rectal tumors. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients diagnosed with rectal cancer were included in this prospective study. All patients underwent both pCT and DCE-MRI. Imaging was performed on a dedicated 40-slice CT-positron emission tomography system and a 3-T MRI system. Dynamic contrast enhancement was measured in tumor tissue and the external iliac artery. Tumor perfusion was quantified in terms of pharmacokinetic parameters: transfer constant K{sup trans}, fractional extravascular-extracellular space v{sub e}, and fractional plasma volume v{sub p}. Pharmacokinetic parameter values and their heterogeneity (by 80% quantile value) were compared between pCT and DCE-MRI. Results: Tumor K{sup trans} values correlated significantly for the voxel-by-voxel-derived median (Kendall's tau correlation, tau = 0.81, p < 0.001) and 80% quantile (tau = 0.54, p = 0.04), as well as for the averaged uptake (tau = 0.58, p = 0.03). However, no significant correlations were found for v{sub e} and v{sub p} derived from the voxel-by-voxel-derived median and 80% quantile and derived from the averaged uptake curves. Conclusions: This study demonstrated for the first time that pCT provides K{sup trans} values comparable to those of DCE-MRI. However, no correlation was found for the v{sub e} and v{sub p} parameters between CT and MRI. Computed tomography can serve as an alternative modality to MRI for the in vivo evaluation of tumor angiogenesis in terms of the transfer constant K{sup trans}.

  11. Seasonal variation and dynamics of Saturn's magnetospheric plasma, after 8 years of Cassini in orbit.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergis, N.

    2012-12-01

    Saturn orbits the Sun with a period of nearly 29.5 years and has an obliquity of 26.73°. As a result, Saturn presents seasonal variations similar to Earth's, but with much longer seasons, as the tilt between the planet's spin axis and the solar wind vary (approximately sinusoidally) with time between solstices. Saturn was close to its equinox (tilt below 8.1°) during the Pioneer 11 and Voyager 1 and 2 flybys that took place between September 1979 and August 1981, so any seasonal effects would have been relatively hard to see in the limited data from these missions. More than 2 decades later, on July 4, 2004, Cassini began orbiting Saturn, returning a variety of in situ and remote measurements. During the last 8 years, Cassini covered a large part of the Saturnian system and offered the opportunity of sampling the planetary magnetosphere not just at different seasons, but also at seasonal phases that are symmetric to the Saturnian equinox (August 2009). In this talk, we focus on the seasonal effects seen in the magnetosphere of Saturn as the angle between the solar wind flow and the Saturn-Sun direction changes from +23.7° (northern hemisphere winter) at the arrival of Cassini, to -14.9° (northern hemisphere summer) on July 2012. Particle and magnetic field data taken from a extensive set of equatorial and high latitude orbits of Cassini, at various distances and local times, show that: (a) the plasma sheet of Saturn has the form of a magnetodisk, with an energy-dependent vertical structure, being thicker by a factor of ~2 in the energetic particle range than in the electron plasma, and (b) it exhibits intense dynamical behavior, evident in in-situ particle measurements but also in energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions. The study of the pre-equinox high latitude orbits revealed that the night side plasma sheet was tilted northward beyond a radial distance of ~15 Rs (1Rs=60,258 km). As equinox approached, Cassini observed a clear decrease in the tilt of the

  12. Kinetic model optimization for characterizing tumour physiology by dynamic contrast-enhanced near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    St Lawrence, K; Verdecchia, K; Elliott, J; Tichauer, K; Diop, M; Hoffman, L; Lee, T-Y

    2013-03-07

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) methods are widely used with magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography to assess the vascular characteristics of tumours since these properties can affect the response to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In contrast, there have been far fewer studies using optical-based applications despite the advantages of low cost and safety. This study investigated an appropriate kinetic model for optical applications to characterize tumour haemodynamics (blood flow, F, blood volume, V(b), and vascular heterogeneity) and vascular leakage (permeability surface-area product, PS). DCE data were acquired with two dyes, indocyanine green (ICG) and 800 CW carboxylate (IRD(cbx)), from a human colon tumour xenograph model in rats. Due to the smaller molecular weight of IRD(cbx) (1166 Da) compared to albumin-bound ICG (67 kDa), PS of IRD(cbx) was significantly larger; however, no significant differences in F and V(b) were found between the dyes as expected. Error analysis demonstrated that all parameters could be estimated with an uncertainty less than 5% due to the high temporal resolution and signal-to-noise ratio of the optical measurements. The next step is to adapt this approach to optical imaging to generate haemodynamics and permeability maps, which should enhance the clinical interest in optics for treatment monitoring.

  13. Kinetic model optimization for characterizing tumour physiology by dynamic contrast-enhanced near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Lawrence, K.; Verdecchia, K.; Elliott, J.; Tichauer, K.; Diop, M.; Hoffman, L.; Lee, T.-Y.

    2013-03-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) methods are widely used with magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography to assess the vascular characteristics of tumours since these properties can affect the response to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In contrast, there have been far fewer studies using optical-based applications despite the advantages of low cost and safety. This study investigated an appropriate kinetic model for optical applications to characterize tumour haemodynamics (blood flow, F, blood volume, Vb, and vascular heterogeneity) and vascular leakage (permeability surface-area product, PS). DCE data were acquired with two dyes, indocyanine green (ICG) and 800 CW carboxylate (IRDcbx), from a human colon tumour xenograph model in rats. Due to the smaller molecular weight of IRDcbx (1166 Da) compared to albumin-bound ICG (67 kDa), PS of IRDcbx was significantly larger; however, no significant differences in F and Vb were found between the dyes as expected. Error analysis demonstrated that all parameters could be estimated with an uncertainty less than 5% due to the high temporal resolution and signal-to-noise ratio of the optical measurements. The next step is to adapt this approach to optical imaging to generate haemodynamics and permeability maps, which should enhance the clinical interest in optics for treatment monitoring.

  14. Semi-quantitative assessment of pulmonary perfusion in children using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetita, Catalin; Thong, William E.; Ou, Phalla

    2013-03-01

    This paper addresses the study of semi-quantitative assessment of pulmonary perfusion acquired from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in a study population mainly composed of children with pulmonary malformations. The automatic analysis approach proposed is based on the indicator-dilution theory introduced in 1954. First, a robust method is developed to segment the pulmonary artery and the lungs from anatomical MRI data, exploiting 2D and 3D mathematical morphology operators. Second, the time-dependent contrast signal of the lung regions is deconvolved by the arterial input function for the assessment of the local hemodynamic system parameters, ie. mean transit time, pulmonary blood volume and pulmonary blood flow. The discrete deconvolution method implements here a truncated singular value decomposition (tSVD) method. Parametric images for the entire lungs are generated as additional elements for diagnosis and quantitative follow-up. The preliminary results attest the feasibility of perfusion quantification in pulmonary DCE-MRI and open an interesting alternative to scintigraphy for this type of evaluation, to be considered at least as a preliminary decision in the diagnostic due to the large availability of the technique and to the non-invasive aspects.

  15. DCE@urLAB: a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI pharmacokinetic analysis tool for preclinical data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DCE@urLAB is a software application for analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging data (DCE-MRI). The tool incorporates a friendly graphical user interface (GUI) to interactively select and analyze a region of interest (ROI) within the image set, taking into account the tissue concentration of the contrast agent (CA) and its effect on pixel intensity. Results Pixel-wise model-based quantitative parameters are estimated by fitting DCE-MRI data to several pharmacokinetic models using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA). DCE@urLAB also includes the semi-quantitative parametric and heuristic analysis approaches commonly used in practice. This software application has been programmed in the Interactive Data Language (IDL) and tested both with publicly available simulated data and preclinical studies from tumor-bearing mouse brains. Conclusions A user-friendly solution for applying pharmacokinetic and non-quantitative analysis DCE-MRI in preclinical studies has been implemented and tested. The proposed tool has been specially designed for easy selection of multi-pixel ROIs. A public release of DCE@urLAB, together with the open source code and sample datasets, is available at http://www.die.upm.es/im/archives/DCEurLAB/. PMID:24180558

  16. Using Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI to Quantitatively Characterize Maternal Vascular Organization in the Primate Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Frias, A.E.; Schabel, M.C.; Roberts, V.H.J.; Tudorica, A.; Grigsby, P.L.; Oh, K.Y.; Kroenke, C. D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The maternal microvasculature of the primate placenta is organized into 10-20 perfusion domains that are functionally optimized to facilitate nutrient exchange to support fetal growth. This study describes a dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) method for identifying vascular domains, and quantifying maternal blood flow in them. Methods A rhesus macaque on the 133rd day of pregnancy (G133, term=165 days) underwent Doppler ultrasound (US) procedures, DCE-MRI, and Cesarean-section delivery. Serial T1-weighted images acquired throughout intravenous injection of a contrast reagent (CR) bolus were analyzed to obtain CR arrival time maps of the placenta. Results Watershed segmentation of the arrival time map identified 16 perfusion domains. The number and location of these domains corresponded to anatomical cotyledonary units observed following delivery. Analysis of the CR wave front through each perfusion domain enabled determination of volumetric flow, which ranged from 9.03 to 44.9 mL/sec (25.2 ± 10.3 mL/sec). These estimates are supported by Doppler US results. Conclusions The DCE-MRI analysis described here provides quantitative estimates of the number of maternal perfusion domains in a primate placenta, and estimates flow within each domain. Anticipated extensions of this technique are to the study placental function in nonhuman primate models of obstetric complications. PMID:24753177

  17. Bacterial community dynamics during polysaccharide degradation at contrasting sites in the Southern and Atlantic Oceans.

    PubMed

    Wietz, Matthias; Wemheuer, Bernd; Simon, Heike; Giebel, Helge-Ansgar; Seibt, Maren A; Daniel, Rolf; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Simon, Meinhard

    2015-10-01

    The bacterial degradation of polysaccharides is central to marine carbon cycling, but little is known about the bacterial taxa that degrade specific marine polysaccharides. Here, bacterial growth and community dynamics were studied during the degradation of the polysaccharides chitin, alginate and agarose in microcosm experiments at four contrasting locations in the Southern and Atlantic Oceans. At the Southern polar front, chitin-supplemented microcosms were characterized by higher fractions of actively growing cells and a community shift from Alphaproteobacteria to Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. At the Antarctic ice shelf, chitin degradation was associated with growth of Bacteroidetes, with 24% higher cell numbers compared with the control. At the Patagonian continental shelf, alginate and agarose degradation covaried with growth of different Alteromonadaceae populations, each with specific temporal growth patterns. At the Mauritanian upwelling, only the alginate hydrolysis product guluronate was consumed, coincident with increasing abundances of Alteromonadaceae and possibly cross-feeding SAR11. 16S rRNA gene amplicon libraries indicated that growth of the Bacteroidetes-affiliated genus Reichenbachiella was stimulated by chitin at all cold and temperate water stations, suggesting comparable ecological roles over wide geographical scales. Overall, the predominance of location-specific patterns showed that bacterial communities from contrasting oceanic biomes have members with different potentials to hydrolyse polysaccharides.

  18. Coregistration of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy for characterizing breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsiang, David; Shah, Natasha; Yu, Hon; Su, Min-Ying; Cerussi, Albert; Butler, John; Baick, Choong; Mehta, Rita; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Tromberg, Bruce

    2005-10-01

    A hand-held scanning probe based on broadband Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy (DOS) was used in combination with dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) to quantitatively characterize locally-advanced breast cancers in six patients. Measurements were performed sequentially using external fiducial markers for co-registration. Tumor patterns were categorized according to MRI morphological data, and 3D DCE-MRI slices were converted into a volumetric matrix with isotropic voxels to generate views that coincided with the DOS scanning plane. Tumor volume and depth at each DOS measurement site were determined, and a tissue optical index (TOI) that reflects both angiogenic and stromal characteristics was derived from broadband DOS data. In all six cases, optical scans showed significant TOI contrast corresponding to MRI morphological information. Sharp TOI peaks were recovered for well-circumscribed masses. A reduction in TOI was found inside a tumor with a necrotic center. A broadened peak was observed for a diffuse tumor pattern, and an inflammatory septal case provided two TOI peaks that correlated qualitatively with MRI enhancement. These results provide qualitative confirmation of the common signal origin and complementary information content that can be achieved by combining optical and MR imaging for breast cancer detection and clinical management.

  19. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Quantitative Perfusion in Cerebral Cavernous Angiomas

    PubMed Central

    Mikati, Abdul Ghani; Tan, Huan; Shenkar, Robert; Li, Luying; Zhang, Lingjiao; Guo, Xiaodong; Shi, Changbin; Liu, Tian; Wang, Yi; Shah, Akash; Edelman, Robert; Christoforidis, Gregory; Awad, Issam

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyperpermeability and iron deposition are two central pathophysiological phenomena in human cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) disease. Here we used two novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to establish a relationship between these phenomena. Methods Subjects with CCM disease (4 sporadic and 18 familial) underwent MRI imaging using the Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Quantitative Perfusion (DCEQP) and Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM) techniques that measure hemodynamic factors of vessel leak and iron deposition respectively, previously demonstrated in CCM disease. Regions of interest encompassing the CCM lesions were analyzed using these techniques Results Susceptibility measured by QSM was positively correlated with permeability of lesions measured using DCEQP (r=0.49, p=<0.0001). The correlation was not affected by factors including familial predisposition, lesion volume, the contrast agent and the use of statin medication. Susceptibility was correlated with lesional blood volume (r=0.4, p=0.0001), but not with lesional blood flow. Conclusion The correlation between QSM and DCEQP suggests that the phenomena of permeability and iron deposition are related in CCM; hence “more leaky lesions” also manifest a more cumulative iron burden. These techniques might be used as biomarkers to monitor the course of this disease and the effect of therapy. PMID:24302484

  20. Estuarine Nitrogen Dynamics Along the Alaskan Beaufort Sea Coast: Seasonal Patterns and Potential Climate Change Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, J. W.; Connelly, T. L.; Crump, B. C.; Kellogg, C.; Dunton, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Seasonal runoff and sea-ice cover create highly dynamic estuarine conditions in the Arctic. Studies focusing on major systems such as the Mackenzie have demonstrated how these variables interact to influence nutrient supply and uptake dynamics. Far less is known about the seasonality of smaller estuarine systems in the Arctic. Data collected from lagoons along the eastern Alaska Beaufort Sea coast show that salinities range from near zero in the spring to as high as 50 in the winter. Runoff and sea-ice thaw in the spring create highly stratified conditions, with hyper-saline bottom waters persisting through the summer in some locations. These variations in physical conditions are accompanied by variations in nitrogen availability within the lagoons. High concentrations of ammonium, and to a lesser extent nitrate, build up under the ice during the winter months. These nutrients are rapidly depleted during the ice break-up period and remain low throughout the summer. Concentrations of organic nitrogen, on the other hand, peak during the ice break-up period. While river inputs contribute directly to this nitrogen peak through the supply of land-derived organic matter, fatty acid markers also show that locally produced organic matter (primarily diatoms) peaks during the ice break-up period. Seasonal changes in nitrogen are accompanied by distinct shifts in microbial community composition as well as changes in stable isotope values of metazoan consumers. Changes in climate that are altering both runoff and sea-ice have the potential to influence the quantity and timing of nutrient availability and associated biological production in arctic coastal waters.

  1. Modeling seasonal dynamics of the small fish cohorts in fluctuating freshwater marsh landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jopp, Fred; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Trexler, Joel C.

    2010-01-01

    Small-bodied fishes constitute an important assemblage in many wetlands. In wetlands that dry periodically except for small permanent waterbodies, these fishes are quick to respond to change and can undergo large fluctuations in numbers and biomasses. An important aspect of landscapes that are mixtures of marsh and permanent waterbodies is that high rates of biomass production occur in the marshes during flooding phases, while the permanent waterbodies serve as refuges for many biotic components during the dry phases. The temporal and spatial dynamics of the small fishes are ecologically important, as these fishes provide a crucial food base for higher trophic levels, such as wading birds. We develop a simple model that is analytically tractable, describing the main processes of the spatio-temporal dynamics of a population of small-bodied fish in a seasonal wetland environment, consisting of marsh and permanent waterbodies. The population expands into newly flooded areas during the wet season and contracts during declining water levels in the dry season. If the marsh dries completely during these times (a drydown), the fish need refuge in permanent waterbodies. At least three new and general conclusions arise from the model: (1) there is an optimal rate at which fish should expand into a newly flooding area to maximize population production; (2) there is also a fluctuation amplitude of water level that maximizes fish production, and (3) there is an upper limit on the number of fish that can reach a permanent waterbody during a drydown, no matter how large the marsh surface area is that drains into the waterbody. Because water levels can be manipulated in many wetlands, it is useful to have an understanding of the role of these fluctuations.

  2. Effect of abiotic factors on seasonal population dynamics of Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae) in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ximenes, Maria de Fátima Freire de Melo; Castellón, Eloy G; De Souza, Maria de Fátima; Menezes, Alexandre A Lara; Queiroz, José Wilton; Macedo e Silva, Virgínia Penéllope; Jerônimo, Selma M B

    2006-09-01

    The resurgence of visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil increases the need for studies to elucidate the spatial and temporal dynamics of Lutzomyia longipalpis (Lutz and Neiva) (Diptera: Psychodidae), the vector of Leishmania infantum, the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil. Sand flies were captured in peridomestic habitats biweekly for 3 yr. Cross-correlation tests and spectral analysis were used to analyze the simultaneous and lag-time correlations between Lu. longipalpis population densities and abiotic factors of temperature, relative humidity, wind velocity, and rainfall. Distinct seasonal patterns were observed for males and females, with intervals of 6 mo between population peaks for males and 12 mo for females. Peak female population densities lagged 3 mo behind the maximum annual temperature. Female population density was negatively correlated with relative humidity. An increase in average wind velocity was followed by a decrease in the number of females for 2 wk. Understanding the relationship between the seasonal population dynamics of Lu. longipalpis and abiotic factors will contribute to the design of better control measures to decrease transmission of L. infantum and consequently the incidence of leishmaniasis.

  3. Stability and resilience of seagrass meadows to seasonal and interannual dynamics and environmental stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Joel A.; D'Odorico, Paolo; McGlathery, Karen J.; Wiberg, Patricia L.

    2012-03-01

    Shallow coastal bays provide habitat for diverse fish and invertebrate populations and are an important source of sediment for surrounding marshes. The sediment dynamics of these bays are strongly affected by seagrass meadows, which limit sediment resuspension, thereby providing a more favorable light environment for their own survival and growth. Due to this positive feedback between seagrass and light conditions, it has been suggested that bare sediment and seagrass meadows are potential alternate stable states of the benthos in shallow coastal bays. To investigate the stability and resilience of seagrass meadows subjected to variation in environmental conditions (e.g., light, temperature), a coupled model of vegetation-sediment-water flow interactions and vegetation growth was developed. The model was used to examine the effect of dynamically varying seasonal and interannual seagrass density on sediment resuspension, water column turbidity, and the subsequent light environment on hourly time steps and then run over decadal time scales. A daily growth model was designed to capture both belowground biomass and the growth and senescence of aboveground biomass structural components (e.g., leaves and stems). This allowed us to investigate how the annual and seasonal variability in shoot and leaf density within a meadow affects the strength of positive feedbacks between seagrass and their light environment. The model demonstrates both the emergence of bistable behavior from 1.6 to 1.8 m mean sea level due to the strength of the positive feedback, as well as the limited resilience of seagrass meadows within this bistable range.

  4. Seasonal dynamics and microgeographical spatial heterogeneity of malaria along the China-Myanmar border.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Zhou, Guofa; Ruan, Yonghua; Lee, Ming-chieh; Xu, Xin; Deng, Shuang; Bai, Yao; Zhang, Jie; Morris, James; Liu, Huaie; Wang, Ying; Fan, Qi; Li, Peipei; Wu, Yanrui; Yang, Zhaoqing; Yan, Guiyun; Cui, Liwang

    2016-05-01

    Malaria transmission is heterogeneous in the Greater Mekong Subregion with most of the cases occurring along international borders. Knowledge of transmission hotspots is essential for targeted malaria control and elimination in this region. This study aimed to determine the dynamics of malaria transmission and possible existence of transmission hotspots on a microgeographical scale along the China-Myanmar border. Microscopically confirmed clinical malaria cases were recorded in five border villages through a recently established surveillance system between January 2011 and December 2014. A total of 424 clinical cases with confirmed spatial and temporal information were analyzed, of which 330 (77.8%) were Plasmodium vivax and 88 (20.8%) were Plasmodium falciparum, respectively. The P. vivax and P. falciparum case ratio increased dramatically from 2.2 in 2011 to 4.7 in 2014, demonstrating that P. vivax malaria has become the predominant parasite species. Clinical infections showed a strong bimodal seasonality. There were significant differences in monthly average incidence rates among the study villages with rates in a village in China being 3-8 folds lower than those in nearby villages in Myanmar. Spatial analysis revealed the presence of clinical malaria hotspots in four villages. This information on malaria seasonal dynamics and transmission hotspots should be harnessed for planning targeted control.

  5. [Seasonal dynamics of nitrogen- and phosphorus absorption efficiency of wetland plants in Minjiang River estuary].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Long; Zeng, Cong-Sheng; Zhang, Lin-Hai; Wang, Wei-Qi; Lin, Yan; Ai, Jin-Quan

    2009-06-01

    Taking the native Phragmites australis and invasive Spartina alterniflora in Minjiang River estuary as test objectives, this paper studied the seasonal dynamics of their biomass and nitrogen- and phosphorus absorption efficiency. A typical single-peak curve was presented for the seasonal dynamics of aboveground biomass and nitrogen- and phosphorus absorption efficiency of the two species. P. australis had the maximum aboveground biomass (2195.33 g X m(-2)) in summer, while S. alterniflora had it (3670.02 g X m(-2)) in autumn. The total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) contents of P. australis reached the peak (21.06 g x m(-2) of TN and 1.12 g x m(-2) of TP) in summer and in autumn, respectively, while those of S. alterniflora all reached the peak (26.76 g x m(-2) of TN and 3.23 g x m(-2) of TP) in autumn. Both of the two species had a higher absorption efficiency in TN than in TP (P < 0.01), and S. alterniflora had a significantly higher absorption efficiency of TN and TP than P. australis (P < 0.05). To some extent, the N/P, C/N, and C/P ratios of plants could indicate the nitrogen- and phosphorus absorption efficiency of the plants.

  6. Daily and seasonal dynamics of remotely sensed photosynthetic efficiency in tree canopies.

    PubMed

    Pieruschka, Roland; Albrecht, Hendrik; Muller, Onno; Berry, Joseph A; Klimov, Denis; Kolber, Zbigniew S; Malenovský, Zbyněk; Rascher, Uwe

    2014-07-01

    The photosynthesis of various species or even a single plant varies dramatically in time and space, creating great spatial heterogeneity within a plant canopy. Continuous and spatially explicit monitoring is, therefore, required to assess the dynamic response of plant photosynthesis to the changing environment. This is a very challenging task when using the existing portable field instrumentation. This paper reports on the application of a technique, laser-induced fluorescence transient (LIFT), developed for ground remote measurement of photosynthetic efficiency at a distance of up to 50 m. The LIFT technique was used to monitor the seasonal dynamics of selected leaf groups within inaccessible canopies of deciduous and evergreen tree species. Electron transport rates computed from LIFT measurements varied over the growth period between the different species studied. The LIFT canopy data and light-use efficiency measured under field conditions correlated reasonably well with the single-leaf pulse amplitude-modulated measurements of broadleaf species, but differed significantly in the case of conifer tree species. The LIFT method has proven to be applicable for a remote sensing assessment of photosynthetic parameters on a diurnal and seasonal scale; further investigation is, however, needed to evaluate the influence of complex heterogeneous canopy structures on LIFT-measured chlorophyll fluorescence parameters.

  7. Evaluation of liver parenchyma and perfusion using dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in captive green iguanas (Iguana iguana) under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Contrast-enhanced diagnostic imaging techniques are considered useful in veterinary and human medicine to evaluate liver perfusion and focal hepatic lesions. Although hepatic diseases are a common occurrence in reptile medicine, there is no reference to the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) to evaluate the liver in lizards. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the pattern of change in echogenicity and attenuation of the liver in green iguanas (Iguana iguana) after administration of specific contrast media. Results An increase in liver echogenicity and density was evident during CEUS and CECT, respectively. In CEUS, the mean ± SD (median; range) peak enhancement was 19.9% ± 7.5 (18.3; 11.7-34.6). Time to peak enhancement was 134.0 ± 125.1 (68.4; 59.6-364.5) seconds. During CECT, first visualization of the contrast medium was at 3.6 ± 0.5 (4; 3-4) seconds in the aorta, 10.7 ± 2.2 (10.5; 7-14) seconds in the hepatic arteries, and 15 ± 4.5 (14.5; 10-24) seconds in the liver parenchyma. Time to peak was 14.1 ± 3.4 (13; 11-21) and 31 ± 9.6 (29; 23-45) seconds in the aorta and the liver parenchyma, respectively. Conclusion CEUS and dynamic CECT are practical means to determine liver hemodynamics in green iguanas. Distribution of contrast medium in iguana differed from mammals. Specific reference ranges of hepatic perfusion for diagnostic evaluation of the liver in iguanas are necessary since the use of mammalian references may lead the clinician to formulate incorrect diagnostic suspicions. PMID:24885935

  8. Seasonal and interannual variations of carbon and oxygen isotopes of respired CO2 in a tallgrass prairie: Measurements and modeling results from 3 years with contrasting water availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chun-Ta; Riley, William; Owensby, Clenton; Ham, Jay; Schauer, Andrew; Ehleringer, James R.

    2006-04-01

    We made weekly measurements of carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) isotopes of atmospheric CO2 in a C3/C4 tallgrass prairie during the growing season for 3 years with contrasting soil moisture conditions. Air samples above and within canopies were collected using 100-ml flasks at night to characterize isotopic composition of ecosystem respiration. We used a two-source mixing line (Keeling plot) approach to estimate isotope ratios of ecosystem respired CO2 for both carbon (δ13CR) and oxygen (δ18OR). Measured net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) showed the largest net carbon uptake in 2004, followed by 2003 and 2002. This interannual difference in NEE strongly depends on the amount and distribution of precipitation received by this tallgrass prairie. Precipitation also affects the timing of the seasonal transition from C3 dominance in spring to C4 dominance in summer. Variations of δ13CR showed that C4 plants dominated ecosystem respiration in 2003 and 2004, except in early spring when C3 plants were more active. In contrast, contributions of C3 plants were relatively higher for an extended period in the summer of 2002, when a severe drought occurred. Typically, C3 forbs extract water and nutrients from soil layers below that of the C4 grasses and remain photosynthetically active in periods when C4 grasses have water stress that limits photosynthesis. Drought-reduced C4 grass photosynthesis was lower than temperature-limited C3 forb growth during this period. We used an integrated isotope land surface model (ISOLSM) to simulate (and compare to measurements) net CO2 fluxes, δ18O values of leaf and soil water, and δ18O values of aboveground and soil respiration. The Keeling plot analysis becomes less reliable for estimating δ18OR values when the surface soil is dry. We suspect this is due to low CO2 production in the soil when water is limiting, in which case the invasion (abiotic) effect is more significant. ISOLSM reasonably captured seasonal variations of measured

  9. A model for the dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shengping; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2010-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Plesset (RP) equation for a clean gas bubble in an incompressible and infinite liquid has previously been applied to approximately simulate the behavior of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) in vivo, and extended RP equations have been proposed to account for the effects of the UCA shell or surrounding soft tissue. These models produce results that are consistent with experimental measurements for low acoustic pressure scenarios. For applications of UCAs in therapeutic medicine, the transmitted acoustic pulse can have a peak negative pressure (PNP) up to a few megapascals, resulting in discrepancies between measurements and predictions using these extended RP equations. Here, a model was developed to describe the dynamics of UCAs in vivo while taking account of the effects of liquid compressibility, the shell and the surrounding tissue. Liquid compressibility is approximated to first order and the shell is treated either as a Voigt viscoelastic solid or a Newtonian viscous liquid. Finite deformation of the shell and tissue is derived. Dynamics of UCAs with a shell of lipid, polymer, albumin and liquid are investigated for typical therapeutic ultrasound pulses. The effects of liquid compressibility and shell and tissue parameters are analyzed. PMID:20815486

  10. Cancer diagnostics using dynamic near-infrared optical imaging and fluorescent contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurfinkel, Mikhail

    2004-12-01

    A new optical imaging modality has been developed for small animal in vivo imaging of near-infrared fluorescence resulting from fluorescent contrast agents specifically targeted to molecular markers of cancer. The imaging system is comprised of an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) for the detection of ultra-low levels of re-emitted fluorescence following the delivery of an expanded beam of excitation light. The design of the ICCD detection system allows for both continuous wave (CW) and frequency-domain modes of operation. Since the accurate acquisition of frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM) data is important for tomographic imaging, the imaging system was also validated using experimentally obtained FDPM measurements of homogenous turbid media and diffusion theory to obtain estimates of the optical properties characteristic of the media. The experiments demonstrated that the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients are determined least accurately when relative measurements of average light intensity IrelDC are employed either alone or in a combination with relative modulation amplitude data IrelAC and/or relative phase shift data thetarel. However, when FDPM measurements of thetarel are employed either alone or in combination with IrelAC data, the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients may be found accurate to within 15% and I1%, respectively, of the values obtained from standard single-pixel measurements; a result that suggests that FDPM data obtained from an ICCD detection system may in fact be useful in tomographic imaging. Furthermore, intensified-detection allows for sub-second exposure times, permitting the acquisition of dynamic fluorescence images immediately following administration of the contrast agent. Experimental results demonstrate that when coupled with a suitable pharmacokinetic model describing targeted dye distribution throughout the body, dynamic fluorescence imaging may be used to discriminate spontaneous canine

  11. Temporal Dynamics and Decay of Putatively Allochthonous and Autochthonous Viral Genotypes in Contrasting Freshwater Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Jorge G.; Brown, Julia M.; Donelan, Ryan P.; Eaglesham, James B.; Eggleston, Erin M.; LaBarre, Brenna A.

