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Sample records for control coating performance

  1. Review of End-of-Life Thermal Control Coating Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Kline, Sara E.

    2008-01-01

    White thermal control coatings capable of long term performance are needed for Fission Surface Power (FSP) where heat from a nuclear reactor placed on the surface of the Moon must be rejected to the environment. The threats to thermal control coating durability on the lunar surface are electrons, protons, and ultraviolet radiation. The anticipated damage to the coating is a gradual darkening over time. The increase in solar absorptance would, in essence, add a cyclic heat load to the radiator. The greater the darkening, the greater the added heat load. The cyclic heat load could ultimately impart a cyclic influence on FSP system performance. No significant change in emittance is anticipated. Optical properties degradation data were found in the open literature for the Z-93 series of thermal control paints. Additional optical properties degradation data were found from the Lunar Orbiter V mission, the Optical Properties Monitor, and the Materials International Space Station Experiment. Anticipated end-of-life thermal control coating performance for a FSP installation is postulated. With the FSP installation located away from landing and launching areas, and out of line-of-sight, lunar dust from human activity may not be a threat. The benefits of investing in next generation thermal control paint chemistry are explored.

  2. NEW HIGHER PERFORMANCE LOW COST SELECTIVE SOLAR RADIATION CONTROL COATINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy Ellison; Buddie Dotter; David Tsu

    2003-10-28

    Energy Conversion Devices, Inc., ECD, has developed a new high-speed low-cost process for depositing high quality dielectric optical coatings--Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD). This process can deposit SiO{sub x} about 10 times faster than the state-of-the-art conventional technology, magnetron sputtering, at about 1/10th the cost. This process is also being optimized for depositing higher refractive index materials such as Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and TiO{sub 2}. In this program ECD, in collaboration with Southwall Technologies, Inc. (STI), demonstrated that this process can be used to fabricate high performance low cost Selective Solar Radiation Control (SSRC) films for use in the automotive industry. These coatings were produced on thin (2 mil thick) PET substrates in ECD's pilot roll-to-roll pilot MPECVD deposition machine. Such film can be laminated with PVB in a vehicle's windows. This process can also be used to deposit the films directly onto the glass. Such highly selective films, with a visible transmission (T{sub vis}) of > 70% and a shading coefficient of < 60% can significantly reduce the heat entering a car from solar radiation. Consequently, passenger comfort is increased and the energy needed to operate air conditioning (a/c) systems is reduced; consequently smaller a/c systems can be employed resulting in improved vehicle fuel efficiency.

  3. Better Quality Control: Stochastic Approaches to Optimize Properties and Performance of Plasma-Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Robert B.

    2010-06-01

    Statistical design of experiment (SDE) methodology applied to design and performance testing of plasma-sprayed coatings follows an evolutionary path, usually starting with classic multiparameter screening designs (Plackett-Burman), and progressing through factorial (Taguchi) to limited response surface designs (Box-Behnken). Modern designs of higher dimensionality, such as central composite and D-optimal designs, will provide results with higher predictive power. Complex theoretical models relying on evolutionary algorithms, and application of artificial neuronal networks (ANNs) and fuzzy logic control (FLC) allow estimating the behavior of the complex plasma spray environment through validation either by key experiments or first-principle calculations. In this review, paper general principles of SDE will be discussed and examples be given that underscore the different powers of prediction of individual statistical designs. Basic rules of ANN and FLC will be briefly touched on, and their potential for increased reliability of coating performance through stringent quality control measures assessed. Salient features will be reviewed of studies performed to optimize thermal coating properties and processes reported in the pertinent literature between 2000 and the present.

  4. Fabrication of color-controllable superhydrophobic copper compound coating with decoration performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Cui; Li, Qing; Cai, Peng; Yang, Na; Xi, Zhongxian

    2015-02-01

    A facile and low-cost method for fabricating the color-controllable superhydrophobic coatings on copper was reported in this paper. By simply changing the electrolytic conditions, tunable color surfaces can be obtained. The fundamental cause of color variation should be attributed to the composition of resulting coatings. After modification with stearic acid, the contact angles (CA) of samples with three different colors are 156.8°, 160.0°, 162.8°, respectively, and slide angles (SA) are all nearly 1°. In addition, potentiodynamic polarization test, pH stability, atmospheric exposure test, antibacterial test, abrasion test and tape adhesion test were also performed from the viewpoint of the physical stability and chemical stability of superhydrophobic surfaces. Results indicate that the obtained surfaces be of excellent environmental adaptability, high anti-corrosion ability, and good mechanical property. Results reported here would be helpful for enlarging the application of superhydrophobic surface. Moreover, this method, chemical in situ growth of colored coating, is a new strategy for preparing color-tuned superhydrophobic surface and could be applied on other metal substrates.

  5. Optical Coating Performance and Thermal Structure Design for Heat Reflectors of JWST Electronic Control Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Threat, Felix; Garrison, Matt; Perrygo, Chuck; Bousquet, Robert; Rashford, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) consists of an infrared-optimized Optical Telescope Element (OTE) that is cooled down to 40 degrees Kelvin. A second adjacent component to the OTE is the Integrated Science Instrument Module, or ISIM. This module includes the electronic compartment, which provides the mounting surfaces and ambient thermally controlled environment for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the 200 watts generated from the ISIM structure away from the OTE is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft's own heat does not interfere with the infrared light detected from distant cosmic sources. This technical challenge is overcome by a thermal subsystem unit that provides passive cooling to the ISIM control electronics. The proposed design of this thermal radiator consists of a lightweight structure made out of composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings. In this paper, we will present characterizations of the coating emittance, bidirectional reflectance, and mechanical structure design that will affect the performance of this passive cooling system.

  6. The performance of thermal control coatings on LDEF and implications to future spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Donald R.; Miller, Edgar R.; Mell, Richard J.; Lemaster, Paul S.; Zwiener, James M.

    1993-01-01

    The stability of thermal control coatings over the lifetime of a satellite or space platform is crucial to the success of the mission. With the increasing size, complexity, and duration of future missions, the stability of these materials becomes even more important. The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) offered an excellent testbed to study the stability and interaction of thermal control coatings in the low-Earth orbit (LEO) space environment. Several experiments on LDEF exposed thermal control coatings to the space environment. This paper provides an overview of the different materials flown and their stability during the extended LDEF mission. The exposure conditions, exposure environment, and measurements of materials properties (both in-space and postflight) are described. The relevance of the results and the implications to the design and operation of future space vehicles are also discussed.

  7. Effects of high energy simulated space radiation on polymeric second-surface mirrors. [thermal control coatings - performance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eogdall, L. B.; Cannaday, S. S.

    1975-01-01

    A radiation effects experimental program was performed, in which second surface mirror type thermal control coatings were exposed to ultraviolet radiation, electrons, and protons simultaneously. Stability was assessed by making periodic spectral reflectance measurements in situ (and in air after testing for comparison). Solar absorption coefficients were derived by computer. Many of the exposed materials showed large amounts of degradation in reflectance absorptance, principally due to the electron exposure. A series of tests was conducted, leading to the identification of a modified second surface mirror that shows considerable improvement and promise for stability during thermal control applications in a charged particle space radiation environment.

  8. UNDERWATER COATINGS FOR CONTAMINATION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) deactivated several aging nuclear fuel storage basins. Planners for this effort were greatly concerned that radioactive contamination present on the basin walls could become airborne as the sides of the basins became exposed during deactivation and allowed to dry after water removal. One way to control this airborne contamination was to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls were still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market for marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives were easily applied and adhered well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INL fuel pools. Lab-scale experiments were conducted by applying fourteen different commercial underwater coatings to four substrate materials representative of the storage basin construction materials, and evaluating their performance. The coupons included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The evaluation criteria included ease of application, adherence to the four surfaces of interest, no change on water clarity or chemistry, non-hazardous in final applied form and be proven in underwater applications. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected from the underwater coatings tested for application to all four pools. Divers scrubbed loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuumed up the sludge. The divers then applied the coating using a special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pools with no detectable airborne contamination releases.

  9. Coating Microstructure-Property-Performance Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Terry C. Totemeier; Richard N. Wright

    2005-05-01

    Results of studies on the relationships between spray parameters and performance of thermally-sprayed intermetallic coatings for high-temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance are presented. Coating performance is being assessed by corrosion testing of free-standing coatings, thermal cycling of coating substrates, and coating ductility measurement. Coating corrosion resistance was measured in a simulated coal combustion gas environment (N2-CO-CO2-H2O-H2S) at temperatures from 500 to 800°C using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA testing was also performed on a typical ferritic-martensitic steel, austenitic stainless steel, and a wrought Fe3Al-based alloy for direct comparison to coating behavior. FeAl and Fe3Al coatings showed corrosion rates slightly greater than that of wrought Fe3Al, but markedly lower than the steels at all temperatures. The corrosion rates of the coatings were relatively independent of temperature. Thermal cycling was performed on coated 316SS and nickel alloy 600 substrates from room temperature to 800°C to assess the relative effects of coating microstructure, residual stress, and thermal expansion mismatch on coating cracking by thermal fatigue. Measurement of coating ductility was made by acoustic emission monitoring of coated 316SS tensile specimens during loading.

  10. Weathering of Thermal Control Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Tuan, George C.; Westheimer, David T.; Peters, Wanda C.; Kauder, Lonny R.; Triolo, Jack J.

    2007-01-01

    Spacecraft radiators reject heat to their surroundings. Radiators can be deployable or mounted on the body of the spacecraft. NASA's Crew Exploration Vehicle is to use body mounted radiators. Coatings play an important role in heat rejection. The coatings provide the radiator surface with the desired optical properties of low solar absorptance and high infrared emittance. These specialized surfaces are applied to the radiator panel in a number of ways, including conventional spraying, plasma spraying, or as an applique. Not specifically designed for a weathering environment, little is known about the durability of conventional paints, coatings, and appliques upon exposure to weathering and subsequent exposure to solar wind and ultraviolet radiation exposure. In addition to maintaining their desired optical properties, the coatings must also continue to adhere to the underlying radiator panel. This is a challenge, as new composite radiator panels are being considered as replacements for the aluminum panels used previously. Various thermal control paints, coatings, and appliques were applied to aluminum and isocyanate ester composite coupons and were exposed for 30 days at the Atmospheric Exposure Site of the Kennedy Space Center s Beach Corrosion Facility for the purpose of identifying their durability to weathering. Selected coupons were subsequently exposed to simulated solar wind and vacuum ultraviolet radiation to identify the effect of a simulated space environment on the as-weathered surfaces. Optical properties and adhesion testing were used to document the durability of the paints and coatings. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the weathering testing and to summarize the durability of several thermal control paints, coatings, and appliques to weathering and postweathering environments.

  11. High performance Cu adhesion coating

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.W.; Viehbeck, A.; Chen, W.R.; Ree, M.

    1996-12-31

    Poly(arylene ether benzimidazole) (PAEBI) is a high performance thermoplastic polymer with imidazole functional groups forming the polymer backbone structure. It is proposed that upon coating PAEBI onto a copper surface the imidazole groups of PAEBI form a bond with or chelate to the copper surface resulting in strong adhesion between the copper and polymer. Adhesion of PAEBI to other polymers such as poly(biphenyl dianhydride-p-phenylene diamine) (BPDA-PDA) polyimide is also quite good and stable. The resulting locus of failure as studied by XPS and IR indicates that PAEBI gives strong cohesive adhesion to copper. Due to its good adhesion and mechanical properties, PAEBI can be used in fabricating thin film semiconductor packages such as multichip module dielectric (MCM-D) structures. In these applications, a thin PAEBI coating is applied directly to a wiring layer for enhancing adhesion to both the copper wiring and the polymer dielectric surface. In addition, a thin layer of PAEBI can also function as a protection layer for the copper wiring, eliminating the need for Cr or Ni barrier metallurgies and thus significantly reducing the number of process steps.

  12. Effect of W coating on microengine performance

    SciTech Connect

    MANI,SEETHAMBAL S.; FLEMING,JAMES G.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.; DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; IRWIN,LLOYD W.; TANNER,DANELLE M.; LAVAN,DAVID A.; DUGGER,MICHAEL T.; JAKUBCZAK II,JEROME F.; MILLER,WILLIAM M.

    2000-03-01

    Two major problems associated with Si-based MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) devices are stiction and wear. Surface modifications are needed to reduce both adhesion and friction in micromechanical structures to solve these problems. In this paper, the authors present a CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) process that selectively coats MEMS devices with tungsten and significantly enhances device durability. Tungsten CVD is used in the integrated-circuit industry, which makes this approach manufacturable. This selective deposition process results in a very conformal coating and can potentially address both stiction and wear problems confronting MEMS processing. The selective deposition of tungsten is accomplished through the silicon reduction of WF{sub 6}. The self-limiting nature of the process ensures consistent process control. The tungsten is deposited after the removal of the sacrificial oxides to minimize stress and process integration problems. The tungsten coating adheres well and is hard and conducting, which enhances performance for numerous devices. Furthermore, since the deposited tungsten infiltrates under adhered silicon parts and the volume of W deposited is less than the amount of Si consumed, it appears to be possible to release adhered parts that are contacted over small areas such as dimples. The wear resistance of tungsten coated parts has been shown to be significantly improved by microengine test structures.

  13. Lithium Coatings on NSTX Plasma Facing Components and Its Effects On Boundary Control, Core Plasma Performance, and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    H.W.Kugel, M.G.Bell, H.Schneider, J.P.Allain, R.E.Bell, R Kaita, J.Kallman, S. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, D. Mansfield, R.E. Nygen, R. Maingi, J. Menard, D. Mueller, M. Ono, S. Paul, S.Gerhardt, R.Raman, S.Sabbagh, C.H.Skinner, V.Soukhanovskii, J.Timberlake, L.E.Zakharov, and the NSTX Research Team

    2010-01-25

    NSTX high-power divertor plasma experiments have used in succession lithium pellet injection (LPI), evaporated lithium, and injected lithium powder to apply lithium coatings to graphite plasma facing components. In 2005, following wall conditioning and LPI, discharges exhibited edge density reduction and performance improvements. Since 2006, first one, and now two lithium evaporators have been used routinely to evaporate lithium onto the lower divertor region at total rates of 10-70 mg/min for periods 5-10 min between discharges. Prior to each discharge, the evaporators are withdrawn behind shutters. Significant improvements in the performance of NBI heated divertor discharges resulting from these lithium depositions were observed. These evaporators are now used for more than 80% of NSTX discharges. Initial work with injecting fine lithium powder into the edge of NBI heated deuterium discharges yielded comparable changes in performance. Several operational issues encountered with lithium wall conditions, and the special procedures needed for vessel entry are discussed. The next step in this work is installation of a Liquid Lithium Divertor surface on the outer part of the lower divertor.

  14. Lithium coatings on NSTX plasma facing components and its effects on boundary control, core plasma performance, and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H. W.; Bell, M. G.; Maingi, R.

    2010-01-01

    NSTX high power divertor plasma experiments have used in succession lithium pellet injection (LPI), evaporated lithium, and injected lithium powder to apply lithium coatings to graphite plasma facing components. In 2005, following the wall conditioning and LPI, discharges exhibited edge density reduction and performance improvements. Since 2006, first one, and now two lithium evaporators have been used routinely to evaporate lithium onto the lower divertor region at total rates of 10-70 mg/min for periods 5-10 min between discharges. Prior to each discharge, the evaporators are withdrawn behind shutters. Significant improvements in the performance of NBI heated divertor discharges resulting from these lithium depositions were observed. These evaporators are now used for more than 80% of NSTX discharges. Initial work with injecting fine lithium powder into the edge of NBI heated deuterium discharges yielded comparable changes in performance. Several operational issues encountered with lithium wall conditions, and the special procedures needed for vessel entry are discussed. The next step in this work is installation of a liquid lithium divertor surface on the outer part of the lower divertor.

  15. Gear Performance Improved by Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, Timothy L.

    2004-01-01

    Gears, bearings, and other mechanical elements transmit loads through contacting surfaces. Even if properly designed, manufactured, installed, and maintained, gears and bearings will eventually fail because of the fatigue of the working surfaces. Economical means for extending the fatigue lives of gears and bearings are highly desired, and coatings offer the opportunity to engineer surfaces to extend the fatigue lives of mechanical components. A tungsten-containing diamondlike-carbon coating exhibiting high hardness, low friction, and good toughness was evaluated for application to spur gears. Fatigue testing was done at the NASA Glenn Research Center on both uncoated and coated spur gears. The results showed that the coating extended the surface fatigue lives of the gears by a factor of about 5 relative to the uncoated gears. For the experiments, a lot of spur test gears made from AISI 9310 gear steel were case-carburized and ground to aerospace specifications. The geometries of the 28-tooth, 8-pitch gears were verified as meeting American Gear Manufacturing Association (AGMA) quality class 12. One-half of the gears were randomly selected for coating. The method of coating was selected to achieve desired adherence, toughness, hardness, and low-friction characteristics. First the gears to be coated were prepared by blasting (vapor honing) with Al2O3 particles and cleaning. Then, the gears were provided with a thin adhesion layer of elemental chromium followed by magnetron sputtering of the outer coating consisting of carbon (70 at.%), hydrogen (15 at.%), tungsten (12 at.%), and nickel (3 at.%) (atomic percent at the surface). In total, the coating thickness was about 2.5 to 3 microns. As compared with the steel substrate, the coated surface was harder by a factor of about 2 and had a smaller elastic modulus. All gears were tested using a 5-centistoke synthetic oil, a 10,000-rpm rotation speed, and a hertzian contact stress of at least 1.7 GPa (250 ksi). Tests were

  16. Instrumental color control for metallic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, W.; Han, Bing; Cui, Guihua; Rigg, Bryan; Luo, Ming R.

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes work investigating a suitable color quality control method for metallic coatings. A set of psychological experiments was carried out based upon 50 pairs of samples. The results were used to test the performance of various color difference formulae. Different techniques were developed by optimising the weights and/or the lightness parametric factors of colour differences calculated from the four measuring angles. The results show that the new techniques give a significant improvement compared to conventional techniques.

  17. High-Performance Polyimide Powder Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leahy, Jonathan J.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center have developed advanced powder coatings for longer-lasting, improved corrosion control. The results of preliminary tests of the coatings and their resistance to salt spray corrosion are very encouraging, and commercial partners are sought for further development.

  18. Wear Performance of Laser Processed Tantalum Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Dittrick, Stanley; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2011-01-01

    This first generation investigation evaluates the in vitro tribological performance of laser-processed Ta coatings on Ti for load-bearing implant applications. Linear reciprocating wear tests in simulated body fluid showed one order of magnitude less wear rate, of the order of 10−4mm3(N.m)−1, for Ta coatings compared to Ti. Our results demonstrate that Ta coatings can potentially minimize the early-stage bone-implant interface micro-motion induced wear debris generation due to their excellent bioactivity comparable to that of hydroxyapatite (HA), high wear resistance and toughness compared to popular HA coatings. PMID:22058608

  19. Incorporation of capsaicin in silicone coatings for enhanced antifouling performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy Jaggari, Karunakar; Zhang Newby, Bi-Min

    2002-03-01

    Successful use of capsaicin as insect and animal repellant propelled us to use it as a possible antifouling agent. Its non-toxic, non-biocidal, non-leaching properties make it a viable alternative to organotin compounds. In order to optimize the anti-fouling performance of the coating, silicone, the most effective foul-release marine coating, was chosen as the carrier. We have incorporated capsaicin into silicone coating, by both bulk entrapment and surface immobilization. Contact angle measurements on capsaicin-incorporated silicone exhibited an increase in wettability, owing to the presence of capsaicin. FTIR study further confirmed the incorporation of capsaicin in silicone. Bacterial attachment studies were conducted using lake Erie water. While bacteria liberally inhabited the control coating, their presence on the capsaicin-incorporated coating was found to be minimal. These preliminary studies indicate that capsaicin incorporated silicone could be a viable environment friendly alternative to currently used antifouling coatings.

  20. Simulation to coating weight control for galvanizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junsheng; Yan, Zhang; Wu, Kunkui; Song, Lei

    2013-05-01

    Zinc coating weight control is one of the most critical issues for continuous galvanizing line. The process has the characteristic of variable-time large time delay, nonlinear, multivariable. It can result in seriously coating weight error and non-uniform coating. We develop a control system, which can automatically control the air knives pressure and its position to give a constant and uniform zinc coating, in accordance with customer-order specification through an auto-adaptive empirical model-based feed forward adaptive controller, and two model-free adaptive feedback controllers . The proposed models with controller were applied to continuous galvanizing line (CGL) at Angang Steel Works. By the production results, the precise and stability of the control model reduces over-coating weight and improves coating uniform. The product for this hot dip galvanizing line does not only satisfy the customers' quality requirement but also save the zinc consumption.

  1. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  2. Underwater Coatings for Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann-Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included 1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; 2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; 3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and 4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55oF to 80oF dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature. The following criteria were used during this evaluation. The underwater coating must: · Be easy to apply · Adhere well to the four surfaces of interest · Not change or have a negative impact on water chemistry or clarity · Not be hazardous in final applied form · Be proven in other underwater applications. In addition, it is desirable for the coating to have a high pigment or high cross-link density to prevent radiation from penetrating. This paper will detail the testing completed and the test results. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected to

  3. Analysis of Thermal Control Coatings on MISSE for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Miria; Kenny, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Many different passive thermal control materials were flown as part of the Materials on International Space Station Experiment. Engineers and scientists at the Marshall Space Flight Center have analyzed a number of these materials, including: Zinc oxide/potassium silicate coating, Zinc oxide/potassium silicate/silicone coating, Zinc orthotitanate/potassium silicate coating, Electrically conductive thermal control coatings and Various coatings for part marking, automated rendezvous and capture, and astronaut visual aids These and other material samples were exposed to the low Earth orbital environment of atormc oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and hard vacuum, though atomic oxygen exposure was very limited for some samples. Solar absorptance, infrared emittance, and mass measurements indicate the durability of these materials to withstand the space environment. The effect of contamination from an active space station on the performance of white thermal control coatings is discussed.

  4. Variable anodic thermal control coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliland, C. S.; Duckett, J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A process for providing a thermal control solar stable surface coating for aluminum surfaces adapted to be exposed to solar radiation wherein selected values within the range of 0.10 to 0.72 thermal emittance (epsilon sub tau) and 0.2 to 0.4 solar absorptance (alpha subs) are reproducibly obtained by anodizing the surface area in a chromic acid solution for a selected period of time. The rate voltage and time, along with the parameters of initial epsilon sub tau and alpha subs, temperature of the chromic acid solution, acid concentration of the solution and the material anodized determines the final values of epsilon/tau sub and alpha sub S. 9 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures.

  5. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, B. F.; Dupont, J. N.; Marder, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Research is being conducted to develop criteria for selecting weld overlay coatings for erosion mitigation in circulated fluidized beds. Twelve weld overlay alloys were deposited on 1018 steel substrates using plasma arc welding. Ten samples from each coating were prepared for erosion testing. All selected coatings were erosion tested at 400C and their erosion resistance and microstructure evaluated. Steady state erosion rates were similar for several weld overlay coatings (Ultimet, Inconel-625, Iron-Aluminide, 316L SS, and High Chromium Cast Iron) and were considerably lower than the remaining coating evaluated. These coatings had different base (Co, Fe, Ni-base). No correlations were found between room temperature microhardness of the weld overlay coatings and their erosion resistance at elevated temperature, although this criteria is often thought to be an indicator of erosion resistance. It was suggested that the coatings that showed similar erosion rates may have similar mechanical properties such as fracture strength, toughness and work hardening rates at this temperature. During the past quarter, Iron-Aluminide, Inconel-625, and 316L SS coatings were selected for more detailed investigations based upon the preliminary erosion test results. Microhardness tests were performed on eroded samples to determine the size of the work hardened zone and change in coatings hardness due to erosion. The work hardened zone was correlated with erosion resistance of the coatings. Additional Iron-Aluminide, Inconel-625, and 316L SS coatings were deposited on 1018 steel substrates.

  6. Space stable thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Y.

    1982-01-01

    A specification quality zinc orthotitanate coating was developed. This silicate-bonded Zn2TiO4 coating is discussed. The effects of precursor chemistry, precursor mixing procedures, stoichiometry variations, and of different heat treatments on the physical and optical properties of Zn2TiO4 are investigated. Inorganic silicates are compared to organic silicone binder systems. The effects of pigment to binder ratio, water content, and of different curing procedures on the optical and physical properties of Zn2TiO4 potassium silicate coatings are also studied. Environmental tests were conducted to determine the UV vacuum stability of coatings for durations up to 5000 equivalent Sun hours.

  7. HIGH-PERFORMANCE COATING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion, erosion, oxidation, and fouling by scale deposits impose critical issues in selecting the metal components used at geothermal power plants operating at brine temperatures up to 300 C. Replacing these components is very costly and time consuming. Currently, components made of titanium alloy and stainless steel commonly are employed for dealing with these problems. However, another major consideration in using these metals is not only that they are considerably more expensive than carbon steel, but also the susceptibility of corrosion-preventing passive oxide layers that develop on their outermost surface sites to reactions with brine-induced scales, such as silicate, silica, and calcite. Such reactions lead to the formation of strong interfacial bonds between the scales and oxide layers, causing the accumulation of multiple layers of scales, and the impairment of the plant component's function and efficacy; furthermore, a substantial amount of time is entailed in removing them. This cleaning operation essential for reusing the components is one of the factors causing the increase in the plant's maintenance costs. If inexpensive carbon steel components could be coated and lined with cost-effective high-hydrothermal temperature stable, anti-corrosion, -oxidation, and -fouling materials, this would improve the power plant's economic factors by engendering a considerable reduction in capital investment, and a decrease in the costs of operations and maintenance through optimized maintenance schedules.

  8. Laboratory electron exposure of TSS-1 thermal control coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, J. A.; Mccollum, M.; Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    RM400, a conductive thermal control coating, was developed for use on the exterior shell of the tethered satellite. Testing was performed by the Engineering Physics Division to quantify effects of the space environment on this coating and its conductive and optical properties. Included in this testing was exposure of RM400 to electrons with energies ranging from 0.1 to 1 keV, to simulate electrons accelerated from the ambient space plasma when the tethered satellite is fully deployed. During this testing, the coating was found to luminesce, and a prolonged exposure of the coating to high-energy electrons caused the coating to darken. This report describes the tests done to quantify the degradation of the thermal control properties caused by electron exposure and to measure the luminescence as a function of electron energy and current density to the satellite.

  9. Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Wright, Richard N.; Swank, William D.; Lister, Tedd E.; Pinhero, Patrick J.

    2007-10-23

    A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

  10. Space stable thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Y.

    1977-01-01

    Efforts to develop an engineering paint were concentrated on inorganic silicate-bonded systems as opposed to the silicone coatings. The UV-vacuum stability of potassium silicate-Zn2TiO4 paints were shown to be quite good. Reflectance optimization of these systems is being studied by maximizing thickness and pigment to binder ratio.

  11. Assessment of Thermal Control and Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mell, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    This final report is concerned with the tasks performed during the contract period which included spacecraft coating development, testing, and applications. Five marker coatings consisting of a bright yellow handrail coating, protective overcoat for ceramic coatings, and specialized primers for composites (or polymer) surfaces were developed and commercialized by AZ Technology during this program. Most of the coatings have passed space environmental stability requirements via ground tests and/or flight verification. Marker coatings and protective overcoats were successfully flown on the Passive Optical Sample Assembly (POSA) and the Optical Properties Monitor (OPM) experiments flown on the Russian space station MIR. To date, most of the coatings developed and/or modified during this program have been utilized on the International Space Station and other spacecraft. For ISS, AZ Technology manufactured the 'UNITY' emblem now being flown on the NASA UNITY node (Node 1) that is docked to the Russian Zarya (FGB) utilizing the colored marker coatings (white, blue, red) developed by AZ Technology. The UNITY emblem included the US American flag, the Unity logo, and NASA logo on a white background, applied to a Beta cloth substrate.

  12. Porcelain enamel passive thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leggett, H.; King, H. M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and evaluation of a highly adherent, low solar absorptance, porcelain enamel thermal control coating applied to 6061 and 1100 aluminum for space vehicle use. The coating consists of a low index of refraction, transparent host frit and a high volume fraction of titania as rutile, crystallized in-situ, as the scattering medium. Solar absorptance is 0.21 at a coating thickness of 0.013 cm. Hemispherical emittance is 0.88. The change in solar absorptance is 0.03, as measured in-situ, after an exposure of 1000 equivalent sun hours in vacuum.

  13. Control of electroosmosis in coated quartz capillaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Blair J.; Van Alstine, James; Snyder, Robert S.; Shafer, Steven G.; Harris, J. Milton

    1987-01-01

    The effectiveness of various coatings for controlling the electroosmotic fluid flow that hinders electrophoretic processes is studied using analytical particle microelectrophoresis. The mobilities of 2-micron diameter glass and polystyrene latex spheres (exhibiting both negative and zero effective surface charge) were measured in 2-mm diameter quartz capillaries filled with NaCl solutions within the 3.5-7.8 pH range. It is found that capillary inner surface coatings using 5000 molecular weight (or higher) poly(ethylene glycol): significantly reduced electroosmosis within the selected pH range, were stable for long time periods, and appeared to be more effective than dextran, methylcellulose, or silane coatings.

  14. Space stable thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Y.

    1977-01-01

    Both pigment and paint studies were conducted to determine the effect of calcination conditions on optical properties of Zn2TiO4. Paint studies were concerned with the effects of spraying technique, of pigment to binder ratio, and of thickness on the properties of finished coatings. The results are reviewed in detail. Pigments prepared by calcination at 600 deg. to 800 deg. were evaluated. Low temperature syntheses were conducted to determine; (1) extent of ZnO + TiO2 reaction; and (2) the potential of higher peak reflectance with finer particle size powder obtained at lower temperatures.

  15. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion is a destructive process that often causes failure in metallic components and structures. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of other existing microcapsules designs, the corrosion controlled release function that allows the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand only when and where they are needed. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into the microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection efficacy.

  16. High-Performance Polyimide Powder Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Much of the infrastructure at Kennedy Space Center and other NASA sites has been subjected to outside weathering effects for more than 40 years. Because much of this infrastructure has metallic surfaces, considerable effort is continually devoted to developing methods to minimize the effects of corrosion on these surfaces. These efforts are especially intense at KSC, where offshore salt spray and exhaust from Solid Rocket Boosters accelerate corrosion. Coatings of various types have traditionally been the choice for minimizing corrosion, and improved corrosion control methods are constantly being researched. Recent work at KSC on developing an improved method for repairing Kapton (polyimide)-based electrical wire insulation has identified polyimides with much lower melting points than traditional polyimides used for insulation. These lower melting points and the many other outstanding physical properties of polyimides (thermal stability, chemical resistance, and electrical properties) led us to investigate whether they could be used in powder coatings.

  17. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOEpatents

    Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

    1993-07-06

    Coatings and sensors are described having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  18. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOEpatents

    Frye, Gregory C.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Doughty, Daniel H.; Bein, Thomas; Moller, Karin

    1993-01-01

    Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  19. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOEpatents

    Frye, Gregory C.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Doughty, Daniel H.; Bein, Thomas; Moller, Karin

    1996-01-01

    Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  20. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOEpatents

    Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

    1996-12-31

    Coatings and sensors are disclosed having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided. 7 figs.

  1. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The erosion of materials by the impact of solid particles has received increasing attention during the past twenty years. Recently, research has been initiated with the event of advanced coal conversion processes in which erosion plays an important role. The resulting damage, termed Solid Particle Erosion (SPE), is of concern primarily because of the significantly increased operating costs which result in material failures. Reduced power plant efficiency due to solid particle erosion of boiler tubes and waterfalls has led to various methods to combat SPE. One method is to apply coatings to the components subjected to erosive environments. Protective weld overlay coatings are particularly advantageous in terms of coating quality. The weld overlay coatings are essentially immune to spallation due to a strong metallurgical bond with the substrate material. By using powder mixtures, multiple alloys can be mixed in order to achieve the best performance in an erosive environment. However, a review of the literature revealed a lack of information on weld overlay coating performance in erosive environments which makes the selection of weld overlay alloys a difficult task. The objective of this project is to determine the effects of weld overlay coating composition and microstructure on erosion resistance. These results will lead to a better understanding of erosion mitigation in CFB's.

  2. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The erosion of materials by the impact of solid particles has received increasing attention during the past twenty years. Recently, research has been initiated with the event of advanced coal conversion processes in which erosion plays an important role. The resulting damage, termed Solid Particle Erosion (SPE), is of concern primarily because of the significantly increased operating costs which result in material failures. Reduced power plant efficiency due to solid particle erosion of boiler tubes and waterfalls has led to various methods to combat SPE. One method is to apply coatings to the components subjected to erosive environments. Protective weld overlay coatings are particularly advantageous in terms of coating quality. The weld overlay coatings are essentially immune to spallation due to a strong metallurgical bond with the substrate material. By using powder mixtures, multiple alloys can be mixed in order to achieve the best performance in an erosive environment. However, a review of the literature revealed a lack of information on weld overlay coating performance in erosive environments which makes the selection of weld overlay alloys a difficult task. The objective of this project is to determine the effects of weld overlay coating composition and microstructure on erosion resistance. These results will lead to a better understanding of erosion mitigation in CFB`s.

  3. Plasma process control for improved PEO coatings on magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Riyad Omran

    coating growth, and to determine plasma electron temperatures. The coating requirements for good tribological properties are somewhat different than for good corrosion performance. However, good tribological performance combined with good corrosion performance can be obtained through control of the PEO processing parameters.

  4. Controlled Thermal Expansion Coat for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J. (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor); Aikin, Beverly J. M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A improved thermal barrier coating and method for producing and applying such is disclosed herein. The thermal barrier coating includes a high temperature substrate, a first bond coat layer applied to the substrate of MCrAlX, and a second bond coat layer of MCrAlX with particles of a particulate dispersed throughout the MCrAlX and the preferred particulate is Al2O3. The particles of the particulate dispersed throughout the second bond coat layer preferably have a diameter of less then the height of the peaks of the second bond coat layer, or a diameter of less than 5 microns. The method of producing the second bond coat layer may either include the steps of mechanical alloying of particles throughout the second bond coat layer, attrition milling the particles of the particulate throughout the second bond coat layer, or using electrophoresis to disperse the particles throughout the second bond coat layer. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the first bond coat layer is applied to the substrate, and then the second bond coat layer is thermally sprayed onto the first bond coat layer. Further, in a preferred embodiment of die invention, a ceramic insulating layer covers the second bond coat layer.

  5. Selected results for LDEF thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1993-01-01

    Several different thermal control coatings were analyzed as part of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Materials Special Investigation Group activity and as part of the Space Environment Effects on Spacecraft Materials Experiment M0003. A brief discussion of the results obtained for these materials is presented.

  6. Launch Pad Coatings for Smart Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Bucherl, Cori N.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Curran, Jerome P.; Whitten, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion is the degradation of a material as a result of its interaction with the environment. The environment at the KSC launch pads has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in the US. The 70 tons of highly corrosive hydrochloric acid that are generated by the solid rocket boosters during a launch exacerbate the corrosiveness of the environment at the pads. Numerous failures at the pads are caused by the pitting of stainless steels, rebar corrosion, and the degradation of concrete. Corrosion control of launch pad structures relies on the use of coatings selected from the qualified products list (QPL) of the NASA Standard 5008A for Protective Coating of Carbon Steel, Stainless Steel, and Aluminum on Launch Structures, Facilities, and Ground Support Equipment. This standard was developed to establish uniform engineering practices and methods and to ensure the inclusion of essential criteria in the coating of ground support equipment (GSE) and facilities used by or for NASA. This standard is applicable to GSE and facilities that support space vehicle or payload programs or projects and to critical facilities at all NASA locations worldwide. Environmental regulation changes have dramatically reduced the production, handling, use, and availability of conventional protective coatings for application to KSC launch structures and ground support equipment. Current attrition rate of qualified KSC coatings will drastically limit the number of commercial off the shelf (COTS) products available for the Constellation Program (CxP) ground operations (GO). CxP GO identified corrosion detection and control technologies as a critical, initial capability technology need for ground processing of Ares I and Ares V to meet Constellation Architecture Requirements Document (CARD) CxP 70000 operability requirements for reduced ground processing complexity, streamlined integrated testing, and operations phase affordability

  7. Microstructure, Processing, Performance Relationships for High Temperature Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas M. Lillo; Richard N. Wright; W. David Swank; D.C Haggard; Dennis C. Kunerth; Denis E. Clark

    2008-07-01

    HVOF coating have shown high resistance to corrosion in fossil energy applications and it is generally accepted that mechanical failure, e.g. cracking or spalling, ultimately will determine coating lifetime. The high velocity oxygen-fuel method (HVOF) of applying coatings is one of the most commercially viable and allows the control of various parameters including powder particle velocity and temperature which influence coating properties, such as residual stress, bond coat strength and microstructure. Methods of assessing the mechanical durability of coatings are being developed in order to explore the relationship between HVOF spraying parameters and the mechanical properties of the coating and coating bond strength. The room temperature mechanical strength, as well as the resistance of the coating to cracking/spalling during thermal transients, is of considerable importance. Eddy current, acoustic emission and thermal imaging methods are being developed to detect coating failure during thermal cycling tests and room temperature tensile tests. Preliminary results on coating failure of HVOF FeAl coatings on carbon steel, as detected by eddy current measurements during thermal cycling, are presented. The influence of HVOF coating parameters of iron aluminides - applied to more relevant structural steels, like 316 SS and Grade 91 steel, - on coating durability will be explored once reliable methods for identification of coating failure have been developed.

  8. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, L. M.; Hintze, P. E.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Jolley, S. T.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effects of corrosion on various structures at the Kennedy Space Center, and the work to discover a corrosion control coating that will be autonomous and will indicate corrosion at an early point in the process. Kennedy Space Center has many environmental conditions that are corrosive: ocean salt spray, heat, humidity, sunlight and acidic exhaust from the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs). Presented is a chart which shows the corrosion rates of carbon steel at various locations. KSC has the highest corrosion rates with 42.0 mils/yr, leading the next highest Galeta Point Beach, in the Panama Canal Zone with 27 mils/yr corrosion. A chart shows the changes in corrosion rate with the distance from the ocean. The three types of corrosion protective coatings are described: barrier (passive), Barrier plus active corrosion inhibiting components, and smart. A smart coating will detect and respond actively to changes in its environment in a functional and predictable manner and is capable of adapting its properties dynamically. The smart coating uses microcapsules, particles or liquid drops coated in polymers, that can detect and control the corrosion caused by the environment. The mechanism for a pH sensitive microcapsule and the hydrophobic core microcapsule are demonstrated and the chemistry is reviewed. When corrosion begins, the microcapsule will release the contents of the core (indicator, inhibitor, and self healing agent) in close proximity to the corrosion. The response to a pH increase is demonstrated by a series of pictures that show the breakdown of the microcapsule and the contents release. An example of bolt corrosion is used, as an example of corrosion in places that are difficult to ascertain. A comparison of various coating systems is shown.

  9. Space stable thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Y.

    1976-01-01

    The MOX method, i.e., the use of zinc and titanium oxalate precursors, has the distinct advantages of simple and rapid processing, and of controlled pigment particle size. The chemical identify of TiOX was determined. The Zn/Ti ratio effect on the reflectance spectra and ultraviolet irradiation stability in vacuum for Zn2TiO4 was examined. Optimized processing parameters are considered for reproducibly obtaining a pigment of the most desirable optical properties and behavior.

  10. Final Technical Report - Recovery Act: Organic Coatings as Encapsulants for Low Cost, High Performance PV Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Hellring; Jiping Shao; James Poole

    2011-12-05

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing PPG's commercial organic coatings systems as efficient, modernized encapsulants for low cost, high performance, thin film photovoltaic modules. Our hypothesis was that the combination of an anticorrosive coating with a more traditional barrier topcoat would mitigate many electrochemical processes that are now responsible for the significant portion of photovoltaic (PV) failures, thereby nullifying the extremely high moisture barrier requirements of currently used encapsulation technology. Nine commercially available metal primer coatings and six commercially available top coatings were selected for screening. Twenty-one different primer/top coat combinations were evaluated. The primer coatings were shown to be the major contributor to corrosion inhibition, adhesion, and barrier properties. Two primer coatings and one top coating were downselected for testing on specially-fabricated test modules. The coated test modules passed initial current leakage and insulation testing. Damp Heat testing of control modules showed visible corrosion to the bus bar metal, whereas the coated modules showed none. One of the primer/top coat combinations retained solar power performance after Damp Heat testing despite showing some delamination at the EVA/solar cell interface. Thermal Cycling and Humidity Freeze testing resulted in only one test module retaining its power performance. Failure modes depended on the particular primer/top coating combination used. Overall, this study demonstrated that a relatively thin primer/top coating has the potential to replace the potting film and backsheet in crystalline silicon-based photovoltaic modules. Positive signals were received from commercially available coatings developed for applications having performance requirements different from those required for photovoltaic modules. It is likely that future work to redesign and customize these coatings would result in a

  11. Dissipation factor as a predictor of anodic coating performance

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, Janda K. G.

    1995-01-01

    A dissipation factor measurement is used to predict as-anodized fixture performance prior to actual use of the fixture in an etching environment. A dissipation factor measurement of the anodic coating determines its dielectric characteristics and correlates to the performance of the anodic coating in actual use. The ability to predict the performance of the fixture and its anodized coating permits the fixture to be repaired or replaced prior to complete failure.

  12. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion...

  13. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion...

  14. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion...

  15. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion...

  16. Microstructure, Processing, Performance Relationships for High Temperature Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas M. Lillo

    2011-04-01

    This work evaluates the suitability of iron aluminide coatings for use in high temperature fossil fuel combustion environments, such as boiler applications. The coatings are applied using High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray techniques. Iron aluminide coatings, with the nominal composition of Fe3Al, were applied to various high temperature structural materials (316 Stainless Steel, 9Cr-1Mo steel and Inconel 600) that typically lack inherent resistance to environmental degradation found in fossil fuel combustion atmospheres. Coating/substrate combinations were subjected to thermal cycling to evaluate the effect of HVOF parameters, coating thickness, substrate material and substrate surface roughness on the resistance to coating delamination and cracking. It was found that substrate surface roughness had a profound influence on the performance of a given substrate/coating system and that surface preparation techniques will need to be tailored to the specific substrate material. Also, higher particle velocity during HVOF thermal spray deposition of the iron aluminide coatings tended to result in better-performing coating/substrate systems with less delamination at the coating/substrate interface. Some combinations of HVOF parameters, coating thickness and substrate materials were found to perform extremely well even at temperatures up to 900oC. However, in some cases, substantial reactions at the interface were observed.

  17. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  18. Analyzing the performance of diamond-coated micro end mills.

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, C. D.; Heaney, P. J.; Sumant, A. V.; Hamilton, M. A.; Carpick, R. W.; Pfefferkorn, F. E.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; Univ. of Pennsylvania

    2009-06-01

    A method is presented to improve the tool life and cutting performance of 300 {micro}m diameter tungsten carbide (WC) micro end mills by applying thin (<300 nm) fine-grained diamond (FGD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings using the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) process. The performance of the diamond-coated tools has been evaluated by comparing their performance in dry slot milling of 6061-T6 aluminum against uncoated WC micro end mills. Tool wear, coating integrity, and chip morphology were characterized using SEM and white light interferometry. The initial test results show a dramatic improvement in the tool integrity (i.e., corners not breaking off), a lower wear rate, no observable adhesion of aluminum to the diamond-coated tool, and a significant reduction in the cutting forces (>50%). Reduction of the cutting forces is attributed to the low friction and adhesion of the diamond coating. However, approximately 80% of the tools coated with the larger FGD coatings failed during testing due to delamination. Additional machining benefits were attained for the NCD films, which was obtained by using a higher nucleation density seeding process for diamond growth. This process allowed for thinner, smaller grained diamond coatings to be deposited on the micro end mills, and enabled continued operation of the tool even after the integrity of the diamond coating had been compromised. As opposed to the FGD-coated end mills, only 40% of the NCD-tools experienced delamination issues.

  19. Porous coatings for hypersonic laminar flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inkman, Matthew; Bres, Guillaume; Colonius, Tim; Fedorov, Alexander

    2010-11-01

    We present the results of linear and nonlinear simulations of hypersonic boundary layers over ultrasonic absorptive coatings consisting of uniform arrays of rectangular pores. Through direct numerical simulation of the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, we explore the effects of coatings of various porosities and pore aspect ratios on the growth rate of the second mode instability. The performance of deep pores operating in the attenuative regime, in which acoustic waves are attenuated by viscous effects within the pores, is contrasted with more shallow pores operating in the cancellation/reinforcement regime. The results of linear simulations in many cases match the results of linear stability theory and confirm the ability of such coatings to stabilize the second mode. At certain conditions such as high porosity and large acoustic Reynolds numbers, the porous layer leads to instability of slow waves, introducing a new instability due to coupled resonant forcing of the cavity array. We confirm the observed instability arises in the linear stability theory, and suggest constraints on cavity size and spacing. Finally, nonlinear simulations of the same geometries confirm the results of our linear analysis; in particular, we did not observe and "tripping" of the boundary layer due to small scale disturbances associated with individual pores.

  20. Cellulose Nanocrystals--Bioactive Glass Hybrid Coating as Bone Substitutes by Electrophoretic Co-deposition: In Situ Control of Mineralization of Bioactive Glass and Enhancement of Osteoblastic Performance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Garcia, Rosalina Pérez; Munoz, Josemari; Pérez de Larraya, Uxua; Garmendia, Nere; Yao, Qingqing; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2015-11-11

    Surface functionalization of orthopedic implants is being intensively investigated to strengthen bone-to-implant contact and accelerate bone healing process. A hybrid coating, consisting of 45S5 bioactive glass (BG) individually wrapped and interconnected with fibrous cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), is deposited on 316L stainless steel from aqueous suspension by a one-step electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. Apart from the codeposition mechanism elucidated by means of zeta-potential and scanning electron microscopy measurements, in vitro characterization of the deposited CNCs-BG coating in simulated body fluid reveals an extremely rapid mineralization of BG particles on the coating (e.g., the formation of hydroxyapatite crystals layer after 0.5 day). A series of comparative trials and characterization methods were carried out to comprehensively understand the mineralization process of BG interacting with CNCs. Furthermore, key factors for satisfying the applicability of an implant coating such as coating composition, surface topography, and adhesion strength were quantitatively investigated as a function of mineralization time. Cell culture studies (using MC3T3-E1) indicate that the presence of CNCs-BG coating substantially accelerated cell attachment, spreading, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization of extracellular matrix. This study has confirmed the capability of CNCs to enhance and regulate the bioactivity of BG particles, leading to mineralized CNCs-BG hybrids for improved bone implant coatings.

  1. Cellulose Nanocrystals--Bioactive Glass Hybrid Coating as Bone Substitutes by Electrophoretic Co-deposition: In Situ Control of Mineralization of Bioactive Glass and Enhancement of Osteoblastic Performance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Garcia, Rosalina Pérez; Munoz, Josemari; Pérez de Larraya, Uxua; Garmendia, Nere; Yao, Qingqing; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2015-11-11

    Surface functionalization of orthopedic implants is being intensively investigated to strengthen bone-to-implant contact and accelerate bone healing process. A hybrid coating, consisting of 45S5 bioactive glass (BG) individually wrapped and interconnected with fibrous cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), is deposited on 316L stainless steel from aqueous suspension by a one-step electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. Apart from the codeposition mechanism elucidated by means of zeta-potential and scanning electron microscopy measurements, in vitro characterization of the deposited CNCs-BG coating in simulated body fluid reveals an extremely rapid mineralization of BG particles on the coating (e.g., the formation of hydroxyapatite crystals layer after 0.5 day). A series of comparative trials and characterization methods were carried out to comprehensively understand the mineralization process of BG interacting with CNCs. Furthermore, key factors for satisfying the applicability of an implant coating such as coating composition, surface topography, and adhesion strength were quantitatively investigated as a function of mineralization time. Cell culture studies (using MC3T3-E1) indicate that the presence of CNCs-BG coating substantially accelerated cell attachment, spreading, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization of extracellular matrix. This study has confirmed the capability of CNCs to enhance and regulate the bioactivity of BG particles, leading to mineralized CNCs-BG hybrids for improved bone implant coatings. PMID:26460819

  2. A performance and reliability model for thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batakis, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    A modeling technique for predicting the performance and reliability of TBC's is being developed at Solar Turbines Incorporated. The concept combines experimental coating property data with finite element analyses to predict the thermal and mechanical behavior of coating systems in service. A key feature of Solar's approach is the use of a four point flexure test to estimate coating strength distributions and to predict coating failure probability. This model was used to evaluate the effect of physical variations on coating performance in high heat flux rocket engine applications for NASA. Current work, promoted by Caterpillar Tractor Company for diesel engine applications, is being conducted to measure coating strength as a function of temperature, and future work will document strength degradation with time at temperature. Solar's interest lies in the application of TBCs to gas turbine engine components.

  3. Microencapsulation of Self Healing Agents for Corrosion Control Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolley, S. T.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Calle, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion, the environmentally induced degradation of materials, is a very costly problem that has a major impact on the global economy. Results from a 2-year breakthrough study released in 2002 by the U.S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) showed that the total annual estimated direct cost associated with metallic corrosion in nearly every U.S. industry sector was a staggering $276 billion, approximately 3.1% of the nation's Gross Domestic Product (GOP). Corrosion protective coatings are widely used to protect metallic structures from the detrimental effects of corrosion but their effectiveness can be seriously compromised by mechanical damage, such as a scratch, that exposes the metallic substrate. The incorporation of a self healing mechanism into a corrosion control coating would have the potential to significantly increase its effectiveness and useful lifetime. This paper describes work performed to incorporate a number of microcapsule-based self healing systems into corrosion control coatings. The work includes the preparation and evaluation of self-healing systems based on curable epoxy, acrylate, and siloxane resins, as well as, microencapsulated systems based on passive, solvent born, healing agent delivery. The synthesis and optimization of microcapsule-based self healing systems for thin coating (less than 100 micron) will be presented.

  4. Radiation Control Coatings Installed on Federal Buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base

    SciTech Connect

    Kaba, R.L.; Petrie, T.W.

    1999-03-16

    The technical objectives of this CRADA comprise technology deployment and energy conservation efforts with the radiation control coatings industry and the utility sector. The results of this collaboration include a high-level data reporting, analysis and management system to support the deployment efforts. The technical objectives include successfully install, commission, operate, maintain and document the performance of radiation control coatings on roofs at Tyndall AFB and the Buildings Technology Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory; determine the life cycle savings that can be achieved by using radiation control coatings on entire roofs at Tyndall AFB, based on documented installed cost and operating maintenance costs with and without the coatings; determine if any specific improvements are required in the coatings before they can be successfully deployed in the federal sector; determine the most effective way to facilitate the widespread and rapid deployment of radiation control coatings in the federal sector; and clearly define any barriers to deployment.

  5. Correlation of Predicted and Observed Optical Properties of Multilayer Thermal Control Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal control coatings on spacecraft will be increasingly important, as spacecraft grow smaller and more compact. New thermal control coatings will be needed to meet the demanding requirements of next generation spacecraft. Computer programs are now available to design optical coatings and one such program was used to design several thermal control coatings consisting of alternating layers of WO3 and SiO2. The coatings were subsequently manufactured with electron beam evaporation and characterized with both optical and thermal techniques. Optical data were collected in both the visible region of the spectrum and the infrared. Predictions of solar absorptance and infrared emittance were successfully correlated to the observed thermal control properties. Functional performance of the coatings was verified in a bench top thermal vacuum chamber.

  6. Press-coating of immediate release powders onto coated controlled release tablets with adhesives.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Kenneth C; Fergione, Michael B

    2003-05-20

    A novel adhesive coating was developed that allows even small quantities of immediate-release (IR) powders to be press-coated onto controlled-release (CR), coated dosage forms without damaging the CR coating. The process was exemplified using a pseudoephedrine osmotic tablet (asymmetric membrane technology, AMT) where a powder weighing less than 25% of the core was pressed onto the osmotic tablet providing a final combination tablet with low friability. The dosage form with the adhesive plus the press-coated powder showed comparable sustained drug release rates to the untreated dosage form after an initial 2-h lag. The adhesive layer consisted of an approximately 100- microm coating of Eudragit RL, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and triethyl citrate (TEC) at a ratio of 5:3:1.2. This coating provides a practical balance between handleability before press-coating and good adhesion.

  7. Development of Silane Hydrolysate Binder for Thermal-Control Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Technical report describes theoretical and experimental development of methyltriethoxysilane (MTES) hydrolysate binder for white, titanium dioxidepigmented thermal-control coatings often needed on satellites. New coating is tougher and more abrasion-resistant than conventional coating, S-13G, which comprises zinc oxide in hydroxyl-therminated dimethylsiloxane binder.

  8. Wear and corrosion performance of metallurgical coatings in sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.N.; Farwick, D.G.

    1980-04-24

    The friction, wear, and corrosion performance of several metallurgical coatings in 200 to 650/sup 0/C sodium are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on those coatings which have successfully passed the qualification tests necessary for acceptance in breeder reactor environments. Tests include friction, wear, corrosion, thermal cycling, self-welding, and irradiation exposure under as-prototypic-as-possible service conditions. Materials tested were coatings of various refractory metal carbides in metallic binders, nickel-base and cobalt-base alloys and intermetallic compounds such as the aluminides and borides. Coating processes evaluated included plasma spray, detonation gun, sputtering, spark-deposition, and solid-state diffusion.

  9. Metallized coatings for corrosion control of Naval ship structures and components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    In attempting to improve corrosion control, the U.S. Navy has undertaken a program of coating corrosion-susceptible shipboard components with thermally sprayed aluminum. In this report the program is reviewed in depth, including examination of processes, process controls, the nature and properties of the coatings, nondestructive examination, and possible hazards to personnel. The performance of alternative metallic coating materials is also discussed. It is concluded that thermally sprayed aluminum can provide effective long-term protection against corrosion, thereby obviating the need for chipping of rust and repainting by ship personnel. Such coatings are providing excellent protection to below-deck components such as steam valves, but improvements are needed to realize the full potential of coatings for above-deck service. Several recommendations are made regarding processes, materials, and research and development aimed at upgrading further the performance of these coatings.

  10. Microstructure, Processing, Performance Relationships for High Temperature Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Lillo; Richard Wright

    2009-05-01

    HVOF coatings have shown high resistance to corrosion in fossil energy applications and it is generally accepted that mechanical failure, e.g. cracking or spalling, ultimately will determine coating lifetime. The high velocity oxygen-fuel method (HVOF) for applying coatings is one of the most commercially viable and allows the control of various parameters including powder particle velocity and temperature which influence coating properties, such as residual stress, bond coat strength and microstructure. The mechanical durability of coatings is being assessed using a dual eddy current coil method to monitor crack formation in real time during thermal cycling. Absolute impedence signals from two coils, which interrogate two different areas on the sample, are collected. Crack detection can be determined from the differential signal generated from these absolute signals. The coils are operated at two different frequencies, resulting in two differential signals used for crack detection. Currently this crack detection method is being used to elucidate the influence of thermal cycling temperature and coating thickness on cracking. Recent results (cycles to failure) will be presented for FeAl coatings thermally sprayed (HVOF) onto carbon steel to two coating thicknesses (160 microns and 250 microns thick) and subsequently cycled at temperatures up to 700oC. Thinner coatings exhibit greater resistance to cracking. Ultimately the resistance to cracking will be used to explore the relationship between HVOF spraying parameters, the mechanical properties of the coating and coating bond strength to develop optimized thermal spray parameters. To this end thermal spray coatings (FeAl and Fe3Al) have been applied to additional alloy substrates (Grade 91 steel, 316 SS, etc.) relevant to the fossil industry. Future plans also include a direct comparison to conventional weld overlay coatings currently used in the industry as well as exploration of new coatings. The room temperature

  11. Laser-controllable coatings for corrosion protection.

    PubMed

    Skorb, Ekaterina V; Skirtach, Andre G; Sviridov, Dmitry V; Shchukin, Dmitry G; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2009-07-28

    We introduce a novel and versatile approach to the corrosion protection by use of "smart" laser-controllable coating. The main advantage of the proposed technique is that one could terminate the corrosion process by very intensive healing after an appearance of corrosion centers using local laser irradiation. It is also shown that by applying a polyelectrolyte shell with noble metal particles over the mesoporous titania and silica via layer-by-layer assembly it is possible to fabricate micro- and nanoscaled reservoirs, which, being incorporated into the zirconia-organosilica matrix, are responsible for the ability of laser-driven release of the loaded materials (e.g., corrosion inhibitor). Furthermore, the resultant films are highly adhesive and could be easily deposited onto different metallic substrates. Laser-mediated remote release of incorporated corrosion inhibitor (benzotriazole) from engineered mesoporous containers with silver nanoparticles in the container shell is observed in real time on single and multicontainer levels.

  12. High Performance AR Coatings For Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willey, Ronald R.

    1989-02-01

    The theoretical design of a high efficiency antireflection coating on germanium for the 8 to 11.5 micrometer band is a relatively simple matter, but the reduction to practice of a high durability version of such a coating is not as easy. The first requirement is to reduce the reflection losses due to the very high index of refraction without adding significant absorptance or scattering. The second is to provide resistance to the environmental conditions which might be encountered by the product. The practical problems of stress and adhesion, hardness and abrasion resistance, and salt fog and humidity resistance pose some major challenges to the transformation from a design to a successful coating process. We describe some of our experiences with the evolution of the process from theory to practice, some of the problems encountered, and what we believe we have learned. Due to the extensive number of variables and the constraint on time and resources, the development could not be totally rigorous or exhaustive. The judgement and experience of the development staff was exercised to focus the resources on areas which were perceived to offer the best possibility of a solution to the requirements. The net result of the work described here was a process with considerably improved properties over the starting point of the development.

  13. Advanced electrochemical methods for characterizing the performance of organic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Vinod

    Advanced electrochemical techniques such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrochemical noise method (ENM) and coulometry as tools to study and extract information about the coating system is the focus of this thesis. This thesis explored three areas of research. In all the three research areas, advanced electrochemical techniques were used to extract information and understand the coating system. The first area was to use EIS and coulometric technique for extracting information using AC-DC-AC method. It was examined whether the total charge passing through the coating during the DC polarization step of AC-DC-AC determines coating failure. An almost constant total amount of charge transfer was required by the coating before it failed and was independent of the applied DC polarization. The second area focused in this thesis was to investigate if embedded sensors in coatings are sensitive enough to monitor changes in environmental conditions and to locate defects in coatings by electrochemical means. Influence of topcoat on embedded sensor performance was also studied. It was observed that the embedded sensors can distinguish varying environmental conditions and locate defects in coatings. Topcoat could influence measurements made using embedded sensors and the choice of topcoat could be very important in the successful use of embedded sensors. The third area of research of this thesis work was to examine systematically polymer-structure coating property relationships using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It was observed that the polymer modifications could alter the electrochemical properties of the coating films. Moreover, it was also observed that by cyclic wet-dry capacitance measurement using aqueous electrolyte and ionic liquid, ranking of the stability of organic polymer films could be performed.

  14. Visual and energy performance of switchable windows with antireflection coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsson, Andreas; Roos, Arne

    2010-08-15

    The aim of this project was to investigate how the visual appearance and energy performance of switchable or smart windows can be improved by using antireflective coatings. For this study clear float glass, low-e glass and electrochromic glass were treated with antireflection (AR) coatings. Such a coating considerably increases the transmittance of solar radiation in general and the visible transmittance in particular. For switchable glazing based on absorptive electrochromic layers in their dark state it is necessary to use a low-emissivity coating on the inner pane of a double glazed window in order to reject the absorbed heat. In principle all surfaces can be coated with AR coatings, and it was shown that a thin AR coating on the low-e surface neither influences the thermal emissivity nor the U-value of the glazing. The study showed that the use of AR coatings in switchable glazing significantly increases the light transmittance in the transparent state. It is believed that this is important for a high level of user acceptance of such windows. (author)

  15. High performance radiation curable hybrid coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nik Salleh, Nik Ghazali; Sofian Alias, Mohd; Gläsel, H.-J.; Mehnert, R.

    2013-03-01

    Radiation curing is one of the most effective processes to produce rapidly composite materials at ambient temperature. Silica nanoparticles can be introduced into radiation curable resins to produce scratch and abrasion resistant materials, which can be used as sealants or clear coatings. In preparation of radiation cured polymeric composites for wood based products such as medium density fiberboard etc., we synthesized radiation curable silico-organic nanoparticles from silica/acrylates system. These nano-sized silica particles were used as fillers. Epoxy acrylates was used as prepolymer while pentaerythritol triacrylate and tetraacrylate (PETIA) was used as monomer. The acrylated epoxy resin synthesized from palm oil based product (EPOLA) i.e. bio-renewable raw materials was also used in the system. The surface of the silica was chemically modified to improve the embedding of the filler within the acrylate matrix. Modification of the silica surface using silane was done to overcome the problem of incompatibility with acrylates at high silica contents. The nature of the nanoparticles is now changed from hydrophilic to organophilic. In these investigations, we use low energy electron beam accelerator to initiate polymerization and interaction at the interface between the nanoparticles and the monomeric materials. These polymerization active nanoparticles were obtained by heterogeneous hydrolytic condensation of the silane to the silanol groups of the silica particles. Formulations useful for technical coating processes could be prepared and these composite materials showed highly improved mechanical properties. They also provided a high network density whilst the coatings remain transparent. These polymeric nanocomposites show excellent resistances toward abrasion properties including scratch property as compared to pure acrylates.

  16. Thin film thermoelectric devices as thermal control coatings: A study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemons, J. M.; Krupnick, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    Peltier effect, Thomson effect, and Seeback effect are utilized in design of thermal control coating that serves as versatile means for controlling heat absorbed and radiated by surface. Coatings may be useful in extreme temperature environment enclosures or as heat shields.

