Science.gov

Sample records for control promotes pancreatic

  1. Pleiotrophin promotes perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jun; Hu, Xiu-Feng; Feng, Xiao-Shan; Gao, She-Gan

    2013-01-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) in pancreatic cancer is an important cause of local recurrence, but little is known about its mechanism. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is an important neurotrophic factor. It is of interest that our recent experimental data showed its involvement in PNI of pancreatic cancer. PTN strongly presents in the cytoplasm of pancreatic cancer cells, and high expression of PTN and its receptor may contribute to the high PNI of pancreatic cancer. Correspondingly, PNI is prone to happen in PTN-positive tumors. We thus hypothesize that, as a neurite growth-promoting factor, PTN may promote PNI in pancreatic cancer. PTN is released at the time of tumor cell necrosis, and binds with its high-affinity receptor, N-syndecan on pancreatic nerves, to promote neural growth in pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, neural destruction leads to a distorted neural homeostasis. Neurons and Schwann cells produce more N-syndecan in an effort to repair the pancreatic nerves. However, the abundance of N-syndecan attracts further PTN-positive cancer cells to the site of injury, creating a vicious cycle. Ultimately, increased PTN and N-syndecan levels, due to the continuous nerve injury, may promote cancer invasion and propagation along the neural structures. Therefore, it is meaningful to discuss the relationship between PTN/N-syndecan signaling and PNI in pancreatic cancer, which may lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of PNI in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24151381

  2. Pleiotrophin promotes perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Hu, Xiu-Feng; Feng, Xiao-Shan; Gao, She-Gan

    2013-10-21

    Perineural invasion (PNI) in pancreatic cancer is an important cause of local recurrence, but little is known about its mechanism. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is an important neurotrophic factor. It is of interest that our recent experimental data showed its involvement in PNI of pancreatic cancer. PTN strongly presents in the cytoplasm of pancreatic cancer cells, and high expression of PTN and its receptor may contribute to the high PNI of pancreatic cancer. Correspondingly, PNI is prone to happen in PTN-positive tumors. We thus hypothesize that, as a neurite growth-promoting factor, PTN may promote PNI in pancreatic cancer. PTN is released at the time of tumor cell necrosis, and binds with its high-affinity receptor, N-syndecan on pancreatic nerves, to promote neural growth in pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, neural destruction leads to a distorted neural homeostasis. Neurons and Schwann cells produce more N-syndecan in an effort to repair the pancreatic nerves. However, the abundance of N-syndecan attracts further PTN-positive cancer cells to the site of injury, creating a vicious cycle. Ultimately, increased PTN and N-syndecan levels, due to the continuous nerve injury, may promote cancer invasion and propagation along the neural structures. Therefore, it is meaningful to discuss the relationship between PTN/N-syndecan signaling and PNI in pancreatic cancer, which may lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of PNI in pancreatic cancer.

  3. MicroRNA-155 Controls Exosome Synthesis and Promotes Gemcitabine Resistance in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mikamori, Manabu; Yamada, Daisaku; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Hasegawa, Shinichiro; Kishimoto, Tomoya; Tomimaru, Yoshito; Asaoka, Tadafumi; Noda, Takehiro; Wada, Hiroshi; Kawamoto, Koichi; Gotoh, Kunihito; Takeda, Yutaka; Tanemura, Masahiro; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2017-01-01

    The cancer drug gemcitabine (GEM) is a key drug for treating pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but PDAC cells develop chemoresistance after long-term administration. Since the tolerance was immediately spread to every PDAC tissue in a patient, it is assumed that some certain efficient mechanisms underlay in the development of chemoresistance. Changes in the levels of particular microRNAs or alterations in intercellular communication play a dominant role in chemoresistance development, and recent data also suggest that exosomes play an important role in this process. In this study, we revealed that the loop conferred chemoresistance in PDAC cells. The loop was as follows; 1, The long-term exposure of GEM increased miR-155 expression in PDAC cells. 2, The increase of miR-155 induced two different functions; exosome secretion and chemoresistance ability via facilitating the anti-apoptotic activity. 3, Exosome deliver the miR-155 into the other PDAC cells and induce the following function. The target therapy to miR-155 or the exosome secretion effectively attenuated the chemoresistance, and these results were validated with both clinical samples and in vivo experiments. This mechanism represents a novel therapeutic target in GEM treatment to PDAC. PMID:28198398

  4. Alternatively activated macrophages promote pancreatic fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jing; Sharma, Vishal; Hsieh, Michael H.; Chawla, Ajay; Murali, Ramachandran; Pandol, Stephen J.; Habtezion, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive and irreversible inflammatory and fibrotic disease with no cure. Unlike acute pancreatitis, we find that alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs) are dominant in mouse and human CP. AAMs are dependent on IL-4 and IL-13 signaling and we show that mice lacking IL-4Rα, myeloid specific IL-4Rα, and IL-4/IL-13 were less susceptible to pancreatic fibrosis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that mouse and human pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are a source of IL-4/IL-13. Notably, we show that pharmacologic inhibition of IL-4/IL-13 in human ex-vivo studies as well as in established mouse CP decreases pancreatic AAMs and fibrosis. We identify a critical role for macrophages in pancreatic fibrosis and in turn PSCs as important inducers of macrophage alternative activation. Our study challenges and identifies pathways involved in cross talk between macrophages and PSCs that can be targeted to reverse or halt pancreatic fibrosis progression. PMID:25981357

  5. Overexpression of ankyrin1 promotes pancreatic cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Omura, Noriyuki; Mizuma, Masamichi; MacGregor, Anne; Hong, Seung-Mo; Ayars, Michael; Almario, Jose Alejandro; Borges, Michael; Kanda, Mitsuro; Li, Ang; Vincent, Audrey; Maitra, Anirban; Goggins, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The methylation status of a promoter influences gene expression and aberrant methylation during tumor development has important functional consequences for pancreatic and other cancers. Using methylated CpG island amplification and promoter microarrays, we identified ANK1 as hypomethylated in pancreatic cancers. Expression analysis determined ANK1 as commonly overexpressed in pancreatic cancers relative to normal pancreas. ANK1 was co-expressed with miR-486 in pancreatic cancer cells. Stable knockdown of ANK1 in the pancreatic cancer cell line AsPC1 led to changes in cell morphology, and decreases in colony formation. Stable knockdown of ANK1 also marked reduced the growth of tumors in athymic nude mice. Among patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy, those with pancreatic cancers expressing ANK1 had a poorer prognosis than those without ANK1 expression. These findings indicate a role for ANK1 overexpression in mediating pancreatic cancer tumorigenicity. PMID:27144336

  6. [Expression of the radio-inducible TK suicide gene controlled by Egr-1 promoter in pancreatic cancer cells: an in vitro experiment].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-long; Liu, Xun-liang; Qian, Qing; Du, Qing; Guo, Shi-ying; Li, Chao-jun; Miao, Yi

    2008-07-22

    To investigate the expression of radio-inducible herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) suicide gene controlled by early growth response-1 (Egr-1) promoter in pancreatic cancer cells. Adenoviral vector pAdEgr-1-TK containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) was constructed. Human pancreatic cancer cells of the line PC-3 were cultured, transfected with pAdEgr-1-TK, and then exposed to 60Co source gamma-radiation at the doses of 0, 5, 7.5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy respectively for 24 hours. RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the TK mRNA and protein expression in the PC3 cells. The TK mRNA expression levels of the PC3 cells exposed to y-radiation at the doses of 0, 5, 7.5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy respectively were (67.3 +/- 2.1)%, (89.3 +/- 1.0)%, (114.7 +/- 5.7)%, (140.5 +/- 3.1)%, (134.5 +/- 4.0)%, and (117.4 +/- 3.4)% respectively. The TK mRNA expression level was markedly increased after exposure to gamma-radiation, especially that t the dose of 10 Gy (all P < 0.01). The TK protein expression levels of the PC3 cells exposed to y-radiation at the doses of 0, 5, 7.5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy were (5.4 +/- 0.7)%, (7.6 +/- 0.9)%, (21.5 +/- 1.5)%, (35.7 +/- l1.4)%, (32.1 +/- 1.2)%, and (28.8 +/- 1.5)% respectively. The Egr-1 promoter causes high expression of TK suicide gene in cancer cells after exposure to 60Co-gamma-radiation. These data provide an experimental basis for gene therapy.

  7. Pancreatic stellate cells promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Masamune, Atsushi; Watanabe, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiromichi; Hamada, Shin; Satoh, Kennichi; Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Recent studies have shown that pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. {yields} Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. {yields} PSCs decreased the expression of epithelial markers but increased that of mesenchymal markers, along with increased migration. {yields} This study suggests epithelial-mesenchymal transition as a novel mechanism by which PSCs contribute to the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Because epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in the progression of pancreatic cancer, we hypothesized that PSCs promote EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. Panc-1 and SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were indirectly co-cultured with human PSCs isolated from patients undergoing operation for pancreatic cancer. The expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was examined by real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was examined by scratch and two-chamber assays. Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and a scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. The expression of E-cadherin, cytokeratin 19, and membrane-associated {beta}-catenin was decreased, whereas vimentin and Snail (Snai-1) expression was increased more in cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs than in mono-cultured cells. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was increased by co-culture with PSCs. The PSC-induced decrease of E-cadherin expression was not altered

  8. MDM2 promoter polymorphism and pancreatic cancer risk and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Asomaning, Kofi; Reid, Amy E; Zhou, Wei; Heist, Rebecca S; Zhai, Rihong; Su, Li; Kwak, Eunice L; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence; Zhu, Andrew X; Ryan, David P; Christiani, David C; Liu, Geoffrey

    2008-06-15

    The mouse double minute 2 homologue (MDM2) -309T/G promoter polymorphism has been associated recently with the development and prognosis of a variety of tumors. The G allele is associated with increased affinity for Sp1 binding and higher MDM2 mRNA and protein levels, leading to diminished tumor suppressor activity of the p53 pathway. We hypothesized that the G allele is also associated with increased risk and worse outcome in pancreatic cancer. We evaluated the association between MDM2 309T/G and the risk of histologically confirmed pancreatic adenocarcinoma at Massachusetts General Hospital using unconditional logistic regression (123 cases and 372 controls). Complete overall survival and progression-free survival data were also available for 109 newly diagnosed patients. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of pancreatic cancer associated with the MDM2 T/G and G/G genotypes compared with TT were 1.89 (1.20-2.99) and 2.07 (1.03-4.16), respectively (adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and pack-years of smoking). In Cox proportional hazards model with the wild-type T/T genotype as the reference category and adjusting for stage, treatment, and performance status, both the heterozygous T/G and the homozygous G/G genotypes were associated with decreased progression-free survival [adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval), 1.67 (0.98-2.84) for T/G and 2.28 (1.11-4.71) for G/G] and overall survival [2.64 (1.23-5.67) for T/G and 3.12 (1.22-7.91) for G/G]. The G allele of the MDM2 -309T/G polymorphism is associated with 2- to 3-fold increase risk and progression of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and a corresponding decrease in survival.

  9. Kindlin-2 in pancreatic stellate cells promotes the progression of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Naoki; Masamune, Atsushi; Hamada, Shin; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2017-04-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a pivotal role in pancreatic fibrosis associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Kindlin-2 is a focal adhesion protein that regulates the activation of integrins. This study aimed to clarify the role of kindlin-2 in PSCs in pancreatic cancer. Kindlin-2 expression in 79 resected pancreatic cancer tissues was examined by immunohistochemical staining. Kindlin-2-knockdown immortalized human PSCs were established using small interfering RNA. Pancreatic cancer cells were treated with conditioned media of PSCs, and the cell proliferation and migration were examined. SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were subcutaneously injected into nude mice alone or with PSCs and the size of the tumors was monitored. Kindlin-2 expression was observed in PDAC and the peritumoral stroma. Stromal kindlin-2 expression was associated with shorter recurrence-free survival time after R0 resection. Knockdown of kindlin-2 resulted in decreased proliferation, migration, and cytokine expression in PSCs. The PSC-induced proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cells were suppressed by kindlin-2 knockdown in PSCs. In vivo, co-injection of PSCs increased the size of the tumors, but this effect was abolished by kindlin-2 knockdown in PSCs. In conclusion, kindlin-2 in PSCs promoted the progression of pancreatic cancer.

  10. APC promoter is frequently methylated in pancreatic juice of patients with pancreatic carcinomas or periampullary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ginesta, Mireia M.; Diaz-Riascos, Zamira Vanessa; Busquets, Juli; Pelaez, Núria; Serrano, Teresa; Peinado, Miquel Àngel; Jorba, Rosa; García-Borobia, Francisco Javier; Capella, Gabriel; Fabregat, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms is critical to improve their clinical outcome. The present authors previously demonstrated that DNA hypermethylation of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), histamine receptor H2 (HRH2), cadherin 13 (CDH13), secreted protein acidic and cysteine rich (SPARC) and engrailed-1 (EN-1) promoters is frequently detected in pancreatic tumor cells. The aim of the present study was to assess their prevalence in pancreatic juice of carcinomas of the pancreas and periampullary area. A total of 135 pancreatic juices obtained from 85 pancreatic cancer (PC), 26 ampullary carcinoma (AC), 10 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and 14 chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients were analyzed. The methylation status of the APC, HRH2, CDH13, SPARC and EN-1 promoters was analyzed using methylation specific-melting curve analysis (MS-MCA). Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations were also tested with allele-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction amplification. Out of the 5 promoters analyzed, APC (71%) and HRH2 (65%) were the most frequently methylated in PC juice. APC methylation was also detected at a high frequency in AC (76%) and IPMN (80%), but only occasionally observed in CP (7%). APC methylation had a high sensitivity (71–80%) for all types of cancer analyzed. The panel (where a sample scored as positive when ≥2 markers were methylated) did not outperform APC as a single marker. Finally, KRAS detection in pancreatic juice offered a lower sensitivity (50%) and specificity (71%) for detection of any cancer. APC hypermethylation in pancreatic juice, as assessed by MS-MCA, is a frequent event of potential clinical usefulness in the diagnosis of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms. PMID:27602165

  11. Molecular Pathways Controlling Autophagy in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    New, Maria; Van Acker, Tim; Long, Jaclyn S.; Sakamaki, Jun-ichi; Ryan, Kevin M.; Tooze, Sharon A.

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the few cancer types where the 5-year survival rate shows no improvement. Despite conflicting evidence, the majority of data points to an essential role for autophagy in PDAC growth and survival, in particular constitutively activated autophagy, can provide crucial fuel to PDAC tumor cells in their nutrient-deprived environment. Autophagy, which is required for cell homeostasis, can both suppress and promote tumorigenesis and tumor survival in a context-dependent manner. Protein by protein, the mystery of how PDAC abuses the cell’s homeostasis system for its malignant growth has recently begun to be unraveled. In this review, we focus on how autophagy is responsible for growth and development of PDAC tumors and where autophagy and the mechanisms controlling it fit into PDAC metabolism. Understanding the range of pathways controlling autophagy and their interplay in PDAC could open the way for new therapeutic avenues. PMID:28316954

  12. Molecular Pathways Controlling Autophagy in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    New, Maria; Van Acker, Tim; Long, Jaclyn S; Sakamaki, Jun-Ichi; Ryan, Kevin M; Tooze, Sharon A

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the few cancer types where the 5-year survival rate shows no improvement. Despite conflicting evidence, the majority of data points to an essential role for autophagy in PDAC growth and survival, in particular constitutively activated autophagy, can provide crucial fuel to PDAC tumor cells in their nutrient-deprived environment. Autophagy, which is required for cell homeostasis, can both suppress and promote tumorigenesis and tumor survival in a context-dependent manner. Protein by protein, the mystery of how PDAC abuses the cell's homeostasis system for its malignant growth has recently begun to be unraveled. In this review, we focus on how autophagy is responsible for growth and development of PDAC tumors and where autophagy and the mechanisms controlling it fit into PDAC metabolism. Understanding the range of pathways controlling autophagy and their interplay in PDAC could open the way for new therapeutic avenues.

  13. SOX2 promotes dedifferentiation and imparts stem cell-like features to pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Herreros-Villanueva, M; Zhang, J-S; Koenig, A; Abel, E V; Smyrk, T C; Bamlet, W R; de Narvajas, A A-M; Gomez, T S; Simeone, D M; Bujanda, L; Billadeau, D D

    2013-01-01

    SOX2 (Sex-determining region Y (SRY)-Box2) has important functions during embryonic development and is involved in cancer stem cell (CSC) maintenance, in which it impairs cell growth and tumorigenicity. However, the function of SOX2 in pancreatic cancer cells is unclear. The objective of this study was to analyze SOX2 expression in human pancreatic tumors and determine the role of SOX2 in pancreatic cancer cells regulating CSC properties. In this report, we show that SOX2 is not expressed in normal pancreatic acinar or ductal cells. However, ectopic expression of SOX2 is observed in 19.3% of human pancreatic tumors. SOX2 knockdown in pancreatic cancer cells results in cell growth inhibition via cell cycle arrest associated with p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 induction, whereas SOX2 overexpression promotes S-phase entry and cell proliferation associated with cyclin D3 induction. SOX2 expression is associated with increased levels of the pancreatic CSC markers ALDH1, ESA and CD44. Importantly, we show that SOX2 is enriched in the ESA+/CD44+ CSC population from two different patient samples. Moreover, we show that SOX2 directly binds to the Snail, Slug and Twist promoters, leading to a loss of E-Cadherin and ZO-1 expression. Taken together, our findings show that SOX2 is aberrantly expressed in pancreatic cancer and contributes to cell proliferation and stemness/dedifferentiation through the regulation of a set of genes controlling G1/S transition and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype, suggesting that targeting SOX2-positive cancer cells could be a promising therapeutic strategy. PMID:23917223

  14. Chlamydia pneumoniae promotes dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Annette R; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Witt, Colleen M; Yu, Jieh-Juen; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Chambers, James P; Perry, George; Guentzel, M Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2015-06-01

    The human pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae has been implicated in chronic inflammatory diseases including type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we designed a study to evaluate pancreatic beta cells and mast cells during chlamydial infection. Our study revealed that C. pneumoniae infected mast cells significantly (p<0.005) decreased beta cell ATP and insulin production, in contrast to uninfected mast cells co-cultured with beta cells. Infected mast cells exhibited pyknotic nuclei and active caspase-3 and caspase-1 expression. Additionally, ex vivo analyses of tissues collected from C. pneumoniae infected mice showed increased interleukin-1β production in splenocytes and pancreatic tissues as was observed with in vitro mast cell-beta cell co-cultures during C. pneumoniae infection. Notably, infected mast cells promoted beta cell destruction. Our findings reveal the negative effect of C. pneumoniae on mast cells, and the consequential impact on pancreatic beta cell function and viability.

  15. TLR9 ligation in pancreatic stellate cells promotes tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P.; Levie, Elliot; Nguy, Susanna; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Xu, Yijie; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Greco, Stephanie H.; Deutsch, Michael; Jonnadula, Saikiran; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Tippens, Daniel; Pushalkar, Smruti; Eisenthal, Andrew; Saxena, Deepak; Ahn, Jiyoung; Hajdu, Cristina; Engle, Dannielle D.; Tuveson, David

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling can have protective or protumorigenic effects on oncogenesis depending on the cancer subtype and on specific inflammatory elements within the tumor milieu. We found that TLR9 is widely expressed early during the course of pancreatic transformation and that TLR9 ligands are ubiquitous within the tumor microenvironment. TLR9 ligation markedly accelerates oncogenesis, whereas TLR9 deletion is protective. We show that TLR9 activation has distinct effects on the epithelial, inflammatory, and fibrogenic cellular subsets in pancreatic carcinoma and plays a central role in cross talk between these compartments. Specifically, TLR9 activation can induce proinflammatory signaling in transformed epithelial cells, but does not elicit oncogene expression or cancer cell proliferation. Conversely, TLR9 ligation induces pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) to become fibrogenic and secrete chemokines that promote epithelial cell proliferation. TLR9-activated PSCs mediate their protumorigenic effects on the epithelial compartment via CCL11. Additionally, TLR9 has immune-suppressive effects in the tumor microenvironment (TME) via induction of regulatory T cell recruitment and myeloid-derived suppressor cell proliferation. Collectively, our work shows that TLR9 has protumorigenic effects in pancreatic carcinoma which are distinct from its influence in extrapancreatic malignancies and from the mechanistic effects of other TLRs on pancreatic oncogenesis. PMID:26481685

  16. TLR9 ligation in pancreatic stellate cells promotes tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Levie, Elliot; Nguy, Susanna; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Xu, Yijie; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Greco, Stephanie H; Deutsch, Michael; Jonnadula, Saikiran; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Tippens, Daniel; Pushalkar, Smruti; Eisenthal, Andrew; Saxena, Deepak; Ahn, Jiyoung; Hajdu, Cristina; Engle, Dannielle D; Tuveson, David; Miller, George

    2015-11-16

    Modulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling can have protective or protumorigenic effects on oncogenesis depending on the cancer subtype and on specific inflammatory elements within the tumor milieu. We found that TLR9 is widely expressed early during the course of pancreatic transformation and that TLR9 ligands are ubiquitous within the tumor microenvironment. TLR9 ligation markedly accelerates oncogenesis, whereas TLR9 deletion is protective. We show that TLR9 activation has distinct effects on the epithelial, inflammatory, and fibrogenic cellular subsets in pancreatic carcinoma and plays a central role in cross talk between these compartments. Specifically, TLR9 activation can induce proinflammatory signaling in transformed epithelial cells, but does not elicit oncogene expression or cancer cell proliferation. Conversely, TLR9 ligation induces pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) to become fibrogenic and secrete chemokines that promote epithelial cell proliferation. TLR9-activated PSCs mediate their protumorigenic effects on the epithelial compartment via CCL11. Additionally, TLR9 has immune-suppressive effects in the tumor microenvironment (TME) via induction of regulatory T cell recruitment and myeloid-derived suppressor cell proliferation. Collectively, our work shows that TLR9 has protumorigenic effects in pancreatic carcinoma which are distinct from its influence in extrapancreatic malignancies and from the mechanistic effects of other TLRs on pancreatic oncogenesis.

  17. Pancreatic acinar cells-derived cyclophilin A promotes pancreatic damage by activating NF-κB pathway in experimental pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Hu, Yanling; Ni, Jianbo; Yin, Guojian; Xing, Miao; Shen, Jie; Tang, Maochun; Chen, Congying; Fan, Yuting; Xiao, Wenqin; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xingpeng; and others

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • CypA is upregulated in experimental pancreatitis. • CCK induces expression and release of CypA in acinar cell in vitro. • rCypA aggravates CCK-induced acinar cell death and inflammatory cytokine production. • rCypA activates the NF-κB pathway in acinar cells in vitro. - Abstract: Inflammation triggered by necrotic acinar cells contributes to the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), but its precise mechanism remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that Cyclophilin A (CypA) released from necrotic cells is involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. We therefore investigated the role of CypA in experimental AP induced by administration of sodium taurocholate (STC). CypA was markedly upregulated and widely expressed in disrupted acinar cells, infiltrated inflammatory cells, and tubular complexes. In vitro, it was released from damaged acinar cells by cholecystokinin (CCK) induction. rCypA (recombinant CypA) aggravated CCK-induced acinar cell necrosis, promoted nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, and increased cytokine production. In conclusion, CypA promotes pancreatic damage by upregulating expression of inflammatory cytokines of acinar cells via the NF-κB pathway.

  18. Hippo transducer TAZ promotes epithelial mesenchymal transition and supports pancreatic cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Dacheng; Cui, Jiujie; Xia, Tian; Jia, Zhiliang; Wang, Liang; Wei, Wenfei; Zhu, Anna; Gao, Yong; Xie, Keping; Quan, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional co-activator with PDZ binding motif (TAZ) is a transducer of the Hippo pathway and promotes cancer development and progression. In the present study, we sought to determine the roles and underlying mechanisms of elevated expression and activation of TAZ in pancreatic cancer development and progression. The mechanistic role of TAZ and Hippo signaling in promotion of pancreatic cancer development and progression was examined using cell culture, molecular biology, and mouse models. The relevance of our experimental and mechanistic findings was validated using human pancreatic tumor specimens. We found that TAZ expression was markedly higher in pancreatic tumors than in normal pancreatic tissue. Further analysis of the correlation of TAZ expression with tissue microarray clinicopathologic parameters revealed that this expression was positively associated with tumor differentiation. Also, TAZ expression was higher in pancreatic cancer cell lines than in pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. TAZ activation in pancreatic cancer cells promoted their proliferation, migration, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that aberrant expression and activation of TAZ in pancreatic cancer cells resulted from suppression of the expression of Merlin, a positive regulator upstream of the Hippo pathway, and that the oncogenic function of TAZ in pancreatic cancer cells was mediated by TEA/ATTS domain transcription factors. Therefore, TAZ functioned as an oncogene and promoted pancreatic cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition and progression. TAZ thus may be a target for effective therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26416426

  19. A simian virus 40 large T-antigen segment containing amino acids 1 to 127 and expressed under the control of the rat elastase-1 promoter produces pancreatic acinar carcinomas in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tevethia, M J; Bonneau, R H; Griffith, J W; Mylin, L

    1997-01-01

    The simian virus 40 large T antigen induces tumors in a wide variety of tissues in transgenic mice, the precise tissues depending on the tissue specificity of the upstream region controlling T-antigen expression. Expression of mutant T antigens that contain a subset of the protein's activities restricts the spectrum of tumors induced. Others showed previously that expression of a mutant large T antigen containing the N-terminal 121 amino acids (T1-121) under control of the lymphotropic papovavirus promoter resulted in slow-growing choroid plexus tumors, whereas full-length T antigen under the same promoter induced rapidly growing CPR tumors, T-cell lymphomas, and B-cell lymphomas. In those instances, the alteration in tumor induction or progression correlated with inability of the mutant large T antigen to bind the tumor suppressor p53. In the study reported here, we investigated the capacity of an N-terminal T antigen segment (T1-127) expressed in conjunction with small t antigen under control of the rat elastase-1 (E1) promoter to induce pancreatic tumors. The results show that pancreases of transgenic mice expressing T1-127 and small t antigen display acinar cell dysplasia at birth that progresses to neoplasia. The average age to death in these mice is within the range reported for transgenic mice expressing full-length T antigen under control of the E1 promoter. These results indicate that sequestering p53 by binding is not required for the development of rapidly growing acinar cell carcinomas. In addition, we provide evidence that small t antigen is unlikely to be required. Finally, we show that the p53 protein in acinar cell carcinomas is wild type in conformation. PMID:9343166

  20. Epidemiology, risk factors, and the promotion of pancreatic cancer: role of the stellate cell.

    PubMed

    Pandol, Stephen; Gukovskaya, Anna; Edderkaoui, Mouad; Edderkoui, Mouad; Dawson, David; Eibl, Guido; Lugea, Aurelia

    2012-03-01

    There are approximately 277,000 new cases of pancreatic cancer and 266,000 deaths from pancreatic cancer annually, indicating a mortality rate of 96% of the cases diagnosed. Because of the ineffectiveness of therapies, a major emphasis needs to be placed on prevention. This paper reviews the epidemiology and risk factors for pancreatic cancer, and uses this information to propose plausible research directions for determining the biological mechanisms mediating the effects of risk factors on the promotion of pancreatic cancer, with a focus on the pancreatic stellate cell. © 2012 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Pancreatic tumor cell secreted CCN1/Cyr61 promotes endothelial cell migration and aberrant neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Maity, Gargi; Mehta, Smita; Haque, Inamul; Dhar, Kakali; Sarkar, Sandipto; Banerjee, Sushanta K; Banerjee, Snigdha

    2014-05-16

    The complex signaling networks between cancer cells and adjacent endothelial cells make it challenging to unravel how cancer cells send extracellular messages to promote aberrant vascularization or tumor angiogenesis. Here, in vitro and in vivo models show that pancreatic cancer cell generated unique microenvironments can underlie endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis. Mechanistically, we find that pancreatic cancer cell secreted CCN1/Cyr61 matricellular protein rewires the microenvironment to promote endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis. This event can be overcome by Sonic Hedgehog (SHh) antibody treatment. Collectively, these studies identify a novel CCN1 signaling program in pancreatic cancer cells which activates SHh through autocrine-paracrine circuits to promote endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis and suggests that CCN1 signaling of pancreatic cancer cells is vital for the regulation of tumor angiogenesis. Thus CCN1 signaling could be an ideal target for tumor vascular disruption in pancreatic cancer.

  2. Autophagy Is Required for Activation of Pancreatic Stellate Cells, Associated With Pancreatic Cancer Progression and Promotes Growth of Pancreatic Tumors in Mice.

    PubMed

    Endo, Sho; Nakata, Kohei; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Takesue, Shin; Nakayama, Hiromichi; Abe, Toshiya; Koikawa, Kazuhiro; Okumura, Takashi; Sada, Masafumi; Horioka, Kohei; Zheng, Biao; Mizuuchi, Yusuke; Iwamoto, Chika; Murata, Masaharu; Moriyama, Taiki; Miyasaka, Yoshihiro; Ohtsuka, Takao; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Oda, Yoshinao; Hashizume, Makoto; Nakamura, Masafumi

    2017-05-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) change from a quiescent to activated state in the tumor environment and secrete extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and cytokines to increase the aggressiveness of tumors. However, it is not clear how PSCs are activated to produce these factors, or whether this process can be inhibited. PSCs have morphologic and functional similarities to hepatic stellate cells, which undergo autophagy to promote fibrosis and tumor growth. We investigated whether autophagy activates PSCs, which promotes development of the tumor stroma and growth of pancreatic tumors in mice. We used immunofluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry to analyze pancreatic tumor specimens from 133 patients who underwent pancreatectomy in Japan from 2000 to 2009. PSCs were cultured from pancreatic tumor tissues or tissues of patients with chronic pancreatitis; these were analyzed by immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblots, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and in assays for invasiveness, proliferation, and lipid droplets. Autophagy was inhibited in PSCs by administration of chloroquine or transfection with small interfering RNAs. Proteins were knocked down in immortalized PSCs by expression of small hairpin RNAs. Cells were transplanted into pancreatic tails of nude mice, and tumor growth and metastasis were quantified. Based on immunohistochemical analyses, autophagy was significantly associated with tumor T category (P = .018), histologic grade (P = .001), lymph node metastases (P < .001), stage (P = .009), perilymphatic invasion (P = .001), and perivascular invasion (P = .003). Autophagy of PSCs was associated with shorter survival times of patients with pancreatic cancer. PSC expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3, a marker of autophagosomes, was associated with poor outcomes (shorter survival time, disease recurrence) for patients with pancreatic cancer (relative risk of shorter survival time, 1

  3. SIRT1 promotes the proliferation and metastasis of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jianguang; Chu, Zhijie; Ma, Pengfei; Meng, Yuanpu; Yang, Yanhui

    2017-03-01

    SIRT1 plays an important role in human malignant progression, inducing cancer cell proliferation and metastasis by regulating downstream gene expressions. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms in which SIRT1 promotes pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis. The aim of this study is to investigate the SIRT1 expression levels and biological functions in promoting pancreatic cancer progression. We first investigated the expression of SIRT1 in a series of pancreatic cancer tissues as well as in a panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines. The effect of SIRT1 on cell activity was explored by knockdown experiments. Cell growth was measured using the MTT assay and colony-formation assay. Migration and invasion were tested using transwell assay. Our results showed that the expression of SIRT1 was significantly up-regulated both in pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. Knockdown of SIRT1 suppressed cell proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cells. This is the first report to disclose the role of SIRT1 in regulation of pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and migration, which may provide a potential therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer patients.

  4. Early immunization induces persistent tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T cells against an immunodominant epitope and promotes lifelong control of pancreatic tumor progression in SV40 tumor antigen transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Otahal, Pavel; Schell, Todd D; Hutchinson, Sandra C; Knowles, Barbara B; Tevethia, Satvir S

    2006-09-01

    The ability to recruit the host's CD8+ T lymphocytes (T(CD8)) against cancer is often limited by the development of peripheral tolerance toward the dominant tumor-associated Ags. Because multiple epitopes derived from a given tumor Ag (T Ag) can be targeted by T(CD8), vaccine approaches should be directed toward those T(CD8) that are more likely to survive under conditions of persistent Ag expression. In this study, we investigated the effect of peripheral tolerance on the endogenous T(CD8) response toward two epitopes, designated epitopes I and IV, from the SV40 large T Ag. Using rat insulin promoter (RIP) 1-Tag4 transgenic mice that express T Ag from the RIP and develop pancreatic insulinomas, we demonstrate that epitope IV- but not epitope I-specific T(CD8) are maintained long term in tumor-bearing RIP1-Tag4 mice. Even large numbers of TCR-transgenic T cells specific for epitope I were rapidly eliminated from RIP1-Tag4 mice after adoptive transfer and recognition of the endogenous T Ag. Importantly, immunization of RIP1-Tag4 mice at 5 wk of age against epitope IV resulted in complete protection from tumor progression over a 2-year period despite continued expression of T Ag in the pancreas. This extensive control of tumor progression was associated with the persistence of functional epitope IV-specific T(CD8) within the pancreas for the lifetime of the mice without the development of diabetes. This study indicates that an equilibrium is reached in which immune surveillance for spontaneous cancer can be achieved for the lifespan of the host while maintaining normal organ function.

  5. Control of beta-cell differentiation by the pancreatic mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Attali, Myriam; Stetsyuk, Volodymyr; Basmaciogullari, Annie; Aiello, Virginie; Zanta-Boussif, Maria A; Duvillie, Bertrand; Scharfmann, Raphael

    2007-05-01

    The importance of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions for normal development of the pancreas was recognized in the early 1960s, and mesenchymal signals have been shown to control the proliferation of early pancreatic progenitor cells. The mechanisms by which the mesenchyme coordinates cell proliferation and differentiation to produce the normal number of differentiated pancreatic cells are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that the mesenchyme positively controls the final number of beta-cells that develop from early pancreatic progenitor cells. In vitro, the number of beta-cells that developed from rat embryonic pancreatic epithelia was larger in cultures with mesenchyme than without mesenchyme. The effect of mesenchyme was not due to an increase in beta-cell proliferation but was due to increased proliferation of early pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX1)-positive progenitor cells, as confirmed by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Consequently, the window during which early PDX1(+) pancreatic progenitor cells differentiated into endocrine progenitor cells expressing Ngn3 was extended. Fibroblast growth factor 10 mimicked mesenchyme effects on proliferation of early PDX1(+) progenitor cells and induction of Ngn3 expression. Taken together, our results indicate that expansion of early PDX1(+) pancreatic progenitor cells represents a way to increase the final number of beta-cells developing from early embryonic pancreas.

  6. Proteasome activator subunit 3 promotes pancreatic cancer growth via c-Myc-glycolysis signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiefang; Hao, Jun; Jiang, Hongxue; Jin, Jing; Wu, Hongyu; Jin, Zhendong; Li, Zhaoshen

    2017-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis among all cancers and novel markers and therapeutic targets are desperately needed for this terribly deadly disease. Proteasome activator subunit 3 (PSME3) is highly involved in the initiation and progression of many human cancers. However, the potential effect of PSME3 on pancreatic cancer remains largely unknown. In the present study, we first found that PSME3 was significantly upregulated in pancreatic cancer cells and tissues at both mRNA and protein levels using qRT-PCR, western blot analysis, Oncomine data mining and immunohistochemical analysis. High PSME3 expression was positively correlated with tumor size and pM stage, and was significantly correlated with poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer patients revealed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Gene set enrichment analysis demonstrated that the gene sets related to cell proliferation and metastasis were positively correlated with elevated PSME3 expression. Consistently, silencing of PSME3 suppressed cell proliferation and invasive capacity of pancreatic cancer. Mechanistically, PSME3 inhibited the degradation of c-Myc and thus enhanced glycolysis, which ultimately led to the oncogenic effects of PSME3 on pancreatic cancer. Collectively, our data suggest that PSME3 plays oncogenic roles in pancreatic cancer by inhibiting c-Myc degradation to promote glycolysis, and could serve as a novel therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. VEGF Promotes Glycolysis in Pancreatic Cancer via HIF1α Up-Regulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, S; Xu, J; Zhang, B; Ji, S; Xu, W; Liu, J; Jin, K; Liang, D; Liang, C; Liu, L; Liu, C; Qin, Y; Yu, X

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is highly expressed in many types of tumors, including pancreatic cancer. Tumor cellderived VEGF promotes angiogenesis and tumor progression. However, the role of VEGF in glucose metabolism remains unclear. We investigated the role and the underlying mechanism of VEGF in the glucose metabolism of pancreatic cancer cells. Pancreatic cancer cells were stimulated with VEGF165 for 1 or 2 h. The oxygen consumption rates (OCR) and extracellular acidification rates (ECAR) were measured using the Seahorse XF96 Extracellular Flux Analyzer. Glycolytic enzymes were detected by quantitative real-time PCR. Neuropilin 1 (NRP1) was silenced by shRNA in order to investigate its role in VEGF-induced glycolysis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed to identify the correlation among VEGF, NRP1 and hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) in pancreatic cancer tissues. VEGF stimulation led to a metabolic transition from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis in pancreatic cancer. HIF1α and NRP1 protein levels were both increased after VEGF stimulation. The down-regulation of NRP1 reduced glycolysis in pancreatic cancer cells. NRP1 and VEGF levels both correlated with HIF1α expression in pancreatic tumor tissues. VEGF enhances glycolysis in pancreatic cancer via HIF1α up-regulation. NRP1 plays a key role in VEGF-induced glycolysis.

  8. Chidamide Inhibits Aerobic Metabolism to Induce Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth Arrest by Promoting Mcl-1 Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanbing; Kuai, Qiyuan; Li, Changlan; Wang, Yu; Jiang, Xingwei; Wang, Xuanlin; Li, Weijing; He, Min; Ren, Suping; Yu, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a fatal malignancy worldwide and urgently requires valid therapies. Previous research showed that the HDAC inhibitor chidamide is a promising anti-cancer agent in pancreatic cancer cell lines. In this study, we elucidate a probable underlying anti-cancer mechanism of chidamide involving the degradation of Mcl-1. Mcl-1 is frequently upregulated in human cancers, which has been demonstrated to participate in oxidative phosphorylation, in addition to its anti-apoptotic actions as a Bcl-2 family member. The pancreatic cancer cell lines BxPC-3 and PANC-1 were treated with chidamide, resulting in Mcl-1 degradation accompanied by induction of Mcl-1 ubiquitination. Treatment with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor reduced Mcl-1 degradation stimulated by chidamide. Chidamide decreased O2 consumption and ATP production to inhibit aerobic metabolism in both pancreatic cancer cell lines and primary cells, similar to knockdown of Mcl-1, while overexpression of Mcl-1 in pancreatic cancer cells could restore the aerobic metabolism inhibited by chidamide. Furthermore, chidamide treatment or Mcl-1 knockdown significantly induced cell growth arrest in pancreatic cancer cell lines and primary cells, and Mcl-1 overexpression could reduce this cell growth inhibition. In conclusion, our results suggest that chidamide promotes Mcl-1 degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, suppressing the maintenance of mitochondrial aerobic respiration by Mcl-1, and resulting in inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Our work supports the claim that chidamide has therapeutic potential for pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:27875574

  9. Vitamin D and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, M; Risch, H A; Bosetti, C; Anderson, K E; Petersen, G M; Bamlet, W R; Cotterchio, M; Cleary, S P; Ibiebele, T I; La Vecchia, C; Skinner, H G; Strayer, L; Bracci, P M; Maisonneuve, P; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Zaton Ski, W; Lu, L; Yu, H; Janik-Koncewicz, K; Polesel, J; Serraino, D; Neale, R E

    2015-08-01

    The potential role of vitamin D in the aetiology of pancreatic cancer is unclear, with recent studies suggesting both positive and negative associations. We used data from nine case-control studies from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4) to examine associations between pancreatic cancer risk and dietary vitamin D intake. Study-specific odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression, and ORs were then pooled using a random-effects model. From a subset of four studies, we also calculated pooled estimates of association for supplementary and total vitamin D intake. Risk of pancreatic cancer increased with dietary intake of vitamin D [per 100 international units (IU)/day: OR = 1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-1.19, P = 7.4 × 10(-6), P-heterogeneity = 0.52; ≥230 versus <110 IU/day: OR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.10-1.55, P = 2.4 × 10(-3), P-heterogeneity = 0.81], with the association possibly stronger in people with low retinol/vitamin A intake. Increased risk of pancreatic cancer was observed with higher levels of dietary vitamin D intake. Additional studies are required to determine whether or not our finding has a causal basis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Vitamin D and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Case–Control Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Waterhouse, M.; Risch, H. A.; Bosetti, C.; Anderson, K. E.; Petersen, G. M.; Bamlet, W. R.; Cotterchio, M.; Cleary, S. P.; Ibiebele, T. I.; La Vecchia, C.; Skinner, H. G.; Strayer, L.; Bracci, P. M.; Maisonneuve, P.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.; Zaton´ski, W.; Lu, L.; Yu, H.; Janik-Koncewicz, K.; Neale, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The potential role of vitamin D in the aetiology of pancreatic cancer is unclear, with recent studies suggesting both positive and negative associations. Patients and methods We used data from nine case–control studies from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case–Control Consortium (PanC4) to examine associations between pancreatic cancer risk and dietary vitamin D intake. Study-specific odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression, and ORs were then pooled using a random-effects model. From a subset of four studies, we also calculated pooled estimates of association for supplementary and total vitamin D intake. Results Risk of pancreatic cancer increased with dietary intake of vitamin D [per 100 international units (IU)/day: OR = 1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07–1.19, P = 7.4 × 10−6, P-heterogeneity = 0.52; ≥230 versus <110 IU/day: OR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.10–1.55, P = 2.4 × 10−3, P-heterogeneity = 0.81], with the association possibly stronger in people with low retinol/vitamin A intake. Conclusion Increased risk of pancreatic cancer was observed with higher levels of dietary vitamin D intake. Additional studies are required to determine whether or not our finding has a causal basis. PMID:25977560

  11. Transgenic expression of the human growth hormone minigene promotes pancreatic β-cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Baan, Mieke; Kibbe, Carly R; Bushkofsky, Justin R; Harris, Ted W; Sherman, Dawn S; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic mouse models are designed to study the role of specific proteins. To increase transgene expression the human growth hormone (hGH) minigene, including introns, has been included in many transgenic constructs. Until recently, it was thought that the hGH gene was not spliced, transcribed, and translated to produce functional hGH protein. We generated a transgenic mouse with the transcription factor Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) followed by the hGH minigene, under control of the mouse insulin promoter (MIP) to target expression specifically in the pancreatic β-cell. Expression of FoxM1 in isolated pancreatic islets in vitro stimulates β-cell proliferation. We aimed to investigate the effect of FoxM1 on β-cell mass in a mouse model for diabetes mellitus. However, we found inadvertent coexpression of hGH protein from a spliced, bicistronic mRNA. MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice had lower blood glucose and higher pancreatic insulin content, due to increased β-cell proliferation. hGH signals through the murine prolactin receptor, and expression of its downstream targets tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (Tph1), tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2), and cytokine-inducible SH2 containing protein (Cish) was increased. Conversely, transcriptional targets of FoxM1 were not upregulated. Our data suggest that the phenotype of MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice is due primarily to hGH activity and that the FoxM1 protein remains largely inactive. Over the past decades, multiple transgenic mouse strains were generated that make use of the hGH minigene to increase transgene expression. Our work suggests that each will need to be carefully screened for inadvertent hGH production and critically evaluated for the use of proper controls.

  12. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligands in Cigarette Smoke Induce Production of Interleukin-22 to Promote Pancreatic Fibrosis in Models of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jing; Zhao, Qinglan; Sharma, Vishal; Nguyen, Linh P; Lee, Yvonne N; Pham, Kim L; Edderkaoui, Mouad; Pandol, Stephen J; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2016-12-01

    Cigarette smoke has been identified as an independent risk factor for chronic pancreatitis (CP). Little is known about the mechanisms by which smoking promotes development of CP. We assessed the effects of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands found in cigarette smoke on immune cell activation in humans and pancreatic fibrosis in animal models of CP. We obtained serum samples from patients with CP treated at Stanford University hospital and healthy individuals (controls) and isolated CD4(+) T cells. Levels of interleukin-22 (IL22) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and smoking histories were collected. T cells from healthy nonsmokers and smokers were stimulated and incubated with AhR agonists (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin or benzo[a]pyrene) or antagonists and analyzed by flow cytometry. Mice were given intraperitoneal injections of caerulein or saline, with or without lipopolysaccharide, to induce CP. Some mice were given intraperitoneal injections of AhR agonists at the start of caerulein injection, with or without an antibody against IL22 (anti-IL22) starting 2 weeks after the first caerulein injection, or recombinant mouse IL22 or vehicle (control) intraperitoneally 4 weeks after the first caerulein injection. Mice were exposed to normal air or cigarette smoke for 6 h/d for 7 weeks and expression of AhR gene targets was measured. Pancreata were collected from all mice and analyzed by histology and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Pancreatic stellate cells and T cells were isolated and studied using immunoblot, immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent analyses. Mice given AhR agonists developed more severe pancreatic fibrosis (based on decreased pancreas size, histology, and increased expression of fibrosis-associated genes) than mice not given agonists after caerulein injection. In mice given saline instead of caerulein, AhR ligands did not induce fibrosis. Pancreatic T cells

  13. GSH2 promoter methylation in pancreatic cancer analyzed by quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    GAO, FEI; HUANG, HAO-JIE; GAO, JUN; LI, ZHAO-SHEN; MA, SHU-REN

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene silencing via promoter hypermethylation is an important event in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis. Aberrant DNA hypermethylation events are highly tumor specific, and may provide a diagnostic tool for pancreatic cancer patients. The objective of the current study was to identify novel methylation-related genes that may potentially be used to establish novel therapeutic and diagnostic strategies against pancreatic cancer. The methylation status of the GS homeobox 2 (GSH2) gene was analyzed using the sodium bisulfite sequencing method. The GSH2 methylation ratio was examined in primary carcinomas and corresponding normal tissues derived from 47 patients with pancreatic cancer, using quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Methylation ratios were found to be associated with the patient's clinicopathological features. GSH2 gene methylation was detected in 26 (55.3%) of the 47 pancreatic cancer patients, indicating that it occurs frequently in pancreatic cancer. A significant association with methylation was observed for tumor-node-metastasis stage (P=0.031). GSH2 may be a novel methylation-sensitive tumor suppressor gene in pancreatic cancer and may be a tumor-specific biomarker of the disease. PMID:26171036

  14. Influence of matrix metalloproteinase-1 gene -1607 (1G/2G) (rs1799750) promoter polymorphism on circulating levels of MMP-1 in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sri Manjari, K; Nallari, Pratibha; Balakrishna, N; Vidyasagar, A; Prabhakar, B; Jyothy, A; Venkateshwari, A

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the role of -1607 (1G/2G) (rs1799750) polymorphism of the MMP-1 gene in chronic pancreatitis. We genotyped 100 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 100 control subjects using tetra-primer ARMS-PCR followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Serum levels of MMP-1 were determined by Elisa. Statistical analysis was applied to test the significance of the results. The genotypic and allelic distribution varied significantly between the disease group and the control subjects [OD = 1.981 (1.236-3.181), p = 0.004]. MMP-1 levels were higher in subjects homozygous for the 2G allele than in subjects with the 1G allele. The present study revealed a significant association of the MMP-1 -1607 1G/2G (rs1799750) gene promoter polymorphism with chronic pancreatitis, and it can be considered a biological marker in the etiology of chronic pancreatitis.

  15. Calmodulin antagonists promote TRA-8 therapy of resistant pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kaiyu; Yong, Sun; Xu, Fei; Zhou, Tong; McDonald, Jay M; Chen, Yabing

    2015-09-22

    Pancreatic cancer is highly malignant with limited therapy and a poor prognosis. TRAIL-activating therapy has been promising, however, clinical trials have shown resistance and limited responses of pancreatic cancers. We investigated the effects of calmodulin(CaM) antagonists, trifluoperazine(TFP) and tamoxifen(TMX), on TRA-8-induced apoptosis and tumorigenesis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells, and underlying mechanisms. TFP or TMX alone did not induce apoptosis of resistant PANC-1 cells, while they dose-dependently enhanced TRA-8-induced apoptosis. TMX treatment enhanced efficacy of TRA-8 therapy on tumorigenesis in vivo. Analysis of TRA-8-induced death-inducing-signaling-complex (DISC) identified recruitment of survival signals, CaM/Src, into DR5-associated DISC, which was inhibited by TMX/TFP. In contrast, TMX/TFP increased TRA-8-induced DISC recruitment/activation of caspase-8. Consistently, caspase-8 inhibition blocked the effects of TFP/TMX on TRA-8-induced apoptosis. Moreover, TFP/TMX induced DR5 expression. With a series of deletion/point mutants, we identified CaM antagonist-responsive region in the putative Sp1-binding domain between -295 to -300 base pairs of DR5 gene. Altogether, we have demonstrated that CaM antagonists enhance TRA-8-induced apoptosis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells by increasing DR5 expression and enhancing recruitment of apoptotic signal while decreasing survival signals in DR5-associated DISC. Our studies support the use of these readily available CaM antagonists combined with TRAIL-activating agents for pancreatic cancer therapy.

  16. Calmodulin antagonists promote TRA-8 therapy of resistant pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kaiyu; Yong, Sun; Xu, Fei; Zhou, Tong; McDonald, Jay M; Chen, Yabing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly malignant with limited therapy and a poor prognosis. TRAIL-activating therapy has been promising, however, clinical trials have shown resistance and limited responses of pancreatic cancers. We investigated the effects of calmodulin(CaM) antagonists, trifluoperazine(TFP) and tamoxifen(TMX), on TRA-8-induced apoptosis and tumorigenesis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells, and underlying mechanisms. TFP or TMX alone did not induce apoptosis of resistant PANC-1 cells, while they dose-dependently enhanced TRA-8-induced apoptosis. TMX treatment enhanced efficacy of TRA-8 therapy on tumorigenesis in vivo. Analysis of TRA-8-induced death-inducing-signaling-complex (DISC) identified recruitment of survival signals, CaM/Src, into DR5-associated DISC, which was inhibited by TMX/TFP. In contrast, TMX/TFP increased TRA-8-induced DISC recruitment/activation of caspase-8. Consistently, caspase-8 inhibition blocked the effects of TFP/TMX on TRA-8-induced apoptosis. Moreover, TFP/TMX induced DR5 expression. With a series of deletion/point mutants, we identified CaM antagonist-responsive region in the putative Sp1-binding domain between −295 to −300 base pairs of DR5 gene. Altogether, we have demonstrated that CaM antagonists enhance TRA-8-induced apoptosis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells by increasing DR5 expression and enhancing recruitment of apoptotic signal while decreasing survival signals in DR5-associated DISC. Our studies support the use of these readily available CaM antagonists combined with TRAIL-activating agents for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:26320171

  17. Establishment of a novel, eco-friendly transgenic pig model using porcine pancreatic amylase promoter-driven fungal cellulase transgenes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y S; Yang, C C; Hsu, C C; Hsu, J T; Wu, S C; Lin, C J; Cheng, W T K

    2015-02-01

    Competition between humans and livestock for cereal and legume grains makes it challenging to provide economical feeds to livestock animals. Recent increases in corn and soybean prices have had a significant impact on the cost of feed for pig producers. The utilization of byproducts and alternative ingredients in pig diets has the potential to reduce feed costs. Moreover, unlike ruminants, pigs have limited ability to utilize diets with high fiber content because they lack endogenous enzymes capable of breaking down nonstarch polysaccharides into simple sugars. Here, we investigated the feasibility of a transgenic strategy in which expression of the fungal cellulase transgene was driven by the porcine pancreatic amylase promoter in pigs. A 2,488 bp 5'-flanking region of the porcine pancreatic amylase gene was cloned by the genomic walking technique, and its structural features were characterized. Using GFP as a reporter, we found that this region contained promoter activity and had the potential to control heterologous gene expression. Transgenic pigs were generated by pronuclear microinjection. Founders and offspring were identified by PCR and Southern blot analyses. Cellulase mRNA and protein showed tissue-specific expression in the pancreas of F1 generation pigs. Cellulolytic enzyme activity was also identified in the pancreas of transgenic pigs. These results demonstrated the establishment of a tissue-specific promoter of the porcine pancreatic amylase gene. Transgenic pigs expressing exogenous cellulase may represent a way to increase the intake of low-cost, fiber-rich feeds.

  18. Hyperglycemia Promotes the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Pancreatic Cancer via Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and pancreatic cancer are intimately related, as approximately 85% of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer have impaired glucose tolerance or even DM. Our previous studies have indicated that high glucose could promote the invasive and migratory abilities of pancreatic cancer cells. We therefore explored the underlying mechanism that hyperglycemia modulates the metastatic potential of pancreatic cancer. Our data showed that streptozotocin- (STZ-) treated diabetic nude mice exhibit larger tumor size than that of the euglycemic mice. The number of nude mice that develop liver metastasis or ascites is much more in the STZ-treated group than that in the euglycemic group. Hyperglycemic mice contain a higher plasma H2O2-level than that from euglycemic mice. The injection of polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-CAT), an H2O2 scavenger, may reverse hyperglycemia-induced tumor metastasis. In addition, hyperglycemia could also modulate the expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition- (EMT-) related factors in pancreatic tumor tissues, as the E-cadherin level is decreased and the expression of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin and vimentin as well as transcription factor snail is strongly increased. The injection of PEG-CAT could also reverse hyperglycemia-induced EMT. These results suggest that the association between hyperglycemia and poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer can be attributed to the alterations of EMT through the production of hydrogen peroxide. PMID:27433288

  19. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... removal is sometimes performed along with a sphincterotomy. Stent placement. Using the endoscope, the doctor places a ... a narrowed pancreatic or bile duct. A temporary stent may be placed for a few months to ...

  20. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  1. Randomized Controlled Trial of Pancreaticojejunostomy versus Stapler Closure of the Pancreatic Stump During Distal Pancreatectomy to Reduce Pancreatic Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Manabu; Hirono, Seiko; Okada, Ken-ichi; Sho, Masayuki; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Nagano, Hiroaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Morimura, Ryou; Takeda, Yutaka; Nakahira, Shin; Suzumura, Kazuhiro; Fujimoto, Jiro; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate in a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) whether pancreaticojejunostomy (PJ) of pancreatic stump decreases the incidence of pancreatic fistula after distal pancreatectomy (DP) compared with stapler closure. Background: Several studies reported that PJ of pancreatic stump reduces the incidence of pancreatic fistula after DP. However, no RCT has confirmed the efficacy of PJ of pancreatic stump. Methods: One hundred thirty-six patients scheduled for DP were enrolled in this study between June 2011 and March 2014 at 6 high-volume surgical centers in Japan. Enrolled patients were randomized to either stapler closure or PJ. The primary endpoint was the incidence of pancreatic fistula based on the International Study Group on Pancreatic Fistula criteria. This RCT was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01384617). Results: Sixty-one patients randomized to stapler and 62 patients randomized to PJ were analyzed by intention-to-treat. Pancreatic fistula occurred in 23 patients (37.7%) in the stapler closure group and 24 (38.7%) in the PJ group (P = 0.332) in intention-to-treat analysis. The incidence of clinically relevant pancreatic fistula (grade B or C) was 16.4% for stapler closure and 9.7% for PJ (P = 0.201). Mortality was zero in both groups. In a subgroup analysis for thickness of pancreas greater than 12 mm, the incidence of clinically relevant pancreatic fistula occurred in 22.2% of the patients in the stapler closure group and in 6.2% of the PJ group (P = 0.080). Conclusions: PJ of the pancreatic stump during DP does not reduce pancreatic fistula compared with stapler closure. PMID:26473652

  2. [Chronic pancreatitis, acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, T; Katada, N; Nishimura, D; Hoshino, H; Shimizu, F; Suzuki, R; Sano, H; Kato, K

    1998-11-01

    MRCP has been recognized as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic method. In the present study we evaluated the usefulness of MRCP in diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis. Two-dimensional fast asymmetric spin-echo (FASE) MRCP was performed in 40 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 13 with acute pancreatitis. In 29 patients (72.5%) with chronic pancreatitis and 9 (66.7%) with acute pancreatitis, main pancreatic duct (MPD) was visualized entirely. MRCP could demonstrate the characteristic findings of chronic pancreatitis such as dilatation and irregularity of MPD in most cases. In acute pancreatitis, MRCP indicated that MPD was normal in diameter, but irregular in configuration compared with that of the control group. MRCP may facilitate the diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis.

  3. KLF4α Upregulation Promotes Cell Cycle Progression and Reduces Survival Time of Patients with Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    WEI, DAOYAN; WANG, LIWEI; KANAI, MASASHI; JIA, ZHILIANG; LE, XIANGDONG; LI, QIANG; WANG, HUAMIN; XIE, KEPING

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Krüppel-like factor (KLF)4 is a transcription factor associated with tumor suppression and oncogenesis. KLF4 suppresses pancreatic tumorigenesis by unknown mechanisms; we investigated alterations that might affect KLF4 function and lead to tumor formation. Methods We identified different isoforms of KLF4 in pancreatic cancer cells by reverse transcriptase-PCR, cloning, and DNA sequence analyses. We constructed vectors to express the isoform KLF4α and characterize its function. Using real-time PCR, immunoprecipitation, and immunohistochemical analyses, we assessed expression of KLF4α in pancreatic cancer cell lines and tumor tissue samples; xenograft models were used to determine the effect of KLF4α on pancreatic tumorigenesis. Results We identified 4 KLF4 isoforms in human pancreatic cancer cells, designated KLF4α, KLF4β, KLF4γ, and KLF4δ. KLF4α localized primarily to the cytoplasm; its protein and mRNA were upregulated in pancreatic cancer cell lines with high metastatic potential and human pancreatic tumors, compared with normal pancreatic tissue. Transgenic expression of KLF4α reduced expression of p27Kip1 and p21CIP1, promoting cell cycle progression and in vivo tumor formation by pancreatic cancer cells. Increased expression of KLF4α in pancreatic tumor tissue was inversely correlated with overall time of survival in patients with stage II pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Conclusions We identified a splice variant of KLF4 (KLF4α) that is upregulated in aggressive pancreatic cancer cells and human pancreatic tumor tissues. Increased expression promotes growth of pancreatic tumors in mice is associated with reduced survival times of patients. PMID:20727893

  4. Lipocalin2 promotes invasion, tumorigenicity and gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lisa; Radulovich, Nikolina; Zhu, Chang-Qi; Organ, Shawna; Bandarchi, Bizhan; Pintilie, Melania; To, Christine; Panchal, Devang; Tsao, Ming Sound

    2012-01-01

    Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is a small secreted protein and its elevated expression has been observed in pancreatic as well as other cancer types. LCN2 has been reported to promote resistance to drug-induced apoptosis, enhance invasion through its physical association with matrix metalloproteinase-9, and promote in vivo tumor growth. LCN2 was found to be commonly expressed in patient PDAC samples and its pattern of immunohistochemical staining intensified with increasing severity in high-grade precursor lesions. Downregulation of LCN2 in two pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell lines (BxPC3 and HPAF-II) with high LCN2 expression significantly reduced attachment, invasion, and tumour growth in vivo, but not proliferation or motility. Downregulation of LCN2 in two pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell lines (BxPC3 and HPAF-II) with high expression significantly reduced attachment, invasion, and tumour growth in vivo. In contrast, LCN2 overexpression in PANC1, with low endogenous expression, significantly increased invasion, attachment, and enhanced tumor growth. Suppression of LCN2 in BxPC3 and HPAF-II cells increased their sensitivity to gemcitabine in vitro, and in vivo when BxPC3 was tested. Furthermore, LCN2 promotes expression of VEGF and HIF1A which contribute to enhanced vascularity. These overall results demonstrate that LCN2 plays an important role in the malignant progression of pancreatic ductal carcinoma and is a potential therapeutic target for this disease.

  5. Lipocalin2 Promotes Invasion, Tumorigenicity and Gemcitabine Resistance in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Lisa; Radulovich, Nikolina; Zhu, Chang-Qi; Organ, Shawna; Bandarchi, Bizhan; Pintilie, Melania; To, Christine; Panchal, Devang; Tsao, Ming Sound

    2012-01-01

    Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is a small secreted protein and its elevated expression has been observed in pancreatic as well as other cancer types. LCN2 has been reported to promote resistance to drug-induced apoptosis, enhance invasion through its physical association with matrix metalloproteinase-9, and promote in vivo tumor growth. LCN2 was found to be commonly expressed in patient PDAC samples and its pattern of immunohistochemical staining intensified with increasing severity in high-grade precursor lesions. Downregulation of LCN2 in two pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell lines (BxPC3 and HPAF-II) with high LCN2 expression significantly reduced attachment, invasion, and tumour growth in vivo, but not proliferation or motility. Downregulation of LCN2 in two pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell lines (BxPC3 and HPAF-II) with high expression significantly reduced attachment, invasion, and tumour growth in vivo. In contrast, LCN2 overexpression in PANC1, with low endogenous expression, significantly increased invasion, attachment, and enhanced tumor growth. Suppression of LCN2 in BxPC3 and HPAF-II cells increased their sensitivity to gemcitabine in vitro, and in vivo when BxPC3 was tested. Furthermore, LCN2 promotes expression of VEGF and HIF1A which contribute to enhanced vascularity. These overall results demonstrate that LCN2 plays an important role in the malignant progression of pancreatic ductal carcinoma and is a potential therapeutic target for this disease. PMID:23056397

  6. Furin promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells via Hippo-YAP pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youli; Zhou, Meng; Wei, Hong; Zhou, Hailang; He, Junbo; Lu, Ying; Wang, Dawei; Chen, Baoding; Zeng, Jian; Peng, Wanxin; Du, Fengyi; Gong, Aihua; Xu, Min

    2017-04-01

    Furin, a well-characterized proprotein convertase, plays an important role in many diseases and links to tumor metastasis. However, the role of furin in pancreatic cancer progression remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we found that furin promotes the growth and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of pancreatic cancer cells. First, we found that furin knockdown significantly inhibited proliferation, invasion and migration in BxPC3 and SW1990 cells, while furin overexpression promoted the above behavior in PANC1 and PaTu8988 cells. Further evidence revealed that furin knockdown resulted in the upregulation of E-cadherin (epithelial marker), and the downregulation of N-cadherin and Vimentin (mesenchymal markers) in BxPC3 and SW1990 cells, whereas furin overexpression remarkably led to the opposite effects in PANC1 and PaTu8988 cells. Furthermore, our data showed that Furin knockdown, furin inhibitor D6R or overexpression significantly affected YAP phosphoration level and total YAP protein level, indicating that furin was involved in Hippo-YAP pathway. It is suggested that furin promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells probably via Hippo-YAP pathway and may be a potential target for anti-pancreatic cancer.