    2012-01-01

    Aquatic viruses play important roles in the biogeochemistry and ecology of lacustrine ecosystems; however, their composition, dynamics, and interactions with viruses of terrestrial origin are less extensively studied. We used a viral shotgun metagenomic approach to elucidate candidate autochthonous (i.e., produced within the lake) and allochthonous (i.e., washed in from other habitats) viral genotypes for a comparative study of their dynamics in lake waters. Based on shotgun metagenomes prepared from catchment soil and freshwater samples from two contrasting lakes (Cayuga Lake and Fayetteville Green Lake), we selected two putatively autochthonous viral genotypes (phycodnaviruses likely infecting algae and cyanomyoviruses likely infecting picocyanobacteria) and two putatively allochthonous viral genotypes (geminiviruses likely infecting terrestrial plants and circoviruses infecting unknown hosts but common in soil libraries) for analysis by genotype-specific quantitative PCR (TaqMan) applied to DNAs from viruses in the viral size fraction of lake plankton, i.e., 0.2 μm > virus > 0.02 μm. The abundance of autochthonous genotypes largely reflected expected host abundance, while the abundance of allochthonous genotypes corresponded with rainfall and storm events in the respective catchments, suggesting that viruses with these genotypes may have been transported to the lake in runoff. The decay rates of allochthonous and autochthonous genotypes, assessed in incubations where all potential hosts were killed, were generally lower (0.13 to 1.50% h−1) than those reported for marine virioplankton but similar to those for freshwater virioplankton. Both allochthonous and autochthonous viral genotypes were detected at higher concentrations in subsurface sediments than at the water-sediment interface. Our data indicate that putatively allochthonous viruses are present in lake plankton and sediments, where their temporal dynamics reflect active transport to the lake during

  12. The role of stream water carbon dynamics and export in the carbon balance of a tropical seasonal rainforest, southwest China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Schaefer, Douglas A; Sha, Li-Qing; Deng, Yun; Deng, Xiao-Bao; Dai, Kai-Jie

    2013-01-01

    A two-year study (2009 ~ 2010) was carried out to investigate the dynamics of different carbon (C) forms, and the role of stream export in the C balance of a 23.4-ha headwater catchment in a tropical seasonal rainforest at Xishuangbanna (XSBN), southwest China. The seasonal volumetric weighted mean (VWM) concentrations of total inorganic C (TIC) and dissolved inorganic C (DIC) were higher, and particulate inorganic C (PIC) and organic C (POC) were lower, in the dry season than the rainy season, while the VWM concentrations of total organic C (TOC) and dissolved organic C (DOC) were similar between seasons. With increased monthly stream discharge and stream water temperature (SWT), only TIC and DIC concentrations decreased significantly. The most important C form in stream export was DIC, accounting for 51.8% of the total C (TC) export; DOC, POC, and PIC accounted for 21.8%, 14.9%, and 11.5% of the TC export, respectively. Dynamics of C flux were closely related to stream discharge, with the greatest export during the rainy season. C export in the headwater stream was 47.1 kg C ha(-1) yr(-1), about 2.85% of the annual net ecosystem exchange. This finding indicates that stream export represented a minor contribution to the C balance in this tropical seasonal rainforest.

  13. Seasonal Dynamics of Phlebotomine Sand Fly Species Proven Vectors of Mediterranean Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Alten, Bulent; Maia, Carla; Afonso, Maria Odete; Campino, Lenea; Jiménez, Maribel; González, Estela; Molina, Ricardo; Bañuls, Anne Laure; Prudhomme, Jorian; Vergnes, Baptiste; Toty, Celine; Cassan, Cécile; Rahola, Nil; Thierry, Magali; Sereno, Denis; Bongiorno, Gioia; Bianchi, Riccardo; Khoury, Cristina; Tsirigotakis, Nikolaos; Dokianakis, Emmanouil; Antoniou, Maria; Christodoulou, Vasiliki; Mazeris, Apostolos; Karakus, Mehmet; Ozbel, Yusuf; Arserim, Suha K.; Erisoz Kasap, Ozge; Gunay, Filiz; Oguz, Gizem; Kaynas, Sinan; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Tskhvaradze, Lamzira; Gramiccia, Marina; Volf, Petr; Gradoni, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Background The recent geographical expansion of phlebotomine vectors of Leishmania infantum in the Mediterranean subregion has been attributed to ongoing climate changes. At these latitudes, the activity of sand flies is typically seasonal; because seasonal phenomena are also sensitive to general variations in climate, current phenological data sets can provide a baseline for continuing investigations on sand fly population dynamics that may impact on future scenarios of leishmaniasis transmission. With this aim, in 2011–2013 a consortium of partners from eight Mediterranean countries carried out entomological investigations in sites where L. infantum transmission was recently reported. Methods/Principal Findings A common protocol for sand fly collection included monthly captures by CDC light traps, complemented by sticky traps in most of the sites. Collections were replicated for more than one season in order to reduce the effects of local weather events. In each site, the trapping effort was left unchanged throughout the survey to legitimate inter-seasonal comparisons. Data from 99,000 collected specimens were analyzed, resulting in the description of seasonal dynamics of 56,000 sand flies belonging to L. infantum vector species throughout a wide geographical area, namely P. perniciosus (Portugal, Spain and Italy), P. ariasi (France), P. neglectus (Greece), P. tobbi (Cyprus and Turkey), P. balcanicus and P. kandelakii (Georgia). Time of sand fly appearance/disappearance in collections differed between sites, and seasonal densities showed variations in each site. Significant correlations were found between latitude/mean annual temperature of sites and i) the first month of sand fly appearance, that ranged from early April to the first half of June; ii) the type of density trend, varying from a single peak in July/August to multiple peaks increasing in magnitude from May through September. A 3-modal trend, recorded for P. tobbi in Cyprus, represents a novel

  14. Repeatability of Cerebral Perfusion Using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI in Glioblastoma Patients12

    PubMed Central

    Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Emblem, Kyrre E.; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Bjørnerud, Atle; Vangel, Mark G.; Gerstner, Elizabeth R.; Schmainda, Kathleen M.; Paynabar, Kamran; Wu, Ona; Wen, Patrick Y.; Batchelor, Tracy; Rosen, Bruce; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study evaluates the repeatability of brain perfusion using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with a variety of post-processing methods. METHODS Thirty-two patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were recruited. On a 3-T MRI using a dual-echo, gradient-echo spin-echo DSC-MRI protocol, the patients were scanned twice 1 to 5 days apart. Perfusion maps including cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were generated using two contrast agent leakage correction methods, along with testing normalization to reference tissue, and application of arterial input function (AIF). Repeatability of CBV and CBF within tumor regions and healthy tissues, identified by structural images, was assessed with intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and repeatability coefficients (RCs). Coefficients of variation (CVs) were reported for selected methods. RESULTS CBV and CBF were highly repeatable within tumor with ICC values up to 0.97. However, both CBV and CBF showed lower ICCs for healthy cortical tissues (up to 0.83), healthy gray matter (up to 0.95), and healthy white matter (WM; up to 0.93). The values of CV ranged from 6% to 10% in tumor and 3% to 11% in healthy tissues. The values of RC relative to the mean value of measurement within healthy WM ranged from 22% to 42% in tumor and 7% to 43% in healthy tissues. These percentages show how much variation in perfusion parameter, relative to that in healthy WM, we expect to observe to consider it statistically significant. We also found that normalization improved repeatability, but AIF deconvolution did not. CONCLUSIONS DSC-MRI is highly repeatable in high-grade glioma patients. PMID:26055170

  15. Assessment of blood–brain barrier disruption using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Heye, Anna K.; Culling, Ross D.; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Thrippleton, Michael J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the importance of blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption in aging, dementia, stroke and multiple sclerosis in addition to more commonly-studied pathologies such as tumors. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) is a method for studying BBB disruption in vivo. We review pathologies studied, scanning protocols and data analysis procedures to determine the range of available methods and their suitability to different pathologies. We systematically review the existing literature up to February 2014, seeking studies that assessed BBB integrity using T1-weighted DCE-MRI techniques in animals and humans in normal or abnormal brain tissues. The literature search provided 70 studies that were eligible for inclusion, involving 417 animals and 1564 human subjects in total. The pathologies most studied are intracranial neoplasms and acute ischemic strokes. There are large variations in the type of DCE-MRI sequence, the imaging protocols and the contrast agents used. Moreover, studies use a variety of different methods for data analysis, mainly based on model-free measurements and on the Patlak and Tofts models. Consequently, estimated KTrans values varied widely. In conclusion, DCE-MRI is shown to provide valuable information in a large variety of applications, ranging from common applications, such as grading of primary brain tumors, to more recent applications, such as assessment of subtle BBB dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease. Further research is required in order to establish consensus-based recommendations for data acquisition and analysis and, hence, improve inter-study comparability and promote wider use of DCE-MRI. PMID:25379439

  16. Temporal phase-unwrapping algorithm for dynamic interference pattern analysis in interference-contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    van den Doel, L R; van Vliet, L J

    2001-09-01

    A temporal phase-unwrapping algorithm has been developed for the analysis of dynamic interference patterns generated with interference-contrast microscopy in micromachined picoliter vials. These vials are etched in silicon dioxide, have a typical depth of 6 mum, and are filled with a liquid sample. In this kind of microscopy, fringe patterns are observed at the air-liquid interface. These fringe patterns are caused by interference between the directly reflected part of an incident plane wave and the part of that wave that is reflected on the bottom of the vial. The optical path difference (OPD) between both parts is proportional to the distance to the reflecting bottom of the vial. Evaporation decreases the OPD at the meniscus level and causes alternating constructive and destructive interference of the incident light, resulting in an interferogram. Imaging of the space-varying OPD yields a fringe pattern in which the isophotes correspond to isoheight curves of the meniscus. When the bottom is flat, the interference pattern allows for monitoring of the meniscus as a function of time during evaporation. However, when there are objects on the bottom of the vial, the heights of these objects are observed as phase jumps in the fringes proportional to their heights. First, we present a classical electromagnetic description of interference-contrast microscopy. Second, a temporal phase-unwrapping algorithm is described that retrieves the meniscus profile from the interference pattern. Finally, this algorithm is applied to measure height differences of objects on the bottom in other micromachined vials with a precision of ~5 nm.

  17. A Comparison of Dynamical Seasonal Tropical Cyclone Predictions for the Australian and Western Pacific Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Kay; Charles, Andrew; Nakaegawa, Toshiyuki; Hendon, Harry; Kuleshov, Yuriy

    2013-04-01

    The Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) issues predictions of tropical cyclone (TC) activity in the Australian and South Pacific regions in the October before the TC season (November to April). Currently, these predictions utilise a statistical model based on the historical relationship between tropical cyclone activity and (i) sea surface temperature anomalies in the Equatorial Pacific (NINO3.4 region) and (ii) the Southern Oscillation Index over the past few decades. Variations in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-TC relationship that are not contained within the historical record can lead to deficiencies in future predictions. The use of dynamical (physics-based) climate models (GCMs) offers an alternative to statistical TC prediction schemes. Any changes to the environment (whatever their character or cause) are incorporated in the analyses used to initialise a dynamical model. As part of the Pacific-Australia Climate Change Science and Adaptation Planning (PACCSAP) Program, BoM is developing dynamically-based seasonal TC predictions for the Australian, South Pacific and North-West Pacific regions. The seasonal TC predictions from two fully-coupled GCMs are evaluated and compared. These models are BoM's Predictive Ocean-Atmosphere Model for Australia (POAMA) and the Japan Meteorological Agency/Meteorological Research Institute Coupled GCM (JMA/MRI-CGCM). The resolution of POAMA's atmospheric component is T42 (~2.5° x 2.5°), while JMA/MRI-CGCM is T95 (~1.8° x 1.8°). Two TC tracking methods are employed and applied to both models to evaluate the influence of model composition and tracking technique on seasonal TC predictions. In the more traditional TC detection scheme TCs are identified where 850-hPa relative vorticity is a maximum (minimum in the Southern Hemisphere) and exceeds a certain threshold. Additionally, the 500-200-hPa thickness and the difference in maximum winds at 850 and 200 hPa are used to differentiate tropical from extratropical

  18. Multiclass relevance vector machine classification to explore annual and seasonal dynamics of an Invasive reed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, B.; Torres, A.; McKee, M.

    2014-12-01

    Phragmites Australis forms dense stands which shade native vegetation and alter the ecosystem. Information on annual and seasonal dynamics of this plant contributes to the decision support system of wetland management. The study area is the Bear River Migratory bird refuge (BRMBR) which encompasses the Bear river and its delta where it flows into the northern part of theGreat Salt Lake, Utah. Seasonal change detection was carried out between the months of June 2010 and September 2010. The imagery from June 2011 and July 2011 were used for annual change detection. The remote sensing data was acquired by AggieAir, an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platform, flown autonomously via pre-programmed flight plans at low altitudes to limit atmospheric effects. This UAV acquires high resolution multispectral images in the visible, near-infrared and thermal bands and has a flight interval of about 30 minutes. The reflectance values of the classes in wavebands 550, 650 and 850 nm were used to train the Multiclass relevance vector machine (MCRVM) model developed to classify the imagery of study area. There were a total of 5 classes: water, phragmites australis, marshy land, mixed vegetation and salt flats and three attributes. The multiclass classification accuracy achieved for June 2010, September 2010 and July 2011 were 95.2%, 95% and 98.7% respectively. The seasonal change detection indicated an average increase of 17% in area of phragmites and annual change detection results indicated an average increase of 110% from June 2010 to July 2011. It's astonishing rate of increase in distribution and abundance was alarming.

  19. Long Term Seasonal Dynamics of Synechococcus Population Structure in the Gulf of Aqaba, Northern Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Post, Anton F.; Penno, Sigrid; Zandbank, Keren; Paytan, Adina; Huse, Susan M.; Welch, David Mark

    2011-01-01

    Spatial patterns of marine Synechococcus diversity across ocean domains have been reported on extensively. However, much less is known of seasonal and multiannual patterns of change in Synechococcus community composition. Here we report on the genotypic diversity of Synechococcus populations in the Gulf of Aqaba, Northern Red Sea, over seven annual cycles of deep mixing and stabile stratification, using ntcA as a phylogenetic marker. Synechococcus clone libraries were dominated by clade II and XII genotypes and a total of eight different clades were identified. Inclusion of ntcA sequences from the Global Ocean Sampling database in our analyses identified members of clade XII from beyond the Gulf of Aqaba, extending its known distribution. Most of the Synechococcus diversity was attributed to members of clade II during the spring bloom, while clade III contributed significantly to diversity during summer stratification. Clade XII diversity was most prevalent in fall and winter. Clade abundances were estimated from pyrosequencing of the V6 hypervariable region of 16S rRNA. Members of clade II dominated Synechococcus communities throughout the year, whereas the less frequent genotypes showed a pattern of seasonal succession. Based on the prevailing nutritional conditions we observed that clade I members thrive at higher nutrient concentrations during winter mixing. Clades V, VI and X became apparent during the transition periods between mixing and stratification. Clade III became prominent during sumeer stratification. We propose that members of clades V, VI, and X, and clade III are Synechococcus ecotypes that are adapted to intermediate and low nutrient levels respectively. This is the first time that molecular analyses have correlated population dynamics of Synechococcus genotypes with temporal fluctuations in nutrient regimes. Since these Synechococcus genotypes are routinely observed in the Gulf of Aqaba we suggest that seasonal fluctuations in nutrient levels

  20. Seasonal Dynamics of Water Use Strategy of Two Salix Shrubs in Alpine Sandy Land, Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yajuan; Wang, Guojie; Li, Renqiang

    2016-01-01

    Water is a limiting factor for plant growth and vegetation dynamics in alpine sandy land of the Tibetan Plateau, especially with the increasing frequency of extreme precipitation events and drought caused by climate change. Therefore, a relatively stable water source from either deeper soil profiles or ground water is necessary for plant growth. Understanding the water use strategy of dominant species in the alpine sandy land ecosystem is important for vegetative rehabilitation and ecological restoration. The stable isotope methodology of δD, δ18O, and δ13C was used to determine main water source and long-term water use efficiency of Salix psammophila and S. cheilophila, two dominant shrubs on interdune of alpine sandy land in northeastern Tibetan Plateau. The root systems of two Salix shrubs were investigated to determine their distribution pattern. The results showed that S. psammophila and S. cheilophila absorbed soil water at different soil depths or ground water in different seasons, depending on water availability and water use strategy. Salix psammophila used ground water during the growing season and relied on shallow soil water recharged by rain in summer. Salix cheilophila used ground water in spring and summer, but relied on shallow soil water recharged by rain in spring and deep soil water recharged by ground water in fall. The two shrubs had dimorphic root systems, which is coincident with their water use strategy. Higher biomass of fine roots in S. psammophila and longer fine roots in S. cheilophila facilitated to absorb water in deeper soil layers. The long-term water use efficiency of two Salix shrubs increased during the dry season in spring. The long-term water use efficiency was higher in S. psammophila than in S. cheilophila, as the former species is better adapted to semiarid climate of alpine sandy land. PMID:27243772

  1. Soil radon dynamics in the Amer fault zone: An example of very high seasonal variations.

    PubMed

    Moreno, V; Bach, J; Font, Ll; Baixeras, C; Zarroca, M; Linares, R; Roqué, C

    2016-01-01

    Soil radon levels of the Amer fault zone have been measured for a 4 year-period with the aim of checking seasonal fluctuations obtained in previous studies and to understand radon origin and dynamics. In this manuscript additional results are presented: updated continuous and integrated soil radon measurements, radionuclide content of soil materials and a detailed analysis of an urban profile by means of the electrical resistivity imaging technique and punctual soil radon, thoron and CO2 measurements. Integrated and continuous measurements present a wide range of values, [0.2-151.6] kBq m(-3) for radon, [4.5-39.6] kBq m(-3) for thoron and [4.0-71.2] g m(-2) day(-1) for CO2. The highest soil radon levels in the vicinity of the Amer fault (>40 kBq m(-3)) are found close to the fractured areas and present very important fluctuations repeated every year, with values in summer much higher than in winter, confirming previous studies. The highest radon values, up to 150 kBq m(-3), do not have a local origin because the mean value of radium concentration in this soil (19 ± 5 Bq kg(-1)) could not explain these values. Then soil radon migration through the fractures, influenced by atmospheric parameters, is assumed to account for such a high seasonal fluctuation. As main conclusion, in fractured areas, seasonal variations of soil radon concentration can be very important even in places where average soil radon concentration and radium content are not especially high. In these cases the migration capability of the soil is given not by intrinsic permeability but by the fracture structure. Potential risk estimation based on soil radon concentration and intrinsic permeability must be complemented with geological information in fractured systems.

  2. Seasonal dynamics of groundwater-lake interactions at Doñana National Park, Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sacks, Laura A.; Herman, Janet S.; Konikow, Leonard F.; Vela, Antonio L.

    1992-01-01

    The hydrologic and solute budgets of a lake can be strongly influenced by transient groundwater flow. Several shallow interdunal lakes in southwest Spain are in close hydraulic connection with the shallow ground water. Two permanent lakes and one intermittent lake have chloride concentrations that differ by almost an order of magnitude. A two-dimensional solute-transport model, modified to simulate transient groundwater-lake interaction, suggests that the rising water table during the wet season leads to local flow reversals toward the lakes. Response of the individual lakes, however, varies depending on the lake's position in the regional flow system. The most dilute lake is a flow-through lake during the entire year; the through flow is driven by regional groundwater flow. The other permanent lake, which has a higher solute concentration, undergoes seasonal groundwater flow reversals at its downgradient end, resulting in complex seepage patterns and higher solute concentrations in the ground water near the lake. The solute concentration of the intermittent lake is influenced more strongly by the seasonal wetting and drying cycle than by the regional flow system. Although evaporation is the major process affecting the concentration of conservative solutes in the lakes, geochemical and biochemical reactions influence the concentration of nonconservative solutes. Probable reactions in the lakes include biological uptake of solutes and calcite precipitation; probable reactions as lake water seeps into the aquifer are sulfate reduction and calcite dissolution. Seepage reversals can result in water composition that appears inconsistent with predictions based on head measurements because, under transient flow conditions, the flow direction at any instant may not satisfactorily depict the source of the water. Understanding the dynamic nature of groundwater-lake interaction aids in the interpretation of hydrologic and chemical relations between the lakes and the ground

  3. Differentiation of solid pancreatic tumors by using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seung Joon; Kim, Hyung Sik; Park, Hyunjin

    2014-01-01

    Distinguishing among different solid pancreatic tumor types, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), and solid pseudopapillary tumors (SPTs) is important, as the treatment options are vastly different. This study compared characteristics of solid pancreatic tumors by using dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fifty patients underwent MR imaging of pancreatic masses with a histopathology that was later confirmed as an adenocarcinoma (n = 27), a NET (n = 16), and a SPT (n = 7). For qualitative analysis, two reviewers evaluated the morphologic features of the tumors: locations, margins, shapes, contained products, pancreatic ductal dilatation, and grade of signal intensity (SI). For the quantitative analysis, all phases of the MR images were co-registered using proprietary image registration software; thus, a region of interest (ROI) defined on one phase could be re-applied in other phases. The following four ratios were considered: tumor-to-uninvolved pancreas SI ratio, percent SI change, tumor-touninvolved pancreas enhancement index, and arterial-to-delayed washout rate. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were assessed for the four ratios. Adenocarcinomas had ill-defined margins, irregular shapes, and ductal dilatation compared with NETs and SPTs (P < 0.001). The tumor-to-uninvolved pancreas ratio on all dynamic phases was significantly higher for NETs than for both adenocarcinomas and SPTs (P < 0.05). Percentage SI changes of pancreatic tumors on the pancreatic and the portal venous phases were significantly higher for NETs than for both adenocarcinomas and SPTs (P < 0.05). A significant difference between NETs and adenocarcinomas was also found with respect to the tumor-to-uninvolved pancreas enhancement index and arterial-to-delayed washout rate. The percentage SI changes in the pancreatic phase and the arterial-to-delayed washout rate best distinguished between adenocarcinomas and

  4. The nonlinear dynamics of microbubble contrast agents used in medical ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Anil J.

    Microbubbles are used as contrast agents in diagnostic ultrasound, and as transport agents or to engender physical effects in therapeutic ultrasound. The distinguishing characteristic of bubbles is their small size, on the order of microns, which allows them to traverse the smallest capillaries in the human body. Furthermore, when subject to acoustic forcing (ultrasound), the oscillations of bubbles become highly nonlinear, leading to a unique echo characteristic. Bubble echo improves the clinician's ability to distinguish between blood carrying contrast agent from the surrounding tissue. Present ultrasound techniques, however, do not take full advantage of the nonlinear properties of oscillating microbubbles. In this work, a novel method to maximize the bubble echo, thereby improving image quality, is suggested. Pulse-inversion imaging is utilized as a means of filtering out the linear echo of surrounding tissue. A norm is defined for the nonlinear bubble echo and it is shown how the norm may be maximized, given a limit on ultrasound intensity, by optimizing the acoustic pulse shape using optimal control theory. The optimization is performed for a single bubble of a particular size. The optimal pulse yields a several-fold increase in the echo norm over conventional pulse driving. It is also shown that the optimal pulse effectively maximizes the echo of a bubble cloud with mean size equal to that of the single bubble. Increased bubble response comes as a result of severe radial collapse, which in turn drives the translation dynamics of the bubble. These motions have been observed by others in experiment, but have, up this point, been inadequately explained. The erratic translation of a bubble is found to be intimately coupled to the radial dynamics, especially in the case of violent oscillations. The assumption of spherical symmetry is relaxed and it is considered how bubble translation can be a mechanism for shape instability, thereby leading to bubble destruction

  5. [An evaluation of ischemic stroke using dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, H; Igarashi, H; Katayama, Y; Terashi, A

    1998-04-01

    Thrombolytic therapy during the hyperacute stage is important for salvaging dying cerebral tissue. To date, however, accurate non-invasive assessment of an ischemic lesion during the hyperacute stage has not been possible. Perfusion MRI may be the key to the quick diagnosis of ischemic lesions. To assess the feasibility of dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI, echo planar imaging was performed in 10 patients with ischemic stroke. The relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), mean transit time (MTT), and relative cerebral blood flow(rCBF) were measured based on moment analysis and the gamma variate method. These measurements, however, are not suitable for the detection of cerebral ischemia during the hyperacute stage. Therefore, we additionally studied the changes in a concentration curve (time-delta R* curve) of Gd-DTPA, injected into the median vein of the forearm. From the curve the SUM (delta R*) time to peak and the delta R* peak, which may be calculated quickly, were determined and were compared to rCBV, MTT, and rCBF, respectively. The rCBV and the rCBF in the ischemic regions were less than those in the contralateral healthy regions (p < 0.05), and the MTT in the ischemic regions was longer than that in the contralateral healthy regions (p < 0.05). Additionally, SUM (delta R*) and the delta R* peak in the ischemic regions were less, and the time to peak in the ischemic regions was longer than the value in the contralateral healthy regions (p < 0.05), correlating well to the rCBV, rCBF, and MTT measurements. Also, images of these parameters, depicting the ischemic lesion earlier than conventional T2 weighted images, can be easily made by using an MRI console. These results suggest that the SUM (delta R*), time to peak and the delta R* peak images calculated with dynamic contrast enhanced perfusion MRI may be one of the best techniques for the detection of cerebral ischemic lesions during the hyperacute stage.

  6. Rheology contrast in the shallow conduit and eruption dynamics at Stromboli: insights from analogue experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capponi, Antonio; Lane, Stephen J.; James, Mike R.

    2014-05-01

    Strombolian eruptions result from the bursting of large individual gas pockets (slugs) in a low-viscosity magma. Scaled experimental investigations of the processes involved have generally been carried out in single Newtonian liquids, and have explored the dynamics of slug expansion, burst and their control on the generation of geophysical signals. Such studies provide a thorough first order investigation of the mechanisms involved, but little attention has been given so far to the processes of slug expansion and burst in more complex fluids. Observations at Stromboli show that obstructions in the conduit (due to, e.g., partial wall collapse or fall back in the vent of ejecta) can generate a viscous impedance within the upper portion of magma, leading to more violent eruptions. Petrological and textural data also suggest the presence of different magma rheologies due to degassing driven crystallisation. Here we use laboratory experiments to investigate the role of a vertical contrast in magma rheology on the dynamics of slug expansion and burst, and the resulting geophysical signals. The analogue materials used are silicon oil (μ = 0.1 Pa*s) capped with castor oil (μ = 1 Pa*s) to give a viscosity contrast of 10. Vertical pressure gradient is scaled by reducing the pressure at the top of the experimental apparatus with a vacuum pump. Pressure variations are measured at the top and bottom of the apparatus and correlated with high-speed imagery of the experiments and the results compared with control experiments using single liquid. The thickness of the viscous plug was varied along with the gas volumes and the gas pressure at the liquid surface (1 kPa, 3 kPa and 300 Pa). Our results show that the thickness of the viscous plug strongly controls slug expansion and systematically changes the magnitude of the associated pressure transients, favouring a more impulsive and energetic pressure release compared with the control experiments. The intrusion of slugs in the

  7. Calculation of intravascular signal in dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI using adaptive complex independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Mehrabian, Hatef; Chopra, Rajiv; Martel, Anne L

    2013-04-01

    Assessing tumor response to therapy is a crucial step in personalized treatments. Pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling provides quantitative information about tumor perfusion and vascular permeability that are associated with prognostic factors. A fundamental step in most PK analyses is calculating the signal that is generated in the tumor vasculature. This signal is usually inseparable from the extravascular extracellular signal. It was shown previously using in vivo and phantom experiments that independent component analysis (ICA) is capable of calculating the intravascular time-intensity curve in dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI. A novel adaptive complex independent component analysis (AC-ICA) technique is developed in this study to calculate the intravascular time-intensity curve and separate this signal from the DCE-MR images of tumors. The use of the complex-valued DCE-MRI images rather than the commonly used magnitude images satisfied the fundamental assumption of ICA, i.e., linear mixing of the sources. Using an adaptive cost function in ICA through estimating the probability distribution of the tumor vasculature at each iteration resulted in a more robust and accurate separation algorithm. The AC-ICA algorithm provided a better estimate for the intravascular time-intensity curve than the previous ICA-based method. A simulation study was also developed in this study to realistically simulate DCE-MRI data of a leaky tissue mimicking phantom. The passage of the MR contrast agent through the leaky phantom was modeled with finite element analysis using a diffusion model. Once the distribution of the contrast agent in the imaging field of view was calculated, DCE-MRI data was generated by solving the Bloch equation for each voxel at each time point. The intravascular time-intensity curve calculation results were compared to the previously proposed ICA-based intravascular time-intensity curve calculation method that applied ICA to the magnitude of the DCE-MRI data

  8. Seasonal invasion dynamics in a spatially heterogeneous river with fluctuating flows.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yu; Hilker, Frank M; Steffler, Peter M; Lewis, Mark A

    2014-07-01

    A key problem in environmental flow assessment is the explicit linking of the flow regime with ecological dynamics. We present a hybrid modeling approach to couple hydrodynamic and biological processes, focusing on the combined impact of spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability on population dynamics. Studying periodically alternating pool-riffle rivers that are subjected to seasonally varying flows, we obtain an invasion ratchet mechanism. We analyze the ratchet process for a caricature model and a hybrid physical-biological model. The water depth and current are derived from a hydrodynamic equation for variable stream bed water flows and these quantities feed into a reaction-diffusion-advection model that governs population dynamics of a river species. We establish the existence of spreading speeds and the invasion ratchet phenomenon, using a mixture of mathematical approximations and numerical computations. Finally, we illustrate the invasion ratchet phenomenon in a spatially two-dimensional hydraulic simulation model of a meandering river structure. Our hybrid modeling approach strengthens the ecological component of stream hydraulics and allows us to gain a mechanistic understanding as to how flow patterns affect population survival.

  9. Seasonal Dynamics of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Communities in Roots in a Seminatural Grassland▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Santos-González, Juan C.; Finlay, Roger D.; Tehler, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have been shown to influence both the diversity and productivity of grassland plant communities. These effects have been postulated to depend on the differential effects of individual mycorrhizal taxa on different plant species; however, so far there are few detailed studies of the dynamics of AMF colonization of different plant species. In this study, we characterized the communities of AMF colonizing the roots of two plant species, Prunella vulgaris and Antennaria dioica, in a Swedish seminatural grassland at different times of the year. The AMF small subunit rRNA genes were subjected to PCR, cloning, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis. Nineteen discrete sequence types belonging to Glomus groups A and B and to the genus Acaulospora were distinguished. No significant seasonal changes in the species compositions of the AMF communities as a whole were observed. However, the two plant species hosted significantly different AMF communities. P. vulgaris hosted a rich AMF community throughout the entire growing season. The presence of AMF in A. dioica decreased dramatically in autumn, while an increased presence of Ascomycetes species was detected. PMID:17630308

  10. Seasonal hyporheic dynamics control coupled microbiology and geochemistry in Colorado River sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danczak, Robert E.; Sawyer, Audrey H.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Stegen, James C.; Hobson, Chad; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2016-12-01

    Riverbed microbial communities play an oversized role in many watershed ecosystem functions, including the processing of organic carbon, cycling of nitrogen, and alterations to metal mobility. The structure and activity of microbial assemblages depend in part on geochemical conditions set by river-groundwater exchange or hyporheic exchange. To assess how seasonal changes in river-groundwater mixing affect these populations in a snowmelt-dominated fluvial system, vertical sediment and pore water profiles were sampled at three time points at one location in the hyporheic zone of the Colorado River and analyzed by using geochemical measurements, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and ecological modeling. Oxic river water penetrated deepest into the subsurface during peak river discharge, while under base flow conditions, anoxic groundwater dominated shallower depths. Over a 70 cm thick interval, riverbed sediments were therefore exposed to seasonally fluctuating redox conditions and hosted microbial populations statistically different from those at both shallower and deeper locations. Additionally, microbial populations within this zone were shown to be the most dynamic across sampling time points, underlining the critical role that hyporheic mixing plays in constraining microbial abundances. Given such mixing effects, we anticipate that future changes in river discharge in mountainous, semiarid western U.S. watersheds may affect microbial community structure and function in riverbed environments, with potential implications for biogeochemical processes in riparian regions.