  17. Controlled drug release through a plasma polymerized tetramethylcyclo-tetrasiloxane coating barrier.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Shigemasa; Chen, Meng; Zamora, Paul O

    2012-01-01

    A plasma polymerized tetramethylcyclo-tetrasiloxane (TMCTS) coating was deposited onto a metallic biomaterial, 316 stainless steel, to control the release rate of drugs, including daunomycin, rapamycin and NPC-15199 (N-(9-fluorenylmethoxy-carbonyl)-leucine), from the substrate surface. The plasma-state polymerized TMCTS thin film was deposited in a vacuum plasma reactor operated at a radio-frequency of 13.56 MHz, and was highly adhesive to the stainless steel, providing a smooth and hard coating layer for drugs coated on the substrate. To investigate the influence of plasma coating thickness on the drug diffusion profile, coatings were deposited at various time lengths from 20 s to 6 min, depending on the type of drug. Atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) was utilized to characterize coating thickness. Drug elution was measured using a spectrophotometer or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system. The experimental results indicate that plasma polymerized TMCTS can be used as an over-coating to control drug elution at the desired release rate. The drug-release rate was also found to be dependent on the molecular weight of the drug with plasma coating barrier on top of it. The in vitro cytotoxicity test result suggested that the TMCTS plasma coatings did not produce a cytotoxic response to mammalian cells. The non-cytotoxicity of TMCTS coating plus its high thrombo-resistance and biocompatibility are very beneficial to drug-eluting devices that contact blood.

  18. A Review of Tribological Coatings for Control Drive Mechanisms in Space Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    CJ Larkin; JD Edington; BJ Close

    2006-02-21

    Tribological coatings must provide lubrication for moving components of the control drive mechanism for a space reactor and prevent seizing due to friction or diffusion welding to provide highly reliable and precise control of reflector position over the mission lifetime. Several coatings were evaluated based on tribological performance at elevated temperatures and in ultrahigh vacuum environments. Candidates with proven performance in the anticipated environment are limited primarily to disulfide materials. Irradiation data for these coatings is nonexistent. Compatibility issues between coating materials and structural components may require the use of barrier layers between the solid lubricant and structural components to prevent deleterious interactions. It would be advisable to consider possible lubricant interactions prior to down-selection of structural materials. A battery of tests was proposed to provide the necessary data for eventual solid lubricant/coating selection.

  19. Development of Process Analytical Technology (PAT) methods for controlled release pellet coating.

    PubMed

    Avalle, P; Pollitt, M J; Bradley, K; Cooper, B; Pearce, G; Djemai, A; Fitzpatrick, S

    2014-07-01

    This work focused on the control of the manufacturing process for a controlled release (CR) pellet product, within a Quality by Design (QbD) framework. The manufacturing process was Wurster coating: firstly layering active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) onto sugar pellet cores and secondly a controlled release (CR) coating. For each of these two steps, development of a Process Analytical Technology (PAT) method is discussed and also a novel application of automated microscopy as the reference method. Ultimately, PAT methods should link to product performance and the two key Critical Quality Attributes (CQAs) for this CR product are assay and release rate, linked to the API and CR coating steps respectively. In this work, the link between near infra-red (NIR) spectra and those attributes was explored by chemometrics over the course of the coating process in a pilot scale industrial environment. Correlations were built between the NIR spectra and coating weight (for API amount), CR coating thickness and dissolution performance. These correlations allow the coating process to be monitored at-line and so better control of the product performance in line with QbD requirements.

  20. Formulation of electrically conductive, thermal-control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shai, M. C.

    1977-01-01

    Formulation of electrically conductive, thermal-control coatings was undertaken for use on the International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE) spacecraft. Unsuccessful formulation efforts as well as the successful use of oxide pigments fired at 1175 C are described. Problems attributed to reactivity of specific coating vehicles exposed to high humidity are discussed. Measurement and testing methods, including resulting data are mentioned, but the emphasis, in this report, is placed on coating formulation and application techniques. Methods of varying, as desired, optical properties are also described as well as formulations of white, low-absorptance coatings.

  1. Coating induced phase shift and impact on Euclid imaging performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar Venancio, Luis M.; Carminati, Lionel; Lorenzo Alvarez, Jose; Amiaux, Jérôme; Bonino, Luciana; Salvignol, Jean-Christophe; Vavrek, Roland; Laureijs, René; Short, Alex; Boenke, Tobias; Strada, Paulo

    2016-07-01

    The challenging constraints imposed on the Euclid telescope imaging performances have driven the design, manufacturing and characterisation of the multi-layers coatings of the dichroic. Indeed it was found that the coatings layers thickness inhomogeneity will introduce a wavelength dependent phase-shift resulting in degradation of the image quality of the telescope. Such changes must be characterized and/or simulated since they could be non-negligible contributors to the scientific performance accuracy. Several papers on this topic can be found in literature, however the results can not be applied directly to Euclid's dichroic coatings. In particular an applicable model of the phase-shift variation with the wavelength could not be found and was developed. The results achieved with the mathematical model are compared to experimental results of tests performed on a development prototype of the Euclid's dichroic.

  2. Inorganic Zn2TiO4 thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Y.; Wilkes, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Silicate-bonded zinc orthotitanate thermal control coatings for space applications have been developed. This paper discusses preparation of the pigment, paint formulation and application, and some properties of the coatings. Very high reflectance (low solar absorptance), high emittance, and good stability in an ultraviolet-vacuum environment are indicated for this paint.

  3. Performance of microprocessor controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, R.S.; Turner, L.W.; Overhults, D.G. . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    United States animal production systems are at the threshold of a major new method for daily management of environmental control -- the integrated microprocessor-based environmental control system. Widespread adoption of this technology has the potential for dramatic improvement in production efficiencies through lower management costs, improved energy savings, and better feed conversion efficiencies. However, the technical problems of transient surge protection and appropriate mechanical backup systems have not been adequately addressed by the industry. The goals of this research were to identify the degree to which transient surge protection was being provided by current manufacturers, and to illustrate the implementation of microprocessor environmental control systems with mechanical backup. Transient open circuit over-voltage tests (ANSI/IEEE C62.41-1980) were performed on 16 environmental control units: a maximum of 800 V spike was applied to the power supplies, and up to 100 V spike applied to temperature sensor lines. Under these relatively mild tests, no failures were noted due to power supply transients, but three units failed when subjected to transients on their temperature sensor lines. Mechanical backup systems were designed to provide essential life-support during critical conditions of extreme outside conditions and extreme animal densities. The design and installation of environmental control systems for (1) a gestation unit and (2) a broiler house was performed. An overview of the process, and difficulties noted, is presented. Both systems incorporated mechanical backups. 20 refs.

  4. Tests of the Performance of Coatings for Low Ice Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Reich, Allen D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports studies of the performance of low-ice-adhesion coatings by NASA Lewis and BFGoodrich. Studies used impact ice accreted both in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) and in the BFGoodrich Icing Wind Tunnel (IWT) and static ice in a BFGoodrich bench-top parallel-plate shear rig. Early tests at NASA Lewis involved simple qualitative evaluations of the ease of removing impact ice from a surface. Coated surfaces were compared with uncoated ones. Some of the coatings were tested again with static ice at BFGoodrich to obtain quantitative measurements. Later, methods to establish the adhesion force on surfaces subjected to impact ice were explored at Lewis. This paper describes the various test programs and the results of testing some of the coatings looked at over the past 5 years. None of the coatings were found to be truly ice-phobic; however, the most effective coatings were found to reduce the adhesion of ice to about 1/2 that of an uncoated aluminum sample.

  5. High-performance nanoscale composite coatings for boiler applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branagan, D. J.; Breitsameter, M.; Meacham, B. E.; Belashchenko, V.

    2005-06-01

    In this article, we will show how unconventional nanoscale composite coatings can be formed using conventional wire-arc thermal spray systems. The as-sprayed SHS7170 wire-arc coatings are found to develop an amorphous matrix structure containing starburst-shaped boride and carbide crystallites with sizes ranging from 60 to 140 nm. After heating to temperatures above the peak crystalline temperature (566 °C), a solid/state transformation occurs that results in the formation of an intimate three-phase matrix structure consisting of the same complex boride and carbide phases, along with α-iron interdispersed on a structural scale from 60 to 110 nm. The nanocomposite microstructure contains clean grain boundaries, which are found to be extremely stable and resist coarsening throughout the range of temperatures found in boilers. Additionally, the properties of the coating are presented including the bond strength, hardness, bend resistance, and impact resistance. The sprayability, forgiveness, and repairability of the SHS7170 wire-arc coatings are explained in detail, with an emphasis on field applicability in boiler environments. The performance of the SHS7170 coatings in boiler environments is measured via elevated temperature-erosion experiments conducted at 300, 450, and 600 °C using bed ash from an operating circulating fluidized-bed combustor boiler, and the results are compared with those for existing boiler coatings.

  6. Controlling the Lithiation-Induced Strain and Charging Rate in Nanowire Electrodes by Coating

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Li Q.; Liu, Xiao H.; Liu, Yang; Huang, Shan; Zhu, Ting; Gui, Liangjin; Mao, Scott X.; Ye, Zhi Zhen; Wang, Chong M.; Sullivan, J. P.; Huang, Jian Yu

    2011-05-04

    Lithiation-induced-strain (LIS) in electrode materials plagues the performance and lifetime of lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Controlling the LIS is one of the ultimate goals for making better LIBs. Here we report that by carbon or aluminum coating, the charging rate and LIS of individual SnO2 nanowire electrodes can be altered dramatically: namely the carbon or aluminum coated nanowires can be charged about 10 times faster than the non-coated nanowires, and the radial expansion of the coated nanowires was completely suppressed, resulting little or no mismatch strain at the reaction front, as evidenced by the lack of dislocations near the reaction front. The improved charging rate and the suppression of the radial expansion were attributed to the mechanical confinement of the coatings. These studies demonstrate an effective route to control the charging rate and LIS, enabling the design of better LIBs.

  7. Evaluation of thermal control coatings for use on solar dynamic radiators in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Rodriguez, Elvin; Slemp, Wayne S.; Stoyack, Joseph E.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal control coatings with high thermal emittance and low solar absorptance are needed for Space Station Freedom (SSF) solar dynamic power module radiator (SDR) surfaces for efficient heat rejection. Additionally, these coatings must be durable to low earth orbital (LEO) environmental effects of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation and deep thermal cycles which occur as a result of start-up and shut-down of the solar dynamic power system. Eleven candidate coatings were characterized for their solar absorptance and emittance before and after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation (200 to 400 nm), vacuum UV (VUV) radiation (100 to 200 nm) and atomic oxygen. Results indicated that the most durable and best performing coatings were white paint thermal control coatings Z-93, zinc oxide pigment in potassium silicate binder, and YB-71, zinc orthotitanate pigment in potassium silicate binder. Optical micrographs of these materials exposed to the individual environmental effects of atomic oxygen and vacuum thermal cycling showed that no surface cracking occurred.

  8. Evaluation of thermal control coatings for use on solar dynamic radiators in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Rodriguez, Elvin; Slemp, Wayne S.; Stoyack, Joseph E.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal control coatings with high thermal emittance and low solar absorptance are needed for Space Station Freedom (SSF) solar dynamic power module radiator (SDR) surfaces for efficient heat rejection. Additionally, these coatings must be durable to low earth orbital (LEO) environmental effects of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation and deep thermal cycles which occur as a result of start-up and shut-down of the solar dynamic power system. Eleven candidate coatings were characterized for their solar absorptance and emittance before and after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation (200 to 400 nm), vacuum UV (VUV) radiation (100 to 200 nm) and atomic oxygen. Results indicated that the most durable and best performing coatings were white paint thermal control coatings Z-93, zinc oxide pigment in potassium silicate binder, and YB-71, zinc orthotitanate pigment in potassium silicate binder. Optical micrographs of these materials exposed to the individual environmental effects of atomic oxygen and vacuum thermal cycling showed that no surface cracking occurred.

  9. Preparation and performance of thermal insulation energy saving coating materials for exterior wall.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Liang, Jinsheng; Tang, Qingguo; Chen, Gong; Chen, Yalei

    2014-05-01

    Nano zinc oxide with a high refractive index has good thermal reflection performance, hollow glass microspheres have good thermal reflection and insulation performance, and sepiolite nanofibers with many nanostructural pores have good thermal insulation performance. The dispensability of nano zinc oxide in coating materials was improved by optimizing surface silane coupling agent modification process, leading to the good thermal reflection performance. The thermal insulation performance was improved by hollow glass microspheres and sepiolite nanofibers. On this basis, the thermal insulation coating materials were prepared by exploring the effect of amount, complex mode, and other factors of the above three kinds of functional fillers on the thermal reflection and insulation performance of coating materials. The results showed that the surface modification effect of nano zinc oxide was the best when the silane coupling agent addition was 6%. The reflection and insulation performance of the coatings were the best when the additions of modified nano zinc oxide, hollow glass microspheres, and sepiolite nanofibers were 3%, 4%, and 4%, respectively. Compared with the control coating materials, the thermal insulation effect was improved obviously, which was evaluated by the -13.5 degrees C increase of maximum temperature difference between the upper and the lower surfaces.

  10. Coating Processes Boost Performance of Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    NASA currently has spacecraft orbiting Mercury (MESSENGER), imaging the asteroid Vesta (Dawn), roaming the red plains of Mars (the Opportunity rover), and providing a laboratory for humans to advance scientific research in space (the International Space Station, or ISS). The heart of the technology that powers those missions and many others can be held in the palm of your hand - the solar cell. Solar, or photovoltaic (PV), cells are what make up the panels and arrays that draw on the Sun s light to generate electricity for everything from the Hubble Space Telescope s imaging equipment to the life support systems for the ISS. To enable NASA spacecraft to utilize the Sun s energy for exploring destinations as distant as Jupiter, the Agency has invested significant research into improving solar cell design and efficiency. Glenn Research Center has been a national leader in advancing PV technology. The Center s Photovoltaic and Power Technologies Branch has conducted numerous experiments aimed at developing lighter, more efficient solar cells that are less expensive to manufacture. Initiatives like the Forward Technology Solar Cell Experiments I and II in which PV cells developed by NASA and private industry were mounted outside the ISS have tested how various solar technologies perform in the harsh conditions of space. While NASA seeks to improve solar cells for space applications, the results are returning to Earth to benefit the solar energy industry.

  11. Surface figure control for coated optics

    DOEpatents

    Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.; Spence, Paul A.; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    A pedestal optical substrate that simultaneously provides high substrate dynamic stiffness, provides low surface figure sensitivity to mechanical mounting hardware inputs, and constrains surface figure changes caused by optical coatings to be primarily spherical in nature. The pedestal optical substrate includes a disk-like optic or substrate section having a top surface that is coated, a disk-like base section that provides location at which the substrate can be mounted, and a connecting cylindrical section between the base and optics or substrate sections. The optic section has an optical section thickness.sup.2 /optical section diameter ratio of between about 5 to 10 mm, and a thickness variation between front and back surfaces of less than about 10%. The connecting cylindrical section may be attached via three spaced legs or members. However, the pedestal optical substrate can be manufactured from a solid piece of material to form a monolith, thus avoiding joints between the sections, or the disk-like base can be formed separately and connected to the connecting section. By way of example, the pedestal optical substrate may be utilized in the fabrication of optics for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography imaging system, or in any optical system requiring coated optics and substrates with reduced sensitivity to mechanical mounts.

  12. Evaluation of colorless polyimide film for thermal control coating applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; Slemp, W. S.

    1985-01-01

    A series of essentially colorless aromatic polyimide films was synthesized and characterized with the objective of obtaining maximum optical transparency for applications in space. Optical transparency is a requirement for high performance polymeric films used in second surface mirror coatings on thermal control systems. The intensity in color of aromatic polyimide films was lowered by reducing the electronic interaction between chromophoric centers in the polymer molecular structure and by using highly purified monomers. The resulting lightly colored to colorless polyimide films were characterized by UV-visible and infrared spectroscopy before and after exposure to 300 equivalent solar hours UV irradiation and varying doses of 1 MeV electron irradiation. After irradiation, the films were found to be 2 to 2.5 times more transparent than commercial polyimide film of the same thickness.

  13. Environmentally Friendly Coating Technology for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.; Jolley, Scott T.; Pearman, Benjamin P.; Zhang, Xuejun; Fitzpatrick, Lilliana; Gillis, Mathew; Blanton, Michael; Hanna, Joshua S.; Rawlins, James W.

    2016-01-01

    This work concerns the development of environmentally friendly encapsulation technology, specifically designed to incorporate corrosion indicators, inhibitors, and self-healing agents into a coating, in such a way that the delivery of the indicators and inhibitors is triggered by the corrosion process, and the delivery of self-healing agents is triggered by mechanical damage to the coating. Encapsulation of the active corrosion control ingredients allows the incorporation of desired autonomous corrosion control functions such as: early corrosion detection, hidden corrosion detection, corrosion inhibition, and self-healing of mechanical damage into a coating. The technology offers the versatility needed to include one or several corrosion control functions into the same coating.The development of the encapsulation technology has progressed from the initial proof-of-concept work, in which a corrosion indicator was encapsulated into an oil-core (hydrophobic) microcapsule and shown to be delivered autonomously, under simulated corrosion conditions, to a sophisticated portfolio of micro carriers (organic, inorganic, and hybrid) that can be used to deliver a wide range of active corrosion ingredients at a rate that can be adjusted to offer immediate as well as long-term corrosion control. The micro carriers have been incorporated into different coating formulas to test and optimize the autonomous corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing functions of the coatings. This paper provides an overview of progress made to date and highlights recent technical developments, such as improved corrosion detection sensitivity, inhibitor test results in various types of coatings, and highly effective self-healing coatings based on green chemistry.

  14. Improved cooler performance using spectrally selective thermal coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuberger, Dave; Ackerman, Norm; Harris, George

    1998-01-01

    The GOES Imager and Sounder Radiant Coolers are controlled to run at temperatures around 100 K. Future instruments may have added detectors and additional detector heat that will cause the radiant cooler temperatures to rise if design changes are not implemented. Thermal analyses show that lowering the radiant energy from the cooler sun shield (temperatures range between 170 K and 250 K) and/or the Solar Sail Astromast (temperatures range between 270 K and 310 K) adsorbed by the 100 K cooler patch (detector radiator) can significantly lower cooler temperatures if the patch hemispherical emittance is not lowered substantially. The existing cooler patch is an open honeycomb with black paint (Z-307) and had an extremely high emittance even at 100 K. The proposed approach is to replace the open honeycomb with a coating that is spectrally selective with low absorptance out to 10 micrometers and high absorptance beyond 20 micrometers. Several coating formulations were developed and parametric thermal analyses were conducted to select the coating formulation for final coating verification. The coating formulation selected was Ag/Al2O3 (14,000 Å)/TiO2 (6,000 Å)/Al2O3 (14,000 Å) vacuum deposited to a highly specular substrate. The thermal radiative properties were: solar absorptance, 0.09, hemispherical emittance at 100 K, 0.80, IR absorptance (200 K blackbody), 0.78, and IR absorptance (300 K BB), 0.65. To take advantage of the low solar absorptance of this cooler patch coating, a change in the Astromast coating was proposed that would keep its solar absorptance/emittance ratio the same (approximately 1.0), but significantly lower the emittance, and thereby lower the IR irradiance on the emitter. The net results reduce the patch temperature by approximately 9 K. The paper will also contain descriptions of the environmental tests and measurements conducted on the coatings and the results of the thermal parametric studies on the cooler patch.

  15. A Multifunctional Smart Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion is a destructive process that often causes failure in metallic components and structures. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on micro-encapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of other existing microcapsules designs, the corrosion controlled release function that allows the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand only when and where needed. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection efficacy. This

  16. Comparison study of different coatings on degradation performance and cell response of Mg-Sr alloy.

    PubMed

    Shangguan, Yongming; Sun, Lina; Wan, Peng; Tan, Lili; Wang, Chengyue; Fan, Xinmin; Qin, Ling; Yang, Ke

    2016-12-01

    To solve the problem of rapid degradation for magnesium-based implants, surface modification especially coating method is widely studied and showed the great potential for clinical application. However, as concerned to the further application and medical translation for biodegradable magnesium alloys, there are still lack of data and comparisons among different coatings on their degradation and biological properties. This work studied three commonly used coatings on Mg-Sr alloy, including micro-arc oxidation coating, electrodeposition coating and chemical conversion coating, and compared these coatings for requirements of favorable degradation and biological performances, how each of these coating systems has performed. Finally the mechanism for the discrepancy between these coatings is proposed. The results indicate that the micro-arc oxidation coating on Mg-Sr alloy exhibited the best corrosion resistance and cell response among these coatings, and is proved to be more suitable for the orthopedic application. PMID:27612693

  17. Performance of multilayer coated diffraction gratings in the EUV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keski-Kuha, Ritva A. M.; Thomas, Roger J.; Gum, Jeffrey S.; Condor, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of multilayer coating application on the performance of a diffraction grating in the EUV spectral region was evaluated by examining the performance of a 3600-line/mm and a 1200-line/mm replica blazed gratings, designed for operation in the 300-A spectral region in first order. A ten-layer IrSi multilayer optimized for 304 A was deposited using electron-beam evaporation. The grating efficiency was measured on the SURF II calibration beamline in a chamber designed for calibrating the solar EUV rocket telescope and spectrograph multilayer coatings. A significant (by a factor of about 7) enhancement in grating efficiency in the 300-A region was demonstrated.

  18. Antibacterial Performance of Alginic Acid Coating on Polyethylene Film

    PubMed Central

    Karbassi, Elika; Asadinezhad, Ahmad; Lehocký, Marian; Humpolíček, Petr; Vesel, Alenka; Novák, Igor; Sáha, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Alginic acid coated polyethylene films were examined in terms of surface properties and bacteriostatic performance against two most representative bacterial strains, that is, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Microwave plasma treatment followed by brush formation in vapor state from three distinguished precursors (allylalcohol, allylamine, hydroxyethyl methacrylate) was carried out to deposit alginic acid on the substrate. Surface analyses via various techniques established that alginic acid was immobilized onto the surface where grafting (brush) chemistry influenced the amount of alginic acid coated. Moreover, alginic acid was found to be capable of bacterial growth inhibition which itself was significantly affected by the brush type. The polyanionic character of alginic acid as a carbohydrate polymer was assumed to play the pivotal role in antibacterial activity. The cell wall composition of two bacterial strains along with the substrates physicochemical properties accounted for different levels of bacteriostatic performance. PMID:25196604

  19. Antibacterial performance of alginic acid coating on polyethylene film.

    PubMed

    Karbassi, Elika; Asadinezhad, Ahmad; Lehocký, Marian; Humpolíček, Petr; Vesel, Alenka; Novák, Igor; Sáha, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Alginic acid coated polyethylene films were examined in terms of surface properties and bacteriostatic performance against two most representative bacterial strains, that is, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Microwave plasma treatment followed by brush formation in vapor state from three distinguished precursors (allylalcohol, allylamine, hydroxyethyl methacrylate) was carried out to deposit alginic acid on the substrate. Surface analyses via various techniques established that alginic acid was immobilized onto the surface where grafting (brush) chemistry influenced the amount of alginic acid coated. Moreover, alginic acid was found to be capable of bacterial growth inhibition which itself was significantly affected by the brush type. The polyanionic character of alginic acid as a carbohydrate polymer was assumed to play the pivotal role in antibacterial activity. The cell wall composition of two bacterial strains along with the substrates physicochemical properties accounted for different levels of bacteriostatic performance. PMID:25196604

  20. Improvement in Plasma Performance with Lithium Coatings in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R; Ahn, J -W; Allain, J P; Bell, M G; Bell, R; Boedo, J; Bush, C; Mansfield, D; Menard, J; Mueller, D; Ono, M; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Ross, P W; Sabbagh, S; Schneider, H; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Stotler, D; Timberlake, J; Wampler, W R; Wilgen, J B; Zakharov, L

    2008-09-12

    Lithium as a plasma-facing material has attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Dramatic effects on plasma performance with lithium-coated plasma-facing components (PFCOs) have been demonstrated on many fusion devices, including TFTR, [1] T-11M, [2] and FT-U. [3] Using a liquid-lithium-filled tray as a limiter, the CDX-U device achieved very significant enhancement in the confinement time of ohmically heated plasmas. [4] The recent NSTX experiments reported here have demonstrated, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium PFC coatings on divertor plasma performance in both L- and H- mode regimes heated by neutral beams.

  1. Improvement in Plasma Performance with Lithium Coatings in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R

    2009-02-17

    Lithium as a plasma-facing material has attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Dramatic effects on plasma performance with lithium-coated plasma-facing components (PFC's) have been demonstrated on many fusion devices, including TFTR, T-11M, and FT-U. Using a liquid-lithium-filled tray as a limiter, the CDX-U device achieved very significant enhancement in the confinement time of ohmically heated plasmas. The recent NSTX experiments reported here have demonstrated, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium PFC coatings on divertor plasma performance in both L- and H- mode regimes heated by neutral beams.

  2. Corrosion performance of zinc coated steel in seawater environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuan; Zhao, Xia; Zhao, Haichao; Sun, Huyuan; Chen, Jianmin

    2016-05-01

    Considering the continuous exploitation of marine resources, it is very important to study the anticorrosion performance and durability of zinc coated streel (ZCS) because its increasing use as reinforcements in seawater. Tafel polarization curves and linear polarization curves combined with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to evaluate the corrosion performance of ZCS at Qingdao test station during long-term immersion in seawater. The results indicated that the corrosion rate of the ZCS increased obviously with immersion time in seawater. The corrosion products that formed on the zinc coated steel were loose and porous, and were mainly composed of Zn5(OH)8Cl2, Zn5(OH)6(CO3)2, and ZnO. Pitting corrosion occurred on the steel surface in neutral seawater, and the rate of ZCS corrosion decreased with increasing pH.

  3. Development of silane-hydrolysate binder for UV-resistant thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    Detailed characterizaton and formulation studies were performed on a methyltriakoxysilane hydrolysate as a binder for thermal control coatings. The binder was optimized by varying hydrolysis temperature, time, catalyst type, and water concentration. The candidate coating formulations, based on this binder with TiO2 pigment, were optimized via a detailed series of sprayed test panels that included the parameters of binder/pigment ratio, ethanol content, pigment particle size, coating thickness and cure conditions. A typical optimized coating was prepared by acetic acid catalyzed hydrolysis of methyltriethoxysilane with 3.25 mol-equivalents of water over a 24 hour period at room temperature. The resulting hydrolysate was directly mixed with pre-milled TiO2 (12 grams pigment/26 grams binder) to yield a sprayable consistency. Panels were sprayed to result in a nominal cure coating thickness of 2 mils. Cure was affected by air drying for 24 hr at room temperature plus 72 hr at 150 F. These coatings are typically extremely tough and abrasion-resistant, with an absorptance (alpha) of 0.20 and emittance (e) of 0.89. No significant coating damage was observed in the mandrel bend test, even after exposure to thermal cycling from -160 to 160 F. Vacuum exposure of the coatings for 930 hours at 1 equivalent UV sun resulted in no visible degradation and no significant increase in absorptance.

  4. Use of hydrophilic polymer coatings for control of electroosmosis and protein adsorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. Milton

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine the utility of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and dextran coatings for control of electroosmosis and protein adsorption; electroosmosis is an important, deleterious process affecting electrophoretic separations, and protein adsorption is a factor which needs to be controlled during protein crystal growth to avoid multiple nucleation sites. Performance of the project required use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to refine previously developed synthetic methods. The results of this spectroscopic examination are reported. Measurements of electroosmotic mobility of charged particles in appropriately coated capillaries reveals that a new, one-step route to coating capillaries gives a surface in which electroosmosis is dramatically reduced. Similarly, both PEG and dextran coatings were shown by protein adsorption measurements to be highly effective at reducing protein adsorption on solid surfaces. These results should have impact on future low-g electrophoretic and protein crystal growth experiments.

  5. Improved performance of sulfur cathode by an easy and scale-up coating strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jing; Qin, Furong; Li, Jie; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Wenwen; Wang, Mengran; Yu, Fan; Zhang, Liyuan

    2015-11-01

    A new fabricating process for high-performance sulfur cathode is proposed. The fabricating process relies on two-step coating technique: firstly, high sulfur content slurry is coated on the current collector. After drying, the electrode is coated with another slurry composed of Super P and binder. The sulfur electrode with relatively high sulfur content/loading of 60 wt%/2 mg cm-2 discharges capacity of ∼695 mAh g-1 at 0.5 C after 100 cycling. This method is easy for industrialization and well controlled over the areal sulfur loading and mass, therefore it is efficient for fabricating high-performance Li-S batteries with high-energy density.

  6. Post Irradiation Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings and Solid Lubricants to Support Fission Surface Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Stanford, Malcolm K.; Persinger, Justin A.; Khorsandi, Behrooz; Blue, Thomas E.

    2007-01-30

    The development of a nuclear power system for space missions, such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter or a lunar outpost, requires substantially more compact reactor design than conventional terrestrial systems. In order to minimize shielding requirements and hence system weight, the radiation tolerance of component materials within the power conversion and heat rejection systems must be defined. Two classes of coatings, thermal control paints and solid lubricants, were identified as material systems for which limited radiation hardness information was available. Screening studies were designed to explore candidate coatings under a predominately fast neutron spectrum. The Ohio State Research Reactor Facility staff performed irradiation in a well characterized, mixed energy spectrum and performed post irradiation analysis of representative coatings for thermal control and solid lubricant applications. Thermal control paints were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1013 to 1015 n/cm2. No optical degradation was noted although some adhesive degradation was found at higher fluence levels. Solid lubricant coatings were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1015 to 1016 n/cm2 with coating adhesion and flexibility used for post irradiation evaluation screening. The exposures studied did not lead to obvious property degradation indicating the coatings would have survived the radiation environment for the previously proposed Jupiter mission. The results are also applicable to space power development programs such as fission surface power for future lunar and Mars missions.

  7. Post Irradiation Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings and Solid Lubricants to Support Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Stanford, Malcolm K.; Persinger, Justin A.; Khorsandi, Behrooz; Blue, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a nuclear power system for space missions, such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter or a lunar outpost, requires substantially more compact reactor design than conventional terrestrial systems. In order to minimize shielding requirements and hence system weight, the radiation tolerance of component materials within the power conversion and heat rejection systems must be defined. Two classes of coatings, thermal control paints and solid lubricants, were identified as material systems for which limited radiation hardness information was available. Screening studies were designed to explore candidate coatings under a predominately fast neutron spectrum. The Ohio State Research Reactor Facility staff performed irradiation in a well characterized, mixed energy spectrum and performed post irradiation analysis of representative coatings for thermal control and solid lubricant applications. Thermal control paints were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1013 to 1015 n/cm2. No optical degradation was noted although some adhesive degradation was found at higher fluence levels. Solid lubricant coatings were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1015 to 1016 n/cm2 with coating adhesion and flexibility used for post irradiation evaluation screening. The exposures studied did not lead to obvious property degradation indicating the coatings would have survived the radiation environment for the previously proposed Jupiter mission. The results are also applicable to space power development programs such as fission surface power for future lunar and Mars missions.

  8. Post Irradiation Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings and Solid Lubricants to Support Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Stanford, Malcolm K.; Persinger, Justin A.; Khorsandi, Behrooz; Blue, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a nuclear power system for space missions, such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter or a lunar outpost, requires substantially more compact reactor design than conventional terrestrial systems. In order to minimize shielding requirements and hence system weight, the radiation tolerance of component materials within the power conversion and heat rejection systems must be defined. Two classes of coatings, thermal control paints and solid lubricants, were identified as material systems for which limited radiation hardness information was available. Screening studies were designed to explore candidate coatings under a predominately fast neutron spectrum. The Ohio State Research Reactor Facility staff performed irradiation in a well characterized, mixed energy spectrum and performed post irradiation analysis of representative coatings for thermal control and solid lubricant applications. Thermal control paints were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 10(exp 13) to 10(exp 15) n per square centimeters. No optical degradation was noted although some adhesive degradation was found at higher fluence levels. Solid lubricant coatings were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 10(exp 15) to 10(exp 16) n per square centimeters with coating adhesion and flexibility used for post irradiation evaluation screening. The exposures studied did not lead to obvious property degradation indicating the coatings would have survived the radiation environment for the previously proposed Jupiter mission. The results are also applicable to space power development programs such as fission surface power for future lunar and Mars missions.

  9. Apparatus for and method of controlling sputter coating

    SciTech Connect

    Boys, R.

    1985-02-19

    The magnetic field of a magnetron sputter coating apparatus is controlled in response to measurements of plasma parameters to control deposition parameters, such as sputter deposition rate and material deposition thickness profile. From time to time the apparatus is standardized to change preset values for parameters of the plasma to manage the deposition parameters.

  10. Controlling film topography to form highly hydrophobic waterborne coatings.

    PubMed

    López, Ana B; de la Cal, José C; Asua, José M

    2016-08-17

    Coatings have a tremendous impact on economy as they reduce corrosion that has an estimated cost of 3% of the world's GDP. Hydrophobic coatings are particularly efficient for this purpose and the challenge is to produce cost effective and environmentally friendly, highly hydrophobic, cohesive and non-porous coatings applicable to large and irregular surfaces. This work shows that this goal can be achieved by forming wrinkles on the surface of waterborne coatings through fine-tuning of the film forming conditions. The proof of concept was demonstrated by using waterborne dispersions of copolymers of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate and 2-ethylhexyl acrylate, and using the temperature and hardness of the copolymer as control variables during film formation. This allowed the formation of transparent films with a wrinkled surface that had a contact angle of 133°, which represents an increase of 20° with respect to the film cast under standard conditions.

  11. Coating synthesis controlled by electron-beam heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, A. I.; Knyazeva, A. G.; Pobol, I. L.

    2016-07-01

    The methods of combined electron-beam treatment of parts made of steel with one- and two-layer coatings are studied experimentally. Ti-Ni, Ni-Al and Al-Ti systems were used as the examples in the experiments. The mathematical model is suggested for coating formation in the controlled regime of high temperature synthesis during high energy source motion along the preliminarily deposited layer of exothermic composition. The study takes into account the difference in thermophysical properties of the materials of coating and substrate, heat release from chemical reaction that leads to the coating properties formation and other factors. The realization of the synthesis depends on technological parameters. Various regimes of the treatment process are investigated numerically.

  12. Controlling film topography to form highly hydrophobic waterborne coatings.

    PubMed

    López, Ana B; de la Cal, José C; Asua, José M

    2016-08-17

    Coatings have a tremendous impact on economy as they reduce corrosion that has an estimated cost of 3% of the world's GDP. Hydrophobic coatings are particularly efficient for this purpose and the challenge is to produce cost effective and environmentally friendly, highly hydrophobic, cohesive and non-porous coatings applicable to large and irregular surfaces. This work shows that this goal can be achieved by forming wrinkles on the surface of waterborne coatings through fine-tuning of the film forming conditions. The proof of concept was demonstrated by using waterborne dispersions of copolymers of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate and 2-ethylhexyl acrylate, and using the temperature and hardness of the copolymer as control variables during film formation. This allowed the formation of transparent films with a wrinkled surface that had a contact angle of 133°, which represents an increase of 20° with respect to the film cast under standard conditions. PMID:27476531

  13. Optical Property Evaluation of Next Generation Thermal Control Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Deshpande, Mukund S.; Pierson, Edward A.

    2010-01-01

    Next generation white thermal control coatings were developed via the Small Business Innovative Research program utilizing lithium silicate chemistry as a binder. Doping of the binder with additives yielded a powder that was plasma spray capable and that could be applied to light weight polymers and carbon-carbon composite surfaces. The plasma sprayed coating had acceptable beginning-of-life and end-of-live optical properties, as indicated by a successful 1.5 year exposure to the space environment in low Earth orbit. Recent studies also showed the coating to be durable to simulated space environments consisting of 1 keV and 10 keV electrons, 4.5 MeV electrons, and thermal cycling. Large scale deposition was demonstrated on a polymer matrix composite radiator panel, leading to the selection of the coating for use on the Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission.

  14. Simulation of controllable permeation in PNIPAAm coated membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenhofer, Adrian; Wallmersperger, Thomas; Richter, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Membranes separate fluid compartments and can comprise transport structures for selective permeation. In biology, channel proteins are specialized in their atomic structure to allow transport of specific compounds (selectivity). Conformational changes in protein structure allow the control of the permeation abilities by outer stimuli (gating). In polymeric membranes, the selectivity is due to electrostatic or size-exclusion. It can thus be controlled by size variation or electric charges. Controllable permeation can be useful to determine particle-size distributions in continuous flow, e.g. in microfluidics and biomedicine to gain cell diameter profiles in blood. The present approach uses patterned polyethylene terephthalate (PET) membranes with hydrogel surface coating for permeation control by size-exclusion. The thermosensitive hydrogel poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) is structured with a cross-shaped pore geometry. A change in the temperature of the water flow through the membrane leads to a pore shape variation. The temperature dependent behavior of PNIPAAm can be numerically modeled with a temperature expansion model, where the swelling and deswelling is depicted by temperature dependent expansion coefficients. In the present study, the free swelling behavior was implemented to the Finite Element tool ABAQUS for the complex composite structure of the permeation control membrane. Experimental values of the geometry characteristics were derived from microscopy images with the tool Image J and compared to simulation results. Numerical simulations using the derived thermo-mechanical model for different pore geometries (circular, rectangle, cross and triangle) were performed. With this study, we show that the temperature expansion model with values from the free swelling behavior can be used to adequately predict the deformation behavior of the complex membrane system. The predictions can be used to optimize the behavior of the membrane pores and the overall

  15. Radiation control coatings installed on rough-surfaced built-up roofs -- Initial results

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.; Christian, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    The authors have tracked the solar reflectance and thermal performance of small samples of various radiation control coatings on smooth surfaces for several years on a roof test facility in East Tennessee. The focus is on white coatings because of their potential to weather, causing the solar reflectance to decrease as the coatings age. Support of the federal New Technology Demonstration Program allowed them to extend the study to more samples on smooth surfaces and entire rough-surfaced roofs at a federal facility in the Panhandle of Florida. Two rough-surfaced, moderately well-insulated, low solar reflectance built-up roofs (BURs) were spray-coated with a latex-based product with ceramic beads added to improve solar reflectance. In the first three months after installation, the fresh BUR coatings showed a significant decrease in both the outside-surface temperature and the heat flux through the roof insulation. Average sunlit values were generated to exclude nighttime data, data on cloudy days, and data when the uncoated patch on one roof was more strongly shaded in mid-afternoon on sunny days. The average power demand during occupied periods for the first month with the coating for the building with the thermally massive roof deck was 13% less than during the previous month without the coating. For the other buildings with a lightweight roof deck but high internal loads, there were no clear average power savings due to the coating. The authors are continuing to monitor electricity use in these all-electric buildings to calibrate a model for the peak power and annual energy use of the buildings. Modeling results to be given at the end of the two year project will address the effect of roof R-value, geographic location, and solar reflectance, including the effect of weathering, on the performance of coated roofs. The calibrated models should allow one to segregate site-specific effects such as shading and large thermal mass.

  16. Smart microneedle coatings for controlled delivery and biomedical analysis.

    PubMed

    Khan, H; Mehta, P; Msallam, H; Armitage, D; Ahmad, Z

    2014-11-01

    The work presented demonstrates an unconventional approach in the preparation of smart microneedle (MN) coatings utilising electrohydrodynamic atomisation (EHDA) principles. Stainless steel (600-900 µm in height) MNs were coupled to a ground electrode (in the EHDA coating set-up) with the deposition distance and collecting methodology varied for an ethanol:methanol (50:50) vehicle system. The preparation of nano- and micrometre-scaled pharmaceutical coatings was achieved. Fluorescein dye (serving as potential drug, sensory materials or disease state markers) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, polymer matrix system) formed the remaining components of the coating formulation. Based on these excipients and by varying the coating process, particles (100 nm to 3 µm) and fibres (400 nm to 1 µm) were deposited directly on MNs in controlled and selectable fashion (flow rates variable ∼ 5-50 µL/min, applied voltage variable 6-19 kV). These demonstrated options for multiple targeting and analysis applications. The underlying EHDA process permits room temperature fabrication, controlled output and scale-up potential for emerging MN devices as drug systems or lab-chip testing devices.

  17. Anodisation with dynamic current control for tailored alumina coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieber, M.; Althöfer, I.; Höhlich, D.; Scharf, I.; Böttger, D.; Böttger, S.; Böttger, E.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    The anodic oxidation process is commonly used to refine the surface of aluminium and its alloys. Compared to the substrate, the alumina layers produced by anodising exhibit an increased hardness and chemical resistance. Thus, the corrosion and wear resistance are generally improved. The coatings are also electrically isolating and may serve decorative purposes. Applying a time-variant, dynamic electrical process control by pulse-current or current-steps is a promising approach to improve the coating properties, which is partially deployed in an industrial scale. In the present work, the influence of dynamic electrical process control on the coating properties is examined by means of a design of experiments (DOE). The effects of various electrolyte compositions and temperatures as well as processing time are considered with regard to coating thickness, hardness, wear resistance and the electrical energy consumption during the formation of the coatings. Information about the statistical significance of the effects of the parameters on the considered properties is obtained by an analysis of variance (ANOVA).

  18. A performance evaluation of coating systems for long term aqueous immersion service

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, S.J.

    1994-11-08

    The static immersion of coated steel panels in various media representative of chemical and waste processes around the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was terminated after 16 months exposure for evaluation of coating performance and comparison with observations collected following 1, 6, and 11 months exposure. In each environment, a wide range of coating performance was observed, including some coatings unsuitable for use in the test environment (despite the high recommendation of the vendor). Further, coating performance as a function of time suggests a test duration of at least several months is required to fully assess candidate coating performance for specific applications. The performance of many coatings, particularly in the most alkaline environment, was adversely affected by the imposition of supplemental cathodic protection on the coated test panels.

  19. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating. 192.461 Section 192.461 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS...

  20. High performance composites with active stiffness control.

    PubMed

    Tridech, Charnwit; Maples, Henry A; Robinson, Paul; Bismarck, Alexander

    2013-09-25

    High performance carbon fiber reinforced composites with controllable stiffness could revolutionize the use of composite materials in structural applications. Here we describe a structural material, which has a stiffness that can be actively controlled on demand. Such a material could have applications in morphing wings or deployable structures. A carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy composite is described that can undergo an 88% reduction in flexural stiffness at elevated temperatures and fully recover when cooled, with no discernible damage or loss in properties. Once the stiffness has been reduced, the required deformations can be achieved at much lower actuation forces. For this proof-of-concept study a thin polyacrylamide (PAAm) layer was electrocoated onto carbon fibers that were then embedded into an epoxy matrix via resin infusion. Heating the PAAm coating above its glass transition temperature caused it to soften and allowed the fibers to slide within the matrix. To produce the stiffness change the carbon fibers were used as resistance heating elements by passing a current through them. When the PAAm coating had softened, the ability of the interphase to transfer load to the fibers was significantly reduced, greatly lowering the flexural stiffness of the composite. By changing the moisture content in PAAm fiber coating, the temperature at which the PAAm softens and the composites undergo a reduction in stiffness can be tuned. PMID:23978266

  1. Results of the examination of LDEF polyurethane thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the condition of polyurethane thermal control coatings subjected to 69 months of low earth orbit (LEO) exposure on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission. Specimens representing all environmental aspects obtainable by LDEF were analyzed. Widely varying changes in the thermo-optical and mechanical properties of these materials were observed, depending on atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation fluences. High atomic oxygen fluences, regardless of ultraviolet radiation exposure levels, resulted in near original optical properties for these coatings but with a degradation in their mechanical condition. A trend in solar absorptance increase with ultraviolet radiation fluence was observed. Contamination, though observed, exhibited minimal effects.

  2. Improved plasma performance in TEXTOR with silicon coated surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.; Esser, H.G.; Jackson, G.L.; Koenen, L.; Messiaen, A.; Ongena, J.; Philipps, V.; Pospiesczcyk, A.; Samm, U.; Schweer, B.; Unterberg, B.; the TEXTOR Team Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas-Laboratorium voor Plasmafysica, Association EURATOM-Etat Belge, Associatie EURATOM-Belgische Staat, Ecole Royale Militaire, Koninklijke Militaire School, B-1040, Brussels General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-9784 )

    1993-09-06

    Coating of the walls of TEXTOR with silicon has led to improved tokamak plasma performance. Very low concentrations of C, B, and O are measured. Radiation from silicon is located at the plasma periphery at [ital r]/[ital a][ge]0.75 and decreases with increasing plasma density. Density limits are enhanced by 30% as compared to boronized conditions; large density gradients and low electron temperatures at the edge ([lt]10 eV) are obtained. The improved confinement regimes observed earlier at low densities [[tau][sub [ital E

  3. Spectrometric control of coatings deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrin, D. K.; Lisenkov, A. A.; Uhov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    It is shown that one of the most important technological tasks for the process of reactive magnetron sputtering is to control the composition of a gas mix. Possibility of determining the composition of a gas mix using spectrometric equipment on example of argon–oxygen mix during deposition of tantalum pentoxide films is demonstrated. Results of experiments show that it is possible to control concentration of oxygen not only by change of intensity of oxygen lines, but also by relative change of intensity of argon lines.

  4. Quality control of thermal barrier coatings using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, David J.; Taylor, Jenifer A. T.

    2000-06-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to protect underlying metal from heat generated during combustion of fuel, especially in truck engines and jet turbines. These coatings are thin, partially stabilized zirconia, separated from the substrate metal by an interface layer, which serves to enhance bonding and reduce the thermal expansion mismatch between the metal and the ceramic. The reliability of these coatings is currently not predictable. The work described in this paper focused on the use of acoustic emission (AE) as a quality control test for TBCs. The test specimens were commercially sprayed straps. The data show that differences in spraying parameters and microstructure are clearly visible in the emissions during thermal cycling. This work indicates that the failure mechanism can be predicted from the AEs during the first thermal cycle.

  5. Formulation of electrically conductive thermal-control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shai, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    The development and formulation of electrically conductive thermal control coating was undertaken for use on the International Sun Earth Explorer spacecraft. The primary effort was to develop a coating with a bulk resistivity of less than 100,000 ohm/sqm, an optical absorptance of approximately 0.55, and a normal emittance of 0.90. The required stability in space called for a bulk resistivity of less than 100,000 ohm/sq m, an absorptance of less than 0.67, and a normal emittance of 0.90 after exposure to approximately 4 x 10 to the 16th proton/sq cm of solar-wind particles and 5300 equivalent sun-hours. These exposures represent 2 years of ISEE flight conditions. Both the unsuccessful formulation efforts and the successful use of oxide pigments fired at 1448 K are described. Problems relative to the reactivity of specific coating vehicles exposed to high humidity are discussed.

  6. Current technology for development of low solar absorptance/high emittance coatings. [spacecraft thermal control surface materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilligan, J. E.; Harada, Y.; Gates, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    A comprehensive program to develop low solar absorptance/high emittance coatings, to be successful, must coordinate basic materials preparation, coatings technology, environmental simulation, production, and flight-test evaluation. The prime criteria for 'white' thermal-control coatings are low solar absorptance and, most importantly, solar-absorptance stability. Many variables affect the solar absorptance and its stability. These effects must be discerned and evaluated. The factors involved, however, are not entirely independent; accordingly, the present paper emphasizes the major variables, the relationships among them, and how important they are in improving the properties and performance of the coatings.

  7. Controlling Variable Emittance (MEMS) Coatings for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrar, D.; Schneider, W.; Osiander, R.; Champion, J. L.; Darrin, A. G.; Douglas, Donya; Swanson, Ted D.

    2003-01-01

    Small spacecraft, including micro and nanosats, as they are envisioned for future missions, will require an alternative means to achieve thermal control due to their small power and mass budgets. One of the proposed alternatives is Variable Emittance (Vari-E) Coatings for spacecraft radiators. Space Technology-5 (ST-5) is a technology demonstration mission through NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) that will utilize Vari-E Coatings. This mission involves a constellation of three (3) satellites in a highly elliptical orbit with a perigee altitude of approximately 200 kilometers and an apogee of approximately 38,000 kilometers. Such an environment will expose the spacecraft to a wide swing in the thermal and radiation environment of the earth's atmosphere. There are three (3) different technologies associated with this mission. The three technologies are electrophoretic, electrochromic, and Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). The ultimate goal is to make use of Van-E coatings, in order to achieve various levels of thermal control. The focus of this paper is to highlight the Vari-E Coating MEMS instrument, with an emphasis on the Electronic Control Unit responsible for operating the MEMS device. The Test & Evaluation approach, along with the results, is specific for application on ST-5, yet the information provides a guideline for future experiments and/or thermal applications on the exterior structure of a spacecraft.

  8. Weld overlay coatings for erosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1993-03-03

    A literature review was made. In spite of similarities between abrasive wear and solid particle erosion, weld overlay hardfacing alloys that exhibit high abrasion resistance may not necessarily have good erosion resistance. The performance of weld overlay hardfacing alloys in erosive environments has not been studied in detail. It is believed that primary-solidified hard phases such as carbides and intermetallic compounds have a strong influence on erosion resistance of weld overlay hardfacing alloys. However, relationships between size, shape, and volume fraction of hard phases in a hardfacing alloys and erosion resistance were not established. Almost all hardfacing alloys can be separated into two major groups based upon chemical compositions of the primary solidified hard phases: (a) carbide hardening alloys (Co-base/carbide, WC-Co and some Fe base superalloys); and (b) intermetallic hardening alloys (Ni-base alloys, austenitic steels, iron-aluminides).

  9. Further Analysis of Thermal Control Coatings on MISSE for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Mike; McNulty, Robert; Finckenor, Miria

    2009-01-01

    Many different passive thermal control materials were flown as part of the Materials on International Space Station Experiment. Engineers and scientists at the Marshall Space Flight Center have analyzed a number of these materials, including Z93P zinc oxide/potassium silicate coating, YB-71P zinc orthotitanate/potassium silicate coating, NZOT, which is a low-cost alternative to YB-71P, several electrically conductive/static dissipative thermal control coatings, as well as black coatings for part marking and automated rendezvous and capture. These were exposed to the low Earth orbital environment of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and hard vacuum, though atomic oxygen exposure was very limited for some samples. Results from the one-year exposure of MISSE-3 and MISSE-4 are compared to the four-year exposure of MISSE-1 and MISSE-2. Solar absorptance, infrared emittance, and mass measurements indicate the durability of these materials to withstand the space environment. The effect of contamination from an active space station on the performance of white thermal control coatings is discussed.

  10. In vitro performance of ceramic coatings obtained by high velocity oxy-fuel spray.

    PubMed

    Melero, H; Garcia-Giralt, N; Fernández, J; Díez-Pérez, A; Guilemany, J M

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings obtained by plasma-spraying have been used for many years to improve biological performance of bone implants, but several studies have drawn attention to the problems arising from high temperatures and the lack of mechanical properties. In this study, plasma-spraying is substituted by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray, with lower temperatures reached, and TiO2 is added in low amounts to hydroxyapatite in order to improve the mechanical properties. Four conditions have been tested to evaluate which are those with better biological properties. Viability and proliferation tests, as well as differentiation assays and morphology observation, are performed with human osteoblast cultures onto the studied coatings. The hydroxyapatite-TiO2 coatings maintain good cell viability and proliferation, especially the cases with higher amorphous phase amount and specific surface, and promote excellent differentiation, with a higher ALP amount for these cases than for polystyrene controls. Observation by SEM corroborates this excellent behaviour. In conclusion, these coatings are a good alternative to those used industrially, and an interesting issue would be improving biological behaviour of the worst cases, which in turn show the better mechanical properties.

  11. Microtribological Performance of Metal-doped Molybdenum Disulfide Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, Pantcho

    2011-07-01

    The mechanical and tribological properties of pure MoS2, pure Au, Au-MoS2 and Ti-MoS2 coatings were evaluated and examined at a microscopic scale. The metal doped MoS2 coatings had varying metal content, 5-10at% for Ti and 10-90% for Au. Reciprocating sliding wear tests were performed with a range of initial Hertzian contact pressures from 0.41 to 3.5 GPa and in air at two humidity levels (i.e. "low" being 3-5%RH and "high" being 30-40%RH). Titanium and gold were chosen for this study as metal additives due to their positive influence on the mechanical properties of the coating. The friction and wear behavior at the micro-scale were directly compared to tribological properties at the macro-scale, which were performed using an in situ tribometer. Reciprocating micro- and macro- wear tests were performed with spherical diamond tip (with 10 and 50 mum radii) and a sapphire tip (with a radius of 3.175 mm), respectively. The range of initial Hertzian contact pressures for macro-scale (i.e. between 0.41GPa and 1.2GPa) overlapped with that for micro-scale. However, the initial Hertzian contact diameters (2*a) were very different (i.e. 0.8-2.3 mum for micro-scale and 60-180 mum for macro-scale). It was observed that the small addition of Ti or Au to MoS2 improved the microtribological properties (i.e. lower friction and less wear) compared to pure MoS2 coatings. The improved microtribological properties with metal additions were attributed to an increase in the mechanical properties, decrease in adhesion, and a decrease in the interfacial shear strength. In terms of the different length scales, lower steady state friction was observed for macrotribology compared to microtribology. The higher friction at the micro- scale was explained by the greater adhesion effects and additional velocity accommodation modes (e.g. microplowing or plowing). The microplowing or plowing at the microscopic scale was attributed to the tip roughness and the inability to sustain a stable

  12. Contamination control in hybrid microelectronic modules. Part 3: Specifications for coating material and process controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himmel, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    Resin systems for coating hybrids prior to hermetic sealing are described. The resin systems are a flexible silicone junction resin system and a flexible cycloaliphatic epoxy resin system. The coatings are intended for application to the hybrid after all the chips have been assembled and wire bonded, but prior to hermetic sealing of the package. The purpose of the coating is to control particulate contamination by immobilizing particles and by passivating the hybrid. Recommended process controls for the purpose of minimizing contamination in hybrid microcircuit packages are given. Emphasis is placed on those critical hybrid processing steps in which contamination is most likely to occur.

  13. Development of coatings to control electroosmosis in zero gravity electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupnick, A. C.

    1974-01-01

    A major problem confronting the operation of free fluid electrophoresis in zero gravity is the control of electrokinetic phenomena and, in particular, electroosmosis. Due to the severity of counter flow, as a result of electroosmosis, the electrical potential developed at the surface of shear must be maintained at near, or as close to, zero millivolts as possible. Based upon this investigation, it has been found that the amount of bound water or the degree of hydroxylation plays a major role in the control of this phenomena. Of necessity, factors, such as adhesion, biocompatibility, protein adsorption, and insolubility were considered in this investigation because of the long buffer-coating exposure times required by present space operations. Based upon tests employing microcapillary electrophoresis, it has been found that gamma amino propyl trihydroxysilane produced a coating which provides the lowest potential (minus 3.86 mv) at the surface of shear between the stationary and mobile layers. This coating has been soaked in both borate and saline buffers, up to three months, in a pH range of 6.5 to 10 without deleterious effects or a change in its ability to control electrokinetic effects.

  14. Optimum Me-DLC coatings and hard coatings for tribological performance[Diamond-Like Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Y.L.; Kao, W.H.

    2000-02-01

    In this study, hard coatings (TiN, TiCN, CrN, and CrCN) and Me-DLC coatings (Ti{sub x%}-C:H and Cr{sub x%}-C:H) were deposited on tungsten carbide (WC) substrate by multiarc physical vapor deposition (MAPVD) and unbalanced magnetron (UBM) sputtering, respectively. Counterbodies of the AISI 1045 steel cylinder and the AA7075T65l aluminum cylinder were used in the cylinder-on-disk, line-contact wear mode under dry condition; a counterbody of the AISI 51200 steel ball was used in the ball-on-disk, point-contact wear mode, under both dry and lubricated conditions. All wear tests were conducted with a reciprocating machine. After the tests, the most suitable coating for various counterbodies and test environments was selected. For the coating/1045 steel cylinder, the Ti{sub 10%}-C:H coating possesses excellent tribological characteristics. For the coating/7075T651 aluminum cylinder, hard coatings display excellent wear resistance. For the coating/steel ball, CrCN and CrN coatings display very little wear under both dry and lubricated conditions. On TiN and TiCN coatings, special wear mechanisms of material transfer, adhesion wear, and fatigue fracture occurred during initial tests under kerosene lubrication.

  15. Coatings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    This review covers analytical techniques applicable to the examination of coatings, raw materials, and substrates upon which coatings are placed. Techniques include chemical and electrochemical methods, chromatography, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, microscopy, and miscellaneous techniques. (MVL)

  16. Tribological performance of hybrid filtered arc-magnetron coatings - Part I: Coating deposition process and basic coating properties characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Gorokhovsky, Vladimir; Bowman, C.; Gannon, Paul E.; VanVorous, D.; Voevodin, A. A.; Rutkowski, A.; Muratore, C.; Smith, Richard J.; Kayani, Asghar N.; Gelles, David S.; Shutthanandan, V.; Trusov, B. G.

    2006-12-04

    Aircraft propulsion applications require low-friction and wear resistant surfaces that operate under high contact loads in severe environments. Recent research on supertough and low friction nanocomposite coatings produced with hybrid plasma deposition processes was demonstrated to have a high potential for such demanding applications. However, industrially scalable hybrid plasma technologies are needed for their commercial realization. The Large area Filtered Arc Deposition (LAFAD) process provides atomically smooth coatings at high deposition rates over large surface areas. The LAFAD technology allows functionally graded, multilayer, super-lattice and nanocomposite architectures of multi-elemental coatings via electro-magnetic mixing of two plasma flows composed of different metal ion vapors. Further advancement can be realized through a combinatorial process using a hybrid filtered arc-magnetron deposition system. In the present study, multilayer and nanostructured TiCrCN/TiCr +TiBC composite cermet coatings were deposited by the hybrid filtered arc-magnetron process. Filtered plasma streams from arc evaporated Ti and Cr targets, and two unbalanced magnetron sputtered B4C targets, were directed to the substrates in the presence of reactive gases. A multiphase nanocomposite coating architecture was designed to provide the optimal combination of corrosion and wear resistance of advanced steels (Pyrowear 675) used in aerospace bearing and gear applications. Coatings were characterized using SEM/EDS, XPS and RBS for morphology and chemistry, XRD and TEM for structural analyses, wafer curvature and nanoindentation for stress and mechanical properties, and Rockwell and scratch indentions for adhesion. Coating properties were evaluated for a variety of coating architectures. Thermodynamic modeling was used for estimation of phase composition of the top TiBC coating segment. Correlations between coating chemistry, structure and mechanical properties are discussed.

  17. Phase-diffractive coating for daylight control on smart window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perennes, Frederic; Twardowski, Patrice J.; Gesbert, D.; Meyrueis, Patrick

    1992-11-01

    Daylight can be processed by a smart window in a transmission, reflective, refractive, and diffractive mode. In the future an optimization will be realized by a mixing of these approaches depending on the applied cases. Non-imaging diffractive optics has its roots in the work done in holographic diffractive coating for head up displays (HUD) and helmet mounted displays. For having globally good results on smart window with diffractive coating, a very high diffraction efficiency must be reached close to 100% without having a too important lowering of the control of other parameters of the light processed by a smart window (direction and frequency control essentially). We propose a method for designing, realizing, and using diffractive coating for a smart window that is based on a new organic material and diffractive model that were already validated in HUD. Potential low cost is possible for mass production on a large surface with an adapted investment. We describe the present technology and its limits and the ones that can be reached in the future. In this work, we present a holographic way to modify the slant of sun rays through a window, and to filter infrared radiations by using dichromated gelatin material. In this way it would be able to ensure a more uniform lighting and a more pleasant temperature inside buildings or vehicles, without using dye or photochromics glasses.

  18. Novel hybrid coatings with controlled wettability by composite nanoparticle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hritcu, Doina; Dodi, Gianina; Iordache, Mirabela L.; Draganescu, Dan; Sava, Elena; Popa, Marcel I.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate novel hybrid materials as potential candidates for producing coatings with hierarchical roughness and controlled wetting behaviour. Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles obtained by co-precipitation were embedded in matrices synthesized by radical graft co-polymerization of butyl acrylate (BA), butyl methacrylate (BMA), hexyl acrylate (HA) or styrene (ST) with ethylene glycol di-methacrylate (EGDMA) onto previously modified chitosan bearing surface vinyl groups. The resulting composite particles were characterized regarding their average size, composition and magnetic properties. Hybrid thin films containing suspension of composite particles in ethanol and pre-hydrolysed hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (HDTS) as a coupling/crosslinking agent were deposited by spin coating or spraying. The films were cured by heating and subsequently characterized regarding their morphology (scanning electron microscopy), contact angle with water and adhesion to substrate (scratch test). The structure-property relationship is discussed.

  19. Preparation, Characterization and Performance of CVR Coatings for PBR Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. W.; Barletta, R. E.; Vanier, P. E.; Dowell, M. B.; Lennartz, J. W.

    1994-07-01

    As a part of the US Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Program, a process to deposit refractory carbide coatings using a fluidized bed chemical vapor reaction (CVR) process has been developed. Several types of coating have been applied to the graphite substrate which served as a surrogate fuel kernel. The coatings include NbC in various thicknesses and a bilayer coating consisting of NbC and TaC with an intermediate layer of pyrolytic graphite(PG). They were applied to a surrogate fuel kernel consisting of a PG-coated, graphite particle. The particles were characterized prior to test for coating thickness, grain size, stoichiometry (NbC only), free carbon and surface area. The initial screening tests for these coatings consisted of heating in flowing hot hydrogen at one atmosphere. The carbon loss from these particles was measured as a function of time. Exposure temperatures ranging from 2500 to 3000 K were used and samples were exposed for up to 14 minutes in a cyclical fashion, cooling to room temperature between exposures. Microscopic examination of the coatings after exposure was conducted. The rate of weight loss from these particles can be characterized as a simple Arrhenius process. These rates are compared to that from other tests of coated materials under similar conditions.

  20. Development of space stable thermal control coatings for use on large space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilligan, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    A reserach project to develop space stable thermal control coatings for large surfaces is discussed. Four major tasks are considered: (1) pigment development, (2) binder development, (3) environmental effects evaluations, and (4) general coatings investigations.

  1. Evaluation of commercially supplied silver coated Teflon for spacecraft temperature control usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaney, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    A series of tests are described which were performed to evaluate the acceptability of a commercially supplied silver backed teflon thermal control coating relative to teflon previously coated at GSFC. Optical measurements made on numerous samples indicate that the commercial material possesses an average solar absorptance of 0.085, an emittance of 0.76 and an average alpha/epsilon equal to 0.112, all of which are equivalent to the GSFC coated teflon. The emittance of the protective inconel backing was found to be 0.037. The coating is shown to have good adhesion at the Ag-teflon interface and exposure to UV irradiation uncovered no coating irregularities. Temperature cycling over the range -135 C to +200 C produced crazing in the evaporated Ag layer as expected but no delamination was observed. The suitability of Mystik no. 7366 and 3M no. 467 adhesives as bonding agents for the metallized polymer is demonstrated. Various problems associated with production reproducibility and selection of a proper bonding process are discussed.

