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Sample records for control light-induced chromatin

  1. Combinatorial Control of Light Induced Chromatin Remodeling and Gene Activation in Neurospora

    PubMed Central

    Sancar, Cigdem; Ha, Nati; Yilmaz, Rüstem; Tesorero, Rafael; Fisher, Tamas; Brunner, Michael; Sancar, Gencer

    2015-01-01

    Light is an important environmental cue that affects physiology and development of Neurospora crassa. The light-sensing transcription factor (TF) WCC, which consists of the GATA-family TFs WC1 and WC2, is required for light-dependent transcription. SUB1, another GATA-family TF, is not a photoreceptor but has also been implicated in light-inducible gene expression. To assess regulation and organization of the network of light-inducible genes, we analyzed the roles of WCC and SUB1 in light-induced transcription and nucleosome remodeling. We show that SUB1 co-regulates a fraction of light-inducible genes together with the WCC. WCC induces nucleosome eviction at its binding sites. Chromatin remodeling is facilitated by SUB1 but SUB1 cannot activate light-inducible genes in the absence of WCC. We identified FF7, a TF with a putative O-acetyl transferase domain, as an interaction partner of SUB1 and show their cooperation in regulation of a fraction of light-inducible and a much larger number of non light-inducible genes. Our data suggest that WCC acts as a general switch for light-induced chromatin remodeling and gene expression. SUB1 and FF7 synergistically determine the extent of light-induction of target genes in common with WCC but have in addition a role in transcription regulation beyond light-induced gene expression. PMID:25822411

  2. PHYTOCHROME B and HISTONE DEACETYLASE 6 Control Light-Induced Chromatin Compaction in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Pavlova, Penka; Clifton, Rachel; Pontvianne, Frédéric; Snoek, L. Basten; Millenaar, Frank F.; Schulkes, Roeland Kees; van Driel, Roel; Voesenek, Laurentius A. C. J.; Spillane, Charles; Pikaard, Craig S.; Fransz, Paul; Peeters, Anton J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis thaliana exists for many traits and often reflects acclimation to local environments. Studying natural variation has proven valuable in the characterization of phenotypic traits and, in particular, in identifying genetic factors controlling these traits. It has been previously shown that chromatin compaction changes during development and biotic stress. To gain more insight into the genetic control of chromatin compaction, we investigated the nuclear phenotype of 21 selected Arabidopsis accessions from different geographic origins and habitats. We show natural variation in chromatin compaction and demonstrate a positive correlation with latitude of geographic origin. The level of compaction appeared to be dependent on light intensity. A novel approach, combining Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) mapping and microscopic examination, pointed at PHYTOCHROME-B (PHYB) and HISTONE DEACETYLASE-6 (HDA6) as positive regulators of light-controlled chromatin compaction. Indeed, mutant analyses demonstrate that both factors affect global chromatin organization. HDA6, in addition, strongly promotes the light-mediated compaction of the Nucleolar Organizing Regions (NORs). The accession Cape Verde Islands-0 (Cvi-0), which shows sequence polymorphism in the PHYB gene and in the HDA6 promotor, resembles the hda6 mutant in having reduced chromatin compaction and decreased methylation levels of DNA and histone H3K9 at the NORs. We provide evidence that chromatin organization is controlled by light intensity. We propose that chromatin plasticity is associated with acclimation of Arabidopsis to its environment. The polymorphic alleles such as PHYB and HDA6 control this process. PMID:19730687

  3. Dietary control of chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhiguang; Cai, Ling; Tu, Benjamin P

    2015-01-01

    Organisms must be able to rapidly alter gene expression in response to changes in their nutrient environment. This review summarizes evidence that epigenetic modifications of chromatin depend on particular metabolites of intermediary metabolism, enabling the facile regulation of gene expression in tune with metabolic state. Nutritional or dietary control of chromatin is an often-overlooked, yet fundamental regulatory mechanism directly linked to human physiology. Nutrient-sensitive epigenetic marks are dynamic, suggesting rapid turnover, and may have functions beyond the regulation of gene transcription, including pH regulation and as carbon sources in cancer cells. PMID:26094239

  4. Photoreceptors CRYTOCHROME2 and Phytochrome B Control Chromatin Compaction in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    van Zanten, Martijn; Tessadori, Federico; McLoughlin, Fionn; Smith, Reuben; Millenaar, Frank F.; van Driel, Roel; Voesenek, Laurentius A.C.J.; Peeters, Anton J.M.; Fransz, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Development and acclimation processes to the environment are associated with large-scale changes in chromatin compaction in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here, we studied the effects of light signals on chromatin organization. A decrease in light intensity induces a large-scale reduction in chromatin compaction. This low light response is reversible and shows strong natural genetic variation. Moreover, the degree of chromatin compaction is affected by light quality signals relevant for natural canopy shade. The photoreceptor CRYPTOCHROME2 appears a general positive regulator of low light-induced chromatin decompaction. Phytochrome B also controls light-induced chromatin organization, but its effect appears to be dependent on the genetic background. We present a model in which chromatin compaction is regulated by the light environment via CRYPTOCHROME2 protein abundance, which is controlled by phytochrome B action. PMID:20935177

  5. Snapshots: Chromatin Control of Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, David M.; Lieberman, Paul M.; Jung, Jae U.; McBride, Alison A.; Morris, Kevin V.; Ott, Melanie; Margolis, David; Nieto, Amelia; Nevels, Michael; Parks, Robin J.; Kristie, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Like their cellular host counterparts, many invading viral pathogens must contend with, modulate, and utilize the host cell’s chromatin machinery to promote efficient lytic infection or control persistent-latent states. While not intended to be comprehensive, this review represents a compilation of conceptual snapshots of the dynamic interplay of viruses with the chromatin environment. Contributions focus on chromatin dynamics during infection, viral circumvention of cellular chromatin repression, chromatin organization of large DNA viruses, tethering and persistence, viral interactions with cellular chromatin modulation machinery, and control of viral latency-reactivation cycles. PMID:23217624

  6. Arabidopsis Pol II-Dependent in Vitro Transcription System Reveals Role of Chromatin for Light-Inducible rbcS Gene Transcription.

    PubMed

    Ido, Ayaka; Iwata, Shinya; Iwata, Yuka; Igarashi, Hisako; Hamada, Takahiro; Sonobe, Seiji; Sugiura, Masahiro; Yukawa, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    In vitro transcription is an essential tool to study the molecular mechanisms of transcription. For over a decade, we have developed an in vitro transcription system from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum)-cultured cells (BY-2), and this system supported the basic activities of the three RNA polymerases (Pol I, Pol II, and Pol III). However, it was not suitable to study photosynthetic genes, because BY-2 cells have lost their photosynthetic activity. Therefore, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) in vitro transcription systems were developed from green and etiolated suspension cells. Sufficient in vitro Pol II activity was detected after the minor modification of the nuclear soluble extracts preparation method; removal of vacuoles from protoplasts and L-ascorbic acid supplementation in the extraction buffer were particularly effective. Surprisingly, all four Arabidopsis Rubisco small subunit (rbcS-1A, rbcS-1B, rbcS-2B, and rbcS-3B) gene members were in vitro transcribed from the naked DNA templates without any light-dependent manner. However, clear light-inducible transcriptions were observed using chromatin template of rbcS-1A gene, which was prepared with a human nucleosome assembly protein 1 (hNAP1) and HeLa histones. This suggested that a key determinant of light-dependency through the rbcS gene transcription was a higher order of DNA structure (i.e. chromatin). © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Light-induced bending and smart control of photochromic liquid crystal elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Lihua; Yan, Yan; Huo, Yongzhong

    2007-07-01

    Light-induce bending of photochromic LCEs is a newly found phenomenon, with potential applications such as artificial muscles, nano actuators and remote-controllable implements. To simulate this, light-induced bending models of straight and curved beams can be derived from the simple beam theory. The effect of the light is substituted as an effective bending moment. Several examples, with different approximations, boundary conditions, under uniform or nonuniform illuminations, are demonstrated to calculate the curvature, the restraining force or the deflection. Especially, under weak light intensities and low temperature, the analytical expression of the curvature is obtained. A simplified remote controllable grip hand is simulated by the curved beam bending model. We calculate the grip force of the hand to hold a body, controlled by light and heat. The simulation shows that the largest value of grip stress can be about 1Mpa. In order to optimize the light-induced bending, the effects on the effective moment of the parameters, such as the light intensity, the thickness of the beam and the decay distance of the material are further analyzed. It is found that the effective moment is not a monotonic function of these parameters. Therefore, proper light intensity, material and thickness must be chosen to get the largest bending.

  8. A repressor-antirepressor pair links two loci controlling light-induced carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    López-Rubio, José Juan; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S; Murillo, Francisco José

    2002-03-01

    The light-inducible carB operon encodes all but one of the structural genes for carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus. It is transcriptionally controlled by two proteins expressed from two unlinked genetic loci: CarS from the light-inducible carQRS operon, and CarA from the light-independent carA operon. CarA represses transcription from the carB promoter (P(B)) in the dark, and CarS counteracts this on illumination. The CarA sequence revealed a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif of the type found in bacterial MerR transcriptional factors, whereas CarS contains no known DNA-binding motif. Here, we examine the molecular interplay between CarA and CarS. We demonstrate the following. (i) Whereas CarS exhibits no DNA binding in vitro, CarA binds specifically to a region encompassing P(B) to form at least two distinct complexes. (ii) A palindrome located between positions -46 and -63 relative to the transcription start point is essential but not sufficient for the formation of the two CarA-DNA complexes observed. (iii) CarS abrogates the specific DNA binding of CarA. CarA is therefore a repressor and CarS an antirepressor. (iv) CarS physically interacts with CarA; thus, the functional interaction between them is mediated by protein-protein interactions.

  9. In vitro Chromatin Assembly - Strategies and Quality Control

    PubMed Central

    Muthurajan, Uma; Mattiroli, Francesca; Bergeron, Serge; Zhou, Keda; Gu, Yajie; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Dyer, Pamela; Irving, Thomas; Luger, Karolin

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin accessibility is modulated by structural transitions that provide timely access to the genetic and epigenetic information during many essential nuclear processes. These transitions are orchestrated by regulatory proteins that coordinate intricate structural modifications and signalling pathways. In vitro reconstituted chromatin samples from defined components are instrumental in defining the mechanistic details of such processes. The bottleneck to appropriate in vitro analysis is the production of high quality, and quality-controlled, chromatin substrates. In this chapter we describe methods for in vitro chromatin reconstitution and quality control. We highlight the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches, and emphasize quality control steps that ensure reconstitution of a bona fide homogenous chromatin preparation. This is essential for optimal reproducibility and reliability of ensuing experiments using chromatin substrates. PMID:27372747

  10. Protein phosphatase PHLPP1 controls the light-induced resetting of the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Masubuchi, Satoru; Gao, Tianyan; O'Neill, Audrey; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Newton, Alexandra C.; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1) differentially attenuates Akt, PKC, and ERK1/2 signaling, thereby controlling the duration and amplitude of responses evoked by these kinases. PHLPP1 is expressed in the mammalian central clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, where it oscillates in a circadian fashion. To explore the role of PHLPP1 in vivo, we have generated mice with a targeted deletion of the PHLPP1 gene. Here we show that PHLPP1-null mice, although displaying normal circadian rhythmicity, have a drastically impaired capacity to stabilize the circadian period after light-induced resetting, producing a large phase shift after light resetting. Our findings reveal that PHLPP1 exerts a previously unappreciated role in circadian control, governing the consolidation of circadian periodicity after resetting. PMID:20080691

  11. Light-induced Notch activity controls neurogenic and gliogenic potential of neural progenitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Tai; Song, Mi-Ryoung

    2016-10-28

    Oscillations in Notch signaling are essential for reserving neural progenitors for cellular diversity in developing brains. Thus, steady and prolonged overactivation of Notch signaling is not suitable for generating neurons. To acquire greater temporal control of Notch activity and mimic endogenous oscillating signals, here we adopted a light-inducible transgene system to induce active form of Notch NICD in neural progenitors. Alternating Notch activity saved more progenitors that are prone to produce neurons creating larger number of mixed clones with neurons and progenitors in vitro, compared to groups with no light or continuous light stimulus. Furthermore, more upper layer neurons and astrocytes arose upon intermittent Notch activity, indicating that dynamic Notch activity maintains neural progeny and fine-tune neuron-glia diversity.

  12. Controllable 3D alginate hydrogel patterning via visible-light induced electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Dai, Gaole; Wan, Wenfeng; Zhao, Yuliang; Wang, Zixun; Li, Wenjun; Shi, Peng; Shen, Yajing

    2016-04-25

    The fabrication of alginate hydrogel in 3D has recently received increasing attention owing to its distinct efficacy as biocompatible scaffold for 3D cell culture, biomedical and tissue engineering. We report a controllable 3D alginate hydrogel patterning method by developing a visible-light induced electrodeposition chip. The chip mainly consists of a photoconductive titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc) anode plate, an indium tin oxide (ITO) cathode plate and the mixed solution (1% sodium alginate and 0.25% CaCO3 nano particles) between them. After a designed visible-light pattern is projected onto the TiOPc plate, the produced H(+) by electrolysis will trigger Ca(2+) near the anode (illuminated area), and then the gelation of calcium alginate patterns, as desired, happens controllably. In addition, we further establish an exponential model to elucidate the gel growth v.s. time and current density. The results indicate that the proposed method is able to fabricate various 3D alginate hydrogel patterns in a well controllable manner, and maintain the laden cells at high survival rate (>98% right after gel formation). This research paves an alternative way for 3D alginate hydrogel patterning with high controllability and productivity, which would benefit the research in biomedical and tissue engineering.

  13. A remotely driven and controlled micro-gripper fabricated from light-induced deformation smart material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chaolei; Lv, Jiu-an; Tian, Xiaojun; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Jie; Yu, Yanlei

    2016-09-01

    Micro-gripper is an important tool to manipulate and assemble micro-scale objects. Generally, as micro-gripper is too small to be directly driven by general motors, it always needs special driving devices and suitable structure design. In this paper, two-finger micro-grippers are designed and fabricated, which utilize light-induced deformation smart material to make one of the two fingers. As the smart material is directly driven and controlled by remote lights instead of lines and motors, this light-driven mode simplifies the design of the two-finger micro-gripper and avoids special drivers and complex mechanical structure. In addition, a micro-manipulation experiment system is set up which is based on the light-driven micro-gripper. Experimental results show that this remotely light-driven micro-gripper has ability to manipulate and assemble micro-scale objects both in air and water. Furthermore, two micro-grippers can also work together for cooperation which can further enhance the assembly ability. On the other hand, this kind of remotely controllable micro-gripper that does not require on-board energy storage, can be used in mobile micro-robot as a manipulation hand.

  14. A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through the Regulation of Chromatin Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Jégu, Teddy; Domenichini, Séverine; Blein, Thomas; Ariel, Federico; Christ, Aurélie; Kim, Soon-Kap; Crespi, Martin; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Mouille, Grégory; Bourge, Mickaël; Hirt, Heribert; Bergounioux, Catherine; Raynaud, Cécile; Benhamed, Moussa

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin architecture determines transcriptional accessibility to DNA and consequently gene expression levels in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regulators of chromatin architecture. To gain insight into the function of these complexes during root development, we have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show that BAF60 is a positive regulator of root development and cell cycle progression in the root meristem via its ability to down-regulate cytokinin production. By opposing both the deposition of active histone marks and the formation of a chromatin regulatory loop, BAF60 negatively regulates two crucial target genes for cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT3 and IPT7) and one cell cycle inhibitor (KRP7). Our results demonstrate that SWI/SNF complexes containing BAF60 are key factors governing the equilibrium between formation and dissociation of a chromatin loop controlling phytohormone production and cell cycle progression. PMID:26457678

  15. Control of chromatin structure by long noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Böhmdorfer, Gudrun; Wierzbicki, Andrzej T.

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) is a pivotal factor regulating various aspects of genome activity. Genome regulation via DNA methylation and posttranslational histone modifications is a well-documented function of lncRNA in plants, fungi, and animals. Here, we summarize evidence showing that lncRNA also controls chromatin structure including nucleosome positioning and chromosome looping. We focus on data from plant experimental systems, discussed in the context of other eukaryotes. We explain the mechanisms of lncRNA-controlled chromatin remodeling and the implications of the functional interplay between noncoding transcription and several different chromatin remodelers. We propose that the unique properties of RNA make it suitable for controlling chromatin modifications and structure. PMID:26410408

  16. The Fun30 chromatin remodeler Fft3 controls nuclear organization and chromatin structure of insulators and subtelomeres in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Steglich, Babett; Strålfors, Annelie; Khorosjutina, Olga; Persson, Jenna; Smialowska, Agata; Javerzat, Jean-Paul; Ekwall, Karl

    2015-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, local chromatin structure and chromatin organization in the nucleus both influence transcriptional regulation. At the local level, the Fun30 chromatin remodeler Fft3 is essential for maintaining proper chromatin structure at centromeres and subtelomeres in fission yeast. Using genome-wide mapping and live cell imaging, we show that this role is linked to controlling nuclear organization of its targets. In fft3∆ cells, subtelomeres lose their association with the LEM domain protein Man1 at the nuclear periphery and move to the interior of the nucleus. Furthermore, genes in these domains are upregulated and active chromatin marks increase. Fft3 is also enriched at retrotransposon-derived long terminal repeat (LTR) elements and at tRNA genes. In cells lacking Fft3, these sites lose their peripheral positioning and show reduced nucleosome occupancy. We propose that Fft3 has a global role in mediating association between specific chromatin domains and the nuclear envelope.

  17. Genetic control for light-induced carotenoid production in non-phototrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Takano, Hideaki; Asker, Dalal; Beppu, Teruhiko; Ueda, Kenji

    2006-02-01

    Carotenoids are naturally occurring yellow or orange pigments that serve as a protectant against photo-oxidative damages. Among the wide variety of producers, the prokaryotes generate a broad spectrum of carotenoids with diverse chemical structures that are expected to have a high potential in biotechnological applications. Bacterial carotenogenesis occurs in a constitutive or light-induced manner, which suggests the diversity of the regulatory mechanism. The mechanism for light-induced carotenoid production in non-phototrophic bacteria has been studied in detail in Myxococcus xanthus, a Gram-negative gliding bacterium. The complicated mechanism involves the activation of an extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor (CarQ), which leads to the sequestration of a MerR family transcriptional regulator (CarA) that represses the expression of the carotenoid biosynthesis genes in the dark. Recently, we identified another regulatory mechanism for light-induced carotenogenesis in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), a Gram-positive soil bacterium. In this organism, the transcription of the carotenoid biosynthesis gene cluster is specified by LitS, a photo-inducible ECF sigma factor. The evidence indicates that the photo-dependent transcription of litS is mediated by LitR, a MerR family transcriptional regulator. In addition, it is suggested that the conformational alteration of LitR upon receiving the illumination signal determines its binding to DNA. The carboxy-terminal domain of LitR contains a possible binding site for Vitamin B12, which may serve as a capturing apparatus for the illumination signal.

  18. Light-induced director-controlled microassembly of dye molecules from a liquid crystal matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloschenko, D.; Lavrentovich, O. D.

    1999-11-01

    We report on a light-induced phenomenon in dye-doped liquid crystals (LCs) with the distinctive features of molecular transport and assembly at micron scales. Under single-beam laser irradiation, the dye molecules phase separate from the LC host and assemble onto the cell substrate. Although the intensity of incident light is uniform within the irradiated area, the density of the adsorbed dye is modulated in accord with the director modulation of the LC. The dye molecules form a surface imprint that portrays orientational distortions of the LC host.

  19. Preparation and controlled drug delivery applications of mesoporous silica polymer nanocomposites through the visible light induced surface-initiated ATRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Long; Liu, Meiying; Mao, Liucheng; Xu, Dazhuang; Wan, Qing; Zeng, Guangjian; Shi, Yingge; Wen, Yuanqing; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-08-01

    The mesoporous materials with large pore size, high specific surface area and high thermal stability have been widely utilized in a variety of fields ranging from environmental remediation to separation and biomedicine. However, surface modification of these silica nanomaterials is required to endow novel properties and achieve better performance for most of these applications. In this work, a new method has been established for surface modification of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that relied on the visible light induced atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). In the procedure, the copolymers composited with itaconic acid (IA) and poly(ethylene glycol)methyl acrylate (PEGMA) were grafted from MSNs using IA and PEGMA as the monomers and 10-Phenylphenothiazine(PTH) as the organic catalyst. The successful preparation of final polymer nanocomposites (named as MSNs-NH2-poly(IA-co-PEGMA)) were evidenced by a series of characterization techniques. More importantly, the anticancer agent cisplatin can be effectively loaded on MSNs-NH2-poly(IA-co-PEGMA) and controlled release it from the drug-loading composites with pH responsive behavior. As compared with conventional ATRP, the light induced surface-initiated ATRP could also be utilized for preparation of various silica polymer nanocomposites under rather benign conditions (e.g. absent of transition metal ions, low polymerization temperature and short polymerization time). Taken together, we have developed a rather promising strategy method for fabrication of multifunctional MSNs-NH2-poly(IA-co-PEGMA) with great potential for biomedical applications.

  20. Engineering light-inducible nuclear localization signals for precise spatiotemporal control of protein dynamics in living cells.

    PubMed

    Niopek, Dominik; Benzinger, Dirk; Roensch, Julia; Draebing, Thomas; Wehler, Pierre; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2014-07-14

    The function of many eukaryotic proteins is regulated by highly dynamic changes in their nucleocytoplasmic distribution. The ability to precisely and reversibly control nuclear translocation would, therefore, allow dissecting and engineering cellular networks. Here we develop a genetically encoded, light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) based on the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1. LINuS is a small, versatile tag, customizable for different proteins and cell types. LINuS-mediated nuclear import is fast and reversible, and can be tuned at different levels, for instance, by introducing mutations that alter AsLOV2 domain photo-caging properties or by selecting nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of various strengths. We demonstrate the utility of LINuS in mammalian cells by controlling gene expression and entry into mitosis with blue light.

  1. Optogenetic Control of Nuclear Protein Import in Living Cells Using Light-Inducible Nuclear Localization Signals (LINuS).

    PubMed

    Wehler, Pierre; Niopek, Dominik; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2016-06-02

    Many biological processes are regulated by the timely import of specific proteins into the nucleus. The ability to spatiotemporally control the nuclear import of proteins of interest therefore allows study of their role in a given biological process as well as controlling this process in space and time. The light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) was developed based on a natural plant photoreceptor that reversibly triggers the import of proteins of interest into the nucleus with blue light. Each LINuS is a small, genetically encoded domain that is fused to the protein of interest at the N or C terminus. These protocols describe how to carry out initial microscopy-based screening to assess which LINuS variant works best with a protein of interest. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Engineering light-inducible nuclear localization signals for precise spatiotemporal control of protein dynamics in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Niopek, Dominik; Benzinger, Dirk; Roensch, Julia; Draebing, Thomas; Wehler, Pierre; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The function of many eukaryotic proteins is regulated by highly dynamic changes in their nucleocytoplasmic distribution. The ability to precisely and reversibly control nuclear translocation would, therefore, allow dissecting and engineering cellular networks. Here we develop a genetically encoded, light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) based on the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1. LINuS is a small, versatile tag, customizable for different proteins and cell types. LINuS-mediated nuclear import is fast and reversible, and can be tuned at different levels, for instance, by introducing mutations that alter AsLOV2 domain photo-caging properties or by selecting nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of various strengths. We demonstrate the utility of LINuS in mammalian cells by controlling gene expression and entry into mitosis with blue light. PMID:25019686

  3. Tuning the Binding Affinities and Reversion Kinetics of a Light Inducible Dimer Allows Control of Transmembrane Protein Localization.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Seth P; Hallett, Ryan A; Bourke, Ashley M; Bear, James E; Kennedy, Matthew J; Kuhlman, Brian

    2016-09-20

    Inducible dimers are powerful tools for controlling biological processes through colocalizing signaling molecules. To be effective, an inducible system should have a dissociation constant in the "off" state that is greater (i.e., weaker affinity) than the concentrations of the molecules that are being controlled, and in the "on" state a dissociation constant that is less (i.e., stronger affinity) than the relevant protein concentrations. Here, we reengineer the interaction between the light inducible dimer, iLID, and its binding partner SspB, to better control proteins present at high effective concentrations (5-100 μM). iLID contains a light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) domain that undergoes a conformational change upon activation with blue light and exposes a peptide motif, ssrA, that binds to SspB. The new variant of the dimer system contains a single SspB point mutation (A58V), and displays a 42-fold change in binding affinity when activated with blue light (from 3 ± 2 μM to 125 ± 40 μM) and allows for light-activated colocalization of transmembrane proteins in neurons, where a higher affinity switch (0.8-47 μM) was less effective because more colocalization was seen in the dark. Additionally, with a point mutation in the LOV domain (N414L), we lengthened the reversion half-life of iLID. This expanded suite of light induced dimers increases the variety of cellular pathways that can be targeted with light.

  4. Engineering an improved light-induced dimer (iLID) for controlling the localization and activity of signaling proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Guntas, Gurkan; Hallett, Ryan A.; Zimmerman, Seth P.; ...

    2014-12-22

    The discovery of light-inducible protein–protein interactions has allowed for the spatial and temporal control of a variety of biological processes. To be effective, a photodimerizer should have several characteristics: it should show a large change in binding affinity upon light stimulation, it should not cross-react with other molecules in the cell, and it should be easily used in a variety of organisms to recruit proteins of interest to each other. In this study, to create a switch that meets these criteria we have embedded the bacterial SsrA peptide in the C-terminal helix of a naturally occurring photoswitch, the light-oxygen-voltage 2more » (LOV2) domain from Avena sativa. In the dark the SsrA peptide is sterically blocked from binding its natural binding partner, SspB. When activated with blue light, the C-terminal helix of the LOV2 domain undocks from the protein, allowing the SsrA peptide to bind SspB. Without optimization, the switch exhibited a twofold change in binding affinity for SspB with light stimulation. Here, we describe the use of computational protein design, phage display, and high-throughput binding assays to create an improved light inducible dimer (iLID) that changes its affinity for SspB by over 50-fold with light stimulation. A crystal structure of iLID shows a critical interaction between the surface of the LOV2 domain and a phenylalanine engineered to more tightly pin the SsrA peptide against the LOV2 domain in the dark. Finally, we demonstrate the functional utility of the switch through light-mediated subcellular localization in mammalian cell culture and reversible control of small GTPase signaling.« less

  5. Engineering an improved light-induced dimer (iLID) for controlling the localization and activity of signaling proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Guntas, Gurkan; Hallett, Ryan A.; Zimmerman, Seth P.; Williams, Tishan; Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Bear, James E.; Kuhlman, Brian

    2014-12-22

    The discovery of light-inducible protein–protein interactions has allowed for the spatial and temporal control of a variety of biological processes. To be effective, a photodimerizer should have several characteristics: it should show a large change in binding affinity upon light stimulation, it should not cross-react with other molecules in the cell, and it should be easily used in a variety of organisms to recruit proteins of interest to each other. In this study, to create a switch that meets these criteria we have embedded the bacterial SsrA peptide in the C-terminal helix of a naturally occurring photoswitch, the light-oxygen-voltage 2 (LOV2) domain from Avena sativa. In the dark the SsrA peptide is sterically blocked from binding its natural binding partner, SspB. When activated with blue light, the C-terminal helix of the LOV2 domain undocks from the protein, allowing the SsrA peptide to bind SspB. Without optimization, the switch exhibited a twofold change in binding affinity for SspB with light stimulation. Here, we describe the use of computational protein design, phage display, and high-throughput binding assays to create an improved light inducible dimer (iLID) that changes its affinity for SspB by over 50-fold with light stimulation. A crystal structure of iLID shows a critical interaction between the surface of the LOV2 domain and a phenylalanine engineered to more tightly pin the SsrA peptide against the LOV2 domain in the dark. Finally, we demonstrate the functional utility of the switch through light-mediated subcellular localization in mammalian cell culture and reversible control of small GTPase signaling.

  6. Light-inducible and clock-controlled expression of MAP kinase phosphatase 1 in mouse central pacemaker neurons.

    PubMed

    Doi, Masao; Cho, Sehyung; Yujnovsky, Irene; Hirayama, Jun; Cermakian, Nicolas; Cato, Andrew C B; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2007-04-01

    MAP kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP1) is a negative regulator for the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated signal transduction, a key pathway that leads to the regulated expression of circadian clock genes. Here the authors analyzed mkp1 expression by in situ hybridization and found that mkp1 is a light-inducible and clock-controlled gene expressed in the central pacemaker neurons of the hypothalamic SCN. Interestingly, mkp1 presents a marked similarity to the clock core gene per1 in terms of the gene expression profiles as well as the gene promoter organization. Both mkp1 and per1 are subject to bimodal regulation in the SCN: the external light-dependent acute up-regulation and the functional clock-dependent circadian oscillation. Consistent with this, the authors show that mkp1 gene has a per1-like promoter that contains 2 functionally distinct elements: cAMP-responsive element (CRE) and E-box. CRE sites present in the mkp1 promoter constitute the functional binding sites for the CRE binding protein (CREB), which serves as an important regulator that mediates the light-induced signaling cascades in the SCN neurons. Furthermore, the authors show that the E-box present in the mkp1 promoter is necessary and sufficient for transcriptional control exerted by circadian clock core regulators that include a positive complex CLOCK/BMAL1 and a negative factor CRY1. The authors' studies on mkp1 have identified for the first time a gene encoding a phosphatase that functions in light-dependent and time-of-day-dependent manners in the mammalian central clock structure SCN.

  7. Dimension reduction by balanced truncation: application to light-induced control of open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Schäfer-Bung, Boris; Hartmann, Carsten; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schütte, Christof

    2011-07-07

    In linear control, balanced truncation is known as a powerful technique to reduce the state-space dimension of a system. Its basic principle is to identify a subspace of jointly easily controllable and observable states and then to restrict the dynamics to this subspace without changing the overall response of the system. This work deals with a first application of balanced truncation to the control of open quantum systems which are modeled by the Liouville-von Neumann equation within the Lindblad formalism. Generalization of the linear theory has been proposed to cope with the bilinear terms arising from the coupling between the control field and the quantum system. As an example we choose the dissipative quantum dynamics of a particle in an asymmetric double well potential driven by an external control field, monitoring population transfer between the potential wells as a control target. The accuracy of dimension reduction is investigated by comparing the populations obtained for the truncated system versus those for the original system. The dimension of the model system can be reduced very efficiently where the degree of reduction depends on temperature and relaxation rate.

  8. Diverse lamin-dependent mechanisms interact to control chromatin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Camozzi, Daria; Capanni, Cristina; Cenni, Vittoria; Mattioli, Elisabetta; Columbaro, Marta; Squarzoni, Stefano; Lattanzi, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Interconnected functional strategies govern chromatin dynamics in eukaryotic cells. In this context, A and B type lamins, the nuclear intermediate filaments, act on diverse platforms involved in tissue homeostasis. On the nuclear side, lamins elicit large scale or fine chromatin conformational changes, affect DNA damage response factors and transcription factor shuttling. On the cytoplasmic side, bridging-molecules, the LINC complex, associate with lamins to coordinate chromatin dynamics with cytoskeleton and extra-cellular signals.   Consistent with such a fine tuning, lamin mutations and/or defects in their expression or post-translational processing, as well as mutations in lamin partner genes, cause a heterogeneous group of diseases known as laminopathies. They include muscular dystrophies, cardiomyopathy, lipodystrophies, neuropathies, and progeroid syndromes. The study of chromatin dynamics under pathological conditions, which is summarized in this review, is shedding light on the complex and fascinating role of the nuclear lamina in chromatin regulation. PMID:25482195

  9. Embryonic transcription is controlled by maternally defined chromatin state

    PubMed Central

    Hontelez, Saartje; van Kruijsbergen, Ila; Georgiou, Georgios; van Heeringen, Simon J.; Bogdanovic, Ozren; Lister, Ryan; Veenstra, Gert Jan C.

    2015-01-01

    Histone-modifying enzymes are required for cell identity and lineage commitment, however little is known about the regulatory origins of the epigenome during embryonic development. Here we generate a comprehensive set of epigenome reference maps, which we use to determine the extent to which maternal factors shape chromatin state in Xenopus embryos. Using α-amanitin to inhibit zygotic transcription, we find that the majority of H3K4me3- and H3K27me3-enriched regions form a maternally defined epigenetic regulatory space with an underlying logic of hypomethylated islands. This maternal regulatory space extends to a substantial proportion of neurula stage-activated promoters. In contrast, p300 recruitment to distal regulatory regions requires embryonic transcription at most loci. The results show that H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 are part of a regulatory space that exerts an extended maternal control well into post-gastrulation development, and highlight the combinatorial action of maternal and zygotic factors through proximal and distal regulatory sequences. PMID:26679111

  10. Controlled release of encapsulated bioactive volatiles by rupture of the capsule wall through the light-induced generation of a gas.

    PubMed

    Paret, Nicolas; Trachsel, Alain; Berthier, Damien L; Herrmann, Andreas

    2015-02-09

    The encapsulation of photolabile 2-oxoacetates in core-shell microcapsules allows the light-induced, controlled release of bioactive compounds. On irradiation with UVA light these compounds degrade to generate an overpressure of gas inside the capsules, which expands or breaks the capsule wall. Headspace measurements confirmed the light-induced formation of CO and CO2 and the successful release of the bioactive compound, while optical microscopy demonstrated the formation of gas bubbles, the cleavage of the capsule wall, and the leakage of the oil phase out of the capsule. The efficiency of the delivery system depends on the structure of the 2-oxoacetate, the quantity used with respect to the thickness of the capsule wall, and the intensity of the irradiating UVA light. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Senataxin controls meiotic silencing through ATR activation and chromatin remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Abrey J; Becherel, Olivier J; Luff, John E; Graham, Mark E; Richard, Derek; Lavin, Martin F

    2015-01-01

    Senataxin, defective in ataxia oculomotor apraxia type 2, protects the genome by facilitating the resolution of RNA–DNA hybrids (R-loops) and other aspects of RNA processing. Disruption of this gene in mice causes failure of meiotic recombination and defective meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, leading to male infertility. Here we provide evidence that the disruption of Setx leads to reduced SUMOylation and disruption of protein localization across the XY body during meiosis. We demonstrate that senataxin and other DNA damage repair proteins, including ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner, are SUMOylated, and a marked downregulation of both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner and TopBP1 leading to defective activation and signaling through ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein occurs in the absence of senataxin. Furthermore, chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4, a component of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase chromatin remodeler that interacts with both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein and senataxin was not recruited efficiently to the XY body, triggering altered histone acetylation and chromatin conformation in Setx−/− pachytene-staged spermatocytes. These results demonstrate that senataxin has a critical role in ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein- and chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4-mediated transcriptional silencing and chromatin remodeling during meiosis providing greater insight into its critical role in gene regulation to protect against neurodegeneration. PMID:27462424

  12. Senataxin controls meiotic silencing through ATR activation and chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Abrey J; Becherel, Olivier J; Luff, John E; Graham, Mark E; Richard, Derek; Lavin, Martin F

    2015-01-01

    Senataxin, defective in ataxia oculomotor apraxia type 2, protects the genome by facilitating the resolution of RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops) and other aspects of RNA processing. Disruption of this gene in mice causes failure of meiotic recombination and defective meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, leading to male infertility. Here we provide evidence that the disruption of Setx leads to reduced SUMOylation and disruption of protein localization across the XY body during meiosis. We demonstrate that senataxin and other DNA damage repair proteins, including ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner, are SUMOylated, and a marked downregulation of both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner and TopBP1 leading to defective activation and signaling through ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein occurs in the absence of senataxin. Furthermore, chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4, a component of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase chromatin remodeler that interacts with both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein and senataxin was not recruited efficiently to the XY body, triggering altered histone acetylation and chromatin conformation in Setx (-/-) pachytene-staged spermatocytes. These results demonstrate that senataxin has a critical role in ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein- and chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4-mediated transcriptional silencing and chromatin remodeling during meiosis providing greater insight into its critical role in gene regulation to protect against neurodegeneration.

  13. Chromatin Computation

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In living cells, DNA is packaged along with protein and RNA into chromatin. Chemical modifications to nucleotides and histone proteins are added, removed and recognized by multi-functional molecular complexes. Here I define a new computational model, in which chromatin modifications are information units that can be written onto a one-dimensional string of nucleosomes, analogous to the symbols written onto cells of a Turing machine tape, and chromatin-modifying complexes are modeled as read-write rules that operate on a finite set of adjacent nucleosomes. I illustrate the use of this “chromatin computer” to solve an instance of the Hamiltonian path problem. I prove that chromatin computers are computationally universal – and therefore more powerful than the logic circuits often used to model transcription factor control of gene expression. Features of biological chromatin provide a rich instruction set for efficient computation of nontrivial algorithms in biological time scales. Modeling chromatin as a computer shifts how we think about chromatin function, suggests new approaches to medical intervention, and lays the groundwork for the engineering of a new class of biological computing machines. PMID:22567109

  14. Light-induced short-term adaptation mechanisms under redox control in the PS II-LHCII supercomplex: LHC II state transitions and PS II repair cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Olaf

    2001-05-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis takes place in the thylakoid membranes of cyanobacteria, algae and higher plants. While cyanobacteria have adapted to relatively constant environments, higher plants had to evolve mechanisms to adapt to continuous environmental changes. These include changes in light intensity, temperature and availability of water. One of the great challenges in plant cell biology is therefore to determine the regulatory mechanisms employed by higher plants and some algae to adapt to these constant environmental changes. The particular emphasis of this review is the description and characterisation of light-induced redox-controlled processes regulating the photosynthetic reactions, which involves maintaining maximal electron transport flow through the PS II-Cytb6f-PS I-FoF1ATPase electron transport chain and minimising light-induced oxidative damage to PS II which drives the highly oxidising water-splitting reaction. Two of the mechanisms involved in such short-term regulation processes are known as light harvesting complex II (LHC II) state transitions and photosystem II (PS II) repair cycle. They are followed by, and indeed may be a precondition in order to establish, the onset of the subsequent long-term mechanisms of regulation. In particular, the redox control of LHC II state transitions by reversible phosphorylation has been in the focus of many investigations, leading to many new results demonstrating the complexity of thylakoid-associated redox control mechanisms.

  15. Moving chromatin within the interphase nucleus- controlled transitions?

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Chien-Hui; Belmont, Andrew S.

    2007-01-01

    The past decade has seen an increasing appreciation for nuclear compartmentalization as an underlying determinant of interphase chromosome nuclear organization. To date, attention has focused primarily on describing differential localization of particular genes or chromosome regions as a function of differentiation, cell cycle position, and/or transcriptional activity. The question of how exactly interphase chromosome compartmentalization is established and in particular how interphase chromosomes might move during changes in nuclear compartmentalization, has received less attention. Here we review what is known concerning chromatin mobility in relationship to physiologically regulated changes in nuclear interphase chromosome organization. PMID:17905613

  16. ERECTA signaling controls Arabidopsis inflorescence architecture through chromatin-mediated activation of PRE1 expression.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hanyang; Zhao, Lihua; Wang, Lulu; Zhang, Man; Su, Zhenxia; Cheng, Yan; Zhao, Heming; Qin, Yuan

    2017-03-13

    Flowering plants display a remarkable diversity in inflorescence architecture, and pedicel length is one of the key contributors to this diversity. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the receptor-like kinase ERECTA (ER) mediated signaling pathway plays important roles in regulating inflorescence architecture by promoting cell proliferation. However, the regulating mechanism remains elusive in the pedicel. Genetic interactions between ERECTA signaling and the chromatin remodeling complex SWR1 in the control of inflorescence architecture were studied. Comparative transcriptome analysis was applied to identify downstream components. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and nucleosome occupancy was further investigated. The results indicated that the chromatin remodeler SWR1 coordinates with ERECTA signaling in regulating inflorescence architecture by activating the expression of PRE1 family genes and promoting pedicel elongation. It was found that SWR1 is required for the incorporation of the H2A.Z histone variant into nucleosomes of the whole PRE1 gene family and the ERECTA controlled expression of PRE1 gene family through regulating nucleosome dynamics. We propose that utilization of a chromatin remodeling complex to regulate gene expression is a common theme in developmental control across kingdoms. These findings shed light on the mechanisms through which chromatin remodelers orchestrate complex transcriptional regulation of gene expression in coordination with a developmental cue.

  17. Two groups control light-induced Schiff base deprotonation and the proton affinity of Asp85 in the Arg82 his mutant of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Imasheva, E S; Balashov, S P; Ebrey, T G; Chen, N; Crouch, R K; Menick, D R

    1999-11-01

    Arg(82) is one of the four buried charged residues in the retinal binding pocket of bacteriorhodopsin (bR). Previous studies show that Arg(82) controls the pK(a)s of Asp(85) and the proton release group and is essential for fast light-induced proton release. To further investigate the role of Arg(82) in light-induced proton pumping, we replaced Arg(82) with histidine and studied the resulting pigment and its photochemical properties. The main pK(a) of the purple-to-blue transition (pK(a) of Asp(85)) is unusually low in R82H: 1.0 versus 2.6 in wild type (WT). At pH 3, the pigment is purple and shows light and dark adaptation, but almost no light-induced Schiff base deprotonation (formation of the M intermediate) is observed. As the pH is increased from 3 to 7 the M yield increases with pK(a) 4.5 to a value approximately 40% of that in the WT. A transition with a similar pK(a) is observed in the pH dependence of the rate constant of dark adaptation, k(da). These data can be explained, assuming that some group deprotonates with pK(a) 4.5, causing an increase in the pK(a) of Asp(85) and thus affecting k(da) and the yield of M. As the pH is increased from 7 to 10.5 there is a further 2.5-fold increase in the yield of M and a decrease in its rise time from 200 micros to 75 micros with pK(a) 9. 4. The chromophore absorption band undergoes a 4-nm red shift with a similar pK(a). We assume that at high pH, the proton release group deprotonates in the unphotolyzed pigment, causing a transformation of the pigment into a red-shifted "alkaline" form which has a faster rate of light-induced Schiff base deprotonation. The pH dependence of proton release shows that coupling between Asp(85) and the proton release group is weakened in R82H. The pK(a) of the proton release group in M is 7.2 (versus 5.8 in the WT). At pH < 7, most of the proton release occurs during O --> bR transition with tau approximately 45 ms. This transition is slowed in R82H, indicating that Arg(82) is important

  18. Nucleosome geometry and internucleosomal interactions control the chromatin fiber conformation.

    PubMed

    Kepper, Nick; Foethke, Dietrich; Stehr, Rene; Wedemann, Gero; Rippe, Karsten

    2008-10-01

    Based on model structures with atomic resolution, a coarse-grained model for the nucleosome geometry was implemented. The dependence of the chromatin fiber conformation on the spatial orientation of nucleosomes and the path and length of the linker DNA was systematically explored by Monte Carlo simulations. Two fiber types were analyzed in detail that represent nucleosome chains without and with linker histones, respectively: two-start helices with crossed-linker DNA (CL conformation) and interdigitated one-start helices (ID conformation) with different nucleosome tilt angles. The CL conformation was derived from a tetranucleosome crystal structure that was extended into a fiber. At thermal equilibrium, the fiber shape persisted but relaxed into a structure with a somewhat lower linear mass density of 3.1 +/- 0.1 nucleosomes/11 nm fiber. Stable ID fibers required local nucleosome tilt angles between 40 degrees and 60 degrees. For these configurations, much higher mass densities of up to 7.9 +/- 0.2 nucleosomes/11 nm fiber were obtained. A model is proposed, in which the transition between a CL and ID fiber is mediated by relatively small changes of the local nucleosome geometry. These were found to be in very good agreement with changes induced by linker histone H1 binding as predicted from the high resolution model structures.

  19. Biotic Control of Surface pH and Evidence of Light-Induced H+ Pumping and Ca2+-H+ Exchange in a Tropical Crustose Coralline Alga

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Laurie C.; Koch, Marguerite; de Beer, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Presently, an incomplete mechanistic understanding of tropical reef macroalgae photosynthesis and calcification restricts predictions of how these important autotrophs will respond to global change. Therefore, we investigated the mechanistic link between inorganic carbon uptake pathways, photosynthesis and calcification in a tropical crustose coralline alga (CCA) using microsensors. We measured pH, oxygen (O2), and calcium (Ca2+) dynamics and fluxes at the thallus surface under ambient (8.1) and low (7.8) seawater pH (pHSW) and across a range of irradiances. Acetazolamide (AZ) was used to inhibit extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CAext), which mediates hydrolysis of HCO3-, and 4,4′ diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulphonate (DIDS) that blocks direct HCO3- uptake by anion exchange transport. Both inhibited photosynthesis, suggesting both diffusive uptake of CO2 via HCO3- hydrolysis to CO2 and direct HCO3- ion transport are important in this CCA. Surface pH was raised approximately 0.3 units at saturating irradiance, but less when CAext was inhibited. Surface pH was lower at pHSW 7.8 than pHSW 8.1 in the dark, but not in the light. The Ca2+ fluxes were large, complex and temporally variable, but revealed net Ca2+ uptake under all conditions. The temporal variability in Ca2+ dynamics was potentially related to localized dissolution during epithallial cell sloughing, a strategy of CCA to remove epiphytes. Simultaneous Ca2+ and pH dynamics suggest the presence of Ca2+/H+ exchange. Rapid light-induced H+ surface dynamics that continued after inhibition of photosynthesis revealed the presence of a light-mediated, but photosynthesis-independent, proton pump. Thus, the study indicates metabolic control of surface pH can occur in CCA through photosynthesis and light-inducible H+ pumps. Our results suggest that complex light-induced ion pumps play an important role in biological processes related to inorganic carbon uptake and calcification in CCA. PMID:27459463

  20. Light-inducible genetic engineering and control of non-homologous end-joining in industrial eukaryotic microorganisms: LML 3.0 and OFN 1.0.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Xihua; Zhang, Guoxiu; Zhang, Jiajia; Wang, Xuedong; Zhang, Suping; Wang, Wei; Wei, Dongzhi

    2016-02-09

    Filamentous fungi play important roles in the production of plant cell-wall degrading enzymes. In recent years, homologous recombinant technologies have contributed significantly to improved enzymes production and system design of genetically manipulated strains. When introducing multiple gene deletions, we need a robust and convenient way to control selectable marker genes, especially when only a limited number of markers are available in filamentous fungi. Integration after transformation is predominantly nonhomologous in most fungi other than yeast. Fungal strains deficient in the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway have limitations associated with gene function analyses despite they are excellent recipient strains for gene targets. We describe strategies and methods to address these challenges above and leverage the power of resilient NHEJ deficiency strains. We have established a foolproof light-inducible platform for one-step unmarked genetic modification in industrial eukaryotic microorganisms designated as 'LML 3.0', and an on-off control protocol of NHEJ pathway called 'OFN 1.0', using a synthetic light-switchable transactivation to control Cre recombinase-based excision and inversion. The methods provide a one-step strategy to sequentially modify genes without introducing selectable markers and NHEJ-deficiency. The strategies can be used to manipulate many biological processes in a wide range of eukaryotic cells.

  1. Light-inducible genetic engineering and control of non-homologous end-joining in industrial eukaryotic microorganisms: LML 3.0 and OFN 1.0

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Xihua; Zhang, Guoxiu; Zhang, Jiajia; Wang, Xuedong; Zhang, Suping; Wang, Wei; Wei, Dongzhi

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi play important roles in the production of plant cell-wall degrading enzymes. In recent years, homologous recombinant technologies have contributed significantly to improved enzymes production and system design of genetically manipulated strains. When introducing multiple gene deletions, we need a robust and convenient way to control selectable marker genes, especially when only a limited number of markers are available in filamentous fungi. Integration after transformation is predominantly nonhomologous in most fungi other than yeast. Fungal strains deficient in the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway have limitations associated with gene function analyses despite they are excellent recipient strains for gene targets. We describe strategies and methods to address these challenges above and leverage the power of resilient NHEJ deficiency strains. We have established a foolproof light-inducible platform for one-step unmarked genetic modification in industrial eukaryotic microorganisms designated as ‘LML 3.0’, and an on-off control protocol of NHEJ pathway called ‘OFN 1.0’, using a synthetic light-switchable transactivation to control Cre recombinase-based excision and inversion. The methods provide a one-step strategy to sequentially modify genes without introducing selectable markers and NHEJ-deficiency. The strategies can be used to manipulate many biological processes in a wide range of eukaryotic cells. PMID:26857594

  2. Evaluating Light-Induced Promoters for the Control of Heterologous Gene Expression in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Albers, Stevan C; Peebles, Christie A M

    2017-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are enticing microbial factories, but little is understood how their gene control elements respond to the periodic availability to light. This research tested the capability of PpsbAII to control gene expression during light/dark conditions when moved to a neutral location within the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 genome. When the eYFP reporter gene was run by PpsbAII in the promoter's native genomic location, mutants exposed to 12-hour light conditions experienced a 15.8× increase in transcript abundance over that observed from the same construct exposed to 12-hour dark conditions. When this same construct was moved to the hypothetical coding region slr0168 in the genome, transcripts generated during 12 hour light conditions accumulated to 1.67X of the levels of transcripts generated by the same construct during 12 hour dark conditions. Three additional promoter constructs, PpsbAIII , PgroEL2 , and PsigD were also tested for differential expression in light and dark conditions within the neutral region slr0168. While low amounts of transcript accumulation were observed from PgroEL2 and PsigD , the PpsbAIII construct accumulated 5.79× more transcripts when compared to transcript abundance during dark conditions, which highlights the potential of this promoter to control gene expression during diel-cycle light conditions. Additionally, nucleotide mutations were made to regions within PpsbAII . Mutations to the cis-acting hexo-nucleotide region increased expression 3.71× over that of the native promoter, while the addition of the "HLR" nucleotide region to the PpsbAII::ΔHex construct increased expression 2.76× over that of the native promoter. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:45-53, 2017.

  3. The chromatin remodeling factor CHD7 controls cerebellar development by regulating reelin expression.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Danielle E; Riegman, Kimberley L H; Kasah, Sahrunizam; Mohan, Conor; Yu, Tian; Sala, Blanca Pijuan; Hebaishi, Husam; Caruso, Angela; Marques, Ana Claudia; Michetti, Caterina; Smachetti, María Eugenia Sanz; Shah, Apar; Sabbioni, Mara; Kulhanci, Omer; Tee, Wee-Wei; Reinberg, Danny; Scattoni, Maria Luisa; Volk, Holger; McGonnell, Imelda; Wardle, Fiona C; Fernandes, Cathy; Basson, M Albert

    2017-03-01

    The mechanisms underlying the neurodevelopmental deficits associated with CHARGE syndrome, which include cerebellar hypoplasia, developmental delay, coordination problems, and autistic features, have not been identified. CHARGE syndrome has been associated with mutations in the gene encoding the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler CHD7. CHD7 is expressed in neural stem and progenitor cells, but its role in neurogenesis during brain development remains unknown. Here we have shown that deletion of Chd7 from cerebellar granule cell progenitors (GCps) results in reduced GCp proliferation, cerebellar hypoplasia, developmental delay, and motor deficits in mice. Genome-wide expression profiling revealed downregulated expression of the gene encoding the glycoprotein reelin (Reln) in Chd7-deficient GCps. Recessive RELN mutations have been associated with severe cerebellar hypoplasia in humans. We found molecular and genetic evidence that reductions in Reln expression contribute to GCp proliferative defects and cerebellar hypoplasia in GCp-specific Chd7 mouse mutants. Finally, we showed that CHD7 is necessary for maintaining an open, accessible chromatin state at the Reln locus. Taken together, this study shows that Reln gene expression is regulated by chromatin remodeling, identifies CHD7 as a previously unrecognized upstream regulator of Reln, and provides direct in vivo evidence that a mammalian CHD protein can control brain development by modulating chromatin accessibility in neuronal progenitors.

  4. The chromatin remodeling factor CHD7 controls cerebellar development by regulating reelin expression

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, Danielle E.; Riegman, Kimberley L.H.; Kasah, Sahrunizam; Mohan, Conor; Yu, Tian; Sala, Blanca Pijuan; Hebaishi, Husam; Caruso, Angela; Marques, Ana Claudia; Michetti, Caterina; Smachetti, María Eugenia Sanz; Shah, Apar; Sabbioni, Mara; Kulhanci, Omer; Tee, Wee-Wei; Reinberg, Danny; Scattoni, Maria Luisa; McGonnell, Imelda; Wardle, Fiona C.; Fernandes, Cathy

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the neurodevelopmental deficits associated with CHARGE syndrome, which include cerebellar hypoplasia, developmental delay, coordination problems, and autistic features, have not been identified. CHARGE syndrome has been associated with mutations in the gene encoding the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler CHD7. CHD7 is expressed in neural stem and progenitor cells, but its role in neurogenesis during brain development remains unknown. Here we have shown that deletion of Chd7 from cerebellar granule cell progenitors (GCps) results in reduced GCp proliferation, cerebellar hypoplasia, developmental delay, and motor deficits in mice. Genome-wide expression profiling revealed downregulated expression of the gene encoding the glycoprotein reelin (Reln) in Chd7-deficient GCps. Recessive RELN mutations have been associated with severe cerebellar hypoplasia in humans. We found molecular and genetic evidence that reductions in Reln expression contribute to GCp proliferative defects and cerebellar hypoplasia in GCp-specific Chd7 mouse mutants. Finally, we showed that CHD7 is necessary for maintaining an open, accessible chromatin state at the Reln locus. Taken together, this study shows that Reln gene expression is regulated by chromatin remodeling, identifies CHD7 as a previously unrecognized upstream regulator of Reln, and provides direct in vivo evidence that a mammalian CHD protein can control brain development by modulating chromatin accessibility in neuronal progenitors. PMID:28165338

  5. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of High-Quality Cu7 S4 Nanocrystals for Efficient Light-Induced Water Evaporation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changbo; Yan, Cong; Xue, Zhenjie; Yu, Wei; Xie, Yinde; Wang, Tie

    2016-10-01

    Copper sulfides (Cu2-x S), are a novel kind of photothermal material exhibiting significant photothermal conversion efficiency, making them very attractive in various energy conversion related devices. Preparing high quality uniform Cu2-x S nanocrystals (NCs) is a top priority for further energy-and sustainability relevant nanodevices. Here, a shape-controlled high quality Cu7 S4 NCs synthesis strategy is reported using sulfur in 1-octadecene as precursor by varying the heating temperature, as well as its forming mechanism. The performance of the Cu7 S4 NCs is further explored for light-driven water evaporation without the need of heating the bulk liquid to the boiling point, and the results suggest that as-synthesized highly monodisperse NCs perform higher evaporation rate than polydisperse NCs under the identical morphology. Furthermore, disk-like NCs exhibit higher water evaporation rate than spherical NCs. The water evaporation rate can be further enhanced by assembling the organic phase Cu7 S4 NCs into a dense film on the aqueous solution surface. The maximum photothermal conversion efficiency is as high as 77.1%. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Chromatin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Michael R.; Spector, David L.

    2010-01-01

    The expression patterns of many protein-coding genes are orchestrated in response to exogenous stimuli, as well as cell-type-specific developmental programs. In recent years, researchers have shown that dynamic chromatin movements and interactions in the nucleus play a crucial role in gene regulation. In this review, we highlight our current understanding of the organization of chromatin in the interphase nucleus and the impact of chromatin dynamics on gene expression. We also discuss the current state of knowledge with regard to the localization of active and inactive genes within the three-dimensional nuclear space. Furthermore, we address recent findings that demonstrate the movements of chromosomal regions and genomic loci in association with changes in transcriptional activity. Finally, we discuss the role of intra-and interchromosomal interactions in the control of coregulated genes. PMID:20462379

  7. Chromatin-remodeling factor SMARCD2 regulates transcriptional networks controlling differentiation of neutrophil granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Witzel, Maximilian; Petersheim, Daniel; Fan, Yanxin; Bahrami, Ehsan; Racek, Tomas; Rohlfs, Meino; Puchałka, Jacek; Mertes, Christian; Gagneur, Julien; Ziegenhain, Christoph; Enard, Wolfgang; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Arkwright, Peter D; Abboud, Miguel R; Pazhakh, Vahid; Lieschke, Graham J; Krawitz, Peter M; Dahlhoff, Maik; Schneider, Marlon R; Wolf, Eckhard; Horny, Hans-Peter; Schmidt, Heinrich; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Klein, Christoph

    2017-04-03

    We identify SMARCD2 (SWI/SNF-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily D, member 2), also known as BAF60b (BRG1/Brahma-associated factor 60b), as a critical regulator of myeloid differentiation in humans, mice, and zebrafish. Studying patients from three unrelated pedigrees characterized by neutropenia, specific granule deficiency, myelodysplasia with excess of blast cells, and various developmental aberrations, we identified three homozygous loss-of-function mutations in SMARCD2. Using mice and zebrafish as model systems, we showed that SMARCD2 controls early steps in the differentiation of myeloid-erythroid progenitor cells. In vitro, SMARCD2 interacts with the transcription factor CEBPɛ and controls expression of neutrophil proteins stored in specific granules. Defective expression of SMARCD2 leads to transcriptional and chromatin changes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) human promyelocytic cells. In summary, SMARCD2 is a key factor controlling myelopoiesis and is a potential tumor suppressor in leukemia.

  8. A mono-allelic bivalent chromatin domain controls tissue-specific imprinting at Grb10.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Lionel A; Chamberlain, Stormy; Sabourin, Jean-Charles; Henckel, Amandine; Magnuson, Terry; Hugnot, Jean-Philippe; Feil, Robert; Arnaud, Philippe

    2008-10-08

    Genomic imprinting is a developmental mechanism that mediates parent-of-origin-specific expression in a subset of genes. How the tissue specificity of imprinted gene expression is controlled remains poorly understood. As a model to address this question, we studied Grb10, a gene that displays brain-specific expression from the paternal chromosome. Here, we show in the mouse that the paternal promoter region is marked by allelic bivalent chromatin enriched in both H3K4me2 and H3K27me3, from early embryonic stages onwards. This is maintained in all somatic tissues, but brain. The bivalent domain is resolved upon neural commitment, during the developmental window in which paternal expression is activated. Our data indicate that bivalent chromatin, in combination with neuronal factors, controls the paternal expression of Grb10 in brain. This finding highlights a novel mechanism to control tissue-specific imprinting.

  9. Light-induced decomposition of indocyanine green.

    PubMed

    Engel, Eva; Schraml, Rüdiger; Maisch, Tim; Kobuch, Karin; König, Burkhard; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus; Hillenkamp, Jost; Bäumler, Wolfgang; Vasold, Rudolf

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the light-induced decomposition of indocyanine green (ICG) and to test the cytotoxicity of light-induced ICG decomposition products. ICG in solution was irradiated with laser light, solar light, or surgical endolight. The light-induced decomposition of ICG was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry. Porcine retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells were incubated with the light-induced decomposition products of ICG, and cell viability was measured by trypan blue exclusion assay. Independent of the light source used, singlet oxygen (photodynamic type 2 reaction) is generated by ICG leading to dioxetanes by [2+2]-cycloaddition of singlet oxygen. These dioxetanes thermally decompose into several carbonyl compounds. The decomposition products were identified by mass spectrometry. The decomposition of ICG was inhibited by adding sodium azide, a quencher of singlet oxygen. Incubation with ICG decomposition products significantly reduced the viability of RPE cells in contrast to control cells. ICG is decomposed by light within a self-sensitized photo oxidation. The decomposition products reduce the viability of RPE cells in vitro. The toxic effects of decomposed ICG should be further investigated under in vivo conditions.

  10. Osterix and NO66 histone demethylase control the chromatin of Osterix target genes during osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Krishna M; Yasuda, Hideyo; Zhou, Xin; deCrombrugghe, Benoit

    2014-04-01

    Commitment of Runx2-expressing precursor osteoblasts to functional osteoblasts and then to osteocytes is triggered by Osterix (Osx), which activates its target genes in those cells during bone formation. It is not yet known whether Osx has a role in remodeling the chromatin architecture of its target genes during the transition from preosteoblast to osteoblast. In testing the hypothesis that Osx is indispensable for active chromatin architecture, we first showed that in Osx-null calvarial cells occupancy of the transcriptional activators, including lysine 4 methyl transferase (Wdr5), c-Myc, and H2A.Z, at the Osx target gene Bsp was very markedly decreased. The levels of methylation of lysines 4 and 36 and acetylation of histone H3, markers for active chromatin, were also reduced at the Bsp gene in these cells. In contrast, occupancy of the transcriptional repressors HP1 and the nucleolar protein 66 (NO66), a histone demethylase previously identified as an Osx-interacting protein, was increased at the Bsp gene in Osx-null calvarial cells. Furthermore, the Bsp promoter was hypermethylated in embryonic stem (ES) cells and in embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5) embryos but was markedly hypomethylated in the calvaria of E18.5 embryos, coinciding with robust Bsp expression. In contrast, CpG methylation in the Bsp promoter remained high in Osx-null calvaria compared to Osx-wild-type calvaria. Our data also revealed that NO66 interacted with DNA Methyltransferase 1A (DNMT1A), histone deacetylase 1A (HDAC1A), and HP1, which are known to control histone and DNA methylation. In addition, HP1 stimulated the demethylase activity of NO66 for its substrates "trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4" (H3K4me3) and "trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 36" (H3K36me3). Our findings strongly suggest that in the absence of Osx, the chromatin of Osx target genes is transcriptionally inactive. We propose that Osx is a molecular switch for the formation of an active chromatin state during

  11. DNA methylation-independent removable insulator controls chromatin remodeling at the HOXA locus via retinoic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Ko; Nakamoto, Masafumi; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-12-15

    Chromatin insulators partition the genome into functional units to control gene expression, particularly in complex chromosomal regions. The CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is an insulator-binding protein that functions in transcriptional regulation and higher-order chromatin formation. Variable CTCF-binding sites have been identified to be cell type-specific partly due to differential DNA methylation. Here, we show that DNA methylation-independent removable CTCF insulator is responsible for retinoic acid (RA)-mediated higher-order chromatin remodeling in the human HOXA gene locus. Detailed chromatin analysis characterized multiple CTCF-enriched sites and RA-responsive enhancers at this locus. These regulatory elements and transcriptionally silent HOXA genes are closely positioned under basal conditions. Notably, upon RA signaling, the RAR/RXR transcription factor induced loss of adjacent CTCF binding and changed the higher-order chromatin conformation of the overall locus. Targeted disruption of a CTCF site by genome editing with zinc finger nucleases and CRISPR/Cas9 system showed that the site is required for chromatin conformations that maintain the initial associations among insulators, enhancers and promoters. The results indicate that the initial chromatin conformation affects subsequent RA-induced HOXA gene activation. Our study uncovers that a removable insulator spatiotemporally switches higher-order chromatin and multiple gene activities via cooperation of CTCF and key transcription factors. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Chromatin recruitment of activated AMPK drives fasting response genes co-controlled by GR and PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Ratman, Dariusz; Mylka, Viacheslav; Bougarne, Nadia; Pawlak, Michal; Caron, Sandrine; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Paumelle, Réjane; De Cauwer, Lode; Thommis, Jonathan; Rider, Mark H.; Libert, Claude; Lievens, Sam; Tavernier, Jan; Staels, Bart; De Bosscher, Karolien

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to fasting involves both Glucocorticoid Receptor (GRα) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) activation. Given both receptors can physically interact we investigated the possibility of a genome-wide cross-talk between activated GR and PPARα, using ChIP- and RNA-seq in primary hepatocytes. Our data reveal extensive chromatin co-localization of both factors with cooperative induction of genes controlling lipid/glucose metabolism. Key GR/PPAR co-controlled genes switched from transcriptional antagonism to cooperativity when moving from short to prolonged hepatocyte fasting, a phenomenon coinciding with gene promoter recruitment of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and blocked by its pharmacological inhibition. In vitro interaction studies support trimeric complex formation between GR, PPARα and phospho-AMPK. Long-term fasting in mice showed enhanced phosphorylation of liver AMPK and GRα Ser211. Phospho-AMPK chromatin recruitment at liver target genes, observed upon prolonged fasting in mice, is dampened by refeeding. Taken together, our results identify phospho-AMPK as a molecular switch able to cooperate with nuclear receptors at the chromatin level and reveal a novel adaptation mechanism to prolonged fasting. PMID:27576532

  13. Hsp90 and p23 Molecular Chaperones Control Chromatin Architecture by Maintaining the Functional Pool of the RSC Chromatin Remodeler.

    PubMed

    Echtenkamp, Frank J; Gvozdenov, Zlata; Adkins, Nicholas L; Zhang, Yang; Lynch-Day, Melinda; Watanabe, Shinya; Peterson, Craig L; Freeman, Brian C

    2016-12-01

    Molecular chaperones govern protein homeostasis, being allied to the beginning (folding) and ending (degradation) of the protein life cycle. Yet, the Hsp90 system primarily associates with native factors, including fully assembled complexes. The significance of these connections is poorly understood. To delineate why Hsp90 and its cochaperone p23 interact with a mature structure, we focused on the RSC chromatin remodeler. Both Hsp90 and p23 triggered the release of RSC from DNA or a nucleosome. Although Hsp90 only freed bound RSC, p23 enhanced nucleosome remodeling prior to discharging the complex. In vivo, RSC mobility and remodeling function were chaperone dependent. Our results suggest Hsp90 and p23 contribute to proteostasis by chaperoning mature factors through energetically unfavorable events, thereby maintaining the cellular pool of active native proteins. In the case of RSC, p23 and Hsp90 promote a dynamic action, allowing a limited number of remodelers to effectively maintain chromatin in a pliable state. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Photosynthetic control of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase in Vallisneria leaves. I. Regulation of activity during light-induced membrane hyperpolarization.

    PubMed

    Harada, Akiko; Okazaki, Yoshiji; Takagi, Shingo

    2002-04-01

    In mesophyll cells of the aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria gigantea Graebner, red, blue, or blue plus far-red light induced a typical membrane hyperpolarization, whereas far-red light alone had little effect. Both N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, a potent inhibitor of H+-ATPase, and carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, an uncoupler, produced a considerable membrane depolarization in the dark-adapted cells and a complete suppression of the light-induced hyperpolarization. Although 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), an inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport, did not affect the membrane potential in darkness, it completely inhibited the light-induced membrane hyperpolarization. In vivo illumination of the leaves with red light caused a substantial decrease in the Km for ATP, not only of the vanadate-sensitive ATP-hydrolyzing activity in leaf homogenate, but also of the ATP-dependent H+-transporting activity in plasma membrane (PM) vesicles isolated from the leaves by aqueous polymer two-phase partitioning methods. The effects of red light were negated by the presence of DCMU during illumination. In vivo illumination with far-red light had no effect on the Km for ATP of H+-transporting activity. These results strongly suggest that an electrogenic component in the membrane potential of the mesophyll cell is generated by the PM H+-ATPase, and that photosynthesis-dependent modulation of the enzymatic activity of the PM H+-ATPase is involved in the light-induced membrane hyperpolarization.