  7. H19-Promoter-Targeted Therapy Combined with Gemcitabine in the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sorin, Vladimir; Ohana, Patricia; Gallula, Jennifer; Birman, Tatiana; Matouk, Imad; Hubert, Ayala; Gilon, Michal; Hochberg, Avraham; Czerniak, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the eighth cancer leading cause of cancer-related death in the world and has a 5-year survival rate of 1–4% only. Gemcitabine is a first line agent for advanced pancreatic therapy; however, its efficacy is limited by its poor intracellular metabolism and chemoresistance. Studies have been conducted in an effort to improve gemcitabine treatment results by adding other chemotherapeutic agents, but none of them showed any significant advantage over gemcitabine monotherapy. We found that 85% of human pancreatic tumors analyzed by in situ hybridization analyses showed moderated to strong expression of the H19 gene. We designed a preclinical study combining gemcitabine treatment and a DNA-based therapy for pancreatic cancer using a non viral vector BC-819 (also known as DTA-H19), expressing the diphtheria toxin A chain under the control of the H19 gene regulatory sequences. The experiments conducted either in an orthotopic and heterotopic pancreatic carcinoma animal model showed better antitumor activity following the sequential administration of the vector BC-819 and gemcitabine as compared to the effect of each of them alone. The results presented in the current study indicate that treatment with BC-819 in combination with gemcitabine might be a viable new therapeutic option for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:22701803

  8. H19-promoter-targeted therapy combined with gemcitabine in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Sorin, Vladimir; Ohana, Patricia; Gallula, Jennifer; Birman, Tatiana; Matouk, Imad; Hubert, Ayala; Gilon, Michal; Hochberg, Avraham; Czerniak, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the eighth cancer leading cause of cancer-related death in the world and has a 5-year survival rate of 1-4% only. Gemcitabine is a first line agent for advanced pancreatic therapy; however, its efficacy is limited by its poor intracellular metabolism and chemoresistance. Studies have been conducted in an effort to improve gemcitabine treatment results by adding other chemotherapeutic agents, but none of them showed any significant advantage over gemcitabine monotherapy. We found that 85% of human pancreatic tumors analyzed by in situ hybridization analyses showed moderated to strong expression of the H19 gene. We designed a preclinical study combining gemcitabine treatment and a DNA-based therapy for pancreatic cancer using a non viral vector BC-819 (also known as DTA-H19), expressing the diphtheria toxin A chain under the control of the H19 gene regulatory sequences. The experiments conducted either in an orthotopic and heterotopic pancreatic carcinoma animal model showed better antitumor activity following the sequential administration of the vector BC-819 and gemcitabine as compared to the effect of each of them alone. The results presented in the current study indicate that treatment with BC-819 in combination with gemcitabine might be a viable new therapeutic option for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

  9. Mutant K-RAS Promotes Invasion and Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer Through GTPase Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Padavano, Julianna; Henkhaus, Rebecca S; Chen, Hwudaurw; Skovan, Bethany A; Cui, Haiyan; Ignatenko, Natalia A

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies, characterized by the local invasion into surrounding tissues and early metastasis to distant organs. Oncogenic mutations of the K-RAS gene occur in more than 90% of human pancreatic cancers. The goal of this study was to investigate the functional significance and downstream effectors of mutant K-RAS oncogene in the pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis. We applied the homologous recombination technique to stably disrupt K-RAS oncogene in the human pancreatic cell line MiaPaCa-2, which carries the mutant K-RASG12C oncogene in both alleles. Using in vitro assays, we found that clones with disrupted mutant K-RAS gene exhibited low RAS activity, reduced growth rates, increased sensitivity to the apoptosis inducing agents, and suppressed motility and invasiveness. In vivo assays showed that clones with decreased RAS activity had reduced tumor formation ability in mouse xenograft model and increased survival rates in the mouse orthotopic pancreatic cancer model. We further examined molecular pathways downstream of mutant K-RAS and identified RhoA GTP activating protein 5, caveolin-1, and RAS-like small GTPase A (RalA) as key effector molecules, which control mutant K-RAS-dependent migration and invasion in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Our study provides rational for targeting RhoA and RalA GTPase signaling pathways for inhibition of pancreatic cancer metastasis. PMID:26512205

  10. Interleukin-9 Promotes Pancreatic Cancer Cells Proliferation and Migration via the miR-200a/Beta-Catenin Axis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bangli; Qiu-lan, Huang; Lei, Rong-e; Shi, Cheng; Jiang, Hai-xing

    2017-01-01

    Background. Both IL-9 and miR-200a are involved in the pathogenesis of cancers; however, the role of IL-9 in pancreatic cancer and the possible underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of IL-9 on pancreatic cancer cells and its interaction with miR-200a. Methods. Pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1 and AsPC-1) were treated with IL-9 and the expression of miR-200a and β-catenin in pancreatic cancer cells was measured. β-Catenin was examined as a target gene of miR-200a in pancreatic cancer cells. The interaction between IL-9 and miR-200a in pancreatic cancer cells was determined by infecting miR-200a mimics prior to IL-9 treatment and then measuring miR-200a and β-catenin expression. Results. IL-9 significantly promoted the proliferation, invasion, and migration of pancreatic cancer cells; however, the effect on pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis was insignificant. β-Catenin was verified as a target gene of miR-200a in pancreatic cancer cells. Overexpression of miR-200a in pancreatic cancer cells significantly attenuated proliferation and metastasis and reduced β-catenin expression. IL-9 treatment of pancreatic cancer cells decreased miR-200a expression and increased β-catenin expression. The effect of miR-200a on pancreatic cancer cells decreased following IL-9 treatment. Conclusions. IL-9 promotes proliferation and metastasis in pancreatic cancer cells; this effect may partly involve regulation of the miR-200a/β-catenin axis. PMID:28349057

  11. Nuclear localization of tricellulin promotes the oncogenic property of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takasawa, Akira; Murata, Masaki; Takasawa, Kumi; Ono, Yusuke; Osanai, Makoto; Tanaka, Satoshi; Nojima, Masanori; Kono, Tsuyoshi; Hirata, Koichi; Kojima, Takashi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that dysregulation of tight junctions (TJs) is involved in tumor development and progression. In this study, we investigated the expression and subcellular distribution of tricellulin, which constitutes tricellular TJs, using human pancreatic adenocarcinomas. In well-differentiated pancreatic adenocarcinoma tissues, tricellulin immunostaining was prominent in the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane. In contrast, in poorly differentiated tissues, its immunostaining was predominantly observed in the nuclei and was almost absent in the plasma membrane. The distinct immunostaining of tricellulin successfully distinguished poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma from moderately and well-differentiated adenocarcinomas with high levels of sensitivity and specificity. Nuclear tricellulin expression significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis, lymphatic invasion and poor survival. In pancreatic cancer cell lines, tricellulin localization shifted from the membrane to nucleus with decreasing differentiation status. Nuclear localization of tricellulin promoted cell proliferation and invasiveness possibly in association with MAPK and PKC pathways in pancreatic cancers. Our results provide new insights into the function of tricellulin, and its nuclear localization may become a new prognostic factor for pancreatic cancers. PMID:27641742

  12. MiR-451 Promotes Cell Proliferation and Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer through Targeting CAB39

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jianhua; Zhang, Zhibin

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence shows that microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the regulation of various biological and pathologic processes in human cancers and the aberrant expression of miRNAs contributes to the tumor development. In this study, our findings indicate that miR-451 is significantly overexpressed in pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines and elevated expression of miR-451 contributes to promoted cell viability (in vitro and in vivo). Moreover, overexpression of miR-451 is closely linked to poor prognosis and lymphatic metastasis. Inhibition of miR-451 dramatically suppresses cell viability and invasion, promotes cell apoptosis, and induces cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, miR-451 directly targets CAB39 and negatively regulates its expression and inhibition of CAB39 contributes to the promoted cell viability and invasion. Our findings improve our understanding of the function of miR-451 in the identification and therapy of pancreatic cancer. PMID:28197410

  13. Hepatic nutrient and hormonal regulation of the PANcreatic-DERived factor (PANDER) promoter.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, Whitney A; Athanason, Mark G; Chechele, Alicia C; Kuehl, Melanie N; Fernandez, Amanda M; MarElia, Catherine B; Burkhardt, Brant R

    2015-09-15

    PANcreatic-DERived factor (PANDER, FAM3B) has been shown to regulate glycemic levels via interactions with both pancreatic islets and the liver. Although PANDER is predominantly expressed from the endocrine pancreas, recent work has provided sufficient evidence that the liver may also be an additional tissue source of PANDER production. At physiological levels, PANDER is capable of disrupting insulin signaling and promoting increased hepatic glucose production. As shown in some animal models, strong expression of PANDER, induced by viral delivery within the liver, induces hepatic steatosis. However, no studies to date have explicitly characterized the transcriptional regulation of PANDER from the liver. Therefore, our investigation elucidated the nutrient and hormonal regulation of the hepatic PANDER promoter. Initial RNA-ligated rapid amplification of cDNA ends identified a novel transcription start site (TSS) approximately 26 bp upstream of the PANDER translational start codon not previously revealed in pancreatic β-cell lines. Western evaluation of various murine tissues demonstrated robust expression in the liver and brain. Promoter analysis identified strong tissue-specific activity of the PANDER promoter in both human and murine liver-derived cell lines. The minimal element responsible for maximal promoter activity within hepatic cell lines was located between -293 and -3 of the identified TSS. PANDER promoter activity was inhibited by both insulin and palmitate, whereas glucose strongly increased expression. The minimal element was responsible for maximal glucose-responsive and basal activity. Co-transfection reporter assays, chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the carbohydrate-responsive element binding protein (ChREBP) increased PANDER promoter activity and interacted with the PANDER promoter. E-box 3 was shown to be critical for basal and glucose responsive expression. In summary, in-vitro and in-vivo glucose

  14. CCN1 promotes tumorigenicity through Rac1/Akt/NF-κB signaling pathway in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuqing; Deng, Yuezhen; Mao, Zhengfa; Ma, Xiaoyan; Fan, Xin; Cui, Lei; Qu, Jianguo; Xie, Dong; Zhang, Jianxin

    2012-10-01

    Aberrant CCN1 expression has been reported to play an important role in the tumor development. However, the pattern and the role of CCN1 in pancreatic cancer remain largely unknown. Therefore, we further deciphered the role CCN1 played in pancreatic cancer. We first evaluated the CCN1 expression in human pancreatic cancer tissues and pancreatic cancer cells. Then we forced expression and silenced CCN1 expression in pancreatic cancer cell lines MIA PaCa2 and PANC-1 respectively, using lentivirus vectors. We characterized the stable cells in vitro and in vivo using a nude mouse xenograft model. In this study, we found that CCN1 expression was significantly higher in cancer specimens which positively correlated with the expression level of phosphorylated Akt and p65. and poorer outcome. Moreover, our results demonstrated that CCN1 positively regulated pancreatic cell growth in vitro and in vivo and helped cancer cells resist to tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, we disclosed that activation of CCN1/ras-related c3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1)/V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (Akt)/nuclear factor-kappa B pathway inhibited apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. CCN1 is upregulated in pancreatic cancer and promotes the survival of pancreatic cancer cells. Taken together, these results indicate that CCN1 may be a potential target for pancreatic cancer therapy.

  15. High Fat, High Calorie Diet Promotes Early Pancreatic Neoplasia in the Conditional KrasG12D Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, David W.; Hertzer, Kathleen; Moro, Aune; Donald, Graham; Chang, Hui-Hua; Go, Vay Liang; Pandol, Steven J.; Lugea, Aurelia; Gukovskaya, Anna S.; Li, Gang; Hines, Oscar J.; Rozengurt, Enrique; Eibl, Guido

    2013-01-01

    There is epidemiologic evidence that obesity increases the risk of cancers. Several underlying mechanisms, including inflammation and insulin resistance, are proposed. However, the driving mechanisms in pancreatic cancer are poorly understood. The goal of the present study was to develop a model of diet-induced obesity and pancreatic cancer development in a state-of-the-art mouse model, which resembles important clinical features of human obesity, e.g. weight gain and metabolic disturbances. Offspring of Pdx-1-Cre and LSL-KrasG12D mice were allocated to either a diet high in fats and calories (HFCD; ~4,535 kcal/kg; 40% of calories from fats) or control diet (CD; ~3,725 kcal/kg; 12% of calories from fats) for 3 months. Compared to control animals, mice fed the HFCD significantly gained more weight and developed hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, hyperleptinemia, and elevated levels of IGF-1. The pancreas of HFCD-fed animals showed robust signs of inflammation with increased numbers of infiltrating inflammatory cells (macrophages and T-cells), elevated levels of several cytokines and chemokines, increased stromal fibrosis, and more advanced PanIN lesions. Our results demonstrate that a diet high in fats and calories leads to obesity and metabolic disturbances similar to humans and accelerates early pancreatic neoplasia in the conditional KrasG12D mouse model. This model and findings will provide the basis for more robust studies attempting to unravel the mechanisms underlying the cancer-promoting properties of obesity as well as to evaluate dietary- and chemo-preventive strategies targeting obesity-associated pancreatic cancer development. PMID:23943783

  16. The pancreatitis-associated protein VMP1, a key regulator of inducible autophagy, promotes KrasG12D-mediated pancreatic cancer initiation

    PubMed Central

    Loncle, C; Molejon, M I; Lac, S; Tellechea, J I; Lomberk, G; Gramatica, L; Fernandez Zapico, M F; Dusetti, N; Urrutia, R; Iovanna, J L

    2016-01-01

    Both clinical and experimental evidence have firmly established that chronic pancreatitis, in particular in the context of Kras oncogenic mutations, predisposes to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the repertoire of molecular mediators of pancreatitis involved in Kras-mediated initiation of pancreatic carcinogenesis remains to be fully defined. In this study we demonstrate a novel role for vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1), a pancreatitis-associated protein critical for inducible autophagy, in the regulation of Kras-induced PDAC initiation. Using a newly developed genetically engineered model, we demonstrate that VMP1 increases the ability of Kras to give rise to preneoplastic lesions, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs). This promoting effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation is due, at least in part, by an increase in cell proliferation combined with a decrease in apoptosis. Using chloroquine, an inhibitor of autophagy, we show that this drug antagonizes the effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation. Thus, we conclude that VMP1-mediated autophagy cooperate with Kras to promote PDAC initiation. These findings are of significant medical relevance, molecules targeting autophagy are currently being tested along chemotherapeutic agents to treat PDAC and other tumors in human trials. PMID:27415425

  17. IL-17 functions through the novel REG3β-JAK2-STAT3 inflammatory pathway to promote the transition from chronic pancreatitis to pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loncle, Celine; Bonjoch, Laia; Folch-Puy, Emma; Lopez-Millan, Maria Belen; Lac, Sophie; Molejon, Maria Inés; Chuluyan, Eduardo; Cordelier, Pierre; Dubus, Pierre; Lomberk, Gwen; Urrutia, Raul; Closa, Daniel; Iovanna, Juan L

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) offers an optimal model for discovering “druggable” molecular pathways that participate in inflammation-associated cancer development. Chronic pancreatitis, a common prolonged inflammatory disease, behaves as a well-known premalignant condition that contributes to PDAC development. Although the mechanisms underlying the pancreatitis-to-cancer transition remain to be fully elucidated, emerging evidence supports the hypothesis that the actions of proinflammatory mediators on cells harboring Kras mutations promote neoplastic transformation. Recent elegant studies demonstrated that the IL-17 pathway mediates this phenomenon and can be targeted with antibodies, but the downstream mechanisms by which IL-17 functions during this transition are currently unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that IL-17 induces the expression of REG3β, a well-known mediator of pancreatitis, during acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and in early PanIN lesions. Furthermore, we found that REG3β promotes cell growth and decreases sensitivity to cell death through activation of the gp130-JAK2-STAT3-dependent pathway. Genetic inactivation of REG3β in the context of oncogenic Kras-driven PDAC resulted in reduced PanIN formation, an effect that could be rescued by administration of exogenous REG3β. Taken together, our findings provide mechanistic insight into the pathways underlying inflammation-associated pancreatic cancer, revealing a dual and contextual pathophysiological role for REG3β during pancreatitis and PDAC initiation. PMID:26404002

  18. Pancreatitis promotes oncogenic Kras(G12D)-induced pancreatic transformation through activation of Nupr1.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Daniel; Garcia, Maria Noé; Hamidi, Tewfik; Cano, Carla; Calvo, Ezequiel; Lomberk, Gwen; Urrutia, Raul; Iovanna, Juan L

    2014-01-01

    During the initiation stage of pancreatic adenocarcinoma induced by oncogenic Kras, pancreatic cells are exposed to both a protumoral effect and an opposing tumor suppressive process known as oncogene-induced senescence. Pancreatitis disrupts this balance in favor of the transforming effect of oncogenes by lowering the tumor suppressive threshold of oncogene-induced senescence through expression of the stress protein Nupr1.

  19. Serotonin promotes acinar dedifferentiation following pancreatitis-induced regeneration in the adult pancreas.

    PubMed

    Saponara, Enrica; Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Bombardo, Marta; Buzzi, Raphael; Silva, Alberto B; Malagola, Ermanno; Tian, Yinghua; Hehl, Adrian B; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Seleznik, Gitta M; Zabel, Anja; Reding, Theresia; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2015-12-01

    The exocrine pancreas exhibits a distinctive capacity for tissue regeneration and renewal following injury. This regenerative ability has important implications for a variety of disorders, including pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, diseases associated with high morbidity and mortality. Thus, understanding its underlying mechanisms may help in developing therapeutic interventions. Serotonin has been recognized as a potent mitogen for a variety of cells and tissues. Here we investigated whether serotonin exerts a mitogenic effect in pancreatic acinar cells in three regenerative models, inflammatory tissue injury following pancreatitis, tissue loss following partial pancreatectomy, and thyroid hormone-stimulated acinar proliferation. Genetic and pharmacological techniques were used to modulate serotonin levels in vivo. Acinar dedifferentiation and cell cycle progression during the regenerative phase were investigated over the course of 2 weeks. By comparing acinar proliferation in the different murine models of regeneration, we found that serotonin did not affect the clonal regeneration of mature acinar cells. Serotonin was, however, required for acinar dedifferentiation following inflammation-mediated tissue injury. Specifically, lack of serotonin resulted in delayed up-regulation of progenitor genes and delayed the formation of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and defective acinar cell proliferation. We identified serotonin-dependent acinar secretion as a key step in progenitor-based regeneration, as it promoted acinar cell dedifferentiation and the recruitment of type 2 macrophages. Finally, we identified a regulatory Hes1-Ptfa axis in the uninjured adult pancreas, activated by zymogen secretion. Our findings indicated that serotonin plays a critical role in the regeneration of the adult pancreas following pancreatitis by promoting the dedifferentiation of acinar cells.

  20. PanScan, the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium, and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium consists of more than a dozen prospective epidemiologic cohort studies within the NCI Cohort Consortium, whose leaders work together to investigate the etiology and natural history of pancreatic cancer.

  1. Transplantation of bone marrow derived cells promotes pancreatic islet repair in diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Xiaodong; Song Lujun; Shen Kuntang; Wang Hongshan; Niu Weixin Qin Xinyu

    2008-06-20

    The transplantation of bone marrow (BM) derived cells to initiate pancreatic regeneration is an attractive but as-yet unrealized strategy. Presently, BM derived cells from green fluorescent protein transgenic mice were transplanted into diabetic mice. Repair of diabetic islets was evidenced by reduction of hyperglycemia, increase in number of islets, and altered pancreatic histology. Cells in the pancreata of recipient mice co-expressed BrdU and insulin. Double staining revealed {beta} cells were in the process of proliferation. BrdU{sup +} insulin{sup -} PDX-1{sup +} cells, Ngn3{sup +} cells and insulin{sup +} glucagon{sup +} cells, which showed stem cells, were also found during {beta}-cell regeneration. The majority of transplanted cells were mobilized to the islet and ductal regions. In recipient pancreas, transplanted cells simultaneously expressed CD34 but did not express insulin, PDX-1, Ngn3, Nkx2.2, Nkx6.1, Pax4, Pax6, and CD45. It is concluded that BM derived cells especially CD34{sup +} cells can promote repair of pancreatic islets. Moreover, both proliferation of {beta} cells and differentiation of pancreatic stem cells contribute to the regeneration of {beta} cells.

  2. Transplantation of bone marrow derived cells promotes pancreatic islet repair in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaodong; Song, Lujun; Shen, Kuntang; Wang, Hongshan; Niu, Weixin; Qin, Xinyu

    2008-06-20

    The transplantation of bone marrow (BM) derived cells to initiate pancreatic regeneration is an attractive but as-yet unrealized strategy. Presently, BM derived cells from green fluorescent protein transgenic mice were transplanted into diabetic mice. Repair of diabetic islets was evidenced by reduction of hyperglycemia, increase in number of islets, and altered pancreatic histology. Cells in the pancreata of recipient mice co-expressed BrdU and insulin. Double staining revealed beta cells were in the process of proliferation. BrdU(+) insulin(-) PDX-1(+) cells, Ngn3(+) cells and insulin(+) glucagon(+) cells, which showed stem cells, were also found during beta-cell regeneration. The majority of transplanted cells were mobilized to the islet and ductal regions. In recipient pancreas, transplanted cells simultaneously expressed CD34 but did not express insulin, PDX-1, Ngn3, Nkx2.2, Nkx6.1, Pax4, Pax6, and CD45. It is concluded that BM derived cells especially CD34(+) cells can promote repair of pancreatic islets. Moreover, both proliferation of beta cells and differentiation of pancreatic stem cells contribute to the regeneration of beta cells.

  3. KDM2B promotes pancreatic cancer via Polycomb-dependent and -independent transcriptional programs

    PubMed Central

    Tzatsos, Alexandros; Paskaleva, Polina; Ferrari, Francesco; Deshpande, Vikram; Stoykova, Svetlana; Contino, Gianmarco; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Lan, Fei; Trojer, Patrick; Park, Peter J.; Bardeesy, Nabeel

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms mediate heritable control of cell identity in normal cells and cancer. We sought to identify epigenetic regulators driving the pathogenesis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), one of the most lethal human cancers. We found that KDM2B (also known as Ndy1, FBXL10, and JHDM1B), an H3K36 histone demethylase implicated in bypass of cellular senescence and somatic cell reprogramming, is markedly overexpressed in human PDAC, with levels increasing with disease grade and stage, and highest expression in metastases. KDM2B silencing abrogated tumorigenicity of PDAC cell lines exhibiting loss of epithelial differentiation, whereas KDM2B overexpression cooperated with KrasG12D to promote PDAC formation in mouse models. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments coupled to genome-wide gene expression and ChIP studies revealed that KDM2B drives tumorigenicity through 2 different transcriptional mechanisms. KDM2B repressed developmental genes through cobinding with Polycomb group (PcG) proteins at transcriptional start sites, whereas it activated a module of metabolic genes, including mediators of protein synthesis and mitochondrial function, cobound by the MYC oncogene and the histone demethylase KDM5A. These results defined epigenetic programs through which KDM2B subverts cellular differentiation and drives the pathogenesis of an aggressive subset of PDAC. PMID:23321669

  4. Nicotine Induces Inhibitor of Differentiation-1 in a Src-dependent Pathway Promoting Metastasis and Chemoresistance in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma1

    PubMed Central

    Trevino, Jose G; Pillai, Smitha; Kunigal, Sateesh; Singh, Sandeep; Fulp, William J; Centeno, Barbara A; Chellappan, Srikumar P

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is a significant risk factor for pancreatic cancer, but the molecular mechanisms by which tobacco smoke components promote the growth and progression of these cancers are not fully understood. While nicotine, the addictive component of tobacco smoke, is not a carcinogen, it has been shown to promote the growth of non-small cell lung and pancreatic cancers in a receptor-dependent fashion. Here, we show that stimulation of pancreatic cancer cells with nicotine concentrations that are within the range of human exposure results in activation of Src kinase, which facilitated the induction of the inhibitor of differentiation-1 (Id1) transcription factor. Depletion of Id1 prevented nicotine-mediated induction of proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, indicating that it is a major mediator of nicotine function. Nicotine could promote the growth and metastasis of pancreatic cancers orthotopically implanted into SCID mice; in addition, cells stably expressing a short hairpin RNA for Id1 did not grow or metastasize in response to nicotine. Nicotine could also confer resistance to apoptosis induced by gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and depletion of Src or Id1 rendered the cells sensitive to gemcitabine. Further, nicotine could effectively inhibit the chemotherapeutic effects of gemcitabine on pancreatic tumors xenografted into mice. Clinical analyses of resected pancreatic cancer specimens demonstrated a statistically significant correlation between Id1 expression and phospho-Src, tumor grade/differentiation, and worsening overall patient survival. These results demonstrate that exposure to tobacco smoke components might promote pancreatic cancer progression, metastasis, and chemoresistance and highlight the role of Id1 in these processes. PMID:23308043

  5. TGF-β1 promotes acinar to ductal metaplasia of human pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Akanuma, Naoki; Liu, Chengyang; Naji, Ali; Halff, Glenn A.; Washburn, William K.; Sun, Luzhe; Wang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that pancreatitis-induced acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) is a key event for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) initiation. However, there has not been an adequate system to explore the mechanisms of human ADM induction. We have developed a flow cytometry-based, high resolution lineage tracing method and 3D culture system to analyse ADM in human cells. In this system, well-known mouse ADM inducers did not promote ADM in human cells. In contrast, TGF-β1 efficiently converted human acinar cells to duct-like cells (AD) in a SMAD-dependent manner, highlighting fundamental differences between the species. Functionally, AD cells gained transient proliferative capacity. Furthermore, oncogenic KRAS did not induce acinar cell proliferation, but did sustain the proliferation of AD cells, suggesting that oncogenic KRAS requires ADM-associated-changes to promote PDAC initiation. This ADM model provides a novel platform to explore the mechanisms involved in the development of human pancreatic diseases. PMID:27485764

  6. TM4SF1 Promotes Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer via Regulating the Expression of DDR1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jia-chun; Zhang, Yi; He, Si-jia; Li, Ming-ming; Cai, Xiao-lei; Wang, Hui; Xu, Lei-ming; Cao, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Transmembrane-4-L-six-family-1(TM4SF1), a four-transmembrane L6 family member, is highly expressed in various pancreatic cancer cell lines and promotes cancer cells metastasis. However, the TM4SF1-associated signaling network in metastasis remains unknown. In the present study, we found that TM4SF1 affected the formation and function of invadopodia. Silencing of TM4SF1 reduced the expression of DDR1 significantly in PANC-1 and AsPC-1 cells. Through double fluorescence immuno-staining and Co-immunoprecipitation, we also found that TM4SF1 colocalized with DDR1 and had an interaction with DDR1. In addition, upregulating the expression of DDR1 rescued the inhibitory effects of cell migration and invasion, the expression of MMP2 and MMP9 and the formation and function of invadopodia when TM4SF1 silenced. In pancreatic cancer tissues, qRT-PCR and scatter plots analysis further determined that TM4SF1 had a correlation with DDR1. Collectively, our study provides a novel regulatory pathway involving TM4SF1, DDR1, MMP2 and MMP9, which promotes the formation and function of invadopodia to support cell migration and invasion in pancreatic cancer. PMID:28368050

  7. ROCK signaling promotes collagen remodeling to facilitate invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tumor cell growth.

    PubMed

    Rath, Nicola; Morton, Jennifer P; Julian, Linda; Helbig, Lena; Kadir, Shereen; McGhee, Ewan J; Anderson, Kurt I; Kalna, Gabriela; Mullin, Margaret; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Samuel, Michael S; Olson, Michael F

    2017-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a major cause of cancer death; identifying PDAC enablers may reveal potential therapeutic targets. Expression of the actomyosin regulatory ROCK1 and ROCK2 kinases increased with tumor progression in human and mouse pancreatic tumors, while elevated ROCK1/ROCK2 expression in human patients, or conditional ROCK2 activation in a Kras(G12D)/p53(R172H) mouse PDAC model, was associated with reduced survival. Conditional ROCK1 or ROCK2 activation promoted invasive growth of mouse PDAC cells into three-dimensional collagen matrices by increasing matrix remodeling activities. RNA sequencing revealed a coordinated program of ROCK-induced genes that facilitate extracellular matrix remodeling, with greatest fold-changes for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) Mmp10 and Mmp13 MMP inhibition not only decreased collagen degradation and invasion, but also reduced proliferation in three-dimensional contexts. Treatment of Kras(G12D)/p53(R172H) PDAC mice with a ROCK inhibitor prolonged survival, which was associated with increased tumor-associated collagen. These findings reveal an ancillary role for increased ROCK signaling in pancreatic cancer progression to promote extracellular matrix remodeling that facilitates proliferation and invasive tumor growth.

  8. TGF-β1 promotes acinar to ductal metaplasia of human pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Akanuma, Naoki; Liu, Chengyang; Naji, Ali; Halff, Glenn A; Washburn, William K; Sun, Luzhe; Wang, Pei

    2016-08-03

    Animal studies suggest that pancreatitis-induced acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) is a key event for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) initiation. However, there has not been an adequate system to explore the mechanisms of human ADM induction. We have developed a flow cytometry-based, high resolution lineage tracing method and 3D culture system to analyse ADM in human cells. In this system, well-known mouse ADM inducers did not promote ADM in human cells. In contrast, TGF-β1 efficiently converted human acinar cells to duct-like cells (AD) in a SMAD-dependent manner, highlighting fundamental differences between the species. Functionally, AD cells gained transient proliferative capacity. Furthermore, oncogenic KRAS did not induce acinar cell proliferation, but did sustain the proliferation of AD cells, suggesting that oncogenic KRAS requires ADM-associated-changes to promote PDAC initiation. This ADM model provides a novel platform to explore the mechanisms involved in the development of human pancreatic diseases.

  9. TM4SF1 Promotes Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer via Regulating the Expression of DDR1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jia-Chun; Zhang, Yi; He, Si-Jia; Li, Ming-Ming; Cai, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Hui; Xu, Lei-Ming; Cao, Jia

    2017-04-03

    Transmembrane-4-L-six-family-1(TM4SF1), a four-transmembrane L6 family member, is highly expressed in various pancreatic cancer cell lines and promotes cancer cells metastasis. However, the TM4SF1-associated signaling network in metastasis remains unknown. In the present study, we found that TM4SF1 affected the formation and function of invadopodia. Silencing of TM4SF1 reduced the expression of DDR1 significantly in PANC-1 and AsPC-1 cells. Through double fluorescence immuno-staining and Co-immunoprecipitation, we also found that TM4SF1 colocalized with DDR1 and had an interaction with DDR1. In addition, upregulating the expression of DDR1 rescued the inhibitory effects of cell migration and invasion, the expression of MMP2 and MMP9 and the formation and function of invadopodia when TM4SF1 silenced. In pancreatic cancer tissues, qRT-PCR and scatter plots analysis further determined that TM4SF1 had a correlation with DDR1. Collectively, our study provides a novel regulatory pathway involving TM4SF1, DDR1, MMP2 and MMP9, which promotes the formation and function of invadopodia to support cell migration and invasion in pancreatic cancer.

  10. NFAT Targets Signaling Molecules to Gene Promoters in Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein-Auerbach, Nofit; McGlynn, Kathleen; Kunnathodi, Faisal; Shahbazov, Rauf; Syed, Ilham; Kanak, Mazhar; Takita, Morihito; Levy, Marlon F.; Naziruddin, Bashoo

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is activated by calcineurin in response to calcium signals derived by metabolic and inflammatory stress to regulate genes in pancreatic islets. Here, we show that NFAT targets MAPKs, histone acetyltransferase p300, and histone deacetylases (HDACs) to gene promoters to differentially regulate insulin and TNF-α genes. NFAT and ERK associated with the insulin gene promoter in response to glucagon-like peptide 1, whereas NFAT formed complexes with p38 MAPK (p38) and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) upon promoters of the TNF-α gene in response to IL-1β. Translocation of NFAT and MAPKs to gene promoters was calcineurin/NFAT dependent, and complex stability required MAPK activity. Knocking down NFATc2 expression, eliminating NFAT DNA binding sites, or interfering with NFAT nuclear import prevented association of MAPKs with gene promoters. Inhibiting p38 and JNK activity increased NFAT-ERK association with promoters, which repressed TNF-α and enhanced insulin gene expression. Moreover, inhibiting p38 and JNK induced a switch from NFAT-p38/JNK-histone acetyltransferase p300 to NFAT-ERK-HDAC3 complex formation upon the TNF-α promoter, which resulted in gene repression. Histone acetyltransferase/HDAC exchange was reversed on the insulin gene by p38/JNK inhibition in the presence of glucagon-like peptide 1, which enhanced gene expression. Overall, these data indicate that NFAT directs signaling enzymes to gene promoters in islets, which contribute to protein-DNA complex stability and promoter regulation. Furthermore, the data suggest that TNF-α can be repressed and insulin production can be enhanced by selectively targeting signaling components of NFAT-MAPK transcriptional/signaling complex formation in pancreatic β-cells. These findings have therapeutic potential for suppressing islet inflammation while preserving islet function in diabetes and islet transplantation. PMID:25496032

  11. Coordination of stress signals by the lysine methyltransferase SMYD2 promotes pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reynoird, Nicolas; Mazur, Pawel K.; Stellfeld, Timo; Flores, Natasha M.; Lofgren, Shane M.; Carlson, Scott M.; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Hainaut, Pierre; Kaznowska, Ewa B.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Khatri, Purvesh; Stresemann, Carlo; Gozani, Or; Sage, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal form of cancer with few therapeutic options. We found that levels of the lysine methyltransferase SMYD2 (SET and MYND domain 2) are elevated in PDAC and that genetic and pharmacological inhibition of SMYD2 restricts PDAC growth. We further identified the stress response kinase MAPKAPK3 (MK3) as a new physiologic substrate of SMYD2 in PDAC cells. Inhibition of MAPKAPK3 impedes PDAC growth, identifying a potential new kinase target in PDAC. Finally, we show that inhibition of SMYD2 cooperates with standard chemotherapy to treat PDAC cells and tumors. These findings uncover a pivotal role for SMYD2 in promoting pancreatic cancer. PMID:26988419

  12. Pancreatitis promotes oncogenic KrasG12D-induced pancreatic transformation through activation of Nupr1

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Daniel; Garcia, Maria Noé; Hamidi, Tewfik; Cano, Carla; Calvo, Ezequiel; Lomberk, Gwen; Urrutia, Raul; Iovanna, Juan L

    2014-01-01

    During the initiation stage of pancreatic adenocarcinoma induced by oncogenic Kras, pancreatic cells are exposed to both a protumoral effect and an opposing tumor suppressive process known as oncogene-induced senescence. Pancreatitis disrupts this balance in favor of the transforming effect of oncogenes by lowering the tumor suppressive threshold of oncogene-induced senescence through expression of the stress protein Nupr1. PMID:27308320

  13. Radiation promotes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and invasion of pancreatic cancer cell by activating carcinoma-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Doudou; Qu, Chao; Ning, Zhouyu; Wang, Haiyong; Zang, Kun; Zhuang, Liping; Chen, Lianyu; Wang, Peng; Meng, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is of crucial importance affecting treatment and prognosis. High degree of carcinoma-associated fibroblast (CAF) infiltration occurs in pancreatic cancer, though its effect on radiotherapy remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that radiation enhanced the migration- and invasion-promoting capacity of CAFs both in vitro and in vivo in a lung metastasis model. Radiation exposure increased the expression of CXCL12 by CAFs. CAF-derived CXCL12 promoted tumor cell EMT and invasion directly, acting through CXCR4 on pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, we showed that CXCL12-CXCR4 signaling promoted pancreatic cancer cell EMT and invasion by activating the P38 pathway. Therefore, our study concluded that radiation promoted pancreatic cancer cell invasion and EMT by activating CAFs, while inhibiting the CXCL12/CXCR4 interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and CAFs could potentially attenuate tumor cell invasion induced by radiation, which provides an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutic targets to improve the prognosis for human pancreatic cancer treated with radiation therapy. PMID:27822411

  14. Risk Factors for Pancreatic Cancer in China: A Multicenter Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaoxu; Zheng, Rongshou; He, Yutong; Sun, Xibin; Wang, Ning; Chen, Tianhui; Chen, Wanqing

    2016-01-01

    Despite having one of the highest mortality rates of all cancers, the risk factors of pancreatic cancer remain unclear. We assessed risk factors of pancreatic cancer in China. A case-control study design was conducted using data from four hospital-based cancer registries (Henan Provincial Cancer Hospital, Beijing Cancer Hospital, Hebei Provincial Cancer Hospital, and Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences). Controls were equally matched and selected from family members of non-pancreatic cancer patients in the same hospitals. Face-to-face interviews were conducted by trained staff using questionnaires. Conditional logistic regression models were used to assess odd ratios (ORs) and 95% confident intervals (CIs). Among 646 recruited participants, 323 were pancreatic cancer patients and 323 were controls. Multivariate logistic analysis suggested that pancreatic cancer family history (adjusted OR 1.23; 95% CI, 1.11-3.70), obesity (adjusted OR 1.77; 95% CI, 1.22-2.57), diabetes (adjusted OR 2.96; 95% CI, 1.48-5.92) and smoking (adjusted OR 1.78; 95% CI, 1.02-3.10) were risk factors for pancreatic cancer, but that drinking tea (adjusted OR 0.49; 95% CI, 0.25-0.84) was associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. Cigarette smoking, family history, obesity, and diabetes are risk factors of pancreatic cancer, which is important information for designing early intervention and preventive strategies for pancreatic cancer and may be beneficial to pancreatic cancer control in China.

  15. Obesity-Induced Inflammation and Desmoplasia Promote Pancreatic Cancer Progression and Resistance to Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Incio, Joao; Liu, Hao; Suboj, Priya; Chin, Shan M; Chen, Ivy X; Pinter, Matthias; Ng, Mei R; Nia, Hadi T; Grahovac, Jelena; Kao, Shannon; Babykutty, Suboj; Huang, Yuhui; Jung, Keehoon; Rahbari, Nuh N; Han, Xiaoxing; Chauhan, Vikash P; Martin, John D; Kahn, Julia; Huang, Peigen; Desphande, Vikram; Michaelson, James; Michelakos, Theodoros P; Ferrone, Cristina R; Soares, Raquel; Boucher, Yves; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K

    2016-08-01

    It remains unclear how obesity worsens treatment outcomes in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). In normal pancreas, obesity promotes inflammation and fibrosis. We found in mouse models of PDAC that obesity also promotes desmoplasia associated with accelerated tumor growth and impaired delivery/efficacy of chemotherapeutics through reduced perfusion. Genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of angiotensin-II type-1 receptor reverses obesity-augmented desmoplasia and tumor growth and improves response to chemotherapy. Augmented activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) in obesity is induced by tumor-associated neutrophils (TAN) recruited by adipocyte-secreted IL1β. PSCs further secrete IL1β, and inactivation of PSCs reduces IL1β expression and TAN recruitment. Furthermore, depletion of TANs, IL1β inhibition, or inactivation of PSCs prevents obesity-accelerated tumor growth. In patients with pancreatic cancer, we confirmed that obesity is associated with increased desmoplasia and reduced response to chemotherapy. We conclude that cross-talk between adipocytes, TANs, and PSCs exacerbates desmoplasia and promotes tumor progression in obesity. Considering the current obesity pandemic, unraveling the mechanisms underlying obesity-induced cancer progression is an urgent need. We found that the aggravation of desmoplasia is a key mechanism of obesity-promoted PDAC progression. Importantly, we discovered that clinically available antifibrotic/inflammatory agents can improve the treatment response of PDAC in obese hosts. Cancer Discov; 6(8); 852-69. ©2016 AACR.See related commentary by Bronte and Tortora, p. 821This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 803. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Exendin-4 promotes pancreatic β-cell proliferation via inhibiting the expression of Wnt5a.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinger; Liang, Weiwei; Guan, Hongyu; Liu, Juan; Liu, Liehua; Li, Hai; He, Xiaoying; Zheng, Jing; Chen, Jie; Cao, Xiaopei; Li, Yanbing

    2017-02-01

    Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, is currently regarded as an effective therapeutic strategy for type-2 diabetes. Previous studies indicated that exendin-4 promoted β cell proliferation. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Recently it was reported that exendin-4 promoted pancreatic β cell proliferation by regulating the expression level of Wnt4. The present study was designed to investigate whether other Wnt isoforms take part in accommodation of β-cell proliferation. We found that exendin-4 promotes the proliferation and suppresses the expression of Wnt5a in INS-1 cell line and C57Bl/6 mouse pancreatic β-cells. Further mechanistic study demonstrated that exendin-4 promoted INS-1 cell proliferation partly through down-regulating the expression of Wnt5a. Furthermore, Wnt5a could induce the activation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in INS-1 cells, thereby decreasing the cellular stable β-catenin and its nuclear translocation, and finally reduce the expression of cyclin D1. In addition, we also found that both of the receptors (Frz-2 and Ror-2) mediated the effect of Wnt5a on β cell line INS-1 proliferation. Taken together, this study suggests that Wnt5a plays a critical role in exendin-4-induced β-cell proliferation, indicating that Wnt5a might be a novel regulator in counterbalance of β cell mass.

  17. SerpinB1 Promotes Pancreatic β Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Dirice, Ercument; Gedeon, Nicholas; Hu, Jiang; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Shirakawa, Jun; Hou, Lifei; Goodman, Jessica; Karampelias, Christos; Qiang, Guifeng; Boucher, Jeremie; Martinez, Rachael; Gritsenko, Marina A; De Jesus, Dario F; Kahraman, Sevim; Bhatt, Shweta; Smith, Richard D; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Jungtrakoon, Prapaporn; Gong, Yanping; Goldfine, Allison B; Liew, Chong Wee; Doria, Alessandro; Andersson, Olov; Qian, Wei-Jun; Remold-O'Donnell, Eileen; Kulkarni, Rohit N

    2016-01-12

    Although compensatory islet hyperplasia in response to insulin resistance is a recognized feature in diabetes, the factor(s) that promote β cell proliferation have been elusive. We previously reported that the liver is a source for such factors in the liver insulin receptor knockout (LIRKO) mouse, an insulin resistance model that manifests islet hyperplasia. Using proteomics we show that serpinB1, a protease inhibitor, which is abundant in the hepatocyte secretome and sera derived from LIRKO mice, is the liver-derived secretory protein that regulates β cell proliferation in humans, mice, and zebrafish. Small-molecule compounds, that partially mimic serpinB1 effects of inhibiting elastase activity, enhanced proliferation of β cells, and mice lacking serpinB1 exhibit attenuated β cell compensation in response to insulin resistance. Finally, SerpinB1 treatment of islets modulated proteins in growth/survival pathways. Together, these data implicate serpinB1 as an endogenous protein that can potentially be harnessed to enhance functional β cell mass in patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of injured pancreatic extract promotes bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells efficiently differentiate into insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hongbin; Wang, Yunshuai; Zhang, Hui; Qi, Hui; Zhou, Hanxin; Li, Fu-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be successfully induced to differentiate into insulin-producing cells (IPCs) by a variety of small molecules and cytokines in vitro. However, problems remain, such as low transdifferentiation efficiency and poor maturity of trans-differentiated cells. The damaged pancreatic cells secreted a large amount of soluble proteins, which were able to promote pancreative islet regeneration and MSCs differentiation. In this study, we utilized the rat injured pancreatic tissue extract to modulate rat bone marrow-derived MSCs differentiation into IPCs by the traditional two-step induction. Our results showed that injured pancreatic tissue extract could effectively promote the trans-differentiation efficiency and maturity of IPCs by the traditional induction. Moreover, IPCs were able to release more insulin in a glucose-dependent manner and ameliorate better the diabetic conditions of streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rats. Our study provides a new strategy to induce an efficient and directional differentiation of MSCs into IPCs.

  19. TM4SF1 Promotes Gemcitabine Resistance of Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Vijaya; Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Deng, Defeng; Li, Zhaoshen; Xu, Leiming; Logsdon, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    Background TM4SF1 is overexpressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and affects the development of this cancer. Also, multidrug resistance (MDR) is generally associated with tumor chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer. However, the correlation between TM4SF1 and MDR remains unknown. This research aims to investigate the effect of TM4SF1 on gemcitabine resistance in PDAC and explore the possible molecular mechanism between TM4SF1 and MDR. Methods The expression of TM4SF1 was evaluated in pancreatic cancer cell lines and human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cell lines by quantitative RT-PCR. TM4SF1 siRNA transfection was carried out using Hiperfect transfection reagent to knock down TM4SF1. The transcripts were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR, RT-PCR and western blotting for further study. The cell proliferation and apoptosis were obtained to investigate the sensitivity to gemcitabine of pancreatic cancer cells after silencing TM4SF1 in vitro. We demonstrated that cell signaling of TM4SF1 mediated chemoresistance in cancer cells by assessing the expression of multidrug resistance (MDR) genes using quantitative RT-PCR. In vivo, we used orthotopic pancreatic tumor models to investigate the effect of proliferation after silencing TM4SF1 by a lentivirus-mediated shRNA in MIA PaCa-2 cell lines. Results The mRNA expression of TM4SF1 was higher in seven pancreatic cancer cell lines than in HPDE cell lines. In three gemcitabine-sensitive cell lines (L3.6pl, BxPC-3, SU86.86), the expression of TM4SF1 was lower than that in four gemcitabine-resistant cell lines (MIA PaCa-2, PANC-1, Hs766T, AsPC-1). We evaluated that TM4SF1 was a putative target for gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells. Using AsPC-1, MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1, we investigated that TM4SF1 silencing affected cell proliferation and increased the percentages of cell apoptosis mediated by treatment with gemcitabine compared with cells which were treated with negative control. This resistance was

  20. Pim-3 promotes the growth of human pancreatic cancer in the orthotopic nude mouse model through vascular endothelium growth factor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Li, Hong-Yu; Liu, Bin; Huang, Sheng; Wu, Li; Li, Ying-Yi

    2013-12-01

    As one of the most lethal cancers, pancreatic cancer presents poor prognosis with an overall 5-y survival of less than 5%. We previously reported that Pim-3, a member of the proto-oncogene Pim family that encodes serine/threonine kinases, is aberrantly expressed in human pancreatic cancer lesions. In the current study, we investigated the role of Pim-3 in promoting tumor growth and angiogenesis in an orthotopic nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. We constructed retroviral vectors for human Pim-3 and a kinase-dead mutant of human Pim-3 (K69M); the retroviral supernatants generated from these vectors were then used to infect the human pancreatic cancer cell line MiaPaCa-2 to establish stable cell lines. We assessed cell proliferation using CCK-8, tumor growth, and angiogenesis in vivo in an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer. While tumor size was measured using magnetic resonance imaging, the tumor tissues were excised for protein extraction and histological analysis to detect vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF) expression and vessel density. We established an orthotopic nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. We observed that Pim-3 promoted the proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, Pim-3 is required for vasculogenesis of primary human pancreatic tumors in vivo and promotion of angiogenesis through the induction of VEGF expression. Pim-3 can promote tumor growth and angiogenesis by stimulating the VEGF pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Adrenomedullin promotes the growth of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma through recruitment of myelomonocytic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaosen; Ma, Xuhui; Wang, Shan; Wang, Chunying; Fu, Yan; Luo, Yongzhang

    2016-01-01

    Stromal infiltration of myelomonocytic cells is a hallmark of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and is related to a poor prognosis. However, the detailed mechanism for the recruitment of myelomonocytic cells to pancreatic cancer tissue remains unclear. In the present study, pancreatic cancer cells secreted high levels of adrenomedullin (ADM), and CD11b+ myelomonocytic cells expressed all components of ADM receptors, including GPR182, CRLR, RAMP2 and RAMP3. ADM enhanced the migration and invasion of myelomonocytic cells through activation of the MAPK, PI3K/Akt and eNOS signaling pathways, as well as the expression and activity of MMP-2. ADM also promoted the adhesion and trans-endothelial migration of myelomonocytic cells by increasing expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells. In addition, ADM induced macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) to express pro-tumor phenotypes. ADM knockdown in tumor-bearing mice or administration of AMA, an ADM antagonist, significantly inhibited the recruitment of myelomonocytic cells and tumor angiogenesis. Moreover, in vivo depletion of myelomonocytic cells using clodronate liposomes suppressed the progression of PDAC. These results reveal a novel function of ADM in PDAC, and suggest ADM is a promising target in the treatment of PDAC. PMID:27391260

  2. Lipocalin-2 Promotes Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma by Regulating Inflammation in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Chou, Sobeyda; Swidnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka; Badi, Niharika; Chavez-Tomar, Myrriah; Lesinski, Gregory B; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Farren, Matthew R; Mace, Thomas A; Schmidt, Carl; Liu, Yan; Deng, Defeng; Hwang, Rosa F; Zhou, Liran; Moore, Todd T; Chatterjee, Deyali; Wang, Huamin; Leng, Xiaohong; Arlinghaus, Ralph B; Logsdon, Craig D; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida

    2017-03-01

    Lipocalin-2 (LCN2) promotes malignant development in many cancer types. LCN2 is upregulated in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and in obese individuals, but whether it contributes to PDAC development is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of Lcn2 depletion on diet-induced obesity, inflammation and PDAC development. Mice with acinar cell-specific expression of KrasG12D were crossed with Lcn2-depleted animals and fed isocaloric diets with varying amounts of fat content. Pancreas were collected and analyzed for inflammation, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and PDAC. We also used a syngeneic orthotopic PDAC mouse model to study tumor growth in the presence or absence of Lcn2 expression. In addition, to understand the mechanistic role of how LCN2 could be mediating PDAC, we studied LCN2 and its specific receptor solute carrier family 22 member 17 (SLC22A17) in human pancreatic cancer stellate cells (PSC), key mediators of the PDAC stroma. Depletion of Lcn2 diminished extracellular matrix deposition, immune cell infiltration, PanIN formation and tumor growth. Notably, it also increased survival in both obesity-driven and syngeneic orthotopic PDAC mouse models. LCN2 modulated the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in PSC of the PDAC tumor microenvironment, while downregulation of LCN2-specific receptor SLC22A17 blocked these effects. Our results reveal how LCN2 acts in the tumor microenvironment links obesity, inflammation and PDAC development.

  3. The Aurora-A-Twist1 axis promotes highly aggressive phenotypes in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Nikhil, Kumar; Viccaro, Keith; Chang, Lei; Jacobsen, Max; Sandusky, George; Shah, Kavita

    2017-03-15

    We uncovered a crucial role for the Aurora kinase A (AURKA)-Twist1 axis in promoting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer. Twist1 is the first EMT-specific target of AURKA that was identified using an innovative screen. AURKA phosphorylates Twist1 at three sites, which results in its multifaceted regulation - AURKA inhibits its ubiquitylation, increases its transcriptional activity and favors its homodimerization. Twist1 reciprocates and prevents AURKA degradation, thereby triggering a feedback loop. Ablation of either AURKA or Twist1 completely inhibits EMT, highlighting both proteins as central players in EMT progression. Phosphorylation-dead Twist1 serves as a dominant-negative and fully reverses the EMT phenotype induced by Twist1, underscoring the crucial role of AURKA-mediated phosphorylation in mediating Twist1-induced malignancy. Likewise, Twist1-overexpressing BxPC3 cells formed large tumors in vivo, whereas expression of phosphorylation-dead Twist1 fully abrogated this effect. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis of pancreatic cancer specimens revealed a 3-fold higher level of Twist1 compared to that seen in healthy normal tissues. This is the first study that links Twist1 in a feedback loop with its activating kinase, which indicates that concurrent inhibition of AURKA and Twist1 will be synergistic in inhibiting pancreatic tumorigenesis and metastasis.

  4. SerpinB1 Promotes Pancreatic β Cell Proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Dirice, Ercument; Gedeon, Nicholas; Hu, Jiang; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Shirakawa, Jun; Hou, Lifei; Goodman, Jessica; Karampelias, Christos; Qiang, Guifeng; Boucher, Jeremie; Martinez, Rachael; Gritsenko, Marina A.; De Jesus, Dario F.; Kahraman, Sevim; Bhatt, Shweta; Smith, Richard D.; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Jungtrakoon, Prapaporn; Gong, Yanping; Goldfine, Allison B.; Liew, Chong Wee; Doria, Alessandro; Andersson, Olov; Qian, Wei-Jun; Remold-O’Donnell, Eileen; Kulkarni, Rohit N.

    2016-01-01

    Compensatory β-cell growth in response to insulin resistance is a common feature in diabetes. We recently reported that liver-derived factors participate in this compensatory response in the liver insulin receptor knockout (LIRKO) mouse, a model of significant islet hyperplasia. Here we show that serpinB1 is a liver-derived secretory protein that controls β-cell proliferation. SerpinB1 is abundant in the hepatocyte secretome and sera derived from LIRKO mice. SerpinB1 and small molecule compounds that partially mimic serpinB1 activity enhanced proliferation of zebrafish, mouse and human β-cells. We report that serpinB1-induced β-cell replication requires protease inhibition activity and mice lacking serpinB1 exhibit attenuated β-cell replication in response to insulin resistance. Finally, SerpinB1-treatment of islets modulated signaling proteins in growth and survival pathways such as MAPK, PKA and GSK3. Together, these data implicate SerpinB1 as a protein that can potentially be harnessed to enhance functional β-cell mass in patients with diabetes.

  5. Promoting Effect of a High-Fat/High-Protein Diet in DMBA-Induced Ductal Pancreatic Cancer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Z’graggen, Kaspar; Warshaw, Andrew L.; Werner, Jens; Graeme-Cook, Fiona; Jimenez, Ramon E.; Fernández-del Castillo, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether a high-fat/high-protein diet (HFPD) acts as a promoter of the natural course of cancer growth in the 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA)-induced ductal pancreatic cancer model in rats. Summary Background Data DMBA implantation to the rat pancreas induces ductal adenocarcinoma. Information regarding the effects of diet and the presence of K-ras mutation in this model is not available. Methods Rats were randomly assigned to regular rat chow or a diet with a 30% content in fat and protein (HFPD). The presentation of cancer, the histologic spectrum of neoplasia at 1 and 9 months, and the prevalence of cancer in relation to diet were assessed. Histologic specimens comprising normal ducts, hyperplasia, dysplasia/carcinoma in situ, or carcinoma were designated by a pathologist and microdissected. Genomic DNA was extracted, and K-ras and H-ras gene mutations were determined by a mutant-enriched polymerase chain reaction assay and direct sequencing. Results Rats fed HFPD increased their weight significantly compared with controls. DMBA induced characteristic stages of neoplasia at the implant site but not elsewhere. Macroscopic cancers of the pancreatic head presented regularly with common bile duct and gastric outlet obstruction. The prevalence of K-ras mutations was proportional to the degree of epithelial abnormality. K-ras mutations were significantly more frequent in cancer than in normal and hyperplastic ducts. H-ras mutations were not found. At 1 month in the HFPD-fed rats, the prevalence of cancer (16%) and dysplasia (16%) was not significantly different from the prevalence of cancer (29%) and dysplasia (8%) in the chow-fed rats. At 9 months the prevalence of cancer in the HFPD-fed rats increased to 29%, whereas that in the chow-fed rats decreased to 17%. The combined prevalence of cancer and dysplasia at 9 months in the HFPD-fed rats (34%) significantly exceeded that in the chow-fed rats. Conclusions DMBA induces characteristic

  6. High Rab11-FIP4 expression predicts poor prognosis and exhibits tumor promotion in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Yun; Ye, Mengsi; Zhou, Lingling; Shan, Yunfeng; Lu, Guangrong; Zhou, Yuhui; Zhong, Jinwei; Zheng, Jihang; Xue, Zhanxiong; Cai, Zhenzhai

    2017-01-01

    Some studies have demonstrated that Rab11-family interacting proteins (Rab11-FIPs) are connected with the tumorigenesis, and they may act as tumor promoters in some cancers. The clinicopathological significance of Rab11-family interacting protein 4 (Rab11-FIP4) expression and its possible effects on pancreatic cancer (PC) are still undiscovered. In this study, Rab11-FIP4 protein expression level in 60 PC specimens and pair-matched non-cancerous samples were detected by immunohistochemistry analysis. The results were analysed and compared with each patients' clinical data. Rab11-FIP4 expression in PC tissues increased significantly more than that of adjacent non-cancerous tissues (P=0.0001). Overexpression of Rab11-FIP4 in the PC tissues was significantly related to tumor size (P=0.0001), histological grade (P=0.028), metastasis (P=0.001) and TNM stage (P=0.004) but not with age (P=0.832), gender (P=0.228) or tumor site (P=0.875). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that overexpression of Rab11-FIP4 was significantly related to overall survival time (P=0.0036). In addition, Rab11-FIP4 in PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells were successfully knocked-out using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Rab11-FIP4 knockout in PANC-1 cells inhibited cell growth, invasion and metastasis, and arrested cell cycle progression, but did not alter apoptosis. Our findings suggest that overexpression of Rab11-FIP4 predicts poor clinical outcomes for pancreatic cancer and contributes to pancreatic tumor progression. PMID:28035375

  7. miR-92a/DUSP10/JNK signalling axis promotes human pancreatic cancer cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    He, Gengsheng; Zhang, Lei; Li, Qing; Yang, Longqiu

    2014-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common types of cancers in the whole world with a poor prognosis. Finding out how the cancer form and develop is the most important way to cure this cancer. miRNAs, 21-22 nucleotides regulatory small non-coding RNAs, have been found to be critical involved in the growth of pancreatic cancer. In this study, we found that miR-92a was up regulated in three kinds of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. There is a correlation between miR-92a and malignant degree of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Then we found that miR-92a was essential for promoting cell proliferation in human pancreatic cancer. Inhibition of the function of miR-92a repressed the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. Further, we found that miR-92a enhanced the activation of JNK signalling pathway by directly targeting the JNK signalling inhibitor DUSP10. DUSP10 is responsible for miR-92a induced JNK signalling and cell proliferation. Altogether, our study showed a miR-92a/DUSP10/JNK signalling pathway that plays an important role in regulating the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells.

  8. Preventive pancreatic stents in the management of acute biliary pancreatitis (PREPAST trial): pre-study protocol for a multicenter, prospective, randomized, interventional, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dubravcsik, Zsolt; Madácsy, László; Gyökeres, Tibor; Vincze, Áron; Szepes, Zoltán; Hegyi, Péter; Hritz, István; Szepes, Attila

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of the most common biliary form of acute pancreatitis has not changed even with the better described indications for early endoscopic intervention. It may be due to the fact that this intrevention theoretically can cause further pancreatic injury or cannot always relieve the pancreatic duct obstruction. We hypothesize that maintaining the outflow of the pancreatic duct with preventive pancreatic stents at the early ERCP improves the outcome of acute biliary pancreatitis. PREPAST is a prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter trial. Patients with acute biliary pancreatitis with coexisting cholangitis are randomized to undergo urgent endoscopic intervention with or without pancreatic stenting within 48 h from the onset of pain, and in addition patients without signs of cholangitis but cholestasis are randomly allocated to recieve conservative treatment or early endoscopic intervention with or without pancreatic stenting within 48 h from the onset of pain. Patients without acute cholangitis and signs of cholestasis recieve conservative treatment. 230 patients are planned to be enrolled during a 48 months period from different centers. The primary endpoint is the outcome of acute biliary pancreatitis as described by the latest guidelines. Secondary endpoints include mortality data, and other variables not analyzed as a primary endpoint but related to the pancreatitis or the pancreatic stenting. The PREPAST trial is designed to show whether early endoscopic intervention with the usage of preventive pancreatic stenting improves the outcome of acute biliary pancreatitis. The study has been registered at the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN) Register (trial ID: ISRCTN13517695). Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Hypothyroidism Affects Vascularization and Promotes Immune Cells Infiltration into Pancreatic Islets of Female Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Castelán, Julia; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Castelán, Francisco; Cuevas, Estela

    2015-01-01

    Thyroidectomy induces pancreatic edema and immune cells infiltration similarly to that observed in pancreatitis. In spite of the controverted effects of hypothyroidism on serum glucose and insulin concentrations, the number and proliferation of Langerhans islet cells as well as the presence of extracellular matrix are affected depending on the islet size. In this study, we evaluated the effect of methimazole-induced hypothyroidism on the vascularization and immune cells infiltration into islets. A general observation of pancreas was also done. Twelve Chinchilla-breed female adult rabbits were divided into control (n = 6) and hypothyroid groups (n = 6, methimazole, 0.02% in drinking water for 30 days). After the treatment, rabbits were sacrificed and their pancreas was excised, histologically processed, and stained with Periodic Acid-Schiff (PAS) or Masson's Trichrome techniques. Islets were arbitrarily classified into large, medium, and small ones. The external and internal portions of each islet were also identified. Student-t-test and Mann-Whitney-U test or two-way ANOVAs were used to compare variables between groups. In comparison with control rabbits, hypothyroidism induced a strong infiltration of immune cells and a major presence of collagen and proteoglycans in the interlobular septa. Large islets showed a high vascularization and immune cells infiltration. The present results show that hypothyroidism induces pancreatitis and insulitis. PMID:26175757

  10. Hypothyroidism Affects Vascularization and Promotes Immune Cells Infiltration into Pancreatic Islets of Female Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Castelán, Julia; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Castelán, Francisco; Cuevas, Estela

    2015-01-01

    Thyroidectomy induces pancreatic edema and immune cells infiltration similarly to that observed in pancreatitis. In spite of the controverted effects of hypothyroidism on serum glucose and insulin concentrations, the number and proliferation of Langerhans islet cells as well as the presence of extracellular matrix are affected depending on the islet size. In this study, we evaluated the effect of methimazole-induced hypothyroidism on the vascularization and immune cells infiltration into islets. A general observation of pancreas was also done. Twelve Chinchilla-breed female adult rabbits were divided into control (n = 6) and hypothyroid groups (n = 6, methimazole, 0.02% in drinking water for 30 days). After the treatment, rabbits were sacrificed and their pancreas was excised, histologically processed, and stained with Periodic Acid-Schiff (PAS) or Masson's Trichrome techniques. Islets were arbitrarily classified into large, medium, and small ones. The external and internal portions of each islet were also identified. Student-t-test and Mann-Whitney-U test or two-way ANOVAs were used to compare variables between groups. In comparison with control rabbits, hypothyroidism induced a strong infiltration of immune cells and a major presence of collagen and proteoglycans in the interlobular septa. Large islets showed a high vascularization and immune cells infiltration. The present results show that hypothyroidism induces pancreatitis and insulitis.

  11. The miR-24-Bim pathway promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis in pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Haiyang; Wang, Xia; Zhou, Likun; Li, Hongli; Deng, Ting; Qu, Yanjun; Duan, Jingjing; Bai, Ming; Ge, Shaohua; Ning, Tao; Zhang, Le

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs are a group of small RNAs that have been reported to play a key role at each stage of tumorigenesis and are believed to have future practical value. We now demonstrate that Bim, which stimulates cell apoptosis, is obviously down-regulated in pancreatic cancer (PaC) tissues and cell lines. And Bim-related miR-24 is significantly up-regulated in PaC. The repressed expression of Bim is proved to be a result of miR-24, thus promoting cell growth of both cancer and vascular cells, and accelerating vascular ring formation. By using mouse tumor model, we clearly showed that miR-24 promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by suppressing Bim expression in vivo. Therefore, a new pathway comprising miR-24 and Bim can be used in the exploration of drug-target therapy of PaC. PMID:26517093

  12. The miR-24-Bim pathway promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Zhang, Haiyang; Wang, Xia; Zhou, Likun; Li, Hongli; Deng, Ting; Qu, Yanjun; Duan, Jingjing; Bai, Ming; Ge, Shaohua; Ning, Tao; Zhang, Le; Huang, Dingzhi; Ba, Yi

    2015-12-22

    miRNAs are a group of small RNAs that have been reported to play a key role at each stage of tumorigenesis and are believed to have future practical value. We now demonstrate that Bim, which stimulates cell apoptosis, is obviously down-regulated in pancreatic cancer (PaC) tissues and cell lines. And Bim-related miR-24 is significantly up-regulated in PaC. The repressed expression of Bim is proved to be a result of miR-24, thus promoting cell growth of both cancer and vascular cells, and accelerating vascular ring formation. By using mouse tumor model, we clearly showed that miR-24 promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by suppressing Bim expression in vivo. Therefore, a new pathway comprising miR-24 and Bim can be used in the exploration of drug-target therapy of PaC.