  2. Dexamethasone electrically controlled release from polypyrrole-coated nanostructured electrodes.

    PubMed

    Leprince, Lucas; Dogimont, Audrey; Magnin, Delphine; Demoustier-Champagne, Sophie

    2010-03-01

    One of the key challenges to engineering neural interfaces is to reduce their immune response toward implanted electrodes. One potential approach to minimize or eliminate this undesired early inflammatory tissue reaction and to maintain signal transmission quality over time is the delivery of anti-inflammatory biomolecules in the vicinity of the implant. Here, we report on a facile and reproducible method for the fabrication of high surface area nanostructured electrodes coated with an electroactive polymer, polypyrrole (PPy) that can be used to precisely release drug by applying an electrical stimuli. The method consists of the electropolymerization of PPy incorporated with drug, dexamethasone (DEX), onto a brush of metallic nanopillars, obtained by electrodeposition of the metal within the nanopores of gold-coated polycarbonate template. The study of the release of DEX triggered by electrochemical stimuli indicates that the system is a true electrically controlled release system. Moreover, it appears that the presence of metallic nanowires onto the electrode surface improves the adherence between the polymer and the electrode and increases the electroactivity of the PPy coating.

  3. Method of Producing Controlled Thermal Expansion Coat for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J. (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor); Aikin, Beverly J. M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved thermal barrier coating and method for producing and applying such is disclosed herein. The thermal barrier coatings includes a high temperature substrate, a first bond coat layer applied to the substrate of MCrAlX and a second bond coat layer of MCrAlX with particles of a particulate dispersed throughout the MCrAlX and the preferred particulate is Al2O3. The particles of the particulate dispersed throughout the second bond coat layer preferably have a diameter of less then the height of the peaks of the second bond coat layer or a diameter of less than 5 micron. The method of producing the second bond coat layer may either include the steps of mechanical alloying of particles throughout the second bond coat layer, attrition milling the particles of the particulate throughout the second bond coat layer, or using electrophoresis to disperse the particles throughout the second bond coat layer. In the preferred embodiment of the invention the first bond coat layer is applied to the substrate. and then the second bond coat layer is thermally sprayed onto the first bond coat layer. Further, in a preferred embodiment of the invention a ceramic insulating layer covers the second bond coat layer.

  4. Characterization and Performance of Magnetron-Sputtered Zirconium Coatings Deposited on 9Cr-1Mo Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Akash; Murugesan, Somasundaram; Parameswaran, P.; Priya, R.; Thirumurugessan, R.; Muthukumar, N.; Mohandas, E.; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Krishnamurthi, J.

    2016-09-01

    Zirconium coatings of different thicknesses have been deposited at 773 K on 9Cr-1Mo steel substrate using pulsed DC magnetron sputtering. These coatings were heat treated in vacuum at two different temperatures (1173 and 1273 K) for one hour. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of Zr-coated samples revealed the formation of α-phase (HCP structure) of Zr. XRD analysis of heat-treated samples show the presence of Zr3Fe and Zr2Fe intermetallics. The lattice parameter of these coatings was calculated, and it matches with the bulk values when the thickness reached 2µm. In order to understand this, crystallite size and strain values of these coatings were calculated from XRD plots employing Williamson-Hall method. In order to assess the performance of the coatings, systematic corrosion tests were carried out. The corrosion current density calculated from the polarization behavior showed that the corrosion current density of the uncoated 9Cr-1Mo steel was higher than the coated sample before and after the heat treatment. Studies using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy confirmed that the coated steel has higher impedance than the uncoated steel. The corrosion resistance of 9Cr1Mo steel had improved after Zr coating. However, the corrosion resistance of the coating after heat treatment decreased when compared to the as-deposited coating. The microstructure and composition of the surface oxide film influence the corrosion resistance of the Zr-coated 9Cr1Mo steel.

  5. High Performance Optical Coatings Utilizing Tailored Refractive Index Nanoporous Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poxson, David J.

    Refractive index is perhaps the most important quantity in optics. It is particularly relevant in the field of optical coatings, where the refractive index appears in virtually every optics equation as a figure of merit. Recently it has been demonstrated through control of the deposition angle during oblique-angle electron-beam deposition, nanoporous films of virtually any desired porosity may be accurately deposited. As the porosity of a nanoporous film directly relates to its effective refractive index, the refractive index value of a film may be tailored to any value between that of the bulk material and close to that of air. These two characteristics, namely; (i) tailored-refractive index and (ii) very low-refractive index values close to that of air, offer significant advantages in the design and optical performance in all optical coating applications. In this dissertation we explore optical coating applications whose performance can be greatly enhanced by utilization of a tailored- and low-refractive index nanoporous material system. One such important application is in the design and fabrication of broadband, omnidirectional antireflection (AR) coatings on solar cell devices. To harness the full spectrum of solar energy, Fresnel reflections at the surface of a photovoltaic cell must be reduced as much as possible over the relevant solar wavelength range and over a wide range of incident angles. However, the development of AR coatings embodying omni-directionality over a wide range of wavelengths is challenging. By utilizing the tailored- and low-refractive index properties of the nanoporous material system, in conjunction with a computational genetic algorithm and a predictive quantitative model for the porosity of such nanoporous films, truly optimized AR coatings can be designed and fabricated on solar cells. Here we show that these optimized AR structures demonstrate significant improvement to overall device efficiency. Traditionally, nanoporous films

  6. Research of the coating resin performance of the polarization-maintaining fiber coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokui; Shao, Hongfeng; Xu, Hongjie; Yang, Yuanhong

    2006-11-01

    The coating resin performance of the Polarization-Maintaining fiber coil is an important fact to affect the performance of the FOG. It is one of some problems in the fact during the industrialization of the FOG. From the action and effect on the two important performance parameters such as temperature and vibration of the fiber ring and Fiber Optical Gyroscope (FOG). In allusion to the factual conditions of the FOG, all aspects of experiments are done and the experiment results are analyzed. The experiment and analysis results show that the facts to affect coating resin performance of the Polarization-Maintaining fiber coil is brought due to the unsuitable coating adhesive. The amount and uniformity of coating resin are the two main facts of the effect. In addition, the temperature performance of the resin and the remaining stress which are the facts to affect the coating resin performance of the Polarization-Maintaining fiber coil can not be ignored.

  7. Induction plasma calcining of pigment particles for thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    Induction plasma heating techniques were studied for calcining zinc orthotitanate particles for use in thermal control coatings. Previous studies indicated that the optimum calcining temperature is between 1400 and 1750 C. An intermediate temperature (1670 C) was chosen as a reference point for running a temperature series at the reference point and 220 C on both sides. The effect of varying chamber temperature on the reflectance spectra, before and after vacuum UV irradiation, is presented. The correlation between Zn2Ti04 paramagnetic resonance activity and its susceptibility to vacuum UV damage is discussed.

  8. Advanced Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings: Performance and Future Directions (Invited paper)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and performance will be emphasized. Advanced thermal barrier coatings have been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability and lower conductivity. The coating systems have been demonstrated for high temperature combustor applications. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the toughened thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion, impact and high heat-flux damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be described.

  9. Performance Evaluation and Modeling of Erosion Resistant Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to the rotorcraft engine performance and durability. The objective of this work was to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments, thus validating a new thermal barrier coating turbine blade technology for future rotorcraft applications. A high velocity burner rig based erosion test approach was established and a new series of rare earth oxide- and TiO2/Ta2O5- alloyed, ZrO2-based low conductivity thermal barrier coatings were designed and processed. The low conductivity thermal barrier coating systems demonstrated significant improvements in the erosion resistance. A comprehensive model based on accumulated strain damage low cycle fatigue is formulated for blade erosion life prediction. The work is currently aiming at the simulated engine erosion testing of advanced thermal barrier coated turbine blades to establish and validate the coating life prediction models.

  10. 49 CFR 195.559 - What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.559 Section 195.559 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.559 What coating material may I use for external corrosion control? Coating material for external corrosion control...

  11. 49 CFR 195.559 - What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.559 Section 195.559 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.559 What coating material may I use for external corrosion control? Coating material for external corrosion control...

  12. 49 CFR 195.559 - What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.559 Section 195.559 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.559 What coating material may I use for external corrosion control? Coating material for external corrosion control...

  13. Modeling and analysis of high-performance, multicolored anti-reflection coatings for solar cells.

    PubMed

    Lumb, Matthew P; Yoon, Woojun; Bailey, Christopher G; Scheiman, David; Tischler, Joseph G; Walters, Robert J

    2013-07-01

    In this work solar cell anti-reflection coatings tuned to give a specific hue under solar illumination are investigated. We demonstrate that it is possible to form patterned coatings with large color contrast and high transmittance. We use colorimetric and thin film optics models to explore the relationship between the color and performance of bilayer anti-reflection coatings on Si, and predict the photocurrent generation from an example Si solar cell. The colorimetric predictions were verified by measuring a series of coatings deposited on Si substrates. Finally, a patterned Si sample was produced using a simple, low-cost photolithography procedure to selectively etch only the top layer of a bilayer coating to demonstrate a high-performance anti-reflection coating with strong color contrast.

  14. Ethanol-resistant polymeric film coatings for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Rosiaux, Y; Muschert, S; Chokshi, R; Leclercq, B; Siepmann, F; Siepmann, J

    2013-07-10

    The sensitivity of controlled release dosage forms to the presence of ethanol in the gastro intestinal tract is critical, if the incorporated drug is potent and exhibits severe side effects. This is for instance the case for most opioid drugs. The co-ingestion of alcoholic beverages can lead to dose dumping and potentially fatal consequences. For these reasons the marketing of hydromorphone HCl extended release capsules (Palladone) was suspended. The aim of this study was to develop a novel type of controlled release film coatings, which are ethanol-resistant: even the presence of high ethanol concentrations in the surrounding bulk fluid (e.g., up to 40%) should not affect the resulting drug release kinetics. Interestingly, blends of ethylcellulose and medium or high viscosity guar gums provide such ethanol resistance. Theophylline release from pellets coated with the aqueous ethylcellulose dispersion Aquacoat® ECD 30 containing 10 or 15% medium and high viscosity guar gum was virtually unaffected by the addition of 40% ethanol to the release medium. Furthermore, drug release was shown to be long term stable from this type of dosage forms under ambient and stress conditions (without packaging material), upon appropriate curing.

  15. Advanced Antireflection Coatings for High-Performance Solar Energy Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Noren

    2015-01-01

    Phase II objectives: Develop and refine antireflection coatings incorporating lanthanum titanate as an intermediate refractive index material; Investigate wet/dry thermal oxidation of aluminum containing semiconductor compounds as a means of forming a more transparent window layer with equal or better optical properties than its unoxidized form; Develop a fabrication process that allows integration of the oxidized window layer and maintains the necessary electrical properties for contacting the solar cell; Conduct an experimental demonstration of the best candidates for improved antireflection coatings.

  16. ACCESS: Detector Control and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Matthew J.; Kaiser, M.; McCandliss, S. R.; Rauscher, B. J.; Kimble, R. A.; Kruk, J. W.; Wright, E. L.; Bohlin, R.; Kurucz, R. L.; Riess, A. G.; Pelton, R.; Deustua, S. E.; Dixon, W. V.; Sahnow, D. J.; Mott, D. B.; Wen, Y.; Benford, D. J.; Gardner, J. P.; Feldman, P. D.; Moos, H. W.; Lampton, M.; Perlmutter, S.; Woodgate, B. E.

    2014-01-01

    ACCESS, Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars, is a series of rocket-borne sub-orbital missions and ground-based experiments that will enable improvements in the precision of the astrophysical flux scale through the transfer of absolute laboratory detector standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to a network of stellar standards with a calibration accuracy of 1% and a spectral resolving power of 500 across the 0.35 to 1.7 micron bandpass (companion poster, Kaiser et al.). The flight detector and detector spare have been selected and integrated with their electronics and flight mount. The controller electronics have been flight qualified. Vibration testing to launch loads and thermal vacuum testing of the detector, mount, and housing have been successfully performed. Further improvements to the flight controller housing have been made. A cryogenic ground test system has been built. Dark current and read noise tests have been performed, yielding results consistent with the initial characterization tests of the detector performed by Goddard Space Flight Center’s Detector Characterization Lab (DCL). Detector control software has been developed and implemented for ground testing. Performance and integration of the detector and controller with the flight software will be presented. NASA APRA sounding rocket grant NNX08AI65G supports this work.

  17. Radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base. Volume 2: Long-term monitoring and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Through a partnership with a federal site, the utility serving the site, a manufacturer of an energy-related technology, and other organizations associated with these interests, DOE can evaluate a new technology. The results of the program give federal agency decision makers more hands-on information with which to validate a decision to utilize a new technology in their facilities. This is the second volume of a two-volume report that describes the effects of radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB) in Florida by ThermShield International. ORNL`s Buildings Technology Center (BTC) was assigned the responsibility for gathering, analyzing, and reporting on the data to describe the effects of the coatings. The first volume described the monitoring plan and its implementation, the results of pre-coating monitoring, the coating installation, results from fresh coatings compared to pre-coating results, and a plan to decommission the monitoring equipment. This second volume updates and completes the presentation of data to compare performance of fresh coatings with weathered coatings.

  18. Development of coatings to control electroosmosis in zero gravity electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupnick, A. C.

    1974-01-01

    A major problem confronting the operation of free fluid electrophoresis in zero gravity is the control of electrokinetic phenomena and, in particular, electroosmosis. Due to the severity of counter flow as a result of electroosmosis, the electrical potential developed at the surface of shear must be maintained at near, or as close, to zero millivolts as possible. Based upon this investigation, it has been found that the amount of bound water or the degree of hydroxylation plays a major role in the control of this phenomenon. Based upon tests employing microcapillary electrophoresis, it has been found that gamma amino propyl trihydroxysilane produced a coating which provides the lowest potential (about 3.86 mV) at the surface of shear between the stationary and mobile layers.

  19. Bioreactor control improves bioprocess performance.

    PubMed

    Simutis, Rimvydas; Lübbert, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    The performance of bioreactors is not only determined by productivity but also by process quality, which is mainly determined by variances in the process variables. As fluctuations in these quantities directly affect the variability in the product properties, combatting distortions is the main task of practical quality assurance. The straightforward way of reducing this variability is keeping the product formation process tightly under control. Purpose of this keynote is to show that there is enough evidence in literature showing that the performance of the fermentation processes can significantly be improved by feedback control. Most of the currently used open loop control procedures can be replaced by relatively simple feedback techniques. It is shown by practical examples that such a retrofitting does not require significant changes in the well-established equipment. Feedback techniques are best in assuring high reproducibility of the industrial cultivation processes and thus in assuring the quality of their products. Many developments in supervising and controlling industrial fermentations can directly be taken over in manufacturing processes. Even simple feedback controllers can efficiently improve the product quality. It's the time now that manufacturers follow the developments in most other industries and improve process quality by automatic feedback control. PMID:26228573

  20. Bioreactor control improves bioprocess performance.

    PubMed

    Simutis, Rimvydas; Lübbert, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    The performance of bioreactors is not only determined by productivity but also by process quality, which is mainly determined by variances in the process variables. As fluctuations in these quantities directly affect the variability in the product properties, combatting distortions is the main task of practical quality assurance. The straightforward way of reducing this variability is keeping the product formation process tightly under control. Purpose of this keynote is to show that there is enough evidence in literature showing that the performance of the fermentation processes can significantly be improved by feedback control. Most of the currently used open loop control procedures can be replaced by relatively simple feedback techniques. It is shown by practical examples that such a retrofitting does not require significant changes in the well-established equipment. Feedback techniques are best in assuring high reproducibility of the industrial cultivation processes and thus in assuring the quality of their products. Many developments in supervising and controlling industrial fermentations can directly be taken over in manufacturing processes. Even simple feedback controllers can efficiently improve the product quality. It's the time now that manufacturers follow the developments in most other industries and improve process quality by automatic feedback control.

  1. Fluorescence of thermal control coatings on S0069 and A0114

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwiener, James M.; Mell, Richard J.; Peters, Palmer N.; Wilkes, Donald R.; Miller, Edgar R.; Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Many of the thermal control surfaces exposed to the space environment during the 5.8 year LDEF mission experienced changes in fluorescence. All of the thermal control coatings flown on LDEF experiments S0069 and A0114 were characterized for fluorescence under ambient conditions. Some of the black coatings, having protective overcoats, appear bright yellow under ultraviolet exposure. Urethane based coatings exhibited emission spectra shifts toward longer wavelengths in the visible range. Zinc oxide pigment based coatings experienced a quenching of fluorescence, while zinc orthotitanate pigment based and other ceramic type coatings had no measurable fluorescence.

  2. Corrosion protection performance of porous strontium hydroxyapatite coating on polypyrrole coated 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Gopi, D; Ramya, S; Rajeswari, D; Kavitha, L

    2013-07-01

    Polypyrrole/strontium hydroxyapatite bilayer coatings were achieved on 316L stainless steel (316L SS) by the electropolymerisation of pyrrole from sodium salicylate solution followed by the electrodeposition of porous strontium hydroxyapatite. The formation and the morphology of the bilayer coatings were characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), respectively. The corrosion resistance of the coated 316L SS specimens was investigated in Ringer's solution by electrochemical techniques and the results were substantiated with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The passive film underneath the polypyrrole layer is effective in protecting 316L SS against corrosion in Ringer's solution. Moreover, we believe that the top porous strontium hydroxyapatite layer can provide potential bioactivity to the 316L SS.

  3. Corrosion protection performance of porous strontium hydroxyapatite coating on polypyrrole coated 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Gopi, D; Ramya, S; Rajeswari, D; Kavitha, L

    2013-07-01

    Polypyrrole/strontium hydroxyapatite bilayer coatings were achieved on 316L stainless steel (316L SS) by the electropolymerisation of pyrrole from sodium salicylate solution followed by the electrodeposition of porous strontium hydroxyapatite. The formation and the morphology of the bilayer coatings were characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), respectively. The corrosion resistance of the coated 316L SS specimens was investigated in Ringer's solution by electrochemical techniques and the results were substantiated with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The passive film underneath the polypyrrole layer is effective in protecting 316L SS against corrosion in Ringer's solution. Moreover, we believe that the top porous strontium hydroxyapatite layer can provide potential bioactivity to the 316L SS. PMID:23475060

  4. Osmium coated diffraction grating in the Space Shuttle environment - Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Samples coated with osmium were flown on the early Shuttle test flights, and on the return of these samples, the osmium coating was found to have disappeared, evidently due to the oxidation of the material in the atomic oxygen atmosphere. An instrument flown on the Spacelab 1 mission comprised an array of five spectrometers covering the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) to near-IR wavelengths. The EUV spectrometer contained an osmium-coated reflective grating located fairly deep within the instruments. Here, results of an assessment of the reflectivity and stability of the osmium surface over the course of the ten-day mission are reported. It is concluded that the osmium reflective coating remained stable relative to the spectrometer coated with MgF2 over the course of the mission. In addition, the ratio of sensitivity of these two spectrometers did not change in any major way from the time of the laboratory calibration until the time of flight two years later. Any changes are within the 50-percent calibration uncertainty.

  5. Coatings for laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1981-12-18

    Optical coatings are used in lasers systems for fusion research to control beam propagation and reduce surface reflection losses. The performance of coatings is important in the design, reliability, energy output, and cost of the laser systems. Significant developments in coating technology are required for future lasers for fusion research and eventual power reactors.

  6. Understanding the role of dip-coating process parameters in the mechanical performance of polymer-coated bioglass robocast scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Motealleh, Azadeh; Eqtesadi, Siamak; Perera, Fidel Hugo; Pajares, Antonia; Guiberteau, Fernando; Miranda, Pedro

    2016-12-01

    The effect of different dip-coating variables-solvent, deposition temperature and polymer concentration-on the mechanical performance of polycaprolactone-coated 45S5 bioglass robocast scaffolds is systematically analyzed in this work. The reproducible geometry of the scaffolds produced by this additive manufacturing technique makes them an optimal model system and facilitates the analysis. The results suggest that the mechanical performance of the hybrid scaffolds is improved monotonically with polymer concentration, but this concentration cannot be increased indefinitely if the macroporosity interconnectivity, and thus the scaffold׳s capacity to promote tissue ingrowth, are to be preserved. An optimal concentration, and therefore viscosity (~1-4Pas in the present case), exists for any given set of process variables (scaffold geometry and material, polymer, solvent and process temperature) that yields coatings with optimal reinforcement and minimal reduction of scaffold functionality. Solvent and process temperature do not directly affect the strengthening provided by the polymeric coating. However they can determine the maximum concentration at the critical viscosity, and thereby the maximum achievable mechanical performance of the resulting hybrid scaffold.

  7. Understanding the role of dip-coating process parameters in the mechanical performance of polymer-coated bioglass robocast scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Motealleh, Azadeh; Eqtesadi, Siamak; Perera, Fidel Hugo; Pajares, Antonia; Guiberteau, Fernando; Miranda, Pedro

    2016-12-01

    The effect of different dip-coating variables-solvent, deposition temperature and polymer concentration-on the mechanical performance of polycaprolactone-coated 45S5 bioglass robocast scaffolds is systematically analyzed in this work. The reproducible geometry of the scaffolds produced by this additive manufacturing technique makes them an optimal model system and facilitates the analysis. The results suggest that the mechanical performance of the hybrid scaffolds is improved monotonically with polymer concentration, but this concentration cannot be increased indefinitely if the macroporosity interconnectivity, and thus the scaffold׳s capacity to promote tissue ingrowth, are to be preserved. An optimal concentration, and therefore viscosity (~1-4Pas in the present case), exists for any given set of process variables (scaffold geometry and material, polymer, solvent and process temperature) that yields coatings with optimal reinforcement and minimal reduction of scaffold functionality. Solvent and process temperature do not directly affect the strengthening provided by the polymeric coating. However they can determine the maximum concentration at the critical viscosity, and thereby the maximum achievable mechanical performance of the resulting hybrid scaffold. PMID:27522314

  8. Thermo-Mechanical Analysis of Coated Particle Fuel Experiencing a Fast Control Rod Ejection Transient

    SciTech Connect

    Ortensi, J.; Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-10-01

    A rapid increase of the temperature and the mechanical stress is expected in TRISO coated particle fuel that experiences a fast Total Control Rod Ejection (CRE) transient event. During this event the reactor power in the pebble bed core increases significantly for a short time interval. The power is deposited instantly and locally in the fuel kernel. This could result in a rapid increase of the pressure in the buffer layer of the coated fuel particle and, consequently, in an increase of the coating stresses. These stresses determine the mechanical failure probability of the coatings, which serve as the containment of radioactive fission products in the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR). A new calculation procedure has been implemented at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), which analyzes the transient fuel performance behavior of TRISO fuel particles in PBRs. This early capability can easily be extended to prismatic designs, given the availability of neutronic and thermal-fluid solvers. The full-core coupled neutronic and thermal-fluid analysis has been modeled with CYNOD-THERMIX. The temperature fields for the fuel kernel and the particle coatings, as well as the gas pressures in the buffer layer, are calculated with the THETRIS module explicitly during the transient calculation. Results from this module are part of the feedback loop within the neutronic-thermal fluid iterations performed for each time step. The temperature and internal pressure values for each pebble type in each region of the core are then input to the PArticle STress Analysis (PASTA) code, which determines the particle coating stresses and the fraction of failed particles. This paper presents an investigation of a Total Control Rod Ejection (TCRE) incident in the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular reactor design using the above described calculation procedure. The transient corresponds to a reactivity insertion of $3 (~2000 pcm) reaching 35 times the nominal power in 0.5 seconds. For each position in the core

  9. Modeling controlled nutrient release from polymer coated fertilizers: diffusion release from single granules.

    PubMed

    Shaviv, Avi; Raban, Smadar; Zaidel, Elina

    2003-05-15

    A comprehensive model describing the complex and "non-Fickian" (mathematically nonlinear) nature of the release from single granules of membrane coated, controlled release fertilizers (CRFs) is proposed consisting of three stages: i. a lag period during which water penetrates the coating of the granule dissolving part of the solid fertilizer in it ii. a period of linear release during which water penetration into and release out occur concomitantly while the total volume of the granules remains practically constant; and iii. a period of "decaying release", starting as the concentration inside the granule starts to decrease. A mathematical model was developed based on vapor and nutrient diffusion equations. The model predicts the release stages in terms of measurable geometrical and chemophysical parameters such as the following: the product of granule radius and coating thickness, water and solute permeability, saturation concentration of the fertilizer, and its density. The model successfully predicts the complex and "sigmoidal" pattern of release that is essential for matching plant temporal demand to ensure high agronomic and environmental effectiveness. It also lends itself to more complex statistical formulations which account for the large variability within large populations of coated CRFs and can serve for further improving CRF production and performance. PMID:12785532

  10. Modeling controlled nutrient release from polymer coated fertilizers: diffusion release from single granules.

    PubMed

    Shaviv, Avi; Raban, Smadar; Zaidel, Elina

    2003-05-15

    A comprehensive model describing the complex and "non-Fickian" (mathematically nonlinear) nature of the release from single granules of membrane coated, controlled release fertilizers (CRFs) is proposed consisting of three stages: i. a lag period during which water penetrates the coating of the granule dissolving part of the solid fertilizer in it ii. a period of linear release during which water penetration into and release out occur concomitantly while the total volume of the granules remains practically constant; and iii. a period of "decaying release", starting as the concentration inside the granule starts to decrease. A mathematical model was developed based on vapor and nutrient diffusion equations. The model predicts the release stages in terms of measurable geometrical and chemophysical parameters such as the following: the product of granule radius and coating thickness, water and solute permeability, saturation concentration of the fertilizer, and its density. The model successfully predicts the complex and "sigmoidal" pattern of release that is essential for matching plant temporal demand to ensure high agronomic and environmental effectiveness. It also lends itself to more complex statistical formulations which account for the large variability within large populations of coated CRFs and can serve for further improving CRF production and performance.

  11. Long-Term Anti-Corrosion Performance of a Conducting Polymer-Based Coating System for Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Tongyan; Yu, Qifeng

    2016-06-01

    The long-term durability of a two-layer coating system was evaluated by two accelerated corrosion tests, i.e., the ASTM B117 Salt spray test and the ASTM D5894 Cyclic salt fog/UV exposure test, and a series of surface analyses. The coating system was developed for protecting structural steels from corrosion, including a functional primer made of intrinsically conducting polymer (ICP) and a protective topcoat. The standard pull-off test per ASTM D4541 was employed for characterizing the adhesion of the coating systems to substrate, aided by visual examination of the surface deterioration of the samples. The ICP-based systems demonstrated superior long-term anti-corrosion capacity when a polyurethane topcoat is used. The ICP-based primer made of a waterborne epoxy gave poorer anti-corrosion performance than the ICP-based primer made of regular non-waterborne epoxy, which can be attributed to the lower adhesion the waterborne epoxy demonstrated to the substrate surface. The zinc-rich control systems showed good anti-corrosion durability; however, they may produce excessive oxidative products of zinc to cause coating delamination. Based on the test results, the two-layer coating system consisting of an ICP-based primer and a polyurethane topcoat outperforms the conventional zinc-rich coating systems for corrosion protection of steels.

  12. Performance characteristics of zinc-rich coatings applied to carbon steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paton, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    A program was conducted to evaluate the performance of topcoated and untopcoated zinc-rich coatings. Sacrificial coatings of this type are required for protecting carbon steel structures from the aggressive KSC sea coast environment. A total of 59 commercially available zinc-rich coatings and 47 topcoated materials were exposed for an 18-month period. Test panels were placed in special racks placed approximately 30.5 m (100 feet) above the high tide line at the KSC Corrosion Test Site. Laboratory tests to determine the temperature resistance, abrasion resistance, and adhesion of the untopcoated zinc-rich coatings were also performed. It has been concluded that: (1) The inorganic types of zinc-rich coatings are far superior to the organic types in the KSC environment. (2) Organic zinc-rich coatings applied at 0.1 - 0.15 mm (4-6 mils) film thickness provide better corrosion protection than when applied at the manufacturers' recommended nominal film thickness of .08 mm (3 mils). (3) Topcoats are not necessary, or even desirable, when used in conjunction with zinc-rich coatings in the KSC environment. (4) Some types of inorganic zinc-rich coatings require an extended outdoor weathering period in order to obtain adequate mechanical properties. and (5) A properly formulated inorganic zinc-rich coating is not affected by a 24-hour thermal exposure to 400 C (752 F).

  13. Experimental study of spray cooling performance on micro-porous coated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoon-Ho; Choi, Chihwan; Lee, Kyu-Jung; Han, Donghyouck

    2009-08-01

    Experiments on evaporative spray cooling of flat heaters with plain and micro-porous coated surfaces were performed in this study. Micro-porous coated surfaces were made by using the DOM [Diamond particle, Omegabond 101, Methyl-Ethyl-Keton] coating method. In pure air-jet cooling, micro-porous coating did not show heat transfer improvement over plain surface. In spray cooling, however, three different flow patterns (complete wetting, evaporative wetting and dryout) were observed on both plain and micro-porous coated surfaces. The effects of various operating conditions, such as water flow rate, particle size, and coating thickness on the micro-porous coated surface were investigated. It was found that the level of surface wetting was an important factor in determining the performance of spray cooling. The level of surface wetting depended on the balance between the amount of liquid absorbed by capillary force over porosity and the amount of liquid evaporated. A micro-porous coated surface has a very high cooling capacity, especially in the evaporative wetting zone. The liquid flow rate and coating thickness are significant factors in the evaporative wetting zone, but are not in the complete wetting zone and the dryout zone.

  14. Optical coating performance for heat reflectors of JWST-ISIM electronic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Bousquet, Robert; Garrison, Matt; Perrygo, Chuck; Threat, Felix; Rashford, Robert

    2008-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) consists of an infrared-optimized Optical Telescope Element (OTE) that is cooled down to 40 degrees Kelvin. A second adjacent component to the OTE is the Integrated Science Instrument Module, or ISIM. This module includes the electronic compartment, which provides the mounting surfaces and ambient thermally controlled environment for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the 200 watts generated from the ISIM structure away from the OTE is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft's own heat does not interfere with the infrared light detected from distant cosmic sources. This technical challenge is overcome by a thermal subsystem unit that provides passive cooling to the ISIM control electronics. The proposed design of this thermal radiator consists of a lightweight structure made out of composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings. In this paper, we will present characterizations of the coating emittance, bidirectional reflectance, and mechanical structure design that will affect the performance of this passive cooling reflector.

  15. Quality control of the tribological coating PS212

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher; Deadmore, Daniel L.

    1989-01-01

    PS212 is a self-lubricating, composite coating that is applied by the plasma spray process. It is a functional lubricating coating from 25 C (or lower) to 900 C. The coating is prepared from a blend of three different powders with very dissimilar properties. Therefore, the final chemical composition and lubricating effectiveness of the coatings are very sensitive to the process variables used in their preparation. Defined here are the relevant variables. The process and analytical procedures that will result in satisfactory tribological coatings are discussed.

  16. Enhanced electrochemical performance of nanoparticle coated polyethylene separator surface for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaprakash, Prabhavathy; Sen, P. K.; Sivaprakash, S.

    2014-12-01

    The separator (membrane) in a lithium ion rechargeable battery plays an indispensable role by preventing material and electrical contact of positive and negative electrodes, allowing swift ionic flow within the cell. Herein, we report an interesting approach to improve performance of readily available polyolefin separator by coating it with synthesized silica nanoparticles/polyvinylidene fluoride optimal blend. This coated composite separator was investigated for surface morphology, wettability, electrolyte uptake, thermal stability and performance studies. Coin cells fabricated using surface coated separator show good C-rate capability and stable cycle performance with capacity retention of 99% even after 50 cycles.

  17. Enhancement of deep-UV patterning integrity and process control using antireflective coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, Bruce W.; Jones, Susan K.; Peters, Charles R.; Koester, David A.; Barnes, Gregg A.; Flaim, Tony D.; Lamb, James E., III

    1992-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the results of experiments performed using wafers having either phosphorous (POCl3) doped polysilicon, LPCVD silicon nitride, LPCVD silicon dioxide, LPCVD silicon dioxide over POCl3 doped polysilicon, evaporated aluminum, or CVD tungsten thin films, patterned with and without the use of deep UV anti-reflective coatings. The parameters of reflectance control, critical dimension control, focus/exposure latitude, and resist profiles were studied for line/space gratings and contacts. Incorporation of anti-reflective coatings was shown to be very beneficial for reducing the impact of highly reflective substrates, grainy surfaces, and topographical features encountered during deep UV imaging. The ARC process is independent of the substrate's reflectivity, allowing the same exposure dose for all substrates studied. Without ARC the optimum exposure dose for the same substrates varied over a 35% range. ARC also provides slightly increased exposure and focus windows for some substrates, and was shown to significantly improve linewidth control on rough substrates such as POCl3 doped polysilicon and tungsten. The grainy surface of the tungsten wafers was nearly impossible to pattern without the use of an anti-reflective coating; without ARC, there was virtually no process window (approximately 2 mJ/cm2) for retention of 0.50 micrometers features.

  18. Effect of carbon coating on scuffing performance in diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O. O.; Alzoubi, M. F.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    2000-06-29

    Low-sulfur and low-aromatic diesel fuels are being introduced in order to reduce various types of emissions in diesel engines to levels in compliance with current and impending US federal regulations. The low lubricity of these fuels, however, poses major reliability and durability problems for fuel injection components that depend on diesel fuel for their lubrication. In the present study, the authors evaluated the scuff resistance of surfaces in regular diesel fuel containing 500 ppm sulfur and in Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel fuel containing no sulfur or aromatics. Tests were conducted with the high frequency reciprocating test rig (HFRR) using 52100 steel balls and H-13 tool-steel flats with and without Argonne's special carbon coatings. Test results showed that the sulfur-containing fuels provide about 20% higher scuffing resistance than does fuel without sulfur. Use of the carbon coating on the flat increased scuffing resistance in both regular and synthetic fuels by about ten times, as measured by the contact severity index at scuffing. Scuffing failure in tests conducted with coated surfaces did not occur until the coating had been removed by the two distinct mechanisms of spalling and wear.

  19. Performance of protective polymeric coatings for nonlinear optical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, K.L.; Schmid, A.W.; Smith, D.J.; Bevin, A.A.; Guardalben, M.J.; Jacobs, S.D.

    1988-09-01

    KDP, KD*P, and LiNbO/sub 3/, three nonlinear optical materials that have been difficult to coat, are treated with polymeric surface layers. These layers hermetically seal the hygroscopic crystal surfaces. Their optical properties, thermal compatibility, high-power laser damage behavior, abrasive resistance, and suitability for overcoating with traditional, dielectric antireflection multilayers are reported.

  20. Fire propagation performance of intumescent fire protective coatings using eggshells as a novel biofiller.

    PubMed

    Yew, M C; Ramli Sulong, N H; Yew, M K; Amalina, M A; Johan, M R

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to synthesize and characterize an effective intumescent fire protective coating that incorporates eggshell powder as a novel biofiller. The performances of thermal stability, char formation, fire propagation, water resistance, and adhesion strength of coatings have been evaluated. A few intumescent flame-retardant coatings based on these three ecofriendly fire retardant additives ammonium polyphosphate phase II, pentaerythritol and melamine mixed together with flame-retardant fillers, and acrylic binder have been prepared and designed for steel. The fire performance of the coatings has conducted employing BS 476: Part 6-Fire propagation test. The foam structures of the intumescent coatings have been observed using field emission scanning electron microscopy. On exposure, the coated specimens' B, C, and D had been certified to be Class 0 due to the fact that their fire propagation indexes were less than 12. Incorporation of ecofriendly eggshell, biofiller into formulation D led to excellent performance in fire stopping (index value, (I) = 4.3) and antioxidation of intumescent coating. The coating is also found to be quite effective in water repellency, uniform foam structure, and adhesion strength.

  1. Fire Propagation Performance of Intumescent Fire Protective Coatings Using Eggshells as a Novel Biofiller

    PubMed Central

    Yew, M. C.; Ramli Sulong, N. H.; Yew, M. K.; Amalina, M. A.; Johan, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to synthesize and characterize an effective intumescent fire protective coating that incorporates eggshell powder as a novel biofiller. The performances of thermal stability, char formation, fire propagation, water resistance, and adhesion strength of coatings have been evaluated. A few intumescent flame-retardant coatings based on these three ecofriendly fire retardant additives ammonium polyphosphate phase II, pentaerythritol and melamine mixed together with flame-retardant fillers, and acrylic binder have been prepared and designed for steel. The fire performance of the coatings has conducted employing BS 476: Part 6-Fire propagation test. The foam structures of the intumescent coatings have been observed using field emission scanning electron microscopy. On exposure, the coated specimens' B, C, and D had been certified to be Class 0 due to the fact that their fire propagation indexes were less than 12. Incorporation of ecofriendly eggshell, biofiller into formulation D led to excellent performance in fire stopping (index value, (I) = 4.3) and antioxidation of intumescent coating. The coating is also found to be quite effective in water repellency, uniform foam structure, and adhesion strength. PMID:25136687

  2. Effect of SOFC Interconnect-Coating Interactions on Coating Properties and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey W. Fergus

    2012-09-05

    The high operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) provides good fuel flexibility which expands potential applications, but also creates materials challenges. One such challenge is the interconnect material, which was the focus of this project. In particular, the objective of the project was to understand the interaction between the interconnect alloy and ceramic coatings which are needed to minimize chromium volatilization and the associated chromium poisoning of the SOFC cathode. This project focused on coatings based on manganese cobalt oxide spinel phases (Mn,Co)3O4, which have been shown to be effective as coatings for ferritic stainless steel alloys. Analysis of diffusion couples was used to develop a model to describe the interaction between (Mn,Co)3O4 and Cr2O3 in which a two-layer reaction zone is formed. Both layers form the spinel structure, but the concentration gradients at the interface appear like a two-phase boundary suggesting that a miscibility gap is present in the spinel solid solution. A high-chromium spinel layer forms in contact with Cr2O3 and grows by diffusion of manganese and cobalt from the coating material to the Cr2O3. The effect of coating composition, including the addition of dopants, was evaluated and indicated that the reaction rate could be decreased with additions of iron, titanium, nickel and copper. Diffusion couples using stainless steel alloys (which form a chromia scale) had some similarities and some differences as compared to those with Cr2O3. The most notable difference was that the high-chromium spinel layer did not form in the diffusion couples with stainless steel alloys. This difference can be explained using the reaction model developed in this project. In particular, the chromia scale grows at the expense of the alloy, the high-chromia layer grows at the expense of chromia scale and the high-chromia layer is consumed by diffusion of chromium into the coating material. If the last process (dissolution

  3. Performance of HTGR biso- and triso-coated fertile particles irradiated in capsule HT-34

    SciTech Connect

    Long, E.L. Jr.; Tiegs, T.N.; Robbins, J.M.; Kania, M.J.

    1981-08-01

    Experiment HT-34, irradiated in the target region of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), was designed to correlate HTGR Biso- and Triso-coated particle performance with fabrication parameters. Gamma analysis of the irradiated Triso-coated ThO/sub 2/ particles showed that the SiC deposited at the highest coating rate apparently had the best cesium-retention properties. Results of a similar analysis of the irradiated Biso-coated ThO/sub 2/ particles showed no differences in performance that could be related to coating conditions, but all the particles showed a significant loss of cesium (> 50%) at the higher temperatures. Pressure-vessel failures occurred with a significant number of particles; however, fission-gas-content measurements made at room temperature showed that the intact Biso particles from all batches except one became permeable during irradiation.

  4. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 7: Improved radiator coating adhesive tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    Silver/Teflon thermal control coatings have been tested on a modular radiator system projected for use on the space shuttle. Seven candidate adhesives have been evaluated in a thermal vacuum test on radiator panels similar to the anticipated flight hardware configuration. Several classes of adhesives based on polyester, silicone, and urethane resin systems were tested. These included contact adhesives, heat cured adhesives, heat and pressure cured adhesives, pressure sensitive adhesives, and two part paint on or spray on adhesives. The coatings attached with four of the adhesives, two silicones and two urethanes, had no changes develop during the thermal vacuum test. The two silicone adhesives, both of which were applied to the silver/Teflon as transfer laminates to form a tape, offered the most promise based on application process and thermal performance. Each of the successful silicone adhesives required a heat and pressure cure to adhere during the cryogenic temperature excursion of the thermal-vacuum test.

  5. [Research advances on controlled-release mechanisms of nutrients in coated fertilizers].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haijun; Wu, Zhijie; Liang, Wenju; Xie, Hongtu

    2003-12-01

    Using encapsulation techniques to coat easily soluble fertilizers is an important way to improve fertilizer use efficiency while reduce environmental hazards. Based on a wide range of literature collection on coated fertilizer research, the theories, processes, and characters of nutrient controlled-release from coated fertilizer were discussed, and the factors affecting nutrient controlled-release and the mathematical simulations on it were reviewed. The main tendencies related to this research in China were also put forward. PMID:15031946

  6. [Research advances on controlled-release mechanisms of nutrients in coated fertilizers].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haijun; Wu, Zhijie; Liang, Wenju; Xie, Hongtu

    2003-12-01

    Using encapsulation techniques to coat easily soluble fertilizers is an important way to improve fertilizer use efficiency while reduce environmental hazards. Based on a wide range of literature collection on coated fertilizer research, the theories, processes, and characters of nutrient controlled-release from coated fertilizer were discussed, and the factors affecting nutrient controlled-release and the mathematical simulations on it were reviewed. The main tendencies related to this research in China were also put forward.

  7. Improved engine performance via use of nickel ceramic composite coatings (NCC coat)

    SciTech Connect

    Funatani, K.; Kurosawa, K.; Fabiyi, P.A.; Puz, M.F.

    1994-09-01

    In seeking to produce lightweight aluminum block based engines, a variety of metallurgical and surface modification techniques for cylinder bores, pistons and piston rings are available. This paper discusses these various alternative methods while placing particular emphasis on electroplated nickel ceramic composite coatings (NCC). NCC Coating properties are characterized by high hardness, high corrosion resistance, high temperature wear and scuff resistance and low frictional coefficients. The application of NCC Coatings in 2-stroke motorcycle and diesel engines has resulted in benefits in the following areas: elimination of cast iron liners; reduced cylinder wall temperature, engine weight and increased power; lowering of oil consumption; improved fuel economy; reduction in emissions; improved scuff and wear resistance on cylinder bores, pistons and piston rings; friction reduction; combating of piston ring groove microwelding and pound out; thermal barrier protection on diesel piston domes; reduction in carbon deposition on piston domes; reduced noise from piston slap; and ability to operate in corrosive environments. The sum of the above stated benefits holds much potential for contributing towards greater flexibility in materials selection for the design of lightweight, fuel efficient vehicles based upon the use of aluminum engines. 13 refs., 13 figs.

  8. Performance of Al-Rich Oxidation Resistant Coatings For Fe-Base Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A

    2010-01-01

    Aluminum-rich coatings made by chemical vapor deposition and pack cementation on ferritic (e.g. Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and austenitic (Type 304L) substrates are being evaluated at 650-800 C. For oxidation testing, a humid air environment was used to quantify coating performance, as uncoated substrates experience rapid oxidation at these temperatures. A main goal of this work is to demonstrate the potential benefits and problems with alumina-forming coatings. The higher exposure temperatures were selected to accelerate the degradation of the coating by interdiffusion with the substrate. A general conclusion of this testing was that coatings with less Al and a ferritic Fe(Al) structure could be more durable than higher Al content aluminide coatings which have a large thermal expansion mismatch with these substrates. A lifetime model has been developed using diffusion and oxidation observations to predict coating performance as a function of temperature and initial coating composition. To test and improve the model, additional experiments are now being conducted to determine the effect of substrate composition (e.g. Cr content using Fe-12Cr and Fe-9Cr-2W substrates) and exposure temperature on the critical Al content for coating failure. Because of the unexpectedly low level of Al measured at coating failure ({approx}3.5at.% at 700 C), exposures of specimens with thick ({approx}200 {mu}m) high Al content coatings were stopped after 10kh at 800 C and 20kh at 700 C because extremely long times to failure were predicted. Post-exposure Al concentration profiles for these specimens were measured using electron microprobe.

  9. Performance of Al-rich Oxidation Resistant Coatings for Fe-Base Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Zhang, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum-rich coatings made by chemical vapor deposition and pack cementation on ferritic (e.g. Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and austenitic (Type 304L) substrates are being evaluated at 650-800 C. For oxidation testing, a humid air environment was used to quantify coating performance, as uncoated substrates experience rapid oxidation at these temperatures. A main goal of this work is to demonstrate the potential benefits and problems with alumina-forming coatings. The higher exposure temperatures were selected to accelerate the degradation of the coating by interdiffusion with the substrate. A general conclusion of this testing was that coatings with less Al and a ferritic Fe(Al) structure could be more durable than higher Al content aluminide coatings which have a large thermal expansion mismatch with these substrates. A lifetime model has been developed using diffusion and oxidation observations to predict coating performance as a function of temperature and initial coating composition. To test and improve the model, additional experiments are now being conducted to determine the effect of substrate composition (e.g. Cr content using Fe-12Cr and Fe-9Cr-2W substrates) and exposure temperature on the critical Al content for coating failure. Because of the unexpectedly low level of Al measured at coating failure ({approx}3.5 at.% at 700 C), exposures of specimens with thick ({approx}200 {micro}m) high Al content coatings were stopped after 10kh at 800 C and 20kh at 700 C because extremely long times to failure were predicted. Post-exposure Al concentration profiles for these specimens were measured using electron microprobe.

  10. Low Earth Orbit Environmental Durability of Recently Developed Thermal Control Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2015-01-01

    The Materials International Space Station Experiment provided a means to expose materials and devices to the low Earth orbit environment on the exterior of the International Space Station. By returning the specimens to Earth after flight, the specimens could be evaluated by comparison with pre-flight measurements. One area of continuing interest is thermal control paints and coatings that are applied to exterior surfaces of spacecraft. Though traditional radiator coatings have been available for decades, recent work has focused on new coatings that offer custom deposition or custom optical properties. The custom deposition of interest is plasma spraying and one type of coating recently developed as part of a Small Business Innovative Research effort was designed to be plasma sprayed onto radiator surfaces. The custom optical properties of interest are opposite to those of a typical radiator coating, having a combination of high solar absorptance and low infrared emittance for solar absorber applications, and achieved in practice via a cermet coating. Selected specimens of the plasma sprayed coatings and the solar absorber coating were flown on Materials International Space Station Experiment 7, and were recently returned to Earth for post-flight analyses. For the plasma sprayed coatings in the ram direction, one specimen increased in solar absorptance and one specimen decreased in solar absorptance, while the plasma sprayed coatings in the wake direction changed very little in solar absorptance. For the cermet coating deployed in both the ram and wake directions, the solar absorptance increased. Interestingly, all coatings showed little change in infrared emittance.

  11. Twenty year field study of the performance of coatings in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Blaricum, V.L. Van; Beitelman, A.; Boy, J.H. |

    1997-12-31

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the long-term performance of various coatings on steel piles in seawater and to investigate nondestructive electrochemical corrosion testing techniques for coating evaluation in the field. Steel H piles which were 20.3 cm x 20.3 cm and 12.2 m long were installed in Buzzards Bay, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The piles were coated with various coatings such as coal tar epoxy, polyurethane, flame sprayed zinc and aluminum. Several of the piles were left uncoated for baseline comparison. Sacrificial cathodic protection was provided by anodes to some of the bare and coated steel pilings. Corrosion rate measurements using electrochemical polarization resistance and Tafel plots were conducted periodically in the field during the twenty year study. The results of the Cape Cod, MA, corrosion study were compared with a similar study conducted at the La Costa Island, FL. The long-term coating evaluation showed that flame sprayed aluminum with a topcoat sealer performed best at the cooler temperatures in Massachusetts and polyester glass flake was the best performed in Florida. Coal tar epoxy coatings with zinc-rich primers performed well at both of the locations.

  12. High performance magnetically controllable microturbines.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yong-Lai; Ku, Jin-Feng; He, Yan; Xu, Bin-Bin; Chen, Qi-Dai; Xia, Hong; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2010-11-01

    Reported in this paper is two-photon photopolymerization (TPP) fabrication of magnetic microturbines with high surface smoothness towards microfluids mixing. As the key component of the magnetic photoresist, Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles were carefully screened for homogeneous doping. In this work, oleic acid stabilized Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles synthesized via high-temperature induced organic phase decomposition of an iron precursor show evident advantages in particle morphology. After modification with propoxylated trimethylolpropane triacrylate (PO(3)-TMPTA, a kind of cross-linker), the magnetic nanoparticles were homogeneously doped in acrylate-based photoresist for TPP fabrication of microstructures. Finally, a magnetic microturbine was successfully fabricated as an active mixing device for remote control of microfluids blending. The development of high quality magnetic photoresists would lead to high performance magnetically controllable microdevices for lab-on-a-chip (LOC) applications. PMID:20721411

  13. Weathering performance of the polyurethane nanocomposite coatings containing silane treated TiO 2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabedini, S. M.; Sabzi, M.; Zohuriaan-Mehr, J.; Atai, M.; Behzadnasab, M.

    2011-02-01

    Nano-filled polyurethane coatings were prepared by incorporation of various amounts of untreated and amino propyltrimethoxy silane (APS) treated TiO2 nanoparticles. TEM and AFM techniques were employed to evaluate dispersion of nanoparticles and surface morphology of the coating, respectively. TEM observations revealed that the APS treated nanoparticles have a better dispersion and smaller agglomeration, compared with their untreated counterparts. AFM images revealed that, surface roughness of the coatings increased with increasing of nanoparticles content, however, at equal level of loadings; coatings containing untreated nanoparticles showed a higher surface roughness. Colour changes (colour coordinates data measurements), mechanical properties and surface morphology of the PU nanocomposite coatings, before and after being exposed to a QUV chamber for 1000 h were studied using various techniques. The results revealed that addition of 0.5 to 1.0 wt.% APS treated TiO2 nanoparticles reduces photocatalytic activity, and improves the weathering performance PU nanocomposite coatings. Tensile strength measurements showed significant improvement of mechanical properties of PU coatings containing modified TiO2 nanoparticles. Results also revealed that the colour measurement is a useful technique and non destructive method for evaluation of coating's performance against weathering conditions. The experimental results showed a good correlation between different techniques findings.

  14. Composite neutron absorbing coatings for nuclear criticality control

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Richard N.; Swank, W. David; Mizia, Ronald E.

    2005-07-19

    Thermal neutron absorbing composite coating materials and methods of applying such coating materials to spent nuclear fuel storage systems are provided. A composite neutron absorbing coating applied to a substrate surface includes a neutron absorbing layer overlying at least a portion of the substrate surface, and a corrosion resistant top coat layer overlying at least a portion of the neutron absorbing layer. An optional bond coat layer can be formed on the substrate surface prior to forming the neutron absorbing layer. The neutron absorbing layer can include a neutron absorbing material, such as gadolinium oxide or gadolinium phosphate, dispersed in a metal alloy matrix. The coating layers may be formed by a plasma spray process or a high velocity oxygen fuel process.

  15. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control. Quarterly progress report, October 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.F.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1994-01-20

    Research is being conducted to develop criteria for selecting weld overlay coatings for erosion mitigation in Circulated Fluidized Beds. Twelve weld overlay alloys were deposited on 1018 steel substrates using plasma arc welding. Ten samples from each coating were prepared for erosion testing. All selected coatings were erosion tested at 400C and their erosion resistance and microstructure evaluated. Steady state erosion rates were similar for several weld overlay coatings (Ultimet, Inconel-625, Iron-Aluminide, 316L SS, and High Chromium Cast Iron) and were considerably lower than the remaining coating evaluated. These coatings had different base (Co, Fe, Ni-base). No correlations were found between room temperature microhardness of the weld overlay coatings and their erosion resistance at elevated temperature, although this criteria is often thought to be an indicator of erosion resistance. It was suggested that the coatings that showed similar erosion rates may have similar mechanical properties such as fracture strength, toughness and work hardening rates at this temperature. During the past quarter, Iron-Aluminide, Inconel-625, and 316L SS coatings were selected for more detailed investigations based upon the preliminary erosion test results. Microhardness tests were performed on eroded samples to determine the size of the work hardened zone and change in coatings hardness due to erosion. The work hardened zone was to correlated with erosion resistance of the coatings. Additional Iron-Aluminide, Inconel-625, and 316L SS coatings were deposited on 1018 steel substrates.

  16. Reliability performance of titanium sputter coated Ni-Ti arch wires: mechanical performance and nickel release evaluation.

    PubMed

    Anuradha, P; Varma, N K Sapna; Balakrishnan, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    The present research was aimed at developing surface coatings on NiTi archwires capable of protection against nickel release and to investigate the stability, mechanical performance and prevention of nickel release of titanium sputter coated NiTi arch wires. Coated and uncoated specimens immersed in artificial saliva were subjected to critical evaluation of parameters such as surface analysis, mechanical testing, element release, friction coefficient and adhesion of the coating. Titanium coatings exhibited high reliability on exposure even for a prolonged period of 30 days in artificial saliva. The coatings were found to be relatively stable on linear scratch test with reduced frictional coefficient compared to uncoated samples. Titanium sputtering adhered well with the Ni-Ti substrates at the molecular level, this was further confirmed by Inductive coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPE) analysis which showed no dissolution of nickel in the artificial saliva. Titanium sputter coatings seem to be promising for nickel sensitive patients. The study confirmed the superior nature of the coating, evident as reduced surface roughness, friction coefficient, good adhesion and minimal hardness and elastic modulus variations in artificial saliva over a given time period.

  17. Performance of coatings for concrete exposed to pesticides and fertilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Broder, M.F.; Nguyen, D.T.; Zarate, E.A.

    1994-12-31

    As a result of Congressional amendments for the reauthorization of the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (known as FIFRA 1988), EPA is proposing minimum standards for secondary containment of pesticide bulk containers and for containment structures for certain pesticide dispensing operations. Concrete is the most common secondary containment construction material for pesticides but concrete may be susceptible to migration of spilled pesticides due to its porosity and potential for cracking. The research described here was requested by EPA`s Office of Pesticide Programs to help identify coatings for concrete that could reduce the migration of pesticides through containment structures. At the time of this writing, the study was about half completed. Preliminary results from twelve generic coating types are discussed.

  18. Performance of thermal barrier coatings in high heat flux environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings were exposed to the high temperature and high heat flux produced by a 30 kW plasma torch. Analysis of the specimen heating rates indicates that the temperature drop across the thickness of the 0.038 cm ceramic layer was about 1100 C after 0.5 sec in the flame. An as-sprayed ZrO2-8 percent Y203 specimens survived 3000 of the 0.5 sec cycles with failing. Surface spalling was observed when 2.5 sec cycles were employed but this was attributed to uneven heating caused by surface roughness. This surface spalling was prevented by smoothing the surface with silicon carbide paper or by laser glazing. A coated specimen with no surface modification but which was heat treated in argon also did not surface spall. Heat treatment in air led to spalling in as early as 2 cycle from heating stresses. Failures at edges were investigated and shown to be a minor source of concern. Ceramic coatings formed from ZrO2-12 percent Y2O3 or ZrO2-20 percent Y2O3 were shown to be unsuited for use under the high heat flux conditions of this study.

  19. Performance of thermal barrier coatings in high heat flux environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings were exposed to the high temperature and high heat flux produced by a 30 kW plasma torch. Analysis of the specimen heating rates indicates that the temperature drop across the thickness of the 0.038 cm ceramic layer was about 1100 C after 0.5 sec in the flame. An as-sprayed ZrO2-8 percent Y2O3 specimens survived 3000 of the 0.5 sec cycles with falling. Surface spalling was observed when 2.5 sec cycles were employed but this was attributed to uneven heating caused by surface roughness. This surface spalling was prevented by smoothing the surface with silicon carbide paper or by laser glazing. A coated specimen with no surface modification but which was heat treated in argon also did not surface spall. Heat treatment in air led to spalling in as early as 1 cycle from heating stresses. Failures at edges were investigated and shown to be a minor source of concern. Ceramic coatings formed from ZrO2-12 percent Y2O3 or ZrO2-2O percent Y2O3 were shown to be unsuited for use under the high heat flux conditions of this study.

  20. Performance of thermal barrier coatings in high heat flux environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings were exposed to the high temperature and high heat flux produced by a 30 kW plasma torch. Analysis of the specimen heating rates indicates that the temperature drop across the thickness of the 0.038 cm ceramic layer was about 1100 C after 0.5 sec in the flame. An as-sprayed ZrO2-8%Y2O3 specimens survived 3000 of the 0.5 sec cycles with failing. Surface spalling was observed when 2.5 sec cycles were employed but this was attributed to uneven heating caused by surface roughness. This surface spalling was prevented by smoothing the surface with silicon carbide paper or by laser glazing. A coated specimen with no surface modification but which was heat treated in argon also did not surface spall. Heat treatment in air led to spalling in as early as 2 cycle from heating stresses. Failures at edges were investigated and shown to be a minor source of concern. Ceramic coatings formed from ZrO2-12%Y2O3 or ZrO2-20%Y2O3 were shown to be unsuited for use under the high heat flux conditions of this study.

  1. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Turbine Engines: A Design and Performance Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Ghosn, Louis; Smialek, James L.; Miller, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBC) for SiC-based ceramics will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. However, the coating long-term durability remains a major concern with the ever-increasing temperature, strength and stability requirements in engine high heat-flux combustion environments, especially for highly-loaded rotating turbine components. Advanced TEBC systems, including nano-composite based HfO2-aluminosilicate and rare earth silicate coatings are being developed and tested for higher temperature capable SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine blade applications. This paper will emphasize coating composite and multilayer design approach and the resulting performance and durability in simulated engine high heat-flux, high stress and high pressure combustion environments. The advances in the environmental barrier coating development showed promise for future rotating CMC blade applications.

  2. Radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base. Volume 1: Pre-coating monitoring and fresh coating results

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.

    1997-02-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Through a partnership with a federal site, the utility serving the site, a manufacturer of an energy-related technology, and other organizations associated with these interests, DOE can evaluate a new technology. The results of the program give federal agency decision makers more hands-on information with which to validate a decision to utilize a new technology in their facilities. The partnership of these interests is secured through a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA), in this case between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation, the manager of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and ThermShield International, Ltd., the manufacturer of the technology. This is the first volume of a two-volume report that describes the effects of radiation control coatings installed on federal buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB) in Florida by ThermShield International. ORNL`s Buildings Technology Center (BTC) was assigned the responsibility for gathering, analyzing, and reporting on the data to describe the effects of the coatings. This volume describes the monitoring plan and its implementation, the results of pre-coating monitoring, the coating installation, results from fresh coatings compared to pre-coating results, and a plan to decommission the monitoring equipment. By including results from roofs at Tyndall AFB and from an outdoor test facility at the BTC, the data cover the range from poorly insulated to well-insulated roofs and two kinds of radiation control coatings on various roof membranes.

  3. Development of porcelain enamel passive thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, H.; Lent, W. E.; Buettner, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    A white porcelain enamel coating was developed for application to high temperature metallic alloy substrates on spacecraft. The coating consists of an optically opacifying zirconia pigment, a lithia-zirconia-silica frit, and an inorganic pigment dispersant. The coating is fired at 1000 to 1150 C to form the enamel. The coating has a solar absorptance of 0.22 and a total normal emittance of 0.82 for a 0.017 cm thick coating. The coating exhibits excellent adhesion, cleanability, and integrity and is thermal shock resistant to 900 C. Capability to coat large panels has been demonstrated by successful coating of 30 cm x 30 cm Hastelloy X alloy panels. Preliminary development of low temperature enamels for application to aluminum and titanium alloy substrates was initiated. It was determined that both leaded and leadless frits were feasible when applied with appropriate mill fluxes. Indications were that opacification could be achieved at firing temperatures below 540 C for extended periods of time.

  4. Voltage-controlled surface wrinkling of elastomeric coatings.

    PubMed

    van den Ende, Daan; Kamminga, Jan-Dirk; Boersma, Arjen; Andritsch, Thomas; Steeneken, Peter G

    2013-07-01

    Wrinkling of elastomeric coatings by an electric field is reported. The associated changes in the coating's optical properties yield switchable mirrors and windows. The field Ec needed to induce wrinkling is a factor of 4.4 lower than the theoretically predicted value, which is attributed to space-charge injection. PMID:23703838

  5. Biodegradation performance of a chitosan coated magnesium-zinc-tricalcium phosphate composite as an implant.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Chen, Liangjian; Yu, Kun; Chen, Chang; Dai, Yilong; Qiao, Xueyan; Yan, Yang

    2014-09-01

    A Mg-Zn-tricalcium phosphate composite with a chitosan coating was prepared in this investigation to study its biodegradation performance both in vitro and in vivo conditions. The in vitro test results show that the immersion corrosion rate, the pH values of the simulated body fluids and the released metal ion concentration of the chitosan coated composite are all lower than those of the uncoated composite. The in vitro cytotoxicity test shows that the chitosan coated specimens is safe for cellular applications. When the chitosan coated composite is tested in vivo, the concentration of metal ions from the composite observed in the venous blood of Zelanian rabbits is less than the uncoated composite specimens. The chitosan coating slows down the in vivo degradation of the composite after surgery. In vivo testing also indicates that the chitosan coated composite is harmless to important visceral organs, including the heart, kidneys, and liver of the rabbits. The new bone formation surrounding the chitosan coated composite implant shows that the composite improves the concrescence of the bone tissues. The chitosan coating is an effective corrosion resistant layer that reduces the hydrogen release of the implant composite, thereby decreasing the subcutaneous gas bubbles formed.

  6. Morphological control of polypyrrole coatings electropolymerized onto carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, G.A.; Iroh, J.O.

    1995-12-31

    Polypyrrole coatings have been electropolymerized onto carbon fiber bundles. Several process parameters were varied, and their effect on the morphology and composition of the coatings was studied. The parameters that were varied included the choice of supporting electrolyte, the concentration of electrolyte, the concentration of pyrrole monomer, the applied constant voltage, and time. SEM micrographs of the coated samples revealed at least four distinct morphologies. EDAX analysis, elemental analysis, and infrared spectroscopy all confirmed that part of the supporting electrolyte was present in the coatings. In addition, the parametric variation showed that the type and concentration of the supporting electrolyte had the greatest influence on the resulting morphologies of the coatings. Later, mechanical properties will be examined.