  15. Imprinting control regions (ICRs) are marked by mono-allelic bivalent chromatin when transcriptionally inactive

    PubMed Central

    Maupetit-Méhouas, Stéphanie; Montibus, Bertille; Nury, David; Tayama, Chiharu; Wassef, Michel; Kota, Satya K.; Fogli, Anne; Cerqueira Campos, Fabiana; Hata, Kenichiro; Feil, Robert; Margueron, Raphael; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Court, Franck; Arnaud, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Parental allele-specific expression of imprinted genes is mediated by imprinting control regions (ICRs) that are constitutively marked by DNA methylation imprints on the maternal or paternal allele. Mono-allelic DNA methylation is strictly required for the process of imprinting and has to be faithfully maintained during the entire life-span. While the regulation of DNA methylation itself is well understood, the mechanisms whereby the opposite allele remains unmethylated are unclear. Here, we show that in the mouse, at maternally methylated ICRs, the paternal allele, which is constitutively associated with H3K4me2/3, is marked by default by H3K27me3 when these ICRs are transcriptionally inactive, leading to the formation of a bivalent chromatin signature. Our data suggest that at ICRs, chromatin bivalency has a protective role by ensuring that DNA on the paternal allele remains unmethylated and protected against spurious and unscheduled gene expression. Moreover, they provide the proof of concept that, beside pluripotent cells, chromatin bivalency is the default state of transcriptionally inactive CpG island promoters, regardless of the developmental stage, thereby contributing to protect cell identity. PMID:26400168

  16. Imprinting control regions (ICRs) are marked by mono-allelic bivalent chromatin when transcriptionally inactive.

    PubMed

    Maupetit-Méhouas, Stéphanie; Montibus, Bertille; Nury, David; Tayama, Chiharu; Wassef, Michel; Kota, Satya K; Fogli, Anne; Cerqueira Campos, Fabiana; Hata, Kenichiro; Feil, Robert; Margueron, Raphael; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Court, Franck; Arnaud, Philippe

    2016-01-29

    Parental allele-specific expression of imprinted genes is mediated by imprinting control regions (ICRs) that are constitutively marked by DNA methylation imprints on the maternal or paternal allele. Mono-allelic DNA methylation is strictly required for the process of imprinting and has to be faithfully maintained during the entire life-span. While the regulation of DNA methylation itself is well understood, the mechanisms whereby the opposite allele remains unmethylated are unclear. Here, we show that in the mouse, at maternally methylated ICRs, the paternal allele, which is constitutively associated with H3K4me2/3, is marked by default by H3K27me3 when these ICRs are transcriptionally inactive, leading to the formation of a bivalent chromatin signature. Our data suggest that at ICRs, chromatin bivalency has a protective role by ensuring that DNA on the paternal allele remains unmethylated and protected against spurious and unscheduled gene expression. Moreover, they provide the proof of concept that, beside pluripotent cells, chromatin bivalency is the default state of transcriptionally inactive CpG island promoters, regardless of the developmental stage, thereby contributing to protect cell identity.

  17. Dynamic chromatin boundaries delineate a latency control region of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Chau, Charles M; Lieberman, Paul M

    2004-11-01

    The oncogenic potential of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can be regulated by epigenetic factors controlling LMP1 and EBNA2 gene transcription. The EBV latency control region (LCR) constitutes approximately 12 kb of viral sequence spanning the divergent promoters of LMP1 and EBNA2 and encompasses the EBV latent replication origin OriP and RNA polymerase III-transcribed EBV-encoded RNA genes. We have used the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay to examine the chromatin architecture of the LCR in different types of EBV latency programs. We have found that histone H3 K4 methylation (H3mK4) was enriched throughout a large domain that extended from internal repeat 1 (IR1) to the terminal repeat in type III latency where EBNA2 and LMP1 genes are expressed. In type I latency where EBNA2 and LMP1 genes are transcriptionally silent, the H3mK4 domain contracts and does not enter the EBNA2 or LMP1 promoters. In contrast, histone H3 K9 methylation (H3mK9), associated with silent heterochromatin, was enriched in the EBNA2 and LMP1 upstream control regions in type I but not type III cells. MTA [5'-deoxy-5'(methylthio)adenosine], a pharmacological inhibitor of protein methylation, globally reduced histone H3mK4 and inhibited EBNA2 transcription in type III cells. 5'-Azacytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation that derepresses EBNA2 transcription in type I latency, caused H3mK4 expansion and a corresponding loss of H3mK9 at IR1. The chromatin boundary protein and transcription repressor CCCTC-binding factor was enriched at the EBNA2 transcription control region in type I but not type III cells. We also present evidence that OriP binding factors EBNA1 and ORC2 can interact with sequences outside of OriP including a region within IR1 that may influence EBNA2 transcription status. These results indicate that types I and III latency programs have distinct histone methylation patterns in the LCR and suggest that chromatin architecture coordinates gene expression of LMP1 and EBNA2.

  18. Control of Genome Integrity by RFC Complexes; Conductors of PCNA Loading onto and Unloading from Chromatin during DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Shiomi, Yasushi; Nishitani, Hideo

    2017-01-01

    During cell division, genome integrity is maintained by faithful DNA replication during S phase, followed by accurate segregation in mitosis. Many DNA metabolic events linked with DNA replication are also regulated throughout the cell cycle. In eukaryotes, the DNA sliding clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), acts on chromatin as a processivity factor for DNA polymerases. Since its discovery, many other PCNA binding partners have been identified that function during DNA replication, repair, recombination, chromatin remodeling, cohesion, and proteolysis in cell-cycle progression. PCNA not only recruits the proteins involved in such events, but it also actively controls their function as chromatin assembles. Therefore, control of PCNA-loading onto chromatin is fundamental for various replication-coupled reactions. PCNA is loaded onto chromatin by PCNA-loading replication factor C (RFC) complexes. Both RFC1-RFC and Ctf18-RFC fundamentally function as PCNA loaders. On the other hand, after DNA synthesis, PCNA must be removed from chromatin by Elg1-RFC. Functional defects in RFC complexes lead to chromosomal abnormalities. In this review, we summarize the structural and functional relationships among RFC complexes, and describe how the regulation of PCNA loading/unloading by RFC complexes contributes to maintaining genome integrity. PMID:28134787

  19. Control of Genome Integrity by RFC Complexes; Conductors of PCNA Loading onto and Unloading from Chromatin during DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Yasushi; Nishitani, Hideo

    2017-01-26

    During cell division, genome integrity is maintained by faithful DNA replication during S phase, followed by accurate segregation in mitosis. Many DNA metabolic events linked with DNA replication are also regulated throughout the cell cycle. In eukaryotes, the DNA sliding clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), acts on chromatin as a processivity factor for DNA polymerases. Since its discovery, many other PCNA binding partners have been identified that function during DNA replication, repair, recombination, chromatin remodeling, cohesion, and proteolysis in cell-cycle progression. PCNA not only recruits the proteins involved in such events, but it also actively controls their function as chromatin assembles. Therefore, control of PCNA-loading onto chromatin is fundamental for various replication-coupled reactions. PCNA is loaded onto chromatin by PCNA-loading replication factor C (RFC) complexes. Both RFC1-RFC and Ctf18-RFC fundamentally function as PCNA loaders. On the other hand, after DNA synthesis, PCNA must be removed from chromatin by Elg1-RFC. Functional defects in RFC complexes lead to chromosomal abnormalities. In this review, we summarize the structural and functional relationships among RFC complexes, and describe how the regulation of PCNA loading/unloading by RFC complexes contributes to maintaining genome integrity.

  20. Control of Chromatin Structure by Spt6: Different Consequences in Coding and Regulatory Regions▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ivanovska, Iva; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Rando, Oliver J.; Robert, François; Winston, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Spt6 is a highly conserved factor required for normal transcription and chromatin structure. To gain new insights into the roles of Spt6, we measured nucleosome occupancy along Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome III in an spt6 mutant. We found that the level of nucleosomes is greatly reduced across some, but not all, coding regions in an spt6 mutant, with nucleosome loss preferentially occurring over highly transcribed genes. This result provides strong support for recent studies that have suggested that transcription at low levels does not displace nucleosomes, while transcription at high levels does, and adds the idea that Spt6 is required for restoration of nucleosomes at the highly transcribed genes. Unexpectedly, our studies have also suggested that the spt6 effects on nucleosome levels across coding regions do not cause the spt6 effects on mRNA levels, suggesting that the role of Spt6 across coding regions is separate from its role in transcriptional regulation. In the case of the CHA1 gene, regulation by Spt6 likely occurs by controlling the position of the +1 nucleosome. These results, along with previous studies, suggest that Spt6 regulates transcription by controlling chromatin structure over regulatory regions, and its effects on nucleosome levels over coding regions likely serve an independent function. PMID:21098123

  1. Control of chromatin structure by spt6: different consequences in coding and regulatory regions.

    PubMed

    Ivanovska, Iva; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Rando, Oliver J; Robert, François; Winston, Fred

    2011-02-01

    Spt6 is a highly conserved factor required for normal transcription and chromatin structure. To gain new insights into the roles of Spt6, we measured nucleosome occupancy along Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome III in an spt6 mutant. We found that the level of nucleosomes is greatly reduced across some, but not all, coding regions in an spt6 mutant, with nucleosome loss preferentially occurring over highly transcribed genes. This result provides strong support for recent studies that have suggested that transcription at low levels does not displace nucleosomes, while transcription at high levels does, and adds the idea that Spt6 is required for restoration of nucleosomes at the highly transcribed genes. Unexpectedly, our studies have also suggested that the spt6 effects on nucleosome levels across coding regions do not cause the spt6 effects on mRNA levels, suggesting that the role of Spt6 across coding regions is separate from its role in transcriptional regulation. In the case of the CHA1 gene, regulation by Spt6 likely occurs by controlling the position of the +1 nucleosome. These results, along with previous studies, suggest that Spt6 regulates transcription by controlling chromatin structure over regulatory regions, and its effects on nucleosome levels over coding regions likely serve an independent function.

  2. NF-E2 disrupts chromatin structure at human beta-globin locus control region hypersensitive site 2 in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, J A; Emerson, B M

    1996-01-01

    The human beta-globin locus control region (LCR) is responsible for forming an active chromatin structure extending over the 100-kb locus, allowing expression of the beta-globin gene family. The LCR consists of four erythroid-cell-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS1 to -4). DNase I hypersensitive sites are thought to represent nucleosome-free regions of DNA which are bound by trans-acting factors. Of the four hypersensitive sites only HS2 acts as a transcriptional enhancer. In this study, we examine the binding of an erythroid protein to its site within HS2 in chromatin in vitro. NF-E2 is a transcriptional activator consisting of two subunits, the hematopoietic cell-specific p45 and the ubiquitous DNA-binding subunit, p18. NF-E2 binds two tandem AP1-like sites in HS2 which form the core of its enhancer activity. In this study, we show that when bound to in vitro-reconstituted chromatin, NF-E2 forms a DNase I hypersensitive site at HS2 similar to the site observed in vivo. Moreover, NF-E2 binding in vitro results in a disruption of nucleosome structure which can be detected 200 bp away. Although NF-E2 can disrupt nucleosomes when added to preformed chromatin, the disruption is more pronounced when NF-E2 is added to DNA prior to chromatin assembly. Interestingly, the hematopoietic cell-specific subunit, p45, is necessary for binding to chromatin but not to naked DNA. Interaction of NF-E2 with its site in chromatin-reconstituted HS2 allows a second erythroid factor, GATA-1, to bind its nearby sites. Lastly, nucleosome disruption by NF-E2 is an ATP-dependent process, suggesting the involvement of energy-dependent nucleosome remodeling factors. PMID:8816476

  3. Chromatin Controls DNA Replication Origin Selection, Lagging-Strand Synthesis, and Replication Fork Rates.

    PubMed

    Kurat, Christoph F; Yeeles, Joseph T P; Patel, Harshil; Early, Anne; Diffley, John F X

    2017-01-05

    The integrity of eukaryotic genomes requires rapid and regulated chromatin replication. How this is accomplished is still poorly understood. Using purified yeast replication proteins and fully chromatinized templates, we have reconstituted this process in vitro. We show that chromatin enforces DNA replication origin specificity by preventing non-specific MCM helicase loading. Helicase activation occurs efficiently in the context of chromatin, but subsequent replisome progression requires the histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription). The FACT-associated Nhp6 protein, the nucleosome remodelers INO80 or ISW1A, and the lysine acetyltransferases Gcn5 and Esa1 each contribute separately to maximum DNA synthesis rates. Chromatin promotes the regular priming of lagging-strand DNA synthesis by facilitating DNA polymerase α function at replication forks. Finally, nucleosomes disrupted during replication are efficiently re-assembled into regular arrays on nascent DNA. Our work defines the minimum requirements for chromatin replication in vitro and shows how multiple chromatin factors might modulate replication fork rates in vivo. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gene activation and cell fate control in plants: a chromatin perspective.

    PubMed

    Engelhorn, Julia; Blanvillain, Robert; Carles, Cristel C

    2014-08-01

    In plants, environment-adaptable organogenesis extends throughout the lifespan, and iterative development requires repetitive rounds of activation and repression of several sets of genes. Eukaryotic genome compaction into chromatin forms a physical barrier for transcription; therefore, induction of gene expression requires alteration in chromatin structure. One of the present great challenges in molecular and developmental biology is to understand how chromatin is brought from a repressive to permissive state on specific loci and in a very specific cluster of cells, as well as how this state is further maintained and propagated through time and cell division in a cell lineage. In this review, we report recent discoveries implementing our knowledge on chromatin dynamics that modulate developmental gene expression. We also discuss how new data sets highlight plant specificities, likely reflecting requirement for a highly dynamic chromatin.

  5. Light-Inducible Gene Regulation with Engineered Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Polstein, Lauren R.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    The coupling of light-inducible protein-protein interactions with gene regulation systems has enabled the control of gene expression with light. In particular, heterodimer protein pairs from plants can be used to engineer a gene regulation system in mammalian cells that is reversible, repeatable, tunable, controllable in a spatiotemporal manner, and targetable to any DNA sequence. This system, Light-Inducible Transcription using Engineered Zinc finger proteins (LITEZ), is based on the blue light-induced interaction of GIGANTEA and the LOV domain of FKF1 that drives the localization of a transcriptional activator to the DNA-binding site of a highly customizable engineered zinc finger protein. This chapter provides methods for modifying LITEZ to target new DNA sequences, engineering a programmable LED array to illuminate cell cultures, and using the modified LITEZ system to achieve spatiotemporal control of transgene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:24718797

  6. Magnetic routing of light-induced waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izdebskaya, Yana; Shvedov, Vladlen; Assanto, Gaetano; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2017-02-01

    Among photofunctional materials that can be employed to control the propagation of light by modifying their properties, soft dielectrics such as nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) stand out for their large all-optical response. Through reorientation, the molecular distribution of NLCs can be modified by the electric field of light, permitting functional operations and supporting self-localized light beams or spatial optical solitons. To date, the generation and routing of such solitons have been limited by the boundary conditions employed to tailor the properties of NLCs in planar cells or capillaries. Here we report on spatial solitons in bulk NLCs with no lateral anchoring, where the application of an external magnetic field effectively controls the direction of propagation and the angular steering of the self-trapped wavepackets. Our results entail a completely new approach to the routing of self-localized beams and light-induced waveguides in three dimensions, without the usual limitations imposed by transverse boundary conditions.

  7. Magnetic routing of light-induced waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Izdebskaya, Yana; Shvedov, Vladlen; Assanto, Gaetano; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2017-01-01

    Among photofunctional materials that can be employed to control the propagation of light by modifying their properties, soft dielectrics such as nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) stand out for their large all-optical response. Through reorientation, the molecular distribution of NLCs can be modified by the electric field of light, permitting functional operations and supporting self-localized light beams or spatial optical solitons. To date, the generation and routing of such solitons have been limited by the boundary conditions employed to tailor the properties of NLCs in planar cells or capillaries. Here we report on spatial solitons in bulk NLCs with no lateral anchoring, where the application of an external magnetic field effectively controls the direction of propagation and the angular steering of the self-trapped wavepackets. Our results entail a completely new approach to the routing of self-localized beams and light-induced waveguides in three dimensions, without the usual limitations imposed by transverse boundary conditions. PMID:28198374

  8. Control of 5S RNA transcription in Xenopus somatic cell chromatin: activation with an oocyte extract.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, W F; Bloomer, L S; Gottesfeld, J M

    1983-01-01

    A chromatin fraction enriched for Xenopus 5S RNA genes has been isolated by restriction endonuclease digestion and sucrose gradient velocity sedimentation. Soluble chromatin sedimenting at 70-80S contains approximately 50% of the oocyte-expressed 5S RNA genes and only 1.5-3% of total chromatin DNA; this represents a 15- to 30-fold purification of the 5S genes. Such chromatin isolated from somatic cells (blood and cultured kidney cells) retains the transcriptionally-inactive state of the oocyte-expressed 5S genes. Soluble chromatin from somatic cells prepared by micrococcal nuclease digestion also retains the inactive state of the oocyte-type 5S genes. It is likely that the level of chromatin structure responsible for inactivity of the oocyte genes in somatic cells is the nucleosome or short chains of nucleosomes and not supranucleosomal structures. The oocyte-type genes can be rendered transcriptionally active in somatic cell chromatin either by salt extraction of some chromosomal proteins or by treatment with the ion exchange resin Dowex A50W-X2. Alternatively, activation of these genes can be achieved by incubating somatic cell chromatin or nuclei with an extract prepared from Xenopus oocytes. This effect is not specific for 5S RNA genes as the transcription of other small RNAs (including pre-tRNA) is stimulated by the oocyte extract. The activating factor(s) is resistant to micrococcal nuclease, nondialyzable, heat labile and sensitive to trypsin; thus it is highly likely to be a protein or a group of proteins. Partial purification of the activating factor(s) has been achieved by ion exchange chromatography. Images PMID:6866764

  9. Long-range looping of a locus control region drives tissue-specific chromatin packing within a multigene cluster

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Cooke, Nancy E.; Liebhaber, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The relationships of higher order chromatin organization to mammalian gene expression remain incompletely defined. The human Growth Hormone (hGH) multigene cluster contains five gene paralogs. These genes are selectively activated in either the pituitary or the placenta by distinct components of a remote locus control region (LCR). Prior studies have revealed that appropriate activation of the placental genes is dependent not only on the actions of the LCR, but also on the multigene composition of the cluster itself. Here, we demonstrate that the hGH LCR ‘loops’ over a distance of 28 kb in primary placental nuclei to make specific contacts with the promoters of the two GH genes in the cluster. This long-range interaction sequesters the GH genes from the three hCS genes which co-assemble into a tightly packed ‘hCS chromatin hub’. Elimination of the long-range looping, via specific deletion of the placental LCR components, triggers a dramatic disruption of the hCS chromatin hub. These data reveal a higher-order structural pathway by which long-range looping from an LCR impacts on local chromatin architecture that is linked to tissue-specific gene regulation within a multigene cluster. PMID:26893355

  10. The effect of a high mobility group protein (HMG 17) on the structure of acetylated and control core HeLa cell chromatin.

    PubMed

    Sasi, R; Fasman, G D

    1984-05-15

    The effect of binding a high mobility group protein (HMG 17) on the stability and conformation of acetylated and control HeLa high molecular weight core chromatin (stripped of H1 and non-histone chromosomal proteins) was studied by circular dichroism and thermal-denaturation measurements. Previously it had been shown that conformational differences exist between native whole chromatin derived from butyrate-treated (acetylated) and control HeLa cells and that these conformational differences disappear by removing H1 and non-histone chromosomal proteins ( Reczek , P.R., Weissman , D., Huvos , P.E. and Fasman, G.D. (1982) Biochemistry 21, 993-1002). The circular dichroism spectra and the thermal denaturation profiles of control and acetylated core chromatin were found to be similar. The circular dichroism properties of HMG 17 reconstituted highly acetylated and control core chromatin indicated the same alteration of chromatin structure at low ionic strength (1 mM sodium phosphate/0.25 mM EDTA, pH 7.0). The magnitudes of the decrease in ellipticity were proportional to the amount of HMG 17 bound and were found to be the same for both the acetylated and control core chromatin. Thermal denaturation profiles confirmed this change in structure induced by HMG 17 on control and highly acetylated core chromatin. The thermal denaturation profiles, which were resolved into three component transitions, exhibited a shifting of hyperchromicity from the lower melting transitions to the higher melting transitions, with a concomitant rise in Tm, on HMG 17 binding to both control and acetylated chromatin. The natures of the interactions of HMG 17 at higher ionic strength (50 mM NaCl/0.25 mM EDTA/1 mM sodium phosphate, pH 7.0) with acetylated and control core chromatin were slightly different, as measured by circular dichroism; however, a decrease in ellipticity was observed for both samples upon binding of HMG 17. These observations suggest that acetylation coupled with HMG 17 binding

  11. Chromatin Topological Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavelle, C.; Bancaud, A.; Recouvreux, P.; Barbi, M.; Victor, J.; Viovy, J.

    DNA transaction events occurring during a cell cycle (transcription,repair, replication) are always associated with severe topological constraints on the double helix. However, since nuclear DNA is bound to various proteins (including histones) that control its accessibility and 3D organization, these topological constraints propagate or accumulate on a chromatin substrate. This paper focuses on chromatin fiber response to physiological mechanical constraints expected to occur during transcription elongation. We will show in particular how recent single molecule techniques help us to understand how chromatin conformational dynamics could manage harsh DNA supercoiling changes.

  12. Chromatin hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, Robijn; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Rabin, Yitzhak; Zidovska, Alexandra

    2014-05-06

    Following recent observations of large scale correlated motion of chromatin inside the nuclei of live differentiated cells, we present a hydrodynamic theory-the two-fluid model-in which the content of a nucleus is described as a chromatin solution with the nucleoplasm playing the role of the solvent and the chromatin fiber that of a solute. This system is subject to both passive thermal fluctuations and active scalar and vector events that are associated with free energy consumption, such as ATP hydrolysis. Scalar events drive the longitudinal viscoelastic modes (where the chromatin fiber moves relative to the solvent) while vector events generate the transverse modes (where the chromatin fiber moves together with the solvent). Using linear response methods, we derive explicit expressions for the response functions that connect the chromatin density and velocity correlation functions to the corresponding correlation functions of the active sources and the complex viscoelastic moduli of the chromatin solution. We then derive general expressions for the flow spectral density of the chromatin velocity field. We use the theory to analyze experimental results recently obtained by one of the present authors and her co-workers. We find that the time dependence of the experimental data for both native and ATP-depleted chromatin can be well-fitted using a simple model-the Maxwell fluid-for the complex modulus, although there is some discrepancy in terms of the wavevector dependence. Thermal fluctuations of ATP-depleted cells are predominantly longitudinal. ATP-active cells exhibit intense transverse long wavelength velocity fluctuations driven by force dipoles. Fluctuations with wavenumbers larger than a few inverse microns are dominated by concentration fluctuations with the same spectrum as thermal fluctuations but with increased intensity.

  13. Kinetic Control of Nucleosome Displacement by ISWI/ACF Chromatin Remodelers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florescu, Ana-Maria; Schiessel, Helmut; Blossey, Ralf

    2012-09-01

    Chromatin structure is dynamically organized by chromatin remodelers, motor protein complexes which move and remove nucleosomes. The regulation of remodeler action has recently been proposed to underlie a kinetic proofreading scheme which combines the recognition of histone-tail states and the ATP-dependent loosening of DNA around nucleosomes. Members of the ISWI-family of remodelers additionally recognize linker length between nucleosomes. Here, we show that the additional proofreading step involving linker length alone is sufficient to promote the formation of regular arrays of nucleosomes. ATP-dependent remodeling by bidirectional motors is shown to reinforce positioning as compared to statistical positioning.

  14. The impact of chromatin dynamics on plant light responses and circadian clock function.

    PubMed

    Barneche, Fredy; Malapeira, Jordi; Mas, Paloma

    2014-06-01

    Research on the functional properties of nucleosome structure and composition dynamics has revealed that chromatin-level regulation is an essential component of light signalling and clock function in plants, two processes that rely extensively on transcriptional controls. In particular, several types of histone post-translational modifications and chromatin-bound factors act sequentially or in combination to establish transcriptional patterns and to fine-tune the transcript abundance of a large repertoire of light-responsive genes and clock components. Cytogenetic approaches have also identified light-induced higher-order chromatin changes that dynamically organize the condensation of chromosomal domains into sub-nuclear foci containing silenced repeat elements. In this review, we report recently identified molecular actors that establish chromatin state dynamics in response to light signals such as photoperiod, intensity, and spectral quality. We also highlight the chromatin-dependent mechanisms that contribute to the 24-h circadian gene expression and its impact on plant physiology and development. The commonalities and contrasts of light- and clock-associated chromatin-based mechanisms are discussed, with particular emphasis on their impact on the selective regulation and rapid modulation of responsive genes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Control of V(D)J Recombination through Transcriptional Elongation and Changes in Locus Chromatin Structure and Nuclear Organization.

    PubMed

    Del Blanco, Beatriz; García, Vanina; García-Mariscal, Alberto; Hernández-Munain, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    V(D)J recombination is the assembly of gene segments at the antigen receptor loci to generate antigen receptor diversity in T and B lymphocytes. This process is regulated, according to defined developmental programs, by the action of a single specific recombinase complex formed by the recombination antigen gene (RAG-1/2) proteins that are expressed in immature lymphocytes. V(D)J recombination is strictly controlled by RAG-1/2 accessibility to specific recombination signal sequences in chromatin at several levels: cellular lineage, temporal regulation, gene segment order, and allelic exclusion. DNA cleavage by RAG-1/2 is regulated by the chromatin structure, transcriptional elongation, and three-dimensional architecture and position of the antigen receptor loci in the nucleus. Cis-elements specifically direct transcription and V(D)J recombination at these loci through interactions with transacting factors that form molecular machines that mediate a sequence of structural events. These events open chromatin to activate transcriptional elongation and to permit the access of RAG-1/2 to their recombination signal sequences to drive the juxtaposition of the V, D, and J segments and the recombination reaction itself. This chapter summarizes the advances in this area and the important role of the structure and position of antigen receptor loci within the nucleus to control this process.

  16. Genetic Control of Chromatin States in Humans Involves Local and Distal Chromosomal Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Grubert, Fabian; Zaugg, Judith B.; Kasowski, Maya; Ursu, Oana; Spacek, Damek V.; Martin, Alicia R.; Greenside, Peyton; Srivas, Rohith; Phanstiel, Doug H.; Pekowska, Aleksandra; Heidari, Nastaran; Euskirchen, Ghia; Huber, Wolfgang; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Kundaje, Anshul; Snyder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Deciphering the impact of genetic variants on gene regulation is fundamental to understanding human disease. Although gene regulation often involves long-range interactions, it is unknown to what extent non-coding genetic variants influence distal molecular phenotypes. Here, we integrate chromatin profiling for three histone marks in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from 75 sequenced individuals with LCL-specific Hi-C and ChIA-PET-based chromatin contact maps to uncover one of the largest collections of local and distal histone quantitative trait loci (hQTLs). Distal QTLs are enriched within topologically associated domains and exhibit largely concordant variation of chromatin state coordinated by proximal and distal non-coding genetic variants. Histone QTLs are enriched for common variants associated with autoimmune diseases and enable identification of putative target genes of disease-associated variants from genome-wide association studies. These analyses provide insights into how genetic variation can affect human disease phenotypes by coordinated changes in chromatin at interacting regulatory elements. PMID:26300125

  17. The nuclear oncogene SET controls DNA repair by KAP1 and HP1 retention to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Kalousi, Alkmini; Hoffbeck, Anne-Sophie; Selemenakis, Platonas N; Pinder, Jordan; Savage, Kienan I; Khanna, Kum Kum; Brino, Laurent; Dellaire, Graham; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G; Soutoglou, Evi

    2015-04-07

    Cells experience damage from exogenous and endogenous sources that endanger genome stability. Several cellular pathways have evolved to detect DNA damage and mediate its repair. Although many proteins have been implicated in these processes, only recent studies have revealed how they operate in the context of high-ordered chromatin structure. Here, we identify the nuclear oncogene SET (I2PP2A) as a modulator of DNA damage response (DDR) and repair in chromatin surrounding double-strand breaks (DSBs). We demonstrate that depletion of SET increases DDR and survival in the presence of radiomimetic drugs, while overexpression of SET impairs DDR and homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA repair. SET interacts with the Kruppel-associated box (KRAB)-associated co-repressor KAP1, and its overexpression results in the sustained retention of KAP1 and Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) on chromatin. Our results are consistent with a model in which SET-mediated chromatin compaction triggers an inhibition of DNA end resection and HR. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A phospho-dependent mechanism involving NCoR and KMT2D controls a permissive chromatin state at Notch target genes

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Franz; Rodriguez, Patrick; Giaimo, Benedetto Daniele; Antonello, Zeus A.; Mira, Laura; Mittler, Gerhard; Thiel, Verena N.; Collins, Kelly J.; Tabaja, Nassif; Cizelsky, Wiebke; Rothe, Melanie; Kühl, Susanne J.; Kühl, Michael; Ferrante, Francesca; Hein, Kerstin; Kovall, Rhett A.; Dominguez, Maria; Borggrefe, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    The transcriptional shift from repression to activation of target genes is crucial for the fidelity of Notch responses through incompletely understood mechanisms that likely involve chromatin-based control. To activate silenced genes, repressive chromatin marks are removed and active marks must be acquired. Histone H3 lysine-4 (H3K4) demethylases are key chromatin modifiers that establish the repressive chromatin state at Notch target genes. However, the counteracting histone methyltransferase required for the active chromatin state remained elusive. Here, we show that the RBP-J interacting factor SHARP is not only able to interact with the NCoR corepressor complex, but also with the H3K4 methyltransferase KMT2D coactivator complex. KMT2D and NCoR compete for the C-terminal SPOC-domain of SHARP. We reveal that the SPOC-domain exclusively binds to phosphorylated NCoR. The balance between NCoR and KMT2D binding is shifted upon mutating the phosphorylation sites of NCoR or upon inhibition of the NCoR kinase CK2β. Furthermore, we show that the homologs of SHARP and KMT2D in Drosophila also physically interact and control Notch-mediated functions in vivo. Together, our findings reveal how signaling can fine-tune a committed chromatin state by phosphorylation of a pivotal chromatin-modifier. PMID:26912830

  19. A phospho-dependent mechanism involving NCoR and KMT2D controls a permissive chromatin state at Notch target genes.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Franz; Rodriguez, Patrick; Giaimo, Benedetto Daniele; Antonello, Zeus A; Mira, Laura; Mittler, Gerhard; Thiel, Verena N; Collins, Kelly J; Tabaja, Nassif; Cizelsky, Wiebke; Rothe, Melanie; Kühl, Susanne J; Kühl, Michael; Ferrante, Francesca; Hein, Kerstin; Kovall, Rhett A; Dominguez, Maria; Borggrefe, Tilman

    2016-06-02

    The transcriptional shift from repression to activation of target genes is crucial for the fidelity of Notch responses through incompletely understood mechanisms that likely involve chromatin-based control. To activate silenced genes, repressive chromatin marks are removed and active marks must be acquired. Histone H3 lysine-4 (H3K4) demethylases are key chromatin modifiers that establish the repressive chromatin state at Notch target genes. However, the counteracting histone methyltransferase required for the active chromatin state remained elusive. Here, we show that the RBP-J interacting factor SHARP is not only able to interact with the NCoR corepressor complex, but also with the H3K4 methyltransferase KMT2D coactivator complex. KMT2D and NCoR compete for the C-terminal SPOC-domain of SHARP. We reveal that the SPOC-domain exclusively binds to phosphorylated NCoR. The balance between NCoR and KMT2D binding is shifted upon mutating the phosphorylation sites of NCoR or upon inhibition of the NCoR kinase CK2β. Furthermore, we show that the homologs of SHARP and KMT2D in Drosophila also physically interact and control Notch-mediated functions in vivo Together, our findings reveal how signaling can fine-tune a committed chromatin state by phosphorylation of a pivotal chromatin-modifier.

  20. Autophagy in light-induced retinal damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Perusek, Lindsay; Maeda, Akiko

    2016-03-01

    Vision is reliant upon converting photon signals to electrical information which is interpreted by the brain and therefore allowing us to receive information about our surroundings. However, when exposed to excessive light, photoreceptors and other types of cells in the retina can undergo light-induced cell death, termed light-induced retinal damage. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding molecular events in the retina after excessive light exposure and mechanisms of light-induced retinal damage. We also introduce works which investigate potential roles of autophagy, an essential cellular mechanism required for maintaining homeostasis under stress conditions, in the illuminated retina and animal models of light-induced retinal damage.

  1. Autophagy in light-induced retinal damage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Perusek, Lindsay; Maeda, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Vision is reliant upon converting photon signals to electrical information which is interpreted by the brain and therefore allowing us to receive information about our surroundings. However, when exposed to excessive light, photoreceptors and other types of cells in the retina can undergo light-induced cell death, termed light-induced retinal damage. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding molecular events in the retina after excessive light exposure and mechanisms of light-induced retinal damage. We also introduce works which investigate potential roles of autophagy, an essential cellular mechanism required for maintaining homeostasis under stress conditions, in the illuminated retina and animal models of light-induced retinal damage. PMID:26325327

  2. Replicating centromeric chromatin: Spatial and temporal control of CENP-A assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Nechemia-Arbely, Yael; Fachinetti, Daniele; Cleveland, Don W.

    2012-07-15

    The centromere is the fundamental unit for insuring chromosome inheritance. This complex region has a distinct type of chromatin in which histone H3 is replaced by a structurally different homologue identified in humans as CENP-A. In metazoans, specific DNA sequences are neither required nor sufficient for centromere identity. Rather, an epigenetic mark comprised of CENP-A containing chromatin is thought to be the major determinant of centromere identity. In this view, CENP-A deposition and chromatin assembly are fundamental processes for the maintenance of centromeric identity across mitotic and meiotic divisions. Several lines of evidence support CENP-A deposition in metazoans occurring at only one time in the cell cycle. Such cell cycle-dependent loading of CENP-A is found in divergent species from human to fission yeast, albeit with differences in the cell cycle point at which CENP-A is assembled. Cell cycle dependent CENP-A deposition requires multiple assembly factors for its deposition and maintenance. This review discusses the regulation of new CENP-A deposition and its relevance to centromere identity and inheritance.

  3. Light-induced quantitative microprinting of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strale, Pierre-Olivier; Azioune, Ammar; Bugnicourt, Ghislain; Lecomte, Yohan; Chahid, Makhlad; Studer, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    Printing of biomolecules on substrates has developed tremendously in the past few years. The existing methods either rely on slow serial writing processes or on parallelized photolithographic techniques where cumbersome mask alignment procedures usually impair the ability to generate multi-protein patterns. We recently developed a new technology allowing for high resolution multi protein micro-patterning. This technology named "Light-Induced Molecular Adsorption of Proteins (LIMAP)" is based on a water-soluble photo-initiator able to reverse the antifouling property of polymer brushes when exposed to UV light. We developed a wide-field pattern projection system based on a DMD coupled to a conventional microscope which permits to generate arbitrary grayscale patterns of UV light at the micron scale. Interestingly, the density of adsorbed molecules scales with the dose of UV light thus allowing the quantitative patterning of biomolecules. The very low non specific background of biomolecules outside of the UV-exposed areas allows for the sequential printing of multiple proteins without alignment procedures. Protein patterns ranging from 500 nm up to 1 mm can be performed within seconds, as well as gradients of arbitrary shapes. The range of applications of the LIMAP approach extends from the single molecule up to the multicellular scale with an exquisite control over local protein density. We show that it can be used to generate complex protein landscapes useful to study protein-protein, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions.

  4. Nonlinear Absorption Spectroscopy of Porphyrin J-aggregates in Aqueous Solution: Evidence for Control of Degree of Association by Light-Induced Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakawa, Masayuki; Nakata, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Masaya; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Tokunaga, Eiji

    2017-04-01

    Spectroscopic evidence was obtained for molecular aggregation states to be controlled by the irradiation of light, which is off-resonant below the peak absorption energies of both monomers and well-grown J-aggregates. In low (undersaturated)-concentration aqueous solutions of porphyrin molecules (tetraphenyl porphyrin tetrasulfonic acid; TPPS) where the monomer absorbance dominates, irradiation with a 532 nm laser induces a decrease in the monomer absorbance and an increase in the aggregate absorbance. The increase in the absorbance of J-aggregates occurs in a broad spectral range associated with the increase in the number of not only variously sized oligomer aggregates but also aggregates structurally different from well-grown stable J-aggregates. In high-concentration solutions where the J-aggregate absorbance dominates, a blue shift of the absorption peak of J-aggregates is induced at the same 532 nm irradiation, corresponding to a decrease in the aggregation number or in the association energy. By contrast, for spin-coated polymer films of monomers and J-aggregates where molecules are immobile, these features are not observed. It is remarkable that the gradient force potential is smaller by more than seven orders of magnitude than the kinetic energy of the thermal motion of the molecule at room temperature, but the absorption change in solution indicating the increase in the number of aggregates is as large as ΔA ˜ 10-3 in magnitude.

  5. Control of alpha-herpesvirus IE gene expression by HCF-1 coupled chromatin modification activities.

    PubMed

    Kristie, Thomas M; Liang, Yu; Vogel, Jodi L

    2010-01-01

    The immediate early genes of the alpha-herpesviruses HSV and VZV are transcriptionally regulated by viral and cellular factors in a complex combinatorial manner. Despite this complexity and the apparent redundancy of activators, the expression of the viral IE genes is critically dependent upon the cellular transcriptional coactivator HCF-1. Although the role of HCF-1 had remained elusive, recent studies have demonstrated that the protein is a component of multiple chromatin modification complexes including the Set1/MLL1 histone H3K4 methyltransferases. Studies using model viral promoter-reporter systems as well as analyses of components recruited to the viral genome during the initiation of infection have elucidated the significance of HCF-1 chromatin modification complexes in contributing to the final state of modified histones assembled on the viral IE promoters. Strikingly, the absence of HCF-1 results in the accumulation of nucleosomes bearing repressive marks on the viral IE promoters and silencing of viral gene expression. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Distinct Roles of Chromatin Insulator Proteins in Control of the Drosophila Bithorax Complex

    PubMed Central

    Savitsky, Mikhail; Kim, Maria; Kravchuk, Oksana; Schwartz, Yuri B.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin insulators are remarkable regulatory elements that can bring distant genomic sites together and block unscheduled enhancer–promoter communications. Insulators act via associated insulator proteins of two classes: sequence-specific DNA binding factors and “bridging” proteins. The latter are required to mediate interactions between distant insulator elements. Chromatin insulators are critical for correct expression of complex loci; however, their mode of action is poorly understood. Here, we use the Drosophila bithorax complex as a model to investigate the roles of the bridging proteins Cp190 and Mod(mdg4). The bithorax complex consists of three evolutionarily conserved homeotic genes Ubx, abd-A, and Abd-B, which specify anterior–posterior identity of the last thoracic and all abdominal segments of the fly. Looking at effects of CTCF, mod(mdg4), and Cp190 mutations on expression of the bithorax complex genes, we provide the first functional evidence that Mod(mdg4) acts in concert with the DNA binding insulator protein CTCF. We find that Mod(mdg4) and Cp190 are not redundant and may have distinct functional properties. We, for the first time, demonstrate that Cp190 is critical for correct regulation of the bithorax complex and show that Cp190 is required at an exceptionally strong Fub insulator to partition the bithorax complex into two topological domains. PMID:26715665

  7. Distinct Roles of Chromatin Insulator Proteins in Control of the Drosophila Bithorax Complex.

    PubMed

    Savitsky, Mikhail; Kim, Maria; Kravchuk, Oksana; Schwartz, Yuri B

    2016-02-01

    Chromatin insulators are remarkable regulatory elements that can bring distant genomic sites together and block unscheduled enhancer-promoter communications. Insulators act via associated insulator proteins of two classes: sequence-specific DNA binding factors and "bridging" proteins. The latter are required to mediate interactions between distant insulator elements. Chromatin insulators are critical for correct expression of complex loci; however, their mode of action is poorly understood. Here, we use the Drosophila bithorax complex as a model to investigate the roles of the bridging proteins Cp190 and Mod(mdg4). The bithorax complex consists of three evolutionarily conserved homeotic genes Ubx, abd-A, and Abd-B, which specify anterior-posterior identity of the last thoracic and all abdominal segments of the fly. Looking at effects of CTCF, mod(mdg4), and Cp190 mutations on expression of the bithorax complex genes, we provide the first functional evidence that Mod(mdg4) acts in concert with the DNA binding insulator protein CTCF. We find that Mod(mdg4) and Cp190 are not redundant and may have distinct functional properties. We, for the first time, demonstrate that Cp190 is critical for correct regulation of the bithorax complex and show that Cp190 is required at an exceptionally strong Fub insulator to partition the bithorax complex into two topological domains. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  8. Chromatin architecture: A new dimension in the dynamic control of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Prado, Juan Sebastian; Rodriguez-Granados, Natalia Yaneth; Ariel, Federico; Raynaud, Cécile; Benhamed, Moussa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT As the most recent evidence of eukaryotic cell complexity, genome architecture has astounded the scientific community and prompted a variety of technical and cognitive challenges. Several technologies have emerged and evidenced the integration of chromatin packaging and topology, epigenetic processes, and transcription for the pertinent regulation of gene expression. In the present addendum we present and discuss some of our recent research, directed toward the holistic comprehension of the processes by which plants respond to environmental and developmental stimuli. We propose that the study of genome topology and genomic interactions is essential for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind a phenotype. Even though our knowledge and understanding of genome architecture and hierarchy has improved substantially in the last few years -in Arabidopsis and other eukaryotes -, there is still a long way ahead in this relatively new field of study. For this, it is necessary to take advantage of the high resolution of the emerging available techniques, and perform integrative approaches with which it will be possible to depict the role of chromatin architecture in the regulation of transcription and ultimately, physiological processes. PMID:27611230

  9. Light-induced amphiphilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rong; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Fujishima, Akira; Chikuni, Makota; Kojima, Eiichi; Kitamura, Atsushi; Shimohigoshi, Mitsuhide; Watanabe, Toshiya

    1997-07-01

    The ability to control the surface wettability of solid substrates is important in many situations. Here we report the photogeneration of a highly amphiphilic (both hydrophilic and oleophilic) titanium dioxide surface. The unique character of this surface is ascribed to the microstructured composition of hydrophilic and oleophilic phases, produced by ultraviolet irradiation. The result is a TiO2-coated glass which is antifogging and self-cleaning.

  10. Light-induced actuating nanotransducers

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Tao; Valev, Ventsislav K.; Salmon, Andrew R.; Forman, Chris J.; Smoukov, Stoyan K.; Scherman, Oren A.; Frenkel, Daan; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoactuators and nanomachines have long been sought after, but key bottlenecks remain. Forces at submicrometer scales are weak and slow, control is hard to achieve, and power cannot be reliably supplied. Despite the increasing complexity of nanodevices such as DNA origami and molecular machines, rapid mechanical operations are not yet possible. Here, we bind temperature-responsive polymers to charged Au nanoparticles, storing elastic energy that can be rapidly released under light control for repeatable isotropic nanoactuation. Optically heating above a critical temperature Tc = 32 °C using plasmonic absorption of an incident laser causes the coatings to expel water and collapse within a microsecond to the nanoscale, millions of times faster than the base polymer. This triggers a controllable number of nanoparticles to tightly bind in clusters. Surprisingly, by cooling below Tc their strong van der Waals attraction is overcome as the polymer expands, exerting nanoscale forces of several nN. This large force depends on van der Waals attractions between Au cores being very large in the collapsed polymer state, setting up a tightly compressed polymer spring which can be triggered into the inflated state. Our insights lead toward rational design of diverse colloidal nanomachines. PMID:27140648

  11. Reconstitution of human beta-globin locus control region hypersensitive sites in the absence of chromatin assembly.

    PubMed

    Leach, K M; Nightingale, K; Igarashi, K; Levings, P P; Engel, J D; Becker, P B; Bungert, J

    2001-04-01

    The human beta-globin genes are regulated by the locus control region (LCR), an element composed of multiple DNase I-hypersensitive sites (HS sites) located 5' to the genes. Various functional studies indicate that the LCR confers high-level, position-independent, and copy number-dependent expression to linked globin genes in transgenic mice. However, the structural basis for LCR function is unknown. Here we show that LCR HS sites can be reconstituted in an erythroid cell-specific manner on chromatin-assembled LCR templates in vitro. Surprisingly, HS2 and HS3 are also formed with erythroid proteins in the absence of chromatin assembly, indicating that sensitivity to nucleases is not simply a consequence of nucleosome reorganization. The generation of LCR HS sites in the absence of chromatin assembly leads to the formation of S1- and KMnO(4)-sensitive regions in HS2 and HS3. These sites are also sensitive to S1 nuclease in erythroid cells in vivo, suggesting a distorted DNA structure in the LCR core enhancer elements. Finally, we show that RNA polymerase II initiates transcription in the HS2 and HS3 core enhancer regions in vitro. Transcription in both HS2 and HS3 proceeds in a unidirectional manner. Taken together, the data suggest that erythroid proteins interact with the core enhancer elements, distort the DNA structure, and recruit polymerase II transcription complexes. These results further our understanding of the structural basis for LCR function and provide an explanation for why the LCR core regions are so extremely sensitive to nucleases in erythroid cells.

  12. MiRNA-Mediated Regulation of the SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complex Controls Pluripotency and Endodermal Differentiation in Human ESCs.

    PubMed

    Wade, Staton L; Langer, Lee F; Ward, James M; Archer, Trevor K

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNAs and chromatin remodeling complexes represent powerful epigenetic mechanisms that regulate the pluripotent state. miR-302 is a strong inducer of pluripotency, which is characterized by a distinct chromatin architecture. This suggests that miR-302 regulates global chromatin structure; however, a direct relationship between miR-302 and chromatin remodelers has not been established. Here, we provide data to show that miR-302 regulates Brg1 chromatin remodeling complex composition in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) through direct repression of the BAF53a and BAF170 subunits. With the subsequent overexpression of BAF170 in hESCs, we show that miR-302's inhibition of BAF170 protein levels can affect the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation. Furthermore, miR-302-mediated repression of BAF170 regulates pluripotency by positively influencing mesendodermal differentiation. Overexpression of BAF170 in hESCs led to biased differentiation toward the ectoderm lineage during EB formation and severely hindered directed definitive endoderm differentiation. Taken together, these data uncover a direct regulatory relationship between miR-302 and the Brg1 chromatin remodeling complex that controls gene expression and cell fate decisions in hESCs and suggests that similar mechanisms are at play during early human development.

  13. Transcriptional Control by PARP-1: Chromatin Modulation, Enhancer-binding, Coregulation, and Insulation

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, W. Lee

    2008-01-01

    Summary The regulation of gene expression requires a wide array of protein factors that can modulate chromatin structure, act at enhancers, function as transcriptional coregulators, or regulate insulator function. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), an abundant and ubiquitous nuclear enzyme that catalyzes the NAD+-dependent addition of ADP-ribose polymers on a variety of nuclear proteins, has been implicated in all of these functions. Recent biochemical, genomic, proteomic, and cell-based studies have highlighted the role of PARP-1 in each of these processes and provided new insights about the molecular mechanisms governing PARP-1-dependent regulation of gene expression. In addition, these studies have demonstrated how PARP-1 functions as an integral part of cellular signaling pathways that culminate in gene regulatory outcomes. PMID:18450439

  14. Focal Adhesion-Chromatin Linkage Controls Tumor Cell Resistance to Radio- and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Storch, Katja; Cordes, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Cancer resistance to therapy presents an ongoing and unsolved obstacle, which has clear impact on patient's survival. In order to address this problem, novel in vitro models have been established and are currently developed that enable data generation in a more physiological context. For example, extracellular-matrix- (ECM-) based scaffolds lead to the identification of integrins and integrin-associated signaling molecules as key promoters of cancer cell resistance to radio- and chemotherapy as well as modern molecular agents. In this paper, we discuss the dynamic nature of the interplay between ECM, integrins, cytoskeleton, nuclear matrix, and chromatin organization and how this affects the response of tumor cells to various kinds of cytotoxic anticancer agents. PMID:22778951

  15. Early programming of the oocyte epigenome temporally controls late prophase I transcription and chromatin remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Costa, Paulo; McCarthy, Alicia; Prudêncio, Pedro; Greer, Christina; Guilgur, Leonardo G.; Becker, Jörg D.; Secombe, Julie; Rangan, Prashanth; Martinho, Rui G.

    2016-01-01

    Oocytes are arrested for long periods of time in the prophase of the first meiotic division (prophase I). As chromosome condensation poses significant constraints to gene expression, the mechanisms regulating transcriptional activity in the prophase I-arrested oocyte are still not entirely understood. We hypothesized that gene expression during the prophase I arrest is primarily epigenetically regulated. Here we comprehensively define the Drosophila female germ line epigenome throughout oogenesis and show that the oocyte has a unique, dynamic and remarkably diversified epigenome characterized by the presence of both euchromatic and heterochromatic marks. We observed that the perturbation of the oocyte's epigenome in early oogenesis, through depletion of the dKDM5 histone demethylase, results in the temporal deregulation of meiotic transcription and affects female fertility. Taken together, our results indicate that the early programming of the oocyte epigenome primes meiotic chromatin for subsequent functions in late prophase I. PMID:27507044

  16. Light-induced Ethylene Production in Sorghum

    PubMed Central

    Craker, L. E.; Abeles, F. B.; Shropshire, W.

    1973-01-01

    Ethylene production was induced in sections of dark-grown Sorghum vulgare L. seedlings by treatment with light in the blue and far red regions of the light spectrum. The action spectrum closely resembled the previously reported spectra for high irradiance response; thus, light-induced ethylene production is probably a high irradiance response with phytochrome as the initial photoreceptor. PMID:16658470

  17. Visible Light-Induced Plasticity of Shape Memory Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shaobo; Fan, Fuqiang; Sun, Chenxing; Yu, Ying; Xu, Huaping

    2017-09-27

    Plasticity of thermoset polymers has been realized by introducing exchangeable bonds, and the plasticity is mostly triggered via heat or UV light. Visible light is a relatively mild trigger that has not been used to induce plasticity in polymer materials. Herein, thermoset polyurethanes (PUs) containing diselenide bonds are fabricated that possess visible light-induced plasticity along with shape memory behavior. A series of PUs with different diselenide bond contents were tested and their shape memory properties and plasticity varied. With a higher diselenide bond content, both shape memory and light-induced plasticity are achieved. By combining these two properties, reshaping the permanent shapes of the PUs is easier. Compared with heat or UV light, visible light has the advantage of spatial control. For instance, a pattern of visible light was introduced by a commercial projector to demonstrate facile reshaping of the materials. Because visible light can be introduced via various methods, PUs with visible light-induced plasticity have great potential applications.

  18. Metastable light induced defects in pentacene

    SciTech Connect

    Liguori, R.; Aprano, S.; Rubino, A.

    2014-02-21

    In this study we analyzed one of the environmental factors that could affect organic materials. Pentacene thin film samples were fabricated and the degradation of their electrical characteristics was measured when the devices were exposed to ultraviolet light irradiation. The results have been reported in terms of a trap density model, which provides a description of the dynamics of light induced electrically active defects in an organic semiconductor.

  19. CTCF-dependent chromatin bias constitutes transient epigenetic memory of the mother at the H19-Igf2 imprinting control region in prospermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Singh, Purnima; Tsai, Shirley Y; Oates, Nathan; Spalla, Alexander; Spalla, Claudio; Brown, Lucy; Rivas, Guillermo; Larson, Garrett; Rauch, Tibor A; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Szabó, Piroska E

    2010-11-24

    Genomic imprints-parental allele-specific DNA methylation marks at the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of imprinted genes-are erased and reestablished in germ cells according to the individual's sex. Imprint establishment at paternally methylated germ line DMRs occurs in fetal male germ cells. In prospermatogonia, the two unmethylated alleles exhibit different rates of de novo methylation at the H19/Igf2 imprinting control region (ICR) depending on parental origin. We investigated the nature of this epigenetic memory using bisulfite sequencing and allele-specific ChIP-SNuPE assays. We found that the chromatin composition in fetal germ cells was biased at the ICR between the two alleles with the maternally inherited allele exhibiting more H3K4me3 and less H3K9me3 than the paternally inherited allele. We determined genetically that the chromatin bias, and also the delayed methylation establishment in the maternal allele, depended on functional CTCF insulator binding sites in the ICR. Our data suggest that, in primordial germ cells, maternally inherited allele-specific CTCF binding sets up allele-specific chromatin differences at the ICR. The erasure of these allele-specific chromatin marks is not complete before the process of de novo methylation imprint establishment begins. CTCF-dependent allele-specific chromatin composition imposes a maternal allele-specific delay on de novo methylation imprint establishment at the H19/Igf2 ICR in prospermatogonia.

  20. The mobile nucleoporin Nup2p and chromatin-bound Prp20p function in endogenous NPC-mediated transcriptional control

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, David J.; Tackett, Alan J.; Rogers, Richard S.; Yi, Eugene C.; Christmas, Rowan H.; Smith, Jennifer J.; Siegel, Andrew F.; Chait, Brian T.; Wozniak, Richard W.; Aitchison, John D.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) govern macromolecular transport between the nucleus and cytoplasm and serve as key positional markers within the nucleus. Several protein components of yeast NPCs have been implicated in the epigenetic control of gene expression. Among these, Nup2p is unique as it transiently associates with NPCs and, when artificially tethered to DNA, can prevent the spread of transcriptional activation or repression between flanking genes, a function termed boundary activity. To understand this function of Nup2p, we investigated the interactions of Nup2p with other proteins and with DNA using immunopurifications coupled with mass spectrometry and microarray analyses. These data combined with functional assays of boundary activity and epigenetic variegation suggest that Nup2p and the Ran guanylyl-nucleotide exchange factor, Prp20p, interact at specific chromatin regions and enable the NPC to play an active role in chromatin organization by facilitating the transition of chromatin between activity states. PMID:16365162

  1. Chromatin and Transcription in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rando, Oliver J.; Winston, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which chromatin structure controls eukaryotic transcription has been an intense area of investigation for the past 25 years. Many of the key discoveries that created the foundation for this field came from studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including the discovery of the role of chromatin in transcriptional silencing, as well as the discovery of chromatin-remodeling factors and histone modification activities. Since that time, studies in yeast have continued to contribute in leading ways. This review article summarizes the large body of yeast studies in this field. PMID:22345607

  2. Isorefractive high internal phase emulsion organogels for light induced reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Guo, Qipeng

    2016-03-25

    Isorefractive high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) organogels have been fabricated and investigated for light induced reactions. High transparency facilitates both the UV and visible light induced reactions within HIPE organogels. Transparent HIPE organogels are advantageous for light induced polymerizations, accelerating such polymerizations and enabling the preparation of large polyHIPE monoliths.

  3. Light-induced superconductivity in high-Tc cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses allow for optical control of superconductivity on picosecond timescales. Intriguing experiments at mid-IR and THz frequencies using tailored excitation pulses tuned resonantly to specific phonon modes have been shown to induce transient superconducting states even far above the equilibrium transition temperature (T c). So far, experiments with light-induced superconductivity can be roughly divided into two classes: on the one hand the light pulses trigger the interplay of competing order parameters in favor of superconductivity, while in the second class of experiments a transient superconducting coherence is induced and dynamically stabilized.

  4. Light-induced voltage alteration for integrated circuit analysis

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Jr., Edward I.; Soden, Jerry M.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method are described for analyzing an integrated circuit (IC), The invention uses a focused light beam that is scanned over a surface of the IC to generate a light-induced voltage alteration (LIVA) signal for analysis of the IC, The LIVA signal may be used to generate an image of the IC showing the location of any defects in the IC; and it may be further used to image and control the logic states of the IC. The invention has uses for IC failure analysis, for the development of ICs, for production-line inspection of ICs, and for qualification of ICs.

  5. Light-induced voltage alteration for integrated circuit analysis

    DOEpatents

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Soden, J.M.

    1995-07-04

    An apparatus and method are described for analyzing an integrated circuit (IC). The invention uses a focused light beam that is scanned over a surface of the IC to generate a light-induced voltage alteration (LIVA) signal for analysis of the IC. The LIVA signal may be used to generate an image of the IC showing the location of any defects in the IC; and it may be further used to image and control the logic states of the IC. The invention has uses for IC failure analysis, for the development of ICs, for production-line inspection of ICs, and for qualification of ICs. 18 figs.

  6. Chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of the developmental switch gene eud-1 control predatory feeding plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Serobyan, Vahan; Xiao, Hua; Namdeo, Suryesh; Rödelsperger, Christian; Sieriebriennikov, Bogdan; Witte, Hanh; Röseler, Waltraud; Sommer, Ralf J.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been suggested to act through developmental switches, but little is known about associated molecular mechanisms. In the nematode Pristionchus pacificus, the sulfatase eud-1 was identified as part of a developmental switch controlling mouth-form plasticity governing a predatory versus bacteriovorous mouth-form decision. Here we show that mutations in the conserved histone-acetyltransferase Ppa-lsy-12 and the methyl-binding-protein Ppa-mbd-2 mimic the eud-1 phenotype, resulting in the absence of one mouth-form. Mutations in both genes cause histone modification defects and reduced eud-1 expression. Surprisingly, Ppa-lsy-12 mutants also result in the down-regulation of an antisense-eud-1 RNA. eud-1 and antisense-eud-1 are co-expressed and further experiments suggest that antisense-eud-1 acts through eud-1 itself. Indeed, overexpression of the antisense-eud-1 RNA increases the eud-1-sensitive mouth-form and extends eud-1 expression. In contrast, this effect is absent in eud-1 mutants indicating that antisense-eud-1 positively regulates eud-1. Thus, chromatin remodelling and antisense-mediated up-regulation of eud-1 control feeding plasticity in Pristionchus. PMID:27487725

  7. Evidence for chromatin-remodeling complex PBAP-controlled maintenance of the Drosophila ovarian germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    He, Jie; Xuan, Tao; Xin, Tianchi; An, Hongbo; Wang, Jinye; Zhao, Gengchun; Li, Mingfa

    2014-01-01

    In the Drosophila oogenesis, germline stem cells (GSCs) continuously self-renew and differentiate into daughter cells for consecutive germline lineage commitment. This developmental process has become an in vivo working platform for studying adult stem cell fate regulation. An increasing number of studies have shown that while concerted actions of extrinsic signals from the niche and intrinsic regulatory machineries control GSC self-renewal and germline differentiation, epigenetic regulation is implicated in the process. Here, we report that Brahma (Brm), the ATPase subunit of the Drosophila SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes, is required for maintaining GSC fate. Removal or knockdown of Brm function in either germline or niche cells causes a GSC loss, but does not disrupt normal germline differentiation within the germarium evidenced at the molecular and morphological levels. There are two Drosophila SWI/SNF complexes: the Brm-associated protein (BAP) complex and the polybromo-containing BAP (PBAP) complex. More genetic studies reveal that mutations in polybromo/bap180, rather than gene encoding Osa, the BAP complex-specific subunit, elicit a defect in GSC maintenance reminiscent of the brm mutant phenotype. Further genetic interaction test suggests a functional association between brm and polybromo in controlling GSC self-renewal. Taken together, studies in this paper provide the first demonstration that Brm in the form of the PBAP complex functions in the GSC fate regulation.

  8. Identification of a novel distal control region upstream of the human steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene that participates in SF-1-dependent chromatin architecture.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Tetsuya; Yazawa, Takashi; Ju, Yunfeng; Imamichi, Yoshitaka; Uesaka, Miki; Inaoka, Yoshihiko; Matsuura, Kaoru; Kamiki, Yasue; Oki, Masaya; Umezawa, Akihiro; Miyamoto, Kaoru

    2010-09-03

    StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein) mediates the transport of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, the process of which is the rate-limiting step for steroidogenesis. Transcriptional regulation of the proximal promoter of the human StAR gene has been well characterized, whereas analysis of its distal control region has not. Recently, we found that SF-1 (steroidogenic factor 1) induced the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into steroidogenic cells with the concomitant strong induction of StAR expression. Here, we show, using differentiated MSCs, that StAR expression is regulated by a novel distal control region. Using electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, we identified novel SF-1 binding sites between 3,000 and 3,400 bp upstream of StAR. A luciferase reporter assay revealed that the region worked as a strong regulator to exert maximal transcription of StAR. ChIP analysis of histone H3 revealed that upon SF-1 expression, nucleosome eviction took place at the SF-1 binding sites, not only in the promoter but also in the distal SF-1 binding sites. Chromosome conformation capture analysis revealed that the region upstream of StAR formed a chromatin loop both in the differentiated MSCs and in KGN cells, a human granulosa cell tumor cell line, where SF-1 is endogenously expressed. Finally, SF-1 knockdown resulted in disrupted formation of this chromatin loop in KGN cells. These results indicate that the novel distal control region participate in StAR activation through SF-1 dependent alterations of chromatin structure, including histone eviction and chromatin loop formation.

  9. Plant chromatin warms up in Madrid

    PubMed Central

    Jarillo, José A; Gaudin, Valerie; Hennig, Lars; Köhler, Claudia; Piñeiro, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The 3rd European Workshop on Plant Chromatin (EWPC) was held on August 2013 in Madrid, Spain. A number of different topics on plant chromatin were presented during the meeting, including new factors mediating Polycomb Group protein function in plants, chromatin-mediated reprogramming in plant developmental transitions, the role of histone variants, and newly identified chromatin remodeling factors. The function of interactions between chromatin and transcription factors in the modulation of gene expression, the role of chromatin dynamics in the control of nuclear processes and the influence of environmental factors on chromatin organization were also reported. In this report, we highlight some of the new insights emerging in this growing area of research, presented at the 3rd EWPC. PMID:24504145

  10. Teaching resources. Chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Lue, Neal F

    2005-07-26

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes and slides for a class covering chromatin remodeling mechanisms and is part of the course "Cell Signaling Systems: a Course for Graduate Students." The lecture begins with a discussion of chromatin organization and then proceeds to describe the process of chromatin remodeling through a review of chromatin remodeling complexes and methods used to study their function.

  11. Strain Differences in Light-Induced Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Polosa, Anna; Bessaklia, Hyba; Lachapelle, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the role of ocular pigmentation and genetics in light-induced retinal damage. Adult pigmented [Long Evans (LE) and Brown Norway (BN)] and albino [Sprague Dawley (SD) and Lewis (LW)] rats were exposed to a bright cyclic light for 6 consecutive days and where compared with juvenile animals exposed to the same bright light environment from postnatal age 14 to 28. Flash ERGs and retinal histology were performed at predetermined days (D) post-light exposure. At D1, ERGs were similar in all adult groups with no recordable a-waves and residual b-waves. A transient recovery was noticed at D30 in the LW and LE only [b-wave: 18% and 25% of their original amplitude respectively]. Histology revealed that BN retina was the most damaged, while LE retina was best preserved. SD and LW rats were almost as damaged as BN rats. In contrast, the retina of juvenile BN was almost as resistant to the bright light exposure as that of juvenile LE rats. Our results strongly suggest that, although ocular pigmentation and genetic background are important factors in regulating the severity of light-induced retinal damage, the age of the animal at the onset of light exposure appears to be the most important determining factor. PMID:27355622

  12. Solar light induced opacity of MIND cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznicki, Zbigniew T.; Meyrueis, Patrick

    2006-04-01

    Multi-interface novel devices (MIND) exhibit a dramatically low UV- and blue-spectrum photovoltaic (PV) performance. A paradox could even be observed, the better the electronic passivation the poorer the PV performance. The paradox appears under relatively low excitations in comparison with intense laser fluxes usually at its origin. The effect can be explained by solar light induced opacity, which reduces considerably or even totally the photon penetration into deeper layers, from which exclusively the photocarrier collection is possible. This opacity results from a feedback occasioned by the free-carrier absorption: better surface passivation, higher free-carrier density, stronger surface dead zone absorptance. The total energy of the incident short wavelength beam can be absorbed before a carrier collection limit buried in the emitter. This limit acts simultaneously on the electronic performance, blocking free-carriers, and on the optical performance, being at the origin of an enhancement of the surface absorptance. As a consequence, a thin surface zone dominates the optical functions of MIND cells through the free-carrier gas confined inside it. In this work we report specific effects concerning the solar-light induced opacity in MIND cells. The investigation allows modification of the free-carrier confinement using different device architectures. The main characterization methods were reflectivity and spectral response with a varying incident beam. The results prove the domination of the free-carrier optical functions on the MIND PV conversion.

  13. Regulation of cellular chromatin state

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rakesh K; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2010-01-01

    The identity and functionality of eukaryotic cells is defined not just by their genomic sequence which remains constant between cell types, but by their gene expression profiles governed by epigenetic mechanisms. Epigenetic controls maintain and change the chromatin state throughout development, as exemplified by the setting up of cellular memory for the regulation and maintenance of homeotic genes in proliferating progenitors during embryonic development. Higher order chromatin structure in reversibly arrested adult stem cells also involves epigenetic regulation and in this review we highlight common trends governing chromatin states, focusing on quiescence and differentiation during myogenesis. Together, these diverse developmental modules reveal the dynamic nature of chromatin regulation providing fresh insights into the role of epigenetic mechanisms in potentiating development and differentiation. PMID:20592864

  14. Cohesins: chromatin architects in chromosome segregation, control of gene expression and much more.

    PubMed

    Barbero, José L

    2009-07-01

    Cells have evolved to develop molecules and control mechanisms that guarantee correct chromosome segregation and ensure the proper distribution of genetic material to daughter cells. In this sense, the establishment, maintenance, and removal of sister chromatid cohesion is one of the most fascinating and dangerous processes in the life of a cell because errors in the control of these processes frequently lead to cell death or aneuploidy. The main protagonist in this mechanism is a four-protein complex denominated the cohesin complex. In the last 10 years, we have improved our understanding of the key players in the regulation of sister chromatid cohesion during cell division in mitosis and meiosis. The last 2 years have seen an increase in evidence showing that cohesins have important functions in non-dividing cells, revealing new, unexplored roles for these proteins in the control of gene expression, development, and other essential cell functions in mammals.

  15. Molecular Toxicology of Chromatin: The Role of Poly (ADP-Ribose) in Gene Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-15

    Imunology) were a . gift from Dr. Alex Tseng (Cancer Research Institute). HPLC HPLC was performed with the following instrumental components: Waters ...Associates (Milford, Ma., USA) Model 6001 Solvent Delivery Pumps, Waters Model 680 Gradient Controller, Waters Model 730 Data Module, and Hewlett- Packard...confluency cells were removed by trypsin treatment , sedimented at 1500 rpm (room temperature), washed twice by centri- fugation in PBS and counted in

  16. Differential control of xanthophylls and light-induced stress proteins, as opposed to light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b proteins, during photosynthetic acclimation of barley leaves to light irradiance

    PubMed

    Montane; Tardy; Kloppstech; Havaux

    1998-09-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) plants were grown at different photon flux densities ranging from 100 to 1800 &mgr;mol m-2 s-1 in air and/or in atmospheres with reduced levels of O2 and CO2. Low O2 and CO2 partial pressures allowed plants to grow under high photosystem II (PSII) excitation pressure, estimated in vivo by chlorophyll fluorescence measurements, at moderate photon flux densities. The xanthophyll-cycle pigments, the early light-inducible proteins, and their mRNA accumulated with increasing PSII excitation pressure irrespective of the way high excitation pressure was obtained (high-light irradiance or decreased CO2 and O2 availability). These findings indicate that the reduction state of electron transport chain components could be involved in light sensing for the regulation of nuclear-encoded chloroplast gene expression. In contrast, no correlation was found between the reduction state of PSII and various indicators of the PSII light-harvesting system, such as the chlorophyll a-to-b ratio, the abundance of the major pigment-protein complex of PSII (LHCII), the mRNA level of LHCII, the light-saturation curve of O2 evolution, and the induced chlorophyll-fluorescence rise. We conclude that the chlorophyll antenna size of PSII is not governed by the redox state of PSII in higher plants and, consequently, regulation of early light-inducible protein synthesis is different from that of LHCII.

  17. A light-induced microwave oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1995-01-01

    We describe a novel oscillator that converts continuous light energy into sta ble and spectrally pure microwave signals. This light-induced microwave oscillator (LIMO) consists of a pump laser and a feedback circuit, including an intensity modulator, an optical fiber delay line, a photodetector, an amplifier, and a filter. We develop a quasilinear theory and obtain expressions for the threshold condition, the amplitude, the frequency, the line width, and the spectral power density of the oscillation. We also present experimental data to compare with the theoretical results. Our findings indicate that the LIMO can generate ultrastable, spectrally pure microwave reference signals up to 75 GHz with a phase noise lower than -140 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz.