  13. Enhanced Expression of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2 IIIc Promotes Human Pancreatic Cancer Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ishiwata, Toshiyuki; Matsuda, Yoko; Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Uchida, Eiji; Korc, Murray; Naito, Zenya

    2012-01-01

    In pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR-1) IIIb isoform correlates with the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, whereas FGFR-1 IIIc enhances cancer cell proliferation. The FGFR-2 IIIb isoform is expressed in PDAC, and its expression correlates with increased venous invasion. We examined the role of FGFR-2 IIIc in PDAC. FGFR-2 IIIc was expressed in all six pancreatic cancer cell lines examined and was highest in PANC-1 cells. FGFR-2 IIIc was abundant in the cancer cells from 83 of 117 PDAC cases, which correlated with decreased duration to development of liver metastasis after surgery. FGFR-2 IIIc-transfected cells exhibited increased proliferation in vitro and formed larger subcutaneous and orthotopic tumors, the latter producing more liver metastases. Moreover, FGF-2 exerted a more rapid stimulatory effect on the levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) in FGFR-2 IIIc stably transfected PANC-1 cells, compared with control cells. FGFR-2 IIIc-transfected cells also formed more spheres and contained more side population cells. Suppression of FGFR-2 IIIc expression inhibited the proliferation of PANC-1 cells, whereas an anti-FGFR-2 IIIc antibody inhibited the proliferation and migration of PANC-1 cells. Thus, high FGFR-2 IIIc levels in PDAC contribute to disease aggressiveness and confer to pancreatic cancer cells features suggestive of cancer stem cells, indicating that FGFR-2 IIIc may be a novel and important therapeutic target in PDAC. PMID:22440254

  14. Long non-coding RNA TUG1 can promote proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer via EMT pathway.

    PubMed

    Qin, C-F; Zhao, F-L

    2017-05-01

    This paper aimed to investigate the effect of long non-coding RNA TUG1 (lncRNA TUG1) on cell proliferation, as well as cell migration in pancreatic cancer. The mRNA levels of Taurine-up-regulated gene 1 (TUG1) in three kinds of pancreatic cancer cells BxPC3, PaTu8988 and SW1990 was detected by RT-qPCR. Meantime, RT-qPCR was used to examine the mRNA levels of TUG1 in 20 cases of human pancreatic cancer tissues and its para-carcinoma tissues. pCDH-TUG1 plasmid and its empty plasmid pCDH were transfected into BxPC3 and PaTu8988 cells to up-regulate TUG1 expression. siRNA targeting TUG1 and the control siRNA were transfected into SW1990 cells to down-regulate TUG1 expression. Cell clone formation and CCK-8 assay were used to detect the cell proliferation capacity. Transwell assay was used to evaluate cell migration capacity. Western blot was applied to examine the protein expressions of MMP2, MMP9, E-cadherin, Smad 2, Smad 3, p-Smad 2, p-Smad 3, TGF-β and TGF-βR. RT-qPCR was used to detect the levels of MMP2 and MMP9. The results showed that TUG1 was differentially expressed in the three kinds of pancreatic cancer cells, among which the expression level of SW1990 was relatively high, and the expression levels of BxPC3 and PaTu8988 were relatively low. TUG1 had more expression in pancreatic cancer tissues than that in para-carcinoma tissues. After the up-regulation of TUG1, cell proliferation and migration capacities were increased, protein levels of MMP2 and MMP9 were increased and protein level of E-cadherin was declined. Conversely, after down-regulation of TUG1 expression, cell proliferation and migration capacities were weakened, protein levels of MMP2 and MMP9 were decreased and protein level of E-cadherin was increased. In addition, over-expressed TUG1 could promote Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation, but Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation were weakened after down-regulated expression of TUG1. The protein expression of TGF-β and TGF-β receptor were more in the TUG1

  15. Pancreatic Stenting Reduces Post-ERCP Pancreatitis and Biliary Sepsis in High-Risk Patients: A Randomized, Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hai-En; Li, Qi-Xiang; Wang, Wei; Ou, Wei-Lin; Xia, Harry Hua-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is an established treatment modality for bile duct disorders, but patients have a risk of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) and biliary sepsis. Aim. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of pancreatic stent for prophylaxis of PEP and biliary sepsis in high-risk patients with complicating common bile duct (CBD) disorders. Methods. Two hundred and six patients with complicating confirmed or suspected CBD disorders were randomly assigned to receive ERCP with pancreatic stenting (experimental group) or without stenting (control group). Primary outcome measure was frequency of PEP, and secondary outcome measures included operative time, blood loss, postoperative recovery times, and other ERCP-associated morbidities. Results. Baseline age, sex, CBD etiology, concomitant medical/surgical conditions, cannulation difficulty, and ERCP success were comparable between the two groups (all P > 0.05). Compared to the control group, the experimental group had a significantly lower frequency of PEP (7.7% versus 17.7%, P < 0.05) and positive bile microbial culture (40.4% versus 62.7%, P < 0.05). However, the two groups were similar in operative time, blood loss, postoperative recovery times, and other ERCP-associated morbidities (all P > 0.05). Conclusions. Pancreatic stenting can reduce the occurrence of PEP and biliary sepsis in high-risk patients with complicating CBD disorders but does not increase other ERCP-associated morbidities. This trial is registered with the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (registration identifier ChiCTR-OCH-14005134). PMID:27057161

  16. An inhibitor of fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) promotes late-stage terminal differentiation from NGN3+ pancreatic endocrine progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita-Sugahara, Yzumi; Matsumoto, Masahito; Ohtaka, Manami; Nishimura, Ken; Nakanishi, Mahito; Mitani, Kohnosuke; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) provide a potential resource for regenerative medicine. To identify the signalling pathway(s) contributing to the development of functional β cells, we established a tracing model consisting of dual knock-in hiPSCs (INS-Venus/NGN3-mCherry) (hIveNry) expressing the fluorescent proteins Venus and mCherry under the control of intrinsic insulin (INS) and neurogenin 3 (NGN3) promoters, respectively. hIveNry iPSCs differentiated into NGN3- and mCherry-positive endocrine progenitors and then into Venus-positive β cells expressing INS, PDX1, NKX6.1, and glucokinase (GCK). Using these cells, we conducted high-throughput screening of chemicals and identified a specific kinase inhibitor of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) that acted in a stage-dependent manner to promote the terminal differentiation of pancreatic endocrine cells, including β cells, from the intermediate stage of pancreatic endocrine progenitors while blocking the early development of pancreatic progenitors. This FGFR1 inhibitor augmented the expression of functional β cell markers (SLC30A8 and ABCC8) and improved glucose-stimulated INS secretion. Our findings indicate that the hIveNry model could provide further insights into the mechanisms of hiPS-derived β cell differentiation controlled by FGFR1-mediated regulatory pathways in a temporal-dependent fashion. PMID:27786288

  17. Inflammation induced NFATc1-STAT3 Transcription Complex Promotes Pancreatic Cancer initiation by KrasG12D

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, Sandra; Chen, Nai-ming; Siveke, Jens T.; König, Alexander; Zhang, Jin-San; Singh, Shiv K.; Wolf, Elmar; Bartkuhn, Marek; Esposito, Irene; Heßmann, Elisabeth; Reinecke, Johanna; Nikorowitsch, Julius; Brunner, Marius; Singh, Garima; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.; Smyrk, Thomas; Bamlet, William R.; Eilers, Martin; Neesse, Albrecht; Gress, Thomas M.; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Tuveson, David; Urrutia, Raul; Ellenrieder, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cancer-associated inflammation is a molecular key feature in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Oncogenic KRAS in conjunction with persistent inflammation is known to accelerate carcinogenesis, although the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we outline a novel pathway whereby the transcription factors NFATc1 and STAT3 cooperate in pancreatic epithelial cells to promote KrasG12D-driven carcinogenesis. NFATc1 activation is induced by inflammation and itself accelerates inflammation-induced carcinogenesis in KrasG12D mice, whereas genetic or pharmacological ablation of NFATc1 attenuates this effect. Mechanistically, NFATc1 complexes with STAT3 for enhancer-promoter communications at jointly regulated genes involved in oncogenesis, e.g. Cyclin, EGFR and WNT family members. The NFATc1-STAT3 cooperativity is operative in pancreatitis-mediated carcinogenesis as well as in established human pancreatic cancer. Together, these studies unravel new mechanisms of inflammatory driven pancreatic carcinogenesis and suggest beneficial effects of chemopreventive strategies using drugs which are currently available for targeting these factors in clinical trials. PMID:24694735

  18. Past medical history and pancreatic cancer risk: Results from a multicenter case-control study.

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, Patrick; Lowenfels, Albert B; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Ghadirian, Parviz; Baghurst, Peter A; Zatonski, Witold A; Miller, Anthony B; Duell, Eric J; Boffetta, Paolo; Boyle, Peter

    2010-02-01

    To investigate risk factors that may be linked to pancreatic cancer. We designed a multicenter population-based case-control (823 cases, 1679 control patients) study with data collection by using a common protocol and questionnaire. Participating centers were located in Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, and Poland. After adjustment for confounding factors, a positive history of pancreatitis was associated with pancreatic cancer (odds ratio [OR], 4.68; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 2.23-9.84). The risk was especially high in heavy smokers (OR, 15.4; 95% CI, 3.18-74.9). Patients with diabetes had an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer (OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.60-2.91). The risk was highest in the first year after the development of diabetes (OR, 6.68; 95% CI, 3.56-12.6) and decreased over time. A history of allergy was associated with a reduced risk of pancreas cancer (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.50-0.82). Patients with newly diagnosed diabetes and patients with pancreatitis, particularly in heavy smokers, have an increased risk for developing pancreatic cancer. In addition to being risk factors, these conditions could be early manifestations of underlying pancreatic cancer. A history of allergy decreases the risk of pancreatic cancer. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Vagal control of pancreatic ß-cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lausier, James; Diaz, William C; Roskens, Violet; LaRock, Kyla; Herzer, Kristi; Fong, Christopher G; Latour, Martin G; Peshavaria, Mina; Jetton, Thomas L

    2010-11-01

    The physiological mechanisms that preserve pancreatic β-cell mass (BCM) are not fully understood. Although the regulation of islet function by the autonomic nervous system (ANS) is well established, its potential roles in BCM homeostasis and compensatory growth have not been adequately explored. The parasympathetic vagal branch of the ANS serves to facilitate gastrointestinal function, metabolism, and pancreatic islet regulation of glucose homeostasis, including insulin secretion. Given the functional importance of the vagus nerve and its branches to the liver, gut, and pancreas in control of digestion, motility, feeding behavior, and glucose metabolism, it may also play a role in BCM regulation. We have begun to examine the potential roles of the parasympathetic nervous system in short-term BCM maintenance by performing a selective bilateral celiac branch-vagus nerve transection (CVX) in normal Sprague-Dawley rats. CVX resulted in no detectable effects on basic metabolic parameters or food intake through 1 wk postsurgery. Although there were no differences in BCM or apoptosis in this 1-wk time frame, β-cell proliferation was reduced 50% in the CVX rats, correlating with a marked reduction in activated protein kinase B/Akt. Unexpectedly, acinar proliferation was increased 50% in these rats. These data suggest that the ANS, via the vagus nerve, contributes to the regulation of BCM maintenance at the level of cell proliferation and may also mediate the drive for enhanced growth under physiological conditions when insulin requirements have increased. Furthermore, the disparate effects of CVX on β-cell and acinar cells suggest that the endocrine and exocrine pancreas respond to different neural signals in regard to mass homeostasis.

  20. RUNX3 controls a metastatic switch in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, Martin C.; Izeradjene, Kamel; Rani, P. Geetha; Feng, Libing; Carlson, Markus A.; DelGiorno, Kathleen E.; Wood, Laura D.; Goggins, Michael; Hruban, Ralph H.; Chang, Amy E.; Calses, Philamer; Thorsen, Shelley M.; Hingorani, Sunil R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY For the majority of patients with pancreas cancer, the high metastatic proclivity is life-limiting. Some patients, however, present with and succumb to locally destructive disease. A molecular understanding of these distinct disease manifestations can critically inform patient management. Using genetically engineered mouse models, we show that heterozygous mutation of Dpc4/Smad4 attenuates the metastatic potential of KrasG12D/+;Trp53R172H/+ pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas while increasing their proliferation. Subsequent loss of heterozygosity of Dpc4 restores metastatic competency while further unleashing proliferation, creating a highly lethal combination. Expression levels of Runx3 respond to and combine with Dpc4 status to coordinately regulate the balance between cancer cell division and dissemination. Runx3 serves as both a tumor suppressor and promoter in slowing proliferation while orchestrating a metastatic program to stimulate cell migration, invasion and secretion of proteins that favor distant colonization. These findings suggest a model to anticipate likely disease behaviors in patients and tailor treatment strategies accordingly. PMID:26004068

  1. The necrosome promotes pancreatic oncogenesis via CXCL1 and Mincle-induced immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Giao Ly, Nancy Ngoc; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Daley, Donnele; Greco, Stephanie H; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Pergamo, Matthew; Ochi, Atsuo; Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Pansari, Mridul; Rendon, Mauricio; Tippens, Daniel; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Hajdu, Cristina; Engle, Dannielle; Miller, George

    2016-04-14

    Neoplastic pancreatic epithelial cells are believed to die through caspase 8-dependent apoptotic cell death, and chemotherapy is thought to promote tumour apoptosis. Conversely, cancer cells often disrupt apoptosis to survive. Another type of programmed cell death is necroptosis (programmed necrosis), but its role in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is unclear. There are many potential inducers of necroptosis in PDA, including ligation of tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1), CD95, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors, Toll-like receptors, reactive oxygen species, and chemotherapeutic drugs. Here we report that the principal components of the necrosome, receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1 and RIP3, are highly expressed in PDA and are further upregulated by the chemotherapy drug gemcitabine. Blockade of the necrosome in vitro promoted cancer cell proliferation and induced an aggressive oncogenic phenotype. By contrast, in vivo deletion of RIP3 or inhibition of RIP1 protected against oncogenic progression in mice and was associated with the development of a highly immunogenic myeloid and T cell infiltrate. The immune-suppressive tumour microenvironment associated with intact RIP1/RIP3 signalling depended in part on necroptosis-induced expression of the chemokine attractant CXCL1, and CXCL1 blockade protected against PDA. Moreover, cytoplasmic SAP130 (a subunit of the histone deacetylase complex) was expressed in PDA in a RIP1/RIP3-dependent manner, and Mincle--its cognate receptor--was upregulated in tumour-infiltrating myeloid cells. Ligation of Mincle by SAP130 promoted oncogenesis, whereas deletion of Mincle protected against oncogenesis and phenocopied the immunogenic reprogramming of the tumour microenvironment that was induced by RIP3 deletion. Cellular depletion suggested that whereas inhibitory macrophages promote tumorigenesis in PDA, they lose their immune-suppressive effects when RIP3 or Mincle is deleted. Accordingly, T cells

  2. Presenilins, Notch dose control the fate of pancreatic endocrine progenitors during a narrow developmental window.

    PubMed

    Cras-Méneur, Corentin; Li, Lin; Kopan, Raphael; Permutt, M Alan

    2009-09-01

    Canonical Notch signaling is thought to control the endocrine/exocrine decision in early pancreatic progenitors. Later, RBP-Jkappa interacts with Ptf1a and E12 to promote acinar differentiation. To examine the involvement of Notch signaling in selecting specific endocrine lineages, we deregulated this pathway by targeted deletion of presenilin1 and presenilin2, the catalytic core of gamma-secretase, in Ngn3- or Pax6-expressing endocrine progenitors. Surprisingly, whereas Pax6(+) progenitors were irreversibly committed to the endocrine fate, we discovered that Ngn3(+) progenitors were bipotential in vivo and in vitro. When presenilin amounts are limiting, Ngn3(+) progenitors default to an acinar fate; subsequently, they expand rapidly to form the bulk of the exocrine pancreas. gamma-Secretase inhibitors confirmed that enzymatic activity was required to block acinar fate selection by Ngn3 progenitors. Genetic interactions identified Notch2 as the substrate, and suggest that gamma-secretase and Notch2 act in a noncanonical titration mechanism to sequester RBP-Jkappa away from Ptf1a, thus securing selection of the endocrine fate by Ngn3 progenitors. These results revise the current view of pancreatic cell fate hierarchy, establish that Ngn3 is not in itself sufficient to commit cells to the endocrine fate in the presence of Ptf1a, reveal a noncanonical action for Notch2 protein in endocrine cell fate selection, and demonstrate that acquisition of an endocrine fate by Ngn3(+) progenitors is gamma-secretase-dependent until Pax6 expression begins.

  3. miR-208-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition of pancreatic cancer cells promotes cell metastasis and invasion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Anan; Shao, Chenghao; Jin, Gang; Liu, Rui; Hao, Jun; Song, Bin; Ouyang, Liu; Hu, Xiangui

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miR-208 in the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells and the underlying molecular mechanism. miR-208 mimic, miR-208 inhibitor and NC were transfected into pancreatic cancer cell line Bxpc3 using liposome. Transwell invasion and scratch assays were used to test cell migratory and invasive abilities. Western blotting and quantitative PCR methods were used to detect E-cadherin, fibronectin and vimentin protein and mRNA expression in pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3 after transfection by miR-208 mimic, miR-208 inhibitor and NC. Transwell invasion and scratch assays showed that after overexpressing miR-208, pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3 exhibited enhanced in vitro migratory and invasive abilities, while after downregulating miR-208 expression, cell migratory and invasive abilities were decreased. Western blotting and quantitative PCR showed that after overexpressing miR-208, expression of E-cadherin, an epithelial cell marker, was decreased and expression of fibronectin and vimentin, interstitial cell markers, was increased in pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3; however, after inhibiting miR-208, increased E-cadherin expression and decreased fibronectin and vimentin expression were observed in pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3. After overexpressing miR-208, p-AKT and p-GSK-3β expression was altered by activating AKT/GSK-3β/snail signaling pathway. miR-208 induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition of pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3 by activating AKT/GSK-3β/snail signaling pathway and thereby promotes cell metastasis and invasion.

  4. Stromal-derived factor-1α/CXCL12-CXCR4 chemotactic pathway promotes perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qinhong; Wang, Zheng; Chen, Xin; Duan, Wanxing; Lei, Jianjun; Zong, Liang; Li, Xuqi; Sheng, Liang; Ma, Jiguang; Han, Liang; Li, Wei; Zhang, Lun; Guo, Kun; Ma, Zhenhua; Wu, Zheng; Wu, Erxi; Ma, Qingyong

    2015-03-10

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is considered as an alternative route for the metastatic spread of pancreatic cancer cells; however, the molecular changes leading to PNI are still poorly understood. In this study, we show that the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis plays a pivotal role in the neurotropism of pancreatic cancer cells to local peripheral nerves. Immunohistochemical staining results revealed that CXCR4 elevation correlated with PNI in 78 pancreatic cancer samples. Both in vitro and in vivo PNI models were applied to investigate the function of the CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling in PNI progression and pathogenesis. The results showed that the activation of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis significantly increased pancreatic cancer cells invasion and promoted the outgrowth of the dorsal root ganglia. CXCL12 derived from the peripheral nerves stimulated the invasion and chemotactic migration of CXCR4-positive cancer cells in a paracrine manner, eventually leading to PNI. In vivo analyses revealed that the abrogation of the activated signaling inhibited tumor growth and invasion of the sciatic nerve toward the spinal cord. These data indicate that the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis may be a novel therapeutic target to prevent the perineural dissemination of pancreatic cancer.

  5. EGFR-induced phosphorylation of type Iγ phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase promotes pancreatic cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Junli; Xiong, Xunhao; Huang, Yan; Hu, Jinghua; Ling, Kun

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest malignancies and effective treatment has always been lacking. In current study, we investigated how the type Iγ phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPKIγ) participates in the progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) for novel therapeutic potentials against this lethal disease. We found that PIPKIγ is up-regulated in all tested PDAC cell lines. The growth factor (including EGFR)-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PIPKIγ is significantly elevated in in situ and metastatic PDAC tissues. Loss of PIPKIγ inhibits the aggressiveness of PDAC cells by restraining the activities of AKT and STAT3, as well as MT1-MMP expression. Therefore when planted into the pancreas of nude mice, PIPKIγ-depleted PDAC cells exhibits substantially repressed tumor growth and metastasis comparing to control PDAC cells. Results from further studies showed that the phosphorylation-deficient PIPKIγ mutant, unlike its wild-type counterpart, cannot rescue PDAC progression inhibited by PIPKIγ depletion. These findings indicate that PIPKIγ, functioning downstream of EGFR signaling, is critical to the progression of PDAC, and suggest that PIPKIγ is potentially a valuable therapeutic target for PDAC treatment. PMID:28388589

  6. Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load and risk of pancreatic cancer: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Marta; Lipworth, Loren; Polesel, Jerry; Negri, Eva; Bosetti, Cristina; Talamini, Renato; McLaughlin, Joseph K; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2010-06-01

    Carbohydrates and dietary glycemic index (GI) influence the secretion of insulin and insulin-related growth factors and may play a role in the development of diabetes and obesity, both of which have been related to pancreatic cancer risk. We examined the association between dietary GI and glycemic load (GL) and pancreatic cancer by conducting a hospital-based case-control study in Italy in 1991-2008 of 326 cases of pancreatic cancer and 652 control patients. Dietary data were obtained with the use of a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were computed with the use of multiple logistic regression. GI was positively associated with pancreatic cancer, with ORs of 1.56 (95% CI, 1.06-2.30) and 1.78 (95% CI, 1.20-2.62) for the second and third tertiles, respectively, compared with the lowest. No significant association was observed between GL and pancreatic cancer. Consumption of sugar, candy, honey, and jam was positively associated with pancreatic cancer, whereas consumption of fruit was inversely associated. In conclusion, the positive association with high GI, in the absence of an association with dietary GL, fruit, or total carbohydrates, likely reflects the positive association between sweets or refined carbohydrates and pancreatic cancer in this study population. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pancreatic Islet Survival and Engraftment Is Promoted by Culture on Functionalized Spider Silk Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Ulrika; Dekki Shalaly, Nancy; Zaitsev, Sergei V.; Berggren, Per-Olof; Hedhammar, My

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of pancreatic islets is one approach for treatment of diabetes, however, hampered by the low availability of viable islets. Islet isolation leads to disruption of the environment surrounding the endocrine cells, which contributes to eventual cell death. The reestablishment of this environment is vital, why we herein investigated the possibility of using recombinant spider silk to support islets in vitro after isolation. The spider silk protein 4RepCT was formulated into three different formats; 2D-film, fiber mesh and 3D-foam, in order to provide a matrix that can give the islets physical support in vitro. Moreover, cell-binding motifs from laminin were incorporated into the silk protein in order to create matrices that mimic the natural cell environment. Pancreatic mouse islets were thoroughly analyzed for adherence, necrosis and function after in vitro maintenance on the silk matrices. To investigate their suitability for transplantation, we utilized an eye model which allows in vivo imaging of engraftment. Interestingly, islets that had been maintained on silk foam during in vitro culture showed improved revascularization. This coincided with the observation of preserved islet architecture with endothelial cells present after in vitro culture on silk foam. Selected matrices were further evaluated for long-term preservation of human islets. Matrices with the cell-binding motif RGD improved human islet maintenance (from 36% to 79%) with preserved islets architecture and function for over 3 months in vitro. The islets established cell-matrix contacts and formed vessel-like structures along the silk. Moreover, RGD matrices promoted formation of new, insulin-positive islet-like clusters that were connected to the original islets via endothelial cells. On silk matrices with islets from younger donors (<35 year), the amount of newly formed islet-like clusters found after 1 month in culture were almost double compared to the initial number of islets

  8. Pancreatic Islet Survival and Engraftment Is Promoted by Culture on Functionalized Spider Silk Matrices.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ulrika; Ria, Massimiliano; Åvall, Karin; Dekki Shalaly, Nancy; Zaitsev, Sergei V; Berggren, Per-Olof; Hedhammar, My

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of pancreatic islets is one approach for treatment of diabetes, however, hampered by the low availability of viable islets. Islet isolation leads to disruption of the environment surrounding the endocrine cells, which contributes to eventual cell death. The reestablishment of this environment is vital, why we herein investigated the possibility of using recombinant spider silk to support islets in vitro after isolation. The spider silk protein 4RepCT was formulated into three different formats; 2D-film, fiber mesh and 3D-foam, in order to provide a matrix that can give the islets physical support in vitro. Moreover, cell-binding motifs from laminin were incorporated into the silk protein in order to create matrices that mimic the natural cell environment. Pancreatic mouse islets were thoroughly analyzed for adherence, necrosis and function after in vitro maintenance on the silk matrices. To investigate their suitability for transplantation, we utilized an eye model which allows in vivo imaging of engraftment. Interestingly, islets that had been maintained on silk foam during in vitro culture showed improved revascularization. This coincided with the observation of preserved islet architecture with endothelial cells present after in vitro culture on silk foam. Selected matrices were further evaluated for long-term preservation of human islets. Matrices with the cell-binding motif RGD improved human islet maintenance (from 36% to 79%) with preserved islets architecture and function for over 3 months in vitro. The islets established cell-matrix contacts and formed vessel-like structures along the silk. Moreover, RGD matrices promoted formation of new, insulin-positive islet-like clusters that were connected to the original islets via endothelial cells. On silk matrices with islets from younger donors (<35 year), the amount of newly formed islet-like clusters found after 1 month in culture were almost double compared to the initial number of islets

  9. Insights into the Epigenetic Mechanisms Controlling Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    McCleary-Wheeler, Angela L.; Lomberk, Gwen A.; Weiss, Frank U.; Schneider, Günter; Fabbri, Muller; Poshusta, Tara L.; Dusetti, Nelson J.; Baumgart, Sandra; Iovanna, Juan L.; Ellenrieder, Volker; Urrutia, Raul; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.

    2012-01-01

    During the last couple decades, we have significantly advanced our understanding of mechanisms underlying the development of pancreatic ductural adenocarcinoma (PDAC). In the late 1990s into the early 2000s, a model of PDAC development and progression was developed as a multi-step process associated with the accumulation of somatic mutations. The correlation and association of these particular genetic aberrations with the establishment and progression of PDAC has revolutionized our understanding of this process. However, this model leaves out other molecular events involved in PDAC pathogenesis that contribute to its development and maintenance, specifically those being epigenetic events. Thus, a new model considering the new scientific paradigms of epigenetics will provide a more comprehensive and useful framework for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this disease. Epigenetics is defined as the type of inheritance not based on a particular DNA sequence but rather traits that are passed to the next generation via DNA and histone modifications as well as microRNA-dependent mechanisms. Key tumor suppressors that are well established to play a role in PDAC may be altered through hypermethylation, and oncogenes can be upregulated secondary to permissive histone modifications. Factors involved in tumor invasiveness can be aberrantly expressed through dysregulated microRNAs. A noteworthy characteristic of epigenetic-based inheritance is its reversibility, which is in contrast to the stable nature of DNA sequence-based alterations. Given this nature of epigenetic alterations, it becomes imperative that our understanding of epigenetic-based events promoting and maintain PDAC continues to grow. PMID:23073473

  10. Tissue-specific and glucose-responsive expression of the pancreatic derived factor (PANDER) promoter.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Brant R; Yang, Michael C; Robert, Claudia E; Greene, Scott R; McFadden, K Kelly; Yang, Jichun; Wu, Jianmei; Gao, Zhiyong; Wolf, Bryan A

    2005-09-25

    Pancreatic derived factor (PANDER) is a recently identified cytokine-like protein that is dominantly expressed in the islets of Langerhans of the pancreas. To investigate the mechanism of tissue-specific regulation of PANDER, we identified and characterized the promoter region. The transcriptional start site was identified 520 bp upstream of the translational start codon by 5'-RLM-RACE. Computer algorithms identified several islet-associated and glucose-responsive binding motifs that included A and E boxes, hepatocyte nuclear factors 1 and 4, Oct-1, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, and 5. Reporter gene analysis revealed cell type-specific PANDER promoter expression in islet and liver-derived cell lines. Levels of PANDER mRNA were directly concordant to the observed cell type-specific PANDER promoter gene expression. The minimal element was mapped to the 5'-UTR and located between +200 and +491 relative to the transcriptional start site and imparted maximal gene expression. In addition, several putative glucose-responsive binding sites were further functionally characterized to reveal critical regulatory elements of PANDER. The PANDER promoter was demonstrated to be glucose-responsive in a dose-dependent manner in murine insulinoma beta-TC3 cells and primary murine islets, but unresponsive in glucagon-secreting alpha-TC3 cells. Our findings revealed that the 5'-UTR of PANDER contains the minimal element for gene expression and imparts both tissue-specificity and glucose-responsiveness. The regulation of PANDER gene expression mimics that of insulin and suggests a potential biological function of PANDER involved in metabolic homeostasis.

  11. The MEK/ERK Pathway Promotes NOTCH Signalling in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Isabelle; Paré, Emanuel; Arsenault, Dominique; Douziech, Mélanie; Boucher, Marie-Josée

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the NOTCH receptors relies on their intracellular proteolysis by the gamma-secretase complex. This cleavage liberates the NOTCH intracellular domain (NIC) thereby allowing the translocation of NIC towards the nucleus to assemble into a transcriptional platform. Little information is available regarding the regulatory steps operating on NIC following its release from the transmembrane receptor up to its association with transcriptional partners. Interfering with these regulatory steps might potentially influences the nuclear outcome of NOTCH signalling. Herein, we exploited a reliable model to study the molecular events occurring subsequent to NOTCH1 cleavage. In pancreatic cancer cells, pulse of NOTCH1 activation led to increased expression of NOTCH target genes namely HES1 and c-MYC. We uncovered that, upon its release, the NOTCH1 intracellular domain, NIC1, undergoes a series of post-translational modifications that include phosphorylation. Most interestingly, we found that activation of the MEK/ERK pathway promotes HES1 expression. Inhibition of the gamma-secretase complex prevented the MEK/ERK-induced HES1 expression suggesting a NOTCH-dependent mechanism. Finally, higher levels of NIC1 were found associated with its transcriptional partners [CBF1, Su(H) and LAG-1] (CSL) and MASTERMIND-LIKE 1 (MAML1) upon MEK/ERK activation providing a potential mechanism whereby the MEK/ERK pathway promotes expression of NOTCH target genes. For the first time, our data exposed a signalling pathway, namely the MEK/ERK pathway that positively impacts on NOTCH nuclear outcome. PMID:24392017

  12. Role of Injured Pancreatic Extract Promotes Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Efficiently Differentiate into Insulin-Producing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongbin; Wang, Yunshuai; Zhang, Hui; Qi, Hui; Zhou, Hanxin; Li, Fu-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be successfully induced to differentiate into insulin-producing cells (IPCs) by a variety of small molecules and cytokines in vitro. However, problems remain, such as low transdifferentiation efficiency and poor maturity of trans-differentiated cells. The damaged pancreatic cells secreted a large amount of soluble proteins, which were able to promote pancreative islet regeneration and MSCs differentiation. In this study, we utilized the rat injured pancreatic tissue extract to modulate rat bone marrow-derived MSCs differentiation into IPCs by the traditional two-step induction. Our results showed that injured pancreatic tissue extract could effectively promote the trans-differentiation efficiency and maturity of IPCs by the traditional induction. Moreover, IPCs were able to release more insulin in a glucose-dependent manner and ameliorate better the diabetic conditions of streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rats. Our study provides a new strategy to induce an efficient and directional differentiation of MSCs into IPCs. PMID:24058711

  13. Aberrant methylation of MUC1 and MUC4 promoters are potential prognostic biomarkers for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Seiya; Higashi, Michiyo; Kitamoto, Sho; Oeldorf, Monika; Knippschild, Uwe; Kornmann, Marko; Maemura, Kosei; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Wiest, Edwin; Hamada, Tomofumi; Kitazono, Ikumi; Goto, Yuko; Tasaki, Takashi; Hiraki, Tsubasa; Hatanaka, Kazuhito; Mataki, Yuko; Taguchi, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Batra, Surinder K.; Tanimoto, Akihide; Yonezawa, Suguru; Hollingsworth, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is still a disease of high mortality despite availability of diagnostic techniques. Mucins (MUC) play crucial roles in carcinogenesis and tumor invasion in pancreatic neoplasms. MUC1 and MUC4 are high molecular weight transmembrane mucins. These are overexpressed in many carcinomas, and high expression of these molecules is a risk factor associated with poor prognosis. We evaluated the methylation status of MUC1 and MUC4 promoter regions in pancreatic tissue samples from 169 patients with various pancreatic lesions by the methylation specific electrophoresis (MSE) method. These results were compared with expression of MUC1 and MUC4, several DNA methylation/demethylation factors (e.g. ten-eleven translocation or TET, and activation-induced cytidine deaminase or AID) and CAIX (carbonic anhydrase IX, as a hypoxia biomarker). These results were also analyzed with clinicopathological features including time of overall survival of PDAC patients. We show that the DNA methylation status of the promoters of MUC1 and MUC4 in pancreatic tissue correlates with the expression of MUC1 and MUC4 mRNA. In addition, the expression of several DNA methylation/demethylation factors show a significant correlation with MUC1 and MUC4 methylation status. Furthermore, CAIX expression significantly correlates with the expression of MUC1 and MUC4. Interestingly, our results indicate that low methylation of MUC1 and/or MUC4 promoters correlates with decreased overall survival. This is the first report to show a relationship between MUC1 and/or MUC4 methylation status and prognosis. Analysis of epigenetic changes in mucin genes may be of diagnostic utility and one of the prognostic predictors for patients with PDAC. PMID:27283771

  14. Use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis: A case–control study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Some cases of acute pancreatitis have been reported to be associated with use of methimazole. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis on the basis of a systematic analysis. Methods: This was a population-based case–control study analyzing the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 5764 individuals aged 20–84 years with a first attack of acute pancreatitis from 1998 to 2011 as the cases and 23,056 randomly selected sex- and age-matched individuals without acute pancreatitis as the controls. Use of methimazole was categorized as “never use” and “ever use.” We estimated the relative risk of acute pancreatitis associated with the use of methimazole by calculating the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) using a multivariable logistic regression model. Results: After adjustment for confounding factors, the OR of acute pancreatitis was 0.91 in individuals with ever use of methimazole, when compared with individuals with never use of methimazole (95% CI, 0.60–1.38). Unlike methimazole use, alcohol-related disease, biliary stone, cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and hypertriglyceridemia were factors significantly associated with acute pancreatitis. Conclusions: Our study does not detect a substantial association between the use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis on the basis of systematic analysis. There appears to be a discrepancy between case reports and our systematic analysis about the association between the use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis. PMID:27127323

  15. Occupation and risk of pancreatic cancer: a population-based case-control study in iowa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yawei; Cantor, Kenneth P; Lynch, Charles F; Zhu, Yong; Zheng, Tongzhang

    2005-04-01

    Previous epidemiological studies have inconsistently linked various occupations and industries to pancreatic cancer risk. We analyzed data from a population-based case-control study conducted in Iowa involving 376 histologically confirmed incident pancreatic cancer cases and 2434 control subjects. A significantly increased risk was observed among men who worked in the following industries: chemical and allied products, transportation, and elementary and secondary schools. Increased risks also were observed in men who were employed as truck drivers; railroad brake, signal, and switch operators; purchasing agents and buyers; teachers; insurance agents; and retail supervisors. Among women, a significantly increased risk of pancreatic cancer was found for employment in furniture and home furnishing stores, and a borderline significantly increased risk among textile sewing machine operators and tenders. Working in several occupations and industries was associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer in this study, and these associations warrant further investigation.

  16. Activation of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells in a cAMP-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hejun; Wei, Rui; Wang, Liang; Tian, Qing; Tao, Ming; Ke, Jing; Liu, Ye; Hou, Wenfang; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Jin; Hong, Tianpei

    2014-06-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) promotes pancreatic β-cell regeneration through GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation. However, whether it promotes exocrine pancreas growth and thereby increases the risk of pancreatic cancer has been a topic of debate in recent years. Clinical data and animal studies published so far have been controversial. In the present study, we report that GLP-1R activation with liraglutide inhibited growth and promoted apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cell lines in vitro and attenuated pancreatic tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model in vivo. These effects of liraglutide were mediated through activation of cAMP production and consequent inhibition of Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in a GLP-1R-dependent manner. Moreover, we examined GLP-1R expression in human pancreatic cancer tissues and found that 43.3% of tumor tissues were GLP-1R-null. In the GLP-1R-positive tumor tissues (56.7%), the level of GLP-1R was lower compared with that in tumor-adjacent normal pancreatic tissues. Furthermore, the GLP-1R-positive tumors were significantly smaller than the GLP-1R-null tumors. Our study shows for the first time that GLP-1R activation has a cytoreductive effect on human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which may help address safety concerns of GLP-1-based therapies in the context of human pancreatic cancer.

  17. High-fat, high-calorie diet promotes early pancreatic neoplasia in the conditional KrasG12D mouse model.

    PubMed

    Dawson, David W; Hertzer, Kathleen; Moro, Aune; Donald, Graham; Chang, Hui-Hua; Go, Vay Liang; Pandol, Steven J; Lugea, Aurelia; Gukovskaya, Anna S; Li, Gang; Hines, Oscar J; Rozengurt, Enrique; Eibl, Guido

    2013-10-01

    There is epidemiologic evidence that obesity increases the risk of cancers. Several underlying mechanisms, including inflammation and insulin resistance, are proposed. However, the driving mechanisms in pancreatic cancer are poorly understood. The goal of the present study was to develop a model of diet-induced obesity and pancreatic cancer development in a state-of-the-art mouse model, which resembles important clinical features of human obesity, for example, weight gain and metabolic disturbances. Offspring of Pdx-1-Cre and LSL-KrasG12D mice were allocated to either a high-fat, high-calorie diet (HFCD; ∼4,535 kcal/kg; 40% of calories from fats) or control diet (∼3,725 kcal/kg; 12% of calories from fats) for 3 months. Compared with control animals, mice fed with the HFCD significantly gained more weight and developed hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, hyperleptinemia, and elevated levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). The pancreas of HFCD-fed animals showed robust signs of inflammation with increased numbers of infiltrating inflammatory cells (macrophages and T cells), elevated levels of several cytokines and chemokines, increased stromal fibrosis, and more advanced PanIN lesions. Our results show that a diet high in fats and calories leads to obesity and metabolic disturbances similar to humans and accelerates early pancreatic neoplasia in the conditional KrasG12D mouse model. This model and findings will provide the basis for more robust studies attempting to unravel the mechanisms underlying the cancer-promoting properties of obesity, as well as to evaluate dietary- and chemopreventive strategies targeting obesity-associated pancreatic cancer development.

  18. Controlled clinical trial of selective decontamination for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Luiten, E J; Hop, W C; Lange, J F; Bruining, H A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A randomized, controlled, multicenter trial was undertaken in 102 patients with objective evidence of severe acute pancreatitis to evaluate whether selective decontamination reduces mortality. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Secondary pancreatic infection is the major cause of death in patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Controlled clinical trials to study the effect of selective decontamination in such patients are not available. METHODS: Between April 22, 1990 and April 19, 1993, 102 patients with severe acute pancreatitis were admitted to 16 participating hospitals. Patients were entered into the study if severe acute pancreatitis was indicated, on admission, by multiple laboratory criteria (Imrie score > or = 3) and/or computed tomography criteria (Balthazar grade D or E). Patients were randomly assigned to receive standard treatment (control group) or standard treatment plus selective decontamination (norfloxacin, colistin, amphotericin; selective decontamination group). All patients received full supportive treatment, and surveillance cultures were taken in both groups. RESULTS: Fifty patients were assigned to the selective decontamination group and 52 were assigned to the control group. There were 18 deaths in the control group (35%), compared with 11 deaths (22%) in the selective decontamination group (adjusted for Imrie score and Balthazar grade: p = 0.048). This difference was mainly caused by a reduction of late mortality (> 2 weeks) due to significant reduction of gram-negative pancreatic infection (p = 0.003). The average number of laparotomies per patient was reduced in patients treated with selective decontamination (p < 0.05). Failure of selective decontamination to prevent secondary gram-negative pancreatic infection with subsequent death was seen in only three patients (6%) and transient gram-negative pancreatic infection was seen in one (2%). In both groups of patients, all gram-negative aerobic pancreatic infection was preceded by

  19. Increased Serotonin Signaling Contributes to the Warburg Effect in Pancreatic Tumor Cells Under Metabolic Stress and Promotes Growth of Pancreatic Tumors in Mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu-Heng; Li, Jun; Dong, Fang-Yuan; Yang, Jian-Yu; Liu, De-Jun; Yang, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Ya-Hui; Yang, Min-Wei; Fu, Xue-Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Xin; Li, Qing; Pang, Xiu-Feng; Huo, Yan-Miao; Li, Jiao; Zhang, Jun-Feng; Lee, Ho-Young; Lee, Su-Jae; Qin, Wen-Xin; Gu, Jian-Ren; Sun, Yong-Wei; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2017-07-01

    of 5-HT to be increased in human PDAC tissues compared with non-tumor pancreatic tissues, and PDAC cell lines compared with non-transformed pancreatic cells. Incubation of PDAC cell lines with 5-HT increased proliferation and prevented apoptosis. Agonists of HTR2B, but not other 5-HT receptors, promoted proliferation and prevented apoptosis of PDAC cells. Knockdown of HTR2B in PDAC cells, or incubation of cells with HTR2B inhibitors, reduced their growth as xenograft tumors in mice. We observed a correlation between 5-HT and glycolytic flux in PDAC cells; levels of metabolic enzymes involved in glycolysis, the phosphate pentose pathway, and hexosamine biosynthesis pathway increased significantly in PDAC cells following 5-HT stimulation. 5-HT stimulation led to formation of the HTR2B-LYN-p85 complex, which increased PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling and the Warburg effect by increasing protein levels of MYC and HIF1A. Administration of SB204741 to KPC mice slowed growth and metabolism of established pancreatic tumors and prolonged survival of the mice. Human PDACs have increased levels of 5-HT, and PDAC cells increase expression of its receptor, HTR2B. These increases allow for tumor glycolysis under metabolic stress and promote growth of pancreatic tumors and PDAC xenograft tumors in mice. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. PREX2 promotes the proliferation, invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer cells by modulating the PI3K signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianyi; Gong, Xuejun; Ouyang, Lu; He, Wen; Xiao, Rou; Tan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Rac exchanger factor 2 (PREX2) is a novel regulator of the small guanosine triphosphatase Rac, and has been observed to be implicated in human cancer by inhibiting the activity of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), thus upregulating the activity of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. However, the exact role of PREX2 in pancreatic cancer has not been reported to date. In the present study, the expression levels of PREX2 were observed to be frequently increased in pancreatic cancer specimens compared with those in their matched adjacent normal tissues. In addition, PREX2 expression was also frequently upregulated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines, including AsPC-1, BxPC-3, PANC-1 and CFAPC-1, compared with that in the normal pancreatic epithelial cell line HPC-Y5. Overexpression of PREX2 significantly promoted the proliferation, invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cells, while small interfering RNA-induced knockdown of PREX2 expression significantly inhibited the proliferation, invasion and migration of these cells. Investigation of the molecular mechanism revealed that the overexpression of PREX2 upregulated the phosphorylation levels of PTEN, indicating that the activity of PTEN was reduced, which further increased the phosphorylation levels of AKT, which indicated that the activity of the PI3K signaling pathway was upregulated. By contrast, knockdown of PREX2 upregulated the activity of PTEN and inhibited the activity of the PI3K signaling pathway. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that PREX2 regulates the proliferation, invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer cells, probably at least via modulation of the activity of PTEN and the PI3K signaling pathway. PMID:27446408

  1. Tumor Cell-derived MMP-3 Orchestrates Rac1b and Tissue Alterations that Promote Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mehner, Christine; Miller, Erin; Khauv, Davitte; Nassar, Aziza; Oberg, Ann L.; Bamlet, William R.; Zhang, Lizhi; Waldmann, Jens; Radisky, Evette S.; Crawford, Howard C.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) arises at the convergence of genetic alterations in KRAS with a fostering microenvironment shaped by immune cell influx and fibrotic changes; identification of the earliest tumorigenic molecular mediators evokes the proverbial chicken and egg problem. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are key drivers of tumor progression that originate primarily from stromal cells activated by the developing tumor. Here matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3), known to be expressed in PDA, was found to be associated with expression of Rac1b, a tumorigenic splice isoform of Rac1, in all stages of pancreatic cancer. Using a large cohort of human PDA tissue biopsies specimens, both MMP3 and Rac1b are expressed in PDA cells, that the expression levels of the two markers are highly correlated, and that the subcellular distribution of Rac1b in PDA is significantly associated with patient outcome. Using transgenic mouse models, co-expression of MMP3 with activated KRAS in pancreatic acinar cells stimulates metaplasia and immune cell infiltration, priming the stromal microenvironment for early tumor development. Finally, exposure of cultured pancreatic cancer cells to recombinant MMP3 stimulates expression of Rac1b, increases cellular invasiveness, and activation of tumorigenic transcriptional profiles. Implications MMP3 acts as a co-conspirator of oncogenic KRAS in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis and progression, both through Rac1b-mediated phenotypic control of pancreatic cancer cells themselves, and by giving rise to the tumorigenic microenvironment; these findings also point to inhibition of this pathway as a potential therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:24850902

  2. Pancreatic cancer control: is vitamin D the answer?

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Sarah; Naseem, Imrana

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by late detection, resistance to therapy, poor prognosis, and an exceptionally high mortality rate. Epidemiology ascribes a chemopreventive role to vitamin D in several cancers including pancreatic cancer. Vitamin D therapy has been ascribed a role previously in tumor inhibition and differentiation in addition to reduction of inflammation and angiogenesis. However, the role of vitamin D in pancreatic cancer prevention or therapy remains elusive to date. Studies have shown a negative correlation between the risk of pancreatic cancer and serum vitamin D levels. It is believed that vitamin D binding to certain conserved sequences called vitamin D response elements in the DNA can alter the expression of genes involved in tumorigenesis. Recent research has elucidated the role of zinc in carcinogenesis, which in turn is found to be affected by vitamin D supplementation. In the light of numerous new-found roles for vitamin D, we review and evaluate the potential actions of the sunshine vitamin with respect to pancreatic cancer prevention and therapy.

  3. Human pancreatic stellate cells modulate 3D collagen alignment to promote the migration of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Drifka, Cole R; Loeffler, Agnes G; Esquibel, Corinne R; Weber, Sharon M; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Kao, W John

    2016-12-01

    A hallmark of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the ability for cancer cells to aggressively infiltrate and navigate through a dense stroma during the metastatic process. Key features of the PDAC stroma include an abundant population of activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and highly aligned collagen fibers; however, important questions remain regarding how collagen becomes aligned and what the biological manifestations are. To better understand how PSCs, aligned collagen, and PDAC cells might cooperate during the transition to invasion, we utilized a microchannel-based in vitro tumor model and advanced imaging technologies to recreate and examine in vivo-like heterotypic interactions. We found that PSCs participate in a collaborative process with cancer cells by orchestrating the alignment of collagen fibers that, in turn, are permissive to enhanced cell migration. Additionally, direct contact between PSCs, collagen, and PDAC cells is critical to invasion and co-migration of both cell types. This suggests PSCs may accompany and assist in navigating PDAC cells through the stromal terrain. Together, our data provides a new role for PSCs in stimulating the metastatic process and underscores the importance of collagen alignment in cancer progression.

  4. Poorly controlled type 2 diabetes complicated by an episode of severe hypertriglyceridaemia-induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Denecker, Nathalie; Decochez, Katelijn

    2013-04-29

    A 23-year-old woman with a history of type 2 diabetes and non-compliance presented to the emergency department with abdominal epigastric pain and nausea. Laboratory examination revealed a mild ketoacidosis while an abdominal CT scan performed the following day demonstrated a severe acute pancreatitis of the body and tail (Balthazar grade E) despite normal amylase serum levels on admission. The presence of a lactescent serum was the clue to an extremely high triglyceride level (>10 000 mg/dl) causing the pancreatitis. The hypertriglyceridaemia itself was attributed mainly to the diabetic ketoacidosis. There was no family history of hypertriglyceridaemia. The triad consisting of diabetic ketoacidosis, hypertriglyceridaemia and acute pancreatitis is an unusual presentation of poorly controlled diabetes which can occur in type 1 as well as type 2 diabetic adults and children. Treatment with intravenous insulin and hydration successfully resolved the ketoacidosis and hypertriglyceridaemia and reversed the episode of acute pancreatitis.

  5. Poorly controlled type 2 diabetes complicated by an episode of severe hypertriglyceridaemia-induced pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Denecker, Nathalie; Decochez, Katelijn

    2013-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman with a history of type 2 diabetes and non-compliance presented to the emergency department with abdominal epigastric pain and nausea. Laboratory examination revealed a mild ketoacidosis while an abdominal CT scan performed the following day demonstrated a severe acute pancreatitis of the body and tail (Balthazar grade E) despite normal amylase serum levels on admission. The presence of a lactescent serum was the clue to an extremely high triglyceride level (>10 000 mg/dl) causing the pancreatitis. The hypertriglyceridaemia itself was attributed mainly to the diabetic ketoacidosis. There was no family history of hypertriglyceridaemia. The triad consisting of diabetic ketoacidosis, hypertriglyceridaemia and acute pancreatitis is an unusual presentation of poorly controlled diabetes which can occur in type 1 as well as type 2 diabetic adults and children. Treatment with intravenous insulin and hydration successfully resolved the ketoacidosis and hypertriglyceridaemia and reversed the episode of acute pancreatitis. PMID:23632173

  6. Pleiotrophin and N-syndecan promote perineural invasion and tumor progression in an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun; Zhang, Lu-Lin; Huang, Xu-Mei; Li, Wen-Yao; Gao, She-Gan

    2017-06-07

    To detect the expression of pleiotrophin (PTN) and N-syndecan in pancreatic cancer and analyze their association with tumor progression and perineural invasion (PNI). An orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer was created by injecting tumor cells subcapsularly in a root region of the pancreas beneath the spleen. Pancreatic cancer tissues were taken from 36 mice that survived for more than 90 d. PTN and N-syndecan proteins were detected by immunohistochemistry and analyzed for their correlation with pathological features, PNI, and prognosis. The expression rates of PTN and N-syndecan proteins were 66.7% and 61.1%, respectively, in cancer tissue. PTN and N-syndecan expression was associated with PNI (P = 0.019 and P = 0.032, respectively). High PTN expression was closely associated with large bloody ascites (P = 0.009), liver metastasis (P = 0.035), and decreased survival time (P = 0.022). N-syndecan expression was significantly associated with tumor size (P = 0.025), but not with survival time (P = 0.539). High PTN and N-syndecan expression was closely associated with metastasis and poor prognosis, suggesting that they may promote tumor progression and PNI in the orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

  7. Modulation of PKM alternative splicing by PTBP1 promotes gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Calabretta, Sara; Bielli, Pamela; Passacantilli, Ilaria; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Fendrich, Volker; Capurso, Gabriele; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Sette, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive and incurable disease. Poor prognosis is due to multiple reasons, including acquisition of resistance to gemcitabine, the first line chemotherapeutic approach. Thus, there is a strong need for novel therapies, targeting more directly the molecular aberrations of this disease. We found that chronic exposure of PDAC cells to gemcitabine selected a subpopulation of cells that are drug-resistant (DR-PDAC cells). Importantly, alternative splicing of the pyruvate kinase gene (PKM) was differentially modulated in DR-PDAC cells, resulting in promotion of the cancer-related PKM2 isoform, whose high expression also correlated with shorter recurrence free survival in PDAC patients. Switching PKM splicing by antisense oligonucleotides to favour the alternative PKM1 variant rescued sensitivity of DR-PDAC cells to gemcitabine and cisplatin, suggesting that PKM2 expression is required to withstand drug-induced genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, up-regulation of the polypyrimidine-tract binding protein (PTBP1), a key modulator of PKM splicing, correlated with PKM2 expression in DR-PDAC cell lines. PTBP1 was recruited more efficiently to PKM pre-mRNA in DR- than in parental PDAC cells. Accordingly, knockdown of PTBP1 in DR-PDAC cells reduced its recruitment to the PKM pre-mRNA, promoted splicing of the PKM1 variant and abolished drug resistance. Thus, chronic exposure to gemcitabine leads to up-regulation of PTBP1 and modulation of PKM alternative splicing in PDAC cells, conferring resistance to the drug. These findings point to PKM2 and PTBP1 as new potential therapeutic targets to improve response of PDAC to chemotherapy. PMID:26234680

  8. Nicotine/Cigarette-smoke Promotes Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer Through α7nAChR-mediated MUC4 Up-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Momi, Navneet; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P.; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Kunigal, Sateesh S; Chellappan, Srikumar; Ouellette, Michel M; Batra, Surinder K

    2012-01-01

    Despite evidence that long-term smoking is the leading risk factor for pancreatic malignancies, the underlying mechanism(s) for cigarette-smoke (CS)-induced pancreatic cancer (PC) pathogenesis has not been well-established. Our previous studies revealed an aberrant expression of the MUC4 mucin in PC as compared to the normal pancreas and its association with cancer progression and metastasis. Interestingly, here we explore a potential link between MUC4 expression and smoking-mediated PC pathogenesis and report that both cigarette-smoke-extract (CSE) and nicotine, which is the major component of CS, significantly up-regulates MUC4 in PC cells. This nicotine-mediated MUC4 overexpression was via α7 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) stimulation and subsequent activation of the JAK2/STAT3 downstream signaling cascade in cooperation with the MEK/ERK1/2 pathway; this effect was blocked by the α7nAChR antagonists, α-bungarotoxin and mecamylamine, and by specific siRNA-mediated STAT3 inhibition. Additionally, we demonstrated that nicotine-mediated MUC4 up-regulation promotes the PC cell migration through the activation of the downstream effectors such as HER2, c-Src and FAK; this effect was attenuated by shRNA-mediated MUC4 abrogation, further implying that these nicotine-mediated pathological effects on PC cells are MUC4 dependent. Furthermore, the in-vivo studies demonstrated a dramatic increase in the mean pancreatic tumor weight [low-dose (100 mg/m3 TSP), p=0.014; high-dose (247 mg/m3 TSP), p=0.02] and significant tumor metastasis to various distant organs in the CS-exposed-mice, orthotopically implanted with luciferase-transfected PC cells, as compared to the sham-controls. Moreover, the CS-exposed mice had elevated levels of serum cotinine [low-dose, 155.88±35.96 ng/ml; high-dose, 216.25±29.95 ng/ml] and increased MUC4, α7nAChR and pSTAT3 expression in the pancreatic tumor tissues. Altogether, our findings revealed for the first time that CS up

  9. Downregulation of the CCK-B receptor in pancreatic cancer cells blocks proliferation and promotes apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Fino, Kristin K.; Matters, Gail L.; McGovern, Christopher O.; Gilius, Evan L.

    2012-01-01

    Gastrin stimulates the growth of pancreatic cancer cells through the activation of the cholecystokinin-B receptor (CCK-BR), which has been found to be overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. In this study, we proposed that the CCK-BR drives growth of pancreatic cancer; hence, interruption of CCK-BR activity could potentially be an ideal target for cancer therapeutics. The effect of CCK-BR downregulation in the human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells was examined by utilizing specific CCK-BR-targeted RNA interference reagents. The CCK-BR receptor expression was both transiently and stably downregulated by transfection with selective CCK-BR small-interfering RNA or short-hairpin RNA, respectively, and the effects on cell growth and apoptosis were assessed. CCK-BR downregulation resulted in reduced cancer cell proliferation, decreased DNA synthesis, and cell cycle arrest as demonstrated by an inhibition of G1 to S phase progression. Furthermore, CCK-BR downregulation increased caspase-3 activity, TUNEL-positive cells, and decreased X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein expression, suggesting apoptotic activity. Pancreatic cancer cell mobility was decreased when the CCK-BR was downregulated, as assessed by a migration assay. These results show the importance of the CCK-BR in regulation of growth and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer. Strategies to decrease the CCK-BR expression and activity may be beneficial for the development of new methods to improve the treatment for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:22442157

  10. Loss of acinar cell IKKα triggers spontaneous pancreatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Wu, Xuefeng; Holzer, Ryan G.; Lee, Jun-Hee; Todoric, Jelena; Park, Eek-Joong; Ogata, Hisanobu; Gukovskaya, Anna S.; Gukovsky, Ilya; Pizzo, Donald P.; VandenBerg, Scott; Tarin, David; Atay, Çiǧdem; Arkan, Melek C.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Moscat, Jorge; Diaz-Meco, Maria; Dawson, David; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Karin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease that causes progressive destruction of pancreatic acinar cells and, ultimately, loss of pancreatic function. We investigated the role of IκB kinase α (IKKα) in pancreatic homeostasis. Pancreas-specific ablation of IKKα (IkkαΔpan) caused spontaneous and progressive acinar cell vacuolization and death, interstitial fibrosis, inflammation, and circulatory release of pancreatic enzymes, clinical signs resembling those of human chronic pancreatitis. Loss of pancreatic IKKα causes defective autophagic protein degradation, leading to accumulation of p62-mediated protein aggregates and enhanced oxidative and ER stress in acinar cells, but none of these effects is related to NF-κB. Pancreas-specific p62 ablation prevented ER and oxidative stresses and attenuated pancreatitis in IkkαΔpan mice, suggesting that cellular stress induced by p62 aggregates promotes development of pancreatitis. Importantly, downregulation of IKKα and accumulation of p62 aggregates were also observed in chronic human pancreatitis. Our studies demonstrate that IKKα, which may control autophagic protein degradation through its interaction with ATG16L2, plays a critical role in maintaining pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis, whose dysregulation promotes pancreatitis through p62 aggregate accumulation. PMID:23563314

  11. Inhibitory effect of green tea extract on the process of pancreatic carcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosobis-(2-oxypropyl)amine (BOP) and on tumor promotion after transplantation of N-nitrosobis-(2-hydroxypropyl)amine (BHP)-induced pancreatic cancer in Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Hiura, A; Tsutsumi, M; Satake, K

    1997-10-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown a lower risk of gastrointestinal cancer in green tea drinkers. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of green tea extract (GTE) on the process of pancreatic carcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosobis-(2-oxypropyl)amine (BOP) and on tumor promotion after transplantation of N-nitrosobis-(2-hydroxypropyl)amine (BHP)-induced pancreatic cancer were investigated in hamsters. In the first experiment, shortly after the initiation of pancreatic carcinogenesis by BOP, the animals in the GTE group were given GTE (0.5 mg/L) in their drinking water and the control group was given tap water. All animals were sacrificed 24 weeks later. There were no significant differences in body weight, water intake, or food consumption between the two groups during the experiments. GTE consumption was approximately 1.25 mg/day/100 g body weight during this experiment. Seven of the 13 hamsters (54%) in the control group were found to have pancreatic tumors, versus six of the 18 hamsters (33%) in the GTE group. The average number of tumors in the control group was 1.0/hamster, compared with 0.5/hamster in the GTE group. The overall incidence of macroscopic pancreatic tumors in the GTE group was about half that in the control group. The incidence of pancreatic cancer was 54% (12/13) in the control group and 44% (8/18) in the GTE group. The number of pancreatic cancers, including invasive carcinoma and carcinoma in situ, in the GTE group was 0.88/hamster, significantly lower than in the control group (1.68/hamster) (p < 0.05). The incidence of atypical ductal hyperplasia, which is thought to be an early pancreatic cancer, was also significantly lower in the GTE group than in the control group (1.50/hamster vs. 4.65/hamster) (p < 0.05). In the second experiment, 1-mm3 pieces of BHP-induced pancreatic cancer were transplanted into the back of hamsters. The control group (N = 16) was maintained on the basal diet and tap water throughout the experiment, and the GTE

  12. FAM83A is amplified and promotes cancer stem cell-like traits and chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Huang, J; Liu, Z; Liang, Q; Zhang, N; Jin, Y

    2017-03-13

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells (TICs), contribute to tumorigenesis, resistance to chemoradiotherapy and recurrence in human cancers, suggesting targeting CSCs may represent a potential therapeutic strategy. In the current study, we found family with sequence similarity 83, member A (FAM83A) is significantly overexpressed and associated with poorer overall survival and disease-free survival in pancreatic cancer. Overexpression of FAM83A markedly promoted, whereas inhibition of FAM83A decreased, CSC-like traits and chemoresistance both in vitro and in an in vivo mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, overexpression of FAM83A activated the well-characterized CSC-associated pathways transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Importantly, the FAM83A locus was amplified in a number of human cancers and silencing FAM83A in associated cancer cell lines inhibited activation of the WNT/β-catenin and TGF-β signaling pathways and reduced tumorigenicity. Taken together, these results indicate that FAM83A has a vital oncogenic role to promote pancreatic cancer progression and may represent a potential clinical target.