  7. The Effect of Dispersed State to Control of Radiative Properties of Coatings Pigmented with Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonome, Hiroki; Baneshi, Mehdi; Vaillon, Rodolphe; Okajima, Junnosuke; Komiya, Atsuki; Maruyama, Shigenao

    This study describes nanoparticle pigmented coatings used in controlling the radiative properties of surfaces exposed to sunlight. The effect of particle dispersed state to reflectance of the coating is discussed. As the dispersed particles, TiO2 and Fe2O3 are used. From Raman spectral intensity measurements made on the coating, the dispersed state of particles was investigated. The spectral reflectance of the coating was measured by spectroscopy. The reflectivity of the coating is analyzed theoretically. In this calculation, the dispersed state is assumed to be monodispersed and homogeneous. Comparison between experimental and numerical results shows that the difference between the measured and calculated reflectance increases as the volume fraction increases. The maximum absolute error of reflectance is about 10% when the volume fraction is 0.05. In contrast, the maximum absolute error of reflectance is about 3% when the volume fraction is 0.01. The control of dispersed state affects the radiative properties of pigmented coatings.

  8. Fluoride coatings on orthodontic wire for controlled release of fluorine ion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Hee; Kim, Hae-Won; Kong, Young-Min; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Lee, Sung-Ho; Chang, Young-Il

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new method of releasing fluorine in a controlled manner for applications in the field of orthodontic Ti-based wire, namely the coating of fluorides on Ti. Thin films of two fluoride compounds, CaF(2) and MgF(2), were coated on Ti via the electron-beam evaporation method. The fluorine was released rapidly from the as-deposited MgF(2) coating within a short period(,) and then the release rate slowed down. When the MgF(2) coating was heat treated, this initial burst effect was decreased, but a significant amount of cracks were generated. On the other hand, in the case of the as-deposited CaF(2) coating, fluorine was released linearly for the entire period, without an initial burst. In the heat-treated CaF(2) coatings the trend was similarly observed. The linear fluorine release from the CaF(2) coatings, even in the as-deposited state, was attributed to the high degree of crystallinity of the coatings. A preliminary cell test showed favorable cell viability on both the fluoride coatings. Given their sustained and controlled fluorine release, these fluoride coatings, particularly CaF(2), are suggested to be potentially useful in the field of orthodontic Ti-based wire.

  9. Polarization compensating protective coatings for TPF-Coronagraph optics to control contrast degrading cross polarization leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis Z.; Marchen, Luis F.; Shaklan, Stuart B.

    2005-01-01

    We describe here the design approaches and performance analysis of the OTA in the wavelength band of interest. Coronagraph performance at 600nm wavelength based on a particular coating and occulting focal plane mask is also presented.

  10. Fabrication of ordered NiO coated Si nanowire array films as electrodes for a high performance lithium ion battery.

    PubMed

    Qiu, M C; Yang, L W; Qi, X; Li, Jun; Zhong, J X

    2010-12-01

    Highly ordered NiO coated Si nanowire array films are fabricated as electrodes for a high performance lithium ion battery via depositing Ni on electroless-etched Si nanowires and subsequently annealing. The structures and morphologies of as-prepared films are characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. When the potential window versus lithium was controlled, the coated NiO can be selected to be electrochemically active to store and release Li+ ions, while highly conductive crystalline Si cores function as nothing more than a stable mechanical support and an efficient electrical conducting pathway. The hybrid nanowire array films exhibit superior cyclic stability and reversible capacity compared to that of NiO nanostructured films. Owing to the ease of large-scale fabrication and superior electrochemical performance, these hybrid nanowire array films will be promising anode materials for high performance lithium-ion batteries.

  11. Tribological performance of NFC coatings under oil lubrication[Near Frictionless Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O. O.; Alzoubi, M.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Zimmerman, S.

    2000-01-20

    An increase in engine and vehicle efficiency usually requires an increase in the severity of contact at the interfaces of many critical components. Examples of such components include piston rings and cylinder liners in the engine, gears in the transmission and axle, bearings, etc. These components are oil-lubricated and require enhancement of their tribological performance. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) recently developed a carbon-based coating with very low friction and wear properties. These near-frictionless-carbon (NFC) coatings have potential for application in various engine components for performance enhancement. This paper presents the study of the tribological performance of NFC-coated steel surfaces when lubricated with fully formulated and basestock synthetic oils. The NFC coatings reduced both the friction and wear of lubricated steel surfaces. The effect of the coating was much more pronounced in tests with basestock oil. This suggests that NFC-coated parts may not require heavily formulated lubricant oils to perform satisfactorily in terms of reliability and durability.

  12. Effect of Heat Treatment on Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Performance of Cold-Sprayed Tantalum Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Vidyasagar, V.; Jyothirmayi, A.; Joshi, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    The cold-spray technique is of significant interest to deposit refractory metals with relatively high melting point for a variety of demanding applications. In the present study, mechanical properties of cold-sprayed tantalum coatings heat treated at different temperatures were investigated using microtensile testing, scratch testing, and nanoindentation. The corrosion performance of heat-treated coatings was also evaluated in 1 M KOH solution, and potentiodynamic polarization as well as impedance spectroscopy studies were carried out. Assessment of structure-property correlations was attempted based on microstructure, porosity, and intersplat bonding state, together with mechanical and corrosion properties of the heat-treated cold-sprayed tantalum coatings. Coatings annealed at 1500 °C, which is very close to the recrystallization temperature of tantalum, were found to perform almost as bulk tantalum, with exciting implications for various applications.

  13. Performance of composite coatings in a coal-fired boiler environment

    SciTech Connect

    Nava, J.C.

    2009-09-15

    Four samples of thermal spray coatings, each made from different core wire consumables by twin wire arc spray, were exposed for 18 months in a coal-fired boiler environment. The tests are described and the performance of each coating is evaluated. Results indicated that the four consumable wire alloys showed remarkable resistance to fly ash erosion and corrosion over the period of the test.

  14. Preparation and exceptional lithium anodic performance of porous carbon-coated ZnO quantum dots derived from a metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung Jae; Nam, Seunghoon; Kim, Taehoon; Im, Ji Hyuk; Jung, Haesol; Kang, Jong Hun; Wi, Sungun; Park, Byungwoo; Park, Chong Rae

    2013-05-22

    Hierarchically porous carbon-coated ZnO quantum dots (QDs) (~3.5 nm) were synthesized by a one-step controlled pyrolysis of the metal-organic framework IRMOF-1. We have demonstrated a scalable and facile synthesis of carbon-coated ZnO QDs without agglomeration by structural reorganization. This unique microstructure exhibits outstanding electrochemical performance (capacity, cyclability, and rate capability) when evaluated as an anode material for lithium ion batteries.

  15. Effect of surface coating with magnesium stearate via mechanical dry powder coating approach on the aerosol performance of micronized drug powders from dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Qu, Li; Gengenbach, Thomas; Larson, Ian; Stewart, Peter J; Morton, David A V

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of particle surface coating with magnesium stearate on the aerosolization of dry powder inhaler formulations. Micronized salbutamol sulphate as a model drug was dry coated with magnesium stearate using a mechanofusion technique. The coating quality was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Powder bulk and flow properties were assessed by bulk densities and shear cell measurements. The aerosol performance was studied by laser diffraction and supported by a twin-stage impinger. High degrees of coating coverage were achieved after mechanofusion, as measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Concomitant significant increases occurred in powder bulk densities and in aerosol performance after coating. The apparent optimum performance corresponded with using 2% w/w magnesium stearate. In contrast, traditional blending resulted in no significant changes in either bulk or aerosolization behaviour compared to the untreated sample. It is believed that conventional low-shear blending provides insufficient energy levels to expose host micronized particle surfaces from agglomerates and to distribute guest coating material effectively for coating. A simple ultra-high-shear mechanical dry powder coating step was shown as highly effective in producing ultra-thin coatings on micronized powders and to substantially improve the powder aerosolization efficiency.

  16. Investigation of environmental effects on coatings for thermal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashford, N. A.; Gilligan, J. E.; Zerlaut, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Accomplishments made during study of coatings are reported. Development of structure/property theory for selecting most appropriate pigments for space vehicle paints is discussed along with improvements made in zinc-oxide pigmented potassium silicate paint.

  17. Versatile surface engineering of porous nanomaterials with bioinspired polyphenol coatings for targeted and controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Wu, Shuxian; Wu, Cuichen; Qiu, Liping; Zhu, Guizhi; Cui, Cheng; Liu, Yuan; Hou, Weijia; Wang, Yanyue; Zhang, Liqin; Teng, I.-Ting; Yang, Huang-Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2016-04-01

    The development of biocompatible drug delivery systems with targeted recognition and controlled release has experienced a number of design challenges, including, for example, complicated preparation steps and premature drug release. Herein, we address these problems through an in situ self-polymerization method that synthesizes biodegradable polyphenol-coated porous nanomaterials for targeted and controlled drug delivery. As a proof of concept, we synthesized polyphenol-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles, termed MSN@polyphenol. The polyphenol coatings not only improved colloidal stability and prevented premature drug leakage, but also provided a scaffold for immobilization of targeting moieties, such as aptamers. Both immobilization of targeting aptamers and synthesis of polyphenol coating are easily accomplished without the aid of any other organic reagents. Importantly, the polyphenol coating (EGCg) used in this study could be biodegraded by acidic pH and intracellular glutathione, resulting in the release of trapped anticancer drugs. Based on confocal fluorescence microscopy and cytotoxicity experiments, drug-loaded and polyphenol-coated MSNs were shown to possess highly efficient internalization and an apparent cytotoxic effect on target cancer, but not control, cells. Our results suggest that these highly biocompatible and biodegradable polyphenol-coated MSNs are promising vectors for controlled-release biomedical applications and cancer therapy.The development of biocompatible drug delivery systems with targeted recognition and controlled release has experienced a number of design challenges, including, for example, complicated preparation steps and premature drug release. Herein, we address these problems through an in situ self-polymerization method that synthesizes biodegradable polyphenol-coated porous nanomaterials for targeted and controlled drug delivery. As a proof of concept, we synthesized polyphenol-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles

  18. Electrically conductive, black thermal control coatings for space craft application. II - Silicone matrix formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hribar, V. F.; Bauer, J. L.; O'Donnell, T. P.

    1986-01-01

    Five black electrically conductive thermal-control coatings have been formulated and tested for application on the Galileo spacecraft. The coatings consisted of organic and inorganic systems applied on titanium and aluminum surfaces. The coatings were tested under simulated space environment conditions. Coated specimens were subjected to thermal radiation and convective and conductive heating from -196 to 538 C. Mechanical, physical, thermal, electrical, and optical characteristics, formulation, mixing, application, surface preparation of substrates, and a method of determining electrical resistance are presented for the silicone matrix formulation designated as GF-580.

  19. Nano-structural bioactive gradient coating fabricated by computer controlled plasma-spraying technology.

    PubMed

    Ning, C Y; Wang, Y J; Lu, W W; Qiu, Q X; Lam, R W M; Chen, X F; Chiu, K Y; Ye, J D; Wu, G; Wu, Z H; Chow, S P

    2006-10-01

    The poor mechanical property of hydroxyapatite was the major problem for load bearing and implant coating in clinical applications. To overcome this weakness, a bioactive gradient coating with a special design composition of hydroxyapatite (HA), ZrO2, Ti, bioglass was developed. This 120 microm coating with an upper layer of 30-50 microm porous HA produced by computer controlled plasma spraying which maintained energy level of the plasma which ensure proper melting of powder. The crystal size of the coating was 18.6-26.2 nm. Transformation of t-ZrO2 to m-ZrO2 reduced the thermal stress that weakened the coating and lowered down interfacial strength of the coating and metal substrate. Thermal stress of sprayed coating was 16.4 MPa which was much smaller than the sample without thermal treatment of 67.1 MPa. Interfacial strength between the coating and metal substrate was 53 MPa which is much higher than conventional Hydroxyapatite coating. Based on XRD analysis crystallinity of HA approached 98%. Therefore, high temperature treatment improved long term stability of the coating through improved crystallinity of hydroxyapatite and reduced other impure calcium phosphate phase.

  20. Antimicrobial PVK:SWNT nanocomposite coated membrane for water purification: performance and toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Farid; Santos, Catherine M; Mangadlao, Joey; Advincula, Rigoberto; Rodrigues, Debora F

    2013-08-01

    This study demonstrated that coated nitrocellulose membranes with a nanocomposite containing 97% (wt%) of polyvinyl-N-carbazole (PVK) and 3% (wt%) of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) (97:3 wt% ratio PVK:SWNT) achieve similar or improved removal of bacteria when compared with 100% SWNTs coated membranes. Membranes coated with the nanocomposite exhibited significant antimicrobial activity toward Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (≈ 80-90%); and presented a virus removal efficiency of ≈ 2.5 logs. Bacterial cell membrane damage was considered a possible mechanism of cellular inactivation since higher efflux of intracellular material (Deoxyribonucleic acid, DNA) was quantified in the filtrate of PVK-SWNT and SWNT membranes than in the filtrate of control membranes. To evaluate possible application of these membrane filters for drinking water treatment, toxicity of PVK-SWNT was tested against fibroblast cells. The results demonstrated that PVK-SWNT was non toxic to fibroblast cells as opposed to pure SWNT (100%). These results suggest that it is possible to synthesize antimicrobial nitrocellulose membranes coated with SWNT based nanocomposites for drinking water treatment. Furthermore, membrane filters coated with the nanocomposite PVK-SWNT (97:3 wt% ratio PVK:SWNT) will produce more suitable coated membranes for drinking water than pure SWNTs coated membranes (100%), since the reduced load of SWNT in the nanocomposite will reduce the use of costly and toxic SWNT nanomaterial on the membranes.

  1. Fabrication of electrically bistable organic semiconducting/ferroelectric blend films by temperature controlled spin coating.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinghang; Zhang, Jianchi; Fu, Zongyuan; Weng, Junhui; Chen, Weibo; Ding, Shijin; Jiang, Yulong; Zhu, Guodong

    2015-03-25

    Organic semiconducting/ferroelectric blend films attracted much attention due to their electrical bistability and rectification properties and thereof the potential in resistive memory devices. During film deposition from the blend solution, spinodal decomposition induced phase separation, resulting in discrete semiconducting phase whose electrical property could be modulated by the continuous ferroelectric phase. However, blend films processed by common spin coating method showed extremely rough surfaces, even comparable to the film thickness, which caused large electrical leakage and thus compromised the resistive switching performance. To improve film roughness and thus increase the productivity of these resistive devices, we developed temperature controlled spin coating technique to carefully adjust the phase separation process. Here we reported our experimental results from the blend films of ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene (P(VDF-TrFE)) and semiconducting poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). We conducted a series of experiments at various deposition temperatures ranging from 20 to 90 °C. The resulting films were characterized by AFM, SEM, and VPFM to determine their structure and roughness. Film roughness first decreased and then increased with the increase of deposition temperature. Electrical performance was also characterized and obviously improved insulating property was obtained from the films deposited between 50 and 70 °C. By temperature control during film deposition, it is convenient to efficiently fabricate ferroelectric/semiconducting blend films with good electrical bistability.

  2. 49 CFR 195.559 - What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.559 What coating... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What coating material may I use for...

  3. Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings for Flexible Ceramic Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius; Carroll, Carol; Smith, Dane; Guzinski, Mike; Marschall, Jochen; Pallix, Joan; Ridge, Jerry; Tran, Duoc

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the evaluation and testing of high emissivity protective coatings applied to flexible insulations for the Reusable Launch Vehicle technology program. Ceramic coatings were evaluated for their thermal properties, durability, and potential for reuse. One of the major goals was to determine the mechanism by which these coated blanket surfaces become brittle and try to modify the coatings to reduce or eliminate embrittlement. Coatings were prepared from colloidal silica with a small percentage of either SiC or SiB6 as the emissivity agent. These coatings are referred to as gray C-9 and protective ceramic coating (PCC), respectively. The colloidal solutions were either brushed or sprayed onto advanced flexible reusable surface insulation blankets. The blankets were instrumented with thermocouples and exposed to reentry heating conditions in the Ames Aeroheating Arc Jet Facility. Post-test samples were then characterized through impact testing, emissivity measurements, chemical analysis, and observation of changes in surface morphology. The results show that both coatings performed well in arc jet tests with backface temperatures slightly lower for the PCC coating than with gray C-9. Impact testing showed that the least extensive surface destruction was experienced on blankets with lower areal density coatings.

  4. Contamination control in hybrid microelectronic modules. Part 2: Selection and evaluation of coating materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himmel, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    The selection, test, and evaluation of organic coating materials for contamination control in hybrid circuits is reported. The coatings were evaluated to determine their suitability for use as a conformal coating over the hybrid microcircuit (including chips and wire bonds) inside a hermetically sealed package. Evaluations included ease of coating application and repair and effect on thin film and thick film resistors, beam leads, wire bonds, transistor chips, and capacitor chips. The coatings were also tested for such properties as insulation resistance, voltage breakdown strength, and capability of immobilizing loose particles inside the packages. The selected coatings were found to be electrically, mechanically, and chemically compatible with all components and materials normally used in hybrid microcircuits.

  5. Effects of ultraviolet and protons radiations on thermal control coatings after contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faye, D.; Marco, J.

    2003-09-01

    The impact of molecular deposits from spacecraft materials outgassing is not only dependent on sensitive surface nature and contaminant type but also on space environment parameters. In order to study the combined effects of contamination and solar radiation, ground tests have been performed on thermal control coatings: innovative ones such as Flexible and Rigid Solar Reflectors (FSR and RSR), and classic ones such as Optical Solar Reflectors (OSR) and Second Surface Mirrors (SSM). During a first phase, samples of these cold coatings have been exposed to an outgassing flux of different widely used materials: - a PU1 black paint, - a conformal coating MAPSIL 213B, - a structural adhesive Scotchweld EC2216 and to an outgassing flux coming from the mixture of these three materials. During a second phase, the samples have been exposed through two successive tests (either under UV or protons) to a simulated space environment corresponding to one year satellite GEO orbit on North / South faces. Material degradation has been evaluated by in-situ reflectance spectra in the range 250-2500 nm (UV test) and in the range 250-840 nm (Protons test). Negligible changes occurred during initial air to vacuum transition whereas significant recoveries of degradations occurred when returning to ambient atmospheric pressure. The observed degradation is the most important in the UV-visible range independently of the contaminants and substrates. It is partly due to contaminants and substrates for silicone cold coatings FSRs, RSRs, mainly due to contaminants for OSRs, SSMs and mainly due to substrates in the case of paints.

  6. Oxidation Control of Atmospheric Plasma Sprayed FeAl Intermetallic Coatings Using Dry-Ice Blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bo; Dong, Shujuan; Coddet, Pierre; Hansz, Bernard; Grosdidier, Thierry; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2013-03-01

    The performance of atmospheric plasma sprayed FeAl coatings has been remarkably limited because of oxidation and phase transformation during the high-temperature process of preparation. In the present work, FeAl intermetallic coatings were prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying combined with dry-ice blasting. The microstructure, oxidation, porosity, and surface roughness of FeAl intermetallic coatings were investigated. The results show that a denser FeAl coating with a lower content of oxide and lower degree of phase transformation can be achieved because of the cryogenic, the cleaning, and the mechanical effects of dry-ice blasting. The surface roughness value decreased, and the adhesive strength of FeAl coating increased after the application of dry-ice blasting during the atmospheric plasma spraying process. Moreover, the microhardness of the FeAl coating increased by 72%, due to the lower porosity and higher dislocation density.

  7. Performance of a polyurethane vascular prosthesis carrying a dipyridamole (Persantin) coating on its lumenal surface.

    PubMed

    Aldenhoff, Y B; van Der Veen, F H; ter Woorst, J; Habets, J; Poole-Warren, L A; Koole, L H

    2001-02-01

    A porous polyurethane vascular prosthesis with an internal diameter of 5 mm was studied. The graft carries a coating of immobilized dipyridamole (Persantin(R)) on the surface of its lumen. Dipyridamole is a potent nontoxic inhibitor of platelet activation/aggregation, and also a strong inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. The polyurethane material is also known as Chronoflex(R), and already finds use as a vascular access graft. The coated vascular graft was studied in vitro (hemocompatibility, interaction with blood platelets and cultured endothelial cells), as well as in two established in vivo models. In the first in vivo study, coated grafts were implanted in goats, as a bypass of the carotid artery (four animals, eight grafts, length of the graft was approximately 12 cm). Four uncoated grafts were used as controls in otherwise identical experiments. In the second in vivo experiment, eight sheep were used. Each animal received one coated and one uncoated prosthesis as an interposition graft in the carotid artery (length of the graft was 4 cm). The in vitro experiments revealed that the dipyridamole coating has three beneficial effects: reduced thrombogenicity, reduced adherence of blood platelets, and accommodation of a confluent monolayer of endothelial cells. The goat experiments showed patency of the coated grafts in three of the eight cases. The sheep experiments were not useful for the evaluation of the dipyridamole coating because deterioration of the polyurethane material was observed. The in vivo results indicate that the dipyridamole coating may positively influence the patency rate, probably because the coating promotes the growth of an endothelial cell lining. The sheep data show, however, that the limited stability of the Chronoflex(R) material precludes its issue for the construction of permanent small-bore vascular grafts. PMID:11093182

  8. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture.

    PubMed

    Karthikeya Sharma, T

    2015-11-01

    Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE). This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar) gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine's performance within the range studied.

  9. Performance and emission characteristics of the thermal barrier coated SI engine by adding argon inert gas to intake mixture

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeya Sharma, T.

    2014-01-01

    Dilution of the intake air of the SI engine with the inert gases is one of the emission control techniques like exhaust gas recirculation, water injection into combustion chamber and cyclic variability, without scarifying power output and/or thermal efficiency (TE). This paper investigates the effects of using argon (Ar) gas to mitigate the spark ignition engine intake air to enhance the performance and cut down the emissions mainly nitrogen oxides. The input variables of this study include the compression ratio, stroke length, and engine speed and argon concentration. Output parameters like TE, volumetric efficiency, heat release rates, brake power, exhaust gas temperature and emissions of NOx, CO2 and CO were studied in a thermal barrier coated SI engine, under variable argon concentrations. Results of this study showed that the inclusion of Argon to the input air of the thermal barrier coated SI engine has significantly improved the emission characteristics and engine’s performance within the range studied. PMID:26644918

  10. The calcium phosphate coating of soy lecithin nanoemulsion with performance in stability and as an oxygen carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kyu B.

    This work studied the relationship between surfactant, oil, and water, by building ternary phase diagrams, the goal of which was to identify the oil-in-water phase composition. The resulting nano-sized emulsion was coated with dicalcium phosphate by utilizing the ionic affinity between calcium ions and the emulsion surface. Since the desired function of the particle is as an oxygen carrier, the particle stability, oxygen capacity, and oxygen release rate were investigated. The first step in the process was to construct ternary phase diagrams with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (DOPA) and soy derived lecithin. The results showed that the lecithin surfactant formed an oil-in-water phase region that was 36 times greater than that of DOPA. With the desired phase composition set, the lecithin emulsion was extruded, resulting in a well-dispersed nanosized particle. A pH titration study of the emulsion found an optimized calcium phosphate coating condition at pH 8.8, at which, the calcium ion had a greater affinity for the emulsion surface than phosphate. A Hill plot was used to show calcium cooperativeness on the emulsion surface which suggested one calcium ion binds to one lecithin molecule. The lecithin emulsion particles were then coated with calcium phosphate using a layering technique that allowed for careful control of the coating thickness. The overall particle hydrodynamic radius was consistent with the growth of the calcium phosphate coating, from 8 nm to 28 nm. This observation was further supported with cryo-TEM measurements. The stability of the coated emulsion was tested in conditions that simulate practical thermal, physical, and time-dependent conditions. Throughout the tests, the coated emulsion exhibited a constant mono-dispersed particle size, while the uncoated emulsion size fluctuated greatly and exhibited increased polydispersion. The fast mixing method with the stopped-flow apparatus was employed to test the product as an oxygen carrier, and it

  11. Tribological performance of an H-DLC coating prepared by PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, J.; Zhao, H.; Wang, C.; Verduzco, J. A.; Bueno, A. S.; Neville, A.

    2016-10-01

    Carbon-based coatings are of wide interest due to their application in machine elements subjected to continuous contact where fluid lubricant films are not permitted. This paper describes the tribological performance under dry conditions of duplex layered H-DLC coating sequentially deposited by microwave excited plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition on AISI 52100 steel. The architecture of the coating comprised Cr, WC, and DLC (a-C:H) with a total thickness of 2.8 μm and compressive residual stress very close to 1 GPa. Surface hardness was approximately 22 GPa and its reduced elastic modulus around 180 GPa. Scratch tests indicated a well adhered coating achieving a critical load of 80 N. The effect of normal load on the friction and wear behaviours were investigated with steel pins sliding against the actual coating under dry conditions at room temperature (20 ± 2 °C) and 35-50% RH. The results show that coefficient of friction of the coating decreased from 0.21 to 0.13 values with the increase in the applied loads (10-50 N). Specific wear rates of the surface coating also decrease with the increase in the same range of applied loads. Maximum and minimum values were 14 × 10-8 and 5.5 × 10-8 mm-3/N m, respectively. Through Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy it was confirmed the carbon-carbon contact, due to the tribolayer formation on the wear scars of the coating and pin. In order to further corroborate the experimental observations regarding the graphitisation behaviour, the existing mathematical relationships to determine the graphitisation temperature of the coating/steel contact as well as the flash temperature were used.

  12. Self-cleaning and self-sanitizing coatings on plastic fabrics: design, manufacture and performance.

    PubMed

    Barletta, M; Vesco, S; Tagliaferri, V

    2014-08-01

    Self-cleaning and self-sanitizing coatings are of utmost interest in several manufacturing domains. In particular, fabrics and textile materials are often pre-treated by impregnation or incorporation with antimicrobial pesticides for protection purposes against bacteria and fungi that are pathogenic for man or other animals. In this respect, the present investigation deals with the design and manufacture of self-cleaning and self-sanitizing coatings on plastic fabrics. The functionalization of the coatings was yield by incorporating active inorganic matter alone (i.e., photo-catalytic TiO2 anatase and Ag(+) ions) inside an organic inorganic hybrid binder. The achieved formulations were deposited on coextruded polyvinylchloride-polyester fabrics by air-mix spraying and left to dry at ambient temperature. The performance of the resulting coatings were characterized for their self-cleaning and self-sanitizing ability according to standardized testing procedure and/or applicable international regulations.

  13. Performance of "Moth Eye" Anti-Reflective Coatings for Solar Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.; Kane, M.; Jiang, P.

    2011-03-14

    An inexpensive, effective anti-reflective coating (ARC) has been developed at the University of Florida to significantly enhance the absorption of light by silicon in solar cells. This coating has nano-scale features, and its microstructure mimics that of various night active insects (e.g. a moth's eye). It is a square array of pillars, each about 700 nm high and having a diameter of about 300 nm. Samples of silicon having this coating were exposed either to various combinations of either elevated temperature and humidity or to gamma irradiation ({sup 60}Co) at the Savannah River National Laboratory, or to a broad spectrum ultraviolet light and to a 532 nm laser light at the University of Florida. The anti-reflective properties of the coatings were unaffected by any of these environmental stresses, and the microstructure of the coating was also unaffected. In fact, the reflectivity of the gamma irradiated ARC became lower (advantageous for solar cell applications) at wavelengths between 400 and 1000 nm. These results show that this coating is robust and should be tested in actual systems exposed to either weather or a space environment. Structural details of the ARCs were studied to optimize their performance. Square arrays performed better than hexagonal arrays - the natural moth-eye coating is indeed a square array. The optimal depth of the templated nanopillars in the ARC was investigated. A wet etching technology for ARC formation was developed that would be less expensive and much faster than dry etching. Theoretical modeling revealed that dimple arrays should perform better than nipple arrays. A method of fabricating both dimple and nipple arrays having the same length was developed, and the dimple arrays performed better than the nipple arrays, in agreement with the modeling. The commercial viability of the technology is quite feasible, since the technology is scalable and inexpensive. This technology is also compatible with current industrial fabrication of

  14. Collagen Coated Nanoliposome as a Targeted and Controlled Drug Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, G.; Stephen, P.; Prabhu, M.; Sehgal, P. K.; Sadulla, S.

    2010-10-01

    The collagen coated nanoliposome (CCNL) have been prepared and characterized in order to develop a targeted and controlled drug delivery system. The zeta potential (ZP) measurement, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectral and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Cell viability assay data showed that the collagen coated nanoliposome particle size and charges, structural interaction and surface morphology and high bio-cyto-compatibility of collagen coated nanoliposome. The particle sizes of nanoliposome (NL) and collagen coated nanoliposome are 20-300 nm and 0.1-10 μm respectively. The introduction of triple helical, coiled coil and fibrous protein of collagen into nanoliposome can improves the stability of nanoliposome, resistant to phospholipase activities and decreasing the phagocytosis of liposomes by reticuloendothelial system. The collagen coated nanoliposome is expected to be used as for targeted and controlled drug delivery system, and tissue engineering application.

  15. Improvement of linewidth control with antireflective coating in optical lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Ching; Purdes, Andrew J.; Saller, Steve A.; Hunter, William R.

    1984-02-01

    Antireflective (AR) coating less than 5000 Å has been investigated to eliminate the light reflection from layers under resist and to reduce the linewidth variation over topographical features. Theoretical calculations based on simulation results using the sample program indicate that more than 50% of the variations at the step crossover can be reduced by eliminating the standing wave effects for a step of height less than 0.8 μm. Several types of AR coating, including TiW, V, polysilicon films, and spun-on layer incorporated with an absorbing dye will be presented and compared. The exposure latitude can be widely extended by the AR coating. Both the standing wave effect and the linewidth change with respect to variation in exposure dose can also be reduced significantly. With the spun-on AR coating, which can be applied, patterned, developed, and stripped with the photoresist, the only steps added to the standard photoresist process are coating and baking the AR layer. Using a 10 : 1 reduction GCA Mann stepper to expose, linewidth variation of the order of 0.3 μm (total range) for 1.2-μm-thick aluminum over 0.5-μm steps, resulting from polysilicon gate patterning, has been demonstrated. There is no adverse undercutting due to the AR layer during the resist development and plasma aluminum etch. This simple and convenient technique can be effectively applied to wafers with topographical steps less than 0.8-μm height.

  16. Aligning Task Control with Desire for Control: Implications for Performance

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Alex T.; Etcheverry, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined whether matches between task control and participants' desire for control over their environment lead to better task performance than mismatches. Work control and desire for control were manipulated, and participants engaged in timed tasks. As predicted, performance was higher in cases of match, even when task control and desire for control were low. Task control and desire for control may predict work performance in combination, highlighting the importance of Person-Environment Fit theory for both selection and work design. By manipulating desire for control, our research also explores the potentially state-dependent quality of this individual difference variable. PMID:26045630

  17. Controlling the scattering properties of thin, particle-doped coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, William; Corbett, Madeleine; Manoharan, Vinothan

    2013-03-01

    Coatings and thin films of small particles suspended in a matrix possess optical properties that are important in several industries from cosmetics and paints to polymer composites. Many of the most interesting applications require coatings that produce several bulk effects simultaneously, but it is often difficult to rationally formulate materials with these desired optical properties. Here, we focus on the specific challenge of designing a thin colloidal film that maximizes both diffuse and total hemispherical transmission. We demonstrate that these bulk optical properties follow a simple scaling with two microscopic length scales: the scattering and transport mean free paths. Using these length scales and Mie scattering calculations, we generate basic design rules that relate scattering at the single particle level to the film's bulk optical properties. These ideas will be useful in the rational design of future optically active coatings.

  18. Preliminary evaluation of radiation control coatings for energy conservation in buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.W.

    1992-02-01

    Radiation Control Coatings (RCCs) applied to external building surfaces can reflect about 85 percent of the solar heating from the surfaces of buildings. Since in warm climates, solar heating is the primary source of heat gain through walls and roofs, RCC technology represents an alternative or adjunct to conventional thermal control methods (e.g., thermal insulation) for opaque building components. The primary objectives of this project were to: (1) obtain solar and infrared reflectance data for representative RCC products, (2) evaluate test methods for measurement of the radiative properties of RCCs, (3) calculate the changes in heat flow attributed to RCCs in flat roof applications in several geographic locations, and (4) compare field tests and calculated thermal performance of an RCC in a flat roof configuration. Data are presented for the radiative properties of five commercially available RCC products as determined by several test methods. The potential energy benefits of RCCs are presented for flat roofs in both warm and cold climates.

  19. Optimizing Compliance and Thermal Conductivity of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings via Controlled Powders and Processing Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yang; Srinivasan, Vasudevan; Nakamura, Toshio; Sampath, Sanjay; Bertrand, Pierre; Bertrand, Ghislaine

    2012-09-01

    The properties and performance of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are strongly dependent on the microstructural defects, which are affected by starting powder morphology and processing conditions. Of particular interest is the use of hollow powders which not only allow for efficient melting of zirconia ceramics but also produce lower conductivity and more compliant coatings. Typical industrial hollow spray powders have an assortment of densities resulting in masking potential advantages of the hollow morphology. In this study, we have conducted process mapping strategies using a novel uniform shell thickness hollow powder to control the defect microstructure and properties. Correlations among coating properties, microstructure, and processing reveal feasibility to produce highly compliant and low conductivity TBC through a combination of optimized feedstock and processing conditions. The results are presented through the framework of process maps establishing correlations among process, microstructure, and properties and providing opportunities for optimization of TBCs.

  20. Formulation of MS-74 white thermal-control coating and revised application procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shai, M. C.; Hirschfield, J.

    1978-01-01

    Procedures are given for formulating, blending, and applying MS-74 white thermal-control coating and CC-1 primer to spacecraft structures. Improved ultraviolet stability, higher emittance and low absorptivity, and enhanced adhesion characteristics result from the revised procedures.

  1. Controlled-release fertilizer composition substantially coated with an impermeable layer

    DOEpatents

    Ankeny, Mark

    2016-03-29

    A controlled-release fertilizer composition is provided that is substantially coated with an impermeable layer. The fertilizer composition may further include one or more hollow sections to allow for root penetration and efficient delivery of nutrients.

  2. Polydopamine film coated controlled-release multielement compound fertilizer based on mussel-inspired chemistry.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xin; Ma, Zhi-yuan; Zhang, Guo-xiang; Hu, Jia-mei; Liu, Zhi-yong; Wang, He-yun; Zhou, Feng

    2013-03-27

    This work reports on a facile and reliable method to prepare a polydopamine film coated controlled-release multielement compound fertilizer (PCMCF) based on mussel-inspired chemistry for the first time. The polydopamine (Pdop) film was coated on double copper potassium pyrophosphate trihydrate, providing three essential nutrients (Cu, K, and P) by spontaneous oxidative polymerization of dopamine. The thickness of the polymer coating of the fertilizer was controlled by using the multistep deposition technique. The morphology and composition of the products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometer, a vis spectrophotometer, and a Kjeltec autoanalyzer. The controlled-release behavior of four elements, including nitrogen from Pdop, was evaluated in water and in soil (sterilized or not). The results revealed that the coated fertilizers had good slow-release properties, incubated in either water or soil. It is noted that the release rate of nutrients of PCMCF can be tailored by the thickness of the Pdop coating, and the Pdop coating can be biodegraded in soil. This coating technology will be effective and promising in the research and development of controlled-release fertilizer. PMID:23464683

  3. Polydopamine film coated controlled-release multielement compound fertilizer based on mussel-inspired chemistry.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xin; Ma, Zhi-yuan; Zhang, Guo-xiang; Hu, Jia-mei; Liu, Zhi-yong; Wang, He-yun; Zhou, Feng

    2013-03-27

    This work reports on a facile and reliable method to prepare a polydopamine film coated controlled-release multielement compound fertilizer (PCMCF) based on mussel-inspired chemistry for the first time. The polydopamine (Pdop) film was coated on double copper potassium pyrophosphate trihydrate, providing three essential nutrients (Cu, K, and P) by spontaneous oxidative polymerization of dopamine. The thickness of the polymer coating of the fertilizer was controlled by using the multistep deposition technique. The morphology and composition of the products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometer, a vis spectrophotometer, and a Kjeltec autoanalyzer. The controlled-release behavior of four elements, including nitrogen from Pdop, was evaluated in water and in soil (sterilized or not). The results revealed that the coated fertilizers had good slow-release properties, incubated in either water or soil. It is noted that the release rate of nutrients of PCMCF can be tailored by the thickness of the Pdop coating, and the Pdop coating can be biodegraded in soil. This coating technology will be effective and promising in the research and development of controlled-release fertilizer.

  4. Durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings in beta and gamma radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagh, Arun S.; Sayenko, S. Yu.; Dovbnya, A. N.; Shkuropatenko, V. A.; Tarasov, R. V.; Rybka, A. V.; Zakharchenko, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    Ceramicrete™, a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic, was developed for nuclear waste immobilization and nuclear radiation shielding. Ceramicrete products are fabricated by an acid-base reaction between magnesium oxide and mono potassium phosphate. Fillers are used to impart desired properties to the product. Ceramicrete's tailored compositions have resulted in several commercial structural products, including corrosion- and fire-protection coatings. Their borated version, called Borobond™, has been studied for its neutron shielding capabilities and is being used in structures built for storage of nuclear materials. This investigation assesses the durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings when exposed to gamma and beta radiations to predict the composition needed for optimal shielding performance in a realistic nuclear radiation field. Investigations were conducted using experimental data coupled with predictive Monte Carlo computer model. The results show that it is possible to produce products for simultaneous shielding of all three types of nuclear radiations, viz., neutrons, gamma-, and beta-rays. Additionally, because sprayable Ceramicrete coatings exhibit excellent corrosion- and fire-protection characteristics on steel, this research also establishes an opportunity to produce thick coatings to enhance the shielding performance of corrosion and fire protection coatings for use in high radiation environment in nuclear industry.

  5. High temperature glass thermal control structure and coating. [for application to spacecraft reusable heat shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, D. A.; Goldstein, H. E.; Leiser, D. B. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A high temperature stable and solar radiation stable thermal control coating is described which is useful either as such, applied directly to a member to be protected, or applied as a coating on a re-usable surface insulation (RSI). It has a base coat layer and an overlay glass layer. The base coat layer has a high emittance, and the overlay layer is formed from discrete, but sintered together glass particles to give the overlay layer a high scattering coefficient. The resulting two-layer space and thermal control coating has an absorptivity-to-emissivity ratio of less than or equal to 0.4 at room temperature, with an emittance of 0.8 at 1200 F. It is capable of exposure to either solar radiation or temperatures as high as 2000 F without significant degradation. When used as a coating on a silica substrate to give an RSI structure, the coatings of this invention show significantly less reduction in emittance after long term convective heating and less residual strain than prior art coatings for RSI structures.

  6. Microwave absorption properties of carbon nanocoils coated with highly controlled magnetic materials by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guizhen; Gao, Zhe; Tang, Shiwei; Chen, Chaoqiu; Duan, Feifei; Zhao, Shichao; Lin, Shiwei; Feng, Yuhong; Zhou, Lei; Qin, Yong

    2012-12-21

    In this work, atomic layer deposition is applied to coat carbon nanocoils with magnetic Fe(3)O(4) or Ni. The coatings have a uniform and highly controlled thickness. The coated nanocoils with coaxial multilayer nanostructures exhibit remarkably improved microwave absorption properties compared to the pristine carbon nanocoils. The enhanced absorption ability arises from the efficient complementarity between complex permittivity and permeability, chiral morphology, and multilayer structure of the products. This method can be extended to exploit other composite materials benefiting from its convenient control of the impedance matching and combination of dielectric-magnetic multiple loss mechanisms for microwave absorption applications.

  7. Multifaceted and route-controlled "click" reactions based on vapor-deposited coatings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ting-Pi; Tai, Ching-Heng; Wu, Jyun-Ting; Wu, Chih-Yu; Liang, Wei-Chieh; Chen, Hsien-Yeh

    2016-02-01

    "Click" reactions provide precise and reliable chemical transformations for the preparation of functional architectures for biomaterials and biointerfaces. The emergence of a multiple-click reaction strategy has paved the way for a multifunctional microenvironment with orthogonality and precise multitasking that mimics nature. We demonstrate a multifaceted and route-controlled click interface using vapor-deposited functionalized poly-para-xylylenes. Distinctly clickable moieties of ethynyl and maleimide were introduced into poly-para-xylylenes in one step via a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) copolymerization process. The advanced interface coating allows for a double-click route with concurrent copper(i)-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAC) and the thiol-maleimide click reaction. Additionally, double-click reactions can also be performed in a cascade manner by controlling the initiation route to enable the CuAAC and/or thiol-yne reaction using a mono-functional alkyne-functionalized poly-para-xylylene. The use of multifaceted coatings to create straightforward and orthogonal interface properties with respect to protein adsorption and cell attachment is demonstrated and characterized. PMID:26650976

  8. Formation and Oxidation Performance of Low-Temperature Pack Aluminide Coatings on Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Brian; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, Ying; Pint, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    A pack cementation process was developed to coat commercial 9% Cr ferritic-martensitic steel T91 at temperatures below its normal tempering temperature to avoid any potential detrimental effect on the mechanical properties of the coated alloy. In order to prevent the formation of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} coatings, the Al activity in the pack cementation process was reduced by substituting the pure Al masteralloy with binary Cr-Al masteralloys containing either 15 or 25 wt.% Al. When the Cr-25Al masteralloy was used, a duplex coating was formed at 700 C, consisting of a thin Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} outer layer and an inner layer of FeAl. With the Cr-15Al masteralloy, an FeAl coating of {approx} 12 {micro}m thick was achieved at 700 C. The pack aluminide coatings fabricated at 700 C are being evaluated in air + 10 vol.% H{sub 2}O at 650 C and 700 C to determine their long-term oxidation performance.

  9. Effect of laser remelting on the tribological performance of thermal barrier coatings.

    PubMed

    Rico, A; Sevillano, F; Múnez, C J; López, M D; Utrilla, V; Rodríguez, J; Poza, P

    2012-06-01

    Gas turbine's efficiency improves as operating temperature is increased. For this reason, metallic components used in turbine engines, for propulsion and power generation, are protected by thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Laser glazing has been used to enhance the oxidation and corrosion resistance of thermally sprayed TBC, but there is no information about the effect of this treatment on the tribological performance. ZrO2(CaO) top coat and NiAIMo bond coating were flame sprayed onto an AlSI 1045 carbon steel. The top coat was laser remelted and a densified ceramic layer was induced in the top surface of the ceramic coating. Both, the as sprayed and the laser remelted top coatings, were formed by cubic ZrO2 with some tetragonal precipitates. The grain size was reduced by the laser treatment. The mechanical properties and the local wear rate were evaluated by depth sensing indentation and scratch tests respectively. The nanoscale wear behaviour was always improved by the laser treatment. PMID:22905563

  10. Plasma sprayed manganese-cobalt spinel coatings: Process sensitivity on phase, electrical and protective performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Su Jung; Pala, Zdenek; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-02-01

    Manganese cobalt spinel (Mn1.5Co1.5O4, MCO) coatings are prepared by the air plasma spray (APS) process to examine their efficacy in serving as protective coatings from Cr-poisoning of the cathode side in intermediate temperature-solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). These complex oxides are susceptible to process induced stoichiometric and phase changes which affect their functional performance. To critically examine these effects, MCO coatings are produced with deliberate modifications to the spray process parameters to explore relationship among process conditions, microstructure and functional properties. The resultant interplay among particle thermal and kinetic energies are captured through process maps, which serve to characterize the parametric effects on properties. The results show significant changes to the chemistry and phase composition of the deposited material resulting from preferential evaporation of oxygen. Post deposition annealing recovers oxygen in the coatings and allows partial recovery of the spinel phase, which is confirmed through thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA)/differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and magnetic hysteresis measurements. In addition, coatings with high density after sintering show excellent electrical conductivity of 40 S cm-1 at 800 °C while simultaneously providing requisite protection characteristics against Cr-poisoning. This study provides a framework for optimal evaluation of MCO coatings in intermediate temperature SOFCs.

  11. A Five-year Performance Study of Low VOC Coatings over Zinc Thermal Spray for the Protection of Carbon Steel at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolody, Mark R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    The launch facilities at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are located approximately 1000 feet from the Atlantic Ocean where they are exposed to salt deposits, high humidity, high UV degradation, and acidic exhaust from solid rocket boosters. These assets are constructed from carbon steel, which requires a suitable coating to provide long-term protection to reduce corrosion and its associated costs. While currently used coating systems provide excellent corrosion control performance, they are subject to occupational, safety, and environmental regulations at the Federal and State levels that limit their use. Many contain high volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants, and other hazardous materials. Hazardous waste from coating operations include vacuum filters, zinc dust, hazardous paint related material, and solid paint. There are also worker safety issues such as exposure to solvents and isocyanates. To address these issues, top-coated thermal spray zinc coating systems were investigated as a promising environmentally friendly corrosion protection for carbon steel in an acidic launch environment. Additional benefits of the combined coating system include a long service life, cathodic protection to the substrate, no volatile contaminants, and high service temperatures. This paper reports the results of a performance based study to evaluate low VOC topcoats (for thermal spray zinc coatings) on carbon steel for use in a space launch environment.

  12. A new gene that controls seed coat wrinkling in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed coat wrinkling is a major factor affecting the germinability of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] seed produced in high-temperature environments, such as in the early soybean production system (ESPS) of the midsouthern United States. Exposure of seed to high temperatures, coupled with alternatin...

  13. Improved performance of P-type DSCs with a compact blocking layer coated by different thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Phuong; Bao, Le Quoc; Cheruku, Rajesh; Kim, Jae Hong

    2016-09-01

    The introduction of different thicknesses of a compact NiO blocking layer coating with different spin speeds on FTO and followed by a coating of photoactive NiO electrode for p-type dye-sensitized solar cells ( p-DSCs). This study examined the fabrication of a compact NiO blocking layer by decomposing an ethanolic precursor solution of nickel acetate tetrahydrate. The DCBZ dye used as the photosensitizer for the NiO electrode in the p-DSCs device and their performances have been analyzed. The enhancement of photovoltaic performance and resulted from an increase in the power conversion efficiency ( η). The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement demonstrated that charge recombination was suppressed when a compact NiO blocking layer was applied. The results showed that the best p-DSC was achieved by employing 3000 rpm spin-coated process for different times of blocking layer.

  14. Improved performance of P-type DSCs with a compact blocking layer coated by different thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Phuong; Bao, Le Quoc; Cheruku, Rajesh; Kim, Jae Hong

    2016-07-01

    The introduction of different thicknesses of a compact NiO blocking layer coating with different spin speeds on FTO and followed by a coating of photoactive NiO electrode for p-type dye-sensitized solar cells (p-DSCs). This study examined the fabrication of a compact NiO blocking layer by decomposing an ethanolic precursor solution of nickel acetate tetrahydrate. The DCBZ dye used as the photosensitizer for the NiO electrode in the p-DSCs device and their performances have been analyzed. The enhancement of photovoltaic performance and resulted from an increase in the power conversion efficiency (η). The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement demonstrated that charge recombination was suppressed when a compact NiO blocking layer was applied. The results showed that the best p-DSC was achieved by employing 3000 rpm spin-coated process for different times of blocking layer.

  15. Smart Multifunctional Coatings for Corrosion Detection and Control in the Aerospace Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it.

  16. The Study of Indicatrices of Space Object Coatings in a Controlled Laboratory Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshkin, N.; Burlak, N.; Petrov, M.; Strakhova, S.

    The indicatrices of light scattering by radiation balance coatings used on space objects (SO) were determined in the laboratory experiment in a controlled condition. The laboratory device for the physical simulation of photometric observations of space objects in orbit, which was used in this case to study optical properties of coating samples, is described. The features of light reflection off plane coating samples, including multi-layer insulation (MLI) blankets, metal surfaces coated with several layers of enamel EP-140, special polyacrylate enamel AK-512 and matte finish Tp-CO-2, were determined. The indicated coatings are compound reflectors which exhibit both diffuse and specular reflections. The data obtained are to be used in the development of computer optical-geometric models of space objects or their fragments (space debris) to interpret the photometry results for real space objects.

  17. Thermal control/oxidation resistant coatings for titanium-based alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ronald K.; Wallace, Terryl A.; Cunnington, George R.; Wiedemann, Karl E.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive research and development efforts have been expended toward development of thermal control and environmental protection coatings for NASP and generic hypersonic vehicle applications. The objective of the coatings development activities summarized here was to develop light-weight coatings for protecting advanced titanium alloys from oxidation in hypersonic vehicle applications. A number of new coating concepts have been evaluated. Coated samples were exposed to static oxidation tests at temperatures up to 1000 C using a thermogravimetric apparatus. Samples were also exposed to simulated hypersonic flight conditions for up to 10 hr to determine their thermal and chemical stability and catalytic efficiency. The emittance of samples was determined before and after exposure to simulated hypersonic flight conditions.

  18. Controlled release of manganese into water from coated experimental fertilizers: laboratory characterization.

    PubMed

    Novillo, J; Rico, M I; Alvarez, J M

    2001-03-01

    The release of manganese into water from controlled-release formulations containing manganese EDTA or manganese lignosulfonate was studied. These fertilizers were obtained in the laboratory by adhering the source of manganese over urea pellets and by adding a coating. The materials used as adhesives and coatings were mixtures of rosins plus tricalcium phosphate. With regard to the chemical composition, these formulations conformed to national and international standards for commercial fertilizers. The rate of release of manganese was a function of both the source of manganese used and the coating thickness. Under the same conditions the release of manganese was greater for formulations with manganese EDTA than with manganese lignosulfonate. To predict the kinetic behaviors of the two series of formulations, mathematical equations were established. The manganese source plus rosin coatings improved the handling and storage characteristics of the commercial urea pellets. The study of the rosin coatings using scanning electron microscopy showed that they were compact and homogeneous. PMID:11312854

  19. Controlled release of manganese into water from coated experimental fertilizers: laboratory characterization.

    PubMed

    Novillo, J; Rico, M I; Alvarez, J M

    2001-03-01

    The release of manganese into water from controlled-release formulations containing manganese EDTA or manganese lignosulfonate was studied. These fertilizers were obtained in the laboratory by adhering the source of manganese over urea pellets and by adding a coating. The materials used as adhesives and coatings were mixtures of rosins plus tricalcium phosphate. With regard to the chemical composition, these formulations conformed to national and international standards for commercial fertilizers. The rate of release of manganese was a function of both the source of manganese used and the coating thickness. Under the same conditions the release of manganese was greater for formulations with manganese EDTA than with manganese lignosulfonate. To predict the kinetic behaviors of the two series of formulations, mathematical equations were established. The manganese source plus rosin coatings improved the handling and storage characteristics of the commercial urea pellets. The study of the rosin coatings using scanning electron microscopy showed that they were compact and homogeneous.

  20. Effects of ultrathin silicone coating of porous membrane on gas transfer and hemolytic performance.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Y; Ueyama, K; Yamaji, K; Yamane, S; Tayama, E; Sueoka, A; Kuwana, K; Tahara, K; Nosé, Y

    1997-10-01

    To assess the effect of an ultrathin (0.2 microm) silicone-coated microporous membrane oxygenator on gas transfer and hemolytic performance, a silicone-coated capillary membrane oxygenator (Mera HP Excelung-prime, HPO-20H-C, Senko Medical Instrument Mfg. Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) was compared with a noncoated polypropylene microporous membrane oxygenator of the same model and manufacturer using an in vitro test circuit. The 2 oxygenators showed little difference in the oxygen (O2) transfer rate over a wide range of blood flow rates (1 L/min to 8 L/min). The carbon dioxide (CO2) transfer rate was almost the same in both devices at low blood flow rates, but the silicone-coated oxygenator showed a decrease of more than 20% in the CO2 transfer rate at higher blood flow rates. This loss in performance could be partly attenuated by increasing the gas/blood flow ratio from 0.5 or 1.0 to 2.0. In the hemolysis study, the silicone-coated membrane oxygenator showed a smaller increase in plasma free hemoglobin than the noncoated oxygenator. The pressure drop across both oxygenators was the same. These results suggest that the ultrathin silicone-coated porous membrane oxygenator may be a useful tool for long-term extracorporeal lung support while maintaining a sufficient gas transfer rate and causing less blood component damage.

  1. Randomized controlled clinical trial of 2 types of hydroxyapatite-coated implants on moderate periodontitis patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare and analyze the peri-implant tissue conditions and prospective clinical outcomes associated with 2 types of hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated implants: (1) fully HA-coated implants and (2) partially HA-coated implants with resorbable blast medium on the coronal portion of the threads. Methods Forty-four partially edentulous patients were randomly assigned to undergo the placement of 62 HA-coated implants, and were classified as the control group (partially HA-coated, n=30) and the test group (fully HA-coated, n=32). All patients had chronic periodontitis with moderate crestal bone loss around the edentulous area. The stability and clinical outcomes of the implants were evaluated using the primary and secondary implant stability quotient (ISQ), as well as radiographic, mobility, and peri-implant soft tissue assessments around the implants. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and the Mann-Whitney test were used to evaluate differences between and within the 2 groups, with P values <0.05 considered to indicate statistical significance. Results The fully HA-coated implants displayed good retention of crestal bone, and insignificant differences were found in annual marginal bone loss between the 2 types of HA-coated implants (P>0.05). No significant differences were found in the survival rate (group I, 100%; group II, 100%) or the success rate (group I, 93.3%; group II, 93.8%). The fully HA-coated implants also did not significantly increase the risk of peri-implantitis (P>0.05). Conclusions The fully HA-coated implants did not lead to an increased risk of peri-implantitis and showed good retention of the crestal bone, as well as good survival and success rates. Our study suggests that fully HA-coated implants could become a reliable treatment alternative for edentulous posterior sites and are capable of providing good retention of the crestal bone. PMID:27800216

  2. Fabrication of Polymeric Coatings with Controlled Microtopographies Using an Electrospraying Technique

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiongyu; Mather, Jason P.; Yang, Pine; Boden, Mark; Mather, Patrick T.

    2015-01-01

    Surface topography of medical implants provides an important biophysical cue on guiding cellular functions at the cell-implant interface. However, few techniques are available to produce polymeric coatings with controlled microtopographies onto surgical implants, especially onto implant devices of small dimension and with complex structures such as drug-eluting stents. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to develop a new strategy to fabricate polymeric coatings using an electrospraying technique based on the uniqueness of this technique in that it can be used to produce a mist of charged droplets with a precise control of their shape and dimension. We hypothesized that this technique would allow facile manipulation of coating morphology by controlling the shape and dimension of electrosprayed droplets. More specifically, we employed the electrospraying technique to coat a layer of biodegradable polyurethane with tailored microtopographies onto commercial coronary stents. The topography of such stent coatings was modulated by controlling the ratio of round to stretched droplets or the ratio of round to crumped droplets under high electric field before deposition. The shape of electrosprayed droplets was governed by the stability of these charged droplets right after ejection or during their flight in the air. Using the electrospraying technique, we achieved conformal polymeric coatings with tailored microtopographies onto conductive surgical implants. The approach offers potential for controlling the surface topography of surgical implant devices to modulate their integration with surrounding tissues. PMID:26090663

  3. Neonicotinoid-Coated Zea mays Seeds Indirectly Affect Honeybee Performance and Pathogen Susceptibility in Field Trials.

    PubMed

    Alburaki, Mohamed; Boutin, Sébastien; Mercier, Pierre-Luc; Loublier, Yves; Chagnon, Madeleine; Derome, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-two honeybee (Apis mellifera) colonies were studied in order to detect and measure potential in vivo effects of neonicotinoid pesticides used in cornfields (Zea mays spp) on honeybee health. Honeybee colonies were randomly split on four different agricultural cornfield areas located near Quebec City, Canada. Two locations contained cornfields treated with a seed-coated systemic neonicotinoid insecticide while the two others were organic cornfields used as control treatments. Hives were extensively monitored for their performance and health traits over a period of two years. Honeybee viruses (brood queen cell virus BQCV, deformed wing virus DWV, and Israeli acute paralysis virus IAPV) and the brain specific expression of a biomarker of host physiological stress, the Acetylcholinesterase gene AChE, were investigated using RT-qPCR. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was performed to detect pesticide residues in adult bees, honey, pollen, and corn flowers collected from the studied hives in each location. In addition, general hive conditions were assessed by monitoring colony weight and brood development. Neonicotinoids were only identified in corn flowers at low concentrations. However, honeybee colonies located in neonicotinoid treated cornfields expressed significantly higher pathogen infection than those located in untreated cornfields. AChE levels showed elevated levels among honeybees that collected corn pollen from treated fields. Positive correlations were recorded between pathogens and the treated locations. Our data suggests that neonicotinoids indirectly weaken honeybee health by inducing physiological stress and increasing pathogen loads. PMID:25993642

  4. Neonicotinoid-Coated Zea mays Seeds Indirectly Affect Honeybee Performance and Pathogen Susceptibility in Field Trials.

    PubMed

    Alburaki, Mohamed; Boutin, Sébastien; Mercier, Pierre-Luc; Loublier, Yves; Chagnon, Madeleine; Derome, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-two honeybee (Apis mellifera) colonies were studied in order to detect and measure potential in vivo effects of neonicotinoid pesticides used in cornfields (Zea mays spp) on honeybee health. Honeybee colonies were randomly split on four different agricultural cornfield areas located near Quebec City, Canada. Two locations contained cornfields treated with a seed-coated systemic neonicotinoid insecticide while the two others were organic cornfields used as control treatments. Hives were extensively monitored for their performance and health traits over a period of two years. Honeybee viruses (brood queen cell virus BQCV, deformed wing virus DWV, and Israeli acute paralysis virus IAPV) and the brain specific expression of a biomarker of host physiological stress, the Acetylcholinesterase gene AChE, were investigated using RT-qPCR. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was performed to detect pesticide residues in adult bees, honey, pollen, and corn flowers collected from the studied hives in each location. In addition, general hive conditions were assessed by monitoring colony weight and brood development. Neonicotinoids were only identified in corn flowers at low concentrations. However, honeybee colonies located in neonicotinoid treated cornfields expressed significantly higher pathogen infection than those located in untreated cornfields. AChE levels showed elevated levels among honeybees that collected corn pollen from treated fields. Positive correlations were recorded between pathogens and the treated locations. Our data suggests that neonicotinoids indirectly weaken honeybee health by inducing physiological stress and increasing pathogen loads.

  5. Neonicotinoid-Coated Zea mays Seeds Indirectly Affect Honeybee Performance and Pathogen Susceptibility in Field Trials

    PubMed Central

    Alburaki, Mohamed; Boutin, Sébastien; Mercier, Pierre-Luc; Loublier, Yves; Chagnon, Madeleine; Derome, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Thirty-two honeybee (Apis mellifera) colonies were studied in order to detect and measure potential in vivo effects of neonicotinoid pesticides used in cornfields (Zea mays spp) on honeybee health. Honeybee colonies were randomly split on four different agricultural cornfield areas located near Quebec City, Canada. Two locations contained cornfields treated with a seed-coated systemic neonicotinoid insecticide while the two others were organic cornfields used as control treatments. Hives were extensively monitored for their performance and health traits over a period of two years. Honeybee viruses (brood queen cell virus BQCV, deformed wing virus DWV, and Israeli acute paralysis virus IAPV) and the brain specific expression of a biomarker of host physiological stress, the Acetylcholinesterase gene AChE, were investigated using RT-qPCR. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was performed to detect pesticide residues in adult bees, honey, pollen, and corn flowers collected from the studied hives in each location. In addition, general hive conditions were assessed by monitoring colony weight and brood development. Neonicotinoids were only identified in corn flowers at low concentrations. However, honeybee colonies located in neonicotinoid treated cornfields expressed significantly higher pathogen infection than those located in untreated cornfields. AChE levels showed elevated levels among honeybees that collected corn pollen from treated fields. Positive correlations were recorded between pathogens and the treated locations. Our data suggests that neonicotinoids indirectly weaken honeybee health by inducing physiological stress and increasing pathogen loads. PMID:25993642

  6. Low emittance chromated chemical conversion coatings for spacecraft thermal control in low earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeVesque, R. J.; DeJesus, R. R.; Jones, C. A.; Babel, H. W.

    1996-03-01

    Low emittance coatings were required on the inner side of micro-meteoroid shielding and other structures to minimize heat transfer from the sun illuminated side to the underlying structure. A program was undertaken to evaluate conversion coatings for long term use in space. The conversion coatings evaluated were Alodine 1200 with three different bath chemistries, Iridite 14-2, and Alodine 600. Although the primary emphasis was on evaluating how processing conditions influenced the infrared emittance, corrosion resistance and electrical bonding characteristics were also evaluated. All of the conversion coatings were able to provide the target emittance value of less than 0.10, although baths with ferricyanide accelerators required shorter immersion times than typical of standard shop practices. The balance between emittance, corrosion resistance, and electrical bonding were defined. Space environmental stability tests were conducted on conversion coated 2219 and 7075 aluminum. The emittance and the electrical bonding characteristics were not affected by the space exposure even though the coating dehydrated and mud cracking is evident under a microscope. The dehydration resulted in a loss of corrosion resistance which is a consideration for hardware returned to Earth. It was concluded that conversion coatings are acceptable thermal control coatings for long life spacecraft although additional work is recommended for solar exposed surfaces.