  18. Broadband Visible Light Induced NO Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lubart, Rachel; Eichler, Maor; Friedmann, Harry; Ankri, Rinat; Savion, N.; Breitbart, Haim

    2009-06-19

    Nitric oxide formation is a potential mechanism for photobiomodulation because it is synthesized in cells by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), which contains both flavin and heme, and thus absorbs visible light. The purpose of this work was to study broadband visible light induced NO formation in various cells. Cardiac, endothelial, sperm cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages were illuminated with broadband visible light, 40-130 mW/cm2, 2.4-39 J/cm2, and nitric oxide production was quantified by using the Griess reagent. The results showed that visible light illumination increased NO concentration both in sperm and endothelial cells, but not in cardiac cells. Activation of RAW 264.7 macrophages was very small. It thus appears that NO is involved in photobiomodulation, though different light parameters and illumination protocols are needed to induce NO in various cells.

  19. Visible-Light-Induced Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Jan O; Schmidt, Friedrich G; Blinco, James P; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2015-08-24

    A rapid and catalyst-free cycloaddition system for visible-light-induced click chemistry is reported. A readily accessible photoreactive 2H-azirine moiety was designed to absorb light at wavelengths above 400 nm. Irradiation with low-energy light sources thus enables efficient small-molecule synthesis with a diverse range of multiple-bond-containing compounds. Moreover, in order to demonstrate the efficiency of the current approach, quantitative ligation of the photoactivatable chromophore with functional polymeric substrates was performed and full conversion with irradiation times of only 1 min at ambient conditions was achieved. The current report thus presents a highly efficient method for applications involving selective cycloaddition to electron-deficient multiple-bond-containing materials.

  20. Light-Induced Dielectrophoretic Manipulation of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hoeb, Marco; Rädler, Joachim O.; Klein, Stefan; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S.

    2007-01-01

    Light-induced dielectrophoretic movement of polystyrene beads and λ-DNA is studied using thin films of amorphous hydrogenated silicon as local photoaddressable electrodes with a diameter of 4 μm. Positive (high-field seeking) dielectrophoretic movement is observed for both types of objects. The absence of strong negative (low-field seeking) dielectrophoresis of DNA at high frequencies is in agreement with the similarity of the dielectric constants of DNA and water, the real part of the dielectric function. The corresponding imaginary part of the dielectric function governed by the conductivity of DNA can be determined from a comparison of the frequency dependence of the dielectrophoretic drift velocity with the Clausius-Mossotti relation. PMID:17483160

  1. Green light induces shade avoidance symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingting; Maruhnich, Stefanie A; Folta, Kevin M

    2011-11-01

    Light quality and quantity affect plant adaptation to changing light conditions. Certain wavelengths in the visible and near-visible spectrum are known to have discrete effects on plant growth and development, and the effects of red, far-red, blue, and ultraviolet light have been well described. In this report, an effect of green light on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rosette architecture is demonstrated using a narrow-bandwidth light-emitting diode-based lighting system. When green light was added to a background of constant red and blue light, plants exhibited elongation of petioles and upward leaf reorientation, symptoms consistent with those observed in a shaded light environment. The same green light-induced phenotypes were also observed in phytochrome (phy) and cryptochrome (cry) mutant backgrounds. To explore the molecular mechanism underlying the green light-induced response, the accumulation of shade-induced transcripts was measured in response to enriched green light environments. Transcripts that have been demonstrated to increase in abundance under far-red-induced shade avoidance conditions either decrease or exhibit no change when green light is added. However, normal far-red light-associated transcript accumulation patterns are observed in cryptochrome mutants grown with supplemental green light, indicating that the green-absorbing form of cryptochrome is the photoreceptor active in limiting the green light induction of shade-associated transcripts. These results indicate that shade symptoms can be induced by the addition of green light and that cryptochrome receptors and an unknown light sensor participate in acclimation to the enriched green environment.

  2. Localized light-induced protein dimerization in living cells using a photocaged dimerizer

    PubMed Central

    Ballister, Edward R.; Aonbangkhen, Chanat; Mayo, Alyssa M.; Lampson, Michael A.; Chenoweth, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Regulated protein localization is critical for many cellular processes. Several techniques have been developed for experimental control over protein localization, including chemically induced and light-induced dimerization, which both provide temporal control. Light-induced dimerization offers the distinct advantage of spatial precision within subcellular length scales. A number of elegant systems have been reported that utilize natural light-sensitive proteins to induce dimerization via direct protein–protein binding interactions, but the application of these systems at cellular locations beyond the plasma membrane has been limited. Here we present a new technique to rapidly and reversibly control protein localization in living cells with subcellular spatial resolution using a cell-permeable, photoactivatable chemical inducer of dimerization. We demonstrate light-induced recruitment of a cytosolic protein to individual centromeres, kinetochores, mitochondria and centrosomes in human cells, indicating that our system is widely applicable to many cellular locations. PMID:25400104

  3. Light-induced chemical vapour deposition painting with titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halary-Wagner, E.; Bret, T.; Hoffmann, P.

    2003-03-01

    Light-induced chemical vapour deposits of titanium dioxide are obtained from titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) in an oxygen and nitrogen atmosphere with a long pulse (250 ns) 308 nm XeCl excimer laser using a mask projection set-up. The demonstrated advantages of this technique are: (i) selective area deposition, (ii) precise control of the deposited thickness and (iii) low temperature deposition, enabling to use a wide range of substrates. A revolving mask system enables, in a single reactor load, to deposit shapes of controlled heights, which overlap to build up a complex pattern. Interferential multi-coloured deposits are achieved, and the process limitations (available colours and resolution) are discussed.

  4. Light-induced unfolding and refolding of supramolecular polymer nanofibres

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Bimalendu; Yamada, Yuki; Yamauchi, Mitsuaki; Wakita, Kengo; Lin, Xu; Aratsu, Keisuke; Ohba, Tomonori; Karatsu, Takashi; Hollamby, Martin J.; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Takagi, Hideaki; Haruki, Rie; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Yagai, Shiki

    2017-01-01

    Unlike classical covalent polymers, one-dimensionally (1D) elongated supramolecular polymers (SPs) can be encoded with high degrees of internal order by the cooperative aggregation of molecular subunits, which endows these SPs with extraordinary properties and functions. However, this internal order has not yet been exploited to generate and dynamically control well-defined higher-order (secondary) conformations of the SP backbone, which may induce functionality that is comparable to protein folding/unfolding. Herein, we report light-induced conformational changes of SPs based on the 1D exotic stacking of hydrogen-bonded azobenzene hexamers. The stacking causes a unique internal order that leads to spontaneous curvature, which allows accessing conformations that range from randomly folded to helically folded coils. The reversible photoisomerization of the azobenzene moiety destroys or recovers the curvature of the main chain, which demonstrates external control over the SP conformation that may ultimately lead to biological functions. PMID:28488694

  5. Chromatin regulated interchange between polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2)-Ezh2 and PRC2-Ezh1 complexes controls myogenin activation in skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Polycomb group (PcG) genes code for chromatin multiprotein complexes that are responsible for maintaining gene silencing of transcriptional programs during differentiation and in adult tissues. Despite the large amount of information on PcG function during development and cell identity homeostasis, little is known regarding the dynamics of PcG complexes and their role during terminal differentiation. Results We show that two distinct polycomb repressive complex (PRC)2 complexes contribute to skeletal muscle cell differentiation: the PRC2-Ezh2 complex, which is bound to the myogenin (MyoG) promoter and muscle creatine kinase (mCK) enhancer in proliferating myoblasts, and the PRC2-Ezh1 complex, which replaces PRC2-Ezh2 on MyoG promoter in post-mitotic myotubes. Interestingly, the opposing dynamics of PRC2-Ezh2 and PRC2-Ezh1 at these muscle regulatory regions is differentially regulated at the chromatin level by Msk1 dependent methyl/phospho switch mechanism involving phosphorylation of serine 28 of the H3 histone (H3S28ph). While Msk1/H3S28ph is critical for the displacement of the PRC2-Ezh2 complex, this pathway does not influence the binding of PRC2-Ezh1 on the chromatin. Importantly, depletion of Ezh1 impairs muscle differentiation and the chromatin recruitment of MyoD to the MyoG promoter in differentiating myotubes. We propose that PRC2-Ezh1 is necessary for controlling the proper timing of MyoG transcriptional activation and thus, in contrast to PRC2-Ezh2, is required for myogenic differentiation. Conclusions Our data reveal another important layer of epigenetic control orchestrating skeletal muscle cell terminal differentiation, and introduce a novel function of the PRC2-Ezh1 complex in promoter setting. PMID:21892963

  6. Chromatin enrichment for proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Kustatscher, Georg; Wills, Karen L. H.; Furlan, Cristina; Rappsilber, Juri

    2015-01-01

    During interphase, chromatin hosts fundamental cellular processes, such as gene expression, DNA replication and DNA damage repair. To analyze chromatin on a proteomic scale, we have developed chromatin enrichment for proteomics (ChEP), which is a simple biochemical procedure that enriches interphase chromatin in all its complexity. It enables researchers to take a ‘snapshot’ of chromatin and to isolate and identify even transiently bound factors. In ChEP, cells are fixed with formaldehyde; subsequently, DNA together with all cross-linked proteins is isolated by centrifugation under denaturing conditions. This approach enables the analysis of global chromatin composition and its changes, which is in contrast with existing chromatin enrichment procedures, which either focus on specific chromatin loci (e.g., affinity purification) or are limited in specificity, such as the analysis of the chromatin pellet (i.e., analysis of all insoluble nuclear material). ChEP takes half a day to complete and requires no specialized laboratory skills or equipment. ChEP enables the characterization of chromatin response to drug treatment or physiological processes. Beyond proteomics, ChEP may preclear chromatin for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses. PMID:25101823

  7. Light-induced fluorescence for pulpal diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, Arata; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Wilder-Smith, Petra B. B.

    2001-04-01

    A direct non-histological means of pulpal diagnosis remains elusive to clinical practice. Clinical vitality testing remains limited to electric, thermal criteria, or laser Doppler flowmetry. The goal of these investigations was to determine the feasibility of using light-induced fluorescence as a non-invasive modality for pulpal evaluation. Such a capability would, for example, permit expanded use of pulpotomy/pulpectomy techniques. Clinically healthy and diseased human extirpated pulpal tissues were used in this study. After excision, they were rapidly frozen and standard cryosections prepared. Measurement of tissue excitation/emission characteristics was performed using spectrographic analysis. A low-light level fluorescence microscopy system was then used to image autofluorescence localization and intensity at optimal excitation/detection parameters. Excitation/detection parameters used in this study included 405/605, 405/635, 405/670, 440/550, and 440/635. Autofluorescence intensities in healthy tissues were significantly stronger than those in diseased tissues at optimal parameters. It is postulated that autofluorescence characteristics are related to pathology- related structural changes in the pulp. This work provides the basis for further investigation into the relation between autofluorescence, histology and clinical symptoms.

  8. Light-induced shape-memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendlein, Andreas; Jiang, Hongyan; Jünger, Oliver; Langer, Robert

    2005-04-01

    Materials are said to show a shape-memory effect if they can be deformed and fixed into a temporary shape, and recover their original, permanent shape only on exposure to an external stimulus. Shape-memory polymers have received increasing attention because of their scientific and technological significance. In principle, a thermally induced shape-memory effect can be activated by an increase in temperature (also obtained by heating on exposure to an electrical current or light illumination). Several papers have described light-induced changes in the shape of polymers and gels, such as contraction, bending or volume changes. Here we report that polymers containing cinnamic groups can be deformed and fixed into pre-determined shapes-such as (but not exclusively) elongated films and tubes, arches or spirals-by ultraviolet light illumination. These new shapes are stable for long time periods, even when heated to 50°C, and they can recover their original shape at ambient temperatures when exposed to ultraviolet light of a different wavelength. The ability of polymers to form different pre-determined temporary shapes and subsequently recover their original shape at ambient temperatures by remote light activation could lead to a variety of potential medical and other applications.

  9. Light-induced shape-memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Lendlein, Andreas; Jiang, Hongyan; Jünger, Oliver; Langer, Robert

    2005-04-14

    Materials are said to show a shape-memory effect if they can be deformed and fixed into a temporary shape, and recover their original, permanent shape only on exposure to an external stimulus. Shape-memory polymers have received increasing attention because of their scientific and technological significance. In principle, a thermally induced shape-memory effect can be activated by an increase in temperature (also obtained by heating on exposure to an electrical current or light illumination). Several papers have described light-induced changes in the shape of polymers and gels, such as contraction, bending or volume changes. Here we report that polymers containing cinnamic groups can be deformed and fixed into pre-determined shapes--such as (but not exclusively) elongated films and tubes, arches or spirals--by ultraviolet light illumination. These new shapes are stable for long time periods, even when heated to 50 degrees C, and they can recover their original shape at ambient temperatures when exposed to ultraviolet light of a different wavelength. The ability of polymers to form different pre-determined temporary shapes and subsequently recover their original shape at ambient temperatures by remote light activation could lead to a variety of potential medical and other applications.

  10. Light-induced drift of Na atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werij, H. G. C.; Woerdman, J. P.

    1988-10-01

    Light can induce a flux of optically absorbing particles immersed in a buffer gas, when these particles have a different mobility in the ground and excited state. This paper presents a study of light-induced drift (LID) of Na atoms in noble gases, which can be regarded as the “canonical” system for experiments in this field. We have experimentally studied the LID effect in the optically thin and the optically thick regimes. Parameters which have been varied are laser frequency, laser intensity, buffer gas pressure and buffer gas species. This work gives the first critical comparison of LID experiments with realistic theory in which the multilevel complications of the Na atom have been incorporated. In the optically thick case (“optical piston”) one can distinguish the open cell and the closed cell regimes. Effects of adsorption and desorption of Na atoms at the surface of the cell wall have been incorporated into the theory. The experimental data are in excellent agreement with the results of a four-level rate-equation model for LID which incorporates the fine and hyperfine structure of the level scheme of the Na absorbers.

  11. Femtosecond light-induced macromolecular self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebane, Aleksander; Mikhaylov, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    We report femtosecond light-induced macromolecular self-assembly (FLIMSA), which is observed when a high peak intensity femtosecond laser beam propagates through aqueous solution of pseudoisocyanine iodide (PIC) J-aggregates and induces the formation of 0.1 - 1.0 mm-size tube-like structure surrounding the laser beam, while at the same time allowing the beam to continue propagating without obstruction or scattering. The FLIMSA material is morphologically heterogeneous and gel-like and is formed at the margins rather than at the center of the beam. As a potential explanation of this effect we assume that the FLIMSA is induced by the high photon flux gradient characteristic of the femtosecond laser beam periphery. This hypothesis is corroborated by control experiments, where J-aggregate samples were illuminated with nanosecond laser sources with a varying pulse duration, power- and beam shape characteristics, but where no FLIMSA formation was observed.

  12. EDITORIAL Light-induced material organization Light-induced material organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainos, Nikos; Rode, Andrei V.

    2010-12-01

    horizons to production processing (Koroleva et al). The use of femtosecond lasers enables polymerization for flexible production of micro-optics and integrated optics (Malinauskas et al). Laser beams of moderate intensity are used to create surface relief patterning in polymer and hybrid matter (Babeva et al) while the use of optimized acrylamide photopolymers results in submicron holographic structures (Trainer et al). In a different concept, the application of laser radiation forces in soft polymer matter offers intriguing, yet unexplored, means for the organization of dense structures and filaments in polymer solutes, pointing to nonlinear optical applications (Anyfantakis et al). Finally, high laser intensities are used for the processing of soft polymer and hybrid matter. In the two modes of operation available, laser-induced forward transfer of polymers is a promising alternative for the creation of controlled structures (Palla-Papavlu et al), while ablative structuring creates interfaces with enhanced properties by excimer laser irradiation at the deep ultraviolet 193 nm and 157 nm wavelengths (Athanasekos et al). Such methods provide flexible tools for the fabrication of optimized photonic sensor structures based on hybrid nanocomposites incorporating diffractive optic interfaces, a technology enabling the recent advent of remote point sensing of chemical and physical agents by light (Vasileiades et al). A substantial part of this work has been supported in the framework of COST MP0604 Action `Optical Micro-Manipulation by Nonlinear Nanophotonics' of the European Science Foundation. We are confident that this collection of papers on light-induced material organization will guide the reader in this emerging field, inspire the interested scientific community and stimulate further research and innovation in this exciting and growing field.

  13. Chromatin modification in zebrafish development.

    PubMed

    Cayuso Mas, Jordi; Noël, Emily S; Ober, Elke A

    2011-01-01

    The generation of complex organisms requires that an initial population of cells with identical gene expression profiles can adopt different cell fates during development by progressively diverging transcriptional programs. These programs depend on the binding of transcritional regulators to specific genomic sites, which in turn is controlled by modifications of the chromatin. Chromatin modifications may occur directly upon DNA by methylation of specific nucleotides, or may involve post-translational modification of histones. Local regulation of histone post-translational modifications regionalizes the genome into euchromatic regions, which are more accessible to DNA-binding factors, and condensed heterochromatic regions, inhibiting the binding of such factors. In addition, these modifications may be required in a genome-wide fashion for processes such as DNA replication or chromosome condensation. From an embryologist's point of view chromatin modifications are intensively studied in the context of imprinting and have more recently received increasing attention in understanding the basis of pluripotency and cellular differentiation. Here, we describe recently uncovered roles of chromatin modifications in zebrafish development and regeneration, as well as available resources and commonly used techniques. We provide a general introduction into chromatin modifications and their respective functions with a focus on gene transcription, as well as key aspects of their roles in the early zebrafish embryo, neural development, formation of the digestive system and tissue regeneration.

  14. Regulation of TCR delta and alpha repertoires by local and long-distance control of variable gene segment chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Hawwari, Abbas; Krangel, Michael S

    2005-08-15

    Murine Tcrd and Tcra gene segments reside in a single genetic locus and undergo recombination in CD4- CD8- (double negative [DN]) and CD4+ CD8+ (double positive [DP]) thymocytes, respectively. TcraTcrd locus variable gene segments are subject to complex regulation. Only a small subset of approximately 100 variable gene segments contributes substantially to the adult TCRdelta repertoire. Moreover, although most contribute to the TCRalpha repertoire, variable gene segments that are Jalpha proximal are preferentially used during primary Tcra recombination. We investigate the role of local chromatin accessibility in determining the developmental pattern of TcraTcrd locus variable gene segment recombination. We find variable gene segments to be heterogeneous with respect to acetylation of histones H3 and H4. Those that dominate the adult TCRdelta repertoire are hyperacetylated in DN thymocytes, independent of their position in the locus. Moreover, proximal variable gene segments show dramatic increases in histone acetylation and germline transcription in DP thymocytes, a result of super long-distance regulation by the Tcra enhancer. Our results imply that differences in chromatin accessibility contribute to biases in TcraTcrd locus variable gene segment recombination in DN and DP thymocytes and extend the distance over which the Tcra enhancer can regulate chromatin structure to a remarkable 525 kb.

  15. p63 regulates Satb1 to control tissue-specific chromatin remodeling during development of the epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Fessing, Michael Y.; Mardaryev, Andrei N.; Gdula, Michal R.; Sharov, Andrey A.; Sharova, Tatyana Y.; Rapisarda, Valentina; Gordon, Konstantin B.; Smorodchenko, Anna D.; Poterlowicz, Krzysztof; Ferone, Giustina; Kohwi, Yoshinori; Missero, Caterina

    2011-01-01

    During development, multipotent progenitor cells establish tissue-specific programs of gene expression. In this paper, we show that p63 transcription factor, a master regulator of epidermal morphogenesis, executes its function in part by directly regulating expression of the genome organizer Satb1 in progenitor cells. p63 binds to a proximal regulatory region of the Satb1 gene, and p63 ablation results in marked reduction in the Satb1 expression levels in the epidermis. Satb1−/− mice show impaired epidermal morphology. In Satb1-null epidermis, chromatin architecture of the epidermal differentiation complex locus containing genes associated with epidermal differentiation is altered primarily at its central domain, where Satb1 binding was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation–on-chip analysis. Furthermore, genes within this domain fail to be properly activated upon terminal differentiation. Satb1 expression in p63+/− skin explants treated with p63 small interfering ribonucleic acid partially restored the epidermal phenotype of p63-deficient mice. These data provide a novel mechanism by which Satb1, a direct downstream target of p63, contributes in epidermal morphogenesis via establishing tissue-specific chromatin organization and gene expression in epidermal progenitor cells. PMID:21930775

  16. Light-induced aggregation of microbial exopolymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Sun, Luni; Xu, Chen; Zhang, Saijin; Lin, Peng; Schwehr, Kathleen A; Quigg, Antonietta; Chiu, Meng-Hsuen; Chin, Wei-Chun; Santschi, Peter H

    2017-08-01

    Sunlight can inhibit or disrupt the aggregation process of marine colloids via cleavage of high molecular weight compounds into smaller, less stable fragments. In contrast, some biomolecules, such as proteins excreted from bacteria can form aggregates via cross-linking due to photo-oxidation. To examine whether light-induced aggregation can occur in the marine environment, we conducted irradiation experiments on a well-characterized protein-containing exopolymeric substance (EPS) from the marine bacterium Sagitulla stellata. Our results show that after 1 h sunlight irradiation, the turbidity level of soluble EPS was 60% higher than in the dark control. Flow cytometry also confirmed that more particles of larger sized were formed by sunlight. In addition, we determined a higher mass of aggregates collected on filter in the irradiated samples. This suggests light can induce aggregation of this bacterial EPS. Reactive oxygen species hydroxyl radical and peroxide played critical roles in the photo-oxidation process, and salts assisted the aggregation process. The observation that Sagitulla stellata EPS with relatively high protein content promoted aggregation, was in contrast to the case where no significant differences were found in the aggregation of a non-protein containing phytoplankton EPS between the dark and light conditions. This, together with the evidence that protein-to-carbohydrate ratio of aggregates formed under light condition is significantly higher than that formed under dark condition suggest that proteins are likely the important component for aggregate formation. Light-induced aggregation provides new insights into polymer assembly, marine snow formation, and the fate/transport of organic carbon and nitrogen in the ocean. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Visible light-induced ion-selective optodes based on a metastable photoacid for cation detection.

    PubMed

    Patel, Parth K; Chumbimuni-Torres, Karin Y

    2016-01-07

    A new platform of ion-selective optodes is presented here to detect cations under thermodynamic equilibrium via ratiometric analysis. This novel platform utilizes a 'one of a kind' visible light-induced metastable photoacid as a reference ion indicator to achieve activatable and controllable sensors. These ion-selective optodes were studied in terms of their stability, sensitivity, selectivity, and theoretical aspects.

  18. Long range chromatin organization

    PubMed Central

    Acuña, Luciana I Gómez; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2014-01-01

    Splicing is a predominantly co-transcriptional process that has been shown to be tightly coupled to transcription. Chromatin structure is a key factor that mediates this functional coupling. In light of recent evidence that shows the importance of higher order chromatin organization in the coordination and regulation of gene expression, we discuss here the possible roles of long-range chromatin organization in splicing and alternative splicing regulation. PMID:25764333

  19. Epigenetic control of cardiovascular health by nutritional polyphenols involves multiple chromatin-modifying writer-reader-eraser proteins.

    PubMed

    Declerck, Ken; Szarc vel Szic, Katarzyna; Palagani, Ajay; Heyninck, Karen; Haegeman, Guy; Morand, Christine; Milenkovic, Dragan; Vanden Berghe, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, epigenetic mechanisms involving DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNA regulation emerge as important players in cardiovascular disease (CVD). Epigenetics may provide the missing link between environment, genome and disease phenotype and be responsible for the strong interindividual variation in disease risk factors underlying CVD. Daily diet is known to have a major influence on both the development and the prevention of CVD. Interestingly, the dietary lifestyle of our (grand)parents and of us contributes to CVD risk by metabolic (re)programming of our epigenome in utero, after birth or during life. In contrast to genetic mutations, the plasticity of CVD related epigenetic changes makes them attractive candidates for nutritional prevention or pharmacological intervention. Although a growing number of epidemiologic studies have shown a link between the ingestion of nutritional polyphenols and cardiovascular health benefits, potential involvement of epigenetic mechanisms has been underexplored. In this review, we will give an overview of epigenetic alterations in atherosclerosis, with the focus on DNA and histone modifications by chromatin-modifying proteins. Finally, we illustrate that cocoa flavanols and other classes of dietary molecules may promote cardiovascular health by targeting multiple classes of chromatin writer-reader-eraser proteins related to histone acetylation-methylation and DNA methylation.

  20. Direct interplay among histones, histone chaperones, and a chromatin boundary protein in the control of histone gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zunder, Rachel M; Rine, Jasper

    2012-11-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the histone chaperone Rtt106 binds newly synthesized histone proteins and mediates their delivery into chromatin during transcription, replication, and silencing. Rtt106 is also recruited to histone gene regulatory regions by the HIR histone chaperone complex to ensure S-phase-specific expression. Here we showed that this Rtt106:HIR complex included Asf1 and histone proteins. Mutations in Rtt106 that reduced histone binding reduced Rtt106 enrichment at histone genes, leading to their increased transcription. Deletion of the chromatin boundary element Yta7 led to increased Rtt106:H3 binding, increased Rtt106 enrichment at histone gene regulatory regions, and decreased histone gene transcription at the HTA1-HTB1 locus. These results suggested a unique regulatory mechanism in which Rtt106 sensed the level of histone proteins to maintain the proper level of histone gene transcription. The role of these histone chaperones and Yta7 differed markedly among the histone gene loci, including the two H3-H4 histone gene pairs. Defects in silencing in rtt106 mutants could be partially accounted for by Rtt106-mediated changes in histone gene repression. These studies suggested that feedback mediated by histone chaperone complexes plays a pivotal role in regulating histone gene transcription.

  1. Chromatin as an expansive canvas for chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Fierz, Beat; Muir, Tom W

    2012-04-17

    Chromatin is extensively chemically modified and thereby acts as a dynamic signaling platform controlling gene function. Chromatin regulation is integral to cell differentiation, lineage commitment and organism development, whereas chromatin dysregulation can lead to age-related and neurodegenerative disorders as well as cancer. Investigating chromatin biology presents a unique challenge, as the issue spans many disciplines, including cell and systems biology, biochemistry and molecular biophysics. In recent years, the application of chemical biology methods for investigating chromatin processes has gained considerable traction. Indeed, chemical biologists now have at their disposal powerful chemical tools that allow chromatin biology to be scrutinized at the level of the cell all the way down to the single chromatin fiber. Here we present recent examples of how this rapidly expanding palette of chemical tools is being used to paint a detailed picture of chromatin function in organism development and disease.

  2. Light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices

    PubMed Central

    Stenhammar, Joakim; Wittkowski, Raphael; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Self-propelled colloidal objects, such as motile bacteria or synthetic microswimmers, have microscopically irreversible individual dynamics—a feature they share with all living systems. The incoherent behavior of individual swimmers can be harnessed (or “rectified”) by microfluidic devices that create systematic motions that are impossible in equilibrium. We present a computational proof-of-concept study showing that such active rectification devices could be created directly from an unstructured “primordial soup” of light-controlled motile particles, solely by using spatially modulated illumination to control their local propulsion speed. Alongside both microscopic irreversibility and speed modulation, our mechanism requires spatial symmetry breaking, such as a chevron light pattern, and strong interactions between particles, such as volume exclusion, which cause a collisional slowdown at high density. Together, we show how these four factors create a novel, many-body rectification mechanism. Our work suggests that standard spatial light modulator technology might allow the programmable, light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices from an unstructured particle bath. PMID:27051883

  3. Light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices.

    PubMed

    Stenhammar, Joakim; Wittkowski, Raphael; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E

    2016-04-01

    Self-propelled colloidal objects, such as motile bacteria or synthetic microswimmers, have microscopically irreversible individual dynamics-a feature they share with all living systems. The incoherent behavior of individual swimmers can be harnessed (or "rectified") by microfluidic devices that create systematic motions that are impossible in equilibrium. We present a computational proof-of-concept study showing that such active rectification devices could be created directly from an unstructured "primordial soup" of light-controlled motile particles, solely by using spatially modulated illumination to control their local propulsion speed. Alongside both microscopic irreversibility and speed modulation, our mechanism requires spatial symmetry breaking, such as a chevron light pattern, and strong interactions between particles, such as volume exclusion, which cause a collisional slowdown at high density. Together, we show how these four factors create a novel, many-body rectification mechanism. Our work suggests that standard spatial light modulator technology might allow the programmable, light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices from an unstructured particle bath.

  4. Arabidopsis BREVIPEDICELLUS Interacts with the SWI2/SNF2 Chromatin Remodeling ATPase BRAHMA to Regulate KNAT2 and KNAT6 Expression in Control of Inflorescence Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Yang; Li, Chenlong; Shan, Wei; Lu, Wangjin; Cui, Yuhai; Liu, Xuncheng; Wu, Keqiang

    2015-01-01

    BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP or KNAT1), a class-I KNOTTED1-like homeobox (KNOX) transcription factor in Arabidopsis thaliana, contributes to shaping the normal inflorescence architecture through negatively regulating other two class-I KNOX genes, KNAT2 and KNAT6. However, the molecular mechanism of BP-mediated transcription regulation remains unclear. In this study, we showed that BP directly interacts with the SWI2/SNF2 chromatin remodeling ATPase BRAHMA (BRM) both in vitro and in vivo. Loss-of-function BRM mutants displayed inflorescence architecture defects, with clustered inflorescences, horizontally orientated pedicels, and short pedicels and internodes, a phenotype similar to the bp mutants. Furthermore, the transcript levels of KNAT2 and KNAT6 were elevated in brm-3, bp-9 and brm-3 bp-9 double mutants. Increased histone H3 lysine 4 tri-methylation (H3K4me3) levels were detected in brm-3, bp-9 and brm-3 bp-9 double mutants. Moreover, BRM and BP co-target to KNAT2 and KNAT6 genes, and BP is required for the binding of BRM to KNAT2 and KNAT6. Taken together, our results indicate that BP interacts with the chromatin remodeling factor BRM to regulate the expression of KNAT2 and KNAT6 in control of inflorescence architecture. PMID:25822547

  5. Arabidopsis BREVIPEDICELLUS interacts with the SWI2/SNF2 chromatin remodeling ATPase BRAHMA to regulate KNAT2 and KNAT6 expression in control of inflorescence architecture.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minglei; Yang, Songguang; Chen, Chia-Yang; Li, Chenlong; Shan, Wei; Lu, Wangjin; Cui, Yuhai; Liu, Xuncheng; Wu, Keqiang

    2015-03-01

    BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP or KNAT1), a class-I KNOTTED1-like homeobox (KNOX) transcription factor in Arabidopsis thaliana, contributes to shaping the normal inflorescence architecture through negatively regulating other two class-I KNOX genes, KNAT2 and KNAT6. However, the molecular mechanism of BP-mediated transcription regulation remains unclear. In this study, we showed that BP directly interacts with the SWI2/SNF2 chromatin remodeling ATPase BRAHMA (BRM) both in vitro and in vivo. Loss-of-function BRM mutants displayed inflorescence architecture defects, with clustered inflorescences, horizontally orientated pedicels, and short pedicels and internodes, a phenotype similar to the bp mutants. Furthermore, the transcript levels of KNAT2 and KNAT6 were elevated in brm-3, bp-9 and brm-3 bp-9 double mutants. Increased histone H3 lysine 4 tri-methylation (H3K4me3) levels were detected in brm-3, bp-9 and brm-3 bp-9 double mutants. Moreover, BRM and BP co-target to KNAT2 and KNAT6 genes, and BP is required for the binding of BRM to KNAT2 and KNAT6. Taken together, our results indicate that BP interacts with the chromatin remodeling factor BRM to regulate the expression of KNAT2 and KNAT6 in control of inflorescence architecture.

  6. Use of chromatin remodeling ATPases as RNAi targets for parental control of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) and Neotropical brown stink bug (Euschistus heros).

    PubMed

    Fishilevich, Elane; Vélez, Ana M; Khajuria, Chitvan; Frey, Meghan L F; Hamm, Ronda L; Wang, Haichuan; Schulenberg, Greg A; Bowling, Andrew J; Pence, Heather E; Gandra, Premchand; Arora, Kanika; Storer, Nicholas P; Narva, Kenneth E; Siegfried, Blair D

    2016-04-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism that is present in animals and plants and is triggered by double stranded RNA (dsRNA) or small interfering RNA (siRNA), depending on the organism. In the western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), RNAi can be achieved by feeding rootworms dsRNA added to artificial diet or plant tissues transformed to express dsRNA. The effect of RNAi depends on the targeted gene function and can range from an absence of phenotypic response to readily apparent responses, including lethality. Furthermore, RNAi can directly affect individuals that consume dsRNA or the effect may be transferred to the next generation. Our previous work described the potential use of genes involved in embryonic development as a parental RNAi technology for the control of WCR. In this study, we describe the use of chromatin-remodeling ATPases as target genes to achieve parental gene silencing in two insect pests, a coleopteran, WCR, and a hemipteran, the Neotropical brown stink bug, Euschistus heros Fabricius (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae). Our results show that dsRNA targeting chromatin-remodeling ATPase transcripts, brahma, mi-2, and iswi strongly reduced the fecundity of the exposed females in both insect species. Additionally, knockdown of chd1 reduced the fecundity of E. heros.

  7. A green-light inducible lytic system for cyanobacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Kotone; Abe, Koichi; Ferri, Stefano; Nakajima, Mitsuharu; Nakamura, Mayumi; Yoshida, Wataru; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Ikebukuro, Kazunori; Sode, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are an attractive candidate for the production of biofuel because of their ability to capture carbon dioxide by photosynthesis and grow on non-arable land. However, because huge quantities of water are required for cultivation, strict water management is one of the greatest issues in algae- and cyanobacteria-based biofuel production. In this study, we aim to construct a lytic cyanobacterium that can be regulated by a physical signal (green-light illumination) for future use in the recovery of biofuel related compounds. We introduced T4 bacteriophage-derived lysis genes encoding holin and endolysin under the control of the green-light regulated cpcG2 promoter in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. When cells harboring the lysis genes were illuminated with both red and green light, we observed a considerable decrease in growth rate, a significant increase in cellular phycocyanin released in the medium, and a considerable fraction of dead cells. These effects were not observed when these cells were illuminated with only red light, or when cells not containing the lysis genes were grown under either red light or red and green light. These results indicate that our constructed green-light inducible lytic system was clearly induced by green-light illumination, resulting in lytic cells that released intracellular phycocyanin into the culture supernatant. This property suggests a future possibility to construct photosynthetic genetically modified organisms that are unable to survive under sunlight exposure. Expression of the self-lysis system with green-light illumination was also found to greatly increase the fragility of the cell membrane, as determined by subjecting the induced cells to detergent, osmotic-shock, and freeze-thaw treatments. A green-light inducible lytic system was constructed in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The engineered lytic cyanobacterial cells should be beneficial for the recovery of biofuels and related compounds from cells with minimal effort

  8. A green-light inducible lytic system for cyanobacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria are an attractive candidate for the production of biofuel because of their ability to capture carbon dioxide by photosynthesis and grow on non-arable land. However, because huge quantities of water are required for cultivation, strict water management is one of the greatest issues in algae- and cyanobacteria-based biofuel production. In this study, we aim to construct a lytic cyanobacterium that can be regulated by a physical signal (green-light illumination) for future use in the recovery of biofuel related compounds. Results We introduced T4 bacteriophage-derived lysis genes encoding holin and endolysin under the control of the green-light regulated cpcG2 promoter in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. When cells harboring the lysis genes were illuminated with both red and green light, we observed a considerable decrease in growth rate, a significant increase in cellular phycocyanin released in the medium, and a considerable fraction of dead cells. These effects were not observed when these cells were illuminated with only red light, or when cells not containing the lysis genes were grown under either red light or red and green light. These results indicate that our constructed green-light inducible lytic system was clearly induced by green-light illumination, resulting in lytic cells that released intracellular phycocyanin into the culture supernatant. This property suggests a future possibility to construct photosynthetic genetically modified organisms that are unable to survive under sunlight exposure. Expression of the self-lysis system with green-light illumination was also found to greatly increase the fragility of the cell membrane, as determined by subjecting the induced cells to detergent, osmotic-shock, and freeze-thaw treatments. Conclusions A green-light inducible lytic system was constructed in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The engineered lytic cyanobacterial cells should be beneficial for the recovery of biofuels and related compounds

  9. A light-induced shortcut in the planktonic microbial loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptacnik, Robert; Gomes, Ana; Royer, Sarah-Jeanne; Berger, Stella A.; Calbet, Albert; Nejstgaard, Jens C.; Gasol, Josep M.; Isari, Stamatina; Moorthi, Stefanie D.; Ptacnikova, Radka; Striebel, Maren; Sazhin, Andrey F.; Tsagaraki, Tatiana M.; Zervoudaki, Soultana; Altoja, Kristi; Dimitriou, Panagiotis D.; Laas, Peeter; Gazihan, Ayse; Martínez, Rodrigo A.; Schabhüttl, Stefanie; Santi, Ioulia; Sousoni, Despoina; Pitta, Paraskevi

    2016-07-01

    Mixotrophs combine photosynthesis with phagotrophy to cover their demands in energy and essential nutrients. This gives them a competitive advantage under oligotropihc conditions, where nutrients and bacteria concentrations are low. As the advantage for the mixotroph depends on light, the competition between mixo- and heterotrophic bacterivores should be regulated by light. To test this hypothesis, we incubated natural plankton from the ultra-oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean in a set of mesocosms maintained at 4 light levels spanning a 10-fold light gradient. Picoplankton (heterotrophic bacteria (HB), pico-sized cyanobacteria, and small-sized flagellates) showed the fastest and most marked response to light, with pronounced predator-prey cycles, in the high-light treatments. Albeit cell specific activity of heterotrophic bacteria was constant across the light gradient, bacterial abundances exhibited an inverse relationship with light. This pattern was explained by light-induced top-down control of HB by bacterivorous phototrophic eukaryotes (PE), which was evidenced by a significant inverse relationship between HB net growth rate and PE abundances. Our results show that light mediates the impact of mixotrophic bacterivores. As mixo- and heterotrophs differ in the way they remineralize nutrients, these results have far-reaching implications for how nutrient cycling is affected by light.

  10. A light-induced shortcut in the planktonic microbial loop

    PubMed Central

    Ptacnik, Robert; Gomes, Ana; Royer, Sarah-Jeanne; Berger, Stella A.; Calbet, Albert; Nejstgaard, Jens C.; Gasol, Josep M.; Isari, Stamatina; Moorthi, Stefanie D.; Ptacnikova, Radka; Striebel, Maren; Sazhin, Andrey F.; Tsagaraki, Tatiana M.; Zervoudaki, Soultana; Altoja, Kristi; Dimitriou, Panagiotis D.; Laas, Peeter; Gazihan, Ayse; Martínez, Rodrigo A.; Schabhüttl, Stefanie; Santi, Ioulia; Sousoni, Despoina; Pitta, Paraskevi

    2016-01-01

    Mixotrophs combine photosynthesis with phagotrophy to cover their demands in energy and essential nutrients. This gives them a competitive advantage under oligotropihc conditions, where nutrients and bacteria concentrations are low. As the advantage for the mixotroph depends on light, the competition between mixo- and heterotrophic bacterivores should be regulated by light. To test this hypothesis, we incubated natural plankton from the ultra-oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean in a set of mesocosms maintained at 4 light levels spanning a 10-fold light gradient. Picoplankton (heterotrophic bacteria (HB), pico-sized cyanobacteria, and small-sized flagellates) showed the fastest and most marked response to light, with pronounced predator-prey cycles, in the high-light treatments. Albeit cell specific activity of heterotrophic bacteria was constant across the light gradient, bacterial abundances exhibited an inverse relationship with light. This pattern was explained by light-induced top-down control of HB by bacterivorous phototrophic eukaryotes (PE), which was evidenced by a significant inverse relationship between HB net growth rate and PE abundances. Our results show that light mediates the impact of mixotrophic bacterivores. As mixo- and heterotrophs differ in the way they remineralize nutrients, these results have far-reaching implications for how nutrient cycling is affected by light. PMID:27404551

  11. Retino-hypothalamic regulation of light-induced murine sleep

    PubMed Central

    Muindi, Fanuel; Zeitzer, Jamie M.; Heller, Horace Craig

    2014-01-01

    The temporal organization of sleep is regulated by an interaction between the circadian clock and homeostatic processes. Light indirectly modulates sleep through its ability to phase shift and entrain the circadian clock. Light can also exert a direct, circadian-independent effect on sleep. For example, acute exposure to light promotes sleep in nocturnal animals and wake in diurnal animals. The mechanisms whereby light directly influences sleep and arousal are not well understood. In this review, we discuss the direct effect of light on sleep at the level of the retina and hypothalamus in rodents. We review murine data from recent publications showing the roles of rod-, cone- and melanopsin-based photoreception on the initiation and maintenance of light-induced sleep. We also present hypotheses about hypothalamic mechanisms that have been advanced to explain the acute control of sleep by light. Specifically, we review recent studies assessing the roles of the ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). We also discuss how light might differentially promote sleep and arousal in nocturnal and diurnal animals respectively. Lastly, we suggest new avenues for research on this topic which is still in its early stages. PMID:25140132

  12. Light induced DEP for immobilizing and orienting Escherichia coli bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccio, Lisa; Marchesano, Valentina; Mugnano, Martina; Grilli, Simonetta; Ferraro, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Manipulating bacteria and understanding their behavior when interacting with different substrates are of fundamental importance for patterning, detection, and any other topics related to health-care, food-enterprise, etc. Here, we adopt an innovative dielectrophoretic (DEP) approach based on electrode-free DEP for investigating smart but simple strategies for immobilization and orientation of bacteria. Escherichia coli DH5-alpha strain has been selected as subject of the study. The light induced DEP is achieved through ferroelectric iron-doped lithium niobate crystals used as substrates. Due to the photorefractive (PR) property of such material, suitable light patterns allow writing spatial-charges-distribution inside its volume and the resultant electric fields are able to immobilize E. coli on the surface. The experiments showed that, after laser irradiation, about 80% of bacteria is blocked and oriented along a particular direction on the crystals within an area of few square centimeters. The investigation presented here could open the way for detection or patterning applications based on a new driving mechanism. Future perspectives also include the possibility to actively switch by light the DEP forces, through the writing/erasing characteristic of PR fields, to dynamically control biofilm spatial structure and arrangement.

  13. Green-Light-Induced Inactivation of Receptor Signaling Using Cobalamin-Binding Domains.

    PubMed

    Kainrath, Stephanie; Stadler, Manuela; Reichhart, Eva; Distel, Martin; Janovjak, Harald

    2017-04-10

    Optogenetics and photopharmacology provide spatiotemporally precise control over protein interactions and protein function in cells and animals. Optogenetic methods that are sensitive to green light and can be used to break protein complexes are not broadly available but would enable multichromatic experiments with previously inaccessible biological targets. Herein, we repurposed cobalamin (vitamin B12) binding domains of bacterial CarH transcription factors for green-light-induced receptor dissociation. In cultured cells, we observed oligomerization-induced cell signaling for the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 fused to cobalamin-binding domains in the dark that was rapidly eliminated upon illumination. In zebrafish embryos expressing fusion receptors, green light endowed control over aberrant fibroblast growth factor signaling during development. Green-light-induced domain dissociation and light-inactivated receptors will critically expand the optogenetic toolbox for control of biological processes.

  14. Nuclear phosphoinositide regulation of chromatin.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Bree L; Blind, Raymond D

    2018-01-01

    Phospholipid signaling has clear connections to a wide array of cellular processes, particularly in gene expression and in controlling the chromatin biology of cells. However, most of the work elucidating how phospholipid signaling pathways contribute to cellular physiology have studied cytoplasmic membranes, while relatively little attention has been paid to the role of phospholipid signaling in the nucleus. Recent work from several labs has shown that nuclear phospholipid signaling can have important roles that are specific to this cellular compartment. This review focuses on the nuclear phospholipid functions and the activities of phospholipid signaling enzymes that regulate metazoan chromatin and gene expression. In particular, we highlight the roles that nuclear phosphoinositides play in several nuclear-driven physiological processes, such as differentiation, proliferation, and gene expression. Taken together, the recent discovery of several specifically nuclear phospholipid functions could have dramatic impact on our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that enable tight control of cellular physiology. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Chromatin reorganization through mitosis.

    PubMed

    Vagnarelli, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome condensation is one of the major chromatin-remodeling events that occur during cell division. The changes in chromatin compaction and higher-order structure organization are essential requisites for ensuring a faithful transmission of the replicated genome to daughter cells. Although the observation of mitotic chromosome condensation has fascinated Scientists for a century, we are still far away from understanding how the process works from a molecular point of view. In this chapter, I will analyze our current understanding of chromatin condensation during mitosis with particular attention to the major molecular players that trigger and maintain this particular chromatin conformation. However, within the chromosome, not all regions of the chromatin are organized in the same manner. I will address separately the structure and functions of particular chromatin domains such as the centromere. Finally, the transition of the chromatin through mitosis represents just an interlude for gene expression between two cell cycles. How the transcriptional information that governs cell linage identity is transmitted from mother to daughter represents a big and interesting question. I will present how cells take care of the aspect ensuring that mitotic chromosome condensation and the block of transcription does not wipe out the cell identity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis by Cucumber Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kenneth D.; Purves, William K.

    1970-01-01

    When intact etiolated 2-day cucumber (Cucumis sativus) embryos were treated with indoleacetic acid (IAA), gibberellin A7 (GA7), or kinetin, chromatin derived from the embryonic axes exhibited an increased capacity to support RNA synthesis in either the presence or the absence of bacterial RNA polymerase. An IAA effect on cucumber RNA polymerase activity was evident after 4 hours of hormone treatment; the IAA effect on DNA template activity (bacterial RNA polymerase added) occurred after longer treatments (12 hours). GA7 also promoted template activity, but again only after a prior stimulation of endogenous chromatin activity. After 12 hours of kinetin treatment, both endogenous chromatin and DNA template activities were substantially above control values, but longer kinetin treatments caused these activities to decline in magnitude. When chromatin was prepared from hypocotyl segments that were floated on a GA7 solution, a GA-induced increase in endogenous chromatin activity occurred, but only if cotyledon tissue was left attached to the segments during the period of hormone treatment. Age of the seedling tissue had a profound influence on the chromatin characteristics. With progression of development from the 2-day to the 4-day stage, the endogenous chromatin activity declined while the DNA template activity increased. PMID:16657509

  17. Remodelling chromatin to shape development of plants.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Matthew; Hennig, Lars

    2014-02-01

    Establishment and dynamic regulation of a higher order chromatin structure is an essential component of development. Chromatin remodelling complexes such as the SWI2/SNF2 family of ATP-dependent chromatin remodellers can alter chromatin architecture by changing nucleosome positioning or substituting histones with histone variants. These remodellers often act in concert with chromatin modifiers such as the polycomb group proteins which confer repressive states through modification of histone tails. These mechanisms are highly conserved across the eukaryotic kingdom although in plants, owing to the maintenance of dedifferentiated cell states that allow for post-embyronic changes in development, strict control of chromatin remodelling is even more paramount. Recent and ongoing studies in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have found that while the major families of the SWI2/SNF2 ATPase chromatin remodellers are represented, a number of redundancies and divergent functions have emerged that show a break from the roles of their metazoan counterparts. This review focusses on the SNF2 and CHD families of ATP-dependent remodellers and their roles in plant development. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Chromatin fiber functional organization: Some plausible models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesne, A.; Victor, J.-M.

    2006-03-01

    We here present a modeling study of the chromatin fiber functional organization. Multi-scale modeling is required to unravel the complex interplay between the fiber and the DNA levels. It suggests plausible scenarios, including both physical and biological aspects, for fiber condensation, its targeted decompaction, and transcription regulation. We conclude that a major role of the chromatin fiber structure might be to endow DNA with allosteric potentialities and to control DNA transactions by an epigenetic tuning of its mechanical and topological constraints.

  19. The epigenetic control of E-box and Myc-dependent chromatin modifications regulate the licensing of lamin B2 origin during cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Swarnalatha, Manickavinayaham; Singh, Anup Kumar; Kumar, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    Recent genome-wide mapping of the mammalian replication origins has suggested the role of transcriptional regulatory elements in origin activation. However, the nature of chromatin modifications associated with such trans-factors or epigenetic marks imprinted on cis-elements during the spatio-temporal regulation of replication initiation remains enigmatic. To unveil the molecular underpinnings, we studied the human lamin B2 origin that spatially overlaps with TIMM 13 promoter. We observed an early G1-specific occupancy of c-Myc that facilitated the loading of mini chromosome maintenance protein (MCM) complex during subsequent mid-G1 phase rather stimulating TIMM 13 gene expression. Investigations on the Myc-induced downstream events suggested a direct interaction between c-Myc and histone methyltransferase mixed-lineage leukemia 1 that imparted histone H3K4me3 mark essential for both recruitment of acetylase complex HBO1 and hyperacetylation of histone H4. Contemporaneously, the nucleosome remodeling promoted the loading of MCM proteins at the origin. These chromatin modifications were under the tight control of active demethylation of E-box as evident from methylation profiling. The active demethylation was mediated by the Ten-eleven translocation (TET)-thymine DNA glycosylase-base excision repair (BER) pathway, which facilitated spatio-temporal occupancy of Myc. Intriguingly, the genome-wide 43% occurrence of E-box among the human origins could support our hypothesis that epigenetic control of E-box could be a molecular switch for the licensing of early replicating origins. PMID:22772991

  20. Chromatin potentiates transcription

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Shigeki; Davis, Ralph E.; Mattei, Pierre Jean; Eagen, Kyle Patrick; Kornberg, Roger D.

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin isolated from the chromosomal locus of the PHO5 gene of yeast in a transcriptionally repressed state was transcribed with 12 pure proteins (80 polypeptides): RNA polymerase II, six general transcription factors, TFIIS, the Pho4 gene activator protein, and the SAGA, SWI/SNF, and Mediator complexes. Contrary to expectation, a nucleosome occluding the TATA box and transcription start sites did not impede transcription but rather, enhanced it: the level of chromatin transcription was at least sevenfold greater than that of naked DNA, and chromatin gave patterns of transcription start sites closely similar to those occurring in vivo, whereas naked DNA gave many aberrant transcripts. Both histone acetylation and trimethylation of H3K4 (H3K4me3) were important for chromatin transcription. The nucleosome, long known to serve as a general gene repressor, thus also performs an important positive role in transcription. PMID:28137832

  1. Light-induced electrohydrodynamic instability in plasmonically absorbing gold nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Sujan; Dominguez-Juarez, Jorge Luis; Vuong, Luat T.

    2017-06-01

    Plasmonically absorbing nanofluids exhibit light-induced electrokinetics. We measure an electrical response to the light-induced Rayleigh-Bénard-Marangoni convective instabilities in gold-polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) nanoparticles (NPs) suspended in isopropanol and water. Microampere current oscillations are measured and attributed to the presence of the Au-PVP NPs with negative zeta potential, in correspondence with the accompanying thermal lens oscillations and a nanofluid thermoelectric effect. The measured electrical oscillations represent an electrohydrodynamic stability driven by light, one among many that should be observed with plasmonic nanoparticles in liquids.

  2. Selective excitation of vibrational states by shaping of light-induced potentials

    PubMed

    Sola; Chang; Santamaria; Malinovsky; Krause

    2000-11-13

    In this Letter we describe a method for population transfer using intense, ultrafast laser pulses. The selectivity is accomplished by careful shaping of light-induced potentials (LIPs). Creation and control of the LIPs is accomplished by choosing pairs of pulses with proper frequency detunings and time delays. As an example, selective population transfer is demonstrated for a three-state model of the sodium dimer.

  3. Light induced cytosolic drug delivery from liposomes with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, Tatu; Viitala, Lauri; Kontturi, Leena-Stiina; Laaksonen, Timo; Liang, Huamin; Vuorimaa-Laukkanen, Elina; Viitala, Tapani; Le Guével, Xavier; Yliperttula, Marjo; Murtomäki, Lasse; Urtti, Arto

    2015-04-10

    Externally triggered drug release at defined targets allows site- and time-controlled drug treatment regimens. We have developed liposomal drug carriers with encapsulated gold nanoparticles for triggered drug release. Light energy is converted to heat in the gold nanoparticles and released to the lipid bilayers. Localized temperature increase renders liposomal bilayers to be leaky and triggers drug release. The aim of this study was to develop a drug releasing system capable of releasing its cargo to cell cytosol upon triggering with visible and near infrared light signals. The liposomes were formulated using either heat-sensitive or heat- and pH-sensitive lipid compositions with star or rod shaped gold nanoparticles. Encapsulated fluorescent probe, calcein, was released from the liposomes after exposure to the light. In addition, the pH-sensitive formulations showed a faster drug release in acidic conditions than in neutral conditions. The liposomes were internalized into human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and did not show any cellular toxicity. The light induced cytosolic delivery of calcein from the gold nanoparticle containing liposomes was shown, whereas no cytosolic release was seen without light induction or without gold nanoparticles in the liposomes. The light activated liposome formulations showed a controlled content release to the cellular cytosol at a specific location and time. Triggering with visual and near infrared light allows good tissue penetration and safety, and the pH-sensitive liposomes may enable selective drug release in the intracellular acidic compartments (endosomes, lysosomes). Thus, light activated liposomes with gold nanoparticles are an attractive option for time- and site-specific drug delivery into the target cells.

  4. Plant chromatin warms up in Madrid: meeting summary of the 3rd European Workshop on Plant Chromatin 2013, Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Jarillo, José A; Gaudin, Valérie; Hennig, Lars; Köhler, Claudia; Piñeiro, Manuel

    2014-04-01

    The 3rd European Workshop on Plant Chromatin (EWPC) was held on August 2013 in Madrid, Spain. A number of different topics on plant chromatin were presented during the meeting, including new factors mediating Polycomb Group protein function in plants, chromatin-mediated reprogramming in plant developmental transitions, the role of histone variants, and newly identified chromatin remodeling factors. The function of interactions between chromatin and transcription factors in the modulation of gene expression, the role of chromatin dynamics in the control of nuclear processes and the influence of environmental factors on chromatin organization were also reported. In this report, we highlight some of the new insights emerging in this growing area of research, presented at the 3rd EWPC.

  5. The stem cell--chromatin connection.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yi; Wu, Miin-Feng; Wagner, Doris

    2009-12-01

    Stem cells self-renew and give rise to all differentiated cell types of the adult body. They are classified as toti-, pluri- or multi-potent based on the number of different cell types they can give rise to. Recently it has become apparent that chromatin regulation plays a critical role in determining the fate of stem cells and their descendants. In this review we will discuss the role of chromatin regulators in maintenance of stem cells and their ability to give rise to differentiating cells in both the animal and plant kingdom. We will highlight similarities and differences in chromatin-mediated control of stem cell fate in plants and animals. We will consider possible reasons why chromatin regulators play a central role in pluripotency in both kingdoms given that multicellularity evolved independently in each.

  6. Difference in light-induced annealing behavior of deposition- and light-induced defects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, N.; Matsuda, A.

    1993-10-01

    First experimental results on light-induced annealing (LIA) of deposition-induced defects (DID) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) are reported. LIA of DID and of light-induced defects (LID) showed a big difference: the reduction in density of DID by LIA is as low as one third or less of LID reduced by LIA, while thermal annealing reduced DID and LID very similarly. Those results indicate a structural difference between DID and LID, and are discussed in connection with a structural model of a-Si:H.

  7. Light-Induced Surface Patterning of Silica.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hong Suk; Lee, Seungwoo; Choi, Jaeho; Lee, Hongkyung; Park, Jung-Ki; Kim, Hee-Tak

    2015-10-27

    Manipulating the size and shape of silica precursor patterns using simple far-field light irradiation and transforming such reconfigured structures into inorganic silica patterns by pyrolytic conversion are demonstrated. The key concept of our work is the use of an azobenzene incorporated silica precursor (herein, we refer to this material as azo-silane composite) as ink in a micromolding process. The moving direction of azo-silane composite is parallel to light polarization direction; in addition, the amount of azo-silane composite movement can be precisely determined by controlling light irradiation time. By exploiting this peculiar phenomenon, azo-silane composite patterns produced using the micromolding technique are arbitrarily manipulated to obtain various structural features including high-resolution size or sophisticated shape. The photoreconfigured patterns formed with azo-silane composites are then converted into pure silica patterns through pyrolytic conversion. The pyrolytic converted silica patterns are uniformly formed over a large area, ensuring crack-free formation and providing high structural fidelity. Therefore, this optical manipulation technique, in conjunction with the pyrolytic conversion process, opens a promising route to the design of silica patterns with finely tuned structural features in terms of size and shape. This platform for designing silica structures has significant value in various nanotechnology fields including micro/nanofluidic channel for lab-on-a-chip devices, transparent superhydrophobic surfaces, and optoelectronic devices.

  8. Programming smooth muscle plasticity with chromatin dynamics.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Oliver G; Owens, Gary K

    2007-05-25

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) possess remarkable phenotypic plasticity that allows rapid adaptation to fluctuating environmental cues. For example, vascular SMCs undergo profound changes in their phenotype during neointimal formation in response to vessel injury or within atherosclerotic plaques. Recent studies have shown that interaction of serum response factor (SRF) and its numerous accessory cofactors with CArG box DNA sequences within promoter chromatin of SMC genes is a nexus for integrating signals that influence SMC differentiation in development and disease. During development, SMC-restricted sets of posttranslational histone modifications are acquired within the CArG box chromatin of SMC genes. These modifications in turn control the chromatin-binding properties of SRF. The histone modifications appear to encode a SMC-specific epigenetic program that is used by extracellular cues to influence SMC differentiation, by regulating binding of SRF and its partners to the chromatin template. Thus, SMC differentiation is dynamically regulated by the interplay between SRF accessory cofactors, the SRF-CArG interaction, and the underlying histone modification program. As such, the inherent plasticity of the SMC lineage offers unique glimpses into how cellular differentiation is dynamically controlled at the level of chromatin within the context of changing microenvironments. Further elucidation of how chromatin regulates SMC differentiation will undoubtedly yield valuable insights into both normal developmental processes and the pathogenesis of several vascular diseases that display detrimental SMC phenotypic behavior.

  9. Protective effect of taurine on the light-induced disruption of isolated frog rod outer segments

    SciTech Connect

    Pasantes-Morales, H.; Ademe, R.M.; Quesada, O.

    1981-01-01

    Isolated frog rod outer segments (ROS) incubated in a Krebs-bicarbonate medium, and illuminated for 2 h, show a profound alteration in their structure. This is characterized by distention of discs, vesiculation, and a marked swelling. The light-induced ROS disruption requires the presence of bicarbonate and sodium chloride. Replacement of bicarbonate by TRIS or HEPES protects ROS structure. Also, substitution of sodium chloride by sucrose or choline chloride maintains unaltered the ROS structure. Deletion of calcium, magnesium, or phosphate does not modify the effect produced by illumination. An increased accumulation of labeled bicarbonate and tritiated water is observed in illuminated ROS, as compared with controls in the dark. The presence of taurine, GABA, or glycine, at concentrations of 5-25 mM, effectively counteracts the light-induced ROS disruption. Taurine (25 mM) reduces labeled bicarbonate and tritiated water levels to those observed in the dark incubated ROS.

  10. Light induced degradation of phorbol esters.

    PubMed

    Yunping, Bu; Ha, Bui Thi Ngoc; Eunice, Yeo; Chueng, Lo Loong; Yan, Hong

    2012-10-01

    Jatropha curcas (Jatropha) is a tropical shrub that is gaining popularity as a biofuel feedstock plant. Phorbol esters (PEs) are tetracyclic tiglian diterpenoids that are present in Jatropha seeds and other parts of plant. Epidermal cell irritating and cancer promoting PEs not only reduce commercial values of Jatropha seed cake but also cause some safety and environment concerns on PE leaching to soil. A simple bioassay of PE toxicity was conducted by incubating 48 h old brine shrimp (Artemia salina) nauplii with Jatropha oil for 24 h. 1-4% of Jatropha oil (corresponding to PE concentration of 25-100 mg L(-1)) had mortality rate of 5-95%, with LC50 estimated to be 2.7% of oil or 67 mg L(-1) of PE. Jatropha oil was incubated with clay or black soil (autoclaved or non-autoclaved) in the darkness or under sunlight for different periods of time before oil was re-extracted and tested for PE content by HPLC and for remaining toxicity with the brine shrimp bioassay. Under sunlight, PE decreased to non-detectable level within six days. Toxicity reduced to less than 5% mortality rate that is comparable to rapeseed oil control within the same period. In contrast, PE level and toxicity remained little changed when Jatropha oil was incubated in the darkness. Such PE degradation/detoxification was also found independent of the presence of soil or soil microorganisms. We conclude that sunlight directly degrades and detoxifies PEs and this finding should alleviate the concern on long term environmental impact of PE leaching. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. LIGHT-INDUCED OIL GLOBULE MIGRATION IN HAEMATOCOCCUS PLUVIALIS (CHLOROPHYCEAE).

    PubMed

    Peled, Ehud; Pick, Uri; Zarka, Aliza; Shimoni, Eyal; Leu, Stefan; Boussiba, Sammy

    2012-10-01

    Astaxanthin-rich oil globules in Haematococcus pluvialis display rapid light-induced peripheral migration that is unique to this organism and serves to protect the photosynthetic system from excessive light. We observed rapid light-induced peripheral migration that is associated with chlorophyll fluorescence quenching, whereas the recovery was slow. A simple assay to follow globule migration, based on chlorophyll fluorescence level has been developed. Globule migration was induced by high intensity blue light, but not by high intensity red light. The electron transport inhibitor dichlorophenyl-dimethylurea did not inhibit globule migration, whereas the quinone analog (dibromo-methyl-isopropylbenzoquinone), induced globule migration even at low light. Actin microfilament-directed toxins, such as cytochalasin B and latrunculin A, inhibited the light-induced globule migration, whereas toxins against microtubules were ineffective. Electron microscopic (EM) imaging confirmed the cytoplasmic localization and peripheral migration of globules upon exposure to very high light (VHL). Scanning EM of freeze-fractured cells also revealed globules within cytoplasmic bridges traversing the chloroplast, presumably representing the pathway of migration. Close alignments of globules with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes were also observed following VHL illumination. We propose that light-induced globule migration is regulated by the redox state of the photosynthetic electron transport system. Possible mechanisms of actin-based globule migration are discussed.

  12. EP300 Protects from Light-Induced Retinopathy in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kawase, Reiko; Nishimura, Yuhei; Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Okabe, Shiko; Kawaguchi, Koki; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Moriyuki, Kazumi; Yamane, Shinsaku; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of rhodopsin to bright white light can induce photoreceptor cell damage and degeneration. However, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms underlying light-induced retinopathy remains elusive. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis of three rodent models of light-induced retinopathy, and we identified 37 genes that are dysregulated in all three models. Gene ontology analysis revealed that this gene set is significantly associated with a cytokine signaling axis composed of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 and 3 (STAT1/3), interleukin 6 signal transducer (IL6ST), and oncostatin M receptor (OSMR). Furthermore, the analysis suggested that the histone acetyltransferase EP300 may be a key upstream regulator of the STAT1/3–IL6ST/OSMR axis. To examine the role of EP300 directly, we developed a larval zebrafish model of light-induced retinopathy. Using this model, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of EP300 significantly increased retinal cell apoptosis, decreased photoreceptor cell outer segments, and increased proliferation of putative Müller cells upon exposure to intense light. These results suggest that EP300 may protect photoreceptor cells from light-induced damage and that activation of EP300 may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:27242532

  13. Chromatin organization as a possible factor in the control of susceptibility to radiation-induced AML in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranon, David G.

    C57BL/6). This tissue-dependency is consistent with the concept of tissue predisposition to certain kind of cancers, in which, for instance blood cells contain specific characteristics or nuclear organization not present in fibroblasts that could lead to AML. Using AML cells from actual radiation-induced tumors, the measurements done within the intact chromosome 2 from these AML samples showed a high proportion of cells with distances between the clusters markers that were similar to the distances seen for the small domain from normal BM cells. Therefore, from our data, deletion of chromosome 2 seemed to occur mainly in a non-random fashion because the PU.1 gene was deleted from the large domain in 8 out of 10 cases in an average proportion of ˜74% of the analyzed cells considering all AML cases. To explore and test the possible effect of the genomic imprinting on the structure and organization of the chromatin in both small and large domain from mouse chromosome 2, a different mouse model was used that allowed us to differentiate the parental origin of each chromosome 2 inherited after fertilization for the hybrid offspring (F1) obtained from crosses between a C3H/HeNCrl and Tirano/EiJ mouse strain. The latter has a Robertsonian translocation that involved chromosome 2 and 8, which allows tracking of a paternal or maternal copy of chromosome 2 in the F1 mice. Although such a CBA strain was not available, the C3H mouse strain is similarly sensitive to AML induction after radiation treatment, and chromosome 2 in this mouse model is hyper-radiosensitive as well. Then, if the small or closed and large or open configuration of the chromatin that was observed in the interphase is due to the genomic imprinting, we should be able to determine its parental origin. The experimental data did not show evidence of any influence in the chromosomal domain conformation in relation to the genomic imprinting occurring in mouse chromosome 2. No difference was seen for the maternal

  14. Atomic Force Microscope Imaging of Chromatin Assembled in Xenopus laevis Egg Extract

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hongxia; Freedman, Benjamin S.; Lim, Chwee Teck; Heald, Rebecca; Yan, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Gaps persist in our understanding of chromatin lower-order and higher-order structures. Xenopus egg extracts provide a way to study essential chromatin components which are difficult to manipulate in living cells, but nanoscale imaging of chromatin assembled in extracts poses a challenge. We describe a method for preparing chromatins assembled in extracts for atomic force microscopy (AFM) utilizing restriction enzyme digestion followed by transferring to a mica surface. Using this method, we find that buffer dilution of the chromatin assembly extract or incubation of chromatin in solutions of low ionic strength results in loosely-compacted chromatin fibers that are prone to unraveling into naked DNA. We also describe a method for direct AFM imaging of chromatin which does not utilize restriction enzymes and reveals higher-order fibers of varying widths. Due to the capability of controlling chromatin assembly conditions, we believe these methods have broad potential for studying physiologically relevant chromatin structures. PMID:21369955

  15. The Breakdown of Stored Triacylglycerols Is Required during Light-Induced Stomatal Opening.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Deirdre H; Lan, Jue; Geilfus, Christoph-Martin; Dodd, Antony N; Larson, Tony; Baker, Alison; Hõrak, Hanna; Kollist, Hannes; He, Zhesi; Graham, Ian; Mickelbart, Michael V; Hetherington, Alistair M

    2016-03-07

    Stomata regulate the uptake of CO2 and the loss of water vapor [1] and contribute to the control of water-use efficiency [2] in plants. Although the guard-cell-signaling pathway coupling blue light perception to ion channel activity is relatively well understood [3], we know less about the sources of ATP required to drive K(+) uptake [3-6]. Here, we show that triacylglycerols (TAGs), present in Arabidopsis guard cells as lipid droplets (LDs), are involved in light-induced stomatal opening. Illumination induces reductions in LD abundance, and this involves the PHOT1 and PHOT2 blue light receptors [3]. Light also induces decreases in specific TAG molecular species. We hypothesized that TAG-derived fatty acids are metabolized by peroxisomal β-oxidation to produce ATP required for stomatal opening. In silico analysis revealed that guard cells express all the genes required for β-oxidation, and we showed that light-induced stomatal opening is delayed in three TAG catabolism mutants (sdp1, pxa1, and cgi-58) and in stomata treated with a TAG breakdown inhibitor. We reasoned that, if ATP supply was delaying light-induced stomatal opening, then the activity of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase should be reduced at this time. Monitoring changes in apoplastic pH in the mutants showed that this was the case. Together, our results reveal a new role for TAGs in vegetative tissue and show that PHOT1 and PHOT2 are involved in reductions in LD abundance. Reductions in LD abundance in guard cells of the lycophyte Selaginella suggest that TAG breakdown may represent an evolutionarily conserved mechanism in light-induced stomatal opening.