  13. Germline Brca2 heterozygosity promotes Kras(G12D) -driven carcinogenesis in a murine model of familial pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Skoulidis, Ferdinandos; Cassidy, Liam D; Pisupati, Venkat; Jonasson, Jon G; Bjarnason, Hordur; Eyfjord, Jorunn E; Karreth, Florian A; Lim, Michael; Barber, Lorraine M; Clatworthy, Susan A; Davies, Susan E; Olive, Kenneth P; Tuveson, David A; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2010-11-16

    Inherited heterozygous BRCA2 mutations predispose carriers to tissue-specific cancers, but somatic deletion of the wild-type allele is considered essential for carcinogenesis. We find in a murine model of familial pancreatic cancer that germline heterozygosity for a pathogenic Brca2 truncation suffices to promote pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) driven by Kras(G12D), irrespective of Trp53 status. Unexpectedly, tumor cells retain a functional Brca2 allele. Correspondingly, three out of four PDACs from patients inheriting BRCA2(999del5) did not exhibit loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH). Three tumors from these patients displaying LOH were acinar carcinomas, which also developed only in mice with biallelic Brca2 inactivation. We suggest a revised model for tumor suppression by BRCA2 with implications for the therapeutic strategy targeting BRCA2 mutant cancer cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. microRNA-218 promotes gemcitabine sensitivity in human pancreatic cancer cells by regulating HMGB1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ruixia; Long, Jin; Guo, Kejian; Ge, Chunlin; Bi, Shulong

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of gemcitabine (GEM) on microRNA-218 (miR-218) expression in human pancreatic cancer cells. Methods Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was performed to examine the differences in miR-218 expression between the GEM-sensitive BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells and GEM-resistant PANC-1 cells. The effect of GEM on the expression of miR-218 in PANC-1 cells was also investigated. PANC-1 cells were transfected either with HMGB1 siRNA to knock down the expression of HMGB1 or with the recombinant HMGB1 expression vector (pcDNA3.1-HMGB1) to overexpress HMGB1. The effect of ectopic expression of HMGB1 on the apoptosis of miR-218-transfected and GEM-treated PANC-1 cells was examined by flow cytometric analysis. Results The miR-218 expression level was lower in GEM-resistant PANC-1 cells compared to GEM-sensitive BxPC-3 cells (P<0.05). The percentage of apoptotic PANC-1 cells was significantly increased in the miR-218 mimic + GEM group compared to the mimic ctrl + GEM group and the normal control group (P<0.01). The HMGB1 expression level was markedly decreased in PANC-1 cells transfected with HMGB1 siRNA but was significantly increased in PANC-1 cells transfected with the recombinant HMGB1 expression vector, pcDNA3.1-HMGB1 (P<0.01). The proportion of apoptotic PANC-1 cells was significantly lower in the miR-218 mimic + GEM + pcDNA3.1-HMGB1 group compared to the miR-218 mimic + GEM + HMGB1 siRNA group (P<0.01). Conclusions The expression level of miR-218 was downregulated in the GEM-resistant cell line. miR-218 promoted the sensitivity of PANC-1 cells to GEM, which was achieved mainly through regulating the expression of HMGB1 in PANC-1 cells. PMID:26157323

  15. MYB Promotes Desmoplasia in Pancreatic Cancer through Direct Transcriptional Up-regulation and Cooperative Action of Sonic Hedgehog and Adrenomedullin.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Arun; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Singh, Seema; Tyagi, Nikhil; Arora, Sumit; Carter, James E; Khushman, Moh'd; Singh, Ajay P

    2016-07-29

    Extensive desmoplasia is a prominent pathological characteristic of pancreatic cancer (PC) that not only impacts tumor development, but therapeutic outcome as well. Recently, we demonstrated a novel role of MYB, an oncogenic transcription factor, in PC growth and metastasis. Here we studied its effect on pancreatic tumor histopathology and associated molecular and biological mechanisms. Tumor-xenografts derived from orthotopic-inoculation of MYB-overexpressing PC cells exhibited far-greater desmoplasia in histological analyses compared with those derived from MYB-silenced PC cells. These findings were further confirmed by immunostaining of tumor-xenograft sections with collagen-I, fibronectin (major extracellular-matrix proteins), and α-SMA (well-characterized marker of myofibroblasts or activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs)). Likewise, MYB-overexpressing PC cells provided significantly greater growth benefit to PSCs in a co-culture system as compared with the MYB-silenced cells. Interrogation of deep-sequencing data from MYB-overexpressing versus -silenced PC cells identified Sonic-hedgehog (SHH) and Adrenomedullin (ADM) as two differentially-expressed genes among others, which encode for secretory ligands involved in tumor-stromal cross-talk. In-silico analyses predicted putative MYB-binding sites in SHH and ADM promoters, which was later confirmed by chromatin-immunoprecipitation. A cooperative role of SHH and ADM in growth promotion of PSCs was confirmed in co-culture by using their specific-inhibitors and exogenous recombinant-proteins. Importantly, while SHH acted exclusively in a paracrine fashion on PSCs and influenced the growth of PC cells only indirectly, ADM could directly impact the growth of both PC cells and PSCs. In summary, we identified MYB as novel regulator of pancreatic tumor desmoplasia, which is suggestive of its diverse roles in PC pathobiology.

  16. Mast Cell Tryptase Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Growth through Promoting Angiogenesis via Activation of Angiopoietin-1.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiangjie; Zhai, Liqin; Xue, Ruobing; Shi, Jieru; Zeng, Qiang; Gao, Cairong

    2016-05-27

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. During the development and progression of cancer, tumor angiogenesis plays a crucial role. A great deal of evidence has revealed that human mast cells (MCs) contributed to tumor angiogenesis through releasing several pro-angiogenetic factors, among which tryptase is one of the most active. However, the role of mast cell tryptase (MCT) in human pancreatic cancer angiogenesis is still not well documented. In this study, we examined the MCT levels in serum from pancreatic cancer patients and evaluated the correlationship of the MCT level and tumor angiogenesis. In addition, the effect of MCT on endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation was investigated both in vitro and in nude mice bearing pancreatic tumor. It was found that MCT contributes to endothelial cell growth and tube formation via up-regulation of angiopoietin-1 expression. Moreover, using the MCT inhibitor nafamostat, tryptase-induced angiogenesis was obviously suppressed both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings suggest that MCT plays an important role in pancreatic cancer angiogenesis and tumor growth via activating the angiopoietin-1 pathway, and tryptase inhibitors may be evaluated as an effective anti-angiogenetic approach in pancreatic cancer therapy.

  17. KPNA7, a nuclear transport receptor, promotes malignant properties of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Laurila, Eeva; Vuorinen, Elisa; Savinainen, Kimmo; Rauhala, Hanna; Kallioniemi, Anne

    2014-03-10

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy and one of the leading causes of cancer deaths. The high mortality rate is mostly due to the lack of appropriate tools for early detection of the disease and a shortage of effective therapies. We have previously shown that karyopherin alpha 7 (KPNA7), the newest member of the alpha karyopherin family of nuclear import receptors, is frequently amplified and overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Here, we report that KPNA7 expression is absent in practically all normal human adult tissues but elevated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. Inhibition of KPNA7 expression in AsPC-1 and Hs700T pancreatic cancer cells led to a reduction in cell growth and decreased anchorage independent growth, as well as increased autophagy. The cell growth effects were accompanied by an induction of the cell cycle regulator p21 and a G1 arrest of the cell cycle. Interestingly, the p21 induction was caused by increased mRNA synthesis and not defective nuclear transport. These data strongly demonstrate that KPNA7 silencing inhibits the malignant properties of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and thereby provide the first evidence on the functional role for KPNA7 in human cancer. - Highlights: • KPNA7 expression is elevated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines. • KPNA7 silencing in high expressing cancer cells leads to growth inhibition. • The cell growth reduction is associated with p21 induction and G1 arrest. • KPNA7 silencing is also accompanied with increased autophagy.

  18. Twist promotes invasion and cisplatin resistance in pancreatic cancer cells through growth differentiation factor 15.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Lu, Hong-Wei; Li, Yi-Ming; Lu, Le; Wang, Jin-Long; Zhang, Ya-Fei; Shang, Hao

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is an aggressive and devastating disease with a poor prognosis. Cisplatin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent for solid tumors, is effective as a single agent or in combination with other drugs for the treatment of PC. Previous studies have suggested that Twist and growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) are involved in the progression of PC. However, the role of Twist and GDF15 in PC remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the individual effect of and interaction between Twist and GDF15 in PC cell invasion and chemoresistance to cisplatin was examined. Twist and/or GDF15 were stably overexpressed or knocked down in ASPC‑1 and BXPC‑3 human PC cells. Overexpression of Twist in the two cell lines markedly increased GDF15 expression, cell invasion, matrix metalloproteinase‑2 expression/activity and the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of cisplatin, which was eradicated by GDF15 knockdown or the selective p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor SB203580 (10 µM). By contrast, Twist knockdown significantly decreased GDF15 expression, cell invasion, matrix metalloproteinase‑2 expression/activity and the IC50 values of cisplatin, which was completely reversed by overexpression of GDF15. In addition, while overexpression and knockdown of Twist increased and decreased p38 MAPK activity, respectively, GDF15 demonstrated no significant effect on p38 MAPK activity in PC cells. In conclusion, the present study, for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, demonstrated that Twist promotes PC cell invasion and cisplatin chemoresistance through inducing GDF15 expression via a p38 MAPK‑dependent mechanism. The present study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying PC progression and chemoresistance.

  19. miR-367 promotes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and invasion of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells by targeting the Smad7-TGF-β signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Z; Xu, Y; Zhao, J; Liu, Q; Feng, W; Fan, J; Wang, P

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aberrant Smad7 expression contributes to the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells. However, the potential mechanism underlying aberrant Smad7 expression in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains largely unknown. Methods: Bioinformatic prediction programmes and luciferase reporter assay were used to identify microRNAs regulating Smad7. The association between miR-367 expression and the overall survival of PDAC patients was evaluated by Kaplan–Meier analysis. The effects of miR-367 and Smad7 on the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Results: We found that miR-367 downregulated Smad7 expression by directly targeting its 3′-UTR in human pancreatic cancer cells. High level of miR-367 expression correlated with poor prognosis of PDAC patients. Functional studies showed that miR-367 promoted pancreatic cancer invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo through downregulating Smad7. In addition, we showed that miR-367 promoted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition by increasing transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-induced transcriptional activity. Conclusions: The present study identified and characterised a signalling pathway, the miR-367/Smad7-TGF-β pathway, which is involved in the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells. Our results suggest that miR-367 may be a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of human pancreatic cancer. PMID:25867271

  20. Nerve growth factor regulates CD133 function to promote tumor cell migration and invasion via activating ERK1/2 signaling in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Xin, Beibei; He, Xiaodan; Wang, Juan; Cai, Jun; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Ti; Shen, Xiaohong

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is extremely high frequency among the various metastatic routes in pancreatic cancer. Nerve growth factor, secreted by astroglial cells, exerts effects on tumor invasion in some cancer cells, but its function on migration and invasion in pancreatic cancer is still unclear. In the present study, we determined the effects of NGF on modulating tumor cell metastatic potential and invasion activity and explored its mechanisms in pancreatic cancer. NGF and CD133 expression were detected in tumor tissues using immunohistochemical analysis and Western blotting analysis. The effects of NGF on the regulation of CD133 expression and the promotion of cancer migration and invasion were investigated using wound healing and matrigel transwell assay. A related mechanism that NGF regulates CD133's function via activating ERK1/2 signaling also was observed. NGF/CD133 is overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer and promotes the migration and invasion of human pancreatic cancer cells through the activation of the ERK/CD133 signaling cascade. NGF/ERK signaling modulates the cancer cell EMT process, migration and invasion through the regulation of CD133 expression and its subcellular localization. NGF/CD133 signaling initiated the migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. NGF/CD133 might be an effective and potent therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer metastasis, particularly in PNI. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 12-Lipoxygenase Promotes Obesity-Induced Oxidative Stress in Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Bernhard; Nishiki, Yurika; Maganti, Aarthi V.; Nadler, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    High-fat diets lead to obesity, inflammation, and dysglycemia. 12-Lipoxygenase (12-LO) is activated by high-fat diets and catalyzes the oxygenation of cellular arachidonic acid to form proinflammatory intermediates. We hypothesized that 12-LO in the pancreatic islet is sufficient to cause dysglycemia in the setting of high-fat feeding. To test this, we generated pancreas-specific 12-LO knockout mice and studied their metabolic and molecular adaptations to high-fat diets. Whereas knockout mice and control littermates displayed identical weight gain, body fat distribution, and macrophage infiltration into fat, knockout mice exhibited greater adaptive islet hyperplasia, improved insulin secretion, and complete protection from dysglycemia. At the molecular level, 12-LO deletion resulted in increases in islet antioxidant enzymes Sod1 and Gpx1 in response to high-fat feeding. The absence or inhibition of 12-LO led to increases in nuclear Nrf2, a transcription factor responsible for activation of genes encoding antioxidant enzymes. Our data reveal a novel pathway in which islet 12-LO suppresses antioxidant enzymes and prevents the adaptive islet responses in the setting of high-fat diets. PMID:25071151

  2. Urinary Prostaglandin E2 Metabolite and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: Case-Control Study in Urban Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Jing; Du, Jinfeng; Xu, Hongli; Zhang, Wei; Ni, Quan-Xing; Yu, Herbert; Risch, Harvey A.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gao, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has been increasing in importance in Shanghai over the last four decades. The etiology of the disease is still unclear. Evidence suggests that the COX-2 pathway, an important component of inflammation, may be involved in the disease. We aimed to evaluate the association between urinary prostaglandin E2 metabolite (PGE-M) level and risk of pancreatic cancer. From a recent population-based case-control study in Shanghai, 200 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases and 200 gender- and age- frequency matched controls were selected for the present analysis. Urinary PGE-M was measured with a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric assay. Adjusted unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A positive association was observed between PGE-M leve and pancreatic cancer risk: OR = 1.63 (95% CI 1.01–2.63) for the third tertile compared to the first. Though the interactions were not statistically significant, the associations tended to be stronger among subjects with diabetes history (OR = 3.32; 95% CI 1.20–9.19) and higher meat intake (OR = 2.12; 95% CI 1.10–4.06). The result suggests that higher urinary PGE-M level may be associated with increased risk of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:25679523

  3. Overexpression of GalNAc-transferase GalNAc-T3 Promotes Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Taniuchi, Keisuke; Cerny, Ronald L.; Tanouchi, Aki; Kohno, Kimitoshi; Kotani, Norihiro; Honke, Koichi; Saibara, Toshiji; Hollingsworth, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    O-linked glycans of secreted and membrane bound proteins play an important role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer by modulating immune responses, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. A critical aspect of O-glycosylation, the position at which proteins are glycosylated with N-acetyl-galactosamine on serine and threonine residues, is regulated by the substrate specificity of UDP-GalNAc: polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyl-transferases (GalNAc-Ts). Thus, GalNAc-Ts regulate the first committed step in O-glycosylated protein biosynthesis, determine sites of O-glycosylation on proteins, and are important for understanding normal and carcinoma-associated O-glycosylation. We have found that one of these enzymes, GalNAc-T3, is overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer tissues, and suppression of GalNAc-T3 significantly attenuates growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, suppression of GalNAc-T3 induces apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. Our results indicate that GalNAc-T3 is likely to be involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Modification of cellular glycosylation occurs in nearly all types of cancer as a result of alterations in the expression levels of glycosyltransferases. We report guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha transducing activity polypeptide 1 (GNAT1) as a possible substrate protein of GalNAc-T3. GalNAc-T3 is associated with O-glycosylation of GNAT1, and affects the subcellular distribution of GNAT1. Knocking down endogenous GNAT1 significantly suppresses the growth/survival of PDAC cells. Our results imply that GalNAc-T3 contributes to the function of O-glycosylated proteins and thereby affects the growth and survival of pancreatic cancer cells. Thus, substrate proteins of GalNAc-T3 should serve as important therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancers. PMID:21625220

  4. Overexpression of GalNAc-transferase GalNAc-T3 promotes pancreatic cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Taniuchi, K; Cerny, R L; Tanouchi, A; Kohno, K; Kotani, N; Honke, K; Saibara, T; Hollingsworth, M A

    2011-12-08

    O-linked glycans of secreted and membrane-bound proteins have an important role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer by modulating immune responses, inflammation and tumorigenesis. A critical aspect of O-glycosylation, the position at which proteins are glycosylated with N-acetyl-galactosamine on serine and threonine residues, is regulated by the substrate specificity of UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyl-transferases (GalNAc-Ts). Thus, GalNAc-Ts regulate the first committed step in O-glycosylated protein biosynthesis, determine sites of O-glycosylation on proteins and are important for understanding normal and carcinoma-associated O-glycosylation. We have found that one of these enzymes, GalNAc-T3, is overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer tissues and suppression of GalNAc-T3 significantly attenuates the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, suppression of GalNAc-T3 induces apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells. Our results indicate that GalNAc-T3 is likely involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Modification of cellular glycosylation occurs in nearly all types of cancer as a result of alterations in the expression levels of glycosyltransferases. We report guanine the nucleotide-binding protein, α-transducing activity polypeptide-1 (GNAT1) as a possible substrate protein of GalNAc-T3. GalNAc-T3 is associated with O-glycosylation of GNAT1 and affects the subcellular distribution of GNAT1. Knocking down endogenous GNAT1 significantly suppresses the growth/survival of PDAC cells. Our results imply that GalNAc-T3 contributes to the function of O-glycosylated proteins and thereby affects the growth and survival of pancreatic cancer cells. Thus, substrate proteins of GalNAc-T3 should serve as important therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancers.

  5. Up-regulation of glycolysis promotes the stemness and EMT phenotypes in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hengqiang; Duan, Qingke; Zhang, Zhengle; Li, Hehe; Wu, Heshui; Shen, Qiang; Wang, Chunyou; Yin, Tao

    2017-02-28

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-type cells are considered as underlying causes of chemoresistance, tumour recurrence and metastasis in pancreatic cancer. We aimed to describe the mechanisms - particularly glycolysis - involved in the regulation of the CSC and EMT phenotypes. We used a gemcitabine-resistant (GR) Patu8988 cell line, which exhibited clear CSC and EMT phenotypes and showed reliance on glycolysis. Inhibition of glycolysis using 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of gemcitabine and inhibited the CSC and EMT phenotypes in GR cells both in vitro and in vivo. Intriguingly, the use of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) restored the CSC and EMT phenotypes. H2 O2 produced changes similar to those of 2-DG, indicating that ROS were involved in the acquired cancer stemness and EMT phenotypes of GR cells. Moreover, doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1), a pancreatic CSC marker, was highly expressed and regulated the stemness and EMT phenotypes in GR cell. Both 2-DG and H2 O2 treatment suppressed DCLK1 expression, which was also rescued by NAC. Together, these findings revealed that glycolysis promotes the expression of DCLK1 and maintains the CSC and EMT phenotypes via maintenance of low ROS levels in chemoresistant GR cells. The glycolysis-ROS-DCLK1 pathway may be potential targets for reversing the malignant behaviour of pancreatic cancer.

  6. The EMT-activator Zeb1 is a key factor for cell plasticity and promotes metastasis in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Angela M; Mitschke, Julia; Lasierra Losada, María; Schmalhofer, Otto; Boerries, Melanie; Busch, Hauke; Boettcher, Martin; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Reichardt, Wilfried; Bronsert, Peter; Brunton, Valerie G; Pilarsky, Christian; Winkler, Thomas H; Brabletz, Simone; Stemmler, Marc P; Brabletz, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Metastasis is the major cause of cancer-associated death. Partial activation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition program (partial EMT) was considered a major driver of tumour progression from initiation to metastasis. However, the role of EMT in promoting metastasis has recently been challenged, in particular concerning effects of the Snail and Twist EMT transcription factors (EMT-TFs) in pancreatic cancer. In contrast, we show here that in the same pancreatic cancer model, driven by Pdx1-cre-mediated activation of mutant Kras and p53 (KPC model), the EMT-TF Zeb1 is a key factor for the formation of precursor lesions, invasion and notably metastasis. Depletion of Zeb1 suppresses stemness, colonization capacity and in particular phenotypic/metabolic plasticity of tumour cells, probably causing the observed in vivo effects. Accordingly, we conclude that different EMT-TFs have complementary subfunctions in driving pancreatic tumour metastasis. Therapeutic strategies should consider these potential specificities of EMT-TFs to target these factors simultaneously.

  7. Sp1-driven up-regulation of miR-19a decreases RHOB and promotes pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yonggang; Yin, Hongzhuan; Zhang, Heying; Fang, Jun; Zheng, Wei; Li, Dan; Li, Yue; Cao, Wei; Sun, Cheng; Liang, Yusi; Zeng, Juan; Zou, Huawei; Fu, Weineng; Yang, Xianghong

    2015-07-10

    Cancer treatment alters microRNA (miRNA) expression, revealing potential therapeutic targets (oncotarget). Here we treated pancreatic cancer (ASPC-1) cells with either recombinant human endostatin (rh-endostatin) or gemcitabine. Then high-throughput sequencing assay was performed to screen for altered miRNAs. Both treatments decreased levels of MiR-19a. We found that miR-19a stimulated cell proliferation, migration, invasion in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. High levels of miR-19a correlated with poor prognosis in patients. Ras homolog family member B (RHOB) was identified as a direct target of miR-19a. Furthermore, RHOB was down-regulated in human pancreatic cancer samples. Restoration of RHOB induced apoptosis, inhibited proliferation and migration of ASPC-1 cells. SP-1 was identified as an upstream transcription factor of miR-19a gene, promoting miR-19a transcription. Rh-endostatin decreased miR-19a expression by down-regulating SP-1. These findings suggest that miR-19a is a potential therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer.

  8. SIRT 1 Overexpression is Associated with Metastasis of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and Promotes Migration and Growth of PDAC Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Siqin; Hong, Hua; Lv, Huicheng; Wu, Guozhu; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-05-12

    BACKGROUND SIRT 1, as a class III histone deacetylase (HDAC), is implicated in the initiation and progression of malignancies. However, the association of SIRT 1 with tumorigenesis or progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is not clear. MATERIAL AND METHODS In our study we investigated SIRT 1 expression in PDAC samples and evaluated the association of SIRT 1 level with the clinical and pathological characteristics of PDAC patients. We investigated the role of SIRT 1 in the migration and growth of PDAC PANC-1 or BxPC-3 cells using gain-of-function and loss-of-function approach. RESULTS We demonstrated that SIRT 1 mRNA level was significantly promoted in intra-tumor tissues compared to peri-tumor tissues of PDAC; and SIRT 1 overexpression was markedly associated with distant or lymph node (LN) metastasis of these PDAC tissues. Moreover, the in vitro wound healing assay demonstrated that SIRT 1 overexpression with lentivirus vector markedly promoted the migration of PANC-1 or BxPC-3 cells, whereas SIRT 1 knockdown using SIRT 1 specific siRNA transfection significantly inhibited the migration of PDAC cells. The colony forming assay confirmed SIRT 1 promotion of the growth of PANC-1 or BxPC-3 cells. CONCLUSIONS In summary, SIRT 1 overexpression is significantly associated with metastasis of PDAC, and overexpressed SIRT 1 plays an important role in pancreatic cancer cell migration and growth. Our data warrants further studies on SIRT 1 as a novel chemotherapeutic target in PDAC.

  9. Tumour-derived Interleukin 35 promotes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell extravasation and metastasis by inducing ICAM1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chongbiao; Li, Na; Li, Zengxun; Chang, Antao; Chen, Yanan; Zhao, Tiansuo; Li, Yang; Wang, Xiuchao; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhimin; Luo, Lin; Shi, Jingjing; Yang, Shengyu; Ren, He; Hao, Jihui

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin 35 (IL-35) is a novel member of the IL-12 family, consisting of an EBV-induced gene 3 (EBI3) subunit and a P35 subunit. IL-35 is an immune-suppressive cytokine mainly produced by regulatory T cells. However, the role of IL-35 in cancer metastasis and progression is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that IL-35 is overexpressed in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissues, and that IL-35 overexpression is associated with poor prognosis in PDAC patients. IL-35 has critical roles in PDAC cell extravasation and metastasis by facilitating the adhesion to endothelial cells and transendothelial extravasation. Mechanistically, IL-35 promotes ICAM1 overexpression through a GP130-STAT1 signalling pathway, which facilitates endothelial adhesion and transendothelial migration via an ICAM1–fibrinogen–ICAM1 bridge. In an orthotopic xenograft model, IL-35 promotes spontaneous pancreatic cancer metastasis in an ICAM1-dependent manner. Together, our results indicate additional functions of IL-35 in promoting PDAC metastasis through mediating ICAM1 expression. PMID:28102193

  10. Pancreatic STAT3 protects mice against caerulein-induced pancreatitis via PAP1 induction.

    PubMed

    Shigekawa, Minoru; Hikita, Hayato; Kodama, Takahiro; Shimizu, Satoshi; Li, Wei; Uemura, Akio; Miyagi, Takuya; Hosui, Atsushi; Kanto, Tatsuya; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Tatsumi, Tomohide; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2012-12-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a transcription factor that controls expressions of several genes involved in cell survival, proliferation and differentiation, and tissue inflammation. However, the significance of pancreatic STAT3 in acute pancreatitis remains unclear. We generated conditional STAT3 knockout (stat3(Δ/Δ)) mice by crossing stat3(flox/flox) mice with Pdx1-promoter Cre transgenic mice. Caerulein administration activated pancreatic STAT3 and induced acute pancreatitis as early as 3 hours in wild-type mice, and full recovery from the induced pancreatic injury was observed within 7 days. The levels of serum amylase and lipase and histologic scores of pancreatic necrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration were significantly higher at 3 hours in stat3(Δ/Δ) mice than in stat3(flox/flox) mice. Pancreatic recovery after pancreatitis was significantly delayed in stat3(Δ/Δ) mice compared with stat3(flox/flox) mice. Although stat3(flox/flox) mice had marked production in the pancreas of pancreatitis-associated protein 1 (PAP1), a serum acute phase protein, this induction was completely abrogated in stat3(Δ/Δ) mice. Enforced production of PAP1 by a hydrodynamic procedure in the liver significantly suppressed pancreatic necrosis and inflammation and also promoted pancreatic regeneration and recovery in stat3(Δ/Δ) mice to levels similar to those observed in stat3(flox/flox) mice. In conclusion, pancreatic STAT3 is indispensable for PAP1 production, and this STAT3/PAP1 pathway plays a protective role in caerulein-induced pancreatitis.

  11. Nuclear protein 1 promotes pancreatic cancer development and protects cells from stress by inhibiting apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Tewfik; Algül, Hana; Cano, Carla Eliana; Sandi, Maria José; Molejon, Maria Inés; Riemann, Marc; Calvo, Ezequiel Luis; Lomberk, Gwen; Dagorn, Jean-Charles; Weih, Falk; Urrutia, Raul; Schmid, Roland Michael; Iovanna, Juan Lucio

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has the lowest survival rate of all cancers and shows remarkable resistance to cell stress. Nuclear protein 1 (Nupr1), which mediates stress response in the pancreas, is frequently upregulated in pancreatic cancer. Here, we report that Nupr1 plays an essential role in pancreatic tumorigenesis. In a mouse model of pancreatic cancer with constitutively expressed oncogenic KrasG12D, we found that loss of Nupr1 protected from the development of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs). Further, in cultured pancreatic cells, nutrient deprivation activated Nupr1 expression, which we found to be required for cell survival. We found that Nupr1 protected cells from stress-induced death by inhibiting apoptosis through a pathway dependent on transcription factor RelB and immediate early response 3 (IER3). NUPR1, RELB, and IER3 proteins were coexpressed in mouse PanINs from KrasG12D-expressing pancreas. Moreover, pancreas-specific deletion of Relb in a KrasG12D background resulted in delayed in PanIN development associated with a lack of IER3 expression. Thus, efficient PanIN formation was dependent on the expression of Nupr1 and Relb, with likely involvement of IER3. Finally, in patients with PDAC, expression of NUPR1, RELB, and IER3 was significantly correlated with a poor prognosis. Cumulatively, these results reveal a NUPR1/RELB/IER3 stress-related pathway that is required for oncogenic KrasG12D-dependent transformation of the pancreas. PMID:22565310

  12. Successful Control of Liver Metastases From Pancreatic Solid-Pseudopapillary Neoplasm (SPN) Using Hepatic Arterial Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Violari, Elena G. Brody, Lynn A.; Covey, Anne M.; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Getrajdman, George I.; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Reidy, Diane L.; Jarnagin, William R.; Brown, Karen T.

    2015-04-15

    No systemic agents that are known to be effective for the treatment of solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) are available. We report the prolonged and sustained control of metastatic pancreatic SPN to the liver using hepatic arterial embolization (HAE), where a total of 13 HAE sessions were performed over a 6-year period.

  13. A red-shifted photochromic sulfonylurea for the remote control of pancreatic beta cell function.

    PubMed

    Broichhagen, J; Frank, J A; Johnston, N R; Mitchell, R K; Šmid, K; Marchetti, P; Bugliani, M; Rutter, G A; Trauner, D; Hodson, D J

    2015-04-07

    Azobenzene photoresponsive elements can be installed on sulfonylureas, yielding optical control over pancreatic beta cell function and insulin release. An obstacle to such photopharmacological approaches remains the use of ultraviolet-blue illumination. Herein, we synthesize and test a novel yellow light-activated sulfonylurea based on a heterocyclic azobenzene bearing a push-pull system.

  14. Digoxin use may increase the relative risk of acute pancreatitis: A population-based case-control study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2015-02-15

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the association between digoxin use and acute pancreatitis in Taiwan. Utilizing the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, this case-control study consisted of 6116 subjects aged 20-84years with a first-attack of acute pancreatitis since 2000 to 2011 as the cases and 24,464 randomly selected subjects without acute pancreatitis as the controls. Both cases and controls were matched by sex, age and index year of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. The absence of digoxin prescription was defined as "never use". Active use of digoxin was defined as subjects who at least received 1 prescription for digoxin within 7days before the date of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Non-active use of digoxin was defined as subjects who did not receive a prescription within 7days but at least received 1 prescription for digoxin ≥8days before the date of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were measured to evaluate the association between digoxin use and acute pancreatitis by a multivariable unconditional logistic regression model. After adjusting for potential confounding factors, the adjusted OR of acute pancreatitis was 5.29 for subjects with active use of digoxin (95% CI 3.61, 7.73), when compared with subjects with never use of digoxin. The adjusted OR of acute pancreatitis decreased to 1.04 for subjects with non-active use of digoxin (95% CI 0.89, 1.21), but no statistical significance. These data indicate that only persons actively using digoxin may have the high relative odds of acute pancreatitis. Further research or case report is warranted to evaluate the pathophysiological basis underlying the relationship between digoxin use and acute pancreatitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Toll Like Receptor 2, 4, and 9 Signaling Promotes Autoregulative Tumor Cell Growth and VEGF/PDGF Expression in Human Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grimmig, Tanja; Moench, Romana; Kreckel, Jennifer; Haack, Stephanie; Rueckert, Felix; Rehder, Roberta; Tripathi, Sudipta; Ribas, Carmen; Chandraker, Anil; Germer, Christoph T.; Gasser, Martin; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    Toll like receptor (TLR) signaling has been suggested to play an important role in the inflammatory microenvironment of solid tumors and through this inflammation-mediated tumor growth. Here, we studied the role of tumor cells in their process of self-maintaining TLR expression independent of inflammatory cells and cytokine milieu for autoregulative tumor growth signaling in pancreatic cancer. We analyzed the expression of TLR2, -4, and -9 in primary human cancers and their impact on tumor growth via induced activation in several established pancreatic cancers. TLR-stimulated pancreatic cancer cells were specifically investigated for activated signaling pathways of VEGF/PDGF and anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL expression as well as tumor cell growth. The primary pancreatic cancers and cell lines expressed TLR2, -4, and -9. TLR-specific stimulation resulted in activated MAP-kinase signaling, most likely via autoregulative stimulation of demonstrated TLR-induced VEGF and PDGF expression. Moreover, TLR activation prompted the expression of Bcl-xL and has been demonstrated for the first time to induce tumor cell proliferation in pancreatic cancer. These findings strongly suggest that pancreatic cancer cells use specific Toll like receptor signaling to promote tumor cell proliferation and emphasize the particular role of TLR2, -4, and -9 in this autoregulative process of tumor cell activation and proliferation in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27941651

  16. KRAS mutations in blood circulating cell-free DNA: a pancreatic cancer case-control

    PubMed Central

    Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Foll, Matthieu; Wozniak, Magdalena B.; Delhomme, Tiffany M.; Durand, Geoffroy; Chopard, Priscilia; Pertesi, Maroulio; Fabianova, Eleonora; Adamcakova, Zora; Holcatova, Ivana; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Vallee, Maxime P.; Rinaldi, Sabina; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D.; Byrnes, Graham B.; Scelo, Ghislaine

    2016-01-01

    The utility of KRAS mutations in plasma circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) samples as non-invasive biomarkers for the detection of pancreatic cancer has never been evaluated in a large case-control series. We applied a KRAS amplicon-based deep sequencing strategy combined with analytical pipeline specifically designed for the detection of low-abundance mutations to screen plasma samples of 437 pancreatic cancer cases, 141 chronic pancreatitis subjects, and 394 healthy controls. We detected mutations in 21.1% (N=92) of cases, of whom 82 (89.1%) carried at least one mutation at hotspot codons 12, 13 or 61, with mutant allelic fractions from 0.08% to 79%. Advanced stages were associated with an increased proportion of detection, with KRAS cfDNA mutations detected in 10.3%, 17,5% and 33.3% of cases with local, regional and systemic stages, respectively. We also detected KRAS cfDNA mutations in 3.7% (N=14) of healthy controls and in 4.3% (N=6) of subjects with chronic pancreatitis, but at significantly lower allelic fractions than in cases. Combining cfDNA KRAS mutations and CA19-9 plasma levels on a limited set of case-control samples did not improve the overall performance of the biomarkers as compared to CA19-9 alone. Whether the limited sensitivity and specificity observed in our series of KRAS mutations in plasma cfDNA as biomarkers for pancreatic cancer detection are attributable to methodological limitations or to the biology of cfDNA should be further assessed in large case-control series. PMID:27705932

  17. Small molecule kaempferol modulates PDX-1 protein expression and subsequently promotes pancreatic β-cell survival and function via CREB.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanling; Zhen, Wei; Maechler, Pierre; Liu, Dongmin

    2013-04-01

    Chronic hyperlipidemia causes β-cell apoptosis and dysfunction, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Thus, searching for agents to promote pancreatic β-cell survival and improve its function could be a promising strategy to prevent and treat T2D. We investigated the effects of kaempferol, a small molecule isolated from ginkgo biloba, on apoptosis and function of β-cells and further determined the mechanism underlying its actions. Kaempferol treatment promoted viability, inhibited apoptosis and reduced caspase-3 activity in INS-1E cells and human islets chronically exposed to palmitate. In addition, kaempferol prevented the lipotoxicity-induced down-regulation of antiapoptotic proteins Akt and Bcl-2. The cytoprotective effects of kaempferol were associated with improved insulin secretion, synthesis, and pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) expression. Chronic hyperlipidemia significantly diminished cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production, protein kinase A (PKA) activation, cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and its regulated transcriptional activity in β-cells, all of which were restored by kaempferol treatment. Disruption of CREB expression by transfection of CREB siRNA in INS-1E cells or adenoviral transfer of dominant-negative forms of CREB in human islets ablated kaempferol protection of β-cell apoptosis and dysfunction caused by palmitate. Incubation of INS-1E cells or human islets with kaempferol for 48h induced PDX-1 expression. This effect of kaempferol on PDX-1 expression was not shared by a host of structurally related flavonoid compounds. PDX-1 gene knockdown reduced kaempferol-stimulated cAMP generation and CREB activation in INS-1E cells. These findings demonstrate that kaempferol is a novel survivor factor for pancreatic β-cells via up-regulating the PDX-1/cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling cascade.

  18. An angiopoietin-like protein 2 autocrine signaling promotes EMT during pancreatic ductal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Carmine; Piro, Geny; Fassan, Matteo; Tamburrino, Anna; Mina, Maria Mihaela; Zanotto, Marco; Chiao, Paul J; Bassi, Claudio; Scarpa, Aldo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Melisi, Davide

    2015-05-30

    The identification of the earliest molecular events responsible for the metastatic dissemination of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains critical for early detection, prevention, and treatment interventions. In this study, we hypothesized that an autocrine signaling between Angiopoietin-like Protein (ANGPTL)2 and its receptor leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor B2 (LILRB2) might be responsible for the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and, the early metastatic behavior of cells in pancreatic preneoplastic lesions.We demonstrated that the sequential activation of KRAS, expression of HER2 and silencing of p16/p14 are sufficient to progressively and significantly increase the secretion of ANGPTL2, and the expression of LILRB2. Silencing the expression of ANGPTL2 reverted EMT and reduced migration in these cell lines. Blocking ANGPTL2 receptor LILRB2 in KRAS, and KRAS/HER2/p16p14shRNA LILRB2- expressing cells reduced ANGPTL2-induced cell proliferation and invasion. An increasingly significant overexpression of ANGPTL2 was observed in in a series of 68 different human PanIN and 27 PDAC lesions if compared with normal pancreatic parenchyma.These findings showed that the autocrine signaling of ANGPTL2 and its receptor LILRB2 plays key roles in sustaining EMT and the early metastatic behavior of cells in pancreatic preneoplastic lesions supporting the potential role of ANGPTL2 for early detection, metastasis prevention, and treatment in PDAC.

  19. An angiopoietin-like protein 2 autocrine signaling promotes EMT during pancreatic ductal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Carmine; Piro, Geny; Fassan, Matteo; Tamburrino, Anna; Mina, Maria Mihaela; Zanotto, Marco; Chiao, Paul J; Bassi, Claudio; Scarpa, Aldo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Melisi, Davide

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the earliest molecular events responsible for the metastatic dissemination of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains critical for early detection, prevention, and treatment interventions. In this study, we hypothesized that an autocrine signaling between Angiopoietin-like Protein (ANGPTL)2 and its receptor leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor B2 (LILRB2) might be responsible for the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and, the early metastatic behavior of cells in pancreatic preneoplastic lesions. We demonstrated that the sequential activation of KRAS, expression of HER2 and silencing of p16/p14 are sufficient to progressively and significantly increase the secretion of ANGPTL2, and the expression of LILRB2. Silencing the expression of ANGPTL2 reverted EMT and reduced migration in these cell lines. Blocking ANGPTL2 receptor LILRB2 in KRAS, and KRAS/HER2/p16p14shRNA LILRB2- expressing cells reduced ANGPTL2-induced cell proliferation and invasion. An increasingly significant overexpression of ANGPTL2 was observed in in a series of 68 different human PanIN and 27 PDAC lesions if compared with normal pancreatic parenchyma. These findings showed that the autocrine signaling of ANGPTL2 and its receptor LILRB2 plays key roles in sustaining EMT and the early metastatic behavior of cells in pancreatic preneoplastic lesions supporting the potential role of ANGPTL2 for early detection, metastasis prevention, and treatment in PDAC. PMID:25360865

  20. Case-control Study of Aspirin Use and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Streicher, Samantha A.; Yu, Herbert; Lu, Lingeng; Kidd, Mark S.; Risch, Harvey A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreas-cancer prognosis is dismal, with 5-year survival less than 5%. Significant relationships between aspirin use and decreased pancreas-cancer incidence and mortality have been shown in four of 13 studies. Methods To evaluate further a possible association between aspirin use and risk of pancreatic cancer, we used data from a population-based Connecticut study conducted from January 2005-August 2009, of 362 pancreas-cancer cases frequency matched to 690 randomly sampled controls. Results Overall, regular use of aspirin was associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer (odds ratio [OR], 0.52; 95% CI, 0.39–0.69). Increments of decreasing risk of pancreatic cancer were observed for each year of low-dose or regular-dose aspirin use (OR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.91–0.98 and OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96–1.01, respectively) and for increasing years in the past that low-dose or regular-dose aspirin use had started (OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92–0.99 and OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96–1.00, respectively). Reduced risk of pancreatic cancer was seen in most categories of calendar time period of aspirin use, for both low-dose aspirin and regular-dose aspirin use. Relative to continuing use at the time of interview, termination of aspirin use within 2 years of interview was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR, 3.24; 95% CI, 1.58–6.65). Conclusions Our results provide some support that a daily aspirin regimen may reduce risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Impact Long-term aspirin use has benefits for both cardiovascular disease and cancer, but appreciable bleeding complications that necessitate risk-benefit analysis for individual applications. PMID:24969230

  1. Ion channels in control of pancreatic stellate cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Storck, Hannah; Hild, Benedikt; Schimmelpfennig, Sandra; Sargin, Sarah; Nielsen, Nikolaj; Zaccagnino, Angela; Budde, Thomas; Novak, Ivana; Kalthoff, Holger; Schwab, Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a critical role in the progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Once activated, PSCs support proliferation and metastasis of carcinoma cells. PSCs even co-metastasise with carcinoma cells. This requires the ability of PSCs to migrate. In recent years, it has been established that almost all “hallmarks of cancer” such as proliferation or migration/invasion also rely on the expression and function of ion channels. So far, there is only very limited information about the function of ion channels in PSCs. Yet, there is growing evidence that ion channels in stromal cells also contribute to tumor progression. Here we investigated the function of KCa3.1 channels in PSCs. KCa3.1 channels are also found in many tumor cells of different origin. We revealed the functional expression of KCa3.1 channels by means of Western blot, immunofluorescence and patch clamp analysis. The impact of KCa3.1 channel activity on PSC function was determined with live-cell imaging and by measuring the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). KCa3.1 channel blockade or knockout prevents the stimulation of PSC migration and chemotaxis by reducing the [Ca2+]i and calpain activity. KCa3.1 channels functionally cooperate with TRPC3 channels that are upregulated in PDAC stroma. Knockdown of TRPC3 channels largely abolishes the impact of KCa3.1 channels on PSC migration. In summary, our results clearly show that ion channels are crucial players in PSC physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:27903970

  2. Calcitriol enhances gemcitabine antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo by promoting apoptosis in a human pancreatic carcinoma model system

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei-Dong; Ma, Yingyu; Flynn, Geraldine; Muindi, Josephia R; Kong, Rui-Xian; Trump, Donald L

    2010-01-01

    Gemcitabine is the standard care chemotherapeutic agent to treat pancreatic cancer. Previously we demonstrated that calcitriol (1, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol) has significant anti-proliferative effects in vitro and in vivo in multiple tumor models and enhances the activity of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents. We therefore investigated whether calcitriol could potentiate the cytotoxic activity of gemcitabine in the human pancreatic cancer Capan-1 model system. Isobologram analysis revealed that calcitriol and gemcitabine had synergistic antiproliferative effect over a wide range of drug concentrations. Calcitriol did not reduce the cytidine deaminase activity in Capan-1 tumors nor in the livers of Capan-1 tumor bearing mice. Calcitriol and gemcitabine combination promoted apoptosis in Capan-1 cells compared with either agent alone. The combination treatment also increased the activation of caspases-8, -9, -6 and -3 in Capan-1 cells. This result was confirmed by substrate-based caspase activity assay. Akt phosphorylation was reduced by calcitriol and gemcitabine combination treatment compared to single agent treatment. However, ERK1/2 phosphorylation was not modulated by either agent alone or by the combination. Tumor regrowth delay studies showed that calcitriol in combination with gemcitabine resulted in a significant reduction of Capan-1 tumor volume compared to single agent treatment. Our study suggests that calcitriol and gemcitabine in combination promotes caspase-dependent apoptosis, which may contribute to increased anti-tumor activity compared to either agent alone. PMID:20699664

  3. An octamer motif is required for activation of the inducible nitric oxide synthase promoter in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Darville, Martine I; Terryn, Sara; Eizirik, Décio L

    2004-03-01

    Nitric oxide, generated by the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), is a potential mediator of cytokine-induced beta-cell dysfunction in type 1 diabetes mellitus. We have previously shown that cytokine-induced iNOS expression is cycloheximide (CHX) sensitive and requires nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) activation. In the present study, we show that an octamer motif located 20 bp downstream of the proximal NF-kappa B binding site in the rat iNOS promoter is critical for IL-1 beta and interferon-gamma induction of promoter activity in rat primary beta-cells and insulin-producing RINm5F cells. In gel shift assays, the octamer motif bound constitutively the transcription factor Oct1. Neither Oct1 nor NF-kappa B binding activities were blocked by CHX, suggesting that other factor(s) synthesized in response to IL-1 beta contribute to iNOS promoter induction. The high mobility group (HMG)-I(Y) protein also bound the proximal iNOS promoter region. HMG-I(Y) binding was decreased in cells treated with CHX and HMG-I(Y) silencing by RNA interference reduced IL-1 beta-induced iNOS promoter activity. These results suggest that Oct1, NF-kappa B, and HMG-I(Y) cooperate for transactivation of the iNOS promoter in pancreatic beta-cells.

  4. Antitumor and apoptosis-promoting properties of emodin, an anthraquinone derivative from Rheum officinale Baill, against pancreatic cancer in mice via inhibition of Akt activation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei-Tian; Chen, Hui; Ni, Zhong-Lin; Liu, Hai-Bin; Tong, Hong-Fei; Fan, Ling; Liu, An; Qiu, Mai-Xuan; Liu, Dian-Lei; Guo, Hong-Chun; Wang, Zhao-Hong; Lin, Sheng-Zhang

    2011-12-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Gemcitabine is currently the standard first-line chemotherapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer. However, gemcitabine can induce activation of Akt and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), which is associated with its chemoresistance. It has been reported that gemcitabine combination therapies result in improved survival outcomes in pancreatic cancer. Therefore, agents that can either enhance the effects of gemcitabine or overcome chemoresistance to the drug are needed for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Emodin is an active component of Chinese medicinal herbs and can inhibit the activation of Akt and NF-κB. In this study, we investigated whether emodin could enhance the anticancer effect of gemcitabine on pancreatic cancer in vivo. We demonstrated that treatment of gemcitabine combined with emodin efficiently suppressed tumor growth in mice inoculated with pancreatic tumor cells. This treatment paradigm promoted apoptotic cell death and mitochondrial fragmentation. Furthermore, it reduced phosphorylated-Akt (p-Akt) level, NF-κB activation and Bcl-2/Bax ratio, increased caspase-9 and -3 activation, Cytochrome C (CytC) release occurred in combination therapy. Collectively, emodin enhanced the activity of gemcitabine in tumor growth suppression via inhibition of Akt and NF-κB activation, thus promoting the mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic pathway. Therefore, our findings may provide new insights into understanding the pharmacological regulation of emodin on gemcitabine-mediated proapoptosis in pancreatic cancer and may aid in the design of new therapeutic strategies for the intervention of human pancreatic cancers.

  5. The PRKD1 promoter is a target of the KRas-NF-κB pathway in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Döppler, Heike; Panayiotou, Richard; Reid, Elizabeth M.; Maimo, Willibroad; Bastea, Ligia; Storz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of PRKD1 and its gene product protein kinase D1 (PKD1) are linked to oncogenic signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, but a direct functional relationship to oncogenic KRas has not been established so far. We here describe the PRKD1 gene promoter as a target for oncogenic KRas signaling. We demonstrate that KRas-induced activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway is one mechanism of how PRKD1 expression is increased and identify the binding sites for NF-κB in the PRKD1 promoter. Altogether, these results describe a novel mechanism governing PRKD1 gene expression in PDA and provide a functional link between oncogenic KRas, NF-κB and expression of PRKD1. PMID:27649783

  6. The PRKD1 promoter is a target of the KRas-NF-κB pathway in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Döppler, Heike; Panayiotou, Richard; Reid, Elizabeth M; Maimo, Willibroad; Bastea, Ligia; Storz, Peter

    2016-09-21

    Increased expression of PRKD1 and its gene product protein kinase D1 (PKD1) are linked to oncogenic signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, but a direct functional relationship to oncogenic KRas has not been established so far. We here describe the PRKD1 gene promoter as a target for oncogenic KRas signaling. We demonstrate that KRas-induced activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway is one mechanism of how PRKD1 expression is increased and identify the binding sites for NF-κB in the PRKD1 promoter. Altogether, these results describe a novel mechanism governing PRKD1 gene expression in PDA and provide a functional link between oncogenic KRas, NF-κB and expression of PRKD1.

  7. Suppository naproxen reduces incidence and severity of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis: Randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz; Joukar, Farahnaz; Taherzadeh, Zahra; Sokhanvar, Homayoon; Hasandokht, Tolou

    2016-06-07

    To determine the efficacy of rectally administered naproxen for the prevention of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP). This double-blind randomized control trial conducted from January 2013 to April 2014 at the Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases Research Center in Rasht, Iran. A total of 324 patients were selected from candidates for diagnostic or therapeutic ERCP by using the simple sampling method. Patients received a single dose of Naproxen (500 mg; n = 162) or a placebo (n = 162) per rectum immediately before ERCP. The overall incidence of PEP, incidence of mild to severe PEP, serum amylase levels and adverse effects were measured. The primary outcome measure was the development of pancreatitis onset of pain in the upper abdomen and elevation of the serum amylase level to > 3 × the upper normal limit (60-100 IU/L) within 24 h after ERCP. The severity of PEP was classified according to the duration of therapeutic intervention for PEP: mild, 2-3 d; moderate 4-10 d; and severe, > 10 d and/or necessitated surgical or intensive treatment, or contributed to death. PEP occurred in 12% (40/324) of participants, and was significantly more frequent in the placebo group compared to the naproxen group (P < 0.01). Of the participants, 25.9% (84/324) developed hyperamylasemia within 2 h of procedure completion, among whom only 35 cases belonged to the naproxen group (P < 0.01). The incidence of PEP was significantly higher in female sex, in patients receiving pancreatic duct injection, more than 3 times pancreatic duct cannulations, and ERCP duration more than 40 min (Ps < 0.01). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups regarding the procedures or factors that might increase the risk of PEP, sphincterotomy, precut requirement, biliary duct injection and number of pancreatic duct cannulations. In the subgroup of patients with pancreatic duct injection, the rate of pancreatitis in the naproxen group was

  8. Aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and pancreatic cancer risk: a clinic-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Reid Lombardo, Kaye M; Bamlet, William R; Oberg, Ann L; Robinson, Dennis P; Anderson, Kristin E; Petersen, Gloria M

    2011-11-01

    Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) show indisputable promise as cancer chemoprevention agents. However, studies have been inconsistent as to whether aspirin has a protective effect in development of pancreatic cancer. To further evaluate the association between aspirin, NSAID, and acetaminophen use with pancreatic cancer risk, we used a clinic-based case-control study of 904 rapidly ascertained histologically or clinically documented pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases, and 1,224 age- and sex-matched healthy controls evaluated at Mayo Clinic from April 2004 to September 2010. Overall, there is no relationship between non-aspirin NSAID or acetaminophen use and risk of pancreatic cancer. Aspirin use for 1 d/mo or greater was associated with a significantly decreased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.60-0.91, P = 0.005) compared with never or less than 1 d/mo. Analysis by frequency and frequency-dosage of use categories showed reduced risk (P = 0.007 and 0.022, respectively). This inverse association was also found for those who took low-dose aspirin for heart disease prevention (OR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.49-0.92, P = 0.013). In subgroup analyses, the association between aspirin use and pancreatic cancer was not significantly affected by pancreatic cancer stage, smoking status, or body mass index. Our data suggest that aspirin use, but not non-aspirin NSAID use, is associated with lowered risk of developing pancreatic cancer.

  9. Endogenously Expressed IL-4Rα Promotes the Malignant Phenotype of Human Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Traub, Benno; Sun, Lie; Ma, Yongsu; Xu, Pengfei; Lemke, Johannes; Paschke, Stephan; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Knippschild, Uwe; Kornmann, Marko

    2017-03-28

    Exogenous interleukin-4 (IL-4) has been demonstrated to affect the growth of different human malignancies including pancreatic cancer cells. The aim of our study was to determine the role of endogenously expressed IL-4-receptor-α-chain (IL-4Rα) in pancreatic cancer cells. IL-4Rα-suppression was achieved by generating Capan-1 cells stably expressing shRNA targeting IL-4Rα. The malignant phenotype was characterized by assessing growth properties, directional and non-directional cell movement in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Signaling pathways were analyzed upon IL-4 and IL-13 stimulation of wildtype (WT) and control-transfected cells compared to IL-4Rα-knockdown cells. Silencing of IL-4Rα resulted in reduced anchorage-dependent cell growth (p < 0.05) and reduced anchorage-independent colony size (p < 0.001) in vitro. Moreover, cell movement and migration was inhibited. IL-4 and IL-13 stimulation of Capan-1-WT cells induced activation of similar pathways like stimulation with Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I. This activation was reduced after IL-4Rα downregulation while IGF-I signaling seemed to be enhanced in knockdown-clones. Importantly, IL-4Rα silencing also significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo. The present study indicates that endogenously expressed IL-4 and IL-4Rα contribute to the malignant phenotype of pancreatic cancer cells by activating diverse pro-oncogenic signaling pathways. Addressing these pathways may contribute to the treatment of the disease.

  10. IL-13 promotes the proliferation of rat pancreatic stellate cells through the suppression of NF-{kappa}B/TGF-{beta}{sub 1} pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Shinozaki, Satoshi; Mashima, Hirosato; Ohnishi, Hirohide; Sugano, Kentaro

    2010-02-26

    In chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a central role in tissue fibrogenesis. Transforming growth factor {beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) and the Th2 lymphokines such as interleukin (IL)-13 are major profibrogenic cytokines in many organs. Activated PSCs produce various inflammatory cytokines including TGF-{beta}{sub 1}. In this study, we investigated whether IL-13 affects pancreatic fibrogenesis by modulating the functions of PSCs. IL-13 promoted PSCs proliferation without activation through the suppression of autocrine TGF-{beta}{sub 1}. IL-13 enhanced Stat6 phosphorylation in PSCs but Stat6 was not involved in the suppression of TGF-{beta}{sub 1}. IL-13 inhibited the transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B, and the expression of mutant I-{kappa}B reproduced the suppression of autocrine TGF-{beta}{sub 1} and promoted PSCs proliferation. Taken together, we demonstrated that IL-13 promotes PSCs proliferation through the suppression of the transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B, resulting in the decrease of autocrine TGF-{beta}{sub 1}. This finding provides an unequivocal evidence of IL-13 participation in pancreatic fibrosis, illustrating a new strategy for chronic pancreatitis.

  11. Treatment with near-infrared radiation promotes apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    OBAYASHI, TOMOHIKO; FUNASAKA, KOHEI; OHNO, EIZABURO; MIYAHARA, RYOJI; HIROOKA, YOSHIKI; HAMAGUCHI, MICHINARI; GOTO, HIDEMI; SENGA, TAKESHI

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains one of the leading causes of human mortality worldwide. Radiation and chemotherapy are commonly used for cancer treatment; however, the combination of these therapies and surgery do not completely eradicate cancer cells. Near-infrared radiation (NIR) is a low-energy form of radiation that exerts multiple effects on mammalian cells. Previous studies have reported that NIR induces DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis of cancer cells. In the present study, a 915-nm laser was used to examine the effects of NIR on pancreatic cancer cells. Irradiation of pancreatic cancer cells using a 915-nm laser significantly induced caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. In addition, the combination of gemcitabine treatment and a 915-nm laser synergistically increased the number of apoptotic cells. The results of the present study indicate the use of infrared irradiation and chemotherapy may be a possible therapy for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26622761

  12. Invasion-promoting extracellular matrix composition enhances photodynamic therapy response in 3D pancreatic cancer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Gwendolyn M.; El-Hamidi, Hamid; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2017-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by extracellular matrix-rich stromal involvement, but it is not clear how ECM properties that affect invasiveness and chemotherapy response influence efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT). To disentangle the mechanical and biochemical effects of ECM composition, we measured the effects of various combinations of ECM proteins on growth behavior, invasive potential, and therapeutic response of multicellular 3D pancreatic tumor models. These spheroids were grown in attachment-free conditions before embedding in combinations of rheologically characterized collagen 1 and Matrigel combinations and treated with oxaliplatin chemotherapy and PDT. We find that cells invading from collagen-embedded tumor spheroids, the least rigid ECM substrate described here, displayed better response to PDT than to oxaliplatin chemotherapy. Overall, our results support that ECM-mediated invading PDAC populations remain responsive to PDT in conditions that induce chemoresistance.

  13. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-02-06

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  14. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  15. Vitamin D–binding protein and pancreatic cancer: a nested case-control study12345

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Marina R; Freedman, D Michal; Robien, Kim; Kopp, William; Rager, Helen; Horst, Ronald L

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D–binding protein (DBP) is the primary carrier of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in the circulation. One prospective study in male smokers found a protective association between DBP and pancreatic cancer, particularly among men with higher 25(OH)D concentrations. Objective: The objective was to examine the association between DBP and pancreatic cancer risk in an American population. Design: We conducted a nested case-control study in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer screening trial cohort of men and women aged 55–74 y at baseline. Between 1993 and 2010, 295 incident pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases were reported (follow-up to 15.1 y). Two controls (n = 590) were matched to each case by age, race, sex, and month of blood draw. We calculated smoking- and diabetes-adjusted ORs and 95% CIs with the use of conditional logistic regression. Results: DBP concentration was not significantly associated with pancreatic cancer overall [highest (≥7149.4 nmol/L) vs. lowest (<3670.4 nmol/L) quintile; OR: 1.75; 95% CI: 0.91, 3.37; P-trend = 0.25]. For serum 25(OH)D compared with the referent (50 to <75 nmol/L), individuals in the highest group had a significantly higher risk (≥100 nmol/L; OR: 3.23; 95% CI: 1.24, 8.44), whereas those in the lowest group had no significant association (<25 nmol/L; OR: 2.50; 95% CI: 0.92, 6.81). Further adjustment for DBP did not alter this association. Conclusion: Our results do not support the hypothesis that serum DBP or 25(OH)D plays a protective role in pancreatic cancer. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00339495. PMID:25904602

  16. Obesity, but not high-fat diet, promotes murine pancreatic cancer growth.

    PubMed

    White, Patrick B; Ziegler, Kathryn M; Swartz-Basile, Deborah A; Wang, Sue S; Lillemoe, Keith D; Pitt, Henry A; Zyromski, Nicholas J

    2012-09-01

    Obesity accelerates pancreatic cancer growth; the mechanisms underlying this association are poorly understood. This study evaluated the hypothesis that obesity, rather than high-fat diet, is responsible for accelerated pancreatic cancer growth. Male C57BL/6J mice were studied after 19 weeks of high-fat (60 % fat; n = 20) or low-fat (10 % fat; n = 10) diet and 5 weeks of Pan02 murine pancreatic cancer growth (flank). By two-way ANOVA, diet did not (p = 0.58), but body weight, significantly influenced tumor weight (p = 0.01). Tumor weight correlated positively with body weight (R (2) = 0.562; p < 0.001). Tumors in overweight mice were twice as large as those growing in lean mice (1.2 ± 0.2 g vs. 0.6 ± .01 g, p < 0.01), had significantly fewer apoptotic cells than those in lean mice (0.8 ± 0.4 vs 2.4 ± 0.5; p < 0.05), and greater adipocyte volume (3.7 vs. 2.2 %, p < 0.05). Apoptosis (R (2) = 0.472; p = 0.008) and serum adiponectin correlated negatively with tumor weight (R = 0.45; p < 0.05). These data suggest that body weight, and not high-fat diet, is responsible for accelerated murine pancreatic cancer growth observed in this model of diet-induced obesity. Decreased tumor apoptosis appears to play an important mechanistic role in this process. The concept that decreased apoptosis is potentiated by hypoadiponectinemia (seen in obesity) deserves further investigation.

  17. IL-6 trans-signaling promotes pancreatitis-associated lung injury and lethality.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Neuhöfer, Patrick; Song, Liang; Rabe, Björn; Lesina, Marina; Kurkowski, Magdalena U; Treiber, Matthias; Wartmann, Thomas; Regnér, Sara; Thorlacius, Henrik; Saur, Dieter; Weirich, Gregor; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Halangk, Walter; Mizgerd, Joseph P; Schmid, Roland M; Rose-John, Stefan; Algül, Hana

    2013-03-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is an inflammatory disease with a high mortality rate. Although typically seen in individuals with sepsis, ALI is also a major complication in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). The pathophysiology of SAP-associated ALI is poorly understood, but elevated serum levels of IL-6 is a reliable marker for disease severity. Here, we used a mouse model of acute pancreatitis-associated (AP-associated) ALI to determine the role of IL-6 in ALI lethality. Il6-deficient mice had a lower death rate compared with wild-type mice with AP, while mice injected with IL-6 were more likely to develop lethal ALI. We found that inflammation-associated NF-κB induced myeloid cell secretion of IL-6, and the effects of secreted IL-6 were mediated by complexation with soluble IL-6 receptor, a process known as trans-signaling. IL-6 trans-signaling stimulated phosphorylation of STAT3 and production of the neutrophil attractant CXCL1 in pancreatic acinar cells. Examination of human samples revealed expression of IL-6 in combination with soluble IL-6 receptor was a reliable predictor of ALI in SAP. These results demonstrate that IL-6 trans-signaling is an essential mediator of ALI in SAP across species and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of IL-6 may prevent SAP-associated ALI.

  18. Allergies and risk of pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium.

    PubMed

    Olson, Sara H; Hsu, Meier; Satagopan, Jaya M; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Silverman, Debra T; Lucenteforte, Ersilia; Anderson, Kristin E; Borgida, Ayelet; Bracci, Paige M; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dai, Qi; Duell, Eric J; Fontham, Elizabeth H; Gallinger, Steven; Holly, Elizabeth A; Ji, Bu-Tian; Kurtz, Robert C; La Vecchia, Carlo; Lowenfels, Albert B; Luckett, Brian; Ludwig, Emmy; Petersen, Gloria M; Polesel, Jerry; Seminara, Daniela; Strayer, Lori; Talamini, Renato

    2013-09-01

    In order to quantify the risk of pancreatic cancer associated with history of any allergy and specific allergies, to investigate differences in the association with risk according to age, gender, smoking status, or body mass index, and to study the influence of age at onset, we pooled data from 10 case-control studies. In total, there were 3,567 cases and 9,145 controls. Study-specific odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated by using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, gender, smoking status, and body mass index. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed by using the Cochran Q statistic. Study-specific odds ratios were pooled by using a random-effects model. The odds ratio for any allergy was 0.79 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.62, 1.00) with heterogeneity among studies (P < 0.001). Heterogeneity was attributable to one study; with that study excluded, the pooled odds ratio was 0.73 (95% CI: 0.64, 0.84) (Pheterogeneity = 0.23). Hay fever (odds ratio = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.96) and allergy to animals (odds ratio = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.41, 0.94) were related to lower risk, while there was no statistically significant association with other allergies or asthma. There were no major differences among subgroups defined by age, gender, smoking status, or body mass index. Older age at onset of allergies was slightly more protective than earlier age.

  19. K-Ras promotes growth transformation and invasion of immortalized human pancreatic cells by Raf and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Paul M; Groehler, Angela L; Lee, Kwang M; Ouellette, Michel M; Khazak, Vladimir; Der, Channing J

    2007-03-01

    Mutational activation of the K-Ras oncogene is well established as a key genetic step in the development and growth of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. However, the mechanism by which aberrant Ras signaling promotes uncontrolled pancreatic tumor cell growth remains to be fully elucidated. The recent use of primary human cells to study Ras-mediated oncogenesis provides important model cell systems to dissect this mechanism. We have used a model of telomerase-immortalized human pancreatic duct-derived cells (E6/E7/st) to study mechanisms of Ras growth transformation. First, we found that human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes, which block the function of the p53 and Rb tumor suppressors, respectively, and SV40 small t antigen were required to allow mutant K-Ras(12D) growth transformation. Second, K-Ras(12D) caused growth transformation in vitro, including enhanced growth rate and loss of density dependency for growth, anchorage independence, and invasion through reconstituted basement membrane proteins, and tumorigenic transformation in vivo. Third, we determined that the Raf, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and Ral guanine nucleotide exchange factor effector pathways were activated, although extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity was not up-regulated persistently. Finally, pharmacologic inhibition of Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK and PI3K signaling impaired K-Ras-induced anchorage-independent growth and invasion. In summary, our studies established, characterized, and validated E6/E7/st cells for the study of Ras-induced oncogenesis.