  7. Crosslinked polymeric ionic liquids as solid-phase microextraction sorbent coatings for high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Honglian; Merib, Josias; Anderson, Jared L

    2016-03-18

    Neat crosslinked polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) sorbent coatings for solid-phase microextraction (SPME) compatible with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are reported for the first time. Six structurally different PILs were crosslinked to nitinol supports and applied for the determination of select pharmaceutical drugs, phenolics, and insecticides. Sampling conditions including sample solution pH, extraction time, desorption solvent, desorption time, and desorption solvent volume were optimized using design of experiment (DOE). The developed PIL sorbent coatings were stable when performing extractions under acidic pH and remained intact in various organic desorption solvents (i.e., methanol, acetonitrile, acetone). The PIL-based sorbent coating polymerized from the IL monomer 1-vinyl-3-(10-hydroxydecyl) imidazolium chloride [VC10OHIM][Cl] and IL crosslinker 1,12-di(3-vinylbenzylimidazolium) dodecane dichloride [(VBIM)2C12] 2[Cl] exhibited superior extraction performance compared to the other studied PILs. The extraction efficiency of pharmaceutical drugs and phenolics increased when the film thickness of the PIL-based sorbent coating was increased while many insecticides were largely unaffected. Satisfactory analytical performance was obtained with limits of detection (LODs) ranging from 0.2 to 2 μg L(-1) for the target analytes. The accuracy of the analytical method was examined by studying the relative recovery of analytes in real water samples, including tap water and lake water, with recoveries varying from 50.2% to 115.9% and from 48.8% to 116.6%, respectively. PMID:26896916

  8. The durability of adhesively bonded titanium: Performance of plasma-sprayed polymeric coating pretreatments

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, F.; Dillard, J.; Dillard, D.

    1996-12-31

    The role of a surface treatment of an adherend is to promote highly stable adhesive-adherend interactions; high stability is accomplished by making the chemistry of the adherend and adhesive compatible. The common surface preparations used to enhance durability include grit blasting, chromic acid or sodium hydroxide anodization, and other chemical treatments for titanium. As interest has grown in the development of environmentally benign surface treatments, other methods have been explored. In this study, plasma-sprayed polymeric materials have been evaluated as a surface coating pretreatment for adhesively bonding titanium alloy. Polyimide and polyether powders were plasm-sprayed onto grit-blasted titanium-6Al-4V. The alloy was adhesively bonded using a high performance polyimide adhesive. The coating was characterized using surface sensitive analytical measurements. The durability performance of the plasma-sprayed adherends was compared to the performance for chromic acid anodized titanium. Among the plasma-sprayed coatings, a LaRC-TPI polyimide-based coating exhibited performance comparable to that for chromic acid anodized specimens.

  9. Crosslinked polymeric ionic liquids as solid-phase microextraction sorbent coatings for high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Honglian; Merib, Josias; Anderson, Jared L

    2016-03-18

    Neat crosslinked polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) sorbent coatings for solid-phase microextraction (SPME) compatible with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are reported for the first time. Six structurally different PILs were crosslinked to nitinol supports and applied for the determination of select pharmaceutical drugs, phenolics, and insecticides. Sampling conditions including sample solution pH, extraction time, desorption solvent, desorption time, and desorption solvent volume were optimized using design of experiment (DOE). The developed PIL sorbent coatings were stable when performing extractions under acidic pH and remained intact in various organic desorption solvents (i.e., methanol, acetonitrile, acetone). The PIL-based sorbent coating polymerized from the IL monomer 1-vinyl-3-(10-hydroxydecyl) imidazolium chloride [VC10OHIM][Cl] and IL crosslinker 1,12-di(3-vinylbenzylimidazolium) dodecane dichloride [(VBIM)2C12] 2[Cl] exhibited superior extraction performance compared to the other studied PILs. The extraction efficiency of pharmaceutical drugs and phenolics increased when the film thickness of the PIL-based sorbent coating was increased while many insecticides were largely unaffected. Satisfactory analytical performance was obtained with limits of detection (LODs) ranging from 0.2 to 2 μg L(-1) for the target analytes. The accuracy of the analytical method was examined by studying the relative recovery of analytes in real water samples, including tap water and lake water, with recoveries varying from 50.2% to 115.9% and from 48.8% to 116.6%, respectively.

  10. Controlled-Release Microcapsules for Smart Coatings for Corrosion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Corrosion is a serious problem that has enormous costs and serious safety implications. Localized corrosion, such as pitting, is very dangerous and can cause catastrophic failures. The NASA Corrosion Technology Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center is developing a smart coating based on pH-sensitive microcapsules for corrosion applications. These versatile microcapsules are designed to be incorporated into a smart coating and deliver their core content when corrosion starts. Corrosion indication was the first function incorporated into the microcapsules. Current efforts are focused on incorporating the corrosion inhibition function through the encapsulation of corrosion inhibitors into water core and oil core microcapsules. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of encapsulated corrosion inhibitors are shown.

  11. 49 CFR 195.561 - When must I inspect pipe coating used for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.561 Section 195.561 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.561 When must I inspect pipe coating used for external corrosion control? (a) You must inspect all external pipe...

  12. 49 CFR 195.561 - When must I inspect pipe coating used for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.561 Section 195.561 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.561 When must I inspect pipe coating used for external corrosion control? (a) You must inspect all external pipe...

  13. 49 CFR 195.561 - When must I inspect pipe coating used for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.561 Section 195.561 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.561 When must I inspect pipe coating used for external corrosion control? (a) You must inspect all external pipe...

  14. 49 CFR 195.561 - When must I inspect pipe coating used for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.561 Section 195.561 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.561 When must I inspect pipe coating used for external corrosion control? (a) You must inspect all external pipe...

  15. Performance of electrocatalytic gold coating on bipolar plates for SO2 depolarized electrolyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santasalo-Aarnio, A.; Lokkiluoto, A.; Virtanen, J.; Gasik, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    One of the largest obstacles for SO2 depolarized electrolyser (SDE) commercialization is the material stability in rough operating conditions. In this work stainless steel bipolar plates have been coated with thin Au layer having bifunctional role: providing electrocatalytic surface for both electrode reactions and simultaneously improves the stainless steel support corrosion tolerance at the potential window of SDE. The stability and performance of the coated bipolar plates were tested in a bench-scale electrolyser set-up and the results indicate that these plates can be utilized as economic catalyst for SDE, moreover, they show corrosion resistance in SDE operation.

  16. Controlled Uniform Coating from the Interplay of Marangoni Flows and Surface-Adsorbed Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoungsoo; Boulogne, François; Um, Eujin; Jacobi, Ian; Button, Ernie; Stone, Howard A

    2016-03-25

    Surface coatings and patterning technologies are essential for various physicochemical applications. In this Letter, we describe key parameters to achieve uniform particle coatings from binary solutions. First, multiple sequential Marangoni flows, set by solute and surfactant simultaneously, prevent nonuniform particle distributions and continuously mix suspended materials during droplet evaporation. Second, we show the importance of particle-surface interactions that can be established by surface-adsorbed macromolecules. To achieve a uniform deposit in a binary mixture, a small concentration of surfactant and surface-adsorbed polymer (0.05 wt% each) is sufficient, which offers a new physicochemical avenue for control of coatings.

  17. Powder-Coated Towpreg: Avenues to Near Net Shape Fabrication of High Performance Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, N. J.; Cano, R. J.; Marchello, J. M.; Sandusky, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Near net shape parts were fabricated from powder-coated preforms. Key issues including powder loss during weaving and tow/tow friction during braiding were addressed, respectively, by fusing the powder to the fiber prior to weaving and applying a water-based gel to the towpreg prior to braiding. A 4:1 debulking of a complex 3-D woven powder-coated preform was achieved in a single step utilizing expansion rubber molding. Also, a process was developed for using powder-coated towpreg to fabricate consolidated ribbon having good dimensional integrity and low voids. Such ribbon will be required for in situ fabrication of structural components via heated head advanced tow placement. To implement process control and ensure high quality ribbon, the ribbonizer heat transfer and pulling force were modeled from fundamental principles. Most of the new ribbons were fabricated from dry polyarylene ether and polymide powders.

  18. Size control of L12-FePt3 nanocrystals by spin-coating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamshad, Zahra; Sebt, Seyed Ali; Abolhassani, Mohammad Reza

    2016-09-01

    Annealing is one of the stages of FePt nanoparticles preparation, during which the transition to a compositionally ordered phase occurs. In order to size and shape control of the nanoparticles in the mentioned stage, it is needed that they be distributed on a suitable surface. In the present work, the spin-coating method is suggested for preparing monolayer from L12-FePt3 nanoparticles colloidal solution on SiO2/Si substrates. FePt3 nanoparticles were gradually deposited as droplets on the center of a 500 rpm rotating substrate. This step was performed in hexane vapor atmosphere without any stopping time. The analyses revealed that a uniform surface distribution was formed so that, after annealing at 600 °C for 1 h the 6.1 nm L12-FePt3 nanoparticles were spherical in shape with standard deviation of 1.5 nm.

  19. Temperature controlled infrared broadband cloaking with the bilayer coatings of semiconductor and superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Liu, Youwen; Feng, Yuncai

    2015-06-01

    The infrared broadband tunable cloaking have been proposed and investigated with the bilayer coating materials of semiconductor (n-Ge) and high-temperature superconductor (YBa2Cu3O7), whose cloaking frequency can be controlled by external temperature. The analytical solution is derived based on the scattering cancellation cloaking technique from the Mie scattering theory, and the full-wave numerical simulation is performed by the finite element method. The calculated and simulated results have demonstrated that this invisibility cloak may reduce the total scattering cross section of the composite structure of 90% over a broad frequency band of nearly 20 THz, and the infrared cloaking frequency can be tuned by the external temperature. It can provide a feasible way to design a broadband tunable cloak.

  20. Enhanced electrochemical performance of Lithium-ion batteries by conformal coating of polymer electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Plylahan, Nareerat; Maria, Sébastien; Phan, Trang Nt; Letiche, Manon; Martinez, Hervé; Courrèges, Cécile; Knauth, Philippe; Djenizian, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    This work reports the conformal coating of poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (P(MePEGMA)) polymer electrolyte on highly organized titania nanotubes (TiO2nts) fabricated by electrochemical anodization of Ti foil. The conformal coating was achieved by electropolymerization using cyclic voltammetry technique. The characterization of the polymer electrolyte by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) shows the formation of short polymer chains, mainly trimers. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results confirm the presence of the polymer and LiTFSI salt. The galvanostatic tests at 1C show that the performance of the half cell against metallic Li foil is improved by 33% when TiO2nts are conformally coated with the polymer electrolyte.

  1. Extreme ultraviolet performance of a multilayer coated high density toroidal grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Roger J.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva A. M.; Neupert, Werner M.; Condor, Charles E.; Gum, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of a multilayer coated diffraction grating has been evaluated at EUV wavelengths both in terms of absolute efficiency and spectral resolution. The application of ten-layer Ir/Si multilayer coating to a 3600-lines/mm blazed toroidal replica grating produced a factor of 9 enhancement in peak efficiency near the design wavelength of about 30 nm in first order, without degrading its excellent quasistigmatic spectral resolution. The measured EUV efficiency peaked at 3.3 percent and was improved over the full spectral range between 25 and 35 nm compared with the premultilayer replica which had a standard gold coating. In addition, the grating's spectral resolution of greater than 5000 was maintained.

  2. Performance of aluminide coatings applied on alloy CF8C plus at 800 C

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Deepak; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Shyam, Amit; Haynes, James A; Pint, Bruce A; Armstrong, Beth L; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    The cost effective, austenitic stainless steel CF8C plus is an attractive alloy for massive cast structures such as steam turbine casings. The microstructure stability and creep strength of this alloy are better than commercial high-performance heat-resistant steels such as NF709 and Super 304H, and are comparable to the Ni-based superalloy Inconel 617. The oxidation resistance of the alloy in atmosphere rich in water vapor is however insufficient at T>800 C, and the use of diffusion aluminide coatings is considered for potential high temperature applications. The thermal stability and protectiveness of coatings applied on the CF8C plus substrate by pack cementation and slurry process were investigated in air + 10% H2O environment at 800 C. Further, the coating effect on the fatigue life of the alloy was assessed via low-cycle-fatigue experiments.

  3. Nafion coated sulfur-carbon electrode for high performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qiwei; Shan, Zhongqiang; Wang, Li; Qin, Xue; Zhu, Kunlei; Tian, Jianhua; Liu, Xuesheng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a nafion coated electrode is prepared to improve the performance of lithium sulfur batteries. It is demonstrated from a series of measurements that the nafion layer is quite effective in reducing shuttle effect and enhancing the stability and the reversibility of the electrode. When measured under the rate of 0.2 C, the initial discharge capacity of the nafion coated electrode can reach 1084 mAh g-1, with a Columbic efficiency of about 100%. After 100 charge/discharge cycles, this electrode can also deliver a reversible capacity of as high as 879 mAh g-1. Significantly, the charge-transfer resistance of the electrode tends to be reducing after coated with an appropriate thickness of nafion film. The cation conductivity as well as anion inconductivity is considered to be the dominant factor for the superior electrochemical properties.

  4. Improved performance of strontium aluminate luminous coating on the ceramic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fang; Xiong, Zhaoxian; Xue, Hao; Liu, Yongxi

    2009-03-01

    Phosphor of strontium aluminate co-actived by Eu2+ and Dy3+ is one kind of important afterglow luminescent materials. In this paper, the phosphors were used with transparent glaze for an inorganic luminous coating on the ceramic surface, which was stable even at high temperature. The chemical structure and microstructure of the luminous coating were identified with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The photoluminescence of the coating was measured by a HITACHI F-4500 fluorescence spectrophotometer. The afterglow property was recorded by a ST-86LA-3 brightness meter. The samples behaved good performances such as high lighting brightness and long after-glowing time.

  5. Enhanced electrochemical performance of Lithium-ion batteries by conformal coating of polymer electrolyte

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This work reports the conformal coating of poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (P(MePEGMA)) polymer electrolyte on highly organized titania nanotubes (TiO2nts) fabricated by electrochemical anodization of Ti foil. The conformal coating was achieved by electropolymerization using cyclic voltammetry technique. The characterization of the polymer electrolyte by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) shows the formation of short polymer chains, mainly trimers. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results confirm the presence of the polymer and LiTFSI salt. The galvanostatic tests at 1C show that the performance of the half cell against metallic Li foil is improved by 33% when TiO2nts are conformally coated with the polymer electrolyte. PMID:25317101

  6. Development of an Integrated Performance Model for TRISO-Coated Gas Reactor Particle Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, David Andrew; Miller, Gregory Kent; Martin, David George; Maki, John Thomas

    2005-05-01

    The success of gas reactors depends upon the safety and quality of the coated particle fuel. The understanding and evaluation of this fuel requires development of an integrated mechanistic fuel performance model that fully describes the mechanical and physico-chemical behavior of the fuel particle under irradiation. Such a model, called PARFUME (PARticle Fuel ModEl), is being developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. PARFUME is based on multi-dimensional finite element modeling of TRISO-coated gas reactor fuel. The goal is to represent all potential failure mechanisms and to incorporate the statistical nature of the fuel. The model is currently focused on carbide, oxide nd oxycarbide uranium fuel kernels, while the coating layers are the classical IPyC/SiC/OPyC. This paper reviews the current status of the mechanical aspects of the model and presents results of calculations for irradiations from the New Production Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor program.

  7. High performance anti-reflection coatings for broadband multi-junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    AIKEN,DANIEL J.

    2000-02-23

    The success of bandgap engineering has made high efficiency broadband multi-junction solar cells possible with photo-response out to the band edge of Ge. Modeling has been conducted which suggests that current double layer anti-reflection coating technology is not adequate for these devices in certain cases. Approaches for the development of higher performance anti-reflection coatings are examined. A new AR coating structure based on the use of Herpin equivalent layers is presented. Optical modeling suggests a decrease in the solar weighted reflectance of over 2.5{percent} absolute as a result. This structure requires no additional optical material development and characterization because no new optical materials are necessary. Experimental results and a sensitivity analysis are presented.

  8. Improved microbial fuel cell performance by encapsulating microbial cells with a nickel-coated sponge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueying; Du, Xiaoyu; Wang, Xia; Li, Naiqiang; Xu, Ping; Ding, Yi

    2013-03-15

    Development of novel anodic materials that could facilitate microbial biofilm formation, substrate transfer, and electron transfer is vital to enhance the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this work, nickel-coated sponge, as a novel and inexpensive material with an open three-dimensional macro-porous structure, was employed as an anode to encapsulate microbial cells. Compared with planar carbon paper, the nickel-coated sponge did not only offer a high surface area to facilitate microbial cells attachment and colonization but also supported sufficient substrate transfer and electron transfer due to multiplexed and highly conductive pathways. As expected, the resulting nickel-coated sponge biofilm demonstrated excellent electrochemical activity and power output stability during electricity generation processes. A higher maximum power density of 996 mW m(-2) and a longer, more stable electricity generation period were achieved with the nickel-coated sponge biofilm than previously reported results. Notably, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal reached 90.3% in the anode chamber, suggesting that the nickel-coated sponge is a highly promising anodic material and an efficient immobilization method for the fabrication of MFCs. PMID:22939511

  9. Electrical performance of RTV silicone rubber coating of different thicknesses on porcelain

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, H.; Hackam, R.

    1997-04-01

    A study of the effects of coating thickness of room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone rubber on its electrical performance in salt-fog of 250 {micro}S/cm and 1,000 {micro}S/cm at 0.5 kV{sub rms}/cm is presented. Porcelain rods coated with RTV silicone rubber to a thickness from 0.17 to 0.99 mm were studied. The dependence of current pulse rate and cumulative number of current pulses on coating thickness were determined as a function of time of exposure to combined electric stress and salt-fog. The surface roughness and the total content of low molecular weight (LMW) silicone fluid in the coating were measured before and after the salt-fog test as a function of coating thickness. The effects of heating the RTV in an electric oven on the production and loss of LMW silicone fluid were investigated in order to elucidate the influence of the heat generated by dry band discharges. The loss of weight of RTV at high temperatures (370 C) due to the decomposition of the alumina trihydrate filler into alumina and water was measured and found to be close to the theoretical value.

  10. The Characterisation and Performance of Magnetron Sputter Coatings on Minting Dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, David Alexander

    Enhancing the performance of various tools and mechanical parts through the use of thin films has been given much attention recently. Thin films have many different uses including: reducing friction, protecting from corrosion and increasing hardness and wear resistance. The Royal Canadian Mint has adopted the magnetron sputter ion plating technique to apply a new Cr-Ti-N based multi-component hard coating and thereby replace their Cr-plating process. Apart from showing improvements to the performance of their minting dies, this change is also more environmentally friendly. The purpose of this thesis is to further characterise this new coating which has shown superior performance. The structure of coatings applied using the magnetron sputter ion plating technique was reviewed along with the hardness and performance analysis of thin-film coatings. Hardness performance of the film on minting dies, including hardness testing and thin-film hardness models, are reviewed. The die performance is discussed in terms of surface wear encountered during the minting process. Two test dies made from air-hardening tool steel are coated and analysed for their hardness performance. Three numismatic coin dies are also analysed at different stages of their lifetime to compare the surface wear at those stages and evaluate the performance of the coating. Both nano- and micro-indentation hardness testing was used to obtain hardness data on the two test dies. The Korsunsky thin-film hardness model was selected to best represent both sets of hardness data. The thin-film hardness model parameters and film hardness were simultaneously calibrated using both nano- and micro-indentation test data. The film hardness was determined to be about 2672 HV. The film hardness was then successfully predicted using only the micro-indentation data and the method was demonstrated on two additional dies with the same composition. The hardness performance of the die was linked to the adhesion of the film. In

  11. Extraordinary Performance of Carbon‐Coated Anatase TiO2 as Sodium‐Ion Anode

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Oschmann, Bernd; Buchholz, Daniel; Dou, Xinwei; Lieberwirth, Ingo; Panthöfer, Martin; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of in situ polymer‐functionalized anatase TiO2 particles using an anchoring block copolymer with hydroxamate as coordinating species is reported, which yields nanoparticles (≈11 nm) in multigram scale. Thermal annealing converts the polymer brushes into a uniform and homogeneous carbon coating as proven by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The strong impact of particle size as well as carbon coating on the electrochemical performance of anatase TiO2 is demonstrated. Downsizing the particles leads to higher reversible uptake/release of sodium cations per formula unit TiO2 (e.g., 0.72 eq. Na+ (11 nm) vs only 0.56 eq. Na+ (40 nm)) while the carbon coating improves rate performance. The combination of small particle size and homogeneous carbon coating allows for the excellent electrochemical performance of anatase TiO2 at high (134 mAh g−1 at 10 C (3.35 A g−1)) and low (≈227 mAh g−1 at 0.1 C) current rates, high cycling stability (full capacity retention between 2nd and 300th cycle at 1 C) and improved coulombic efficiency (≈99.8%). PMID:27134618

  12. PAINT ADHESION AND CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF CHROMIUM-FREE PRETREATMENTS OF 55% AL-ZN-COATED STEEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adhesion and corrosion performances for several pretreatments of 55% Al-Zn-coated steels which were coil-coated with polyester paint systems were determined. The objective of this study was to evaluate new, silane-based metal pretreatments and to compare their performance wit...

  13. Effects of yttrium, aluminum, and chromium concentrations in bond coatings on the performance of zirconia-yttria thermal barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.

    1979-01-01

    A cyclic furnace study was conducted between 990 - 280 C and 1095 - 280 C to evaluate the effects of yttrium, chromium, and aluminum concentrations in nickel base alloy bond coatings and also the effect of the bond coating thickness on the performance of yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings. The presence and the concentration of yttrium is very critical. Without yttrium, rapid oxidation of Ni-Al, Ni-Cr, and Ni-Cr-Al bond coatings causes zirconia thermal barrier coatings to fail very rapidly. Concentrations of chrominum and aluminum in Ni-Cr-Al-Y bond coating have a very significant effect on the thermal barrier coating life. This effect, however, is not as great as that due to yttrium. Furthermore, the thickness and the thickness uniformity also have a very significant effect on the life of the thermal barrier system.

  14. LPV Controller Interpolation for Improved Gain-Scheduling Control Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Fen; Kim, SungWan

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a new gain-scheduling control design approach is proposed by combining LPV (linear parameter-varying) control theory with interpolation techniques. The improvement of gain-scheduled controllers can be achieved from local synthesis of Lyapunov functions and continuous construction of a global Lyapunov function by interpolation. It has been shown that this combined LPV control design scheme is capable of improving closed-loop performance derived from local performance improvement. The gain of the LPV controller will also change continuously across parameter space. The advantages of the newly proposed LPV control is demonstrated through a detailed AMB controller design example.

  15. Size-Controlled Dissolution of Organic-Coated Silver Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Rui; Levard, Clément; Marinakos, Stella M.; Cheng, Yingwen; Liu, Jie; Michel, F. Marc; Brown, Jr., Gordon E.; Lowry, Gregory V.

    2012-04-02

    The solubility of Ag NPs can affect their toxicity and persistence in the environment. We measured the solubility of organic-coated silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) having particle diameters ranging from 5 to 80 nm that were synthesized using various methods, and with different organic polymer coatings including poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and gum arabic. The size and morphology of Ag NPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and synchrotron-based total X-ray scattering and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis were used to determine the local structure around Ag and evaluate changes in crystal lattice parameters and structure as a function of NP size. Ag NP solubility dispersed in 1 mM NaHCO{sub 3} at pH 8 was found to be well correlated with particle size based on the distribution of measured TEM sizes as predicted by the modified Kelvin equation. Solubility of Ag NPs was not affected by the synthesis method and coating as much as by their size. Based on the modified Kelvin equation, the surface tension of Ag NPs was found to be {approx}1 J/m{sup 2}, which is expected for bulk fcc (face centered cubic) silver. Analysis of XAFS, X-ray scattering, and PDFs confirm that the lattice parameter, {alpha}, of the fcc crystal structure of Ag NPs did not change with particle size for Ag NPs as small as 6 nm, indicating the absence of lattice strain. These results are consistent with the finding that Ag NP solubility can be estimated based on TEM-derived particle size using the modified Kelvin equation for particles in the size range of 5-40 nm in diameter.

  16. Controlling initial biodegradation of magnesium by a biocompatible strontium phosphate conversion coating.

    PubMed

    Chen, X B; Nisbet, D R; Li, R W; Smith, P N; Abbott, T B; Easton, M A; Zhang, D-H; Birbilis, N

    2014-03-01

    A simple strontium phosphate (SrP) conversion coating process was developed to protect magnesium (Mg) from the initial degradation post-implantation. The coating morphology, deposition rate and resultant phases are all dependent on the processing temperature, which determines the protective ability for Mg in minimum essential medium (MEM). Coatings produced at 80 °C are primarily made up of strontium apatite (SrAp) with a granular surface, a high degree of crystallinity and the highest protective ability, which arises from retarding anodic dissolution of Mg in MEM. Following 14 days' immersion in MEM, the SrAp coating maintained its integrity with only a small fraction of the surface corroded. The post-degradation effect of uncoated Mg and Mg coated at 40 and 80 °C on the proliferation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells was also studied, revealing that the SrP coatings are biocompatible and permit proliferation to a level similar to that of pure Mg. The present study suggests that the SrP conversion coating is a promising option for controlling the early rapid degradation rate, and hence hydrogen gas evolution, of Mg implants without adverse effects on surrounding cells and tissues.

  17. Evaluation of selected thermal control coatings for long-life space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teichman, Louis A.; Slemp, Wayne S.; Witte, William G., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Graphite-reinforced resin matrix composites are being considered for spacecraft structural applications because of their light weight, high stiffness, and lower thermal expansion. Thin protective coatings with stable optical properties and the proper ratio of solar absorption (alpha sub s) to thermal emittance (epsilon) minimize orbital thermal extremes and protect these materials against space environment degradation. Sputtered coatings applied directly to graphite/epoxy composite surfaces and anodized coatings applied to thin aluminum foil were studied for use both as an atomic oxygen barrier and as thermal control coatings. Additional effort was made to develop nickel-based coatings which could be applied directly to composites. These coating systems were selected because their inherent tenacity made them potentially more reliable than commercial white paints for long-life space missions. Results indicate that anodized aluminum foil coatings are suitable for tubular and flat composite structures on large platforms in low Earth orbit. Anodized foil provides protection against some elements of the natural space environment (atomic oxygen, ultraviolet, and particulate radiation) and offers a broad range of tailored alpha sub s/epsilon. The foil is readily available and can be produced in large quantities, while the anodizing process is a routine commercial technique.

  18. A new process control strategy for aqueous film coating of pellets in fluidised bed.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Crilles C; Sonnergaard, Jørn M; Bertelsen, Poul; Holm, Per

    2003-11-01

    The parameters with effect on maximum spray rate and maximum relative outlet air humidity when coating pellets in a fluidised bed were investigated. The tested variables include type of water based modified release film coating (Eudragit NE 30D, Eudragit RS 30D, Aquacoat ECD) coating principle (top spray, bottom spray), inlet air humidity and type of pellets (sugar spheres, microcrystalline cellulose pellets). The maximum spray rate was not influenced by the coating principles. The highest spray rate was obtained for the film polymer with the lowest tackiness which is assumed to be the controlling factor. The type of pellets affected the maximum spray rate. A thermodynamic model for the coating process is employed throughout the process and not just during steady state. The thermodynamic model is incorporated into a new process control strategy. The process control strategy is based on in-process calculation of degree of utilisation of the potential evaporation energy (DUE) of the outlet air and the relative outlet air humidity (RH). The spray rate is maximised using set points of DUE and RH as control parameters. The product temperature is controlled simultaneously by regulating the inlet air temperature. PMID:14592693

  19. A new process control strategy for aqueous film coating of pellets in fluidised bed.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Crilles C; Sonnergaard, Jørn M; Bertelsen, Poul; Holm, Per

    2003-11-01

    The parameters with effect on maximum spray rate and maximum relative outlet air humidity when coating pellets in a fluidised bed were investigated. The tested variables include type of water based modified release film coating (Eudragit NE 30D, Eudragit RS 30D, Aquacoat ECD) coating principle (top spray, bottom spray), inlet air humidity and type of pellets (sugar spheres, microcrystalline cellulose pellets). The maximum spray rate was not influenced by the coating principles. The highest spray rate was obtained for the film polymer with the lowest tackiness which is assumed to be the controlling factor. The type of pellets affected the maximum spray rate. A thermodynamic model for the coating process is employed throughout the process and not just during steady state. The thermodynamic model is incorporated into a new process control strategy. The process control strategy is based on in-process calculation of degree of utilisation of the potential evaporation energy (DUE) of the outlet air and the relative outlet air humidity (RH). The spray rate is maximised using set points of DUE and RH as control parameters. The product temperature is controlled simultaneously by regulating the inlet air temperature.

  20. Performance and stability improvements for dye-sensitized solar cells in the presence of luminescent coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bella, Federico; Griffini, Gianmarco; Gerosa, Matteo; Turri, Stefano; Bongiovanni, Roberta

    2015-06-01

    Here we present how the sunlight radiation incident on a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) can be shifted of a few tens of nanometers by means of an economical, easy to prepare and multifunctional photocurable fluoropolymeric light-shifting (LS) coating, to achieve both improved efficiency and device stability. By the introduction of a very small amount of a luminescent agent in the LS coating, the down-shifting of near-UV photons to higher wavelengths easily harvestable by the organic dye of a DSSC is successfully demonstrated. This optical effect not only results in an over 60% improvement of the power conversion efficiency of DSSC devices, but the UV light filtering action promoted by the luminescent agent also provides protection to the photosensitive DSSC components. This aspect, combined with a potential thermal shielding effect and the easy-cleaning behavior imparted to the coating by its fluorinated nature, leads to excellent device stability as evidenced from an aging test performed outdoors under real operating conditions for more than 2000 h. Our study demonstrates that the use of light-cured multifunctional coatings with light management characteristics at the nanometer scale represents a new promising strategy to simultaneously increase the performance and durability of DSSC devices.

  1. Thermal performance of alumina filler reinforced intumescent fire retardant coating for structural application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Faiz; Ullah, Sami; Farhana Mohammad, Wan; Farth Shariff, M.

    2014-06-01

    In the modern construction, fire safety has significant consideration for the protection of people and assets. Several intumescent fire protection systems are in practice and have constrain of releasing toxic gases on degradation forms an insulating char layer protecting underlying substrate. An intumescent coating expands many times of its thickness on exposure to fire and protect the underlying substrate from fire. This study presents the results of thermal performance of an intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC) developed for structural application. IFRC was developed using expandable graphite (EG), ammonium poly phosphate (APP) and melamine (MEL), epoxy resin Bisphenol-A (BPA) and hardener triethylenetetramine (TETA) were used as a binder as a curing agent. Char expansion of IFRC was measured by furnace fire test at 450°C, thermal performance was measured using a Bunsen burner at 950°C and temperature of substrate was recorded for 60 min at an interval of two min. Results showed that IFRC containing 3wt% alumina showed char expansion X19. After one hour exposure of coating to heat, substrate temperature recorded was 154°C. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) results showed the presence of high temperature compounds present in the char of coating, considered responsible to reduce the penetration of heat to the substrate.

  2. Performance of Diffusion Aluminide Coatings Applied on Alloy CF8C-Plus at 800oC

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Deepak; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Zhang, Ying; Haynes, James A; Pint, Bruce A; Armstrong, Beth L; Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    High performance cast stainless steel, CF8C-Plus, is a low cost alloy with prospective applications ranging from covers and casings of small and medium size gas turbines to turbocharger housing and manifolds in internal combustion engines. Diffusion aluminide coatings were applied on this alloy as a potential strategy for improved oxidation resistance, particularly in wet air and steam. In this paper the performance of the aluminide coatings evaluated by cyclic oxidation experiments in air containing 10 vol.% H2O at 800 C and conventional tension-compression low-cycle-fatigue tests in air at 800 C with a strain range of 0.5% is presented. The results show that specimens coated by a chemical vapor deposition process provide better oxidation resistance than those coated by an Al-slurry coating process. The application of a coating by pack cementation reduced the fatigue life by 15%.

  3. Interfaces of high-protection performance polyaryls-coated zinc phosphated steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.

    1994-05-01

    To evaluate the ability of polyaryl thermoplastic coatings such as polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) and polyphenyletheretherketone (PEEK), to protect zinc phosphate (Zn{center_dot}Ph)-treated steels from corrosion in a wet, harsh environment (1.0 wt % H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, 3.0 wt % NaCl and 96.0 wt % water at temperature from 250 to 200 C), we exposed them in autoclave to determine performance in heating-cooling cyclic fatigue tests (1 cycle = 12 hr at 200 C + 12 hr at 25 C) for up to 90 cycles. Although no changes in appearance were seen in the PEEK specimens after 60 cycles, extension to 90 cycles caused delamination of the coating film from the Zn{center_dot}Ph; the major reason was the degradation of the PEEK polymer caused by its hydrothermalcatalyzed esterification. In urea hydrogen peroxide (UHP)-modified PPS-coating systems, chemical reactions at the interfaces between the PPS and Zn in the Zn{center_dot}Ph layer led to the formation of a ZnS reaction product, which enhanced the Zn{center_dot}Ph-to-PPS adhesive bond; correspondingly, there were no signs of peeling nor separation of the coating after 90 cycles. In addition, because these intermediate reaction products are insoluble at high pH, they minimized the rate of delamination of the PPS coating caused by the cathodic reaction, H{sub 2}O + 1/2O{sub 2} + 2e{sup {minus}} {yields} 2OH{sup {minus}}, at the corrosion side of a defect in the film. In contrast, PEEK coatings containing non-reactive Zn{center_dot}Ph underwent cathodic delamination because of the susceptibility of Zn{center_dot}Ph to alkali dissolution.

  4. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1994--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.F.; Dupont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1994-04-21

    The erosion of materials by the impact of solid particles has received increasing attention during the past twenty years. Recently, research has been initiated with the event of advanced coal conversion processes in which erosion plays an important role. The resulting damage, termed Solid Particle Erosion (SPE), is of concern primarily because of the significantly increased operating costs which result in material failures. Reduced power plant efficiency due to solid particle erosion of boiler tubes and waterwalls has led to various methods to combat SPE. One method is to apply coatings to the components subjected to erosive environments. Protective weld overlay coatings are particularly advantageous in terms of coating quality. The weld overlay coatings are essentially immune to spallation due to a strong metallurgical bond with the substrate material. By using powder mixtures, multiple alloys can be mixed in order to achieve the best performance in an erosive environment. However, a review of the literature revealed a lack of information on weld overlay coating performance in erosive environments which makes the selection of weld overlay alloys a difficult task. The objective of this project is to determine the effects of weld overlay coating composition and microstructure on erosion resistance. These results will lead to a better understanding of erosion mitigation in circulated fluidized beds.

  5. Amplified photoacoustic performance and enhanced photothermal stability of reduced graphene oxide coated gold nanorods for sensitive photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyungwon; Kumar, Dinesh; Kim, Haemin; Sim, Changbeom; Chang, Jin-Ho; Kim, Jung-Mu; Kim, Hyuncheol; Lim, Dong-Kwon

    2015-03-24

    We report a strongly amplified photoacoustic (PA) performance of the new functional hybrid material composed of reduced graphene oxide and gold nanorods. Due to the excellent NIR light absorption properties of the reduced graphene oxide coated gold nanorods (r-GO-AuNRs) and highly efficient heat transfer process through the reduced graphene oxide layer, r-GO-AuNRs exhibit excellent photothermal stability and significantly higher photoacoustic amplitudes than those of bare-AuNRs, nonreduced graphene oxide coated AuNRs (GO-AuNRs), or silica-coated AuNR, as demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo systems. The linear response of PA amplitude from reduced state controlled GO on AuNR indicates the critical role of GO for a strong photothermal effect of r-GO-AuNRs. Theoretical studies with finite-element-method lab-based simulation reveal that a 4 times higher magnitude of the enhanced electromagnetic field around r-GO-AuNRs can be generated compared with bare AuNRs or GO-AuNRs. Furthermore, the r-GO-AuNRs are expected to be a promising deep-tissue imaging probe because of extraordinarily high PA amplitudes in the 4-11 MHz operating frequency of an ultrasound transducer. Therefore, the r-GO-AuNRs can be a useful imaging probe for highly sensitive photoacoustic images and NIR sensitive therapeutics based on a strong photothermal effect. PMID:25751167

  6. Amplified photoacoustic performance and enhanced photothermal stability of reduced graphene oxide coated gold nanorods for sensitive photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyungwon; Kumar, Dinesh; Kim, Haemin; Sim, Changbeom; Chang, Jin-Ho; Kim, Jung-Mu; Kim, Hyuncheol; Lim, Dong-Kwon

    2015-03-24

    We report a strongly amplified photoacoustic (PA) performance of the new functional hybrid material composed of reduced graphene oxide and gold nanorods. Due to the excellent NIR light absorption properties of the reduced graphene oxide coated gold nanorods (r-GO-AuNRs) and highly efficient heat transfer process through the reduced graphene oxide layer, r-GO-AuNRs exhibit excellent photothermal stability and significantly higher photoacoustic amplitudes than those of bare-AuNRs, nonreduced graphene oxide coated AuNRs (GO-AuNRs), or silica-coated AuNR, as demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo systems. The linear response of PA amplitude from reduced state controlled GO on AuNR indicates the critical role of GO for a strong photothermal effect of r-GO-AuNRs. Theoretical studies with finite-element-method lab-based simulation reveal that a 4 times higher magnitude of the enhanced electromagnetic field around r-GO-AuNRs can be generated compared with bare AuNRs or GO-AuNRs. Furthermore, the r-GO-AuNRs are expected to be a promising deep-tissue imaging probe because of extraordinarily high PA amplitudes in the 4-11 MHz operating frequency of an ultrasound transducer. Therefore, the r-GO-AuNRs can be a useful imaging probe for highly sensitive photoacoustic images and NIR sensitive therapeutics based on a strong photothermal effect.

  7. Advanced process control and novel test methods for PVD silicon and elastomeric silicone coatings utilized on ion implant disks, heatsinks and selected platens

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, J.; Allen, B.; Wriggins, W.; Kuzbyt, R.; Sinclair, R.

    2012-11-06

    Coatings play multiple key roles in the proper functioning of mature and current ion implanters. Batch and serial implanters require strategic control of elemental and particulate contamination which often includes scrutiny of the silicon surface coatings encountering direct beam contact. Elastomeric Silicone Coatings must accommodate wafer loading and unloading as well as direct backside contact during implant plus must maintain rigid elemental and particulate specifications. The semiconductor industry has had a significant and continuous effort to obtain ultra-pure silicon coatings with sustained process performance and long life. Low particles and reduced elemental levels for silicon coatings are a major requirement for process engineers, OEM manufacturers, and second source suppliers. Relevant data will be presented. Some emphasis and detail will be placed on the structure and characteristics of a relatively new PVD Silicon Coating process that is very dense and homogeneous. Wear rate under typical ion beam test conditions will be discussed. The PVD Silicon Coating that will be presented here is used on disk shields, wafer handling fingers/fences, exclusion zones of heat sinks, beam dumps and other beamline components. Older, legacy implanters can now provide extended process capability using this new generation PVD silicon - even on implanter systems that were shipped long before the advent of silicon coating for contamination control. Low particles and reduced elemental levels are critical performance criteria for the silicone elastomers used on disk heatsinks and serial implanter platens. Novel evaluation techniques and custom engineered tools are used to investigate the surface interaction characteristics of multiple Elastomeric Silicone Coatings currently in use by the industry - specifically, friction and perpendicular stiction. These parameters are presented as methods to investigate the critical wafer load and unload function. Unique tools and test

  8. Lipid/Polyelectrolyte coatings to control carbon nanotubes intracellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Romero, G; Estrela-Lopis, I; Rojas, E; Llarena, I; Donath, E; Moya, S E

    2012-06-01

    Carbon Nanotubes have been functionalized with a layer of poly (sulfopropyl methacrylate) synthesized from silane initiators attached to the walls of the Carbon nanotubes. On top of the poly sulfo propyl methacrylate, lipid vesicles composed of 75% 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine and 25% 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-[Phospho-L-Serine] were assembled. The surface modification of the Carbon Nanotubes and lipid assembly were followed by TEM. Confocal Raman Microscopy was used to study the uptake and localization of the surface modified Carbon Nanotubes in the HepG2 cell line. The localization of the Carbon Nanotubes in the cells was affected by the surface coating. It was found that poly (sulfopropyl methacrylate) and lipid modified Carbon Nanotubes were present in the region of the lipid bodies in the cytoplasm.

  9. Spectral and Wavefront Error Performance of WFIRST-AFTA Bandpass Filter Coating Prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Seide, Laurie; Pasquale, Bert A.; McMann, Joseph C.; Hagopian, John G.; Dominguez, Margaret Z.; Gong, Quian; Marx, Catherine T.

    2016-01-01

    The Cycle 5 design baseline for the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST/AFTA) instrument includes a single wide-field channel (WFC) instrument for both imaging and slit-less spectroscopy. The only routinely moving part during scientific observations for this wide-field channel is the element wheel (EW) assembly. This filter-wheel assembly will have 8 positions that will be populated with 6 bandpass filters, a blank position, and a Grism that will consist of a three-element assembly to disperse the full field with an undeviated central wavelength for galaxy redshift surveys. All filter elements in the EW assembly will be made out of fused silica substrates (110 mm diameter) that will have the appropriate bandpass coatings according to the filter designations (Z087, Y106, J129, H158, F184, W149 and Grism). This paper presents and discusses the performance (including spectral transmission and reflected/transmitted wavefront error measurements) of a subset of bandpass filter coating prototypes that are based on the WFC instrument filter compliment. The bandpass coating prototypes that are tested in this effort correspond to the Z087, W149, and Grism filter elements. These filter coatings have been procured from three different vendors to assess the most challenging aspects in terms of the in-band throughput, out of band rejection (including the cut-on and cutoff slopes), and the impact the wavefront error distortions of these filter coatings will have on the imaging performance of the wide-field channel in the WFIRST/AFTA observatory.

  10. Controlled Distribution and Clustering of Silver in Ag-DLC Nanocomposite Coatings Using a Hybrid Plasma Approach.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, M; Turgeon, S; Busby, Y; Tatoulian, M; Pireaux, J-J; Mantovani, D

    2016-08-17

    Incorporation of selected metallic elements into diamond-like carbon (DLC) has emerged as an innovative approach to add unique functional properties to DLC coatings, thus opening up a range of new potential applications in fields as diverse as sensors, tribology, and biomaterials. However, deposition by plasma techniques of metal-containing DLC coatings with well-defined structural properties and metal distribution is currently hindered by the limited understanding of their growth mechanisms. We report here a silver-incorporated diamond-like carbon coating (Ag-DLC) prepared in a hybrid plasma reactor which allowed independent control of the metal content and the carbon film structure and morphology. Morphological and chemical analyses of Ag-DLC films were performed by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The vertical distribution of silver from the surface toward the coating bulk was found to be highly inhomogeneous due to top surface segregation and clustering of silver nanoparticles. Two plasma parameters, the sputtered Ag flux and ion energy, were shown to influence the spatial distribution of silver particles. On the basis of these findings, a mechanism for Ag-DLC growth by plasma was proposed. PMID:27454833

  11. Effects of Forged Stock and Pure Aluminum Coating on Cryogenic Performance of Heat Treated Aluminum Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toland, Ronald W.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Barthelmy, Michael P.; Zewari, S. Wahid; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; MacKenty, John W.

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of an on-going test program designed to empirically determine the effects of different stress relief procedures for aluminum mirrors. Earlier test results identified a preferred heat treatment for flat and spherical mirrors diamond turned from blanks cut out of Al 6061-T651 plate stock. Further tests have been performed on mirrors from forged stock and one set from plate stock coated with Alumiplate(trademark) aluminum coating to measure the effect of these variables on cryogenic performance. The mirrors are tested for figure error and radius of curvature at room temperature and at 80 K for three thermal cycles. We correlate the results of our optical testing with heat treatment and metallographic data.

  12. Thermal performance of glass fiber reinforced intumescent fire retardant coating for structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Faiz; Ullah, Sami; Aziz, Hammad; Omar, Nor Sharifah

    2015-07-01

    The results of influence of glass fiber addition into the basic intumescent coating formulation towards the enhancement of its thermal insulation properties are presented. The intumescent coatings were formulated from expandable graphite, ammonium polyphosphate, melamine, boric acid, bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188, polyamide amine H-2310 hardener and fiberglass (FG) of length 3.0 mm. Eight intumescent formulations were developed and the samples were tested for their fire performance by burning them at 450°C, 650°C and 850°C in the furnace for two hours. The effects of each fire test at different temperatures; low and high temperature were evaluated. Scanning Electron Microscope, X-Ray Diffraction technique and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis were conducted on the samples to study the morphology, the chemical components of char and the residual weight of the coatings. The formulation, FG08 containing 7.0 wt% glass fiber provided better results with enhanced thermal insulation properties of the coatings.

  13. Thermal performance of glass fiber reinforced intumescent fire retardant coating for structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Faiz Ullah, Sami; Aziz, Hammad Omar, Nor Sharifah

    2015-07-22

    The results of influence of glass fiber addition into the basic intumescent coating formulation towards the enhancement of its thermal insulation properties are presented. The intumescent coatings were formulated from expandable graphite, ammonium polyphosphate, melamine, boric acid, bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188, polyamide amine H-2310 hardener and fiberglass (FG) of length 3.0 mm. Eight intumescent formulations were developed and the samples were tested for their fire performance by burning them at 450°C, 650°C and 850°C in the furnace for two hours. The effects of each fire test at different temperatures; low and high temperature were evaluated. Scanning Electron Microscope, X-Ray Diffraction technique and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis were conducted on the samples to study the morphology, the chemical components of char and the residual weight of the coatings. The formulation, FG08 containing 7.0 wt% glass fiber provided better results with enhanced thermal insulation properties of the coatings.

  14. Preparation of cribriform sheet-like carbon-coated zinc oxide with improved electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianhang; Yang, Zhanhong; Xie, Xiaoe; Feng, Zhaobin; Zhang, Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Cribriform sheet-like carbon-coated ZnO are prepared using pyrrole as the carbon source. It is found that a sheet-like precursor will form when polymerizing pyrrole in the presence of ZnO particles. After the carbonization of precursor, cribriform sheet-like carbon-coated ZnO can be obtained. Morphology and structure analysis of as-prepared carbon-coated ZnO is conducted by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The carbon overlayer not only present a barrier layer on the surface of the ZnO particles, which keeps relative high discharge capacity by inhibiting the active materials in electrode from dissolving into electrolyte, but also modify the surface status of ZnO particles so as to obtain more uniform current distribution and improved conductivity. As a result, when evaluated as an anode material for Zn/Ni cell, carbon-coated ZnO exhibit a more stable cycle performance than bare ZnO electrode.

  15. Poly-γ-glutamate-based Materials for Multiple Infection Prophylaxis Possessing Versatile Coating Performance

    PubMed Central

    Ashiuchi, Makoto; Hakumai, Yuichi; Shibatani, Shigeo; Hakuba, Hirofumi; Oka, Nogiho; Kobayashi, Hisato; Yoneda, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    Poly-γ-glutamate (PGA) possesses a nylon-like backbone and polyacrylate-like carboxyl groups, and shows an extraordinary solubility in water. In this study, the effective synthesis and structural analysis of some water-insoluble PGA ion-complexes (PGAICs) using cationic surfactants, hexadecylpyridinium (HDP), dodecylpyridinium, benzalkonium and benzetonium, were examined. We demonstrated their spontaneous coating performance to the surfaces of different materials (i.e., plastics, metals, and ceramics) as potent anti-staphylococcal and anti-Candida agents. The tests against Staphylococcus aureus revealed that, regardless of a variety of materials, PGAICs maintained surface antimicrobial activity, even after the water-soaking treatment, whereas those against Candida albicans indicated that, among PGAICs, PGA/HDP complex is most useful as an anti-fungal agent because of its coating stability. Moreover, the log reduction values against Influenza A and B viruses of PGA/HDP-coated surfaces were estimated to be 5.4 and 3.2, respectively, suggesting that it can be dramatically suppressed the infection of influenza. This is to our knowledge the first observation of PGA-based antiviral coatings. PMID:26501266

  16. Solar absorptance and thermal emittance of some common spacecraft thermal-control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henninger, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Solar absorptance and thermal emittance of spacecraft materials are critical parameters in determining spacecraft temperature control. Because thickness, surface preparation, coatings formulation, manufacturing techniques, etc. affect these parameters, it is usually necessary to measure the absorptance and emittance of materials before they are used. Absorptance and emittance data for many common types of thermal control coatings, are together with some sample spectral data curves of absorptance. In some cases for which ultraviolet and particle radiation data are available, the degraded absorptance and emittance values are also listed.

  17. Enhancing the performance of quantum dots sensitized solar cell by SiO2 surface coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhifu; Miyauchi, Masahiro; Uemura, Yu; Cui, Yan; Hara, Kohjiro; Zhao, Zhigang; Sunahara, Kenji; Furube, Akihiro

    2010-06-01

    This letter reports enhanced performance of quantum dots sensitized solar cells by selectively deposition an insulating SiO2 layer over the quantum dots (QDs) sensitized mesoporous TiO2 photoanode. The incident photon to current conversion efficiency of the CdS/CdSe QDs cosensitized solar cell with SiO2 coating can reach 83%. A power conversion efficiency of 2.05% was obtained.

  18. Solid film lubricants and thermal control coatings flown aboard the EOIM-3 MDA sub-experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.J.; David, K.E.; Babel, H.W.

    1995-02-01

    Additional experimental data were desired to support the selection of candidate thermal control coatings and solid film lubricants for the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) Space Station hardware. The third Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions With Materials Mission (EOIM-3) flight experiment presented an opportunity to study the effects of the low Earth orbit environment on thermal control coatings and solid film lubricants. MDA provided five solid film lubricants and two anodic thermal control coatings for EOIM-3. The lubricant sample set consisted of three solid film lubricants with organic binders one solid film lubricant with an inorganic binder, and one solid film lubricant with no binder. The anodize coating sample set consisted of undyed sulfuric acid anodize and cobalt sulfide dyed sulfuric acid anodize, each on two different substrate aluminum alloys. The organic and inorganic binders in the solid film lubricants experienced erosion, and the lubricating pigments experienced oxidation. MDA is continuing to assess the effect of exposure to the low Earth orbit environment on the life and friction properties of the lubricants. Results to date support the design practice of shielding solid film lubricants from the low Earth orbit environment. Post-flight optical property analysis of the anodized specimens indicated that there were limited contamination effects and some atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation effects. These effects appeared to be within the values predicted by simulated ground testing and analysis of these materials, and they were different for each coating and substrate.

  19. Solid film lubricants and thermal control coatings flown aboard the EOIM-3 MDA sub-experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Taylor J.; David, Kaia E.; Babel, Hank W.

    1995-01-01

    Additional experimental data were desired to support the selection of candidate thermal control coatings and solid film lubricants for the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) Space Station hardware. The third Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions With Materials Mission (EOIM-3) flight experiment presented an opportunity to study the effects of the low Earth orbit environment on thermal control coatings and solid film lubricants. MDA provided five solid film lubricants and two anodic thermal control coatings for EOIM-3. The lubricant sample set consisted of three solid film lubricants with organic binders one solid film lubricant with an inorganic binder, and one solid film lubricant with no binder. The anodize coating sample set consisted of undyed sulfuric acid anodize and cobalt sulfide dyed sulfuric acid anodize, each on two different substrate aluminum alloys. The organic and inorganic binders in the solid film lubricants experienced erosion, and the lubricating pigments experienced oxidation. MDA is continuing to assess the effect of exposure to the low Earth orbit environment on the life and friction properties of the lubricants. Results to date support the design practice of shielding solid film lubricants from the low Earth orbit environment. Post-flight optical property analysis of the anodized specimens indicated that there were limited contamination effects and some atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation effects. These effects appeared to be within the values predicted by simulated ground testing and analysis of these materials, and they were different for each coating and substrate.

  20. Mechanical and in vitro biological performances of hydroxyapatite-carbon nanotube composite coatings deposited on Ti by aerosol deposition.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Byung-Dong; Lee, Jung-Min; Park, Dong-Soo; Choi, Jong-Jin; Ryu, Jungho; Yoon, Woon-Ha; Lee, Byoung-Kuk; Shin, Du-Sik; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2009-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-carbon nanotube (CNT) composite coatings on Ti plate, produced by aerosol deposition using HA-CNT powders, were developed for biomedical applications. For the deposition process HA-CNT powder mixtures with CNT contents of 1 and 3 wt.% were used. Dense coatings with a thickness of 5 microm were fabricated, irrespective of the content of CNTs. No pores or microcracks were observed in the coatings. The coatings had good adhesion to the substrate, exhibiting a high adhesion strength, ranging from 27.3 to 29.0 MPa. Microstructural observation using field-emission gun scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that CNTs with a typical tubular structure were found in the HA-CNT composite coatings. Nanoindentation tests revealed that the mechanical properties, such as the hardness and elastic modulus, were significantly improved by the addition of the CNTs to the HA coating. In addition, the proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cells grown on the HA-CNT composite coatings were higher than those on the bare Ti and pure HA coating. The ALP activity of the composite coatings considerably improved as the CNT content increased. These results suggest that CNTs would be an effective reinforcing agent to enhance both the mechanical and biological performances of HA coatings.

  1. Effect of ceramic coating of JT8D combustor liner on maximum liner temperatures and other combustor performance parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butze, H. F.; Liebert, C. H.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of ceramic coating of a JT8D combustor liner was investigated at simulated cruise and takeoff conditions with two fuels of widely different aromatic contents. Substantial decreases in maximum liner temperatures and flame radiation values were obtained with the ceramic-coated liner. Small reductions in exhaust gas smoke concentrations were observed with the ceramic-coated liner. Other performance parameters such as combustion efficiency and emissions of unburned hydrocarbons, CO, and NOx were not affected significantly. No deterioration of the ceramic coating was observed after about 6 hours of cyclic operation including several startups and shutdowns.

  2. The High performance of nanocrystalline CVD diamond coated hip joints in wear simulator test.

    PubMed

    Maru, M M; Amaral, M; Rodrigues, S P; Santos, R; Gouvea, C P; Archanjo, B S; Trommer, R M; Oliveira, F J; Silva, R F; Achete, C A

    2015-09-01

    The superior biotribological performance of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings grown by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was already shown to demonstrate high wear resistance in ball on plate experiments under physiological liquid lubrication. However, tests with a close-to-real approach were missing and this constitutes the aim of the present work. Hip joint wear simulator tests were performed with cups and heads made of silicon nitride coated with NCD of ~10 μm in thickness. Five million testing cycles (Mc) were run, which represent nearly five years of hip joint implant activity in a patient. For the wear analysis, gravimetry, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy techniques were used. After 0.5 Mc of wear test, truncation of the protruded regions of the NCD film happened as a result of a fine-scale abrasive wear mechanism, evolving to extensive plateau regions and highly polished surface condition (Ra<10nm). Such surface modification took place without any catastrophic features as cracking, grain pullouts or delamination of the coatings. A steady state volumetric wear rate of 0.02 mm(3)/Mc, equivalent to a linear wear of 0.27 μm/Mc favorably compares with the best performance reported in the literature for the fourth generation alumina ceramic (0.05 mm(3)/Mc). Also, squeaking, quite common phenomenon in hard-on-hard systems, was absent in the present all-NCD system.

  3. Synergistic effects of mica and wollastonite fillers on thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia-ul-Mustafa, M.; Ahmad, Faiz; Megat-Yusoff, Puteri S. M.; Aziz, Hammad

    2015-07-01

    In this study, intumescent fire retardant coatings (IFRC) were developed to investigate the synergistic effects of reinforced mica and wollastonite fillers based IFRC towards heat shielding, char expansion, char composition and char morphology. Ammonium poly-phosphate (APP) was used as acid source, expandable graphite (EG) as carbon source, melamine as blowing agent, boric acid as additive and Hardener H-2310 polyamide amine in bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188(BPA) was used as curing agent. Bunsen burner fire test was used for thermal performance according to UL-94 for 1 h. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) was used to observe char microstructure. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to analyse char composition. The results showed that addition of clay filler in IFRC enhanced the fire protection performance of intumescent coating. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed the presence of boron phosphate, silicon phosphate oxide, aluminium borate in the char that improved the thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC). Resultantly, the presence of these developed compounds enhanced the Integrity of structural steel upto 500°C.

  4. Synergistic effects of mica and wollastonite fillers on thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating

    SciTech Connect

    Zia-ul-Mustafa, M. Ahmad, Faiz; Megat-Yusoff, Puteri S. M.; Aziz, Hammad

    2015-07-22

    In this study, intumescent fire retardant coatings (IFRC) were developed to investigate the synergistic effects of reinforced mica and wollastonite fillers based IFRC towards heat shielding, char expansion, char composition and char morphology. Ammonium poly-phosphate (APP) was used as acid source, expandable graphite (EG) as carbon source, melamine as blowing agent, boric acid as additive and Hardener H-2310 polyamide amine in bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188(BPA) was used as curing agent. Bunsen burner fire test was used for thermal performance according to UL-94 for 1 h. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) was used to observe char microstructure. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to analyse char composition. The results showed that addition of clay filler in IFRC enhanced the fire protection performance of intumescent coating. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed the presence of boron phosphate, silicon phosphate oxide, aluminium borate in the char that improved the thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC). Resultantly, the presence of these developed compounds enhanced the Integrity of structural steel upto 500°C.

  5. Scattering from coated structures and antenna pattern control using impedance surfaces, part A/B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polka, Lesley A.; Liu, Kefeng

    1990-01-01

    The scattering from coated, conducting structures, specifically the coated dihedral corner reflector configuration and the coated strip/plate configuration is examined. The formulation uses impedance-wedge Uniform Theory of Diffraction scattering coefficients to calculate the diffracted fields. A finite-thickness coating is approximated using the impedance boundary condition to arrive at an equivalent impedance for the coating. The formulation of the impedance wedge coefficients is outlined. Far-field, perfectly conducting approximations are discussed. Problems with the present dihedral corner reflector model for certain angles of incidence and observation are discussed along with a potentially rectifying modification. Also, the capacity to measure the electromagnetic properties of lossy materials was developed. The effects of using multiple material coatings on the radiation pattern of the horn antenna were studied. Numerous computations were devoted toward the inverse problem of synthesizing desired radiation patterns using the impedance surfaces. Stabilizing the equivalent sheet impedance using the linear control condition was attempted, and it was found to be a very difficult task.

  6. Electrophoretic deposition of antibiotic loaded PHBV microsphere-alginate composite coating with controlled delivery potential.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Li, Wei; Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Ding, Yaping; Cabanas-Polo, Sandra; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2015-06-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique has been developed for the fabrication of antibiotic-loaded PHBV microsphere (MS)-alginate antibacterial coatings. The composite coatings deposited from suspensions with different MS concentrations were produced in order to demonstrate the versatility of the proposed method for achieving functional coatings with tailored drug loading and release profiles. Linearly increased deposit mass with increasing MS concentrations was obtained, and MS were found to be homogeneously stabilized in the alginate matrix. Chemical composition, surface roughness and wettability of the deposited coatings were measured by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, laser profilometer and water contact angle instruments, respectively. The co-deposition mechanism was described by two separate processes according to the results of relevant measurements: (i) the deposition of alginate-adsorbed MS and (ii) the non-adsorbed alginate. Qualitative antibacterial tests indicated that MS containing coatings exhibit excellent inhibition effects against E. coli (gram-negative bacteria) after 1h of incubation. The proposed coating system combined with the simplicity of the EPD technique can be considered a promising surface modification approach for the controlled in situ delivery of drug or other biomolecules.

  7. Electrophoretic deposition of antibiotic loaded PHBV microsphere-alginate composite coating with controlled delivery potential.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Li, Wei; Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Ding, Yaping; Cabanas-Polo, Sandra; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2015-06-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique has been developed for the fabrication of antibiotic-loaded PHBV microsphere (MS)-alginate antibacterial coatings. The composite coatings deposited from suspensions with different MS concentrations were produced in order to demonstrate the versatility of the proposed method for achieving functional coatings with tailored drug loading and release profiles. Linearly increased deposit mass with increasing MS concentrations was obtained, and MS were found to be homogeneously stabilized in the alginate matrix. Chemical composition, surface roughness and wettability of the deposited coatings were measured by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, laser profilometer and water contact angle instruments, respectively. The co-deposition mechanism was described by two separate processes according to the results of relevant measurements: (i) the deposition of alginate-adsorbed MS and (ii) the non-adsorbed alginate. Qualitative antibacterial tests indicated that MS containing coatings exhibit excellent inhibition effects against E. coli (gram-negative bacteria) after 1h of incubation. The proposed coating system combined with the simplicity of the EPD technique can be considered a promising surface modification approach for the controlled in situ delivery of drug or other biomolecules. PMID:25921640

  8. Comparative Study of Performance and Combustion Characteristics of Conventional and Low Heat Rejection (Mullite Coated) Diesel Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patond, S. B.; Chaple, S. A.; Shrirao, P. N.; Shaikh, P. I.

    2013-06-01

    Tests were performed on a single cylinder, four stroke, direct injection, diesel engine whose piston crown, cylinder head and valves were coated with a 0.5 mm thickness of 3Al2O3·2SiO2 (mullite) (Al2O3 = 60%, SiO2 = 40%) over a 150 μm thickness of NiCrAlY bond coat. The working conditions for the conventional engine (without coating) and LHR (mullite coated) engine were kept exactly same to ensure a comparison between the two configurations of the engine. This paper is intended to emphasis on performance and combustion characteristics of conventional and LHR (Mullite coated) diesel engines under identical conditions. Tests were carried out at same operational constraints i.e. air-fuel ratio and engine speed conditions for both conventional engine (without coating) and LHR (mullite coated) engines. The results showed that, there was as much as 1.8 % increasing on brake power for LHR (mullite coated) engine compared to conventional engine (without coating) at full load The average decrease in brake specific fuel consumption in the LHR engine compared with the conventional engine was 1.76 % for full engine load. However, there was increasing on cylinder gas pressure and net heat release rate for LHR engine compared to conventional engine. Also the results revealed that, there was as much as 22% increasing on exhaust gas temperature for LHR engine compared to conventional engine at full engine load.

  9. The Effect of Journal Roughness and Foil Coatings on the Performance of Heavily Loaded Foil Air Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin C.; DellaCorte, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    Foil air bearing load capacity tests were conducted to investigate if a solid lubricant coating applied to the surface of the bearing's top foil can function as a break-in coating. Two foil coating materials, a conventional soft polymer film (polyimide) and a hard ceramic (alumina), were independently evaluated against as-ground and worn (run-in) journals coated with NASA PS304, a high-temperature solid lubricant composite coating. The foil coatings were evaluated at journal rotational speeds of 30,000 rpm and at 25 C. Tests were also performed on a foil bearing with a bare (uncoated) nickel-based superalloy top foil to establish a baseline for comparison. The test results indicate that the presence of a top foil solid lubricant coating is effective at increasing the load capacity performance of the foil bearing. Compared to the uncoated baseline, the addition of the soft polymer coating on the top foil increased the bearing load coefficient by 120% when operating against an as-ground journal surface and 85 percent against a run-in journal surface. The alumina coating increased the load coefficient by 40% against the as-ground journal but did not have any affect when the bearing was operated with the run-in journal. The results suggest that the addition of solid lubricant films provide added lubrication when the air film is marginal indicating that as the load capacity is approached foil air bearings transition from hydrodynamic to mixed and boundary lubrication.