  16. A versatile, fast, and efficient method of visible-light-induced surface grafting polymerization.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xinhong; Liu, Wei; Luan, Yafei; Du, Jun; Wu, Zhaoqiang; Chen, Hong

    2014-05-20

    To overcome the problem caused by the lability of the Au-S bond, we demonstrate the first use of Mn2(CO)10 for visible-light-induced surface grafting polymerization on Au surfaces in this paper. The visible-light-induced surface grafting of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) has the features of a "controlled" polymerization, which is characterized by a linear relationship between the thickness of the grafting layer and the monomer concentration. Ellipsometry indicated the formation of PNIPAAm films of up to ∼200 nm in thickness after only 10 min of polymerization at room temperature, demonstrating that this is a very fast process in comparison with traditional grafting polymerization techniques. Moreover, to demonstrate the potential applications of our approach, different substrates grafted by PNIPAAm and the covalent immobilization of a range of polymers on Au surfaces were also demonstrated. Considering the advantages of simplicity, efficiency, and mild reaction conditions as well as the ability of catecholic derivatives to bind to a large variety of substrates, this visible-light-induced grafting method is expected to be useful in designing functional interfaces.

  17. Protein-dependent conformational behavior of DNA in chromatin.

    PubMed

    Riehm, M R; Harrington, R E

    1987-05-19

    Information from circular dichroism (CD) and DNA thermal denaturation has been used in concert to study the conformational behavior of DNA in the extended 11-nm fiber of chromatin isolated from HeLa nuclei. The histone-dependent conformational states of the system were investigated by selectively removing the hydrophilic histone domains with trypsin. These were compared to acetylated chromatin from the same source. The integrated intensity of the positive CD band for DNA above 260 nm is found to increase with the content of relatively unstressed B-form DNA. This same increase is observed along the series of whole, H1-stripped, and trypsinized chromatin samples as protein is removed. Hence, the ratio of percent hyperchromicity to integrated CD band intensity of the respective melting transitions provides useful information on the conformational state of DNA in the three principal regions of the chromatin fiber: the central loop and flanking nucleosomal regions and the linker. Results from this study suggest that central loop DNA in both hyperacetylated and control chromatin relaxes as protein is removed. However, hyperacetylated chromatin shows significantly less dependence than control chromatin upon core histone hydrophilic domains in the flanking and linker regions. Thus, histone hyperacetylation evidently relaxes DNA in chromatin with no major overall conformational changes. A possible role of histone hyperacetylation may therefore be to reduce cooperativity in the unfolding transition in chromatin and thus provide for greater localized control of unfolding during transcription.

  18. Light-induced atomic elevator in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prants, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    It is shown how an atomic elevator that can elevate falling cold atoms in a vertical optical lattice can be created. The effect appears near resonance owing to the nonlinear interaction between the electronic and mechanical degrees of freedom of an atom, which is responsible for its random walk in rigid optical lattices without any modulation and additional action. Numerical experiments involving spontaneous emission demonstrate that random walk of atoms and light-induced atomic elevator can be observed in a real experiment.

  19. Archaeal chromatin proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, ZhenFeng; Guo, Li; Huang, Li

    2012-05-01

    Archaea, along with Bacteria and Eukarya, are the three domains of life. In all living cells, chromatin proteins serve a crucial role in maintaining the integrity of the structure and function of the genome. An array of small, abundant and basic DNA-binding proteins, considered candidates for chromatin proteins, has been isolated from the Euryarchaeota and the Crenarchaeota, the two major phyla in Archaea. While most euryarchaea encode proteins resembling eukaryotic histones, crenarchaea appear to synthesize a number of unique DNA-binding proteins likely involved in chromosomal organization. Several of these proteins (e.g., archaeal histones, Sac10b homologs, Sul7d, Cren7, CC1, etc.) have been extensively studied. However, whether they are chromatin proteins and how they function in vivo remain to be fully understood. Future investigation of archaeal chromatin proteins will lead to a better understanding of chromosomal organization and gene expression in Archaea and provide valuable information on the evolution of DNA packaging in cellular life.

  20. Chromatin and DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    MacAlpine, David M.; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    The size of a eukaryotic genome presents a unique challenge to the cell: package and organize the DNA to fit within the confines of the nucleus while at the same time ensuring sufficient dynamics to allow access to specific sequences and features such as genes and regulatory elements. This is achieved via the dynamic nucleoprotein organization of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin, the nucleosome, comprises a core particle with 147 bp of DNA wrapped 1.7 times around an octamer of histones. The nucleosome is a highly versatile and modular structure, both in its composition, with the existence of various histone variants, and through the addition of a series of posttranslational modifications on the histones. This versatility allows for both short-term regulatory responses to external signaling, as well as the long-term and multigenerational definition of large functional chromosomal domains within the nucleus, such as the centromere. Chromatin organization and its dynamics participate in essentially all DNA-templated processes, including transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Here we will focus mainly on nucleosomal organization and describe the pathways and mechanisms that contribute to assembly of this organization and the role of chromatin in regulating the DNA replication program. PMID:23751185

  1. Analysis of Chromatin Organisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: chromatin, nucleases, sucrose density gradient centrifugation, melting point, gel electrophoresis, ethidium bromide, autoradiography, Southern blotting, Northern blotting, Sanger sequencing, restriction endonucleases, exonucleases, linker DNA, chloroform extraction, nucleosomes,…

  2. Analysis of Chromatin Organisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: chromatin, nucleases, sucrose density gradient centrifugation, melting point, gel electrophoresis, ethidium bromide, autoradiography, Southern blotting, Northern blotting, Sanger sequencing, restriction endonucleases, exonucleases, linker DNA, chloroform extraction, nucleosomes,…

  3. Chromatin and DNA replication.

    PubMed

    MacAlpine, David M; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2013-08-01

    The size of a eukaryotic genome presents a unique challenge to the cell: package and organize the DNA to fit within the confines of the nucleus while at the same time ensuring sufficient dynamics to allow access to specific sequences and features such as genes and regulatory elements. This is achieved via the dynamic nucleoprotein organization of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin, the nucleosome, comprises a core particle with 147 bp of DNA wrapped 1.7 times around an octamer of histones. The nucleosome is a highly versatile and modular structure, both in its composition, with the existence of various histone variants, and through the addition of a series of posttranslational modifications on the histones. This versatility allows for both short-term regulatory responses to external signaling, as well as the long-term and multigenerational definition of large functional chromosomal domains within the nucleus, such as the centromere. Chromatin organization and its dynamics participate in essentially all DNA-templated processes, including transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Here we will focus mainly on nucleosomal organization and describe the pathways and mechanisms that contribute to assembly of this organization and the role of chromatin in regulating the DNA replication program.

  4. An Overview of Chromatin-Regulating Proteins in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pingyu; Torres, Keila; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Chang-gong; Pollock, Raphael E.

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, gene expressions on chromosome DNA are orchestrated by a dynamic chromosome structure state that is largely controlled by chromatin-regulating proteins, which regulate chromatin structures, release DNA from the nucleosome, and activate or suppress gene expression by modifying nucleosome histones or mobilizing DNA-histone structure. The two classes of chromatin- regulating proteins are 1) enzymes that modify histones through methylation, acetylation, phosphorylation, adenosine diphosphate–ribosylation, glycosylation, sumoylation, or ubiquitylation and 2) enzymes that remodel DNA-histone structure with energy from ATP hydrolysis. Chromatin-regulating proteins, which modulate DNA-histone interaction, change chromatin conformation, and increase or decrease the binding of functional DNA-regulating protein complexes, have major functions in nuclear processes, including gene transcription and DNA replication, repair, and recombination. This review provides a general overview of chromatin-regulating proteins, including their classification, molecular functions, and interactions with the nucleosome in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26796306

  5. Chromatin structure and the state of human organism.

    PubMed

    Shckorbatov, Yuriy G; Zhuravlyova, Lyubov A; Navrotskaya, Valeria V; Miroshnichenko, Elena V; Montvid, Pavel Y; Shakhbazov, Valery G; Sutushev, Takhir A

    2005-01-01

    The state of chromatin in human buccal epithelium cell nuclei upon the influence of sport trainings was investigated. Chromatin state was evaluated in interphase buccal cell nuclei after orcein staining. The heterochromatin granule quantity (HGQ) was estimated in 30 nuclei per sample, and for every donor the mean HGQ value per 30 cells was determined. Donors of masculine sex, aged from 18 to 48 years performed training walks and samples of buccal epithelium were collected. Sportive charges induced the process of chromatin condensation in cell nuclei. After the period of repose (24-48 h) the HGQ decreased to control level therefore the process of chromatin decondensation was observed. The state of chromatin changes in connection with circadian rhythm. Chromatin became more condensed at nighttime and less condensed in the morning. Hormones such as adrenaline, noradrenaline, and hydrocortisone in vitro induced the increase of HGQ.

  6. Drugging Chromatin in Cancer: Recent Advances and Novel Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Sheng F.; Chen, Chun-Wei; Armstrong, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin regulatory mechanisms play a major role in the control of gene expression programs during normal development and are disrupted in specific disease states, particularly in cancer. Important mediators of chromatin regulatory processes can broadly be classified into writers, erasers, and readers of covalent chromatin modifications that modulate eukaryotic gene transcription and maintain the integrity of the genome. The reversibility and disease-specific nature of these chromatin states make these regulators attractive therapeutic targets. As such, there is an ever-increasing number of candidate therapies aimed at targeting cancer-associated chromatin states that are in various stages of preclinical and clinical development. In this review, we discuss recent advances that have been made in the rational therapeutic targeting of chromatin regulatory mechanisms and highlight certain cancers where there is a specific rationale to assess these therapeutic approaches. PMID:26590715

  7. Chemical physics: Quantum control of light-induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, David W.

    2016-07-01

    An investigation of how ultracold molecules are broken apart by light reveals surprising, previously unobserved quantum effects. The work opens up avenues of research in quantum optics. See Letter p.122

  8. Chromatin organization and dynamics in double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Seeber, Andrew; Gasser, Susan M

    2016-10-31

    Chromatin is organized and segmented into a landscape of domains that serve multiple purposes. In contrast to transcription, which is controlled by defined sequences at distinct sites, DNA damage can occur anywhere. Repair accordingly must occur everywhere, yet it is inevitably affected by its chromatin environment. In this review, we summarize recent work investigating how changes in chromatin organization facilitate and/or guide DNA double-strand break repair. In addition, we examine new live cell studies on the dynamics of chromatin and the mechanisms that regulate its movement.

  9. Chromatin regulators: weaving epigenetic nets.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Muñoz, Inmaculada

    2010-10-01

    In multicellular organisms differentiated cells must maintain their cellular memory, which will be faithfully inherited and maintained by their progeny. In addition, these specialized cells are exposed to specific environmental and cell-intrinsic signals and will have to appropriately respond to them. Some of these stimuli lead to changes in a subset of genes or to a genome-wide reprogramming of the cells that will remain after stimuli removal and, in some instances, will be inherited by the daughter cells. The molecular substrate that integrates cellular memory and plasticity is the chromatin, a complex of DNA and histones unique to eukaryotes. The nucleosome is the fundamental unit of the chromatin and nucleosomal organization defines different chromatin conformations. Chromatin regulators affect chromatin conformation and accessibility by covalently modifying the DNA or the histones, substituting histone variants, remodeling the nucleosome position or modulating chromatin looping and folding. These regulators frequently act in multiprotein complexes and highly specific interplays among chromatin marks and different chromatin regulators allow a remarkable array of possibilities. Therefore, chromatin regulator nets act to propagate the conformation of different chromatin regions through DNA replication and mitosis, and to remodel the chromatin fiber to regulate the accessibility of the DNA to transcription factors and to the transcription and repair machineries. Here, the state-of-the-art of the best-known chromatin regulators is reviewed.

  10. Proteomic Interrogation of Human Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Torrente, Mariana P.; Zee, Barry M.; Young, Nicolas L.; Baliban, Richard C.; LeRoy, Gary; Floudas, Christodoulos A.; Hake, Sandra B.; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2011-01-01

    Chromatin proteins provide a scaffold for DNA packaging and a basis for epigenetic regulation and genomic maintenance. Despite understanding its functional roles, mapping the chromatin proteome (i.e. the “Chromatome”) is still a continuing process. Here, we assess the biological specificity and proteomic extent of three distinct chromatin preparations by identifying proteins in selected chromatin-enriched fractions using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. These experiments allowed us to produce a chromatin catalog, including several proteins ranging from highly abundant histone proteins to less abundant members of different chromatin machinery complexes. Using a Normalized Spectral Abundance Factor approach, we quantified relative abundances of the proteins across the chromatin enriched fractions giving a glimpse into their chromosomal abundance. The large-scale data sets also allowed for the discovery of a variety of novel post-translational modifications on the identified chromatin proteins. With these comparisons, we find one of the probed methods to be qualitatively superior in specificity for chromatin proteins, but inferior in proteomic extent, evidencing a compromise that must be made between biological specificity and broadness of characterization. Additionally, we attempt to identify proteins in eu- and heterochromatin, verifying the enrichments by characterizing the post-translational modifications detected on histone proteins from these chromatin regions. In summary, our results provide insights into the value of different methods to extract chromatin-associated proteins and provide starting points to study the factors that may be involved in directing gene expression and other chromatin-related processes. PMID:21935452

  11. Correlating in Vitro and in Vivo Activities of Light-Inducible Dimers: A Cellular Optogenetics Guide.

    PubMed

    Hallett, Ryan A; Zimmerman, Seth P; Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Bear, James E; Kuhlman, Brian

    2016-01-15

    Light-inducible dimers are powerful tools for cellular optogenetics, as they can be used to control the localization and activity of proteins with high spatial and temporal resolution. Despite the generality of the approach, application of light-inducible dimers is not always straightforward, as it is frequently necessary to test alternative dimer systems and fusion strategies before the desired biological activity is achieved. This process is further hindered by an incomplete understanding of the biophysical/biochemical mechanisms by which available dimers behave and how this correlates to in vivo function. To better inform the engineering process, we examined the biophysical and biochemical properties of three blue-light-inducible dimer variants (cryptochrome2 (CRY2)/CIB1, iLID/SspB, and LOVpep/ePDZb) and correlated these characteristics to in vivo colocalization and functional assays. We find that the switches vary dramatically in their dark and lit state binding affinities and that these affinities correlate with activity changes in a variety of in vivo assays, including transcription control, intracellular localization studies, and control of GTPase signaling. Additionally, for CRY2, we observe that light-induced changes in homo-oligomerization can have significant effects on activity that are sensitive to alternative fusion strategies.

  12. Heterogeneous nucleation and growth dynamics in the light-induced phase transition in vanadium dioxide

    DOE PAGES

    Brady, Nathaniel F.; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Seo, Minah; ...

    2016-03-02

    Here we report on ultrafast optical investigations of the light-induced insulator-to-metal phase transition in vanadium dioxide with controlled disorder generated by substrate mismatch. These results reveal common dynamics of this optically-induced phase transition that are independent of this disorder. Lastly, above the fluence threshold for completing the transition to the rutile crystalline phase, we find a common time scale, independent of sample morphology, of 40.5 ± 2 ps that is consistent with nucleation and growth dynamics of the R phase from the parent M1 ground state.

  13. A synthetic erectile optogenetic stimulator enabling blue-light-inducible penile erection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeuk; Folcher, Marc; Doaud-El Baba, Marie; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-05-11

    Precise spatiotemporal control of physiological processes by optogenetic devices inspired by synthetic biology may provide novel treatment opportunities for gene- and cell-based therapies. An erectile optogenetic stimulator (EROS), a synthetic designer guanylate cyclase producing a blue-light-inducible surge of the second messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in mammalian cells, enabled blue-light-dependent penile erection associated with occasional ejaculation after illumination of EROS-transfected corpus cavernosum in male rats. Photostimulated short-circuiting of complex psychological, neural, vascular, and endocrine factors to stimulate penile erection in the absence of sexual arousal may foster novel advances in the treatment of erectile dysfunction.

  14. Experimental studies of excitations in a BEC in light-induced gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan-Hsun; Blasing, David; Olson, Abraham; Niffenegger, Robert; Chen, Yong P.

    2014-05-01

    We present our experimental studies of various excitation processes in a 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the presence of Raman light-induced gauge fields. We have systematically studied controllable inter-band excitations by modulating the strength of the Raman coupling, and probed the resultant decay from the upper dressed bands and heating of the BEC. We also present preliminary results probing the effects of synthetic spin-orbit coupling and gauge fields on collective excitations as well as photoassociation processes in the BEC.

  15. MAP3K4 Controls the Chromatin Modifier HDAC6 during Trophoblast Stem Cell Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Robert J; Raghu, Deepthi; Duke, Lauren D; Abell-Hart, Kayley; Zawistowski, Jon S; Lutz, Kyla; Gomez, Shawn M; Roy, Sujoy; Homayouni, Ramin; Johnson, Gary L; Abell, Amy N

    2017-03-07

    The first epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurs in trophoblast stem (TS) cells during implantation. Inactivation of the serine/threonine kinase MAP3K4 in TS cells (TS(KI4) cells) induces an intermediate state of EMT, where cells retain stemness, lose epithelial markers, and gain mesenchymal characteristics. Investigation of relationships among MAP3K4 activity, stemness, and EMT in TS cells may reveal key regulators of EMT. Here, we show that MAP3K4 activity controls EMT through the ubiquitination and degradation of HDAC6. Loss of MAP3K4 activity in TS(KI4) cells results in elevated HDAC6 expression and the deacetylation of cytoplasmic and nuclear targets. In the nucleus, HDAC6 deacetylates the promoters of tight junction genes, promoting the dissolution of tight junctions. Importantly, HDAC6 knockdown in TS(KI4) cells restores epithelial features, including cell-cell adhesion and barrier formation. These data define a role for HDAC6 in regulating gene expression during transitions between epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes.

  16. The Chromatin Protein DUET/MMD1 Controls Expression of the Meiotic Gene TDM1 during Male Meiosis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Andreuzza, Sébastien; Nishal, Bindu; Singh, Aparna; Siddiqi, Imran

    2015-09-01

    Meiosis produces haploid cells essential for sexual reproduction. In yeast, entry into meiosis activates transcription factors which trigger a transcriptional cascade that results in sequential co-expression of early, middle and late meiotic genes. However, these factors are not conserved, and the factors and regulatory mechanisms that ensure proper meiotic gene expression in multicellular eukaryotes are poorly understood. Here, we report that DUET/MMD1, a PHD finger protein essential for Arabidopsis male meiosis, functions as a transcriptional regulator in plant meiosis. We find that DUET-PHD binds H3K4me2 in vitro, and show that this interaction is critical for function during meiosis. We also show that DUET is required for proper microtubule organization during meiosis II, independently of its function in meiosis I. Remarkably, DUET protein shows stage-specific expression, confined to diplotene. We identify two genes TDM1 and JAS with critical functions in cell cycle transitions and spindle organization in male meiosis, as DUET targets, with TDM1 being a direct target. Thus, DUET is required to regulate microtubule organization and cell cycle transitions during male meiosis, and functions as a direct transcription activator of the meiotic gene TDM1. Expression profiling showed reduced expression of a subset comprising about 12% of a known set of meiosis preferred genes in the duet mutant. Our results reveal the action of DUET as a transcriptional regulator during male meiosis in plants, and suggest that transcription of meiotic genes is under stagewise control in plants as in yeast.

  17. Chromatin retention of DNA damage sensors DDB2 and XPC through loss of p97 segregase causes genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Puumalainen, Marjo-Riitta; Lessel, Davor; Rüthemann, Peter; Kaczmarek, Nina; Bachmann, Karin; Ramadan, Kristijan; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage recognition subunits like DDB2 and XPC protect the human skin from ultraviolet (UV) light-induced genome instability and cancer, as demonstrated by the devastating inherited syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum. Here, we show that the beneficial DNA repair response triggered by these two genome caretakers critically depends on a dynamic spatiotemporal regulation of their homeostasis. The prolonged retention of DDB2 and XPC in chromatin, due to a failure to readily remove both recognition subunits by the ubiquitin-dependent p97/VCP/Cdc48 segregase complex, leads to impaired DNA excision repair of UV lesions. Surprisingly, the ensuing chromosomal aberrations in p97-deficient cells are alleviated by a concomitant down regulation of DDB2 or XPC. Also, genome instability resulting from an excess of DDB2 persisting in UV-irradiated cells is prevented by concurrent p97 over-expression. Our findings demonstrate that DNA damage sensors and repair initiators acquire unexpected genotoxic properties if not controlled by timely extraction from chromatin. PMID:24770583

  18. Functions of the Proteasome on Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Tyler S.; Tansey, William P.

    2014-01-01

    The proteasome is a large self-compartmentalized protease complex that recognizes, unfolds, and destroys ubiquitylated substrates. Proteasome activities are required for a host of cellular functions, and it has become clear in recent years that one set of critical actions of the proteasome occur on chromatin. In this review, we discuss some of the ways in which proteasomes directly regulate the structure and function of chromatin and chromatin regulatory proteins, and how this influences gene transcription. We discuss lingering controversies in the field, the relative importance of proteolytic versus non-proteolytic proteasome activities in this process, and highlight areas that require further investigation. Our intention is to show that proteasomes are involved in major steps controlling the expression of the genetic information, that proteasomes use both proteolytic mechanisms and ATP-dependent protein remodeling to accomplish this task, and that much is yet to be learned about the full spectrum of ways that proteasomes influence the genome. PMID:25422899

  19. The Molecular Geometric Phase and Light-Induced Conical Intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, Emil J.

    2017-06-01

    Potential energy surfaces for electronic states of molecules in strong electromagnetic fields can be described in the dressed-state formalism, which introduces light-induced potentials. A light-induced conical intersection (LICI) [1] appears when two electronic states intersect due to the presence of an external electric field and when the dipole coupling between the field and the molecule vanishes. There are several aspects of quantum dynamics near LICIs, which still require a thorough investigation. How do non-adiabatic effects manifest themselves in polyatomic molecules in strong electromagnetic fields? Are the natural conical-intersections (NCI) and the light-induced conical intersections identical in nature? Do topological effects (Berry phase) [2] influence the nuclear dynamics around NCIs and LICIs? To answer these questions, a computer code for time-propagation of the ro-vibronic wavefunction on multiple coupled potential energy surfaces has been developed. The time-independent zero-order basis is taken from the DUO suite [3], which solves the full ro-vibronic Schrödinger equation for diatomic molecules. Non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics near LICIs will be presented on the examples of NaH and CaF molecules, with a perspective for extension to polyatomics. G. J. Halász, A Vibók, M. Sindelka, N. Moiseyev, L. S. Cederbaum, 2011 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 44 175102 C. Wittig, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 6409-6432 S. N. Yurchenko, L. Lodi, J. Tennyson, A. V. Stolyarov, Comput. Phys. Commun., 202, 262, 2016

  20. The Chromatin Protein DUET/MMD1 Controls Expression of the Meiotic Gene TDM1 during Male Meiosis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Andreuzza, Sébastien; Nishal, Bindu; Singh, Aparna; Siddiqi, Imran

    2015-01-01

    Meiosis produces haploid cells essential for sexual reproduction. In yeast, entry into meiosis activates transcription factors which trigger a transcriptional cascade that results in sequential co-expression of early, middle and late meiotic genes. However, these factors are not conserved, and the factors and regulatory mechanisms that ensure proper meiotic gene expression in multicellular eukaryotes are poorly understood. Here, we report that DUET/MMD1, a PHD finger protein essential for Arabidopsis male meiosis, functions as a transcriptional regulator in plant meiosis. We find that DUET-PHD binds H3K4me2 in vitro, and show that this interaction is critical for function during meiosis. We also show that DUET is required for proper microtubule organization during meiosis II, independently of its function in meiosis I. Remarkably, DUET protein shows stage-specific expression, confined to diplotene. We identify two genes TDM1 and JAS with critical functions in cell cycle transitions and spindle organization in male meiosis, as DUET targets, with TDM1 being a direct target. Thus, DUET is required to regulate microtubule organization and cell cycle transitions during male meiosis, and functions as a direct transcription activator of the meiotic gene TDM1. Expression profiling showed reduced expression of a subset comprising about 12% of a known set of meiosis preferred genes in the duet mutant. Our results reveal the action of DUET as a transcriptional regulator during male meiosis in plants, and suggest that transcription of meiotic genes is under stagewise control in plants as in yeast. PMID:26348709

  1. Light-induced metastable structural changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzsche, H.

    1996-09-01

    Light-induced defects (LID) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and its alloys limit the ultimate efficiency of solar panels made with these materials. This paper reviews a variety of attempts to find the origin of and to eliminate the processes that give rise to LIDs. These attempts include novel deposition processes and the reduction of impurities. Material improvements achieved over the past decade are associated more with the material`s microstructure than with eliminating LIDs. We conclude that metastable LIDs are a natural by-product of structural changes which are generally associated with non-radiative electron-hole recombination in amorphous semiconductors.

  2. Effect of hyperfine splitting on light-induced drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhomenko, A. I.; Shalagin, A. M.

    1986-09-01

    The influence of the hyperfine structure (hfs) of the levels upon the light-induced drift (LID) effect is investigated. It is shown that hfs considerably affects the dependence of the LID velocity upon the radiation frequency. It is concluded that for decreasing separation between the hfs components the LID effect can both increase and decrease depending upon the relationship of the system parameters (collision frequencies in different levels, the pressure of a buffer gas, etc.). A considerable decrease of the effect however is highly unlikely. It is shown that a change in the buffer gas pressure can lead to reversal of the LID velocity direction.

  3. Preventing light-induced degradation in multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lindroos, J. Boulfrad, Y.; Yli-Koski, M.; Savin, H.

    2014-04-21

    Multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) is currently dominating the silicon solar cell market due to low ingot costs, but its efficiency is limited by transition metals, extended defects, and light-induced degradation (LID). LID is traditionally associated with a boron-oxygen complex, but the origin of the degradation in the top of the commercial mc-Si brick is revealed to be interstitial copper. We demonstrate that both a large negative corona charge and an aluminum oxide thin film with a built-in negative charge decrease the interstitial copper concentration in the bulk, preventing LID in mc-Si.

  4. Preventing light-induced degradation in multicrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, J.; Boulfrad, Y.; Yli-Koski, M.; Savin, H.

    2014-04-01

    Multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) is currently dominating the silicon solar cell market due to low ingot costs, but its efficiency is limited by transition metals, extended defects, and light-induced degradation (LID). LID is traditionally associated with a boron-oxygen complex, but the origin of the degradation in the top of the commercial mc-Si brick is revealed to be interstitial copper. We demonstrate that both a large negative corona charge and an aluminum oxide thin film with a built-in negative charge decrease the interstitial copper concentration in the bulk, preventing LID in mc-Si.

  5. Influenza Virus and Chromatin: Role of the CHD1 Chromatin Remodeler in the Virus Life Cycle.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Villar, Laura; Pazo, Alejandra; Nieto, Amelia

    2016-01-20

    Influenza A virus requires ongoing cellular transcription to carry out the cap-snatching process. Chromatin remodelers modify chromatin structure to produce an active or inactive conformation, which enables or prevents the recruitment of transcriptional complexes to specific genes; viral transcription thus depends on chromatin dynamics. Influenza virus polymerase associates with chromatin components of the infected cell, such as RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) or the CHD6 chromatin remodeler. Here we show that another CHD family member, CHD1 protein, also interacts with the influenza virus polymerase complex. CHD1 recognizes the H3K4me3 (histone 3 with a trimethyl group in lysine 4) histone modification, a hallmark of active chromatin. Downregulation of CHD1 causes a reduction in viral polymerase activity, viral RNA transcription, and the production of infectious particles. Despite the dependence of influenza virus on cellular transcription, RNAP II is degraded when viral transcription is complete, and recombinant viruses unable to degrade RNAP II show decreased pathogenicity in the murine model. We describe the CHD1-RNAP II association, as well as the parallel degradation of both proteins during infection with viruses showing full or reduced induction of degradation. The H3K4me3 histone mark also decreased during influenza virus infection, whereas a histone mark of inactive chromatin, H3K27me3, remained unchanged. Our results indicate that CHD1 is a positive regulator of influenza virus multiplication and suggest a role for chromatin remodeling in the control of the influenza virus life cycle. Although influenza virus is not integrated into the genome of the infected cell, it needs continuous cellular transcription to synthesize viral mRNA. This mechanism implies functional association with host genome expression and thus depends on chromatin dynamics. Influenza virus polymerase associates with transcription-related factors, such as RNA polymerase II, and with

  6. Id2 leaves the chromatin of the E2F4–p130-controlled c-myc promoter during hepatocyte priming for liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, José L.; Sandoval, Juan; Serviddio, Gaetano; Sastre, Juan; Morante, María; Perrelli, Maria-Giulia; Martínez-Chantar, María L.; Viña, José; Viña, Juan R.; Mato, José M.; Ávila, Matías A.; Franco, Luis; López-Rodas, Gerardo; Torres, Luis

    2006-01-01

    The Id (inhibitor of DNA binding or inhibitor of differentiation) helix–loop–helix proteins are involved in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation and cancer. The fact that the molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration are not completely understood prompted us to study the fate of Id2 in proliferating liver. Id2 increases in liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy, following the early induction of its gene. Co-immunoprecipitation shows that Id2 forms a complex with E2F4, p130 and mSin3A in quiescent liver and all these components are present at the c-myc promoter as shown using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation). Activation of c-myc during hepatocyte priming (G0–G1 transition) correlates with the dissociation of Id2 and HDAC (histone deacetylase), albeit p130 remains bound at least until 6 h. Moreover, as the G0–G1 transition progresses, Id2 and HDAC again bind the c-myc promoter concomitantly with the repression of this gene. The time course of c-myc binding to the Id2 promoter, as determined by ChIP assays is compatible with a role of the oncoprotein as a transcriptional inducer of Id2 in liver regeneration. Immunohistochemical analysis shows that Id2 also increases in proliferating hepatocytes after bile duct ligation. In this case, the pattern of Id2 presence in the c-myc promoter parallels that found in regenerating liver. Our results may suggest a control role for Id2 in hepatocyte priming, through a p130 dissociation-independent regulation of c-myc. PMID:16776654

  7. Epidermal Rac1 regulates the DNA damage response and protects from UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis and skin carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Haase, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common type of cancer. Increased expression and activity of Rac1, a small Rho GTPase, has been shown previously in NMSC and other human cancers; suggesting that Rac1 may function as an oncogene in skin. DMBA/TPA skin carcinogenesis studies in mice have shown that Rac1 is required for chemically induced skin papilloma formation. However, UVB radiation by the sun, which causes DNA damage, is the most relevant cause for NMSC. A potential role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far. To investigate this, we irradiated mice with epidermal Rac1 deficiency (Rac1-EKO) and their controls using a well-established protocol for long-term UV-irradiation. Most of the Rac1-EKO mice developed severe skin erosions upon long-term UV-irradiation, unlike their controls. These skin erosions in Rac1-EKO mice healed subsequently. Surprisingly, we observed development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) within the UV-irradiation fields. This shows that the presence of Rac1 in the epidermis protects from UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis. Short-term UV-irradiation experiments revealed increased UV-light-induced apoptosis of Rac1-deficient epidermal keratinocytes in vitro as well as in vivo. Further investigations using cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase transgenic mice revealed that the observed increase in UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis in Rac1-EKO mice is DNA damage dependent and correlates with caspase-8 activation. Furthermore, Rac1-deficient keratinocytes showed reduced levels of p53, γ-H2AX and p-Chk1 suggesting an attenuated DNA damage response upon UV-irradiation. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for a protective role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis and keratinocyte apoptosis probably through regulating mechanisms of the DNA damage response and repair pathways. PMID:28277539

  8. Epidermal Rac1 regulates the DNA damage response and protects from UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis and skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Haase, Ingo

    2017-03-09

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common type of cancer. Increased expression and activity of Rac1, a small Rho GTPase, has been shown previously in NMSC and other human cancers; suggesting that Rac1 may function as an oncogene in skin. DMBA/TPA skin carcinogenesis studies in mice have shown that Rac1 is required for chemically induced skin papilloma formation. However, UVB radiation by the sun, which causes DNA damage, is the most relevant cause for NMSC. A potential role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far. To investigate this, we irradiated mice with epidermal Rac1 deficiency (Rac1-EKO) and their controls using a well-established protocol for long-term UV-irradiation. Most of the Rac1-EKO mice developed severe skin erosions upon long-term UV-irradiation, unlike their controls. These skin erosions in Rac1-EKO mice healed subsequently. Surprisingly, we observed development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) within the UV-irradiation fields. This shows that the presence of Rac1 in the epidermis protects from UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis. Short-term UV-irradiation experiments revealed increased UV-light-induced apoptosis of Rac1-deficient epidermal keratinocytes in vitro as well as in vivo. Further investigations using cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase transgenic mice revealed that the observed increase in UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis in Rac1-EKO mice is DNA damage dependent and correlates with caspase-8 activation. Furthermore, Rac1-deficient keratinocytes showed reduced levels of p53, γ-H2AX and p-Chk1 suggesting an attenuated DNA damage response upon UV-irradiation. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for a protective role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis and keratinocyte apoptosis probably through regulating mechanisms of the DNA damage response and repair pathways.

  9. Light-induced vegetative anthocyanin pigmentation in Petunia.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nick W; Lewis, David H; Zhang, Huaibi; Irving, Louis J; Jameson, Paula E; Davies, Kevin M

    2009-01-01

    The Lc petunia system, which displays enhanced, light-induced vegetative pigmentation, was used to investigate how high light affects anthocyanin biosynthesis, and to assess the effects of anthocyanin pigmentation upon photosynthesis. Lc petunia plants displayed intense purple anthocyanin pigmentation throughout the leaves and stems when grown under high-light conditions, yet remain acyanic when grown under shade conditions. The coloured phenotypes matched with an accumulation of anthocyanins and flavonols, as well as the activation of the early and late flavonoid biosynthetic genes required for flavonol and anthocyanin production. Pigmentation in Lc petunia only occurred under conditions which normally induce a modest amount of anthocyanin to accumulate in wild-type Mitchell petunia [Petunia axillaris x (Petunia axillaris x Petunia hybrida cv. 'Rose of Heaven')]. Anthocyanin pigmentation in Lc petunia leaves appears to screen underlying photosynthetic tissues, increasing light saturation and light compensation points, without reducing the maximal photosynthetic assimilation rate (A(max)). In the Lc petunia system, where the bHLH factor Leaf colour is constitutively expressed, expression of the bHLH (Lc) and WD40 (An11) components of the anthocyanin regulatory system were not limited, suggesting that the high-light-induced anthocyanin pigmentation is regulated by endogenous MYB transcription factors.

  10. Blue light-induced oxidative stress in live skin.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yuya; Ohta, Shigeo; Wolf, Alexander M

    2017-03-15

    Skin damage from exposure to sunlight induces aging-like changes in appearance and is attributed to the ultraviolet (UV) component of light. Photosensitized production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by UVA light is widely accepted to contribute to skin damage and carcinogenesis, but visible light is thought not to do so. Using mice expressing redox-sensitive GFP to detect ROS, blue light could produce oxidative stress in live skin. Blue light induced oxidative stress preferentially in mitochondria, but green, red, far red or infrared light did not. Blue light-induced oxidative stress was also detected in cultured human keratinocytes, but the per photon efficacy was only 25% of UVA in human keratinocyte mitochondria, compared to 68% of UVA in mouse skin. Skin autofluorescence was reduced by blue light, suggesting flavins are the photosensitizer. Exposing human skin to the blue light contained in sunlight depressed flavin autofluorescence, demonstrating that the visible component of sunlight has a physiologically significant effect on human skin. The ROS produced by blue light is probably superoxide, but not singlet oxygen. These results suggest that blue light contributes to skin aging similar to UVA.

  11. Light-induced vegetative anthocyanin pigmentation in Petunia

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Nick W.; Lewis, David H.; Zhang, Huaibi; Irving, Louis J.; Jameson, Paula E.; Davies, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    The Lc petunia system, which displays enhanced, light-induced vegetative pigmentation, was used to investigate how high light affects anthocyanin biosynthesis, and to assess the effects of anthocyanin pigmentation upon photosynthesis. Lc petunia plants displayed intense purple anthocyanin pigmentation throughout the leaves and stems when grown under high-light conditions, yet remain acyanic when grown under shade conditions. The coloured phenotypes matched with an accumulation of anthocyanins and flavonols, as well as the activation of the early and late flavonoid biosynthetic genes required for flavonol and anthocyanin production. Pigmentation in Lc petunia only occurred under conditions which normally induce a modest amount of anthocyanin to accumulate in wild-type Mitchell petunia [Petunia axillaris×(Petunia axillaris×Petunia hybrida cv. ‘Rose of Heaven’)]. Anthocyanin pigmentation in Lc petunia leaves appears to screen underlying photosynthetic tissues, increasing light saturation and light compensation points, without reducing the maximal photosynthetic assimilation rate (Amax). In the Lc petunia system, where the bHLH factor Leaf colour is constitutively expressed, expression of the bHLH (Lc) and WD40 (An11) components of the anthocyanin regulatory system were not limited, suggesting that the high-light-induced anthocyanin pigmentation is regulated by endogenous MYB transcription factors. PMID:19380423

  12. Light-induced defects in hybrid lead halide perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharia, Onise; Schneider, William

    One of the main challenges facing organohalide perovskites for solar application is stability. Solar cells must last decades to be economically viable alternatives to traditional energy sources. While some causes of instability can be avoided through engineering, light-induced defects can be fundamentally limiting factor for practical application of the material. Light creates large numbers of electron and hole pairs that can contribute to degradation processes. Using ab initio theoretical methods, we systematically explore first steps of light induced defect formation in methyl ammonium lead iodide, MAPbI3. In particular, we study charged and neutral Frenkel pair formation involving Pb and I atoms. We find that most of the defects, except negatively charged Pb Frenkel pairs, are reversible, and thus most do not lead to degradation. Negative Pb defects create a mid-gap state and localize the conduction band electron. A minimum energy path study shows that, once the first defect is created, Pb atoms migrate relatively fast. The defects have two detrimental effects on the material. First, they create charge traps below the conduction band. Second, they can lead to degradation of the material by forming Pb clusters.

  13. Light-induced body color change in developing zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Shiraki, Tomoya; Kojima, Daisuke; Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2010-11-01

    In response to ambient light levels, many lower vertebrates darken or lighten their body colors by regulating dispersion or aggregation, respectively, of melanin granules (melanosomes) in the melanophore. This physiological reaction is mediated by photoreception in the eyes, the pineal gland, the deep brain and the melanophores themselves, depending on species and their developmental stages. In this study, we established a method for quantitative measurement of the light-induced body color change in zebrafish larvae. From 2 days post-fertilization (dpf), the dermal melanophores responded to light illumination, but the response patterns and temporal profiles changed across the developmental stages. At 2 dpf, light illumination on larvae induced a relatively fast dispersion of the pigments in the melanophores, whereas continuous illumination additionally caused a delayed pigment aggregation at 3 dpf or later stages. Removal of the eyes abolished the light-dependent pigment aggregation but not the pigment dispersion at 5 dpf, while the pigment dispersion at 2 dpf was retained even in the isolated tail. These results suggest that the pigment dispersion is triggered by photoreception intrinsic to the melanophores and that the pigment aggregation is mediated by photoreception in the eyes. The monitoring system developed in this study will be useful to understand the neural mechanisms underlying the body color change depending on the ocular system. We also discussed the putative role(s) of opsin-type photoreceptive molecules in the light-induced body color change of the larval zebrafish.

  14. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kolossov, Vladimir L.; Beaudoin, Jessica N.; Hanafin, William P.; DiLiberto, Stephen J.; Kenis, Paul J.A.; Rex Gaskins, H.

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition.

  15. Phytochromes A and B Mediate Red-Light-Induced Positive Phototropism in Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, John Z.; Mullen, Jack L.; Correll, Melanie J.; Hangarter, Roger P.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of tropisms is important in determining the final growth form of the plant body. In roots, gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response, but phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism that is mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors. In contrast, red light induces a positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Because this red-light-induced response is weak relative to both gravitropism and negative phototropism, we used a novel device to study phototropism without the complications of a counteracting gravitational stimulus. This device is based on a computer-controlled system using real-time image analysis of root growth and a feedback-regulated rotatable stage. Our data show that this system is useful to study root phototropism in response to red light, because in wild-type roots, the maximal curvature detected with this apparatus is 30° to 40°, compared with 5° to 10° without the feedback system. In positive root phototropism, sensing of red light occurs in the root itself and is not dependent on shoot-derived signals resulting from light perception. Phytochrome (Phy)A and phyB were severely impaired in red-light-induced phototropism, whereas the phyD and phyE mutants were normal in this response. Thus, PHYA and PHYB play a key role in mediating red-light-dependent positive phototropism in roots. Although phytochrome has been shown to mediate phototropism in some lower plant groups, this is one of the few reports indicating a phytochrome-dependent phototropism in flowering plants. PMID:12644690

  16. Phytochromes A and B mediate red-light-induced positive phototropism in roots.

    PubMed

    Kiss, John Z; Mullen, Jack L; Correll, Melanie J; Hangarter, Roger P

    2003-03-01

    The interaction of tropisms is important in determining the final growth form of the plant body. In roots, gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response, but phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism that is mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors. In contrast, red light induces a positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Because this red-light-induced response is weak relative to both gravitropism and negative phototropism, we used a novel device to study phototropism without the complications of a counteracting gravitational stimulus. This device is based on a computer-controlled system using real-time image analysis of root growth and a feedback-regulated rotatable stage. Our data show that this system is useful to study root phototropism in response to red light, because in wild-type roots, the maximal curvature detected with this apparatus is 30 degrees to 40 degrees, compared with 5 degrees to 10 degrees without the feedback system. In positive root phototropism, sensing of red light occurs in the root itself and is not dependent on shoot-derived signals resulting from light perception. Phytochrome (Phy)A and phyB were severely impaired in red-light-induced phototropism, whereas the phyD and phyE mutants were normal in this response. Thus, PHYA and PHYB play a key role in mediating red-light-dependent positive phototropism in roots. Although phytochrome has been shown to mediate phototropism in some lower plant groups, this is one of the few reports indicating a phytochrome-dependent phototropism in flowering plants.

  17. Phytochromes A and B mediate red-light-induced positive phototropism in roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Mullen, Jack L.; Correll, Melanie J.; Hangarter, Roger P.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of tropisms is important in determining the final growth form of the plant body. In roots, gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response, but phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism that is mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors. In contrast, red light induces a positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Because this red-light-induced response is weak relative to both gravitropism and negative phototropism, we used a novel device to study phototropism without the complications of a counteracting gravitational stimulus. This device is based on a computer-controlled system using real-time image analysis of root growth and a feedback-regulated rotatable stage. Our data show that this system is useful to study root phototropism in response to red light, because in wild-type roots, the maximal curvature detected with this apparatus is 30 degrees to 40 degrees, compared with 5 degrees to 10 degrees without the feedback system. In positive root phototropism, sensing of red light occurs in the root itself and is not dependent on shoot-derived signals resulting from light perception. Phytochrome (Phy)A and phyB were severely impaired in red-light-induced phototropism, whereas the phyD and phyE mutants were normal in this response. Thus, PHYA and PHYB play a key role in mediating red-light-dependent positive phototropism in roots. Although phytochrome has been shown to mediate phototropism in some lower plant groups, this is one of the few reports indicating a phytochrome-dependent phototropism in flowering plants.

  18. Light-induced morphological alteration in anthocyanin-accumulating vacuoles of maize cells

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Niloufer G; Grotewold, Erich

    2005-01-01

    Background Plant pigmentation is affected by a variety of factors. Light, an important plant developmental signal, influences the accumulation of anthocyanins primarily through the activation of the transcription factors that regulate the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. In this study, we utilized maize Black Mexican Sweet (BMS) cells expressing the R and C1 regulators of anthocyanin biosynthesis from a light-insensitive promoter as a means to investigate the existence of additional levels of control of pigmentation by light. Results BMS cells expressing the R and C1 regulators from the CaMV 35S constitutive promoter accumulate anthocyanins when grown in complete darkness, suggesting that the transcription factors R and C1 are sufficient for the transcription of the genes corresponding to the structural enzymes of the pathway, with no requirement for additional light-induced regulators. Interestingly, light induces a "darkening" in the color of the purple anthocyanin pigmentation of transgenic BMS cells expressing R and C1. This change in the pigment hue is not associated with a variation in the levels or types of anthocyanins present, or with an alteration of the transcript levels of several flavonoid biosynthetic genes. However, cytological observations show that light drives unexpected changes in the morphology and distribution of the anthocyanins-containing vacuolar compartments. Conclusion By uncoupling the effect of light on anthocyanin accumulation, we have found light to induce the fusion of anthocyanin-containing vacuoles, the coalescence of anthocyanic vacuolar inclusion (AVI)-like structures contained, and the spread of anthocyanins from the inclusions into the vacuolar sap. Similar light-induced alterations in vacuolar morphology are also evident in the epidermal cells of maize floral whorls accumulating anthocyanins. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism for the action of light on the vacuolar storage of anthocyanin. PMID:15907203

  19. Phytochromes A and B mediate red-light-induced positive phototropism in roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Mullen, Jack L.; Correll, Melanie J.; Hangarter, Roger P.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of tropisms is important in determining the final growth form of the plant body. In roots, gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response, but phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism that is mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors. In contrast, red light induces a positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Because this red-light-induced response is weak relative to both gravitropism and negative phototropism, we used a novel device to study phototropism without the complications of a counteracting gravitational stimulus. This device is based on a computer-controlled system using real-time image analysis of root growth and a feedback-regulated rotatable stage. Our data show that this system is useful to study root phototropism in response to red light, because in wild-type roots, the maximal curvature detected with this apparatus is 30 degrees to 40 degrees, compared with 5 degrees to 10 degrees without the feedback system. In positive root phototropism, sensing of red light occurs in the root itself and is not dependent on shoot-derived signals resulting from light perception. Phytochrome (Phy)A and phyB were severely impaired in red-light-induced phototropism, whereas the phyD and phyE mutants were normal in this response. Thus, PHYA and PHYB play a key role in mediating red-light-dependent positive phototropism in roots. Although phytochrome has been shown to mediate phototropism in some lower plant groups, this is one of the few reports indicating a phytochrome-dependent phototropism in flowering plants.

  20. Light-Induced Subunit Dissociation by a LOV domain Photoreceptor from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Karen S.; Bilwes, Alexandrine M.; Crane, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    Light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) domains bind a flavin chromophore to serve as blue light sensors in a wide range of eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins. LOV domains are associated with a variable effector domain or a separate protein signaling partner to execute a wide variety of functions that include regulation of kinases, generation of antisigma-factor antagonists, and regulation of circadian clocks. Here we present the crystal structure, photocycle kinetics, association properties, and spectroscopic features of a full-length LOV protein from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RsLOV). RsLOV exhibits N-terminal and C-terminal helical extensions that form an unusual helical bundle at its dimer interface with some resemblance to the helical transducer of sensory rhodopsin II. The blue light-induced conformational changes of RsLOV revealed from a comparison of light and dark state crystal structures support a shared signaling mechanism of LOV domain proteins that originates with the light-induced formation of a flavin-cysteinyl photoadduct. Adduct formation disrupts hydrogen bonding in the active site and propagates structural changes through the LOV domain core to the N- and C-terminal extensions. Single residue variants in the active site and dimer interface of RsLOV alter photoadduct lifetimes and induce structural changes that perturb oligomeric state. Size exclusion chromatography, multi-angle light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering and cross-linking studies indicate that RsLOV dimerizes in the dark, but upon light excitation, dissociates into monomers. This light-induced switch in oligomeric state may prove useful for engineering molecular associations in controlled cellular settings. PMID:23252338

  1. Understanding the chromatin remodeling code.

    PubMed

    Ha, Misook

    2013-10-01

    Remodeling a chromatin structure enables the genetic elements stored in a genome to function in a condition-specific manner and predisposes the interactions between cis-regulatory elements and trans-acting factors. A chromatin signature can be an indicator of the activity of the underlying genetic elements. This paper reviews recent studies showing that the combination and arrangements of chromatin remodeling marks play roles as chromatin code affecting the activity of genetic elements. This paper also reviews recent studies inferring the primary DNA sequence contexts associated with chromatin remodeling that suggest interactions between genetic and epigenetic factors. We conclude that chromatin remodeling, which provides accurate models of gene expression and morphological variations, may help to find the biological marks that cannot be detected by genome-wide association study or genetic study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Light-induced nuclear export reveals rapid dynamics of epigenetic modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Lerner, Andrew Michael; Zimmerman, Seth Parker; Hahn, Klaus; Bear, James E; Strahl, Brian D.; Kuhlman, Brian

    2016-01-01

    We engineered a photoactivatable system for rapidly and reversibly exporting proteins from the nucleus by embedding a nuclear export signal in the LOV2 domain from phototropin 1. Fusing the chromatin modifier Bre1 to the photoswitch, we achieved light-dependent control of histone H2B monoubiquitylation in yeast, revealing fast turnover of the ubiquitin mark. Moreover, this inducible system allowed us to dynamically monitor the status of epigenetic modifications dependent on H2B ubiquitylation. PMID:27089030

  3. Molecular Toxicology of Chromatin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    FINAL 01 Jan 89 TO 31 Dec 91 4. ITL ANO SUS Y, L RE %UMAS MOLECULAR TOXICOLOGY OF CHROMATIN AFOSR-89-0231 PE - 61102F AUT PR - 2312 TA - A5 Dr Ernest Kun...Waterbury, CT), 2-mercaptoethanol, NAD+, NADPH, nucleo- tides, sodium tungstate , hydrogen peroxide, Tris and MES buffers from Sigma (St. Louis, MO...ml) with sodium tungstate (5.93 g, in 20 ml H20) for 1.5 h followed by extraction of the green product into ethyl acetate, washing with 0.1 N HCl, and

  4. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Barkal, Amira A.; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Gifford, David K.; Sherwood, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding. PMID:27031353

  5. Mapping chromatin modifications in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Shuang Fang; Karpusenko, Alena; Riehn, Robert

    2013-03-01

    DNA and chromatin are elongated to a fixed fraction of their contour length when introduced into quasi-1d nanochannels. Because single molecules are analyzed, their hold great potential for the analysis for the genetic analysis of material from single cells. In this study, we have reconstituted chromatin with histones from a variety of sources, and mapped the modification profile of the chromatin. We monitored methylation and acetylation patterns of the histone tail protein residues using fluorescently labelled antibodies. Using those, we distinguished chromatin reconstituted from chicken erythrocytes, calf thymus, and HeLa cells. We discuss prospects for profiling histone modifications for whole chromosomes from single cells.

  6. Chromatin structure in barley nuclei.

    PubMed

    Mithieux, G; Roux, B

    1983-10-03

    In order to study the chromatin structure of a higher plant we used a high-yield method, which allows one to obtain up to 10(9) nuclei/kg fresh barley leaves. Significant amounts of low-ionic-strength-soluble chromatin can be extracted from these nuclei. Physicochemical properties were examined and discussed. Electric birefringence allowed us to observe the same transition in electro-optical properties as has been observed for animal chromatin, and suggested the existence of a symetrical structure occurring for approximately six nucleosomes. Circular dichroism showed that barley oligonucleosomes exhibit a higher molar ellipticity at 282 nm than total soluble chromatin and than their animal counterparts.

  7. Light-induced metastable defects or light-induced metastable H atoms in a-Si:H films?

    SciTech Connect

    Godet, C.

    1997-07-01

    In hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films, the increase of the metastable defect density under high-intensity illumination is usually described by an empirical two-parameter stretched-exponential time dependence (characteristic time {tau}{sub SE} and dispersion parameter {beta}). In this study, a clearly different (one-parameter) analytic function is obtained from a microscopic model based on the formation of metastable H (MSH) atoms in a-Si:H films. Assuming that MSH atoms are the only mobile species, only three chemical reactions are significant: MSH are produced from doubly hydrogenated (SiH HSi) configurations and trapped either at broken bonds or Si-H bonds, corresponding respectively to light-induced annealing (LIA) and light-induced creation (LIC) of defects. Competition between trapping sites results in a saturation of N(t) at a steady-state value N{sub ss}. A one-parameter fit of this analytical function to experimental data is generally good, indicating that the use of a statistical distribution of trap energies is not necessary.

  8. Chromatin dynamics: interplay between remodeling enzymes and histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Swygert, Sarah G; Peterson, Craig L

    2014-08-01

    Chromatin dynamics play an essential role in regulating the accessibility of genomic DNA for a variety of nuclear processes, including gene transcription and DNA repair. The posttranslational modification of the core histones and the action of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes represent two primary mechanisms by which chromatin dynamics are controlled and linked to nuclear events. Although there are examples in which a histone modification or a remodeling enzyme may be sufficient to drive a chromatin transition, these mechanisms typically work in concert to integrate regulatory inputs, leading to a coordinated alteration in chromatin structure and function. Indeed, site-specific histone modifications can facilitate the recruitment of chromatin remodeling enzymes to particular genomic regions, or they can regulate the efficiency or the outcome of a chromatin remodeling reaction. Conversely, chromatin remodeling enzymes can also influence, and sometimes directly modulate, the modification state of histones. These functional interactions are generally complex, frequently transient, and often require the association of myriad additional factors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Molecular mechanisms of histone modification function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Chromatin dynamics: Interplay between remodeling enzymes and histone modifications

    PubMed Central

    Swygert, Sarah G.; Peterson, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin dynamics play an essential role in regulating the accessibility of genomic DNA for a variety of nuclear processes, including gene transcription and DNA repair. The posttranslational modification of the core histones and the action of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes represent two primary mechanisms by which chromatin dynamics are controlled and linked to nuclear events. Although there are examples in which a histone modification or a remodeling enzyme may be sufficient to drive a chromatin transition, these mechanisms typically work in concert to integrate regulatory inputs, leading to a coordinated alteration in chromatin structure and function. Indeed, site-specific histone modifications can facilitate the recruitment of chromatin remodeling enzymes to particular genomic regions, or they can regulate the efficiency or the outcome of a chromatin remodeling reaction. Conversely, chromatin remodeling enzymes can also influence, and sometimes directly modulate, the modification state of histones. These functional interactions are generally complex, frequently transient, and often require the association of myriad additional factors. PMID:24583555

  10. Light-induced effects in liquid crystals: recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoni, F.; Lucchetti, L.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we outline that light-induced effects in liquid crystals are still able to provide scientific and technological novelty in spite of a long time investigation started more than thirty years ago. Here we review some recent achievements related to new phenomena that have been studied in the past few years. In the first part of our report we discuss optical trapping of nematic colloids whose origin relies on the elastic properties of liquid crystals rather than on the field gradient that is on the basis of conventional optical tweezing. In the second part we present some recent results obtained in studying the self-phase modulation in bent core nematic liquid crystals, pointing out a peculiar two regimes behavior.

  11. Light-induced performance increase of silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Eiji; De Wolf, Stefaan; Levrat, Jacques; Christmann, Gabriel; Descoeudres, Antoine; Nicolay, Sylvain; Despeisse, Matthieu; Watabe, Yoshimi; Ballif, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Silicon heterojunction solar cells consist of crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers coated with doped/intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) bilayers for passivating-contact formation. Here, we unambiguously demonstrate that carrier injection either due to light soaking or (dark) forward-voltage bias increases the open circuit voltage and fill factor of finished cells, leading to a conversion efficiency gain of up to 0.3% absolute. This phenomenon contrasts markedly with the light-induced degradation known for thin-film a-Si:H solar cells. We associate our performance gain with an increase in surface passivation, which we find is specific to doped a-Si:H/c-Si structures. Our experiments suggest that this improvement originates from a reduced density of recombination-active interface states. To understand the time dependence of the observed phenomena, a kinetic model is presented.

  12. Light-induced binding of metal nanoparticles via surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. L.; Zheng, M. J.; Yu, K. W.

    2010-03-01

    Recently, nanomachines based on the interaction of nanosize objects with nanostructrued surfaces have attracted much attention. In this work, we study theoretically the light-induced binding forces between a metallic nanosphere and a planar structure, and also between nanoparticles in a diatomic plamonic chain of shelled and unshelled metallic nanoparticles placed alternatively. These forces are calculated by Bergman-Milton spectral representation and multiple image methods within the long wavelength limit. When we tune the incident frequency to the surface plasmon resonant frequency, a stable local minimum in the potential energy is found. It signifies a binding between nanoparticles (nanostructures), which indicates a possible stable structure of the metallic clusters. Such binding is caused by the excitation of collective plasmon modes, which depends on the interparticle distances. This study has potential applications in plasmonic waveguides and colloidal metallic clusters on the nanoscales.

  13. Light-induced suppression of endogenous circadian amplitude in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, Megan; Czeisler, Charles A.; Kronauer, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A recent demonstration that the phase of the human circadian pacemaker could be inverted using an unconventional three-cycle stimulus has led to an investigation of whether critically timed exposure to a more moderate stimulus could drive that oscillator toward its singularity, a phaseless position at which the amplitude of circadian oscillation is zero. It is reported here that exposure of humans to fewer cycles of bright light, centered around the time at which the human circadian pacemaker is most sensitive to light-induced phase shifts, can markedly attenuate endogenous cicadian amplitude. In some cases this results in an apparent loss of rhythmicity, as expected to occur in the region of singularity.

  14. Light-induced metastability in pure and hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Queen, D. R.; Liu, X.; Karel, J.; Wang, Q.; Crandall, R. S.; Metcalf, T. H.; Hellman, F.

    2015-10-01

    Light soaking is found to increase the specific heat C and internal friction Q-1 of pure (a-Si) and hydrogenated (a-Si:H) amorphous silicon. At the lowest temperatures, the increases in C and Q-1 are consistent with an increased density of two-level systems (TLS). The light-induced increase in C persists to room temperature. Neither the sound velocity nor shear modulus change with light soaking indicating that the Debye specific heat is unchanged which suggests that light soaking creates localized vibrational modes in addition to TLS. The increase can be reversibly added and removed by light soaking and annealing, respectively, suggesting that it is related to the Staebler-Wronski effect (SWE), even in a-Si without H, and involves a reversible nanoscale structural rearrangement that is facilitated by, but does not require, H to occur.

  15. Functional analysis of chloroplast early light inducible proteins (ELIPs)

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, Carolyn M

    2005-02-22

    The objectives of this project were to characterize gene expression patterns of early light inducible protein (ELIP) genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Lycopersicon esculentum, to identify knock mutants of the 2 ELIP genes in Arabidopsis, and to characterize the effects of the knockouts. Expression in Arabidopsis was studied in response to thylakoid electron transport chain (PETC) capacity, where it was found that there is a signal for expression associated with reduction of the PETC. Expression in response to salt was also studied, with different responses of the two gene copies. Knockout lines for ELIP1 and ELIP2 have been identified and are being characterized. In tomato, it was found that the single-copy ELIP gene is highly expressed in ripening fruit during the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition. Studies of expression in tomato ripening mutants are ongoing.

  16. Light-induced suppression of endogenous circadian amplitude in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, Megan; Czeisler, Charles A.; Kronauer, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A recent demonstration that the phase of the human circadian pacemaker could be inverted using an unconventional three-cycle stimulus has led to an investigation of whether critically timed exposure to a more moderate stimulus could drive that oscillator toward its singularity, a phaseless position at which the amplitude of circadian oscillation is zero. It is reported here that exposure of humans to fewer cycles of bright light, centered around the time at which the human circadian pacemaker is most sensitive to light-induced phase shifts, can markedly attenuate endogenous cicadian amplitude. In some cases this results in an apparent loss of rhythmicity, as expected to occur in the region of singularity.

  17. Polymer-Fullerene Network Formation via Light-Induced Crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Yuuki; Hiltebrandt, Kai; Blasco, Eva; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2016-09-01

    A facile and efficient methodology for the formation of polymer-fullerene networks via a light-induced reaction is reported. The photochemical crosslinking is based on a nitrile imine-mediated tetrazole-ene cycloaddition reaction, which proceeds catalyst-free under UV-light irradiation (λmax = 320 nm) at ambient temperature. A tetrazole-functionalized polymer (Mn = 6500 g mol(-1) , Ð = 1.3) and fullerene C60 are employed for the formation of the hybrid networks. The tetrazole-functionalized polymer as well as the fullerene-containing networks are carefully characterized by NMR spectrometry, size exclusion chromatography, infrared spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. Furthermore, thermal analysis of the fullerene networks and their precursors is carried out. The current contribution thus induces an efficient platform technology for fullerene-based network formation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Light-induced spin polarizations in quantum rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joibari, Fateme K.; Blanter, Ya. M.; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2014-10-01

    Nonresonant circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation can exert torques on magnetizations by the inverse Faraday effect (IFE). Here, we discuss the enhancement of IFE by spin-orbit interactions. We illustrate the principle by studying a simple generic model system, i.e., the quasi-one-dimensional ring in the presence of linear/cubic Rashba and Dresselhaus interactions. We combine the classical IFE in electron plasmas that is known to cause persistent currents in the plane perpendicular to the direction of the propagation of light with the concept of current and spin-orbit-induced spin transfer torques. We calculate light-induced spin polarization that in ferromagnets might give rise to magnetization switching.

  19. Light-induced potentials ignite dissociation of N22+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffee, Ryan N.; Fang, Li; Gibson, George N.

    2006-04-01

    Direct ionization to dissociative potential curves is the dominant explanation for intense-field dissociative ionization of N2 . In this article we contradict this notion by showing that the dissociation of N22+ adiabatically follows the avoided crossing formed by the ∣XΠu3,n⟩ and ∣DΠg3,n-1⟩ dressed curves. Dissociation along this light-induced molecular potential implies that one photon is absorbed and adds to the kinetic release of the fragments. We compare the fragmentation energies for three different laser wavelengths and find that nitrogen shows photon absorption whereas iodine does not. From this we conclude that one must account for the absorbed photon when interpreting the time-of-flight spectra for molecules with appreciable nuclear motion during the laser pulse. In nitrogen, doing so allows us to identify enhanced ionization of the dication at 2.2Å independent of laser wavelength.

  20. Light-induced structural changes in a monomeric bacteriophytochrome

    PubMed Central

    Takala, Heikki; Niebling, Stephan; Berntsson, Oskar; Björling, Alexander; Lehtivuori, Heli; Häkkänen, Heikki; Panman, Matthijs; Gustavsson, Emil; Hoernke, Maria; Newby, Gemma; Zontone, Federico; Wulff, Michael; Menzel, Andreas; Ihalainen, Janne A.; Westenhoff, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Phytochromes sense red light in plants and various microorganism. Light absorption causes structural changes within the protein, which alter its biochemical activity. Bacterial phytochromes are dimeric proteins, but the functional relevance of this arrangement remains unclear. Here, we use time-resolved X-ray scattering to reveal the solution structural change of a monomeric variant of the photosensory core module of the phytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans. The data reveal two motions, a bend and a twist of the PHY domain with respect to the chromophore-binding domains. Infrared spectroscopy shows the refolding of the PHY tongue. We conclude that a monomer of the phytochrome photosensory core is sufficient to perform the light-induced structural changes. This implies that allosteric cooperation with the other monomer is not needed for structural activation. The dimeric arrangement may instead be intrinsic to the biochemical output domains of bacterial phytochromes. PMID:27679804

  1. Light-Induced Degradation of Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelmann, F. U.; Weicht, J. A.; Behrens, G.

    2016-02-01

    Silicon-wafer based solar cells are still domination the market for photovoltaic energy conversion. However, most of the silicon is used only for mechanical stability, while only a small percentage of the material is needed for the light absorption. Thin film silicon technology reduces the material demand to just some hundred nanometer thickness. But even in a tandem stack (amorphous and microcrystalline silicon) the efficiencies are lower, and light-induced degradation is an important issue. The established standard tests for characterisation are not precise enough to predict the performance of thin film silicon solar cells under real conditions, since many factors do have an influence on the degradation. We will show some results of laboratory and outdoor measurements that we are going to use as a base for advanced modelling and simulation methods.

  2. Light-induced degradation of storage starch in turions of Spirodela polyrhiza depends on nitrate.

    PubMed

    Appenroth, Klaus-J; Ziegler, Paul

    2008-10-01

    Light induces both the germination of turions of the duckweed Spirodela polyrhiza and the degradation of the reserve starch stored in the turions. The germination photoresponse requires nitrate, and we show here that nitrate is also needed for the light-induced degradation of the turion starch. Ammonium cannot substitute for nitrate in this regard, and nitrate thus acts specifically as signal to promote starch degradation in the turions. Irradiation with continuous red light leads to starch degradation via auto-phosphorylation of starch-associated glucan, water dikinase (GWD), phosphorylation of the turion starch and enhanced binding of alpha-amylase to starch granules. The present study shows that all of these processes require the presence of nitrate, and that nitrate exerts its effect on starch degradation at a point between the absorption of light by phytochrome and the auto-phosphorylation of the GWD. Nitrate acts to coordinate carbon and nitrogen metabolism in germinating turions: starch will only be broken down when sufficient nitrogen is present to ensure appropriate utilization of the released carbohydrate. These data constitute the first report of control over the initiation of reserve starch degradation by nitrate.

  3. Kinetics of light-induced ordering and deformation in LC azobenzene-containing materials.

    PubMed

    Toshchevikov, Vladimir; Petrova, Tatiana; Saphiannikova, Marina

    2017-04-12

    Azobenzene-containing smart materials are able to transform the energy of light into directional mechanical stress. We develop a theory of time-dependent light-induced ordering and deformation in azobenzene materials starting from the kinetic equations of photoisomerization. The liquid crystalline (LC) interactions between rod-like trans-isomers are taken into account. Angular selectivity of the photoisomerization known as an "angular hole burning" or the Weigert effect leads to the light-induced ordering and deformation of the azobenzene materials. The time evolution of ordering and deformation is found as a function of intensity of light depending on the opto-mechanical characteristics of the materials, such as probabilities of the optical excitation of trans- and cis-isomers, angular jump during the single isomerization event, viscosity of the materials, strength of the LC interactions in both the isotropic and LC materials, and the angular distribution of chromophores in polymer chains. Established structural-property relationships are in agreement with a number of experiments and can be used for the construction of light-controllable smart materials for practical applications.

  4. Pressure- and light-induced luminescence of several aldehydes dissolved in polymer matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Dreger, Z.A.; Lang, J.M.; Drickamer, H.G.

    1996-03-14

    The pressure- and light-induced emissions of four aldehydes - benzaldehyde (BA), 4-(dimethylamino)-benzaldehyde (DMABA), 4-(dibutylamino)-benzaldehyde (DBABA), and 4-(dimethylamino)-1-naphthaldehyde (DMANA) - dissolved in solid polymers have been investigated. All compounds studied exhibit under pressure as well as under continuous irradiation a significant enhancement of the luminescence emission. In the case of substituted aldehydes, both the fluorescence and phosphorescence increase markedly when pressure increases. For BA only increasing phosphorescence is observed. These changes are explained in terms of a model which takes a mixing of the lowest triplet state character as a controlling factor of the pressure effect. Thus, the pressure-induced emission arises from a decrease of the n,{pi}{sup *} character of the lowest triplet state and as a result an increase of its radiative rate and decrease of the intersystem crossing. The lowest triplet state is also assumed to be a precursor for the light-induced effect. In this case, the emission is proposed to occur as a result of the triplet reactivity and consequently the creation of a light-emitting species. 17 refs., 20 figs.