  20. Liposomal insulin promoter-thymidine kinase gene therapy followed by ganciclovir effectively ablates human pancreatic cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, James X; Liu, Shi-He; Nemunaitis, John J; Brunicardi, F Charles

    2015-04-10

    PDX1 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, and activates the insulin promoter (IP). Adenoviral IP-thymidine kinase and ganciclovir (TK/GCV) suppresses human pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDAC) in mice, but repeated doses carry significant toxicity. We hypothesized that multiple cycles of liposomal IP-TK/GCV ablate human PDAC in SCID mice with minimal toxicity compared to adenoviral IP-TK/GCV. SCID mice with intraperitoneal human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 tumor implants were given a single cycle of 35 µg iv L-IP-TK, or four cycles of 1, 10, 20, 30, or 35 µg iv L-IP-TK (n = 20 per group), followed by intraperitoneal GCV. Insulin and glucose levels were monitored in mice treated with four cycles of 35 µg iv L-IP-TK. We found that four cycles of 10-35 µg L-IP-TK/GCV ablated more PANC-1 tumor volume compared to a single cycle with 35 µg. Mice that received four cycles of 10 µg L-IP-TK demonstrated the longest survival (P < 0.05), with a median survival of 126 days. In comparison, mice that received a single cycle of 35 µg L-IP-TK/GCV or GCV alone survived a median of 92 days and 68.7 days, respectively. There were no significant changes in glucose or insulin levels following treatment. In conclusion, multiple cycles of liposomal IP-TK/GCV ablate human PDAC in SCID mice with minimal toxicity, suggesting non-viral vectors are superior to adenoviral vectors for IP-gene therapy.

  1. Serum CA19-9 Level Associated with Metabolic Control and Pancreatic Beta Cell Function in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haoyong; Li, Ruixia; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Haibing; Bao, Yuqian; Jia, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    CA19-9 is a tumor-associated antigen. It is also a marker of pancreatic tissue damage that might be caused by diabetes. Long-term poor glycemic control may lead to pancreatic beta cell dysfunction which is reflected by elevated serum CA19-9 level. Intracellular cholesterol accumulation leads to islet dysfunction and impaired insulin secretion which provide a new lipotoxic model. This study firstly found total cholesterol was one of the independent contributors to CA19-9. Elevated serum CA19-9 level in diabetic patients may indicate further investigations of glycemic control, pancreatic beta cell function, and total cholesterol level. PMID:22778715

  2. RABL6A Promotes Oxaliplatin Resistance in Tumor Cells and Is a New Marker of Survival for Resected Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Muniz, Viviane P; Askeland, Ryan W; Zhang, Xuefeng; Reed, Sara M; Tompkins, Van S; Hagen, Jussara; McDowell, Bradley D; Button, Anna; Smith, Brian J; Weydert, Jamie A; Mezhir, James J; Quelle, Dawn E

    2013-07-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by early recurrence following pancreatectomy, rapid progression, and chemoresistance. Novel prognostic and predictive biomarkers are urgently needed to both stratify patients for clinical trials and select patients for adjuvant therapy regimens. This study sought to determine the biological significance of RABL6A (RAB, member RAS oncogene family-like protein 6 isoform A), a novel pancreatic protein, in PDAC. Analyses of RABL6A protein expression in PDAC specimens from 73 patients who underwent pancreatic resection showed that RABL6A levels are altered in 74% of tumors relative to adjacent benign ductal epithelium. Undetectable RABL6A expression, found in 7% (5/73) of patients, correlated with improved overall survival (range 41 to 118 months with 3/5 patients still living), while patients with RABL6A expression had a worse outcome (range 3.3 to 100 months, median survival 20.3 months) (P = 0.0134). In agreement with those findings, RABL6A expression was increased in pancreatic cancer cell lines compared to normal pancreatic epithelial cells, and its knockdown inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. Moreover, RABL6A depletion selectively sensitized cells to oxaliplatin-induced arrest and death. This work reveals that RABL6A promotes the proliferation, survival, and oxaliplatin resistance of PDAC cells, whereas its loss is associated with extended survival in patients with resected PDAC. Such data suggest RABL6A is a novel biomarker of PDAC and potential target for anticancer therapy.

  3. SIRT 1 Overexpression is Associated with Metastasis of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and Promotes Migration and Growth of PDAC Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siqin; Hong, Hua; Lv, Huicheng; Wu, Guozhu; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Background SIRT 1, as a class III histone deacetylase (HDAC), is implicated in the initiation and progression of malignancies. However, the association of SIRT 1 with tumorigenesis or progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is not clear. Material/Methods In our study we investigated SIRT 1 expression in PDAC samples and evaluated the association of SIRT 1 level with the clinical and pathological characteristics of PDAC patients. We investigated the role of SIRT 1 in the migration and growth of PDAC PANC-1 or BxPC-3 cells using gain-of-function and loss-of-function approach. Results We demonstrated that SIRT 1 mRNA level was significantly promoted in intra-tumor tissues compared to peri-tumor tissues of PDAC; and SIRT 1 overexpression was markedly associated with distant or lymph node (LN) metastasis of these PDAC tissues. Moreover, the in vitro wound healing assay demonstrated that SIRT 1 overexpression with lentivirus vector markedly promoted the migration of PANC-1 or BxPC-3 cells, whereas SIRT 1 knockdown using SIRT 1 specific siRNA transfection significantly inhibited the migration of PDAC cells. The colony forming assay confirmed SIRT 1 promotion of the growth of PANC-1 or BxPC-3 cells. Conclusions In summary, SIRT 1 overexpression is significantly associated with metastasis of PDAC, and overexpressed SIRT 1 plays an important role in pancreatic cancer cell migration and growth. Our data warrants further studies on SIRT 1 as a novel chemotherapeutic target in PDAC. PMID:27170223

  4. New insights into pancreatic cancer-induced paraneoplastic diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Raghuwansh P.; Nagpal, Sajan Jiv Singh; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Chari, Suresh T.

    2014-01-01

    Up to 85% of patients with pancreatic cancer have diabetes or hyperglycaemia, which frequently manifests as early as 2–3 years before a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Conversely, patients with new-onset diabetes have a 5–8-fold increased risk of being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer within 1–3 years of developing diabetes. Emerging evidence now indicates that pancreatic cancer causes diabetes. As in type 2 diabetes, β-cell dysfunction and peripheral insulin resistance are seen in pancreatic cancer-induced diabetes. However, unlike in patients with type 2 diabetes, glucose control worsens in patients with pancreatic cancer in the face of ongoing, often profound, weight loss. Diabetes and weight loss, which precede cachexia onset by several months, are paraneoplastic phenomena induced by pancreatic cancer. Although the pathogenesis of these pancreatic cancer-induced metabolic alterations is only beginning to be understood, these are likely mechanisms to promote the survival and growth of pancreatic cancer in a hostile and highly desmoplastic microenvironment. Interestingly, these metabolic changes could enable early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, if they can be distinguished from the ones that occur in patients with type 2 diabetes. One such possible biomarker is adrenomedullin, which is a potential mediator of β-cell dysfunction in pancreatic cancer-induced diabetes. PMID:23528347

  5. Controlled induction of human pancreatic progenitors produces functional beta-like cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Holger A; Parent, Audrey V; Ringler, Jennifer J; Hennings, Thomas G; Nair, Gopika G; Shveygert, Mayya; Guo, Tingxia; Puri, Sapna; Haataja, Leena; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Blelloch, Robert; Szot, Greg L; Arvan, Peter; Hebrok, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into functional insulin-producing beta-like cells holds great promise for cell replacement therapy for patients suffering from diabetes. This approach also offers the unique opportunity to study otherwise inaccessible aspects of human beta cell development and function in vitro. Here, we show that current pancreatic progenitor differentiation protocols promote precocious endocrine commitment, ultimately resulting in the generation of non-functional polyhormonal cells. Omission of commonly used BMP inhibitors during pancreatic specification prevents precocious endocrine formation while treatment with retinoic acid followed by combined EGF/KGF efficiently generates both PDX1+ and subsequent PDX1+/NKX6.1+ pancreatic progenitor populations, respectively. Precise temporal activation of endocrine differentiation in PDX1+/NKX6.1+ progenitors produces glucose-responsive beta-like cells in vitro that exhibit key features of bona fide human beta cells, remain functional after short-term transplantation, and reduce blood glucose levels in diabetic mice. Thus, our simplified and scalable system accurately recapitulates key steps of human pancreas development and provides a fast and reproducible supply of functional human beta-like cells. PMID:25908839

  6. Long noncoding RNA uc.345 promotes tumorigenesis of pancreatic cancer by upregulation of hnRNPL expression

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiaoyuan; Qian, Wenli; Zhang, Bosen; Shi, Minmin; Xie, Junjie; Shen, Baiyong; Xu, Hong; Hou, Zhaoyuan; Chen, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to an important functional or regulatory role of long noncoding RNA in cellular processes as well as cancer diseases resulted from the aberrant lncRNA expression. LncRNA could participate in the cancer progression and develop a significant role through the interaction with proteins. In the present study, we report a lncRNA termed uc.345 that is up-regulated in tumor tissues, compared to the corresponding noncancerous tissues. We found that a higher uc.345 expression level was more frequently observed in tissues with increased depth of invasion and advanced TNM tumor node metastasis T stage. Moreover, uc.345 could be used as an independent risk factor for the overall survival (OS) of the pancreatic cancer patients. By employing soft agar assays and tumor xenograft models, we showed that uc.345 could accelerate tumor growth. Further, we discovered that uc.345 could upregulate the hnRNPL expression and that inhibition of (hnRNPL) dampens the tumorigenesis capability of uc.345. Collectively, these results demonstrate that uc.345 functions as an oncogenic lncRNA that promotes tumor progression and serves as a poor predictor for pancreatic cancer patients' overall survival. PMID:27689400

  7. Convergence of bone morphogenetic protein and laminin-1 signaling pathways promotes proliferation and colony formation by fetal mouse pancreatic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Fangxu . E-mail: jiang@wehi.edu.au; Harrison, Leonard C.

    2005-08-01

    We previously reported that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), members of the transforming growth factor superfamily, together with the basement membrane glycoprotein laminin-1 (Ln-1), promote proliferation of fetal pancreatic cells and formation of colonies containing peripheral insulin-positive cells. Here, we further investigate the cross-talk between BMP and Ln-1 signals. By RT-PCR, receptors for BMP (BMPR) (excepting BMPR-1B) and Ln-1 were expressed in the fetal pancreas between E13.5 and E17.5. Specific blocking antibodies to BMP-4 and -6 and selective BMP antagonists partially inhibited colony formation by fetal pancreas cells. Colony formation induced by BMP-6 and Ln-1 was completely abolished in a dose-dependent manner by blocking Ln-1 binding to its {alpha}{sub 6} integrin and {alpha}-dystroglycan receptors or by blocking the Ln-1 signaling molecules, phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (P13K) and MAP kinase kinase-1. These results demonstrate a convergence of BMP and Ln-1 signaling through P13K and MAP kinase pathways to induce proliferation and colony formation in E15.5 fetal mouse pancreatic cells.

  8. TERT promoter mutations in pancreatic endocrine tumours are rare and mainly found in tumours from patients with hereditary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Vinagre, João; Nabais, Joana; Pinheiro, Jorge; Batista, Rui; Oliveira, Rui Caetano; Gonçalves, António Pedro; Pestana, Ana; Reis, Marta; Mesquita, Bárbara; Pinto, Vasco; Lyra, Joana; Cipriano, Maria Augusta; Ferreira, Miguel Godinho; Lopes, José Manuel; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is its unlimited replicative potential that needs a compensatory mechanism for the consequential telomere erosion. Telomerase promoter (TERTp) mutations were recently reported as a novel mechanism for telomerase re-activation/expression in order to maintain telomere length. Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) were so far recognized to rely mainly on the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanism. It was our objective to study if TERTp mutations were present in pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET) and could represent an alternative mechanism to ALT. TERTp mutations were detected in 7% of the cases studied and were mainly associated to patients harbouring hereditary syndromes. In vitro, using PET-derived cell lines and by luciferase reporter assay, these mutations confer a 2 to 4-fold increase in telomerase transcription activity. These novel alterations are able to recruit ETS transcription factor members, in particular GABP-α and ETV1, to the newly generated binding sites. We report for the first time TERTp mutations in PETs and PET-derived cell lines. Additionally, our data indicate that these mutations serve as an alternative mechanism and in an exclusive manner to ALT, in particular in patients with hereditary syndromes. PMID:27411289

  9. TERT promoter mutations in pancreatic endocrine tumours are rare and mainly found in tumours from patients with hereditary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Vinagre, João; Nabais, Joana; Pinheiro, Jorge; Batista, Rui; Oliveira, Rui Caetano; Gonçalves, António Pedro; Pestana, Ana; Reis, Marta; Mesquita, Bárbara; Pinto, Vasco; Lyra, Joana; Cipriano, Maria Augusta; Ferreira, Miguel Godinho; Lopes, José Manuel; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2016-07-14

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is its unlimited replicative potential that needs a compensatory mechanism for the consequential telomere erosion. Telomerase promoter (TERTp) mutations were recently reported as a novel mechanism for telomerase re-activation/expression in order to maintain telomere length. Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) were so far recognized to rely mainly on the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanism. It was our objective to study if TERTp mutations were present in pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET) and could represent an alternative mechanism to ALT. TERTp mutations were detected in 7% of the cases studied and were mainly associated to patients harbouring hereditary syndromes. In vitro, using PET-derived cell lines and by luciferase reporter assay, these mutations confer a 2 to 4-fold increase in telomerase transcription activity. These novel alterations are able to recruit ETS transcription factor members, in particular GABP-α and ETV1, to the newly generated binding sites. We report for the first time TERTp mutations in PETs and PET-derived cell lines. Additionally, our data indicate that these mutations serve as an alternative mechanism and in an exclusive manner to ALT, in particular in patients with hereditary syndromes.

  10. The Myokine Irisin Is Released in Response to Saturated Fatty Acids and Promotes Pancreatic Beta-Cell Survival and Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Natalicchio, Annalisa; Marrano, Nicola; Biondi, Giuseppina; Spagnuolo, Rosaria; Labarbuta, Rossella; Porreca, Immacolata; Cignarelli, Angelo; Bugliani, Marco; Marchetti, Piero; Perrini, Sebastio; Laviola, Luigi; Giorgino, Francesco

    2017-07-19

    This study explored the role of irisin as a new pancreatic beta-cell secretagogue and survival factor and its potential role in the communication between skeletal muscle and pancreatic beta-cells under lipotoxic conditions. Recombinant irisin stimulated insulin biosynthesis and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in a PKA-dependent manner, and prevented saturated fatty acid-induced apoptosis in human and rat pancreatic beta-cells, as well as in human and murine pancreatic islets, via AKT/BCL2 signaling. Treatment of myotubes with 0.5 mM palmitate for 4 h, but not with oleate, promoted an increase in irisin release in the culture medium. Moreover, increased serum levels of irisin were observed in mice fed with a high-fat diet. Mouse serum rich in irisin and the conditioned medium from myotubes exposed to palmitate for 4 h significantly reduced apoptosis of murine pancreatic islets and insulin-secreting INS-1E cells, respectively, and this was abrogated in the presence of an irisin neutralizing antibody. Finally, in vivo administration of irisin improved GSIS and increased beta-cell proliferation. In conclusion, irisin can promote beta-cell survival and enhance GSIS, and may thus participate in the communication between skeletal muscle and beta-cells under conditions of excess saturated fatty acids. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  11. Nicotine promotes initiation and progression of KRAS-induced pancreatic cancer via Gata6-dependent dedifferentiation of acinar cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Patrick C; Sancho, Patricia; Cañamero, Marta; Martinelli, Paola; Madriles, Francesc; Michl, Patrick; Gress, Thomas; de Pascual, Ricardo; Gandia, Luis; Guerra, Carmen; Barbacid, Mariano; Wagner, Martin; Vieira, Catarina R; Aicher, Alexandra; Real, Francisco X; Sainz, Bruno; Heeschen, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    Although smoking is a leading risk factor for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), little is known about the mechanisms by which smoking promotes initiation or progression of PDAC. We studied the effects of nicotine administration on pancreatic cancer development in Kras(+/LSLG12Vgeo);Elas-tTA/tetO-Cre (Ela-KRAS) mice, Kras(+/LSLG12D);Trp53+/LSLR172H;Pdx-1-Cre (KPC) mice (which express constitutively active forms of KRAS), and C57/B6 mice. Mice were given nicotine for up to 86 weeks to produce blood levels comparable with those of intermediate smokers. Pancreatic tissues were collected and analyzed by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction; cells were isolated and assayed for colony and sphere formation and gene expression. The effects of nicotine were also evaluated in primary pancreatic acinar cells isolated from wild-type, nAChR7a(-/-), Trp53(-/-), and Gata6(-/-);Trp53(-/-) mice. We also analyzed primary PDAC cells that overexpressed GATA6 from lentiviral expression vectors. Administration of nicotine accelerated transformation of pancreatic cells and tumor formation in Ela-KRAS and KPC mice. Nicotine induced dedifferentiation of acinar cells by activating AKT-ERK-MYC signaling; this led to inhibition of Gata6 promoter activity, loss of GATA6 protein, and subsequent loss of acinar differentiation and hyperactivation of oncogenic KRAS. Nicotine also promoted aggressiveness of established tumors as well as the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, increasing numbers of circulating cancer cells and their dissemination to the liver, compared with mice not exposed to nicotine. Nicotine induced pancreatic cells to acquire gene expression patterns and functional characteristics of cancer stem cells. These effects were markedly attenuated in K-Ras(+/LSL-G12D);Trp53(+/LSLR172H);Pdx-1-Cre mice given metformin. Metformin prevented nicotine-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis and tumor growth by up-regulating GATA6 and promoting

  12. Hypoxia induces oncogene yes-associated protein 1 nuclear translocation to promote pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma invasion via epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Wei, Honglong; Xu, Zongzhen; Liu, Feng; Wang, Fuhai; Wang, Xin; Sun, Xueying; Li, Jie

    2017-05-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most lethal cancers. The Hippo pathway is involved in tumorigenesis and remodeling of tumor microenvironments. Hypoxia exists in the microenvironment of solid tumors, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and plays a vital role in tumor progression and metastasis. However, it remains unclear how hypoxia interacts with the Hippo pathway to regulate these events. In this study, expressions of yes-associated protein 1 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α were found to be elevated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma samples compared with those in matched adjacent non-tumor samples. Moreover, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression was positively correlated with yes-associated protein 1 level in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues. The higher expression of nuclear yes-associated protein 1 was associated with poor histological grade and prognosis for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients. In vitro, yes-associated protein 1 was highly expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells. Depletion of yes-associated protein 1 inhibited the invasion of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells via downregulation of Vimentin, matrix metalloproteinase-2, and matrix metalloproteinase-13, and upregulation of E-cadherin. In addition, hypoxia promoted the invasion of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells via regulating the targeted genes. Hypoxia also deactivated the Hippo pathway and induced yes-associated protein 1 nuclear translocation. Furthermore, depletion of yes-associated protein 1 or hypoxia-inducible factor-1α suppressed the invasion of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells under hypoxia. Mechanism studies showed that nuclear yes-associated protein 1 interacted with hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and activated Snail transcription to participate in epithelial-mesenchymal transition-mediated and matrix metalloproteinase-mediated remodeling of tumor microenvironments. Collectively, yes-associated protein 1 is an

  13. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... meals throughout the day that are high in carbohydrates and low in protein and fat. Pancreatic enzymes ... the Pancreas NPF Centers Pancreatitis Centers Pancreatitis Center Application Pancreatic Cancer Centers Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer Pancreas ...

  14. Main dietary compounds and pancreatic cancer risk. The quantitative analysis of case-control and cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Paluszkiewicz, Piotr; Smolińska, Katarzyna; Dębińska, Iwona; Turski, Waldemar A

    2012-02-01

    Estimation of the role of main dietary compounds in the risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Literature published till 2010 was reviewed and selected for further analysis. The used terms were: red meat, minced meat, ham, bacon, sausages, white meat, poultry, vegetables, fish, eggs, fruits, lifestyle, diet, pancreatic cancer and pancreatic neoplasm. The collected data were meta-analysed with calculation of combined relative risk and 95% confidence interval as well as studies heterogeneity. A meta-analysis of 11 case-control studies indicates that red meat ingestion elevates pancreatic cancer risk by 48% (95% CI=1.25-1.76). The vegetables and fruit reduce the risk by 38% (95% CI=0.54-0.73) and 29% (95% CI=0.59-0.84), respectively. The pooled analyses of 10 cohort studies do not show significant relations between main dietary compound ingestion and pancreatic cancer risk. The red meat intake is associated with elevated risk of pancreatic cancer in contrast to vegetables and fruit ingestion. The ingestion of red meat, vegetables and fruit in cohort studies was not influenced on pancreatic cancer risk. The role of fish, poultry and eggs was not significant in both case-control and cohort studies, thus further studies were needed. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Promoter Hypermethylation and Decreased Expression of Syncytin-1 in Pancreatic Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Senkowski, Christopher; Tang, Zuoqing; Wang, Jianhao; Huang, Tianhe; Wang, Xue; Terry, Karen; Brower, Steven; Glasgow, Wayne; Chen, Haibin; Jiang, Shi-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Syncytin-1 is a member of human endogenous retroviral W gene family (HERVW1). Known to be expressed in human placental trophoblast, syncytin-1 protein mediates the fusion of cytotrophoblasts for the formation of syncytiotrophoblasts, the terminally differentiated form of trophoblast lineage. In addition, in vitro studies indicate that syncytin-1 possessed nonfusogenic functions such as those for immune suppression, cell cycle regulation and anti-apoptotic activities. Overexpression of syncytin-1 has been observed in various malignant tissues including breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers. It was reported that syncytin-1 gene expression is associated with dynamic changes of DNA hypomethylation in the 5’ LTR. In this study, applying the real-time PCR, Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry methods, we demonstrate a constitutive expression of syncytin-1 in normal pancreas tissues as well as normal tissues adjacent to cancer lesions. Moreover, a reduced expression is found in the pancreatic adenocarcinoma tissues. The expression levels of syncytin-1 are not correlated with the stage, historical grade and gender, but inversely correlated with patients’ age. Furthermore, COBRA and bisulfite sequencing results indicated that the lower expression of syncytin-1 is correlated with the hypermethylation of two CpG dinucleotides in the 5’ LTR of syncytin-1 gene. The nonfusogenic function of syncytin-1 in normal pancreas as well as its role(s) in the pathogenesis and progression of pancreatic cancers remains to be investigated. Identification of the two CpG dinucleotides around transcription start site as key epigenetic elements has provided valuable information for further studies on the epigenetic regulation of syncytin-1 in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:26230721

  16. Optogenetic control of insulin secretion by pancreatic β-cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, T; Okawa, S; Hirasawa, T; Ishihara, M

    2015-07-01

    The present study assessed the ability of optogenetics techniques to provide a better understanding of the control of insulin secretion, particularly regarding pancreatic β-cell function in homeostasis and pathological conditions such as diabetes mellitus (DM). We used optogenetics to investigate whether insulin secretion and blood glucose homeostasis could be controlled by regulating intracellular calcium ion concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) in a mouse pancreatic β-cell line (MIN6) transfected with the optogenetic protein channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2). The ChR2-transfected MIN6 (ChR2-MIN6) cells secreted insulin following irradiation with a laser (470 nm). The increase in [Ca(2+)]i was accompanied by elevated levels of messenger RNAs that encode calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta and adenylate cyclase 1. ChR2-MIN6 cells suspended in matrigel were inoculated into streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice that were then subjected to a glucose tolerance test. Laser irradiation of these mice caused a significant decrease in blood glucose, and the irradiated implanted cells expressed insulin. These findings demonstrate the power of optogenetics to precisely and efficiently controlled insulin secretion by pancreatic β-cells 'on demand', in contrast to techniques using growth factors or chemical inducers. Optogenetic technology shows great promise for understanding the mechanisms of glucose homeostasis and for developing treatments for metabolic diseases such as DM.

  17. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into pancreatic endoderm in patterned size-controlled clusters.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, Dennis; Mendelsohn, Adam D; Seerke, Rina; Desai, Tejal A; German, Michael S

    2011-05-01

    Pancreatic β-cells function optimally when clustered in islet-like structures. However, nutrient and oxygen deprivation limits the viability of cells at the core of excessively large clusters. Hence, production of functional β-cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) for patients with diabetes would benefit from the growth and differentiation of these cells in size-controlled aggregates. In this study, we controlled cluster size by seeding hESCs onto glass cover slips patterned by the covalent microcontact-printing of laminin in circular patches of 120 μm in diameter. These were used as substrates to grow and differentiate hESCs first into SOX17-positive/SOX7-negative definitive endoderm, after which many clusters released and formed uniformly sized three-dimensional clusters. Both released clusters and those that remained attached differentiated into HNF1β-positive primitive gut tube-like cells with high efficiency. Further differentiation yielded pancreatic endoderm-like cells that co-expressed PDX1 and NKX6.1. Controlling aggregate size allows efficient production of uniformly-clustered pancreatic endocrine precursors for in vivo engraftment or further in vitro maturation.

  18. Clonidine promotes the accumulation of /sup 45/Ca in pancreatic beta-cell organelles

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, T.; Nygren, P.

    1983-12-01

    Glucose-stimulated insulin release from pancreatic islets of ob/ob-mice was inhibited by 10(-9) M of the alpha 2-adrenergic agonist clonidine. This inhibitory effect was abolished by 10(-7) M of the antagonist yohimbine. Loading the islets with /sup 45/Ca during the clonidine exposure followed by isolation of subcellular fractions under conditions known to minimize the /sup 45/Ca redistribution resulted in increased accumulation of the isotope in the mitochondrial and microsomal fractions. It is suggested that clonidine inhibits glucose-stimulated insulin release by increasing the organelle sequestration of Ca2+.

  19. Genetic deletion of the desmosomal component desmoplakin promotes tumor microinvasion in a mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chun, Matthew G H; Hanahan, Douglas

    2010-09-16

    We used the RIP1-Tag2 (RT2) mouse model of islet cell carcinogenesis to profile the transcriptome of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET) that were either non-invasive or highly invasive, seeking to identify pro- and anti-invasive molecules. Expression of multiple components of desmosomes, structures that help maintain cellular adhesion, was significantly reduced in invasive carcinomas. Genetic deletion of one of these desmosomal components, desmoplakin, resulted in increased local tumor invasion without affecting tumor growth parameters in RT2 PNETs. Expression of cadherin 1, a component of the adherens junction adhesion complex, was maintained in these tumors despite the genetic deletion of desmoplakin. Our results demonstrate that loss of desmoplakin expression and resultant disruption of desmosomal adhesion can promote increased local tumor invasion independent of adherens junction status.

  20. Reg proteins promote acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and act as novel diagnostic and prognostic markers in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zogopoulos, George; Shao, Qin; Dong, Kun; Lv, Fudong; Nwilati, Karam; Gui, Xian-yong; Cuggia, Adeline; Liu, Jun-Li; Gao, Zu-hua

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive malignant tumor. Acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) are both precursor lesions that lead to the development of PDAC. Reg family proteins (Reg1A, 1B, 3A/G, 4) are a group of calcium-dependent lectins that promote islet growth in response to inflammation and/or injuries. The aim of this study was to establish a role for Reg proteins in the development of PDAC and their clinical value as biomarkers. We found that Reg1A and Reg3A/G were highly expressed in the ADM tissues by immunohistochemistry. In the 3-dimensional culture of mouse acinar cells, Reg3A promoted ADM formation with concurrent activation of mitogen-acitvated protein kinase. Upregulation of Reg1A and Reg1B levels was observed as benign ductal epithelium progresses from PanIN to invasive PDAC. Patients with PDAC showed significantly higher serum levels of Reg1A and Reg1B than matching healthy subjects. These results were further validated by the quantification of Reg 1A and 1B mRNA levels in the microdissected tissues (22- and 6-fold increases vs. non-tumor tissues). Interestingly, patients with higher levels of Reg1A and 1B exhibited improved survival rate than those with lower levels. Furthermore, tissue expressions of Reg1A, Reg1B, and Reg4 could differentiate metastatic PDAC in the liver from intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with 92% sensitivity and 95% specificity. Overall, our results demonstrate the upregulation of Reg proteins during PDAC development. If validated in larger scale, Reg1A and Reg1B could become clinical markers for detecting early stages of PDAC, monitoring therapeutic response, and/or predicting patient's prognosis. PMID:27788482

  1. Trimeprazine increases IRS2 in human islets and promotes pancreatic β cell growth and function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Yu, Yue; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Opare-Addo, Lynn; Rozzo, Aldo; Sadagurski, Marianna; Norquay, Lisa; Reed, Jessica E.; El Khattabi, Ilham; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C.; Sharma, Arun

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of pancreatic β cells to maintain glucose homeostasis during chronic physiologic and immunologic stress is important for cellular and metabolic homeostasis. Insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) is a regulated adapter protein that links the insulin and IGF1 receptors to downstream signaling cascades. Since strategies to maintain or increase IRS2 expression can promote β cell growth, function, and survival, we conducted a screen to find small molecules that can increase IRS2 mRNA in isolated human pancreatic islets. We identified 77 compounds, including 15 that contained a tricyclic core. To establish the efficacy of our approach, one of the tricyclic compounds, trimeprazine tartrate, was investigated in isolated human islets and in mouse models. Trimeprazine is a first-generation antihistamine that acts as a partial agonist against the histamine H1 receptor (H1R) and other GPCRs, some of which are expressed on human islets. Trimeprazine promoted CREB phosphorylation and increased the concentration of IRS2 in islets. IRS2 was required for trimeprazine to increase nuclear Pdx1, islet mass, β cell replication and function, and glucose tolerance in mice. Moreover, trimeprazine synergized with anti-CD3 Abs to reduce the progression of diabetes in NOD mice. Finally, it increased the function of human islet transplants in streptozotocin-induced (STZ-induced) diabetic mice. Thus, trimeprazine, its analogs, or possibly other compounds that increase IRS2 in islets and β cells without adverse systemic effects might provide mechanism-based strategies to prevent the progression of diabetes. PMID:27152363

  2. IL-6 trans-signaling promotes pancreatitis-associated lung injury and lethality

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Neuhöfer, Patrick; Song, Liang; Rabe, Björn; Lesina, Marina; Kurkowski, Magdalena U.; Treiber, Matthias; Wartmann, Thomas; Regnér, Sara; Thorlacius, Henrik; Saur, Dieter; Weirich, Gregor; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Halangk, Walter; Mizgerd, Joseph P.; Schmid, Roland M.; Rose-John, Stefan; Algül, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is an inflammatory disease with a high mortality rate. Although typically seen in individuals with sepsis, ALI is also a major complication in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). The pathophysiology of SAP-associated ALI is poorly understood, but elevated serum levels of IL-6 is a reliable marker for disease severity. Here, we used a mouse model of acute pancreatitis–associated (AP-associated) ALI to determine the role of IL-6 in ALI lethality. Il6-deficient mice had a lower death rate compared with wild-type mice with AP, while mice injected with IL-6 were more likely to develop lethal ALI. We found that inflammation-associated NF-κB induced myeloid cell secretion of IL-6, and the effects of secreted IL-6 were mediated by complexation with soluble IL-6 receptor, a process known as trans-signaling. IL-6 trans-signaling stimulated phosphorylation of STAT3 and production of the neutrophil attractant CXCL1 in pancreatic acinar cells. Examination of human samples revealed expression of IL-6 in combination with soluble IL-6 receptor was a reliable predictor of ALI in SAP. These results demonstrate that IL-6 trans-signaling is an essential mediator of ALI in SAP across species and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of IL-6 may prevent SAP-associated ALI. PMID:23426178

  3. Pancreatitis of biliary origin, optimal timing of cholecystectomy (PONCHO trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background After an initial attack of biliary pancreatitis, cholecystectomy minimizes the risk of recurrent biliary pancreatitis and other gallstone-related complications. Guidelines advocate performing cholecystectomy within 2 to 4 weeks after discharge for mild biliary pancreatitis. During this waiting period, the patient is at risk of recurrent biliary events. In current clinical practice, surgeons usually postpone cholecystectomy for 6 weeks due to a perceived risk of a more difficult dissection in the early days following pancreatitis and for logistical reasons. We hypothesize that early laparoscopic cholecystectomy minimizes the risk of recurrent biliary pancreatitis or other complications of gallstone disease in patients with mild biliary pancreatitis without increasing the difficulty of dissection and the surgical complication rate compared with interval laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods/Design PONCHO is a randomized controlled, parallel-group, assessor-blinded, superiority multicenter trial. Patients are randomly allocated to undergo early laparoscopic cholecystectomy, within 72 hours after randomization, or interval laparoscopic cholecystectomy, 25 to 30 days after randomization. During a 30-month period, 266 patients will be enrolled from 18 hospitals of the Dutch Pancreatitis Study Group. The primary endpoint is a composite endpoint of mortality and acute re-admissions for biliary events (that is, recurrent biliary pancreatitis, acute cholecystitis, symptomatic/obstructive choledocholithiasis requiring endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography including cholangitis (with/without endoscopic sphincterotomy), and uncomplicated biliary colics) occurring within 6 months following randomization. Secondary endpoints include the individual endpoints of the composite endpoint, surgical and other complications, technical difficulty of cholecystectomy and costs. Discussion The PONCHO trial is designed to show that early laparoscopic cholecystectomy

  4. Early biliary decompression versus conservative treatment in acute biliary pancreatitis (APEC trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Schepers, Nicolien J; Bakker, Olaf J; Besselink, Marc G H; Bollen, Thomas L; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; van Eijck, Casper H J; Fockens, Paul; van Geenen, Erwin J M; van Grinsven, Janneke; Hallensleben, Nora D L; Hansen, Bettina E; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Timmer, Robin; Anten, Marie-Paule G F; Bolwerk, Clemens J M; van Delft, Foke; van Dullemen, Hendrik M; Erkelens, G Willemien; van Hooft, Jeanin E; Laheij, Robert; van der Hulst, René W M; Jansen, Jeroen M; Kubben, Frank J G M; Kuiken, Sjoerd D; Perk, Lars E; de Ridder, Rogier J J; Rijk, Marno C M; Römkens, Tessa E H; Schoon, Erik J; Schwartz, Matthijs P; Spanier, B W Marcel; Tan, Adriaan C I T L; Thijs, Willem J; Venneman, Niels G; Vleggaar, Frank P; van de Vrie, Wim; Witteman, Ben J; Gooszen, Hein G; Bruno, Marco J

    2016-01-05

    Acute pancreatitis is mostly caused by gallstones or sludge. Early decompression of the biliary tree by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) with sphincterotomy may improve outcome in these patients. Whereas current guidelines recommend early ERC in patients with concomitant cholangitis, early ERC is not recommended in patients with mild biliary pancreatitis. Evidence on the role of routine early ERC with endoscopic sphincterotomy in patients without cholangitis but with biliary pancreatitis at high risk for complications is lacking. We hypothesize that early ERC with sphincterotomy improves outcome in these patients. The APEC trial is a randomized controlled, parallel group, superiority multicenter trial. Within 24 hours after presentation to the emergency department, patients with biliary pancreatitis without cholangitis and at high risk for complications, based on an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE-II) score of 8 or greater, Modified Glasgow score of 3 or greater, or serum C-reactive protein above 150 mg/L, will be randomized. In 27 hospitals of the Dutch Pancreatitis Study Group, 232 patients will be allocated to early ERC with sphincterotomy or to conservative treatment. The primary endpoint is a composite of major complications (that is, organ failure, pancreatic necrosis, pneumonia, bacteremia, cholangitis, pancreatic endocrine, or exocrine insufficiency) or death within 180 days after randomization. Secondary endpoints include ERC-related complications, infected necrotizing pancreatitis, length of hospital stay and an economical evaluation. The APEC trial investigates whether an early ERC with sphincterotomy reduces the composite endpoint of major complications or death compared with conservative treatment in patients with biliary pancreatitis at high risk of complications. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN97372133 (date registration: 17-12-2012).

  5. Inflammation marker and risk of pancreatic cancer: a nested case–control study within the EPIC cohort

    PubMed Central

    Grote, V A; Kaaks, R; Nieters, A; Tjønneland, A; Halkjær, J; Overvad, K; Skjelbo Nielsen, M R; Boutron-Ruault, M C; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Racine, A; Teucher, B; Becker, S; Pischon, T; Boeing, H; Trichopoulou, A; Cassapa, C; Stratigakou, V; Palli, D; Krogh, V; Tumino, R; Vineis, P; Panico, S; Rodríguez, L; Duell, E J; Sánchez, M-J; Dorronsoro, M; Navarro, C; Gurrea, A B; Siersema, P D; HM Peeters, P; Ye, W; Sund, M; Lindkvist, B; Johansen, D; Khaw, K-T; Wareham, N; Allen, N E; Travis, R C; Fedirko, V; Jenab, M; Michaud, D S; Chuang, S-C; Romaguera, D; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B; Rohrmann, S

    2012-01-01

    Background: Established risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking, long-standing diabetes, high body fatness, and chronic pancreatitis, all of which can be characterised by aspects of inflammatory processes. However, prospective studies investigating the relation between inflammatory markers and pancreatic cancer risk are scarce. Methods: We conducted a nested case–control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, measuring prediagnostic blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and soluble receptors of tumour necrosis factor-α (sTNF-R1, R2) in 455 pancreatic cancer cases and 455 matched controls. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression models. Results: None of the inflammatory markers were significantly associated with risk of pancreatic cancer overall, although a borderline significant association was observed for higher circulating sTNF-R2 (crude OR=1.52 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.97–2.39), highest vs lowest quartile). In women, however, higher sTNF-R1 levels were significantly associated with risk of pancreatic cancer (crude OR=1.97 (95% CI 1.02–3.79)). For sTNF-R2, risk associations seemed to be stronger for diabetic individuals and those with a higher BMI. Conclusion: Prospectively, CRP and IL-6 do not seem to have a role in our study with respect to risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas sTNF-R1 seemed to be a risk factor in women and sTNF-R2 might be a mediator in the risk relationship between overweight and diabetes with pancreatic cancer. Further large prospective studies are needed to clarify the role of proinflammatory proteins and cytokines in the pathogenesis of exocrine pancreatic cancer. PMID:22617158

  6. Allergies and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: A Pooled Analysis From the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Sara H.; Hsu, Meier; Satagopan, Jaya M.; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Silverman, Debra T.; Lucenteforte, Ersilia; Anderson, Kristin E.; Borgida, Ayelet; Bracci, Paige M.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dai, Qi; Duell, Eric J.; Fontham, Elizabeth H.; Gallinger, Steven; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Ji, Bu-Tian; Kurtz, Robert C.; La Vecchia, Carlo; Lowenfels, Albert B.; Luckett, Brian; Ludwig, Emmy; Petersen, Gloria M.; Polesel, Jerry; Seminara, Daniela; Strayer, Lori; Talamini, Renato

    2013-01-01

    In order to quantify the risk of pancreatic cancer associated with history of any allergy and specific allergies, to investigate differences in the association with risk according to age, gender, smoking status, or body mass index, and to study the influence of age at onset, we pooled data from 10 case-control studies. In total, there were 3,567 cases and 9,145 controls. Study-specific odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated by using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, gender, smoking status, and body mass index. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed by using the Cochran Q statistic. Study-specific odds ratios were pooled by using a random-effects model. The odds ratio for any allergy was 0.79 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.62, 1.00) with heterogeneity among studies (P < 0.001). Heterogeneity was attributable to one study; with that study excluded, the pooled odds ratio was 0.73 (95% CI: 0.64, 0.84) (Pheterogeneity = 0.23). Hay fever (odds ratio = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.96) and allergy to animals (odds ratio = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.41, 0.94) were related to lower risk, while there was no statistically significant association with other allergies or asthma. There were no major differences among subgroups defined by age, gender, smoking status, or body mass index. Older age at onset of allergies was slightly more protective than earlier age. PMID:23820785

  7. The transcription factor HNF1α induces expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in pancreatic islets from evolutionarily conserved promoter motifs.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Kim Brint; Chhabra, Kavaljit H; Nguyen, Van K; Xia, Huijing; Lazartigues, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Pancreatic angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has previously been shown to be critical for maintaining glycemia and β-cell function. Efforts to maintain or increase ACE2 expression in pancreatic β-cells might therefore have therapeutic potential for treating diabetes. In our study, we investigated the transcriptional role of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β) in induction of ACE2 expression in insulin-secreting cells. A deficient allele of HNF1α or HNF1β causes maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) types 3 and 5, respectively, in humans. We found that ACE2 is primarily transcribed from the proximal part of the ACE2 promoter in the pancreas. In the proximal part of the human ACE2 promoter, we further identified three functional HNF1 binding sites, as they have binding affinity for HNF1α and HNF1β and are required for induction of promoter activity by HNF1β in insulinoma cells. These three sites are well-conserved among mammalian species. Both HNF1α and HNF1β induce expression of ACE2 mRNA and lead to elevated levels of ACE2 protein and ACE2 enzymatic activity in insulinoma cells. Furthermore, HNF1α dose-dependently increases ACE2 expression in primary pancreatic islet cells. We conclude that HNF1α can induce the expression of ACE2 in pancreatic islet cells via evolutionarily conserved HNF1 binding sites in the ACE2 promoter. Potential therapeutics aimed at counteracting functional HNF1α depletion in diabetes and MODY3 will thus have ACE2 induction in pancreatic islets as a likely beneficial effect.

  8. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy in patients with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency due to chronic pancreatitis: a 1-year disease management study on symptom control and quality of life.

    PubMed

    D'Haese, Jan G; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Layer, Peter; Uhl, Waldemar; Löhr, Matthias; Rychlik, Reinhard; Pirilis, Konstantinos; Zöllner, York; Gradl, Birgit; Foerster, Douglas; Möbius, Julia; Henniges, Friederike; Friess, Helmut

    2014-08-01

    Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) is frequent in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). This 1-year, prospective, multicenter, observational, disease management study aimed to assess symptom improvement and quality of life in patients with CP with EPI who were receiving pancreatic enzyme replacement. Patients with CP and chronic EPI were either assigned to cohort 1 that consisted of patients already taking pancreatin (Kreon; Abbott Arzneimittel GmbH, Hannover, Germany) or cohort 2 that consisted of patients with newly diagnosed EPI without prior pancreatic enzyme treatment. Symptoms were documented, and quality of life was assessed using the gastrointestinal quality of life index (GIQLI) at baseline, 6 months, and 1 year. A total of 294 patients were evaluated (cohort 1, n = 206; cohort 2, n = 88). The proportion of patients experiencing gastrointestinal symptoms and recurrent pain after 1 year was significantly reduced in both cohorts (P < 0.001). The alleviation of symptoms was reflected in GIQLI score improvements at 1 year in both cohorts (P < 0.001), independent of CP severity and etiology. Improvements in GIQLI score were more pronounced in cohort 2 (P < 0.001). Pancreatin demonstrated symptom relief and improvement in quality of life in patients with CP-related EPI in this disease management study.

  9. BAG3 promotes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma growth by activating stromal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rosati, Alessandra; Basile, Anna; D'Auria, Raffaella; d'Avenia, Morena; De Marco, Margot; Falco, Antonia; Festa, Michelina; Guerriero, Luana; Iorio, Vittoria; Parente, Roberto; Pascale, Maria; Marzullo, Liberato; Franco, Renato; Arra, Claudio; Barbieri, Antonio; Rea, Domenica; Menichini, Giulio; Hahne, Michael; Bijlsma, Maarten; Barcaroli, Daniela; Sala, Gianluca; di Mola, Fabio Francesco; di Sebastiano, Pierluigi; Todoric, Jelena; Antonucci, Laura; Corvest, Vincent; Jawhari, Anass; Firpo, Matthew A; Tuveson, David A; Capunzo, Mario; Karin, Michael; De Laurenzi, Vincenzo; Turco, Maria Caterina

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and death rate of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have increased in recent years, therefore the identification of novel targets for treatment is extremely important. Interactions between cancer and stromal cells are critically involved in tumour formation and development of metastasis. Here we report that PDAC cells secrete BAG3, which binds and activates macrophages, inducing their activation and the secretion of PDAC supporting factors. We also identify IFITM-2 as a BAG3 receptor and show that it signals through PI3K and the p38 MAPK pathways. Finally, we show that the use of an anti-BAG3 antibody results in reduced tumour growth and prevents metastasis formation in three different mouse models. In conclusion, we identify a paracrine loop involved in PDAC growth and metastatic spreading, and show that an anti-BAG3 antibody has therapeutic potential. PMID:26522614

  10. Tissue-Resident Macrophages in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Originate from Embryonic Hematopoiesis and Promote Tumor Progression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Herndon, John M; Sojka, Dorothy K; Kim, Ki-Wook; Knolhoff, Brett L; Zuo, Chong; Cullinan, Darren R; Luo, Jingqin; Bearden, Audrey R; Lavine, Kory J; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Hawkins, William G; Fields, Ryan C; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; DeNardo, David G

    2017-08-15

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are essential components of the cancer microenvironment and play critical roles in the regulation of tumor progression. Optimal therapeutic intervention requires in-depth understanding of the sources that sustain macrophages in malignant tissues. In this study, we investigated the ontogeny of TAMs in murine pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) models. We identified both inflammatory monocytes and tissue-resident macrophages as sources of TAMs. Unexpectedly, significant portions of pancreas-resident macrophages originated from embryonic development and expanded through in situ proliferation during tumor progression. Whereas monocyte-derived TAMs played more potent roles in antigen presentation, embryonically derived TAMs exhibited a pro-fibrotic transcriptional profile, indicative of their role in producing and remodeling molecules in the extracellular matrix. Collectively, these findings uncover the heterogeneity of TAM origin and functions and could provide therapeutic insight for PDAC treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. BAG3 promotes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma growth by activating stromal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Alessandra; Basile, Anna; D'Auria, Raffaella; d'Avenia, Morena; De Marco, Margot; Falco, Antonia; Festa, Michelina; Guerriero, Luana; Iorio, Vittoria; Parente, Roberto; Pascale, Maria; Marzullo, Liberato; Franco, Renato; Arra, Claudio; Barbieri, Antonio; Rea, Domenica; Menichini, Giulio; Hahne, Michael; Bijlsma, Maarten; Barcaroli, Daniela; Sala, Gianluca; di Mola, Fabio Francesco; di Sebastiano, Pierluigi; Todoric, Jelena; Antonucci, Laura; Corvest, Vincent; Jawhari, Anass; Firpo, Matthew A; Tuveson, David A; Capunzo, Mario; Karin, Michael; De Laurenzi, Vincenzo; Turco, Maria Caterina

    2015-11-02

    The incidence and death rate of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have increased in recent years, therefore the identification of novel targets for treatment is extremely important. Interactions between cancer and stromal cells are critically involved in tumour formation and development of metastasis. Here we report that PDAC cells secrete BAG3, which binds and activates macrophages, inducing their activation and the secretion of PDAC supporting factors. We also identify IFITM-2 as a BAG3 receptor and show that it signals through PI3K and the p38 MAPK pathways. Finally, we show that the use of an anti-BAG3 antibody results in reduced tumour growth and prevents metastasis formation in three different mouse models. In conclusion, we identify a paracrine loop involved in PDAC growth and metastatic spreading, and show that an anti-BAG3 antibody has therapeutic potential.

  12. The Phosphatase PHLPP1 Regulates Akt2, Promotes Pancreatic Cancer Cell Death, and Inhibits Tumor Formation

    PubMed Central

    NITSCHE, CLAUDIA; EDDERKAOUI, MOUAD; MOORE, RYAN M.; EIBL, GUIDO; KASAHARA, NORIYUKI; TREGER, JANET; GRIPPO, PAUL J.; MAYERLE, JULIA; LERCH, MARKUS M.; GUKOVSKAYA, ANNA S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The kinase Akt mediates resistance of pancreatic cancer (PaCa) cells to death and is constitutively active (phosphorylated) in cancer cells. Whereas the kinases that activate Akt are well characterized, less is known about phosphatases that dephosporylate and thereby inactivate it. We investigated regulation of Akt activity and cell death by the phosphatases PHLPP1 and PHLPP2 in PaCa cells, mouse models of PaCa, and human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). METHODS We measured the effects of PHLPP overexpression or knockdown with small interfering RNAs on Akt activation and cell death. We examined regulation of PHLPPs by growth factors and reactive oxygen species, as well as associations between PHLPPs and tumorigenesis. RESULTS PHLPP overexpression inactivated Akt, whereas PHLPP knockdown increased phosphorylation of Akt in PaCa cells. Levels of PHLPPs were greatly reduced in human PDAC and in mouse genetic and xenograft models of PaCa. PHLPP activities in PaCa cells were down-regulated by growth factors and Nox4 reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase. PHLPP1 selectively dephosphorylated Akt2, whereas PHLPP2 selectively dephosphorylated Akt1. Akt2, but not Akt1, was up-regulated in PDAC, and Akt2 levels correlated with mortality. Consistent with these results, high levels of PHLPP1, which dephosphorylates Akt2 (but not PHLPP2, which dephosphorylates Akt1), correlated with longer survival times of patients with PDAC. In mice, xenograft tumors derived from PaCa cells that overexpress PHLPP1 (but not PHLPP2) had inactivated Akt, greater extent of apoptosis, and smaller size. CONCLUSIONS PHLPP1 has tumor suppressive activity and might represent a therapeutic or diagnostic tool for PDAC. PMID:22044669

  13. Physiological control of cholecystokinin release and pancreatic enzyme secretion by intraduodenal bile acids.

    PubMed Central

    Koop, I; Schindler, M; Bosshammer, A; Scheibner, J; Stange, E; Koop, H

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The physiological relevance of duodenal bile acids in the control of cholecystokinin release and pancreatic enzyme secretion is still unknown. AIMS: To provide a near physiological situation by perfusing a bile acid mixture mimicking the individual endogenous bile acid composition of the person under investigation. For maximal reduction of endogenous bile output the CCK-A receptor antagonist loxiglumide was infused intravenously. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Seven healthy volunteers were studied on four different days by a duodenal marker perfusion technique. The individual bile acid composition in duodenal juice and test meal stimulated bile acid output was assessed on day 1. Bile acids were perfused at an amount of 30 or 100% as determined on day 1 in combination with the test meal in the presence or absence of loxiglumide. Pancreatic enzymes, bilirubin, and bile acid output were determined in duodenal juice. Plasma cholecystokinin (CCK) and plasma pancreatic polypeptide (PP) were measured radioimmunologically. RESULTS: Bile acid perfusion did not significantly alter stimulated pancreatic enzyme, bilirubin or bile acid output or plasma CCK. Loxiglumide did not alter basal CCK release but increased test meal stimulated CCK output fourfold (p < 0.05). The addition of bile acids to the test meal at a dose resembling 30% of bile acid output as determined on day 1 prevented this increase. Plasma PP concentration remained unchanged by bile acids and were mostly undetectable during loxiglumide infusion. CONCLUSIONS: The CCK producing cell is under constant suppression by intraduodenal bile acids which cannot be further enhanced by a physiological bile acid mixture. However, removal of duodenal bile acids by inhibition of gall bladder contraction unmasks this suppression leading to a dramatic increase in plasma CCK levels. As little as one third of postprandially released bile acids completely reverse this effect. Bile acids are the most important luminal regulator

  14. Growth-promoting effect of Rh(D) antibody on human pancreatic islet cells.

    PubMed

    Feller, John M; Simpson, Ann M; Nelson, Margaret; Swan, M Anne; O'Connell, Philip J; Hawthorne, Wayne J; Tao, Chang; O'Brien, Bronwyn A

    2008-09-01

    Hyperinsulinism with islet cell hyperplasia is a frequent complication, of unknown cause, in hemolytic disease of the newborn, occurring in Rh(D)-positive infants of Rh-isoimmunized Rh(D)-negative mothers, but not in infants with other hemolytic disorders. We investigated the possibility that trans-placentally acquired anti-D Ig is the cause of both conditions. Monolayer cultures of human islet cells were exposed to sera from Rh-isoimmunized mothers and newborns, where jaundice, hyperinsulinism, and hypoglycemia in the infant had ensued. Parallel cultures with anti-D, specific anti-D monoclonal antibodies, normal human Ig (15 microg/ml), and serum controls were also undertaken. Islet cell proliferation was determined by [3H]thymidine incorporation. Insulin storage and chronic and acute insulin secretion to glucose were analyzed by RIA. Rh(D) surface antigen expression was determined on islet cells by flow cytometric analysis. Islet cell proliferation and insulin secretion were significantly greater in coculture with test sera (P < 0.01; n = 8) and with anti-D (P < 0.001; n = 8), compared with either controls or Ig. After 8 d of growth, the static incubation experiment showed a 3.5-fold response to glucose stimulus in all sera. Rh(D) antigen expression was detected on the islet cell surface by flow cytometry, and islet cell morphology was normal. Colocalization of the proliferation marker Ki67 with insulin by immunofluorescent staining further indicated that Rh(D) antibody promoted islet growth. The anti-Rh(D) islet cell proliferative effect generates neonatal hyperinsulinism in Rh isoimmunization. Anti-Rh(D) may have application for islet cell proliferation in diabetes mellitus treatment for Rh(D)-positive subjects. Further analysis is required.

  15. Use of RGD-Functionalized Sandwich Cultures to Promote Redifferentiation of Human Pancreatic Beta Cells After In Vitro Expansion.

    PubMed

    Aloy-Reverté, Caterina; Moreno-Amador, José L; Nacher, Montserrat; Montanya, Eduard; Semino, Carlos E

    2017-08-31

    Islet transplantation has provided proof of concept that cell therapy can restore normoglycemia in patients with diabetes. However, limited availability of islet tissue severely restricts the clinical use of the treatment. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop new strategies to generate an abundant source of insulin-producing cells that could be used to treat diabetes. A potential approach is the in vitro expansion of pancreatic beta cells obtained from cadaveric organ donors. However, when human beta cells are expanded in vitro, they dedifferentiate and lose the expression of insulin, probably as a consequence of pancreatic islet dissociation into single cells. We have studied whether reestablishment of cell-cell and cell-matrix relationships with a biomimetic synthetic scaffold could induce redifferentiation of expanded dedifferentiated beta cells. Cells isolated from human islet preparations were expanded in monolayer cultures and allowed to reaggregate into islet-like cell clusters (ICCs). Afterward, ICCs were embedded between two thin layers of the noninstructive self-assembling peptide (SAP), RAD16-I or RAD16-I functionalized with the integrin-binding motif RGD (RAD16-I/RGD) (R: arginine, G: glycine, D: aspartic acid), which was expected to promote cell-extracellular matrix interactions. ICCs cultured with RAD16-I were viable, maintained their cluster conformation, and increased in size by aggregation of ICCs, suggesting a self-organizing process. ICCs cultured in RAD16-I/RGD showed enhanced cell adhesion to RAD16-I matrix and reexpression of the beta cell-specific genes, Ins, Pdx1, Nkx6.1, and MafA. Redifferentiation was caused solely by bioactive cues introduced to the RAD16-I peptide since no differentiation factors were added to the culture medium. The results indicate that RGD-functionalized SAP in sandwich conformation is a promising three-dimensional platform to induce redifferentiation toward a beta cell phenotype and to generate insulin

  16. A prospective nested case-control study of vitamin D status and pancreatic cancer risk in male smokers.

    PubMed

    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Vieth, Reinhold; Azad, Azar; Pietinen, Pirjo; Taylor, Philip R; Virtamo, Jarmo; Albanes, Demetrius

    2006-10-15

    Sun exposure is associated with lower death rates for pancreatic cancer in some ecological studies. Skin exposure to UVB light induces cutaneous production of precursors to 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]. Pancreatic islet and duct cells express 25(OH)D(3)-1alpha-hydroxylase that generates the biologically active 1,25(OH)(2) vitamin D form. Thus, 25(OH)D concentrations could affect pancreatic function and possibly pancreatic cancer etiology. We conducted a prospective nested case-control study in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention cohort of male Finnish smokers, ages 50 to 69 years at baseline, to test whether more adequate vitamin D status, as determined by prediagnostic serum 25(OH)D concentrations, was associated with lower pancreatic cancer risk. Two hundred incident exocrine pancreatic cancer cases that occurred between 1985 and 2001 (up to 16.7 years of follow-up) were matched by age and date of blood draw to 400 controls who were alive and free of cancer at the time the case was diagnosed. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Higher vitamin D concentrations were associated with a 3-fold increased risk for pancreatic cancer (highest versus lowest quintile, >65.5 versus <32.0 nmol/L: OR, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.56-5.48, P(trend) = 0.001) that remained after excluding cases diagnosed early during follow-up. Contrary to expectations, subjects with higher prediagnostic vitamin D status had an increased pancreatic cancer risk compared with those with lower status. Our findings need to be replicated in other populations and caution is warranted in their interpretation and implication. Our results are intriguing and may provide clues that further the understanding of the etiology of this highly fatal cancer.

  17. Inflammatory stimuli promote growth and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells through NF-κB pathway dependent repression of PP2Ac

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Min; Liu, Lu; Shen, Meng; Zhi, Qiaoming; Gong, Fei-Ran; Zhou, Binhua P.; Wu, Yadi; Liu, Haiyan; Chen, Kai; Shen, Bairong; Wu, Meng-Yao; Shou, Liu-Mei; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have indicated that inflammatory stimulation represses protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a well-known tumor suppressor. However, whether PP2A repression participates in pancreatic cancer progression has not been verified. We used lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and macrophage-conditioned medium (MCM) to establish in vitro inflammation models, and investigated whether inflammatory stimuli affect pancreatic cancer cell growth and invasion PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac)-dependently. Via nude mouse models of orthotopic tumor xenografts and dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC)-induced chronic pancreatitis, we evaluated the effect of an inflammatory microenvironment on PP2Ac expression in vivo. We cloned the PP2Acα and PP2Acβ isoform promoters to investigate the PP2Ac transcriptional regulation mechanisms. MCM accelerated pancreatic cancer cell growth; MCM and LPS promoted cell invasion. DBTC promoted xenograft growth and metastasis, induced tumor-associated macrophage infiltration, promoted angiogenesis, activated the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway, and repressed PP2Ac expression. In vitro, LPS and MCM downregulated PP2Ac mRNA and protein. PP2Acα overexpression attenuated JNK, ERK, PKC, and IKK phosphorylation, and impaired LPS/MCM-stimulated cell invasion and MCM-promoted cell growth. LPS and MCM activated the NF-κB pathway in vitro. LPS and MCM induced IKK and IκB phosphorylation, leading to p65/RelA nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation. Overexpression of the dominant negative forms of IKKα attenuated LPS and MCM downregulation of PP2Ac, suggesting inflammatory stimuli repress PP2Ac expression NF-κB pathway–dependently. Luciferase reporter gene assay verified that LPS and MCM downregulated PP2Ac transcription through an NF-κB–dependent pathway. Our study presents a new mechanism in inflammation-driven cancer progression through NF-κB pathway–dependent PP2Ac repression. PMID:26761431

  18. COUP-TFII Controls Mouse Pancreatic β-Cell Mass through GLP-1-β-Catenin Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Boutant, Marie; Ramos, Oscar Henrique Pereira; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cécile; Movassat, Jamileh; Ilias, Anissa; Vallois, David; Planchais, Julien; Pégorier, Jean-Paul; Schuit, Frans; Petit, Patrice X.; Bossard, Pascale; Maedler, Kathrin; Grapin-Botton, Anne; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Background The control of the functional pancreatic β-cell mass serves the key homeostatic function of releasing the right amount of insulin to keep blood sugar in the normal range. It is not fully understood though how β-cell mass is determined. Methodology/Principal Findings Conditional chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII)-deficient mice were generated and crossed with mice expressing Cre under the control of pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (pdx1) gene promoter. Ablation of COUP-TFII in pancreas resulted in glucose intolerance. Beta-cell number was reduced at 1 day and 3 weeks postnatal. Together with a reduced number of insulin-containing cells in the ductal epithelium and normal β-cell proliferation and apoptosis, this suggests decreased β-cell differentiation in the neonatal period. By testing islets isolated from these mice and cultured β-cells with loss and gain of COUP-TFII function, we found that COUP-TFII induces the expression of the β-catenin gene and its target genes such as cyclin D1 and axin 2. Moreover, induction of these genes by glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) via β-catenin was impaired in absence of COUP-TFII. The expression of two other target genes of GLP-1 signaling, GLP-1R and PDX-1 was significantly lower in mutant islets compared to control islets, possibly contributing to reduced β-cell mass. Finally, we demonstrated that COUP-TFII expression was activated by the Wnt signaling-associated transcription factor TCF7L2 (T-cell factor 7-like 2) in human islets and rat β-cells providing a feedback loop. Conclusions/Significance Our findings show that COUP-TFII is a novel component of the GLP-1 signaling cascade that increases β-cell number during the neonatal period. COUP-TFII is required for GLP-1 activation of the β-catenin-dependent pathway and its expression is under the control of TCF7L2. PMID:22292058

  19. Satellite RNAs promote pancreatic oncogenic processes via the dysfunction of YBX1

    PubMed Central

    Kishikawa, Takahiro; Otsuka, Motoyuki; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Ohno, Motoko; Ijichi, Hideaki; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Highly repetitive tandem arrays at the centromeric and pericentromeric regions in chromosomes, previously considered silent, are actively transcribed, particularly in cancer. This aberrant expression occurs even in K-ras-mutated pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) tissues, which are precancerous lesions. To examine the biological roles of the satellite RNAs in carcinogenesis, we construct mouse PanIN-derived cells expressing major satellite (MajSAT) RNA and show increased malignant properties. We find an increase in frequency of chromosomal instability and point mutations in both genomic and mitochondrial DNA. We identify Y-box binding protein 1 (YBX1) as a protein that binds to MajSAT RNA. MajSAT RNA inhibits the nuclear translocation of YBX1 under stress conditions, thus reducing its DNA-damage repair function. The forced expression of YBX1 significantly decreases the aberrant phenotypes. These findings indicate that during the early stage of cancer development, satellite transcripts may act as ‘intrinsic mutagens' by inducing YBX1 dysfunction, which may be crucial in oncogenic processes. PMID:27667193

  20. Continuous postoperative blood glucose monitoring and control by artificial pancreas in patients having pancreatic resection: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Okabayashi, Takehiro; Nishimori, Isao; Yamashita, Koichi; Sugimoto, Takeki; Maeda, Hiromichi; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Kohsaki, Takuhiro; Kobayashi, Michiya; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate a closed-loop system providing continuous monitoring and strict control of perioperative blood glucose following pancreatic resection. Prospective, randomized clinical trial. Thirty patients who had pancreatic resection for pancreatic neoplasm. Patients were prospectively randomized. Perioperative blood glucose levels were continuously monitored using an artificial endocrine pancreas (STG-22). Glucose levels were controlled using either the sliding scale method (sliding scale group, n = 13) or the artificial pancreas (artificial pancreas group, n = 17). Incidence of severe hypoglycemia (<40 mg/dL) during the intensive care period following pancreatic resection in patients monitored with the artificial pancreas. The secondary outcome measure was the total amount of insulin required for glycemic control in the first 18 hours after pancreatic resection in each patient group. In the sliding scale group, postoperative blood glucose levels rose initially before reaching a plateau of approximately 200 mg/dL between 4 and 6 hours after pancreatectomy. The levels remained high for 18 hours postoperatively. In the artificial pancreas group, blood glucose levels reduced steadily, reaching the target zone (80-110 mg/dL) by 6 hours after surgery. The total insulin dose administered per patient during the first postoperative 18 hours was significantly higher in the artificial pancreas group (mean [SD], 107 [109] IU) than the sliding scale group (8 [6] IU; P < .01). Neither group showed hypoglycemia. Perioperative use of an artificial endocrine pancreas to control pancreatogenic diabetes after pancreatic resection is an easy and effective way to maintain near-normal blood glucose levels. The artificial pancreas shows promise for use as insulin treatment for patients with pancreatogenic diabetes after pancreatic resection.