  11. Carbon cycling dynamics in the seasonal sea-ice zone of East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, Nicholas P.; Tilbrook, Bronte; Trull, Thomas W.; Virtue, Patti; Williams, Guy D.

    2016-12-01

    The carbon cycle of the seasonally ice covered region of the southwest Indian Ocean sector of East Antarctica (30°-80°E, 60°-69°S) was investigated during austral summer (January-March 2006). Large variability in the drivers and timing of carbon cycling dynamics were observed and indicated that the study site was a weak net source of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere of 0.8 ± 1.6 g C m-2 during the ice-free period, with narrow bands of CO2 uptake observed near the continental margin and north of the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front. Continuous surface measurements of dissolved oxygen and the fugacity of CO2 were combined with net community production estimates from oxygen/argon ratios to show that surface heat gain and photosynthesis were responsible for the majority of observed surface water variability. On seasonal timescales, winter sea-ice cover reduced the flux of CO2 to the atmosphere in the study area, followed by biologically driven drawdown of CO2 as the ice retreated in spring-summer highlighting the important role that sea-ice formation and retreat has on the biogeochemical cycling of the region.

  12. Microbial community dynamics in a seasonally anoxic fjord: Saanich Inlet, British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Zaikova, Elena; Walsh, David A; Stilwell, Claire P; Mohn, William W; Tortell, Philippe D; Hallam, Steven J

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen concentration plays a major role in shaping biotic interactions and nutrient flows within marine ecosystems. Throughout the global ocean, regions of low dissolved oxygen concentration (hypoxia) are a common and expanding feature of the water column, with major feedback on productivity and greenhouse gas cycling. To better understand microbial diversity underlying biogeochemical transformations within oxygen-deficient oceanic waters, we monitored and quantified bacterial and archaeal community dynamics in relation to dissolved gases and nutrients during a seasonal stratification and deep water renewal cycle in Saanich Inlet, British Columbia, a seasonally anoxic fjord. A number of microbial groups partitioned within oxygen-deficient waters including Nitrospina and SAR324 affiliated with the delta-proteobacteria, SAR406 and gamma-proteobacteria related to thiotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea clams and mussels. Microbial diversity was highest within the hypoxic transition zone decreasing dramatically within anoxic basin waters and temporal patterns of niche partitioning were observed along defined gradients of oxygen and phosphate. These results provide a robust comparative phylogenetic framework for inferring systems metabolism of nitrogen, carbon and sulfur cycling within oxygen-deficient oceanic waters and establish Saanich Inlet as a tractable model for studying the response of microbial communities to changing levels of water column hypoxia.

  13. Seasonal Dynamics of Water, Carbon, and Energy Flux in Mesquite Forest: Project Overview and Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. G.; Scott, R.; Lin, G.; Martens, D.; Watts, C.; Goodrich, D.; Garatuza, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Edwards, E.; Hultine, K.; Yepez, E.; Ellsworth, P.; Cable, W.; vanHaren, J.; Pierce, D.

    2001-12-01

    Mesquite is the dominant woody plant in floodplain environments of warm deserts in the southwestern US and thus plays a central role in biogeochemical cycling and energy exchange at landscape and potentially regional scales. Our project investigates the biotic and abiotic controls over seasonal dynamics of energy exchange, CO2 uptake and release, and evapotranspiration within a mature mesquite forest on the San Pedro River floodplain in southeastern Arizona. The growing season in the upper San Pedro River basin is punctuated by a very hot, dry period in early summer followed by monsoon rains that stimulate prolific growth of under story C4 grasses. Our general objectives are to determine the impact of summer rains on net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), evapotranspiration (ET), energy fluxes and soil nutrient cycling, and to understand and model component fluxes in these two-layered canopies. We are continuously monitoring NEE and ET using an eddy covariance system mounted on a 14-m tall tower at the site. Three intensive field campaigns (pre-, mid-, and post-monsoon) included measurements of eddy fluxes beneath the mesquite canopy, mesquite sap flow, mesquite leaf area index, mesquite and grass water sources and stomatal conductance, soil moisture distribution, soil respiration, soil carbon and nitrogen pools, and isotopic composition of CO2 and water vapor within and above the canopy boundary layer. This talk will highlight some of the important findings from the first year of this project. >http://www.tucson.ars.ag.gov/~russell/mesquitehome.htm

  14. Nonspherical dynamics and shape mode stability of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvisi, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are shell encapsulated microbubbles developed originally for ultrasound imaging enhancement. UCAs are more recently being exploited for therapeutic applications, such as for drug delivery, gene therapy, and tissue ablation. Ultrasound transducer pulses can induce spherical (radial) UCA oscillations, translation, and nonspherical shape oscillations, the dynamics of which are highly coupled. If driven sufficiently strongly, the ultrasound can induce breakup of UCAs, which can facilitate drug or gene delivery but should be minimized for imaging purposes to increase residence time and maximize diagnostic effect. Therefore, an understanding of the interplay between the acoustic driving and nonspherical shape mode stability of UCAs is essential for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this work, we use both analytical and numerical methods to analyze shape mode stability for cases of small and large nonspherical oscillations, respectively. To analyze shape mode stability in the limit of small nonspherical perturbations, we couple a radial model of a lipid-coated microbubble with a model for bubble translation and nonspherical shape oscillation. This hybrid model is used to predict shape mode stability for ultrasound driving frequencies and pressure amplitudes of clinical interest. In addition, calculations of the stability of individual shape modes, residence time, maximum radius, and translation are provided with respect to acoustic driving parameters and compared to an unshelled bubble. The effects of shell elasticity, shell viscosity, and initial radius on stability are investigated. Furthermore, the well-established boundary element method (BEM) is used to investigate the dynamics and shape stability of large amplitude nonspherical oscillations of an ultrasonically-forced, polymer-coated microbubble near a rigid boundary. Different instability modes are identified based on the degree of jetting and proximity to the

  15. Seasonal population dynamics of Draeculacephala minerva (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) and transmission of Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-La Rosa, Juan C; Johnson, Marshall W; Civerolo, Edwin L; Chen, Jianchi; Groves, Russell L

    2008-08-01

    The grass sharpshooter, Draeculacephala minerva Ball (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), is a very common and often abundant grass-feeding leafhopper in California. Its population dynamics and ability to transmit Xylella fastidiosa were monitored over a 2-yr period in California's San Joaquin Valley. Collections of individuals from natural populations in irrigated pastures and alfalfa, Medicago savita L. fields adjacent to X. fastidiosa-infected almond (Prunus spp.) orchards indicated the occurrence of three discrete generations per year that peaked during the summer. Population densities varied significantly among experimental field survey sites. Insects captured on intercepting mesh traps, yellow sticky cards, and UV-light traps indicated local movement of these insects into and surrounding X. fastidiosa-infected, almond orchards. Local movement and seasonal transmission of X. fastidiosa from infected almonds to Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don indicated that this insect may be partly responsible for the slow spread of almond leaf scorch now recently observed in California's San Joaquin Valley.

  16. Age distribution and seasonal dynamics of abomasal helminths in wild red deer from central Spain.

    PubMed

    Santín-Durán, Mónica; Alunda, José M; Hoberg, Eric P; de la Fuente, Concepción

    2008-10-01

    A study on age distribution and seasonal dynamics of abomasal helminths in wild red deer was conducted in central Spain, by monthly samplings of fawns (<1 yr), subadult (1-2 yr), and adult (>2 yr) animals. Both intensity and prevalence of abomasal parasitism were higher in older animals, particularly in males. A bimodal pattern for intensity of infection by gastrointestinal parasites was observed. Maximum values attained in winter and summer may be related to variation in climate and the shifting availability of forage resources. The pattern was largely due to the contribution of Spiculopteragia asymmetrica/Spiculopteragia quadrispiculata, whereas the other species found (Ostertagia leptospicularis/Ostertagia kolchida and Ostertagia drozdzi/Ostertagia ryjikovi) occurred with lower prevalence and intensity of infection. Among these ostertagiines, the ratio for major and minor morphotypes of males of respective species and the relative abundance of males and females were stable through the annual cycle.

  17. Mapping Coral-Algal Dynamics in a Seasonal Upwelling Area Using Spaceborne High Resolution Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauly, Klaas; Goossens, Rudi; De Clerck, Olivier

    2010-12-01

    PROBA/CHRIS is one of the first satellite sensors to offer both high spatial and spectral resolutions. We explored the potential of this sensor to map the dynamics of seaweed and coral cover in an area influenced by seasonal upwelling in the Arabian Sea. Quantitative field assessments coincided with image acquisitions. After removal of sensor noise and atmospheric effects, maximum likelihood supervised classification yielded a tau accuracy of 64.09 for the summer monsoon dataset. Clearer waters and a lower spatial heterogeneity in the winter monsoon dataset resulted in a tau accuracy of 71.45. Post-classification comparison and vegetation indices illustrated the conspicuous turnover from dense macroalgal stands covering nearly all coral communities during summer to bare rock or turf communities during winter, with coral becoming the predominant bottom type. These results were further analysed using a novel maximum entropy sub-pixel approach and were shown to consistently outperform results from Landsat 7 ETM+ imagery.

  18. The seasonal dynamics of yeast communities in the rhizosphere of soddy-podzolic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubtsova, Yu. V.; Glushakova, A. M.; Chernov, I. Yu.

    2007-08-01

    The annual dynamics of the number and taxonomic composition of yeast was studied in the rhizosphere of two plant species (Ajuga reptans L. and Taraxacum officinale Wigg.) in a forb-birch forest on soddy-podzolic soil. Eurybiont phyllobasidial cryptococci and red-pigmented phytobionts Rhodotorula glutinis were found to predominate in the phyllosphere of these plants, whereas the typical pedobionts Cryptococcus terricola and Cr. podzolicus occurred on the surface of roots and in the rhizosphere. The seasonal changes in the number and species composition of the yeast communities in the rhizosphere were more smooth as compared to those in the phyllosphere. In the period of active vegetation of the plants, the phytobiont yeasts develop over their whole surface, including the rhizoplane. Their number on the aboveground parts of the plants was significantly lower than that of the pedobiont forms. Thus, the above-and underground parts of the plants significantly differed in the composition of the dominant species of epiphytic yeasts.

  19. Functional traits explain phytoplankton community structure and seasonal dynamics in a marine ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Kyle F; Litchman, Elena; Klausmeier, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental yet elusive goal of ecology is to predict the structure of communities from the environmental conditions they experience. Trait-based approaches to terrestrial plant communities have shown that functional traits can help reveal the mechanisms underlying community assembly, but such approaches have not been tested on the microbes that dominate ecosystem processes in the ocean. Here, we test whether functional traits can explain community responses to seasonal environmental fluctuation, using a time series of the phytoplankton of the English Channel. We show that interspecific variation in response to major limiting resources, light and nitrate, can be well-predicted by lab-measured traits characterising light utilisation, nitrate utilisation and maximum growth rate. As these relationships were predicted a priori, using independently measured traits, our results show that functional traits provide a strong mechanistic foundation for understanding the structure and dynamics of ecological communities.

  20. Seasonal variations of phytoplankton dynamics in Nunatsiavut fjords (Labrador, Canada) and their relationships with environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simo-Matchim, Armelle-Galine; Gosselin, Michel; Blais, Marjolaine; Gratton, Yves; Tremblay, Jean-Éric

    2016-04-01

    We assessed phytoplankton dynamics and its environmental control in four Labrador fjords (Nachvak, Saglek, Okak, and Anaktalak) during summer, early fall and late fall. Primary production and chlorophyll a (chl a) biomass were measured at seven optical depths, including the depth of subsurface chl a maximum (SCM). Phytoplankton abundance, size structure and taxonomy were determined at the SCM. Principal component analysis and non-metric multidimensional scaling were used to analyze relationships between production, biomass and community composition in relation to environmental variables. We observed a marked seasonal variability, with significant differences in phytoplankton structure and function between summer and fall. Surprisingly, primary production and chl a biomass were not significantly different from one fjord to another. The highest values of primary production (1730 mg C m- 2 day- 1) and chl a biomass (96 mg chl a m- 2) were measured during the summer bloom, and those high values indicate that Labrador fjords are highly productive ecosystems. The summer community showed relatively high abundance of nanophytoplankton (2-20 μm) while the fall community was characterized by low primary production and chl a biomass as well as relatively high abundance of picophytoplankton (< 2 μm). The low value of carbon potentially exported out of the euphotic zone throughout the study (≤ 31% of total primary production) suggests that phytoplankton production was mainly grazed by microzooplankton rather than being exported to greater depths. We observed a mixed assemblage of diatoms and flagellates in summer, whereas the fall community was largely dominated by flagellates. Seasonal variations in phytoplankton dynamics were mainly controlled by the strength of the vertical stratification and by the large differences in day length due to the northerly location of Labrador fjords. This study documents for the very first time phytoplankton structure and function in

  1. Seasonal dynamics of spinose ear tick Otobius megnini associated with horse otoacariasis in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Diyes, G C P; Rajakaruna, R S

    2016-07-01

    Otobius megnini is a one host, nidicolous soft tick (Family Argasidae) whose larvae and nymphs parasitize the external ear canal of many wild and domestic animals and occasionally humans. The present study was conducted to determine the seasonal dynamics of O. megnini infesting stabled horses in Nuwara Eliya racecourses. Ticks were sampled biweekly for two years from May 2013 to May 2015 from the ear canal of seven thoroughbred male horses. Weather data: temperature, rainfall and humidity for the study period were obtained from the Meteorological Department, Colombo. A total of 23, 287 ticks of O. megnini were collected from the ear canal of horses and all of which were immature stages comprising 41.4% larvae and 59.6% nymphs. Larval counts were high during warmer months of the year with minimum numbers recording September-November. High larval abundance may be due to the high hatching rate of eggs at high temperatures. Larval abundance was significantly affected by maximum temperature, minimum relative humidity and average relative humidity (Multiple regression; r(2)=0.5, F=3.7, p=0.01). Population peaks for nymphs occurred in May, October and January. Nymph counts were low in March and April. Weather conditions did not have any correlation with the abundance of nymphs. Rainfall had no effect on both larvae and nymph counts. Even though control measures have been taken, O. megnini infestation is a serious problem for the stable owners especially because these horses are used in racing and other recreational purposes. Further, there is a high risk of spreading this tick within the country due to the presence of suitable hosts and the adaptability of the tick to survive in changing climatic conditions. Information on the seasonal dynamics of the tick population is important for employing control measures.

  2. Genetic and environmental control of seasonal carbohydrate dynamics in trees of diverse Pinus sylvestris populations.

    PubMed

    Oleksyn, J.; Zytkowiak, R.; Karolewski, P.; Reich, P. B.; Tjoelker, M. G.

    2000-06-01

    We explored environmental and genetic factors affecting seasonal dynamics of starch and soluble nonstructural carbohydrates in needle and twig cohorts and roots of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees of six populations originating between 49 degrees and 60 degrees N, and grown under common garden conditions in western Poland. Trees of each population were sampled once or twice per month over a 3-year period from age 15 to 17 years. Based on similarity in starch concentration patterns in needles, two distinct groups of populations were identified; one comprised northern populations from Sweden and Russia (59-60 degrees N), and another comprised central European populations from Latvia, Poland, Germany and France (49-56 degrees N). Needle starch concentrations of northern populations started to decline in late spring and reached minimum values earlier than those of central populations. For all populations, starch accumulation in spring started when minimum air temperature permanently exceeded 0 degrees C. Starch accumulation peaked before bud break and was highest in 1-year-old needles, averaging 9-13% of dry mass. Soluble carbohydrate concentrations were lowest in spring and summer and highest in autumn and winter. There were no differences among populations in seasonal pattern of soluble carbohydrate concentrations. Averaged across all populations, needle soluble carbohydrate concentrations increased from about 4% of needle dry mass in developing current-year needles, to about 9% in 1- and 2-year-old needles. Root carbohydrate concentration exhibited a bimodal pattern with peaks in spring and autumn. Northern populations had higher concentrations of fine-root starch in spring and autumn than central populations. Late-summer carbohydrate accumulation in roots started only after depletion of starch in needles and woody shoots. We conclude that Scots pine carbohydrate dynamics depend partially on inherited properties that are probably related to phenology of root

  3. Green light: gross primary production influences seasonal stream N export by controlling fine-scale N dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lupon, Anna; Martí, Eugènia; Sabater, Francesc; Bernal, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring nutrient concentrations at fine-scale temporal resolution contributes to a better understanding of nutrient cycling in stream ecosystems. However, the mechanisms underlying fine-scale nutrient dynamics and its implications for budget catchent fluxes are still poorly understood. To gain understanding of patterns and controls of fine-scale stream nitrogen (N) dynamics and to assess how they affect hydrological N fluxes, we explored diel variation in stream nitrate (NO3-) concentration along a headwater stream with increasing riparian area and channel width. At the downstream site, the highest day-night variations occurred in early spring, when stream NO3- concentrations were 13% higher at night than at daytime. Such day-night variations were strongly related to daily light inputs (R2 = 0.74) and gross primary production (GPP; R2 = 0.74), and they showed an excellent fit with day-night NO- variations predicted from GPP (R2 = 0.85). These results suggest that diel fluctuations in stream NO3- concentration were mainly driven by photoautotrophic N uptake. Terrestrial influences were discarded because no simultaneous diel variations in stream discharge, riparian groundwater level, or riparian solute concentration were observed. In contrast to the downstream site, no diel variations in NO3- concentration occurred at the upstream site, likely because water temperature was colder (10 degrees C vs. 12 degrees C) and light availability was lower (4 vs. 9 mol x m(-2) x d(-1)). Although daily GPP was between 10- and 100-fold lower than daily respiration, photoautotrophic N uptake contributed to a 10% reduction in spring NO3- loads at the downstream site. Our study clearly shows that the activity of photoautotrophs can substantially change over time and along the stream continuum in response to key environmental drivers such as light and temperature, and further, that its capacity to regulate diel and seasonal N fluxes can be important even in low-productivity streams.

  4. Intra-individual comparison of different gadolinium-based contrast agents in the quantitative evaluation of C6 glioma with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Liu, Gang; Lou, Xin; Chen, Zhiye; Ma, Lin

    2017-01-01

    This experiment aimed to compare the ionic (Gadodiamide, Gd-DTPA-BMA) and non-ionic (Gadopentetate dimeglumine, Gd-DTPA) gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) in the quantitative evaluation of C6 glioma with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). A C6 glioma model was established in 12 Wistar rats, and magnetic resonance (MR) scans were performed six days after tumor implantation. Imaging was performed using a 3.0-T MR scanner with a 7-inch handmade circular coil. Pre-contrast T1 mapping and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1WI after a bolus injection (0.2 mL s(-1)) of GBCA at 0.4 mmol kg(-1) were performed. Each rat received two DCE-MRI scans, 24 h apart. The first and second scans were performed using Gd-DTPA-BMA and Gd-DTPA, respectively. Image data were processed using the Patlak model. Both K (trans) and V p maps were generated. Tumors were manually segmented on all 3D K (trans) and V p maps. Pixel counts and mean values were recorded for use in a paired t-test. Three radiologists independently performed the tumor segmentation and value calculation. The agreements from different observers were subjective to the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Readers demonstrated that the pixel counts of tumors in K (trans) maps were higher with Gd-DTPA-BMA than with Gd-DTPA (P<0.001, all readers). Although the K (trans) values were higher with Gd-DTPA-BMA than with Gd-DTPA, there was no statistical significance (P>0.05, all readers). The pixel counts of tumors in V p maps, as well as V p values, showed no obvious difference between the two agents (P>0.05, all readers). Excellent interobserver measurement reproducibility and reliability were demonstrated in the ICC tests. The Gd-DTPA-BMA contrast agent had significantly higher pixel counts of glioma in the K (trans) maps, and an increased tendency for average K (trans) values, indicating that DCE-MRI with Gd-DTPA-BMA may be more suitable and sensitive for the evaluation of glioma.

  5. Effects of thermal vapor diffusion on seasonal dynamics of water in the unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milly, P.C.D.

    1996-01-01

    The response of water in the unsaturated zone to seasonal changes of temperature (T) is determined analytically using the theory of nonisothermal water transport in porous media, and the solutions are tested against field observations of moisture potential and bomb fallout isotopic (36Cl and3H) concentrations. Seasonally varying land surface temperatures and the resulting subsurface temperature gradients induce thermal vapor diffusion. The annual mean vertical temperature gradient is close to zero: however, the annual mean thermal vapor flux is downward, because the temperature-dependent vapor diffusion coefficient is larger, on average, during downward diffusion (occurring at high T) than during upward diffusion (low T). The annual mean thermal vapor flux is shown to decay exponentially with depth; the depth (about 1 m) at which it decays to ??-1 of its surface value is one half of the corresponding decay depth for the amplitude of seasonal temperature changes. This depth-dependent annual mean flux is effectively a source of water, which must be balanced by a flux divergence associated with other transport processes. In a relatively humid environment the liquid fluxes greatly exceed the thermal vapor fluxes, so such a balance is readily achieved without measurable effect on the dynamics of water in the unsaturated zone. However, if the mean vertical water flux through the unsaturated zone is very small (<1 mm y-1), as it may be at many locations in a desert landscape, the thermal vapor flux must be balanced mostly by a matric-potential-induced upward flux of water. This return flux may include both vapor and liquid components. Below any near-surface zone of weather- related fluctuations of matric potential, maintenance of this upward flux requires an increase with depth in the annual mean matric potential; this theoretical prediction is supported by long-term field measurements in the Chihuahuan Desert. The analysis also makes predictions, confirmed by the field

  6. Magnitude subtraction vs. complex subtraction in dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D-MR angiography: basic experiments and clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Naganawa, S; Ito, T; Iwayama, E; Fukatsu, H; Ishiguchi, T; Ishigaki, T; Ichinose, N

    1999-11-01

    Magnitude subtraction and complex subtraction in dynamic contrast-enhanced three-dimensional magnetic resonance (3D-MR) angiography were compared using a phantom and 23 human subjects. In phantom studies, complex subtraction showed far better performance than magnitude subtraction, especially for longer echo times, with thicker slices, and without fat suppression. With complex subtraction, non-fat-suppressed studies showed contrast-to-noise ratios comparable to those in fat-suppressed studies. In human subjects, complex subtraction was superior to magnitude subtraction in 9 subjects, but comparable to magnitude subtraction in 14 subjects. There were no cases in which magnitude subtraction was superior to complex subtraction. Although the differences observed in human studies when complex subtraction was applied with thinner slices, shorter echo times, and the fat-suppression technique were not as pronounced as those seen in phantom studies, complex subtraction should be performed in dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D-MR angiography because there are no drawbacks in complex subtraction. Further research is necessary to assess the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D-MR angiography without fat suppression in human subjects using complex subtraction, as suggested by the results of phantom studies. If it is found to be feasible, dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D-MR angiography without fat suppression using complex subtraction may prove to be a robust technique that eliminates the need for shimming and can reduce the acquisition time. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:813-820.

  7. Quantifying heterogeneity of lesion uptake in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahaliou, A.; Vassiou, K.; Skiadopoulos, S.; Kanavou, T.; Yiakoumelos, A.; Costaridou, L.

    2009-07-01

    The current study investigates whether texture features extracted from lesion kinetics feature maps can be used for breast cancer diagnosis. Fifty five women with 57 breast lesions (27 benign, 30 malignant) were subjected to dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) on 1.5T system. A linear-slope model was fitted pixel-wise to a representative lesion slice time series and fitted parameters were used to create three kinetic maps (wash out, time to peak enhancement and peak enhancement). 28 grey level co-occurrence matrices features were extracted from each lesion kinetic map. The ability of texture features per map in discriminating malignant from benign lesions was investigated using a Probabilistic Neural Network classifier. Additional classification was performed by combining classification outputs of most discriminating feature subsets from the three maps, via majority voting. The combined scheme outperformed classification based on individual maps achieving area under Receiver Operating Characteristics curve 0.960±0.029. Results suggest that heterogeneity of breast lesion kinetics, as quantified by texture analysis, may contribute to computer assisted tissue characterization in DCE-MRI.

  8. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Perfusion Parameters as Imaging Biomarkers of Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment is the leading factor in angiogenesis. Angiogenesis can be identified by dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI (DCE MRI). Here we investigate the relationship between perfusion parameters on DCE MRI and angiogenic and prognostic factors in patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Perfusion parameters (Ktrans, kep and ve) of 81 IDC were obtained using histogram analysis. Twenty-fifth, 50th and 75th percentile values were calculated and were analyzed for association with microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and conventional prognostic factors. Correlation between MVD and ve50 was positive (r = 0.33). Ktrans50 was higher in tumors larger than 2 cm than in tumors smaller than 2 cm. In multivariate analysis, Ktrans50 was affected by tumor size and MVD with 12.8% explanation. There was significant association between Ktrans50 and tumor size and MVD. Therefore we conclude that DCE MRI perfusion parameters are potential imaging biomarkers for prediction of tumor angiogenesis and aggressiveness. PMID:28036342

  9. Detection of Early Tumor Response to Axitinib in Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lo, Glen M; Al Zahrani, Hassan; Jang, Hyun Jung; Menezes, Ravi; Hudson, John; Burns, Peter; McNamara, Mairéad G; Kandel, Sonja; Khalili, Korosh; Knox, Jennifer; Rogalla, Patrik; Kim, Tae Kyoung

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) in measuring early tumor response of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma to axitinib. Twenty patients were enrolled (aged 18-78 y; median 65). DCE-US was performed with bolus injection and infusion/disruption replenishment. Median overall survival was 7.1 mo (1.8-27.3) and progression free survival was 3.6 mo (1.8-17.4). Fifteen patients completed infusion scans and 12 completed bolus scans at 2 wk. Among the perfusion parameters, fractional blood volume at infusion (INFBV) decreased at 2 wk in 10/15 (16%-81% of baseline, mean 47%) and increased in 5/15 (116%-535%, mean 220%). This was not significantly associated with progression free survival (p = 0.310) or progression at 16 wk (p = 0.849), but was borderline statistically significant (p = 0.050) with overall survival, limited by a small sample size. DCE-US is potentially useful in measuring early tumor response of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma to axitinib, but a larger trial is needed.

  10. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in clinical trials of antivascular therapies.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, James P B; Jackson, Alan; Parker, Geoff J M; Roberts, Caleb; Jayson, Gordon C

    2012-02-14

    About 100 early-phase clinical trials and investigator-led studies of targeted antivascular therapies--both anti-angiogenic and vascular-targeting agents--have reported data derived from T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI. However, the role of DCE-MRI for decision making during the drug-development process remains controversial. Despite well-documented guidelines on image acquisition and analysis, several key questions concerning the role of this technique in early-phase trial design remain unanswered. This Review describes studies of single-agent antivascular therapies, in which DCE-MRI parameters are incorporated as pharmacodynamic biomarkers. We discuss whether these parameters, such as volume transfer constant (K(trans)), are reproducible and reliable biomarkers of both drug efficacy and proof of concept, and whether they assist in dose selection and drug scheduling for subsequent phase II trials. Emerging evidence indicates that multiparametric analysis of DCE-MRI data offers greater insight into the mechanism of drug action than studies measuring a single parameter, such as K(trans). We also provide an overview of current data and appraise the future directions of this technique in oncology trials. Finally, major hurdles in imaging biomarker development, validation and qualification that hinder a wide application of DCE-MRI techniques in clinical trials are addressed.

  11. ASFNR Recommendations for Clinical Performance of MR Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion Imaging of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Welker, K.; Boxerman, J.; Kalnin, A.; Kaufmann, T.; Shiroishi, M.; Wintermark, M.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY MR perfusion imaging is becoming an increasingly common means of evaluating a variety of cerebral pathologies, including tumors and ischemia. In particular, there has been great interest in the use of MR perfusion imaging for both assessing brain tumor grade and for monitoring for tumor recurrence in previously treated patients. Of the various techniques devised for evaluating cerebral perfusion imaging, the dynamic susceptibility contrast method has been employed most widely among clinical MR imaging practitioners. However, when implementing DSC MR perfusion imaging in a contemporary radiology practice, a neuroradiologist is confronted with a large number of decisions. These include choices surrounding appropriate patient selection, scan-acquisition parameters, data-postprocessing methods, image interpretation, and reporting. Throughout the imaging literature, there is conflicting advice on these issues. In an effort to provide guidance to neuroradiologists struggling to implement DSC perfusion imaging in their MR imaging practice, the Clinical Practice Committee of the American Society of Functional Neuroradiology has provided the following recommendations. This guidance is based on review of the literature coupled with the practice experience of the authors. While the ASFNR acknowledges that alternate means of carrying out DSC perfusion imaging may yield clinically acceptable results, the following recommendations should provide a framework for achieving routine success in this complicated-but-rewarding aspect of neuroradiology MR imaging practice. PMID:25907520

  12. DCEMRI.jl: a fast, validated, open source toolkit for dynamic contrast enhanced MRI analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Welch, E. Brian

    2015-01-01

    We present a fast, validated, open-source toolkit for processing dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data. We validate it against the Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA) Standard and Extended Tofts-Kety phantoms and find near perfect recovery in the absence of noise, with an estimated 10–20× speedup in run time compared to existing tools. To explain the observed trends in the fitting errors, we present an argument about the conditioning of the Jacobian in the limit of small and large parameter values. We also demonstrate its use on an in vivo data set to measure performance on a realistic application. For a 192 × 192 breast image, we achieved run times of <1 s. Finally, we analyze run times scaling with problem size and find that the run time per voxel scales as O(N1.9), where N is the number of time points in the tissue concentration curve. DCEMRI.jl was much faster than any other analysis package tested and produced comparable accuracy, even in the presence of noise. PMID:25922795

  13. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast-MRI Quantification Software Tool: Development and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Korfiatis, Panagiotis; Kline, Timothy L.; Kelm, Zachary S.; Carter, Rickey E.; Hu, Leland S.; Erickson, Bradley J.