  5. Dynamic chromatin regulation at Notch target genes

    PubMed Central

    Giaimo, Benedetto Daniele; Oswald, Franz; Borggrefe, Tilman

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT RBPJ is the central transcription factor that controls the Notch-dependent transcriptional response by coordinating repressing histone H3K27 deacetylation and activating histone H3K4 methylation. Here, we discuss the molecular mechanisms how RBPJ interacts with opposing NCoR/HDAC-corepressing or KMT2D/UTX-coactivating complexes and how this is controlled by phosphorylation of chromatin modifiers. PMID:28027012

  6. A circulating ghrelin mimetic attenuates light-induced phase delay of mice and light-induced Fos expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of rats.

    PubMed

    Yi, Chun-Xia; Challet, Etienne; Pévet, Paul; Kalsbeek, Andries; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M

    2008-04-01

    Anatomical evidence suggests that the ventromedial arcuate nucleus (vmARC) is a route for circulating hormonal communications to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Whether this vmARC-SCN connection is involved in the modulation of circadian activity of the SCN is not yet known. We recently demonstrated, in rats, that intravenous (i.v.) injection of a ghrelin mimetic, GHRP-6, during the daytime activated neurons in the vmARC and reduced the normal endogenous daytime Fos expression in the SCN. In the present study we show that i.v. administration of GHRP-6 decreases light-induced Fos expression at ZT13 in the rat SCN by 50%, indicating that light-induced changes in the SCN Fos expression can also be reduced by GHRP-6. Because it is difficult to study light-induced phase changes in rats, we examined the functional effects of GHRP-6 on light-induced phase shifts in mice and demonstrated that peripherally injected GHRP-6 attenuates light-induced phase delays at ZT13 by 45%. However, light-induced Fos expression in the mice SCN was not blocked by GHRP-6. These results illustrate that acute stimulation of the ghrelinergic system may modulate SCN activity, but that its effect on light-induced phase shifts and Fos expression in the SCN might be species related.

  7. FANCD2-Controlled Chromatin Access of the Fanconi-Associated Nuclease FAN1 Is Crucial for the Recovery of Stalled Replication Forks

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Indrajit; Stroik, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by cellular hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Within the FA pathway, an upstream core complex monoubiquitinates and recruits the FANCD2 protein to ICLs on chromatin. Ensuing DNA repair involves the Fanconi-associated nuclease 1 (FAN1), which interacts selectively with monoubiquitinated FANCD2 (FANCD2Ub) at ICLs. Importantly, FANCD2 has additional independent functions: it binds chromatin and coordinates the restart of aphidicolin (APH)-stalled replication forks in concert with the BLM helicase, while protecting forks from nucleolytic degradation by MRE11. We identified FAN1 as a new crucial replication fork recovery factor. FAN1 joins the BLM-FANCD2 complex following APH-mediated fork stalling in a manner dependent on MRE11 and FANCD2, followed by FAN1 nuclease-mediated fork restart. Surprisingly, APH-induced activation and chromatin recruitment of FAN1 occur independently of the FA core complex or the FAN1 UBZ domain, indicating that the FANCD2Ub isoform is dispensable for functional FANCD2-FAN1 cross talk during stalled fork recovery. In the absence of FANCD2, MRE11 exonuclease-promoted access of FAN1 to stalled forks results in severe FAN1-mediated nucleolytic degradation of nascent DNA strands. Thus, FAN1 nuclease activity at stalled replication forks requires tight regulation: too little inhibits fork restart, whereas too much causes fork degradation. PMID:25135477

  8. FANCD2-controlled chromatin access of the Fanconi-associated nuclease FAN1 is crucial for the recovery of stalled replication forks.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Indrajit; Stroik, Daniel R; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2014-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by cellular hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Within the FA pathway, an upstream core complex monoubiquitinates and recruits the FANCD2 protein to ICLs on chromatin. Ensuing DNA repair involves the Fanconi-associated nuclease 1 (FAN1), which interacts selectively with monoubiquitinated FANCD2 (FANCD2(Ub)) at ICLs. Importantly, FANCD2 has additional independent functions: it binds chromatin and coordinates the restart of aphidicolin (APH)-stalled replication forks in concert with the BLM helicase, while protecting forks from nucleolytic degradation by MRE11. We identified FAN1 as a new crucial replication fork recovery factor. FAN1 joins the BLM-FANCD2 complex following APH-mediated fork stalling in a manner dependent on MRE11 and FANCD2, followed by FAN1 nuclease-mediated fork restart. Surprisingly, APH-induced activation and chromatin recruitment of FAN1 occur independently of the FA core complex or the FAN1 UBZ domain, indicating that the FANCD2(Ub) isoform is dispensable for functional FANCD2-FAN1 cross talk during stalled fork recovery. In the absence of FANCD2, MRE11 exonuclease-promoted access of FAN1 to stalled forks results in severe FAN1-mediated nucleolytic degradation of nascent DNA strands. Thus, FAN1 nuclease activity at stalled replication forks requires tight regulation: too little inhibits fork restart, whereas too much causes fork degradation.

  9. Chromatin condensation during terminal erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baobing; Yang, Jing; Ji, Peng

    2016-09-02

    Mammalian terminal erythropoiesis involves gradual but dramatic chromatin condensation steps that are essential for cell differentiation. Chromatin and nuclear condensation is followed by a unique enucleation process, which is believed to liberate more spaces for hemoglobin enrichment and enable the generation of a physically flexible mature red blood cell. Although these processes have been known for decades, the mechanisms are still unclear. Our recent study reveals an unexpected nuclear opening formation during mouse terminal erythropoiesis that requires caspase-3 activity. Major histones, except H2AZ, are partially released from the opening, which is important for chromatin condensation. Block of the nuclear opening through caspase inhibitor or knockdown of caspase-3 inhibits chromatin condensation and enucleation. We also demonstrate that nuclear opening and histone release are cell cycle regulated. These studies reveal a novel mechanism for chromatin condensation in mammalia terminal erythropoiesis.

  10. Theory of light-induced drift. III. Models of surface and bulk light-induced drift in one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Frank O.

    2003-01-01

    Light-induced drift (LID) of a rarefied gas in a cell is studied, and exact analytical closed-form solutions to the model rate equations, which model the gas motion in one dimension, are obtained for cases of both surface LID (SLID) and bulk LID (BLID); the special case of the limit of low radiation absorption by the gas is given particular attention. Similarities and differences among the results for SLID and BLID are discussed. This is part III of a series of papers, parts I and II having studied LID, but concentrating on SLID, with flat-plate and circular-cylindrical cell geometries, respectively [F. O. Goodman, Phys. Rev. A 65, 064309 (2002); 65, 064310 (2002)].

  11. Light-induced refractive index changes in singlemode channel waveguides in KTiOPO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruske, J.-P.; Rottschalk, M.; Steinberg, S.

    1995-02-01

    Light-induced changes of the effective refractive index in Rb ↔ K ion-exchanged singlemode channel waveguides in KTiOPO 4 have been investigated in the visible wavelength region dependent on time, guided optical mode intensity and temperature. A hypothesis for the explanation of the light-induced effects is suggested. Thermooptic and pyroelectric effects are discussed. The light-induced refractive index changes do not restrict the function of integrated-optic components in the visible.

  12. CCSI: a database providing chromatin-chromatin spatial interaction information.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaowei; Ma, Wenbin; Songyang, Zhou; Luo, Zhenhua; Huang, Junfeng; Dai, Zhiming; Xiong, Yuanyan

    2016-01-01

    Distal regulatory elements have been shown to regulate gene transcription through spatial interactions, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are linked with distal gene expression by spatial proximity, which helps to explain the causal role of disease-associated SNPs in non-coding region. Therefore, studies on spatial interactions between chromatin have created a new avenue for elucidating the mechanism of transcriptional regulation in disease pathogenesis. Recently, a growing number of chromatin interactions have been revealed by means of 3C, 4C, 5C, ChIA-PET and Hi-C technologies. To interpret and utilize these interactions, we constructed chromatin-chromatin spatial interaction (CCSI) database by integrating and annotating 91 sets of chromatin interaction data derived from published literature, UCSC database and NCBI GEO database, resulting in a total of 3,017,962 pairwise interactions (false discovery rate < 0.05), covering human, mouse and yeast. A web interface has been designed to provide access to the chromatin interactions. The main features of CCSI are (i) showing chromatin interactions and corresponding genes, enhancers and SNPs within the regions in the search page; (ii) offering complete interaction datasets, enhancer and SNP information in the download page; and (iii) providing analysis pipeline for the annotation of interaction data. In conclusion, CCSI will facilitate exploring transcriptional regulatory mechanism in disease pathogenesis associated with spatial interactions among genes, regulatory regions and SNPs. Database URL: http://songyanglab.sysu.edu.cn/ccsi.

  13. Oxygen and hydrogen peroxide enhance light-induced carotenoid synthesis in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Iigusa, Hideo; Yoshida, Yusuke; Hasunuma, Kohji

    2005-07-18

    Previously, we found that intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) affect photomorphogenesis in Neurospora crassa. In this study, we investigated the physiological roles of ROS in the response to light and found that the exposure of mycelia to air was important for the light-induced carotenogenesis. Mycelia treated with a high concentration of O(2) gas and H(2)O(2) to release ROS showed an enhancement of light-induced carotenoid accumulation and the expression of gene related to light-inducible carotenogenesis. These results suggested that stimuli caused by the exposure of the mycelia to air containing O(2) gas triggered the light-induced carotenoid synthesis.

  14. Quantitative investigation of light induced defects in glassy Se90Ag10 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anjani; Kumar, D.; Dwivedi, Prabhat K.; Kumar, A.

    2016-05-01

    An attempt is made to investigate light induced defects (LID) in amorphous chalcogenide Se90Ag10 thin films prepared by vacuum evaporation technique. For the determination of light induced defects quantitatively, space charge limited current (SCLC) measurements have been made in a vacuum ~ 10-3 Torr before and after exposing amorphous films to white light for different exposure times (0 to 6 hours). Results indicate that light induced defects are created due to prolonged exposure of light which is explained by a microscopic model for light induced defects creation proposed by Shimakawa and co-workers.

  15. [Study of blue light induced DNA damage of retinal pigment epithelium(RPE) cells and the protection of vitamin C].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian Wei; Ren, Guo Liang; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Zhu, Xi; Lin, Hai Yan; Zhou, Ji Lin

    2003-10-01

    To evaluate protection of vitamin C on blue light-induced DNA damage of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. The cultured RPE cells were divided into 3 groups: Control group (no blue light exposure), blue light exposure group (blue light exposure for 20 minutes) and blue light exposure + vitamin C group (blue light exposure + 100 mumol/L vitamin C). Travigen's comet assay kit and Euclid comet assay software were used to assay the DNA damage levels. The DNA percentage in the tail of electrophoretogram in the three groups were 18.44%, 54.42% and 32.43% respectively (p < 0.01). Tail moments were 8.2, 48.3, and 18.4 respectively (p < 0.01). Blue light could induce DNA damage to RPE cells but vitamin C could protect the RPE cells from the blue light-induced DNA damage.

  16. Structure of chromatin in spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Björndahl, Lars; Kvist, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    The specialized structure of the sperm chromatin has a dual function - first to protect the DNA from damage during storage and transport to the oocyte, and then to enable a rapid and complete unpacking of the undamaged paternal genome in the ooplasm. It is evident that zinc has a pivotal role in maintaining the structural stability and in enabling a rapid decondensation at the appropriate time. It is important for the sperm chromatin structure that the spermatozoa are ejaculated together with the zinc-rich prostatic secretion. Early exposure to zinc-binding seminal vesicular fluid can deplete the sperm chromatin of zinc and most likely induce surplus formation of disulfide bridges, likely to cause incomplete and delayed decondensation of the sperm chromatin in the oocyte. A premature decrease in sperm chromatin structure stability is likely to increase the risk for damage to the DNA due to increased access to the genome for DNA damaging compounds. The status of the sperm chromatin structure can vary in vitro depending on the exposure to zinc-depleting conditions when spermatozoa are stored in semen after ejaculation. When sperm DNA damage tests are evaluated and validated, it is therefore essential to also take into account the dynamics of zinc-dependent and zinc-independent sperm chromatin stability.

  17. Single Molecule Studies of Chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, C; Colvin, M E; Thelen, M P; Noy, A

    2004-01-06

    The DNA in eukaryotic cells is tightly packaged as chromatin through interactions with histone proteins to form nucleosomes. These nucleosomes are themselves packed together through interactions with linker histone and non-histone proteins. In order for processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcription to occur, the chromatin fiber must be remodeled such that the necessary enzymes can access the DNA. The structure of the chromatin fiber beyond the level of the single nucleosome and the structural changes which accompany the remodeling process are poorly understood. We are studying the structures and forces behind the remodeling process through the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). This allows both high-resolution imaging of the chromatin, and manipulation of individual fibers. Pulling a single chromatin fiber apart using the AFM tip yields information on the forces which hold the structure together. We have isolated chromatin fibers from chicken erythrocytes and Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. AFM images of these fibers will be presented, along with preliminary data from the manipulation of these fibers using the AFM tip. The implications of these data for the structure of chromatin undergoing the remodeling process are discussed.

  18. An Intronic Locus Control Region Plays an Essential Role in the Establishment of an Autonomous Hepatic Chromatin Domain for the Human Vitamin D-Binding Protein Gene▿

    PubMed Central

    Hiroki, Tomoko; Liebhaber, Stephen A.; Cooke, Nancy E.

    2007-01-01

    The human vitamin D-binding protein (hDBP) gene exists in a cluster of four liver-expressed genes. A minimal hDBP transgene, containing a defined set of liver-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites (HSs), is robustly expressed in mouse liver in a copy-number-dependent manner. Here we evaluate these HSs for function. Deletion of HSI, located 5′ to the promoter (kb −2.1) had no significant effect on hDBP expression. In contrast, deletion of HSIV and HSV from intron 1 repressed hDBP expression and eliminated copy number dependency without a loss of liver specificity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed peaks of histone H3 and H4 acetylation coincident with HSIV in the intact hDBP locus. This region contains a conserved array of binding sites for the liver-enriched transcription factor C/EBP. In vitro studies revealed selective binding of C/EBPα to HSIV. In vivo occupancy of C/EBPα at HSIV was demonstrated in hepatic chromatin, and depletion of C/EBPα in a hepatic cell line decreased hDBP expression. A nonredundant role for C/EBPα was confirmed in vivo by demonstrating a reduction of hDBP expression in C/EBPα-null mice. Parallel studies revealed in vivo occupancy of the liver-enriched factor HNF1α at HSIII (at kb 0.13) within the hDBP promoter. These data demonstrate a critical role for elements within intron 1 in the establishment of an autonomous and productive hDBP chromatin locus and suggest that this function is dependent upon C/EBPα. Cooperative interactions between these intronic complexes and liver-restricted complexes within the target promoter are likely to underlie the consistency and liver specificity of the hDBP activation. PMID:17785430

  19. Near-infrared light protect the photoreceptor from light-induced damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chao; Cao, Wei; Fan, Yingchuan; Lin, Ying

    2010-01-01

    A project originally developed for NASA plant growth experiments in space demonstrating the Light-Emitting Diode (LED) could promote the wound healing. Further study showed that the LED's could protect cells by stimulating the basic energy processes in the mitochondria of each cell. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of 670 nm LED to protect the photoreceptor from the light-induced damage in a rodent model. SD rats were randomly assigned to one of eight groups: untreated control group, the LED-treated control group, three light-induced damage groups, and three LED-protected groups. The rats were exposed to constant light for 3 h of different illuminations of 900, 1,800 and 2,700 lux, respectively. The LED treatment (50 mW) were done for 30 min, 3 h before the light damage and 0, 24 and 48 h after the light damage. Using the electroretinogram as a sensitive indicator of retinal function, and the histopathologic change was showed as a proof of the protective effect of LED treatment. The 900 lux illumination for 3 h did not cause damage to the retina of rats, however, the 1,800 lux illumination for 3 h caused significant damage to ONL of an approximate half retina, which caused the swing of ERG b wave to be 431 muV. With the LED protection: the damage of ONL was near 1/6 of retina, which was significantly reduced than the ones without LED protection (P < 0.01); and the swing of ERG b wave was recorded to be 1,011 muV, which was increased significantly than the ones without LED protection (P < 0.01). The illumination of 2,700 lux for 3 h caused severe damage to the rats' retinas and the LED could not protect them significantly in both of morphology and function (P > 0.05, P > 0.05). 670 nm LED treatment has an evident protective effect on retinal cells against light-induced damage, which may be an innovative and non-invasive therapeutic approach to prevent or to delay age-related macular degeneration.

  20. Mesoscale Modeling of Chromatin Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlick, Tamar

    2009-03-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is the fundamental protein/nucleic acid unit that stores the genetic material. Understanding how chromatin fibers fold and unfold in physiological conditions is important for interpreting fundamental biological processes like DNA replication and transcription regulation. Using a mesoscopic model of oligonucleosome chains and tailored sampling protocols, we elucidate the energetics of oligonucleosome folding/unfolding and the role of each histone tail, linker histones, and divalent ions in regulating chromatin structure. The resulting compact topologies reconcile features of the zigzag model with straight linker DNAs with the solenoid model with bent linker DNAs for optimal fiber organization and reveal dynamic and energetic aspects involved.

  1. Persistent Chromatin Modifications Induced by High Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Leung, Amy; Trac, Candi; Du, Juan; Natarajan, Rama; Schones, Dustin E

    2016-05-13

    Obesity is a highly heritable complex disease that results from the interaction of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Formerly obese individuals are susceptible to metabolic disorders later in life, even after lifestyle changes are made to mitigate the obese state. This is reminiscent of the metabolic memory phenomenon originally observed for persistent complications in diabetic patients, despite subsequent glycemic control. Epigenetic modifications represent a potential mediator of this observed memory. We previously demonstrated that a high fat diet leads to changes in chromatin accessibility in the mouse liver. The regions of greatest chromatin changes in accessibility are largely strain-dependent, indicating a genetic component in diet-induced chromatin alterations. We have now examined the persistence of diet-induced chromatin accessibility changes upon diet reversal in two strains of mice. We find that a substantial fraction of loci that undergo chromatin accessibility changes with a high fat diet remains in the remodeled state after diet reversal in C57BL/6J mice. In contrast, the vast majority of diet-induced chromatin accessibility changes in A/J mice are transient. Our data also indicate that the persistent chromatin accessibility changes observed in C57BL/6J mice are associated with specific transcription factors and histone post-translational modifications. The persistent loci identified here are likely to be contributing to the overall phenotype and are attractive targets for therapeutic intervention.

  2. Light-induced currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing bovine rhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, B E; Khorana, H G; Nasi, E

    1993-01-01

    1. We have investigated the functioning of bovine rod opsin, which is efficiently synthesized from RNA made by in vitro transcription, following injection into Xenopus oocytes. We found that oocytes expressing the gene for opsin exhibit light-dependent ionic currents only after pigment generation by incubation with 11-cis-retinal. These currents are similar to the endogenous muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) response of oocytes, but their amplitude is substantially smaller. 2. In order to optimize the conditions for obtaining light-induced currents in RNA-injected oocytes, the native ACh response was examined under several conditions. It was found that elevated external calcium markedly enhances the muscarinic response and that these currents have a non-linear dependence on membrane voltage, increasing substantially with depolarization. 3. Using the optimal conditions for evoking the largest ACh responses, (28 mM [Ca2+]o, 0 mV, omission of serum and Hepes from the media), the light-evoked currents obtained in RNA-injected oocytes were remarkably enhanced, and responses to multiple light stimuli could be obtained. 4. The light response appeared to desensitize, even after long periods of recovery and pigment regeneration. By contrast, the ACh responses continued to appear normal. These results suggest that desensitization of photoresponses expressed in Xenopus oocytes involve changes at early stages of the pathway, resulting in a reduced ability of rhodopsin to couple to the endogenous signalling system. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7692039

  3. Influence of sugars on blue light-induced chloroplast relocations.

    PubMed

    Banaś, Agnieszka Katarzyna; Gabryś, Halina

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sugars on blue light-induced chloroplast movements. Sucrose and glucose inhibited chloroplast responses in the detached leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana and in Lemna trisulca fronds in a concentration and time-dependent manner. The prolonged exposure necessary for inhibition indicates that sugars may act via altered gene expression. Overexpression of phototropin2, a photoreceptor responsible for the strong blue light response of chloroplasts, counteracted the sugar effect. This may suggest that sugars modify some component(s) of the phototropin2-mediated signal transduction pathway. The expression of PHOT2 was not suppressed by sugars in wild type plants, it was even upregulated by glucose. Impaired chloroplast movements were observed only in mature Arabidopsis plants. The mRNA of SAG12, a late senescence marker, was not detectable in the sugar-incubated leaves. The SAG13 mRNA level and its regulation by sugars were similar in wild type and PHOT2 overexpressor. Thus, the sugar insensitivity of 35S:PHOT2 chloroplast responses was not due to delayed senescence. The sugar-induced transduction pathway involved remains unclear. 3-O-methylglucose did not affect chloroplast movements suggesting the participation of a hexokinase-dependent pathway. Only the amplitude of avoidance response was reduced in gin2-1, a hexokinase1 null mutant. Probably other hexokinases, or glycolysis-associated signals play a role in the suppression of chloroplast responses.

  4. Diagnosis of dental caries using quantitative light-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaechi, Bennett T.; Higham, Susan M.

    2001-10-01

    Current dental diagnostic methods can detect caries but cannot quantify the mineral status of the lesion. Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence (QLF) measures the percentage fluorescence radiance change of demineralised enamel with respect to surround sound enamel, and related it directly to the amount of mineral lost during demineralisation. Demineralisation of teeth to produce caries-like lesions and the subsequent remineralisation of the lesions were monitored quantitatively and longitudinally with QLF. The influence of factors such as presence of plaque or saliva, lesion staining, lesion magnification, tooth thickness and developmental hypomineralisation, on the reproducibility of QLF imaging and analysis were investigated, Results showed that the integrated fluorescence change (hence the mineral loss) increased linearly with demineralisation time and decreased with increasing remineralisation time. Caries detection was limited by saliva or plaque, but enhanced by staining. QLF could not discriminate between developmental hypomineralisation and caries. Neither the variation in tooth thickness nor lesion magnification within the limit of a sharp image made a significant difference in QLF analysis. It was concluded that QLF could detect and quantitatively monitor the mineral changes in an incipient caries on a longitudinal basis, however detection may be limited by the presence of saliva or plaque or enhanced by staining.

  5. A possible mechanism for visible-light-induced skin rejuvenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Leonardo; Lubart, Rachel; Friedman, Harry; Lavie, R.

    2004-09-01

    In recent years there has been intensive research in the field of non-ablative skin rejuvenation. This comes as a response to the desire for a simple method of treating rhytids caused by aging, UV exposure and acne scars. In numerous studies intense visible light pulsed systems (20-30J/cm2) are used. The mechanism of action was supposed to be a selective heat induced denaturalization of dermal collagen that leads to subsequent reactive synthesis. In this study we suggest a different mechanism for photorejuvenation based on light induced Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) formation. We irradiated collagen in-vitro with a broad band of visible light, 400-800 nm, 12-22J/cm2, and used the spin trapping coupled with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to detect ROS. In vivo, we used dose 30 J in average (35 for acnis scars, 25 for wrinkles and redness). Irradiated collagen results in hydroxyl and methyl radicals formation. We propose, as a new concept, that visible light at the intensity used for skin rejuvenation, 20-30J/cm2, produces high amounts of ROS which destroy old collagen fibers encouraging the formation of new ones. On the other hand at inner depths of the skin, where the light intensity is much weaker, low amounts of ROS are formed which are well known to stimulate fibroblast proliferation.

  6. Influence of Sugars on Blue Light-Induced Chloroplast Relocations

    PubMed Central

    Banaś, Agnieszka Katarzyna

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sugars on blue light-induced chloroplast movements. Sucrose and glucose inhibited chloroplast responses in the detached leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana and in Lemna trisulca fronds in a concentration and time-dependent manner. The prolonged exposure necessary for inhibition indicates that sugars may act via altered gene expression. Overexpression of phototropin2, a photoreceptor responsible for the strong blue light response of chloroplasts, counteracted the sugar effect. This may suggest that sugars modify some component(s) of the phototropin2-mediated signal transduction pathway. The expression of PHOT2 was not suppressed by sugars in wild type plants, it was even upregulated by glucose. Impaired chloroplast movements were observed only in mature Arabidopsis plants. The mRNA of SAG12, a late senescence marker, was not detectable in the sugar-incubated leaves. The SAG13 mRNA level and its regulation by sugars were similar in wild type and PHOT2 overexpressor. Thus, the sugar insensitivity of 35S:PHOT2 chloroplast responses was not due to delayed senescence. The sugar-induced transduction pathway involved remains unclear. 3-O-methylglucose did not affect chloroplast movements suggesting the participation of a hexokinase-dependent pathway. Only the amplitude of avoidance response was reduced in gin2-1, a hexokinase1 null mutant. Probably other hexokinases, or glycolysis-associated signals play a role in the suppression of chloroplast responses. PMID:19516992

  7. Chromatin fiber allostery and the epigenetic code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesne, Annick; Foray, Nicolas; Cathala, Guy; Forné, Thierry; Wong, Hua; Victor, Jean-Marc

    2015-02-01

    The notion of allostery introduced for proteins about fifty years ago has been extended since then to DNA allostery, where a locally triggered DNA structural transition remotely controls other DNA-binding events. We further extend this notion and propose that chromatin fiber allosteric transitions, induced by histone-tail covalent modifications, may play a key role in transcriptional regulation. We present an integrated scenario articulating allosteric mechanisms at different scales: allosteric transitions of the condensed chromatin fiber induced by histone-tail acetylation modify the mechanical constraints experienced by the embedded DNA, thus possibly controlling DNA-binding of allosteric transcription factors or further allosteric mechanisms at the linker DNA level. At a higher scale, different epigenetic constraints delineate different statistically dominant subsets of accessible chromatin fiber conformations, which each favors the assembly of dedicated regulatory complexes, as detailed on the emblematic example of the mouse Igf2-H19 gene locus and its parental imprinting. This physical view offers a mechanistic and spatially structured explanation of the observed correlation between transcriptional activity and histone modifications. The evolutionary origin of allosteric control supports to speak of an ‘epigenetic code’, by which events involved in transcriptional regulation are encoded in histone modifications in a context-dependent way.

  8. Ultrafast light-induced symmetry changes in single BaTiO3 nanowires

    DOE PAGES

    Kuo, Yi -Hong; Nah, Sanghee; He, Kai; ...

    2017-01-23

    The coupling of light to nanoscale ferroelectric materials enables novel means of controlling their coupled degrees of freedom and engineering new functionality. Here we present femtosecond time-resolution nonlinear-optical measurements of light-induced dynamics within single ferroelectric barium titanate nanowires. By analyzing the time-dependent and polarization-dependent second harmonic intensity generated by the nanowire, we identify its crystallographic orientation and then make use of this information in order to probe its dynamic structural response and change in symmetry. Here, we show that photo-excitation leads to ultrafast, non-uniform modulations in the second order nonlinear susceptibility tensor, indicative of changes in the local symmetry ofmore » the nanostructure occurring on sub-picosecond time-scales.« less

  9. Dynamics of the light-induced atomic desorption at homogeneous illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, S.; Taslakov, M.; Gateva, S.

    2017-03-01

    An experimental investigation of Light-Induced Atomic Desorption (LIAD) at homogeneous illumination in uncoated Rb glass cell is reported. The dynamics parameters of LIAD and their dependences on the illumination intensity in uncoated cell are measured and compared with these in paraffin-coated cell and the theoretical dependences for coated cell at homogeneous illumination. The homogeneous illumination not only increases the yield of LIAD, but increases the rates of desorption and adsorption. The results are interesting for the better understanding of the process of LIAD and the atom-surface interaction, for the development of new LIAD-loaded atomic devices, all-optical control of light, optical sensors miniaturization, and new methods for surface and coating diagnostics and nanostructuring.

  10. Light-induced switching of a chalcogenide-coated side-polished fiber device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Shu-Chen; Chang, Chih-Wei; Lin, Chia-Ming; Liu, Hua-an; Hsiao, Vincent K. S.; Yu, Jianhui; Chen, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we describe light-induced switching of the state of polarization of a side-polished fiber (SPF) coated with a chalcogenide (ChG) film, amorphous As2Se3 (a-As2Se3). The transient photodarkening effect produced by a-As2Se3 under 532-nm laser illumination modulated the refractive index of the coated ChG, changed the refractive index of the a-As2Se3-coated SPF device, and controlled and switched the phase retardation. When this design was used, a 70° phase change coupled with an optical loss of <0.2 dB was achieved at a probe-beam wavelength of 1550 nm; moreover, the extinction ratio achieved using an inline fiber polarizer was 22.8 dB.

  11. The Role of Various Regions of the Bean Hypocotyl on Red Light-induced Hook Opening.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, B

    1971-08-01

    Measurement of various zones on the concave half of etiolated Phaseolus vulgaris L. (cv. Black Valentine) hypocotyls has shown that growth at the basal portion of the elbow and the contiguous upper portion of the shank was stimulated earliest by red light. Growth of these two zones was unaffected by the tissue of the convex half but was inhibited by tissue distal to them. The inhibition was alleviated by the continuous presence of shank tissue below the growing zones. Based on cuts made halfway through the hypocotyl at positions above, below, or between the two zones of growth, it is suggested that cells at the inner portion of the upper shank control in some way the light-induced growth of the elbow cells directly above.

  12. Orthogonal light-induced self-assembly of nanoparticles using differently substituted azobenzenes.

    PubMed

    Manna, Debasish; Udayabhaskararao, Thumu; Zhao, Hui; Klajn, Rafal

    2015-10-12

    Precise control of the self-assembly of selected components within complex mixtures is a challenging goal whose realization is important for fabricating novel nanomaterials. Herein we show that by decorating the surfaces of metallic nanoparticles with differently substituted azobenzenes, it is possible to modulate the wavelength of light at which the self-assembly of these nanoparticles is induced. Exposing a mixture of two types of nanoparticles, each functionalized with a different azobenzene, to UV or blue light induces the selective self-assembly of only one type of nanoparticles. Irradiation with the other wavelength triggers the disassembly of the aggregates, and the simultaneous self-assembly of nanoparticles of the other type. By placing both types of azobenzenes on the same nanoparticles, we created unique materials ("frustrated" nanoparticles) whose self-assembly is induced irrespective of the wavelength of the incident light.

  13. Evidence for a distinct light-induced calcium-dependent potassium current in Hermissenda crassicornis.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, K T

    2000-01-01

    A model of phototransduction is developed as a first step toward a model for investigating the critical interaction of light and turbulence stimuli within the type B photoreceptor of Hermissenda crassicronis. The model includes equations describing phototransduction, release of calcium from intracellular stores, and other calcium regulatory mechanisms, as well as equations describing ligand-gating of a rhabdomeric sodium current. The model is used to determine the sources of calcium in the soma, whether calcium or IP3 is a plausible ligand of the light-induced sodium current, and whether the light-induced potassium current is equivalent to the calcium-dependent potassium current activated by light-induced calcium release. Simulations show that the early light-induced calcium elevation is due to influx through voltage-dependent channels, whereas the later calcium elevation is due to release from intracellular stores. Simulations suggest that the ligand of the fast, light-induced sodium current is IP3 but that there is a smaller, prolonged component of the light-induced sodium current that is activated by calcium. In the model, the calcium-dependent potassium current, located in the soma, is activated only slightly by light-induced calcium elevation, leading to the prediction that a calcium-dependent potassium current, active at resting potential, is located in the rhabdomere and is responsible for the light-induced potassium current.

  14. Unusual chromatin in human telomeres.

    PubMed Central

    Tommerup, H; Dousmanis, A; de Lange, T

    1994-01-01

    We report that human telomeres have an unusual chromatin structure characterized by diffuse micrococcal nuclease patterns. The altered chromatin manifested itself only in human telomeres that are relatively short (2 to 7 kb). In contrast, human and mouse telomeres with telomeric repeat arrays of 14 to 150 kb displayed a more canonical chromatin structure with extensive arrays of tightly packed nucleosomes. All telomeric nucleosomes showed a shorter repeat size than bulk nucleosomes, and telomeric mononucleosomal particles were found to be hypersensitive to micrococcal nuclease. However, telomeric nucleosomes were similar to bulk nucleosomes in the rate at which they sedimented through sucrose gradients. We speculate that mammalian telomeres have a bipartite structure with unusual chromatin near the telomere terminus and a more canonical nucleosomal organization in the proximal part of the telomere. Images PMID:8065312

  15. Light-Induced Changes of the Circadian Clock of Humans: Increasing Duration is More Effective than Increasing Light Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Karuna; Benloucif, Susan; Reid, Kathryn; Wolfe, Lisa F.; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the effect of increasing the intensity and/or duration of exposure on light-induced changes in the timing of the circadian clock of humans. Design: Multifactorial randomized controlled trial, between and within subject design Setting: General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) of an academic medical center Participants: 56 healthy young subjects (20-40 years of age) Interventions: Research subjects were admitted for 2 independent stays of 4 nights/3 days for treatment with bright or dim-light (randomized order) at a time known to induce phase delays in circadian timing. The intensity and duration of the bright light were determined by random assignment to one of 9 treatment conditions (duration of 1, 2, or 3 hours at 2000, 4000, or 8000 lux). Measurements and Results: Treatment-induced changes in the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) and dim light melatonin offset (DLMOff) were measured from blood samples collected every 20-30 min throughout baseline and post-treatment nights. Comparison by multi-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) of light-induced changes in the time of the circadian melatonin rhythm for the 9 conditions revealed that changing the duration of the light exposure from 1 to 3 h increased the magnitude of light-induced delays. In contrast, increasing from moderate (2,000 lux) to high (8,000 lux) intensity light did not alter the magnitude of phase delays of the circadian melatonin rhythm. Conclusions: Results from the present study suggest that for phototherapy of circadian rhythm sleep disorders in humans, a longer period of moderate intensity light may be more effective than a shorter exposure period of high intensity light. Citation: Dewan K; Benloucif S; Reid K; Wolfe LF; Zee PC. Light-induced changes of the circadian clock of humans: increasing duration is more effective than increasing light intensity. SLEEP 2011;34(5):593-599. PMID:21532952

  16. Effect of captopril and melatonin on fibrotic rebuilding of the aorta in 24 hour light-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Repová-Bednárová, K; Aziriová, S; Hrenák, J; Krajčírovičová, K; Adamcová, M; Paulis, L; Simko, F

    2013-01-01

    Chronic continuous light exposure leads to melatonin deficiency along with complex neurohumoral activation resulting in hypertension development in rats. The aim of this study was to show, whether continuous light induces fibrotic rebuilding of the aorta and whether the treatment with melatonin or angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor captopril can prevent these potential alterations. In a six-week experiment, 3-month-old Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups (ten per group): controls, rats exposed to continuous light, exposed to continuous light plus treated with captopril (100 mg/kg/24 h) and exposed to continuous light plus treated with melatonin (10 mg/kg/24 h). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and collagen type I and III in the media of thoracic aorta were measured. Continuous light induced hypertension and fibrotic rebuilding of the aorta in terms of enhancement of collagen I and III concentration in the aortic media. Both captopril and melatonin prevented SBP rise and reduced collagen III concentration in the aorta. However, only melatonin reduced collagen I and the sum of collagen I and III in the aortic tissue. We conclude that in continuous light-induced hypertension, administration of melatonin, along with SBP reduction, decreases collagen I and III concentration in the aorta. It is suggested that antifibrotic effect of melatonin may reduce the stiffness of the aorta and small arteries and beneficially influence the nature of the pulse wave and peripheral vascular resistance.

  17. Highly efficient visible light-induced O₂ generation by self-assembled nanohybrids of inorganic nanosheets and polyoxometalate nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Gunjakar, Jayavant L; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, In Young; Lee, Jang Mee; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2013-01-01

    Unusually high photocatalytic activity of visible light-induced O₂ generation can be achieved by electrostatically-derived self-assembly between exfoliated Zn-Cr-LDH 2D nanosheets and POM 0D nanoclusters (W₇O₂₄⁶⁻ and V₁₀O₂₈⁶⁻) acting as an electron acceptor. This self-assembly can provide a high flexibility in the control of the chemical composition and pore structure of the resulting LDH-based nanohybrids. The hybridization with POM nanoclusters remarkably enhances the photocatalytic activity of the pristine Zn-Cr-LDH, which is attributable to the formation of porous structure and depression of charge recombination. Of prime interest is that the excellent photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared Zn-Cr-LDH-POM nanohybrid for visible light-induced O₂ generation can be further enhanced by calcination at 200 °C, leading to the very high apparent quantum yield of ∼75.2% at 420 nm. The present findings clearly demonstrate that the self-assembly of LDH-POM is fairly powerful in synthesizing novel LDH-based porous nanohybrid photocatalyst for visible light-induced O₂ generation.

  18. Highly Efficient Visible Light-Induced O2 Generation by Self-Assembled Nanohybrids of Inorganic Nanosheets and Polyoxometalate Nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Gunjakar, Jayavant L.; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, In Young; Lee, Jang Mee; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2013-01-01

    Unusually high photocatalytic activity of visible light-induced O2 generation can be achieved by electrostatically-derived self-assembly between exfoliated Zn-Cr-LDH 2D nanosheets and POM 0D nanoclusters (W7O246− and V10O286−) acting as an electron acceptor. This self-assembly can provide a high flexibility in the control of the chemical composition and pore structure of the resulting LDH-based nanohybrids. The hybridization with POM nanoclusters remarkably enhances the photocatalytic activity of the pristine Zn-Cr-LDH, which is attributable to the formation of porous structure and depression of charge recombination. Of prime interest is that the excellent photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared Zn-Cr-LDH-POM nanohybrid for visible light-induced O2 generation can be further enhanced by calcination at 200 °C, leading to the very high apparent quantum yield of ∼75.2% at 420 nm. The present findings clearly demonstrate that the self-assembly of LDH–POM is fairly powerful in synthesizing novel LDH-based porous nanohybrid photocatalyst for visible light-induced O2 generation. PMID:23801108

  19. Chromatin Changes Associated with Neuronal Maintenance and Their Pharmacological Application.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang Ho; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Sunhong; Cho, Kyoung Sang; Lee, Sung Bae

    2017-06-01

    The transcriptional control of neuronal specification and early development has been intensively studied over the past few decades. However, relatively little is known about transcriptional programs associated with the maintenance of terminally differentiated neuronal cells with respect to their functions, structures, and cell type-specific identity features. Notably, largely because of the recent advances in related techniques such as next generation sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing, the physiological implications of system-wide regulation of gene expression through changes in chromatin states have begun to be extensively studied in various contexts and systems, including the nervous system. Here, we attempt to review our current understanding of the link between chromatin changes and neuronal maintenance in the period of life after the completion of neuronal development. Perturbations involving chromatin changes in the system-wide transcriptional control are believed to be closely associated with diverse aspects of neuronal aging and neurodegenerative conditions. In this review, we focused on examples of epigenetic dysregulations in neurodegenerative conditions as well as neuronal aging, the most important risk factor leading to neuronal degeneration, in order to highlight the close association between chromatin changes and neuronal maintenance. Lastly, we reviewed the currently available and potential future applications of pharmacological control of the chromatin states associated with neuronal maintenance. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Linker DNA destabilizes condensed chromatin.

    PubMed

    Green, G R; Ferlita, R R; Walkenhorst, W F; Poccia, D L

    2001-01-01

    The contribution of the linker region to maintenance of condensed chromatin was examined in two model systems, namely sea urchin sperm nuclei and chicken red blood cell nuclei. Linkerless nuclei, prepared by extensive digestion with micrococcal nuclease, were compared with Native nuclei using several assays, including microscopic appearance, nuclear turbidity, salt stability, and trypsin resistance. Chromatin in the Linkerless nuclei was highly condensed, resembling pyknotic chromatin in apoptotic cells. Linkerless nuclei were more stable in low ionic strength buffers and more resistant to trypsin than Native nuclei. Analysis of histones from the trypsinized nuclei by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that specific histone H1, H2B, and H3 tail regions stabilized linker DNA in condensed nuclei. Thermal denaturation of soluble chromatin preparations from differentially trypsinized sperm nuclei demonstrated that the N-terminal regions of histones Sp H1, Sp H2B, and H3 bind tightly to linker DNA, causing it to denature at a high temperature. We conclude that linker DNA exerts a disruptive force on condensed chromatin structure which is counteracted by binding of specific histone tail regions to the linker DNA. The inherent instability of the linker region may be significant in all eukaryotic chromatins and may promote gene activation in living cells.

  1. Orally administered epigallocatechin gallate attenuates light-induced photoreceptor damage.

    PubMed

    Costa, Belmira Lara da Silveira Andrade da; Fawcett, Rebecca; Li, Guang-Yu; Safa, Rukhsana; Osborne, Neville N

    2008-07-01

    EGCG, a major component of green tea, has a number of properties which includes it being a powerful antioxidant. The purpose of this investigation was to deduce whether inclusion of EGCG in the drinking water of albino rats attenuates the effect of a light insult (2200lx, for 24h) to the retina. TUNEL-positive cells were detected in the outer nuclear layer of the retina, indicating the efficacy of the light insult in inducing photoreceptor degeneration. Moreover, Ret-P1 and the mRNA for rhodopsin located at photoreceptors were also significantly reduced as well as the amplitude of both the a- and b-waves of the electroretinogram was also reduced showing that photoreceptors in particular are affected by light. An increase in protein/mRNA of GFAP located primarily to Müller cells caused by light shows that other retinal components are also influenced by the light insult. However, antigens associated with bipolar (alpha-PKC), ganglion (Thy-1) and amacrine (GABA) cells, in contrast, appeared unaffected. The light insult also caused a change in the content of various proteins (caspase-3, caspase-8, PARP, Bad, and Bcl-2) involved in apoptosis. A number of the changes to the retina caused by a light insult were significantly attenuated when EGCG was in the drinking water. The reduction of the a- and b-waves and photoreceptor specific mRNAs/protein caused by light were significantly less. In addition, EGCG attenuated the changes caused by light to certain apoptotic proteins (especially at after 2 days) but did not appear to significantly influence the light-induced up-regulation of GFAP protein/mRNA. It is concluded that orally administered EGCG blunts the detrimental effect of light to the retina of albino rats where the photoreceptors are primarily affected.

  2. NAD+ maintenance attenuates light induced photoreceptor degeneration Δ

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Shi; Sheline, Christian T.

    2013-01-01

    Light-induced retinal damage (LD) occurs after surgery or sun exposure. We previously showed that zinc (Zn2+) accumulated in photoreceptors and RPE cells after LD but prior to cell death, and pyruvate or nicotinamide attenuated the resultant death perhaps by restoring nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) levels. We first examined the levels of NAD+ and the efficacy of pyruvate or nicotinamide in oxidative toxicities using primary retinal cultures. We next manipulated NAD+ levels in vivo and tested the affect on LD to photoreceptors and RPE. NAD+ levels cycle with a 24-h rhythm in mammals, which is affected by the feeding schedule. Therefore, we tested the affect of increasing NAD+ levels on LD by giving nicotinamide, inverting the feeding schedule, or using transgenic mice which overexpress cytoplasmic nicotinamide mononucleotide adenyl-transferase-1 (cytNMNAT1), an NAD+ synthetic enzyme. Zn2+ accumulation was also assessed in culture and in retinal sections. Retinas of light damaged animals were examined by OCT and plastic sectioning, and retinal NAD levels were measured. Day fed, or nicotinamide treated rats showed less NAD+ loss, and LD compared to night fed rats or untreated rats without changing the Zn2+ staining pattern. CytNMNAT1 showed less Zn2+ staining, NAD+ loss, and cell death after LD. In conclusion, intense light, Zn2+ and oxidative toxicities caused an increase in Zn2+, NAD+ loss, and cell death which were attenuated by NAD+ restoration. Therefore, NAD+ levels play a protective role in LD-induced death of photoreceptors and RPE cells. PMID:23274583

  3. Light-induced metastable states in ferroelectric oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G. K.; Vikhnin, V. S.; Kapphan, S. E.

    2007-07-01

    New Raman scattering lines (at 463 cm-1 and at 156 cm-1) induced by strong enough optical pumping in nominally pure KTaO3 crystals are manifested. The model of such effect is proposed. This model is based on the light-induced formation of metastable polar clusters constructed from bi-polaronic excitons - Charge Transfer Vibronic Excitons (CTVEs) with their high degree alignment. The CTVEs are caused by photo-carriers with high local concentration which are trapped to local potential wells related with long-range defect fields. CTVE formation are realized in these potential wells due to significant easing of charge transfer fluctuations induced by photo-carrier screening effects. This model is effective also for explanation of giant dielectric constant inducing by strong illumination which was detected recently in KTaO3 and SrTiO3 by Japanese investigators [M. Takesada, T. Yagi, M. Itoh, S. Koshihara, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 72 (2003) 37; T. Hasegawa, S. Mouri, Y. Yamada, K. Tanaka, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 72 (2003) 41; I. Katayama, Y. Ichikawa, K. Tanaka, Phys. Rev. B 67 (2003) 100102(R)]. Another aspect of the present study was specific recombination luminescence of CTVEs which was investigated here with respect to the influence of additional IR pumping. The present investigation has led to experimental evidence of new, mainly non-linear CTVE with good defined metastable behavior. Such an essentially anharmonic CTVE with respect to charge transfer and lattice displacements was predicted recently in our work [V.S. Vikhnin, Solid State Commun. 127 (2003) 283]. Here, we present experimental evidence of the existence of a new type of exciton state.

  4. Light-Induced Alterations in Basil Ganglia Kynurenic Acid Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sroufe, Angela E.; Whittaker, J. A.; Patrickson, J. W.; Orr, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The metabolic synthesis, release and breakdown of several known CNS neurotransmitters have been shown to follow a circadian pattern entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle. The levels of excitatory amino acid (EAA) transmitters such as glutamate, have been shown to vary with environmental lighting conditions. Kynurenic Acid (KA), an endogenous tryptophan metabolite and glutamate receptor antagonist, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects against EAA-induced excitotoxic cell damage. Changes in KA's activity within the mammalian basal ganglia has been proposed as being contributory to neurotoxicity in Huntington's Disease. It is not known whether CNS KA levels follow a circadian pattern or exhibit light-induced fluctuations. However, because the symptoms of certain degenerative motor disorders seem to fluctuate with daily 24 hour rhythm, we initiated studies to determine if basal ganglia KA were influenced by the daily light/dark cycle and could influence motor function. Therefore in this study, HPLC-EC was utilized to determine if basal ganglia KA levels in tissue extracts from adult male Long-Evans rats (200-250g) entrained to 24 and 48 hours constant light and dark conditions, respectively. Samples were taken one hour before the onset of the subjective day and one hour prior to the onset of the subjective night in order to detect possible phase differences in KA levels and to allow for accumulation of factors expressed in association with the light or dark phase. Data analysis revealed that KA levels in the basal ganglia vary with environmental lighting conditions; being elevated generally during the dark. Circadian phase differences in KA levels were also evident during the subjective night and subjective day, respectively. Results from these studies are discussed with respect to potential cyclic changes in neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxic damage during the daily 24 hour cycle and its possible relevance to future therapeutic approaches in

  5. Light-Induced Alterations in Basil Ganglia Kynurenic Acid Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sroufe, Angela E.; Whittaker, J. A.; Patrickson, J. W.; Orr, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The metabolic synthesis, release and breakdown of several known CNS neurotransmitters have been shown to follow a circadian pattern entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle. The levels of excitatory amino acid (EAA) transmitters such as glutamate, have been shown to vary with environmental lighting conditions. Kynurenic Acid (KA), an endogenous tryptophan metabolite and glutamate receptor antagonist, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects against EAA-induced excitotoxic cell damage. Changes in KA's activity within the mammalian basal ganglia has been proposed as being contributory to neurotoxicity in Huntington's Disease. It is not known whether CNS KA levels follow a circadian pattern or exhibit light-induced fluctuations. However, because the symptoms of certain degenerative motor disorders seem to fluctuate with daily 24 hour rhythm, we initiated studies to determine if basal ganglia KA were influenced by the daily light/dark cycle and could influence motor function. Therefore in this study, HPLC-EC was utilized to determine if basal ganglia KA levels in tissue extracts from adult male Long-Evans rats (200-250g) entrained to 24 and 48 hours constant light and dark conditions, respectively. Samples were taken one hour before the onset of the subjective day and one hour prior to the onset of the subjective night in order to detect possible phase differences in KA levels and to allow for accumulation of factors expressed in association with the light or dark phase. Data analysis revealed that KA levels in the basal ganglia vary with environmental lighting conditions; being elevated generally during the dark. Circadian phase differences in KA levels were also evident during the subjective night and subjective day, respectively. Results from these studies are discussed with respect to potential cyclic changes in neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxic damage during the daily 24 hour cycle and its possible relevance to future therapeutic approaches in

  6. Monitoring powder blend homogeneity using light-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Karumanchi, Vineela; Taylor, Michael K; Ely, Kevin J; Stagner, William C

    2011-12-01

    Light-induced fluorescence (LIF) was evaluated as a process analytical technology to monitor blend homogeneity and establish a relationship with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Secondary aims for this study included a determination of blend steady-state, acceptable mixing time interval, and mixing end point. Also, identification of potential "dead spots" in the 124 L intermediate bulk container mixing tote was explored. Individual samples from 13 sample locations were collected at 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 min and analyzed using LIF and HPLC. LIF and HPLC methods showed similar mixing profiles. A coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.86 (p value < 0.0001) was obtained for a second-degree polynomial bivariate fit of LIF counts by HPLC percent label claim (%LC). A significant linear relationship was determined between LIF percent relative standard (%RSD) and HPLC %RSD (R(2) = 0.97, p < 0.0001). The LIF steady-state, acceptable mixing time interval, and mixing end point were determined to be 1-20, 2-20, and 2 min, respectively. The steady-state, acceptable mixing time interval, and mixing end point determined by HPLC were 1-20, 5-10, and 5 min, respectively. The Tukey-Kramer honestly significant difference analysis of HPLC %LC by sample location at 5 and 10 min mixing times showed that there was a statistical difference between the HPLC %LC group means at two blender locations.

  7. The nucleotides responsible for the direct physical contact between the chromatin insulator protein CTCF and the H19 imprinting control region manifest parent of origin-specific long-distance insulation and methylation-free domains

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Vinod; Mariano, Piero; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar; Mattsson, Anita; Lobanenkov, Victor; Heuchel, Rainer; Ohlsson, Rolf

    2003-01-01

    The repression of the maternally inherited Igf2 allele has been proposed to depend on a methylation-sensitive chromatin insulator organized by the 11 zinc finger protein CTCF at the H19 imprinting control region (ICR). Here we document that point mutations of the nucleotides in physical contact with CTCF within the endogenous H19 ICR lead to loss of CTCF binding and Igf2 imprinting only when passaged through the female germline. This effect is accompanied by a significant loss of methylation protection of the maternally derived H19 ICR. Because CTCF interacts with other imprinting control regions, it emerges as a central factor responsible for interpreting and propagating gamete-derived epigenetic marks and for organizing epigenetically controlled expression domains. PMID:12629040

  8. The polymorphisms of the chromatin fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulé, Jean-Baptiste; Mozziconacci, Julien; Lavelle, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the genome is packed into chromosomes, each consisting of large polymeric fibers made of DNA bound with proteins (mainly histones) and RNA molecules. The nature and precise 3D organization of this fiber has been a matter of intense speculations and debates. In the emerging picture, the local chromatin state plays a critical role in all fundamental DNA transactions, such as transcriptional control, DNA replication or repair. However, the molecular and structural mechanisms involved remain elusive. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the tremendous efforts that have been made for almost 40 years to build physiologically relevant models of chromatin structure. The motivation behind building such models was to shift our representation and understanding of DNA transactions from a too simplistic ‘naked DNA’ view to a more realistic ‘coated DNA’ view, as a step towards a better framework in which to interpret mechanistically the control of genetic expression and other DNA metabolic processes. The field has evolved from a speculative point of view towards in vitro biochemistry and in silico modeling, but is still longing for experimental in vivo validations of the proposed structures or even proof of concept experiments demonstrating a clear role of a given structure in a metabolic transaction. The mere existence of a chromatin fiber as a relevant biological entity in vivo has been put into serious questioning. Current research is suggesting a possible reconciliation between theoretical studies and experiments, pointing towards a view where the polymorphic and dynamic nature of the chromatin fiber is essential to support its function in genome metabolism.

  9. Discrimination of phytochrome dependent light inducible from non-light inducible plant genes. Prediction of a common light-responsive element (LRE) in phytochrome dependent light inducible plant genes.

    PubMed Central

    Grob, U; Stüber, K

    1987-01-01

    We aligned 14 5'-leading sequences of small subunit ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rbcS) genes. A strong consensus sequence ("CCTTATCAT") was located directly upstream of the TATA-box. The occurrence of this motif in other light dependent phytochrome regulated plant genes led to the calculation of two consensus matrices. With these two matrices we are able to distinguish almost all known light induced plant genes which are phytochrome regulated from non-light induced plant genes indicating, that all these genes share a common light-responsive element (LRE). The results obtained by computer analysis are discussed with regard to experimental data. PMID:3697087

  10. ISWI chromatin remodeling complexes in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Özge Z; Vermeulen, Wim; Lans, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of chromatin structure is an essential component of the DNA damage response (DDR), which effectively preserves the integrity of DNA by a network of multiple DNA repair and associated signaling pathways. Within the DDR, chromatin is modified and remodeled to facilitate efficient DNA access, to control the activity of repair proteins and to mediate signaling. The mammalian ISWI family has recently emerged as one of the major ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex families that function in the DDR, as it is implicated in at least 3 major DNA repair pathways: homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining and nucleotide excision repair. In this review, we discuss the various manners through which different ISWI complexes regulate DNA repair and how they are targeted to chromatin containing damaged DNA.

  11. Light-Induced Reversible Change of Roughness and Thickness of Photosensitive Polymer Brushes.

    PubMed

    Kopyshev, Alexey; Galvin, Casey J; Patil, Rohan R; Genzer, Jan; Lomadze, Nino; Feldmann, David; Zakrevski, Juri; Santer, Svetlana

    2016-07-27

    We investigate light-induced changes in thickness and roughness of photosensitive polymer brushes containing azobenzene cationic surfactants by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in real time during light irradiation. Because the cis-state of azobenzene unit requires more free volume than its trans counterpart, the UV light-induced expansion of polymer thin films associated with the trans-to-cis isomerism of azobenzene groups is expected to occur. This phenomenon is well documented in physisorbed polymer films containing azobenzene groups. In contrast, photosensitive polymer brushes show a decrease in thickness under UV irradiation. We have found that the azobenzene surfactants in their trans-state form aggregates within the brush. Under irradiation, the surfactants undergo photoisomerization to the cis-state, which is more hydrophilic. As a consequence, the aggregates within the brush are disrupted, and the polymer brush contracts. When subsequently irradiated with blue light the polymer brush thickness returns back to its initial value. This behavior is related to isomerization of the surfactant to the more hydrophobic trans-state and subsequent formation of surfactant aggregates within the polymer brush. The photomechanical function of the dry polymer brush, i.e., contraction and expansion, was found to be reversible with repeated irradiation cycles and requires only a few seconds for switching. In addition to the thickness change, the roughness of the brush also changes reversibly between a few Angstroms (blue light) and several nanometers (UV light). Photosensitive polymer brushes represent smart films with light responsive thickness and roughness that could be used for generating dynamic fluctuating surfaces, the function of which can be turned on and off in a controllable manner on a nanometer length scale.

  12. Immobilization of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans with addressable light-induced heat knockdown (ALINK).

    PubMed

    Chuang, Han-Sheng; Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Chen, Chang-Shi; Chiu, Wen-Tai

    2013-08-07

    Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans is a model animal used in genetics, neuroscience, and developmental biology. Researchers often immobilize squirming worms to obtain high-quality images for analysis. However, current methods usually require physical contact or anesthetics. This can cause injuries to worm bodies or neuron disturbances. This study presents an alternative technique, called addressable light-induced heat knockdown (ALINK), to effectively immobilize worms by using light-induced sublethal heat. A microchip composed of an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass plate and an ITO glass plate coated with a photoconductive layer (a-Si:H) was produced. Worms to be immobilized were immersed in a liquid medium and sandwiched between the two plates. When the worms were irradiated with a focused laser beam in the presence of electric fields (referred to as an optoelectric treatment), the optoelectric effect heated the liquid medium. The neural functions of the worms shut down temporarily when a critical temperature (>31 °C) was reached. Their neural functions resumed after the heat source was removed. A temperature above 37 °C killed all worms. Using short-wavelength light reduced the worms' recovery time. An equivalent circuit was modeled to predict the operating modes, and an optoelectric treatment with a high-concentration medium enhanced rapid heating. A safe operating range (20 Vpp (peak-to-peak voltage), 100 kHz to 10 MHz, 31 to 37 °C) to induce heat knockdown (KD) was also investigated. The results show that the heat KD was well controlled, autonomous, and reversible. This technique can be used for worm immobilization.

  13. METHODS IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY: ASSAYING CHROMATIN SIRTUINS

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Dafne M.; Sebastian, Carlos; Mostoslavsky, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Summary Most of the sirtuins’ nuclear substrates indentified so far are histones or other chromatin-associated proteins and, thus, it is of special relevance the development of good biochemical techniques to analyze the biology of these proteins in the context of chromatin. Here, we describe several of the chromatin-based techniques to identify sirtuins’ substrates, including a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocol, an acid-extraction protocol, and a nucleosomal immunoprecipitation protocol to analyze putative sirtuin chromatin interactors. PMID:24014405

  14. Centromeric chromatin in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Janet F

    2008-05-01

    A fundamental requirement for life is the ability of cells to divide properly and to pass on to their daughters a full complement of genetic material. The centromere of the chromosome is essential for this process, as it provides the DNA sequences on which the kinetochore (the proteinaceous structure that links centromeric DNA to the spindle microtubules) assembles to allow segregation of the chromosomes during mitosis. It has long been recognized that kinetochore assembly is subject to epigenetic control, and deciphering how centromeres promote faithful chromosome segregation provides a fascinating intellectual challenge. This challenge is made more difficult by the scale and complexity of DNA sequences in metazoan centromeres, thus much research has focused on dissecting centromere function in the single celled eukaryotic yeasts. Interestingly, in spite of similarities in the genome size of budding and fission yeasts, they seem to have adopted some striking differences in their strategy for passing on their chromosomes. Budding yeast have "point" centromeres, where a 125 base sequence is sufficient for mitotic propagation, whereas fission yeast centromeres are more reminiscent of the large repetitive centromeres of metazoans. In addition, the centromeric heterochromatin which coats centromeric domains of fission yeast and metazoan centromeres and is critical for their function, is largely absent from budding yeast centromeres. This review focuses on the assembly and maintenance of centromeric chromatin in the fission yeast.

  15. [Electron microscope examination of chromatin in hepatocyte nuclei within the first hourse after partial hepatectomy, II. The degree of chromatin condensation and the organization of fibrillar RNP components].

    PubMed

    Ershov, Iu V; Manteifel', V M; Batova, I N; Zelenin, A V

    1979-01-01

    The state of hepatocyte chromatin (the area occupied by the regions of condensed chromatin on ultrathin sections and the quantity of perichromatin RNP fibrils which was estimated by the area of the fibrillar zone and the concentration of fibrils within the same zone) were studied within the first hours after partial hepatectomy of guinea pigs. The area occupied by the regions of condensed chromatin on preparations with differentially revealed DNP and RNP components decreased by 12% in 2.5 hours since the operation had been performed, became normal in 5 hours, and again decreased by 30% in 9 hours. Decondensation of chromatin was accompanied with the increase of the number of perichromatin RNP fibrils, products of template activity of chromatin, and the rise of ethidium bromide binding. The binding of ethidium bromide by the chromatin of hepatocytes increased by 39% in 2.5 hours, returned to the control level in 5 hours and again increased by 22% in 9 hours.

  16. TOPOISOMERASE 6B is involved in chromatin remodelling associated with control of carbon partitioning into secondary metabolites and cell walls, and epidermal morphogenesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Amandeep; Balasubramanian, Rajagopal; Cao, Jin; Singh, Prabhjeet; Subramanian, Senthil; Hicks, Glenn; Nothnagel, Eugene A.; Abidi, Noureddine; Janda, Jaroslav; Galbraith, David W.; Rock, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth is continuous and modular, a combination that allows morphogenesis by cell division and elongation and serves to facilitate adaptation to changing environments. The pleiotropic phenotypes of the harlequin (hlq) mutant, isolated on the basis of ectopic expression of the abscisic acid (ABA)- and auxin-inducible proDc3:GUS reporter gene, were previously characterized. Mutants are skotomorphogenic, have deformed and collapsed epidermal cells which accumulate callose and starch, cell walls abundant in pectins and cell wall proteins, and abnormal and reduced root hairs and leaf trichomes. hlq and two additional alleles that vary in their phenotypic severity of starch accumulation in the light and dark have been isolated, and it is shown that they are alleles of bin3/hyp6/rhl3/Topoisomerase6B. Mutants and inhibitors affecting the cell wall phenocopy several of the traits displayed in hlq. A microarray analysis was performed, and coordinated expression of physically adjacent pairs/sets of genes was observed in hlq, suggesting a direct effect on chromatin. Histones, WRKY and IAA/AUX transcription factors, aquaporins, and components of ubiquitin-E3-ligase-mediated proteolysis, and ABA or biotic stress response markers as well as proteins involved in cellular processes affecting carbon partitioning into secondary metabolites were also identified. A comparative analysis was performed of the hlq transcriptome with other previously published TopoVI mutant transcriptomes, namely bin3, bin5, and caa39 mutants, and limited concordance between data sets was found, suggesting indirect or genotype-specific effects. The results shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the det/cop/fus-like pleiotropic phenotypes of hlq and support a broader role for TopoVI regulation of chromatin remodelling to mediate development in response to environmental and hormonal signals. PMID:24821950

  17. Assessing the Association between Oral Hygiene and Preterm Birth by Quantitative Light-Induced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Christopher K.; Wang, Qian; Adeyemi, Adejumoke A.; Quenby, Siobhan; Smith, Philip W.; Higham, Susan M.; Whitworth, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the purported link between oral hygiene and preterm birth by using image analysis tools to quantify dental plaque biofilm. Volunteers (n = 91) attending an antenatal clinic were identified as those considered to be “at high risk” of preterm delivery (i.e., a previous history of idiopathic preterm delivery, case group) or those who were not considered to be at risk (control group). The women had images of their anterior teeth captured using quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF). These images were analysed to calculate the amount of red fluorescent plaque (ΔR%) and percentage of plaque coverage. QLF showed little difference in ΔR% between the two groups, 65.00% case versus 68.70% control, whereas there was 19.29% difference with regard to the mean plaque coverage, 25.50% case versus 20.58% control. A logistic regression model showed a significant association between plaque coverage and case/control status (P = 0.031), controlling for other potential predictor variables, namely, smoking status, maternal age, and body mass index (BMI). PMID:24511282

  18. Stem cell factors in plants: chromatin connections.

    PubMed

    Kornet, N; Scheres, B

    2008-01-01

    The progression of pluripotent stem cells to differentiated cell lineages requires major shifts in cell differentiation programs. In both mammals and higher plants, this process appears to be controlled by a dedicated set of transcription factors, many of which are kingdom specific. These divergent transcription factors appear to operate, however, together with a shared suite of factors that affect the chromatin state. It is of major importance to investigate whether such shared global control mechanisms indicate a common mechanistic basis for preservation of the stem cell state, initiation of differentiation programs, and coordination of cell state transitions.

  19. Chromatin structure and DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation examines the structure and structural transitions of chromatin in relation to DNA damage. The ability of intact and histone H1 depleted chromatin fibers to fold into higher ordered structures in vitro was examined following DNA photodamage introduced by two different agents. (1) 254-nm UV radiation and (2) trimethylpsoralen (plus near-UV radiation). Both agents are highly specific for DNA and form adducts predicted to cause different degrees of distortion in the DNA helix. The salt-induced structural transitions of intact and histone H1 depleted chromatin fibers were monitored by both analytical ultracentrifugation and light scattering. Our results show that even in the presence of extremely large, nonphysiological amounts of photodamage by either agent the ability of chromatin to fold into higher ordered structures is not affected. The compact, 30 nm fiber must therefore be able to accommodate a large amount of DNA damage without any measurable changes in the overall size or degree of compaction of this structure. The distribution of pyrimidine dimers was mapped at the single nucleotide level in nucleosome core DNA from UV-irradiated mononucleosomes, chromatin fibers, and human cells in culture using the 3' ..-->.. 5' exonuclease activity of T4 DNA polymerase.

  20. Chromatin shapes the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Dinarina, Ana; Pugieux, Céline; Corral, Maria Mora; Loose, Martin; Spatz, Joachim; Karsenti, Eric; Nédélec, François

    2009-08-07

    In animal and plant cells, mitotic chromatin locally generates microtubules that self-organize into a mitotic spindle, and its dimensions and bipolar symmetry are essential for accurate chromosome segregation. By immobilizing microscopic chromatin-coated beads on slide surfaces using a microprinting technique, we have examined the effect of chromatin on the dimensions and symmetry of spindles in Xenopus laevis cytoplasmic extracts. While circular spots with diameters around 14-18 microm trigger bipolar spindle formation, larger spots generate an incorrect number of poles. We also examined lines of chromatin with various dimensions. Their length determined the number of poles that formed, with a 6 x 18 microm rectangular patch generating normal spindle morphology. Around longer lines, multiple poles formed and the structures were disorganized. While lines thinner than 10 mum generated symmetric structures, thicker lines induced the formation of asymmetric structures where all microtubules are on the same side of the line. Our results show that chromatin defines spindle shape and orientation. For a video summary of this article, see the PaperFlick file available with the online Supplemental Data.

  1. Single Molecule Studies of Chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, C; Thelen, M P; Noy, A

    2006-02-06

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA is packaged as chromatin, a highly ordered structure formed through the wrapping of the DNA around histone proteins, and further packed through interactions with a number of other proteins. In order for processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcription to occur, the structure of chromatin must be remodeled such that the necessary enzymes can access the DNA. A number of remodeling enzymes have been described, but our understanding of the remodeling process is hindered by a lack of knowledge of the fine structure of chromatin, and how this structure is modulated in the living cell. We have carried out single molecule experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the packaging arrangements in chromatin from a variety of cell types. Comparison of the structures observed reveals differences which can be explained in terms of the cell type and its transcriptional activity. During the course of this project, sample preparation and AFM techniques were developed and optimized. Several opportunities for follow-up work are outlined which could provide further insight into the dynamic structural rearrangements of chromatin.

  2. Gibberellin-induced change in the structure of chromatin in wheat sprouts: decrease in the accessibility of DNA in preparations of soluble chromatin to the action of EcoRII methylase

    SciTech Connect

    Noskov, V.A.; Kintsurashvili, L.N.; Smirnova, T.A.; Manamsh'yan, T.A.; Kir'yanov, G.I.; Vanyushin, B.F.