  1. TLR7 and TLR8 expression increases tumor cell proliferation and promotes chemoresistance in human pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    GRIMMIG, TANJA; MATTHES, NIELS; HOELAND, KATHARINA; TRIPATHI, SUDIPTA; CHANDRAKER, ANIL; GRIMM, MARTIN; MOENCH, ROMANA; MOLL, EVA-MARIA; FRIESS, HELMUT; TSAUR, IGOR; BLAHETA, ROMAN A.; GERMER, CRISTOPH T.; WAAGA-GASSER, ANA MARIA; GASSER, MARTIN

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation as an important epigenetic and environmental factor for putative tumorigenesis and tumor progression may be associated with specific activation of Toll-like receptors (TLR). Recently, carcinogenesis has been suggested to be dependent on TLR7 signaling. In the present study, we determined the role of both TLR7 and TLR8 expression and signaling in tumor cell proliferation and chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer. Expression of TLR7/TLR8 in UICC stage I–IV pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, normal pancreatic tissue and human pancreatic (PANC1) cancer cell line was examined. For in vitro/in vivo studies TLR7/TLR8 overexpressing PANC1 cell lines were generated and analyzed for effects of (un-)stimulated TLR expression on tumor cell proliferation and chemoresistance. TLR expression was increased in pancreatic cancer, with stage-dependent upregulation in advanced tumors, compared to earlier stages and chronic pancreatitis. Stimulation of TLR7/TLR8 overexpressing PANC1 cells resulted in elevated NF-κB and COX-2 expression, increased cancer cell proliferation and reduced chemosensitivity. More importantly, TLR7/TLR8 expression increased tumor growth in vivo. Our data demonstrate a stage-dependent upregulation of both TLR7 and TLR8 expression in pancreatic cancer. Functional analysis in human pancreatic cancer cells point to a significant role of both TLRs in chronic inflammation-mediated TLR7/TLR8 signaling leading to tumor cell proliferation and chemoresistance. PMID:26134824

  2. Dclk1 Defines Quiescent Pancreatic Progenitors that Promote Injury-Induced Regeneration and Tumorigenesis | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The existence of adult pancreatic progenitor cells has been debated. While some favor the concept of facultative progenitors involved in homeostasis and repair, neither a location nor markers for such cells have been defined. Using genetic lineage tracing, we show that Doublecortin-like kinase-1 (Dclk1) labels a rare population of long-lived, quiescent pancreatic cells. In vitro, Dclk1+ cells proliferate readily and sustain pancreatic organoid growth. In vivo, Dclk1+ cells are necessary for pancreatic regeneration following injury and chronic inflammation.

  3. Use of corticosteriods in the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis: results of a controlled prospective study.

    PubMed

    De Palma, G D; Catanzano, C

    1999-04-01

    The aim of this prospective controlled study was to determine whether prophylactic corticosteroids decrease the incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis. A double-blind comparison of hydrocortisone (100 mg by i.v. infusion immediately before endoscopy) with placebo (sodium chloride administered in the same fashion). A total of 535 patients (286 women and 249 men, with an average age of 58.6 yr) who were scheduled to undergo diagnostic or operative ERCP underwent randomization. Six patients were excluded from the final evaluation for various reasons. The remaining 529 patients, 263 in the hydrocortisone group and 266 in the placebo group, were analyzed. Patients were divided into subgroups with regard to high risk factors for acute pancreatitis after ERCP. The overall incidence of acute pancreatitis was 5.3% (28 of 529 patients). Procedure-induced pancreatitis occurred in 15 of 263 (5.7%) patients treated with hydrocortisone and in 13 of 266 (4.9%) patients treated with placebo (p = NS). The results of analysis of risk factors for pancreatitis did not evidence any significant difference between the hydrocortisone group and the placebo group. Hydrocortisone does not prevent acute pancreatitis after diagnostic or therapeutic ERCP.

  4. RABL6A Promotes Oxaliplatin Resistance in Tumor Cells and Is a New Marker of Survival for Resected Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Muniz, Viviane P.; Askeland, Ryan W.; Zhang, Xuefeng; Reed, Sara M.; Tompkins, Van S.; Hagen, Jussara; McDowell, Bradley D.; Button, Anna; Smith, Brian J.; Weydert, Jamie A.; Mezhir, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by early recurrence following pancreatectomy, rapid progression, and chemoresistance. Novel prognostic and predictive biomarkers are urgently needed to both stratify patients for clinical trials and select patients for adjuvant therapy regimens. This study sought to determine the biological significance of RABL6A (RAB, member RAS oncogene family-like protein 6 isoform A), a novel pancreatic protein, in PDAC. Analyses of RABL6A protein expression in PDAC specimens from 73 patients who underwent pancreatic resection showed that RABL6A levels are altered in 74% of tumors relative to adjacent benign ductal epithelium. Undetectable RABL6A expression, found in 7% (5/73) of patients, correlated with improved overall survival (range 41 to 118 months with 3/5 patients still living), while patients with RABL6A expression had a worse outcome (range 3.3 to 100 months, median survival 20.3 months) (P = 0.0134). In agreement with those findings, RABL6A expression was increased in pancreatic cancer cell lines compared to normal pancreatic epithelial cells, and its knockdown inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. Moreover, RABL6A depletion selectively sensitized cells to oxaliplatin-induced arrest and death. This work reveals that RABL6A promotes the proliferation, survival, and oxaliplatin resistance of PDAC cells, whereas its loss is associated with extended survival in patients with resected PDAC. Such data suggest RABL6A is a novel biomarker of PDAC and potential target for anticancer therapy. PMID:24167655

  5. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... fluids through an intravenous (IV) tube in your vein and nutrition through a feeding tube or IV. ...

  6. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donate E-News Sign-Up Home Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis (HP) is a rare genetic condition characterized ... at least 1,000 individuals are affected with hereditary pancreatitis. HP has also been linked to an ...

  7. Desferrioxamine Attenuates Pancreatic Injury after Major Hepatectomy under Vascular Control of the Liver: Experimental Study in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Varsos, Panagiotis; Nastos, Constantinos; Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Kalimeris, Konstantinos; Defterevos, George; Nomikos, Tzortzis; Pafiti, Agathi; Fragulidis, George; Economou, Emmanuel; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Smyrniotis, Vassilios; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Pancreatic injury can manifest after major hepatectomy under vascular control. The main mechanism involved seems to be remote oxidative injury due to “spillage” of reactive oxygen species and cytokines from the liver. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of desferrioxamine in the prevention of pancreatic injury following major hepatectomy. Methods. Twelve Landrace pigs were subjected to a combination of major hepatectomy (70–75%), using the Pringle maneuver for 150 minutes, after constructing a porta-caval side-to-side anastomosis. The duration of reperfusion was 24 hours. Animals were randomly divided into a control group (n = 6) and a desferrioxamine group (DFX, n = 6). DFX animals were treated with continuous IV infusion of desferrioxamine 100 mg/kg. Pancreatic tissue injury, c-peptide and amylase concentrations, and pancreatic tissue oxidative markers were evaluated. Results. Desferrioxamine-treated animals showed decreased c-peptide levels, decreased acinar cell necrosis, and decreased tissue malondialdehyde levels 24 hours after reperfusion compared with the control group. There was no difference in portal pressure or serum amylase levels between the groups. Conclusions. Desferrioxamine seems to attenuate pancreatic injury after major hepatectomy under vascular control possibly by preventing and reversing production and circulation of oxidative products. PMID:22791933

  8. Pancreatic Satellite Cells Derived Galectin-1 Increase the Progression and Less Survival of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Wang, Sen; Ye, Nianyuan; Li, Ping; Gao, Sujun; Miao, Yi; Wang, Daorong; Jiang, Kuirong

    2014-01-01

    Background Galectin-1, a member of carbohydrate-binding proteins with a polyvalent function on tumor progression, was found strongly expressed in pancreatic satellite cells (PSCs), which partner in crime with cancer cells and promote the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We evaluated the effects of PSCs derived Galectin-1 on the progression of PDAC, as well as the tumor establishment and development in mouse xenografts. Methods The relationship between immunohistochemistry staining intensity of Galectin-1 and clinicopathologic variables were assessed in 66 PDAC tissues, 18 chronic pancreatitis tissues and 10 normal controls. The roles of PSCs isolated from PDAC and normal pancreas on the proliferative activity, MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and the invasion of CFPAC-1 in the co-cultured system, as well as on the tumor establishment and development in mouse xenografts by mixed implanting with CFPAC-1 subcutaneously were evaluated. Results Galectin-1 expression was gradually increased from normal pancreas (negative), chronic pancreatitis (weak) to PDAC (strong), in which Galectin-1 expression was also increased from well, moderately to poorly differentiated PDAC. Galectin-1 staining intensity of pancreatic cancer tissue was associated with increase in tumor size, lymph node metastasis, perineural invasion and differentiation and UICC stage, and served as the independent prognostic indicator of poor survival of pancreatic cancer. In vitro and in vivo experiments indicated that TGF-β1 upregulated Galectin-1 expression in PSCs, which could further promotes the proliferative activity, MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, as well as the tumor establishment and growth. Conclusion Galectin-1 expression in stromal cells of pancreatic cancer suggests that this protein plays a role in the promotion of cancer cells invasion and metastasis and provides a therapeutic target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24595374

  9. Pancreatic signals controlling food intake; insulin, glucagon and amylin

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Stephen C; Lutz, Thomas A; Geary, Nori; Langhans, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The control of food intake and body weight by the brain relies upon the detection and integration of signals reflecting energy stores and fluxes, and their interaction with many different inputs related to food palatability and gastrointestinal handling as well as social, emotional, circadian, habitual and other situational factors. This review focuses upon the role of hormones secreted by the endocrine pancreas: hormones, which individually and collectively influence food intake, with an emphasis upon insulin, glucagon and amylin. Insulin and amylin are co-secreted by B-cells and provide a signal that reflects both circulating energy in the form of glucose and stored energy in the form of visceral adipose tissue. Insulin acts directly at the liver to suppress the synthesis and secretion of glucose, and some plasma insulin is transported into the brain and especially the mediobasal hypothalamus where it elicits a net catabolic response, particularly reduced food intake and loss of body weight. Amylin reduces meal size by stimulating neurons in the hindbrain, and there is evidence that amylin additionally functions as an adiposity signal controlling body weight as well as meal size. Glucagon is secreted from A-cells and increases glucose secretion from the liver. Glucagon acts in the liver to reduce meal size, the signal being relayed to the brain via the vagus nerves. To summarize, hormones of the endocrine pancreas are collectively at the crossroads of many aspects of energy homeostasis. Glucagon and amylin act in the short term to reduce meal size, and insulin sensitizes the brain to short-term meal-generated satiety signals; and insulin and perhaps amylin as well act over longer intervals to modulate the amount of fat maintained and defended by the brain. Hormones of the endocrine pancreas interact with receptors at many points along the gut–brain axis, from the liver to the sensory vagus nerve to the hindbrain to the hypothalamus; and their signals are

  10. Negative oncologic impact of poor postoperative pain control in left-sided pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Min, Eun-Ki; Chong, Jae Uk; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Pae, Sang Joon; Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Woo Jung

    2017-01-28

    To investigate the association between postoperative pain control and oncologic outcomes in resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). From January 2009 to December 2014, 221 patients were diagnosed with PDAC and underwent resection with curative intent. Retrospective review of the patients was performed based on electronic medical records system. One patient without records of numerical rating scale (NRS) pain intensity scores was excluded and eight patients who underwent total pancreatectomy were also excluded. NRS scores during 7 postoperative days following resection of PDAC were reviewed along with clinicopathologic characteristics. Patients were stratified into a good pain control group and a poor pain control group according to the difference in average pain intensity between the early (POD 1, 2, 3) and late (POD 5, 7) postoperative periods. Cox-proportional hazards multivariate analysis was performed to determine association between postoperative pain control and oncologic outcomes. A total of 212 patients were dichotomized into good pain control group (n = 162) and poor pain control group (n = 66). Median follow-up period was 17 mo. A negative impact of poor postoperative pain control on overall survival (OS) was observed in the group of patients receiving distal pancreatectomy (DP group; 42.0 mo vs 5.0 mo, P = 0.001). Poor postoperative pain control was also associated with poor disease-free survival (DFS) in the DP group (18.0 mo vs 8.0 mo, P = 0.001). Patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy or pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD group) did not show associations between postoperative pain control and oncologic outcomes. Poor patients' perceived pain control was revealed as an independent risk factor of both DFS (HR = 4.157; 95%CI: 1.938-8.915; P < 0.001) and OS (HR = 4.741; 95%CI: 2.214-10.153; P < 0.001) in resected left-sided pancreatic cancer. Adequate postoperative pain relief during the early postoperative period has important

  11. Negative oncologic impact of poor postoperative pain control in left-sided pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Min, Eun-Ki; Chong, Jae Uk; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Pae, Sang Joon; Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Woo Jung

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the association between postoperative pain control and oncologic outcomes in resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). METHODS From January 2009 to December 2014, 221 patients were diagnosed with PDAC and underwent resection with curative intent. Retrospective review of the patients was performed based on electronic medical records system. One patient without records of numerical rating scale (NRS) pain intensity scores was excluded and eight patients who underwent total pancreatectomy were also excluded. NRS scores during 7 postoperative days following resection of PDAC were reviewed along with clinicopathologic characteristics. Patients were stratified into a good pain control group and a poor pain control group according to the difference in average pain intensity between the early (POD 1, 2, 3) and late (POD 5, 7) postoperative periods. Cox-proportional hazards multivariate analysis was performed to determine association between postoperative pain control and oncologic outcomes. RESULTS A total of 212 patients were dichotomized into good pain control group (n = 162) and poor pain control group (n = 66). Median follow-up period was 17 mo. A negative impact of poor postoperative pain control on overall survival (OS) was observed in the group of patients receiving distal pancreatectomy (DP group; 42.0 mo vs 5.0 mo, P = 0.001). Poor postoperative pain control was also associated with poor disease-free survival (DFS) in the DP group (18.0 mo vs 8.0 mo, P = 0.001). Patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy or pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD group) did not show associations between postoperative pain control and oncologic outcomes. Poor patients’ perceived pain control was revealed as an independent risk factor of both DFS (HR = 4.157; 95%CI: 1.938-8.915; P < 0.001) and OS (HR = 4.741; 95%CI: 2.214-10.153; P < 0.001) in resected left-sided pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSION Adequate postoperative pain relief during the early

  12. Pyruvate kinase, muscle isoform 2 promotes proliferation and insulin secretion of pancreatic β-cells via activating Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suijun; Yang, Zhen; Gao, Ying; Li, Quanzhong; Su, Yong; Wang, Yanfang; Zhang, Yun; Man, Hua; Liu, Hongxia

    2015-01-01

    Failure of pancreatic β-cells is closely associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), an intractable disease affecting numerous patients. Pyruvate kinase, muscle isoform 2 (PKM2) is a potential modulator of insulin secretion in β-cells. This study aims at revealing roles and possible mechanisms of PKM2 in pancreatic β-cells. Mouse pancreatic β-cell line NIT-1 was used for high glucose treatment and PKM2 overexpression by its specific expression vector. Cell proliferation by Thiazolyl blue assay, cell apoptosis by annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/prodium iodide staining and insulin secretion assay by ELISA were performed in each group. The mRNA and protein levels of related factors were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR and western blot. Results showed that Pkm2 was inhibited under high glucose conditions compared to the untreated cells (P < 0.01). Its overexpression significantly suppressed NIT-1 cell apoptosis (P < 0.01), and induced cell proliferation (P < 0.05) and insulin secretion (P < 0.05). Related factors showed consistent mRNA expression changes. Protein levels of β-catenin (CTNNB1), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and IRS2 were all promoted by PKM2 overexpression (P < 0.01), indicating the activated Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling. These results indicated the inductive roles of PKM2 in pancreatic β-cell NIT-1, including promoting cell proliferation and insulin secretion, and inhibiting cell apoptosis, which might be achieved via activating the Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling and downstream factors. This study offers basic information on the role and mechanism of PKM2 in pancreatic β-cells, and lays the foundation for using PKM2 as a potential therapeutic target in T2DM.

  13. Pyruvate kinase, muscle isoform 2 promotes proliferation and insulin secretion of pancreatic β-cells via activating Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Suijun; Yang, Zhen; Gao, Ying; Li, Quanzhong; Su, Yong; Wang, Yanfang; Zhang, Yun; Man, Hua; Liu, Hongxia

    2015-01-01

    Failure of pancreatic β-cells is closely associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), an intractable disease affecting numerous patients. Pyruvate kinase, muscle isoform 2 (PKM2) is a potential modulator of insulin secretion in β-cells. This study aims at revealing roles and possible mechanisms of PKM2 in pancreatic β-cells. Mouse pancreatic β-cell line NIT-1 was used for high glucose treatment and PKM2 overexpression by its specific expression vector. Cell proliferation by Thiazolyl blue assay, cell apoptosis by annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/prodium iodide staining and insulin secretion assay by ELISA were performed in each group. The mRNA and protein levels of related factors were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR and western blot. Results showed that Pkm2 was inhibited under high glucose conditions compared to the untreated cells (P < 0.01). Its overexpression significantly suppressed NIT-1 cell apoptosis (P < 0.01), and induced cell proliferation (P < 0.05) and insulin secretion (P < 0.05). Related factors showed consistent mRNA expression changes. Protein levels of β-catenin (CTNNB1), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and IRS2 were all promoted by PKM2 overexpression (P < 0.01), indicating the activated Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling. These results indicated the inductive roles of PKM2 in pancreatic β-cell NIT-1, including promoting cell proliferation and insulin secretion, and inhibiting cell apoptosis, which might be achieved via activating the Wnt/CTNNB1 signaling and downstream factors. This study offers basic information on the role and mechanism of PKM2 in pancreatic β-cells, and lays the foundation for using PKM2 as a potential therapeutic target in T2DM. PMID:26823761

  14. Early pancreatic islet fate and maturation is controlled through RBP-Jκ

    PubMed Central

    Cras-Méneur, Corentin; Conlon, Megan; Zhang, Yaqing; Pasca Di Magliano, Marina; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling is known to control early pancreatic differentiation through Ngn3 repression. In later stages, downstream of Notch, the Presenilins are still required to maintain the endocrine fate allocation. Amongst their multiple targets, it remains unclear which one actually controls the maintenance of the fate of the early islets. Conditional deletions of the Notch effector RBP-Jκ with lineage tracing in Presenilin-deficient endocrine progenitors, demonstrated that this factor is central to the control of the fate through a non-canonical Notch mechanism. RBP-Jκ mice exhibit normal islet morphogenesis and function, however, a fraction of the progenitors fails to differentiate and develop into disorganized masses resembling acinar to ductal metaplasia and chronic pancreatitis. A subsequent deletion of RBP-Jκ in forming β-cells led to the transdifferentiation into the other endocrine cells types, indicating that this factor still mediates the maintenance of the fate within the endocrine lineage itself. These results highlight the dual importance of Notch signaling for the endocrine lineage. Even after Ngn3 expression, Notch activity is required to maintain both fate and maturation of the Ngn3 progenitors. In a subset of the cells, these alterations of Notch signaling halt their differentiation and leads to acinar to ductal metaplasia. PMID:27240887

  15. Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells Induce a MyD88-Dependent Stromal Response to Promote a Tumor-Tolerant Immune Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Delitto, Daniel; Delitto, Andrea E; DiVita, Bayli B; Pham, Kien; Han, Song; Hartlage, Emily R; Newby, Brittney N; Gerber, Michael H; Behrns, Kevin E; Moldawer, Lyle L; Thomas, Ryan M; George, Thomas J; Brusko, Todd M; Mathews, Clayton E; Liu, Chen; Trevino, Jose G; Hughes, Steven J; Wallet, Shannon M

    2017-02-01

    Cancer cells exert mastery over the local tumor-associated stroma (TAS) to configure protective immunity within the tumor microenvironment. The immunomodulatory character of pancreatic lysates of patients with cancer differs from those with pancreatitis. In this study, we evaluated the cross-talk between pancreatic cancer and its TAS in primary human cell culture models. Upon exposure of TAS to pancreatic cancer cell-conditioned media, we documented robust secretion of IL6 and IL8. This TAS response was MyD88-dependent and sufficient to directly suppress both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation, inducing Th17 polarization at the expense of Th1. We found that patients possessed a similar shift in circulating effector memory Th17:Th1 ratios compared with healthy controls. The TAS response also directly suppressed CD8(+) T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Overall, our results demonstrate how TAS contributes to the production of an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment in pancreatic cancer. Cancer Res; 77(3); 672-83. ©2016 AACR.

  16. Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 3a (eIF3a) Promotes Cell Proliferation and Motility in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu Qian; Liu, Yu; Yao, Min Ya; Jin, Jing

    2016-10-01

    Identifying a target molecule that is crucially involved in pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis is necessary in developing an effective treatment. The study aimed to investigate the role of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3a (eIF3a) in the cell proliferation and motility in pancreatic cancer. Our data showed that the expression of eIF3a was upregulated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma as compared with its expression in normal pancreatic tissues. Knockdown of eIF3a by a specific shRNA caused significant decreases in cell proliferation and clonogenic abilities in pancreatic cancer SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Consistently, the pancreatic cancer cell growth rates were also impaired in xenotransplanted mice. Moreover, wound-healing assay showed that depletion of eIF3a significantly slowed down the wound recovery processes in SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Transwell migration and invasion assays further showed that cell migration and invasion abilities were significantly inhibited by knockdown of eIF3a in SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Statistical analysis of eIF3a expression in 140 cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma samples revealed that eIF3a expression was significantly associated with tumor metastasis and TNM staging. These analyses suggest that eIF3a contributes to cell proliferation and motility in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

  17. Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 3a (eIF3a) Promotes Cell Proliferation and Motility in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Identifying a target molecule that is crucially involved in pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis is necessary in developing an effective treatment. The study aimed to investigate the role of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3a (eIF3a) in the cell proliferation and motility in pancreatic cancer. Our data showed that the expression of eIF3a was upregulated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma as compared with its expression in normal pancreatic tissues. Knockdown of eIF3a by a specific shRNA caused significant decreases in cell proliferation and clonogenic abilities in pancreatic cancer SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Consistently, the pancreatic cancer cell growth rates were also impaired in xenotransplanted mice. Moreover, wound-healing assay showed that depletion of eIF3a significantly slowed down the wound recovery processes in SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Transwell migration and invasion assays further showed that cell migration and invasion abilities were significantly inhibited by knockdown of eIF3a in SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Statistical analysis of eIF3a expression in 140 cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma samples revealed that eIF3a expression was significantly associated with tumor metastasis and TNM staging. These analyses suggest that eIF3a contributes to cell proliferation and motility in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:27550487

  18. Retinoic acid promotes the generation of pancreatic endocrine progenitor cells and their further differentiation into beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Oström, Maria; Loffler, Kelly A; Edfalk, Sara; Selander, Lars; Dahl, Ulf; Ricordi, Camillo; Jeon, Jongmin; Correa-Medina, Mayrin; Diez, Juan; Edlund, Helena

    2008-07-30

    The identification of secreted factors that can selectively stimulate the generation of insulin producing beta-cells from stem and/or progenitor cells represent a significant step in the development of stem cell-based beta-cell replacement therapy. By elucidating the molecular mechanisms that regulate the generation of beta-cells during normal pancreatic development such putative factors may be identified. In the mouse, beta-cells increase markedly in numbers from embryonic day (e) 14.5 and onwards, but the extra-cellular signal(s) that promotes the selective generation of beta-cells at these stages remains to be identified. Here we show that the retinoic acid (RA) synthesizing enzyme Raldh1 is expressed in developing mouse and human pancreas at stages when beta-cells are generated. We also provide evidence that RA induces the generation of Ngn3(+) endocrine progenitor cells and stimulates their further differentiation into beta-cells by activating a program of cell differentiation that recapitulates the normal temporal program of beta-cell differentiation.

  19. Elevated COX-2 Expression Promotes Angiogenesis Through EGFR/p38-MAPK/Sp1-Dependent Signalling in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hai; Han, Ting; Zhuo, Meng; Wu, Lei-Lei; Yuan, Cuncun; Wu, Lixia; Lei, Wang; Jiao, Feng; Wang, Li-Wei

    2017-03-28

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was stated to be overexpression in various human malignancies associating with angiogenesis, metastasis and chemoresistence. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal disease displaying many of these characteristics. A common abnormality of PDAC is overexpression of specificity protein-1 (Sp1), which was said to correlate with malignant phenotypes of human cancers. Using RNA-seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we found that Sp1 expression was positively correlated with that of COX-2 in PDAC, and that the inhibition or overexpression of Sp1 in PDAC cells leads to decreased or elevated COX-2 expression. Luciferase reporter gene and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays revealed that elevated transcription of COX-2 requires Sp1 binding to sequence positions around -245/-240 of COX-2 promoter. Activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and downstream p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) were also profoundly altered in PDAC. The inhibition of EGFR/p38-MAPK signaling resulted in reduced Sp1 activation, decreased COX-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Thus, Sp1 could transcriptionally activate COX-2 expression in a process relies on activated EGFR/p38-MAPK signaling. Finally, we found that the inhibition of COX-2 leads to decreased angiogenesis in a process dependent on VEGF, which link COX-2 to angiogenesis in PDAC.

  20. USP39, a direct target of microRNA-133a, promotes progression of pancreatic cancer via the AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Liu, Tiande; Huang, Peng; Yan, Wei; Guo, Changkuo; Xiong, Le; Liu, Anwen

    2017-04-22

    Ubiquitin specific protease 39 (USP39) is one of the deubiquitinating enzymes without ubiquitin protease activity, which has been implicated in the progression of several cancers. However, the role of USP39 in pancreatic cancer (PC) is largely unknown. In present study, we found that USP39 expression was elevated in PC tissues than adjacent non-tumor tissues. Importantly, we demonstrated that overexpression of USP39 is closely correlated with tumor progression and poor survival in PC patients. Furthermore, high USP39 expression was observed in PC cell lines and ectopic expression of USP39 significantly enhanced in vitro cell proliferation and promoted in vivo tumor growth, whereas silencing USP39 suppressed growth of PC cells. Besides, our experimental data revealed that knockdown of USP39 induced cell apoptosis through inhibition of AKT signaling pathway in PC cells. Moreover, USP39 was a direct target of miR-133a, a microRNA that has been reported to be involved in progression of PC. Taken together, our data provide a novel PC regulatory axis that is miR-133a/USP39, the dysfunction of which drives diverse aspects of the progression of PC.

  1. RABL6A promotes G1-S phase progression and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell proliferation in an Rb1-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Jussara; Muniz, Viviane P.; Falls, Kelly; Reed, Sara M.; Taghiyev, Agshin F.; Quelle, Frederick W.; Gourronc, Francoise; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; Major, Heather J.; Askeland, Ryan; Sherman, Scott K.; O'Dorisio, Thomas M.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Howe, James R.; Darbro, Benjamin W.; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) proliferation are poorly understood and therapies that effectively control NET progression and metastatic disease are limited. We found amplification of a putative oncogene, RABL6A, in primary human pancreatic NETs(PNETs) that correlated with high level RABL6A protein expression. Consistent with those results, stable silencing of RABL6A in cultured BON-1 PNET cells revealed that it is essential for their proliferation and survival. Cells lacking RABL6A predominantly arrested in G1 phase with a moderate mitotic block. Pathway analysis of microarray data suggested activation of the p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb1) tumor suppressor pathways in the arrested cells. Loss of p53 had no effect on the RABL6A knockdown phenotype, indicating RABL6A functions independent of p53 in this setting. By comparison, Rb1 inactivation partially restored G1 to S phase progression in RABL6A knockdown cells although it was insufficient to override the mitotic arrest and cell death caused by RABL6A loss. Thus, RABL6A promotes G1 progression in PNET cells by inactivating Rb1, an established suppressor of PNET proliferation and development. This work identifies RABL6A as a novel negative regulator of Rb1 that is essential for PNET proliferation and survival. We suggest RABL6A is a new potential biomarker and target for anticancer therapy in PNET patients. PMID:25273089

  2. RABL6A promotes G1-S phase progression and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell proliferation in an Rb1-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Jussara; Muniz, Viviane P; Falls, Kelly C; Reed, Sara M; Taghiyev, Agshin F; Quelle, Frederick W; Gourronc, Francoise A; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J; Major, Heather J; Askeland, Ryan W; Sherman, Scott K; O'Dorisio, Thomas M; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Howe, James R; Darbro, Benjamin W; Quelle, Dawn E

    2014-11-15

    Mechanisms of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) proliferation are poorly understood, and therapies that effectively control NET progression and metastatic disease are limited. We found amplification of a putative oncogene, RABL6A, in primary human pancreatic NETs (PNET) that correlated with high-level RABL6A protein expression. Consistent with those results, stable silencing of RABL6A in cultured BON-1 PNET cells revealed that it is essential for their proliferation and survival. Cells lacking RABL6A predominantly arrested in G1 phase with a moderate mitotic block. Pathway analysis of microarray data suggested activation of the p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb1) tumor-suppressor pathways in the arrested cells. Loss of p53 had no effect on the RABL6A knockdown phenotype, indicating that RABL6A functions independent of p53 in this setting. By comparison, Rb1 inactivation partially restored G1 to S phase progression in RABL6A-knockdown cells, although it was insufficient to override the mitotic arrest and cell death caused by RABL6A loss. Thus, RABL6A promotes G1 progression in PNET cells by inactivating Rb1, an established suppressor of PNET proliferation and development. This work identifies RABL6A as a novel negative regulator of Rb1 that is essential for PNET proliferation and survival. We suggest RABL6A is a new potential biomarker and target for anticancer therapy in PNET patients.

  3. Generation and Characterization of Transgenic Mice Expressing Mouse Ins1 Promoter for Pancreatic β-Cell-Specific Gene Overexpression and Knockout.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yulong; Su, Yutong; Shan, Aijing; Jiang, Xiuli; Ma, Qinyun; Wang, Weiqing; Ning, Guang; Cao, Yanan

    2015-07-01

    The technologies for pancreatic β-cell-specific gene overexpression or knockout are fundamental for investigations of functional genes in vivo. Here we generated the Ins1-Cre-Dsred and Ins1-rtTA mouse models, which expressed the Cre recombinase or reverse tetracycline regulatable transactivator (rtTA) without hGH minigene under the control of mouse Ins1 promoter. Our data showed that the Cre-mediated recombination and rtTA-mediated activation could be efficiently detected at embryonic day 13.5 when these models were crossed with the reporter mice (ROSA(mT/mG) or tetO-HIST1H2BJ/GFP). The Cre and rtTA expression was restricted to β-cells without leakage in the brain and other tissues. Moreover, both the transgenic lines showed normal glucose tolerance and insulin secretion. These results suggested that the Ins1-Cre-Dsred and Ins1-rtTA mice could be used to knock out or overexpress target genes in embryos and adults to facilitate β-cell researches.

  4. Arginase-II Promotes Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Release From Pancreatic Acinar Cells Causing β-Cell Apoptosis in Aging.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yuyan; Yepuri, Gautham; Necetin, Sevil; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Ming, Xiu-Fen; Yang, Zhihong

    2017-06-01

    Aging is associated with glucose intolerance. Arginase-II (Arg-II), the type-II L-arginine-ureahydrolase, is highly expressed in pancreas. However, its role in regulation of pancreatic β-cell function is not known. Here we show that female (not male) mice deficient in Arg-II (Arg-II(-/-)) are protected from age-associated glucose intolerance and reveal greater glucose induced-insulin release, larger islet size and β-cell mass, and more proliferative and less apoptotic β-cells compared with the age-matched wild-type (WT) controls. Moreover, Arg-II is mainly expressed in acinar cells and is upregulated with aging, which enhances p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) activation and release of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Accordingly, conditioned medium of isolated acinar cells from old WT (not Arg-II(-/-)) mice contains higher TNF-α levels than the young mice and stimulates β-cell apoptosis and dysfunction, which are prevented by a neutralizing anti-TNF-α antibody. In acinar cells, our study demonstrates an age-associated Arg-II upregulation, which promotes TNF-α release through p38 MAPK leading to β-cell apoptosis, insufficient insulin secretion, and glucose intolerance in female rather than male mice. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  5. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy versus surgery first for resectable pancreatic cancer (Norwegian Pancreatic Cancer Trial - 1 (NorPACT-1)) - study protocol for a national multicentre randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Labori, Knut Jørgen; Lassen, Kristoffer; Hoem, Dag; Grønbech, Jon Erik; Søreide, Jon Arne; Mortensen, Kim; Smaaland, Rune; Sorbye, Halfdan; Verbeke, Caroline; Dueland, Svein

    2017-08-25

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death. While surgical resection remains the foundation for potentially curative treatment, survival benefit is achieved with adjuvant oncological treatment. Thus, completion of multimodality treatment (surgical resection and (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy) to all patients and early treatment of micrometastatic disease is the ideal goal. NorPACT-1 aims to test the hypothesis that overall mortality at one year after allocation of treatment can be reduced with neoadjuvant chemotherapy in surgically treated patients with resectable pancreatic cancer. The NorPACT- 1 is a multicentre, randomized controlled phase III trial organized by the Norwegian Gastrointestinal Cancer Group for Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary cancer. Patients with resectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head are randomized to receive either surgery first (Group 1: SF/control) or neoadjuvant chemotherapy (Group 2: NT/intervention) with four cycles FOLFIRINOX followed by resection. Both groups receive adjuvant chemotherapy with gemicitabine and capecitabine (six cycles in Group 1, four cycles in Group 2). In total 90 patients will be randomized in all the five Norwegian university hospitals performing pancreatic surgery. Primary endpoint is overall mortality at one year following commencement of treatment for those who ultimately undergo resection. Secondary endpoints are overall survival after date of randomization (intention to treat), overall survival after resection, disease-free survival, histopathological response, complication rates after surgery, feasibility of neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy, completion rates of all parts of multimodal treatment, and quality-of-life. Bolt-on to the study is a translational research program that aims at identifying factors that are predictive of response to NT, the risk of distant cancer spread, and patient outcome. NorPACT- 1 is designed to investigate the additional benefit of NT compared to

  6. Clock-controlled output gene Dbp is a regulator of Arnt/Hif-1β gene expression in pancreatic islet β-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakabayashi, Hiroko; Ohta, Yasuharu Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Susuki, Yosuke; Taguchi, Akihiko; Tanabe, Katsuya; Kondo, Manabu; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Nagao, Yuko; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •Arnt mRNA expressed in a circadian manner in mouse pancreatic islets. •Expressions of Dbp and Arnt damped in the islets of a diabetic model mouse. •DBP and E4BP4 regulate Arnt promoter activity by direct binding. •Arnt may have a role in connecting circadian rhythm and metabolism. -- Abstract: Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)/hypoxia inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β) has emerged as a potential determinant of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and type 2 diabetes in humans. An 82% reduction in Arnt expression was observed in islets from type 2 diabetic donors as compared to non-diabetic donors. However, few regulators of Arnt expression have been identified. Meanwhile, disruption of the clock components CLOCK and BMAL1 is known to result in hypoinsulinemia and diabetes, but the molecular details remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel molecular connection between Arnt and two clock-controlled output genes, albumin D-element binding protein (Dbp) and E4 binding protein 4 (E4bp4). By conducting gene expression studies using the islets of Wfs1{sup −/−} A{sup y}/a mice that develop severe diabetes due to β-cell apoptosis, we demonstrated clock-related gene expressions to be altered in the diabetic mice. Dbp mRNA decreased by 50%, E4bp4 mRNA increased by 50%, and Arnt mRNA decreased by 30% at Zeitgever Time (ZT) 12. Mouse pancreatic islets exhibited oscillations of clock gene expressions. E4BP4, a D-box negative regulator, oscillated anti-phase to DBP, a D-box positive regulator. We also found low-amplitude circadian expression of Arnt mRNA, which peaked at ZT4. Over-expression of DBP raised both mRNA and protein levels of ARNT in HEK293 and MIN6 cell lines. Arnt promoter-driven luciferase reporter assay in MIN6 cells revealed that DBP increased Arnt promoter activity by 2.5-fold and that E4BP4 competitively inhibited its activation. In addition, on ChIP assay, DBP and E4BP4 directly bound to D-box elements within the

  7. CXCL8/IL-8 and CXCL12/SDF-1α Co-operatively Promote Invasiveness and Angiogenesis in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yoichi; Ochi, Nobuo; Sawai, Hirozumi; Yasuda, Akira; Takahashi, Hiroki; Funahashi, Hitoshi; Takeyama, Hiromitsu; Tong, Zhimin; Guha, Sushovan

    2009-01-01

    CXC-chemokines are involved in the chemotaxis of neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes. However, role of these chemokines in tumorigenesis, especially with regard to interaction between tumor and its microenvironment, has not been clearly elucidated. The purpose of this study was to analyze the co-operative role of CXCL8 and CXCL12 in the tumor-stromal interaction in pancreatic cancer (PaCa). Using ELISA and RT-PCR, we initially confirmed the expression of ligands and receptors, respectively, of CXC-chemokines in PaCa and stromal cells. We examined the co-operative role of CXCL8 and CXCL12 in proliferation/invasion of PaCa and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and in HUVEC tube-formations through tumor-stromal interaction by MTS, Matrigel invasion, and angiogenesis assays, respectively. We detected expression of CXCR4, but not CXCR2, in all PaCa cells and fibroblasts. PaCa cells secreted CXCL8, and fibroblast cells secreted CXCL12. CXCL8 production in PaCa was significantly enhanced by CXCL12, and CXCL12 production in fibroblasts was significantly enhanced by co-culturing with PaCa. CXCL8 enhanced proliferation/invasion of HUVECs but did not promote proliferation/invasion of PaCa. Both recombinant and PaCa-derived CXCL8 enhanced tube formation of HUVECs that were co-cultured with fibroblast cells. CXCL12 enhanced the proliferation/invasion of HUVECs and the invasion of PaCa cells but had no effect on tube formation of HUVEC. We showed that PaCa-derived CXCL8 and fibroblast-derived CXCL12 cooperatively induced angiogenesis in vitro by promoting HUVEC proliferation, invasion, and tube formation. Thus, corresponding receptors CXCR2 and CXCR4 are potential antiangiogenic and antimetastatic therapeutic targets in PaCa. PMID:19035451

  8. Pancreatic cancer-associated gene polymorphisms in a nation-wide cohort of p16-Leiden germline mutation carriers; a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Potjer, Thomas P; van der Stoep, Nienke; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Konings, Ingrid C A W; Aalfs, Cora M; van den Akker, Peter C; Ausems, Margreet G; Dommering, Charlotte J; van der Kolk, Lizet E; Maiburg, Merel C; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Wagner, Anja; Vasen, Hans F A; Hes, Frederik J

    2015-06-26

    The p16-Leiden founder mutation in the CDKN2A gene is the most common cause of Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome in the Netherlands. Individuals with this mutation are at increased risk for developing melanoma of the skin, as well as pancreatic cancer. However, there is a notable interfamilial variability in the occurrence of pancreatic cancer among p16-Leiden families. We aimed to test whether previously identified genetic risk factors for pancreatic cancer modify the risk for pancreatic cancer in p16-Leiden germline mutation carriers. Seven pancreatic cancer-associated SNPs were selected from the literature and were genotyped in a cohort of 185 p16-Leiden germline mutation carriers from 88 families, including 50 cases (median age 55 years) with pancreatic cancer and 135 controls (median age 64 years) without pancreatic cancer. Allelic odds ratios per SNP were calculated. No significant association with pancreatic cancer was found for any of the seven SNPs. Since genetic modifiers for developing melanoma have already been identified in CDKN2A mutation carriers, this study does not exclude that genetic modifiers do not play a role in the individual pancreatic cancer risk in this cohort of p16-Leiden germline mutation carriers. The search for these modifiers should therefore continue, because they can potentially facilitate more targeted pancreatic surveillance programs.

  9. Genetic Variability in Energy Balance and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in a Population-Based Case-Control Study in Minnesota

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianjun; Dhakal, Ishwori B.; Zhang, Xuemei; Prizment, Anna E.; Anderson, Kristin E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Accumulating evidence suggests that energy imbalance plays a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. However, it remains unclear whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes regulating energy homeostasis influence pancreatic cancer risk. We investigated this question in a case-control study conducted from 1994 to 1998. Methods Cases (n=173) were ascertained from hospitals in the Twin Cities and Mayo Clinic, Minnesota. Controls (n=476) were identified from the general population and frequency matched to cases by age and sex. Seven SNPs were evaluated in relation to pancreatic cancer using unconditional logistic regression. Results After adjustment for confounders, the leucine/proline or proline/proline genotype of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene rs16139 was associated with a lower risk than the leucine/leucine genotype [odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval) (95% CI): 0.40 (0.15, 0.91)]. Conversely, an increased risk was observed for the glycine/arginine or arginine/arginine genotype of the adrenoceptor beta 2, surface (ADRB2) gene rs1042713 as compared with the glycine/glycine genotype [OR (95% CI): 1.52 (1.01, 2.31)]. Conclusions This study first reveals that SNPs in genes modulating energy intake (NPY) and energy expenditure (ADRB2) altered pancreatic cancer risk. If confirmed by other studies, our findings may shed new light on the etiology and prevention of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24201779

  10. Genetic variability in energy balance and pancreatic cancer risk in a population-based case-control study in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianjun; Dhakal, Ishwori B; Zhang, Xuemei; Prizment, Anna E; Anderson, Kristin E

    2014-03-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that energy imbalance plays a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. However, it remains unclear whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes regulating energy homeostasis influence pancreatic cancer risk. We investigated this question in a case-control study conducted from 1994 to 1998. Patients (n = 173) were ascertained from hospitals in the Twin Cities and Mayo Clinic, Minnesota. Control subjects (n = 476) were identified from the general population and frequency matched to patients by age and sex. Seven SNPs were evaluated in relation to pancreatic cancer using unconditional logistic regression. After adjustment for confounders, the leucine/proline or proline/proline genotype of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene rs16139 was associated with a lower risk than the leucine/leucine genotype (odds ratio, 0.40 [95% confidence interval, 0.15-0.91]). Conversely, an increased risk was observed for the glycine/arginine or arginine/arginine genotype of the adrenoceptor β2, surface (ADRB2) gene rs1042713 as compared with the glycine/glycine genotype (odds ratio, 1.52 [95% confidence interval, 1.01-2.31]). This study first reveals that SNPs in genes modulating energy intake (NPY) and energy expenditure (ADRB2) altered pancreatic cancer risk. If confirmed by other studies, our findings may shed new light on the etiology and prevention of pancreatic cancer.

  11. Physical and mental quality of life in chronic pancreatitis: a case-control study from the North American Pancreatitis Study 2 cohort.

    PubMed

    Amann, Stephen T; Yadav, Dhiraj; Barmada, M Micheal; O'Connell, Michael; Kennard, Elizabeth D; Anderson, Michelle; Baillie, John; Sherman, Stuart; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Hawes, Robert H; Alkaade, Samer; Brand, Randall E; Lewis, Michele D; Gardner, Timothy B; Gelrud, Andres; Money, Mary E; Banks, Peter A; Slivka, Adam; Whitcomb, David C

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to define the quality of life (QOL) in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). We studied 443 well-phenotyped CP subjects and 611 control subjects prospectively enrolled from 20 US centers between 2000 and 2006 in the North American Pancreatitis Study 2. Responses to the SF-12 questionnaire were used to calculate the mental (MCS) and physical component summary scores (PCS) with norm-based scoring (normal ≥50). Quality of life in CP subjects was compared with control subjects after controlling for demographic factors, drinking history, smoking, and medical conditions. Quality of life in CP was also compared with known scores for several chronic conditions. Both PCS (38 [SD, 11.5] vs 52 [SD, 9.4]) and MCS (44 [SD, 11.5] vs 51 [SD, 9.2]) were significantly lower in CP compared with control subjects (P < 0.001). On multivariable analyses, compared with control subjects, a profound decrease in physical QOL (PCS 12.02 points lower) and a clinically significant decrease in mental QOL (MCS 4.24 points lower) was seen due to CP. Quality of life in CP was similar to (heart, kidney, liver, lung disease) or worse than (nonskin cancers, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, rheumatoid arthritis) other chronic conditions. The impact of CP on QOL appears substantial. The QOL in CP subjects appears to be worse or similar to the QOL of many other chronic conditions.

  12. Long-Term Pancreatic Beta Cell Exposure to High Levels of Glucose but Not Palmitate Induces DNA Methylation within the Insulin Gene Promoter and Represses Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kota; Tsunekawa, Shin; Ikeniwa, Makoto; Izumoto, Takako; Iida, Atsushi; Ogata, Hidetada; Uenishi, Eita; Seino, Yusuke; Ozaki, Nobuaki; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Hamada, Yoji; Kuroda, Akio; Shinjo, Keiko; Kondo, Yutaka; Oiso, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated epigenetics in the pathophysiology of diabetes. Furthermore, DNA methylation, which irreversibly deactivates gene transcription, of the insulin promoter, particularly the cAMP response element, is increased in diabetes patients. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We aimed to investigate insulin promoter DNA methylation in an over-nutrition state. INS-1 cells, the rat pancreatic beta cell line, were cultured under normal-culture-glucose (11.2 mmol/l) or experimental-high-glucose (22.4 mmol/l) conditions for 14 days, with or without 0.4 mmol/l palmitate. DNA methylation of the rat insulin 1 gene (Ins1) promoter was investigated using bisulfite sequencing and pyrosequencing analysis. Experimental-high-glucose conditions significantly suppressed insulin mRNA and increased DNA methylation at all five CpG sites within the Ins1 promoter, including the cAMP response element, in a time-dependent and glucose concentration-dependent manner. DNA methylation under experimental-high-glucose conditions was unique to the Ins1 promoter; however, palmitate did not affect DNA methylation. Artificial methylation of Ins1 promoter significantly suppressed promoter-driven luciferase activity, and a DNA methylation inhibitor significantly improved insulin mRNA suppression by experimental-high-glucose conditions. Experimental-high-glucose conditions significantly increased DNA methyltransferase activity and decreased ten-eleven-translocation methylcytosine dioxygenase activity. Oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress did not affect DNA methylation of the Ins1 promoter. High glucose but not palmitate increased ectopic triacylglycerol accumulation parallel to DNA methylation. Metformin upregulated insulin gene expression and suppressed DNA methylation and ectopic triacylglycerol accumulation. Finally, DNA methylation of the Ins1 promoter increased in isolated islets from Zucker diabetic fatty rats. This study helps to clarify the

  13. Obestatin Accelerates the Recovery in the Course of Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bukowczan, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Tomaszewska, Romana

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several previous studies have shown that obestatin exhibits protective and regenerative effects in some organs including the stomach, kidney, and the brain. In the pancreas, pretreatment with obestatin inhibits the development of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, and promotes survival of pancreatic beta cells and human islets. However, no studies investigated the effect of obestatin administration following the onset of experimental acute pancreatitis. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of obestatin therapy in the course of ischemia/reperfusion-induced pancreatitis. Moreover, we tested the influence of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis and administration of obestatin on daily food intake and pancreatic exocrine secretion. Methods Acute pancreatitis was induced by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion of the pancreas. Obestatin (8nmol/kg/dose) was administered intraperitoneally twice a day, starting 24 hours after the beginning of reperfusion. The effect of obestatin in the course of necrotizing pancreatitis was assessed between 2 and 14 days, and included histological, functional, and biochemical analyses. Secretory studies were performed on the third day after sham-operation or induction of acute pancreatitis in conscious rats equipped with chronic pancreatic fistula. Results Treatment with obestatin ameliorated morphological signs of pancreatic damage including edema, vacuolization of acinar cells, hemorrhages, acinar necrosis, and leukocyte infiltration of the gland, and led to earlier pancreatic regeneration. Structural changes were accompanied by biochemical and functional improvements manifested by accelerated normalization of interleukin-1β level and activity of myeloperoxidase and lipase, attenuation of the decrease in pancreatic DNA synthesis, and by an improvement of pancreatic blood flow. Induction of acute pancreatitis by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion significantly decreased daily food

  14. Role of survivor bias in pancreatic cancer case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhen-Huan; Connett, John E; Yuan, Jian-Min; Anderson, Kristin E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of survivor bias on pancreatic cancer case-control studies. The authors constructed five case-loss scenarios based on the Iowa Women's Health Study cohort to reflect how case recruitment in population-based studies varies by case survival time. Risk factors for disease incidence included smoking, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, diabetes, and alcohol consumption. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated by conditional logistic regression and quantitatively compared by the interactions between risk factors and 3-month survival time. Additionally, Kaplan-Meier estimates for overall survival were compared within the subset cohort of pancreatic cancer cases. BMI and waist circumference showed a significant inverse relationship with survival time. Decreasing trends in ORs for BMI and waist circumference were observed with increasing case survival time. The interaction between BMI and survival time based on a cutpoint of 3 months was significant (P < .01) as was the interaction between waist circumference and survival time (P < .01). The findings suggested that case losses could result in survivor bias causing underestimated odds ratios for both BMI and waist circumference, whereas other risk factors were not significantly affected by case losses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Transcriptional control of the autophagy-lysosome system in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Rushika M.; Stoykova, Svetlana; Nicolay, Brandon N.; Ross, Kenneth N.; Fitamant, Julien; Boukhali, Myriam; Lengrand, Justine; Deshpande, Vikram; Selig, Martin K.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Settleman, Jeff; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Dyson, Nicholas J.; Zoncu, Roberto; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Haas, Wilhelm; Bardeesy, Nabeel

    2016-01-01

    Activation of cellular stress response pathways to maintain metabolic homeostasis is emerging as a critical growth and survival mechanism in many cancers1. The pathogenesis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) requires high levels of autophagy2–4, a conserved self-degradative process5. However, the regulatory circuits that activate autophagy and reprogram PDA cell metabolism are unknown. We now show that autophagy induction in PDA occurs as part of a broader transcriptional program that coordinates activation of lysosome biogenesis and function, and nutrient scavenging, mediated by the MiT/TFE family transcription factors. In PDA cells, the MiT/TFE proteins6 – MITF, TFE3 and TFEB – are decoupled from regulatory mechanisms that control their cytoplasmic retention. Increased nuclear import in turn drives the expression of a coherent network of genes that induce high levels of lysosomal catabolic function essential for PDA growth. Unbiased global metabolite profiling reveals that MiT/TFE-dependent autophagy-lysosomal activation is specifically required to maintain intracellular amino acid (AA) pools. These results identify the MiT/TFE transcription factors as master regulators of metabolic reprogramming in pancreatic cancer and demonstrate activation of clearance pathways converging on the lysosome as a novel hallmark of aggressive malignancy. PMID:26168401

  16. Green tea drinking and risk of pancreatic cancer: a large-scale, population-based case-control study in urban Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Lu; Yu, Herbert; Ni, Quan-Xing; Risch, Harvey; Gao, Yu-Tang

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the etiology of pancreatic cancer. Epidemiological studies on tea consumption and pancreatic cancer risk have been inconclusive. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between green tea drinking and the risk of pancreatic cancer in urban Shanghai, China. Methods In this population-based case-control study conducted in urban Shanghai, 908 cases of pancreatic cancer and 1067 healthy controls were recruited. Information on tea drinking, including type of tea, amount of tea consumption, temperature of tea, and the duration of regular tea drinking, were collected via interview questionnaire. Results We examined the association of multiple tea drinking habits with the risk of pancreatic cancer. In women, regular green tea drinking was associated with 32% reduction of pancreatic cancer risk (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.48–0.96), compared to those who did not drink tea regularly. Increased consumption and longer duration of tea drinking were both associated with reduced pancreatic cancer risk in women. Among regular tea drinkers, lower temperature of tea was associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in both men and women, independent of amount or duration of tea drinking. Conclusions Habits of green tea drinking, including regular drinking, amount of consumption, persistence of the habit, and tea temperature, may lower pancreatic cancer risk. PMID:22944495

  17. A case-control study of pancreatic cancer and cigarettes, alcohol, coffee and diet.

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, G W; Mandel, J S; Gibson, R W; Wattenberg, L W; Schuman, L M

    1989-01-01

    A pancreatic cancer case-control study was conducted in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area. Family members were interviewed about the subject's usage of cigarettes, alcohol, coffee, and other dietary factors in the two years prior to death (cases, n = 212) or prior to interview (controls, n = 220). The adjusted odds ratio for two packs or more of cigarettes per day was 3.92 (95% CI = 1.18, 13.01) and four or more drinks per day OR 2.69 (95% CI = 1.00, 7.27). Coffee was not a risk factor (seven cups or more per day; OR 0.58 (95% CI = 0.27, 1.27). A positive trend was observed for beef and pork consumption, and a negative trend from cruciferous vegetables. PMID:2751016

  18. Insights into the control of geminiviral promoters.

    PubMed

    Borah, B K; Zarreen, F; Baruah, G; Dasgupta, I

    2016-08-01

    Geminiviruses constitute one of the largest groups of plant viruses, having characteristic twinned geminate particles encapsidating small circular single-stranded DNA molecules. Geminiviral promoters are generally located within the intergenic region, although promoters have also been detected within the genes. Similarly, the geminivirus-associated betasatellite also harbours a promoter element for driving the expression of its only ORF. These regulatory elements of geminiviral and satellite origins have been subject of great interest to develop heterologous gene expression modules. Geminiviral promoter and regulatory elements show a complex regulation that is mediated by several host as well as viral proteins. Here, the structural and functional features of geminiviral and satellite promoters are discussed along with their regulation by plant and viral proteins. Although generalization in many cases is difficult and demands further studies, a pattern is seen to emerge on the regulation of the promoters.

  19. The HMGB1/RAGE inflammatory pathway promotes pancreatic tumor growth by regulating mitochondrial bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Kang, R; Tang, D; Schapiro, NE; Loux, T; Livesey, KM; Billiar, TR; Wang, H; Van Houten, B; Lotze, MT; Zeh, HJ

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells require increased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to support anabolism and proliferation. The precise mechanisms regulating this process in tumor cells are unknown. Here, we show that the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) and one of its primary ligands, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), are required for optimal mitochondrial function within tumors. We found that RAGE is present in the mitochondria of cultured tumor cells as well as primary tumors. RAGE and HMGB1 coordinately enhanced tumor cell mitochondrial complex I activity, ATP production, tumor cell proliferation and migration. Lack of RAGE or inhibition of HMGB1 release diminished ATP production and slowed tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. These findings link, for the first time, the HMGB1–RAGE pathway with changes in bioenergetics. Moreover, our observations provide a novel mechanism within the tumor microenvironment by which necrosis and inflammation promote tumor progression. PMID:23318458

  20. Interleukin 6 Is Required for Pancreatic Cancer Progression by Promoting MAPK Signaling Activation and Oxidative Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaqing; Yan, Wei; Collins, Meredith A.; Bednar, Filip; Rakshit, Sabita; Zetter, Bruce R.; Stanger, Ben Z.; Chung, Ivy; Rhim, Andrew D.; di Magliano, Marina Pasca

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest human malignancies, is almost invariably associated with the presence of an oncogenic form of Kras. Mice expressing oncogenic Kras in the pancreas recapitulate the step-wise progression of the human disease. The inflammatory cytokine interleukin 6 (IL6) is often expressed by multiple cell types within the tumor microenvironment. Here, we show that IL6 is required for the maintenance and progression of pancreatic cancer precursor lesions. In fact, the lack of IL6 completely ablates cancer progression even in presence of oncogenic Kras. Mechanistically, we show that IL6 synergizes with oncogenic Kras to activate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification program downstream of the MAPK/ERK signaling cascade. In addition, IL6 regulates the inflammatory microenvironment of pancreatic cancer throughout its progression, providing several signals that are essential for carcinogenesis. Thus, IL6 emerges as a key player at all stages of pancreatic carcinogenesis, and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24097820

  1. Loss of Tyrosine Phosphatase Dependent Inhibition Promotes Activation of Tyrosine Kinase c-Src in Detached Pancreatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Sarah F.; Isley, Beth A.; Baker, Cheryl H.; Gallick, Gary E.; Summy, Justin M.

    2010-01-01

    Despite an intense focus on novel therapeutic strategies, pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains one of the deadliest human malignancies. The frequent and rapid mortality associated with pancreatic cancer may be attributed to several factors, including late diagnosis, rapid tumor invasion into surrounding tissues, and formation of distant metastases. Both local invasion and metastasis require disruption of tumor cell contacts with the extracellular matrix. Detachment of normal cells from the extracellular matrix leads to a form of programmed cell death termed anoikis. Pancreatic cancer cells avert anoikis by activation of signaling pathways that allow for adhesion-independent survival. In the present studies, cellular signaling pathways activated in detached pancreatic cancer cells were examined. We demonstrate a rapid and robust activation of Src kinase in detached pancreatic cancer cells, relative to adherent. Src autophosphorylation rapidly returned to baseline levels upon reattachment to tissue culture plastic, in the presence or absence of specific extracellular matrix proteins. Treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors increased steady-state Src autophosphorylation in adherent cells and abrogated the detachment-induced increase in Src autophosphorylation. Src was found to co-immunoprecipitate with the Src Homology 2 (SH2) domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-2) in pancreatic cancer cells, suggesting that SHP-2 may participate in regulation of Src autophosphorylation in adherent cells. Src family kinase (SFK) dependent increases in Akt and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation were observed in detached cells, indicating the potential for Src-dependent activation of survival and stress pathways in pancreatic cancer cells that have detached from the extracellular matrix. PMID:20945416

  2. Polycomb complex protein BMI-1 promotes invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer stem cells by activating PI3K/AKT signaling, an ex vivo, in vitro, and in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min-Cong; Jiao, Min; Wu, Tao; Jing, Li; Cui, Jie; Guo, Hui; Tian, Tao; Ruan, Zhi-ping; Wei, Yong-Chang; Jiang, Li-Li; Sun, Hai-Feng; Huang, Lan-Xuan; Nan, Ke-Jun; Li, Chun-Li

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cell theory indicates cancer stem cells are the key to promote tumor invasion and metastasis. Studies showed that BMI-1 could promote self-renew, differentiation and tumor formation of CSCs and invasion/metastasis of human cancer. However, whether BMI-1 could regulate invasion and metastasis ability of CSCs is still unclear. In our study, we found that up-regulated expression of BMI-1 was associated with tumor invasion, metastasis and poor survival of pancreatic cancer patients. CD133+ cells were obtained by using magnetic cell sorting and identified of CSCs properties such as self-renew, multi-differentiation and tumor formation ability. Then, we found that BMI-1 expression was up-regulated in pancreatic cancer stem cells. Knockdown of BMI-1 expression attenuated invasion ability of pancreatic cancer stem cells in Transwell system and liver metastasis capacity in nude mice which were injected CSCs through the caudal vein. We are the first to reveal that BMI-1 could promote invasion and metastasis ability of pancreatic cancer stem cells. Finally, we identified that BMI-1 expression activating PI3K/AKT singing pathway by negative regulating PTEN was the main mechanism of promoting invasion and metastasis ability of pancreatic CSCs. In summary, our findings indicate that BMI-1 could be used as the therapeutic target to inhibiting CSCs-mediated pancreatic cancer metastasis. PMID:26840020

  3. Polycomb complex protein BMI-1 promotes invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer stem cells by activating PI3K/AKT signaling, an ex vivo, in vitro, and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min-Cong; Jiao, Min; Wu, Tao; Jing, Li; Cui, Jie; Guo, Hui; Tian, Tao; Ruan, Zhi-ping; Wei, Yong-Chang; Jiang, Li-Li; Sun, Hai-Feng; Huang, Lan-Xuan; Nan, Ke-Jun; Li, Chun-Li

    2016-02-23

    Cancer stem cell theory indicates cancer stem cells are the key to promote tumor invasion and metastasis. Studies showed that BMI-1 could promote self-renew, differentiation and tumor formation of CSCs and invasion/metastasis of human cancer. However, whether BMI-1 could regulate invasion and metastasis ability of CSCs is still unclear. In our study, we found that up-regulated expression of BMI-1 was associated with tumor invasion, metastasis and poor survival of pancreatic cancer patients. CD133+ cells were obtained by using magnetic cell sorting and identified of CSCs properties such as self-renew, multi-differentiation and tumor formation ability. Then, we found that BMI-1 expression was up-regulated in pancreatic cancer stem cells. Knockdown of BMI-1 expression attenuated invasion ability of pancreatic cancer stem cells in Transwell system and liver metastasis capacity in nude mice which were injected CSCs through the caudal vein. We are the first to reveal that BMI-1 could promote invasion and metastasis ability of pancreatic cancer stem cells. Finally, we identified that BMI-1 expression activating PI3K/AKT singing pathway by negative regulating PTEN was the main mechanism of promoting invasion and metastasis ability of pancreatic CSCs. In summary, our findings indicate that BMI-1 could be used as the therapeutic target to inhibiting CSCs-mediated pancreatic cancer metastasis.

  4. Pancreatic α-Amylase Controls Glucose Assimilation by Duodenal Retrieval through N-Glycan-specific Binding, Endocytosis, and Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Date, Kimie; Satoh, Ayano; Iida, Kaoruko; Ogawa, Haruko

    2015-01-01

    α-Amylase, a major pancreatic protein and starch hydrolase, is essential for energy acquisition. Mammalian pancreatic α-amylase binds specifically to glycoprotein N-glycans in the brush-border membrane to activate starch digestion, whereas it significantly inhibits glucose uptake by Na+/glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) at high concentrations (Asanuma-Date, K., Hirano, Y., Le, N., Sano, K., Kawasaki, N., Hashii, N., Hiruta, Y., Nakayama, K., Umemura, M., Ishikawa, K., Sakagami, H., and Ogawa, H. (2012) Functional regulation of sugar assimilation by N-glycan-specific interaction of pancreatic α-amylase with glycoproteins of duodenal brush border membrane. J. Biol. Chem. 287, 23104–23118). However, how the inhibition is stopped was unknown. Here, we show a new mechanism for the regulation of intestinal glucose absorption. Immunohistochemistry revealed that α-amylase in the duodena of non-fasted, but not fasted, pigs was internalized from the pancreatic fluid and immunostained. We demonstrated that after N-glycan binding, pancreatic α-amylase underwent internalization into lysosomes in a process that was inhibited by α-mannoside. The internalized α-amylase was degraded, showing low enzymatic activity and molecular weight at the basolateral membrane. In a human intestinal Caco-2 cell line, Alexa Fluor 488-labeled pancreatic α-amylase bound to the cytomembrane was transported to lysosomes through the endocytic pathway and then disappeared, suggesting degradation. Our findings indicate that N-glycan recognition by α-amylase protects enterocytes against a sudden increase in glucose concentration and restores glucose uptake by gradual internalization, which homeostatically controls the postprandial blood glucose level. The internalization of α-amylase may also enhance the supply of amino acids required for the high turnover of small intestine epithelial cells. This study provides novel and significant insights into the control of blood sugar during the absorption

  5. Resistin is not an appropriate biochemical marker to predict severity of acute pancreatitis: A case-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maramhy, Hamdi; Abdelrahman, Abdelrahman I; Sawalhi, Samer

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess levels of serum resistin upon hospital admission as a predictor of acute pancreatitis (AP) severity. METHODS: AP is both a common and serious disease, with severe cases resulting in a high mortality rate. Several predictive inflammatory markers have been used clinically to assess severity. This prospective study collected data from 102 patients who were diagnosed with an initial acute biliary pancreatitis between March 2010 and February 2013. Measurements of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were obtained and serum resistin levels were analyzed at the time of hospital admission using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additionally, resistin levels were measured from a control group after matching gender, BMI and age. RESULTS: A total of 102 patients (60 females and 42 males) were diagnosed with acute gallstone-induced pancreatitis. The mean age was 45 years, and mean BMI value was 30.5 kg/m2 (Obese, class I). Twenty-two patients (21.6%) had severe AP, while eighty-eight patients had mild pancreatitis (78.4%). Our results showed that BMI significantly correlated with pancreatitis severity (P = 0.007). Serum resistin did not correlate with BMI, weight or WC. Furthermore, serum resistin was significantly higher in patients with AP compared to control subjects (P < 0.0001). The mean resistin values upon admission were 17.5 ng/mL in the severe acute biliary pancreatitis group and 16.82 ng/mL in the mild AP group (P = 0.188), indicating that resistin is not an appropriate predictive marker of clinical severity. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that obesity is a risk factor for developing severe AP. Further, although there is a correlation between serum resistin levels and AP at the time of hospital admission, resistin does not adequately serve as a predictive marker of clinical severity. PMID:25386084

  6. Pancreatic α-Amylase Controls Glucose Assimilation by Duodenal Retrieval through N-Glycan-specific Binding, Endocytosis, and Degradation.