  10. Performance specification for control tower display systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleva, Denise L.; Meyer, Frederick M.

    2003-09-01

    Personnel in airport control towers monitor and direct the takeoff of outgoing aircraft, landing of incoming aircraft and all movements of aircraft on the ground. Although the primary source of information for the Local Controller, Assistant Local Controller and the Ground Controller is the real world viewed through the windows of the control tower, electronic displays are also used to provide situation awareness. Due to the criticality of the work to be performed by the controllers and the rather unique environment of the air traffic control tower, display hardware standards, which have been developed for general use, are not directly applicable. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requested assistance of Air Force Research Laboratory Human Effectiveness Directorate in producing a document which can be adopted as a Tower Display Standard usable by display engineers, human factors practitioners and system integrators. Particular emphasis was placed on human factors issues applicable to the control tower environment and controller task demands.

  11. Electroless (autocatalytic) nickel-cobalt thin films as solar control coatings

    SciTech Connect

    John, S.; Srinivasan, K.N.; Selvam, M.; Anuradha, S.; Rajendran, S.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the deposition of nickel-cobalt-phosphorus coatings by the electroless deposition technique for use as solar control coatings in architectural glazing of buildings. Electroless deposition is characterized by the autocatalytic deposition of a metal/alloy from an aqueous solution of its ions by interaction with a chemical reducing agent. The reducing agent provides electrons for the metal ions to be neutralized. The reduction is initiated by the catalyzed surface of the substrate and continued by the self catalytic activity of the deposited metal/alloy as long as the substrate is immersed in the electroless bath and operating conditions are maintained. Electroless nickel-cobalt-phosphorus thin films were deposited from a solution containing 15 g/l nickel sulphate, 5 g/l cobalt sulphate, 60 g/l ammonium citrate and 25 g/l sodium hypophosphite operating at 30 C, at a pH of 9.5 for two minutes. Electroless nickel-cobalt-phosphorus coatings are found to satisfy the basic requirements of solar control coatings. Autocatalytic deposition technique offers the possibilities of producing large area coatings with low capital investment, stability and good adhesion to glass substrates.

  12. Tailoring Interfacial Properties by Controlling Carbon Nanotube Coating Thickness on Glass Fibers Using Electrophoretic Deposition.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, Sandeep; An, Qi; Thostenson, Erik T; Rider, Andrew N; Haque, Bazle Z Gama; Gillespie, John W

    2016-01-20

    The electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method was used to deposit polyethylenimine (PEI) functionalized multiwall carbon nanotube (CNT) films onto the surface of individual S-2 glass fibers. By varying the processing parameters of EPD following Hamaker's equation, the thickness of the CNT film was controlled over a wide range from 200 nm to 2 μm. The films exhibited low electrical resistance, providing evidence of coating uniformity and consolidation. The effect of the CNT coating on fiber matrix interfacial properties was investigated through microdroplet experiments. Changes in interfacial properties due to application of CNT coatings onto the fiber surface with and without a CNT-modified matrix were studied. A glass fiber with a 2 μm thick CNT coating and the unmodified epoxy matrix showed the highest increase (58%) in interfacial shear strength (IFSS) compared to the baseline. The increase in the IFSS was proportional to CNT film thickness. Failure analysis of the microdroplet specimens indicated higher IFSS was related to fracture morphologies with higher levels of surface roughness. EPD enables the thickness of the CNT coating to be adjusted, facilitating control of fiber/matrix interfacial resistivity. The electrical sensitivity provides the opportunity to fabricate a new class of sizing with tailored interfacial properties and the ability to detect damage initiation.

  13. Evaporative Deposition of Aluminum Coatings and Shapes with Grain Size Control

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F; Hayes, J P

    2003-02-19

    The direct deposition of coatings with variable cross-section profiles presents a challenge for the use of physical vapor deposition technology. Coatings with constant and variable cross-section profiles are of interest for advancing the evaluation of material behavior under extreme loading conditions, as for example under high strain rate. The synthesis of a variable cross-section profile by design in the as-deposited condition requires process innovation. It is demonstrated that a thickness gradient in cross-section can be produced when the substrate is exposed to a highly collimated evaporation source. The exposure is governed using a variable position shutter as driven by a computer-controlled stepper motor. An example is shown for aluminum deposition in which the coating thickness varies linearly from one plateau to another forming a wedge shape. To deposit a controlled grain size in coatings as these wedge shapes, first requires an understanding of the affect of time at temperature. An examination of aluminum coatings with constant cross-section reveals that ideal-grain growth behavior is observed from the micron-to-millimeter scale for depositions at temperatures in excess of half the melt point.

  14. Tailoring Interfacial Properties by Controlling Carbon Nanotube Coating Thickness on Glass Fibers Using Electrophoretic Deposition.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, Sandeep; An, Qi; Thostenson, Erik T; Rider, Andrew N; Haque, Bazle Z Gama; Gillespie, John W

    2016-01-20

    The electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method was used to deposit polyethylenimine (PEI) functionalized multiwall carbon nanotube (CNT) films onto the surface of individual S-2 glass fibers. By varying the processing parameters of EPD following Hamaker's equation, the thickness of the CNT film was controlled over a wide range from 200 nm to 2 μm. The films exhibited low electrical resistance, providing evidence of coating uniformity and consolidation. The effect of the CNT coating on fiber matrix interfacial properties was investigated through microdroplet experiments. Changes in interfacial properties due to application of CNT coatings onto the fiber surface with and without a CNT-modified matrix were studied. A glass fiber with a 2 μm thick CNT coating and the unmodified epoxy matrix showed the highest increase (58%) in interfacial shear strength (IFSS) compared to the baseline. The increase in the IFSS was proportional to CNT film thickness. Failure analysis of the microdroplet specimens indicated higher IFSS was related to fracture morphologies with higher levels of surface roughness. EPD enables the thickness of the CNT coating to be adjusted, facilitating control of fiber/matrix interfacial resistivity. The electrical sensitivity provides the opportunity to fabricate a new class of sizing with tailored interfacial properties and the ability to detect damage initiation. PMID:26699906

  15. Nanocellulose 3, 5-Dimethylphenylcarbamate Derivative Coated Chiral Stationary Phase: Preparation and Enantioseparation Performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Litao; Dong, Shuqing; Zhang, Xia; Wu, Qi; Zhao, Liang; Shi, Yanping

    2016-05-01

    Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) with high surface area and high ordered crystalline structure was prepared from microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) under the hydrolysis of sodium hypochlorite. NCC was further reacted with 3,5-dimethylphenyl isocyanate to obtain the nanocellulose derivative, and then coated successfully on the surface of silica gel to a prepared NCC-coated chiral stationary phase (CSP) as a new kind of chiral separation material. Similarly, MCC derivative-coated CSP was also prepared as contrast. The chiral separation performance of NCC-based CSP was evaluated and compared with MCC-based CSP by high-performance liquid chromatography. Moreover, the effects of the alcohol modifiers, mobile phase additives, and flow rates on chiral separations were investigated in detail. The results showed that 10 chiral compounds were separated on NCC-based CSP with better peak shape and higher column efficiency than MCC-based CSP, which confirmed that NCC-based CSP was a promising packing material for the resolution of chiral compounds.Chirality 28:376-381, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26949227

  16. Nanocellulose 3, 5-Dimethylphenylcarbamate Derivative Coated Chiral Stationary Phase: Preparation and Enantioseparation Performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Litao; Dong, Shuqing; Zhang, Xia; Wu, Qi; Zhao, Liang; Shi, Yanping

    2016-05-01

    Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) with high surface area and high ordered crystalline structure was prepared from microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) under the hydrolysis of sodium hypochlorite. NCC was further reacted with 3,5-dimethylphenyl isocyanate to obtain the nanocellulose derivative, and then coated successfully on the surface of silica gel to a prepared NCC-coated chiral stationary phase (CSP) as a new kind of chiral separation material. Similarly, MCC derivative-coated CSP was also prepared as contrast. The chiral separation performance of NCC-based CSP was evaluated and compared with MCC-based CSP by high-performance liquid chromatography. Moreover, the effects of the alcohol modifiers, mobile phase additives, and flow rates on chiral separations were investigated in detail. The results showed that 10 chiral compounds were separated on NCC-based CSP with better peak shape and higher column efficiency than MCC-based CSP, which confirmed that NCC-based CSP was a promising packing material for the resolution of chiral compounds.Chirality 28:376-381, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control. Final technical progress report, July 1992--July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.F.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1995-10-15

    The erosion behavior of weld overlay coatings has been studied. Eleven weld overlay alloys were deposited on 1018 steel substrates using the plasma arc welding process and erosion tested at 400{degrees}C at 90{degrees} and 30{degrees} particle impact angles. The microstructure of each coating was characterized before erosion testing. A relative ranking of the coatings erosion resistance was developed by determining the steady state erosion rates. Ultimet, Inconel-625, and 316L SS coatings showed the best erosion resistance at both impact angles. It was found that weld overlays that exhibit good abrasion resistance did not show good erosion resistance. Erosion tests were also performed for selected wrought materials with chemical composition similar to weld overlays. Eroded surfaces of the wrought and weld alloys were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Microhardness tests were performed on the eroded samples below the erosion surface to determine size of the plastically deformed region. It was found that one group of coatings experienced significant plastic deformation as a result of erosion while the other did not. It was also established that, in the steady state erosion regime, the size of the plastically deformed region is constant.

  18. Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous Metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Control

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J

    2007-01-12

    This report describes the analysis and modeling approaches used in the evaluation for criticality-control applications of the neutron-absorbing structural-amorphous metal (SAM) coatings. The applications of boron-containing high-performance corrosion-resistant material (HPCRM)--amorphous metal as the neutron-absorbing coatings to the metallic support structure can enhance criticality safety controls for spent nuclear fuel in baskets inside storage containers, transportation casks, and disposal containers. The use of these advanced iron-based, corrosion-resistant materials to prevent nuclear criticality in transportation, aging, and disposal containers would be extremely beneficial to the nuclear waste management programs.

  19. Atmospheric Plasma Sprayed Forsterite (Mg2SiO4) Coatings: An Investigation of the Processing-Microstructure-Performance Relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojocaru, C. V.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Legoux, J.-G.; Marple, B. R.

    2013-03-01

    Evaluating and understanding the relationship between processing, microstructure and performance of a dielectric coating is essential for its practical usage and reliable application. In this study, the role of the powder feedstock on the properties of atmospheric plasma sprayed forsterite (Mg2SiO4) dielectric coatings was investigated by using different forsterite powder granulometries. The microstructural and porosity characteristics of the coatings associated with the spray conditions employed were assessed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image analysis. The phase composition of the coatings was studied via x-ray diffraction and their crystallinity index determined. The electrical insulating characteristics were investigated using the dielectric breakdown test and impedance spectroscopy measurements. The electrical properties obtained were correlated with the microstructural characteristics and a performance comparison between forsterite and other dielectric coatings is presented.

  20. Microstructure and performance of titanium oxide coatings sprayed by oxygen-acetylene flame.

    PubMed

    Ctibor, Pavel; Stengl, Vaclav; Zahalka, Frantisek; Murafa, Nataliya

    2011-03-01

    TiO(2) nano-powders were agglomerated by a spray drying process for application to thermal spraying. A conventional oxygen-acetylene flame torch was used to deposit porous partially nanostructured TiO(2) coatings. Steel substrates were used as a support for tested samples. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis and X-ray diffraction were performed to study the morphology and the crystalline phases of the titania coatings. Optical bandgap and kinetics of the acetone decomposition were also studied. The best results were obtained for the powder which is available as a commercial spray feedstock. This powder seems to be most resistant against the reducing atmosphere in the jet of combustive gases. PMID:20938550

  1. Carbon-coated silicon nanowire array films for high-performance lithium-ion battery anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rui; Fan, Xing; Shen, Wanci; Zhu, Jing

    2009-09-01

    Carbon-coated silicon nanowire array films prepared by metal catalytic etching of silicon wafers and pyrolyzing of carbon aerogel were used for lithium-ion battery anodes. The films exhibited an excellent first discharge capacity of 3344 mAh g-1 with a Coulombic efficiency of 84% at a rate of 150 mA g-1 between 2 and 0.02 V and a significantly enhanced cycling performance, i.e., a reversible capacity of 1326 mAh g-1 was retained after 40 cycles. These improvements were attributed to the uniform and continuous carbon coatings, which increased electronic contact and conduction and buffered large volume changes during lithium ion insertion/extraction.

  2. Development, Processing, and Testing of High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant HVOF Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Wong, F; Haslam, J; Estill, J; Branagan, D; Yang, N; Blue, C

    2003-08-26

    New amorphous-metal and ceramic coatings applied by the high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) process may reduce the waste package materials cost of the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository by over $4 billion (cost reduction of 27 to 42%). Two critical requirements that have been determined from design analysis are protection in brines that may evolve from the evaporative concentration of pore waters and protection for waste package welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Our efforts are directed towards producing and evaluating these high-performance coatings for the development of lower cost waste packages, and will leverage a cost-effective collaboration with DARPA for applications involving marine corrosion.

  3. 49 CFR 195.557 - Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Which pipelines must have coating for external... (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.557 Which...

  4. 49 CFR 195.557 - Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Which pipelines must have coating for external... (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.557 Which...

  5. 49 CFR 195.557 - Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Which pipelines must have coating for external... (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.557 Which...

  6. 49 CFR 195.557 - Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Which pipelines must have coating for external... (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.557 Which...

  7. 49 CFR 195.557 - Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Which pipelines must have coating for external... (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.557 Which...

  8. 49 CFR 195.561 - When must I inspect pipe coating used for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false When must I inspect pipe coating used for external corrosion control? 195.561 Section 195.561 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION...

  9. 49 CFR 195.559 - What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What coating material may I use for external corrosion control? 195.559 Section 195.559 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF...

  10. Control of household refrigerators. Part 1: Modeling temperature control performance

    SciTech Connect

    Graviss, K.J.; Collins, R.L.

    1999-07-01

    Commercial household refrigerators use simple, cost-effective, temperature controllers to obtain acceptable control. A manually adjusted airflow damper regulates the freezer compartment temperature while a thermostat controls operation of the compressor and evaporator fan to regulate refrigerator compartment temperature. Dual compartment temperature control can be achieved with automatic airflow dampers that function independently of the compressor and evaporator fan thermostat, resulting in improved temperature control quality and energy consumption. Under dual control, freezer temperature is controlled by the thermostat while the damper controls refrigerator temperature by regulating airflow circulation. A simulation model is presented that analyzes a household refrigerator configured with a conventional thermostat and both manual and automatic dampers. The model provides a new paradigm for investigating refrigerator systems and temperature control performance relative to the extensive verification testing that is typically done by manufacturers. The effects of each type of control and damper configuration are compared with respect to energy usage, control quality, and ambient temperature shift criteria. The results indicate that the appropriate control configuration can have significant effects and can improve plant performance.

  11. Development of polymeric coatings for control of electro-osmotic flow in ASTP MA-011 electrophoresis technology experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, W. J.

    1976-01-01

    The development of a methyl cellulose based coating system for control of electro-osmotic flow at the walls of electrophoresis cells is described. Flight electrophoresis columns were coated with this system, resulting in a flight set of six columns. In flight photography of MA-011 electrophoretic separations verified control of electro-osmotic flow.

  12. Comparison of sulfuric and oxalic acid anodizing for preparation of thermal control coatings for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Huong G.; Watcher, John M.; Smith, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    The development of thermal control surfaces, which maintain stable solar absorptivity and infrared emissivity over long periods, is challenging due to severe conditions in low-Earth orbit (LEO). Some candidate coatings are second-surface silver-coated Teflon; second-surface, silvered optical solar reflectors made of glass or quartz; and anodized aluminum. Sulfuric acid anodized and oxalic acid anodized aluminum was evaluated under simulated LEO conditions. Oxalic acid anodizing shows promise of greater stability in LEO over long missions, such as the 30 years planned for the Space Station. However, sulfuric acid anodizing shows lower solar absorptivity.

  13. Thermal control coatings on magnesium alloys prepared by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lingqian; Zhou, Jiansong; Liang, Jun; Chen, Jianmin

    2013-09-01

    Four kinds of oxide coatings with different solar absorptance properties were prepared on AZ91D magnesium alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation. They were of different colors due to the different additives in the electrolytes. The microstructure and composition were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The optical properties were investigated by the UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer, and the thermal control properties were measured by solar spectrum reflectometer as well as emissivity tester. Results showed that the solar absorptance of the coatings ranged from 0.439 to 0.918 while the emittance remained unchanged.

  14. Testing to determine the vacuum-ultraviolet degradation rate of thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilligan, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Samples of S-13G that had been exposed to the salt air environment of Cape Kennedy, Florida were irradiated with simulated solar ultraviolet radiation after various cleaning treatments. In both of the the tests conducted two of the salt air exposed samples were not cleaned, two were lightly cleaned with water and detergent (i.e. rinsed), and two were vigorously scrubbed. Several other white thermal control coatings were also irradiated. The solar absorptance values of these coatings before and as a result of the ultraviolet irradiation are reported for exposure levels up to approximately 2000 ESH.

  15. THE SNS RESONANCE CONTROL COOLING SYSTEM CONTROL VALVE UPGRADE PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Derrick C; Schubert, James Phillip; Tang, Johnny Y

    2008-01-01

    The normal-conducting linac of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) uses 10 separate Resonance Control Cooling System (RCCS) water skids to control the resonance of 6 Drift Tube Linac (DTL) and 4 Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) accelerating structures. The RCCS water skids use 2 control valves; one to regulate the chilled water flow and the other to bypass water to a chilled water heat exchanger. These valves have hydraulic actuators that provide position and feedback to the control system. Frequency oscillations occur using these hydraulic actuators due to their coarse movement and control of the valves. New pneumatic actuator and control positioners have been installed on the DTL3 RCCS water skid to give finer control and regulation of DTL3 cavity temperature. This paper shows a comparison of resonance control performance for the two valve configurations.

  16. Evaluation of reformulated thermal control coatings in a simulated space environment. Part 1: YB-71

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerbus, Clifford A.; Carlin, Patrick S.

    1994-01-01

    The Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center and Wright Laboratory Materials Directorate (WL/ML) have sponsored and effort to effort to reformulate and qualify Illinois Institute of Technology Research Institute (IITRI) spacecraft thermal control coatings. S13G/LO-1, Z93, and YB-71 coatings were reformulated because the potassium silicate binder, Sylvania PS-7, used in the coatings is no longer manufactured. Coatings utilizing the binder's replacement candidate, Kasil 2130, manufactured by The Philadelphia Quartz (PQ) Corporation, Baltimore, Maryland, and undergoing testing at the Materials Directorate's Space Combined Effects Primary Test and Research Equipment (SCEPTRE) Facility operated by the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI). The simulated space environment consists of combined ultraviolet (UV) and electron exposure with in site specimen reflectance measurements. A brief description of the effort at IITRI, results and discussion from testing the reformulated YB-71 coating in SCEPTRE, and plans for further testing of reformulated Z93 and S13G/LO-1 are presented.

  17. Thermal barrier characteristics of partially stabilized zirconia coatings on INCOLOY alloy 909; A controlled expansion alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.D. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on INCOLOY{sup 1} alloy 909 which is a low-expansion alloy used in critical seal and shaft applications within the gas turbine engine. However, because of its poor oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures, the maximum service temperature is limited. Since its coefficient of expansion is similar to that of partially stabilized zirconia for temperatures to 1200{degrees}F (649{degrees}C), it has been proposed to use this metal-ceramic combination for dimensionally critical, air-cooled jet engine components. This coating system should extend temperature limitations by reducing metal temperatures and providing oxidation resistance. The performance advantage offered by a thermal barrier coating has been investigated at temperatures up to 2000{degrees}F (1093{degrees}C) and the results are presented in this paper. Metal temperatures and heat flow rates of coated and bare specimens are compared for two air-cooling flow rates.

  18. Performance of Hydrogenated a-Si:H Solar Cells with Downshifting Coating: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, B.; Xu, Y.; Wang, H.; Sun, T.; Lee, B. G.; Duda, A.; Wang, Q.

    2011-05-01

    We apply a thin luminescent downshifting (LDS) coating to a hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) solar cell and study the mechanism of possible current enhancement. The conversion material used in this study converts wavelengths below 400 nm to a narrow line around 615 nm. This material is coated on the front of the glass of the a-Si:H solar cell with a glass/TCO/p/i/n/Ag superstrate configuration. The initial efficiency of the solar cell without the LDS coating is above 9.0 % with open circuit voltage of 0.84 V. Typically, the spectral response below 400 nm of an a-Si:H solar cell is weaker than that at 615 nm. By converting ultraviolet (UV) light to red light, the solar cell will receive more red photons; therefore, solar cell performance is expected to improve. We observe evidence of downshifting in reflectance spectra. The cell Jsc decreases by 0.13 mA/cm2, and loss mechanisms are identified.

  19. Characterization and antimicrobial performance of nano silver coatings on leather materials.

    PubMed

    Lkhagvajav, N; Koizhaiganova, M; Yasa, I; Çelik, E; Sari, Ö

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the characterization and the antimicrobial properties of nano silver (nAg) coating on leather were investigated. For this purpose, turbidity, viscosity and pH of nAg solutions prepared by the sol-gel method were measured. The formation of films from these solutions was characterized according to temperature by Differential Thermal Analysis-Thermogravimetry (DTA-TG) equipment. The surface morphology of treated leathers was observed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The antimicrobial performance of nAg coatings on leather materials to the test microorganisms as Escherichia coli , Staphylococcus aureus , Candida albicans and Aspergillius niger was evaluated by the application of qualitative (Agar overlay method) and quantitative (percentage of microbial reduction) tests. According to qualitative test results it was found that 20 μg/cm (2) and higher concentrations of nAg on the leather samples were effective against all microorganisms tested. Moreover, quantitative test results showed that leather samples treated with 20 μg/cm (2) of nAg demonstrated the highest antibacterial activity against E. coli with 99.25% bacterium removal, whereas a 10 μg/cm (2) concentration of nAg on leather was enough to exhibit the excellent percentage reduction against S. aureus of 99.91%. The results are promising for the use of colloidal nano silver solution on lining leather as antimicrobial coating.

  20. Blunt Trauma Performance of Fabric Systems Utilizing Natural Rubber Coated High Strength Fabrics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, M. R.; Ahmad, W. Y. W.; Samsuri, A.; Salleh, J.; Abidin, M. H.

    2010-03-11

    The blunt trauma performance of fabric systems against 9 mm bullets is reported. Three shots were fired at each fabric system with impact velocity of 367+-9 m/s and the depth of indentation on the modeling clay backing was measured. The results showed that 18-layer and 21-layer all-neat fabric systems failed the blunt trauma test. However, fabric systems with natural rubber (NR) latex coated fabric layers gave lower blunt trauma of between 25-32 mm indentation depths. Deformations on the neat fabrics upon impact were identified as broken yarns, yarn stretching and yarn pull-out. Deflections of the neat fabrics were more localised. For the NR latex coated fabric layers, no significant deformation can be observed except for peeled-off regions of the NR latex film at the back surface of the last layer. From the study, it can be said that the NR latex coated fabric layers were effective in reducing the blunt trauma of fabric systems.

  1. Polypyrrole coated carbon nanotubes for supercapacitor devices with enhanced electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yeling; Shi, Kaiyuan; Zhitomirsky, Igor

    2014-12-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) electrodes for electrochemical supercapacitors (ES) are prepared using amaranth as a new redox-active anionic dopant for chemical polymerization of PPy. The use of amaranth allows excellent electrochemical performance of electrodes with high mass loading and high PPy to current collector mass ratio. The specific capacitance of 4.2 F cm-2 is achieved at a scan rate of 2 mV s-1. The analysis of electrochemical testing results provides an insight into the influence of the chemical structure of amaranth on microstructure, electrochemical properties and cycling stability of PPy. New method is introduced for the fabrication of PPy coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). The use of amaranth allows fine microstructure of PPy coatings formed on MWCNT, which are well dispersed in the presence of pyrocatechol violet dispersant. The use of PPy coated MWCNT allows significant improvement in capacitance retention at high charge-discharge rates, compared to pure PPy material, and good cycling stability of individual electrodes and ES cells. The ES cells, based on PPy show specific capacitance of 1.3-1.6 F cm-2 at discharge current densities of 1-33 mA cm-2.

  2. Adsorption and photocatalyst assisted dye removal and bactericidal performance of ZnO/chitosan coating layer.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Tahseen; Ul-Islam, Mazhar; Khan, Sher Bahadar; Asiri, Abdullah M

    2015-11-01

    Pure chitosan and its zinc oxide composite coatings were applied on microfibriller cellulose mat (MCM) to prepare chitosan coated microfibriller cellulose (Chi-MCM) and zinc oxide/chitosan coated microfibriller cellulose (ZnO/Chi-MCM), respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), were used to characterize the samples in this study. SEM images showed that dense chitosan solutions (3 and 5wt%) made a thick layer over MCM while diluted solution (1wt%) resulted in wrapping of the chitosan over the individual microfibers and avoided the thick layer formation. Removal of an azo dye methyl orange (MO) from aqueous solution using adsorption and combined adsorption with photodegradation activity of the Chi-MCM and ZnO/Chi-MCM were evaluated, respectively. Compared in the absence of UV light, ZnO/Chi-MCM showed faster and higher degree of dye removal by photocatalytic dissociation and adsorption under ultraviolet irradiation. Various parameters including pH of MO solution and its initial concentration were tested for the removal of MO dye. ZnO/Chi-MCM showed maximum adsorption capacity of 42.8mg/g. Antibacterial activities were also evaluated where ZnO/Chi-MCM displayed a remarkable performance inhibiting the Escherichia coli growth.

  3. Adsorption and photocatalyst assisted dye removal and bactericidal performance of ZnO/chitosan coating layer.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Tahseen; Ul-Islam, Mazhar; Khan, Sher Bahadar; Asiri, Abdullah M

    2015-11-01

    Pure chitosan and its zinc oxide composite coatings were applied on microfibriller cellulose mat (MCM) to prepare chitosan coated microfibriller cellulose (Chi-MCM) and zinc oxide/chitosan coated microfibriller cellulose (ZnO/Chi-MCM), respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), were used to characterize the samples in this study. SEM images showed that dense chitosan solutions (3 and 5wt%) made a thick layer over MCM while diluted solution (1wt%) resulted in wrapping of the chitosan over the individual microfibers and avoided the thick layer formation. Removal of an azo dye methyl orange (MO) from aqueous solution using adsorption and combined adsorption with photodegradation activity of the Chi-MCM and ZnO/Chi-MCM were evaluated, respectively. Compared in the absence of UV light, ZnO/Chi-MCM showed faster and higher degree of dye removal by photocatalytic dissociation and adsorption under ultraviolet irradiation. Various parameters including pH of MO solution and its initial concentration were tested for the removal of MO dye. ZnO/Chi-MCM showed maximum adsorption capacity of 42.8mg/g. Antibacterial activities were also evaluated where ZnO/Chi-MCM displayed a remarkable performance inhibiting the Escherichia coli growth. PMID:26321421

  4. Fabrication of biomimetic high performance antireflective and antifogging film by spin-coating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Lü, Changli; Li, Yunfeng; Lin, Zhe; Wang, Zhanhua; Dong, Heping; Wang, Tieqiang; Zhang, Xuemin; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Junhu; Yang, Bai

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we report a facile way to fabricate biomimetic high performance optical hybrid films with excellent antireflective and antifogging properties by one-step spin-coating the mixture of mesoporous SiO(2) particles and SiO(2) sol. The production process of the films is easy, low-cost, and time-efficient. Mesoporous SiO(2) particles containing surfactants disperse in SiO(2) sol stably without any chemical modification, which decrease the effective refractive index and increase the transmittance of the films. In addition, such films possess superhydrophilic properties and exhibit high performance antifogging properties. Due to the good film forming performance of SiO(2) sol, mesoporous SiO(2) particles are embedded in the films and impart the films high mechanical stability and durability. The surface morphology of the films can maintain well after repeated friction, and the performances of antireflective and antifogging also do not change as well.

  5. Drastically Enhanced High-Rate Performance of Carbon-Coated LiFePO4 Nanorods Using a Green Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Method for Lithium Ion Battery: A Selective Carbon Coating Process.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ruiyuan; Liu, Haiqiang; Jiang, Yi; Chen, Jiankun; Tan, Xinghua; Liu, Guangyao; Zhang, Lina; Gu, Xiaohua; Guo, Yanjun; Wang, Hanfu; Sun, Lianfeng; Chu, Weiguo

    2015-06-01

    Application of LiFePO4 (LFP) to large current power supplies is greatly hindered by its poor electrical conductivity (10(-9) S cm(-1)) and sluggish Li+ transport. Carbon coating is considered to be necessary for improving its interparticle electronic conductivity and thus electrochemical performance. Here, we proposed a novel, green, low cost and controllable CVD approach using solid glucose as carbon source which can be extended to most cathode and anode materials in need of carbon coating. Hydrothermally synthesized LFP nanorods with optimized thickness of carbon coated by this recipe are shown to have superb high-rate performance, high energy, and power densities, as well as long high-rate cycle lifetime. For 200 C (18s) charge and discharge, the discharge capacity and voltage are 89.69 mAh g(-1) and 3.030 V, respectively, and the energy and power densities are 271.80 Wh kg(-1) and 54.36 kW kg(-1), respectively. The capacity retention of 93.0%, and the energy and power density retention of 93.6% after 500 cycles at 100 C were achieved. Compared to the conventional carbon coating through direct mixing with glucose (or other organic substances) followed by annealing (DMGA), the carbon phase coated using this CVD recipe is of higher quality and better uniformity. Undoubtedly, this approach enhances significantly the electrochemical performance of high power LFP and thus broadens greatly the prospect of its applications to large current power supplies such as electric and hybrid electric vehicles.

  6. High temperature performance of high-efficiency, multi-layer solar selective coatings for tower applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gray, M. H.; Tirawat, R.; Kessinger, K. A.; Ndione, P. F.

    2015-05-01

    The roadmap to next-generation concentrating solar power plants anticipates a progression to central towers with operating temperatures in excess of 650°C. These higher temperatures are required to drive higher power-cycle efficiencies, resulting in lower cost energy. However, these conditions also place a greater burden on the materials making up the receiver. Any novel absorber material developed for next-generation receivers must be stable in air, cost effective, and survive thousands of heating and cooling cycles. The collection efficiency of a power tower plant can be increased if the energy absorbed by the receiver is maximized while the heat loss from themore » receiver to the environment is minimized. Thermal radiation losses can be significant (>7% annual energy loss) with receivers at temperatures above 650°C. We present progress toward highly efficient and durable solar selective absorbers (SSAs) intended for operating temperatures from 650°C to 1000°C. Selective efficiency (ηsel) is defined as the energy retained by the absorber, accounting for both absorptance and emittance, relative to the energy incident on the surface. The low emittance layers of multilayer SSAs are binary compounds of refractory metals whose material properties indicate that coatings formed of these materials should be oxidation resistant in air to 800-1200°C. On this basis, we initially developed a solar selective coating for parabolic troughs. This development has been successfully extended to meet the absorptance and emittance objectives for the more demanding, high temperature regime. We show advancement in coating materials, processing and designs resulting in the initial attainment of target efficiencies ηsel > 0.91 for proposed tower conditions. Additionally, spectral measurements show that these coatings continue to perform at targeted levels after cycling to temperatures of 1000°C in environments of nitrogen and forming gas.« less

  7. High temperature performance of high-efficiency, multi-layer solar selective coatings for tower applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M. H.; Tirawat, R.; Kessinger, K. A.; Ndione, P. F.

    2015-05-01

    The roadmap to next-generation concentrating solar power plants anticipates a progression to central towers with operating temperatures in excess of 650°C. These higher temperatures are required to drive higher power-cycle efficiencies, resulting in lower cost energy. However, these conditions also place a greater burden on the materials making up the receiver. Any novel absorber material developed for next-generation receivers must be stable in air, cost effective, and survive thousands of heating and cooling cycles. The collection efficiency of a power tower plant can be increased if the energy absorbed by the receiver is maximized while the heat loss from the receiver to the environment is minimized. Thermal radiation losses can be significant (>7% annual energy loss) with receivers at temperatures above 650°C. We present progress toward highly efficient and durable solar selective absorbers (SSAs) intended for operating temperatures from 650°C to 1000°C. Selective efficiency (ηsel) is defined as the energy retained by the absorber, accounting for both absorptance and emittance, relative to the energy incident on the surface. The low emittance layers of multilayer SSAs are binary compounds of refractory metals whose material properties indicate that coatings formed of these materials should be oxidation resistant in air to 800-1200°C. On this basis, we initially developed a solar selective coating for parabolic troughs. This development has been successfully extended to meet the absorptance and emittance objectives for the more demanding, high temperature regime. We show advancement in coating materials, processing and designs resulting in the initial attainment of target efficiencies ηsel > 0.91 for proposed tower conditions. Additionally, spectral measurements show that these coatings continue to perform at targeted levels after cycling to temperatures of 1000°C in environments of nitrogen and forming gas.

  8. Solar Sail Attitude Control Performance Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bladt, Jeff J.; Lawrence, Dale A.

    2005-01-01

    Performance of two solar sail attitude control implementations is evaluated. One implementation employs four articulated reflective vanes located at the periphery of the sail assembly to generate control torque about all three axes. A second attitude control configuration uses mass on a gimbaled boom to alter the center-of-mass location relative to the center-of-pressure producing roll and pitch torque along with a pair of articulated control vanes for yaw control. Command generation algorithms employ linearized dynamics with a feedback inversion loop to map desired vehicle attitude control torque into vane and/or gimbal articulation angle commands. We investigate the impact on actuator deflection angle behavior due to variations in how the Jacobian matrix is incorporated into the feedback inversion loop. Additionally, we compare how well each implementation tracks a commanded thrust profile, which has been generated to follow an orbit trajectory from the sun-earth L1 point to a sub-L1 station.

  9. Ultrathin Coating of Confined Pt Nanocatalysts by Atomic Layer Deposition for Enhanced Catalytic Performance in Hydrogenation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meihua; Gao, Zhe; Zhang, Bin; Yang, Huimin; Qiao, Yan; Chen, Shuai; Ge, Huibin; Zhang, Jiankang; Qin, Yong

    2016-06-13

    Metal-support interfaces play a prominent role in heterogeneous catalysis. However, tailoring the metal-support interfaces to realize full utilization remains a major challenge. In this work, we propose a graceful strategy to maximize the metal-oxide interfaces by coating confined nanoparticles with an ultrathin oxide layer. This is achieved by sequential deposition of ultrathin Al2 O3 coats, Pt, and a thick Al2 O3 layer on carbon nanocoils templates by atomic layer deposition (ALD), followed by removal of the templates. Compared with the Pt catalysts confined in Al2 O3 nanotubes without the ultrathin coats, the ultrathin coated samples have larger Pt-Al2 O3 interfaces. The maximized interfaces significantly improve the activity and the protecting Al2 O3 nanotubes retain the stability for hydrogenation reactions of 4-nitrophenol. We believe that applying ALD ultrathin coats on confined catalysts is a promising way to achieve enhanced performance for other catalysts.

  10. Porous cellulose diacetate-SiO2 composite coating on polyethylene separator for high-performance lithium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenju; Shi, Liyi; Wang, Zhuyi; Zhu, Jiefang; Yang, Haijun; Mao, Xufeng; Chi, Mingming; Sun, Lining; Yuan, Shuai

    2016-08-20

    The developments of high-performance lithium ion battery are eager to the separators with high ionic conductivity and thermal stability. In this work, a new way to adjust the comprehensive properties of inorganic-organic composite separator was investigated. The cellulose diacetate (CDA)-SiO2 composite coating is beneficial for improving the electrolyte wettability and the thermal stability of separators. Interestingly, the pore structure of composite coating can be regulated by the weight ratio of SiO2 precursor tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in the coating solution. The electronic performance of lithium ion batteries assembled with modified separators are improved compared with the pristine PE separator. When weight ratio of TEOS in the coating solution was 9.4%, the composite separator shows the best comprehensive performance. Compared with the pristine PE separator, its meltdown temperature and the break-elongation at elevated temperature increased. More importantly, the discharge capacity and the capacity retention improved significantly.

  11. Porous cellulose diacetate-SiO2 composite coating on polyethylene separator for high-performance lithium-ion battery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenju; Shi, Liyi; Wang, Zhuyi; Zhu, Jiefang; Yang, Haijun; Mao, Xufeng; Chi, Mingming; Sun, Lining; Yuan, Shuai

    2016-08-20

    The developments of high-performance lithium ion battery are eager to the separators with high ionic conductivity and thermal stability. In this work, a new way to adjust the comprehensive properties of inorganic-organic composite separator was investigated. The cellulose diacetate (CDA)-SiO2 composite coating is beneficial for improving the electrolyte wettability and the thermal stability of separators. Interestingly, the pore structure of composite coating can be regulated by the weight ratio of SiO2 precursor tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) in the coating solution. The electronic performance of lithium ion batteries assembled with modified separators are improved compared with the pristine PE separator. When weight ratio of TEOS in the coating solution was 9.4%, the composite separator shows the best comprehensive performance. Compared with the pristine PE separator, its meltdown temperature and the break-elongation at elevated temperature increased. More importantly, the discharge capacity and the capacity retention improved significantly. PMID:27178959

  12. Experimental test plan: USDOE/JAERI collaborative program for the coated particle fuel performance test

    SciTech Connect

    Kania, M.J.; Fukuda, K.

    1989-12-01

    This document describes the coated-particle fuel performance test agreed to under Annex 2 of the arrangement between the US Department of Energy and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute on cooperation in research and development regarding high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The test will evaluate the behavior of reference fuel compacts containing coated-particle fuels fabricated according to the specifications for the US Modular HTGR and the Japanese High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) concepts. Two experimental capsules, HRB-21 and HRB-22, are being tested. Capsule HRB-21 contains only US reference fuel, and HRB-22 contains only JAERI reference fuel. Both capsules will be irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Capsule HRB-21 will be operated at a mean volumetric fuel temperature of 975{degrees}C and will achieve a peak fissile burnup of 26% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA) and a fast fluence of {le}4.5 {times} 10{sup 25} neutrons/m{sup 2}. Capsule HRB-22 will be operated at a mean centerline fuel temperature of 1250 to 1300{degrees}C and will achieve a peak fissile burnup of 5.5% FIMA and a fast fluence of 1.7 {times} 10{sup 25} neutrons/m{sup 2}. Performance of the fuels during irradiation will be closely monitored using on-line fission gas surveillance. Following irradiation, both capsules will undergo detailed examinations and core heatup simulation testing. Results from in-reactor monitoring and postirradiation testing will be analyzed to comparatively assess US and Japanese coated-particle fuel performance. 3 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. Thermal control surfaces experiment flight system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Donald R.; Hummer, Leigh L.; Zwiener, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The Thermal Control Surfaces Experiment (TCSE) is the most complex system, other than the LDEF, retrieved after long term space exposure. The TCSE is a microcosm of complex electro-optical payloads being developed and flow by NASA and the DoD including SDI. The objective of TCSE was to determine the effects of the near-Earth orbital environment and the LDEF induced environment on spacecraft thermal control surfaces. The TCSE was a comprehensive experiment that combined in-space measurements with extensive post flight analyses of thermal control surfaces to determine the effects of exposure to the low earth orbit space environment. The TCSE was the first space experiment to measure the optical properties of thermal control surfaces the way they are routinely measured in a lab. The performance of the TCSE confirms that low cost, complex experiment packages can be developed that perform well in space.

  14. Preparation of pigments for space-stable thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. B.; Smith, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    The identification and control of vapor phase reaction kinetics to produce pigments by homogeneous nucleation were achieved. A vapor phase apparatus was designed, fabricated, and calibrated through 1800 C. Vapor phase reactions were analyzed, calculations made, and powders of alumina, rutile, zinc orthotitanate (in a mixed phase), calcium tungstate, and lanthana were produced by homogeneous nucleation. Electron microscopy shows uniform particle morphology and size, and supports anticipated advantages of vapor-phase homogeneous nucleation; namely, purity, freedom from defects, and uniform particle sizing without grinding.

  15. Performance measurement: A tool for program control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, Nancy

    1994-01-01

    Performance measurement is a management tool for planning, monitoring, and controlling as aspects of program and project management--cost, schedule, and technical requirements. It is a means (concept and approach) to a desired end (effective program planning and control). To reach the desired end, however, performance measurement must be applied and used appropriately, with full knowledge and recognition of its power and of its limitations--what it can and cannot do for the project manager. What is the potential of this management tool? What does performance measurement do that a traditional plan vs. actual technique cannot do? Performance measurement provides an improvement over the customary comparison of how much money was spent (actual cost) vs. how much was planned to be spent based on a schedule of activities (work planned). This commonly used plan vs. actual comparison does not allow one to know from the numerical data if the actual cost incurred was for work intended to be done.

  16. An Improved Formulation for Calorimetric Emittance Testing of Spacecraft Thermal Control Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauder, Lonny R.

    2008-01-01

    Spacecraft often really heavily on passive thermal control to maintain operating temperature. An important parameter in the spacecraft heat balance equation is the emittance of thermal control coatings as a function of coating temperature. One method for determining the emittance of spacecraft thermal control from elevated temperature to cryogenic temperatures relies on a calorimetric technique. The fundamental equation governing this test method can be found in numerous places in the literature and although it generally provides reasonable results, its formulation is based on a conceptual flaw that only becomes apparent when the sample temperature approaches the wall temperature during testing. This paper investigates the cause for this error and develops the correct formulation for calorimetric emittance testing. Experimental data will also be presented that illustrates the difference between the two formulations and the resulting difference in the calculated emittance.

  17. Design of coated standing nanowire array solar cell performing beyond the planar efficiency limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yang; Ye, Qinghao; Shen, Wenzhong

    2016-05-01

    The single standing nanowire (SNW) solar cells have been proven to perform beyond the planar efficiency limits in both open-circuit voltage and internal quantum efficiency due to the built-in concentration and the shifting of the absorption front. However, the expandability of these nano-scale units to a macro-scale photovoltaic device remains unsolved. The main difficulty lies in the simultaneous preservation of an effective built-in concentration in each unit cell and a broadband high absorption capability of their array. Here, we have provided a detailed theoretical guideline for realizing a macro-scale solar cell that performs furthest beyond the planar limits. The key lies in a complementary design between the light-trapping of the single SNWs and that of the photonic crystal slab formed by the array. By tuning the hybrid HE modes of the SNWs through the thickness of a coaxial dielectric coating, the optimized coated SNW array can sustain an absorption rate over 97.5% for a period as large as 425 nm, which, together with the inherited carrier extraction advantage, leads to a cell efficiency increment of 30% over the planar limit. This work has demonstrated the viability of a large-size solar cell that performs beyond the planar limits.

  18. A conductive and hydrophilic bipolar plate coating for enhanced proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance and water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Andrew P.; Salguero, Tina T.; Kirby, Kevin W.; Zhong, Feng; Blunk, Richard H. J.

    2012-07-01

    Electrically conductive and hydrophilic coatings for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stainless steel bipolar plates have been developed in order to minimize voltage losses at the plate and gas diffusion layer (GDL) interface and facilitate liquid water transport in plate channels for efficient stack operation. The coatings are based on a multifunctional silane, 1,2-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane (BTSE), mixed with conductive, hydrophilic carbon black. Vulcan® XC72 carbon black was modified with either polar phenylsulfonic acid (PSA) or carboxylic acid (COOH) groups to increase hydrophilic character and wetting behavior. Wetting and electrical contact resistance performance was compared with coatings based on nano-particle titania and silica. These conductive silane and carbon composite coating precursors are conveniently formulated in alcohol solution for scalable application via spray coating. Cured films exhibit negligible contact resistance increase (<2 mΩ cm2) at 1.4 MPa when deposited on both physical vapor deposited (PVD) carbon and electroplated gold coated stainless steel. The coatings were tested for hydrophilicity retention under wet and dry fuel cell conditions where the BTSE-COOH coating remained hydrophilic on stamped stainless steel bipolar plate prototypes after greater than 1200 h of simulated fuel cell testing with only moderate loss of hydrophilicity.

  19. Slurry Erosion Performance of Ni-Al2O3 Based Thermal-Sprayed Coatings: Effect of Angle of Impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewal, H. S.; Agrawal, Anupam; Singh, H.; Shollock, B. A.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, slurry erosion performance of high velocity flame-sprayed Ni-Al2O3 based coatings was evaluated. The coatings were deposited on a hydroturbine steel (CA6NM) by varying the content of Al2O3 in Ni. Using jet-type test rig, erosion behavior of coatings and bare steel was evaluated at different impingement angles. Detailed investigation of the surface morphology of the eroded specimens was undertaken using SEM/EDS to identify potential erosion mechanism. A parameter named "erosion mechanism identifier" (ξ) was used to predict the mode of erosion. It was observed that the coating prepared using 40 wt.% of Al2O3 showed a highest resistance to erosion. This coating enhanced the erosion resistance of the steel by 2 to 4 times. Spalling in the form of splats and chunks of material (formed by interlinking of cracks) along with fracture of Al2O3 splats were identified as primary mechanisms responsible for the loss of coating material. The erosion mechanism of coatings and bare steel predicted by ξ was in good agreement with that observed experimentally. Among different parameters,, a function of fracture toughness ( K IC) and hardness ( H) showed excellent correlation with erosion resistance of coatings at both the impingement angles.

  20. Moisture interaction and stability of ZOT (Zinc Orthotitanate) thermal control spacecraft coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, Gordon R.; Gonzalez, Charles C.; Ross, Ronald G., Jr.; Wen, Liang C.; Odonnell, Timothy

    1988-01-01

    Two of the many performance requirements of the zinc orthotitanate (ZOT) ceramic thermal control paint covering parts of the Jupiter-bound Galileo spacecraft are that it be sufficiently electrically conductive so as to prevent electrostatic discharge (ESD) damage to onboard electronics and that it adhere to and protect the substrate from corrosion in terrestrial environments. The bulk electrical resistivity of ZOT on an aluminum substrate was measured over the ranges 22 C to 90 C and 0 percent RH to 100 percent RH, and also in soft (10 (minus 2) Torr) and hard (10 (minus 7) Torr) vacuums. No significant temperature dependence was evident, but measured resistivity values ranged over 9 orders of magnitude: 10 to the 5th power ohm-cm at 100 percent RH greater than 10 to the 12th power ohm-cm in a hard vacuum. The latter value violates the ESD criterion for a typical 0.019 cm thick coating. The corrosion study involved exposing typical ZOT substrate combinations to two moisture environments - 30 C/85 percent RH and 85 C/85 percent RH - for 2000 hours, during which time the samples were periodically removed for front-to-back electrical resistance and scratch/peel test measurements. It was determined that the ZOT/Al and ZOT/Mg systems are stable (no ZOT delamination), although some corrosion (oxide formation) and resistivity increases observed among the ZOT/Mg samples warrant that exposure of some parts to humid environments be minimized.

  1. Development of coated beads for oral controlled delivery of cefaclor: In vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Bazigha K Abdul; Fahmy, Sahar A

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop and characterize coated chitosan-alginate beads containing cefaclor as a controlled release delivery system. Coated cefaclor beads were prepared by solvent evaporation techniques. Beads were found to be intact and spherical in shape. Their size range was 1.05 to 2.06. The loading efficiency showed maximum value when the concentration of cefaclor, chitosan and PEG 400 was 10 % (m/V), 0.5 % (m/V) and 2 % (V/V), respectively. Best retardation of cefaclor release from chitosan-alginate beads was achieved by coating with 15 % of shellac in formula F19. A significant antimicrobial activity (p < 0.05) against Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae was observed for formula F19 compared to the standard antibiotic disc. Furthermore, the simulated plasma profile showed the superiority of F19 in sustaining drug release for more than 12 h. Therefore, shellac coated chitosan-alginate beads could be considered a successful controlled release oral cefaclor dosage form.

  2. Review on materials & methods to produce controlled release coated urea fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Azeem, Babar; KuShaari, KuZilati; Man, Zakaria B; Basit, Abdul; Thanh, Trinh H

    2014-05-10

    With the exponential growth of the global population, the agricultural sector is bound to use ever larger quantities of fertilizers to augment the food supply, which consequently increases food production costs. Urea, when applied to crops is vulnerable to losses from volatilization and leaching. Current methods also reduce nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) by plants which limits crop yields and, moreover, contributes towards environmental pollution in terms of hazardous gaseous emissions and water eutrophication. An approach that offsets this pollution while also enhancing NUE is the use of controlled release urea (CRU) for which several methods and materials have been reported. The physical intromission of urea granules in an appropriate coating material is one such technique that produces controlled release coated urea (CRCU). The development of CRCU is a green technology that not only reduces nitrogen loss caused by volatilization and leaching, but also alters the kinetics of nitrogen release, which, in turn, provides nutrients to plants at a pace that is more compatible with their metabolic needs. This review covers the research quantum regarding the physical coating of original urea granules. Special emphasis is placed on the latest coating methods as well as release experiments and mechanisms with an integrated critical analyses followed by suggestions for future research. PMID:24593892

  3. Review on materials & methods to produce controlled release coated urea fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Azeem, Babar; KuShaari, KuZilati; Man, Zakaria B; Basit, Abdul; Thanh, Trinh H

    2014-05-10

    With the exponential growth of the global population, the agricultural sector is bound to use ever larger quantities of fertilizers to augment the food supply, which consequently increases food production costs. Urea, when applied to crops is vulnerable to losses from volatilization and leaching. Current methods also reduce nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) by plants which limits crop yields and, moreover, contributes towards environmental pollution in terms of hazardous gaseous emissions and water eutrophication. An approach that offsets this pollution while also enhancing NUE is the use of controlled release urea (CRU) for which several methods and materials have been reported. The physical intromission of urea granules in an appropriate coating material is one such technique that produces controlled release coated urea (CRCU). The development of CRCU is a green technology that not only reduces nitrogen loss caused by volatilization and leaching, but also alters the kinetics of nitrogen release, which, in turn, provides nutrients to plants at a pace that is more compatible with their metabolic needs. This review covers the research quantum regarding the physical coating of original urea granules. Special emphasis is placed on the latest coating methods as well as release experiments and mechanisms with an integrated critical analyses followed by suggestions for future research.

  4. Controlled deposition of plasma activated coatings on zirconium substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, Behnam; Bilek, Marcela

    2015-12-01

    Zirconium-based alloys are promising materials for orthopedic prostheses due to their low toxicity, superb corrosion resistivity, and favorable mechanical properties. The integration of such bio-implantable devices with local host tissues can strongly be improved by the development of a plasma polymerized acetylene and nitrogen (PPAN) that immobilizes bio-active molecules. The surface chemistry of PPAN is critically important as it plays a key role in affecting the surface free energy that alters the functionality of bio-active molecules at the surface. The cross-linking degree of PPAN is another key property that directly influences the water-permeability and thus also the stability of films in aqueous media. In this study we demonstrate that by simply tuning the zirconium bias voltage, control over the surface chemistry and cross-linking degree of PANN is achieved.

  5. Non-polymeric coatings to control drug release from metallic coronary stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Celia Edith Macias

    Percutaneous transluminal coronary angiography (PTCA) is a procedure used to re-open narrowed coronary arteries. During PTCA, a coronary stent is expanded inside a diseased vessel and serves as a scaffold to keep the artery open. The major drawback of stenting is restenosis---a re-narrowing of the vessel resulting from the hyperproliferation of smooth muscle cells. Drug eluting stents (DES) reduce the rate of restenosis compared to bare metal stents. Paclitaxel (PAT) is commonly used in DES for its ability to prevent restenosis. However, DES have been associated with thrombosis due to the polymer carrier that controls drug delivery. Therefore, there is a need to change the drug delivery mechanisms to eliminate the need of polymers. The goal of this dissertation is to develop a novel polymer-free drug eluting stent that controls drug release using nanoscale metal coatings. The coating was designed to release PAT as the metal slowly degrades in biological conditions. Once all the Paclitaxel has eluted from the surface, the coating will continue to degrade until the final result is a bare metal stent. The results of this study include a novel non-polymeric drug delivery system using nanoscale coatings that release Paclitaxel at a rate similar to commercial stents, as well as the biocompatibility and efficacy of these coatings. The non-polymeric drug delivery system described here achieved a Paclitaxel release profile equivalent to clinically available Paclitaxel-eluting stents and effectively inhibits smooth muscle cell proliferation, thereby completely eliminating the need for polymers to control drug release from coronary stents.

  6. Controlling the size distribution of lipid-coated bubbles via fluidity regulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung-Hsin; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2013-05-01

    Lipid-coated bubbles exhibit oscillation responses capable of enhancing the sensitivity of ultrasound imaging by improving contrast. Further improvements in performance enhancement require control of the size distribution of bubbles to promote correspondence between their resonance frequency and the frequency of the ultrasound. Here we describe a size-controlling technique that can shift the size distribution using a currently available agitation method. This technique is based on regulating the membrane dynamic fluidity of lipid mixtures and provides a general size-controlling variable that could also be applied in other fabrication methods. Three materials (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1,2-dioctadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) and polyethylene glycol 40 stearate) with distinct initial fluidities and phase behaviors were used to demonstrate the use of fluidity regulation to control bubble sizes. Bubble size distributions of different formulations were determined by electrical impedance sensing, and bubble volumes and surface areas were calculated. To confirm the relationship between regulated fluidity and mean bubble size, the membrane fluidity of each composition was determined by fluorescence anisotropy, with the results indicating linear relations in the compositions with similar main transition temperatures. Compositions with a higher molar proportion of polyethylene glycol 40 stearate showed higher fluidities and larger bubbles. B-mode ultrasound imaging was performed to investigate the echogenicity and lifetime of the fabricated bubbles, with the results indicating that co-mixing a high-transition-temperature charged lipid (i.e., 1,2-dioctadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol)) extends the tailoring range of this fluidity regulation technique, allowing refined and continuous changes in mean bubble size (from 0.93 to 2.86 μm in steps of ∼0.5 μm), and also prolongs bubble lifetime. The polydispersity of each

  7. Luminescence-Based Diagnostics of Thermal Barrier Coating Health and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are typically composed of translucent ceramic oxides that provide thermal protection for metallic components exposed to high-temperature environments in both air- and land-based turbine engines. For advanced turbine engines designed for higher temperature operation, a diagnostic capability for the health and performance of TBCs will be essential to indicate when a mitigating action needs to be taken before premature TBC failure threatens engine performance or safety. In particular, it is shown that rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayers can be integrated into the TBC structure to produce luminescence emission that can be monitored to assess TBC erosion and delamination progression, and to map surface and subsurface temperatures as a measure of TBC performance. The design and implementation of these TBCs with integrated luminescent sublayers are presented.

  8. Preliminary evaluation of an aqueous wax emulsion for controlled-release coating.

    PubMed

    Walia, P S; Stout, P J; Turton, R

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the use of an aqueous carnauba wax emulsion (Primafresh HS, Johnson Wax) in a spray-coating process. This involved assessing the effectiveness of the wax in sustaining the release of the drug, theophylline. Second, the process by which the drug was released from the wax-coated pellets was modeled. Finally, a method to determine the optimum blend of pellets with different wax thicknesses, in order to yield a zero-order release profile of the drug, was addressed. Nonpareil pellets were loaded with theophylline using a novel powder coating technique. These drug-loaded pellets were then coated with different levels of carnauba wax in a 6-in. diameter Plexiglas fluid bed with a 3.5-in. diameter Wurster partition. Drug release was measured using a spin-filter dissolution device. The study resulted in continuous carnauba wax coatings which showed sustained drug release profile characteristics typical of a barrier-type, diffusion-controlled system. The effect of varying wax thickness on the release profiles was investigated. It was observed that very high wax loadings would be required to achieve long sustained-release times. The diffusion model, developed to predict the release of the drug, showed good agreement with the experimental data. However, the data exhibited an initial lag-time for drug release which could not be predicted a priori based on the wax coating thickness. A method of mixing pellets with different wax thicknesses was proposed as a way to approximate zero-order release. PMID:9532605

  9. Preliminary evaluation of an aqueous wax emulsion for controlled-release coating.

    PubMed

    Walia, P S; Stout, P J; Turton, R

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the use of an aqueous carnauba wax emulsion (Primafresh HS, Johnson Wax) in a spray-coating process. This involved assessing the effectiveness of the wax in sustaining the release of the drug, theophylline. Second, the process by which the drug was released from the wax-coated pellets was modeled. Finally, a method to determine the optimum blend of pellets with different wax thicknesses, in order to yield a zero-order release profile of the drug, was addressed. Nonpareil pellets were loaded with theophylline using a novel powder coating technique. These drug-loaded pellets were then coated with different levels of carnauba wax in a 6-in. diameter Plexiglas fluid bed with a 3.5-in. diameter Wurster partition. Drug release was measured using a spin-filter dissolution device. The study resulted in continuous carnauba wax coatings which showed sustained drug release profile characteristics typical of a barrier-type, diffusion-controlled system. The effect of varying wax thickness on the release profiles was investigated. It was observed that very high wax loadings would be required to achieve long sustained-release times. The diffusion model, developed to predict the release of the drug, showed good agreement with the experimental data. However, the data exhibited an initial lag-time for drug release which could not be predicted a priori based on the wax coating thickness. A method of mixing pellets with different wax thicknesses was proposed as a way to approximate zero-order release.

  10. Design and Performance Optimizations of Advanced Erosion-Resistant Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings for Rotorcraft Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future rotorcraft engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. For thermal barrier coatings designed for rotorcraft turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability, because the rotorcraft are often operated in the most severe sand erosive environments. Advanced low thermal conductivity and erosion-resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with the current emphasis being placed on thermal barrier coating toughness improvements using multicomponent alloying and processing optimization approaches. The performance of the advanced thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in a high temperature erosion burner rig and a laser heat-flux rig to simulate engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition and architecture optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic oxidation durability

  11. Effect of Spray Distance on Microstructure and Tribological Performance of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Hydroxyapatite-Titania Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Xu, Haifeng; Geng, Xin; Wang, Jingjing; Xiao, Jinkun; Zhu, Peizhi

    2016-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-titania (TiO2) composite coatings prepared on Ti6Al4V alloy surface can combine the excellent mechanical property of the alloy substrate and the good biocompatibility of the coating material. In this paper, HA-TiO2 composite coatings were deposited on Ti6Al4V substrates using suspension plasma spray (SPS). X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier infrared absorption spectrometry and friction tests were used to analyze the microstructure and tribological properties of the obtained coatings. The results showed that the spray distance had an important influence on coating microstructure and tribological performance. The amount of decomposition phases decreased as the spray distance increased. The increase in spray distance from 80 to 110 mm improved the crystalline HA content and decreased the wear performance of the SPS coatings. In addition, the spray distance had a big effect on the coating morphology due to different substrate temperature resulting from different spray distance. Furthermore, a significant presence of OH- and CO3 2- was observed, which was favorable for the biomedical applications.

  12. Anion exchange polymer coated graphite granule electrodes for improving the performance of anodes in unbuffered microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Li, Dengfeng; Mao, Xuhui; Yu, Eileen Hao; Scott, Keith; Zhang, Enren; Wang, Dihua

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, graphite granule composite electrodes are prepared for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) by coating commercial graphite granules with the mixture of quaternary DABCO polysulfone or Nafion ion exchange polymer and carbon black. The results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) suggest that the addition of carbon black could significantly improve the electrical conductivity of graphite granule anodes. When phosphate buffer solution (PBS) is replaced by NaCl solution, the current densities of the pristine anode, 0.08 g Nafion coated anode and 0.16 g QDPSU coated anode decrease by 52.6%, 20.6% and 10.3% at -0.2 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), respectively. The solution resistance of ion exchange polymer coated anodes is more stable in comparison with that of pristine anode. After 40 operational days, the performance drop of 0.16 g QDPSU coated anode when switching the solution from PBS to NaCl is still smaller than that of pristine anode. However, 0.08 g Nafion coated anode shows the similar performance in NaCl solution to the pristine anode after long term operation. This study reveals that QDPSU anion exchange polymer is more suitable for the anode modification. The QDPSU coated anode promises a great potential for three-dimensional anode based MFCs to treat domestic wastewater.

  13. Effect of Spray Distance on Microstructure and Tribological Performance of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Hydroxyapatite-Titania Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Xu, Haifeng; Geng, Xin; Wang, Jingjing; Xiao, Jinkun; Zhu, Peizhi

    2016-09-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-titania (TiO2) composite coatings prepared on Ti6Al4V alloy surface can combine the excellent mechanical property of the alloy substrate and the good biocompatibility of the coating material. In this paper, HA-TiO2 composite coatings were deposited on Ti6Al4V substrates using suspension plasma spray (SPS). X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier infrared absorption spectrometry and friction tests were used to analyze the microstructure and tribological properties of the obtained coatings. The results showed that the spray distance had an important influence on coating microstructure and tribological performance. The amount of decomposition phases decreased as the spray distance increased. The increase in spray distance from 80 to 110 mm improved the crystalline HA content and decreased the wear performance of the SPS coatings. In addition, the spray distance had a big effect on the coating morphology due to different substrate temperature resulting from different spray distance. Furthermore, a significant presence of OH- and CO3 2- was observed, which was favorable for the biomedical applications.

  14. Characterization and irradiation performance of HTGR Biso-coated fertile particles in HFIR experiments HT-28, -29, and -30

    SciTech Connect

    Long, E.L. Jr.; Krautwasser, P.; Beatty, R.L.; Kania, M.J.; Morgan, C.S. Jr.; Yust, C.S.