    2016-01-01

    Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) is a magnetic resonance imaging biomarker that is used to differentiate progression from pseudoprogression in patients with glioblastoma multiforme, the most common primary brain tumor. However, calculated rCBV depends considerably on the software used. Automating all steps required for rCBV calculation is important, as user interaction can lead to increased variability and possible inaccuracies in clinical decision-making. Here, we present an automated tool for computing rCBV from dynamic susceptibility contrast-magnetic resonance imaging that includes leakage correction. The entrance and exit bolus time points are automatically calculated using wavelet-based detection. The proposed tool is compared with 3 Food and Drug Administration-approved software packages, 1 automatic and 2 requiring user interaction, on a data set of 43 patients. We also evaluate manual and automated white matter (WM) selection for normalization of the cerebral blood volume maps. Our system showed good agreement with 2 of the 3 software packages. The intraclass correlation coefficient for all comparisons between the same software operated by different people was >0.880, except for FuncTool when operated by user 1 versus user 2. Little variability in agreement between software tools was observed when using different WM selection techniques. Our algorithm for automatic rCBV calculation with leakage correction and automated WM selection agrees well with 2 out of the 3 FDA-approved software packages. PMID:28066810

  14. Spectral clustering applied for dynamic contrast-enhanced MR analysis of time-intensity curves.

    PubMed

    Tartare, Guillaume; Hamad, Denis; Azahaf, Mustapha; Puech, Philippe; Betrouni, Nacim

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents an emerging method for the prediction of biomarker responses in cancer. However, DCE images remain difficult to analyze and interpret. Although pharmacokinetic approaches, which involve multi-step processes, can provide a general framework for the interpretation of these data, they are still too complex for robust and accurate implementation. Therefore, statistical data analysis techniques were recently suggested as another valid interpretation strategy for DCE-MRI. In this context, we propose a spectral clustering approach for the analysis of DCE-MRI time-intensity signals. This graph theory-based method allows for the grouping of signals after spatial transformation. Subsequently, these data clusters can be labeled following comparison to arterial signals. Here, we have performed experiments with simulated (i.e., generated via pharmacokinetic modeling) and clinical (i.e., obtained from patients scanned during prostate cancer diagnosis) data sets in order to demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of this kind of unsupervised and non-parametric approach.

  15. Woody Plant Cover Dynamics in Sahelian Drylands from Earth Observation Based Seasonal Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, M.; Hiernaux, P.; Fensholt, R.; Tagesson, T.; Rasmussen, K.; Mbow, C.

    2015-12-01

    Woody plants play an important role in drylands primary productivity and peoples' livelihood, however, due to their scattered appearance, quantifying and monitoring their abundance over a large area is challenging. From in situ measured woody cover we develop a phenology driven model to estimate the canopy cover of woody species in the Sahelian drylands. Annual maps are applied to monitor dynamics of woody populations in relation to climate and anthropogenic interference. The model estimates the total canopy cover of all woody phanerophytes and the concept is based on the significant difference in phenophases of dryland trees, shrubs and bushes as compared to that of the herbaceous plants. Whereas annual herbaceous are only green during the rainy season and senescence occurs shortly after flowering towards the last rains, most woody plants remain photosynthetically active over large parts of the year. We use Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and SPOT VEGETATION (VGT) seasonal metrics representing the dry season to reproduce in situ woody cover at 77 field sites (178 observations in 3x3 km plots between 2000 and 2014) in Niger, Mali and Senegal. The extrapolation to Sahel scale shows agreement between VGT and MODIS at an almost nine times higher woody cover than in the global tree cover product MOD44B which only captures trees of a certain minimum size. Trends over 15 years show that the pattern is closely related to population density and land cover/use. A negative woody cover change can be observed in densely populated areas, but a positive change is seen in sparsely populated regions. Whereas woody cover in cropland is generally stable, it is strongly positive in savannas and woodland. Discrepancies between the countries are huge and also deforestation can be observed at a more local scale. The method is applicable and derived woody cover maps of the Sahel are freely available. They represent an improvement of existing products and a

  16. Circadian and seasonal responses in Indian weaver bird: subjective interpretation of day and night depends upon both light intensity and contrast between illuminations.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Rohit Kumar; Bhardwaj, Sanjay Kumar

    2011-11-01

    This study investigated whether changes in illumination modify perception of day and night conditions in a diurnal species, the Indian weaver bird. Birds were initially subjected to a 12-h light:12-h dark regime (12L:12D; L=20 lux, D =0.5 lux). After every 2 wks, the combinations of light illumination in L and D phases were changed as follows: 20:2 lux, 20:5 lux, 20:10 lux, 20:20 lux, 20:100 lux, and 20:200 lux. Finally, birds were released into dim constant light (0.5 lux) for 2 wks to determine the phase and period of the circadian activity rhythm. They were also laparotomized at periodic intervals to examine the effects of the light regimes on the seasonal testicular cycle. All individuals showed a consistently similar response. As evident by the activity pattern under these light regimes, both in total activity during contrasting light phases and during the 2?h in the beginning and end of first light phase, birds interpreted the period of higher light intensity as day, and the period of lower intensity as the night. During the period of similar light intensity, i.e., under LL, birds free-ran with a circadian period ( ~ 24 h). In bright LL (20 lux), the activity rhythm was less distinct, but periodogram analysis revealed the circadian period for the group as 24.46 (+/-) 0.41 h (mean???SE). However, in dim LL at the end of the experiment, all birds exhibited a circadian pattern with average period of 25.52 (+/-) 0.70 h. All birds also showed testicular growth and regression during the 16-wks study. It is suggested that weaver birds interpret day and night subjectively based on both the light intensity and contrast between illuminations during two phases over the 24 h.

  17. Sediment dynamics modulated by burrowing crab activities in contrasting SW Atlantic intertidal habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escapa, Mauricio; Perillo, Gerardo M. E.; Iribarne, Oscar

    2008-11-01

    Biogenic bottom features, animal burrows and biological activities interact with the hydrodynamics of the sediment-water interface to produce altered patterns of sediment erosion, transport and deposition which have consequences for large-scale geomorphologic features. It has been suggested that depending on the hydrodynamic status of the habitat, the biological activity on the bottom may have a variety of effects. In some cases, different bioturbation activities by the same organism can result in different consequences. The burrowing crab Neohelice granulata is the most important bioturbator at SW Atlantic saltmarshes and tidal plains. Because of the great variety of habitats that this species may inhabit, it is possible to compare its bioturbation effects between zones dominated by different hydrodynamic conditions. Internal marsh microhabitats, tidal creeks bottoms and basins, and open mudflats were selected as contrasting zones for the comparison on a large saltmarsh at Bahía Blanca Estuary (Argentina). Crab burrows act as passive traps of sediment in all zones, because their entrances remain open during inundation periods at high tide. Mounds are generated when crabs remove sediments from the burrows to the surface and become distinctive features in all the zones. Two different mechanisms of sediment transport utilizing mounds as sediment sources were registered. In the first one, parts of fresh mound sediments were transported when exposed to water flow during flooding and ebbing tide, with higher mound erosion where currents were higher as compared to internal marsh habitats and open mudflats. In the second mechanism, mounds exposed to atmospheric influence during low tide became desiccated and cracked forming ellipsoidal blocks, which were then transported by currents in zones of intense water flow in the saltmarsh edge. Sedimentary dynamics varied between zones; crabs were promoting trapping of sediments in the internal saltmarsh (380 g m -2 day -1) and

  18. Seasonal emission of seminal coagulum and in vivo sperm dynamics in the black-handed spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi).

    PubMed

    Hernández-López, L; Cerda-Molina, A L; Páez-Ponce, L D; Mondragón-Ceballos, R

    2008-03-01

    The ejaculate of diverse primate species consists of two portions, liquid and solid; the latter, known as the seminal coagulum, is thought to sequester large numbers of sperm. In the black-handed spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi), ejaculates collected by electroejaculation did not always contain seminal coagulum. The objective of the present study was to determine seasonal emission of seminal coagulum and in vivo sperm dynamics in the black-handed spider monkey. Seminal coagulum emission was related to season; it was more frequent in the dry season, coincident with maximal female fertility. Sperm concentration was higher (P = 0.02) in the dry season (dry vs. rainy season: 137.9 +/- 15.7 sperm/mL vs. 82.56 +/- 14.7 x1 0(6) sperm/mL; mean +/- S.E.M.) but also in ejaculates (collected during the rainy season) that had seminal coagulum (coagulum vs. no coagulum: 140.0 +/- 29.3 sperm/mL vs. 31.2+/-0.1 x 10(6) sperm/mL, P<0.001). In semen samples collected from the uterus after AI, the percentage of linearly motile sperm was higher during the dry season (dry vs. rainy: 9.1+/-2.1% vs. 5.9+/-2.5%), as well as whenever coagulum was present (coagulum vs. no coagulum: 13.0+/-3.2% vs. 2.0+/-0.9%, P<0.001).

  19. Global climate modeling of Saturn's atmosphere: exploration of seasonal variability and stratospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, A.; Guerlet, S.; Millour, E.; Sylvestre, M.; Fouchet, T.; Wordsworth, R.; Leconte, J.; Forget, F.; Hourdin, F.

    2013-12-01

    except in the equatorial region, where the temperature structure is governed by the dynamical equatorial oscillation. In the upper stratosphere, our modeled temperature is 5-10K too low compared to measurements. This suggests that processes other than radiative heating/cooling by trace species control the temperature at low pressure levels. Finally, we will show GCM simulations coupling the 3D dynamical core to this radiative model, and discuss the large-scale stratospheric circulations driven by the radiative forcing. In the troposphere and lower stratosphere, zonal winds are relaxed towards the observed winds by Cassini. The emergence and propagation of waves in Saturn's stratosphere will be discussed, as well as eddy-mean flow interactions. Seasonal variations of those dynamical signatures will be investigated.

  20. Flow regulation manipulates contemporary seasonal sedimentary dynamics in the reservoir fluctuation zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir, China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiang; Bao, Yuhai; He, Xiubin; Fu, Bojie; Collins, Adrian L; Zhang, Xinbao

    2016-04-01

    Since the launch of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River, a distinctive reservoir fluctuation zone has been created and significantly modified by regular dam operations. Sediment redistribution within this artificial landscape differs substantially from that in natural fluvial riparian zones, due to a specific hydrological regime comprising steps of water impoundment with increasing magnitudes and seasonal water level fluctuation holding a range of sediment fluxes. This study reinterpreted post-dam sedimentary dynamics in the reservoir fluctuation zone by stratigraphy determination of a 345-cm long sediment core, and related it to impact of the hydrological regime. Seasonality in absolute grain-size composition of suspended sediment was applied as a methodological basis for stratigraphic differentiation. Sedimentary laminations with relatively higher proportions of sandy fractions were ascribed to sedimentation during the dry season when proximal subsurface bank erosion dominates source contributions, while stratigraphy with a lower proportion of sandy fractions is possibly contributed by sedimentation during the wet season when distal upstream surface erosion prevails. Chronology determination revealed non-linear and high annual sedimentation rates ranging from 21.7 to 152.1cm/yr. Although channel geomorphology may primarily determine the spatial extent of sedimentation, seasonal sedimentary dynamics was predominantly governed by the frequency, magnitude, and duration of flooding. Summer inundation by natural floods with enhanced sediment loads produced from upstream basins induced higher sedimentation rates than water impoundment during the dry season when distal sediment supply was limited. We thus conclude that flow regulation manipulates contemporary seasonal sedimentary dynamics in the reservoir fluctuation zone, though little impact on total sediment retention rate was detected. Ongoing reductions in flow and sediment supply under human disturbance may

  1. Assessment of Hypoxia in Human Cervical Carcinoma Xenografts by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, Christine; Egeland, Tormod A.M.; Gulliksrud, Kristine M.Sc.; Gaustad, Jon-Vidar; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Patients with advanced cervical cancer and highly hypoxic primary tumors show increased frequency of locoregional treatment failure and poor disease-free and overall survival rates. The potential usefulness of gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in assessing tumor hypoxia noninvasively was investigated in the present preclinical study. Methods and Materials: CK-160 and TS-415 human cervical carcinoma xenografts transplanted intramuscularly (i.m.) or subcutaneously (s.c.) in BALB/c nu/nu mice were subjected to DCE-MRI and measurement of fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells. Tumor images of K{sup trans} (the volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v{sub e} (the extracellular volume fraction of the imaged tissue) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI data. Fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells was measured by using the paired survival curve method. Results: Fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells differed significantly among the four tumor groups. The mean values {+-} SE were determined to be 44% {+-} 7% (i.m. CK-160), 77% {+-} 10% (s.c. CK-160), 23% {+-} 5% (i.m. TS-415), and 52% {+-} 6% (s.c. TS-415). The four tumor groups differed significantly also in K{sup trans}, and there was an unambiguous inverse relationship between K{sup trans} and fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells. On the other hand, significant differences among the groups in v{sub e} could not be detected. Conclusions: The study supports the clinical development of DCE-MRI as a method for assessing the extent of hypoxia in carcinoma of the cervix.

  2. Investigating Stream Metabolism and Nutrient Dynamics in Contrasting Ecosystems: The Role of Hydrologic Compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Pinzon, R.; Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Covino, T. P.

    2015-12-01

    The interactions between mobile and less mobile hydrologic compartments affect the quality and quantity of water in streams and aquifers, and the cycling of dissolved carbon and nutrients. As new laboratory and field techniques become available, new questions and challenges emerge, including: What do we measure, where, and for how long to fully characterize a system? and, What is the ideal cost-maintenance-benefit relationship that we should strive for to maximize knowledge gained in different field settings? We recently performed a series of field experiments to measure aquatic metabolism and nutrient dynamics in two highly contrasting hydrologic systems, i.e., 1) a wetland-stream alpine, tropical system in Colombia (South America) and 2) a dryland river continuum (1st - 5th stream orders) in New Mexico. In this presentation we discuss how multiple lines of evidence can support the analysis of key aquatic processes and how co-interpretation provides a more complete picture of stream complexity. For this analysis, we deployed YSI EXO2 and 6920 sondes, Turner Designs C-sense and C6 sensors, and Onset HOBO water quality data loggers. Parameters measured by these instruments include conductivity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, pCO2, chlorophyll-a, phycocyanin, fluorescein, CDOM, brighteners and water depth. We also injected conservative tracers (i.e., NaCl and NaBr) and the bioreactive tracer resazurin in both experimental sites, and NO3 in the dryland river continuum. NO3 was measured in-situ with Satlantic Submersible Ultraviolet Nitrate Analyzers (SUNA) sensors and in the laboratory using Ion Chromatograph techniques using stream grab samples. Our results highlight the role of both residence times and chemical fluxes in regulating the effective processing of carbon and nutrients. Our results also demonstrate that stream stimuli from controlled experiments are ideal for maximizing the information content derived from short (hours to days) and mid

  3. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Metastatic Potential of Melanoma Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Ellingsen, Christine; Galappathi, Kanthi; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Gadolinium diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has been suggested as a useful noninvasive method for characterizing the physiologic microenvironment of tumors. In the present study, we investigated whether Gd-DTPA-based DCE-MRI has the potential to provide biomarkers for hypoxia-associated metastatic dissemination. Methods and Materials: C-10 and D-12 melanoma xenografts were used as experimental tumor models. Pimonidazole was used as a hypoxia marker. A total of 60 tumors were imaged, and parametric images of K{sup trans} (volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v{sub e} (fractional distribution volume of Gd-DTPA) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI series. The host mice were killed immediately after DCE-MRI, and the primary tumor and the lungs were resected and prepared for histologic assessment of the fraction of pimonidazole-positive hypoxic tissue and the presence of lung metastases, respectively. Results: Metastases were found in 11 of 26 mice with C-10 tumors and 14 of 34 mice with D-12 tumors. The primary tumors of the metastatic-positive mice had a greater fraction of hypoxic tissue (p = 0.00031, C-10; p < 0.00001, D-12), a lower median K{sup trans} (p = 0.0011, C-10; p < 0.00001, D-12), and a lower median v{sub e} (p = 0.014, C-10; p = 0.016, D-12) than the primary tumors of the metastatic-negative mice. Conclusions: These findings support the clinical attempts to establish DCE-MRI as a method for providing biomarkers for tumor aggressiveness and suggests that primary tumors characterized by low K{sup trans} and low v{sub e} values could have a high probability of hypoxia-associated metastatic spread.

  4. Quantification of tumor perfusion using dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound: impact of mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doury, Maxime; Dizeux, Alexandre; de Cesare, Alain; Lucidarme, Olivier; Pellot-Barakat, Claire; Bridal, S. Lori; Frouin, Frédérique

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound has been proposed to monitor tumor therapy, as a complement to volume measurements. To assess the variability of perfusion parameters in ideal conditions, four consecutive test-retest studies were acquired in a mouse tumor model, using controlled injections. The impact of mathematical modeling on parameter variability was then investigated. Coefficients of variation (CV) of tissue blood volume (BV) and tissue blood flow (BF) based-parameters were estimated inside 32 sub-regions of the tumors, comparing the log-normal (LN) model with a one-compartment model fed by an arterial input function (AIF) and improved by the introduction of a time delay parameter. Relative perfusion parameters were also estimated by normalization of the LN parameters and normalization of the one-compartment parameters estimated with the AIF, using a reference tissue (RT) region. A direct estimation (rRTd) of relative parameters, based on the one-compartment model without using the AIF, was also obtained by using the kinetics inside the RT region. Results of test-retest studies show that absolute regional parameters have high CV, whatever the approach, with median values of about 30% for BV, and 40% for BF. The positive impact of normalization was established, showing a coherent estimation of relative parameters, with reduced CV (about 20% for BV and 30% for BF using the rRTd approach). These values were significantly lower (p  <  0.05) than the CV of absolute parameters. The rRTd approach provided the smallest CV and should be preferred for estimating relative perfusion parameters.

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI perfusion for differentiating between melanoma and lung cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Hatzoglou, Vaios; Tisnado, Jamie; Mehta, Alpesh; Peck, Kyung K; Daras, Mariza; Omuro, Antonio M; Beal, Kathryn; Holodny, Andrei I

    2017-04-01

    Brain metastases originating from different primary sites overlap in appearance and are difficult to differentiate with conventional MRI. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI can assess tumor microvasculature and has demonstrated utility in characterizing primary brain tumors. Our aim was to evaluate the performance of plasma volume (Vp) and volume transfer coefficient (K(trans) ) derived from DCE-MRI in distinguishing between melanoma and nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) brain metastases. Forty-seven NSCLC and 23 melanoma brain metastases were retrospectively assessed with DCE-MRI. Regions of interest were manually drawn around the metastases to calculate Vpmean and Kmeantrans. The Mann-Whitney U test and receiver operating characteristic analysis (ROC) were performed to compare perfusion parameters between the two groups. The Vpmean of melanoma brain metastases (4.35, standard deviation [SD] = 1.31) was significantly higher (P = 0.03) than Vpmean of NSCLC brain metastases (2.27, SD = 0.96). The Kmeantrans values were higher in melanoma brain metastases, but the difference between the two groups was not significant (P = 0.12). Based on ROC analysis, a cut-off value of 3.02 for Vpmean (area under curve = 0.659 with SD = 0.074) distinguished between melanoma brain metastases and NSCLC brain metastases (P < 0.01) with 72% specificity. Our data show the DCE-MRI parameter Vpmean can differentiate between melanoma and NSCLC brain metastases. The ability to noninvasively predict tumor histology of brain metastases in patients with multiple malignancies can have important clinical implications.

  6. Breast mass segmentation on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance scans using the level set method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jiazheng; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Paramagul, Chintana; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Helvie, Mark; Wu, Yi-Ta; Ge, Jun; Zhang, Yiheng; Zhou, Chuan; Wei, Jun

    2008-03-01

    The goal of this study was to develop an automated method to segment breast masses on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) scans that were performed to monitor breast cancer response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A radiologist experienced in interpreting breast MR scans defined the mass using a cuboid volume of interest (VOI). Our method then used the K-means clustering algorithm followed by morphological operations for initial mass segmentation on the VOI. The initial segmentation was then refined by a three-dimensional level set (LS) method. The velocity field of the LS method was formulated in terms of the mean curvature which guaranteed the smoothness of the surface and the Sobel edge information which attracted the zero LS to the desired mass margin. We also designed a method to reduce segmentation leak by adapting a region growing technique. Our method was evaluated on twenty DCE-MR scans of ten patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Each patient had pre- and post-chemotherapy DCE-MR scans on a 1.5 Tesla magnet. Computer segmentation was applied to coronal T1-weighted images. The in-plane pixel size ranged from 0.546 to 0.703 mm and the slice thickness ranged from 2.5 to 4.0 mm. The flip angle was 15 degrees, repetition time ranged from 5.98 to 6.7 ms, and echo time ranged from 1.2 to 1.3 ms. The computer segmentation results were compared to the radiologist's manual segmentation in terms of the overlap measure defined as the ratio of the intersection of the computer and the radiologist's segmentations to the radiologist's segmentation. Pre- and post-chemotherapy masses had overlap measures of 0.81+/-0.11 (mean+/-s.d.) and 0.70+/-0.21, respectively.

  7. Mapping Central Amazon Wetlands Dynamics with Seasonal ALOS PALSAR SCANSAR Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, B. D.; Hess, L. L.; Durieux, L.; Arraut, E.; Marshall, B.; McDonald, K. C.

    2009-12-01

    The extent of wetland areas, and the spatial and temporal variability of wetland inundation, are important components of global biogeochemical and hydrological cycles. Satellite-measured continental water storage variations suggest the importance of the surface waters component in seasonal dynamics of the hydrologic cycle of large tropical river basins. Wetlands play a significant role in climate change as the primary contributor to interannual variations in the growth rate of atmospheric methane, and are projected to be strongly impacted by climate change through alterations in hydrologic regimes. Such alterations can be expected to affect the functioning of wetlands with regard to carbon and nutrient cycling, water quality, flood control, fisheries, and aquatic biodiversity. Despite their importance, current knowledge of the extent of global wetlands and the seasonal variability of surface waters is poor. Global land cover datasets derived from moderate-resolution optical sensors generally include few or no wetland classes other than open water, and do not capture the high temporal variability of surface waters. Coarse-resolution global mapping of seasonal inundation allows consistent multi-year comparison of inundated areas; however, the spatial resolution is not sufficient for some applications and validation of coarse-resolution results is difficult without finer-resolution datasets for comparison. The need for improved wetland characterization has motivated the creation of an Inundated Wetlands Earth System Data Record (IW-ESDR) as part of NASA’s Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program. The IW-ESDR is generating maps of wetland extent and inundation dynamics at two scales: 100-m, using ALOS PALSAR Fine Beam and ScanSAR imagery, and 25-km, using multiple satellite datasets. Here we describe prototype ScanSAR-based 100-m image mosaic results and products for the central Amazon region, and the associated IW

  8. River temperature processes under contrasting riparian land cover: linking microclimate, heat exchange and water thermal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, D. M.; Kantola, K.; Malcolm, I.

    2012-12-01

    -natural > open; hence, the water temperature range was moderated substantially for the commercial site. Daily mean air temperature was ordered open > semi-natural > commercial; seasonality was less marked for the air than water column, although the range was larger for open and semi-natural than commercial site. Humidity was higher and wind speed markedly lower for the commercial than both the other sites. Net radiation was the dominant heat sink in autumn-winter and major heat source in spring-summer with the magnitude of this flux greater in summer and lower in winter for (in order) open, semi-natural and commercial reaches. Sensible heat was an energy source in autumn-winter and sink in spring-summer, with loss (gain) greater in summer (winter) for (in order) open, semi-natural and commercial reaches. Latent heat was predominantly a sink, with the magnitude and variability higher for open than both forested sites. These findings yield important information on: (1) dynamic heat exchange processes that drive stream temperature under different forest treatments, and (2) extent of influence of riparian land cover on stream thermal response. This research provides a basis to predict stream temperature impact given advocated changes to forest practice, and has potential to inform decision making by land/ water managers.

  9. Spatial and seasonal dynamics of brook trout populations inhabiting a central Appalachian watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petty, J.T.; Lamothe, P.J.; Mazik, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    We quantified the watershed-scale spatial population dynamics of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis in the Second Fork, a third-order tributary of Shavers Fork in eastern West Virginia. We used visual surveys, electrofishing, and mark-recapture techniques to quantify brook trout spawning intensity, population density, size structure, and demographic rates (apparent survival and immigration) throughout the watershed. Our analyses produced the following results. Spawning by brook trout was concentrated in streams with small basin areas (i.e., segments draining less than 3 km2), relatively high alkalinity (>10 mg CaCO3/L), and high amounts of instream cover. The spatial distribution of juvenile and small-adult brook trout within the watershed was relatively stable and was significantly correlated with spawning intensity. However, no such relationship was observed for large adults, which exhibited highly variable distribution patterns related to seasonally important habitat features, including instream cover, stream depth and width, and riparian canopy cover. Brook trout survival and immigration rates varied seasonally, spatially, and among size-classes. Differential survival and immigration tended to concentrate juveniles and small adults in small, alkaline streams, whereas dispersal tended to redistribute large adults at the watershed scale. Our results suggest that spatial and temporal variations in spawning, survival, and movement interact to determine the distribution, abundance, and size structure of brook trout populations at a watershed scale. These results underscore the importance of small tributaries for the persistence of brook trout in this watershed and the need to consider watershed-scale processes when designing management plans for Appalachian brook trout populations. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  10. Timing of breeding and reproductive performance in murres and kittiwakes reflect mismatched seasonal prey dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shultz, M.T.; Piatt, J.F.; Harding, A.M.A.; Kettle, Arthur B.; van Pelt, Thomas I.

    2009-01-01

    Seabirds are thought to time breeding to match the seasonal peak of food availability with peak chick energetic demands, but warming ocean temperatures have altered the timing of spring events, creating the potential for mismatches. The resilience of seabird populations to climate change depends on their ability to anticipate changes in the timing and magnitude of peak food availability and 'fine-tune' efforts to match ('Anticipation Hypothesis'). The degree that inter-annual variation in seabird timing of breeding and reproductive performance represents anticipated food availability versus energetic constraints ('Constraint Hypothesis') is poorly understood. We examined the relative merits of the Constraint and Anticipation Hypotheses by testing 2 predictions of the Constraint Hypothesis: (1) seabird timing of breeding is related to food availability prior to egg laying rather than the date of peak food availability, (2) initial reproductive output (e.g. laying success, clutch size) is related to pre-lay food availability rather than anticipated chick-rearing food availability. We analyzed breeding biology data of common murres Uria aalge and black-legged kittiwakes Rissa tridactyla and 2 proxies of the seasonal dynamics of their food availability (near-shore forage fish abundance and sea-surface temperature) at 2 colonies in Lower Cook Inlet, Alaska, USA, from 1996 to 1999. Our results support the Constraint Hypothesis: (1) for both species, egg laying was later in years with warmer sea-surface temperature and lower food availability prior to egg laying, but was not related to the date of peak food availability, (2) pre-egg laying food availability explained variation in kittiwake laying success and clutch size. Murre reproductive success was best explained by food availability during chick rearing. ?? 2009 Inter-Research.

  11. Seasonal Community and Population Dynamics of Pelagic Bacteria and Archaea in a High Mountain Lake

    PubMed Central

    Pernthaler, Jakob; Glöckner, Frank-Oliver; Unterholzner, Stefanie; Alfreider, Albin; Psenner, Roland; Amann, Rudolf

    1998-01-01

    The seasonal variations in community structure and cell morphology of pelagic procaryotes from a high mountain lake (Gossenköllesee, Austria) were studied by in situ hybridization with rRNA-targeted fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes (FISH) and image-analyzed microscopy. Compositional changes and biomass fluctuations within the assemblage were observed both in summer and beneath the winter ice cover and are discussed in the context of physicochemical and biotic parameters. Proteobacteria of the beta subclass (beta-proteobacteria) formed a dominant fraction of the bacterioplankton (annual mean, 24% of the total counts), whereas alpha-proteobacteria were of similar relative importance only during spring (mean, 11%). Bacteria of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium cluster, although less abundant, constituted the largest fraction of the filamentous morphotypes during most of the year, thus contributing significantly to the total microbial biomass. Successive peaks of threadlike and rod-shaped archaea were observed during autumn thermal mixing and the period of ice cover formation, respectively. A set of oligonucleotide probes targeted to single phylotypes was constructed from 16S rRNA-encoding gene clone sequences. Three distinct populations of uncultivated microbes, affiliated with the alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, were subsequently monitored by FISH. About one-quarter of all of the beta-proteobacteria (range, 6 to 53%) could be assigned to only two phylotypes. The bacterial populations studied were annually recurrent, seasonally variable, and vertically stratified, except during the periods of lake overturn. Their variability clearly exceeded the fluctuations of the total microbial assemblage, suggesting that the apparent stability of total bacterioplankton abundances may mask highly dynamic community fluctuations. PMID:9797280

  12. Species sorting and seasonal dynamics primarily shape bacterial communities in the Upper Mississippi River.

    PubMed

    Staley, Christopher; Gould, Trevor J; Wang, Ping; Phillips, Jane; Cotner, James B; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Bacterial community structure (BCS) in freshwater ecosystems varies seasonally and due to physicochemical gradients, but metacommunity structure of a major river remains understudied. Here we characterize the BCS along the Mississippi River and contributing rivers in Minnesota over three years using Illumina next-generation sequencing, to determine how changes in environmental conditions as well as inputs from surrounding land and confluences impacted community structure. Contributions of sediment to water microbial diversity were also evaluated. Long-term variation in community membership was observed, and significant shifts in relative abundances of major freshwater taxa, including α-Proteobacteria, Burkholderiales, and Actinomycetales, were observed due to temporal and spatial variations. Environmental parameters (e.g. temperature, rainfall, and nutrient concentrations) primarily contributed to differences in phyla abundances (88% of variance), with minimal influence from spatial distance alone (<1% of variance). Furthermore, an annually-recurrent BCS was observed in late summer, further suggesting that seasonal dynamics strongly influence community composition. Sediment communities differed from those in the water, but contributed up to 50% to community composition in the water column. Among water sampling sites, 34% showed significant variability in BCS of replicate samples indicating variability among riverine communities due to heterogeneity in the water column. Results of this study highlight the need for a better understanding of spatial and temporal variations in riverine bacterial diversity associated with physicochemical gradients and reveal how communities in sediments, and potentially other environmental reservoirs, impact waterborne BCS. Techniques used in this study may prove useful to determine sources of microbes from sediments and soils to waterways, which will facilitate best management practices and total maximum daily load determinations.