    PubMed

    Date, Kimie; Satoh, Ayano; Iida, Kaoruko; Ogawa, Haruko

    2015-07-10

    α-Amylase, a major pancreatic protein and starch hydrolase, is essential for energy acquisition. Mammalian pancreatic α-amylase binds specifically to glycoprotein N-glycans in the brush-border membrane to activate starch digestion, whereas it significantly inhibits glucose uptake by Na(+)/glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) at high concentrations (Asanuma-Date, K., Hirano, Y., Le, N., Sano, K., Kawasaki, N., Hashii, N., Hiruta, Y., Nakayama, K., Umemura, M., Ishikawa, K., Sakagami, H., and Ogawa, H. (2012) Functional regulation of sugar assimilation by N-glycan-specific interaction of pancreatic α-amylase with glycoproteins of duodenal brush border membrane. J. Biol. Chem. 287, 23104-23118). However, how the inhibition is stopped was unknown. Here, we show a new mechanism for the regulation of intestinal glucose absorption. Immunohistochemistry revealed that α-amylase in the duodena of non-fasted, but not fasted, pigs was internalized from the pancreatic fluid and immunostained. We demonstrated that after N-glycan binding, pancreatic α-amylase underwent internalization into lysosomes in a process that was inhibited by α-mannoside. The internalized α-amylase was degraded, showing low enzymatic activity and molecular weight at the basolateral membrane. In a human intestinal Caco-2 cell line, Alexa Fluor 488-labeled pancreatic α-amylase bound to the cytomembrane was transported to lysosomes through the endocytic pathway and then disappeared, suggesting degradation. Our findings indicate that N-glycan recognition by α-amylase protects enterocytes against a sudden increase in glucose concentration and restores glucose uptake by gradual internalization, which homeostatically controls the postprandial blood glucose level. The internalization of α-amylase may also enhance the supply of amino acids required for the high turnover of small intestine epithelial cells. This study provides novel and significant insights into the control of blood sugar during the absorption

  7. Resistin is not an appropriate biochemical marker to predict severity of acute pancreatitis: a case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Al-Maramhy, Hamdi; Abdelrahman, Abdelrahman I; Sawalhi, Samer

    2014-11-07

    To assess levels of serum resistin upon hospital admission as a predictor of acute pancreatitis (AP) severity. AP is both a common and serious disease, with severe cases resulting in a high mortality rate. Several predictive inflammatory markers have been used clinically to assess severity. This prospective study collected data from 102 patients who were diagnosed with an initial acute biliary pancreatitis between March 2010 and February 2013. Measurements of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were obtained and serum resistin levels were analyzed at the time of hospital admission using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additionally, resistin levels were measured from a control group after matching gender, BMI and age. A total of 102 patients (60 females and 42 males) were diagnosed with acute gallstone-induced pancreatitis. The mean age was 45 years, and mean BMI value was 30.5 kg/m(2) (Obese, class I). Twenty-two patients (21.6%) had severe AP, while eighty-eight patients had mild pancreatitis (78.4%). Our results showed that BMI significantly correlated with pancreatitis severity (P = 0.007). Serum resistin did not correlate with BMI, weight or WC. Furthermore, serum resistin was significantly higher in patients with AP compared to control subjects (P < 0.0001). The mean resistin values upon admission were 17.5 ng/mL in the severe acute biliary pancreatitis group and 16.82 ng/mL in the mild AP group (P = 0.188), indicating that resistin is not an appropriate predictive marker of clinical severity. We demonstrate that obesity is a risk factor for developing severe AP. Further, although there is a correlation between serum resistin levels and AP at the time of hospital admission, resistin does not adequately serve as a predictive marker of clinical severity.

  8. CacyBP/SIP protein promotes proliferation and G1/S transition of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiong; Mo, Ping; Li, Xiaohua; Zheng, Peichan; Zhao, Lina; Xue, Zengfu; Ren, Gui; Han, Guohong; Wang, Xin; Fan, Daiming

    2011-10-01

    Calcyclin-binding protein or Siah-1-interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP), a component of the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, could participate in beta-catenin degradation, which was found to be related to the malignant phenotypes of pancreatic cancer previously. However, the role of CacyBP/SIP itself in pancreatic cancer has not been investigated. In the present study, CacyBP/SIP expression was assayed and manipulated to reveal the potential mechanism in pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis. Here, we show that CacyBP/SIP is over-expressed in pancreatic cancer cells. Down-regulation of CacyBP/SIP by small interference RNA (siRNA) severely suppresses the proliferation and tumorigenesis in pancreatic cancer. G1/S transition arrest induced by inhibition of CacyBP/SIP is at least partly mediated by down-regulation of Cyclin E and CDK2 as well as up-regulation of p27 and Rb. Collectively, CacyBP/SIP as an enhancer of pancreatic cancer malignance might develop into another possible therapeutic target.

  9. The role of the AMOP domain in MUC4/Y-promoted tumour angiogenesis and metastasis in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jie; Zhu, Yi; Xie, Kunling; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhi, Xiaofei; Wang, Weizhi; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Qun; Wang, Linjun; Wang, Jiwei; Xu, Zekuan

    2016-06-10

    MUC4 is a high molecular weight membrane protein that is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer (PC) and is associated with the development and progression of this disease. However, the exact mechanisms through which MUC4 domains promote these biological processes have rarely been studied, partly because of its high molecular weight, difficulty to overexpress it. Here, we use MUC4/Y, one of the MUC4 transcript variants, as a model molecule to investigate the AMOP-domain of MUC4(MUC/Y). We used cell proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation assays in vitro to explore the abilities of AMOP domain in PC. In vivo, the matrigel plug assay, orthotopic implantation and Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to check the results we observed in vitro. Finally, we discovered the underlying mechanism through western blot and immunofluorescence. We found that MUC4/Y overexpression could enhance the angiogenic and metastatic properties of PC cells, both in vitro and in vivo. However, the deletion of AMOP domain could cutback these phenomena. Additionally, Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that mice injected with MUC4/Y overexpressed cells had shorter survival time, compared with empty-vector-transfected cells (MUC4/Y-EV), or cells expressing MUC4/Y without the AMOP domain (MUC4/Y-AMOP(△)). Our data also showed that overexpression of MUC4/Y could activate NOTCH3 signaling, increasing the expression of downstream genes: VEGF-A, MMP-9 and ANG-2. The AMOP domain had an important role in MUC4/Y (MUC4)-mediated tumour angiogenesis and metastasis of PC cells; and the NOTCH3 signaling was involved. These findings provided new insights into PC therapies. Our study also supplies a new method to study other high molecular membrane proteins.

  10. FTO Inhibits Insulin Secretion and Promotes NF-κB Activation through Positively Regulating ROS Production in Pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hong-Qi; He, Wei; Xu, Kuan-Feng; Wang, Zhi-Xiao; Xu, Xin-Yu; Chen, Heng

    2015-01-01

    FTO (Fat mass and obesity-associated) is associated with increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes incurrence. Pancreas islet β cells dysfunction and insulin resistance are major causes of type 2 diabetes. However, whether FTO plays an important functional role in pancreatic β cells as well as the related molecular mechanism is still unclear. In the present study, the tissue expression profile of FTO was firstly determined using quantitative PCR and western blot. FTO is widely expressed in various tissues and presented with relative high expression in pancreas tissue, especially in endocrine pancreas. FTO overexpression in MIN6 cells achieved by lentivirus delivery significantly inhibits insulin secretion in the presence of glucose stimulus as well as KCl. FTO silence has no effect on insulin secretion of MIN6 cells. However, FTO overexpression doesn't affect the transcription of insulin gene. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and NF-κB activation are significantly promoted by FTO overexpression. Inhibition of intracellular ROS production by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) can alleviate NF-κB activation and restore the insulin secretion mediated by FTO overexpression. A whole transcript-microarray is employed to analyze the differential gene expression mediated by FTO overexpression. The genes which are modulated by FTO are involved in many important biological pathways such as G-protein coupled receptor signaling and NF-κB signaling. Therefore, our study indicates that FTO may contribute to pancreas islet β cells dysfunction and the inhibition of FTO activity is a potential target for the treatment of diabetes.

  11. FTO Inhibits Insulin Secretion and Promotes NF-κB Activation through Positively Regulating ROS Production in Pancreatic β cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hong-Qi; He, Wei; Xu, Kuan-Feng; Wang, Zhi-Xiao; Xu, Xin-Yu; Chen, Heng

    2015-01-01

    FTO (Fat mass and obesity-associated) is associated with increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes incurrence. Pancreas islet β cells dysfunction and insulin resistance are major causes of type 2 diabetes. However, whether FTO plays an important functional role in pancreatic β cells as well as the related molecular mechanism is still unclear. In the present study, the tissue expression profile of FTO was firstly determined using quantitative PCR and western blot. FTO is widely expressed in various tissues and presented with relative high expression in pancreas tissue, especially in endocrine pancreas. FTO overexpression in MIN6 cells achieved by lentivirus delivery significantly inhibits insulin secretion in the presence of glucose stimulus as well as KCl. FTO silence has no effect on insulin secretion of MIN6 cells. However, FTO overexpression doesn’t affect the transcription of insulin gene. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and NF-κB activation are significantly promoted by FTO overexpression. Inhibition of intracellular ROS production by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) can alleviate NF-κB activation and restore the insulin secretion mediated by FTO overexpression. A whole transcript-microarray is employed to analyze the differential gene expression mediated by FTO overexpression. The genes which are modulated by FTO are involved in many important biological pathways such as G-protein coupled receptor signaling and NF-κB signaling. Therefore, our study indicates that FTO may contribute to pancreas islet β cells dysfunction and the inhibition of FTO activity is a potential target for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:26018652

  12. Risk Factors for Early-Onset and Very-Early-Onset Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Robert R; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Bamlet, William R; Petersen, Gloria M; Li, Donghui; Risch, Harvey; Yu, Herbert; Fontham, Elizabeth TH; Luckett, Brian; Bosetti, Cristina; Negri, Eva; La Vecchia, Carlo; Talamini, Renato; Bueno de Mesquita, H Bas; Bracci, Paige; Gallinger, Steven; Neale, Rachel E; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives While pancreatic cancer (PC) most often affects older adults, to date, there has been no comprehensive assessment of risk factors among PC patients under age 60. Methods We defined early onset PC (EOPC) and very early onset PC (VEOPC) as diagnosis of PC under ages 60 and 45, respectively. We pooled data from eight case-control studies, including 1,954 patients with EOPC and 3,278 age- and sex-matched controls. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify associations with EOPC and VEOPC. Results Family history of PC, diabetes mellitus, smoking, obesity, and pancreatitis were associated with EOPC. Alcohol use ≥26 g daily also was associated with increased risk for EOPC (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.21-1.84), and there appeared to be a dose-and age-dependent effect of alcohol on risk. The point estimate for risk for VEOPC was OR 2.18, (95% CI 1.17-4.09). Conclusion The established risk factors for PC, including smoking, diabetes, family history of PC, and obesity also apply to EOPC. Alcohol intake appeared to have an age-dependent effect; the strongest association was with VEOPC. PMID:26646264

  13. Risk Factors for Early-Onset and Very-Early-Onset Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4) Analysis.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Robert R; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Bamlet, William R; Petersen, Gloria M; Li, Donghui; Risch, Harvey A; Yu, Herbert; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Luckett, Brian; Bosetti, Cristina; Negri, Eva; La Vecchia, Carlo; Talamini, Renato; Bueno de Mesquita, H Bas; Bracci, Paige; Gallinger, Steven; Neale, Rachel E; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2016-02-01

    While pancreatic cancer (PC) most often affects older adults, to date, there has been no comprehensive assessment of risk factors among PC patients younger than 60 years. We defined early-onset PC (EOPC) and very-early-onset PC (VEOPC) as diagnosis of PC in patients younger than 60 and 45 years, respectively. We pooled data from 8 case-control studies, including 1954 patients with EOPC and 3278 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify associations with EOPC and VEOPC. Family history of PC, diabetes mellitus, smoking, obesity, and pancreatitis were associated with EOPC. Alcohol use equal to or greater than 26 g daily also was associated with increased risk of EOPC (odds ratio, 1.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-1.84), and there appeared to be a dose- and age-dependent effect of alcohol on risk. The point estimate for risk of VEOPC was an odds ratio of 2.18 (95% confidence interval, 1.17-4.09). The established risk factors for PC, including smoking, diabetes, family history of PC, and obesity, also apply to EOPC. Alcohol intake appeared to have an age-dependent effect; the strongest association was with VEOPC.

  14. Pancreatic-β-cell survival and proliferation are promoted by protein kinase G type Iα and downstream regulation of AKT/FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Wong, Janica C; Vo, Van; Gorjala, Priyatham; Fiscus, Ronald R

    2017-09-01

    Early studies showed nitric oxide as a pro-inflammatory-cytokine-induced toxin involved in pancreatic β-cell destruction during pathogenesis of type-1 diabetes. However, nitric oxide has both cytotoxic and cytoprotective effects on mammalian cells, depending on concentration and micro-environmental surroundings. Our studies have shown that low/physiological-level nitric oxide selectively activates protein kinase G type Iα isoform, promoting cytoprotective/pro-cell-survival effects in many cell types. In bone marrow-derived stromal/mesenchymal stem cells, protein kinase G type Iα mediates autocrine effects of nitric oxide and atrial natriuretic peptide, promoting DNA-synthesis/proliferation and cell survival. In this study, endothelial nitric oxide synthase/neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NIO (L-N(5)-(1-iminoethyl)ornithine), soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3,-a] quinoxalin-1-one), atrial natriuretic peptide-receptor inhibitor A71915 and protein kinase G type Iα kinase activity inhibitor DT-2 all increased apoptosis and decreased insulin secretion in RINm5F pancreatic β-cells, suggesting autocrine regulatory role for endogenous nitric oxide- and atrial natriuretic peptide-induced activation of protein kinase G type Iα. In four pancreatic β-cell lines, Beta-TC-6, RINm5F, INS-1 and 1.1B4, protein kinase G type Iα small-interfering RNA decreased phospho-serine-239-VASP (indicator of endogenous protein kinase G type Iα kinase activity), increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation. In protein kinase G type Iα-knockdown β-cell lines, expressions of phospho-protein kinase B (PKB/AKT) (AKT), phospho-Forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) (transcriptional repressor of pancreas duodenum homobox-1) and pancreas duodenum homobox-1 were decreased, suppressing proliferation and survival in pancreatic β-cells. The data suggest autocrine nitric oxide/atrial natriuretic peptide-induced activation of protein kinase G type I

  15. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Severe Acute Pancreatitis: A Pilot, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Vege, Santhi Swaroop; Atwal, Tegpal; Bi, Yan; Chari, Suresh T; Clemens, Magdalen A; Enders, Felicity T

    2015-08-01

    In acute pancreatitis (AP) tumor necrosis factor-α mediates multi-organ failure; in animal models its blockade with pentoxifylline ameliorates AP. The efficacy of pentoxifylline in predicted severe AP (pSAP) was tested in a double-blinded, randomized, control trial. Twenty-eight patients with pSAP were randomized within 72 hours of diagnosis to pentoxifylline or placebo. Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. The pentoxifylline group had fewer intensive care unit admissions and shorter intensive care unit and hospital stays of longer than 4 days (all P < .05). Patients receiving pentoxifylline had no adverse effects. Pentoxifylline within 72 hours of pSAP is safe; a larger study of pentoxifylline in AP is needed to confirm efficacy. ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01292005. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Acute pancreatitis Chronic pancreatitis Pancreatic abscess Shock Review Date 10/27/2015 Updated by: Subodh K. ... gastroenterologist with Gastrointestinal Specialists of Georgia, Austell, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  17. Pancreatic Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... triggering pancreatitis, you may need to have your gallbladder removed. If your pancreatitis is due to alcohol ... www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/pancreatic-cysts/basics/definition/CON-20024331 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  18. Par3 regulates invasion of pancreatic cancer cells via interaction with Tiam1.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xingjun; Wang, Min; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xin; Shen, Ming; Zhu, Feng; Shi, Chengjian; Xu, Meng; Li, Xu; Peng, Feng; Zhang, Hang; Feng, Yechen; Xie, Yu; Xu, Xiaodong; Jia, Wei; He, Ruizhi; Jiang, Jianxin; Hu, Jun; Tian, Rui; Qin, Renyi

    2016-08-01

    The conserved polarity complex, which comprises partitioning-defective proteins Par3, Par6, and the atypical protein kinase C, affects various cell-polarization events, including assembly of tight junctions. Control of tight junction assembly is closely related to invasion and migration potential. However, as the importance of conserved polarity complexes in regulating pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis is unclear, we investigated their role and mechanism in pancreatic cancers. We first detect that the key protein of the conserved polarity complex finds that only Par3 is down-regulated in pancreatic cancer tissues while Par6 and aPKC show no difference. What is more, Par3 tissues level was significantly and positively associated with patient overall survival. Knocking-down Par3 promotes pancreatic cancer cells invasion and migration. And Par3 requires interaction with Tiam1 to affect tight junction assembly, and then affect invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer cells. Then, we find that tight junction marker protein ZO-1 and claudin-1 are down-regulated in pancreatic cancer tissues. And the relationship of the expression of Par3 and ZO-1 in pancreatic cancer tissue is linear correlation. We establish liver metastasis model of human pancreatic cancer cells in Balb/c nude mice and find that knocking down Par3 promotes invasion and metastasis and disturbs tight junction assembly in vivo. Taken together, these results suggest that the Par3 regulates invasion and metastasis in pancreatic cancers by controlling tight junction assembly.

  19. Oncogenic K-Ras signals through epidermal growth factor receptor and wild-type H-Ras to promote radiation survival in pancreatic and colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cengel, Keith A; Voong, K Rahn; Chandrasekaran, Sanjay; Maggiorella, Laurence; Brunner, Thomas B; Stanbridge, Eric; Kao, Gary D; McKenna, W Gillies; Bernhard, Eric J

    2007-04-01

    Pancreatic and colorectal carcinomas frequently express oncogenic/mutant K-Ras that contributes to both tumorigenesis and clinically observed resistance to radiation treatment. We have previously shown that farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI) radiosensitize many pancreatic and colorectal cancer cell lines that express oncogenic K-ras at doses that inhibit the prenylation and activation of H-Ras but not K-Ras. In the present study, we have examined the mechanism of FTI-mediated radiosensitization in cell lines that express oncogenic K-Ras and found that wild-type H-Ras is a contributor to radiation survival in tumor cells that express oncogenic K-Ras. In these experiments, inhibiting the expression of oncogenic K-Ras, wild-type H-Ras, or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) led to similar levels of radiosensitization as treatment with the FTI tipifarnib. Treatment with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib led to similar levels of radiosensitization, and the combinations of tipifarnib or gefitinib plus inhibition of K-Ras, H-Ras, or EGFR expression did not provide additional radiosensitization compared with tipifarnib or gefitinib alone. Finally, supplementing culture medium with the EGFR ligand transforming growth factor alpha was able to reverse the radiosensitizing effect of inhibiting K-ras expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that EGFR-activated H-Ras signaling is initiated by oncogenic K-Ras to promote radiation survival in pancreatic and colorectal cancers.

  20. Oncogenic K-Ras Signals through Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Wild-Type H-Ras to Promote Radiation Survival in Pancreatic and Colorectal Carcinoma Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Cengel, Keith A.; Voong, K. Rahn; Chandrasekaran, Sanjay; Maggiorella, Laurence; Brunner, Thomas B.; Stanbridge, Eric; Kao, Gary D.; McKenna, W. Gillies; Bernhard, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic and colorectal carcinomas frequently express oncogenic/mutant K-Ras that contributes to both tumorigenesis and clinically observed resistance to radiation treatment. We have previously shown that farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTI) radiosensitize many pancreatic and colorectal cancer cell lines that express oncogenic K-ras at doses that inhibit the prenylation and activation of H-Ras but not K-Ras. In the present study, we have examined the mechanism of FTI-mediated radiosensitization in cell lines that express oncogenic K-Ras and found that wild-type H-Ras is a contributor to radiation survival in tumor cells that express oncogenic K-Ras. In these experiments, inhibiting the expression of oncogenic K-Ras, wild-type H-Ras, or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) led to similar levels of radiosensitization as treatment with the FTI tipifarnib. Treatment with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib led to similar levels of radiosensitization, and the combinations of tipifarnib or gefitinib plus inhibition of K-Ras, H-Ras, or EGFR expression did not provide additional radiosensitization compared with tipifarnib or gefitinib alone. Finally, supplementing culture medium with the EGFR ligand transforming growth factor α was able to reverse the radiosensitizing effect of inhibiting K-ras expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that EGFR-activated H-Ras signaling is initiated by oncogenic K-Ras to promote radiation survival in pancreatic and colorectal cancers. PMID:17460778

  1. Smad4 Loss Synergizes with TGFα Overexpression in Promoting Pancreatic Metaplasia, PanIN Development, and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Carracedo, Dario; Yu, Chih-Chieh; Akhavan, Nathan; Fine, Stuart A.; Schönleben, Frank; Maehara, Naoki; Karg, Dillon C.; Xie, Chuangao; Qiu, Wanglong; Fine, Robert L.; Remotti, Helen E.; Su, Gloria H.

    2015-01-01

    Aims While overexpression of TGFα has been reported in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), mice with overexpressed TGFα develop premalignant pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) but not PDAC. TGF-β signaling pathway is pivotal to the development of PDAC and tissue fibrosis. Here we sought to investigate the interplay between TGFα and TGF-β signaling in pancreatic tumorigenesis and fibrosis, namely via Smad4 inactivation. Methods The MT-TGFα mouse was crossed with a new Smad4 conditional knock-out mouse (Smad4flox/flox;p48-Cre or S4) to generate Smad4flox/flox;MT-TGFα;p48-Cre (STP). After TGFα overexpression was induced with zinc sulfate water for eight months, the pancreata of the STP, MT-TGFα, and S4 mice were examined for tumor development and fibrotic responses. PanIN lesions and number of ducts were counted, and proliferation was measured by Ki67 immunohistochemistry (IHC). Qualitative analysis of fibrosis was analyzed by Trichrome Masson and Sirius Red staining, while vimentin was used for quantification. Expression analyses of fibrosis, pancreatitis, or desmoplasia associated markers (α-SMA, Shh, COX-2, Muc6, Col1a1, and Ctgf) were performed by IHC and/or qRT-PCR. Results Our STP mice exhibited advanced ADM, increased fibrosis, increased numbers of PanIN lesions, overexpression of chronic pancreatitis-related marker Muc6, and elevated expression of desmoplasia-associated marker Col1A1, compared to the MT-TGFα mice. The inactivation of Smad4 in the exocrine compartment was responsible for both the enhanced PanIN formation and fibrosis in the pancreas. The phenotype of the STP mice represents a transient state from ADMs to PanINs, closely mimicking the interface area seen in human chronic pancreatitis associated with PDAC. Conclusion We have documented a novel mouse model, the STP mice, which displayed histologic presentations reminiscent to those of human chronic pancreatitis with signs of early tumorigenesis. The STP mice could

  2. Epigenetic inhibition of miR-663b by long non-coding RNA HOTAIR promotes pancreatic cancer cell proliferation via up-regulation of insulin-like growth factor 2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuemin; Sun, Donglin; Chen, Tongbing; Peng, Yan; Zhu, Feng; Jiang, Yong; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly cancers with a poor prognosis. Although microRNAs are involving in the carcinogenesis and development of pancreatic cancer, little information is known regarding the role of miR-663b in pancreatic cancer. In this study, the expression of miR-663b in pancreatic cancer cells was down-regulated by hypermethylation in its putative promoter region, and overexpression of miR-663b repressed cell proliferation, invasion and migration, and induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. Bioinformatics analysis, luciferase report assay and rescue experiments showed that insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) was a direct target of miR-663b. Results from clinical samples showed that the expression level of miR-663b correlated with the pathological grading, and the expression of miR-663b was down-regulated and was inversely correlated with IGF2 expression level in pancreatic cancer tissues. More importantly, the long non-coding RNA, HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR), was up-regulated in both pancreatic cancer cells and tissues, and HOTAIR suppressed the expression of miR-663b in pancreatic cancer by histone modification on H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 on miR-663b promoter. Further in vivo studies demonstrated that the stable overexpression of miR-663b or knock-down of HOTAIR inhibited tumor growth and was associated with IGF2 expression. In summary, our studies demonstrated that miR-663b is epigenetically repressed by HOTAIR and exerts its tumor-suppressive function via targeting IGF2 in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27895308

  3. Adenosine signaling promotes regeneration of pancreatic β-cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Olov; Adams, Bruce A.; Yoo, Daniel; Ellis, Gregory C.; Gut, Philipp; Anderson, Ryan M.; German, Michael S.; Stainier, Didier Y. R.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes can be controlled with insulin injections, but a curative approach that restores the number of insulin-producing β-cells is still needed. Using a zebrafish model of diabetes, we screened ~7000 small molecules to identify enhancers of β-cell regeneration. The compounds we identified converge on the adenosine signaling pathway and include exogenous agonists and compounds that inhibit degradation of endogenously produced adenosine. The most potent enhancer of β-cell regeneration was the adenosine agonist 5′-N-Ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), which acting through the adenosine receptor A2aa increased β-cell proliferation and accelerated restoration of normoglycemia in zebrafish. Despite markedly stimulating β-cell proliferation during regeneration, NECA had only a modest effect during development. The proliferative and glucose-lowering effect of NECA was confirmed in diabetic mice, suggesting an evolutionarily conserved role for adenosine in β-cell regeneration. With this whole-organism screen, we identified components of the adenosine pathway that could be therapeutically targeted for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:22608007

  4. Smoking in Malaysia: promotion and control.

    PubMed

    Soon Kee Teoh

    1984-01-01

    This discussion of the promotion and control of smoking in Malaysia covers: tobacco cultivation; cigarette manufacture, advertising, and smoking; action against smoking; smoking in public; price increases; and future targets. About 62,000 families (120,000 people) of Malaysia's 14 million population are involved in tobacco farming, and 360 independent curers employ about 25,000 workers. Tobacco output has increased from 1.82 million kilograms in 1970 to a peak of 9.4 million kilograms in 1982, worth $38 million. Tobacco manufacturers have direct interest in tobacco growing. 60% of the tobacco required for cigarette manufacturing is locally produced and is expected to increase to 65-70% by 1985. The industry, unable to deny the harmful effects of cigarette smoking, is now exploiting the economy of the tobacco farmers to justify their business and to influence the government from taking any action against smoking. The government still provides technical expertise, guarantees purchase of tobacco, and provides almost 75% of the fertilizers used. There are 7 cigarette manufacturing companies. Cigarette sales in 1982 totaled nearly $460 million. The government received over $210 million or 47% of the total sales in various forms of taxes, a factor which influenced government handling of the smoking issue. Cigarettes were the most advertised product in 1981 when $9 million was spent. In 1982, all cigarette ads were banned from television and radio and in all government publications. The government stated that the revenue could be replaced. The number of cigarette smokers increased from 5 to 7% over the last decade. Recent studies of secondary school children showed a smoking incidence of about 20%; about half were habitual smokers and about 1% had smoked for over 3 years. Except for elderly villagers, few women smoke. After 7 years of lobbying by the Malaysian Medical Association and the Ministry of Health, the Cabinet approved legislation in 1977 requiring all cigarette

  5. Prominent pancreatic endocrinopathy and altered control of food intake disrupt energy homeostasis in prion diseases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, J.D.; Berardinelli, J.G.; Rocke, T.E.; Bessen, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases that can induce endocrinopathies. The basis of altered endocrine function in prion diseases is not well understood, and the purpose of this study was to investigate the spatiotemporal relationship between energy homeostasis and prion infection in hamsters inoculated with either the 139H strain of scrapie agent, which induces preclinical weight gain, or the HY strain of transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME), which induces clinical weight loss. Temporal changes in body weight, feed, and water intake were measured as well as both non-fasted and fasted concentrations of serum glucose, insulin, glucagon, ??-ketones, and leptin. In 139H scrapie-infected hamsters, polydipsia, hyperphagia, non-fasted hyperinsulinemia with hyperglycemia, and fasted hyperleptinemia were found at preclinical stages and are consistent with an anabolic syndrome that has similarities to type II diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome X. In HY TME-infected hamsters, hypodipsia, hypersecretion of glucagon (in both non-fasted and fasted states), increased fasted ??-ketones, fasted hypoglycemia, and suppressed non-fasted leptin concentrations were found while feed intake was normal. These findings suggest a severe catabolic syndrome in HY TME infection mediated by chronic increases in glucagon secretion. In both models, alterations of pancreatic endocrine function were not associated with PrPSc deposition in the pancreas. The results indicate that prominent endocrinopathy underlies alterations in body weight, pancreatic endocrine function, and intake of food. The prion-induced alterations of energy homeostasis in 139H scrapie- or HY TME-infected hamsters could occur within areas of the hypothalamus that control food satiety and/or within autonomic centers that provide neural outflow to the pancreas. ?? 2008 Society for Endocrinology.

  6. Controlled Film Architectures to Detect a Biomarker for Pancreatic Cancer Using Impedance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Soares, Andrey C; Soares, Juliana C; Shimizu, Flavio M; Melendez, Matias E; Carvalho, André L; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2015-11-25

    The need for analytical devices for detecting cancer at early stages has motivated research into nanomaterials where synergy is sought to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity in low-cost biosensors. In this study, we developed a film architecture combining self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and layer-by-layer (LbL) films of polysaccharide chitosan and the protein concanavalin A, on which a layer of anti-CA19-9 antibody was adsorbed. Using impedance spectroscopy with this biosensor, we were capable of detecting low concentrations of the antigen CA19-9, an important biomarker for pancreatic cancer. The limit of detection of 0.69U/mL reached is sufficient for detecting pancreatic cancer at very early stages. The selectivity of the biosensor was inferred from a series of control experiments with samples of cell lines that were tested positive (HT29) and negative (SW620) for the biomarker CA19-9, in addition to the lack of changes in the capacitance value for other analytes and antigen that are not related to this type of cancer. The high sensitivity and selectivity are ascribed to the very specific antigen-antibody interaction, which was confirmed with PM-IRRAS and atomic force microscopy. Also significant is that used information visualization methods to show that different cell lines and commercial samples containing distinct concentrations of CA19-9 and other analytes can be easily distinguished from each other. These computational methods are generic and may be used in optimization procedures to tailor biosensors for specific purposes, as we demonstrated here by comparing the performance of two film architectures in which the concentration of chitosan was varied.

  7. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  8. Ran GTPase protein promotes human pancreatic cancer proliferation by deregulating the expression of Survivin and cell cycle proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Lin; Lu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Xiaodi; Sun, Yi; Shi, Yongquan; Fan, Hongwei; Liu, Changhao; Zhou, Jinfeng; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming; Guo, Xuegang

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Overexpression of Ran in pancreatic cancer was correlated with histological grade. •Downregulation of Ran could induce cell apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation. •The effects were mediated by cell cycle proteins, Survivin and cleaved Caspase-3. -- Abstract: Ran, a member of the Ras GTPase family, has important roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Herein, we detected Ran expression in pancreatic cancer and explored its potential role on tumour progression. Overexpressed Ran in pancreatic cancer tissues was found highly correlated with the histological grade. Downregulation of Ran led to significant suppression of cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase and induction of apoptosis. In vivo studies also validated that result. Further studies revealed that those effects were at least partly mediated by the downregulation of Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, CDK2, CDK4, phospho-Rb and Survivin proteins and up regulation of cleaved Caspase-3.

  9. Extracellular matrix specific protein fingerprints measured in serum can separate pancreatic cancer patients from healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer (PC) is an aggressive disease with an urgent need for biomarkers. Hallmarks of PC include increased collagen deposition (desmoplasia) and increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether protein fingerprints of specific MMP-generated collagen fragments differentiate PC patients from healthy controls when measured in serum. Methods The levels of biomarkers reflecting MMP-mediated degradation of type I (C1M), type III (C3M) and type IV (C4M, C4M12a1) collagen were assessed in serum samples from PC patients (n = 15) and healthy controls (n = 33) using well-characterized and validated competitive ELISAs. Results The MMP-generated collagen fragments were significantly elevated in serum from PC patients as compared to controls. The diagnostic power of C1M, C3M, C4M and C4M12 were ≥83% (p < 0.001) and when combining all biomarkers 99% (p < 0.0001). Conclusions A panel of serum biomarkers reflecting altered MMP-mediated collagen turnover is able to differentiate PC patients from healthy controls. These markers may increase the understanding of mode of action of the disease and, if validated in larger clinical studies, provide an improved and additional tool in the PC setting. PMID:24261855

  10. A bio-inspired glucose controller based on pancreatic β-cell physiology.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Pau; Georgiou, Pantelis; Oliver, Nick; Johnston, Desmond G; Toumazou, Christofer

    2012-05-01

    Control algorithms for closed-loop insulin delivery in type 1 diabetes have been mainly based on control engineering or artificial intelligence techniques. These, however, are not based on the physiology of the pancreas but seek to implement engineering solutions to biology. Developments in mathematical models of the β-cell physiology of the pancreas have described the glucose-induced insulin release from pancreatic β cells at a molecular level. This has facilitated development of a new class of bio-inspired glucose control algorithms that replicate the functionality of the biological pancreas. However, technologies for sensing glucose levels and delivering insulin use the subcutaneous route, which is nonphysiological and introduces some challenges. In this article, a novel glucose controller is presented as part of a bio-inspired artificial pancreas. A mathematical model of β-cell physiology was used as the core of the proposed controller. In order to deal with delays and lack of accuracy introduced by the subcutaneous route, insulin feedback and a gain scheduling strategy were employed. A United States Food and Drug Administration-accepted type 1 diabetes mellitus virtual population was used to validate the presented controller. Premeal and postmeal mean ± standard deviation blood glucose levels for the adult and adolescent populations were well within the target range set for the controller [(70, 180) mg/dl], with a percent time in range of 92.8 ± 7.3% for the adults and 83.5 ± 14% for the adolescents. This article shows for the first time very good glucose control in a virtual population with type 1 diabetes mellitus using a controller based on a subcellular β-cell model. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  11. A Bio-Inspired Glucose Controller Based on Pancreatic β-Cell Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Pau; Georgiou, Pantelis; Oliver, Nick; Johnston, Desmond G; Toumazou, Christofer

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Control algorithms for closed-loop insulin delivery in type 1 diabetes have been mainly based on control engineering or artificial intelligence techniques. These, however, are not based on the physiology of the pancreas but seek to implement engineering solutions to biology. Developments in mathematical models of the β-cell physiology of the pancreas have described the glucose-induced insulin release from pancreatic β cells at a molecular level. This has facilitated development of a new class of bio-inspired glucose control algorithms that replicate the functionality of the biological pancreas. However, technologies for sensing glucose levels and delivering insulin use the subcutaneous route, which is nonphysiological and introduces some challenges. In this article, a novel glucose controller is presented as part of a bio-inspired artificial pancreas. Methods A mathematical model of β-cell physiology was used as the core of the proposed controller. In order to deal with delays and lack of accuracy introduced by the subcutaneous route, insulin feedback and a gain scheduling strategy were employed. A United States Food and Drug Administration-accepted type 1 diabetes mellitus virtual population was used to validate the presented controller. Results Premeal and postmeal mean ± standard deviation blood glucose levels for the adult and adolescent populations were well within the target range set for the controller [(70, 180) mg/dl], with a percent time in range of 92.8 ± 7.3% for the adults and 83.5 ± 14% for the adolescents. Conclusions This article shows for the first time very good glucose control in a virtual population with type 1 diabetes mellitus using a controller based on a subcellular β-cell model. PMID:22768892

  12. Cyr61/CCN1 signaling is critical for epithelial-mesenchymal transition and stemness and promotes pancreatic carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite recent advances in outlining the mechanisms involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis, precise molecular pathways and cellular lineage specification remains incompletely understood. Results We show here that Cyr61/CCN1 play a critical role in pancreatic carcinogenesis through the induction of EMT and stemness. Cyr61 mRNA and protein were detected in the early precursor lesions and their expression intensified with disease progression. Cyr61/CCN1 expression was also detected in different pancreatic cancer cell lines. The aggressive cell lines, in which the expressions of mesenchymal/stem cell molecular markers are predominant; exhibit more Cyr61/CCN1 expression. Cyr61 expression is exorbitantly higher in cancer stem/tumor initiating Panc-1-side-population (SP) cells. Upon Cyr61/CCN1 silencing, the aggressive behaviors are reduced by obliterating interlinking pathobiological events such as reversing the EMT, blocking the expression of stem-cell-like traits and inhibiting migration. In contrast, addition of Cyr61 protein in culture medium augments EMT and stemness features in relatively less aggressive BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells. Using a xenograft model we demonstrated that cyr61/CCN1 silencing in Panc-1-SP cells reverses the stemness features and tumor initiating potency of these cells. Moreover, our results imply a miRNA-based mechanism for the regulation of aggressive behaviors of pancreatic cancer cells by Cyr61/CCN1. Conclusions In conclusion, the discovery of the involvement of Cyr61/CCN1 in pancreatic carcinogenesis may represent an important marker for PDAC and suggests Cyr61/CCN1 can be a potential cancer therapeutic target. PMID:21232118

  13. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    DiMagno, Matthew J; DiMagno, Eugene P

    2012-09-01

    We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis reported in 2011. Smoking increases the risk of nongallstone acute pancreatitis and the progression of acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatitis. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for acute pancreatitis. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90 000 United States Pharmacopeia units of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared with endoscopic treatment in patients advanced chronic pancreatitis with a dilated main duct ± pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with chronic pancreatitis but approximately 30% of patients have significant side effects. Patients with nongallstone-related acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis of any cause should cease smoking. Results of this year's investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in chronic pancreatitis, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in chronic pancreatitis.

  14. DISTRIBUTION OF CCK-B RECEPTOR GENOTYPE BETWEEN PANCREATIC CANCER PATIENTS AND CONTROLS AND ITS IMPACT ON SURVIVAL

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jill P.; Whitcomb, David C.; Matters, Gail L.; Brand, Randall E.; Liao, Jiangang; Huang, Yu-Jing; Frazier, Marsha L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin stimulate growth of pancreatic cancer through the CCK-B receptor (CCK-BR). A splice variant of the CCK-BR that results from a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) has been identified. Since the splice variant receptor has an extended 3rd intracellular loop, an area involved in cell signaling and growth, we hypothesized that this genetic variant could contribute to the poor prognosis and short survival of this malignancy. Methods DNA from 931 patients with pancreatic cancer was evaluated for the SNP (C >A; rs1800843) in the CCK-BR gene. For statistical analysis, the Fisher’s exact test was used to compare the genotype and allele frequency between the cancer cohort and normal controls and the dependence of genotype on factors, such as stage of disease and age, was analyzed using Cox’s proportional hazard models. Results Compared to the normal cohort, the frequency of the A-allele in pancreatic cancer subjects was increased (p=0.01123; OR=2.283). Even after adjustment for stage of disease, survival of subjects with the minor allele was significantly shorter than those with the wild-genotype (HR=1.83; p =3.11×10−11). Conclusion The CCK-BR SNP predicts survival and should be studied as a candidate genetic biomarker for those at risk for pancreatic cancer. PMID:25469546

  15. Risk Factors for Sporadic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ben, Qiwen; Zhong, Jie; Fei, Jian; Chen, Haitao; Yv, Lifen; Tan, Jihong; Yuan, Yaozong

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined risk factors for sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs), including smoking, alcohol use, first-degree family history of any cancer (FHC), and diabetes in the Han Chinese ethnic group. In this clinic-based case-control analysis on 385 patients with sporadic PNETs and 614 age- and sex-matched controls, we interviewed subjects using a specific questionnaire on demographics and potential risk factors. An unconditional multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (AORs). No significant differences were found between patients and controls in terms of demographic variables. Most of the patients with PNETs had well-differentiated PNETs (G1, 62.9%) and non-advanced European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS) stage (stage I or II, 83.9%). Ever/heavy smoking, a history of diabetes and a first-degree FHC were independent risk factors for non-functional PNETs. Only heavy drinking was found to be an independent risk factor for functional PNETs (AOR = 1.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01–3.51). Ever/heavy smoking was also associated with advanced ENETS staging (stage III or IV) at the time of diagnosis. This study identified first-degree FHC, ever/heavy smoking, and diabetes as risk factors for non-functional PNETs, while heavy drinking as a risk factor for functional PNETs. PMID:27782199

  16. Chronic pancreatitis: relation to acute pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Uomo, G; Rabitti, P G

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between chronic pancreatitis (CP) and other pancreatic diseases, such as acute pancreatitis (AP) and pancreatic cancer (PK), remains a fairly debated question. The progression from alcoholic AP to CP is controversial, and some long-term epidemiological studies suggest that alcoholic CP might be the result of recurrent alcoholic AP (necrosis-fibrosis sequence) and a subgroup of alcoholics may present recurrent AP without progression to CP. Other predisposing factors (genetic, nutritional, environmental) seems to be important in inducing different outcomes of pancreatic damage due to alcohol. However, recurrent episodes of AP are clearly involved in pathophysiology of CP in patients with hereditary pancreatitis. A relationship between CP and subsequent PK development has long been suspected, but we actually don't know whether this association is direct or is the result of confounding factors, such as alcohol intake or cigarette smoking. Many issues should be considered as indicators of a causal association, and several of them are not fulfilled. Nonetheless, epidemiological studies (case-control or cohort studies) showed that the risk of PK is increased in patients with CP; the risk is significantly higher in tropical calcifying CP and hereditary pancreatitis. Studies on growth factors, oncogenes, tumor-suppressor genes, and angiogenesis suggest that the sequence PC-KP is plausible from the biological standpoint.

  17. Vitamin C Intake and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Published Case-Control and Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yong-Fei; Wang, Gao-Qing; Jiang, Wei; Huang, Jing; Chen, Guo-Chong; Lu, Cai-De

    2016-01-01

    Background Observational studies inconsistently reported the relationship between vitamin C intake and risk of pancreatic cancer. We conducted a meta-analysis of published case-control and cohort studies to quantify the association. Methods Potentially eligible studies were found on PubMed and EMBASE databases through May 31, 2015. A random-effects model was assigned to compute summary point estimates with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Subgroup and meta-regression analyses were also performed to explore sources of heterogeneity. Results Our final analyses included 20 observational studies comprising nearly 5 thousand cases of pancreatic cancer. When comparing the highest with the lowest categories of vitamin C intake, the summary odds ratio/relative risk for case-control studies (14 studies), cohort studies (6 studies) and all studies combined was 0.58 (95% CI: 0.52–0.66), 0.93 (95% CI: 0.78–1.11) and 0.66 (95% CI: 0.58–0.75), respectively. The difference in the findings between case-control and cohort studies was statistically significant (P < .001). Possible publication bias was shown in the meta-analysis of case-control studies. Conclusion There is insufficient evidence to conclude any relationship between vitamin C intake and risk of pancreatic cancer. The strong inverse association observed in case-control studies may be affected by biases (eg, recall and selection biases) that particularly affect case-control studies and/or potential publication bias. Future prospective studies of vitamin C intake and pancreatic cancer are needed. PMID:26859881

  18. Vitamin C Intake and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Published Case-Control and Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yong-Fei; Wang, Gao-Qing; Jiang, Wei; Huang, Jing; Chen, Guo-Chong; Lu, Cai-De

    2016-01-01

    Observational studies inconsistently reported the relationship between vitamin C intake and risk of pancreatic cancer. We conducted a meta-analysis of published case-control and cohort studies to quantify the association. Potentially eligible studies were found on PubMed and EMBASE databases through May 31, 2015. A random-effects model was assigned to compute summary point estimates with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Subgroup and meta-regression analyses were also performed to explore sources of heterogeneity. Our final analyses included 20 observational studies comprising nearly 5 thousand cases of pancreatic cancer. When comparing the highest with the lowest categories of vitamin C intake, the summary odds ratio/relative risk for case-control studies (14 studies), cohort studies (6 studies) and all studies combined was 0.58 (95% CI: 0.52-0.66), 0.93 (95% CI: 0.78-1.11) and 0.66 (95% CI: 0.58-0.75), respectively. The difference in the findings between case-control and cohort studies was statistically significant (P < .001). Possible publication bias was shown in the meta-analysis of case-control studies. There is insufficient evidence to conclude any relationship between vitamin C intake and risk of pancreatic cancer. The strong inverse association observed in case-control studies may be affected by biases (eg, recall and selection biases) that particularly affect case-control studies and/or potential publication bias. Future prospective studies of vitamin C intake and pancreatic cancer are needed.

  19. Loss of natural killer T cells promotes pancreatic cancer in LSL-Kras(G12D/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Janakiram, Naveena B; Mohammed, Altaf; Bryant, Taylor; Ritchie, Rebekah; Stratton, Nicole; Jackson, Lydgia; Lightfoot, Stan; Benbrook, Doris M; Asch, Adam S; Lang, Mark L; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2017-09-01

    The role of the unique T-cell population, natural killer T (NKT) cells, which have similar functions to NK cells in pancreatic cancer (PC), is not yet evaluated. To address the regulatory roles of NKT cells on tumour progression through tumour-associated macrophages (TAM) and their production of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) in (Kras)-driven pancreatic tumour (KPT) progression, we crossed CD1d(-/-) mice deficient in both invariant and variant NKT cells with the Kras(G12D) mice. Loss of NKT cells significantly increased pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions and also increased 5-LOX and mPGES-1 expression in M2-type macrophages and cancer stem-like cells in pancreatic tumours. Pharmacological inhibition of mPGES-1 and 5-LOX in M2 macrophages with specific inhibitor YS-121 in KPT-CD1d(-/-) mice decreased PanIN lesions and suppressed tumour growth in association with elevated levels of active CD8a cells. Hence, NKT cells regulate PC by modulating TAMs (M2) through mPGES-1 and 5-LOX; and the absence of NKT cells leads to aggressive development of PC. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Down-regulation of zinc transporter 8 (SLC30A8) in pancreatic beta-cells promotes cell survival

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The pancreatic islet contains high levels of zinc in granular vesicles of beta-cells where insulin is matured, crystallized, and stored before secretion. Zinc is an essential co-factor for insulin crystallization forming dense core in secretory granules. In insulin-containing secretory granules, zin...

  1. Down-regulation of zinc transporter 8 (SLC30A8) in pancreatic beta-cells promotes cell survival.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The pancreatic islet contains high levels of zinc in granular vesicles of ß-cells where insulin is matured, crystallized, and stored before secretion. Zinc is an essential co-factor for insulin crystallization forming dense cores in secretory granules. In insulin-containing secretory granules, zinc ...

  2. Pancreatic abscesses.

    PubMed

    Shi, E C; Yeo, B W; Ham, J M

    1984-09-01

    This paper presents the clinical features and problems in the management of 34 patients with pancreatic abscesses. In the majority of patients the abscesses developed following an attack of pancreatitis due to alcohol or gallstones. The abscesses were usually multilocular, and often had spread widely in the retroperitoneal space. Invasion into surrounding viscera or the peritoneal cavity occurred in 12 instances, and eight patients developed major bleeding into the abscess cavity. Obstructive complications (affecting bowel, common bile duct and large veins) occurred in eight patients. Twelve of the 34 patients (35 per cent) died, most deaths being due to failure to control sepsis (seven patients) or to massive bleeding from the abscess cavity (three patients). The mortality of this condition is likely to remain high, but may be reduced by better drainage techniques at the initial exploration. The importance of the infra-mesocolic approach for drainage is emphasized.

  3. Adjuvant chemotherapy with fluorouracil plus folinic acid vs gemcitabine following pancreatic cancer resection: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Neoptolemos, John P; Stocken, Deborah D; Bassi, Claudio; Ghaneh, Paula; Cunningham, David; Goldstein, David; Padbury, Robert; Moore, Malcolm J; Gallinger, Steven; Mariette, Christophe; Wente, Moritz N; Izbicki, Jakob R; Friess, Helmut; Lerch, Markus M; Dervenis, Christos; Oláh, Attila; Butturini, Giovanni; Doi, Ryuichiro; Lind, Pehr A; Smith, David; Valle, Juan W; Palmer, Daniel H; Buckels, John A; Thompson, Joyce; McKay, Colin J; Rawcliffe, Charlotte L; Büchler, Markus W

    2010-09-08

    Adjuvant fluorouracil has been shown to be of benefit for patients with resected pancreatic cancer. Gemcitabine is known to be the most effective agent in advanced disease as well as an effective agent in patients with resected pancreatic cancer. To determine whether fluorouracil or gemcitabine is superior in terms of overall survival as adjuvant treatment following resection of pancreatic cancer. The European Study Group for Pancreatic Cancer (ESPAC)-3 trial, an open-label, phase 3, randomized controlled trial conducted in 159 pancreatic cancer centers in Europe, Australasia, Japan, and Canada. Included in ESPAC-3 version 2 were 1088 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma who had undergone cancer resection; patients were randomized between July 2000 and January 2007 and underwent at least 2 years of follow-up. Patients received either fluorouracil plus folinic acid (folinic acid, 20 mg/m(2), intravenous bolus injection, followed by fluorouracil, 425 mg/m(2) intravenous bolus injection given 1-5 days every 28 days) (n = 551) or gemcitabine (1000 mg/m(2) intravenous infusion once a week for 3 of every 4 weeks) (n = 537) for 6 months. Primary outcome measure was overall survival; secondary measures were toxicity, progression-free survival, and quality of life. Final analysis was carried out on an intention-to-treat basis after a median of 34.2 (interquartile range, 27.1-43.4) months' follow-up after 753 deaths (69%). Median survival was 23.0 (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.1-25.0) months for patients treated with fluorouracil plus folinic acid and 23.6 (95% CI, 21.4-26.4) months for those treated with gemcitabine (chi(1)(2) = 0.7; P = .39; hazard ratio, 0.94 [95% CI, 0.81-1.08]). Seventy-seven patients (14%) receiving fluorouracil plus folinic acid had 97 treatment-related serious adverse events, compared with 40 patients (7.5%) receiving gemcitabine, who had 52 events (P < .001). There were no significant differences in either progression-free survival or

  4. Effect of Nasogastric Tube Feeding vs Nil per Os on Dysmotility in Acute Pancreatitis: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiemin; Pendharkar, Sayali A; O'Grady, Gregory; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2016-02-01

    Evidence from animal studies suggests that gastrointestinal motility is impaired in acute pancreatitis. Enteral nutrition, and more specifically nasogastric tube feeding, has emerged as a key treatment modality in patients with acute pancreatitis, but its effect on motility has not been investigated in this setting. The aim was to validate the Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptom Index (GCSI) in patients with acute pancreatitis and determine the effect of nasogastric tube feeding on GCSI. The study design was a randomized controlled trial. Patients were allocated to nasogastric tube feeding or nil per os within 24 hours of hospital admission. GCSI data from before randomization to 72 hours after randomization were analyzed. The test-retest reliability analysis was used to calculate Cronbach's α. Seventeen patients were randomized to nasogastric tube feeding and 18 to nil per os. Overall, the total GCSI score significantly decreased over the study (F = 8.537; P = .001) but was not significantly different between the 2 study groups during hospitalization (F = 1.159; P = .322). However, patients on nasogastric tube feeding did show improved appetite compared with nil per os (F = 3.526; P = .036). The GCSI was found to be a reliable tool in the setting of acute pancreatitis (Cronbach's α = 0.852). Nasogastric tube feeding does not appear to affect dysmotility symptoms in acute pancreatitis as measured by the GCSI, although appetite improved. Use of the simple, noninvasive, and inexpensive GCSI tool to evaluate motility is recommended in future clinical trials in pancreatology. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  5. Ascl1b and Neurod1, instead of Neurog3, control pancreatic endocrine cell fate in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background NEUROG3 is a key regulator of pancreatic endocrine cell differentiation in mouse, essential for the generation of all mature hormone producing cells. It is repressed by Notch signaling that prevents pancreatic cell differentiation by maintaining precursors in an undifferentiated state. Results We show that, in zebrafish, neurog3 is not expressed in the pancreas and null neurog3 mutant embryos do not display any apparent endocrine defects. The control of endocrine cell fate is instead fulfilled by two basic helix-loop-helix factors, Ascl1b and Neurod1, that are both repressed by Notch signaling. ascl1b is transiently expressed in the mid-trunk endoderm just after gastrulation and is required for the generation of the first pancreatic endocrine precursor cells. Neurod1 is expressed afterwards in the pancreatic anlagen and pursues the endocrine cell differentiation program initiated by Ascl1b. Their complementary role in endocrine differentiation of the dorsal bud is demonstrated by the loss of all hormone-secreting cells following their simultaneous inactivation. This defect is due to a blockage of the initiation of endocrine cell differentiation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that NEUROG3 is not the unique pancreatic endocrine cell fate determinant in vertebrates. A general survey of endocrine cell fate determinants in the whole digestive system among vertebrates indicates that they all belong to the ARP/ASCL family but not necessarily to the Neurog3 subfamily. The identity of the ARP/ASCL factor involved depends not only on the organ but also on the species. One could, therefore, consider differentiating stem cells into insulin-producing cells without the involvement of NEUROG3 but via another ARP/ASCL factor. PMID:23835295

  6. Ascl1b and Neurod1, instead of Neurog3, control pancreatic endocrine cell fate in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Flasse, Lydie C; Pirson, Justine L; Stern, David G; Von Berg, Virginie; Manfroid, Isabelle; Peers, Bernard; Voz, Marianne L

    2013-07-08

    NEUROG3 is a key regulator of pancreatic endocrine cell differentiation in mouse, essential for the generation of all mature hormone producing cells. It is repressed by Notch signaling that prevents pancreatic cell differentiation by maintaining precursors in an undifferentiated state. We show that, in zebrafish, neurog3 is not expressed in the pancreas and null neurog3 mutant embryos do not display any apparent endocrine defects. The control of endocrine cell fate is instead fulfilled by two basic helix-loop-helix factors, Ascl1b and Neurod1, that are both repressed by Notch signaling. ascl1b is transiently expressed in the mid-trunk endoderm just after gastrulation and is required for the generation of the first pancreatic endocrine precursor cells. Neurod1 is expressed afterwards in the pancreatic anlagen and pursues the endocrine cell differentiation program initiated by Ascl1b. Their complementary role in endocrine differentiation of the dorsal bud is demonstrated by the loss of all hormone-secreting cells following their simultaneous inactivation. This defect is due to a blockage of the initiation of endocrine cell differentiation. This study demonstrates that NEUROG3 is not the unique pancreatic endocrine cell fate determinant in vertebrates. A general survey of endocrine cell fate determinants in the whole digestive system among vertebrates indicates that they all belong to the ARP/ASCL family but not necessarily to the Neurog3 subfamily. The identity of the ARP/ASCL factor involved depends not only on the organ but also on the species. One could, therefore, consider differentiating stem cells into insulin-producing cells without the involvement of NEUROG3 but via another ARP/ASCL factor.

  7. Corticosteroid therapy for severe acute pancreatitis: a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Li-Hua; Liu, Zhong-Min; Wang, Shi-Ji; Zhao, Shu-Jie; Zhang, Dong; Chen, Ying; Wang, Yu-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent reports about the benefits of corticosteroid therapy in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) have shown conflicting results. We aimed to explore the effects of corticosteroid therapy in SAP patients on patient outcomes by performing a meta-analysis. Methods: Databases (Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, PubMed, Cochrane Library, Chinese Biomedicine Database, and China Academic Journal Full-Text Database) were queried for all relevant, randomized, controlled trials investigating corticosteroid therapy in patients with SAP. Results: Six randomized, controlled trials including 430 SAP patients were identified. Corticosteroid therapy for SAP was associated with reductions in the length of hospital stay, the need for surgical intervention, and the mortality rate (weighted mean difference [WMD]: -9.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -16.91 to -2.04, P = 0.01; odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.18-0.67, P = 0.002; OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.22-0.94, P = 0.03). There were no significant differences in the complication rates or Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores in patients with or without corticosteroid therapy. Conclusion: Corticosteroid therapy may improve outcomes in patients with SAP. PMID:26339332

  8. Relationship between tea consumption and pancreatic cancer risk: a meta-analysis based on prospective cohort studies and case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Zhang, Qi; Peng, Min; Shen, Yanping; Wan, Peng; Xie, Guoming

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between regular tea consumption and the risk of pancreatic cancer by a meta-analysis. Two investigators independently performed a computer retrieve on the electronic databases of Embase, PubMed, and Ovidsp for prospective cohort studies and case-control studies on regular tea consumption and the risk of pancreatic cancer incidence. The keywords using for search were ('Pancreas' OR 'pancreatic') AND ('neoplasms' OR 'carcinoma' OR 'cancer') AND 'tea'. Risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to determine the effect of tea consumption on pancreatic cancer. A total of 14 studies were included (8078 pancreatic cancer patients, with a total of 859 783 patients) in the present meta-analysis. The pooled results of effect size indicated that tea consumption has no significant relationship with risk of pancreatic cancer (RR=0.99, 95% CI: 0.89-1.11, P=0.922). However, the subgroup analysis of different countries showed a statistical decrease in pancreatic cancer risk by high consumption of tea in a Chinese population (RR=0.76, 95% CI: 0.59-0.98, P=0.036). Similar results were found in the elderly (>60 years old) (RR=0.76, 95% CI: 0.60-0.96, P=0.023). In conclusion, the present meta-analysis of 14 studies suggests that the correlation between tea consumption and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the general population is not significant, but an increase in tea consumption can reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer disease in Chinese populations and in individuals older than 60 years of age. It is necessary to formulate more rigorous designs of regional studies to further confirm the relationship between tea consumption and pancreatic cancer.

  9. Promoter control of translation in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gunkel, N; Braddock, M; Thorburn, A M; Muckenthaler, M; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1995-01-01

    The HIV-1 promoter directs the high level production of transcripts in Xenopus oocytes. However, despite being exported to the cytoplasm, the transcripts are not translated [M. Braddock, A. M. Thorburn, A. Chambers, G. D. Elliott, G. J. Anderson, A. J. Kingsman and S. M. Kingsman (1990) Cell, 62, 1123-1133]. We have shown previously that this is a function of promoter sequences and is independent of the TAR RNA element that is normally located at the 5' end of all HIV mRNAs. We now show that a three nucleotide substitution at position -340, upstream of the RNA start site, reverses the translation inhibition. This site coincides with a sequence that can bind the haematopoietic transcription factor GATA. The inhibition of translation can also be reversed by treatment with inhibitors of casein kinase II or by injection into the nucleus of antibodies specific for the FRGY2 family of RNP proteins. We suggest that the -340 site influences the quality of the transcription complex such that transcripts are diverted to a nucleus-dependent translation inhibition pathway. Images PMID:7885836

  10. Passive smoking and the use of noncigarette tobacco products in association with risk for pancreatic cancer: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Manal M; Abbruzzese, James L; Bondy, Melissa L; Wolff, Robert A; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Pisters, Peter W; Evans, Douglas B; Khan, Rabia; Lenzi, Renato; Jiao, Li; Li, Donghui

    2007-06-15

    The associations between passive smoking and the use of noncigarette tobacco products with pancreatic cancer are not clear. In this case-control study, the authors collected information on passive smoking and the use of noncigarette tobacco products in 808 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 808 healthy controls by personal interview. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to estimate the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The results confirmed the previously reported association between active smoking and increased risk for pancreatic cancer. The AOR was 1.7 (95% CI, 1.4-2.2) for regular smokers, 1.8 (95% CI, 1.4-2.4) for long-term smokers, and 3.1 (95% CI, 2.2-4.3) for former smokers. Although passive smoking showed a nonsignificantly elevated risk for pancreatic cancer in the entire study population (AOR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.9-1.7), the association was present among ever smokers (AOR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.03-2.6) but was absent among never smokers (AOR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.8-1.6). Neither intensity nor duration of passive smoking modified the risk of pancreatic cancer among never smokers. The use of chewing tobacco, snuff, and pipes showed no significant risk elevation for pancreatic cancer after controlling for the confounding effects of demographics and other known risk factors. The use of cigars in never smokers showed a borderline significant increase of risk for pancreatic cancer (AOR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.0-4.7; P = .05). The current observations did not support a role for passive smoking or the use of noncigarette tobacco products in the etiology of pancreatic cancer. The association between cigar use and the risk of pancreatic cancer needs to be confirmed in other study populations. Copyright 2007 American Cancer Society.

  11. Dietary food groups intake and cooking methods associations with pancreatic cancer: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Zeinab; Hekmatdoost, Azita; Zinab, Hassan Eini; Farrokhzad, Solmaz; Rahimi, Roya; Malekzadeh, Reza; Pourshams, Akram

    2015-05-01

    The role of dietary habits in the etiology of pancreatic cancer (PC) has not yet been well elucidated. The aim of the present study was to examine the association of the frequency of different food groups' intake and their cooking methods with PC risk based on a well-designed case-control study. A case-control study including 307 PC patients and 322 controls referred to four tertiary endosonography centers was conducted from January 2011 to January 2014 to compare the frequency intake of different food items and their cooking methods between cases and controls. After adjustment for gender, age, body mass index, years of education, diabetes and alcohol history, smoking status, and opium use, a significant direct relationship was observed between PC risk and intake frequency (time/week) of bread (OR = 1.50; 95 % CI 1.05-2.13; p-value 0.024), rice (OR = 2.10; 95 % CI 1.15-3.82; p for trend 0.034), and red meat (OR = 2.25; 95 % CI 1.22-4.14; p for trend 0.033) (time/day), when comparing the highest category of intake frequency with the lowest, while increasing frequency of fish consumption was associated with a lower risk of PC (OR = 0.93; 95 % CI0.59-1.47; p for trend 0.009). Increasing consumption of barbecuing red meat and deep fried vegetables was associated with 67 % and 70 % increased risk of PC (p-value 0.025 and 0.006, respectively). Our results indicate that increased frequency of intake of bread, rice, and red meat (especially barbecued) and deep fried vegetables can aggregate PC risk, while increased frequency of fish consumption can protect against PC. However, more studies are still needed.