    1980-07-01

    Capsules HT-28, -29, and -30 were irradiated in the target region of the High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL to determine the relative fast-neutron stability of pyrolytic carbons that had been prepared in a small laboratory coating furnace with various deposition conditions. The pyrolytic carbon coatings of 22 batches of particles of HTGR design were characterized by various methods, including optical anisotropy measurements, hot gaseous chlorine leaching, plasma oxidation, small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements, mercury intrusion, immersion density, and, in a few cases, neon-helium permeability measurements. The results of the above measurements were used to quantify microstructural differences between pyrolytic coatings derived at various conditions and to correlate the performance of the coatings with the measured properties. The most consistent results were obtained by comparing various pore size distributions within the coatings (determined from SAXS measurements) with immersion density, mercury intrusion, chlorine leaching, and neon-helium permeability results and with irradiation performance of the coatings. This study also demonstrated that care must be exercised if experiments on coatings containing inert carbon kernels that were codeposited along with dense thoria kernels are to yield meaningful results.

  15. Mussel-Inspired Polydopamine Coating for Enhanced Thermal Stability and Rate Performance of Graphite Anodes in Li-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Hyo; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Lee, Junmin; Jeong, You Kyeong; Choi, Jang Wook; Lee, Hochun

    2016-06-01

    Despite two decades of commercial history, it remains very difficult to simultaneously achieve both high rate capability and thermal stability in the graphite anodes of Li-ion batteries because the stable solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer, which is essential for thermal stability, impedes facile Li(+) ion transport at the interface. Here, we resolve this longstanding challenge using a mussel-inspired polydopamine (PD) coating via a simple immersion process. The nanometer-thick PD coating layer allows the formation of an SEI layer on the coating surface without perturbing the intrinsic properties of the SEI layer of the graphite anodes. PD-coated graphite exhibits far better performances in cycling test at 60 °C and storage test at 90 °C than bare graphite. The PD-coated graphite also displays superior rate capability during both lithiation and delithiation. As evidenced by surface free energy analysis, the enhanced performance of the PD-coated graphite can be ascribed to the Lewis basicity of the PD, which scavenges harmful hydrofluoric acid and forms an intermediate triple-body complex among a Li(+) ion, solvent molecules, and the PD's basic site. The usefulness of the proposed PD coating can be expanded to various electrodes in rechargeable batteries that suffer from poor thermal stability and interfacial kinetics. PMID:27183170

  16. Corrosion Protection Performance of Nano-SiO2/Epoxy Composite Coatings in Acidic Desulfurized Flue Gas Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. B.; Wang, Z. Y.; Hu, H. X.; Liu, C. B.; Zheng, Y. G.

    2016-09-01

    Five kinds of nano-SiO2/epoxy composite coatings were prepared on mild steels, and their corrosion protection performance was evaluated at room temperature (RT) and 50 °C (HT) using electrochemical methods combined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of preparation and sealing processes on the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coatings were specially focused on. The results showed that it was favorable for the corrosion protection and durable performance to add the modified nano-SiO2 during rather than after the synthesis of epoxy coatings. Furthermore, the employment of sealer varnish also had beneficial effects. The two better coatings still exhibited higher impedance values even after immersion tests for up to 1000 h at RT and 500 h at HT. SEM revealed that the improvement of corrosion protection performance mainly resulted from the enhancement of coating density. Moreover, the evolution of electrochemical behavior of the two better coatings with immersion time was also discussed by means of fitting the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results using equivalent circuits with different physical meanings.

  17. Corrosion Protection Performance of Nano-SiO2/Epoxy Composite Coatings in Acidic Desulfurized Flue Gas Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. B.; Wang, Z. Y.; Hu, H. X.; Liu, C. B.; Zheng, Y. G.

    2016-07-01

    Five kinds of nano-SiO2/epoxy composite coatings were prepared on mild steels, and their corrosion protection performance was evaluated at room temperature (RT) and 50 °C (HT) using electrochemical methods combined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of preparation and sealing processes on the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coatings were specially focused on. The results showed that it was favorable for the corrosion protection and durable performance to add the modified nano-SiO2 during rather than after the synthesis of epoxy coatings. Furthermore, the employment of sealer varnish also had beneficial effects. The two better coatings still exhibited higher impedance values even after immersion tests for up to 1000 h at RT and 500 h at HT. SEM revealed that the improvement of corrosion protection performance mainly resulted from the enhancement of coating density. Moreover, the evolution of electrochemical behavior of the two better coatings with immersion time was also discussed by means of fitting the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results using equivalent circuits with different physical meanings.

  18. Effects of weathering on performance of intumescent coatings for structure fire protection in the wildland-urban interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrani, Babak

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of weathering on the performance of intumescent fire-retardant coatings on wooden products. The weathering effects included primary (solar irradiation, moisture, and temperature) and secondary (environmental contaminants) parameters at various time intervals. Wildland urban interface (WUI) fires have been an increasing threat to lives and properties. Existing solutions to mitigate the damages caused by WUI fires include protecting the structures from ignition and minimizing the fire spread from one structure to another. These solutions can be divided into two general categories: active fire protection systems and passive fire protection systems. Passive systems are either using pre-applied wetting agents (water, gel, or foam) or adding an extra layer (composite wraps or coatings). Fire-retardant coating treatment methods can be divided into impregnated (penetrant) and intumescent categories. Intumescent coatings are easy to apply, economical, and have a better appearance in comparison to other passive fire protection methods, and are the main focus of this study. There have been limited studies conducted on the application of intumescent coatings on wooden structures and their performance after long-term weathering exposure. The main concerns of weathering effects are: 1) the reduction of ignition resistance of the coating layer after weathering; and 2) the fire properties of coatings after weathering since coatings might contribute as a combustible fuel and assist the fire growth after ignition. Three intumescent coatings were selected and exposed to natural weathering conditions in three different time intervals. Two types of tests were performed on the specimens: a combustibility test consisted of a bench-scale performance evaluation using a Cone Calorimeter, and a thermal decomposition test using Simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) method (also known

  19. Electrically controlled drug release from nanostructured polypyrrole coated on titanium.

    PubMed

    Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Pareta, Rajesh; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-02-25

    Previous studies have demonstrated that multi-walled carbon nanotubes grown out of anodized nanotubular titanium (MWNT-Ti) can be used as a sensing electrode for various biomedical applications; such sensors detected the redox reactions of certain molecules, specifically proteins deposited by osteoblasts during extracellular matrix bone formation. Since it is known that polypyrrole (PPy) can release drugs upon electrical stimulation, in this study antibiotics (penicillin/streptomycin, P/S) or an anti-inflammatory drug (dexamethasone, Dex), termed PPy[P/S] or PPy[Dex], respectively, were electrodeposited in PPy on titanium. The objective of the present study was to determine if such drugs can be released from PPy on demand and (by applying a voltage) control cellular behavior important for orthopedic applications. Results showed that PPy films possessed nanometer-scale roughness as analyzed by atomic force microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of P/S and Dex encapsulated within the PPy films. Results from cyclic voltammetry showed that 80% of the drugs were released on demand when sweep voltages were applied for five cycles at a scan rate of 0.1 V s(-1). Furthermore, osteoblast (bone-forming cells) and fibroblast (fibrous tissue-forming cells) adhesion were determined on the PPy films. Results showed that PPy[Dex] enhanced osteoblast adhesion after 4 h of culture compared to plain Ti. PPy-Ti (with or without anionic drug doping) inhibited fibroblast adhesion compared to plain Ti. These in vitro results confirmed that electrodeposited PPy[P/S] and PPy[Dex] can release drugs on demand to potentially fight bacterial infection, reduce inflammation, promote bone growth or reduce fibroblast functions, further implicating the use of such materials as implant sensors.

  20. Electrically controlled drug release from nanostructured polypyrrole coated on titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Pareta, Rajesh; Webster, Thomas J.

    2011-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that multi-walled carbon nanotubes grown out of anodized nanotubular titanium (MWNT-Ti) can be used as a sensing electrode for various biomedical applications; such sensors detected the redox reactions of certain molecules, specifically proteins deposited by osteoblasts during extracellular matrix bone formation. Since it is known that polypyrrole (PPy) can release drugs upon electrical stimulation, in this study antibiotics (penicillin/streptomycin, P/S) or an anti-inflammatory drug (dexamethasone, Dex), termed PPy[P/S] or PPy[Dex], respectively, were electrodeposited in PPy on titanium. The objective of the present study was to determine if such drugs can be released from PPy on demand and (by applying a voltage) control cellular behavior important for orthopedic applications. Results showed that PPy films possessed nanometer-scale roughness as analyzed by atomic force microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of P/S and Dex encapsulated within the PPy films. Results from cyclic voltammetry showed that 80% of the drugs were released on demand when sweep voltages were applied for five cycles at a scan rate of 0.1 V s - 1. Furthermore, osteoblast (bone-forming cells) and fibroblast (fibrous tissue-forming cells) adhesion were determined on the PPy films. Results showed that PPy[Dex] enhanced osteoblast adhesion after 4 h of culture compared to plain Ti. PPy-Ti (with or without anionic drug doping) inhibited fibroblast adhesion compared to plain Ti. These in vitro results confirmed that electrodeposited PPy[P/S] and PPy[Dex] can release drugs on demand to potentially fight bacterial infection, reduce inflammation, promote bone growth or reduce fibroblast functions, further implicating the use of such materials as implant sensors.

  1. Performance of Personal Workspace Controls Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila; Loffeld, John; Pettler,Pete; Snook, Joel

    2004-12-01

    One of the key deliverables for the DOE-funded controls research at LBNL for FY04 was the development of a prototype Personal Workspace Control system. The successful development of this system is a critical milestone for the LBNL Lighting Controls Research effort because this system demonstrates how IBECS can add value to today's Task Ambient lighting systems. LBNL has argued that by providing both the occupant and the facilities manager with the ability to precisely control the operation of overhead lighting and all task lighting in a coordinated manner, that task ambient lighting can optimize energy performance and occupant comfort simultaneously [Reference Task Ambient Foundation Document]. The Personal Workspace Control system is the application of IBECS to this important lighting problem. This report discusses the development of the Personal Workspace Control to date including descriptions of the different fixture types that have been converted to IBECS operation and a detailed description of the operation of PWC Scene Controller, which provides the end user with precise control of his task ambient lighting system. The objective, from the Annual Plan, is to demonstrate improvements in efficiency, lighting quality and occupant comfort realized using Personal Workspace Controls (PWC) designed to optimize the delivery of lighting to the individual's workstation regardless of which task-ambient lighting solution is chosen. The PWC will be capable of controlling floor-mounted, desk lamps, furniture-mounted and overhead lighting fixtures from a personal computer and handheld remote. The PWC will use an environmental sensor to automatically monitor illuminance, temperature and occupancy and to appropriately modulate ambient lighting according to daylight availability and to switch off task lighting according to local occupancy. [Adding occupancy control to the system would blunt the historical criticism of occupant-controlled lighting - the tendency of the occupant

  2. Performance of coated columbium and tantalum alloys in plasma arc reentry simulation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Merutka, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The evaluation of coated refractory metals screened in stagnation model plasma arc tests is reported. Columbium alloys FS-85, C-129Y, and Cb-752 coated with Si-20Cr-20Fe (R512E) were tested at 1390 C. Three silicide coatings on Ta-10W were tested at 1470 C. Half-hour cycles and a 6500 N/sqm stagnation pressure were used. The best R512E coated columbium alloy was FS-85 with first local coating breakdowns occurring in 12 to 50 cycles. At coating defects, low metal recession rates (0.005 mm/min) were generally observed on coated columbium alloys while high rates (0.15 mm/min) were observed on coated Ta-10W. Coated columbium suffered large emittance losses (to below 0.7) due to surface refractory metal pentoxide formation.

  3. Effects of low Earth orbit environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampair, Thomas R.; Berrios, William M.

    1992-01-01

    One of the benefits of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was the opportunity to study the before and after effects of low earth orbit space environment on the spacecraft thermal control coatings. Since the LDEF's thermal control was totally passive by design, the selection of the external surface absorptivity to emissivity ratio (alpha/epsilon) and the ability for the coating to retain the alpha/epsilon over time was an important consideration in the thermal design of the LDEF. The primary surface coating chosen for the LDEF structure was clear chromic anodized aluminum with an average design alpha/epsilon of 0.32/0.16. External surface absorptivity (alpha) and emissivity (epsilon) were measured on all intercostals, longerons, tray mounting flanges, thermal control panels, and a limited number of experiment surface coatings after the experiment trays were removed from the LDEF structure. All surface alpha/epsilon measurements were made using portable hand held infrared and solar spectrum reflectometers. The absorptivity measurements were taken with a Devices and Services SSR-ER version 5.0 solar spectra reflectometer which has a stated uncertainty of +/- 0.01, and all normal emissivity measurements were made using the Gier Dunkle DB-100 infrared reflectometer also with a stated uncertainty of +/- 0.01. Both instruments were calibrated in the laboratory by LaRC instrumentation personnel before being used in the field at KSC. A combined total of 733 measurements were taken on the anodized aluminum hardware which included the structure (intercostals, longerons, and center ring), earth and space end thermal control panels, and experiment tray mounting flanges. The facility thermal control coatings measured in this survey cover 33 percent of the total exposed LDEF surface area. To correlate low earth orbit environmental effects on the anodized coatings, measurements were taken in both exposed and unexposed surfaces and compared to quality assurance (QA

  4. Controlling Valence of DNA-Coated Emulsion Droplets with Multiple Flavors of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullen, Angus; Bargteil, Dylan; Pine, David; Brujic, Jasna

    We explore the control of valence of DNA-coated emulsion droplets as a first step in developing DNA-directed self-assembly of emulsions. Emulsion droplets differ from solid colloids in that they are deformable and the DNA strands attached to them are free to move along the emulsion surface. The balance of binding energy and droplet deformation provides control over a droplet's valence via its ligand density. After binding, some DNA often remains unbound due to the entropic cost of DNA recruitment. In practice, therefore, the assembly kinetics yield a distribution in valence. Our goal is to control valence by altering the binding kinetics with multiple flavors of DNA. We coat one set of droplets with two DNA types, A and B, and two other sets with one complementary strand, A' or B'. When an AB droplet binds to an A' droplet, the adhesion patch depletes A strands, leaving the rest of the droplet coated with more B than A strands. This increases the chance that the next droplet to bind will be a B' rather than an A'. Controlling valence will allow us to build a wide array of soft structures, such as emulsion polymers or networks with a determined coordination number. This work was supported by the NSF MRSEC Program (DMR-0820341).

  5. Surface Treatments for Improved Performance of Spinel-coated AISI 441 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Riel, Eric M.; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steels are promising candidates for IT-SOFC interconnect applications due to their low cost and resistance to oxidation at SOFC operating temperatures. However, steel candidates face several challenges; including long term oxidation under interconnect exposure conditions, which can lead to increased electrical resistance, surface instability, and poisoning of cathodes due to volatilization of Cr. To potentially extend interconnect lifetime and improve performance, a variety of surface treatments were performed on AISI 441 ferritic stainless steel coupons prior to application of a protective spinel coating. The coated coupons were then subjected to oxidation testing at 800 and 850°C in air, and electrical testing at 800°C in air. While all of the surface-treatments resulted in improved surface stability (i.e., increased spallation resistance) compared to untreated AISI 441, the greatest degree of improvement (through 20,000 hours of testing at 800°C and 14,000 hours of testing at 850°C) was achieved by surface blasting.

  6. Innovative multilayer coatings for space solar physics: performances and stability over time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuppella, Paola; Corso, Alain J.; Nicolosi, Piergiorgio; Windt, David L.; Pelizzo, Maria G.

    2011-05-01

    Different solar mission are in progress and others are foreseen in the next future to study the structure and the dynamics of the Sun and its interaction with the Earth. Different instruments devoted to solar physics are required to have high reflecting MultiLayers (MLs) coatings. For example, the Multi Element Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy (METIS) coronograph will fly on board of SOLar Orbiter (SOLO) mission to perform simultaneous observation at 30.4 nm (He - II Lyman - α line), 121.6 nm (H - I Lyman - α line) and in the visible range, therefore its optics will require high performances in a wide spectral region. It should be desirable to reach higher reflectivity as well as long term stability and lifetime, then different candidate coatings will be considered. The Sounding - Rocket Coronographic Experiment (SCORE) is a prototype of METIS equipped with Mg/SiC optics and it has flown on board of a NASA sounding rocket. The Mg/SiC multilayers offer good performances in terms of reflectivity, but the long term stability and the lifetime have been preliminary investigated and there are open problems to be further studied. Besides standard Mo/Si multilayer, a possible alternative is represented by new multilayer structures based on well known Mo/Si stack in which the performances have been improved by superimposing innovative capping layers. Another alternative is represented by a recently developed multilayer based on an Ir/Si material couple. In this paper we review and compare the performances of such multilayer in all the spectral ranges of interest for SOLO.

  7. Frequency Control Performance Measurement and Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Illian, Howard F.

    2010-12-20

    Frequency control is an essential requirement of reliable electric power system operations. Determination of frequency control depends on frequency measurement and the practices based on these measurements that dictate acceptable frequency management. This report chronicles the evolution of these measurements and practices. As technology progresses from analog to digital for calculation, communication, and control, the technical basis for frequency control measurement and practices to determine acceptable performance continues to improve. Before the introduction of digital computing, practices were determined largely by prior experience. In anticipation of mandatory reliability rules, practices evolved from a focus primarily on commercial and equity issues to an increased focus on reliability. This evolution is expected to continue and place increased requirements for more precise measurements and a stronger scientific basis for future frequency management practices in support of reliability.

  8. Investigation of phase-change coatings for variable thermal control of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelliher, W. C.; Young, P. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing a spacecraft coating system that could vary the ratio of its solar absorptance to thermal emittance to adjust automatically for changes in the thermal balance of a spacecraft. This study resulted in a new concept called the phase-change effect which uses the change that occurs in the optical properties of many materials during the phase transition from a crystalline solid to an amorphous material. A series of two-component model coatings was developed which, when placed on a highly reflecting substrate, exhibited a sharp decrease in solar absorptance within a narrow temperature range. A variable thermal control coating can have a significant amount of temperature regulation with the phase-change effect. Data are presented on several crystallite-polymer formulations, their physical and optical properties, and associated phase-change temperatures. Aspects pertaining to their use in a space environment and an example of the degree of thermal regulation attainable with these coatings is also given.

  9. Performance TTradeoffs in Distributed Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowski, Holly

    Large scale systems consisting of many interacting subsystems are often controlled in a distributed fashion due to inherent limitations in computation, communication, or sensing. Here, individual agents must make decisions based on local, often incomplete information. This dissertation focuses on understanding performance tradeoffs in distributed control systems, specifically focusing on using a game theoretic framework to assign agent control laws. Performance of a distributed control law is determined by (1) the degree with which it meets a stated objective, (2) the amount of time it takes to converge, (3) agents' informational requirements, and (4) vulnerability to adversarial manipulation. The three main research questions addressed in this work are: • When is fast convergence to near-optimal behavior possible in a distributed system? We design a distributed control law which converges to a near-optimal configuration in a time that is near-linear in the number of agents. This worst case convergence time is an improvement over existing algorithms whose worst-case convergence times are exponential in the number of agents. • Can agents in a distributed system learn near-optimal correlated behavior despite severely limited information about one another's behavior? We design a distributed control law that imposes limited informational requirements for individual agents and converges to near-optimal correlated behavior. • How does the structure of agent interaction impact a distributed control system's vulnerability to adversarial manipulation? We derive a graph theoretical condition that ensures resilience to adversarial manipulation, and we examine the conditions under which an adversary can manipulate collective behavior in a distributed control system, simply by influencing small subsets of agents.

  10. Control of Pythium root rot on hydroponically grown cucumbers with silver-coated cloth.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z H; Kusakari, S; Okada, K; Miyazaki, A; Osaka, T

    2000-07-01

    Silver-coated cloth (SCC) effectively controlled root rot that was caused by Pythium aphanidermatum in hydroponically grown cucumber plants. The presence of SCC in the hydroponic solution reduced the root rot from 100% to 10% 20 days after inoculation with zoospores of P. aphanidermatum. It was suggested that the inhibition of SCC was caused not only by the silver ion dissolved from SCC, but also by the metallic silver and silver compounds formed on the surface of the root.

  11. A novel coating onto LiMn2O4 cathode with increased lithium ion battery performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jiesheng; Li, Minsi; Li, Xifei; Chen, Chen; Xiong, Dongbin; Dong, Litian; Li, Dejun; Lushington, Andrew; Sun, Xueliang

    2014-10-01

    A sol-gel method was employed to synthesize LiMn2O4 cathode for lithium ion batteries. Calcination treatment with citric acid results in the reduction of external active materials of the cathode, finally a novel layer coating of MnO was proposed on the surface of LiMn2O4. The structures and morphologies of the as-prepared samples were characterized by XRD, Raman, SEM and HRTEM techniques. It was found that the reaction between LiMn2O4 and citric acid derived carbon occurred during coating process, and the resultant layer was verified to be MnO uniformly coated onto the cathode. Electrochemical performances show that the amount of coating exhibits a significant effect on LiMn2O4 performance, and the optimized MnO coating could exhibit improved battery performance of the LiMn2O4 cathode. The obtained improvement is attributed to decreased Mn dissolution into electrolyte upon cycling resulting from the MnO coating.

  12. Novel solvent-free direct coating process for battery electrodes and their electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Dong-Won; Cañas, Natalia A.; Wagner, Norbert; Friedrich, K. Andreas

    2016-02-01

    We report a novel solvent-free direct coating process for fabricating a well-structured electrode. The manufacturing process was rapid and facile, involving only dry-spraying of the solvent-free electrode component mixture and a subsequent isothermal hot-pressing. The electrochemical and physicochemical properties of the dry-sprayed electrode with hot-pressing were evaluated in order to understand the correlation between a preparation parameter, morphological characteristic of the electrode, and cell performance. The hot-pressing time had an effect on the binder distribution, which in turn resulted in different electrode morphologies and performance. The dry-sprayed LTO electrode prepared at a hot-pressing time of 60 min had excellent electrical conductivity and Li+ storage capacity, owing to its electron transport structure, which was more suitable than the prepared electrodes at other hot-pressing conditions.

  13. Phase control by coating in 1. 5. mu. m distributed feedback lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Itaya, Y.; Ikegami, T.; Motosugi, G.; Wakita, K.

    1985-06-01

    The dependence of performances on facet phase in distributed feedback lasers was studied by changing SiN film thickness on the cleaved facet. The phase relative to the corrugation could be determined with the measurement of oscillating wavelength shift in a device with and without antireflection coating on the facets. Using the facet phase measured, we could adjust the film thickness so as to reduce the threshold current and to stabilize single longitudinal mode operation which oscillated at the Bragg wavelength.

  14. Performance of microprocessor controllers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, R.S.; Turner, L.W.; Overhults, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    United States animal production systems are at the threshold of a major new method for daily management of environmental control -- the integrated microprocessor-based environmental control system. Widespread adoption of this technology has the potential for dramatic improvement in production efficiencies through lower management costs, improved energy savings, and better feed conversion efficiencies. However, the technical problems of transient surge protection and appropriate mechanical backup systems have not been adequately addressed by the industry. The goals of this research were to identify the degree to which transient surge protection was being provided by current manufacturers, and to illustrate the implementation of microprocessor environmental control systems with mechanical backup. Transient open circuit over-voltage tests (ANSI/IEEE C62.41-1980) were performed on 16 environmental control units: a maximum of 800 V spike was applied to the power supplies, and up to 100 V spike applied to temperature sensor lines. Under these relatively mild tests, no failures were noted due to power supply transients, but three units failed when subjected to transients on their temperature sensor lines. Mechanical backup systems were designed to provide essential life-support during critical conditions of extreme outside conditions and extreme animal densities. The design and installation of environmental control systems for (1) a gestation unit and (2) a broiler house was performed. An overview of the process, and difficulties noted, is presented. Both systems incorporated mechanical backups. 20 refs.

  15. Optimal performance of constrained control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, P. Scott, Jr.; Gavin, Henri P.; Scruggs, Jeffrey T.

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a method to compute optimal open-loop trajectories for systems subject to state and control inequality constraints in which the cost function is quadratic and the state dynamics are linear. For the case in which inequality constraints are decentralized with respect to the controls, optimal Lagrange multipliers enforcing the inequality constraints may be found at any time through Pontryagin’s minimum principle. In so doing, the set of differential algebraic Euler-Lagrange equations is transformed into a nonlinear two-point boundary-value problem for states and costates whose solution meets the necessary conditions for optimality. The optimal performance of inequality constrained control systems is calculable, allowing for comparison to previous, sub-optimal solutions. The method is applied to the control of damping forces in a vibration isolation system subjected to constraints imposed by the physical implementation of a particular controllable damper. An outcome of this study is the best performance achievable given a particular objective, isolation system, and semi-active damper constraints.

  16. Orion Entry Flight Control Stability and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahan, Alan L.; Loe, Greg R.; Seiler, Pete

    2007-01-01

    The Orion Spacecraft will be required to perform entry and landing functions for both Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Lunar return missions, utilizing only the Command Module (CM) with its unique systems and GN&C design. This paper presents the current CM Flight Control System (FCS) design to support entry and landing, with a focus on analyses that have supported its development to date. The CM FCS will have to provide for spacecraft stability and control while following guidance or manual commands during exo-atmospheric flight, after Service Module separation, translational powered flight required of the CM, atmospheric flight supporting both direct entry and skip trajectories down to drogue chute deploy, and during roll attitude reorientation just prior to touchdown. Various studies and analyses have been performed or are on-going supporting an overall FCS design with reasonably sized Reaction Control System (RCS) jets, that minimizes fuel usage, that provides appropriate command following but with reasonable stability and control margin. Results from these efforts to date are included, with particular attention on design issues that have emerged, such as the struggle to accommodate sub-sonic pitch and yaw control without using excessively large jets that could have a detrimental impact on vehicle weight. Apollo, with a similar shape, struggled with this issue as well. Outstanding CM FCS related design and analysis issues, planned for future effort, are also briefly be discussed.

  17. Effects of supplemental coated or crystalline methionine in low-fishmeal diet on the growth performance and body composition of juvenile cobia Rachycentron canadum (Linnaeus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Shuyan; Tan, Beiping; Dong, Xiaohui; Yang, Qihui; Liu, Hongyu

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated the effects of supplemental coated and crystalline methionine (Met) on the growth performance and feed utilization of juvenile cobia ( Rachycentron canadum Linnaeus) in a 60-d feeding trial. Fish groups were fed one of six isonitrogenous and isolipidic diets: 1) fishmeal control; 2) un-supplemented experimental (low-fish-meal diet deficient in Met); or 3) one of four Met diets supplemented with crystalline L-Met, cellulose-acetate-phthalate coated L-Met, acrylic-resin coated L-Met, or tripalmitin-polyvinyl alcohol coated L-Met. The test diets were fed to triplicate groups of cobia (initial body weight 5.40±0.07 g) twice a day. The weight gain and specific growth rate of the fish fed the RES diet were highest among the Met-supplemented groups and were 23.64% and 7.99%, respectively, higher than those of the fish fed with the un-supplemented experimental diet ( P<0.05). The protein efficiency ratio of the fish fed the MET diet was significantly higher than that of the fish fed the un-supplemented experimental diet and the fish in the other methionine supplementation groups ( P<0.05). Our results suggest that supplementation of crystalline Met in low-fish-meal diets promotes the growth performance of juvenile cobia.

  18. The Effect of Post-Heat Treatment on Microstructure of 316L Cold-Sprayed Coatings and Their Corrosion Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikici, B.; Yilmazer, H.; Ozdemir, I.; Isik, M.

    2016-04-01

    The combined effects of process gases and post-heat treatment temperature on the microstructure of 316L cold-sprayed coatings on Al5052 substrates have been investigated in this study. The stainless steel coatings were subjected to heat treatment at four different temperatures (250, 500, 750, and 1000 °C) to study the effect of heat treatment. In addition, the corrosion performances of the coatings at different process temperatures have been compared using the potentiodynamic scanning technique. Microstructural characterization of the coatings was carried out using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The results of present study showed that cold-sprayed stainless steel coatings processed with helium exhibited higher corrosion resistance than those of coatings sprayed with nitrogen process gas. This could partially be attributed to the reduction in porosity level (4.9%) and improvement of particle-particle bonding. In addition, evaluation of the mechanical and microstructural properties of the coatings demonstrated that subsequent heat treatment has major influence on the deposited layers sprayed with He process gas.

  19. APS TBC performance on directionally-solidified superalloy substrates with HVOF NiCoCrAlYHfSi bond coatings

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lance, Michael J.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Haynes, James A.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2015-09-04

    Directionally-solidified (DS) superalloy components with advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) to lower the metal operating temperature have the potential to replace more expensive single crystal superalloys for large land-based turbines. In order to assess relative TBC performance, furnace cyclic testing was used with superalloys 1483, X4 and Hf-rich DS 247 substrates and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF)-NiCoCrAlYHfSi bond coatings at 1100 °C with 1-h cycles in air with 10% H2O. With these coating and test conditions, there was no statistically-significant effect of substrate alloy on the average lifetime of the air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coatings onmore » small coupons. Using photo-stimulated luminescence piezospectroscopy maps at regular cycling intervals, the residual compressive stress in the α-Al2O3 scale underneath the YSZ top coating and on a bare bond coating was similar for all three substrates and delaminations occurred at roughly the same rate and frequency. As a result, x-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements collected from the bare bond coating surface revealed higher Ti interdiffusion occurring with the 1483 substrate, which contained the highest Ti content.« less

  20. APS TBC performance on directionally-solidified superalloy substrates with HVOF NiCoCrAlYHfSi bond coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Lance, Michael J.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Haynes, James A.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2015-09-04

    Directionally-solidified (DS) superalloy components with advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) to lower the metal operating temperature have the potential to replace more expensive single crystal superalloys for large land-based turbines. In order to assess relative TBC performance, furnace cyclic testing was used with superalloys 1483, X4 and Hf-rich DS 247 substrates and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF)-NiCoCrAlYHfSi bond coatings at 1100 °C with 1-h cycles in air with 10% H2O. With these coating and test conditions, there was no statistically-significant effect of substrate alloy on the average lifetime of the air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coatings on small coupons. Using photo-stimulated luminescence piezospectroscopy maps at regular cycling intervals, the residual compressive stress in the α-Al2O3 scale underneath the YSZ top coating and on a bare bond coating was similar for all three substrates and delaminations occurred at roughly the same rate and frequency. As a result, x-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements collected from the bare bond coating surface revealed higher Ti interdiffusion occurring with the 1483 substrate, which contained the highest Ti content.

  1. Remarkable weakness against cleavage stress for YBCO-coated conductors and its effect on the YBCO coil performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Y.; Nakagome, H.; Takematsu, T.; Takao, T.; Sato, N.; Takahashi, M.; Maeda, H.

    2011-08-01

    Cleavage strength for an YBCO-coated conductor at 77 K was investigated with a model experiment. The nominal cleavage strength for an YBCO-coated conductor is extremely low, typically 0.5 MPa. This low nominal cleavage strength is due to stress concentration on a small part of the YBCO-coated conductor in cleavage fracture. Debonding by the cleavage stress occurs at the interface between the buffer layer and the Hastelloy substrate. The nominal cleavage strength for a slit edge of the conductor is 2.5-times lower than that for the original edge of the conductor; cracks and micro-peel existing over the slit edge reduce the cleavage strength for the slit edge. Cleavage stress and peel stress should be avoided in coil winding, as they easily delaminate the YBCO-coated conductor, resulting in substantial degradation of coil performance. These problems are especially important for epoxy impregnated YBCO-coated conductor coils. It appears that effect of cleavage stress and peel stress are mostly negligible for paraffin impregnated YBCO-coated conductor coils or dry wound YBCO-coated conductor coils.

  2. Controlled Design of Functional Nano-Coatings: Reduction of Loss Mechanisms in Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Landsmann, Steve; Surace, Yuri; Trottmann, Matthias; Dilger, Stefan; Weidenkaff, Anke; Pokrant, Simone

    2016-05-18

    Efficient water splitting with photoelectrodes requires highly performing and stable photoactive materials. Since there is no material known which fulfills all these requirements because of various loss mechanisms, we present a strategy for efficiency enhancement of photoanodes via deposition of functional coatings in the nanometer range. Origins of performance losses in particle-based oxynitride photoanodes were identified and specifically designed coatings were deposited to address each loss mechanism individually. Amorphous TiO2 located at interparticle boundaries enables high electron conductivity. A thin layer of amorphous Ta2O5 can be used as protection layer for photoanodes because of its hole conductivity and thermal and chemical stability. An amorphous layer of NiOx and Co(OH)2 reduces photocorrosion or increases water oxidation kinetics because they act as a hole-capture material or water oxidation catalyst, respectively. Crystalline CoOx nanoparticles increase photocurrent and reduce the onset potential due to enhanced charge separation. The combination of all coatings deposited by a scalable, mild, and reproducible step-by-step approach leads to high-performance oxynitride-based photoanodes providing a maximum photocurrent of 2.52 mA/cm(2) at 1.23 VRHE under AM1.5G illumination.

  3. Replication performance of Si-N-DLC-coated Si micro-molds in micro-hot-embossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, B.; Liu, E.; Tor, S. B.; Khun, N. W.; Hardt, D. E.; Chun, J. H.

    2010-04-01

    Micro-hot-embossing is an emerging technology with great potential to form micro- and nano-scale patterns into polymers with high throughput and low cost. Despite its rapid progress, there are still challenges when this technology is employed, as demolding stress is usually very high due to large friction and adhesive forces induced during the process. Surface forces are dominating parameters in micro- and nano-fabrication technologies because of a high surface-to-volume ratio of products. This work attempted to improve the surface properties of Si micro-molds by means of silicon- and nitrogen-doped diamond-like carbon (Si-N-DLC) coatings deposited by dc magnetron cosputtering on the molds. The bonding structure, surface roughness, surface energy, adhesive strength and tribological behavior of the coated samples were characterized with micro Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle measurement, microscratch test and ball-on-disk sliding tribological test, respectively. It was observed that the doping condition had a great effect on the performance of the coatings. The Si-N-DLC coating deposited with 5 × 10-6 m3 min-1 N2 had lowest surface roughness and energy of about 1.2 nm and 38.2 × 10-3 N m-1, respectively, while the coatings deposited with 20 × 10-6 and 25 × 10-6 m3 min-1 N2 showed lowest friction coefficients. The uncoated and Si-N-DLC-coated Si micro-molds were tested in a micro-hot-embossing process for a comparative study of their replication performance and lifetime. The experimental results showed that the performance of the Si micro-molds was improved by the Si-N-DLC coatings, and well-defined micro-features with a height of about 100 µm were fabricated successfully into cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) sheets using the Si-N-DLC-coated micro-molds.

  4. The Prediction of Long-Term Coating Performance from Short-Term Electrochemical Data. Part 2; Comparison of Electrochemical Data to Field Exposure Results for Coatings on Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Contu, F.; Taylor, S. R.; Calle, L. M.; Hintze, P. E.; Curran, J. P.; Li, W.

    2009-01-01

    The pace of coatings development is limited by the time required to assess their corrosion protection properties. This study takes a step f orward from Part I in that it correlates the corrosion performance of organic coatings assessed by a series of short-term electrochemical measurement with 18-month beachside exposure results of duplicate pan els. A series of 19 coating systems on A36 steel substrates were test ed in a completely blind study using the damage tolerance test (DTT). In the DTT, a through-film pinhole defect is created, and the electro chemical characteristics of the defect are then monitored over the ne xt 4 to 7 days while immersed in 0.SM NaCl. The open circuit potentia l, anodic potentiostatic polarization tests and electrochemical imped ance spectroscopy were used to study the corrosion behavior of the co ating systems. The beachside exposure tests were conducted at the Ken nedy Space Center according to ASTM D610-01. It was found that for 79 % of the coatings systems examined, the 18 month beachside exposure r esults could be predicted by two independent laboratory tests obtained within 7 days.

  5. Corrosion-controlling and osteo-compatible Mg ion-integrated phytic acid (Mg-PA) coating on magnesium substrate for biodegradable implants application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingqi; Zhao, Sheng; Liu, Bo; Chen, Meiyun; Mao, Jinlong; He, Hairuo; Zhao, Yuancong; Huang, Nan; Wan, Guojiang

    2014-11-26

    Biodegradable, a new revolutionary concept, is shaping the future design of biomedical implants that need to serve only as a temporary scaffold. Magnesium appears to be the most promising biodegradable metal, but challenges remain in its corrosion-controlling and uncertain biocompatibility. In this work, we employ chemical conversion and alternating dip-coating methods to anchor and deposit an Mg ion-integrated phytic acid (Mg-PA) coating on Mg, which is supposed to function both corrosion-controlling and osteo-compatible. It was ascertained that PA molecules were covalently immobilized on a chemically converted Mg(OH)2 base layer, and more PA molecules were deposited subsequently via chelating reactions with the help of additive Mg ions. The covalent immobilization and the Mg ion-supported chelating deposition contribute to a dense and homogeneous protective Mg-PA coating, which guarantees an improved corrosion resistance as well as a reduced degradation rate. Moreover, the Mg-PA coating performed osteo-compatible to promote not only bioactivity of bonelike apatite precipitation, but also induced osteoblast cells adhesion and proliferation. This is ascribed to its nature of PA molecule and the biocompatible Mg ion, both of which mimic partly the compositional structure of bone. Our magnesium ion-integrated PA-coated Mg might bode well for the future of biodegradable bone implant application.

  6. Antisoiling technology: Theories of surface soiling and performance of antisoiling surface coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Willis, P. B.

    1984-01-01

    Physical examination of surfaces undergoing natural outdoor soiling suggests that soil matter accumulates in up to three distinct layers. The first layer involves strong chemical attachment or strong chemisorption of soil matter on the primary surface. The second layer is physical, consisting of a highly organized arrangement of soil creating a gradation in surface energy from a high associated with the energetic first layer to the lowest possible state on the outer surfce of the second layer. The lowest possible energy state is dictated by the physical nature of the regional atmospheric soiling materials. These first two layers are resistant to removal by rain. The third layer constitutes a settling of loose soil matter, accumulating in dry periods and being removed during rainy periods. Theories and evidence suggest that surfaces that should be naturally resistant to the formation of the first two-resistant layers should be hard, smooth, hydrophobic, free of first-period elements, and have the lowest possible surface energy. These characteristics, evolving as requirements for low-soiling surfaces, suggest that surfaces or surface coatings should be of fluorocarbon chemistry. Evidence for the three-soil-layer concept, and data on the positive performance of candidate fluorocarbon coatings on glass and transparent plastic films after 28 months of outdoor exposure, are presented.

  7. Carbon-coated lithium titanium phosphate nanoporous microplates with superior electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhifeng; Liu, Li; Zhou, Qian; Tan, Jinli; Yan, Zichao; Xia, Dongdong; Shu, Hongbo; Yang, Xiukang; Wang, Xianyou

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we report a facile method to synthesize carbon-coated LiTi2(PO4)3 nanoporous microplates (LTP/C MPs) using ethylenediamine as the chelating agent and carbon source. The as-prepared LTP/C MPs with thickness of 0.4 μm consist of interconnected nanosized particles embedded in nano-thickness carbon layer and well-dispersed nanopores. The carbon layer significantly improves the electrochemical performance of LiTi2(PO4)3 microplates. LTP/C MPs deliver a reversible capacity of 121 mAh g-1 at 0.2C (1C = 138 mAh g-1) and show a remarkable capacity retention of 94.2% over 100 cycles when matched with Li metal counter electrode. It also presents excellent electrochemical properties as anode material for aqueous rechargeable lithium batteries (ARLBs). LTP/C MPs//LiMn2O4 ARLB shows a high discharge capacity of 76 mAh g-1 at 20 mA g-1 and superior rate capability. The results suggest a practical stratagem to develop a novel composite in which the carbon is coated with LiTi2(PO4)3 nanoporous microplates, which can become one of the promising electrode materials for both non-aqueous and aqueous lithium ion batteries.

  8. Ethylcellulose-coated polyolefin separators for lithium-ion batteries with improved safety performance.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ming; Tang, Haolin; Wang, Yadong; Pan, Mu

    2014-01-30

    With the widely use in portable electronic devices and electric vehicles, the safety of lithium-ion battery has raised serious concerns, in which the thermal stability of separator plays an essential role in preventing thermal runaway reactions. The novelty of this work is to coat commercialized polyethylene (PE) separator and trilayer polypropylene/polyethylene/polypropylene (PP/PE/PP) separator with ethylcellulose (EC), a thermally stable and renewable biomass. The formation of the EC layer with high porosity is through a simple dipping and extracting process. The effects of the EC layer on thermal shrinkage, electrolyte wettability and cell performance are investigated. After coating, the thermal shrinkage of PE separator at shutdown and meltdown point is reduced from 20% to 9% and 42% to 23% respectively, while the drop of OCV under increasing temperature is also postponed from 130°C to 160°C. The electrolyte wettability of pristine trilayer PP/PE/PP separator is greatly improved, leading to increased capacity retention from 28% to 99% of the cell.

  9. Adaptive Performance Seeking Control Using Fuzzy Model Reference Learning Control and Positive Gradient Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    1997-01-01

    Performance Seeking Control attempts to find the operating condition that will generate optimal performance and control the plant at that operating condition. In this paper a nonlinear multivariable Adaptive Performance Seeking Control (APSC) methodology will be developed and it will be demonstrated on a nonlinear system. The APSC is comprised of the Positive Gradient Control (PGC) and the Fuzzy Model Reference Learning Control (FMRLC). The PGC computes the positive gradients of the desired performance function with respect to the control inputs in order to drive the plant set points to the operating point that will produce optimal performance. The PGC approach will be derived in this paper. The feedback control of the plant is performed by the FMRLC. For the FMRLC, the conventional fuzzy model reference learning control methodology is utilized, with guidelines generated here for the effective tuning of the FMRLC controller.

  10. Advanced Noise Control Fan Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Noise Control Fan at the NASA Glenn Research Center is used to experimentally analyze fan generated acoustics. In order to determine how a proposed noise reduction concept affects fan performance, flow measurements can be used to compute mass flow. Since tedious flow mapping is required to obtain an accurate mass flow, an equation was developed to correlate the mass flow to inlet lip wall static pressure measurements. Once this correlation is obtained, the mass flow for future configurations can be obtained from the nonintrusive wall static pressures. Once the mass flow is known, the thrust and fan performance can be evaluated. This correlation enables fan acoustics and performance to be obtained simultaneously without disturbing the flow.

  11. Attitude Control Performance of IRVE-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillman, Robert A.; Gsell, Valerie T.; Bowden, Ernest L.

    2013-01-01

    The Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment 3 (IRVE-3) launched July 23, 2012, from NASA Wallops Flight Facility and successfully performed its mission, demonstrating both the survivability of a hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerator in the reentry heating environment and the effect of an offset center of gravity on the aeroshell's flight L/D. The reentry vehicle separated from the launch vehicle, released and inflated its aeroshell, reoriented for atmospheric entry, and mechanically shifted its center of gravity before reaching atmospheric interface. Performance data from the entire mission was telemetered to the ground for analysis. This paper discusses the IRVE-3 mission scenario, reentry vehicle design, and as-flown performance of the attitude control system in the different phases of the mission.

  12. Modeling the Effect of Temperature and Potential on the In Vitro Corrosion Performance of Biomedical Hydroxyapatite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coşkun, M. İbrahim; Karahan, İsmail H.; Yücel, Yasin; Golden, Teresa D.

    2016-08-01

    CoCrMo biomedical alloys were coated with a hydroxyapatite layer to improve biocompatibility and in vitro corrosion performance. A fast electrodeposition process was completed in 5 minutes for the hydroxyapatite coating. Effect of the solution temperature and applied potential on the in vitro corrosion performance of the hydroxyapatite coatings was modeled by response surface methodology (RSM) coupled with central composite design (CCD). A 5-level-2-factor experimental plan designed by CCD was used; the experimental plan contained 13 coating experiments with a temperature range from 283 K to 347 K (10 °C to 74 °C) and potential range from -1.2 to -1.9 V. Corrosion potential (E corr) of the coatings in a simulated body fluid solution was chosen as response for the model. Predicted and experimental values fitted well with an R 2 value of 0.9481. Response surface plots of the impedance and polarization resistance (R P) were investigated. Optimized parameters for electrodeposition of hydroxyapatite were determined by RSM as solution temperature of 305.48 K (32.33 °C) and potential of -1.55 V. Hydroxyapatite coatings fabricated at optimized parameters showed excellent crystal formation and high in vitro corrosion resistance.

  13. Modeling the Effect of Temperature and Potential on the In Vitro Corrosion Performance of Biomedical Hydroxyapatite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coşkun, M. İbrahim; Karahan, İsmail H.; Yücel, Yasin; Golden, Teresa D.

    2016-10-01

    CoCrMo biomedical alloys were coated with a hydroxyapatite layer to improve biocompatibility and in vitro corrosion performance. A fast electrodeposition process was completed in 5 minutes for the hydroxyapatite coating. Effect of the solution temperature and applied potential on the in vitro corrosion performance of the hydroxyapatite coatings was modeled by response surface methodology (RSM) coupled with central composite design (CCD). A 5-level-2-factor experimental plan designed by CCD was used; the experimental plan contained 13 coating experiments with a temperature range from 283 K to 347 K (10 °C to 74 °C) and potential range from -1.2 to -1.9 V. Corrosion potential ( E corr) of the coatings in a simulated body fluid solution was chosen as response for the model. Predicted and experimental values fitted well with an R 2 value of 0.9481. Response surface plots of the impedance and polarization resistance ( R P) were investigated. Optimized parameters for electrodeposition of hydroxyapatite were determined by RSM as solution temperature of 305.48 K (32.33 °C) and potential of -1.55 V. Hydroxyapatite coatings fabricated at optimized parameters showed excellent crystal formation and high in vitro corrosion resistance.

  14. Control of evanescent field using a dynamic waveguide composed of gelatin-coated few-layer fiber.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sudip K; Chaudhuri, Partha Roy

    2016-07-01

    We report here the results of our studies on dynamic refractive-index (RI) profile few-layer fibers in view of controlling the mode-field profile, in particular the evanescent tails under varying structural configuration. We experimentally fabricate dynamic RI profile few-layer fibers using thin gelatin coating on selectively etched fibers and illustrate how the excitation of various modes and the evanescent field at the interface can be controlled with changing humidity parameter. As a technology outcome of this research, we demonstrate through an optimized structural configuration a well performing fiber-optic high (70%-98%) relative humidity (RH) sensor with sensitivity as high as -1.07  dBm/%RH.

  15. Investigation of absorptance and emissivity of thermal control coatings on Mg-Li alloys and OES analysis during PEO process.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhongping; Xia, Qixing; Ju, Pengfei; Wang, Jiankang; Su, Peibo; Li, Dongqi; Jiang, Zhaohua

    2016-01-01

    Thermal control ceramic coatings on Mg-Li alloys have been successfully prepared in silicate electrolyte system by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method. The PEO coatings are mainly composed of crystallized Mg2SiO4 and MgO, which have typical porous structure with some bulges on the surface; OES analysis shows that the plasma temperature, which is influenced by the technique parameters, determines the formation of the coatings with different crystalline phases and morphologies, combined with "quick cooling effect" by the electrolyte; and the electron concentration is constant, which is related to the electric spark breakdown, determined by the nature of the coating and the interface of coating/electrolyte. Technique parameters influence the coating thickness, roughness and surface morphology, but do not change the coating composition in the specific PEO regime, and therefore the absorptance (αS) and emissivity (ε) of the coatings can be adjusted by the technique parameters through changing thickness and roughness in a certain degree. The coating prepared at 10 A/dm(2), 50 Hz, 30 min and 14 g/L Na2SiO3 has the minimum value of αS (0.35) and the maximum value of ε (0.82), with the balance temperature of 320 K.

  16. Investigation of absorptance and emissivity of thermal control coatings on Mg-Li alloys and OES analysis during PEO process.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhongping; Xia, Qixing; Ju, Pengfei; Wang, Jiankang; Su, Peibo; Li, Dongqi; Jiang, Zhaohua

    2016-01-01

    Thermal control ceramic coatings on Mg-Li alloys have been successfully prepared in silicate electrolyte system by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method. The PEO coatings are mainly composed of crystallized Mg2SiO4 and MgO, which have typical porous structure with some bulges on the surface; OES analysis shows that the plasma temperature, which is influenced by the technique parameters, determines the formation of the coatings with different crystalline phases and morphologies, combined with "quick cooling effect" by the electrolyte; and the electron concentration is constant, which is related to the electric spark breakdown, determined by the nature of the coating and the interface of coating/electrolyte. Technique parameters influence the coating thickness, roughness and surface morphology, but do not change the coating composition in the specific PEO regime, and therefore the absorptance (αS) and emissivity (ε) of the coatings can be adjusted by the technique parameters through changing thickness and roughness in a certain degree. The coating prepared at 10 A/dm(2), 50 Hz, 30 min and 14 g/L Na2SiO3 has the minimum value of αS (0.35) and the maximum value of ε (0.82), with the balance temperature of 320 K. PMID:27383569

  17. Investigation of absorptance and emissivity of thermal control coatings on Mg–Li alloys and OES analysis during PEO process

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhongping; Xia, Qixing; Ju, Pengfei; Wang, Jiankang; Su, Peibo; Li, Dongqi; Jiang, Zhaohua

    2016-01-01

    Thermal control ceramic coatings on Mg–Li alloys have been successfully prepared in silicate electrolyte system by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method. The PEO coatings are mainly composed of crystallized Mg2SiO4 and MgO, which have typical porous structure with some bulges on the surface; OES analysis shows that the plasma temperature, which is influenced by the technique parameters, determines the formation of the coatings with different crystalline phases and morphologies, combined with “quick cooling effect” by the electrolyte; and the electron concentration is constant, which is related to the electric spark breakdown, determined by the nature of the coating and the interface of coating/electrolyte. Technique parameters influence the coating thickness, roughness and surface morphology, but do not change the coating composition in the specific PEO regime, and therefore the absorptance (αS) and emissivity (ε) of the coatings can be adjusted by the technique parameters through changing thickness and roughness in a certain degree. The coating prepared at 10 A/dm2, 50 Hz, 30 min and 14 g/L Na2SiO3 has the minimum value of αS (0.35) and the maximum value of ε (0.82), with the balance temperature of 320 K. PMID:27383569

  18. Investigation of absorptance and emissivity of thermal control coatings on Mg–Li alloys and OES analysis during PEO process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhongping; Xia, Qixing; Ju, Pengfei; Wang, Jiankang; Su, Peibo; Li, Dongqi; Jiang, Zhaohua

    2016-07-01

    Thermal control ceramic coatings on Mg–Li alloys have been successfully prepared in silicate electrolyte system by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method. The PEO coatings are mainly composed of crystallized Mg2SiO4 and MgO, which have typical porous structure with some bulges on the surface; OES analysis shows that the plasma temperature, which is influenced by the technique parameters, determines the formation of the coatings with different crystalline phases and morphologies, combined with “quick cooling effect” by the electrolyte; and the electron concentration is constant, which is related to the electric spark breakdown, determined by the nature of the coating and the interface of coating/electrolyte. Technique parameters influence the coating thickness, roughness and surface morphology, but do not change the coating composition in the specific PEO regime, and therefore the absorptance (αS) and emissivity (ε) of the coatings can be adjusted by the technique parameters through changing thickness and roughness in a certain degree. The coating prepared at 10 A/dm2, 50 Hz, 30 min and 14 g/L Na2SiO3 has the minimum value of αS (0.35) and the maximum value of ε (0.82), with the balance temperature of 320 K.

  19. Mussel-inspired thermosensitive polydopamine-graft-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) coating for controlled-release fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiyuan; Jia, Xin; Hu, Jiamei; Liu, Zhiyong; Wang, Heyun; Zhou, Feng

    2013-12-18

    A thermoresponsive release multi-element compound fertilizer was first reported on the basis of a polydopamine-graft-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) bilayer coated on a salty core by a combination of dopamine chemistry and surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization techniques, and the control of nutrient release in response to the environmental temperature was investigated. The successful synthesized stimuli-responsive fertilizers were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The release of elements from fertilizer was determined by an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) emission spectrometer. The thermosensitive fertilizers exhibit outstanding stimuli-responsive permeability to encapsulated nutrients, and the release rate of coated elements can be tailored by the ambient temperature. They can release nutrients easily at T < lower critical solution temperature (LCST) but slow at T > LCST. This strategy of grafting thermoresponsive polymer brushes on polydopamine (Pdop)-coated substrates is useful to prepare a stimuli-responsive release system, which can adjust the release rate according to different conditions, and will be effective and promising in the research and development of a stimuli-sensitive controlled-release system. PMID:24308285

  20. Mussel-inspired thermosensitive polydopamine-graft-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) coating for controlled-release fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiyuan; Jia, Xin; Hu, Jiamei; Liu, Zhiyong; Wang, Heyun; Zhou, Feng

    2013-12-18

    A thermoresponsive release multi-element compound fertilizer was first reported on the basis of a polydopamine-graft-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) bilayer coated on a salty core by a combination of dopamine chemistry and surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization techniques, and the control of nutrient release in response to the environmental temperature was investigated. The successful synthesized stimuli-responsive fertilizers were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The release of elements from fertilizer was determined by an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) emission spectrometer. The thermosensitive fertilizers exhibit outstanding stimuli-responsive permeability to encapsulated nutrients, and the release rate of coated elements can be tailored by the ambient temperature. They can release nutrients easily at T < lower critical solution temperature (LCST) but slow at T > LCST. This strategy of grafting thermoresponsive polymer brushes on polydopamine (Pdop)-coated substrates is useful to prepare a stimuli-responsive release system, which can adjust the release rate according to different conditions, and will be effective and promising in the research and development of a stimuli-sensitive controlled-release system.

  1. Energy efficient fume and odor control equipment for coil coating line

    SciTech Connect

    Coughran, G.

    1982-06-01

    Wolverine Aluminum Corporation, producer of exterior siding building material, recently installed a Variable Energy Recovery Control System at its Lincoln Park coil coating plant. Boilers had an incinerator which emitted odors and consumed large volumes of gas. The fume incinerators were eliminated by one Model G 56,000 SCFM RE-THE M thermal Oxidizer from Reeco of Morris Plains, NJ. Its chambers, preheaters, two main ducts, and other design features are described. Installation was simple, as was operation. Fumes and odor have been controlled; operating costs have been reduced.

  2. A new facility for manufacturing and testing very large narrow bandpass filters and other high performance optical coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, Thomas; Pawlewicz, Walter; Merrill, Michael; Leclerc, David; Hurd, Kerry

    2014-07-01

    Optical coatings are key elements of any optical system. They can reduce surface reflection loss, isolate spectral bands, re-direct the light path and split light beams by wavelength. For decades, astronomers have made use of these special characteristics embodied in Anti-Reflection (AR) coatings, Band Pass (BP) filters, mirrors and Dichroic Beamsplitters (DBS). In the last several years, a need has arisen for much larger high performance filters and coatings. This is being driven by the ever increasing size of new and planned telescopes with their correspondingly larger focal planes. Typical Broadband filters require modest wavelength uniformity and can be produced in legacy (existing) coating chambers, even in fairly large formats. However, some new instruments require narrow BP (NBP) filters of 60 cm or greater diameter in order to perform efficiently. Some planned systems will even require filters in the 75 cm diameter range. The implications for coating such large, very expensive optics are that the equipment must not only accommodate a large optic, but the process must achieve excellent uniformity over broad areas. It must also exhibit excellent performance, reproducibility and reliability in depositions consisting of well over one hundred layers and many hours duration. And finally, the spectral performance must be verifiable, not through an indirect method, but directly of the science optic itself. To address these challenges, Materion designed, built, tested and put into production a purposebuilt laboratory. This paper will describe in detail the elements of the lab creation and initial achievements.

  3. Fire performance, microstructure and thermal degradation of an epoxy based nano intumescent fire retardant coating for structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Hammad Ahmad, Faiz Yusoff, P. S. M. Megat; Zia-ul-Mustafa, M.

    2015-07-22

    Intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC) is a passive fire protection system which swells upon heating to form expanded multi-cellular char layer that protects the substrate from fire. In this research work, IFRC’s were developed using different flame retardants such as ammonium polyphosphate, expandable graphite, melamine and boric acid. These flame retardants were bound together with the help of epoxy binder and cured together using curing agent. IFRC was then reinforced with nano magnesium oxide and nano alumina as inorganic fillers to study their effect towards fire performance, microstructure and thermal degradation. Small scale fire test was conducted to investigate the thermal insulation of coating whereas fire performance was calculated using thermal margin value. Field emission scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the microstructure of char obtained after fire test. Thermogravimetric analysis was conducted to investigate the residual weight of coating. Results showed that the performance of the coating was enhanced by reinforcement with nano size fillers as compared to non-filler based coating. Comparing both nano size magnesium oxide and nano size alumina; nano size alumina gave better fire performance with improved microstructure of char and high residual weight.

  4. Fire performance, microstructure and thermal degradation of an epoxy based nano intumescent fire retardant coating for structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Hammad; Ahmad, Faiz; Yusoff, P. S. M. Megat; Zia-ul-Mustafa, M.

    2015-07-01

    Intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC) is a passive fire protection system which swells upon heating to form expanded multi-cellular char layer that protects the substrate from fire. In this research work, IFRC's were developed using different flame retardants such as ammonium polyphosphate, expandable graphite, melamine and boric acid. These flame retardants were bound together with the help of epoxy binder and cured together using curing agent. IFRC was then reinforced with nano magnesium oxide and nano alumina as inorganic fillers to study their effect towards fire performance, microstructure and thermal degradation. Small scale fire test was conducted to investigate the thermal insulation of coating whereas fire performance was calculated using thermal margin value. Field emission scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the microstructure of char obtained after fire test. Thermogravimetric analysis was conducted to investigate the residual weight of coating. Results showed that the performance of the coating was enhanced by reinforcement with nano size fillers as compared to non-filler based coating. Comparing both nano size magnesium oxide and nano size alumina; nano size alumina gave better fire performance with improved microstructure of char and high residual weight.

  5. Conjugate heat transfer investigation on the cooling performance of air cooled turbine blade with thermal barrier coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yongbin; Ma, Chao; Ge, Bing; Zang, Shusheng

    2016-08-01

    A hot wind tunnel of annular cascade test rig is established for measuring temperature distribution on a real gas turbine blade surface with infrared camera. Besides, conjugate heat transfer numerical simulation is performed to obtain cooling efficiency distribution on both blade substrate surface and coating surface for comparison. The effect of thermal barrier coating on the overall cooling performance for blades is compared under varied mass flow rate of coolant, and spatial difference is also discussed. Results indicate that the cooling efficiency in the leading edge and trailing edge areas of the blade is the lowest. The cooling performance is not only influenced by the internal cooling structures layout inside the blade but also by the flow condition of the mainstream in the external cascade path. Thermal barrier effects of the coating vary at different regions of the blade surface, where higher internal cooling performance exists, more effective the thermal barrier will be, which means the thermal protection effect of coatings is remarkable in these regions. At the designed mass flow ratio condition, the cooling efficiency on the pressure side varies by 0.13 for the coating surface and substrate surface, while this value is 0.09 on the suction side.

  6. Black Molecular Adsorber Coatings for Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin Susan; Hasegawa, Mark Makoto; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  7. Black molecular adsorber coatings for spaceflight applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-09-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  8. Metal Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, General Magnaplate Corporation developed process techniques for bonding dry lubricant coatings to space metals. The coatings were not susceptible to outgassing and offered enhanced surface hardness and superior resistance to corrosion and wear. This development was necessary because conventional lubrication processes were inadequate for lightweight materials used in Apollo components. General Magnaplate built on the original technology and became a leader in development of high performance metallurgical surface enhancement coatings - "synergistic" coatings, - which are used in applications from pizza making to laser manufacture. Each of the coatings is designed to protect a specific metal or group of metals to solve problems encountered under operating conditions.

  9. Modeling controlled nutrient release from a population of polymer coated fertilizers: statistically based model for diffusion release.

    PubMed

    Shaviv, Avi; Raban, Smadar; Zaidel, Elina

    2003-05-15

    A statistically based model for describing the release from a population of polymer coated controlled release fertilizer (CRF) granules by the diffusion mechanism was constructed. The model is based on a mathematical-mechanistic description of the release from a single granule of a coated CRF accounting for its complex and nonlinear nature. The large variation within populations of coated CRFs poses the need for a statistically based approach to integrate over the release from the individual granules within a given population for which the distribution and range of granule radii and coating thickness are known. The model was constructed and verified using experimentally determined parameters and release curves of polymer-coated CRFs. A sensitivity analysis indicated the importance of water permeability in controlling the lag period and that of solute permeability in governing the rate of linear release and the total duration of the release. Increasing the mean values of normally distributed granule radii or coating thickness, increases the lag period and the period of linear release. The variation of radii and coating thickness, within realistic ranges, affects the release only when the standard deviation is very large or when water permeability is reduced without affecting solute permeability. The model provides an effective tool for designing and improving agronomic and environmental effectiveness of polymer-coated CRFs. PMID:12785533

  10. Modeling controlled nutrient release from a population of polymer coated fertilizers: statistically based model for diffusion release.

    PubMed

    Shaviv, Avi; Raban, Smadar; Zaidel, Elina

    2003-05-15

    A statistically based model for describing the release from a population of polymer coated controlled release fertilizer (CRF) granules by the diffusion mechanism was constructed. The model is based on a mathematical-mechanistic description of the release from a single granule of a coated CRF accounting for its complex and nonlinear nature. The large variation within populations of coated CRFs poses the need for a statistically based approach to integrate over the release from the individual granules within a given population for which the distribution and range of granule radii and coating thickness are known. The model was constructed and verified using experimentally determined parameters and release curves of polymer-coated CRFs. A sensitivity analysis indicated the importance of water permeability in controlling the lag period and that of solute permeability in governing the rate of linear release and the total duration of the release. Increasing the mean values of normally distributed granule radii or coating thickness, increases the lag period and the period of linear release. The variation of radii and coating thickness, within realistic ranges, affects the release only when the standard deviation is very large or when water permeability is reduced without affecting solute permeability. The model provides an effective tool for designing and improving agronomic and environmental effectiveness of polymer-coated CRFs.