  13. ENSO influence on the dynamical seasonal prediction of the East Asian Winter Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Daehyun; Lee, Myong-In

    2017-03-01

    This study examined the forecast skill for the East Asian Winter Monsoon (EAWM) using the following state-of-the-art dynamical seasonal prediction systems: CanCM3, CanCM4, CFSv2, CM2.1, and GEOS-5. To assess the prediction skills and the associations with ENSO teleconnections of these systems, long-term seasonal hindcast data sets for 28 years (1983-2010) were investigated. Observational data indicated that the ENSO-EAWM connection strengthened in a recent period (1997-2010; r = -0.84) compared with that in an earlier period (1983-1996; r = -0.44). For the recent period, a practical level of prediction skill for the EAWM index was retained by CFSv2 and GEOS-5 for the lead time of 2 months or longer, with these models showing a realistic ENSO-EAWM relationship throughout the Western Pacific Warm Pool with east-west dipole anomalies of precipitation induced by ENSO. The prediction skill of the other models was poor, even for lead times of zero to 1 month, with weak ENSO-EAWM relationships and errant north-south dipole anomalies of precipitation associated with ENSO. A large model spread was also found consistently in the CMIP5 AMIP and the Historical simulations by 14 models of the spatial pattern of equatorial Pacific precipitation anomalies associated with ENSO and the effect on the ENSO-EAWM relationship. Based on this study, the accurate prediction of EAWM should be linked with a realistic representation of the convection response in the equatorial Pacific by ENSO and the teleconnection to EAWM.

  14. Seasonal dynamics of mobile carbohydrates and stem growth in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) exposed to drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberhuber, Walter; Kofler, Werner; Schuster, Roman; Swidrak, Irene; Gruber, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Tree growth requires a continuous supply of carbon as structural material and as a source for metabolic energy. To detect whether intra-annual stem growth is related to changes in carbon allocation, we monitored seasonal dynamics of shoot and radial growth and concentrations of mobile carbohydrates (NSC) in above- and belowground organs of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). The study area is situated within an inner Alpine dry environment (750 m asl, Tyrol, Austria), which is characterized by recurring drought periods at the start of the growing season in spring and limited water holding capacity of nutrient deficient, shallow stony soils. Shoot elongation was monitored on lateral branches in the canopy and stem radius changes were continuously followed by electronic band dendrometers. Daily radial stem growth and tree water deficit (ΔW) were extracted from dendrometer records. ΔW is regarded a reliable measure of drought stress in trees and develops when transpirational water loss from leaves exceeds water uptake by the root system. Daily radial stem growth and ΔW were related to environmental variables and determination of NSC was performed using specific enzymatic assays. Results revealed quite early culmination of aboveground growth rates in late April (shoot growth) and late May (radial growth), and increasing accumulation of NSC in coarse roots in June. NSC content in roots peaked at the end of July and thereafter decreased again, indicating a shift in carbon allocation after an early cessation of aboveground stem growth. ΔW was found to peak in late summer, when high temperatures prevailed. That maximum growth rates of aboveground organs peaked quite before precipitation increased during summer is related to the finding that ΔW and radial stem growth were more strongly controlled by the atmospheric environment, than by soil water content. We conclude that as a response to the seasonal development of ΔW a shift in carbon allocation from aboveground

  15. Optimized time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS) in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in small animal tumor models.

    PubMed

    Haeck, Joost; Bol, Karin; Bison, Sander; van Tiel, Sandra; Koelewijn, Stuart; de Jong, Marion; Veenland, Jifke; Bernsen, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Anti-tumor efficacy of targeted peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) relies on several factors, including functional tumor vasculature. Little is known about the effect of PRRT on tumor vasculature. With dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI, functional vasculature is imaged and quantified using contrast agents. In small animals DCE-MRI is a challenging application. We optimized a clinical sequence for fast hemodynamic acquisitions, time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS), to obtain DCE-MRI images at both high spatial and high temporal resolution in mice and rats. Using TRICKS, functional vasculature was measured prior to PRRT and longitudinally to investigate the effect of treatment on tumor vascular characteristics. Nude mice bearing H69 tumor xenografts and rats bearing syngeneic CA20948 tumors were used to study perfusion following PRRT administration with (177) lutetium octreotate. Both semi-quantitative and quantitative parameters were calculated. Treatment efficacy was measured by tumor-size reduction. Optimized TRICKS enabled MRI at 0.032 mm(3) voxel size with a temporal resolution of less than 5 s and large volume coverage, a substantial improvement over routine pre-clinical DCE-MRI studies. Tumor response to therapy was reflected in changes in tumor perfusion/permeability parameters. The H69 tumor model showed pronounced changes in DCE-derived parameters following PRRT. The rat CA20948 tumor model showed more heterogeneity in both treatment outcome and perfusion parameters. TRICKS enabled the acquisition of DCE-MRI at both high temporal resolution (Tres ) and spatial resolutions relevant for small animal tumor models. With the high Tres enabled by TRICKS, accurate pharmacokinetic data modeling was feasible. DCE-MRI parameters revealed changes over time and showed a clear relationship between tumor size and Ktrans .

  16. Enhancement tuning and control for high dynamic range images in multi-scale locally adaptive contrast enhancement algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Sascha D.; Schirris, Johan; de With, Peter H. N.

    2009-01-01

    For real-time imaging in surveillance applications, visibility of details is of primary importance to ensure customer confidence. If we display High Dynamic-Range (HDR) scenes whose contrast spans four or more orders of magnitude on a conventional monitor without additional processing, results are unacceptable. Compression of the dynamic range is therefore a compulsory part of any high-end video processing chain because standard monitors are inherently Low- Dynamic Range (LDR) devices with maximally two orders of display dynamic range. In real-time camera processing, many complex scenes are improved with local contrast enhancements, bringing details to the best possible visibility. In this paper, we show how a multi-scale high-frequency enhancement scheme, in which gain is a non-linear function of the detail energy, can be used for the dynamic range compression of HDR real-time video camera signals. We also show the connection of our enhancement scheme to the processing way of the Human Visual System (HVS). Our algorithm simultaneously controls perceived sharpness, ringing ("halo") artifacts (contrast) and noise, resulting in a good balance between visibility of details and non-disturbance of artifacts. The overall quality enhancement, suitable for both HDR and LDR scenes, is based on a careful selection of the filter types for the multi-band decomposition and a detailed analysis of the signal per frequency band.

  17. Fluid Dynamics of Contrast Dispersion in Coronary Arteries: Mechanism and Implications for Identification of Flow-Limiting Lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Parastou; Seo, Jung-Hee; Lardo, Albert C.; Mittal, Rajat

    2013-11-01

    Recent coronary computed tomography angiography studies have noted the presence of axial contrast concentration gradients in stenosed coronary arteries, but the mechanism responsible for this phenomenon is not well understood. We use computational fluid dynamics to study intracoronary contrast dispersion and the correlation of concentration gradients with intracoronary blood flow and stenotic severity. Simulations of flow and contrast dispersion in both canonical and patient derived models of the left coronary artery (LCA) are carried out with a prescribed contrast bolus profile, and stenoses of varying severities (0% to 80%) considered. Data from our CFD simulations show the presence of measurable contrast gradients, the magnitude of which is found to decrease monotonically with stenotic severity and increase monotonically with the pressure drop across the stenosis. All simulated cases indicate a strong inverse correlation between contrast gradients and coronary flow rate. The study reveals that contrast gradients are generated by intracoronary advection effects, and therefore, encode coronary flow velocity. This research is supported by a grant from Coulter Foundation.

  18. [Seasonal dynamics of quantitative and morphological traits of poplar fine roots and their differences between successive rotation plantations].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-ping; Xu, Tan; Zhu, Wan-rui; Wang, Qi-tong; Liu, Meng-ling; Wang, Hua-tian; Li, Chuan-rong; Dong, Yu-feng

    2016-02-01

    Based on the fine root samples of the first and second generations of poplar (Populus x euramericana ' Neva'), this study examined the response of quantitative and morphological traits of fine roots of different orders and the difference between generations. The results showed that, the quantitative traits of fine roots, such as root length, root surface area and root biomass, presented obvious seasonal variation, and the fine root traits had obvious difference among root orders. The quantitative traits of lower-order fine roots showed significant seasonal difference, and the fine root biomass increased in the growing season and then decreased significantly. The specific root length (SRL) of higher-order roots also showed significant change with season, while the root length density (RLD) and root tissue density (RTD) changed a little. The successive rotation resulted in the significant increase of root length, root biomass, SRL and RLD of 1-2 orders in the growing season. The quantitative traits of first order root significantly positively correlated with soil temperature and moisture, and significantly negatively correlated with the soil organic matter and soil available nitrogen content. However, the quantitative traits of second order root only showed significant correlation with soil nutrient content. The seasonal dynamics of poplar fine roots and the difference between successive rotation plantations implied carbon investment change of poplar to roots. Soil nutrient deficiency induced more carbon investment into roots, and this carbon allocation pattern might affect the aboveground productivity of poplar plantation.

  19. Non-Growing Season Dynamics of Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Cropped Land in Southern Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurbrigg, M. E.; Petrone, R. M.; English, M. C.; Spoelstra, J.; Macrae, M. L.

    2009-05-01

    As atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) is increasing at a rate of 0.3% per annum and has a global warming potential 300 times greater than that of carbon dioxide (CO2), it is crucial to understand the dynamics of anthropogenic emissions of this greenhouse gas. Although agriculture represents a small proportion of Canadian land use, it is the most significant source of both human-derived and natural N2O emissions in this country. More than 50% of annual N2O emissions from agricultural soils in northern latitudes may take place in the non-growing season (NGS). Southern Ontario is one of the most intensively farmed regions of Canada. Greater understanding of NGS dynamics of N2O flux will help to develop more accurate N2O modeling methodologies for this region and may help in the refinement of agricultural practices which reduce N2O emissions. This study investigated field and lab NGS dynamics of agricultural N2O flux in southern Ontario, where anaerobic conditions, such as those caused by snowmelt, icemelt and rain, promote the reduction of soil nitrate (NO3-) to N2O. Gas samples were collected from permanent soil gas collars in nine field sites following winter and spring thaw events over the NGS of 2007-2008; otherwise samples were collected at biweekly intervals from these collars, or by means of snow gas chambers when the sites were snow-covered. The field sites were situated in three working farm fields where soils were subjected to typical tillage, amendment and cropping practices. Field data were supplemented by experimental results from soil cores taken from one of two fields previously seeded to corn, and subjected to simulated freeze-thaw cycles of average frequency, duration, and amplitude found in this region. The experimental data show a highly significant positive correlation between N2O flux and soil temperature at 5 cm depth (p < 0.0005). Overall, the field data show a positive correlation between N2O flux and soil temperature (p < 0.025). The less

  20. High Resolution Ultrasound Superharmonic Perfusion Imaging: In Vivo Feasibility and Quantification of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Acoustic Angiography.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Brooks D; Shelton, Sarah E; Martin, K Heath; Ozgun, Kathryn A; Rojas, Juan D; Foster, F Stuart; Dayton, Paul A

    2017-04-01

    Mapping blood perfusion quantitatively allows localization of abnormal physiology and can improve understanding of disease progression. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound is a low-cost, real-time technique for imaging perfusion dynamics with microbubble contrast agents. Previously, we have demonstrated another contrast agent-specific ultrasound imaging technique, acoustic angiography, which forms static anatomical images of the superharmonic signal produced by microbubbles. In this work, we seek to determine whether acoustic angiography can be utilized for high resolution perfusion imaging in vivo by examining the effect of acquisition rate on superharmonic imaging at low flow rates and demonstrating the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced superharmonic perfusion imaging for the first time. Results in the chorioallantoic membrane model indicate that frame rate and frame averaging do not affect the measured diameter of individual vessels observed, but that frame rate does influence the detection of vessels near and below the resolution limit. The highest number of resolvable vessels was observed at an intermediate frame rate of 3 Hz using a mechanically-steered prototype transducer. We also demonstrate the feasibility of quantitatively mapping perfusion rate in 2D in a mouse model with spatial resolution of ~100 μm. This type of imaging could provide non-invasive, high resolution quantification of microvascular function at penetration depths of several centimeters.

  1. Radiation protection issues in dynamic contrast-enhanced (perfusion) computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Brix, Gunnar; Lechel, Ursula; Nekolla, Elke; Griebel, Jürgen; Becker, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT studies are increasingly used in both medical care and clinical trials to improve diagnosis and therapy management of the most common life-threatening diseases: stroke, coronary artery disease and cancer. It is thus the aim of this review to briefly summarize the current knowledge on deterministic and stochastic radiation effects relevant for patient protection, to present the essential concepts for determining radiation doses and risks associated with DCE-CT studies as well as representative results, and to discuss relevant aspects to be considered in the process of justification and optimization of these studies. For three default DCE-CT protocols implemented at a latest-generation CT system for cerebral, myocardial and cancer perfusion imaging, absorbed doses were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters at an anthropomorphic body phantom and compared with thresholds for harmful (deterministic) tissue reactions. To characterize stochastic radiation risks of patients from these studies, life-time attributable cancer risks (LAR) were estimated using sex-, age-, and organ-specific risk models based on the hypothesis of a linear non-threshold dose-response relationship. For the brain, heart and pelvic cancer studies considered, local absorbed doses in the imaging field were about 100-190 mGy (total CTDI(vol), 200 mGy), 15-30 mGy (16 mGy) and 80-270 mGy (140 mGy), respectively. According to a recent publication of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP Publication 118, 2012), harmful tissue reactions of the cerebro- and cardiovascular systems as well as of the lenses of the eye become increasingly important at radiation doses of more than 0.5 Gy. The LARs estimated for the investigated cerebral and myocardial DCE-CT scenarios are less than 0.07% for males and 0.1% for females at an age of exposure of 40 years. For the considered tumor location and protocol, the corresponding LARs are more than 6 times as high

  2. Assessment of Tumor Radioresponsiveness and Metastatic Potential by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Gulliksrud, Kristine; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that gadolinium diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) may provide clinically useful biomarkers for personalized cancer treatment. In this preclinical study, we investigated the potential of DCE-MRI as a noninvasive method for assessing the radioresponsiveness and metastatic potential of tumors. Methods and Materials: R-18 melanoma xenografts growing in BALB/c nu/nu mice were used as experimental tumor models. Fifty tumors were subjected to DCE-MRI, and parametric images of K{sup trans} (the volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v{sub e} (the fractional distribution volume of Gd-DTPA) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI series. The tumors were irradiated after the DCE-MRI, either with a single dose of 10 Gy for detection of radiobiological hypoxia (30 tumors) or with five fractions of 4 Gy in 48 h for assessment of radioresponsiveness (20 tumors). The host mice were then euthanized and examined for lymph node metastases, and the primary tumors were resected for measurement of cell survival in vitro. Results: Tumors with hypoxic cells showed significantly lower K{sup trans} values than tumors without significant hypoxia (p < 0.0001, n = 30), and K{sup trans} decreased with increasing cell surviving fraction for tumors given fractionated radiation treatment (p < 0.0001, n = 20). Tumors in metastasis-positive mice had significantly lower K{sup trans} values than tumors in metastasis-negative mice (p < 0.0001, n = 50). Significant correlations between v{sub e} and tumor hypoxia, radioresponsiveness, or metastatic potential could not be detected. Conclusions: R-18 tumors with low K{sup trans} values are likely to be resistant to radiation treatment and have a high probability of developing lymph node metastases. The general validity of these observations should be investigated further by studying preclinical tumor models with biological

  3. Timing and severity of immunizing diseases in rabbits is controlled by seasonal matching of host and pathogen dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Konstans; Brook, Barry W.; Lacy, Robert C.; Mutze, Greg J.; Peacock, David E.; Sinclair, Ron G.; Schwensow, Nina; Cassey, Phillip; O'Hara, Robert B.; Fordham, Damien A.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases can exert a strong influence on the dynamics of host populations, but it remains unclear why such disease-mediated control only occurs under particular environmental conditions. We used 16 years of detailed field data on invasive European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in Australia, linked to individual-based stochastic models and Bayesian approximations, to test whether (i) mortality associated with rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) is driven primarily by seasonal matches/mismatches between demographic rates and epidemiological dynamics and (ii) delayed infection (arising from insusceptibility and maternal antibodies in juveniles) are important factors in determining disease severity and local population persistence of rabbits. We found that both the timing of reproduction and exposure to viruses drove recurrent seasonal epidemics of RHD. Protection conferred by insusceptibility and maternal antibodies controlled seasonal disease outbreaks by delaying infection; this could have also allowed escape from disease. The persistence of local populations was a stochastic outcome of recovery rates from both RHD and myxomatosis. If susceptibility to RHD is delayed, myxomatosis will have a pronounced effect on population extirpation when the two viruses coexist. This has important implications for wildlife management, because it is likely that such seasonal interplay and disease dynamics has a strong effect on long-term population viability for many species. PMID:25566883

  4. Managing living marine resources in a dynamic environment: The role of seasonal to decadal climate forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasi, Desiree; Stock, Charles A.; Hobday, Alistair J.; Methot, Rick; Kaplan, Isaac C.; Eveson, J. Paige; Holsman, Kirstin; Miller, Timothy J.; Gaichas, Sarah; Gehlen, Marion; Pershing, Andrew; Vecchi, Gabriel A.; Msadek, Rym; Delworth, Tom; Eakin, C. Mark; Haltuch, Melissa A.; Séférian, Roland; Spillman, Claire M.; Hartog, Jason R.; Siedlecki, Samantha; Samhouri, Jameal F.; Muhling, Barbara; Asch, Rebecca G.; Pinsky, Malin L.; Saba, Vincent S.; Kapnick, Sarah B.; Gaitan, Carlos F.; Rykaczewski, Ryan R.; Alexander, Michael A.; Xue, Yan; Pegion, Kathleen V.; Lynch, Patrick; Payne, Mark R.; Kristiansen, Trond; Lehodey, Patrick; Werner, Francisco E.

    2017-03-01

    Recent developments in global dynamical climate prediction systems have allowed for skillful predictions of climate variables relevant to living marine resources (LMRs) at a scale useful to understanding and managing LMRs. Such predictions present opportunities for improved LMR management and industry operations, as well as new research avenues in fisheries science. LMRs respond to climate variability via changes in physiology and behavior. For species and systems where climate-fisheries links are well established, forecasted LMR responses can lead to anticipatory and more effective decisions, benefitting both managers and stakeholders. Here, we provide an overview of climate prediction systems and advances in seasonal to decadal prediction of marine-resource relevant environmental variables. We then describe a range of climate-sensitive LMR decisions that can be taken at lead-times of months to decades, before highlighting a range of pioneering case studies using climate predictions to inform LMR decisions. The success of these case studies suggests that many additional applications are possible. Progress, however, is limited by observational and modeling challenges. Priority developments include strengthening of the mechanistic linkages between climate and marine resource responses, development of LMR models able to explicitly represent such responses, integration of climate driven LMR dynamics in the multi-driver context within which marine resources exist, and improved prediction of ecosystem-relevant variables at the fine regional scales at which most marine resource decisions are made. While there are fundamental limits to predictability, continued advances in these areas have considerable potential to make LMR managers and industry decision more resilient to climate variability and help sustain valuable resources. Concerted dialog between scientists, LMR managers and industry is essential to realizing this potential.

  5. Seasonal and annual dynamics of particulate carbon flux in the Barents Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Wassmann, P. ); Slagstad, D. )

    1993-08-01

    Mathematical modelling was used to explore the seasonal and annual variability of primary, new and secondary production as well as sedimentation between 72[degrees] and 80[degrees]N in the central Barents Sea during the years 1981 to 1983. 1981 and 1982 were years with extensive ice coverage while 1983 experienced little sea-ice. The phyto-plankton [open quotes]spring[close quotes] bloom started usually in April/May at about 75[degrees]N and was delayed from May/June in the south to August/September in the north as a function of thermal stratification and sea-ice dynamics. The model indicates that several, simultaneous spring bloom events, separated in space, can be found, especially during years with low ice coverage. The annual estimates of primary production, secondary production and sedimentation decreased on average from 73, 7.3 and 48 to 18, 1.8 and 9 gCm[sup [minus]2] year[sup [minus]1] between the southern and the northern part of the Barents Sea respectively. The annual estimates of particular carbon flux were much higher in 1983 compared to 1981-1982, especially in the north where up to 6 times higher rates were calculated for 1983. The number of zooplankton species present in spring in the southern Barents Sea is governed by over-wintering success, but probably also influenced by advection of Atlantic water. The model was run for Atlantic water with 10,000, 3,000 or none copepods per m[sup 2] present in March, indicating that sedimentation can vary between 38 and 61 gCm[sup [minus]2] year[sup [minus]1] due to zooplankton grazing alone. This suggests that the supply of organic carbon to the aphotic zone of the Barents Sea is only partly determined by the strength and duration of phytoplankton blooms, but strongly influenced by zooplankton dynamics. 49 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Associations between Season and Gametocyte Dynamics in Chronic Plasmodium falciparum Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gadalla, Amal A. H.; Schneider, Petra; Churcher, Thomas S.; Nassir, Elkhansaa; Abdel-Muhsin, Abdel-Muhsin A.; Ranford-Cartwright, Lisa C.; Reece, Sarah E.; Babiker, Hamza A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In a markedly seasonal malaria setting, the transition from the transmission-free dry season to the transmission season depends on the resurgence of the mosquito population following the start of annual rains. The sudden onset of malaria outbreaks at the start of the transmission season suggests that parasites persist during the dry season and respond to either the reappearance of vectors, or correlated events, by increasing the production of transmission stages. Here, we investigate whether Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte density and the correlation between gametocyte density and parasite density show seasonal variation in chronic (largely asymptomatic) carriers in eastern Sudan. Materials and Methods We recruited and treated 123 malaria patients in the transmission season 2001. We then followed them monthly during four distinct consecutive epidemiological seasons: transmission season 1, transmission-free season, pre-clinical period, and transmission season 2. In samples collected from 25 participants who fulfilled the selection criteria of the current analysis, we used quantitative PCR (qPCR) and RT-qPCR to quantify parasite and gametocyte densities, respectively. Results and Discussion We observed a significant increase in gametocyte density and a significantly steeper positive correlation between gametocyte density and total parasite density during the pre-clinical period compared to the preceding transmission-free season. However, there was no corresponding increase in the density or prevalence of total parasites or gametocyte prevalence. The increase in gametocyte production during the pre-clinical period supports the hypothesis that P. falciparum may respond to environmental cues, such as mosquito biting, to modulate its transmission strategy. Thus, seasonal changes may be important to ignite transmission in unstable-malaria settings. PMID:27870874

  7. Seasonally-Dynamic Presence-Only Species Distribution Models for a Cryptic Migratory Bat Impacted by Wind Energy Development.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Mark A; Cryan, Paul M; Wunder, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Understanding seasonal distribution and movement patterns of animals that migrate long distances is an essential part of monitoring and conserving their populations. Compared to migratory birds and other more conspicuous migrants, we know very little about the movement patterns of many migratory bats. Hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus), a cryptic, wide-ranging, long-distance migrant, comprise a substantial proportion of the tens to hundreds of thousands of bat fatalities estimated to occur each year at wind turbines in North America. We created seasonally-dynamic species distribution models (SDMs) from 2,753 museum occurrence records collected over five decades in North America to better understand the seasonal geographic distributions of hoary bats. We used 5 SDM approaches: logistic regression, multivariate adaptive regression splines, boosted regression trees, random forest, and maximum entropy and consolidated outputs to generate ensemble maps. These maps represent the first formal hypotheses for sex- and season-specific hoary bat distributions. Our results suggest that North American hoary bats winter in regions with relatively long growing seasons where temperatures are moderated by proximity to oceans, and then move to the continental interior for the summer. SDMs suggested that hoary bats are most broadly distributed in autumn-the season when they are most susceptible to mortality from wind turbines; this season contains the greatest overlap between potentially suitable habitat and wind energy facilities. Comparing wind-turbine fatality data to model outputs could test many predictions, such as 'risk from turbines is highest in habitats between hoary bat summering and wintering grounds'. Although future field studies are needed to validate the SDMs, this study generated well-justified and testable hypotheses of hoary bat migration patterns and seasonal distribution.

  8. Seasonally-dynamic presence-only species distribution models for a cryptic migratory bat impacted by wind energy development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Mark A.; Cryan, Paul M.; Wunder, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding seasonal distribution and movement patterns of animals that migrate long distances is an essential part of monitoring and conserving their populations. Compared to migratory birds and other more conspicuous migrants, we know very little about the movement patterns of many migratory bats. Hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus), a cryptic, wide-ranging, long-distance migrant, comprise a substantial proportion of the tens to hundreds of thousands of bat fatalities estimated to occur each year at wind turbines in North America. We created seasonally-dynamic species distribution models (SDMs) from 2,753 museum occurrence records collected over five decades in North America to better understand the seasonal geographic distributions of hoary bats. We used 5 SDM approaches: logistic regression, multivariate adaptive regression splines, boosted regression trees, random forest, and maximum entropy and consolidated outputs to generate ensemble maps. These maps represent the first formal hypotheses for sex- and season-specific hoary bat distributions. Our results suggest that North American hoary bats winter in regions with relatively long growing seasons where temperatures are moderated by proximity to oceans, and then move to the continental interior for the summer. SDMs suggested that hoary bats are most broadly distributed in autumn—the season when they are most susceptible to mortality from wind turbines; this season contains the greatest overlap between potentially suitable habitat and wind energy facilities. Comparing wind-turbine fatality data to model outputs could test many predictions, such as ‘risk from turbines is highest in habitats between hoary bat summering and wintering grounds’. Although future field studies are needed to validate the SDMs, this study generated well-justified and testable hypotheses of hoary bat migration patterns and seasonal distribution.

  9. Seasonally-Dynamic Presence-Only Species Distribution Models for a Cryptic Migratory Bat Impacted by Wind Energy Development

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Mark A.; Cryan, Paul M.; Wunder, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding seasonal distribution and movement patterns of animals that migrate long distances is an essential part of monitoring and conserving their populations. Compared to migratory birds and other more conspicuous migrants, we know very little about the movement patterns of many migratory bats. Hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus), a cryptic, wide-ranging, long-distance migrant, comprise a substantial proportion of the tens to hundreds of thousands of bat fatalities estimated to occur each year at wind turbines in North America. We created seasonally-dynamic species distribution models (SDMs) from 2,753 museum occurrence records collected over five decades in North America to better understand the seasonal geographic distributions of hoary bats. We used 5 SDM approaches: logistic regression, multivariate adaptive regression splines, boosted regression trees, random forest, and maximum entropy and consolidated outputs to generate ensemble maps. These maps represent the first formal hypotheses for sex- and season-specific hoary bat distributions. Our results suggest that North American hoary bats winter in regions with relatively long growing seasons where temperatures are moderated by proximity to oceans, and then move to the continental interior for the summer. SDMs suggested that hoary bats are most broadly distributed in autumn—the season when they are most susceptible to mortality from wind turbines; this season contains the greatest overlap between potentially suitable habitat and wind energy facilities. Comparing wind-turbine fatality data to model outputs could test many predictions, such as ‘risk from turbines is highest in habitats between hoary bat summering and wintering grounds’. Although future field studies are needed to validate the SDMs, this study generated well-justified and testable hypotheses of hoary bat migration patterns and seasonal distribution. PMID:26208098

  10. Impact of oceanic-scale interactions on the seasonal modulation of ocean dynamics by the atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Hideharu; Klein, Patrice; Qiu, Bo; Sasai, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Ocean eddies (with a size of 100–300 km), ubiquitous in satellite observations, are known to represent about 80% of the total ocean kinetic energy. Recent studies have pointed out the unexpected role of smaller oceanic structures (with 1–50 km scales) in generating and sustaining these eddies. The interpretation proposed so far invokes the internal instability resulting from the large-scale interaction between upper and interior oceanic layers. Here we show, using a new high-resolution simulation of the realistic North Pacific Ocean, that ocean eddies are instead sustained by a different process that involves small-scale mixed-layer instabilities set up by large-scale atmospheric forcing in winter. This leads to a seasonal evolution of the eddy kinetic energy in a very large part of this ocean, with an amplitude varying by a factor almost equal to 2. Perspectives in terms of the impacts on climate dynamics and future satellite observational systems are briefly discussed. PMID:25501039

  11. Impact of oceanic-scale interactions on the seasonal modulation of ocean dynamics by the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hideharu; Klein, Patrice; Qiu, Bo; Sasai, Yoshikazu

    2014-12-15

    Ocean eddies (with a size of 100-300 km), ubiquitous in satellite observations, are known to represent about 80% of the total ocean kinetic energy. Recent studies have pointed out the unexpected role of smaller oceanic structures (with 1-50 km scales) in generating and sustaining these eddies. The interpretation proposed so far invokes the internal instability resulting from the large-scale interaction between upper and interior oceanic layers. Here we show, using a new high-resolution simulation of the realistic North Pacific Ocean, that ocean eddies are instead sustained by a different process that involves small-scale mixed-layer instabilities set up by large-scale atmospheric forcing in winter. This leads to a seasonal evolution of the eddy kinetic energy in a very large part of this ocean, with an amplitude varying by a factor almost equal to 2. Perspectives in terms of the impacts on climate dynamics and future satellite observational systems are briefly discussed.

  12. Prediction of the Arctic Oscillation in Boreal Winter by Dynamical Seasonal Forecasting Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Daehyun; Lee, Myong-In; Im, Jungho; Kim, Daehyun; Kim, Hye-Mi; Kang, Hyun-Suk; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Arribas, Alberto; MacLachlan, Craig

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses the skill of boreal winter Arctic Oscillation (AO) predictions with state-of-the-art dynamical ensemble prediction systems (EPSs): GloSea4, CFSv2, GEOS-5, CanCM3, CanCM4, and CM2.1. Long-term reforecasts with the EPSs are used to evaluate how well they represent the AO and to assess the skill of both deterministic and probabilistic forecasts of the AO. The reforecasts reproduce the observed changes in the large-scale patterns of the Northern Hemispheric surface temperature, upper level wind, and precipitation associated with the different phases of the AO. The results demonstrate that most EPSs improve upon persistence skill scores for lead times up to 2 months in boreal winter, suggesting some potential for skillful prediction of the AO and its associated climate anomalies at seasonal time scales. It is also found that the skill of AO forecasts during the recent period (1997-2010) is higher than that of the earlier period (1983-1996).