    1986-05-20

    A method has been perfected for producing soluble chromatin from whole wheat sprouts at low ionic strength. The chromatin preparations isolated possess a native structure: they have a nucleosome organization. Under identical conditions the soluble wheat chromatin undergoes more profound degradation by DNase I and staphylococcal nuclease than the chromatin from the rat liver. The DNA contained in the isolated chromatin is capable of accepting CHnumber groups from S-(methyl-/sup 3/H)-adenosylmethionine during incubation with DNA methylase EcoRII; not all the CC A/T GG sequences in DNA are methylated in vivo. Chromatin from gibberellin A/sub 3/-treated wheat sprout DNA accepts 40% fewer CH/sub 3/ groups than that from the control sprouts, which is probably due to the greater compactness of the chromatin. In the case of longer incubation, the level of methylation of the chromatin falls, which may be associated with the presence of DNA-demethylating activity.

  3. Chromatin Remodeling and Plant Immunity.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Zhu, Q; Liu, Y; Zhang, Q

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling, an important facet of the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes, is performed by two major types of multisubunit complexes, covalent histone- or DNA-modifying complexes, and ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling complexes. Snf2 family DNA-dependent ATPases constitute the catalytic subunits of ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling complexes, which accounts for energy supply during chromatin remodeling. Increasing evidence indicates a critical role of chromatin remodeling in the establishment of long-lasting, even transgenerational immune memory in plants, which is supported by the findings that DNA methylation, histone deacetylation, and histone methylation can prime the promoters of immune-related genes required for disease defense. So what are the links between Snf2-mediated ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling and plant immunity, and what mechanisms might support its involvement in disease resistance?

  4. A Single-Chain Photoswitchable CRISPR-Cas9 Architecture for Light-Inducible Gene Editing and Transcription.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin X; Zou, Xinzhi; Chung, Hokyung K; Gao, Yuchen; Liu, Yanxia; Qi, Lei S; Lin, Michael Z

    2017-09-29

    Optical control of CRISPR-Cas9-derived proteins would be useful for restricting gene editing or transcriptional regulation to desired times and places. Optical control of Cas9 functions has been achieved with photouncageable unnatural amino acids or by using light-induced protein interactions to reconstitute Cas9-mediated functions from two polypeptides. However, these methods have only been applied to one Cas9 species and have not been used for optical control of different perturbations at two genes. Here, we use photodissociable dimeric fluorescent protein domains to engineer single-chain photoswitchable Cas9 (ps-Cas9) proteins in which the DNA-binding cleft is occluded at baseline and opened upon illumination. This design successfully controlled different species and functional variants of Cas9, mediated transcriptional activation more robustly than previous optogenetic methods, and enabled light-induced transcription of one gene and editing of another in the same cells. Thus, a single-chain photoswitchable architecture provides a general method to control a variety of Cas9-mediated functions.

  5. Arabidopsis FHY3 and FAR1 Regulate Light-Induced myo-Inositol Biosynthesis and Oxidative Stress Responses by Transcriptional Activation of MIPS1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Tian, Tian; Lin, Rongcheng; Deng, Xing-Wang; Wang, Haiyang; Li, Gang

    2016-04-04

    myo-Inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS) catalyzes the limiting step of inositol biosynthesis and has crucial roles in plant growth and development. In response to stress, the transcription of MIPS1 is induced and the biosynthesis of inositol or inositol derivatives is promoted by unknown mechanisms. Here, we found that the light signaling protein FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL3 (FHY3) and its homolog FAR-RED IMPAIRED RESPONSE1 (FAR1) regulate light-induced inositol biosynthesis and oxidative stress responses by activating the transcription of MIPS1. Disruption of FHY3 and FAR1 caused light-induced cell death after dark-light transition, precocious leaf senescence, and increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Reduction of salicylic acid (SA) accumulation by overexpression of SALICYLIC ACID 3-HYDROXYLASE largely suppressed the cell death phenotype of fhy3 far1 mutant plants, suggesting that FHY3- and FAR1-mediated cell death is dependent on SA. Furthermore, comparative analysis of chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and microarray results revealed that FHY3 and FAR1 directly target both MIPS1 and MIPS2. The fhy3 far1 mutant plants showed severely decreased MIPS1/2 transcript levels and reduced inositol levels. Conversely, constitutive expression of MIPS1 partially rescued the inositol contents, caused reduced transcript levels of SA-biosynthesis genes, and prevented oxidative stress in fhy3 far1. Taken together, our results indicate that the light signaling proteins FHY3 and FAR1 directly bind the promoter of MIPS1 to activate its expression and thereby promote inositol biosynthesis to prevent light-induced oxidative stress and SA-dependent cell death.

  6. Paramecium tetraurelia chromatin assembly factor-1-like protein PtCAF-1 is involved in RNA-mediated control of DNA elimination.

    PubMed

    Ignarski, Michael; Singh, Aditi; Swart, Estienne C; Arambasic, Miroslav; Sandoval, Pamela Y; Nowacki, Mariusz

    2014-10-29

    Genome-wide DNA remodelling in the ciliate Paramecium is ensured by RNA-mediated trans-nuclear crosstalk between the germline and the somatic genomes during sexual development. The rearrangements include elimination of transposable elements, minisatellites and tens of thousands non-coding elements called internally eliminated sequences (IESs). The trans-nuclear genome comparison process employs a distinct class of germline small RNAs (scnRNAs) that are compared against the parental somatic genome to select the germline-specific subset of scnRNAs that subsequently target DNA elimination in the progeny genome. Only a handful of proteins involved in this process have been identified so far and the mechanism of DNA targeting is unknown. Here we describe chromatin assembly factor-1-like protein (PtCAF-1), which we show is required for the survival of sexual progeny and localizes first in the parental and later in the newly developing macronucleus. Gene silencing shows that PtCAF-1 is required for the elimination of transposable elements and a subset of IESs. PTCAF-1 depletion also impairs the selection of germline-specific scnRNAs during development. We identify specific histone modifications appearing during Paramecium development which are strongly reduced in PTCAF-1 depleted cells. Our results demonstrate the importance of PtCAF-1 for the epigenetic trans-nuclear cross-talk mechanism. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Paramecium tetraurelia chromatin assembly factor-1-like protein PtCAF-1 is involved in RNA-mediated control of DNA elimination

    PubMed Central

    Ignarski, Michael; Singh, Aditi; Swart, Estienne C.; Arambasic, Miroslav; Sandoval, Pamela Y.; Nowacki, Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide DNA remodelling in the ciliate Paramecium is ensured by RNA-mediated trans-nuclear crosstalk between the germline and the somatic genomes during sexual development. The rearrangements include elimination of transposable elements, minisatellites and tens of thousands non-coding elements called internally eliminated sequences (IESs). The trans-nuclear genome comparison process employs a distinct class of germline small RNAs (scnRNAs) that are compared against the parental somatic genome to select the germline-specific subset of scnRNAs that subsequently target DNA elimination in the progeny genome. Only a handful of proteins involved in this process have been identified so far and the mechanism of DNA targeting is unknown. Here we describe chromatin assembly factor-1-like protein (PtCAF-1), which we show is required for the survival of sexual progeny and localizes first in the parental and later in the newly developing macronucleus. Gene silencing shows that PtCAF-1 is required for the elimination of transposable elements and a subset of IESs. PTCAF-1 depletion also impairs the selection of germline-specific scnRNAs during development. We identify specific histone modifications appearing during Paramecium development which are strongly reduced in PTCAF-1 depleted cells. Our results demonstrate the importance of PtCAF-1 for the epigenetic trans-nuclear cross-talk mechanism. PMID:25270876

  8. Light-induced molecular adsorption and reorientation at polyvinylcinnamate-fluorinated/liquid-crystal interface

    SciTech Connect

    Francescangeli, O.; Lucchetti, L.; Simoni, F.; Stanic, V.; Mazzulla, A.

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out a detailed experimental study, by means of x-ray reflectometry (XRR) and half-leaky guided mode (HLGM) optical characterization, of the light-induced molecular adsorption and reorientation at the polyvinylcinnamate-fluorinated (PVCN-F)/liquid-crystal (LC) interface of a LC cell doped with the azo-dye methyl red (MR). The XRR data allowed characterizing the microscopic structure of the adsorbed dye layer both before irradiation (dark adsorption) and after irradiation (light-induced adsorption). The HLGM optical characterization has made possible the experimental determination of the nematic director profile in the LC cell and evaluation of the effects of light-induced adsorption on the LC anchoring conditions. The experimental findings have confirmed the formation of a dark-adsorbed layer and are in agreement with the absorption model previously proposed to account for the complex phenomenology related to light-induced anchoring and reorientation in dye-doped liquid crystals.

  9. Light-induced protein dimerization by one- and two-photon activation of gibberellic acid derivatives in living cells.

    PubMed

    Schelkle, Korwin M; Griesbaum, Tristan; Ollech, Dirk; Becht, Steffy; Buckup, Tiago; Hamburger, Manuel; Wombacher, Richard

    2015-02-23

    We developed a highly efficient system for light-induced protein dimerization in live cells using photo-caged derivatives of the phytohormone gibberellic acid (GA3 ). We demonstrate the application of the photo-activatable chemical inducer of dimerization (CID) for the control of protein translocation with high spatiotemporal precision using light as an external trigger. Furthermore, we present a new two-photon (2P)-sensitive caging group, whose exceptionally high two-photon cross section allows the use of infrared light to efficiently unleash the active GA3 for inducing protein dimerization in living cells. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Global Quantitative Modeling of Chromatin Factor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Troyanskaya, Olga G.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is the driver of gene regulation, yet understanding the molecular interactions underlying chromatin factor combinatorial patterns (or the “chromatin codes”) remains a fundamental challenge in chromatin biology. Here we developed a global modeling framework that leverages chromatin profiling data to produce a systems-level view of the macromolecular complex of chromatin. Our model ultilizes maximum entropy modeling with regularization-based structure learning to statistically dissect dependencies between chromatin factors and produce an accurate probability distribution of chromatin code. Our unsupervised quantitative model, trained on genome-wide chromatin profiles of 73 histone marks and chromatin proteins from modENCODE, enabled making various data-driven inferences about chromatin profiles and interactions. We provided a highly accurate predictor of chromatin factor pairwise interactions validated by known experimental evidence, and for the first time enabled higher-order interaction prediction. Our predictions can thus help guide future experimental studies. The model can also serve as an inference engine for predicting unknown chromatin profiles — we demonstrated that with this approach we can leverage data from well-characterized cell types to help understand less-studied cell type or conditions. PMID:24675896

  11. Rapid changes in protein phosphorylation associated with light-induced gravity perception in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFadden, J. J.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of light and calcium depletion on in vivo protein phosphorylation was tested using dark-grown roots of Merit corn. Light caused rapid and specific promotion of phosphorylation of three polypeptides. Pretreatment of roots with ethylene glycol bis N,N,N',N' tetraacetic acid and A23187 prevented light-induced changes in protein phosphorylation. We postulate that these changes in protein phosphorylation are involved in the light-induced gravity response.

  12. Rapid changes in protein phosphorylation associated with light-induced gravity perception in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFadden, J. J.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of light and calcium depletion on in vivo protein phosphorylation was tested using dark-grown roots of Merit corn. Light caused rapid and specific promotion of phosphorylation of three polypeptides. Pretreatment of roots with ethylene glycol bis N,N,N',N' tetraacetic acid and A23187 prevented light-induced changes in protein phosphorylation. We postulate that these changes in protein phosphorylation are involved in the light-induced gravity response.

  13. Nucleolar chromatin organization at different activities of soybean root meristematic cell nucleoli.

    PubMed

    Stępiński, Dariusz

    2013-06-01

    Nucleolar chromatin, including nucleolus-associated chromatin as well as active and inactive condensed ribosomal DNA (rDNA) chromatin, derives mostly from secondary constrictions known as nucleolus organizer regions containing rDNA genes on nucleolus-forming chromosomes. This chromatin may occupy different nucleolar positions being in various condensation states which may imply different rDNA transcriptional competence. Sections of nucleoli originating from root meristematic cells of soybean seedlings grown at 25 °C (the control), then subjected to chilling stress (10 °C), and next transferred again to 25 °C (the recovery) were used to measure profile areas occupied by nucleolar condensed chromatin disclosed with sodium hydroxide methylation-acetylation plus uranyl acetate technique. The biggest total area of condensed chromatin was found in the nucleoli of chilled plants, while the smallest was found in those of recovered plants in relation to the amounts of chromatin in the control nucleoli. The condensed nucleolar chromatin, in the form of different-sized and different-shaped clumps, was mainly located in fibrillar centers. One can suppose that changes of condensed rDNA chromatin amounts might be a mechanism controlling the number of transcriptionally active rDNA genes as the nucleoli of plants grown under these experimental conditions show different transcriptional activity and morphology.

  14. The Involvement of the Oxidative Stress in Murine Blue LED Light-Induced Retinal Damage Model.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Maho; Kuse, Yoshiki; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    The aim of study was to establish a mouse model of blue light emitting diode (LED) light-induced retinal damage and to evaluate the effects of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Mice were exposed to 400 or 800 lx blue LED light for 2 h, and were evaluated for retinal damage 5 d later by electroretinogram amplitude and outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness. Additionally, we investigated the effect of blue LED light exposure on shorts-wave-sensitive opsin (S-opsin), and rhodopsin expression by immunohistochemistry. Blue LED light induced light intensity dependent retinal damage and led to collapse of S-opsin and altered rhodopsin localization from inner and outer segments to ONL. Conversely, NAC administered at 100 or 250 mg/kg intraperitoneally twice a day, before dark adaptation and before light exposure. NAC protected the blue LED light-induced retinal damage in a dose-dependent manner. Further, blue LED light-induced decreasing of S-opsin levels and altered rhodopsin localization, which were suppressed by NAC. We established a mouse model of blue LED light-induced retinal damage and these findings indicated that oxidative stress was partially involved in blue LED light-induced retinal damage.

  15. Sperm chromatin released by nucleases.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Igor B; Shlyakhtenko, Luda S; Lyubchenko, Yuri L; Zalenskaya, Irina A; Zalensky, Andrei O

    2008-01-01

    In human spermatozoa, 15-20% of histones are retained in the nucleus to coexist with protamines. Hypothetically, nucleohistone regions of sperm chromatin mark DNA sequences for distinctive processing during fertilization and early embryogenesis. The structural organization and molecular composition of nucleohistones in human spermatozoa is poorly studied. Here, we isolate and characterize fractions of sperm chromatin that are solubilized by endogenous and micrococcal nucleases. Chromatin isolated by either nuclease have a nucleosomal organization with the periodicity of approximately 195 bp (endogenous nuclease digest) and approximately 189 bp (micrococcal nuclease digest), which is similar to that of somatic cells. A distinct feature of sperm nucleohistone is its specific compact supra-nucleosomal organization that was demonstrated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and by atomic force microscopy. The latter technique showed compacted fiber arrays composed of globular particles with the prevailing diameter of approximately 16 nm. A rough estimation indicates that histones may cover continuous stretches of >50 kbp of sperm DNA. This initial characterization of sperm chromatin solubilized by nucleases is important for our understanding of the bipartite structural organization of the paternal genome.

  16. Light-induced termination of spiral wave arrhythmias by optogenetic engineering of atrial cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Bingen, Brian O; Engels, Marc C; Schalij, Martin J; Jangsangthong, Wanchana; Neshati, Zeinab; Feola, Iolanda; Ypey, Dirk L; Askar, Saïd F A; Panfilov, Alexander V; Pijnappels, Daniël A; de Vries, Antoine A F

    2014-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and often involves reentrant electrical activation (e.g. spiral waves). Drug therapy for AF can have serious side effects including proarrhythmia, while electrical shock therapy is associated with discomfort and tissue damage. Hypothetically, forced expression and subsequent activation of light-gated cation channels in cardiomyocytes might deliver a depolarizing force sufficient for defibrillation, thereby circumventing the aforementioned drawbacks. We therefore investigated the feasibility of light-induced spiral wave termination through cardiac optogenetics. Neonatal rat atrial cardiomyocyte monolayers were transduced with lentiviral vectors encoding light-activated Ca(2+)-translocating channelrhodopsin (CatCh; LV.CatCh∼eYFP↑) or eYFP (LV.eYFP↑) as control, and burst-paced to induce spiral waves rotating around functional cores. Effects of CatCh activation on reentry were investigated by optical and multi-electrode array (MEA) mapping. Western blot analyses and immunocytology confirmed transgene expression. Brief blue light pulses (10 ms/470 nm) triggered action potentials only in LV.CatCh∼eYFP↑-transduced cultures, confirming functional CatCh-mediated current. Prolonged light pulses (500 ms) resulted in reentry termination in 100% of LV.CatCh∼eYFP↑-transduced cultures (n = 31) vs. 0% of LV.eYFP↑-transduced cultures (n = 11). Here, CatCh activation caused uniform depolarization, thereby decreasing overall excitability (MEA peak-to-peak amplitude decreased 251.3 ± 217.1 vs. 9.2 ± 9.5 μV in controls). Consequently, functional coresize increased and phase singularities (PSs) drifted, leading to reentry termination by PS-PS or PS-boundary collisions. This study shows that spiral waves in atrial cardiomyocyte monolayers can be terminated effectively by a light-induced depolarizing current, produced by the arrhythmogenic substrate itself, upon optogenetic engineering. These results

  17. Using targeted chromatin regulators to engineer combinatorial and spatial transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Keung, Albert J; Bashor, Caleb J; Kiriakov, Szilvia; Collins, James J; Khalil, Ahmad S

    2014-07-03

    The transcription of genomic information in eukaryotes is regulated in large part by chromatin. How a diverse array of chromatin regulator (CR) proteins with different functions and genomic localization patterns coordinates chromatin activity to control transcription remains unclear. Here, we take a synthetic biology approach to decipher the complexity of chromatin regulation by studying emergent transcriptional behaviors from engineered combinatorial, spatial, and temporal patterns of individual CRs. We fuse 223 yeast CRs to programmable zinc finger proteins. Site-specific and combinatorial recruitment of CRs to distinct intralocus locations reveals a range of transcriptional logic and behaviors, including synergistic activation, long-range and spatial regulation, and gene expression memory. Comparing these transcriptional behaviors with annotated CR complex and function terms provides design principles for the engineering of transcriptional regulation. This work presents a bottom-up approach to investigating chromatin-mediated transcriptional regulation and introduces chromatin-based components and systems for synthetic biology and cellular engineering.

  18. Blurring the line between the DNA damage response and transcription: the importance of chromatin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Adam, Salomé; Polo, Sophie E

    2014-11-15

    DNA damage interferes with the progression of transcription machineries. A tight coordination of transcription with signaling and repair of DNA damage is thus critical for safeguarding genome function. This coordination involves modulations of chromatin organization. Here, we focus on the central role of chromatin dynamics, in conjunction with DNA Damage Response (DDR) factors, in controlling transcription inhibition and restart at sites of DNA damage in mammalian cells. Recent work has identified chromatin modifiers and histone chaperones as key regulators of transcriptional activity in damaged chromatin regions. Conversely, the transcriptional state of chromatin before DNA damage influences both DNA damage signaling and repair. We discuss the importance of chromatin plasticity in coordinating the interplay between the DDR and transcription, with major implications for cell fate maintenance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fluorescent light induces neurodegeneration in the rodent nigrostriatal system but near infrared LED light does not.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Stefania; Vitale, Flora; Viaggi, Cristina; di Marco, Stefano; Aloisi, Gabriella; Fasciani, Irene; Pardini, Carla; Pietrantoni, Ilaria; Di Paolo, Mattia; Riccitelli, Serena; Maccarone, Rita; Mattei, Claudia; Capannolo, Marta; Rossi, Mario; Capozzo, Annamaria; Corsini, Giovanni U; Scarnati, Eugenio; Lozzi, Luca; Vaglini, Francesca; Maggio, Roberto

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the effects of continuous artificial light exposure on the mouse substantia nigra (SN). A three month exposure of C57Bl/6J mice to white fluorescent light induced a 30% reduction in dopamine (DA) neurons in SN compared to controls, accompanied by a decrease of DA and its metabolites in the striatum. After six months of exposure, neurodegeneration progressed slightly, but the level of DA returned to the basal level, while the metabolites increased with respect to the control. Three month exposure to near infrared LED light (∼710nm) did not alter DA neurons in SN, nor did it decrease DA and its metabolites in the striatum. Furthermore mesencephalic cell viability, as tested by [(3)H]DA uptake, did not change. Finally, we observed that 710nm LED light, locally conveyed in the rat SN, could modulate the firing activity of extracellular-recorded DA neurons. These data suggest that light can be detrimental or beneficial to DA neurons in SN, depending on the source and wavelength. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [Current insights into chromatin structure organization].

    PubMed

    Ilatovskiĭ, A V; Lebedev, D V; Filatov, M V; Petukhov, M G; Isaev-Ivanov, V V

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes current insights into organization of chromatin structure at different levels of DNA compaction. Analysis of available experimental data allowed concluding that only nucleosomal level of structural organization was sufficiently investigated, whereas structure of a 30-nm chromatin fiber remains an open issue. The data on the chromatin structure obtained at the level of the nucleus speak in favor of a biphasic fractal organization of chromatin.

  1. Coming to terms with chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Even-Faitelson, Liron; Hassan-Zadeh, Vahideh; Baghestani, Zahra; Bazett-Jones, David P

    2016-03-01

    Chromatin, once thought to serve only as a means to package DNA, is now recognized as a major regulator of gene activity. As a result of the wide range of methods used to describe the numerous levels of chromatin organization, the terminology that has emerged to describe these organizational states is often imprecise and sometimes misleading. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of chromatin architecture and propose terms to describe the various biochemical and structural states of chromatin.

  2. Light-induced and sensing capabilities of SI-ATRP modified graphene oxide particles in elastomeric matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osicka, Josef; Cvek, Martin; Mrlik, Miroslav; Ilcikova, Marketa; Pavlinek, Vladimir; Mosnacek, Jaroslav

    2017-04-01

    Photoactuators can concern light stimuli in appropriate wavelength into mechanical response. Such reversible changes in the material shape are highly promising in their applications as remote controllers, or safety sensors. In this work we were focused on light-induced actuation and sensing performance of the prepared materials. In this case poly(dimethyl siloxane) PDMS with various amounts of silicone oil and curing agent was used as matrix. Graphene oxide (GO) as filler in its neat form as well as its modified analogue were used in concentration of 0.1 vol. %. Modified GO particles were controllably coated with poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer chains using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) approach in order improve interactions between the filler and matrix which consequently lead to the enhanced light-induced actuation performance. Generally, the both, GO particles as well as modified ones were characterized using FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and finally conductivity measurement to confirm the controllable coating and simultaneously proceeded reduction. By studying of dielectric properties (activation energies), viscoelastic properties, which were investigated using dynamic mechanical analysis, the interactions between the filler and matrix were evaluated with connection to their light-responsive and sensing capabilities.

  3. O-GlcNAcylation and chromatin remodeling in mammals: an up-to-date overview.

    PubMed

    Leturcq, Maïté; Lefebvre, Tony; Vercoutter-Edouart, Anne-Sophie

    2017-04-15

    Post-translational modifications of histones and the dynamic DNA methylation cycle are finely regulated by a myriad of chromatin-binding factors and chromatin-modifying enzymes. Epigenetic modifications ensure local changes in the architecture of chromatin, thus controlling in fine the accessibility of the machinery of transcription, replication or DNA repair to the chromatin. Over the past decade, the nutrient-sensor enzyme O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) has emerged as a modulator of chromatin remodeling. In mammals, OGT acts either directly through dynamic and reversible O-GlcNAcylation of histones and chromatin effectors, or in an indirect manner through its recruitment into chromatin-bound multiprotein complexes. In particular, there is an increasing amount of evidence of a cross-talk between OGT and the DNA dioxygenase ten-eleven translocation proteins that catalyze active DNA demethylation. Conversely, the stability of OGT itself can be controlled by the histone lysine-specific demethylase 2 (LSD2). Finally, a few studies have explored the role of O-GlcNAcase (OGA) in chromatin remodeling. In this review, we summarize the recent findings on the link between OGT, OGA and chromatin regulators in mammalian cellular models, and discuss their relevance in physiological and pathological conditions.

  4. Berberine protects against light-induced photoreceptor degeneration in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Song, Delu; Song, Jiantao; Wang, Chenguang; Li, Yafeng; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation play key roles in the light damage (LD) model of photoreceptor degeneration, as well as in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We sought to investigate whether Berberine (BBR), an antioxidant herb extract, would protect the retina against light-induced degeneration. To accomplish this, Balb/c mice were treated with BBR or PBS via gavage for 7 days, and then were placed in constant cool white light-emitting diode (LED) light (10,000 lux) for 4 h. Retinal function and degeneration were evaluated by histology, electroretinography (ERG) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) at 7d after LD. Additionally, mRNA levels of cell-type specific, antioxidant, and inflammatory genes were compared 7d after LD. Photoreceptor DNA fragmentation was assessed via the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. LD resulted in substantial photoreceptor-specific cell death. Histological analysis using plastic sections showed dosing with BBR preserved photoreceptors. The ERG analysis demonstrated functional protection by BBR in rod-b, -a, and cone-b waves. In OCT images, mice receiving PBS showed severe thinning and disorganization of the photoreceptor layer 7 days after LD, whereas mice treated with BBR had significantly less thinning and disorganization. Consistent with OCT results, the mRNA levels of Rho in the NSR, and Rpe65 and Mct3 in the RPE, were significantly higher in mice treated with BBR. The numbers of TUNEL-positive photoreceptors were significantly decreased in BBR-treated mice. The retinal mRNA levels of oxidative stress genes, the number of microglia/macrophages, and the malondialdehyde (MDA) immunolabeling were significantly lower in BBR-treated mice compared to controls 48 h after LD, which indicates oxidative stress was reduced by BBR in light-damaged eyes. In conclusion, systemic BBR is protective against light-induced retinal degeneration associated with diminished oxidative stress in the retina

  5. Molecular Toxicology of Chromatin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Role of Poly ADP-ribose. Poly ADP-ribosylated proteins were quantitatively isolated from livers of normal and dimethylnitrosamine treated Syrian hamsters...histone proteins (r180-200 kd) were poly ADP-ribosylated at least 6-9 fold over controls, in livers of dimethylnitrosamine treated Syrian hamsters (ref...34Quantitative Isolation of Oligo- and Polyadenosine-diphosphorylated Proteins by Affinity Chromatography from Livers of Normal and Dimethylnitrosamine - treated

  6. Laser light induced modulations in metabolic activities in human brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tata, Darrell B.; Waynant, Ronald W.

    2008-03-01

    The role of low visible or near infra-red laser intensity in suppressing metabolic activity of malignant human brain cancer (glioblastoma) cells was investigated through the application of either a continuous wave 633nm HeNe or a pulsed picosecond 1,552nm wavelength laser. Human glioblastomas were exposed in their growth culture medium with serum for several energy doses. For both types of laser exposures the glioblastomas exhibited a maximal decline in the metabolic activity relative to their respective sham control counterparts at 10 J/cm2. The cellular metabolic activities for various treatment doses were measured through the colorimetric MTS metabolic assay after the laser exposure. Interestingly, addition of (the enzyme) catalase in the growth medium prior to the laser exposure was found to diminish the laser induced metabolic suppression for all fluence treatment conditions, thus suggesting a functional role of H IIO II in the metabolic suppression. Taken together, our findings reveal that visible or near infra-red low level light exposures could potentially be a viable tool in reducing the metabolic activity of cancers; evidence at hand implicates a role of light induced H IIO II in bringing about in part, suppression in the metabolic activity. Due to the cellular "biphasic" response to the laser exposure, further research needs to be undertaken to determine exposure parameters which would optimize metabolic and cellular growth suppression in-vivo.

  7. Light-induced hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition: a facile and selective photoclick reaction.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Selvanathan; Popik, Vladimir V

    2011-04-13

    2-Napthoquinone-3-methides (oNQMs) generated by efficient photodehydration (Φ=0.2) of 3-(hydroxymethyl)-2-naphthol undergo facile hetero-Diels-Alder addition (k(D-A)∼ 4×10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) to electron-rich polarized olefins in an aqueous solution. The resulting photostable benzo[g]chromans are produced in high to quantitative yield. The unreacted oNQM is rapidly hydrated (k(H2O) ∼145 s(-1)) to regenerate the starting diol. This competition between hydration and cycloaddition makes oNQMs highly selective, since only vinyl ethers and enamines are reactive enough to form the Diels-Alder adduct in an aqueous solution; no cycloaddition was observed with other types of alkenes. To achieve photolabeling or photoligation of two substrates, one is derivatized with a vinyl ether moiety, while 3-(hydroxymethyl)-2-naphthol is attached to the other via an appropriate linker. The light-induced Diels-Alder "click" strategy permits the formation of either a permanent or hydrolytically labile linkage. Rapid kinetics of this photoclick reaction (k=4×10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) is useful for time-resolved applications. The short lifetime (τ ∼7 ms in H(2)O) of the active form of the photoclick reagent prevents its migration from the site of irradiation, thus, allowing for spatial control of the ligation or labeling.

  8. Improved expression of halorhodopsin for light-induced silencing of neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shengli; Cunha, Catarina; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Qun; Gloss, Bernd; Deisseroth, Karl; Augustine, George J; Feng, Guoping

    2008-08-01

    The ability to control and manipulate neuronal activity within an intact mammalian brain is of key importance for mapping functional connectivity and for dissecting the neural circuitry underlying behaviors. We have previously generated transgenic mice that express channelrhodopsin-2 for light-induced activation of neurons and mapping of neural circuits. Here we describe transgenic mice that express halorhodopsin (NpHR), a light-driven chloride pump that can be used to silence neuronal activity via light. Using the Thy-1 promoter to target NpHR expression to neurons, we found that neurons in these mice expressed high levels of NpHR-YFP and that illumination of cortical pyramidal neurons expressing NpHR-YFP led to rapid, reversible photoinhibition of action potential firing in these cells. However, NpHR-YFP expression led to the formation of numerous intracellular blebs, which may disrupt neuronal function. Labeling of various subcellular markers indicated that the blebs arise from retention of NpHR-YFP in the endoplasmic reticulum. By improving the signal peptide sequence and adding an ER export signal to NpHR-YFP, we eliminated the formation of blebs and dramatically increased the membrane expression of NpHR-YFP. Thus, the improved version of NpHR should serve as an excellent tool for neuronal silencing in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Histone lysine methylation and chromatin replication.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Carlos; Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Almouzni, Geneviève; Loyola, Alejandra

    2014-12-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, the replication of the DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin are critical to maintain genome integrity. Chromatin components, such as histone variants and histone post-translational modifications, along with the higher-order chromatin structure, impact several DNA metabolic processes, including replication, transcription, and repair. In this review we focus on lysine methylation and the relationships between this histone mark and chromatin replication. We first describe studies implicating lysine methylation in regulating early steps in the replication process. We then discuss chromatin reassembly following replication fork passage, where the incorporation of a combination of newly synthesized histones and parental histones can impact the inheritance of lysine methylation marks on the daughter strands. Finally, we elaborate on how the inheritance of lysine methylation can impact maintenance of the chromatin landscape, using heterochromatin as a model chromatin domain, and we discuss the potential mechanisms involved in this process.

  10. Chromatin structure as a mediator of aging.

    PubMed

    Feser, Jason; Tyler, Jessica

    2011-07-07

    The aging process is characterized by gradual changes to an organism's macromolecules, which negatively impacts biological processes. The complex macromolecular structure of chromatin regulates all nuclear processes requiring access to the DNA sequence. As such, maintenance of chromatin structure is an integral component to deter premature aging. In this review, we describe current research that links aging to chromatin structure. Histone modifications influence chromatin compaction and gene expression and undergo many changes during aging. Histone protein levels also decline during aging, dramatically affecting chromatin structure. Excitingly, lifespan can be extended by manipulations that reverse the age-dependent changes to chromatin structure, indicating the pivotal role chromatin structure plays during aging. Copyright © 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Phospholipids in plant and animal chromatin.

    PubMed

    Viola-Magni, M P; Gahan, P B; Pacy, J

    1985-01-01

    Isolated hepatic nuclei and hepatic chromatin have been analysed for their DNA, RNA, protein and phospholipid content. The protein/DNA ratio is 3 for nuclei and 1.95 for chromatin extracted from Triton X-100 treated nuclei. The phospholipids, (2.36 +/- 0.91 (S.D.) per cent of the total nuclear material), are lost during the chromatin preparation mainly during the Triton X-100 washings of the nuclei. Nevertheless, 10 per cent of the total nuclear phospholipids remain bound to the chromatin. The comparative analysis of both nuclei and chromatin shows a difference in phospholipids and fatty acid composition. Thus, the chromatin-associated phospholipid cannot be attributed simply to contaminating nuclear membrane. This is supported by the autoradiographic study of semi-thin sections of interphase nuclei from root apices of Vicia faba in which [3H] ethanolamine is clearly localized in the chromatin and nucleolar regions of the nuclei.

  12. Micron-scale coherence in interphase chromatin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zidovska, Alexandra; Weitz, David A.; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin structure and dynamics control all aspects of DNA biology yet are poorly understood, especially at large length scales. We developed an approach, displacement correlation spectroscopy based on time-resolved image correlation analysis, to map chromatin dynamics simultaneously across the whole nucleus in cultured human cells. This method revealed that chromatin movement was coherent across large regions (4–5 µm) for several seconds. Regions of coherent motion extended beyond the boundaries of single-chromosome territories, suggesting elastic coupling of motion over length scales much larger than those of genes. These large-scale, coupled motions were ATP dependent and unidirectional for several seconds, perhaps accounting for ATP-dependent directed movement of single genes. Perturbation of major nuclear ATPases such as DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase II, and topoisomerase II eliminated micron-scale coherence, while causing rapid, local movement to increase; i.e., local motions accelerated but became uncoupled from their neighbors. We observe similar trends in chromatin dynamics upon inducing a direct DNA damage; thus we hypothesize that this may be due to DNA damage responses that physically relax chromatin and block long-distance communication of forces. PMID:24019504

  13. Chromatin structure in telomere dynamics.

    PubMed

    Galati, Alessandra; Micheli, Emanuela; Cacchione, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of a specific nucleoprotein structure, the telomere, is required to ensure the protection of chromosome ends from being recognized as DNA damage sites. Telomere shortening below a critical length triggers a DNA damage response that leads to replicative senescence. In normal human somatic cells, characterized by telomere shortening with each cell division, telomere uncapping is a regulated process associated with cell turnover. Nevertheless, telomere dysfunction has also been associated with genomic instability, cell transformation, and cancer. Despite the essential role telomeres play in chromosome protection and in tumorigenesis, our knowledge of the chromatin structure involved in telomere maintenance is still limited. Here we review the recent findings on chromatin modifications associated with the dynamic changes of telomeres from protected to deprotected state and their role in telomere functions.

  14. Organisation of subunits in chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, B G; Baldwin, J P; Bradbury, E M; Ibel, K

    1976-01-01

    There is considerable current interest in the organisation of nucleosomes in chromatin. A strong X-ray and neutron semi-meridional diffraction peak at approximately 10 nm had previously been attributed to the interparticle specing of a linear array of nucleosomes. This diffraction peak could also result from a close packed helical array of nucleosomes. A direct test of these proposals is whether the 10 nm peak is truly meridional as would be expected for a linear array of nucleosomes or is slightly off the meridian as expected for a helical array. Neutron diffraction studies of H1-depleted chromatin support the latter alternative. The 10 nm peak has maxima which form a cross-pattern with semi-meridional angle of 8 to 9 degrees. This is consistent with a coil of nucleosomes of pitch 10 nm and outer diameter of approximately 30 nm. These dimensions correspond to about six nucleosomes per turn of the coli. PMID:967672

  15. Organisation of subunits in chromatin.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, B G; Baldwin, J P; Bradbury, E M; Ibel, K

    1976-07-01

    There is considerable current interest in the organisation of nucleosomes in chromatin. A strong X-ray and neutron semi-meridional diffraction peak at approximately 10 nm had previously been attributed to the interparticle specing of a linear array of nucleosomes. This diffraction peak could also result from a close packed helical array of nucleosomes. A direct test of these proposals is whether the 10 nm peak is truly meridional as would be expected for a linear array of nucleosomes or is slightly off the meridian as expected for a helical array. Neutron diffraction studies of H1-depleted chromatin support the latter alternative. The 10 nm peak has maxima which form a cross-pattern with semi-meridional angle of 8 to 9 degrees. This is consistent with a coil of nucleosomes of pitch 10 nm and outer diameter of approximately 30 nm. These dimensions correspond to about six nucleosomes per turn of the coli.

  16. Chromatin Structure in Telomere Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Galati, Alessandra; Micheli, Emanuela; Cacchione, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of a specific nucleoprotein structure, the telomere, is required to ensure the protection of chromosome ends from being recognized as DNA damage sites. Telomere shortening below a critical length triggers a DNA damage response that leads to replicative senescence. In normal human somatic cells, characterized by telomere shortening with each cell division, telomere uncapping is a regulated process associated with cell turnover. Nevertheless, telomere dysfunction has also been associated with genomic instability, cell transformation, and cancer. Despite the essential role telomeres play in chromosome protection and in tumorigenesis, our knowledge of the chromatin structure involved in telomere maintenance is still limited. Here we review the recent findings on chromatin modifications associated with the dynamic changes of telomeres from protected to deprotected state and their role in telomere functions. PMID:23471416

  17. CHROMATIN ASSEMBLY AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL CROSS-TALK IN XENOPUS LAEVIS OOCYTE AND EGG EXTRACTS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Lin; Shechter, David

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin, primarily a complex of DNA and histone proteins, is the physiological form of the genome. Chromatin is generally repressive for transcription and other information transactions that occur on DNA. A wealth of post-translational modifications on canonical histones and histone variants encode regulatory information to recruit or repel effector proteins on chromatin, promoting and further repressing transcription and thereby form the basis of epigenetic information. During metazoan oogenesis, large quantities of histone proteins are synthesized and stored in preparation for the rapid early cell cycles of development and to elicit maternal control of chromatin assembly pathways. Oocyte and egg cell-free extracts of the frog Xenopus laevis are a compelling model system for the study of chromatin assembly and transcription precisely because they exist in an extreme state primed for rapid chromatin assembly or for transcriptional activity. We show that chromatin assembly rates are slower in X. laevis oocyte than in egg extracts, while conversely only oocyte extracts transcribe template plasmids. We demonstrate that rapid chromatin assembly in egg extracts represses RNA Polymerase II dependent transcription, while pre-binding of TATA-Binding Protein (TBP) to a template plasmid promotes transcription. Our experimental evidence presented here supports a model in which chromatin assembly and transcription are in competition and that the onset of zygotic genomic activation may be in part due to stable transcriptional complex assembly. PMID:27759158

  18. The Proteomic Investigation of Chromatin Functional Domains Reveals Novel Synergisms among Distinct Heterochromatin Components*

    PubMed Central

    Soldi, Monica; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin is a highly dynamic, well-structured nucleoprotein complex of DNA and proteins that controls virtually all DNA transactions. Chromatin dynamicity is regulated at specific loci by the presence of various associated proteins, histones, post-translational modifications, histone variants, and DNA methylation. Until now the characterization of the proteomic component of chromatin domains has been held back by the challenge of enriching distinguishable, homogeneous regions for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we describe a modified protocol for chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with quantitative proteomics based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture to identify known and novel histone modifications, variants, and complexes that specifically associate with silent and active chromatin domains. Our chromatin proteomics strategy revealed unique functional interactions among various chromatin modifiers, suggesting new regulatory pathways, such as a heterochromatin-specific modulation of DNA damage response involving H2A.X and WICH, both enriched in silent domains. Chromatin proteomics expands the arsenal of tools for deciphering how all the distinct protein components act together to enforce a given region-specific chromatin status. PMID:23319141

  19. Chromatin modification and epigenetic reprogramming in mammalian development.

    PubMed

    Li, En

    2002-09-01

    The developmental programme of embryogenesis is controlled by both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. An emerging theme from recent studies is that the regulation of higher-order chromatin structures by DNA methylation and histone modification is crucial for genome reprogramming during early embryogenesis and gametogenesis, and for tissue-specific gene expression and global gene silencing. Disruptions to chromatin modification can lead to the dysregulation of developmental processes, such as X-chromosome inactivation and genomic imprinting, and to various diseases. Understanding the process of epigenetic reprogramming in development is important for studies of cloning and the clinical application of stem-cell therapy.

  20. Chromatin fractionation analysis of licensing factors in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Nishitani, Hideo; Morino, Masayuki; Murakami, Yusuke; Maeda, Takeshi; Shiomi, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    ORC, Cdc6, Cdt1, and MCM2-7 are replication-licensing factors, which play a central role in the once-per-cell cycle control of DNA replication. ORC, Cdc6, and Cdt1 collaborate to load MCM2-7 onto replication origins in order to license them for replication. MCM2-7 is a DNA helicase directly involved in DNA replication and dissociates from DNA as S phase progresses and each replicon is replicated. In the cell cycle, the loading of MCM2-7 is restricted during the end of mitosis and the G1 phase. Thus, the levels of chromatin-bound MCM2-7 and its loaders oscillate during the cell cycle. Chromatin association of these factors can be analyzed by separating a cell lysate into soluble and chromatin-enriched insoluble fractions in mammalian cells.

  1. pRb, a local chromatin organizer with global possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Longworth, Michelle S.; Dyson, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (Rb) family of proteins are well known for their tumor suppressor properties and for their ability to regulate transcription. The action of Rb-family members correlates with the appearance of repressive chromatin marks at promoter regions of genes encoding key regulators of cell proliferation. Recent studies raise the possibility that Rb family members do not simply act by controlling the activity of individual promoters but that they may also function by promoting the more general organization of chromatin. In several contexts, Rb-family members stimulate the compaction or condensation of chromatin and promote the formation of heterochromatin. In this review, we summarize studies that link pRb family members to the condensation or compaction of DNA. PMID:19714354

  2. Extension of chromatin accessibility by nuclear matrix attachment regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenuwein, Thomas; Forrester, William C.; Fernández-Herrero, Luis A.; Laible, Götz; Dull, Maude; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    1997-01-01

    Transcription of the variable region of the rearranged immunoglobulin μ gene is dependent on an enhancer sequence situated within one of the introns of the gene. Experiments with transgenic mice have shown that activation of the promoter controlling this transcription also requires the matrix-attachment regions (MARs) that flank the intronic enhancer1. As this μ gene enhancer can establish local areas of accessible chromatin2, we investigated whether the MARs can extend accessibility to more distal positions. We eliminated interactions between enhancer- and promoter-bound factors by linking μ enhancer/MAR fragments to the binding sites for bacteriophage RNA polymerases that were either close to or one kilobase distal to the enhancer. The μ enhancer alone mediated chromatin accessibility at the proximal site but required a flanking MAR to confer accessibility upon the distal promoter. This long-range accessibilty correlates with extended demethylation of the geμ enhancer to generate an extended domain of accessible chromatin.

  3. PIN auxin efflux carriers are necessary for pulse-induced but not continuous light-induced phototropism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Haga, Ken; Sakai, Tatsuya

    2012-10-01

    Auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are thought to have central roles in regulating asymmetrical auxin translocation during tropic responses, including gravitropism and phototropism, in plants. Although PIN3 is known to be involved in phototropism in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), no severe defects of phototropism in any of the pin mutants have been reported. We show here that the pulse-induced, first positive phototropism is impaired partially in pin1, pin3, and pin7 single mutants, and severely in triple mutants. In contrast, such impairment was not observed in continuous-light-induced second positive phototropism. Analysis with an auxin-reporter gene demonstrated that PIN3-mediated auxin gradients participate in pulse-induced phototropism but not in continuous-light-induced phototropism. Similar functional separation was also applicable to PINOID, a regulator of PIN localization. Our results strongly suggest the existence of functionally distinct mechanisms i.e. a PIN-dependent mechanism in which transient stimulation is sufficient to induce phototropism, and a PIN-independent mechanism that requires continuous stimulation and does not operate in the former phototropism process. Although a previous study has proposed that blue-light photoreceptors, the phototropins, control PIN localization through the transcriptional down-regulation of PINOID, we could not detect this blue-light-dependent down-regulation event, suggesting that other as yet unknown mechanisms are involved in phototropin-mediated phototropic responses.

  4. Effect of LED photobiomodulation on fluorescent light induced changes in cellular ATPases and Cytochrome c oxidase activity in Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    A, Ahamed Basha; C, Mathangi D; R, Shyamala

    2016-12-01

    Fluorescent light exposure at night alters cellular enzyme activities resulting in health defects. Studies have demonstrated that light emitting diode photobiomodulation enhances cellular enzyme activities. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the effects of fluorescent light induced changes in cellular enzymes and to assess the protective role of pre exposure to 670 nm LED in rat model. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into 10 groups of 6 animals each based on duration of exposure (1, 15, and 30 days) and exposure regimen (cage control, exposure to fluorescent light [1800 lx], LED preexposure followed by fluorescent light exposure and only LED exposure). Na(+)-K(+) ATPase, Ca(2+) ATPase, and cytochrome c oxidase of the brain, heart, kidney, liver, and skeletal muscle were assayed. Animals of the fluorescent light exposure group showed a significant reduction in Na(+)-K(+) ATPase and Ca(2+) ATPase activities in 1 and 15 days and their increase in animals of 30-day group in most of the regions studied. Cytochrome c oxidase showed increase in their level at all the time points assessed in most of the tissues. LED light preexposure showed a significant enhancement in the degree of increase in the enzyme activities in almost all the tissues and at all the time points assessed. This study demonstrates the protective effect of 670 nm LED pre exposure on cellular enzymes against fluorescent light induced change.

  5. Light induced degradation of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, T.; Förster, S.; Schneider, T.; Maiberg, M.; Widdra, W.; Scheer, R.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate light-induced degradation of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) layers by means of time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements. Illumination in the range of minutes with 1 sun white light equivalent leads to a strong reduction of the carrier lifetime as determined by TRPL. Ambient storage in the dark, however, does not cause degradation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the CIGSe surface reveals a light induced enhancement of Na 1s and O 1s core-level emission. The position of the O 1s peak at 531.6 eV is related to a Na-O-CIGSe bonding complex. The light-induced degradation of the CIGSe layer finally translates into inferior open circuit voltages due to the dominance of interface recombination in completed solar cell devices. This study has implications for laboratory research and may need to be regarded in CIGSe module production.

  6. Hexyl glucoside and hexyl maltoside inhibit light-induced oxidation of tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Adem, Yilma T; Molina, Patricia; Liu, Hongbin; Patapoff, Thomas W; Sreedhara, Alavattam; Esue, Osigwe

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the photo-protective effect of sugar-based surfactants--hexyl glucoside and hexyl maltoside--against light-induced oxidation of a monoclonal antibody. Reactive oxygen species are generated in solutions in the presence of light; these reactive species readily oxidize amino acids such as tryptophan. Hexyl glucosides and hexyl maltosides scavenge these reactive species and protect tryptophan residues from light-induced oxidation in a concentration-dependent manner. As a result of the scavenging process, hydrogen peroxide is formed, especially at high (millimolar) concentrations of the alkyl glycoside surfactants. These results suggest that hexyl glucoside and hexyl maltoside have the potential to protect tryptophan residues against light-induced oxidation.

  7. Visible Light Induced Organic Transformations Using Metal-Organic-Frameworks (MOFs).

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaoyu; Li, Zhaohui; García, Hermenegildo

    2017-08-22

    With the aim of developing renewable energy based processes, researchers are paying increasing interest to light induced organic transformations. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a class of micro-/mesoporous hybrid materials, are recently emerging as a new type of photoactive materials for organic syntheses due to their unique structural characteristics. In this Review, we summarized the recent applications of MOFs as photocatalysts for light induced organic transformations, including (1) oxidation of alcohols, amines, alkene, alkanes and sulfides; (2) hydroxylation of aromatic compounds like benzene; (3) activation of the C-H bonds to construct new C-C or C-X bonds; (4) atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). This Review starts with general background information of using MOFs in photocatalysis, followed by a description of light induced organic transformations promoted by photoactive inorganic nodes and photocatalytic active ligands in MOFs, respectively. Thereafter, the use of MOFs as multifunctional catalysts for light induced organic transformations via an efficient merge of the metal/ligand/guest based catalysis where the photocatalytic activity of MOFs plays a key role are discussed. Finally, the limitations, challenges and the future perspective of the application of MOFs for light induced organic transformations were addressed. The objective of this Review is to serve as a starting point for other researchers to get into this largely unexplored field. It is also our goal to stimulate intensive research in this field for rational designing of MOF materials to overcome their current limitations in photocatalysis, which can lead to more creative visible-light-induced organic transformations. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A positive but complex association between meiotic double-strand break hotspots and open chromatin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Berchowitz, Luke E; Hanlon, Sean E; Lieb, Jason D; Copenhaver, Gregory P

    2009-12-01

    During meiosis, chromatin undergoes extensive changes to facilitate recombination, homolog pairing, and chromosome segregation. To investigate the relationship between chromatin organization and meiotic processes, we used formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE) to map open chromatin during the transition from mitosis to meiosis in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that meiosis-induced opening of chromatin is associated with meiotic DSB hotpots. The positive association between open chromatin and DSB hotspots is most prominent 3 h into meiosis, when the early meiotic genes DMC1 and HOP1 exhibit maximum transcription and the early recombination genes SPO11 and RAD51 are strongly up-regulated. While the degree of chromatin openness is positively associated with the occurrence of recombination hotspots, many hotspots occur outside of open chromatin. Of particular interest, many DSB hotspots that fell outside of meiotic open chromatin nonetheless occurred in chromatin that had recently been open during mitotic growth. Finally, we find evidence for meiosis-specific opening of chromatin at the regions adjacent to boundaries of subtelomeric sequences, which exhibit specific crossover control patterns hypothesized to be regulated by chromatin.

  9. Chromatin signatures of the Drosophila replication program

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Matthew L.; Prinz, Joseph A.; MacAlpine, Heather K.; Tretyakov, George; Kharchenko, Peter V.; MacAlpine, David M.

    2011-01-01

    DNA replication initiates from thousands of start sites throughout the Drosophila genome and must be coordinated with other ongoing nuclear processes such as transcription to ensure genetic and epigenetic inheritance. Considerable progress has been made toward understanding how chromatin modifications regulate the transcription program; in contrast, we know relatively little about the role of the chromatin landscape in defining how start sites of DNA replication are selected and regulated. Here, we describe the Drosophila replication program in the context of the chromatin and transcription landscape for multiple cell lines using data generated by the modENCODE consortium. We find that while the cell lines exhibit similar replication programs, there are numerous cell line-specific differences that correlate with changes in the chromatin architecture. We identify chromatin features that are associated with replication timing, early origin usage, and ORC binding. Primary sequence, activating chromatin marks, and DNA-binding proteins (including chromatin remodelers) contribute in an additive manner to specify ORC-binding sites. We also generate accurate and predictive models from the chromatin data to describe origin usage and strength between cell lines. Multiple activating chromatin modifications contribute to the function and relative strength of replication origins, suggesting that the chromatin environment does not regulate origins of replication as a simple binary switch, but rather acts as a tunable rheostat to regulate replication initiation events. PMID:21177973

  10. Chromatin signatures of the Drosophila replication program.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Matthew L; Prinz, Joseph A; MacAlpine, Heather K; Tretyakov, George; Kharchenko, Peter V; MacAlpine, David M

    2011-02-01

    DNA replication initiates from thousands of start sites throughout the Drosophila genome and must be coordinated with other ongoing nuclear processes such as transcription to ensure genetic and epigenetic inheritance. Considerable progress has been made toward understanding how chromatin modifications regulate the transcription program; in contrast, we know relatively little about the role of the chromatin landscape in defining how start sites of DNA replication are selected and regulated. Here, we describe the Drosophila replication program in the context of the chromatin and transcription landscape for multiple cell lines using data generated by the modENCODE consortium. We find that while the cell lines exhibit similar replication programs, there are numerous cell line-specific differences that correlate with changes in the chromatin architecture. We identify chromatin features that are associated with replication timing, early origin usage, and ORC binding. Primary sequence, activating chromatin marks, and DNA-binding proteins (including chromatin remodelers) contribute in an additive manner to specify ORC-binding sites. We also generate accurate and predictive models from the chromatin data to describe origin usage and strength between cell lines. Multiple activating chromatin modifications contribute to the function and relative strength of replication origins, suggesting that the chromatin environment does not regulate origins of replication as a simple binary switch, but rather acts as a tunable rheostat to regulate replication initiation events.

  11. Light-induced crawling of crystals on a glass surface

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Emi; Azumi, Reiko; Norikane, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Motion is an essential process for many living organisms and for artificial robots and machines. To date, creating self-propelled motion in nano-to-macroscopic-sized objects has been a challenging issue for scientists. Herein, we report the directional and continuous motion of crystals on a glass surface when irradiated simultaneously with two different wavelengths, using simple azobenzenes as a photoresponsive organic compound. The direction of the motion can be controlled by the position of the light sources, and the crystals can even climb vertical surfaces. The motion is driven by crystallization and melting at the front and rear edges of the crystal, respectively, via photochemical conversion between the crystal and liquid phases induced by the trans–cis isomerization of azobenzenes. This finding could lead to remote-controlled micrometre-sized vehicles and valves on solid substrates. PMID:26084483

  12. Light-induced crawling of crystals on a glass surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Emi; Azumi, Reiko; Norikane, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    Motion is an essential process for many living organisms and for artificial robots and machines. To date, creating self-propelled motion in nano-to-macroscopic-sized objects has been a challenging issue for scientists. Herein, we report the directional and continuous motion of crystals on a glass surface when irradiated simultaneously with two different wavelengths, using simple azobenzenes as a photoresponsive organic compound. The direction of the motion can be controlled by the position of the light sources, and the crystals can even climb vertical surfaces. The motion is driven by crystallization and melting at the front and rear edges of the crystal, respectively, via photochemical conversion between the crystal and liquid phases induced by the trans-cis isomerization of azobenzenes. This finding could lead to remote-controlled micrometre-sized vehicles and valves on solid substrates.

  13. Chromatin endogenous cleavage and psoralen crosslinking assays to analyze rRNA gene chromatin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Griesenbeck, Joachim; Wittner, Manuel; Charton, Romain; Conconi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, multiple copies of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes co-exist in two different chromatin states: actively transcribed (nucleosome depleted) chromatin, and nontranscribed (nucleosomal) chromatin. The presence of two rRNA gene populations compromises the interpretation of analyses obtained by the standard biochemical methods that are used to study chromatin structure (e.g., nuclease digestion and chromatin immunoprecipitation). Here, we provide a protocol to investigate the specific association of proteins with the two rRNA gene chromatin populations in vivo, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model eukaryote.

  14. Theory of Light-Induced Drift of Electrons in Coupled Quantum Wells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    AD-A253 609 OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Grant N00014-90-J- 1193 TECHNICAL REPORT No. 89 Theory of Light-Induced Drift of Electrons in Coupled Quantum...AGENCY USE ONLY (Lepave &as*) 12. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED I July 1992 IInterim 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMNERS Theory of...CODE Approved for public release; distribution unlimited I 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum,,OO woins) A theory of the new effect of light-induced drift (LID) in

  15. On the mechanochemical machinery underlying chromatin remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.

    This dissertation discuss two recent efforts, via a unique combination of structural bioinformatics and density functional theory, to unravel some of the details concerning how molecular machinery within the eukaryotic cell nucleus controls chromatin architecture. The first, a study of the 5-methylation of cytosine in 5'-CG-3' : 5'-CG-3' base-pair steps, reveals that the methyl groups roughen the local elastic energy landscape of the DNA. This enhances the probability of the canonical B-DNA structure transitioning into the undertwisted A-like and overtwisted C-like forms seen in nucleosomes, or looped segments of DNA bound to histones. The second part focuses on the formation of salt bridges between arginine residues in histones and phosphate groups on the DNA backbone. The arginine residues are ob- served to apply a tunable mechanical load to the backbone, enabling precision-controlled activation of DNA deformations.

  16. Environmental car exhaust pollution damages human sperm chromatin and DNA.

    PubMed

    Calogero, A E; La Vignera, S; Condorelli, R A; Perdichizzi, A; Valenti, D; Asero, P; Carbone, U; Boggia, B; De Rosa, N; Lombardi, G; D'Agata, R; Vicari, L O; Vicari, E; De Rosa, M

    2011-06-01

    The adverse role of traffic pollutants on male fertility is well known. Aim of this study was to evaluate their effects on sperm chromatin/DNA integrity. To accomplish this, 36 men working at motorway tollgates and 32 unexposed healthy men (controls) were enrolled. All of them were interviewed about their lifestyle. Hormone, semen samples, and environmental and biological markers of pollution were evaluated. Sperm chromatin and DNA integrity were evaluated by flow cytometry following propidium iodide staining and TUNEL assay, respectively. LH, FSH, and testosterone serum levels were within the normal range in tollgate workers. Sperm concentration, total sperm count, total and progressive motility, and normal forms were significantly lower in these men compared with controls. Motorway tollgate workers had a significantly higher percentage of spermatozoa with damaged chromatin and DNA fragmentation, a late sign of apoptosis, compared with controls. A significant direct correlation was found between spermatozoa with damaged chromatin or fragmented DNA and the length of occupational exposure, suggesting a time-dependent relationship. This study showed that car exhaust exposure has a genotoxic effect on human spermatozoa. This may be of relevant importance not only for the reproductive performance of the men exposed, but also for the offspring health.

  17. Light-induced protein degradation in human-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wansheng; Zhang, Wenyao; Zhang, Chao; Mao, Miaowei; Zhao, Yuzheng; Chen, Xianjun; Yang, Yi

    2017-05-27

    Controlling protein degradation can be a valuable tool for posttranslational regulation of protein abundance to study complex biological systems. In the present study, we designed a light-switchable degron consisting of a light oxygen voltage (LOV) domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1 (AsLOV2) and a C-terminal degron. Our results showed that the light-switchable degron could be used for rapid and specific induction of protein degradation in HEK293 cells by light in a proteasome-dependent manner. Further studies showed that the light-switchable degron could also be utilized to mediate the degradation of secreted Gaussia princeps luciferase (GLuc), demonstrating the adaptability of the light-switchable degron in different types of protein. We suggest that the light-switchable degron offers a robust tool to control protein levels and may serves as a new and significant method for gene- and cell-based therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Light-Induced Alterations in Striatal Neurochemical Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sroufe, Angela E.; Whittaker, J. A.; Patrickson, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Much of our present knowledge regarding circadian rhythms and biological activity during space flight has been derived from those missions orbiting the Earth. During space missions, astronauts can become exposed to bright/dark cycles that vary considerably from those that entrain the mammalian biological timing system to the 24-hour cycle found on Earth. As a spacecraft orbits the Earth, the duration of the light/dark period experienced becomes a function of the time it takes to circumnavigate the planet which in turn depends upon the altitude of the craft. Orbiting the Earth at an altitude of 200-800 km provides a light/dark cycle lasting between 80 and 140 minutes, whereas a voyage to the moon or even another planet would provide a light condition of constant light. Currently, little is known regarding the effects of altered light/dark cycles on neurochemical levels within the central nervous system (CNS). Many biochemical, physiological and behavioral phenomena are under circadian control, governed primarily by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. As such, these phenomena are subject to influence by the environmental light/dark cycle. Circadian variations in locomotor and behavioral activities have been correlated to both the environmental light/dark cycle and to dopamine (DA) levels within the CNS. It has been postulated by Martin-Iverson et al. that DA's role in the control of motor activity is subject to modulation by circadian rhythms (CR), environmental lighting and excitatory amino acids (EAAs). In addition, DA and EAA receptor regulated pathways are involved in both the photic entrainment of CR and the control of motor activity. The cellular mechanisms by which DA and EAA-receptor ligands execute these functions, is still unclear. In order to help elucidate these mechanisms, we set out to determine the effects of altered environmental light/dark cycles on CNS neurotransmitter levels. In this study, we focused on the striatum, a region of the brain

  19. Chromatin fiber polymorphism triggered by variations of DNA linker lengths.

    PubMed

    Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; Schlick, Tamar

    2014-06-03

    Deciphering the factors that control chromatin fiber structure is key to understanding fundamental chromosomal processes. Although details remain unknown, it is becoming clear that chromatin is polymorphic depending on internal and external factors. In particular, different lengths of the linker DNAs joining successive nucleosomes (measured in nucleosome-repeat lengths or NRLs) that characterize different cell types and cell cycle stages produce different structures. NRL is also nonuniform within single fibers, but how this diversity affects chromatin fiber structure is not clear. Here we perform Monte Carlo simulations of a coarse-grained oligonucleosome model to help interpret fiber structure subject to intrafiber NRL variations, as relevant to proliferating cells of interphase chromatin, fibers subject to remodeling factors, and regulatory DNA sequences. We find that intrafiber NRL variations have a profound impact on chromatin structure, with a wide range of different architectures emerging (highly bent narrow forms, canonical and irregular zigzag fibers, and polymorphic conformations), depending on the NRLs mixed. This stabilization of a wide range of fiber forms might allow NRL variations to regulate both fiber compaction and selective DNA exposure. The polymorphic forms spanning canonical to sharply bent structures, like hairpins and loops, arise from large NRL variations and are surprisingly more compact than uniform NRL structures. They are distinguished by tail-mediated far-nucleosome interactions, in addition to the near-nucleosome interactions of canonical 30-nm fibers. Polymorphism is consistent with chromatin's diverse biological functions and heterogeneous constituents. Intrafiber NRL variations, in particular, may contribute to fiber bending and looping and thus to distant communication in associated regulatory processes.

  20. Molecular-scale dynamics of light-induced spin cross-over in a two-dimensional layer

    PubMed Central

    Bairagi, Kaushik; Iasco, Olga; Bellec, Amandine; Kartsev, Alexey; Li, Dongzhe; Lagoute, Jérôme; Chacon, Cyril; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Miserque, Frédéric; Dappe, Yannick J; Smogunov, Alexander; Barreteau, Cyrille; Boillot, Marie-Laure; Mallah, Talal; Repain, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Spin cross-over molecules show the unique ability to switch between two spin states when submitted to external stimuli such as temperature, light or voltage. If controlled at the molecular scale, such switches would be of great interest for the development of genuine molecular devices in spintronics, sensing and for nanomechanics. Unfortunately, up to now, little is known on the behaviour of spin cross-over molecules organized in two dimensions and their ability to show cooperative transformation. Here we demonstrate that a combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy measurements and ab initio calculations allows discriminating unambiguously between both states by local vibrational spectroscopy. We also show that a single layer of spin cross-over molecules in contact with a metallic surface displays light-induced collective processes between two ordered mixed spin-state phases with two distinct timescale dynamics. These results open a way to molecular scale control of two-dimensional spin cross-over layers. PMID:27425776

  1. A Structurally-Tunable 3-Hydroxyflavone Motif for Visible Light-Induced Carbon Monoxide-Releasing Molecules (CORMs)**

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stacey N; Richards, Jason M; Esquer, Hector J; Benninghoff, Abby D; Arif, Atta M; Berreau, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Molecules that can be used to deliver a controlled amount of carbon monoxide (CO) have the potential to facilitate investigations into the roles of this gaseous molecule in biology and advance therapeutic treatments. This has led to the development of light-induced CO-releasing molecules (photoCORMs). A goal in this field of research is the development of molecules that exhibit a combination of controlled CO release, favorable biological properties (e.g., low toxicity and trackability in cells), and structural tunability to affect CO release. Herein, we report a new biologically-inspired organic photoCORM motif that exhibits several features that are desirable in a next-generation photoCORM. We show that 3-hydroxyflavone-based compounds are easily synthesized and modified to impart changes in absorption features and quantum yield for CO release, exhibit low toxicity, are trackable in cells, and can exhibit both O2-dependent and -independent CO release reactivity. PMID:26491637

  2. A Structurally-Tunable 3-Hydroxyflavone Motif for Visible Light-Induced Carbon Monoxide-Releasing Molecules (CORMs).

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stacey N; Richards, Jason M; Esquer, Hector J; Benninghoff, Abby D; Arif, Atta M; Berreau, Lisa M

    2015-10-01

    Molecules that can be used to deliver a controlled amount of carbon monoxide (CO) have the potential to facilitate investigations into the roles of this gaseous molecule in biology and advance therapeutic treatments. This has led to the development of light-induced CO-releasing molecules (photoCORMs). A goal in this field of research is the development of molecules that exhibit a combination of controlled CO release, favorable biological properties (e.g., low toxicity and trackability in cells), and structural tunability to affect CO release. Herein, we report a new biologically-inspired organic photoCORM motif that exhibits several features that are desirable in a next-generation photoCORM. We show that 3-hydroxyflavone-based compounds are easily synthesized and modified to impart changes in absorption features and quantum yield for CO release, exhibit low toxicity, are trackable in cells, and can exhibit both O2-dependent and -independent CO release reactivity.

  3. Light-induced regulation of ligand-gated channel activity.

    PubMed

    Bregestovski, Piotr; Maleeva, Galyna; Gorostiza, Pau

    2017-08-31

    The control of ligand-gated receptors with light using photochromic compounds has evolved from the first handcrafted examples to accurate, engineered receptors, whose development is supported by rational design, high-resolution protein structures, comparative pharmacology and molecular biology manipulations. Photoswitchable regulators have been designed and characterized for a large number of ligand-gated receptors in the mammalian nervous system, including nicotinic acetylcholine, glutamate and GABA receptors. They provide a well-equipped toolbox to investigate synaptic and neuronal circuits in all-optical experiments. This focused review discusses the design and properties of these photoswitches, their applications and shortcomings and future perspectives in the field. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Characterization of the RNA content of chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Tanmoy; Rasmussen, Markus; Pandey, Gaurav Kumar; Isaksson, Anders; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2010-01-01

    Noncoding RNA (ncRNA) constitutes a significant portion of the mammalian transcriptome. Emerging evidence suggests that it regulates gene expression in cis or trans by modulating the chromatin structure. To uncover the functional role of ncRNA in chromatin organization, we deep sequenced chromatin-associated RNAs (CARs) from human fibroblast (HF) cells. This resulted in the identification of 141 intronic regions and 74 intergenic regions harboring CARs. The intronic and intergenic CARs show significant conservation across 44 species of placental mammals. Functional characterization of one of the intergenic CARs, Intergenic10, revealed that it regulates gene expression of neighboring genes through modulating the chromatin structure in cis. Our data suggest that ncRNA is an integral component of chromatin and that it may regulate various biological functions through fine-tuning of the chromatin architecture. PMID:20404130

  5. Proteomics of a fuzzy organelle: interphase chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Kustatscher, Georg; Hégarat, Nadia; Wills, Karen L H; Furlan, Cristina; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Hochegger, Helfrid; Rappsilber, Juri

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin proteins mediate replication, regulate expression, and ensure integrity of the genome. So far, a comprehensive inventory of interphase chromatin has not been determined. This is largely due to its heterogeneous and dynamic composition, which makes conclusive biochemical purification difficult, if not impossible. As a fuzzy organelle, it defies classical organellar proteomics and cannot be described by a single and ultimate list of protein components. Instead, we propose a new approach that provides a quantitative assessment of a protein's probability to function in chromatin. We integrate chromatin composition over a range of different biochemical and biological conditions. This resulted in interphase chromatin probabilities for 7635 human proteins, including 1840 previously uncharacterized proteins. We demonstrate the power of our large-scale data-driven annotation during the analysis of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) regulation in chromatin. Quantitative protein ontologies may provide a general alternative to list-based investigations of organelles and complement Gene Ontology. PMID:24534090

  6. Androgen receptor overexpression alters binding dynamics of the receptor to chromatin and chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Urbanucci, Alfonso; Marttila, Saara; Jänne, Olli A; Visakorpi, Tapio

    2012-08-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPCs) overexpress often androgen receptor (AR). Here, we investigated the effect of AR overexpression on the dynamics of AR loading and RNA polymerase II (RNA Pol II) recruitment to chromatin. Acetylation of histone 3 (AcH3) on lysines 9 and 14 (K9 and K14) was also studied. We used an LNCaP-based AR overexpression cell line model that includes a control line and two sublines, LNCaP-ARmo and LNCaP-ARhi, which overexpress AR twofold to threefold and fourfold to fivefold, respectively. Cells were exposed to 1 or 100 nM of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) on the promoters and enhancers of prostate specific antigen (PSA) and transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2) genes was performed. qRT-PCR was used to measure the levels of PSA and TMPRSS2 transcripts. Upon stimulation with 1 nM DHT, AR and RNA Pol II were recruited onto PSA and TMPRSS2 enhancer regions to a greater extent (P < 0.05) in AR-overexpressing cells compared to control cells. The difference in AR loading between the control and AR-overexpressing cells was abolished by a higher DHT concentration. The ratio of AcH3/H3 was increased in AR-overexpressing cells. The induction of transcription of PSA and TMPRSS2 occurred earlier in the AR-overexpressing cells. Our findings suggest that the levels of AR potentiate the recruitment of the AR, as well as components of the basic transcription machinery, to chromatin and affect the acetylation of histones in the presence of low levels of androgens. These changes result in enhanced gene transcription of AR target genes. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Light-induced electron localization in a quantum Hall system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikawa, T.; Hyodo, K.; Kadoya, Y.; Tanaka, K.