  11. Experimental analysis of pressure controlled atomization process (PCAP) coatings for replacement of hard chromium plating

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.C.; Glovan, R.J.; Witt, S.J.; Verbael, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    A four-phase experimental design was utilized to evaluate the abrasive wear and corrosion protection characteristics of VERSAlloy 50 coatings applied to AISI 4130 steel sheet. The coatings were applied with the Pressure Controlled Atomization Process (PCAP), a new thermal spray process being developed for the United States Air Force to replace hard chromium plating. Phase 1 of the design consisted of an evaluation of deposit profiles that were sprayed at five different standoff distances. Profile measurements yielded standard deviations ({sigma}) of the plume at each of the spray distances. Phase 2 consisted of a completely randomized series of eight spray tests in which the track gap or distance between consecutive spray passes was varied by amounts of 0.5{sigma}, 1{sigma}, 2{sigma}, and 3{sigma}. The sprayed test coupons were then evaluated for corrosion protection, abrasive wear resistance, microhardness, and porosity. Results from Phase 2 were used to determine the best track gap or overlap for Phase 3 and Phase 4 testing. Phase 3 consisted of 22-run central composite design. The test coupons were evaluated the same as in Phase 2. Statistical analysis of Phase 3 data revealed that the optimal system operating parameters produced coatings that would either provide superior corrosion protection or resistance to abrasive wear. Phase 4 consisted of four spray tests to validate the results obtained in Phase 3. Phase 4 test coupons were again evaluated with the same analysis as in Phases 2 and 3. The validation tests indicated that PCAP system operating parameters could be controlled to produce VERSAlloy 50 coatings with superior corrosion protection or resistance to abrasive wear.

  12. Analysis of WC/Ni-Based Coatings Deposited by Controlled Short-Circuit MIG Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vespa, P.; Pinard, P. T.; Gauvin, R.; Brochu, M.

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the recently developed controlled short-circuit metal inert gas (CSC-MIG) welding system for depositing WC/Ni-based claddings on carbon steel substrates. WC/Ni-based coatings deposited by CSC-MIG were analyzed by optical light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) capabilities. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and hardness measurements of depositions are also reported. The CSC-MIG welding system provides a significant amount of user control over the current waveform during welding and has lower heat input when compared with traditional MIG welding. Heat input for the analyzed coatings ranged from 10.1 to 108.7 J/mm. Metallurgically bonded coatings free from spatter and with 0.75% average porosity were produced. It was found that the detrimental decarburization of the WC particles seen in thermal spray systems does not occur when welding with the CSC-MIG. Precipitation of a reaction layer around the reinforcing phase was identified as WC; the average thickness of which increases from 3.8 to 7.2 μm for the low and high heat input condition, respectively. Precipitation of newly formed WC particles was observed; their size distribution increased from D 50 of 2.4 μm in the low heat input weldment to 6.75 μm in the high heat input weldment. The level of dilution of the reinforcing phase increases significantly with heat input. The hardness of the deposited coatings decreases from 587 HV10 to 410 HV10 when the energy input was increased from 10.1 to 108.7 J/mm.

  13. Control of substrate oxidation in MOD cerawwwmic coating on low-activation ferritic steel with reduced-pressure atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Teruya; Muroga, Takeo

    2014-12-01

    An Er2O3 ceramic coating fabricated using the metal-organic decomposition (MOD) method on a Cr2O3-covered low-activation ferritic steel JLF-1 substrate was examined to improve hydrogen permeation barrier performance of the coating. The Cr2O3 layer was obtained before coating by heat treating the substrate at 700 °C under reduced pressures of <5 × 10-3 Pa and 5 Pa. The Cr2O3 layer was significantly stable even with heat treatment at 700 °C in air. This layer prevented further production of Fe2O3, which has been considered to degrade coating performance. An MOD Er2O3 coating with a smooth surface was successfully obtained on a Cr2O3-covered JLF-1 substrate by dip coating followed by drying and baking. Preprocessing to obtain a Cr2O3 layer would provide flexibility in the coating process for blanket components and ducts. Moreover, the Cr2O3 layer suppressed hydrogen permeation through the JLF-1 substrate. While further optimization of the coating fabrication process is required, it would be possible to suppress hydrogen permeation significantly by multilayers of Cr2O3 and MOD oxide ceramic.

  14. Electrodeposition, Morphology, Composition, and Corrosion Performance of Zn-Mn Coatings from a Deep Eutectic Solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fashu, S.; Gu, C. D.; Zhang, J. L.; Zheng, H.; Wang, X. L.; Tu, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Different Zn-Mn coatings were successfully electrodeposited on copper substrates from deep eutectic solvent-based electrolytes containing boric acid as an additive. The main objective of this work was to optimize the Zn/Mn ratios and morphologies of the as-electrodeposited Zn-Mn films in order to obtain better corrosion protection performance coatings. The electrodeposition behaviors of Zn-Mn alloys as studied by cyclic voltammetry showed that with increase in electrolyte Mn(II) concentration, Zn(II) ion reduction occurs at higher overpotentials while Mn reduction occurs at lower overpotentials, and this in turn enhances Mn incorporation into the deposit. Characterization results showed that the electrodeposition potential and electrolyte Mn(II) concentration significantly affects the Mn content, crystal structure, surface morphology, and corrosion performance of the deposits. With increase in electrodeposition potential and electrolyte Mn(II) concentration, the alloy Mn increased and the grain morphology was refined. The crystal structure of Zn-Mn deposits consists of Zn and hexagonal close packed ɛ-phase Zn-Mn at low electrodeposition potentials and low electrolyte Mn(II) content. However, at high electrodeposition potentials and electrolyte Mn(II) contents, the crystal structure was only composed of hexagonal close packed ɛ-phase Zn-Mn. Corrosion measurements show that all the Zn-Mn samples have a passivating behavior and exhibits higher corrosion resistances when compared to those from aqueous solutions. Thus, optimum electrodeposition potential and electrolyte Mn(II) concentration were determined producing compact Zn-Mn films with the best corrosion resistance.

  15. TRMM On Orbit Attitude Control System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Brent; Placanica, Sam; Morgenstern, Wendy

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Attitude Control System (ACS) along with detailed in-flight performance results for each operational mode. The TRMM spacecraft is an Earth-pointed, zero momentum bias satellite launched on November 27, 1997 from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan designed to monitor and study tropical rainfall and the associated release of energy. Launched to provide a validation for poorly known rainfall data sets generated by global climate models, TRMM has demonstrated its utility by reducing uncertainties in global rainfall measurements by a factor of two. The ACS is comprised of Attitude Control Electronics (ACE), an Earth Sensor Assembly (ESA), Digital Sun Sensors (DSS), Inertial Reference Units (IRU), Three Axis Magnetometers (TAM), Coarse Sun Sensors (CSS), Magnetic Torquer Bars (MTB), Reaction Wheel Assemblies (RWA), Engine Valve Drivers (EVD) and thrusters. While in Mission Mode, the ESA provides roll and pitch axis attitude error measurements and the DSS provide yaw updates twice per orbit. In addition, the TAM in combination with the IRU and DSS can be used to provide pointing in a contingency attitude determination mode which does not rely on the ESA. Although the ACS performance to date has been highly successful, lessons were learned during checkout and initial on-orbit operation. This paper describes the design, on-orbit checkout, performance and lessons learned for the TRMM ACS.

  16. In Vivo Osseointegration Performance of Titanium Dioxide Coating Modified Polyetheretherketone Using Arc Ion Plating for Spinal Implant Application

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Chi, Meng-Hui; Hung, Yi-Wen; Chung, Chi-Jen; He, Ju-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK), which has biomechanical performance similar to that of human cancellous bone, is used widely as a spinal implant material. However, its bioinertness and hydrophobic surface properties result in poor osseointegration. This study applies a novel modification method, arc ion plating (AIP), that produces a highly osteoblast compatible titanium dioxide (TiO2) coatings on a PEEK substrate. This PEEK with TiO2 coating (TiO2/PEEK) was implanted into the femurs of New Zealand white male rabbits to evaluate its in vivo performance by the push-out test and histological observation. Analytical results show that AIP can prepare TiO2 coatings on bullet-shaped PEEK substrates as implant materials. After prolonged implantation in rabbits, no signs of inflammation existed. Newly regenerated bone formed more prominently with the TiO2/PEEK implant by histological observation. The shear strength of the bone/implant interface increases as implantation period increases. Most importantly, bone bonding performance of the TiO2/PEEK implant was superior to that of bare PEEK. The rutile-TiO2 coatings achieved better osseointegration than the anatase-TiO2 coatings. Therefore, AIP-TiO2 can serve as a novel surface modification method on PEEK for spinal interbody fusion cages. PMID:26504800

  17. In Vivo Osseointegration Performance of Titanium Dioxide Coating Modified Polyetheretherketone Using Arc Ion Plating for Spinal Implant Application.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Chi, Meng-Hui; Hung, Yi-Wen; Chung, Chi-Jen; He, Ju-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK), which has biomechanical performance similar to that of human cancellous bone, is used widely as a spinal implant material. However, its bioinertness and hydrophobic surface properties result in poor osseointegration. This study applies a novel modification method, arc ion plating (AIP), that produces a highly osteoblast compatible titanium dioxide (TiO2) coatings on a PEEK substrate. This PEEK with TiO2 coating (TiO2/PEEK) was implanted into the femurs of New Zealand white male rabbits to evaluate its in vivo performance by the push-out test and histological observation. Analytical results show that AIP can prepare TiO2 coatings on bullet-shaped PEEK substrates as implant materials. After prolonged implantation in rabbits, no signs of inflammation existed. Newly regenerated bone formed more prominently with the TiO2/PEEK implant by histological observation. The shear strength of the bone/implant interface increases as implantation period increases. Most importantly, bone bonding performance of the TiO2/PEEK implant was superior to that of bare PEEK. The rutile-TiO2 coatings achieved better osseointegration than the anatase-TiO2 coatings. Therefore, AIP-TiO2 can serve as a novel surface modification method on PEEK for spinal interbody fusion cages. PMID:26504800

  18. Enhanced photoelectrochemical water splitting performance of TiO2 nanotube arrays coated with an ultrathin nitrogen-doped carbon film by molecular layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xili; Yang, Peng; Wang, Yunwei; Qin, Yong; Guo, Xiangyun

    2014-06-21

    Vertically oriented TiO2 nanotube arrays (TNTAs) were conformally coated with an ultrathin nitrogen-doped (N-doped) carbon film via the carbonization of a polyimide film deposited by molecular layer deposition and simultaneously hydrogenated, thereby creating a core/shell nanostructure with a precisely controllable shell thickness. The core/shell nanostructure provides a larger heterojunction interface to substantially reduce the recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs, and hydrogenation enhances solar absorption of TNTAs. In addition, the N-doped carbon film coating acts as a high catalytic active surface for oxygen evolution reaction, as well as a protective film to prevent hydrogen-treated TiO2 nanotube oxidation by electrolyte or air. As a result, the N-doped carbon film coated TNTAs displayed remarkably improved photocurrent and photostability. The TNTAs with a N-doped carbon film of ∼ 1 nm produces a current density of 3.6 mA cm(-2) at 0 V vs. Ag/AgCl under the illumination of AM 1.5 G (100 mW cm(-2)), which represents one of the highest values achieved with modified TNTAs. Therefore, we propose that ultrathin N-doped carbon film coating on materials is a viable approach to enhance their PEC water splitting performance.

  19. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  20. A dual-task design of corrosion-controlling and osteo-compatible hexamethylenediaminetetrakis- (methylene phosphonic acid) (HDTMPA) coating on magnesium for biodegradable bone implants application.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sheng; Chen, Yingqi; Liu, Bo; Chen, Meiyun; Mao, Jinlong; He, Hairuo; Zhao, Yuancong; Huang, Nan; Wan, Guojiang

    2015-05-01

    Magnesium as well as its alloys appears increasingly as a revolutionary bio-metal for biodegradable implants application but the biggest challenges exist in its too fast bio-corrosion/degradation. Both corrosion-controllable and bio-compatible Mg-based bio-metal is highly desirable in clinic. In present work, hexamethylenediaminetetrakis (methylenephosphonic acid) [HDTMPA, (H2 O3 P-CH2 )2 -N-(CH2 )6 -N-(CH2 -PO3 H2 )2 ], as a natural and bioactive organic substance, was covalently immobilized and chelating-deposited onto Mg surface by means of chemical conversion process and dip-coating method, to fullfill dual-task performance of corrosion-protective and osteo-compatible functionalities. The chemical grafting of HDTMPA molecules, by participation of functional groups on pretreated Mg surface, ensured a firmly anchored base layer, and then sub-sequential chelating reactions of HDTMPA molecules guaranteed a homogenous and dense HDTMPA coating deposition on Mg substrate. Electrochemical corrosion and immersion degradation results reveal that the HDTMPA coated Mg provides a significantly better controlled bio-corrosion/degradation behavior in phosphate buffer saline solution as compared with untreated Mg from perspective of clinic requirement. Moreover, the HDTMPA coated Mg exhibits osteo-compatible in that it induces not only bioactivity of bone-like apatite precipitation but also promotes osteoblast cells adhesion and proliferation. Our well-controlled biodegradable and biocompatible HDTMPA modified Mg might bode well for next generation bone implant application.

  1. Shape Control of Doctor blade coated Polymer Electrodes via Microflow Control in a Drying Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Yunseok; Jo, Jeongdai; Lee, Seung-Hyun; PEMS Team

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrated a simple patterning method for polymer electrodes such as poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS) by using the doctor blade coater. We controlled the surface tension for controlling the polymer electrodes shape. We made use of the difference in wettability between hydrophobic surfaces and hydrophilic surfaces to make the polymer electrodes patterns. However, the polymer electrodes patterns made with our patterning method created undesirable ring-like stains, which were caused by the outward flow of the solute within the PEDOT/PSS solution drop. To achieve homogenous device performance, we proposed a simple process for removing this ring-like stain by making the surface tension gradient in the PEDOT/PSS solution drop. Because this surface tension gradient causes the inward flow of the solute within the PEDOT/PSS solution drop, the ring-like stain is removed. Finally, we confirmed the potential of our patterning method for polymer electrodes such as the PEDOT/PSS by fabricating pentacene thin-film transistors (TFTs) and measuring the electrical properties of the pentacene TFTs. This study was supported by a grant (B551179-08-03-00/ B551179-10-01-00/ NK167D/ SC0830) from the cooperative R&D Program funded by the Korea Research Council Industrial Science and Technology, Republic of Korea.

  2. Design of nano-laminated coatings to control bioavailability of lipophilic food components.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian

    2010-01-01

    There is currently a lack of effective delivery systems to encapsulate, protect, and release bioactive lipophilic components, such as omega-3 fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acid, tributyrin, vitamins, antioxidants, carotenoids, and phytosterols, which is holding back the development of functional foods designed to combat diseases such as coronary heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, and cancer. Delivery systems consisting of lipid droplets encapsulated by nano-laminated biopolymer coatings have great potential for use in the food industry for the encapsulation, protection, and release of bioactive lipids. This article reviews the potential impact of the physicochemical characteristics of nano-laminated biopolymer coatings on the bioavailability of encapsulated lipids. The effects of layer thickness, composition, electrical charge, permeability, and environmental responsiveness on digestion, release, and absorption of lipophilic components are highlighted. The possibility of designing nano-laminated biopolymer coatings to increase, decrease, or control the bioavailability of encapsulated lipids is shown. Data generated from in vitro digestion models and animal feeding studies are presented. This knowledge could be used by the food industry to produce functional foods designed to improve human health and wellness. PMID:20492193

  3. Genetic control of the seed coat colour of Middle American and Andean bean seeds.

    PubMed

    Possobom, Micheli Thaise Della Flora; Ribeiro, Nerinéia Dalfollo; Zemolin, Allan Emanoel Mezzomo; Arns, Fernanda Daltrozo

    2015-02-01

    Seed coat colour of bean seeds is decisive for acceptance of a cultivar. The objectives of this research were to determine whether there is maternal effect for "L", a* and b* colour parameters in Middle American and Andean bean seeds; to obtain estimates of heritability and gain with selection for "L", a* and b* values; and select recombinants with the seed coat colour required by the market demand. Thus, controlled crossings were carried out between the Middle American lines CNFP 10104 and CHC 01-175, and between the Andean lines Cal 96 and Hooter, for obtaining F1, F1 reciprocal, F2 and F2 reciprocal generations for each hybrid combination. Parents and generations were evaluated in two field experiments (2012 normal rainy and 2013 dry seasons) in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Seed coat colour was quantified with a portable colorimeter. Genetic variability for "L" (luminosity), chromaticity a* (green to red shade), and chromaticity b* (blue to yellow shade) values was observed in seeds with F2 seed coat of Middle American and Andean beans. "L", a* and b* values in bean seeds presented maternal effects. High broad-sense heritability are observed for luminosity (h(2)b: 76.66-95.07%), chromaticity a* (h(2)b: 73.08-89.31%), and chromaticity b* (h(2)b: 88.63-92.50%) values in bean seeds. From the crossings, it was possible to select bean seeds in early generation for the black group, and for carioca and cranberry types (dark or clear background) which present the colour required by the market demand.

  4. Genetic control of the seed coat colour of Middle American and Andean bean seeds.

    PubMed

    Possobom, Micheli Thaise Della Flora; Ribeiro, Nerinéia Dalfollo; Zemolin, Allan Emanoel Mezzomo; Arns, Fernanda Daltrozo

    2015-02-01

    Seed coat colour of bean seeds is decisive for acceptance of a cultivar. The objectives of this research were to determine whether there is maternal effect for "L", a* and b* colour parameters in Middle American and Andean bean seeds; to obtain estimates of heritability and gain with selection for "L", a* and b* values; and select recombinants with the seed coat colour required by the market demand. Thus, controlled crossings were carried out between the Middle American lines CNFP 10104 and CHC 01-175, and between the Andean lines Cal 96 and Hooter, for obtaining F1, F1 reciprocal, F2 and F2 reciprocal generations for each hybrid combination. Parents and generations were evaluated in two field experiments (2012 normal rainy and 2013 dry seasons) in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Seed coat colour was quantified with a portable colorimeter. Genetic variability for "L" (luminosity), chromaticity a* (green to red shade), and chromaticity b* (blue to yellow shade) values was observed in seeds with F2 seed coat of Middle American and Andean beans. "L", a* and b* values in bean seeds presented maternal effects. High broad-sense heritability are observed for luminosity (h(2)b: 76.66-95.07%), chromaticity a* (h(2)b: 73.08-89.31%), and chromaticity b* (h(2)b: 88.63-92.50%) values in bean seeds. From the crossings, it was possible to select bean seeds in early generation for the black group, and for carioca and cranberry types (dark or clear background) which present the colour required by the market demand. PMID:25523544

  5. Final Report: Novel ALD-Coated Nanoparticle Anodes for Enhanced Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Groner, Markus

    2009-04-16

    The Phase I effort is described in detail in the Phase I report given below. The key accomplishments of the Phase I project were (1) the demonstration of high stability LiCoO2 cathodes using ALD-coated LiCoO2 particles, as well as on ALD-coated LiCoO2 electrodes and (2) the demonstration of high stability of graphite anodes using ALD-coated graphite electrodes.

  6. Plasma Performance Improvement with Lithium-Coated Plasma-Facing Components in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R; Kugel, H; Bell, M G; Bell, R; Boedo, J; Bush, C; Ellis, R; Gates, D; Gerhardt, S; Gray, T; Kallman, J; Kaye, S; LeBlanc, B; Majeski, R; Maingi, R; Mansfield, D; Menard, J; Mueller, D; Ono, M; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Ross, P W; Sabbagh, S; Schneider, H; Skinner, S H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Stotler, D; Timberlake, J; Zakharov, L; Ahn, J; Allain, J P; Wampler, W R

    2009-01-08

    Lithium as a plasma-facing material has many attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Recent NSTX experiments have shown, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium coatings on plasma-facing components (PFC's) to the performance of divertor plasmas in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. They included decreases in the plasma density and inductive flux consumption, and increases in the electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement time, and DD neutron rate. Extended periods of MHD quiescence were also achieved, and measurements of the visible emission from the lower divertor showed a reduction in the deuterium, carbon, and oxygen line emission. Other salient results with lithium evaporation included a broadening of the electron temperature profile, and changes in edge density gradients that benefited electron Bernstein wave coupling. There was also a reduction in ELM frequency and amplitude, followed by a period of complete ELM suppression. In general, it was observed that both the best and the average confinement occurred after lithium deposition and that the increase in WMHD occurs mostly through an increase in We. In addition, a liquid lithium divertor (LLD) is being installed on NSTX this year. As the first fully-toroidal liquid metal divertor target, experiments with the LLD can provide insight into the behavior of metallic ITER PFC's should they liquefy during high-power divertor tokamak operations. The NSTX lithium coating and LLD experiments are important near-term steps in demonstrating the potential of liquid lithium as a solution to the first-wall problem for both magnetic and inertial fusion reactors.

  7. Plasma Performance Improvement with Lithium-Coated Plasma-Facing Components in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R., et. al.

    2008-09-29

    Lithium as a plasma-facing material has many attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Recent NSTX experiments have shown, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium coatings on plasma-facing components (PFC's) to the performance of divertor plasmas in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. They included decreases in the plasma density and inductive flux consumption, and increases in the electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement time, and DD neutron rate. Extended periods of MHD quiescence were also achieved, and measurements of the visible emission from the lower divertor showed a reduction in the deuterium, carbon, and oxygen line emission. Other salient results with lithium evaporation included a broadening of the electron temperature profile, and changes in edge density gradients that benefited electron Bernstein wave coupling. There was also a reduction in ELM frequency and amplitude, followed by a period of complete ELM suppression. In general, it was observed that both the best and the average confinement occurred after lithium deposition and that the increase in WMHD occurs mostly through an increase in We. In addition, a liquid lithium divertor (LLD) is being installed on NSTX this year. As the first fully-toroidal liquid metal divertor target, experiments with the LLD can provide insight into the behavior of metallic ITER PFC's should they liquefy during high-power divertor tokamak operations. The NSTX lithium coating and LLD experiments are important near-term steps in demonstrating the potential of liquid lithium as a solution to the first-wall problem for both magnetic and inertial fusion reactors.

  8. Microstructure and tribological performance of nanocomposite Ti-Si-C-N coatings deposited using hexamethyldisilazane precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Ronghua; Rincon, Christopher; Langa, Edward; Yang Qi

    2010-09-15

    Thick nanocomposite Ti-Si-C-N coatings (20-30 {mu}m) were deposited on Ti-6Al-4V substrate by magnetron sputtering of Ti in a gas mixture of Ar, N{sub 2}, and hexamethyldisilazane (HMDSN) under various deposition conditions. Microstructure and composition of the coatings were studied using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, while the mechanical and tribological properties of these coatings were studied using Rc indentation, and micro- and nanoindentations, solid particle erosion testing, and ball-on-disk wear testing. It has been observed that the Si concentration of these coatings is varied from 0% (TiN) to 15% (Ti-Si-C-N), while the structure of these coatings is similar to the nanocomposite Ti-Si-N coatings and consists of nanocrystalline B1 structured Ti(C,N) in an amorphous matrix of SiC{sub x}N{sub y} with the grain size of 5->100 nm, depending on the coating preparation process. These coatings exhibit excellent adhesion when subjected to Rc indentation tests. The microhardness of these coatings varies from 1200 to 3400 HV25, while the nanohardness varies from 10 to 26 GPa. Both the microhardness and nanohardness are slightly lower than those of similar coatings prepared using trimethylsilane. However, the erosion test using a microsand erosion tester at both 30 deg. and 90 deg. incident angles shows that these coatings have very high erosion resistance and up to a few hundred times of improvement has been observed. These coatings also exhibit very high resistance to sliding wear with a low coefficient of friction of about 0.2 in dry sliding. There are a few advantages of using the HMDSN precursor to prepare the Ti-Si-C-N coatings over conventional magnetron sputtered deposition of Ti-Si-N coatings including composition uniformity, precursor handling safety, and high deposition rate. The coatings can be applied to protect gas turbine compressor blades from solid particle erosion and steam turbine blades

  9. Neurocognitive control in dance perception and performance.

    PubMed

    Bläsing, Bettina; Calvo-Merino, Beatriz; Cross, Emily S; Jola, Corinne; Honisch, Juliane; Stevens, Catherine J

    2012-02-01

    Dance is a rich source of material for researchers interested in the integration of movement and cognition. The multiple aspects of embodied cognition involved in performing and perceiving dance have inspired scientists to use dance as a means for studying motor control, expertise, and action-perception links. The aim of this review is to present basic research on cognitive and neural processes implicated in the execution, expression, and observation of dance, and to bring into relief contemporary issues and open research questions. The review addresses six topics: 1) dancers' exemplary motor control, in terms of postural control, equilibrium maintenance, and stabilization; 2) how dancers' timing and on-line synchronization are influenced by attention demands and motor experience; 3) the critical roles played by sequence learning and memory; 4) how dancers make strategic use of visual and motor imagery; 5) the insights into the neural coupling between action and perception yielded through exploration of the brain architecture mediating dance observation; and 6) a neuroesthetics perspective that sheds new light on the way audiences perceive and evaluate dance expression. Current and emerging issues are presented regarding future directions that will facilitate the ongoing dialog between science and dance.

  10. Solvent Free Fabrication of Micro and Nanostructured Drug Coatings by Thermal Evaporation for Controlled Release and Increased Effects

    PubMed Central

    Zarie, Eman S.; Kaidas, Viktor; Gedamu, Dawit; Mishra, Yogendra K.; Adelung, Rainer; Furkert, Franz H.; Scherließ, Regina; Steckel, Hartwig; Groessner-Schreiber, Birte

    2012-01-01

    Nanostructuring of drug delivery systems offers many promising applications like precise control of dissolution and release kinetics, enhanced activities, flexibility in terms of surface coatings, integration into implants, designing the appropriate scaffolds or even integrating into microelectronic chips etc. for different desired applications. In general such kind of structuring is difficult due to unintentional mixing of chemical solvents used during drug formulations. We demonstrate here the successful solvent-free fabrication of micro-nanostructured pharmaceutical molecules by simple thermal evaporation (TE). The evaporation of drug molecules and their emission to a specific surface under vacuum led to controlled assembling of the molecules from vapour phase to solid phase. The most important aspects of thermal evaporation technique are: solvent-free, precise control of size, possibility of fabricating multilayer/hybrid, and free choice of substrates. This could be shown for twenty eight pharmaceutical substances of different chemical structures which were evaporated on surfaces of titanium and glass discs. Structural investigations of different TE fabricated drugs were performed by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy which revealed that these drug substances preserve their structurality after evaporation. Titanium discs coated with antimicrobial substances by thermal evaporation were subjected to tests for antibacterial or antifungal activities, respectively. A significant increase in their antimicrobial activity was observed in zones of inhibition tests compared to controls of the diluted substances on the discs made of paper for filtration. With thermal evaporation, we have successfully synthesized solvent-free nanostructured drug delivery systems in form of multilayer structures and in hybrid drug complexes respectively. Analyses of these substances consolidated that thermal evaporation opens up the possibility to

  11. Solvent free fabrication of micro and nanostructured drug coatings by thermal evaporation for controlled release and increased effects.

    PubMed

    Zarie, Eman S; Kaidas, Viktor; Gedamu, Dawit; Mishra, Yogendra K; Adelung, Rainer; Furkert, Franz H; Scherließ, Regina; Steckel, Hartwig; Groessner-Schreiber, Birte

    2012-01-01

    Nanostructuring of drug delivery systems offers many promising applications like precise control of dissolution and release kinetics, enhanced activities, flexibility in terms of surface coatings, integration into implants, designing the appropriate scaffolds or even integrating into microelectronic chips etc. for different desired applications. In general such kind of structuring is difficult due to unintentional mixing of chemical solvents used during drug formulations. We demonstrate here the successful solvent-free fabrication of micro-nanostructured pharmaceutical molecules by simple thermal evaporation (TE). The evaporation of drug molecules and their emission to a specific surface under vacuum led to controlled assembling of the molecules from vapour phase to solid phase. The most important aspects of thermal evaporation technique are: solvent-free, precise control of size, possibility of fabricating multilayer/hybrid, and free choice of substrates. This could be shown for twenty eight pharmaceutical substances of different chemical structures which were evaporated on surfaces of titanium and glass discs. Structural investigations of different TE fabricated drugs were performed by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy which revealed that these drug substances preserve their structurality after evaporation. Titanium discs coated with antimicrobial substances by thermal evaporation were subjected to tests for antibacterial or antifungal activities, respectively. A significant increase in their antimicrobial activity was observed in zones of inhibition tests compared to controls of the diluted substances on the discs made of paper for filtration. With thermal evaporation, we have successfully synthesized solvent-free nanostructured drug delivery systems in form of multilayer structures and in hybrid drug complexes respectively. Analyses of these substances consolidated that thermal evaporation opens up the possibility to

  12. Control of shell thickness in silica-coating of Au nanoparticles and their X-ray imaging properties.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yoshio; Inose, Hiromitsu; Nakagawa, Tomohiko; Gonda, Kohsuke; Takeda, Motohiro; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Kasuya, Atsuo

    2011-06-15

    This paper describes a performance of precise control of shell thickness in silica-coating of Au nanoparticles based on a sol-gel process, and an investigation into X-ray imaging properties for the silica-coated Au (Au/SiO(2)) particles. The Au nanoparticles with a size of 16.9±1.2 nm prepared through a conventional citrate reduction method were used as core particles. The Au nanoparticles were silica-coated with a sol-gel reaction using tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as a silica source, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) as a catalyst, and (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APMS) as a silane coupling agent. An increase in TEOS concentration resulted in an increase in shell thickness. Under certain concentrations of Au, H(2)O, NaOH, and APMS, the Au/SiO(2) particles with silica shell thickness of 6.0-61.0 nm were produced with varying TEOS concentration. Absorption peak wavelength of surface plasmon resonance of the Au/SiO(2) colloid solution depended on silica shell thickness, which agreed approximately with the predictions by Mie theory. The as-prepared colloid solution could be concentrated up to an Au concentration of 0.19 M with salting-out and centrifugation. The concentrated colloid solution showed an X-ray image with high contrast, and a computed tomography value for the colloid solution with an Au concentration of 0.129 M was achieved 1329.7±52.7 HU. PMID:21458820

  13. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1993--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.F.; Dupont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1993-07-20

    Twelve weld overlay hardfacing alloys have been selected for preliminary erosion testing based upon a literature review. Four of the selected coatings were deposited on a 1018 steel substrate using plasma arc welding process. During the past quarter, the remaining eight coatings were deposited in the same manner. Ten samples from each coatings were prepared for erosion testing. Microstructural characterization of each coating is in progress. This progress report describes coating deposition and sample preparation procedures. Relation between coatings hardness and formation of cracks in coatings is discussed.

  14. Thermal Performance of Orion Active Thermal Control System With Seven-Panel Reduced-Curvature Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen J.; Yuko, James R.

    2010-01-01

    The active thermal control system (ATCS) of the crew exploration vehicle (Orion) uses radiator panels with fluid loops as the primary system to reject heat from spacecraft. The Lockheed Martin (LM) baseline Orion ATCS uses eight-panel radiator coated with silver Teflon coating (STC) for International Space Station (ISS) missions, and uses seven-panel radiator coated with AZ 93 white paint for lunar missions. As an option to increase the radiator area with minimal impact on other component locations and interfaces, the reduced-curvature (RC) radiator concept was introduced and investigated here for the thermal perspective. Each RC radiator panel has 15 percent more area than each Lockheed Martin (LM) baseline radiator panel. The objective was to determine if the RC seven-panel radiator concept could be used in the ATCS for both ISS and lunar missions. Three radiator configurations the LM baseline, an RC seven-panel radiator with STC, and an RC seven-panel radiator with AZ 93 coating were considered in the ATCS for ISS missions. Two radiator configurations the LM baseline and an RC seven-panel radiator with AZ 93 coating were considered in the ATCS for lunar missions. A Simulink/MATLAB model of the ATCS was used to compute the ATCS performance. Some major hot phases on the thermal timeline were selected because of concern about the large amount of water sublimated for thermal topping. It was concluded that an ATCS with an RC seven-panel radiator could be used for both ISS and lunar missions, but with two different coatings STC for ISS missions and AZ 93 for lunar missions to provide performance similar to or better than that of the LM baseline ATCS.

  15. Plasmon resonant gold-coated liposomes for spectrally controlled content release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Sarah J.; Bobnick, Michael C.; Romanowski, Marek

    2010-02-01

    We recently demonstrated that liposome-supported plasmon resonant gold nanoshells are degradable into components of a size compatible with renal clearance, potentially enabling their use as multifunctional agents in applications in nanomedicine, including imaging, diagnostics, therapy, and drug delivery (Troutman et al., Adv. Mater. 2008, 20, 2604-2608). When illuminated with laser light at the wavelength matching their plasmon resonance band, gold-coated liposomes rapidly release their encapsulated substances, which can include therapeutic and diagnostic agents. The present research demonstrates that release of encapsulated agents from gold-coated liposomes can be spectrally controlled by varying the location of the plasmon resonance band; this spectral tuning is accomplished by varying the concentration of gold deposited on the surface of liposomes. Furthermore, the amount of laser energy required for release is qualitatively explained using the concept of thermal confinement (Jacques, Appl. Opt. 1993, 32(3), 2447-2454). Overlapping thermal confinement zones can be avoided by minimizing the laser pulse width, resulting in lower energy requirements for liposomal content release and less global heating of the sample. Control of heating is especially important in drug delivery applications, where it enables spatial and spectral control of delivery and prevents thermal damage to tissue.

  16. Semi-active control of piezoelectric coating's underwater sound absorption by combining design of the shunt impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang; Li, Zhaohui; Huang, Aigen; Li, Qihu

    2015-10-01

    Piezoelectric shunt damping technology has been applied in the field of underwater sound absorption in recent years. In order to achieve broadband echo reduction, semi-active control of sound absorption of multi-layered piezoelectric coating by shunt damping is significant. In this paper, a practical method is proposed to control the underwater sound absorption coefficients of piezoelectric coating layers by combining design of the shunt impedance that allows certain sound absorption coefficients at setting frequencies. A one-dimensional electro-acoustic model of the piezoelectric coating and the backing is established based on the Mason equivalent circuit theory. First, the shunt impedance of the coating is derived under the constraint of sound absorption coefficient at one frequency. Then, taking the 1-3 piezoelectric composite coating as an example, the sound absorption properties of the coating shunted to the designed shunt impedance are investigated. Next, on the basis of that, an iterative method for two constrained frequencies and an optimizing algorithm for multiple constrained frequencies are provided for combining design of the shunt impedances. At last, an experimental sample with four piezoelectric material layers is manufactured, of which the sound absorption coefficients are measured in an impedance tube. The experimental results show good agreement with the finite element simulation results. It is proved that a serial R-L circuit can control the peak frequency, maximum and bandwidth of the sound absorption coefficient and the combining R-L circuits shunted to multiple layers can control the sound absorption coefficients at multiple frequencies.

  17. Al/Al2O3 Composite Coating Deposited by Flame Spraying for Marine Applications: Alumina Skeleton Enhances Anti-Corrosion and Wear Performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Jianhui; Li, Hua

    2014-04-01

    Here we report aluminum-alumina composite coatings fabricated by flame spraying for potential marine applications against both corrosion and wear. Microstructure examination suggested dense coating structures and the evenly distributed alumina splats formed hard skeleton connecting individual Al splats. The anti-corrosion and wear performance of the coatings were enhanced significantly by the addition of alumina. Failure analyses of the coatings after accelerated corrosion testing disclosed the intact alumina skeleton, which prevented further advancement of the corrosion. The results suggest that there is great potential for the cost-effective Al-Al2O3 coatings with tailorable alumina contents for application in the marine environment.

  18. Investigation of environmental effects on coatings for thermal control of large space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerlaunt, G. A.; Gilligan, J. E.; Ashford, N. A.

    1971-01-01

    The objective of significantly advancing the state-of-the-art of white, spacecraft-radiator coatings has been realized in a comprehensive goal-oriented, pigmented-coatings research program. Considered were inorganic pigments and coatings, silicone polymers and coatings, the design and construction of a combined ultraviolet-plus-proton irradiation facility, the development of zinc orthotitanate pigment and coatings, and the effects on several low alpha sub s/epsilon paints of combined ultraviolet and proton irradiation.

  19. New support for high-performance liquid chromatography based on silica coated with alumina particles.

    PubMed

    Silveira, José Leandro R; Dib, Samia R; Faria, Anizio M

    2014-01-01

    A new material based on silica coated with alumina nanoparticles was proposed for use as a chromatographic support for reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Alumina nanoparticles were synthesized by a sol-gel process in reversed micelles composed of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate, and the support material was formed by the self-assembly of alumina layers on silica spheres. Spectroscopic and (29)Si nuclear magnetic resonance results showed evidence of chemical bonds between the alumina nanoparticles and the silica spheres, while morphological characterizations showed that the aluminized silica maintained the morphological properties of silica desired for chromatographic purposes after alumina incorporation. Stability studies indicated that bare silica showed high dissolution (~83%), while the aluminized silica remained practically unchanged (99%) after passing one liter of the alkaline mobile phase, indicating high stability under alkaline conditions. The C18 bonded aluminized silica phase showed great potential for use in high-performance liquid chromatography to separate basic molecules in the reversed-phase mode.

  20. Optical Coating Performance for Heat Reflectors of the JWST-ISIM Electronic Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashford, Robert A.; Perrygo, Charles M.; Garrison, Matthew B.; White, Bryant K.; Threat, Felix T.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Jeans, James W.; Huber, Frank K.; Bousquet, Robert R.; Shaw, Dave

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a thermal radiator design consisting of lightweight composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings for use on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) structure. The structure will have a Thermal Subsystem unit to provide passive cooling to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) control electronics. The ISIM, in the JWST observatory, is the platform that provides the mounting surfaces for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the control electronic generated-heat away from JWST is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft s own heat does not interfere with the infrared-light gathering of distant cosmic sources. The need to have lateral control in the emission direction of the IEC (ISIM Electronics Compartment) radiators led to the development of a directional baffle design that uses multiple curved mirrorlike surfaces. This concept started out from the so-called Winston non-imaging optical concentrators that use opposing parabolic reflector surfaces, where each parabola has its focus at the opposite edge of the exit aperture. For this reason they are often known as compound parabolic concentrators or CPCs. This radiator system with the circular section was chosen for the IEC reflectors because it offers two advantages over other designs. The first is that the area of the reflector strips for a given radiator area is less, which results in a lower mass baffle assembly. Secondly, the fraction of energy emitted by the radiator strips and subsequently reflected by the baffle is less. These fewer reflections reduced the amount of energy that is absorbed and eventually re-emitted, typically in a direction outside the design emission range angle. A baffle frame holds the mirrors in position above a radiator panel on the IEC. Together, these will direct the majority of the heat from the IEC above the sunshield away towards empty space.

  1. Mussel-inspired polydopamine coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles as pH-sensitive nanocarriers for controlled release.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qishan; Lin, Tianran; Wu, Hanyin; Guo, Liangqia; Ye, Peirong; Hao, Yanli; Guo, Qingquan; Jiang, Jinzhi; Fu, Fengfu; Chen, Guonan

    2014-03-10

    A novel pH-sensitive controlled release system is proposed by using mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA) coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) as nanocarriers. MSNs with a large pore diameter are synthesized by using 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene as a pore-expanding agent and are modified with a PDA coating by virtue of oxidative self-polymerization of dopamine in neutral pH. PDA coated MSNs are characterized by FTIR, TEM, N₂ adsorption and XPS techniques. The PDA coating can work as pH-sensitive gatekeepers to control the release of drug molecules from MSNs in response to the pH-stimulus. Doxorubicin (DOX, an anticancer drug) can be released in the acid media and blocked in the neutral media. PMID:24393764

  2. Improve the performance of coated cemented hip stem through the advanced composite materials.

    PubMed

    Hedia, H S; Fouda, N

    2015-01-01

    Design of hip joint implant using functionally graded material (FGM) (advanced composite material) has been used before through few researches. It gives great results regarding the stress distribution along the implant and bone interfaces. However, coating of orthopaedic implants has been widely investigated through many researches. The effect of using advanced composite stem material, which mean by functionally graded stem material, in the total hip replacement coated with the most common coated materials has not been studied yet. Therefore, this study investigates the effect of utilizing these two concepts together; FGM and coating, in designing new stem material. It is concluded that the optimal FGM cemented stem is consisting from titanium at the upper stem layers graded to collagen at a lower stem layers. This optimal graded stem coated with hydroxyapatite found to reduce stress shielding by 57% compared to homogenous titanium stem coated with hydroxyapatite. However, the optimal functionally graded stem coated with collagen reduced the stress shielding by 51% compared to homogenous titanium stem coated with collagen.

  3. Improve the performance of coated cemented hip stem through the advanced composite materials.

    PubMed

    Hedia, H S; Fouda, N

    2015-01-01

    Design of hip joint implant using functionally graded material (FGM) (advanced composite material) has been used before through few researches. It gives great results regarding the stress distribution along the implant and bone interfaces. However, coating of orthopaedic implants has been widely investigated through many researches. The effect of using advanced composite stem material, which mean by functionally graded stem material, in the total hip replacement coated with the most common coated materials has not been studied yet. Therefore, this study investigates the effect of utilizing these two concepts together; FGM and coating, in designing new stem material. It is concluded that the optimal FGM cemented stem is consisting from titanium at the upper stem layers graded to collagen at a lower stem layers. This optimal graded stem coated with hydroxyapatite found to reduce stress shielding by 57% compared to homogenous titanium stem coated with hydroxyapatite. However, the optimal functionally graded stem coated with collagen reduced the stress shielding by 51% compared to homogenous titanium stem coated with collagen. PMID:26407117

  4. Performance characterization of EURECA retroreflectors with fluoropolymer-filled SiO(x) protective coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Cales, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Aluminized corner-cube polymethylmethacrylate retroreflectors were coated with 92% SiO(x) - 8% fluoropolymer (by volume) and flown on the EURECA spacecraft. The fluoropolymer-filled SiO(x) protective coating was found to be durable to atomic oxygen when exposed in a ground-based plasma asher to an anticipated mission fluence of 2x10(exp 20) atoms/cm(exp 2). Unprotected retroreflector surfaces were found to develop highly diffuse reflectance characteristics, thus inhibiting their use for laser retroreflector purposes. A noncontacting retroreflector optical characterization system was constructed and used to measure the optical retroreflection characteristics of the following retroreflector materials: uncoated unexposed, coated unexposed, both uncoated and coated ground laboratory atomic oxygen exposed, and coated exposed to space atomic oxygen on the EURECA spacecraft. A comparison of the optical characterizations is presented.

  5. Modified Lanthanum Zirconium Oxide buffer layers for low-cost, high performance YBCO coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parans Paranthaman, M.; Sathyamurthy, S.; Li, Xiaoping; Specht, E. D.; Wee, S. H.; Cantoni, C.; Goyal, A.; Rupich, M. W.

    2010-03-01

    The pyrochlore Lanthanum Zirconium Oxide, La 2Zr 2O 7 (LZO), has been developed as a potential replacement barrier layer in the standard RABiTS three-layer architecture of physical vapor deposited CeO 2 cap/YSZ barrier/Y 2O 3 seed on Ni-5%W metal tape. The main focus of this research is to ascertain whether: (i) we can further improve the barrier properties of LZO; (ii) we can modify the LZO cation ratio and still achieve a high level of performance; and (iii) it is possible to reduce the number of buffer layers. We report a systematic investigation of the LZO film growth with varying compositions of La:Zr ratio in the La 2O 3-ZrO 2 system. Using a metal-organic deposition (MOD) process, we have grown smooth, crack-free, epitaxial thin films of La xZr 1-xO y ( x = 0.2-0.6) on standard Y 2O 3 buffered Ni-5W substrates in short lengths. Detailed XRD studies indicate that a single epitaxial LZO phase with only (0 0 1) texture can be achieved in a broad compositional range of x = 0.2-0.6 in La xZr 1-xO y. Both CeO 2 cap layers and MOD-YBCO films were grown epitaxially on these modified LZO barriers. High critical currents per unit width, Ic of 274-292 A/cm at 77 K and self-field were achieved for MOD-YBCO films grown on La xZr 1-xO y ( x = 0.4-0.6) films. These results indicate that LZO films can be grown with a broad compositional range and still support high performance YBCO coated conductors. In addition, epitaxial MOD La xZr 1-xO y ( x = 0.25) films were grown directly on biaxially textured Ni-3W substrates. About 3 μm thick YBCO films grown on a single MOD-LZO buffered Ni-3W substrates using pulsed laser deposition show a critical current density, Jc, of 0.55 MA/cm 2 ( Ic of 169 A/cm) at 77 K and 0.01 T. This work holds promise for a route for producing simplified buffer architecture for RABiTS based YBCO coated conductors.

  6. Modified Lanthanum Zirconium Oxide Buffer for Low-Cost, High Performance YBCO Coated Conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan; Li, Xiaoping; Specht, Eliot D; Wee, Sung Hun; Cantoni, Claudia; Goyal, Amit; Rupich, M. W.

    2010-01-01

    Lanthanum Zirconium Oxide, La2Zr2O7 (LZO) has been developed as a potential replacement barrier layer in the standard RABiTS three-layer architecture of physical vapor deposited CeO2 cap/YSZ barrier/Y2O3 seed/Ni-5W. The main focus of this research is to see (i) whether we can improve further the barrier properties of LZO; (ii) can we widen the LZO composition and still achieve the high performance?; and (iii) is it possible to reduce the number of buffer layers? We report a systematic investigation of the LZO film growth with varying compositions of La:Zr ratio in the La2O3-ZrO2 system. Using metal-organic deposition (MOD) process, we have grown smooth, crack-free, epitaxial thin films of LaxZr1-xOy (x = 0.2-0.6) on standard Y2O3 buffered Ni-5W substrates in short lengths. Detailed XRD studies indicate that a single epitaxial LZO phase without the (111) texture can be achieved in a wider compositional window of x = 0.2-0.6 in LaxZr1-xOy. Both CeO2 cap layers and MOD-YBCO films were grown 2 epitaxially on these modified LZO barriers. Transport property measurements indicate that we can achieve a higher critical current, Ic of 274-292 A/cm at 77 K and self-field on MOD-YBCO films grown on LaxZr1-xOy (x = 0.4-0.6) films. These results indicate that LZO films can be grown with a wider compositional window and still achieve high performance YBCO coated conductors. In addition, epitaxial MOD LaxZr1-xOy (x = 0.25) films were grown directly on biaxially textured Ni-3W substrates. About 3 m thick YBCO films with a Jc of 0.55 MA/cm2 at 77 K and 0.01 T were grown on a single MOD LZO buffered Ni-3W substrate using pulsed laser deposition. This work promises a route for producing simplified buffer architecture for RABiTS based YBCO coated conductors.

  7. Control of volatile organic compound emissions from coating operations at aerospace manufacturing and rework operations. Guideline series. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Hearne, D.G.; Reeves, D.W.

    1996-10-01

    The draft control techniques guideline (CTG) document identifies presumptive reasonably available control technology (RACT) for controlling volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions from aerospace coatings and cleaning solvents. The CTG guidance also reflects EPA`s determination of best available control (BAC) measures for this industry. The CTG document is intended to provide State and local air pollution control authorities with an information base for proceeding with their evaluation and analyses of RACT for their own regulations.

  8. High-performance broadband optical coatings on InGaN/GaN solar cells for multijunction device integration

    SciTech Connect

    Young, N. G. Farrell, R. M.; Iza, M.; Speck, J. S.; Perl, E. E.; Keller, S.; Bowers, J. E.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P.

    2014-04-21

    We demonstrate InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well solar cells grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on a bulk (0001) substrate with high-performance broadband optical coatings to improve light absorption. A front-side anti-reflective coating and a back-side dichroic mirror were designed to minimize front surface reflections across a broad spectral range and maximize rear surface reflections only in the spectral range absorbed by the InGaN, making the cells suitable for multijunction solar cell integration. Application of optical coatings increased the peak external quantum efficiency by 56% (relative) and conversion efficiency by 37.5% (relative) under 1 sun AM0 equivalent illumination.

  9. Toward uniform and ultrathin carbon layer coating on lithium iron phosphate using liquid carbon dioxide for enhanced electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seung-Ah; Kim, Dong Hyun; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Chang, Wonyoung; Yoo, Jibeom; Kim, Jaehoon

    2014-09-01

    In this communication, uniform and ultrathin carbon coating on LiFePO4 (LFP) particles are performed using liquid carbon dioxide (l-CO2)-based free-meniscus coating. The uniform and conformal coverage of the carbon layer on LFP with a thickness of 3.3 nm, and a uniform distribution of carbon on the entire surface of the LFP particle are confirmed. The carbon-coated LFP (C-LFP) with a carbon content of 1.9 wt.% obtained using l-CO2-based coating exhibits a discharge capacity of 169 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C and 71 mAh g-1 at 30 C, while much lower discharge capacity of 146 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C and 17 mAh g-1 at 30 C is observed when C-LFP with an optimized carbon content of 6.0 wt.% is prepared using conventional aqueous-based coating.

  10. Fabrication and Characterization of Novel Fe-Ni Alloy Coated Carbon Fibers for High-Performance Shielding Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Fang; Li, Junjiao; Chen, Liang; Chen, Lixia; Huang, Yuan

    2015-03-01

    Novel Fe-Ni alloy coated carbon fibers (Fe-Ni-CFs) were prepared via two-step electrodeposition with an initial synthesis of Fe coatings on the activated carbon fibers and followed by the co-deposition of Fe and Ni. The effect of annealing treatment on structure and properties of Fe-Ni-CFs was studied through SEM, TEM, XRD and VSM. The results indicated that the Fe-Ni alloy coatings with the thickness of only 0.25 um are highly wrapped on the surface of carbon fibers. The un-annealed coatings showed high saturation magnetization values with 52 dB from 300-1200 MHz, which mainly due to Fe content (18.4 wt.%) of the coatings meets the requirements of high magnetic perm-alloy. The surface quality, crystallinity and conductivity of the Fe-Ni-CFs were obviously improved despite of the reduction of the saturation magnetization resulted from the bigger grains after annealing. Based on the above aspects, annealing at 400∘C was preferred for the Fe-Ni-CFs to obtain good comprehensive performance. Importantly, the Fe-Ni-CFs filled ABS resin composites showed better Electromagnetic Interference shielding effectiveness than the CFs reinforced ABS composites.

  11. Thermal radiative properties: Coatings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Touloukian, Y. S.; Dewitt, D. P.; Hernicz, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    This volume consists, for the most part, of a presentation of numerical data compiled over the years in a most comprehensive manner on coatings for all applications, in particular, thermal control. After a moderately detailed discussion of the theoretical nature of the thermal radiative properties of coatings, together with an overview of predictive procedures and recognized experimental techniques, extensive numerical data on the thermal radiative properties of pigmented, contact, and conversion coatings are presented. These data cover metallic and nonmetallic pigmented coatings, enamels, metallic and nonmetallic contact coatings, antireflection coatings, resin coatings, metallic black coatings, and anodized and oxidized conversion coatings.

  12. Pyrolytic carbon-coated silicon/carbon nanofiber composite anodes for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanli; Hu, Yi; Shao, Jianzhong; Shen, Zhen; Chen, Renzhong; Zhang, Xiangwu; He, Xia; Song, Yuanze; Xing, Xiuli

    2015-12-01

    Pyrolytic carbon-coated Si/C nanofibers (Si/C-CNFs) composites have been prepared through the sucrose coating and secondary thermal treatment of Si/CNFs composites produced via electrospinning and carbonization. This results in a structure in which Si nanoparticles are distributed along the fibers, with the fiber surface being coated with an amorphous carbon layer through pyrolysis of the sucrose. This carbon coating not only limits the volume expansion of the exposed Si nanoparticles, preventing their direct contact with the electrolyte, but also creates a connection between the fibers that is beneficial to Li+ ion transport, structural integrity, and electrochemical conductivity. Consequently, the Si/C-CNFs composite exhibits a more stable cycle performance, better rate performance, and higher conductivity than Si/CNFs alone. The optimal level of performance was attained with a 20:200 mass ratio of sucrose to deionized water, with a high retained capacity of 1215.2 mAh g-1 after 50 cycles, thus indicating that it is a suitable anode material for Li-ion batteries.

  13. A new technique to improve the mechanical and biological performance of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene using a nylon coating.

    PubMed

    Firouzi, Dariush; Youssef, Aya; Amer, Momen; Srouji, Rami; Amleh, Asma; Foucher, Daniel A; Bougherara, Habiba

    2014-04-01

    A new patent pending technique is proposed in this study to improve the mechanical and biological performance of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), i.e., to uniformly coat nylon onto the UHMWPE fiber (Firouzi et al., 2012). Mechanical tests were performed on neat and new nylon coated UHMWPE fibers to examine the tensile strength and creep resistance of the samples at different temperatures. Cytotoxicity and osteolysis induced by wear debris of the materials were investigated using (MTT) assay, and RT-PCR for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) osteolysis markers. Mechanical test results showed substantial improvement in maximum creep time, maximum breaking force, and toughness values of Nylon 6,6 and Nylon 6,12 coated UHMWPE fibers between average 15% and 60% at 25, 50, and 70°C. Furthermore, cytotoxicity studies have demonstrated significant improvement in cell viability using the nylon coated UHMWPE over the neat one (72.4% vs 54.8%) for 48h and (80.7 vs 5%) for 72h (P<0.01). Osteolysis test results have shown that the expression levels of TNFα and IL-6 markers induced by the neat UHMWPE fiber were significantly higher than those induced by the Nylon 6,6 coated UHMWPE (2.5 fold increase for TNFα at 48h, and three fold increase for IL-6 at 72h (P<0.01)). This study suggests that UHMWPE coated with nylon could be used as a novel material in clinical applications with lower cytotoxicity, less wear debris-induced osteolysis, and superior mechanical properties compared to neat UHMWPE.

  14. Sensing, Control, and In Situ Measurement of Coating Properties: An Integrated Approach Toward Establishing Process-Property Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, S.; Srinivasan, V.; Valarezo, A.; Vaidya, A.; Streibl, T.

    2009-06-01

    Over the last decade there has been an explosion in terms of available tools for sensing the particle spray stream in thermal spray processes. This has led to considerable enhancement in our understanding of process reproducibility and reliability. Despite these advances, the linkage to coating properties has continued to be an enigma. This is partially due to the complex nature of the build-up process and the associated issues with measuring properties of these complex coatings. In this paper, we identify critical issues in processing-structure-property relations particularly with respect to the linkage to particle properties. Our goal is to demonstrate an integrated strategy, one that combines particle state sensing, with process mapping and extracting coating properties in situ through the development of robust and advanced curvature-based techniques. These techniques allow estimation of coating modulus, residual stress and, non-linear response of thermal sprayed ceramic coatings all within minutes of the deposition process. Finally, the integrated strategy examines the role of process maps for control of the spray stream as well as tailoring properties of thermal spray coatings. Examples of such studies for yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings are discussed.

  15. Low Conductive Thermal Barrier Coatings Produced by Ion Beam Assisted EB-PVD with Controlled Porosity, Microstructure Refinement and Alloying Additions for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Douglas E.; Singh, Jogender

    2005-01-01

    Various advanced Hafnia-based thermal barrier coatings (TBC) were applied on nickel-based superalloy coupons by electron beam physical vapor deposition. In addition, microstructural modifications to the coating material were made in an effort to reduce the thermal conductivity of the coating materials. Various processing parameters and coating system modifications were made in order to deposit the alloyed TBC with the desired microstructure and thus coating performance, some of which include applying coatings at substrate temperatures of 1150 C on both PtAl and CoNiCrAlY bond coated samples, as well as using 8YSZ as a bond layer. In addition, various characterization techniques including thermal cyclic tests, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, thermal conductivity, and reflectivity measurements were performed. Although the coating microstructure was never fully optimized due to funding being cut short, significant reductions in thermal conductivity were accomplished through both chemistry changes (composition) and microstructural modifications.

  16. PERFORMANCE OF A POLYMER SEALANT COATING IN AN ARCTIC MARINE ENVIRONMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    MOSKOWITZ,P.; COWGILL,M.; GRIFFITH,A.; CHERNAENKO,L.; DIASHEV,A.; NAZARIAN,A.

    2001-02-25

    The feasibility of using a polymer-based coating, Polibrid 705, to seal concrete and steel surfaces from permanent radioactive contamination in an Arctic marine environment has been successfully demonstrated using a combination of field and laboratory testing. A mobile, self-sufficient spraying device was developed to specifications provided by the Russian Northern Navy and deployed at the RTP Atomflot site, Murmansk, Russia. Demonstration coatings were applied to concrete surfaces exposed to conditions ranging from indoor pedestrian usage to heavy vehicle passage and container handling in a loading dock. A large steel container was also coated with the polymer, filled with solid radwaste, sealed, and left out of doors, exposed to the full annual Arctic weather cycle. The 12 months of field testing gave rise to little degradation of the sealant coating, except for a few chips and gouge marks on the loading bay surface that were readily repaired. Contamination resulting from radwaste handling was easily removed and the surface was not degraded by contact with the decontamination agents. The field tests were accompanied by a series of laboratory qualification tests carried out at a research laboratory in St. Petersburg. The laboratory tests examined a variety of properties, including bond strength between the coating and the substrate, thermal cycling resistance, wear resistance, flammability, and ease of decontamination. The Polibrid 705 coating met all the Russian Navy qualification requirements with the exception of flammability. In this last instance, it was decided to restrict application of the coating to land-based facilities.

  17. PERFORMANCE OF A POLYMER SEALANT COATING IN AN ARCTIC MARINE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    MOSKOWITZ,P.; COWGILL,M.; GRIFFITH,A.; CHERNAENKO,L.; DIASHEV,A.; NAZARIAN,A.

    2001-02-25

    The feasibility of using a polymer-based coating, Polibrid 705, to seal concrete and steel surfaces from permanent radioactive contamination in an Arctic marine environment has been successfully demonstrated using a combination of field and laboratory testing. A mobile, self-sufficient spraying device was developed to specifications provided by the Russian Northern Navy and deployed at the RTP Atomflot site, Murmansk, Russia. Demonstration coatings were applied to concrete surfaces exposed to conditions ranging from indoor pedestrian usage to heavy vehicle passage and container handling in a loading dock. A large steel container was also coated with the polymer, filled with solid radwaste, sealed, and left out of doors, exposed to the full annual Arctic weather cycle. The 12 months of field testing gave rise to little degradation of the sealant coating, except for a few chips and gouge marks on the loading bay surface that were readily repaired. Contamination resulting from radwaste handling was easily removed and the surface was not degraded by contact with the decontamination agents. The field tests were accompanied by a series of laboratory qualification tests carried out at a research laboratory in St. Petersburg. The laboratory tests examined a variety of properties, including bond strength between the coating and the substrate, thermal cycling resistance, wear resistance, flammability, and ease of decontamination. The Polibrid 705 coating met all the Russian Navy qualification requirements with the exception of flammability. In this last instance, it was decided to restrict application of the coating to land-based facilities.

  18. Effects of Vanadium Addition on Microstructure and Tribological Performance of Bainite Hardfacing Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jigang; Xing, Xiaolei; Wang, Yajun; Zhou, Yefei; Ren, Xuejun; Yang, Yulin; Yang, Qingxiang

    2015-03-01

    New hardfacing coatings with different vanadium (V) additions were prepared by surfacing technology. The microstructures of the hardfacing coatings were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and examined by transmission electron microscope. The hardness and wear resistances of the hardfacing coatings were measured. Worn debris were collected at the end of wear test and analyzed. The precipitation temperature of the phases in the hardfacing coatings and the mass fraction of MC carbide were calculated by Jmatpro software. The experimental results show that, the hardfacing coating mainly consists of granular bainite. No significant change in the size of linear martensite-austenite (M-A) islands is observed with the increase of V addition, while the size of massive M-A islands is decreased. The wear resistance of the hardfacing coating reaches a maximum level with V content of 0.14 wt.%. The calculated results show that, the mass fraction of MC carbide is increased with the increase of V content. Based on calculation following two-dimensional mismatch theory, MC carbide is a heterogeneous nucleus of the ferrite resulting refined ferrite in the hardfacing coating.

  19. Development and performance of aluminum nitride insulating coatings for application in a lithium environment

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Reed, C.B.; Rink, D.L.; Haglund, R.C.

    1997-10-01

    The blanket system is one of the most important components in a fusion reactor because it has a major impact on both the economics and safety of fusion energy. Based on the requirement that an electrically insulating coating on the first-wall structural material must minimize the magnetohydrodynamic pressure drop that occurs during the flow of liquid metal in a magnetic field, aluminum nitride (AlN) is considered a candidate coating material for the lithium self-cooled blanket concept. Detailed investigations were conducted on the fabrication, metallurgical microstructure, compatibility in liquid Li, and electrical characteristics of AlN as a coating material. A nonindentation technique was used to evaluate the hardness of the coated samples in as-coated condition, after a hardening treatment, and after exposure to Li. Lithium compatibility studies were conducted in static systems by exposure of AlN-coated specimens for several time periods, at various temperatures, and in various lithium chemistries. Electrical resistance of the specimens was measured at room temperature before and after exposure to liquid Li. This paper discusses the results from ongoing activities on the development of AlN coatings.

  20. RCE-DR, a novel process for coated conductor fabrication with high performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Hun; Lee, Hunju; Lee, Jung-Woo; Choi, Soon-Mi; Yoo, Sang-Im; Moon, Seung-Hyun

    2014-04-01

    We report in detail on SuNAM’s reactive co-evaporation by deposition and reaction (RCE-DR) process. We have successfully fabricated a high performance GdBCO coated conductor (CC) with high throughput by the RCE-DR process, that consists of two steps for the deposition of elemental metal oxides and the conversion of cation oxides into the GdBCO superconducting phase. Constituting metals such as Gd, Ba and Cu were first deposited on LaMnO3 (LMO)-buffered IBAD-MgO templates at low temperatures and low pressures followed by a high temperature treatment step under high oxygen partial pressure for fast phase conversion. GdBCO CCs fabricated by RCE-DR showed excellent transport properties such as a critical current of 794 A cm-1 width at 77 K in self-field. With the RCE-DR process, we have achieved an overall processing speed of more than 120 m h-1 (in terms of a real process linear tape speed equivalent). SuNAM’s RCE-DR technique showed great potential as the highest throughput fabrication process compared with other methods developed previously for second generation high temperature superconducting wires, meeting the current and future need of industry in terms of price and production speed.