  13. Prediction of the Arctic Oscillation in Boreal Winter by Dynamical Seasonal Forecasting Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Daehyun; Lee, Myong-In; Im, Jungho; Kim, Daehyun; Kim, Hye-Mi; Kang, Hyun-Suk; Shubert, Siegfried D.; Arriba, Albertom; MacLachlan, Craig

    2013-01-01

    This study assesses the prediction skill of the boreal winter Arctic Oscillation (AO) in the state-of-the-art dynamical ensemble prediction systems (EPSs): the UKMO GloSea4, the NCEP CFSv2, and the NASA GEOS-5. Long-term reforecasts made with the EPSs are used to evaluate representations of the AO, and to examine skill scores for the deterministic and probabilistic forecast of the AO index. The reforecasts reproduce the observed changes in the large-scale patterns of the Northern Hemispheric surface temperature, upper-level wind, and precipitation according to the AO phase. Results demonstrate that all EPSs have better prediction skill than the persistence prediction for lead times up to 3-month, suggesting a great potential for skillful prediction of the AO and the associated climate anomalies in seasonal time scale. It is also found that the deterministic and probabilistic forecast skill of the AO in the recent period (1997-2010) is higher than that in the earlier period (1983-1996).

  14. Seasonal dynamics of mobile carbohydrate pools in phloem and xylem of two alpine timberline conifers.

    PubMed

    Gruber, A; Pirkebner, D; Oberhuber, W

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies on non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) reserves in trees focused on xylem NSC reserves, while still little is known about changes in phloem carbohydrate pools, where NSC charging might be significantly different. To gain insight on NSC dynamics in xylem and phloem, we monitored NSC concentrations in stems and roots of Pinus cembra (L.) and Larix decidua (Mill.) growing at the alpine timberline throughout 2011. Species-specific differences affected tree phenology and carbon allocation during the course of the year. After a delayed start in spring, NSC concentrations in L. decidua were significantly higher in all sampled tissues from August until the end of growing season. In both species, NSC concentrations were five to seven times higher in phloem than that in xylem. However, significant correlations between xylem and phloem starch content found for both species indicate a close linkage between long-term carbon reserves in both tissues. In L. decidua also, free sugar concentrations in xylem and phloem were significantly correlated throughout the year, while a lack of correlation between xylem and phloem free sugar pools in P. cembra indicate a decline of phloem soluble carbohydrate pools during periods of high sink demand.

  15. Seasonal dynamics of mobile carbohydrate pools in phloem and xylem of two alpine timberline conifers

    PubMed Central

    GRUBER, A.; PIRKEBNER, D.; OBERHUBER, W.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies on non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) reserves in trees focused on xylem NSC reserves, while still little is known about changes in phloem carbohydrate pools, where NSC charging might be significantly different. To gain insight on NSC dynamics in xylem and phloem, we monitored NSC concentrations in stems and roots of Pinus cembra and Larix decidua growing at the alpine timberline throughout 2011. Species-specific differences affected tree phenology and carbon allocation in the course of the year. After a delayed start in spring, NSC concentrations in Larix decidua were significantly higher in all sampled tissues from August until end of growing season. In both species NSC concentrations were five to seven times higher in phloem than in xylem. However, significant correlations between xylem and phloem starch content found for both species indicate a close linkage between long term carbon reserves in both tissues. In Larix decidua also free sugar concentrations in xylem and phloem were significantly correlated throughout the year, while missing correlations between xylem and phloem free sugar pools in Pinus cembra indicate a decline of phloem soluble carbohydrate pools during periods of high sink demand. PMID:24186941

  16. Seasonal time bombs: dominant temperate viruses affect Southern Ocean microbial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Brum, Jennifer R; Hurwitz, Bonnie L; Schofield, Oscar; Ducklow, Hugh W; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2016-01-01

    Rapid warming in the highly productive western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) region of the Southern Ocean has affected multiple trophic levels, yet viral influences on microbial processes and ecosystem function remain understudied in the Southern Ocean. Here we use cultivation-independent quantitative ecological and metagenomic assays, combined with new comparative bioinformatic techniques, to investigate double-stranded DNA viruses during the WAP spring–summer transition. This study demonstrates that (i) temperate viruses dominate this region, switching from lysogeny to lytic replication as bacterial production increases, and (ii) Southern Ocean viral assemblages are genetically distinct from lower-latitude assemblages, primarily driven by this temperate viral dominance. This new information suggests fundamentally different virus–host interactions in polar environments, where intense seasonal changes in bacterial production select for temperate viruses because of increased fitness imparted by the ability to switch replication strategies in response to resource availability. Further, temperate viral dominance may provide mechanisms (for example, bacterial mortality resulting from prophage induction) that help explain observed temporal delays between, and lower ratios of, bacterial and primary production in polar versus lower-latitude marine ecosystems. Together these results suggest that temperate virus–host interactions are critical to predicting changes in microbial dynamics brought on by warming in polar marine systems. PMID:26296067

  17. Seasonal time bombs: dominant temperate viruses affect Southern Ocean microbial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Brum, Jennifer R; Hurwitz, Bonnie L; Schofield, Oscar; Ducklow, Hugh W; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2016-02-01

    Rapid warming in the highly productive western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) region of the Southern Ocean has affected multiple trophic levels, yet viral influences on microbial processes and ecosystem function remain understudied in the Southern Ocean. Here we use cultivation-independent quantitative ecological and metagenomic assays, combined with new comparative bioinformatic techniques, to investigate double-stranded DNA viruses during the WAP spring-summer transition. This study demonstrates that (i) temperate viruses dominate this region, switching from lysogeny to lytic replication as bacterial production increases, and (ii) Southern Ocean viral assemblages are genetically distinct from lower-latitude assemblages, primarily driven by this temperate viral dominance. This new information suggests fundamentally different virus-host interactions in polar environments, where intense seasonal changes in bacterial production select for temperate viruses because of increased fitness imparted by the ability to switch replication strategies in response to resource availability. Further, temperate viral dominance may provide mechanisms (for example, bacterial mortality resulting from prophage induction) that help explain observed temporal delays between, and lower ratios of, bacterial and primary production in polar versus lower-latitude marine ecosystems. Together these results suggest that temperate virus-host interactions are critical to predicting changes in microbial dynamics brought on by warming in polar marine systems.

  18. Slip-ring and conventional dynamic hepatic CT: contrast material and timing considerations.

    PubMed

    Berland, L L

    1995-04-01

    The major conclusions and recommendations of this review of contrast material use are summarized as follows: 1. Our recommendations for routine administration of contrast material are summarized in the Table. 2. Patient factors, such as weight, and liver and cardiovascular disorders may be taken into account when the above recommendations are modified. 3. Unenhanced scanning should be performed selectively. It is unnecessary for routine examinations performed with modern scanners and good contrast material injection techniques. 4. Although conclusive evidence is lacking regarding efficacy, reduced doses of contrast material may be given to patients with an elevated serum creatinine level. A full dose of low-osmolar contrast material may be given to functionally anephric patients if otherwise medically appropriate. 5. Differences in enhancement patterns produced by low-osmolar contrast agents and by high-osmolar contrast agents are small. Choice of contrast material should be based on other factors. 6. The dose of low-osmolar contrast material may be lower than the dose of high-osmolar contrast material so the examination cost may be reduced. 7. Low-osmolar contrast material is not satisfactory to use with delayed iodine scanning. 8. With use of slip-ring scanners and either helical or incremented scanning and recommended techniques, scanning should begin by the end of the injection of contrast material for biphasic techniques and within about 5-15 seconds after the end of injection for monophasic techniques. 9. Section thicknesses no greater than 8 mm should be used for helical or nonhelical scanning. 10. With helical scanning, a 1:1 pitch is preferred with a thickness of 5-8 mm. Overlapping sections may be used selectively to help identify and characterize small lesions. 11. Multiple-pass scanning is helpful to identify hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhotic livers. This technique may also prove helpful in other conditions. As with any new technology, considerable

  19. Dynamic full field optical coherence tomography: subcellular metabolic contrast revealed in tissues by interferometric signals temporal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Apelian, Clement; Harms, Fabrice; Thouvenin, Olivier; Boccara, A. Claude

    2016-01-01

    We developed a new endogenous approach to reveal subcellular metabolic contrast in fresh ex vivo tissues taking advantage of the time dependence of the full field optical coherence tomography interferometric signals. This method reveals signals linked with local activity of the endogenous scattering elements which can reveal cells where other OCT-based techniques fail or need exogenous contrast agents. We benefit from the micrometric transverse resolution of full field OCT to image intracellular features. We used this time dependence to identify different dynamics at the millisecond scale on a wide range of organs in normal or pathological conditions. PMID:27446672

  20. Seasonal spectral dynamics and carbon fluxes at core EOS sites using EO-1 Hyperion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagomasino, D.; Campbell, P.; Price, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    Fluxes of water and carbon into the atmosphere are critical components in order to monitor and predict climate change. Spatial heterogeneity and seasonal changes in vegetation contribute to ambiguities in regional and global CO2 and water cycle dynamics. Satellite remote sensing is essential for monitoring the spatial and temporal dynamics of various vegetation types for the purposes of determining carbon and water fluxes. Satellite data from the EO-1 Hyperion sensor was acquired for five Earth Observing Satellite (EOS) sites, Mongu (Zambia, Africa), Konza Prairie (Kansas, USA), Duke Forest (North Carolina, USA), Barrow (Alaska, USA) and Sevilleta (New Mexico, USA). Each EOS site represented a distinct vegetative ecosystem type; hardwood forest, grassland, evergreen forest, lichens, and shrubland/grassland respectively. Satellite data was atmospherically corrected using the Atmosphere CORrection Now (ACORN) model and subsequently, the spectral reflectance data was extracted in the vicinity of existing flux towers. The EO-1 Hyperion sensor proved advantageous because of its high and continuous spectral resolution (10 nm intervals from 355 to 2578 nm wavelengths). The high spectral resolution allowed us calculate biophysical indices based on specific wavelengths in the electromagnetic spectrum that are associated with alterations in foliar chemistry and plant membrane structure (i.e., vegetation stress) brought upon by many environmental factors. Previous studies have focused on relationships within a specific site or vegetation community. This study however, incorporated many sites with different vegetation types and various geographic locations throughout the world. Monitoring the fluctuations in vegetation stress with contemporaneous environmental conditions and carbon flux measurements from each site will provide better insight into water and carbon flux dynamics in many different biomes. Noticeable spectral signatures were identified based on site specific

  1. Seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton in two tropical rivers of varying size and human impact in southeast Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okogwu, Okechukwu Idumah; Ugwumba, Alex O

    2013-12-01

    Phytoplankton occurrence and dynamics in rivers are mainly shaped by hydrophysical conditions and nutrient availability. Phytoplankton main structuring factors have been poorly studied in West African rivers, and this study was undertaken to identify these conditions in two tropical rivers that vary in size and human impact. For this, environmental variables and phytoplankton monthly samples were collected from the middle reaches of Asu and Cross rivers during an 18 months survey from March 2005-July 2006. Phytoplankton biomass (F=11.87, p=0.003), Shannon-Weiner diversity and species richness (F=5.93, p=0.003) showed significant seasonality in Asu but not in Cross River. Data was analyzed with Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and showed environmental differences between the two rivers, nitrate in Asu River (5.1-15.5 mg/L) was significantly higher than Cross River (0.03-1.7 mg/L), while PO4 (0.2-0.9 mg/L) was significantly lower in Asu River compared to Cross River (0.03-2.6 mg/L) (p < 0.05). Eutrophic factors (NO1) determined primarily phytoplankton dynamics in Asu River, especially during the dry season, whereas hydrophysical factors (depth, transparency and temperature) shaped phytoplankton in Cross River. Taxa indicative of an eutrophic condition, such as Euglena, Chlorella, Chlorococcus, Ceratium, Peridinium, Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, Closterium, Scenedesmus and Pediastrum spp., were frequently encountered in the shallow impounded Asu River, while riverine species, such as Frustulia rhomboids, Gyrosigma sp., Opephora martyr and Surirella splendida dominated Cross River. A succession pattern was observed in the functional groups identified: Na/MP-->TB-->P (rainy-->dry season) was observed in Asu River, whereas MP/D predominated in Cross River for both seasons. We concluded that, if nutrients predominate hydrophysical factors in shaping phytoplankton during dry season (half of the year) then, they are as important as hydrophysical factors structuring

  2. Simulation of the modulation transfer function dependent on the partial Fourier fraction in dynamic contrast enhancement magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Takatsu, Yasuo; Ueyama, Tsuyoshi; Miyati, Tosiaki; Yamamura, Kenichirou

    2016-12-01

    The image characteristics in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) depend on the partial Fourier fraction and contrast medium concentration. These characteristics were assessed and the modulation transfer function (MTF) was calculated by computer simulation. A digital phantom was created from signal intensity data acquired at different contrast medium concentrations on a breast model. The frequency images [created by fast Fourier transform (FFT)] were divided into 512 parts and rearranged to form a new image. The inverse FFT of this image yielded the MTF. From the reference data, three linear models (low, medium, and high) and three exponential models (slow, medium, and rapid) of the signal intensity were created. Smaller partial Fourier fractions, and higher gradients in the linear models, corresponded to faster MTF decline. The MTF more gradually decreased in the exponential models than in the linear models. The MTF, which reflects the image characteristics in DCE-MRI, was more degraded as the partial Fourier fraction decreased.

  3. Dynamics of water vapor and energy exchanges above two contrasting Sudanian climate ecosystems in Northern Benin (West Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamadou, Ossénatou; Galle, Sylvie; Cohard, Jean-Martial; Peugeot, Christophe; Kounouhewa, Basile; Biron, Romain; Hector, Basile; Zannou, Arnaud Bruno

    2016-10-01

    Natural ecosystems in sub-Saharan Africa are experiencing intense changes that will probably modify land surface feedbacks and consequently the regional climate. In this study, we have analyzed water vapor (QLE) and sensible heat (QH) fluxes over a woodland (Bellefoungou, BE) and a cultivated area (Nalohou, NA) in the Sudanian climate of Northern Benin, using 2 years (from July 2008 to June 2010) of eddy covariance measurements. The evaporative fraction (EF) response to environmental and surface variables was investigated at seasonal scale. Soil moisture was found to be the main environmental factor controlling energy partitioning. During the wet seasons, EF was rather stable with an average of 0.75 ± 0.07 over the woodland and 0.70 ± 0.025 over the cultivated area. This means that 70-75% of the available energy was changed into actual evapotranspiration during the investigated wet seasons depending on the vegetation type. The cumulative annual actual evapotranspiration (AET) varied between 730 ± 50 mm yr-1 at the NA site and 1040 ± 70 mm yr-1 at the BE site. With similar weather conditions at the two sites, the BE site showed 30% higher AET values than the NA site. The sensible heat flux QH at the cultivated site was always higher than that of the woodland site, but observed differences were much less than those of QLE. In a land surface conversion context, these differences are expected to impact both atmospheric dynamics and the hydrological cycle.

  4. A method for patient dose reduction in dynamic contrast enhanced CT study

    SciTech Connect

    Mo Kim, Sun; Haider, Masoom A.; Milosevic, Michael; Jaffray, David A.; Yeung, Ivan W. T.

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: In dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) study, prolonged CT scanning with high temporal resolution is required to give accurate and precise estimates of kinetic parameters. However, such scanning protocol could lead to substantial radiation dose to the patient. A novel method is proposed to reduce radiation dose to patient, while maintaining high accuracy for kinetic parameter estimates in DCE-CT study. Methods: The method is based on a previous investigation that the arterial impulse response (AIR) in DCE-CT study can be predicted using a population-based scheme. In the proposed method, DCE-CT scanning is performed with relatively low temporal resolution, hence, giving rise to reduction in patient dose. A novel method is proposed to estimate the arterial input function (AIF) based on the coarsely sampled AIF. By using the estimated AIF in the tracer kinetic analysis of the coarsely sampled DCE-CT study, the calculated kinetic parameters are able to achieve a high degree of accuracy. The method was tested on a DCE-CT data set of 48 patients with cervical cancer scanned at high temporal resolution. A random cohort of 34 patients was chosen to construct the orthonormal bases of the AIRs via singular value decomposition method. The determined set of orthonormal bases was used to fit the AIFs in the second cohort (14 patients) at varying levels of down sampling. For each dataset in the second cohort, the estimated AIF was used for kinetic analyses of the modified Tofts and adiabatic tissue homogeneity models for each of the down-sampling schemes between intervals from 2 to 15 s. The results were compared with analyses done with the ''raw'' down-sampled AIF. Results: In the first group of 34 patients, there were 11 orthonormal bases identified to describe the AIRs. The AIFs in the second group were estimated in high accuracy based on the 11 orthonormal bases established in the first group along with down-sampled AIFs. Using the 11 orthonormal bases, the

  5. The seasonal cycle of the Atlantic Jet dynamics in the Alboran Sea: direct atmospheric forcing versus Mediterranean thermohaline circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macias, Diego; Garcia-Gorriz, Elisa; Stips, Adolf

    2016-02-01

    The Atlantic Jet (AJ) is the inflow of Atlantic surface waters into the Mediterranean Sea. This geostrophically adjusted jet fluctuates in a wide range of temporal scales from tidal to subinertial, seasonal, and interannual modifying its velocity and direction within the Alboran Sea. At seasonal scale, a clearly defined cycle has been previously described, with the jet being stronger and flowing towards the northeast during the first half of the year and weakening and flowing more southwardly towards the end of the year. Different hypothesis have been proposed to explain this fluctuation pattern but, up to now, no quantitative assessment of the importance of the different forcings for this seasonality has been provided. Here, we use a 3D hydrodynamic model of the entire Mediterranean Sea forced at the surface with realistic atmospheric conditions to study and quantify the importance of the different meteorological forcings on the velocity and direction of the AJ at seasonal time scale. We find that the direct effects of local zonal wind variations are much more important to explain extreme collapse events when the jet dramatically veers southward than to the seasonal cycle itself while sea level pressure variations over the Mediterranean seem to have very little direct effect on the AJ behavior at monthly and longer time scales. Further model results indicate that the annual cycle of the thermohaline circulation is the main driver of the seasonality of the AJ dynamics in the model simulations. The annual cycles in local wind forcing and SLP variations over the Mediterranean have no causal relationship with the AJ seasonality.

  6. Evaluating seasonal dynamics of bacterial communities in marine fish aquaculture: a preliminary study before applying phage therapy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carla; Salvador, Sara; Arrojado, Cátia; Silva, Yolanda; Santos, Ana L; Cunha, Angela; Gomes, Newton C M; Gomes, Newton; Almeida, Adelaide

    2011-04-01

    The increasing problem of antibiotic resistance in common pathogenic bacteria and the concern about the spreading of antibiotics in the environment bring the need to find new methods to control fish pathogens. Phage therapy represents a potential alternative to antibiotics, but its use in aquaculture requires a detailed understanding of bacterial communities, namely of fish pathogenic bacteria. Therefore, in this study the seasonal dynamics of the overall bacterial communities, microbiological water quality and disease-causing bacteria were followed in a marine aquaculture system of Ria de Aveiro (Portugal). Analysis of the bacterial diversity of the water samples by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA gene fragments indicates that the bacterial community structure varied seasonally, showing a higher complexity during the warm season. The diversity of the main fish pathogenic bacteria, assessed by DGGE targeting the Vibrio genus, showed lower seasonal variation, with new dominating populations appearing mainly in the spring. Bacterial indicators, faecal coliforms and enterococci, enumerated by the filter-membrane method, also varied seasonally. The fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) results showed that the specific groups of bacteria varied during the study period and that the non-indigenous Enterobactereaceae family was the most abundant group followed by Vibrio and Aeromonas. The seasonal variation detected in terms of density and structure of total and pathogenic bacterial communities demonstrates the need for a careful monitoring of water through the year in order to select the suitable phages to inactivate fish pathogenic bacteria. The spring season seems to be the critical time period when phage therapy should be applied.

  7. Seasonal Dynamics of Academic Achievement Inequality by Socioeconomic Status and Race/Ethnicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, David M.; Cooc, North; McIntyre, Joe; Gomez, Celia J.

    2016-01-01

    Early studies examining seasonal variation in academic achievement inequality generally concluded that socioeconomic test score gaps grew more over the summer than the school year, suggesting schools served as "equalizers." In this study, we analyze seasonal trends in socioeconomic status (SES) and racial/ethnic test score gaps using…

  8. Storm impact on the seasonal shoreline dynamics of a meso- to macrotidal open sandy beach (Biscarrosse, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senechal, Nadia; Coco, Giovanni; Castelle, Bruno; Marieu, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    A three-year dataset (2007-2010) of shoreline and sandbar positions derived from video observations of an open sandy beach (Biscarrosse, France) is analyzed, to explore the impact of storms on the seasonal shoreline dynamics. The results indicate that a clear seasonality is observed in the offshore significant wave height and in the occurrence of 'winter storm' events that are defined as periods with significant wave height greater than 4 m lasting at least 12 h. Data indicate that the range of variation of the inner sandbar positions (120 m) is two and a half times larger than the range of variation of the shoreline position. Correlation analyses suggest that the offshore conditions do not conclusively explain the position of the inner bar. Shoreline positions show a clear seasonal pattern, displaying a stable position occurring in February and July, providing evidence of seasonal-recovery although analysis of storm activity indicates that the number and intensity of storms is highly variable over the three years. The Biscarrosse data show that rapid erosion can be observed also under moderate conditions, and that beach recovery after the storm season can be relatively rapid.

  9. Seasonal dynamics of the microbiome of chernozems of the long-term agrochemical experiment in Kamennaya Steppe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, T. I.; Tkhakakhova, A. K.; Ivanova, E. A.; Kutovaya, O. V.; Turusov, V. I.

    2015-12-01

    The seasonal variability (spring-summer-autumn) of the taxonomic structure of prokaryotic microbiomes in chernozems of Kamennaya Steppe was studied using sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The samples were collected from the topsoil (0-20 cm) horizons of a long-term fallow and croplands differing in the rates of application of mineral fertilizers (NPK). The seasonal dynamics of the prokaryotic community in the soils of the fallow and croplands were similar: the summer samples significantly differed from the spring ones; in autumn, the microbiome structure approached that in spring; these changes were probably related to corresponding changes in the temperature and moisture conditions of the growing season. For all the plots, significant seasonal changes in the proportions of Thaumarchaeota (Cranarchaeota), Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and V errucomicrobia phylogenetic groups were observed. The significant changes in the structure of the microbiomes (especially in the number of representatives of the Firmicutes, Cemmatiomonadetes, and Verrucomicrobia phyla) were revealed in the arable and fallow soils irrespectively of the season. The phylogenetic diversity estimated by the Shannon index, the number of the operating taxonomic units found, and the Chao1 index differed little in the soils of the studies plots. The long-term application of mineral fertilizers at different rates had little effect on the taxonomic structure and diversity of prokaryotic communities in the agrochernozems.

  10. A Janus Chelator Enables Biochemically Responsive MRI Contrast with Exceptional Dynamic Range

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Eric M.; Jones, Chloe M.; Ramsay, Ian; Farrar, Christian T.; Caravan, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a new biochemically responsive Mn-based MRI contrast agent that provides a 9-fold change in relaxivity via switching between the Mn3+ and Mn2+ oxidation states. Interchange between oxidation states is promoted by a “Janus” ligand that isomerizes between binding modes that favor Mn3+ or Mn2+. It is the only ligand that supports stable complexes of Mn3+ and Mn2+ in biological milieu. Rapid interconversion between oxidation states is mediated by peroxidase activity (oxidation) and L-cysteine (reduction). This Janus system provides a new paradigm for the design of biochemically responsive MRI contrast agents. PMID:27960350

  11. Seasonal dynamics of human retinol status in mobile pastoralists in Chad.

    PubMed

    Crump, Lisa; Béchir, Mahamat; Ngandolo, Bongo Naré Richard; Daugla, Doumagoum Moto; Hattendorf, Jan; Zinsstag, Jakob

    2017-02-01

    Vitamin A deficiency is a prevalent public health problem in Africa and South-East Asia, although national population based surveys are lacking in many countries. This study investigated seasonal variation of human retinol concentrations in Chadian mobile pastoralists to identify critical time periods for interventions addressing vitamin A deficiency. The repeated cross-sectional study design used convenience sampling during three seasons to include 327 Fulani, Gorane and Arab adult mobile pastoralists in nine camps in the Lake Chad area. Human blood and pooled cattle milk retinol concentrations were rapidly assessed by portable flourometer (iCheck™). Linear regression models with random effects for correlation within camps were applied with human retinol concentration as outcome. Logistic regression models, with camp as random effect, were evaluated for the outcome human retinol deficiency. Human seasonal means were 2.14μmol/L (95% CI 1.82-2.46) in rainy, 0.99μmol/L (95% CI 0.91-1.07) in cold and 1.86μmol/L (95% CI 1.63-2.09) in dry season. Retinol concentration and deficiency varied according to season and ethnic group. Average values were highest in Gorane during rainy and in Fulani in the cold and dry seasons. Arabs had lowest average values in all seasons. Retinol deficiency (<0.70μmol/L) was found in 15% of study participants in the dry, 25% in the rainy and 32% in the cold season. Retinol concentrations varied according to age, sex, milk consumption level and pooled cattle milk retinol concentration. Effect sizes varied and not all were statistically significantly different. Pooled cattle milk retinol concentrations varied seasonally and were positively associated to human retinol concentrations. This study establishes seasonal variation in human blood and pooled cattle milk retinol concentrations in Chad, demonstrating a linkage from animals to humans through milk. Rapid analysis using portable technology is feasible in remote populations under harsh

  12. Seasonal dynamics of water and air chemistry in an indoor chlorinated swimming pool.

    PubMed

    Zare Afifi, Mehrnaz; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2015-01-01

    Although swimming is known to be beneficial in terms of cardiovascular health, as well as for some forms of rehabilitation, swimming is also known to present risks to human health, largely in the form of exposure to microbial pathogens and disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Relatively little information is available in the literature to characterize the seasonal dynamics of air and water chemistry in indoor chlorinated swimming pools. To address this issue, water samples were collected five days per week from an indoor chlorinated swimming pool facility at a high school during the academic year and once per week during summer over a fourteen-month period. The samples were analyzed for free and combined chlorine, urea, volatile DBPs, pH, temperature and total alkalinity. Membrane Introduction Mass Spectrometry (MIMS) was used to identify and measure the concentrations of eleven aqueous-phase volatile DBPs. Variability in the concentrations of these DBPs was observed. Factors that influenced variability included bather loading and mixing by swimmers. These compounds have the ability to adversely affect water and air quality and human health. A large fraction of the existing literature regarding swimming pool air quality has focused on trichloramine (NCl₃). For this work, gas-phase NCl₃ was analyzed by an air sparging-DPD/KI method. The results showed that gas-phase NCl₃ concentration is influenced by bather loading and liquid-phase NCl₃ concentration. Urea is the dominant organic-N compound in human urine and sweat, and is known to be an important precursor for producing NCl₃ in swimming pools. Results of daily measurements of urea indicated a link between bather load and urea concentration in the pool.

  13. Seasonal dynamics of ixodid ticks on wild rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus (Leporidae) from Central Spain.

    PubMed

    González, J; Valcárcel, F; Pérez-Sánchez, J L; Tercero-Jaime, J M; Olmeda, A S

    2016-11-01

    Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease and Myxomatosis caused a decline in the rabbit population in the second half of the last century. Despite some recovery, the risk of vector-borne disease is present and thus the importance of controlling vector populations. In the current study, we describe the ixodid tick fauna in wild rabbit in a natural reserve in Ciudad Real (Central Spain) during the course of two 3-year periods (2007-2009 and 2012-2014). Of all the ticks collected on average 72.5 % were larvae, 24.4 % nymphs and 3.1 % adults, although the percentage varied monthly. Seven tick species were identified: Hyalomma lusitanicum Koch (Parasitic indicator [PI] = number of ticks per examined rabbit = 96.47), Rhipicephalus pusillus Gil Collado (PI = 47.37), Haemaphysalis hispanica Gil Collado (PI = 12.15), Ixodes ventalloi Gil Collado (PI = 0.65), R. bursa Canestrini and Fanzago (PI = 0.18), R. sanguineus Latreille (PI = 0.11), Dermacentor marginatus Sulzer (PI = 0.01). In spring and summer, most abundant were larvae of H. lusitanicum, followed by immature stages of R. pusillus and Ha. hispanica. In autumn, the main tick species were nymphs of I. ventalloi whereas in winter adults of Ha. hispanica were more numerous. Rhipicephalus pusillus was present all year long, although not always in high percentage. PI of other species (R. bursa, R. sanguineus and D. marginatus) were too low to be representative. The seasonal dynamics of ticks on wild rabbit defined in this study could be useful to design species-specific control strategies.

  14. Spread dynamics of perennial pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium) in two seasonal wetland areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renz, Mark J.; Steinmaus, Scott J.; Gilmer, David S.; DiTomaso, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Perennial pepperweed is an invasive plant that is expanding rapidly in several plant communities in the western United States. In California, perennial pepperweed has aggressively invaded seasonal wetlands, resulting in degradation of habitat quality. We evaluated the rate and dynamics of population spread, assessed the effect of disturbance on spread, and determined the biotic and abiotic factors influencing the likelihood of invasion. The study was conducted at eight sites within two wetland regions of California. Results indicate that in undisturbed sites, spread was almost exclusively through vegetative expansion, and the average rate of spread was 0.85 m yr−1 from the leading edge. Spread in sites that were disked was more than three times greater than in undisturbed sites. While smaller infestations increased at a faster rate compared with larger populations, larger infestations accumulated more newly infested areas than smaller infestations from year to year. Stem density was consistently higher in the center of the infestations, with about 2.4 times more stems per square meter compared with the leading edge at the perimeter of the population. The invasion by perennial pepperweed was positively correlated with increased water availability but was negatively correlated with the cover of perennial and annual species. Thus, high cover of resident vegetation can have a suppressive effect on the rate of invasion, even in wetland ecosystems. On the basis of these results, we recommend that resident plant cover not be disturbed, especially in wet areas adjacent to areas currently infested with perennial pepperweed. For infested areas, management efforts should be prioritized to focus on controlling satellite populations as well as the leading edge of larger infestations first. This strategy could reduce the need for costly active restoration efforts by maximizing the probability of successful re-establishment of resident vegetation from the adjacent seedbank.

  15. Regularized Reconstruction of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Images for Evaluation of Breast Lesions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    V. Knopp, E. Weiss, H. P. Sinn, J. Mattern, H. Junkermann, J. Radeleff, A. Magener, G. Brix , S. Delorme, I. Zuna, and G. . Kaick, “Pathophysiologic...basis of contrast enhancement in breast tumors,” J. Mag. Res. Im., vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 260–6, Sept. 1999. [11] P. S. Tofts, G. Brix , D. L. Buckley, J. L

  16. [Seasonal dynamics of soil organic carbon and active organic carbon fractions in Calamagrostis angustifolia wetlands topsoil under different water conditions].