    2017-07-01

    An insulating bulk state is a prerequisite for the protection of topological edge states. In quantum Hall systems, the thermal excitation of delocalized electrons is the main route to breaking bulk insulation. In equilibrium, the only way to achieve a clear bulk gap is to use a high-quality crystal under high magnetic field at low temperature. However, bulk conduction could also be suppressed in a system driven out of equilibrium such that localized states in the Landau levels are selectively occupied. Here we report a transient suppression of bulk conduction induced by terahertz wave excitation between the Landau levels in a GaAs quantum Hall system. Strikingly, the Hall resistivity almost reaches the quantized value at a temperature where the exact quantization is normally disrupted by thermal fluctuations. The electron localization is realized by the long-range potential fluctuations, which are a unique and inherent feature of quantum Hall systems. Our results demonstrate a new means of effecting dynamical control of topology by manipulating bulk conduction using light.

  8. Local light-induced magnetization using nanodots and chiral molecules.

    PubMed

    Dor, Oren Ben; Morali, Noam; Yochelis, Shira; Baczewski, Lech Tomasz; Paltiel, Yossi

    2014-11-12

    With the increasing demand for miniaturization, nanostructures are likely to become the primary components of future integrated circuits. Different approaches are being pursued toward achieving efficient electronics, among which are spin electronics devices (spintronics). In principle, the application of spintronics should result in reducing the power consumption of electronic devices. Recently a new, promising, effective approach for spintronics has emerged, using spin selectivity in electron transport through chiral molecules. In this work, using chiral molecules and nanocrystals, we achieve local spin-based magnetization generated optically at ambient temperatures. Through the chiral layer, a spin torque can be transferred without permanent charge transfer from the nanocrystals to a thin ferromagnetic layer, creating local perpendicular magnetization. We used Hall sensor configuration and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure the induced local magnetization. At low temperatures, anomalous spin Hall effects were measured using a thin Ni layer. The results may lead to optically controlled spintronics logic devices that will enable low power consumption, high density, and cheap fabrication.

  9. Light-induced modification of plant plasma membrane ion transport.

    PubMed

    Marten, I; Deeken, R; Hedrich, R; Roelfsema, M R G

    2010-09-01

    Light is not only the driving force for electron and ion transport in the thylakoid membrane, but also regulates ion transport in various other membranes of plant cells. Light-dependent changes in ion transport at the plasma membrane and associated membrane potential changes have been studied intensively over the last century. These studies, with various species and cell types, revealed that apart from regulation by chloroplasts, plasma membrane transport can be controlled by phytochromes, phototropins or channel rhodopsins. In this review, we compare light-dependent plasma membrane responses of unicellular algae (Eremosphaera and Chlamydomonas), with those of a multicellular alga (Chara), liverworts (Conocephalum), mosses (Physcomitrella) and several angiosperm cell types. Light-dependent plasma membrane responses of Eremosphaera and Chara are characterised by the dominant role of K(+) channels during membrane potential changes. In most other species, the Ca(2+)-dependent activation of plasma membrane anion channels represents a general light-triggered event. Cell type-specific responses are likely to have evolved by modification of this general response or through the development of additional light-dependent signalling pathways. Future research to elucidate these light-activated signalling chains is likely to benefit from the recent identification of S-type anion channel genes and proteins capable of regulating these channels.

  10. Light-induced nonthermal population of optical phonons in nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcão, Bruno P.; Leitão, Joaquim P.; Correia, Maria R.; Soares, Maria R.; Wiggers, Hartmut; Cantarero, Andrés; Pereira, Rui N.

    2017-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is widely used to study bulk and nanomaterials, where information is frequently obtained from spectral line positions and intensities. In this study, we monitored the Raman spectrum of ensembles of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) as a function of optical excitation intensity (optical excitation experiments). We observe that in NCs the red-shift of the Raman peak position with increasing light power density is much steeper than that recorded for the corresponding bulk material. The increase in optical excitation intensity results also in an increasingly higher temperature of the NCs as obtained with Raman thermometry through the commonly used Stokes/anti-Stokes intensity ratio. More significantly, the obtained dependence of the Raman peak position on temperature in optical excitation experiments is markedly different from that observed when the same NCs are excited only thermally (thermal excitation experiments). This difference is not observed for the control bulk material. The inefficient diffusion of photogenerated charges in nanoparticulate systems, due to their inherently low electrical conductivity, results in a higher steady-state density of photoexcited charges and, consequently, also in a stronger excitation of optical phonons that cannot decay quickly enough into acoustic phonons. This results in a nonthermal population of optical phonons and thus the Raman spectrum deviates from that expected for the temperature of the system. Our study has major consequences to the general application of Raman spectroscopy to nanomaterials.

  11. The Chd Family of Chromatin Remodelers

    PubMed Central

    Marfella, Concetta G.A.; Imbalzano, Anthony N.

    2007-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling enzymes contribute to the dynamic changes that occur in chromatin structure during cellular processes such as transcription, recombination, repair, and replication. Members of the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding (Chd) family of enzymes belong to the SNF2 superfamily of ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers. The Chd proteins are distinguished by the presence of two N-terminal chromodomains that function as interaction surfaces for a variety of chromatin components. Genetic, biochemical, and structural studies demonstrate that Chd proteins are important regulators of transcription and play critical roles during developmental processes. Numerous Chd proteins are also implicated in human disease. PMID:17350655

  12. Genome-Wide Views of Chromatin Structure

    PubMed Central

    Rando, Oliver J.; Chang, Howard Y.

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packaged into a nucleoprotein complex known as chromatin, which affects most processes that occur on DNA. Along with genetic and biochemical studies of resident chromatin proteins and their modifying enzymes, mapping of chromatin structure in vivo is one of the main pillars in our understanding of how chromatin relates to cellular processes. In this review, we discuss the use of genomic technologies to characterize chromatin structure in vivo, with a focus on data from budding yeast and humans. The picture emerging from these studies is the detailed chromatin structure of a typical gene, where the typical behavior gives insight into the mechanisms and deep rules that establish chromatin structure. Important deviation from the archetype is also observed, usually as a consequence of unique regulatory mechanisms at special genomic loci. Chromatin structure shows substantial conservation from yeast to humans, but mammalian chromatin has additional layers of complexity that likely relate to the requirements of multicellularity such as the need to establish faithful gene regulatory mechanisms for cell differentiation. PMID:19317649

  13. Light-induced inhibition of laccase in Pycnoporus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Christian A; Perroni, Yareni; Pérez, José Antonio García; Rivera, Beatriz Gutiérrez; Alarcón, Enrique

    2016-03-01

    The aim was to determine which specific regions of the visible light spectrum were responsible for the induction or inhibition of laccase in Pycnoporus sanguineus. Cultures were exposed to various bandwidth lights: blue (460 nm), green (525 nm), white (a combination of 460 and 560 nm), red (660 nm), and darkness. The results indicate that short wavelengths strongly inhibit the production of laccase: green (3.76 ± 1.12 U/L), blue (1.94 ± 0.36 U/L), and white (1.05 ± 0.21 U/L) in proportions of 85.8, 92.6, and 96.0%, respectively; whereas long wavelengths inhibit laccase production only partially i.e., red light (14.05 ± 4.79 U/L) in a proportion of 46.8%. Maximum activity was induced in absence of visible light (30 °C, darkness), i.e., 30.76 ± 4.0 U/L. It is concluded that the production of laccase in P. sanguineus responds to light stimuli [measured as wavelengths and lx] and that it does so inversely. This can be explained as an ecological mechanism of environmental recognition, given that P. sanguineus develops inside lignocellulose structures in conditions of darkness. The presence of short wavelength light (460-510 nm) would indicate that the organism finds itself in an external environment, unprovided of lignin, and that it is therefore unnecessary to secrete laccase. This possible new regulation in the laccase production in P. sanguineus has important biotechnological implications, for it would be possible to control the production of laccase using light stimuli.

  14. Visible-light-induced chemoselective reductive decarboxylative alkynylation under biomolecule-compatible conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Zhang, Jing; Qi, Li; Hu, Chenchen; Chen, Yiyun

    2015-03-28

    We report a visible-light-induced reductive decarboxylative C(sp(3))-C(sp) bond coupling reaction to construct aryl, alkyl and silyl substituted alkynes at room temperature in organic solvents or neutral aqueous solutions. This chemoselective alkynylation was compatible with various functional groups and biomolecules, and did not affect the protein enzyme activity.

  15. Reply to Comment on Light-induced atomic desorption and diffusion of Rb from porous alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Villalba, S.; Failache, H.; Lezama, A.

    2010-11-15

    We argue that the model used in our paper [Phys. Rev. A 81, 032901 (2010)] for the analysis of the experimental study of light-induced atomic desorption in porous alumina is the simplest consistent approach to a previously unexplored physical system.

  16. Phototropins mediate blue and red light-induced chloroplast movements in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Masahiro; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Kiyosue, Tomohiro; Wada, Masamitsu

    2004-07-01

    Phototropin is the blue-light receptor that mediates phototropism, chloroplast movement, and stomatal opening in Arabidopsis. Blue and red light induce chloroplast movement in the moss Physcomitrella patens. To study the photoreceptors for chloroplast movement in P. patens, four phototropin genes (PHOTA1, PHOTA2, PHOTB1, and PHOTB2) were isolated by screening cDNA libraries. These genes were classified into two groups (PHOTA and PHOTB) on the basis of their deduced amino acid sequences. Then phototropin disruptants were generated by homologous recombination and used for analysis of chloroplast movement. Data revealed that blue light-induced chloroplast movement was mediated by phototropins in P. patens. Both photA and photB groups were able to mediate chloroplast avoidance, as has been reported for Arabidopsis phot2, although the photA group contributed more to the response. Red light-induced chloroplast movement was also significantly reduced in photA2photB1photB2 triple disruptants. Because the primary photoreceptor for red light-induced chloroplast movement in P. patens is phytochrome, phototropins may be downstream components of phytochromes in the signaling pathway. To our knowledge, this work is the first to show a function for the phototropin blue-light receptor in a response to wavelengths that it does not absorb.

  17. The regulatory mechanism underlying light-inducible production of carotenoids in nonphototrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Takano, Hideaki

    2016-07-01

    Light is a ubiquitous environmental factor serving as an energy source and external stimulus. Here, I review the conserved molecular mechanism of light-inducible production of carotenoids in three nonphototrophic bacteria: Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), Thermus thermophilus HB27, and Bacillus megaterium QM B1551. A MerR family transcriptional regulator, LitR, commonly plays a central role in their light-inducible carotenoid production. Genetic and biochemical studies on LitR proteins revealed a conserved function: LitR in complex with adenosyl B12 (AdoB12) has a light-sensitive DNA-binding activity and thus suppresses the expression of the Crt biosynthesis gene cluster. The in vitro DNA-binding and transcription assays showed that the LitR-AdoB12 complex serves as a repressor allowing transcription initiation by RNA polymerase in response to illumination. The existence of novel light-inducible genes and the unique role of the megaplasmid were revealed by the transcriptomic analysis of T. thermophilus. The findings suggest that LitR is a general regulator responsible for the light-inducible carotenoid production in the phylogenetically divergent nonphototrophic bacteria, and that LitR performs diverse physiological functions in bacteria.

  18. Light-induced Effects in Sillenite Crystals with Shallow and Deep Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornienko, Tatiana; Kisteneva, Marina; Shandarov, Stanislav; Tolstik, Alexei

    This paper presents the light-induced effects in bismuth silicon and bismuth titanium oxide crystals associated both with the electron transitions into the conduction band and with the filling of shallow and deep traps, which determine the optical and electroconductive properties of these crystals. The dynamics of photoconductivity and light-induced absorption is analyzed under conditions of pulsed laser illumination at the wavelength of 532 nm. The possibility to describe the relaxation processes of a population for trapping levels with the use of two-exponential function is demonstrated. The photoconductivity dynamics is characterized by two relaxation times on the order of 100 ns and 10 μs, whereas for light-induced absorption the lifetimes about 10 μs and several days for short- and long-lived traps, respectively, have been obtained. Because of this, the relaxation transitions may be occurred both to the shallow trap centers with energy located close to the conduction band and to the deep-lying traps, which should be included into a diversified theoretical model adequately describing the light-induced phenomena in photorefractive sillenite-family crystals.

  19. An Analysis of Light-Induced Retroactive Inhibition in Pigeon Short-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, William A.; Grant, Douglas S.

    1978-01-01

    Grant and Roberts found that houselight presented throughout the delay period on a delayed matching-to-sample task caused pigeons to demonstrate a much lower level of accuracy than was found when the delay was spent in darkness. A series of experiments was carried out to examine possible mechanisms responsible for this light-induced retroactive…

  20. SUMOylation of phytochrome-B negatively regulates light-induced signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sadanandom, Ari; Ádám, Éva; Orosa, Beatriz; Viczián, András; Klose, Cornelia; Zhang, Cunjin; Josse, Eve-Marie; Kozma-Bognár, László; Nagy, Ferenc

    2015-01-01

    The red/far red light absorbing photoreceptor phytochrome-B (phyB) cycles between the biologically inactive (Pr, λmax, 660 nm) and active (Pfr; λmax, 730 nm) forms and functions as a light quality and quantity controlled switch to regulate photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis. At the molecular level, phyB interacts in a conformation-dependent fashion with a battery of downstream regulatory proteins, including PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR transcription factors, and by modulating their activity/abundance, it alters expression patterns of genes underlying photomorphogenesis. Here we report that the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is conjugated (SUMOylation) to the C terminus of phyB; the accumulation of SUMOylated phyB is enhanced by red light and displays a diurnal pattern in plants grown under light/dark cycles. Our data demonstrate that (i) transgenic plants expressing the mutant phyBLys996Arg-YFP photoreceptor are hypersensitive to red light, (ii) light-induced SUMOylation of the mutant phyB is drastically decreased compared with phyB-YFP, and (iii) SUMOylation of phyB inhibits binding of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 5 to phyB Pfr. In addition, we show that OVERLY TOLERANT TO SALT 1 (OTS1) de-SUMOylates phyB in vitro, it interacts with phyB in vivo, and the ots1/ots2 mutant is hyposensitive to red light. Taken together, we conclude that SUMOylation of phyB negatively regulates light signaling and it is mediated, at least partly, by the action of OTS SUMO proteases. PMID:26283376

  1. Increased Sensitivity to Light-Induced Melatonin Suppression in Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Barbara L.; Meliska, Charles J.; Sorenson, Diane L.; Lopez, Ana; Martínez, Luis Fernando; Hauger, Richard L.; Elliott, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Increased sensitivity to light-induced melatonin suppression characterizes some, but not all, patients with bipolar illness or seasonal affective disorder. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that patients with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), categorized as a depressive disorder in DSM-IV, have altered sensitivity to 200 lux light during mid-follicular (MF) and late-luteal (LL) menstrual cycle phases compared with normal control (NC) women. As an extension of a pilot study in which we administered 500 lux to 8 PMDD and 5 NC subjects, in the present study we administered 200 lux to 10 PMDD and 13 NC subjects during MF and LL menstrual cycle phases. We admitted subjects to the General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) in dim light (< 50 lux) to dark (during sleep) conditions at 16:00 h where nurses inserted an intravenous catheter at 17:00 h and collected plasma samples for melatonin at 30-min intervals from 18:00 to 10:00 h, including between 00:00 and 01:00 h for baseline values, between 01:30 and 03:00 h during the 200 lux light exposure administered from 01:00-03:00 h, and at 03:30 and 04:00 h after the light exposure. Median % melatonin suppression was significantly greater in PMDD (30.8%) vs. NC (−0.2%) women (p = 0.040), and was significantly greater in PMDD in the MF (30.8%) than in the LL (−0.15%) phase (p = 0.047). Additionally, in the LL (but not the MF) phase, % suppression after 200 lux light was significantly positively correlated with serum estradiol level (p = 0.007) in PMDD patients, but not in NC subjects (p > .05). PMID:20795885

  2. Epigenetic regulation and chromatin remodeling in learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Somi; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms of memory formation and maintenance has been a major goal in the field of neuroscience. Memory formation and maintenance are tightly controlled complex processes. Among the various processes occurring at different levels, gene expression regulation is especially crucial for proper memory processing, as some genes need to be activated while some genes must be suppressed. Epigenetic regulation of the genome involves processes such as DNA methylation and histone post-translational modifications. These processes edit genomic properties or the interactions between the genome and histone cores. They then induce structural changes in the chromatin and lead to transcriptional changes of different genes. Recent studies have focused on the concept of chromatin remodeling, which consists of 3D structural changes in chromatin in relation to gene regulation, and is an important process in learning and memory. In this review, we will introduce three major epigenetic processes involved in memory regulation: DNA methylation, histone methylation and histone acetylation. We will also discuss general mechanisms of long-term memory storage and relate the epigenetic control of learning and memory to chromatin remodeling. Finally, we will discuss how epigenetic mechanisms can contribute to the pathologies of neurological disorders and cause memory-related symptoms. PMID:28082740

  3. High-resolution, genome-wide mapping of chromatin modifications by GMAT.

    PubMed

    Roh, Tae-Young; Zhao, Keji

    2008-01-01

    One major postgenomic challenge is to characterize the epigenomes that control genome functions. The epigenomes are mainly defined by the specific association of nonhistone proteins with chromatin and the covalent modifications of chromatin, including DNA methylation and posttranslational histone modifications. The in vivo protein-binding and chromatin-modification patterns can be revealed by the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay (ChIP). By combining the ChIP assays and the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) protocols, we have developed an unbiased and high-resolution genome-wide mapping technique (GMAT) to determine the genome-wide protein-targeting and chromatin-modification patterns. GMAT has been successfully applied to mapping the target sites of the histone acetyltransferase, Gcn5p, in yeast and to the discovery of the histone acetylation islands as an epigenetic mark for functional regulatory elements in the human genome.

  4. Chromatin Configuration Determines Cell Responses to Hormone Stimuli | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Ever since selective gene expression was established as the central driver of cell behavior, researchers have been working to understand the forces that control gene transcription. Aberrant gene expression can cause or promote many diseases, including cancer, and alterations in gene expression are the goal of many therapeutic agents. Recent work has focused on the potential role of chromatin structure as a contributor to gene regulation. Chromatin can exist in a tightly packed/inaccessible or loose/accessible configuration depending on the interactions between DNA and its associated proteins. Patterns of chromatin structure can differ between cell types and can also change within cells in response to certain signals. Cancer researchers are particularly interested in the role of chromatin in gene regulation because many of the genomic regions found to be associated with cancer risk are in open chromatin structures.

  5. Chromatin Dynamics during DNA Repair Revealed by Pair Correlation Analysis of Molecular Flow in the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Hinde, Elizabeth; Kong, Xiangduo; Yokomori, Kyoko; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin dynamics modulate DNA repair factor accessibility throughout the DNA damage response. The spatiotemporal scale upon which these dynamics occur render them invisible to live cell imaging. Here we present a believed novel assay to monitor the in vivo structural rearrangements of chromatin during DNA repair. By pair correlation analysis of EGFP molecular flow into chromatin before and after damage, this assay measures millisecond variations in chromatin compaction with submicron resolution. Combined with laser microirradiation we employ this assay to monitor the real-time accessibility of DNA at the damage site. We find from comparison of EGFP molecular flow with a molecule that has an affinity toward double-strand breaks (Ku-EGFP) that DNA damage induces a transient decrease in chromatin compaction at the damage site and an increase in compaction to adjacent regions, which together facilitate DNA repair factor recruitment to the lesion with high spatiotemporal control. PMID:24988341

  6. Scanning force microscopy study of native and linker histone depleted chromatin fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guoliang; Leuba, Sanford S.; Bustamante, Carlos J.; van Holde, Kensal; Zlatanova, Jordanka

    1995-03-01

    Scanning force microscopy has been used to study the structure of chromatin fibers at low salt concentrations. Chicken erythrocyte chromatin fibers in low ionic strength buffer solutions were deposited on mica and imaged in ambient conditions with a tapping mode scanning force microscope. Individual nucleosomes can be clearly discerned in the images of the fibers. Native chromatin fibers show an asymmetrical, 3D structure of sinuous fiber trajectory with irregularly positioned nucleosomes. Fibers depleted of linker histones H1 and H5 have a completely extended 'beads-on-a-string' structure, with linker DNA visible between single nucleosomes. Molecular modeling of the fiber architecture and computer simulation of the imaging process provided more evidence on the observed organization of chromatin at low salt conditions. These results have implications on mechanisms of transcription control and chromatin compaction.

  7. Optogenetic control of nuclear protein export

    PubMed Central

    Niopek, Dominik; Wehler, Pierre; Roensch, Julia; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Active nucleocytoplasmic transport is a key mechanism underlying protein regulation in eukaryotes. While nuclear protein import can be controlled in space and time with a portfolio of optogenetic tools, protein export has not been tackled so far. Here we present a light-inducible nuclear export system (LEXY) based on a single, genetically encoded tag, which enables precise spatiotemporal control over the export of tagged proteins. A constitutively nuclear, chromatin-anchored LEXY variant expands the method towards light inhibition of endogenous protein export by sequestering cellular CRM1 receptors. We showcase the utility of LEXY for cell biology applications by regulating a synthetic repressor as well as human p53 transcriptional activity with light. LEXY is a powerful addition to the optogenetic toolbox, allowing various novel applications in synthetic and cell biology. PMID:26853913

  8. The condensed chromatin fiber: an allosteric chemo-mechanical machine for signal transduction and genome processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesne, Annick; Bécavin, Christophe; Victor, Jean–Marc

    2012-02-01

    Allostery is a key concept of molecular biology which refers to the control of an enzyme activity by an effector molecule binding the enzyme at another site rather than the active site (allos = other in Greek). We revisit here allostery in the context of chromatin and argue that allosteric principles underlie and explain the functional architecture required for spacetime coordination of gene expression at all scales from DNA to the whole chromosome. We further suggest that this functional architecture is provided by the chromatin fiber itself. The structural, mechanical and topological features of the chromatin fiber endow chromosomes with a tunable signal transduction from specific (or nonspecific) effectors to specific (or nonspecific) active sites. Mechanical constraints can travel along the fiber all the better since the fiber is more compact and regular, which speaks in favor of the actual existence of the (so-called 30 nm) chromatin fiber. Chromatin fiber allostery reconciles both the physical and biochemical approaches of chromatin. We illustrate this view with two supporting specific examples. Moreover, from a methodological point of view, we suggest that the notion of chromatin fiber allostery is particularly relevant for systemic approaches. Finally we discuss the evolutionary power of allostery in the context of chromatin and its relation to modularity.

  9. Nanoscale histone localization in live cells reveals reduced chromatin mobility in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre; Lelièvre, Sophie A.; Irudayaraj, Joseph M. K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nuclear functions including gene expression, DNA replication and genome maintenance intimately rely on dynamic changes in chromatin organization. The movements of chromatin fibers might play important roles in the regulation of these fundamental processes, yet the mechanisms controlling chromatin mobility are poorly understood owing to methodological limitations for the assessment of chromatin movements. Here, we present a facile and quantitative technique that relies on photoactivation of GFP-tagged histones and paired-particle tracking to measure chromatin mobility in live cells. We validate the method by comparing live cells to ATP-depleted cells and show that chromatin movements in mammalian cells are predominantly energy dependent. We also find that chromatin diffusion decreases in response to DNA breaks induced by a genotoxic drug or by the ISceI meganuclease. Timecourse analysis after cell exposure to ionizing radiation indicates that the decrease in chromatin mobility is transient and precedes subsequent increased mobility. Future applications of the method in the DNA repair field and beyond are discussed. PMID:25501817

  10. Chromatin insulators: lessons from the fly

    PubMed Central

    Gurudatta, B. V.

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin insulators are DNA–protein complexes with broad functions in nuclear biology. Drosophila has at least five different types of insulators; recent results suggest that these different insulators share some components that may allow them to function through common mechanisms. Data from genome-wide localization studies of insulator proteins indicate a possible functional specialization, with different insulators playing distinct roles in nuclear biology. Cells have developed mechanisms to control insulator activity by recruiting specialized proteins or by covalent modification of core components. Current results suggest that insulators set up cell-specific blueprints of nuclear organization that may contribute to the establishment of different patterns of gene expression during cell differentiation and development. PMID:19752045

  11. Chromatin remodeling: from transcription to cancer.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Moshe

    2014-09-01

    In this short review article, I have tried to trace the path that led my laboratory from the early studies of the structure of papova minichromosomes and transcription control to the investigation of chromatin remodeling complexes of the SWI/SNF family. I discuss briefly the genetic and biochemical studies that lead to the discovery of the SWI/SNF complex in yeast and drosophila and summarize some of the studies on the developmental role of the murine complex. The discovery of the tumor suppressor function of the SNF5/INI1/SMARCB1 gene in humans and the identification of frequent mutations in other subunits of this complex in different human tumors opened a fascinating field of research on this epigenetic regulator. The hope is to better understand tumor development and to develop novel treatments.

  12. Identification of lamin B–regulated chromatin regions based on chromatin landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaobin; Kim, Youngjo; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-01-01

    Lamins, the major structural components of the nuclear lamina (NL) found beneath the nuclear envelope, are known to interact with most of the nuclear peripheral chromatin in metazoan cells. Although NL–chromatin associations correlate with a repressive chromatin state, the role of lamins in tethering chromatin to NL and how such tether influences gene expression have remained challenging to decipher. Studies suggest that NL proteins regulate chromatin in a context-dependent manner. Therefore understanding the context of chromatin states based on genomic features, including chromatin–NL interactions, is important to the study of lamins and other NL proteins. By modeling genome organization based on combinatorial patterns of chromatin association with lamin B1, core histone modification, and core and linker histone occupancy, we report six distinct large chromatin landscapes, referred to as histone lamin landscapes (HiLands)-red (R), -orange (O), -yellow (Y), -green (G), -blue (B), and -purple (P), in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). This HiLands model demarcates the previously mapped lamin-associated chromatin domains (LADs) into two HiLands, HiLands-B and HiLands-P, which are similar to facultative and constitutive heterochromatins, respectively. Deletion of B-type lamins in mESCs caused a reduced interaction between regions of HiLands-B and NL as measured by emerin–chromatin interaction. Our findings reveal the importance of analyzing specific chromatin types when studying the function of NL proteins in chromatin tether and regulation. PMID:25995381

  13. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade suppresses light-induced neural damage in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Narimatsu, Toshio; Ozawa, Yoko; Miyake, Seiji; Nagai, Norihiro; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2014-06-01

    Exposure to light contributes to the development and progression of retinal degenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying light-induced tissue damage are not fully understood. Here, we examined the role of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) signaling, which is part of the renin-angiotensin system, in light-induced retinal damage. Light-exposed Balb/c mice that were treated with the AT1R blockers (angiotensin II receptor blockers; ARBs) valsartan, losartan, and candesartan before and after the light exposure exhibited attenuated visual function impairment, compared to vehicle-treated mice. This effect was dose-dependent and observed across the ARB class of inhibitors. Further evaluation of valsartan showed that it suppressed a number of light-induced retinal effects, including thinning of the photoreceptor cell layer caused by apoptosis, shortening of the photoreceptor cell outer segment, and increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The role of ROS in retinal pathogenesis was investigated further using the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Treatment of light-exposed mice with NAC before the light exposure suppressed the visual function impairment and photoreceptor cell histological changes due to apoptosis. Moreover, treatment with valsartan or NAC suppressed the induction of c-fos (a component of the AP-1 transcription factor) and the upregulation of fasl (a proapoptotic molecule whose transcript is regulated downstream of AP-1). Our results suggest that AT1R signaling mediates light-induced apoptosis, by increasing the levels of ROS and proapoptotic molecules in the retina. Thus, AT1R blockade may represent a new therapeutic approach for preventing light-induced retinal neural tissue damage. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A study of the dynamics of a light-induced detonation wave using a self-consistent numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol'Shov, L. A.; Vorob'ev, V. A.; Kanevskii, M. F.; Chernov, S. Iu.

    1991-07-01

    Results of a theoretical and computational study of the dynamics of light-induced detonation waves in focused laser beams are presented. The effect of the radial structure of the emission on the propagation and breakdown of light-induced detonation waves is analyzed. The computer model used in the study is described in detail.

  15. Generation of bivalent chromatin domains during cell fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In self-renewing, pluripotent cells, bivalent chromatin modification is thought to silence (H3K27me3) lineage control genes while 'poising' (H3K4me3) them for subsequent activation during differentiation, implying an important role for epigenetic modification in directing cell fate decisions. However, rather than representing an equivalently balanced epigenetic mark, the patterns and levels of histone modifications at bivalent genes can vary widely and the criteria for identifying this chromatin signature are poorly defined. Results Here, we initially show how chromatin status alters during lineage commitment and differentiation at a single well characterised bivalent locus. In addition we have determined how chromatin modifications at this locus change with gene expression in both ensemble and single cell analyses. We also show, on a global scale, how mRNA expression may be reflected in the ratio of H3K4me3/H3K27me3. Conclusions While truly 'poised' bivalently modified genes may exist, the original hypothesis that all bivalent genes are epigenetically premarked for subsequent expression might be oversimplistic. In fact, from the data presented in the present work, it is equally possible that many genes that appear to be bivalent in pluripotent and multipotent cells may simply be stochastically expressed at low levels in the process of multilineage priming. Although both situations could be considered to be forms of 'poising', the underlying mechanisms and the associated implications are clearly different. PMID:21645363

  16. Open chromatin reveals the functional maize genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Every cellular process mediated through nuclear DNA must contend with chromatin. As results from ENCODE show, open chromatin assays can efficiently integrate across diverse regulatory elements, revealing functional non-coding genome. In this study, we use a MNase hypersensitivity assay to discover o...

  17. Chromatin remodeling: nucleosomes bulging at the seams.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Craig L

    2002-04-02

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes, such as SWI/SNF, hydrolyze thousands of ATPs to regulate gene expression on chromatin fibers. Recent mechanistic studies suggest that these enzymes generate localized changes in DNA topology that drive formation of multiple, remodeled nucleosomal states.

  18. Chromatin roadblocks to reprogramming 50 years on.

    PubMed

    Skene, Peter J; Henikoff, Steven

    2012-10-29

    A half century after John Gurdon demonstrated nuclear reprogramming, for which he was awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, his group provides insights into the molecular mechanisms whereby chromatin remodeling is required for nuclear reprogramming. Among the issues addressed in Gurdon's latest work are the chromatin impediments to artificially induced reprogramming, discovered by Shinya Yamanaka, who shared the award with Gurdon.

  19. Diabetic retinopathy alters light-induced clock gene expression and dopamine levels in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Lahouaoui, Hasna; Coutanson, Christine; Cooper, Howard M.; Bennis, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common consequences of diabetes that affects millions of working-age adults worldwide and leads to progressive degeneration of the retina, visual loss, and blindness. Diabetes is associated with circadian disruption of the central and peripheral circadian clocks, but the mechanisms responsible for such alterations are unknown. Using a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced model of diabetes, we investigated whether diabetes alters 1) the circadian regulation of clock genes in the retina and in the central clocks, 2) the light response of clock genes in the retina, and/or 3) light-driven retinal dopamine (DA), a major output marker of the retinal clock. Methods To quantify circadian expression of clock and clock-controlled genes, retinas and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) from the same animals were collected every 4 h in circadian conditions, 12 weeks post-diabetes. Induction of Per1, Per2, and c-fos mRNAs was quantified in the retina after the administration of a pulse of monochromatic light (480 nm, 1.17×1014 photons/cm2/s, 15 min) at circadian time 16. Gene expression was assessed with real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT–PCR). Pooled retinas from the control and STZ-diabetic mice were collected 2 h after light ON and light OFF (Zeitgeber time (ZT)2 and ZT14), and DA and its metabolite were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results We found variable effects of diabetes on the expression of clock genes in the retina and only slight differences in phase and/or amplitude in the SCN. c-fos and Per1 induction by a 480 nm light pulse was abolished in diabetic animals at 12 weeks post-induction of diabetes in comparison with the control mice, suggesting a deficit in light-induced neuronal activation of the retinal clock. Finally, we quantified a 56% reduction in the total number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunopositive cells, associated with a decrease in DA levels during the subjective day (ZT2

  20. Interactions of transcription factors with chromatin.

    PubMed

    van Bakel, Harm

    2011-01-01

    Sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs) play a central role in regulating transcription initiation by directing the recruitment and activity of the general transcription machinery and accessory factors. It is now well established that many of the effects exerted by TFs in eukaryotes are mediated through interactions with a host of coregulators that modify the chromatin state, resulting in a more open (in case of activation) or closed conformation (in case of repression). The relationship between TFs and chromatin is a two-way street, however, as chromatin can in turn influence the recognition and binding of target sequences by TFs. The aim of this chapter is to highlight how this dynamic interplay between TF-directed remodelling of chromatin and chromatin-adjusted targeting of TF binding determines where and how transcription is initiated, and to what degree it is productive.

  1. TOPICAL REVIEW: The physics of chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiessel, Helmut

    2003-05-01

    Recent progress has been made in the understanding of the physical properties of chromatin - the dense complex of DNA and histone proteins that occupies the nuclei of plant and animal cells. Here I will focus on the two lowest levels of the hierarchy of DNA folding into the chromatin complex. (i) The nucleosome, the chromatin repeating unit consisting of a globular aggregate of eight histone proteins with the DNA wrapped around it: its overcharging, the DNA unwrapping transition, the 'sliding' of the octamer along the DNA. (ii) The 30 nm chromatin fibre, the necklace-like structure of nucleosomes connected via linker DNA: its geometry, its mechanical properties under stretching and its response to changing ionic conditions. I will stress that chromatin combines two seemingly contradictory features: (1) high compaction of DNA within the nuclear envelope and, at the same time, (2) accessibility to genes, promoter regions and gene regulatory sequences.

  2. Initiation of meiotic recombination in chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takatomi; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2013-08-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is markedly activated during meiotic prophase to play central roles in faithful chromosome segregation and conferring genetic diversity to gametes. It is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the conserved protein Spo11, and preferentially occurs at discrete sites called hotspots. Since the functions of Spo11 are influenced by both of local chromatin at hotspots and higher-order chromosome structures, formation of meiotic DSBs is under regulation of chromatin structure. Therefore, investigating features and roles of meiotic chromatin is crucial to elucidate the in vivo mechanism of meiotic recombination initiation. Recent progress in genome-wide chromatin analyses tremendously improved our understanding on this point, but many critical questions are left unaddressed. In this review, we summarize current knowledge in the field, and also discuss the future problems that must be solved to understand the role of chromatin structure in meiotic recombination.

  3. Computational strategies to address chromatin structure problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perišić, Ognjen; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-06-01

    While the genetic information is contained in double helical DNA, gene expression is a complex multilevel process that involves various functional units, from nucleosomes to fully formed chromatin fibers accompanied by a host of various chromatin binding enzymes. The chromatin fiber is a polymer composed of histone protein complexes upon which DNA wraps, like yarn upon many spools. The nature of chromatin structure has been an open question since the beginning of modern molecular biology. Many experiments have shown that the chromatin fiber is a highly dynamic entity with pronounced structural diversity that includes properties of idealized zig-zag and solenoid models, as well as other motifs. This diversity can produce a high packing ratio and thus inhibit access to a majority of the wound DNA. Despite much research, chromatin’s dynamic structure has not yet been fully described. Long stretches of chromatin fibers exhibit puzzling dynamic behavior that requires interpretation in the light of gene expression patterns in various tissue and organisms. The properties of chromatin fiber can be investigated with experimental techniques, like in vitro biochemistry, in vivo imagining, and high-throughput chromosome capture technology. Those techniques provide useful insights into the fiber’s structure and dynamics, but they are limited in resolution and scope, especially regarding compact fibers and chromosomes in the cellular milieu. Complementary but specialized modeling techniques are needed to handle large floppy polymers such as the chromatin fiber. In this review, we discuss current approaches in the chromatin structure field with an emphasis on modeling, such as molecular dynamics and coarse-grained computational approaches. Combinations of these computational techniques complement experiments and address many relevant biological problems, as we will illustrate with special focus on epigenetic modulation of chromatin structure.

  4. Overexpression of plasma membrane H+-ATPase in guard cells promotes light-induced stomatal opening and enhances plant growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin; Noguchi, Ko; Ono, Natsuko; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Terashima, Ichiro; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2014-01-07

    Stomatal pores surrounded by a pair of guard cells in the plant epidermis control gas exchange between plants and the atmosphere in response to light, CO2, and the plant hormone abscisic acid. Light-induced stomatal opening is mediated by at least three key components: the blue light receptor phototropin (phot1 and phot2), plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, and plasma membrane inward-rectifying K(+) channels. Very few attempts have been made to enhance stomatal opening with the goal of increasing photosynthesis and plant growth, even though stomatal resistance is thought to be the major limiting factor for CO2 uptake by plants. Here, we show that transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing H(+)-ATPase using the strong guard cell promoter GC1 showed enhanced light-induced stomatal opening, photosynthesis, and plant growth. The transgenic plants produced larger and increased numbers of rosette leaves, with ∼42-63% greater fresh and dry weights than the wild type in the first 25 d of growth. The dry weights of total flowering stems of 45-d-old transgenic plants, including seeds, siliques, and flowers, were ∼36-41% greater than those of the wild type. In addition, stomata in the transgenic plants closed normally in response to darkness and abscisic acid. In contrast, the overexpression of phototropin or inward-rectifying K(+) channels in guard cells had no effect on these phenotypes. These results demonstrate that stomatal aperture is a limiting factor in photosynthesis and plant growth, and that manipulation of stomatal opening by overexpressing H(+)-ATPase in guard cells is useful for the promotion of plant growth.

  5. Light-induced conformational change and transient dissociation reaction of the BLUF photoreceptor Synechocystis PixD (Slr1694).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Nakasone, Yusuke; Okajima, Koji; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Tokutomi, Satoru; Terazima, Masahide

    2011-06-24

    The light-induced reaction of the BLUF (blue light photoreceptor using flavin adenine dinucleotide) photoreceptor PixD from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 (Slr1694) was investigated using the time-resolved transient grating method. A conformational change coupled with a volume contraction of 13 mL mol(-1) was observed with a time constant of 45 ms following photoexcitation. At a weak excitation light intensity, there were no further changes in volume and diffusion coefficient (D). The determined D-value (3.7×10(-11) m(2) s(-1)) suggests that PixD exists as a decamer in solution, and this oligomeric state was confirmed by size-exclusion chromatography and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Surprisingly, by increasing the excitation laser power, we observed a large increase in D with a time constant of 350 ms following the volume contraction reaction. The D-value of this photoproduct species (7.5×10(-11) m(2) s(-1)) is close to that of the PixD dimer. Combined with transient grating and size-exclusion chromatography measurements under light-illuminated conditions, the light-induced increase in D was attributed to a transient dissociation reaction of the PixD decamer to a dimer. For the M93A-mutated PixD, no volume or D-change was observed. Furthermore, we showed that the M93A mutant did not form the decamer but only the dimer in the dark state. These results indicate that the formation of the decamer and the conformational change around the Met residue are important factors that control the regulation of the downstream signal transduction by the PixD photoreceptor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Indocyanine green increases light-induced oxidative stress, senescence, and matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3 in human RPE cells.

    PubMed

    Kernt, Marcus; Hirneiss, Christoph; Wolf, Armin; Liegl, Raffael; Rueping, Johann; Neubauer, Aljoscha; Alge, Claudia; Ulbig, Michael; Gandorfer, Arndt; Kampik, Anselm; Haritoglou, Christos

    2012-09-01

    Indocyanine green (ICG) is a commonly used vital dye for macular surgery. Recent reports implicate that its use might be associated with less favourable results regarding postoperative visual outcome and damage of retinal cells, and atrophic degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) has been described. This study investigates the effects of ICG on light-induced senescence of RPE cells. Primary human RPE cells were either pre-incubated with ICG in concentrations of 0.005% and 0.05% or not and then exposed to white light. After 10 min of irradiation viability, induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity (SA β-Gal) were determined. Expression and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 1 and 3 and their mRNA were determined by RT-PCR and ELISA. Light exposure decreased RPE cell viability by 46%. Treatment with 0.005% and 0.05% ICG alone decreased RPE cell viability by 7% and 21%. In addition, expression of ROS, SA β-Gal, and MMP-1 and 3 was significantly increased. When 0.005% and 0.05% ICG treatments were combined with light exposure, viability decreased by 69% and 82% compared to the untreated control. Effects on the expression of ROS, SA β-Gal, and MMP-1 and 3 were, depending on the ICG dose, significantly increased when cells were pre-incubated with ICG and then illuminated. In this study, pretreatment with ICG significantly increased light-induced oxidative stress and senescence. This might indicate a potential, supplementary mechanism that could explain RPE alterations and reduced functional results after ICG-assisted internal limiting membrane peeling. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Acta Ophthalmol.

  7. Overexpression of plasma membrane H+-ATPase in guard cells promotes light-induced stomatal opening and enhances plant growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yin; Noguchi, Ko; Ono, Natsuko; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Terashima, Ichiro; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2014-01-01

    Stomatal pores surrounded by a pair of guard cells in the plant epidermis control gas exchange between plants and the atmosphere in response to light, CO2, and the plant hormone abscisic acid. Light-induced stomatal opening is mediated by at least three key components: the blue light receptor phototropin (phot1 and phot2), plasma membrane H+-ATPase, and plasma membrane inward-rectifying K+ channels. Very few attempts have been made to enhance stomatal opening with the goal of increasing photosynthesis and plant growth, even though stomatal resistance is thought to be the major limiting factor for CO2 uptake by plants. Here, we show that transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing H+-ATPase using the strong guard cell promoter GC1 showed enhanced light-induced stomatal opening, photosynthesis, and plant growth. The transgenic plants produced larger and increased numbers of rosette leaves, with ∼42–63% greater fresh and dry weights than the wild type in the first 25 d of growth. The dry weights of total flowering stems of 45-d-old transgenic plants, including seeds, siliques, and flowers, were ∼36–41% greater than those of the wild type. In addition, stomata in the transgenic plants closed normally in response to darkness and abscisic acid. In contrast, the overexpression of phototropin or inward-rectifying K+ channels in guard cells had no effect on these phenotypes. These results demonstrate that stomatal aperture is a limiting factor in photosynthesis and plant growth, and that manipulation of stomatal opening by overexpressing H+-ATPase in guard cells is useful for the promotion of plant growth. PMID:24367097

  8. Human Genome Replication Proceeds through Four Chromatin States

    PubMed Central

    Julienne, Hanna; Zoufir, Azedine; Audit, Benjamin; Arneodo, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Advances in genomic studies have led to significant progress in understanding the epigenetically controlled interplay between chromatin structure and nuclear functions. Epigenetic modifications were shown to play a key role in transcription regulation and genome activity during development and differentiation or in response to the environment. Paradoxically, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the initiation and the maintenance of the spatio-temporal replication program in higher eukaryotes, and in particular their links to epigenetic modifications, still remain elusive. By integrative analysis of the genome-wide distributions of thirteen epigenetic marks in the human cell line K562, at the 100 kb resolution of corresponding mean replication timing (MRT) data, we identify four major groups of chromatin marks with shared features. These states have different MRT, namely from early to late replicating, replication proceeds though a transcriptionally active euchromatin state (C1), a repressive type of chromatin (C2) associated with polycomb complexes, a silent state (C3) not enriched in any available marks, and a gene poor HP1-associated heterochromatin state (C4). When mapping these chromatin states inside the megabase-sized U-domains (U-shaped MRT profile) covering about 50% of the human genome, we reveal that the associated replication fork polarity gradient corresponds to a directional path across the four chromatin states, from C1 at U-domains borders followed by C2, C3 and C4 at centers. Analysis of the other genome half is consistent with early and late replication loci occurring in separate compartments, the former correspond to gene-rich, high-GC domains of intermingled chromatin states C1 and C2, whereas the latter correspond to gene-poor, low-GC domains of alternating chromatin states C3 and C4 or long C4 domains. This new segmentation sheds a new light on the epigenetic regulation of the spatio-temporal replication program in human and provides a

  9. Chromatin fiber polymorphism triggered by variations of DNA linker lengths

    PubMed Central

    Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; Schlick, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    Deciphering the factors that control chromatin fiber structure is key to understanding fundamental chromosomal processes. Although details remain unknown, it is becoming clear that chromatin is polymorphic depending on internal and external factors. In particular, different lengths of the linker DNAs joining successive nucleosomes (measured in nucleosome-repeat lengths or NRLs) that characterize different cell types and cell cycle stages produce different structures. NRL is also nonuniform within single fibers, but how this diversity affects chromatin fiber structure is not clear. Here we perform Monte Carlo simulations of a coarse-grained oligonucleosome model to help interpret fiber structure subject to intrafiber NRL variations, as relevant to proliferating cells of interphase chromatin, fibers subject to remodeling factors, and regulatory DNA sequences. We find that intrafiber NRL variations have a profound impact on chromatin structure, with a wide range of different architectures emerging (highly bent narrow forms, canonical and irregular zigzag fibers, and polymorphic conformations), depending on the NRLs mixed. This stabilization of a wide range of fiber forms might allow NRL variations to regulate both fiber compaction and selective DNA exposure. The polymorphic forms spanning canonical to sharply bent structures, like hairpins and loops, arise from large NRL variations and are surprisingly more compact than uniform NRL structures. They are distinguished by tail-mediated far-nucleosome interactions, in addition to the near-nucleosome interactions of canonical 30-nm fibers. Polymorphism is consistent with chromatin’s diverse biological functions and heterogeneous constituents. Intrafiber NRL variations, in particular, may contribute to fiber bending and looping and thus to distant communication in associated regulatory processes. PMID:24847063

  10. Experimental evidence on removing copper and light-induced degradation from silicon by negative charge

    SciTech Connect

    Boulfrad, Yacine Lindroos, Jeanette; Yli-Koski, Marko; Savin, Hele; Wagner, Matthias; Wolny, Franziska

    2014-11-03

    In addition to boron and oxygen, copper is also known to cause light-induced degradation (LID) in silicon. We have demonstrated previously that LID can be prevented by depositing negative corona charge onto the wafer surfaces. Positively charged interstitial copper ions are proposed to diffuse to the negatively charged surface and consequently empty the bulk of copper. In this study, copper out-diffusion was confirmed by chemical analysis of the near surface region of negatively/positively charged silicon wafer. Furthermore, LID was permanently removed by etching the copper-rich surface layer after negative charge deposition. These results demonstrate that (i) copper can be effectively removed from the bulk by negative charge, (ii) under illumination copper forms a recombination active defect in the bulk of the wafer causing severe light induced degradation.

  11. Kinetics of Light-induced Metastable Defect Creation and Annealing in a-Si:H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodolbaþ, Alp Osman; Eray, Aynur; Öktü, Özcan

    2002-01-01

    Constant Photocurrent Method (CPM) and steady state photoconductivity measurements are used to investigate the creation of light-induced metastable defects in a-Si:H at room temperature and their annealing. Light-induced metastable defect concentration Nd varies with exposure time teas ter with r=0.34 ± 0.02, as expected from the recombination induced weak bond breaking model [1]. The validity of a stretched exponential model is also studied [2]. From the annealing experiments, the distribution of thermal annealing activation energies is calculated following the method proposed by Hata and Wagner [3]. Defects created at room temperature show a narrow distribution of annealing activation energies peaking at 0.97eV. The relation between photoconductivity and Nd is strongly nonlinear. Defects created at earlier times of illumination degrade photoconductivity more strongly, and these defects anneal out more easily than those created at later times of illumination.

  12. Light-induced heat and mass transfer in a single-component gas in a capillary

    SciTech Connect

    Chermyaninov, I. V. Chernyak, V. G.; Vilisova, E. A.

    2007-10-15

    A theoretical analysis is presented of light-induced heat and mass transfer in a single-component gas in a capillary tube at arbitrary Knudsen numbers. Surface and collisional mechanisms of transfer are analyzed, due to differences in accommodation coefficient and collision cross section between excited-and ground-state particles, respectively. Analytical expressions for kinetic coefficients characterizing the gas drift and heat transfer in a capillary tube are obtained in the limits of low and high Knudsen numbers. Numerical computations are performed for intermediate Knudsen numbers. Both drift and heat fluxes are determined as functions of the light beam frequency. In the case of an inhomogeneously broadened absorption line, the light-induced fluxes are found to depend not only on the sign, but also on the amount, of light beam detuning from the absorption line center frequency.

  13. Experimental study on light induced influence model to mice using support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Lei; Zhao, Zhimin; Yu, Yinshan; Zhu, Xingyue

    2014-08-01

    Previous researchers have made studies on different influences created by light irradiation to animals, including retinal damage, changes of inner index and so on. However, the model of light induced damage to animals using physiological indicators as features in machine learning method is never founded. This study was designed to evaluate the changes in micro vascular diameter, the serum absorption spectrum and the blood flow influenced by light irradiation of different wavelengths, powers and exposure time with support vector machine (SVM). The micro images of the mice auricle were recorded and the vessel diameters were calculated by computer program. The serum absorption spectrums were analyzed. The result shows that training sample rate 20% and 50% have almost the same correct recognition rate. Better performance and accuracy was achieved by third-order polynomial kernel SVM quadratic optimization method and it worked suitably for predicting the light induced damage to organisms.

  14. Effect Of Free Radical Quenchers On Dye-Mediated Laser Light Induced Photosensitization Of Leukemic Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Matthews, James L.; Fay, Joseph W.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1988-02-01

    The effect of free radical quenchers (ascorbate, catalase, and mannitol) on merocyanine 540 (MC540) mediated, laser light induced photolysis of human acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line (HL-60) was investigated. Results show that in the presence of human albumin (0.25%), dye-mediated (2014/m1), laser light induced photolysis of leukemic cells resulted in a 99.9999% cell kill. Seventy percent of the normal bone marrow cells survived the treatment. The addition of free radical quenchers prior to laser irradiation procedure increases the HL-60 cell survival. Increases of 5.5% and 4.4%, respectively, were observed in the presence of catalase and ascorbate or mannitol. In the presence of a mixture of catalase and mannitol or catalase and ascorbate, this increase in viability was not observed. However, the viability of normal bone marrow cells under these conditions also decreased from 70% to 63%. These findings may be useful in ex-vivo bone marrow purging.

  15. Experimental evidence on removing copper and light-induced degradation from silicon by negative charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulfrad, Yacine; Lindroos, Jeanette; Wagner, Matthias; Wolny, Franziska; Yli-Koski, Marko; Savin, Hele

    2014-11-01

    In addition to boron and oxygen, copper is also known to cause light-induced degradation (LID) in silicon. We have demonstrated previously that LID can be prevented by depositing negative corona charge onto the wafer surfaces. Positively charged interstitial copper ions are proposed to diffuse to the negatively charged surface and consequently empty the bulk of copper. In this study, copper out-diffusion was confirmed by chemical analysis of the near surface region of negatively/positively charged silicon wafer. Furthermore, LID was permanently removed by etching the copper-rich surface layer after negative charge deposition. These results demonstrate that (i) copper can be effectively removed from the bulk by negative charge, (ii) under illumination copper forms a recombination active defect in the bulk of the wafer causing severe light induced degradation.

  16. Absolute Configuration from Different Multifragmentation Pathways in Light-Induced Coulomb Explosion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pitzer, Martin; Kastirke, Gregor; Kunitski, Maksim; Jahnke, Till; Bauer, Tobias; Goihl, Christoph; Trinter, Florian; Schober, Carl; Henrichs, Kevin; Becht, Jasper; Zeller, Stefan; Gassert, Helena; Waitz, Markus; Kuhlins, Andreas; Sann, Hendrik; Sturm, Felix; Wiegandt, Florian; Wallauer, Robert; Schmidt, Lothar Ph H; Johnson, Allan S; Mazenauer, Manuel; Spenger, Benjamin; Marquardt, Sabrina; Marquardt, Sebastian; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Stohner, Jürgen; Dörner, Reinhard; Schöffler, Markus; Berger, Robert

    2016-08-18

    The absolute configuration of individual small molecules in the gas phase can be determined directly by light-induced Coulomb explosion imaging (CEI). Herein, this approach is demonstrated for ionization with a single X-ray photon from a synchrotron light source, leading to enhanced efficiency and faster fragmentation as compared to previous experiments with a femtosecond laser. In addition, it is shown that even incomplete fragmentation pathways of individual molecules from a racemic CHBrClF sample can give access to the absolute configuration in CEI. This leads to a significant increase of the applicability of the method as compared to the previously reported complete break-up into atomic ions and can pave the way for routine stereochemical analysis of larger chiral molecules by light-induced CEI.

  17. Dynamics of light-induced NIR-absorption of Nb4 polarons in SBN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Vikhnin, V.; Kapphan, S.

    The dynamics of light-induced (Kr+-, Ar+-laser) electronic polarons (Nb4+ centers with broad absorption band around 0.8 eV) and light-induced centers of other types were investigated in SrxBa1-xNb2O6: Cr (SBN:Cr) and in SBN: Ce using FTIR absorption measurements at low temperature. A theoretical model involving Cr3+/Cr4+, Ce3+/Ce4+, Nb4+ electronic polarons and trapping X-centers is proposed. The trapping of polarons at Cr4+/Ce4+ centers with subsequent recharging is shown to play an important role in the polaron dynamics. The predictions of the model are in very good agreement with the experimental results.

  18. Light-Induced Polar pH Changes in Leaves of Elodea canadensis1

    PubMed Central

    Elzenga, J. Theo M.; Prins, Hidde B. A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of an extracellular electron acceptor, ferricyanide, on the light-induced polar leaf pH changes of the submerged angiosperm Elodea canadensis in light and in darkness was determined. The rate of transmembrane ferricyanide reduction was stimulated by increased light intensity and was inhibited by inorganic carbon, indicating that changes in the redox state of the chloroplast were reflected at the plasma membrane. The addition of ferricyanide inhibited the light-induced polar leaf pH reaction. This effect could be balanced by increasing the light intensity. In the dark, the acidification induced by ferricyanide was not influenced by diethylstilbestrol at concentrations that completely inhibited the polar leaf pH changes. This indicates that the ferricyanide-induced H+ extrusion and the H+ transport during the polar reaction were mediated by different mechanisms. PMID:16667045

  19. Blue-light-induced PIN3 polarization for root negative phototropic response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun-Xiao; Xu, Heng-Hao; Yuan, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Liang; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2013-10-01

    Root negative phototropism is an important response in plants. Although blue light is known to mediate this response, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying root negative phototropism remain unclear. Here, we report that the auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED (PIN) 3 is involved in asymmetric auxin distribution and root negative phototropism. Unilateral blue-light illumination polarized PIN3 to the outer lateral membrane of columella cells at the illuminated root side, and increased auxin activity at the illuminated side of roots, where auxin promotes growth and causes roots bending away from the light source. Furthermore, root negative phototropic response and blue-light-induced PIN3 polarization were modulated by a brefeldin A-sensitive, GNOM-dependent, trafficking pathway and by phot1-regulated PINOID (PID)/PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A (PP2A) activity. Our results indicate that blue-light-induced PIN3 polarization is needed for asymmetric auxin distribution during root negative phototropic response.

  20. Guiding and confinement of light induced by optical vortex solitons in a cubic-quintic medium.

    PubMed

    Reyna, Albert S; de Araújo, Cid B

    2016-01-01

    The observation of confinement and guiding of light induced by an optical vortex soliton (OVS) in a cubic-quintic (defocusing-focusing) medium is reported. The waveguide effect induced by the bright region of the vortex beam, is mainly due to the defocusing nonlinearity that allows the guiding of a probe beam propagating inside of the OVS dark region. The experimental results are corroborated by numerical simulations based on the cubic-quintic nonlinear Schrödinger equation, showing excellent agreement.

  1. Genetic dissection of light-induced Ca2+ influx into Drosophila photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Invertebrate photoreceptors use the inositol-lipid signaling cascade for phototransduction. A useful approach to dissect this pathway and its regulation has been provided by the isolation of Drosophila visual mutants. We measured extracellular changes of Ca2+ [delta Ca2+]o in Drosophila retina using Ca(2+)-selective microelectrodes in both the transient receptor potential (trp) mutant, in which the calcium permeability of the light-sensitive channels is greatly diminished and in the inactivation-but-no-afterpotential C (inaC) mutant which lacks photoreceptor-specific protein kinase C (PKC). Illumination induced a decrease in extracellular [Ca2+] with kinetics and magnitude that changed with light intensity. Compared to wild-type, the light-induced decrease in [Ca2+]o (the Ca2+ signal) was diminished in trp but significantly enhanced in inaC. The enhanced Ca2+ signal was diminished in the double mutant inaC;trp indicating that the effect of the trp mutation overrides the enhancement observed in the absence of eye-PKC. We suggest that the decrease in [Ca2+]o reflects light-induced Ca2+ influx into the photoreceptors and that the trp mutation blocks a large fraction of this Ca2+ influx, while the absence of eye specific PKC leads to enhancement of light-induced Ca2+ influx. This suggestion was supported by Ca2+ measurements in isolated ommatidia loaded with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, Ca Green-5N, which indicated an approximately threefold larger light-induced increase in cellular Ca2+ in inaC relative to WT. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that TRP is a light activated Ca2+ channel and that the increased Ca2+ influx observed in the absence of PKC is mediated mainly via the TRP channel. PMID:7699363

  2. Failure of ascorbate to protect against broadband blue light-induced retinal damage in rat.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Chen, E; Söderberg, P G

    1999-10-01

    Excessive generation of free radicals due to light absorption is proposed as the most likely mechanism for photochemical retinal damage. The observed reduction of green light-induced retinal injury after ascorbate treatment is believed to be an antioxidative effect. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible protection of ascorbate against blue light-induced photoreceptor damage. Cyclic light-reared albino rats were injected intraperitoneally with either ascorbate (1 mg/g body weight) or, as placebo, physiological saline 24 h before and just prior to exposure to blue light. After 20-22 h of dark adaptation, two groups of the rats were exposed in pairs to the blue light (400-480 nm) for 6 h at an average irradiance of 0.7 W/m(2) in the cage. Six days after light exposure, all rats were killed and retinal samples were analyzed. Diffuse blue light irradiation resulted in an uneven distribution of damage in the retina. As judged from the pathological changes in the retina irradiated, no microscopic difference was observed between the two groups. The preserved thickness of the outer nuclear layer was on average 61.3% in the ascorbate-treated and 66.4% in the placebo-treated group. The photoreceptor loss was not significantly different between the two groups. The ascorbate did not protect the retina from blue-light induced damage. This favors the assumption that the mechanisms for blue light-induced retinal damage might differ from that for green light.

  3. Mechanism of UV light-induced photorelaxation in isolated rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Hong, Y; Shim, C S

    2000-12-01

    Isolated rat thoracic aorta which is pharmacologically precontracted by phenylephrine induces photorelaxation when exposed to long wave length UV-light. The aim of the present study was to characterize the mechanism of UV-light induced by photorelaxation in the rat aorta. 1. UV light relaxed both endothelium-intact and -denuded rat aortic rings contracted by phenylephrine. The magnitude of relaxation on UV light was dependent on the exposure time and slightly greatly in endothelium-denuded rings than in endothelium-intact preparations. 2. L-NAME (10 nM-100 uM) but not D-NAME completely inhibited the photorelaxation in a concentration dependent manner. 3. The UV-induced relaxation was inhibited by methylene blue (1 -100 uM), and verapamil (100 nM), and removal of extracellular Ca2+. In contrast, UV-light induced photorelaxation was potentiated by N(w)-nitro-Larginine (L-NOARG) treatment. 4. In immunocytochemical analysis of UV-light induced iNOS and eNOS expression in rat aortas, at which expression levels were increased in a time-dependent manner on UV-irradiation in aortic endothelium and smooth muscle, respectively. These results suggest that UV light-induced photorelaxation may be due to nitric oxide from exogenously administered L-arginine as well as endogenous nitric oxide donors such as amino acid and arginine derivatives. Additional suggestion is that UV light stimulates the expression of nitric oxide synthases, and its activity for nitric oxide generation is dependent on cytosolic Ca2+ originated from extracellular space.

  4. Spatial Symmetry Breaking in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction with Light-Induced Remote Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, M.; Skodt, H.; Showalter, K.

    2001-08-20

    Domains containing spiral waves form on a stationary background in a photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction with light-induced alternating nonlocal feedback. Complex behavior of colliding and splitting wave fragments is found with feedback radii comparable to the spiral wavelength. A linear stability analysis of the uniform stationary states in an Oregonator model reveals a spatial symmetry breaking instability. Numerical simulations show behavior in agreement with that found experimentally and also predict a variety of other new patterns.

  5. Spin Hall effects for cold atoms in a light induced gauge potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Shi-Liang; Fu, Hao; Wu, C.-J.; Zhang, S.-C.; Duan, L.-M. /Michigan U., MCTP

    2010-03-16

    We propose an experimental scheme to observe spin Hall effects with cold atoms in a light induced gauge potential. Under an appropriate configuration, the cold atoms moving in a spatially varying laser field experience an effective spin-dependent gauge potential. Through numerical simulation, we demonstrate that such a gauge field leads to observable spin Hall currents under realistic conditions. We also discuss the quantum spin Hall state in an optical lattice.

  6. Identification of novel light-induced genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Porterfield, Veronica M; Piontkivska, Helen; Mintz, Eric M

    2007-01-01

    Background The transmission of information about the photic environment to the circadian clock involves a complex array of neurotransmitters, receptors, and second messenger systems. Exposure of an animal to light during the subjective night initiates rapid transcription of a number of immediate-early genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Some of these genes have known roles in entraining the circadian clock, while others have unknown functions. Using laser capture microscopy, microarray analysis, and quantitative real-time PCR, we performed a comprehensive screen for changes in gene expression immediately following a 30 minute light pulse in suprachiasmatic nucleus of mice. Results The results of the microarray screen successfully identified previously known light-induced genes as well as several novel genes that may be important in the circadian clock. Newly identified light-induced genes include early growth response 2, proviral integration site 3, growth-arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 45 beta, and TCDD-inducible poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Comparative analysis of promoter sequences revealed the presence of evolutionarily conserved CRE and associated TATA box elements in most of the light-induced genes, while other core clock genes generally lack this combination of promoter elements. Conclusion The photic signalling cascade in the suprachiasmatic nucleus activates an array of immediate-early genes, most of which have unknown functions in the circadian clock. Detected evolutionary conservation of CRE and TATA box elements in promoters of light-induced genes suggest that the functional role of these elements has likely remained the same over evolutionary time across mammalian orders. PMID:18021443

  7. Rise kinetics of light-induced modulation of absorption for a CdS crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, E. R., Jr.; Conway, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study has been made of the rise kinetics for changes in optical absorption in a single crystal of CdS which was bulk excited by pulsed laser light. The experimental data were compared to calculations from a simple model involving a bimolecular process. Experimental and calculated values agreed to within the experimental error and confirmed that light-induced modulation of absorption is a bimolecular process.

  8. Light-induced noncentrosymmetry in acceptor-donor-substituted azobenzene solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiang; Si, Jinhai; Wang, Yougui; Ye, Peixian; Fu, Xingfa; Qiu, Ling; Shen, Yuquan

    1995-10-01

    Light-induced noncentrosymmetry was achieved experimentally in acceptor-donor-substituted azobenzene solutions and observed by phase-matched nondegenerate six-wave mixing. The microscopic origin of the induced noncentrosymmetry was found to be orientational hole burning, which was distinguished directly with net orientation of molecules by experimental observations. The decay time of the induced noncentrosymmetry depended on the rotational orientation time of the sample's molecule, which varied linearly with the viscosity of the solvent.

  9. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in light-induced photoreceptor degeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Tomohiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Sugitani, Sou; Kudo, Takashi; Imai, Shunsuke; Inokuchi, Yuta; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Hara, Hideaki

    2013-04-01

    Exposure to excessive levels of light induces photoreceptor apoptosis and can be a causative factor in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the cellular events that mediate this apoptotic response are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in light-induced cell death in the murine retina and murine photoreceptor cells (661W). Excessive light exposure induced retinal dysfunction, photoreceptor degeneration, and apoptosis. Furthermore, the accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and the transcriptional expression of ER stress-related factors, including 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78)/immunoglobulin-binding protein (BiP) and C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), were increased in light-exposed retinas. Light exposure also induced both cell death and up-regulation of polyubiquitinated proteins, S-opsin aggregation, bip and chop mRNAs in 661W cells in vitro. Knock-down of chop mRNA inhibited photoreceptor cell death induced by light exposure. Furthermore, treatment with BiP inducer X (BIX), an ER stress inhibitor, induced bip mRNA and reduced both chop expression and light-induced photoreceptor cell death. These data indicate that excessive ER stress may induce photoreceptor cell death in light-exposed retinas via activation of the CHOP-dependent apoptotic pathway, suggesting that the ER stress may play a pivotal role in light exposure-induced retinal damage. © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Light induced structural changes of the photoprotein mnemiopsin: Characterization and contribution in photoinactivation.

    PubMed

    Pashandi, Zaiddodine; Molakarimi, Maryam; Sajedi, Reza H; Taghdir, Majid; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2016-12-01

    Mnemiopsin, an EF-hand Ca(2+) binding photoprotein isolated from luminous ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, emits blue light from its chromophore, coelenterazine, which is non-covalently bond in its central hydrophobic core. Previous studies have revealed unique biochemical properties for ctenophore photoproteins such as inactivation by light, but only few have focused on photoinactivation process. To understand the nature of photoinactivation process we have investigated the impact of light alone and in the presence of Ca(2+) ion on the structure of this photoprotein. We used UV-Vis, circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy following Ca(2+) binding assay to analyze the light effects on mnemiopsin conformation in comparison with aequorin at both apo and holo form. Our results showed light induced structural changes which resulted into photoinactivation. These changes include significant modification on secondary structure of mnemiopsin in comparison with aequorin. Our data also revealed that light could influence structure of apo protein regardless of presence of coelenterazine. The comparative studies of Ca(2+) ion binding affinity following light exposure, also showed that light induced structural changes could presumably affect coelenterazine binding or its conformation in binding site in such a way that causes photoinactivation. In conclusion, we have proposed that structural rearrangement of helix 5 and C-terminal motif could be responsible for light induced structural changes.

  11. Light-induced melatonin suppression at night after exposure to different wavelength composition of morning light.

    PubMed

    Kozaki, Tomoaki; Kubokawa, Ayaka; Taketomi, Ryunosuke; Hatae, Keisuke

    2016-03-11

    Bright nocturnal light has been shown to suppress melatonin secretion. However, bright light exposure during the day might reduce light-induced melatonin suppression at night. The human circadian system is sensitive to short wavelength light. This study evaluated the preventive effect of different wavelengths of daytime light on light-induced melatonin suppression at night. Twelve male subjects were exposed to various light conditions (dim, white, and bluish white light) between the hours of 09:00 and 10:30 (daytime light conditions). They were then exposed to light (300lx) again between 01:00 and 02:30 (night-time light exposure). Subjects provided saliva samples before (00:55) and after night-time light exposure (02:30). A two-tailed paired t-test yielded significant decrements in melatonin concentrations after night-time light exposure under daytime dim and white light conditions. No significant differences were found in melatonin concentrations between pre- and post-night-time light exposure with bluish-white light. Present findings suggest that daytime blue light exposure has an acute preventive impact on light-induced melatonin suppression in individuals with a general life rhythm (sleep/wake schedule). These findings may be useful for implementing artificial light environments for humans in, for example, hospitals and underground shopping malls to reduce health risks.

  12. Synthesis of crystalline gels on a light-induced polymerization 3D printer (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jin; Mao, Yuchen; Miyazaki, Takuya; Zhu, Meifang

    2017-04-01

    3D printing, also knows as Additive Manufacturing (AM), was first commercialized in 1986, and has been growing at breakneck speed since 2009 when Stratasys' key patent expired. Currently the 3D printing machines coming on the market can be broadly classified into three categories from the material state point of view: plastic filament printers, powder (or pellet) printers, film printers and liquid photopolymer printers. Much of the work in our laboratory revolves around the crystalline gels. We have succeeded in developing them with high toughness, high flexibility, particularly with many functions as shape memory, energy storage, freshness-retaining, water-absorbing, etc. These crystalline gels are synthesized by light-induced radical polymerization that involves light-reactive monomer having the property of curing with light of a sufficient energy to drive the reaction from liquid to solid. Note that the light-induced polymerized 3D printing uses the same principle. To open up the possibilities for broader application of our crystalline functional gels, we are interested in making them available for 3D printing. In this paper, we share the results of our latest research on the 3D printing of crystalline gels on light-induced 3D printers.

  13. Irradiation of skin with visible light induces reactive oxygen species and matrix-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Liebel, Frank; Kaur, Simarna; Ruvolo, Eduardo; Kollias, Nikiforos; Southall, Michael D

    2012-07-01

    Daily skin exposure to solar radiation causes cells to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are a primary factor in skin damage. Although the contribution of the UV component to skin damage has been established, few studies have examined the effects of non-UV solar radiation on skin physiology. Solar radiation comprises <10% of UV, and thus the purpose of this study was to examine the physiological response of skin to visible light (400-700 nm). Irradiation of human skin equivalents with visible light induced production of ROS, proinflammatory cytokines, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 expression. Commercially available sunscreens were found to have minimal effects on reducing visible light-induced ROS, suggesting that UVA/UVB sunscreens do not protect the skin from visible light-induced responses. Using clinical models to assess the generation of free radicals from oxidative stress, higher levels of free radical activity were found after visible light exposure. Pretreatment with a photostable UVA/UVB sunscreen containing an antioxidant combination significantly reduced the production of ROS, cytokines, and MMP expression in vitro, and decreased oxidative stress in human subjects after visible light irradiation. Taken together, these findings suggest that other portions of the solar spectrum aside from UV, particularly visible light, may also contribute to signs of premature photoaging in skin.

  14. Blue-light-induced rapid chloroplast de-anchoring in Vallisneria epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yuuki; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Harada, Akiko; Shimazaki, Ken-Ichiro; Takagi, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    In the outer periclinal cytoplasm of leaf epidermal cells of an aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria, blue light induces "chloroplast de-anchoring", a rapid decline in the resistance of chloroplasts against centrifugal force. Chloroplast de-anchoring is known induced within 1 min of irradiation with high-fluence-rate blue light specifically, preceding the commencement of chloroplasts migration toward the anticlinal cytoplasm. However, its regulatory mechanism has remained elusive, although pharmacological analysis suggested that a calcium release from intracellular calcium stores is necessary for the response. In search of the responsible photoreceptors, immunoblotting analysis using antibodies against phototropins demonstrated that cross-reactive polypeptides of 120-kDa exist in the plasma-membrane fraction prepared from the leaves. In vitro phosphorylation analysis revealed that 120-kDa polypeptides were phosphorylated by exposure to blue light in a fluence-dependent manner. The blue-light-induced phosphorylation activity was sensitive to a Ser/Thr kinase inhibitor, staurosporine, and unusually was retained at a high level for a long time in darkness. Furthermore, phototropin gene homologs (Vallisneria PHOTOTROPIN1 and PHOTOTROPIN2) expressed in leaves were isolated. We propose that calcium-regulated chloroplast de-anchoring, possibly mediated by phototropins, is an initial process of the blue-light-induced avoidance response of chloroplasts in Vallisneria. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. Light-induced Conductance Switching in Photomechanically Active Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites.

    PubMed

    Schneider, V; Polonskyi, O; Strunskus, T; Elbahri, M; Faupel, F

    2017-08-29

    Novel, optically responsive devices with a host of potential applications have been demonstrated by coupling carbon nanomaterials with photochromic molecules. For light-induced conductance switching in particular, we have recently shown that carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites containing azobenzene are very attractive and provide stable and non-degradable changes in conductivity over time at standard laboratory conditions. In these composites, the photoswitching mechanisms are based on light-induced changes in electronic properties and related to the Pool-Frenkel conduction mechanism. However, no link between conductivity switching and the molecular motion of azobenzene chromophores could be found due to application of high elastic modulus polymer matrices. Here we report on single wall carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites with a soft polycaprolactone polymer host. Such a system clearly shows the transfer of light-induced, nano-sized molecular motion to macroscopic thickness changes of the composite matrix. We demonstrate that these photomechanical effects can indeed overshadow the electronic effects in conductivity switching behavior and lead to a reversion of the conductivity switching direction near the percolation threshold.

  16. Efficient Light-Induced Phase Transitions in Halogen-Bonded Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a new family of light-responsive, fluorinated supramolecular liquid crystals (LCs) showing efficient and reversible light-induced LC-to-isotropic phase transitions. Our materials design is based on fluorinated azobenzenes, where the fluorination serves to strengthen the noncovalent interaction with bond-accepting stilbazole molecules, and increase the lifetime of the cis-form of the azobenzene units. The halogen-bonded LCs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, hot-stage polarized optical microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. Simultaneous analysis of light-induced changes in birefringence, absorption, and optical scattering allowed us to estimate that <4% of the mesogenic units in the cis-form suffices to trigger the full LC-to-isotropic phase transition. We also report a light-induced and reversible crystal-to-isotropic phase transition, which has not been previously observed in supramolecular complexes. In addition to fundamental understanding of light-responsive supramolecular complexes, we foresee this study to be important in the development of bistable photonic devices and supramolecular actuators. PMID:27917024

  17. Effect of hyperthermia on replicating chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Warters, R.L.; Roti Roti, J.L.

    1981-10-01

    The extent of heat-induced structural alterations in chromatin containing nascent (pulse-labeled) DNA was assayed using the enzyme micrococcal nuclease. The basic nucleosome structure in nascent and mature chromatin of S-phase cells appeared unaltered for up to 16 hr after exposure to hyperthermic temperatures as high as 48/sup 0/C for 15 min. However, the rate of nuclease digestion of DNA in both nascent and mature chromatin is inhibited following exposure to hyperthermic temperatures. In unheated cells, pulse-labeled nascent DNA matured into mature chromatin structure with a half-time of 2.5 min. The half-time for the maturation of pulse-labeled DNA from nascent into mature chromatin increased in a linear manner as a function of increasing temperature of exposure with constant heating time at temperatures above 43/sup 0/C. Both the reduced nuclease digestibility of nascent DNA and the increased time for chromatin structural changes could be due to the increased protein mass of chromatin following hyperthermia.

  18. Activation of DNA damage response signaling by condensed chromatin.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Burman, Bharat; Kruhlak, Michael J; Misteli, Tom

    2014-12-11

    The DNA damage response (DDR) occurs in the context of chromatin, and architectural features of chromatin have been implicated in DNA damage signaling and repair. Whereas a role of chromatin decondensation in the DDR is well established, we show here that chromatin condensation is integral to DDR signaling. We find that, in response to DNA damage chromatin regions transiently expand before undergoing extensive compaction. Using a protein-chromatin-tethering system to create defined chromatin domains, we show that interference with chromatin condensation results in failure to fully activate DDR. Conversely, forced induction of local chromatin condensation promotes ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and ATR-dependent activation of upstream DDR signaling in a break-independent manner. Whereas persistent chromatin compaction enhanced upstream DDR signaling from irradiation-induced breaks, it reduced recovery and survival after damage. Our results demonstrate that chromatin condensation is sufficient for activation of DDR signaling and is an integral part of physiological DDR signaling.

  19. Photocarrier Radiometry Investigation of Light-Induced Degradation of Boron-Doped Czochralski-Grown Silicon Without Surface Passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Li, Bincheng

    2016-04-01

    Light-induced degradation (LID) effects of boron-doped Cz silicon wafers without surface passivation are investigated in details by photocarrier radiometry (PCR). The resistivity of all samples is in the range of 0.006 Ω {\\cdot } {cm} to 38 Ω {\\cdot } {cm}. It is found that light-induced changes in surface state occupation have a great effect on LID under illumination. With the increasing contribution of light-induced changes in surface state occupation, the generation rate of the defect decreases. The light-induced changes in surface state occupation and light-induced degradation dominate the temporal behaviors of the excess carrier density of high- and low-resistivity Si wafers, respectively. Moreover, the temporal behaviors of PCR signals of these samples under laser illumination with different powers, energy of photons, and multiple illuminations were also analyzed to understand the light-induced change of material properties. Based on the nonlinear dependence of PCR signal on the excitation power, a theoretical model taking into account both light-induced changes in surface state occupation and LID processes was proposed to explain those temporal behaviors.

  20. Chromatin targeting drugs in cancer and immunity.

    PubMed

    Prinjha, Rab; Tarakhovsky, Alexander

    2013-08-15

    Recent advances in the enzymology of transcription and chromatin regulation have led to the discovery of proteins that play a prominent role in cell differentiation and the maintenance of specialized cell functions. Knowledge about post-synthetic DNA and histone modifications as well as information about the rules that guide the formation of multimolecular chromatin-bound complexes have helped to delineate gene-regulating pathways and describe how these pathways are altered in various pathological conditions. The present review focuses on the emerging area of therapeutic interference with chromatin function for the purpose of cancer treatment and immunomodulation.

  1. reSETting chromatin during transcription elongation

    PubMed Central

    Smolle, Michaela; Workman, Jerry L.; Venkatesh, Swaminathan

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of ordered chromatin structure over the body of genes is vital for the regulation of transcription. Increased access to the underlying DNA sequence results in the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to inappropriate, promoter-like sites within genes, resulting in unfettered transcription. Two new papers show how the Set2-mediated methylation of histone H3 on Lys36 (H3K36me) maintains chromatin structure by limiting histone dynamics over gene bodies, either by recruiting chromatin remodelers that preserve ordered nucleosomal distribution or by lowering the binding affinity of histone chaperones for histones, preventing their removal. PMID:23257840

  2. Nucleosome structure in chromatin from heated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Warters, R.L.; Roti Roti, J.L.; Winward, R.T.

    1980-12-01

    The effect of hyperthermia (40 to 80/sup 0/C) on the nucleosome structure of mammalian chromatin was determined using the enzyme micrococcal nuclease. At equivalent fractional DNA digestion it was found that neither the size of DNA nor the total fraction of cellular DNA associated with nucleosome structure is altered by heat exposure up to 48/sup 0/C for 30 min. It is proposed that this heat-induced reduction in the accessibility to nuclease attack of DNA in chromatin from heated cells is due to the increased protein mass associated with chromatin.

  3. Chromatin Fiber Dynamics under Tension and Torsion

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, Christophe; Victor, Jean-Marc; Zlatanova, Jordanka

    2010-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic information in eukaryotic cells is carried on chromosomes, basically consisting of large compact supercoiled chromatin fibers. Micromanipulations have recently led to great advances in the knowledge of the complex mechanisms underlying the regulation of DNA transaction events by nucleosome and chromatin structural changes. Indeed, magnetic and optical tweezers have allowed opportunities to handle single nucleosomal particles or nucleosomal arrays and measure their response to forces and torques, mimicking the molecular constraints imposed in vivo by various molecular motors acting on the DNA. These challenging technical approaches provide us with deeper understanding of the way chromatin dynamically packages our genome and participates in the regulation of cellular metabolism. PMID:20480035

  4. Unraveling chromatin structure using magnetic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Noort, John

    2010-03-01

    The compact, yet dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in regulating gene expression. Although the static structure of chromatin fibers has been studied extensively, the controversy about the higher order folding remains. The compaction of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin has been implicated in the regulation of all DNA processes. To understand the relation between gene regulation and chromatin structure it is essential to uncover the mechanisms by which chromatin fibers fold and unfold. We used magnetic tweezers to probe the mechanical properties of individual nucleosomes and chromatin fibers consisting of a single, well-defined array of 25 nucleosomes. From these studies five major features appeared upon forced extension of chromatin fibers: the elastic stretching of chromatin's higher order structure, the breaking of internucleosomal contacts, unwrapping of the first turn of DNA, unwrapping of the second turn of DNA, and the dissociation of histone octamers. These events occur sequentially at the increasing force. Neighboring nucleosomes stabilize DNA folding into a nucleosome relative to isolated nucleosomes. When an array of nucleosomes is folded into a 30 nm fiber, representing the first level of chromatin condensation, the fiber stretched like a Hookian spring at forces up to 4 pN. Together with a nucleosome-nucleosome stacking energy of 14 kT this points to a solenoid as the underlying topology of the 30 nm fiber. Surprisingly, linker histones do not affect the length or stiffness of the fibers, but stabilize fiber folding up to forces of 7 pN. The stiffness of the folded chromatin fiber points at histone tails that mediate nucleosome stacking. Fibers with a nucleosome repeat length of 167 bp instead of 197 bp are significantly stiffer, consistent with a two-start helical arrangement. The extensive thermal breathing of the chromatin fiber that is a consequence of the observed high compliance provides a structural basis for understanding the

  5. Characterization of hundreds of regulatory landscapes in developing limbs reveals two regimes of chromatin folding.

    PubMed

    Andrey, Guillaume; Schöpflin, Robert; Jerković, Ivana; Heinrich, Verena; Ibrahim, Daniel M; Paliou, Christina; Hochradel, Myriam; Timmermann, Bernd; Haas, Stefan; Vingron, Martin; Mundlos, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Complex regulatory landscapes control the pleiotropic transcriptional activities of developmental genes. For most genes, the number, location, and dynamics of their associated regulatory elements are unknown. In this work, we characterized the three-dimensional chromatin microarchitecture and regulatory landscape of 446 limb-associated gene loci in mouse using Capture-C, ChIP-seq, and RNA-seq in forelimb, hindlimb at three developmental stages, and midbrain. The fine mapping of chromatin interactions revealed a strong preference for functional genomic regions such as repressed or active domains. By combining chromatin marks and interaction peaks, we annotated more than 1000 putative limb enhancers and their associated genes. Moreover, the analysis of chromatin interactions revealed two regimes of chromatin folding, one producing interactions stable across tissues and stages and another one associated with tissue and/or stage-specific interactions. Whereas stable interactions associate strongly with CTCF/RAD21 binding, the intensity of variable interactions correlates with changes in underlying chromatin modifications, specifically at the viewpoint and at the interaction site. In conclusion, this comprehensive data set provides a resource for the characterization of hundreds of limb-associated regulatory landscapes and a framework to interpret the chromatin folding dynamics observed during embryogenesis.

  6. Impact of Chromatin Structure on PR Signaling: Transition from Local to Global Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grøntved, Lars; Hager, Gordon L

    2011-01-01

    The progesterone receptor (PR) interacts with chromatin in a highly dynamic manner that requires ongoing chromatin remodeling, interaction with chaparones and activity of the proteasome. Here we discuss dynamic interaction of steroid receptor with chromatin, with special attention not only to PR but also to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), as these receptors share many similarities regarding interaction with, and remodeling of, chromatin. Both receptors can bind nucleosomal DNA and have accordingly been described as pioneering factors. However recent genomic approaches (ChIP-seq and DHS-seq) show that a large fraction of receptor binding events occur at pre-accessible chromatin. Thus factors which generate and maintain accessible chromatin during development, and in fully differentiated tissue, contribute a major fraction of receptor tissue specificity. In addition, chromosome conformation capture techniques suggest that steroid receptors preferentially sequester within distinct nuclear hubs. We will integrate dynamic studies from single cells and genomic studies from cell populations, and discuss how genomic approaches have reshaped our current understanding of mechanisms that control steroid receptor interaction with chromatin. PMID:21958695

  7. Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis by Cucumber Chromatin: Developmental and Hormone-induced Changes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K D; Purves, W K

    1970-10-01

    When intact etiolated 2-day cucumber (Cucumis sativus) embryos were treated with indoleacetic acid (IAA), gibberellin A(7) (GA(7)), or kinetin, chromatin derived from the embryonic axes exhibited an increased capacity to support RNA synthesis in either the presence or the absence of bacterial RNA polymerase. An IAA effect on cucumber RNA polymerase activity was evident after 4 hours of hormone treatment; the IAA effect on DNA template activity (bacterial RNA polymerase added) occurred after longer treatments (12 hours). GA(7) also promoted template activity, but again only after a prior stimulation of endogenous chromatin activity. After 12 hours of kinetin treatment, both endogenous chromatin and DNA template activities were substantially above control values, but longer kinetin treatments caused these activities to decline in magnitude. When chromatin was prepared from hypocotyl segments that were floated on a GA(7) solution, a GA-induced increase in endogenous chromatin activity occurred, but only if cotyledon tissue was left attached to the segments during the period of hormone treatment.Age of the seedling tissue had a profound influence on the chromatin characteristics. With progression of development from the 2-day to the 4-day stage, the endogenous chromatin activity declined while the DNA template activity increased.

  8. Unravelling the biology of chromatin in health and cancer using proteomic approaches.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Cassandra G; Dayebgadoh, Gerald; Liu, Xingyu; Washburn, Michael P

    2017-10-01

    Chromatin remodeling complexes play important roles in the control of genome regulation in both normal and diseased states, and are therefore critical components for the regulation of epigenetic states in cells. Given the role epigenetics plays in cancer, for example, chromatin remodeling complexes are routinely targeted for therapeutic intervention. Areas covered: Protein mass spectrometry and proteomics are powerful technologies used to study and understand chromatin remodeling. While impressive progress has been made in this area, there remain significant challenges in the application of proteomic technologies to the study of chromatin remodeling. As parts of large multi-subunit complexes that can be heavily modified with dynamic post-translational modifications, challenges in the study of chromatin remodeling complexes include defining the content, determining the regulation, and studying the dynamics of the complexes under different cellular states. Expert commentary: Impwortant considerations in the study of chromatin remodeling complexes include the complexity of sample preparation, the choice of proteomic methods for the analysis of samples, and data analysis challenges. Continued research in these three areas promise to yield even greater insights into the biology of chromatin remodeling and epigenetics and the dynamics of these systems in human health and cancer.

  9. Roles of pRB in the Regulation of Nucleosome and Chromatin Structures.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Chiharu

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma protein (pRB) interacts with E2F and other protein factors to play a pivotal role in regulating the expression of target genes that induce cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and differentiation. pRB controls the local promoter activity and has the ability to change the structure of nucleosomes and/or chromosomes via histone modification, epigenetic changes, chromatin remodeling, and chromosome organization. Functional inactivation of pRB perturbs these cellular events and causes dysregulated cell growth and chromosome instability, which are hallmarks of cancer cells. The role of pRB in regulation of nucleosome/chromatin structures has been shown to link to tumor suppression. This review focuses on the ability of pRB to control nucleosome/chromatin structures via physical interactions with histone modifiers and chromatin factors and describes cancer therapies based on targeting these protein factors.

  10. Regulation of oncogene-induced cell cycle exit and senescence by chromatin modifiers.

    PubMed

    David, Gregory

    2012-09-01

    Oncogene activation leads to dramatic changes in numerous biological pathways controlling cellular division, and results in the initiation of a transcriptional program that promotes transformation. Conversely, it also triggers an irreversible cell cycle exit called cellular senescence, which allows the organism to counteract the potentially detrimental uncontrolled proliferation of damaged cells. Therefore, a tight transcriptional control is required at the onset of oncogenic signal, coordinating both positive and negative regulation of gene expression. Not surprisingly, numerous chromatin modifiers contribute to the cellular response to oncogenic stress. While these chromatin modifiers were initially thought of as mere mediators of the cellular response to oncogenic stress, recent studies have uncovered a direct and specific regulation of chromatin modifiers by oncogenic signals. We review here the diverse functions of chromatin modifiers in the cellular response to oncogenic stress, and discuss the implications of these findings on the regulation of cell cycle progression and proliferation by activated oncogenes.

  11. Roles of pRB in the Regulation of Nucleosome and Chromatin Structures

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma protein (pRB) interacts with E2F and other protein factors to play a pivotal role in regulating the expression of target genes that induce cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and differentiation. pRB controls the local promoter activity and has the ability to change the structure of nucleosomes and/or chromosomes via histone modification, epigenetic changes, chromatin remodeling, and chromosome organization. Functional inactivation of pRB perturbs these cellular events and causes dysregulated cell growth and chromosome instability, which are hallmarks of cancer cells. The role of pRB in regulation of nucleosome/chromatin structures has been shown to link to tumor suppression. This review focuses on the ability of pRB to control nucleosome/chromatin structures via physical interactions with histone modifiers and chromatin factors and describes cancer therapies based on targeting these protein factors. PMID:28101510

  12. The nss mutation or lanthanum inhibits light-induced Ca2+ influx into fly photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Ion-selective calcium microelectrodes were inserted into the compound eyes of the wild-type sheep blowfly Lucilia or into the retina of the no steady state (nss) mutant of Lucilia. These electrodes monitored light-induced changes in the extracellular concentration of calcium (delta[Ca2+]o) together with the extracellularly recorded receptor potential. Prolonged dim lights induced a steady reduction in [Ca2+]o during light in the retina of normal Lucilia, while relatively little change in [Ca2+]o was observed in the retina of the nss mutant. Prolonged intense light induced a multiphasic change in [Ca2+]o: the [Ca2+]o signal became transient, reaching a minimum within 6 s after light onset, and then rose to a nearly steady-state phase below the dark concentration. When lights were turned off, a rapid increase in [Ca2+]o was observed, reaching a peak above the dark level and then declining again to the dark level within 1 min. In analogy to similar studies conduced in the honeybee drone, we suggest that the reduction in [Ca2+]o reflects light-induced Ca2+ influx into the photoreceptors, while the subsequent increase in [Ca2+]o reflects the activation of the Na-Ca exchange which extrudes Ca2+ from the cells. In the nss mutant in response to intense prolonged light, the receptor potential declines to baseline during light while the Ca2+ signal is almost abolished, revealing only a short transient reduction in [Ca2+]o. Application of lanthanum (La3+), but not nickel (Ni2+), into the retinal extracellular space of normal Lucilia mimicked the effect of the nss mutation on the receptor potential, while complete elimination of the Ca2+ signal in a reversible manner was observed. The results suggest that La3+ and the nss mutation inhibit light-induced Ca2+ influex into the photoreceptor in a manner similar to the action of the trp mutation in Drosophila, which has been shown to block specifically a light-activated Ca2+ channel necessary to maintain light excitation. PMID

  13. Increased sensitivity to light-induced damage in a mouse model of autosomal dominant retinal disease.

    PubMed

    White, D Alan; Fritz, Jason J; Hauswirth, William W; Kaushal, Shalesh; Lewin, Alfred S

    2007-05-01

    To describe a sensitivity to light-induced damage associated with expression of a T17M mutant human rhodopsin (hT17M) transgene in mice, with the goal of minimizing retinal injury during the subretinal delivery of rAAV-mediated gene therapy. Mice were bred to express the hT17M rhodopsin transgene in a line that was hemizygous null for wild-type mouse rhodopsin (mrho(+/-)), and the eyes of transgenic mice and nontransgenic littermates were exposed for 2.5 minutes to unilateral illumination with fiber-optic light ranging from 5,000 to 10,000 lux. Funduscopic images were made with a handheld camera (Genesis; Kowa Company, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Full-field scotopic electroretinographic analysis (ERG) was performed to measure loss of retinal function. Morphometry in the light microscope was used to measure loss of rod photoreceptors. TUNEL staining and a nucleosome release assay were used to measure levels of apoptosis in retinal specimens. mrho(+/-);hT17M mice exhibited a sensitivity to light-induced damage that caused severe loss of a- and b-wave ERG responses. hT17M transgenic mice on the mrho(+/+) background were equally sensitive to light-induced damage. Histologic analysis showed a concomitant loss of photoreceptors and TUNEL labeling of fragmented DNA in rod photoreceptor cells, demonstrating that the damage occurred via an apoptotic pathway. Nontransgenic littermate mice were not affected by this exposure to light. Mice expressing an hP23H mutant human rhodopsin transgene were minimally sensitive to light-induced damage at these intensities, in comparison to hT17M mice. Treating the hT17M mice with an equivalent regimen of exposure to red light was less damaging to the retina, as measured by ERG and histology. Expression of a human hT17M mutant rhodopsin transgene in mice is associated with photoreceptor apoptosis in response to moderate exposure to light. This phenotype was not observed in nontransgenic littermates or in mice expressing an hP23H mutant human

  14. Light-induced pH changes in the intact retinae of normal and early diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Andrey V; Henderson, Desmond; Linsenmeier, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Double-barreled H(+)-selective microelectrodes were used to measure local extracellular concentration of H(+) ([H(+)]o) in the retina of dark-adapted anesthetized Long-Evans rats. The microelectrode advanced in steps of 30 μm throughout the retina from the vitreal surface to retinal pigment epithelium and then to the choroid, recording changes in [H(+)]o evoked by light stimulation. Recordings were performed in diabetic rats 1-3 months after intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin and the results were compared with data obtained in age-matched control animals. Brief light stimulation (2.5 s) evoked changes of [H(+)]o with amplitudes of a few nM. Throughout the retina, there was a transient initial acidification for ∼200 ms followed by steady alkalinization, although amplitudes and kinetics of these components were slightly variable in different retinal layers. No significant difference was found when the light-induced [H(+)]o changes recorded in various retinal layers of early diabetic rats were compared with the [H(+)]o changes from corresponding layers of control animals. Also, when H(+)-selective microelectrodes were located in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer, an increase in H(+) was recorded, whose time course and amplitude were similar in control and diabetic rats. However, a striking difference between light-induced [H(+)]o changes in controls and diabetics was observed in the choriocapillaris, in the thin layer (10-20 μm) distal to the basal membrane of the RPE. In control rats, choroidal [H(+)]o decreased in a few cases, but much more often practically did not change. In contrast, diabetic rats demonstrated either an increase (in half of the cases) or no change in choroidal [H(+)]o. The data suggest that the active participation of the choroidal blood supply in stabilization of [H(+)]o could be partially compromised already at early stages of diabetes in rats. Interestingly, it appeared that the acid removal by the choroidal

  15. Inhibition by acrolein of light-induced stomatal opening through inhibition of inward-rectifying potassium channels in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Moshiul; Ye, Wenxiu; Matsushima, Daiki; Khokon, Md Atiqur Rahman; Munemasa, Shintaro; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Acrolein is a reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde derived from lipid peroxides, which are produced in plants under a variety of stress. We investigated effects of acrolein on light-induced stomatal opening using Arabidopsis thaliana. Acrolein inhibited light-induced stomatal opening in a dose-dependent manner. Acrolein at 100 μM inhibited plasma membrane inward-rectifying potassium (Kin) channels in guard cells. Acrolein at 100 μM inhibited Kin channel KAT1 expressed in a heterologous system using Xenopus leaves oocytes. These results suggest that acrolein inhibits light-induced stomatal opening through inhibition of Kin channels in guard cells.

  16. Roles of chromatin insulator proteins in higher-order chromatin organization and transcription regulation

    PubMed Central

    Vogelmann, Jutta; Valeri, Alessandro; Guillou, Emmanuelle; Cuvier, Olivier; Nollmann, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromosomes are condensed into several hierarchical levels of complexity: DNA is wrapped around core histones to form nucleosomes, nucleosomes form a higher-order structure called chromatin, and chromatin is subsequently compartmentalized in part by the combination of multiple specific or unspecific long-range contacts. The conformation of chromatin at these three levels greatly influences DNA metabolism and transcription. One class of chromatin regulatory proteins called insulator factors may organize chromatin both locally, by setting up barriers between heterochromatin and euchromatin, and globally by establishing platforms for long-range interactions. Here, we review recent data revealing a global role of insulator proteins in the regulation of transcription through the formation of clusters of long-range interactions that impact different levels of chromatin organization. PMID:21983085

  17. Chromatin dynamics during DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Ziv, Raz; Voichek, Yoav; Barkai, Naama

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin is composed of DNA and histones, which provide a unified platform for regulating DNA-related processes, mostly through their post-translational modification. During DNA replication, histone arrangement is perturbed, first to allow progression of DNA polymerase and then during repackaging of the replicated DNA. To study how DNA replication influences the pattern of histone modification, we followed the cell-cycle dynamics of 10 histone marks in budding yeast. We find that histones deposited on newly replicated DNA are modified at different rates: While some marks appear immediately upon replication (e.g., H4K16ac, H3K4me1), others increase with transcription-dependent delays (e.g., H3K4me3, H3K36me3). Notably, H3K9ac was deposited as a wave preceding the replication fork by ∼5–6 kb. This replication-guided H3K9ac was fully dependent on the acetyltransferase Rtt109, while expression-guided H3K9ac was deposited by Gcn5. Further, topoisomerase depletion intensified H3K9ac in front of the replication fork and in sites where RNA polymerase II was trapped, suggesting supercoiling stresses trigger H3K9 acetylation. Our results assign complementary roles for DNA replication and gene expression in defining the pattern of histone modification. PMID:27225843

  18. Programming off and on states in chromatin: mechanisms of Polycomb and trithorax group complexes.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jeffrey A; Tamkun, John W

    2002-04-01

    Polycomb and trithorax group proteins are evolutionarily conserved chromatin components that maintain stable states of gene expression. Recent studies have identified and characterized several multiprotein complexes containing these transcriptional regulators. Advances in understanding molecular activities of these complexes in vitro, and functional domains present in their subunits, suggest that they control transcription through multistep mechanisms that involve nucleosome modification, chromatin remodeling, and interaction with general transcription factors.

  19. Role of Chromatin Loops In DNA Replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechhoefer, John; Jun, Suckjoon; Herrick, John; Bensimon, Aaron

    2003-03-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, DNA is packed together with proteins (histones) into a structure known as the 30-nm chromatin fiber, whose behavior can be modeled as a wormlike polymer chain. We have investigated the relationship between the distributions of chromatin loop sizes and DNA replication in Xenopus laevis egg extracts. We find that the loop-size distribution predicted from the worm-like chain model of chromatin agrees well with the reported spatial distribution of replication origins in this system and that loops can explain quantitatively the observed tendency for nearby origins to start synchronously. Thus, in Xenopus egg extracts, the persistence length of chromatin fiber determines the separation between and synchrony of DNA replication origins.

  20. Chromatin modifiers: regulators of cellular differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Taiping; Dent, Sharon Y. R.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular differentiation, by definition, is epigenetic. Genome-wide profiling of pluripotent cells and differentiated cells suggests global chromatin remodeling during differentiation, resulting in progressive transition from a relatively open chromatin configuration to a more compact state. Genetic studies in mouse models demonstrate major roles for a variety of histone modifiers and chromatin remodelers in key developmental transitions, such as the segregation of embryonic and extraembryonic lineages in blastocyst stage embryos, the formation of the three germ layers during gastrulation, and differentiation of adult stem cells. Furthermore, rather than merely stabilizing the gene expression changes driven by developmental transcription factors, evidence is emerging that chromatin regulators have multifaceted roles in cell fate decisions. PMID:24366184

  1. Transcription of nucleosomes from human chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, P A; Sahasrabuddhe, C G; Hodo, H G; Saunders, G F

    1978-01-01

    Nucleosomes (chromatin subunits) prepared by micrococcal nuclease digestion of human nuclei are similar in histone content but substantially reduced in non-histone proteins as compared to undigested chromatin. Chromatin transcription experiments indicate that the DNA in the nucleosomes is accessible to DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in vitro. The template capacities of chromatin and nucleosomes are 1.5 and 10%, respectively, relative to high molecular weight DNA, with intermediate values for oligonucleosomes. Three distinct sizes of transcripts, 150, 120 and 95 nucleotides in length, are obtained when nucleosomes are used as templates. However, when nucleosomal DNA is used as a template, the predominant size of transcripts is 150 nucleotides. When oligonucleosomes are used as templates longer transcripts are obtained. This indicates that RNA polymerase can transcribe the DNA contained in the nucleosomes. PMID:693325

  2. Hitchhiking on Host Chromatin: how Papillomaviruses Persist

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Alison A.; Sakakibara, Nozomi; Stepp, Wesley H.; Jang, Moon Kyoo

    2012-01-01

    Persistent viruses need mechanisms to protect their genomes from cellular defenses and to ensure that they are efficiently propagated to daughter host cells. One mechanism by which papillomaviruses achieve this is through the association of viral genomes with host chromatin, mediated by the viral E2 tethering protein. Association of viral DNA with regions of active host chromatin ensures that the virus remains transcriptionally active and is not relegated to repressed heterochromatin. In addition, viral genomes are tethered to specific regions of host mitotic chromosomes to efficiently partition their DNA to daughter cells. Vegetative viral DNA replication also initiates at specific regions of host chromatin, where the viral E1 and E2 proteins initiate a DNA damage response that recruits cellular DNA damage and repair proteins to viral replication foci for efficient viral DNA synthesis. Thus, these small viruses have capitalized on interactions with chromatin to efficiently target their genomes to beneficial regions of the host nucleus. PMID:22306660

  3. Predictive Computational Modeling of Chromatin Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Pierro, Miichele; Zhang, Bin; Wolynes, Peter J.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    In vivo, the human genome folds into well-determined and conserved three-dimensional structures. The mechanism driving the folding process remains unknown. We report a theoretical model (MiChroM) for chromatin derived by using the maximum entropy principle. The proposed model allows Molecular Dynamics simulations of the genome using as input the classification of loci into chromatin types and the presence of binding sites of loop forming protein CTCF. The model was trained to reproduce the Hi-C map of chromosome 10 of human lymphoblastoid cells. With no additional tuning the model was able to predict accurately the Hi-C maps of chromosomes 1-22 for the same cell line. Simulations show unknotted chromosomes, phase separation of chromatin types and a preference of chromatin of type A to sit at the periphery of the chromosomes.

  4. Polymer chain models of DNA and chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langowski, J.

    2006-03-01

    Many properties of the genome in the cell nucleus can be understood by modeling DNA and chromatin as a flexible polymer chain. This article introduces into current models for such a coarse-grained description and reviews some recent results from our own group. Examples given are the unrolling of DNA from the histone core and the response of the 30nm chromatin fiber to mechanical stretching.

  5. Nucleosome repeat lengths and columnar chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Trifonov, Edward N

    2016-06-01

    Thorough quantitative study of nucleosome repeat length (NRL) distributions, conducted in 1992 by J. Widom, resulted in a striking observation that the linker lengths between the nucleosomes are quantized. Comparison of the NRL average values with the MNase cut distances predicted from the hypothetical columnar structure of chromatin (this work) shows a close correspondence between the two. This strongly suggests that the NRL distribution, actually, reflects the dominant role of columnar chromatin structure common for all eukaryotes.

  6. Recruitment of Phosphorylated Chromatin Assembly Factor 1 to Chromatin after UV Irradiation of Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Emmanuelle; Roche, Danièle M.J.; Marheineke, Kathrin; Verreault, Alain; Almouzni, Geneviève

    1998-01-01

    The subcellular distribution and posttranslational modification of human chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1) have been investigated after UV irradiation of HeLa cells. In an asynchronous cell population only a subfraction of the two large CAF-1 subunits, p150 and p60, were found to exist in a chromatin-associated fraction. This fraction is most abundant during S phase in nonirradiated cells and is much reduced in G2 cells. After UV irradiation, the chromatin-associated form of CAF-1 dramatically increased in all cells irrespective of their position in the cell cycle. Such chromatin recruitment resembles that seen for PCNA, a DNA replication and repair factor. The chromatin-associated fraction of p60 was predominantly hypophosphorylated in nonirradiated G2 cells. UV irradiation resulted in the rapid recruitment to chromatin of phosphorylated forms of the p60 subunit. Furthermore, the amount of the p60 and p150 subunits of CAF-1 associated with chromatin was a function of the dose of UV irradiation. Consistent with these in vivo observations, we found that the amount of CAF-1 required to stimulate nucleosome assembly during the repair of UV photoproducts in vitro depended upon both the number of lesions and the phosphorylation state of CAF-1. The recruitment of CAF-1 to chromatin in response to UV irradiation of human cells described here supports a physiological role for CAF-1 in linking chromatin assembly to DNA repair. PMID:9813080

  7. Transcriptional Coactivator PC4, a Chromatin-Associated Protein, Induces Chromatin Condensation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Das, Chandrima; Hizume, Kohji; Batta, Kiran; Kumar, B. R. Prashanth; Gadad, Shrikanth S.; Ganguly, Semanti; Lorain, Stephanie; Verreault, Alain; Sadhale, Parag P.; Takeyasu, Kunio; Kundu, Tapas K.

    2006-01-01

    Human transcriptional coactivator PC4 is a highly abundant multifunctional protein which plays diverse important roles in cellular processes, including transcription, replication, and repair. It is also a unique activator of p53 function. Here we report that PC4 is a bona fide component of chromatin with distinct chromatin organization ability. PC4 is predominantly associated with the chromatin throughout the stages of cell cycle and is broadly distributed on the mitotic chromosome arms in a punctate manner except for the centromere. It selectively interacts with core histones H3 and H2B; this interaction is essential for PC4-mediated chromatin condensation, as demonstrated by micrococcal nuclease (MNase) accessibility assays, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM images show that PC4 compacts the 100-kb reconstituted chromatin distinctly compared to the results seen with the linker histone H1. Silencing of PC4 expression in HeLa cells results in chromatin decompaction, as evidenced by the increase in MNase accessibility. Knocking down of PC4 up-regulates several genes, leading to the G2/M checkpoint arrest of cell cycle, which suggests its physiological role as a chromatin-compacting protein. These results establish PC4 as a new member of chromatin-associated protein family, which plays an important role in chromatin organization. PMID:16982701

  8. JOINING THE DOTS: FROM CHROMATIN REMODELING TO NEURONAL PLASTICITY

    PubMed Central

    Zocchi, Loredana; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY In recent years spectacular advances in the field of epigenetics have taken place. Multiple lines of evidence that connect epigenetic regulation to brain functions have been accumulating. Neurons daily convert a variety of external stimuli into rapid or long-lasting changes in gene expression. Control is achieved through several post-translational modifications that occur both on DNA and chromatin. Specific modifications mediate many developmental processes and adult brain functions, such as synaptic plasticity and memory. In this review, we focus on critical chromatin remodeling events that mediate long-lasting neuronal responses. The challenging goal is to reach sufficient understanding of these epigenetic pathways in the brain so that they may be useful for future development of specific pharmacological strategies. PMID:20471240

  9. Chromatin insulation by a transcriptional activator

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Nathan B.; Scalzo, David; Fiering, Steven; Groudine, Mark; Martin, David I. K.

    2003-01-01

    In eukaryotic genomes, transcriptionally active regions are interspersed with silent chromatin that may repress genes in its vicinity. Chromatin insulators are elements that can shield a locus from repressive effects of flanking chromatin. Few such elements have been characterized in higher eukaryotes, but transcriptional activating elements are an invariant feature of active loci and have been shown to suppress transgene silencing. Hence, we have assessed the ability of a transcriptional activator to cause chromatin insulation, i.e., to relieve position effects at transgene integration sites in cultured cells. The transgene contained a series of binding sites for the metal-inducible transcriptional activator MTF, linked to a GFP reporter. Clones carrying single integrated transgenes were derived without selection for expression, and in most clones the transgene was silent. Induction of MTF resulted in transition of the transgene from the silent to the active state, prolongation of the active state, and a marked narrowing of the range of expression levels at different genomic sites. At one genomic site, prolonged induction of MTF resulted in suppression of transgene silencing that persisted after withdrawal of the induction stimulus. These results are consistent with MTF acting as a chromatin insulator and imply that transcriptional activating elements can insulate active loci against chromatin repression. PMID:12547916

  10. Links between genome replication and chromatin landscapes.

    PubMed

    Sequeira-Mendes, Joana; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2015-07-01

    Post-embryonic organogenesis in plants requires the continuous production of cells in the organ primordia, their expansion and a coordinated exit to differentiation. Genome replication is one of the most important processes that occur during the cell cycle, as the maintenance of genomic integrity is of primary relevance for development. As it is chromatin that must be duplicated, a strict coordination occurs between DNA replication, the deposition of new histones, and the introduction of histone modifications and variants. In turn, the chromatin landscape affects several stages during genome replication. Thus, chromatin accessibility is crucial for the initial stages and to specify the location of DNA replication origins with different chromatin signatures. The chromatin landscape also determines the timing of activation during the S phase. Genome replication must occur fully, but only once during each cell cycle. The re-replication avoidance mechanisms rely primarily on restricting the availability of certain replication factors; however, the presence of specific histone modifications are also revealed as contributing to the mechanisms that avoid re-replication, in particular for heterochromatin replication. We provide here an update of genome replication mostly focused on data from Arabidopsis, and the advances that genomic approaches are likely to provide in the coming years. The data available, both in plants and animals, point to the relevance of the chromatin landscape in genome replication, and require a critical evaluation of the existing views about the nature of replication origins, the mechanisms of origin specification and the relevance of epigenetic modifications for genome replication.

  11. The Chromatin Landscape of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Zsolt; Brulois, Kevin; Jung, Jae U.

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is an oncogenic γ-herpesvirus that causes latent infection in humans. In cells, the viral genome adopts a highly organized chromatin structure, which is controlled by a wide variety of cellular and viral chromatin regulatory factors. In the past few years, interrogation of the chromatinized KSHV genome by whole genome-analyzing tools revealed that the complex chromatin landscape spanning the viral genome in infected cells has important regulatory roles during the viral life cycle. This review summarizes the most recent findings regarding the role of histone modifications, histone modifying enzymes, DNA methylation, microRNAs, non-coding RNAs and the nuclear organization of the KSHV epigenome in the regulation of latent and lytic viral gene expression programs as well as their connection to KSHV-associated pathogenesis. PMID:23698402

  12. Conformation of DNA in chromatin protein-DNA complexes studied by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Liquier, J; Gadenne, M C; Taillandier, E; Defer, N; Favatier, F; Kruh, J

    1979-01-01

    The following observations concerning the DNA secondary structures in various nucleohistone complexes were made by infrared spectroscopy: 1/ in chromatin, chromatin extracted by 0.6 M NaCl, nucleosomes, and histone-DNA reconstituted complexes, the DNA remains in a B type conformation at low relative hygrometry; 2/ in chromatin extracted by tRNA and in non histone protein-DNA reconstituted complexes, the DNA can adopt an A type conformation. Infrared linear dichroism data show that in NHP-DNA complexes the low relative hygrometry conformation of DNA may be modified and that the infrared parameter -1090 is close to that measured for RNA's or DNA-RNA hybrids. It is concluded that the histones block the DNA in a B form and that some of the NHP could be involved in the control of the secondary structure of DNA in chromatin. Images PMID:450704

  13. Application of the Protein Semisynthesis Strategy to the Generation of Modified Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Matthew; Muir, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Histone proteins are subject to a host of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) that modulate chromatin structure and function. Such control is achieved by the direct alteration of the intrinsic physical properties of the chromatin fiber or by regulating the recruitment and activity of a host of trans-acting nuclear factors. The sheer number of histone PTMs presents a formidable barrier to understanding the molecular mechanisms at the heart of epigenetic regulation of eukaryotic genomes. One aspect of this multifarious problem, namely how to access homogeneously modified chromatin for biochemical studies, is well suited to the sensibilities of the organic chemist. Indeed, recent years have witnessed a critical role for synthetic protein chemistry methods in generating the raw materials needed for studying how histone PTMs regulate chromatin biochemistry. This review focuses on what is arguably the most powerful, and widely employed, of these chemical strategies, namely histone semisynthesis via the chemical ligation of peptide fragments. PMID:25784050

  14. Beneficial protective effect of pramipexole on light-induced retinal damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Shibagaki, Keiichi; Okamoto, Kazuyoshi; Katsuta, Osamu; Nakamura, Masatsugu

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the effects of pramipexole, a potent dopamine receptor D2/D3 agonist, on light-induced retinal damage in mice, H2O2-induced retinal pigment epithelium ARPE-19 cell injury in humans, and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity in a cell-free system. Pramipexole (0.1 and 1 mg/kg body weight) was orally administered to mice 1 h before light exposure (5000 lux, 2 h). Electrophysiological and morphologic studies were performed to evaluate the effects of the pramipexole on light-induced retinal damage in mice. Pramipexole significantly prevented the reduction of the a- and b-wave electroretinogram (ERG) amplitudes caused by light exposure in a dose-dependent manner. In parallel, damage to the inner and outer segments (IS/OS) of the photoreceptors, loss of photoreceptor nuclei, and the number of Tdt-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) caused by light exposure were notably ameliorated by pramipexole. Additionally, pramipexole suppressed H2O2-induced ARPE-19 cell death in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect of pramipexole was significant at concentrations of 10(-6) M or higher. Pramipexole also significantly prevented H2O2-induced activation of caspases-3/7 and the intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a concentration-dependent manner ranging from 10(-5) to 10(-3) M. Furthermore, pramipexole increased the scavenging activity toward a hydroxyl radical generated from H2O2 in a Fenton reaction. Our results suggest that pramipexole protects against light-induced retinal damage as an antioxidant and that it may be a novel and effective therapy for retinal degenerative disorders, such as dry age-related macular degeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Retinal cone and rod photoreceptor cells exhibit differential susceptibility to light-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kiichiro; Maeda, Akiko; Chen, Yu; Chauhan, Vishal; Tang, Johnny; Palczewska, Grazyna; Sakai, Tsutomu; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Maeda, Tadao

    2012-04-01

    All-trans-retinal and its condensation-products can cause retinal degeneration in a light-dependent manner and contribute to the pathogenesis of human macular diseases such as Stargardt's disease and age-related macular degeneration. Although these toxic retinoid by-products originate from rod and cone photoreceptor cells, the contribution of each cell type to light-induced retinal degeneration is unknown. In this study, the primary objective was to learn whether rods or cones are more susceptible to light-induced, all-trans-retinal-mediated damage. Previously, we reported that mice lacking enzymes that clear all-trans-retinal from the retina, ATP-binding cassette transporter 4 and retinol dehydrogenase 8, manifested light-induced retinal dystrophy. We first examined early-stage age-related macular degeneration patients and found retinal degenerative changes in rod-rich rather than cone-rich regions of the macula. We then evaluated transgenic mice with rod-only and cone-like-only retinas in addition to progenies of such mice inbred with Rdh8(-/-) Abca4(-/-) mice. Of all these strains, Rdh8(-/-) Abca4(-/-) mice with a mixed rod-cone population showed the most severe retinal degeneration under regular cyclic light conditions. Intense light exposure induced acute retinal damage in Rdh8(-/-) Abca4(-/-) and rod-only mice but not cone-like-only mice. These findings suggest that progression of retinal degeneration in Rdh8(-/-) Abca4(-/-) mice is affected by differential vulnerability of rods and cones to light. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  16. Light-induced disulfide dimerization of recoverin under ex vivo and in vivo conditions.

    PubMed

    Zernii, Evgeni Yu; Nazipova, Aliya A; Gancharova, Olga S; Kazakov, Alexey S; Serebryakova, Marina V; Zinchenko, Dmitry V; Tikhomirova, Natalya K; Senin, Ivan I; Philippov, Pavel P; Permyakov, Eugene A; Permyakov, Sergei E

    2015-06-01

    Despite vast knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying photochemical damage of photoreceptors, linked to progression of age-related macular degeneration, information on specific protein targets of the light-induced oxidative stress is scarce. Here, we demonstrate that prolonged intense illumination (halogen bulb, 1500 lx, 1-5 h) of mammalian eyes under ex vivo (cow) or in vivo (rabbit) conditions induces disulfide dimerization of recoverin, a Ca(2+)-dependent inhibitor of rhodopsin kinase. Western blotting and mass spectrometry analysis of retinal extracts reveals illumination time-dependent accumulation of disulfide homodimers of recoverin and its higher order disulfide cross-linked species, including a minor fraction of mixed disulfides with intracellular proteins (tubulins, etc.). Meanwhile, monomeric bovine recoverin remains mostly reduced. These effects are accompanied by accumulation of disulfide homodimers of visual arrestin. Histological studies demonstrate that the light-induced oxidation of recoverin and arrestin occurs in intact retina (illumination for 2 h), while illumination for 5 h is associated with damage of the photoreceptor layer. A comparison of ex vivo levels of disulfide homodimers of bovine recoverin with redox dependence of its in vitro thiol-disulfide equilibrium (glutathione redox pair) gives the lowest estimate of redox potential in rod outer segments under illumination from -160 to -155 mV. Chemical crosslinking and dynamic light scattering data demonstrate an increased propensity of disulfide dimer of bovine recoverin to multimerization/aggregation. Overall, the oxidative stress caused by the prolonged intense illumination of retina might affect rhodopsin desensitization via concerted disulfide dimerization of recoverin and arrestin. The developed herein models of eye illumination are useful for studies of the light-induced thiol oxidation of visual proteins.

  17. Light-induced gradual activation of photosystem II in dark-grown Norway spruce seedlings.

    PubMed

    Pavlovič, Andrej; Stolárik, Tibor; Nosek, Lukáš; Kouřil, Roman; Ilík, Petr

    2016-06-01

    Gymnosperms, unlike angiosperms, are able to synthesize chlorophyll and form photosystems in complete darkness. Photosystem I (PSI) formed under such conditions is fully active, but photosystem II (PSII) is present in its latent form with inactive oxygen evolving complex (OEC). In this work we have studied light-induced gradual changes in PSII function in dark-grown cotyledons of Norway spruce (Picea abies) via the measurement of chlorophyll a fluorescence rise, absorption changes at 830 nm, thermoluminescence glow curves (TL) and protein analysis. The results indicate that in dark-grown cotyledons, alternative reductants were able to act as electron donors to PSII with inactive OEC. Illumination of cotyledons for 5 min led to partial activation of PSII, which was accompanied by detectable oxygen evolution, but still a substantial number of PSII centers remained in the so called PSII-Q(B)-non-reducing form. Interestingly, even 24 h long illumination was not sufficient for the full activation of PSII centers. This was evidenced by a weak attachment of PsbP protein and the absence of PsbQ protein in PSII particles, the absence of PSII supercomplexes, the suboptimal maximum yield of PSII photochemistry, the presence of C band in TL curve and also the presence of up-shifted Q band in TL in DCMU-treated cotyledons. This slow light-induced activation of PSII in dark-grown cotyledons could contribute to the prevention of PSII overexcitation before the light-induced increase in PSI/PSII ratio allows effective operation of linear electron flow.

  18. The quantitative architecture of centromeric chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Bodor, Dani L; Mata, João F; Sergeev, Mikhail; David, Ana Filipa; Salimian, Kevan J; Panchenko, Tanya; Cleveland, Don W; Black, Ben E; Shah, Jagesh V; Jansen, Lars ET

    2014-01-01

    The centromere, responsible for chromosome segregation during mitosis, is epigenetically defined by CENP-A containing chromatin. The amount of centromeric CENP-A has direct implications for both the architecture and epigenetic inheritance of centromeres. Using complementary strategies, we determined that typical human centromeres contain ∼400 molecules of CENP-A, which is controlled by a mass-action mechanism. This number, despite representing only ∼4% of all centromeric nucleosomes, forms a ∼50-fold enrichment to the overall genome. In addition, although pre-assembled CENP-A is randomly segregated during cell division, this amount of CENP-A is sufficient to prevent stochastic loss of centromere function and identity. Finally, we produced a statistical map of CENP-A occupancy at a human neocentromere and identified nucleosome positions that feature CENP-A in a majority of cells. In summary, we present a quantitative view of the centromere that provides a mechanistic framework for both robust epigenetic inheritance of centromeres and the paucity of neocentromere formation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02137.001 PMID:25027692

  19. Failure of reciprocity in light-induced changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S.

    1984-09-01

    From a study of the effect of light exposure on photoconductivity and solar cell performance of hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloys for different exposure time and intensity, we show that the light-induced changes do not obey reciprocity. Degradation is larger at high intensity light exposure for a shorter time than at low intensity exposure for a longer time even though the product of the exposure time and light intensity is kept a constant. A model that can explain the failure of reciprocity is discussed.

  20. Light-Induced Resistance Effect Observed in Nano Au Films Covered Two-Dimensional Colloidal Crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuai; Huang, Meizhen; Yao, Yanjie; Wang, Hui; Jin, Kui-juan; Zhan, Peng; Wang, Zhenlin

    2015-09-09

    Tailoring resistance response using periodic nanostructures is one of the key issues in the current research. Two-dimensional colloidal crystals (CCs) structure is one of popular periodic nanospheres' structures and most of reports are focused on anomalous transmission of light or biomedical applications. In this work, a light-induced resistance effect is observed on silicon-based Au films covered CCs, featuring a remarkable resistance change as much as 56% and resistance switching characteristic. The diffusion and recombination of photocarriers is the crucial factor for this effect. This finding will expand photoelectricity functionality and be useful for future development of CC-based photoelectric devices.

  1. Blue and green light-induced phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana and Lactuca sativa L. seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinitz, B.; Ren, Z.; Poff, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    Exposure time-response curves for blue and green light-induced phototropic bending in hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and Lactuca sativa L. seedlings are presented. These seedlings show significant phototropic sensitivity up to 540 to 550 nanometers. Since wavelengths longer than 560 nanometers do not induce phototropic bending, it is suggested that the response to 510 to 550 nanometers light is mediated by the specific blue light photoreceptor of phototropism. The authors advise care in the use of green safelights for studies of phototropism.

  2. Formation kinetics of copper-related light-induced degradation in crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lindroos, J. Savin, H.

    2014-12-21

    Light-induced degradation (LID) is a deleterious effect in crystalline silicon, which is considered to originate from recombination-active boron-oxygen complexes and/or copper-related defects. Although LID in both cases appears as a fast initial decay followed by a second slower degradation, we show that the time constant of copper-related degradation increases with increasing boron concentration in contrast to boron-oxygen LID. Temperature-dependent analysis reveals that the defect formation is limited by copper diffusion. Finally, interface defect density measurements confirm that copper-related LID is dominated by recombination in the wafer bulk.

  3. Robust measurement of thin-film photovoltaic modules exhibiting light-induced transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deceglie, Michael G.; Silverman, Timothy J.; Marion, Bill; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2015-09-01

    Light-induced changes to the current-voltage characteristic of thin-film photovoltaic modules (i.e. light-soaking effects) frustrate the repeatable measurement of their operating power. We describe best practices for mitigating, or stabilizing, light-soaking effects for both CdTe and CIGS modules to enable robust, repeatable, and relevant power measurements. We motivate the practices by detailing how modules react to changes in different stabilization methods. We also describe and demonstrate a method for validating alternative stabilization procedures, such as those relying on forward bias in the dark. Reliable measurements of module power are critical for qualification testing, reliability testing, and power rating.

  4. Robust Measurement of Thin-Film Photovoltaic Modules Exhibiting Light-Induced Transients: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deceglie, Michael, G.; Silverman, Timothy J.; Marion, Bill; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2015-09-09

    Light-induced changes to the current-voltage characteristic of thin-film photovoltaic modules (i.e. light-soaking effects) frustrate the repeatable measurement of their operating power. We describe best practices for mitigating, or stabilizing, light-soaking effects for both CdTe and CIGS modules to enable robust, repeatable, and relevant power measurements. We motivate the practices by detailing how modules react to changes in different stabilization methods. We also describe and demonstrate a method for validating alternative stabilization procedures, such as those relying on forward bias in the dark. Reliable measurements of module power are critical for qualification testing, reliability testing, and power rating.

  5. Light-Induced Nuclear Synthesis of Spinach Chloroplast Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase 1

    PubMed Central

    Chueca, Ana; Lázaro, Juan José; Gorgé, Julio López

    1984-01-01

    Etiolated spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. var Winter Giant) seedlings show a residual photosynthetic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activity, which sharply rises under illumination. This increase in activity is due to a light-induced de novo synthesis, as it has been demonstrated by enzyme labeling experiments with 2H2O and [35S]methionine. The rise of bisphosphatase activity under illumination is strongly inhibited by cycloheximide, but not by the 70S ribosome inhibitor lincocin, which shows the nuclear origin of this chloroplastic enzyme. Images Fig. 3 PMID:16663662

  6. Nonresonant electronic transitions induced by vibrational motion in light-induced potentials.

    PubMed

    Sampedro, Pablo; Chang, Bo Y; Sola, Ignacio R

    2016-09-14

    We find a new mechanism of electronic population inversion using strong femtosecond pulses, where the transfer is mediated by vibrational motion on a light-induced potential. The process can be achieved with a single pulse tuning its frequency to the red of the Franck-Condon window. We show the determinant role that the gradient of the transition dipole moment can play on the dynamics, and extend the method to multiphoton processes with odd number of pulses. As an example, we show how the scheme can be applied to population inversion in Na2.

  7. Light-induced valley polarization in interacting and nonlinear Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Simon; Garate, Ion; Côté, René

    2017-08-01

    It has been recently predicted that the interplay between Coulomb interactions and Berry curvature can produce interesting optical phenomena in topologically nontrivial two-dimensional insulators. Here, we present a theory of the interband optical absorption for three-dimensional, doped Weyl semimetals. We find that the Berry curvature, Coulomb interactions, and the nonlinearity in the single-particle energy spectrum can together enable a light-induced valley polarization. We support and supplement our numerical results with an analytical toy model calculation, which unveils topologically nontrivial Mahan excitons with nonzero vorticity.

  8. UV light induced photodegradation of organic dye by ZnO nanocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumesh, C. K.; Patel, Bhavin; Parekh, Kinnari

    2013-06-01

    Ultraviolet light induced photocatalytic activity of ZnO nanocatalyst prepared using a wet chemical precipitation route and mineralization of the methyl orange (MO) dye has been carried out in a photocatalytic reactor. The degradation of the MO was monitored spectrophotometrically and showed a decolorization efficiency of 92% after nine hours of irradiation in the MO-ZnO/UV light system. The blue shifting of maximum peak position of the MO and the formation of extra peak at 247 nm during irradiation time advances revealed that MO degrades in the form of intermediates during the photocatalytic process.

  9. Inversion of polarization by light-induced stabilization in NO2 revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, H. G.

    2015-07-01

    We show that light-induced coherence between a state | a > of the electronic ground state X2A1 and a state | b > of the excited electronic state A2B2 of a laser-induced transition in NO2 affects the evolution of the molecule in the excited state. The optical coherence couples | b > strongly with | a >. This optical coupling works against a radiationless process, which is driving the molecule away from the metastable state | b > to a final state | c >. The optical field stabilizes the molecule in the state | b > by the coupling to the ground state | a >. This causes the inversion effect in NO2.

  10. Transcriptomic analyses reveal species-specific light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in chrysanthemum.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yan; Tang, Xingjiao; Huang, He; Zhang, Yuan; Dai, Silan

    2015-03-17

    The flower colour of agricultural products is very important for their commercial value, which is mainly attributed to the accumulation of anthocyanins. Light is one of the key environmental factors that affect the anthocyanin biosynthesis. However, the deep molecular mechanism remains elusive, and many problems regarding the phenotypic change and the corresponding gene regulation are still unclear. In the present study, Chrysanthemum × morifolium 'Purple Reagan', a light-responding pigmentation cultivar, was selected to investigate the mechanism of light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis using transcriptomic analyses. Only cyanidin derivatives were identified based on the analyses of the pigmentation in ray florets. Shading experiments revealed that the capitulum was the key organ and that its bud stage was the key phase responding to light. These results were used to design five libraries for transcriptomic analyses, including three capitulum developmental stages and two light conditions. RNA sequences were de novo assembled into 103,517 unigenes, of which 60,712 were annotated against four public protein databases. As many as 2,135 unigenes were differentially expressed between the light and dark libraries with 923 up-regulated and 1,212 down-regulated unigenes in response to shading. Next, interactive pathway analysis showed that the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway was the only complete metabolic pathway both modulated in response to light and related to capitulum development. Following the shading treatment, nearly all structural genes involved in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway were down-regulated. Moreover, three CmMYB genes and one CmbHLH gene were identified as key transcription factors that might participate in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis under light conditions based on clustering analysis and validation by RT-qPCR. Finally, a light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway in chrysanthemums was inferred. The pigmentation of the ray

  11. Cold-atom physics using ultrathin optical fibers: light-induced dipole forces and surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Sagué, G; Vetsch, E; Alt, W; Meschede, D; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2007-10-19

    The strong evanescent field around ultrathin unclad optical fibers bears a high potential for detecting, trapping, and manipulating cold atoms. Introducing such a fiber into a cold-atom cloud, we investigate the interaction of a small number of cold cesium atoms with the guided fiber mode and with the fiber surface. Using high resolution spectroscopy, we observe and analyze light-induced dipole forces, van der Waals interaction, and a significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of the atoms. The latter can be assigned to the modification of the vacuum modes by the fiber.

  12. Vibrational analysis of carbonyl modes in different stages of light-induced cyclopyrimidine dimer repair reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Matthias; Tavan, Paul; Nonella, Marco

    2001-11-01

    The formation of cyclopyrimidine dimers is a DNA defect, which is repaired by the enzyme DNA photolyase in a light-induced reaction. Radical anions of the dimers have been suggested to occur as short-lived intermediates during repair. For their identification time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy will be a method of choice. To support and guide such spectroscopic studies we have calculated the vibrational spectra of various pyrimidine compounds using density functional methods. Our results suggest that the carbonyl vibrations of these molecules can serve as marker modes to identify and distinguish intermediates of the repair reaction.

  13. Blue and Green Light-Induced Phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana and Lactuca sativa L. Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Steinitz, Benjamin; Ren, Zhangling; Poff, Kenneth L.

    1985-01-01

    Exposure time-response curves for blue and green light-induced phototropic bending in hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and Lactuca sativa L. seedlings are presented. These seedlings show significant phototropic sensitivity up to 540 to 550 nanometers. Since wave-lengths longer than 560 nanometers do not induce phototropic bending, it is suggested that the response to 510 to 550 nanometers light is mediated by the specific blue light photoreceptor of phototropism. We advise care in the use of green `safelights' for studies of phototropism. PMID:16664021

  14. Light-induced generation of electric potential difference in membranes of purple and green sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Krasinskaya, N P; Samuilov, V D

    1977-06-01

    When associated with a planar phospholipid membrane, chromatophores isolated from photosynthetic sulfur bacteria Chromatium minutissimum, Ectothiorhodospira shaposhnikovii, and Chlorobium limicola f. thiosulfatophilum were shown to generate a light-induced transmembrane electric potential difference measured by a direct method using macroelectrodes and a voltmeter. The maximal photoelectric responses were observed upon the addition of 1,4-naphthoquinone in combination with phenazine methosulfate (or TMPD) and ascorbate. The photoeffects were inhibited by CCCP and gramicidin. The data demonstrate that similar mechanisms of photoelectric generation function in membranes of the different bacteria studied.

  15. Light-induced gaps in semiconductor band-to-band transitions.

    PubMed

    Vu, Q T; Haug, H; Mücke, O D; Tritschler, T; Wegener, M; Khitrova, G; Gibbs, H M

    2004-05-28

    We observe a triplet around the third harmonic of the semiconductor band gap when exciting 50-100 nm thin GaAs films with 5 fs pulses at 3 x 10(12) W/cm(2). The comparison with solutions of the semiconductor Bloch equations allows us to interpret the observed peak structure as being due to a two-band Mollow triplet. This triplet in the optical spectrum is a result of light-induced gaps in the band structure, which arise from coherent band mixing. The theory is formulated for full tight-binding bands and uses no rotating-wave approximation.

  16. UV light induced photodegradation of organic dye by ZnO nanocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sumesh, C. K.; Patel, Bhavin; Parekh, Kinnari

    2013-06-03

    Ultraviolet light induced photocatalytic activity of ZnO nanocatalyst prepared using a wet chemical precipitation route and mineralization of the methyl orange (MO) dye has been carried out in a photocatalytic reactor. The degradation of the MO was monitored spectrophotometrically and showed a decolorization efficiency of 92% after nine hours of irradiation in the MO-ZnO/UV light system. The blue shifting of maximum peak position of the MO and the formation of extra peak at 247 nm during irradiation time advances revealed that MO degrades in the form of intermediates during the photocatalytic process.

  17. Very fast light-induced degradation of a-Si:H/c-Si(100) interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wolf, Stefaan; Demaurex, Bénédicte; Descoeudres, Antoine; Ballif, Christophe

    2011-06-01

    Light-induced degradation (LID) of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces passivated with hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is investigated. The initial passivation decays on polished c-Si(100) surfaces on a time scale much faster than usually associated with bulk a-Si:H LID. This phenomenon is absent for the a-Si:H/c-Si(111) interface. We attribute these differences to the allowed reconstructions on the respective surfaces. This may point to a link between the presence of so-called “fast” states and (internal) surface reconstruction in bulk a-Si:H.

  18. Formation kinetics of copper-related light-induced degradation in crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, J.; Savin, H.

    2014-12-01

    Light-induced degradation (LID) is a deleterious effect in crystalline silicon, which is considered to originate from recombination-active boron-oxygen complexes and/or copper-related defects. Although LID in both cases appears as a fast initial decay followed by a second slower degradation, we show that the time constant of copper-related degradation increases with increasing boron concentration in contrast to boron-oxygen LID. Temperature-dependent analysis reveals that the defect formation is limited by copper diffusion. Finally, interface defect density measurements confirm that copper-related LID is dominated by recombination in the wafer bulk.

  19. Evidence for Light-Induced Hole Polarons in LiNbO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herth, P.; Granzow, T.; Schaniel, D.; Woike, Th.; Imlau, M.; Krätzig, E.

    2005-08-01

    Transient light-induced absorption in LiNbO3 is observed in the blue-green spectral range after pulsed illumination with 532 nm. Its buildup and decay in Fe-doped LiNbO3 is satisfactorily described by a sum of two stretched exponential functions. For undoped LiNbO3, however, only one stretched exponential decay is observed. These experimental results are explained by the formation of both small Nb4+Li electron polarons and O- hole polarons. The mechanism is discussed on the basis of a proposed band scheme.

  20. Light-induced electrical switching of porphyrin-covered silicon nanowire FETs (presentation video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2014-03-01

    Nanowires represent excellent building blocks for future nanoelectronics, due to their efficient charge transport characteristics. Here we present light-induced switching behaviour of porphyrin-coated silicon nanowire field effect transistors (Si NW FETs) and demonstrate their capabilities for design of hybrid nanodevices - consisting of organic complexes and inorganic nanowires. Switching of Si NW FETs highly reflects the electrical change of porphyrin molecules by light. To demonstrate significant factors of concentration-dependent switching of porphyrin-covered devices, electrical charging mechanism through molecules and nanowires has been understood, that allows the systematic integration of the hybrid devices.