    PubMed

    Hou, Cui-Cui; Song, Chang-Chun; Li, Ying-Chen; Guo, Yue-Dong

    2011-01-01

    The experiment was carried in Sanjiang Plain in the northeast of China during the growing season in 2009. Soil organic carbon (SOC), as well as the soil active organic carbon fractions in the 0-20 cm soil layer of Calamagrostis angustifolia wetland under different water conditions were on monthly observation. Based on the research and indoor analysis, the seasonal dynamics of light fractions of soil organic carbon (LFOC) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) were analyzed. The results indicated that the SOC contents had significantly seasonal dynamics, and the hydrological circle had apparently driving effect on LFOC and MBC during the growing season, especially under the seasonal flooded condition. The freeze-thaw process reduced the SOC, LFOC, MBC contents, with the decreases of 74.53%, 80.93%, 83.09%, while both carbon contents of light and heavy fractions were reduced at the same time. The result also showed that the seasonal flooding condition increased the proportion of LFOC in topsoil, which was larger in marsh meadow (13.58%) than in wet meadow (11.96%), whilst the MBC in marsh meadow (1 397.21 mg x kg(-1)) was less than the latter (1 603.65 mg x kg(-1)), proving that the inundated environment inhibited the mineralization and decomposition of organic matter. But the microbial activity could be adaptive to the flooding condition. During the growing season the MBC soared to 1 829.21 mg x kg(-1) from 337.56 mg x kg(-1) in July, and the microbial quotient was 1.51 times higher than that in June, indicating the high microbial efficacy of soil organic matter. Meanwhile, there was a significant correlation between the contents of LFOC and SOC (r = 0.816), suggesting that higher LFOC content was favorable to the soil carbon accumulation. Moreover, in the seasonal flooded Calamagrostis angustifolia wetland the soil LFOC content was significantly correlated with MBC (r = 0.95), implying that the available carbon source had more severe restriction on the microbial

  17. Seasonal phytoplankton dynamics in extreme southern South America (Beagle Channel, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almandoz, Gastón O.; Hernando, Marcelo P.; Ferreyra, Gustavo A.; Schloss, Irene R.; Ferrario, Martha E.

    2011-08-01

    The phytoplankton biomass and composition dynamics in relation with environmental factors were explored during an annual cycle (July 2006-2007) for the first time in the Beagle Channel. Samples were examined by light and scanning electron microscopy and carbon biomass was estimated using measured cell biovolumes. The annual cycle was characterized by a sharp contrast between low density and biomass during the autumn-winter period and a significant increase during spring and summer. The maximum biomass peak was observed during early spring (141 μg C l - 1 and 8.7 μg Chl a l - 1 ) and was associated with a bloom of the diatom genus Chaetoceros. In spite of a strong nutrient depletion that lead to the subsequent bloom decline, a second peak of biomass was observed after 2 weeks, mainly represented by the diatoms T. mendiolana and T. anguste-lineata. Towards the end of spring and during summer diatom density decreased and assemblages were enriched by unidentified tiny phytoflagellates and dinoflagellates. A total of 138 taxa were identified during the study period. From these, 10 are known as potentially toxic species: Alexandrium catenella, A. ostenfeldii, A. tamarense, Dinophysis acuminata, D. rotundata, Prorocentrum cordatum, Pseudo-nitzschia australis, P. calliantha, P. fraudulenta and P. cf. seriata. Their presence is noteworthy since the area sustains a growing aquiculture production.

  18. Seasonal dynamics of microzooplankton in the São Sebastião Channel (SP, Brazil).

    PubMed

    Eskinazi-Sant'Anna, E M; Björnberg, T K S

    2006-02-01

    The qualitative composition, numerical abundance and seasonal distribution of microzooplankton in the São Sebastião Channel were studied in different seasonal periods. Data are presented for 43 Protozoa, 4 rotifer and 30 copepod nauplii specimens. Tintinnids represented the most abundant group within the microzooplankton community, with 31 species recorded, among which Amphorellopsis acuta, Codonellopsis morchella, Eutintinnus tenuis, Favella ehrenbergii, Leprotintinnus nodqvisti, Tintinnopsis buetschlil, T. lobiancoi and T. radix stood out, followed in abundance by copepod nauplii. Our findings indicated that water masses play a fundamental role in the seasonal composition of microzooplankton assemblages in the São Sebastião Channel.

  19. Dynamic contrast optical coherence tomography images transit time and quantifies microvascular plasma volume and flow in the retina and choriocapillaris

    PubMed Central

    Merkle, Conrad W.; Leahy, Conor; Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of optical imaging techniques to measure hemodynamics in large retinal vessels, quantitative measurements of retinal capillary and choroidal hemodynamics have traditionally been challenging. Here, a new imaging technique called dynamic contrast optical coherence tomography (DyC-OCT) is applied in the rat eye to study microvascular blood flow in individual retinal and choroidal layers in vivo. DyC-OCT is based on imaging the transit of an intravascular tracer dynamically as it passes through the field-of-view. Hemodynamic parameters can be determined through quantitative analysis of tracer kinetics. In addition to enabling depth-resolved transit time, volume, and flow measurements, the injected tracer also enhances OCT angiograms and enables clear visualization of the choriocapillaris, particularly when combined with a post-processing method for vessel enhancement. DyC-OCT complements conventional OCT angiography through quantification of tracer dynamics, similar to fluorescence angiography, but with the important added benefit of laminar resolution. PMID:27867732

  20. High predictability of the seasonal dynamics of a species-like Polynucleobacter population in a freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinglong L; Hahn, Martin W

    2006-09-01

    One of the key questions in microbial ecology is if seasonal patterns of bacterial community composition (BCC) observed in one year repeat in the following years. We have investigated if the recorded annual dynamics of a species-like Polynucleobacter (subcluster PnecB) population allowed the prediction of the population dynamics in another year. The abundance of PnecB bacteria in the pelagic of temperate Lake Mondsee was investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) over three consecutive years. The PnecB bacteria formed a persistent population, and were present in the entire water body of the lake. Two of the three investigated years differed strongly in summer temperatures and precipitation, which resulted in markedly different growth conditions. But despite of these different environmental conditions, the PnecB population demonstrated remarkably similar seasonal dynamics in the three investigated years. Water temperature was the best predictor of the population dynamics during the first half of the annual cycles. Statistical analysis also indicated influences of phytoplankton and metazooplankton successions on the PnecB population dynamics. Furthermore, 65 lakes and ponds were investigated for the presence of PnecB bacteria. They were detected in the majority (78%) of circum-neutral and alkaline freshwater habitats, but not in any investigated acidic or saline habitat.

  1. The Dynamics of Seasonal Change of the Long Waves as Deduced from a Low-Order General Circulation Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto-Bliesner, Bette Lou

    1980-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of the dynamics of seasonal change through analysis of long-term integrations of a global, low-order general circulation model. The behavior of the long waves, wavenumbers 1 through 5, are investigated in terms of vertically integrated and inter-harmonic exchanges of energy. The seasonal cycle is explored not only in the northern extratropics where observational data is available for comparison, but also in the tropics and southern extratropics where our current knowledge is incomplete. Special attention is given to the temporal variation of the statistics and step -function response of the circulation. The numerical model used in this study is a global, spectral, primitive equation model with five levels in the vertical and tri-angular truncation at wavenumber 10 in the horizontal. Included in the model are: orography; time-varying (but prescribed) sea-surface temperatures, snowcover, and solar declination angle; simplified parameterizations of radiation, convection, condensation, diffusion, and surface transports; and, a surface heat budget. The external seasonal forcing of the model atmosphere is composed of sinusoidal variations in the incoming solar radiation and latitude of the snowline and more complicated variations in the albedo of the snow and the sea-surface temperatures. A five year seasonal simulation has been analyzed. The model simulates the vertically integrated energetics of the long waves of the atmosphere reasonably well. The seasonal cycles and interannual variabilities of the energy statistics resemble those documented in observed studies. There are indications of asymmetric and steplike responses to the external seasonal forcing in the annual cycles of the energetics. The spring decrease of eddy kinetic energy at northern extratropical latitudes is less rapid than the fall increase. The fall increase is composed of equinoctial storminess periods which are characterized by an enhanced

  2. Potential changes in arctic seasonality and plant communities may impact tundra soil chemistry and carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, S.; Cooper, E.; Beilman, D.; Filley, T.; Reimer, P.

    2009-04-01

    On the Svalbard archipelago, as in other high Arctic regions, tundra soil organic matter (SOM) is primarily plant detritus that is largely stabilized by cold, moist conditions and low nitrogen availability. However, the resistance of SOM to decomposition is also influenced by the quality of organic matter inputs to soil. Different plant communities are likely to give different qualities to SOM, especially where lignin-rich woody species encroach into otherwise graminoid and bryophyte-dominated regions. Arctic woody plant species are particularly sensitive to changes in temperature, snow cover, and growing season length. In a changing environment, litter chemistry may emerge as an important control on tundra SOM stabilization. In summer 2007, we collected plant material and soil from the highly-organic upper horizon (appx. 0-5 cm) and the mineral-dominated lower horizon (appx. 5-10cm) from four locations in the southwest facing valleys of Svalbard, Norway. The central goal of the ongoing experiment is to determine whether a greater abundance of woody plants could provide a negative feedback to warming impacts on the carbon (C) balance of Arctic soils. Towards this, we used a combination of plant biopolymer analyses (cupric oxide oxidation and quantification of lignin-derived phenols and cutin/suberin-derived aliphatics) and radiocarbon-based estimates of C longevity and mean residence time (MRT) to characterize potential links between plant type and soil C pools. We found that graminoid species regenerate above- and belowground tissue each year, whereas woody species (Cassiope tetragona and Dryas octopetala) regenerated only leaves yearly. In contrast, C within live branches and roots persisted for 15-18 yr on average. Leaves from woody species remained nearly intact in surface litter for up to 20 yr without being incorporated into the upper soil horizon. Leaves from both graminoid and woody species were concentrated in lignin-derived phenols relative to roots, but

  3. Seasonal Trace Gas Dynamics on Minerotrophic Fen Peatlands in NE-Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giebels, Michael; Beyer, Madlen; Augustin, Jürgen; Minke, Merten; Juszczak, Radoszlav; Serba, Tomasz

    2010-05-01

    In Germany more than 99 % of fens have lost their carbon and nutrient sink function due to heavy drainage and agricultural land use especially during the last decades and thus resulted in compression and heavy peat loss (CHARMAN 2002; JOOSTEN & CLARKE 2002; SUCCOW & JOOSTEN 2001; AUGUSTIN et al. 1996; KUNTZE 1993). Therefore fen peatlands play an important part (4-5 %) in the national anthropogenic trace gas budget. But only a small part of drained and agricultural used fens in NE Germany can be restored. Knowledge of the influence of land use to trace gas exchange is important for mitigation of the climate impact of the anthropogenic peatland use. We study carbon exchanges of several fen peatland use areas between soil and atmosphere at different sites in NE-Germany. Our research covers peatlands of supposed strongly climate forcing land use (cornfield and intensive pasture) and of probably less forcing, alternative types (meadow and extensive pasture) as well as rewetted (formerly drained) areas and near-natural sites like a low-degraded fen and a wetted alder woodland. We measured trace gas fluxes with manual and automatic chambers in periodic routines since spring 2007. The used chamber technique bases on DROESLER (2005). In total we now do research at 22 sites situated in 5 different locations covering agricultural, varying states of rewetted and near-natural treatments. We present results of at least 2 years of measurements and show significant differences in their annual trace gas balances depending on the genesis of the observed sites and the seasonal dynamics. Crosswise comparison of different site treatments combined with the seasonal environmental observations give good hints for the identification of main flux driving parameters. That is that a reduced intensity in land use as a supposed mitigating treatment did not show the expected effect, though a normal meadow treatment surprisingly resulted in the lowest balances in both years. For implementing a

  4. Seasonal Carbon Dynamics on Selected Fen Peatland Sites in NE-Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giebels, Michael; Beyer, Madlen; Augustin, Jürgen; Minke, Merten; Juszczak, Radoszlav; Serba, Tomasz

    2010-05-01

    In Germany more than 99 % of fens have lost their carbon and nutrient sink function due to heavy drainage and agricultural land use especially during the last decades and thus resulted in compression and heavy peat loss (CHARMAN 2002; JOOSTEN & CLARKE 2002; SUCCOW & JOOSTEN 2001; AUGUSTIN et al. 1996; KUNTZE 1993). Therefore fen peatlands play an important part (4-5 %) in the national anthropogenic trace gas budget. But only a small part of drained and agricultural used fens in NE Germany can be restored. Knowledge of the influence of land use to trace gas exchange is important for mitigation of the climate impact of the anthropogenic peatland use. We study carbon exchanges of several fen peatland use areas between soil and atmosphere at different sites in NE-Germany. Our research covers peatlands of supposed strongly climate forcing land use (cornfield and intensive pasture) and of probably less forcing, alternative types (meadow and extensive pasture) as well as rewetted (formerly drained) areas and near-natural sites like a low-degraded fen and a wetted alder woodland. We measured trace gas fluxes with manual and automatic chambers in periodic routines since spring 2007. The used chamber technique bases on DROESLER (2005). In total we now do research at 22 sites situated in 5 different locations covering agricultural, varying states of rewetted and near-natural treatments. We present results of at least 2 years of measurements and show significant differences in their annual carbon balances depending on the genesis of the observed sites and the seasonal dynamics. Crosswise comparison of different site treatments combined with the seasonal environmental observations give good hints for the identification of main flux driving parameters. That is that a reduced intensity in land use as a supposed mitigating treatment did not show the expected effect, though a normal meadow treatment surprisingly resulted in the lowest CO2 balances in both years. For implementing a

  5. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Surface Water Extent from Three Decades of Seasonally Continuous Landsat Time Series at Subcontinental Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulbure, M. G.; Broich, M.

    2015-12-01

    Surface water is a critical resource in semi-arid areas. The Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) of Australia, one of the largest semi-arid basins in the world is aiming to set a worldwide example of how to balance multiple interests (i.e. environment, agriculture and urban use), but has suffered significant water shrinkages during the Millennium Drought (1999-2009), followed by extensive flooding. Baseline information and systematic quantification of surface water (SW) extent and flooding dynamics in space and time are needed for managing SW resources across the basin but are currently lacking. To synoptically quantify changes in SW extent and flooding dynamics over MDB, we used seasonally continuous Landsat TM and ETM+ data (1986 - 2011) and generic machine learning algorithms. We further mapped flooded forest at a riparian forest site that experienced severe tree dieback due to changes in flooding regime. We used a stratified sampling design to assess the accuracy of the SW product across time. Accuracy assessment yielded an overall classification accuracy of 99.94%, with producer's and user's accuracy of SW of 85.4% and 97.3%, respectively. Overall accuracy was the same for Landsat 5 and 7 data but user's and producer's accuracy of water were higher for Landsat 7 than 5 data and stable over time. Our validated results document a rapid loss in SW bodies. The number, size, and total area of SW showed high seasonal variability with highest numbers in winter and lowest numbers in summer. SW extent per season per year showed high interannual and seasonal variability, with low seasonal variability during the Millennium Drought. Examples of current uses of the new dataset will be presented and include (1) assessing ecosystem response to flooding with implications for environmental water releases, one of the largest investment in environment in Australia; (2) quantifying drivers of SW dynamics (e.g. climate, human activity); (3) quantifying changes in SW dynamics and

  6. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Surface Water Extent from Three Decades of Seasonally Continuous Landsat Time Series at Subcontinental Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulbure, M. G.; Broich, M.; Stehman, Stephen V.

    2016-06-01

    Surface water is a critical resource in semi-arid areas. The Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) of Australia, one of the largest semi-arid basins in the world is aiming to set a worldwide example of how to balance multiple interests (i.e. environment, agriculture and urban use), but has suffered significant water shrinkages during the Millennium Drought (1999-2009), followed by extensive flooding. Baseline information and systematic quantification of surface water (SW) extent and flooding dynamics in space and time are needed for managing SW resources across the basin but are currently lacking. To synoptically quantify changes in SW extent and flooding dynamics over MDB, we used seasonally continuous Landsat TM and ETM+ data (1986 - 2011) and generic machine learning algorithms. We further mapped flooded forest at a riparian forest site that experienced severe tree dieback due to changes in flooding regime. We used a stratified sampling design to assess the accuracy of the SW product across time. Accuracy assessment yielded an overall classification accuracy of 99.94%, with producer's and user's accuracy of SW of 85.4% and 97.3%, respectively. Overall accuracy was the same for Landsat 5 and 7 data but user's and producer's accuracy of water were higher for Landsat 7 than 5 data and stable over time. Our validated results document a rapid loss in SW bodies. The number, size, and total area of SW showed high seasonal variability with highest numbers in winter and lowest numbers in summer. SW extent per season per year showed high interannual and seasonal variability, with low seasonal variability during the Millennium Drought. Examples of current uses of the new dataset will be presented and include (1) assessing ecosystem response to flooding with implications for environmental water releases, one of the largest investment in environment in Australia; (2) quantifying drivers of SW dynamics (e.g. climate, human activity); (3) quantifying changes in SW dynamics and

  7. Numerical modeling of the 3D dynamics of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles using the boundary integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianxi; Manmi, Kawa; Calvisi, Michael L.

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are microbubbles stabilized with a shell typically of lipid, polymer, or protein and are emerging as a unique tool for noninvasive therapies ranging from gene delivery to tumor ablation. While various models have been developed to describe the spherical oscillations of contrast agents, the treatment of nonspherical behavior has received less attention. However, the nonspherical dynamics of contrast agents are thought to play an important role in therapeutic applications, for example, enhancing the uptake of therapeutic agents across cell membranes and tissue interfaces, and causing tissue ablation. In this paper, a model for nonspherical contrast agent dynamics based on the boundary integral method is described. The effects of the encapsulating shell are approximated by adapting Hoff's model for thin-shell, spherical contrast agents. A high-quality mesh of the bubble surface is maintained by implementing a hybrid approach of the Lagrangian method and elastic mesh technique. The numerical model agrees well with a modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation for encapsulated spherical bubbles. Numerical analyses of the dynamics of UCAs in an infinite liquid and near a rigid wall are performed in parameter regimes of clinical relevance. The oscillation amplitude and period decrease significantly due to the coating. A bubble jet forms when the amplitude of ultrasound is sufficiently large, as occurs for bubbles without a coating; however, the threshold amplitude required to incite jetting increases due to the coating. When a UCA is near a rigid boundary subject to acoustic forcing, the jet is directed towards the wall if the acoustic wave propagates perpendicular to the boundary. When the acoustic wave propagates parallel to the rigid boundary, the jet direction has components both along the wave direction and towards the boundary that depend mainly on the dimensionless standoff distance of the bubble from the boundary. In all cases, the jet

  8. Seasonal dynamics of fungal communities in a temperate oak forest soil.

    PubMed

    Voříšková, Jana; Brabcová, Vendula; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Baldrian, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are the agents primarily responsible for the transformation of plant-derived carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. However, little is known of their responses to the seasonal changes in resource availability in deciduous forests, including photosynthate allocation below ground and seasonal inputs of fresh litter. Vertical stratification of and seasonal changes in fungal abundance, activity and community composition were investigated in the litter, organic and upper mineral soils of a temperate Quercus petraea forest using ergosterol and extracellular enzyme assays and amplicon 454-pyrosequencing of the rDNA-ITS region. Fungal activity, biomass and diversity decreased substantially with soil depth. The highest enzyme activities were detected in winter, especially in litter, where these activities were followed by a peak in fungal biomass during spring. The litter community exhibited more profound seasonal changes than did the community in the deeper horizons. In the litter, saprotrophic genera reached their seasonal maxima in autumn, but summer typically saw the highest abundance of ectomycorrhizal taxa. Although the composition of the litter community changes over the course of the year, the mineral soil shows changes in biomass. The fungal community is affected by season. Litter decomposition and phytosynthate allocation represent important factors contributing to the observed variations.

  9. Seasonal and spatial dynamics of nutrients and phytoplankton biomass in Victoria Harbour and its vicinity before and after sewage abatement.

    PubMed

    Ho, Alvin Y T; Xu, Jie; Yin, Kedong; Yuan, Xiangcheng; He, Lei; Jiang, Yuelu; Lee, Joseph H W; Anderson, Donald M; Harrison, Paul J

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the seasonal and spatial dynamics of nutrients and phytoplankton biomass at 12 stations in Hong Kong (HK) waters during a three year period from 2004 to 2006 after upgraded sewage treatment and compared these results to observations before sewage treatment. Pearl River estuary (PRE) discharge significantly increased NO(3) and SiO(4) concentrations, particularly in western and southern waters when rainfall and river discharge was maximal in summer. Continuous year round discharge of sewage effluent resulted in high NH(4) and PO(4) in Victoria Harbour (VH) and its vicinity. In winter, spring and fall, the water column at all stations was moderately mixed by winds and tidal currents, and phytoplankton biomass was relatively low compared to summer. In summer, the mean surface phytoplankton chl biomass was generally > 9 microL(-1) in most areas as a result of thermohaline stratification, and high nutrients, light, and water temperature. In summer, the potential limiting nutrient is PO(4) in the most productive southern waters and it seldom decreased to limiting levels ( approximately 0.1 microM), suggesting that phytoplankton growth may be only episodically limiting. The mean bottom dissolved oxygen (DO) remained > 3.5 mg L(-1) at most stations, indicating that the eutrophication impact in HK waters was not as severe as expected for such a eutrophic area. After the implementation of chemically enhanced primary sewage treatment in 2001, water quality in VH improved as indicated by a significant decrease in NH(4) and PO(4) and an increase in bottom DO. In contrast, there were an increase in chl a and NO(3), and a significant decrease in bottom DO in southern waters in summer, suggesting that hypoxic events are most likely to occur in this region if phytoplankton biomass and oxygen consumption keep increasing and exceed the buffering capacity of HK waters maintained by monsoon winds, tidal mixing and zooplankton grazing. Therefore, future studies on

  10. Functional Characterization of the Extra-Classical Receptive Field in Macaque V1: Contrast, Orientation, and Temporal Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Christopher A.; Joshi, Siddhartha; Xing, Dajun; Shapley, Robert M.; Hawken, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons in primary visual cortex, V1, very often have extra-classical receptive fields (eCRFs). The eCRF is defined as the region of visual space where stimuli cannot elicit a spiking response but can modulate the response of a stimulus in the classical receptive field (CRF). We investigated the dependence of the eCRF on stimulus contrast and orientation in macaque V1 cells for which the laminar location was determined. The eCRF was more sensitive to contrast than the CRF across the whole population of V1 cells with the greatest contrast differential in layer 2/3. We confirmed that many V1 cells experience stronger suppression for collinear than orthogonal stimuli in the eCRF. Laminar analysis revealed that the predominant bias for collinear suppression was found in layers 2/3 and 4b. The laminar pattern of contrast and orientation dependence suggests that eCRF suppression may derive from different neural circuits in different layers, and may be comprised of two distinct components: orientation-tuned and untuned suppression. On average tuned suppression was delayed by about 25 milliseconds compared to the onset of untuned suppression. Therefore, response modulation by the eCRF develops dynamically and rapidly in time. PMID:23554504

  11. Sedimentation and particle dynamics in the seasonal ice zone of the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Kanchan; Carroll, JoLynn; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.

    2010-01-01

    The Barents Sea seasonal ice zone (SIZ) is one of the most dynamic areas in the world ocean. This biologically productive area undergoes extreme intra- and inter-annual variabilities in sea ice and water mass transport properties. Here, we investigate seafloor burial processes in three regions of the SIZ with different ice-cover frequencies: predominantly open water (POW), marginally ice-covered (MIC), and predominantly ice-covered (PIC) with approximately 0, 10 and 50% sea ice cover, respectively, in 2002-2003. Down-core sediment profiles of the radionuclides 234Th, 210Pb, and 137Cs, along with sediment carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations are examined in two to three cores from each region. Sedimentation rates and velocities using 210Pb ex (excess 210Pb) profiles and assuming negligible mixing below a surface mixed layer are relatively uniform throughout the study area, averaging 558 ± 154 g m - 2 y - 1 and 1.1 ± 0.4 mm y - 1 ( n = 7). These sedimentation velocities are confirmed using 137Cs (1.0 ± 0.4 mm y - 1 , n = 7). 234Th ex (excess 234Th) derived bioturbation rates are positively correlated with number of benthic individuals per 0.5 m 2 ( R2 = 0.83) and exhibit a pattern of higher rates in the MIC (14.5 ± 2.1 cm - 2 y - 1) relative to both the POW (6.3 ± 2.2 cm - 2 y - 1) and PIC (5.3 ± 1.2 cm - 2 y - 1) ( p < 0.01). 234Th ex inventories are also significantly higher ( p = 0.026) within the MIC, while both 210Pb ex and 137Cs sediment inventories are more regionally uniform. Furthermore, organic carbon (C org) and total nitrogen (N tot) concentrations are relatively high in both the MIC and PIC compared to POW. For this limited data set, higher bioturbation rate coefficients and higher 234Th ex sediment inventories in the MIC relative to the other sampled regions, suggest that the MIC exhibits a greater predominance of marine versus terrestrial sediment sources that support enhanced scavenging and benthic biological activity. These results

  12. Atmospheric aerosols in Rome, Italy: sources, dynamics and spatial variations during two seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struckmeier, Caroline; Drewnick, Frank; Fachinger, Friederike; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Borrmann, Stephan

    2016-12-01

    every day at the urban location, at the suburban location they were only found under favourable meteorological conditions, but were independent of advection of the Rome emission plume. Particles from sources in the metropolitan area of Rome and particles advected from outside Rome contributed 42-70 and 30-58 % to the total measured PM1, respectively. Apart from the general aerosol characteristics, in this study the properties (e.g. emission strength) and dynamics (e.g. temporal behaviour) of each identified aerosol type is investigated in detail to provide a better understanding of the observed seasonal and spatial differences.

  13. [Age dynamics and seasonal variations of parameters of cerebral circulation in children and adolescents from European north].

    PubMed

    Soroko, S I; Rozhkov, V P

    2014-10-01

    Age dynamics and seasonal variations in cerebral blood flow was studied by means of transcranial Doppler in 95 the natives of the Arkhangelsk region school students aged 7 to 18 years. The results of longitudinal (from 2005 to 2014) study of students are presented. The linear blood flow velocity (BFV) showed gradual declining from junior to senior school age, and BFV were in the middle cerebral artery below average, and in the basilar artery--above mid latitude standards. The influence of the seasonal factor is more pronounced in the younger (for boys) and intermediate (for girls) age group and leveled in the older group. The largest seasonal changes were obtained in BFV in carotid arteries, the relative constancy--in BFV in the basilar artery. Estimated by the resistivity index RI circulatory resistance in the younger and intermediate school students groups decreased in the carotid arteries in the spring and summer, and in the posterior cerebral artery territory--in the winter. BFV rate variability identifies groups of children with varying degrees of "sensitivity" to the influence of seasonal factors.

  14. Practical Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Small Animal Models of Cancer: Data Acquisition, Data Analysis, and Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Stephanie L.; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Loveless, Mary E.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) consists of the continuous acquisition of images before, during, and after the injection of a contrast agent. DCE-MRI allows for noninvasive evaluation of tumor parameters related to vascular perfusion and permeability and tissue volume fractions, and is frequently employed in both preclinical and clinical investigations. However, the experimental and analytical subtleties of the technique are not frequently discussed in the literature, nor are its relationships to other commonly used quantitative imaging techniques. This review aims to provide practical information on the development, implementation, and validation of a DCE-MRI study in the context of a preclinical study (though we do frequently refer to clinical studies that are related to these topics). PMID:23105959

  15. Impact of seasonality and anthropogenic impoundments on dissolved organic matter dynamics in the Klamath River (Oregon/California, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Allison A.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; Deas, Michael L.; Dahlgren, Randy A.

    2016-07-01

    Rivers play a major role in the transport and processing of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Disturbances that impact DOM dynamics, such as river impoundments and flow regulation, have consequences for biogeochemical cycling and aquatic ecosystems. In this study we examined how river impoundments and hydrologic regulation impact DOM quantity and quality by tracking spatial and seasonal patterns of DOM in a large, regulated river (Klamath River, USA). Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations decreased downstream and longitudinal patterns in DOC load varied by season. Export of DOM (as DOC) was largely driven by river flow, while DOM composition was strongly influenced by impoundments. Seasonal algal blooms in upstream lentic reaches provided a steady source of algal DOM that was processed in downstream reaches. DOM at upstream sites had an average spectral slope ratio (SR) > 1, indicating algal-derived material, but decreased downstream to an average SR < 1, more indicative of terrestrial-derived material. The increasingly terrestrial nature of DOM exported from reservoirs likely reflects degraded algal material that becomes increasingly more recalcitrant with distance from upstream source and additional processing. As a result, DOM delivered to free-flowing river reaches below impoundments was less variable in composition. Downstream of impoundments, tributary influences resulted in increasing contributions of terrestrial DOM from the surrounding watershed. Removal of the four lower dams on the Klamath River is scheduled to proceed in the next decade. These results suggest that management should consider the role of impoundments on altering DOM dynamics, particularly in the context of dam removal.

  16. Biological soil crusts exhibit a dynamic response to seasonal rain and release from grazing with implications for soil stability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jimenez, Aguilar A.; Huber-Sannwald, E.; Belnap, J.; Smart, D.R.; Arredondo, Moreno J.T.

    2009-01-01

    In Northern Mexico, long-term grazing has substantially degraded semiarid landscapes. In semiarid systems, ecological and hydrological processes are strongly coupled by patchy plant distribution and biological soil crust (BSC) cover in plant-free interspaces. In this study, we asked: 1) how responsive are BSC cover/composition to a drying/wetting cycle and two-year grazing removal, and 2) what are the implications for soil erosion? We characterized BSC morphotypes and their influence on soil stability under grazed/non-grazed conditions during a dry and wet season. Light- and dark-colored cyanobacteria were dominant at the plant tussock and community level. Cover changes in these two groups differed after a rainy season and in response to grazing removal. Lichens with continuous thalli were more vulnerable to grazing than those with semi-continuous/discontinuous thalli after the dry season. Microsites around tussocks facilitated BSC colonization compared to interspaces. Lichen and cyanobacteria morphotypes differentially enhanced resistance to soil erosion; consequently, surface soil stability depends on the spatial distribution of BSC morphotypes, suggesting soil stability may be as dynamic as changes in the type of BSC cover. Longer-term spatially detailed studies are necessary to elicit spatiotemporal dynamics of BSC communities and their functional role in biotically and abiotically variable environments. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Seasonal organic matter dynamics in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon: Contribution of carbohydrates and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lønborg, Christian; Doyle, Jason; Furnas, Miles; Menendez, Patricia; Benthuysen, Jessica A.; Carreira, Cátia

    2017-04-01

    Organic matter (OM) plays a fundamental role in sustaining the high productivity of coral reef ecosystems. Carbohydrates and proteins constitute two of the major chemical classes identified in the OM pool and are used as indicators of bioavailability due to their fast turn-over. We conducted three cruises across the southern shelf of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) during the early dry, late dry and wet seasons in 2009-2010 to 1) assess the relative bioavailability of particulate (POM) and dissolved (DOM) organic matter, 2) track the temporal and spatial variability in the carbohydrate and protein contribution to the OM pool, and 3) assess factors influencing protein and carbohydrate fractions of the OM pool. Generally, higher concentrations of particulate carbohydrates were found during the wet season, while similar concentrations of particulate protein were found during the three seasons. Both the dissolved carbohydrates and proteins had highest levels during the early dry season and lowest during the wet season, suggesting seasonal variations in the chemical composition of the DOM pool. Spatially, carbohydrates showed higher concentrations at the inshore stations, while no clear spatial pattern was found for the protein concentrations. On average carbohydrates and proteins accounted for a similar fraction (13±5 and 12±6% respectively) of POM, while carbohydrates accounted for a smaller fraction of the DOM than the proteins (6±3 and 13±10%). This suggests that the POM bioavailability was similar between seasons, while the DOM bioavailability varied seasonally with highest levels during the early dry season. This demonstrates that carbohydrates and proteins in the GBR have temporal and spatial variations. Our statistical analysis showed that 1) both carbohydrates and proteins were related with the POM and DOM C:N:P stoichiometry, demonstrating that both bulk estimates (stoichiometry) and specific compounds (CHO and Prot) provide useful measures of OM

  18. Evaluation of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Response with Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Locally Advanced Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gezer, Naciye Sinem; Orbay, Özge; Balcı, Pınar; Durak, Merih Guray; Demirkan, Binnaz; Saydam, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    Objective The reliability of traditional methods such as physical examination, ultrasonography (US) and mammography is limited in determining the type of treatment response in patients with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) application for locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is gaining popularity in the evaluation of NAC response. This study aimed to compare NAC response as determined by dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI in patients with LABC to histopathology that is the gold standard; and evaluate the compatibility of MRI, mammography and US with response types. Materials and Methods The US, mammography and MRI findings of 38 patients who received NAC with a diagnosis of locally advanced breast cancer and surgical treatment were retrospectively analyzed and compared to histopathology results. Type of response to treatment was determined according to the “Criteria in Solid Tumors Response Evolution 1.1” by mammography, US and MRI criteria. The relationship between response types as defined by all three imaging modalities and histopathology were evaluated, and the correlation of response type as detected by MRI and pathological response and histopathological type of breast cancer was further determined. For statistical analysis, the chi-square, paired t test, correlation and kappa tests were used. Results There is a statistical moderate positive correlation between response type according to pathology and MRI (kappa: 0.63). There was a weak correlation between response type according to mammography or US and according to pathology (kappa: 0.2). When the distribution of treatment response by MRI is stratified according to histopathological types, partial response was higher in all histopathological types similar to the type of pathologic response. When compared with pathology MRI detected treatment response accurately in 84.2% of the patients. Conclusion Dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI appears to

  19. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of radiation therapy-induced microcirculation changes in rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lussanet, Quido G. de . E-mail: qdlu@rdia.azm.nl; Backes, Walter H.; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Padhani, Anwar R.; Baeten, Coen I.; Baardwijk, Angela van; Lambin, Philippe; Beets, Geerard L.; Engelshoven, Jos van; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) allows noninvasive evaluation of tumor microvasculature characteristics. This study evaluated radiation therapy related microvascular changes in locally advanced rectal cancer by DCE-MRI and histology. Methods and Materials: Dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI was performed in 17 patients with primary rectal cancer. Seven patients underwent 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy radiation therapy (RT) (long RT) before DCE-MRI and 10 did not. Of these 10, 3 patients underwent five fractions of 5 Gy RT (short RT) in the week before surgery. The RT treated and nontreated groups were compared in terms of endothelial transfer coefficient (K{sup PS}, measured by DCE-MRI), microvessel density (MVD) (scored by immunoreactivity to CD31 and CD34), and tumor cell and endothelial cell proliferation (scored by immunoreactivity to Ki67). Results: Tumor K{sup PS} was 77% (p = 0.03) lower in the RT-treated group. Histogram analyses showed that RT reduced both magnitude and intratumor heterogeneity of K{sup PS} (p = 0.01). MVD was significantly lower (37%, p 0.03) in tumors treated with long RT than in nonirradiated tumors, but this was not the case with short RT. Endothelial cell proliferation was reduced with short RT (81%, p = 0.02) just before surgery, but not with long RT (p > 0.8). Tumor cell proliferation was reduced with both long (57%, p < 0.001) and short RT (52%, p = 0.002). Conclusion: Dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI-derived K{sup PS} values showed significant radiation therapy related reductions in microvessel blood flow in locally advanced rectal cancer. These findings may be useful in evaluating effects of radiation combination therapies (e.g., chemoradiation or RT combined with antiangiogenesis therapy), to account for effects of RT alone.

  20. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Localization of Recurrent Prostate Cancer After External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, Masoom A. Chung, Peter; Sweet, Joan; Toi, Ants; Jhaveri, Kartik; Menard, Cynthia; Warde, Padraig; Trachtenberg, John; Lockwood, Gina M.Math.; Milosevic, Michael

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the performance of T2-weighted (T2w) imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate gland in the localization of recurrent prostate cancer in patients with biochemical failure after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: T2-weighted imaging and DCE MRI were performed in 33 patients with suspected relapse after EBRT. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed with a temporal resolution of 95 s. Voxels enhancing at 46 s after injection to a greater degree than the mean signal intensity of the prostate at 618 s were considered malignant. Results from MRI were correlated with biopsies from six regions in the peripheral zone (PZ) (base, mid, and apex). The percentage of biopsy core positive for malignancy from each region was correlated with the maximum diameter of the tumor on DCE MRI with a linear regression model. Results: On a sextant basis, DCE MRI had significantly better sensitivity (72% [21of 29] vs. 38% [11 of 29]), positive predictive value (46% [21 of 46] vs. 24% [11 of 45]) and negative predictive value (95% [144 of 152] vs. 88% [135 of 153] than T2w imaging. Specificities were high for both DCE MRI and T2w imaging (85% [144 of 169] vs. 80% [135 of 169]). There was a linear relationship between tumor diameters on DCE MRI and the percentage of cancer tissue in the corresponding biopsy core (r = 0.9, p < 0.001), with a slope of 1.2. Conclusions: Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI performs better than T2w imaging in the detection and localization of prostate cancer in the peripheral zone after EBRT. This may be helpful in the planning of salvage therapy.

  1. Seasonal dynamics of methane emissions from a subarctic fen in the Hudson Bay Lowlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanis, K. L.; Tenuta, M.; Amiro, B. D.; Papakyriakou, T. N.

    2013-07-01

    Ecosystem-scale methane (CH4) flux (FCH4) over a subarctic fen at Churchill, Manitoba, Canada was measured to understand the magnitude of emissions during spring and fall shoulder seasons, and the growing season in relation to physical and biological conditions. FCH4 was measured using eddy covariance with a closed-path analyser in four years (2008-2011). Cumulative measured annual FCH4 (shoulder plus growing seasons) ranged from 3.0 to 9.6 g CH4 m-2 yr-1 among the four study years, with a mean of 6.5 to 7.1 g CH4 m-2 yr-1 depending upon gap-filling method. Soil temperatures to depths of 50 cm and air temperature were highly correlated with FCH4, with near-surface soil temperature at 5 cm most correlated across spring, fall, and the shoulder and growing seasons. The response of FCH4 to soil temperature at the 5 cm depth and air temperature was more than double in spring to that of fall. Emission episodes were generally not observed during spring thaw. Growing season emissions also depended upon soil and air temperatures but the water table also exerted influence, with FCH4 highest when water was 2-13 cm below and lowest when it was at or above the mean peat surface.

  2. Seasonal dynamics of methane emissions from a subarctic fen in the Hudson Bay Lowlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanis, K. L.; Tenuta, M.; Amiro, B. D.; Papakyriakou, T. N.

    2013-03-01

    Ecosystem-scale methane (CH4) flux (FCH4) over a subarctic fen at Churchill, Manitoba, Canada was measured to understand the magnitude of emissions during spring and fall shoulder seasons, and the growing season in relation to physical and biological conditions. FCH4 was measured using eddy covariance with a closed-path analyzer in four years (2008-2011). Cumulative measured annual FCH4 (shoulder plus growing seasons) ranged from 3.0 to 9.6 g CH4 m-2 yr-1 among the four study years, with a mean of 6.5 to 7.1 g CH4 m-2 yr-1 depending upon gap-filling method. Soil temperatures to depths of 50 cm and air temperature were highly correlated with FCH4, with near surface soil temperature at 5 cm most correlated across spring, fall, and the whole season. The response of FCH4 to soil temperature at the 5 cm depth and air temperature was more than double in spring to that of fall. Emission episodes were generally not observed during spring thaw. Growing season emissions also depended upon soil and air temperatures but water table also exerted influence with FCH4 highest when water was 2-13 cm below and least when it was at or above the mean peat surface.

  3. Regularized Reconstruction of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Images for Evaluation of Breast Lesions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    in determining the image estimate is computing the gradient of the cost function. We were able to accelerate our computation by exploiting Toeplitz ...but, to our knowledge, we are the first to apply it to dynamic MRI. For this study, the Toeplitz -modified algorithm was 1.7 times faster than the...Decreased computation time by exploiting Toeplitz matrices in our reconstruction. • Investigated choice of algorithms’ regularization parameters based on

  4. Impacts of Contrasting Alfalfa Production Systems on the Drivers of Carabid Beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) Community Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Goosey, H B; McKenzie, S C; Rolston, M G; O'Neill, K M; Menalled, F D

    2015-08-01

    Growing concerns about the environmental consequences of chemically based pest control strategies have precipitated a call for the development of integrated, ecologically based pest management programs. Carabid or ground beetles (Coleoptera:Carabidae) are an important group of natural enemies of common agricultural pests such as aphids, slugs, and other beetles. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is one of the most common forage crop species in the semi-arid western United States. In 2011, Montana alone produced 4.0 × 10(6 )Mg of alfalfa on 8.1 × 10(5 )ha for gross revenue in excess of US$4.3 × 10(8), making it the third largest crop by revenue. We conducted our study over the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons. Each year, our study consisted of three sites each with adjacent systems of monoculture alfalfa, alfalfa nurse cropped with hay barley, and an uncultivated refuge consisting of a variety of forbs and grasses. Carabid community structure differed and strong temporal shifts were detected during both 2012 and 2013. Multivariate fuzzy set ordination suggests that variation in canopy height among the three vegetation systems was primarily responsible for the differences observed in carabid community structure. Land managers may be able to enhance carabid species richness and total abundance by creating a heterogeneous vegetation structure, and nurse cropping in particular may be effective strategy to achieve this goal.

  5. Dynamic three-dimensional phase-contrast technique in MRI: application to complex flow analysis around the artificial heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo Jeong; Lee, Dong Hyuk; Song, Inchang; Kim, Nam Gook; Park, Jae-Hyeung; Kim, JongHyo; Han, Man Chung; Min, Byong Goo

    1998-07-01

    Phase-contrast (PC) method of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has bee used for quantitative measurements of flow velocity and volume flow rate. It is a noninvasive technique which provides an accurate two-dimensional velocity image. Moreover, Phase Contrast Cine magnetic resonance imaging combines the flow dependent contrast of PC-MRI with the ability of cardiac cine imaging to produce images throughout the cardiac cycle. However, the accuracy of the data acquired from the single through-plane velocity encoding can be reduced by the effect of flow direction, because in many practical cases flow directions are not uniform throughout the whole region of interest. In this study, we present dynamic three-dimensional velocity vector mapping method using PC-MRI which can visualize the complex flow pattern through 3D volume rendered images displayed dynamically. The direction of velocity mapping can be selected along any three orthogonal axes. By vector summation, the three maps can be combined to form a velocity vector map that determines the velocity regardless of the flow direction. At the same time, Cine method is used to observe the dynamic change of flow. We performed a phantom study to evaluate the accuracy of the suggested PC-MRI in continuous and pulsatile flow measurement. Pulsatile flow wave form is generated by the ventricular assistant device (VAD), HEMO-PULSA (Biomedlab, Seoul, Korea). We varied flow velocity, pulsatile flow wave form, and pulsing rate. The PC-MRI-derived velocities were compared with Doppler-derived results. The velocities of the two measurements showed a significant linear correlation. Dynamic three-dimensional velocity vector mapping was carried out for two cases. First, we applied to the flow analysis around the artificial heart valve in a flat phantom. We could observe the flow pattern around the valve through the 3-dimensional cine image. Next, it is applied to the complex flow inside the polymer sac that is used as ventricle in

  6. Seasonal dynamics of Thelandros maplestonei infections in the wall lizard, Hemidactylus flaviviridis in Imphal Valley, Manipur, India.

    PubMed

    Gambhir, R K; Oinam, Sonia; Lakshmipyari, Wahengbam

    2013-10-01

    The influence of seasons on the population dynamics of the nematode, Thelandros maplestonei infection in Hemidactylus flaviviridis was studied for one annual cycle in the Imphal Valley, Manipur, India. Various factors like the incidence, intensity, density, index of infection and dominance of this parasite was observed in relation to temperature and rainfall. The incidence, intensity, density, index of infection and dominance of T. maplestonei was higher in monsoon season, while lowest during winter. The intensity and density of female T. maplestonei was found to be comparatively higher than the male parasites and this observation indicated a shift from the previous studies. The study thus indicated that the temperature and rainfall acts as one of the most favourable extrinsic factors for T. maplestonei infections in H. flaviviridis in the Imphal Valley, Manipur.

  7. Seasonal dynamics of crustacean zooplankton community structure in Erhai Lake, a plateau lake, with reference to phytoplankton and environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Deng, Daogui; Zhang, Sai; Hu, Cuilin

    2014-09-01

    The seasonal dynamics of a crustacean zooplankton community in Erhai Lake was investigated from May 2010 to April 2011. In total, 11 species were recorded, including six (6 genera) cladoceran and five (5 genera) copepod species. The crustacean zooplankton densities ranged from 24.3 to 155.4 ind./L. In winter and spring, the large-bodied cladoceran Daphnia galeata dominated the crustacean plankton community. In summer and autumn, when the colonial or filamentous algae dominated the phytoplankton communities, the small-bodied species (e.g. B osmina fatalis, Ceriodaphnia quadrangular, and Mesocyclops leuckarti) replaced the large-bodied ones. One-way ANOVA and redundancy analysis revealed that community structure was dependent upon total nitrogen, total phosphorus, water temperature, transparency, and the biomass of small algae. The variation in both phytoplankton structure and environmental variables were important factors in the seasonal succession of crustacean zooplankton structure in Erhai Lake.

  8. Semi-parametric analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using Bayesian P-splines.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Volker J; Whitcher, Brandon; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2006-01-01

    Current approaches to quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI with non-linear models involve the convolution of an arterial input function (AIF) with the contrast agent concentration at a voxel or regional level. Full quantification provides meaningful biological parameters but is complicated by the issues related to convergence, (de-)convolution of the AIF, and goodness of fit. To overcome these problems, this paper presents a penalized spline smoothing approach to model the data in a semi-parametric way. With this method, the AIF is convolved with a set of B-splines to produce the design matrix, and modeling of the resulting deconvolved biological parameters is obtained in a way that is similar to the parametric models. Further kinetic parameters are obtained by fitting a non-linear model to the estimated response function and detailed validation of the method, both with simulated and in vivo data is

  9. Prediction of seasonal summer monsoon rainfall over homogenous regions of India using dynamical prediction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramu, Dandi A.; Rao, Suryachadra A.; Pillai, Prasanth A.; Pradhan, M.; George, G.; Rao, D. Nagarguna; Mahapatra, S.; Pai, D. S.; Rajeevan, M.

    2017-03-01

    Seasonal prediction of Indian summer monsoon rainfall is a challenging task for the modeling community and predicting seasonal mean rainfall at smaller regional scale is much more difficult than predicting all India averaged seasonal mean rainfall. The regional scale prediction of summer monsoon mean rainfall at longer lead time (e.g., predicting 3-4 months in advance) can play a vital role in planning of hydrological and agriculture aspects of the society. Previous attempts for predicting seasonal mean rainfall at regional level (over 5 Homogeneous regions) have resulted with limited success (anomaly correlation coefficient is low, ACC ≈ 0.1-0.4, even at a short lead time of one month). The high resolution Climate Forecast System, version 2 (CFSv2) model, with spectral resolution of T382 (∼38 km), can predict the Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) at lead time of 3-4 months, with a reasonably good prediction skill (ACC ≈ 0.55). In the present study, we have investigated whether the seasonal mean rainfall over different homogenous regions is predictable using the same model, at 3-4 months lead time? Out of five homogeneous regions of India three regions have shown moderate prediction skill, even at 3 months lead time. Compared to lower resolution model, high resolution model has good skill for all the regions except south peninsular India. High resolution model is able to capture the extreme events and also the teleconnections associated with large scale features at four months lead time and hence shows better skill (ACC ≈ 0.45) in predicting the seasonal mean rainfall over homogeneous regions.

  10. Seasonal Dynamics of Mobile Carbon Supply in Quercus aquifolioides at the Upper Elevational Limit

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wan-Ze; Cao, Min; Wang, San-Gen; Xiao, Wen-Fan; Li, Mai-He

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have tried to explain the physiological mechanisms of the alpine treeline phenomenon, but the debate on the alpine treeline formation remains controversial due to opposite results from different studies. The present study explored the carbon-physiology of an alpine shrub species (Quercus aquifolioides) grown at its upper elevational limit compared to lower elevations, to test whether the elevational limit of alpine shrubs (<3 m in height) are determined by carbon limitation or growth limitation. We studied the seasonal variations in non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) and its pool size in Q. aquifolioides grown at 3000 m, 3500 m, and at its elevational limit of 3950 m above sea level (a.s.l.) on Zheduo Mt., SW China. The tissue NSC concentrations along the elevational gradient varied significantly with season, reflecting the season-dependent carbon balance. The NSC levels in tissues were lowest at the beginning of the growing season, indicating that plants used the winter reserve storage for re-growth in the early spring. During the growing season, plants grown at the elevational limit did not show lower NSC concentrations compared to plants at lower elevations, but during the winter season, storage tissues, especially roots, had significantly lower NSC concentrations in plants at the elevational limit compared to lower elevations. The present results suggest the significance of winter reserve in storage tissues, which may determine the winter survival and early-spring re-growth of Q. aquifolioides shrubs at high elevation, leading to the formation of the uppermost distribution limit. This result is consistent with a recent hypothesis for the alpine treeline formation. PMID:22479567

  11. Magnetic protein microspheres as dynamic contrast agents for magnetomotive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Freddy T.; Dibbern, Elizabeth M.; Chaney, Eric J.; Oldenburg, Amy L.; Suslick, Kenneth S.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2008-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging biomedical imaging modality that has been developed over the last 15 years. More recently, OCT has been used for the intraoperative imaging of tumor margins in breast cancer and axillary lymph nodes providing a real time in-vivo assessment of the tissue morphology. Traditional OCT images are limited by only being able to observe morphological structures. As diagnostic medicine continues to push for earlier detection, one must develop functional imaging modalities that would detect molecular information in-vivo allowing a real-time microscopic analysis of the tissue specimen. A novel modality of OCT called magnetomotive-OCT (MMOCT) has been developed by our group, employing an induced modulated magnetic field with a magnetic contrast agent to create the added contrast to structural OCT images. Modified protein microspheres with a BSA protein shell functionalized with RGD peptide sequences for targeting and an oil core have been designed and synthesized. Magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4) and Nile Red dye have been encapsulated into its oil core. These microspheres have previously been demonstrated to target cancer cells by functionalizing them with a layer of RGD peptides and could be functionalized with monoclonal antibodies. Preliminary results show that these magnetic microspheres, which are 2.0- 5.0 microns in size, are readily detectable under MM-OCT when embedded in a 5% agarose gel, in a 3-D scaffold of macrophage cells previously incubated with the microspheres, and when injected in-vivo into a tumor from an NMUcarcinogen rat animal model for breast cancer.

  12. EFFECTS OF TWO CONTRAST INJECTION PROTOCOLS ON FELINE AORTIC AND HEPATIC ENHANCEMENT USING DYNAMIC COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY.

    PubMed

    Makara, Mariano; Chau, Jennifer; Hall, Evelyn; Kloeppel, Heide; Podadera, Juan; Barrs, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    This prospective study compared aortic and hepatic enhancement achieved using a contrast injection protocol with a fixed rate of 5 ml/s vs. that achieved using a protocol with fixed injection duration of 20 s in eight cats. Cats were assigned into two groups (Group 1, rate 5 ml/s; Group 2, duration 20 s). The dose of contrast was the same in both groups (740 mgI/kg). Regions of interest (ROI) were drawn in the aorta and liver for transverse scans acquired at the hepatic hilus. Time to peak aortic enhancement occurred significantly earlier in Group 1 (M = 11s, SD = 1.63) than in Group 2 (M = 25.5 s, SD = 2.51). Peak aortic enhancement was significantly higher in Group 1 (M = 1906.51 HU, SD = 368.64) than in Group 2 (M = 745.08 HU, SD = 201.84). Duration of aortic enhancement equal to or above 300 HU was statistically longer in Group 2 (M = 24.5 s, SD = 8.39) than in Group 1 (M = 10 s, SD = 1.63). There were no significant differences in time to peak liver enhancement, peak liver enhancement, or duration of hepatic arterial phase between groups. Findings supported the hypothesis that longer injection duration results in a broader bolus geometry with a longer time to peak and a lower peak aortic enhancement in cat. This strong influence of injection duration on timing of aortic enhancement may help future users optimize protocols for CT angiography of the aorta and multiphasic evaluation of the liver, pancreas, and small intestine.

  13. Seasonal Prediction of Regional Surface Air Temperature and First-flowering Date in South Korea using Dynamical Downscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, J. B.; Hur, J.

    2015-12-01

    The seasonal prediction of both the surface air temperature and the first-flowering date (FFD) over South Korea are produced using dynamical downscaling (Hur and Ahn, 2015). Dynamical downscaling is performed using Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) v3.0 with the lateral forcing from hourly outputs of Pusan National University (PNU) coupled general circulation model (CGCM) v1.1. Gridded surface air temperature data with high spatial (3km) and temporal (daily) resolution are obtained using the physically-based dynamical models. To reduce systematic bias, simple statistical correction method is then applied to the model output. The FFDs of cherry, peach and pear in South Korea are predicted for the decade of 1999-2008 by applying the corrected daily temperature predictions to the phenological thermal-time model. The WRF v3.0 results reflect the detailed topographical effect, despite having cold and warm biases for warm and cold seasons, respectively. After applying the correction, the mean temperature for early spring (February to April) well represents the general pattern of observation, while preserving the advantages of dynamical downscaling. The FFD predictabilities for the three species of trees are evaluated in terms of qualitative, quantitative and categorical estimations. Although FFDs derived from the corrected WRF results well predict the spatial distribution and the variation of observation, the prediction performance has no statistical significance or appropriate predictability. The approach used in the study may be helpful in obtaining detailed and useful information about FFD and regional temperature by accounting for physically-based atmospheric dynamics, although the seasonal predictability of flowering phenology is not high enough. Acknowledgements This work was carried out with the support of the Rural Development Administration Cooperative Research Program for Agriculture Science and Technology Development under Grant Project No. PJ009953 and

  14. [Seasonal dynamics of soil organic carbon mineralization for two forest types in Xiaoxing'an Mountains, China].

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Lin, Wei; Cui, Xiao-yang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the seasonal dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralization in Xiaoxing'an Mountain, we incubated soil samples collected from virgin Korean pine forest and broad-leaved secondary forest in different seasons in the laboratory and measured the SOC mineralization rate and cumulative SOC mineralization (Cm). We employed simultaneous reaction model to describe C mineralization kinetics and estimated SOC mineralization parameters including soil easily mineralizable C (C1), potentially mineralizable C (C₀). We also analyzed the relations between Cm, C₁and their influencing factors. Results showed that the incubated SOC mineralization rate and Cm for 0-5 cm soil layer decreased from early spring to late autumn, while for 5-10 cm soil layer the seasonal variation was not statistically significant for both forest types. The C₁ in 0-5 and 5-10 cm soil layers varied from 42.92-92.18 and 19.23-32.95 mg kg⁻¹, respectively, while the C₀ in 0-5 and 5-10 cm soil layers varied from 863.92-3957.15 and 434.15-865.79 mg · kg⁻¹, respec- tively. Both C₁ and C₀ decreased from early spring to late autumn. The proportions of C₀ in SOC for two forest types were 0.74%-2.78% and 1.11%-1.84% in 0-5 and 5-10 cm soil layers, respectively, and decreased from early spring to late autumn, indicating that SOC tended to become more stable as a whole from spring to autumn. The Cm and C₀ were significantly positively correlated to in situ soil water content and hot water-extractable carbohydrate content, but were not correlated to in situ soil temperature and cool water-extractable carbohydrate content. We concluded that soil labile organic carbon, soil physical and chemical properties contributed to the seasonal dynamics of SOC mineralization in the forests.

  15. Plankton food web and its seasonal dynamics in a large monsoonal estuary (Cochin backwaters, India)-significance of mesohaline region.

    PubMed

    Sooria, P M; Jyothibabu, R; Anjusha, A; Vineetha, G; Vinita, J; Lallu, K R; Paul, M; Jagadeesan, L

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents the ecology and dynamics of plankton food web in the Cochin backwaters (CBW), the largest monsoonal estuary along the west coast of India. The data source is a time series measurement carried out in the CBW during the Spring Intermonsoon (March-May) and the Southwest Monsoon (June-September). The plankton food web consisting of autotrophic/heterotrophic picoplankton, autotrophic/heterotrophic nanoplankton, microzooplankton, and mesozooplankton was quantified in relation to the seasonal hydrographical settings in the CBW. The study showed that significant changes in the abundance and dynamics of plankton food web components were governed mostly by the spatial and seasonal changes in hydrography rather than short-term changes induced by tide. During the Spring Intermonsoon, all plankton consumers in the CBW was higher than the Southwest Monsoon, and the trophic interaction was more effective in upstream where there was a close coupling between all prey components and their consumers. During the Southwest Monsoon, on the other hand, the trophic interaction was more effective downstream where the abundance of all plankton consumers was significantly higher than the upstream. Based on statistical analyses NMDS/SIMPROF and RDA, we demarcated the spatial difference/mismatch in the prey and consumer distribution in the CBW and showed that a more efficient plankton food web exists in the mesohaline regions during both seasons. This suggests that a noticeable spatial shift occurs seasonally in the active plankton food web zone in the CBW; it is upstream during the Spring Intermonsoon and downstream during the Southwest Monsoon.

  16. Seasonal dynamics of soil CO2 efflux in biodiverse semi-arid ecosystems of Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Lewandrowski, Wolfgang; Martini, Dylan; Erickson, Todd; Merritt, David; Dixon, Kingsley

    2015-04-01

    Introduction In recent years, soil respiration (Rs) has been a major research focus given the increase in atmospheric CO2 emissions and the large contribution of CO2 fluxes from soils. Rs is the second largest carbon flux in terrestrial ecosystems and globally accounts for 98±12 CO2-C yr-1 or ten times that produced by fossil fuel combustion. In addition to its importance in the global carbon cycle, Rs is a key indicator of ecosystem state and functioning. Despite the global importance of this process, there is still limited knowledge of its and responses to abiotic and biotic processes, particularly in arid and semi-arid areas. In this research we investigated the seasonal variations and controlling factors of Rs for different vegetation types in biodiverse ecosystems of the Pilbara region (Western Australia). This region, with a semi-arid climate and two main seasons (wet-summer and dry-winter), is an ancient landscape with diverse geology and high levels of regional endemism. Methods This research was conducted in seven study sites across the Pilbara region with similar native soils and analogous ecosystems representative of the area. A permanent plot was defined at each site which included three of the most representative and dominant vegetation cover types of the Pilbara ecosystems: trees (Corymbia spp.), shrubs (Acacia spp.), grasses (Triodia spp.), and bare soil. Soil sampling and field measurements were carried out in February 2014 (wet-summer season) and July 2014 (dry-winter season). Rs was measured with a portable soil CO2 flux chamber attached to a Li-Cor 6400 and, simultaneously, both temperature and soil moisture were determined. Results Soil CO2 efflux ranged from 0.57 µmol m-2 s-1 to 1.96 µmol m-2 s-1 in the dry-winter season and from 1.57 µmol m-2 s-1 to 3.91 µmol m-2 s-1 in the wet-summer season. Higher Rs rates were found in the wet-summer season in all vegetation types and below Corymbia spp. in both periods. Rs differed significantly

  17. Contrasting the Excited-State Dynamics of the Photoactive Yellow Protein Chromophore: Protein versus Solvent Environments

    PubMed Central

    Vengris, Mikas; van der Horst, Michael A.; Zgrablić, Goran; van Stokkum, Ivo H. M.; Haacke, Stefan; Chergui, Majed; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Larsen, Delmar S.

    2004-01-01

    Wavelength- and time-resolved fluorescence experiments have been performed on the photoactive yellow protein, the E46Q mutant, the hybrids of these proteins containing a nonisomerizing “locked” chromophore, and the native and locked chromophores in aqueous solution. The ultrafast dynamics of these six systems is compared and spectral signatures of isomerization and solvation are discussed. We find that the ultrafast red-shifting of fluorescence is associated mostly with solvation dynamics, whereas isomerization manifests itself as quenching of fluorescence. The observed multiexponential quenching of the protein samples differs from the single-exponential lifetimes of the chromophores in solution. The locked chromophore in the protein environment decays faster than in solution. This is due to additional channels of excited-state energy dissipation via the covalent and hydrogen bonds with the protein environment. The observed large dispersion of quenching timescales observed in the protein samples that contain the native pigment favors both an inhomogeneous model and an excited-state barrier for isomerization. PMID:15345563

  18. Communication: Contrasting effects of glycerol and DMSO on lipid membrane surface hydration dynamics and forces.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Alex M; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Han, Songi

    2016-07-28

    Glycerol and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) are commonly used cryoprotectants in cellular systems, but due to the challenges of measuring the properties of surface-bound solvent, fundamental questions remain regarding the concentration, interactions, and conformation of these solutes at lipid membrane surfaces. We measured the surface water diffusivity at gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer surfaces in aqueous solutions containing