  12. Predator control promotes invasive dominated ecological states.

    PubMed

    Wallach, Arian D; Johnson, Christopher N; Ritchie, Euan G; O'Neill, Adam J

    2010-08-01

    Invasive species are regarded as one of the top five drivers of the global extinction crisis. In response, extreme measures have been applied in an attempt to control or eradicate invasives, with little success overall. We tested the idea that state shifts to invasive dominance are symptomatic of losses in ecosystem resilience, due to the suppression of apex predators. This concept was investigated in Australia where the high rate of mammalian extinctions is largely attributed to the destructive influence of invasive species. Intensive pest control is widely applied across the continent, simultaneously eliminating Australia's apex predator, the dingo (Canis lupus dingo). We show that predator management accounts for shifts between two main ecosystem states. Lethal control fractures dingo social structure and leads to bottom-up driven increases in invasive mesopredators and herbivores. Where control is relaxed, dingoes re-establish top-down regulation of ecosystems, allowing for the recovery of biodiversity and productivity.

  13. Analysis of Local Control in Patients Receiving IMRT for Resected Pancreatic Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Yovino, Susannah; Maidment, Bert W.; Herman, Joseph M.; Pandya, Naimish; Goloubeva, Olga; Wolfgang, Chris; Schulick, Richard; Laheru, Daniel; Hanna, Nader; Alexander, Richard; Regine, William F.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is increasingly incorporated into therapy for pancreatic cancer. A concern regarding this technique is the potential for geographic miss and decreased local control. We analyzed patterns of first failure among patients treated with IMRT for resected pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-one patients who underwent resection and adjuvant chemoradiation for pancreas cancer are included in this report. IMRT was used for all to a median dose of 50.4 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-FU-based in 72% of patients and gemcitabine-based in 28%. Results: At median follow-up of 24 months, 49/71 patients (69%) had failed. The predominant failure pattern was distant metastases in 35/71 patients (49%). The most common site of metastases was the liver. Fourteen patients (19%) developed locoregional failure in the tumor bed alone in 5 patients, regional nodes in 4 patients, and concurrently with metastases in 5 patients. Median overall survival (OS) was 25 months. On univariate analysis, nodal status, margin status, postoperative CA 19-9 level, and weight loss during treatment were predictive for OS. On multivariate analysis, higher postoperative CA19-9 levels predicted for worse OS on a continuous basis (p < 0.01). A trend to worse OS was seen among patients with more weight loss during therapy (p = 0.06). Patients with positive nodes and positive margins also had significantly worse OS (HR for death 2.8, 95% CI 1.1-7.5; HR for death 2.6, 95% CI 1.1-6.2, respectively). Grade 3-4 nausea and vomiting was seen in 8% of patients. Late complication of small bowel obstruction occurred in 4 (6%) patients. Conclusions: This is the first comprehensive report of patterns of failure among patients treated with adjuvant IMRT for pancreas cancer. IMRT was not associated with an increase in local recurrences in our cohort. These data support the use of IMRT in the recently activated EORTC/US Intergroup/RTOG 0848 adjuvant pancreas

  14. Activator protein 1 promotes gemcitabine-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer by upregulating its downstream target Bim

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Wenjing; Du, Yongxing; Zhang, Taiping; You, Lei; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Gemcitabine is a commonly used chemotherapy drug in pancreatic cancer. The function of activator protein 1 (AP-1) is cell-specific, and its function depends on the expression of other complex members. In the present study, we added gemcitabine to the media of Panc-1 and SW1990 cells at clinically achieved concentrations (10 µM). Compared with constitutive c-Fos expression, c-Jun expression increased in a dose-dependent manner upon gemcitabine treatment. c-Jun overexpression increased gemcitabine-induced apoptosis through Bim activation, while cell apoptosis and Bim expression decreased following c-Jun knockdown. Furthermore, gemcitabine-induced apoptosis and Bim levels decreased when c-Jun phosphorylation was blocked by SP600125. Our findings suggest that c-Jun, which is a member of the AP-1 complex, functions in gemcitabine-induced apoptosis by regulating its downstream target Bim in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:28105181

  15. Activator protein 1 promotes gemcitabine-induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer by upregulating its downstream target Bim.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Wenjing; Du, Yongxing; Zhang, Taiping; You, Lei; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-12-01

    Gemcitabine is a commonly used chemotherapy drug in pancreatic cancer. The function of activator protein 1 (AP-1) is cell-specific, and its function depends on the expression of other complex members. In the present study, we added gemcitabine to the media of Panc-1 and SW1990 cells at clinically achieved concentrations (10 µM). Compared with constitutive c-Fos expression, c-Jun expression increased in a dose-dependent manner upon gemcitabine treatment. c-Jun overexpression increased gemcitabine-induced apoptosis through Bim activation, while cell apoptosis and Bim expression decreased following c-Jun knockdown. Furthermore, gemcitabine-induced apoptosis and Bim levels decreased when c-Jun phosphorylation was blocked by SP600125. Our findings suggest that c-Jun, which is a member of the AP-1 complex, functions in gemcitabine-induced apoptosis by regulating its downstream target Bim in pancreatic cancer cells.

  16. Bio-ecological control of acute pancreatitis: the role of enteral nutrition, pro and synbiotics.

    PubMed

    Bengmark, Stig

    2005-09-01

    Increasing knowledge, both experimental and clinical, supports the fact that early and aggressive enteral nutrition has the capacity to reduce superinflammation and prevent infections in severe acute pancreatitis. Clearly, the main role of enteral nutrition is to boost the immune system, and not, at least initially, to provide calories. Whereas enteral nutrition improves, parenteral nutrition reduces immune functions. The content of enteral nutrition solutions is more important than the route of administration per se. Antioxidants, plant fibres and live lactic acid bacteria are especially important for boosting the immune system. Recent studies support the fact that enteral nutrition and the supply of fibres and live lactic acid bacteria may significantly reduce the rate of infections. So far none of the treatments has been able to reduce the incidence of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiorgan dysfunction syndrome. A recent unpublished study indicates, however, that the systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiorgan dysfunction syndrome can also be reduced if much higher doses of lactic acid bacteria and a combination of several bioactive lactic acid bacteria are used (synbiotics). Immunosupporting enteral nutrition with synbiotics is an important tool to control superinflammation and infection, and might also reduce the multiorgan dysfunction syndrome and systemic inflammatory response syndrome. It is essential that it is supplied early, if possible in the emergency room. New autopositioning regurgitation-resistant feeding tubes are available to facilitate such a policy.

  17. Safety constraints in an artificial pancreatic beta cell: an implementation of model predictive control with insulin on board.

    PubMed

    Ellingsen, Christian; Dassau, Eyal; Zisser, Howard; Grosman, Benyamin; Percival, Matthew W; Jovanovic, Lois; Doyle, Francis J

    2009-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is characterized by the destruction of pancreatic beta cells, resulting in the inability to produce sufficient insulin to maintain normoglycemia. As a result, people with T1DM depend on exogenous insulin that is given either by multiple daily injections or by an insulin pump to control their blood glucose. A challenging task is to design the next step in T1DM therapy: a fully automated insulin delivery system consisting of an artificial pancreatic beta cell that shall provide both safe and effective therapy. The core of such a system is a control algorithm that calculates the insulin dose based on automated glucose measurements. A model predictive control (MPC) algorithm was designed to control glycemia by controlling exogenous insulin delivery. The MPC algorithm contained a dynamic safety constraint, insulin on board (IOB), which incorporated the clinical values of correction factor and insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio along with estimated insulin action decay curves as part of the optimal control solution. The results emphasized the ability of the IOB constraint to significantly improve the glucose/insulin control trajectories in the presence of aggressive control actions. The simulation results indicated that 50% of the simulations conducted without the IOB constraint resulted in hypoglycemic events, compared to 10% of the simulations that included the IOB constraint. Achieving both efficacy and safety in an artificial pancreatic beta cell calls for an IOB safety constraint that is able to override aggressive control moves (large insulin doses), thereby minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia. 2009 Diabetes Technology Society.

  18. Safety Constraints in an Artificial Pancreatic β Cell: An Implementation of Model Predictive Control with Insulin on Board

    PubMed Central

    Ellingsen, Christian; Dassau, Eyal; Zisser, Howard; Grosman, Benyamin; Percival, Matthew W.; Jovanovič, Lois; Doyle, Francis J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is characterized by the destruction of pancreatic β cells, resulting in the inability to produce sufficient insulin to maintain normoglycemia. As a result, people with T1DM depend on exogenous insulin that is given either by multiple daily injections or by an insulin pump to control their blood glucose. A challenging task is to design the next step in T1DM therapy: a fully automated insulin delivery system consisting of an artificial pancreatic β cell that shall provide both safe and effective therapy. The core of such a system is a control algorithm that calculates the insulin dose based on automated glucose measurements. Methods A model predictive control (MPC) algorithm was designed to control glycemia by controlling exogenous insulin delivery. The MPC algorithm contained a dynamic safety constraint, insulin on board (IOB), which incorporated the clinical values of correction factor and insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio along with estimated insulin action decay curves as part of the optimal control solution. Results The results emphasized the ability of the IOB constraint to significantly improve the glucose/insulin control trajectories in the presence of aggressive control actions. The simulation results indicated that 50% of the simulations conducted without the IOB constraint resulted in hypoglycemic events, compared to 10% of the simulations that included the IOB constraint. Conclusions Achieving both efficacy and safety in an artificial pancreatic β cell calls for an IOB safety constraint that is able to override aggressive control moves (large insulin doses), thereby minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia. PMID:20144293

  19. [The basic plan to promote cancer control in Japan].

    PubMed

    Monden, Morito

    2013-05-01

    Cancer has been the leading cause of death in Japan since 1981. The Japanese government implemented the Comprehensive 10-year Strategy for Cancer Control in 1984, following which the Second- and Third-term Comprehensive 10-year Strategy for Cancer Control have been implemented every 10years to promote cancer research and disseminate high-quality cancer medical services. The Cancer Control Act was approved in June 2006, and the law has been implemented since April 2007. Based on this law, the Basic Plan to Promote Cancer Control program was discussed by the Cancer Control Promotion Council and approved by the Cabinet of Japan in June 2007. This plan was launched in June 2007, and covered 5 fiscal years from 2007 to 2011. It also provides a model for developing the Prefectural Plan to Promote Cancer Control. The Basic Plan needs to be updated at least every 5 years under the Cancer Control Act; therefore, the Phase Two Basic Plan was approved by the Japanese Cabinet in June 2012. Although the first plan was limited to medicine or medical care, the second plan was broadened to include social undertakings such as patient support in terms of job acquisition or student education for an indepth understanding of cancer. This paper includes the history of cancer control promotion in Japan and viewpoints on the basic plan for cancer control.

  20. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and Symptoms Staging of Pancreatic Cancer Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Whipple Procedure Complementary Therapies Pancreatic Cancer Support ...

  1. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and Symptoms Staging of Pancreatic Cancer Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Whipple Procedure Complementary Therapies Pancreatic Cancer Support ...

  2. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and Symptoms Staging of Pancreatic Cancer Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Whipple Procedure Complementary Therapies Pancreatic Cancer Support ...

  3. Obesity, Intrapancreatic Fatty Infiltration, and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Maitra, Anirban; Wang, Huamin

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and intrapancreatic fatty infiltration are associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions. The interplay among obesity, inflammation, and oncogenic Kras signaling promotes pancreatic tumorigenesis. Targeting the interaction between obesity-associated inflammation and Kras signaling may provide new strategies for prevention and therapy of pancreatic cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Plasma carotenoids, vitamin C, retinol and tocopherols levels and pancreatic cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition: a nested case-control study: plasma micronutrients and pancreatic cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Jeurnink, Suzanne M; Ros, Martine M; Leenders, Max; van Duijnhoven, Franzel J B; Siersema, Peter D; Jansen, Eugene H J M; van Gils, Carla H; Bakker, Marije F; Overvad, Kim; Roswall, Nina; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Racine, Antoine; Cadeau, Claire; Grote, Verena; Kaaks, Rudolf; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Benetou, Vasiliki; Valanou, Elisavet; Palli, Domenico; Krogh, Vittorio; Vineis, Paolo; Tumino, Rosario; Mattiello, Amalia; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Castaño, José María Huerta; Duell, Eric J; Barricarte, Aurelio; Molina-Montes, Esther; Argüelles, Marcial; Dorronsoro, Mire; Johansen, Dorthe; Lindkvist, Björn; Sund, Malin; Crowe, Francesca L; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Jenab, Mazda; Fedirko, Veronika; Riboli, E; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B

    2015-03-15

    Evidence of a protective effect of several antioxidants and other nutrients on pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the association for prediagnostic plasma levels of carotenoids, vitamin C, retinol and tocopherols with risk of pancreatic cancer in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). 446 incident exocrine pancreatic cancer cases were matched to 446 controls by age at blood collection, study center, sex, date and time of blood collection, fasting status and hormone use. Plasma carotenoids (α- and β-carotene, lycopene, β-cryptoxanthin, canthaxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein), α- and γ-tocopherol and retinol were measured by reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography and plasma vitamin C by a colorimetric assay. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for pancreatic cancer risk were estimated using a conditional logistic regression analysis, adjusted for smoking status, smoking duration and intensity, waist circumference, cotinine levels and diabetes status. Inverse associations with pancreatic cancer risk were found for plasma β-carotene (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.52, 95%CI 0.31-0.88, p for trend = 0.02), zeaxanthin (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.53, 95%CI 0.30-0.94, p for trend = 0.06) and α-tocopherol (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.62, 95%CI 0.39-0.99, p for trend = 0.08. For α- and β-carotene, lutein, sum of carotenoids and γ-tocopherol, heterogeneity between geographical regions was observed. In conclusion, our results show that higher plasma concentrations of β-carotene, zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol may be inversely associated with risk of pancreatic cancer, but further studies are warranted.

  5. Ice skating promotes postural control in children.

    PubMed

    Keller, M; Röttger, K; Taube, W

    2014-12-01

    High fall rates causing injury and enormous financial costs are reported for children. However, only few studies investigated the effects of balance training in children and these studies did not find enhanced balance performance in postural (transfer) tests. Consequently, it was previously speculated that classical balance training might not be stimulating enough for children to adequately perform these exercises. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of ice skating as an alternative form of balance training. Volunteers of an intervention (n = 17; INT: 13.1 ± 0.4 years) and a control group (n = 13; CON: 13.2 ± 0.3 years) were tested before and after training in static and dynamic postural transfer tests. INT participated in eight sessions of ice skating during education lessons, whereas CON participated in normal physical education. Enhanced balance performance was observed in INT but not in CON when tested on an unstable free-swinging platform (P < 0.05) or when performing a functional reach test (P < 0.001). This is the first study showing significantly enhanced balance performance after ice skating in children. More importantly, participating children improved static and dynamic balance control in postural tasks that were not part of the training.

  6. Mortality studies of machining fluid exposure in the automobile industry. V: A case-control study of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bardin, J A; Eisen, E A; Tolbert, P E; Hallock, M F; Hammond, S K; Woskie, S R; Smith, T J; Monson, R R

    1997-09-01

    Results are presented from a case-control study of 97 cases of pancreatic cancer nested in a cohort of workers from three automobile manufacturing plants. Risk was examined for lifetime exposure to straight, soluble, and synthetic metalworking fluids, as used in specific machining or grinding operations, as well as for constituents of the fluids. Pancreatic cancer was associated with exposure to synthetic fluids in grinding operations, with an odds ratio of 3.0 (95% CI: 1.2-7.5) among those with more than 1.4 mg/m3-years of exposure. We were unable to examine synthetic exposure in the absence of grinding because there was virtually no exposure to synthetics in machining operations in this study population. Although a disproportionately high percent of the cases were black, no black workers had any exposure to synthetic fluids, and no other measured exposure was found to be related to risk. Thus, the previously documented excess risk of pancreatic cancer among blacks in this cohort remains unexplained.

  7. Calcium and adenosine triphosphate control of cellular pathology: asparaginase-induced pancreatitis elicited via protease-activated receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shuang; Gerasimenko, Julia V.; Tsugorka, Tatiana; Gryshchenko, Oleksiy; Samarasinghe, Sujith; Gerasimenko, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Exocytotic secretion of digestive enzymes from pancreatic acinar cells is elicited by physiological cytosolic Ca2+ signals, occurring as repetitive short-lasting spikes largely confined to the secretory granule region, that stimulate mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. By contrast, sustained global cytosolic Ca2+ elevations decrease ATP levels and cause necrosis, leading to the disease acute pancreatitis (AP). Toxic Ca2+ signals can be evoked by products of alcohol and fatty acids as well as bile acids. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which l-asparaginase evokes AP. Asparaginase is an essential element in the successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the most common type of cancer affecting children, but AP is a side-effect occurring in about 5–10% of cases. Like other pancreatitis-inducing agents, asparaginase evoked intracellular Ca2+ release followed by Ca2+ entry and also substantially reduced Ca2+ extrusion because of decreased intracellular ATP levels. The toxic Ca2+ signals caused extensive necrosis. The asparaginase-induced pathology depended on protease-activated receptor 2 and its inhibition prevented the toxic Ca2+ signals and necrosis. We tested the effects of inhibiting the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ entry by the Ca2+ channel inhibitor GSK-7975A. This markedly reduced asparaginase-induced Ca2+ entry and also protected effectively against the development of necrosis. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377732

  8. Long-term disease control of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with lanreotide autogel(®): a case report.

    PubMed

    Lybaert, Willem; Van Hul, Erik; Woestenborghs, Heidi

    2014-09-01

    The CLARINET study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00353496) showed that somatostatin analogs are able to stabilize tumor growth in patients with intestinal and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Here, we present a case of NET originating from the pancreatic tail that was treated with lanreotide Autogel(®). A 60-year-old patient underwent resection of a pancreatic NET with splenectomy and distal pancreatectomy. Four months after surgery, there was an increase in chromogranin A levels, along with a hypercaptating lesion of approximately 3.5 cm at the residual part of the pancreatic corpus. Treatment with 30 mg monthly-administered octreotide long-acting release (LAR) was initiated. After 3 months of treatment, a control CT scan revealed diffuse metastases in the liver, although the patient presented no symptoms and liver tests were normal. Due to difficulties with the administration of octreotide LAR, treatment was switched to lanreotide Autogel(®) 120 mg, administered as monthly deep-subcutaneous injections. Progression-free survival, as shown by 3-monthly CT scans, was obtained for 2 years without the need to increase the lanreotide Autogel(®) dose, and the patient reported no side effects. After these 2 years, deterioration of the patient's clinical status and weight loss were observed, along with increased size of the liver lesions and appearance of peritoneal metastases. Chemotherapy treatment with cisplatinum-etoposide was initiated, while the lanreotide Autogel(®) injections were continued. After three chemotherapy cycles, a rapid decline in the patient's quality of life was noted, and she requested discontinuation of the chemotherapy and lanreotide injections. One month later, the patient died due to clinical progressive disease.

  9. Early to Late Endosome Trafficking Controls Secretion and Zymogen Activation in Rodent and Human Pancreatic Acinar Cells.

    PubMed

    Messenger, Scott W; Thomas, Diana Dh; Cooley, Michelle M; Jones, Elaina K; Falkowski, Michelle A; August, Benjamin K; Fernandez, Luis A; Gorelick, Fred S; Groblewski, Guy E

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells have an expanded apical endosomal system, the physiological and pathophysiological significance of which is still emerging. Phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P2) is an essential phospholipid generated by PIKfyve, which phosphorylates phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI(3)P). PI(3,5)P2 is necessary for maturation of early endosomes (EE) to late endosomes (LE). Inhibition of EE to LE trafficking enhances anterograde endosomal trafficking and secretion at the plasma membrane by default through a recycling endosome (RE) intermediate. We assessed the effects of modulating PIKfyve activity on apical trafficking and pancreatitis responses in pancreatic acinar cells. Inhibition of EE to LE trafficking was achieved using pharmacological inhibitors of PIKfyve, expression of dominant negative PIKfyve K1877E, or constitutively active Rab5-GTP Q79L. Anterograde endosomal trafficking was manipulated by expression of constitutively active and dominant negative Rab11a mutants. The effects of these agents on secretion, endolysosomal exocytosis of lysosome associated membrane protein (LAMP1), and trypsinogen activation in response to high-dose CCK-8, bile acids and cigarette toxin was determined. PIKfyve inhibition increased basal and stimulated secretion. Adenoviral overexpression of PIKfyve decreased secretion leading to cellular death. Expression of Rab5-GTP Q79L or Rab11a-GTP Q70L enhanced secretion. Conversely, dominant-negative Rab11a-GDP S25N reduced secretion. High-dose CCK inhibited endolysosomal exocytosis that was reversed by PIKfyve inhibition. PIKfyve inhibition blocked intracellular trypsin accumulation and cellular damage responses to high CCK-8, tobacco toxin, and bile salts in both rodent and human acini. These data demonstrate that EE-LE trafficking acutely controls acinar secretion and the intracellular activation of zymogens leading to the pathogenicity of acute pancreatitis.

  10. Circulating fetuin-A in patients with pancreatic cancer: a hospital-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Dalamaga, Maria; Polyzos, Stergios A; Karmaniolas, Konstantinos; Chamberland, John; Lekka, Antigoni; Migdalis, Ilias; Papadavid, Evangelia; Dionyssiou-Asteriou, Amalia; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2014-12-01

    A proteomic analysis has proposed fetuin-A (alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein) as a new potential marker for pancreatic cancer (PC). Circulating fetuin-A levels in patients with PC. Serum fetuin-A was measured in 81 cases with PC and 81 matched controls before the initiation of any treatment. Serum fetuin-A was not independently associated with the presence of PC. Although there was a trend with higher fetuin-A levels across PC stages, comparisons of fetuin-A in patients within different PC prognostic stages revealed no differences. Circulating fetuin-A was similar between patients and controls and was not associated with the disease severity.

  11. Controlled Heat Stress Promotes Myofibrillogenesis during Myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiongyu; Miller, Devin; An, Hongying; Wang, Howard; Lopez, Joseph; Lough, Denver; He, Ling; Kumar, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthermia therapy has recently emerged as a clinical modality used to finely tune heat stress inside the human body for various biomedical applications. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the optimal timing or temperature of heat stress that is needed to achieve favorable results following hyperthermia therapy for muscle regeneration purposes. The regeneration of skeletal muscle after injury is a highly complex and coordinated process that involves a multitude of cellular mechanisms. The main objective of this study was to characterize the effects of hyperthermal therapy on the overall behavior of myoblasts during myogenic differentiation. Various cellular processes, including myogenesis, myofibrillogenesis, hypertrophy/atrophy, and mitochondrial biogenesis, were studied using systematic cellular, morphological, and pathway-focused high-throughput gene expression profiling analyses. We found that C2C12 myoblasts exhibited distinctive time and temperature-dependence in biosynthesis and regulatory events during myogenic differentiation. Specifically, we for the first time observed that moderate hyperthermia at 39°C favored the growth of sarcomere in myofibrils at the late stage of myogenesis, showing universal up-regulation of characteristic myofibril proteins. Characteristic myofibrillogenesis genes, including heavy polypeptide 1 myosin, heavy polypeptide 2 myosin, alpha 1 actin, nebulin and titin, were all significantly upregulated (p<0.01) after C2C12 cells differentiated at 39°C over 5 days compared with the control cells cultured at 37°C. Furthermore, moderate hyperthermia enhanced myogenic differentiation, with nucleus densities per myotube showing 2.2-fold, 1.9-fold and 1.6-fold increases when C2C12 cells underwent myogenic differentiation at 39°C over 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours, respectively, as compared to the myotubes that were not exposed to heat stress. Yet, atrophy genes were sensitive even to moderate hyperthermia, indicating that

  12. Controlled Heat Stress Promotes Myofibrillogenesis during Myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiongyu; Miller, Devin; An, Hongying; Wang, Howard; Lopez, Joseph; Lough, Denver; He, Ling; Kumar, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthermia therapy has recently emerged as a clinical modality used to finely tune heat stress inside the human body for various biomedical applications. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the optimal timing or temperature of heat stress that is needed to achieve favorable results following hyperthermia therapy for muscle regeneration purposes. The regeneration of skeletal muscle after injury is a highly complex and coordinated process that involves a multitude of cellular mechanisms. The main objective of this study was to characterize the effects of hyperthermal therapy on the overall behavior of myoblasts during myogenic differentiation. Various cellular processes, including myogenesis, myofibrillogenesis, hypertrophy/atrophy, and mitochondrial biogenesis, were studied using systematic cellular, morphological, and pathway-focused high-throughput gene expression profiling analyses. We found that C2C12 myoblasts exhibited distinctive time and temperature-dependence in biosynthesis and regulatory events during myogenic differentiation. Specifically, we for the first time observed that moderate hyperthermia at 39°C favored the growth of sarcomere in myofibrils at the late stage of myogenesis, showing universal up-regulation of characteristic myofibril proteins. Characteristic myofibrillogenesis genes, including heavy polypeptide 1 myosin, heavy polypeptide 2 myosin, alpha 1 actin, nebulin and titin, were all significantly upregulated (p<0.01) after C2C12 cells differentiated at 39°C over 5 days compared with the control cells cultured at 37°C. Furthermore, moderate hyperthermia enhanced myogenic differentiation, with nucleus densities per myotube showing 2.2-fold, 1.9-fold and 1.6-fold increases when C2C12 cells underwent myogenic differentiation at 39°C over 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours, respectively, as compared to the myotubes that were not exposed to heat stress. Yet, atrophy genes were sensitive even to moderate hyperthermia, indicating that

  13. Protein-Binding Function of RNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Promotes Proliferation through TRAF2/RIP1/NF-κB/c-Myc Pathway in Pancreatic β cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, LiLi; Tang, Wei; Ding, ZhengZheng; Wang, DingYu; Qi, XiaoQiang; Wu, HuiWen; Guo, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), an intracellular pathogen recognition receptor, is involved both in insulin resistance in peripheral tissues and in downregulation of pancreatic β-cell function in a kinase-dependent manner, indicating PKR as a core component in the progression of type 2 diabetes. PKR also acts as an adaptor protein via its protein-binding domain. Here, the PKR protein-binding function promoted β-cell proliferation without its kinase activity, which is associated with enhanced physical interaction with tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) and TRAF6. In addition, the transcription of the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cell (NF-κB)-dependent survival gene c-Myc was upregulated significantly and is necessary for proliferation. Upregulation of the PKR protein-binding function induced the NF-κB pathway, as observed by dose-dependent degradation of IκBα, induced nuclear translocation of p65 and elevated NF-κB-dependent reporter gene expression. NF-κB-dependent reporter activity and β-cell proliferation both were suppressed by TRAF2-siRNA, but not by TRAF6-siRNA. TRAF2-siRNA blocked the ubiquitination of receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 (RIP1) induced by PKR protein binding. Furthermore, RIP1-siRNA inhibited β-cell proliferation. Proinflammatory cytokines (TNFα) and glucolipitoxicity also promoted the physical interaction of PKR with TRAF2. Collectively, these data indicate a pivotal role for PKR’s protein-binding function on the proliferation of pancreatic β cells through TRAF2/RIP1/NF-κB/c-Myc pathways. Therapeutic opportunities for type 2 diabetes may arise when its kinase catalytic function, but not its protein-binding function, is downregulated. PMID:25715336

  14. Fermented green tea extract exhibits hypolipidaemic effects through the inhibition of pancreatic lipase and promotion of energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dae-Bang; Jeong, Hyun Woo; Kim, Yeon-Ji; Kim, Sukyung; Kim, Jeongkee; Lee, Ji Hae; Joo, Kyungmi; Choi, Jin Kyu; Shin, Song Seok; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2017-01-01

    Hyperlipidaemia is a major cause of atherosclerosis and related CVD and can be prevented with natural substances. Previously, we reported that a novel Bacillus-fermented green tea (FGT) exerts anti-obesity and hypolipidaemic effects. This study further investigated the hypotriglyceridaemic and anti-obesogenic effects of FGT and its underlying mechanisms. FGT effectively inhibited pancreatic lipase activity in vitro (IC50, 0·48 mg/ml) and ameliorated postprandial lipaemia in rats (26 % reduction with 500 mg/kg FGT). In hypertriglyceridaemic hamsters, FGT administration significantly reduced plasma TAG levels. In mice, FGT administration (500 mg/kg) for 2 weeks augmented energy expenditure by 22 % through the induction of plasma serotonin, a neurotransmitter that modulates energy expenditure and mRNA expressions of lipid metabolism genes in peripheral tissues. Analysis of the gut microbiota showed that FGT reduced the proportion of the phylum Firmicutes in hamsters, which could further contribute to its anti-obesity effects. Collectively, these data demonstrate that FGT decreases plasma TAG levels via multiple mechanisms including inhibition of pancreatic lipase, augmentation of energy expenditure, induction of serotonin secretion and alteration of gut microbiota. These results suggest that FGT may be a useful natural agent for preventing hypertriglyceridaemia and obesity.

  15. Tumor-Targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R Promotes Tumoricidal CD8(+) T Cell Tumor Infiltration and Arrests Growth and Metastasis in a Syngeneic Pancreatic-Cancer Orthotopic Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takashi; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Ming; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Miyake, Kentaro; Homma, Yuki; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-06-19

    The present study determined the effect of the tumor-targeting strain Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R) on CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in a syngeneic pancreatic-cancer orthotopic mouse model. The effect of tumor-targeting S. typhimurium A1-R on CD8(+) TILs was determined on the Pan02 murine pancreatic-adenocarcinoma implanted orthotopically in the pancreatic tail of C57BL/6 immunocompromised mice. Three weeks after orthotopic implantation, mice were randomized as follows G1: untreated control group (n = 8); and G2: S. typhimurium A1-R-treatment group (n = 8, 1 × 10(7) colony forming units [CFU]/body, iv, weekly, 3 weeks). On the 22nd day from initial treatment, all mice were sacrificed and tumors were harvested. The tumor-volume ratio was defined as ratio of tumor volume on the 22nd day relative to the 1st day. The tumor volume ratio was significantly lower in the S. typhimurium A1-R-treated group (G2) (3.0 ± 2.8) than the untreated control (G1) (39.9 ± 30.7, P < 0.01). Hematoxylin and easin (H&E) staining on tumor sections was performed to evaluate tumor destruction which was classified according to the Evans grading system and found to be much greater in the S. typhimurium A1-R-treated mice (G2). Six mice in G1 had peritoneal dissemination, whereas no mice showed peritoneal dissemination in G2 (P < 0.01). Immunohistochemical staining with anti-mouse CD8(+) antibody was performed in order to detect TILs determined by calculating the average number of CD8(+) cells in three high power fields (200×) in the treated and untreated tumors. The TIL score was significantly higher in G2 (133.5 ± 32.2) than G1 (45.1 ± 19.4, P < 0.001). The present study demonstrates that S. typhimurium A1-R promotes CD8(+) T cell infiltration and inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-6, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Up-regulation of MBD1 promotes pancreatic cancer cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition and invasion by epigenetic down-regulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Zhu, W; Xu, W; Yao, W; Zhang, B; Xu, Y; Ji, S; Liu, C; Long, J; Ni, Q; Yu, X

    2013-03-01

    Methyl-CpG binding domain protein 1 (MBD1) has been implicated in transcriptional regulation, heterochromatin formation, genomic stability, cell-cycle progression and development. It is also predicted that MBD1 might be involved in tumor development and progression. However, whether and how MBD1 is involved in tumorigenesis, especially in pancreatic cancer (PC), is currently unknown. We found that MBD1 was significantly up-regulated in PC tissues compared with the surrounding normal tissues according to RT-PCR data. Tissue microarray (TMA) based immunohistochemical study from 58 surgically resected PC specimens indicated that higher MBD1 expression correlated with lymph node metastasis and poor survival in PC patients. Gain- and loss-of-function studies in vitro validated MBD1 as a potent oncogene promoting PC cell invasion as well as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Mechanistically, MBD1 is associated with Twist and NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin-1 (SIRT1), thereby forming the Twist-MBD1-SIRT1 complex on the CDH1 promoter, which resulted in reduced E-cadherin transcription activity and increased cell EMT ability. Significantly, targeting MBD1 reversed the EMT phenotype of PC and restored sensitivity to chemotherapy. Taken together, the results of our study revealed a novel function of MBD1 in PC invasion and metastasis by providing a molecular mechanism underlying MBD1-promoted EMT. Thus MBD1 may serve as a potential therapeutic target for PC.

  17. Pancreatic β-Cell Protein Granuphilin Binds Rab3 and Munc-18 and Controls Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Thierry; Frantz, Christian; Perret-Menoud, Véronique; Gattesco, Sonia; Hirling, Harald; Regazzi, Romano

    2002-01-01

    Granuphilin/Slp-4 is a member of the synaptotagmin-like protein family expressed in pancreatic β-cells and in the pituitary gland. We show by confocal microscopy that both granuphilin-a and -b colocalize with insulin-containing secretory granules positioned at the periphery of pancreatic β-cells. Overexpression of granuphilins in insulin-secreting cell lines caused a profound inhibition of stimulus-induced exocytosis. Granuphilins were found to bind to two components of the secretory machinery of pancreatic β-cells, the small GTP-binding protein Rab3 and the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE)–binding protein Munc-18. The interaction with Rab3 occurred only with the GTP-bound form of the protein and was prevented by a point mutation in the effector domain of the GTPase. Structure-function studies using granuphilin-b mutants revealed that complete loss of Rab3 binding is associated with a reduction in the capacity to inhibit exocytosis. However, the granuphilin/Rab3 complex alone is not sufficient to mediate the decrease of exocytosis, suggesting the existence of additional binding partners. Taken together, our observations indicate that granuphilins play an important role in pancreatic β-cell exocytosis. In view of the postulated role of Munc-18 in secretory vesicle docking, our data suggest that granuphilins may also be involved in this process. PMID:12058058

  18. High Intensity Interval Training Improves Glycaemic Control and Pancreatic β Cell Function of Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Søren Møller; Thorup, Anne Cathrine; Overgaard, Kristian; Jeppesen, Per Bendix

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity improves the regulation of glucose homeostasis in both type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients and healthy individuals, but the effect on pancreatic β cell function is unknown. We investigated glycaemic control, pancreatic function and total fat mass before and after 8 weeks of low volume high intensity interval training (HIIT) on cycle ergometer in T2D patients and matched healthy control individuals. Study design/method: Elderly (56 yrs±2), non-active T2D patients (n = 10) and matched (52 yrs±2) healthy controls (CON) (n = 13) exercised 3 times (10×60 sec. HIIT) a week over an 8 week period on a cycle ergometer. Participants underwent a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). On a separate day, resting blood pressure measurement was conducted followed by an incremental maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max) cycle ergometer test. Finally, a whole body dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was performed. After 8 weeks of training, the same measurements were performed. Results: in the T2D-group, glycaemic control as determined by average fasting venous glucose concentration (p = 0.01), end point 2-hour OGTT (p = 0.04) and glycosylated haemoglobin (p = 0.04) were significantly reduced. Pancreatic homeostasis as determined by homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and HOMA β cell function (HOMA-%β) were both significantly ameliorated (p = 0.03 and p = 0.03, respectively). Whole body insulin sensitivity as determined by the disposition index (DI) was significantly increased (p = 0.03). During OGTT, the glucose continuum was significantly reduced at -15 (p = 0.03), 30 (p = 0.03) and 120 min (p = 0.03) and at -10 (p = 0.003) and 0 min (p = 0.003) with an additional improvement (p = 0.03) of its 1st phase (30 min) area under curve (AUC). Significant abdominal fat mass losses were seen in both groups (T2D: p = 0.004 and CON: p = 0.02) corresponding to a percentage change of -17.84%±5.02 and -9.66%±3.07, respectively. Conclusion: these results

  19. Topological entropy and the controlled effect of glucose in the electrical activity of pancreatic β-cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Jorge; Januário, Cristina; Martins, Nuno

    2009-11-01

    Insulin secretion from electrically coupled β-cells is governed by bursting electrical activity. In response to stimulatory concentrations of glucose, the membrane potential of pancreatic β-cells may experience a transition from bursting-spiking oscillations to continuous spiking oscillations. This transition can be chaotic but becomes more and more regular with an increase in glucose. In the presence of chaos, the inhability to predict the behavior of dynamical systems suggests the application of chaos control methods, when we are more interested in obtaining attracting time periodic motion. In this article, we focus our attention on a specific mathematical model from the literature that mimics the glucose-induced electrical activity of pancreatic β-cells (Deng, 1993 [7]). Firstly, using results of symbolic dynamics, we characterize the topological entropy and the parameter space ordering of the kneading sequences, associated with one-dimensional maps that reproduce significant aspects of the model dynamics. The analysis of the variation of this numerical invariant allows us to quantify and to distinguish different chaotic regimes. Finally, we show that chaotic orbits of the system can be controlled, without changing their orbital properties, and be turned into desired limit cycles. The control is illustrated by an application of a feedback control technique developed by Romeiras, Grebogi, Ott and Dayawansa (1992) [13]. This work provides an illustration of how our understanding of biophysically motivated models can be directly enhanced by the theory of dynamical systems.

  20. Tight glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas may play an important role in preventing infection after pancreatic resection.

    PubMed

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2012-08-07

    It is well known that perioperative hyperglycemia is the main cause of infectious complications after surgery. To improve perioperative glycemic control, we wish to highlight and comment on an interesting paper published recently by the Annals of Surgery entitled: "Early postoperative hyperglycemia is associated with postoperative complications after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD)" by Eshuis et al. The authors concluded that early postoperative glucose levels more than 140 mg/dL was significantly associated with complications after PD. Since we recommend that perioperative tight glycemic control (TGC) is an effective method to prevent postoperative complications including surgical site infection after distal, proximal, and total pancreatic resection, we support strongly this conclusion drawn in this article. However, if early postoperative glucose control in patients undergoing PD was administrated by conventional method such as sliding scale approach as described in this article, it is difficult to maintain TGC. Therefore, we introduce a novel perioperative glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas against pancreatogenic diabetes after pancreatic resection including PD.

  1. Genetically Determined Chronic Pancreatitis but not Alcoholic Pancreatitis Is a Strong Risk Factor for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Midha, Shallu; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Kabra, Madhulika; Chattopadhyay, Tushar Kanti; Joshi, Yogendra Kumar; Garg, Pramod Kumar

    2016-11-01

    To study if chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Through a cohort and a case-control study design, CP and other important risk factors including smoking, diabetes, alcohol, obesity, and genetic mutations were studied for their association with pancreatic cancer. In the cohort study, 402 patients with CP were included. During 3967.74 person-years of exposure, 5 of the 402 patients (4 idiopathic CP, 1 hereditary CP) developed pancreatic cancer after 16.60 ± 3.51 years of CP. The standardized incidence ratio was 121. In the case-control study, 249 pancreatic cancer patients and 1000 healthy controls were included. Of the 249 patients with pancreatic cancer, 24 had underlying idiopathic CP, and none had alcoholic pancreatitis. SPINK1 gene mutation was present in 16 of 26 patients with idiopathic CP who had pancreatic cancer. Multivariable analysis showed CP (odds ratio [OR], 97.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 12.69-751.36), diabetes (>4 years duration) (OR, 3.05; 95% CI, 1.79-5.18), smoking (OR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.38-2.69) as significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer. The population attributable risk was 9.41, 9.06, and 9.50 for diabetes, CP, and smoking, respectively. Genetically determined CP but not alcoholic CP is a strong risk factor for pancreatic cancer.

  2. Loss of SOD3 (EcSOD) expression promotes an aggressive phenotype in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Brianne R.; Fath, Melissa A.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Hrabe, Jennifer E.; Button, Anna M.; Allen, Bryan G.; Case, Adam J.; Altekruse, Sean; Wagner, Brett A.; Buettner, Garry R.; Lynch, Charles F.; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Cozen, Wendy; Beardsley, Robert A.; Keene, Jeffery; Henry, Michael D.; Domann, Frederick E.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Mezhir, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells are known to produce excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly superoxide, which may contribute to the aggressive and refractory nature of this disease. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EcSOD) is an antioxidant enzyme that catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide in the extracellular environment. The current work tests the hypothesis that EcSOD modulates PDA growth and invasion by modifying the redox balance in PDA. Experimental Design We evaluated the prognostic significance of EcSOD in a human tissue microarray of patients with PDA. EcSOD overexpression was performed in PDA cell lines and animal models of disease. The impact of EcSOD on PDA cell lines was evaluated with Matrigel invasion in combination with a superoxide-specific SOD mimic and a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor to determine the mechanism of action of EcSOD in PDA. Results Loss of EcSOD expression is a common event in PDA, which correlated with worse disease biology. Overexpression of EcSOD in PDA cell lines resulted in decreased invasiveness that appeared to be related to reactions of superoxide with nitric oxide. Pancreatic cancer xenografts overexpressing EcSOD also demonstrated slower growth and peritoneal metastasis. Over-expression of EcSOD or treatment with a superoxide-specific SOD mimic caused significant decreases in PDA cell invasive capacity. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that loss of EcSOD leads to increased reactions of superoxide with nitric oxide which contributes to the invasive phenotype. These results allow for the speculation that superoxide dismutase mimetics might inhibit PDA progression in human clinical disease. PMID:25634994

  3. Serum B6 vitamers (pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, pyridoxal, and 4-pyridoxic acid) and pancreatic cancer risk: two nested case-control studies in Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Joyce Y; Butler, Lesley M; Midttun, Øivind; Koh, Woon-Puay; Ueland, Per M; Wang, Renwei; Jin, Aizhen; Gao, Yu-Tang; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2016-12-01

    Vitamin B6 is an important enzymatic cofactor in pathways relevant for the development of pancreatic cancer. In order to evaluate vitamin B6 as a preventive factor for pancreatic cancer, a biomarker approach is needed to overcome the limitations inherent in self-reported dietary information. To determine whether levels of serum B6 vitamers, including pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), pyridoxal (PL), 4-pyridoxic acid (PA), and the PA/(PLP + PL) ratio (PAr), were associated with risk of pancreatic cancer, two nested case-control studies of 187 incident pancreatic cancer cases and 258 individually matched controls were conducted within two prospective cohorts of 81,501 participants in Shanghai, China, and Singapore. PLP, PL, and PA were quantified in pre-diagnostic serum samples. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using conditional logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders. The median (5th-95th percentiles) concentrations of serum PLP among control subjects of the Shanghai and Singapore cohorts were 25.7 (10.0-91.7) nmol/L and 58.1 (20.8-563.0) nmol/L, respectively. In pooled analyses, high serum PLP was associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer (P for trend = 0.048); the adjusted odds ratio for the highest category of PLP (>52.4 nmol/L) was 0.46 (95% CI 0.23, 0.92) compared to vitamin B6 deficiency (<20 nmol/L). No associations were found for serum PL, PA, or PAr with pancreatic cancer risk. Higher concentrations of PLP may protect against the development of pancreatic cancer. The protective effect may be more apparent in populations with low concentrations of circulating vitamin B6.

  4. Association between variations in the fat mass and obesity-associated gene and pancreatic cancer risk: a case-control study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingsong; Ueda, Junko; Yagyu, Kiyoko; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ueno, Makoto; Egawa, Naoto; Nakao, Haruhisa; Mori, Mitsuru; Matsuo, Keitaro; Kikuchi, Shogo

    2013-07-08

    It is clear that genetic variations in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene affect body mass index and the risk of obesity. Given the mounting evidence showing a positive association between obesity and pancreatic cancer, this study aimed to investigate the relation between variants in the FTO gene, obesity and pancreatic cancer risk. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study in Japan to investigate whether genetic variations in the FTO gene were associated with pancreatic cancer risk. We genotyped rs9939609 in the FTO gene of 360 cases and 400 control subjects. An unconditional logistic model was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between rs9939609 and pancreatic cancer risk. The minor allele frequency of rs9939609 was 0.18 among control subjects. BMI was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Compared with individuals with the common homozygous TT genotype, those with the heterozygous TA genotype and the minor homozygous AA genotype had a 48% (OR=1.48; 95%CI: 1.07-2.04), and 66% increased risk (OR=1.66; 95%CI: 0.70-3.90), respectively, of pancreatic cancer after adjustment for sex, age, body mass index, cigarette smoking and history of diabetes. The per-allele OR was 1.41 (95%CI: 1.07-1.85). There were no significant interactions between TA/AA genotypes and body mass index. Our findings indicate that rs9939609 in the FTO gene is associated with pancreatic cancer risk in Japanese subjects, possibly through a mechanism that is independent of obesity. Further investigation and replication of our results is required in other independent samples.

  5. Early nasogastric tube feeding versus nil per os in mild to moderate acute pancreatitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Maxim S; McIlroy, Kerry; Grayson, Lorraine; Phillips, Anthony R J; Windsor, John A

    2013-10-01

    Nasojejunal tube feeding is a standard of care in patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis (AP) and several recent trials suggested that nasogastric tube feeding (NGT) is as safe and efficient as nasojejunal tube feeding in these patients. The aim was to investigate whether NGT presents any benefit to patients with mild to moderate AP. The study design was a randomized controlled trial. The patients in the intervention group received NGT within 24 h of hospital admission. The patients in the control group were on nil per os (NPO). The severity of acute pancreatitis was determined according to the new international multidisciplinary classification. There were 17 patients randomly allocated to the NGT group and 18 to the NPO group. The visual analogue pain score decreased to a significantly greater extent in the NGT group (from median 9 (range 7-9) at baseline to 1 (0-3) at 72 h after randomization) compared with the NPO group (from 7 (5-9) to 3 (1-4) (p = 0.036). The number of patients not requiring opiates at 48 h after randomization was significantly different (p = 0.024) between NGT (9/17) and NPO (3/18). Oral food intolerance was observed in 1/17 patient in the NGT group and 9/18 patients in the NPO group (p = 0.004). The overall hospital stay in the NGT group was 9 (5-12) days as compared with 8.5 (6-13) days in the NPO group (p = 0.91). NGT commenced within 24 h of hospital admission is well tolerated in patients with mild to moderate acute pancreatitis. Further, when compared with NPO, it significantly reduces the intensity and duration of abdominal pain, need for opiates, and risk of oral food intolerance, but not overall hospital stay. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  6. Food habits and pancreatic cancer: a case-control study of the Francophone community in Montreal, Canada.

    PubMed

    Ghadirian, P; Baillargeon, J; Simard, A; Perret, C

    1995-12-01

    In a population-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer and nutrition among the Francophone population of Montreal (Quebec, Canada), a total of 179 cases and 239 controls matched for age, sex, and language (French) were interviewed between 1984 and 1988. Data on food habits, methods of food preparation and preservation, and related information were obtained through a questionnaire. The study found an increased risk of pancreatic cancer associated with a high consumption of salt [relative risk (RR) = 4.28; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.20-8.36], smoked meat (RR = 4.68; CI = 2.05-10.69), dehydrated food (RR = 3.10; 95% CI = 1.55-6.22), fried food (RR= 3.84; 95% CI = 1.74-8.48), and refined sugar (RR = 2.81; 95% CI = 0.94-8.45). An inverse association was found with the consumption of food with no preservatives or additives (RR = 0.08; 95% CI = 0.01-0.59), raw food (RR = 0.28; 95% CI = 0.10-0.75), and food prepared by presto or high-pressure cooking (RR = 0.35% 95% CI = 0.15-0.81), electricity (RR = 0.30; 95% CI = 0.90), or microwave oven (RR = 0.56; 95% CI = 0.34-0.92). Cooking with firewood was associated with a significantly higher risk for pancreatic cancer (RR = 4.63; 95% CI = 1.15-16.52). The results of this study suggest that food habits may play an important role in the etiology of cancer of the pancreas among French Canadians in Montreal, whereas other food habits may reduce the risk of this disease.

  7. Alcohol and smoking as risk factors in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Talamini, G; Bassi, C; Falconi, M; Sartori, N; Salvia, R; Rigo, L; Castagnini, A; Di Francesco, V; Frulloni, L; Bovo, P; Vaona, B; Angelini, G; Vantini, I; Cavallini, G; Pederzoli, P

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare alcohol and smoking as risk factors in the development of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. We considered only male subjects: (1) 630 patients with chronic pancreatitis who developed 12 pancreatic and 47 extrapancreatic cancers; (2) 69 patients with histologically well documented pancreatic cancer and no clinical history of chronic pancreatitis; and (3) 700 random controls taken from the Verona polling list and submitted to a complete medical check-up. Chronic pancreatitis subjects drink more than control subjects and more than subjects with pancreatic cancer without chronic pancreatitis (P<0.001). The percentage of smokers in the group with chronic pancreatitis is significantly higher than that in the control group [odds ratio (OR) 17.3; 95% CI 12.6-23.8; P<0.001] and in the group with pancreatic carcinomas but with no history of chronic pancreatitis (OR 5.3; 95% CI 3.0-9.4; P<0.001). In conclusion, our study shows that: (1) the risk of chronic pancreatitis correlates both with alcohol intake and with cigarette smoking with a trend indicating that the risk increases with increased alcohol intake and cigarette consumption; (2) alcohol and smoking are statistically independent risk factors for chronic pancreatitis; and (3) the risk of pancreatic cancer correlates positively with cigarette smoking but not with drinking.

  8. Serum soluble fas levels and superoxide dismutase activity and the risk of death from pancreatic cancer: A nested case-control study within the Japanese Collaborative Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingsong; Kikuchi, Shogo; Yagyu, Kiyoko; Ishibashi, Teruo; Kurosawa, Michiko; Ito, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Inaba, Yutaka; Tajima, Kazuo; Nakachi, Kei; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2009-12-01

    In a search for novel circulating biomarkers for pancreatic cancer, we examined the association between serum soluble Fas (sFas) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and the risk of death from pancreatic cancer in a nested case-control study within the Japanese Collaborative Cohort Study. Case subjects were 68 persons who were free of morbidity, had provided a blood sample at baseline (1988-1990), and subsequently died from pancreatic cancer before December 31, 1997. Control subjects were 199 matched persons who were selected from the remaining participants in the cohort. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate age-adjusted and multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). No statistically significant differences were noted in mean sFas levels (p=0.11) and SOD activity (p=0.42) between cases and controls. Overall, neither serum sFas levels nor SOD activity were associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer deaths, after adjustment for area, BMI, cigarette smoking, and history of diabetes. Furthermore, no significant risk trends were noted. Our results do not support the hypothesis that serum sFas levels and SOD activity are associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

  9. [Treatment of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Naumovski-Mihalić, Slavica

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an autodigestive disease in which the pancreatic tissue is damaged by the digestive enzimes produces by the acinar cells and is associated with severe upper abdominal pain. The severity of acute pancreatitis ranges from edema to necrosis of the gland. The edematous form of the disease occurs in about 80-85% of patients and is self-limited, with recovery in few days. In the 15-20% of patients with the most severe form of pancreatitis, hospitalization is prolonged and commonly associated with infection and other complications including multiple organ failure. The main causes of acute pancreatitis in adults are gallstones, other gallbladder (biliary) diseases and alcohol abuse. Treatment of acute pancreatitis-depends on the severity oft he condition. Generaly, the patients need, hospitalisation with administration of intravenous fluid to help restore blood volume, pain control, supplemental oxygen as required and correction of electrolite and metabolic abnormalities. Antibiotic prophylaxis has not been shown as an effective preventive treatment. Early enteral feeding is based on a high level of evidence, resulting in a reduction of local and sistemic infection. Begin oral feeding once abdominal pain has resolved and the patients regains appetite. The diet should be low in fat and protein. Patients suffering from infected necrosis causing clinical sepsis, pancreatic abscess or surgical acute abdomen are candidates for early intervention. During recent years the management of acute pancreatitis has changed. This has been due particulary in response to the general availability of computed tomography, improved intensive care facilities, knowledge about the central role of pancreatic infection and refinements in surgical and other interventional techniques.

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection, chronic corpus atrophic gastritis and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort: A nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiaqi; Zagai, Ulrika; Hallmans, Göran; Nyrén, Olof; Engstrand, Lars; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Duell, Eric J; Overvad, Kim; Katzke, Verena A; Kaaks, Rudolf; Jenab, Mazda; Park, Jin Young; Murillo, Raul; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Bamia, Christina; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Riboli, Elio; Aune, Dagfinn; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Capellá, Gabriel; Agudo, Antonio; Krogh, Vittorio; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Martínez, Begoña; Redondo-Sanchez, Daniel; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Hm Peeters, Petra; Regnér, Sara; Lindkvist, Björn; Naccarati, Alessio; Ardanaz, Eva; Larrañaga, Nerea; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Rebours, Vinciane; Barré, Amélie; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Ye, Weimin

    2017-04-15

    The association between H. pylori infection and pancreatic cancer risk remains controversial. We conducted a nested case-control study with 448 pancreatic cancer cases and their individually matched control subjects, based on the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, to determine whether there was an altered pancreatic cancer risk associated with H. pylori infection and chronic corpus atrophic gastritis. Conditional logistic regression models were applied to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for matching factors and other potential confounders. Our results showed that pancreatic cancer risk was neither associated with H. pylori seropositivity (OR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.70, 1.31) nor CagA seropositivity (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.77, 1.48). We also did not find any excess risk among individuals seropositive for H. pylori but seronegative for CagA, compared with the group seronegative for both antibodies (OR = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.63, 1.38). However, we found that chronic corpus atrophic gastritis was non-significantly associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 1.35; 95% CI: 0.77, 2.37), and although based on small numbers, the excess risk was particularly marked among individuals seronegative for both H. pylori and CagA (OR = 5.66; 95% CI: 1.59, 20.19, p value for interaction < 0.01). Our findings provided evidence supporting the null association between H. pylori infection and pancreatic cancer risk in western European populations. However, the suggested association between chronic corpus atrophic gastritis and pancreatic cancer risk warrants independent verification in future studies, and, if confirmed, further studies on the underlying mechanisms.

  11. Pre-Study protocol MagPEP: a multicentre randomized controlled trial of magnesium sulphate in the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is the most common complication of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). In spite of continuing research, no pharmacologic agent capable of effectively reducing the incidence of ERCP-induced pancreatitis has found its way into clinical practise. A number of experimental studies suggest that intrapancreatic calcium concentrations play an important role in the initiation of intracellular protease activation, an initiating step in the course of acute pancreatitis. Magnesium can act as a calcium-antagonist and counteracts effects in calcium signalling. It can thereby attenuate the intracellular activation of proteolytic digestive enzymes in the pancreas and reduces the severity of experimental pancreatitis when administered either intravenously or as a food supplement. Methods We designed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III study to test whether the administration of intravenous magnesium sulphate before and after ERCP reduces the incidence and the severity of post-ERCP pancreatitis. A total of 502 adult patients with a medical indication for ERCP are to be randomized to receive either 4930 mg magnesium sulphate (= 20 mmol magnesium) or placebo 60 min before and 6 hours after ERCP. The incidence of clinical post-ERCP pancreatitis, hyperlipasemia, pain levels, use of analgetics and length of hospital stay will be evaluated. Conclusions If magnesium sulphate is found to be effective in preventing post-ERCP pancreatitis, this inexpensive agent with limited adverse effects could be used as a routine pharmacological prophylaxis. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN46556454 PMID:23320650

  12. Insulin Signaling Regulates the FoxM1/PLK1/CENP-A Pathway to Promote Adaptive Pancreatic β Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Jun; Fernandez, Megan; Takatani, Tomozumi; El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Jungtrakoon, Prapaporn; Okawa, Erin R; Zhang, Wei; Yi, Peng; Doria, Alessandro; Kulkarni, Rohit N

    2017-04-04

    Investigation of cell-cycle kinetics in mammalian pancreatic β cells has mostly focused on transition from the quiescent (G0) to G1 phase. Here, we report that centromere protein A (CENP-A), which is required for chromosome segregation during the M-phase, is necessary for adaptive β cell proliferation. Receptor-mediated insulin signaling promotes DNA-binding activity of FoxM1 to regulate expression of CENP-A and polo-like kinase-1 (PLK1) by modulating cyclin-dependent kinase-1/2. CENP-A deposition at the centromere is augmented by PLK1 to promote mitosis, while knocking down CENP-A limits β cell proliferation and survival. CENP-A deficiency in β cells leads to impaired adaptive proliferation in response to pregnancy, acute and chronic insulin resistance, and aging in mice. Insulin-stimulated CENP-A/PLK1 protein expression is blunted in islets from patients with type 2 diabetes. These data implicate the insulin-FoxM1/PLK1/CENP-A pathway-regulated mitotic cell-cycle progression as an essential component in the β cell adaptation to delay and/or prevent progression to diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Successful control of pancreatic cancer pain using S-1 chemotherapy--a case report].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eiji; Kinoshita, Kouichi; Yoshida, Yasushi; Iizaka, Masayoshi; Inoue, Katsuhiko; Uto, Naoya

    2008-08-01

    A 59-year-old man had received chemotherapy with gemcitabine for nonresectable pancreatic cancer. After 14 months, he was hospitalized for obstructive jaundice and severe pain. Cholangioduodenostomy was performed, and the dose of opioids was increased. Although jaundice improved, the uncontrollable pain persisted. Chemotherapy with S-1 was initiated, and a dramatic improvement in the pain was observed. Consequently, the patient could be discharged from the hospital.

  14. SLC26 transporters and the inhibitory control of pancreatic ductal bicarbonate secretion.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Péter; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Tiszlavicz, László; Varró, András; Tóth, András; Rácz, Gábor; Varga, Gábor; Gray, Michael A; Argent, Barry E

    2006-01-01

    SLC26 anion exchangers (probably SLC26A3 and SLC26A6) are expressed on the apical membrane of pancreatic duct cells and play a key role in HCO3- secretion; a process that is inhibited by the neuropeptide, substance P (SP). SP had no effect on basolateral HCO3- transporters in the duct cell or on CFTR Cl- channels, but inhibited a Cl- -dependent HCO3- efflux step on the apical membrane. In microperfused ducts, luminal H2DIDS (0.5mM) caused intracellular pH to alkalinize (consistent with inhibition of HCO3- efflux) and, like SP, inhibited HCO3- secretion. SP did not reduce HCO3- secretion further when H2DIDS was applied to the duct lumen, suggesting that SP and H2DIDS inhibit the same transporter on the apical membrane. As SLC26A6 is DIDS-sensitive, this isoform is the likely target for SP. The inhibitory effect of SP was mimicked by phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC). Moreover, bisindolylmaleimide, a blocker of PKC, relieved the inhibitory effect of both SP and PDBu on HCO3- secretion. Western blot analysis revealed that guinea pig pancreatic ducts express the alpha, beta1, delta, epsilon, eta, theta, zeta and mu isoforms o f PKC. We conclude that PKC is a negative regulator of SLC26 activity in pancreatic duct cells.

  15. Prostaglandin release in canine acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, G; Bennett, A

    1976-01-01

    Acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis was induced in greyhound dogs by a bile salt/trypsin injection into the main pancreatic duct. Prostaglandin-like activity in the pancreatic venous blood, right atrial blood, and arterial blood was measured by bioassay. Activity rose significantly in the pancreatic venous blood of test dogs but not in controls. Chromatographic analysis of the peritoneal exudate from the dogs with pancreatitis showed high levels of prostaglandin E-like material (mean 43 ng/ml prostaglandin E2 equivalents). It seems likely that prostaglandins contribute to the induced pancreatitis. PMID:1269976

  16. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  17. Dietary patterns and risk of pancreatic cancer in a large population-based case-control study in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    PubMed

    Chan, June M; Gong, Zhihong; Holly, Elizabeth A; Bracci, Paige M

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal, and identifying modifiable risk factors could have substantial public health impact. In this population-based case-control study (532 cases, 1701 controls), we used principal component analysis and multivariable unconditional logistic regression models to examine whether a particular dietary pattern was associated with risk of pancreatic cancer, adjusting for other known risk factors. A prudent dietary pattern, characterized by greater intake of vegetables, fruit, fish, poultry, whole grains, and low-fat dairy, was associated with an approximate 50% reduction in pancreatic cancer risk among men [odds ratio (OR) = 0.51, 95% confidence intervals (CI) = 0.31-0.84, P trend = 0.001] and women (OR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.29-0.90, P trend = 0.04). A Western dietary pattern, characterized by higher intake of red and processed meats, potato chips, sugary beverages, sweets, high fat dairy, eggs, and refined grains, was associated with a 2.4-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer among men (95% CI = 1.3-4.2, P trend = 0.008) but was not associated with risk among women. Among men, those in the upper quintiles of the Western diet and lower quintiles of the prudent diet had a threefold increased risk. Consistent with what has been recommended for several other chronic diseases, consuming a diet rich in plant-based foods, whole grains, and white meat, might reduce risk of pancreatic cancer.

  18. TGF-β Plays a Key Role in Morphogenesis of the Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans by Controlling the Activity of the Matrix Metalloproteinase MMP-2

    PubMed Central

    Miralles, Francisco; Battelino, Tadej; Czernichow, Paul; Scharfmann, Raphael

    1998-01-01

    Islets of Langerhans are microorgans scattered throughout the pancreas, and are responsible for synthesizing and secreting pancreatic hormones. While progress has recently been made concerning cell differentiation of the islets of Langerhans, the mechanism controlling islet morphogenesis is not known. It is thought that these islets are formed by mature cell association, first differentiating in the primitive pancreatic epithelium, then migrating in the extracellular matrix, and finally associating into islets of Langerhans. This mechanism suggests that the extracellular matrix has to be degraded for proper islet morphogenesis. We demonstrated in the present study that during rat pancreatic development, matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) is activated in vivo between E17 and E19 when islet morphogenesis occurs. We next demonstrated that when E12.5 pancreatic epithelia develop in vitro, MMP-2 is activated in an in vitro model that recapitulates endocrine pancreas development (Miralles, F., P. Czernichow, and R. Scharfmann. 1998. Development. 125: 1017–1024). On the other hand, islet morphogenesis was impaired when MMP-2 activity was inhibited. We next demonstrated that exogenous TGF-β1 positively controls both islet morphogenesis and MMP-2 activity. Finally, we demonstrated that both islet morphogenesis and MMP-2 activation were abolished in the presence of a pan-specific TGF-β neutralizing antibody. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that in vitro, TGF-β is a key activator of pancreatic MMP-2, and that MMP-2 activity is necessary for islet morphogenesis. PMID:9813100

  19. Obesity, pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gumbs, Andrew A

    2008-09-01

    The only universally accepted risk factors for the development of pancreatic cancer are a positive family history or a history of smoking. Although the contribution of pancreatitis to pancreatic carcinogenesis has been debated for decades in the epidemiology literature, the actual mechanism is still unclear. With the rising epidemic of obesity, scientists have begun to focus on the contribution of chronic inflammatory state of morbidly obese patients in an effort to better understand the contribution of inflammation to the comorbidities of obesity. Notably, population studies are beginning to show that one of the most serious potential comorbidities of obesity is an increased lifetime risk of developing cancer. In this article, the current literature that exists supporting this Chronic Inflammatory Hypothesis as it pertains to obesity and pancreatic carcinogenesis is reviewed. To date, studies have focused on interleukin-6, a cytokine known to play a role in obesity, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The anti-inflammatory adipocytokine, adiponectin, has also shown promise as a key player in this mechanism and has recently been found to be more specific than standard tumor markers in differentiating pancreatic cancer from chronic pancreatitis. If the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer is related to hormone levels associated with obesity, such as adipocytokines, and cytokines associated with chronic inflammation, this could potentially lead to the development of new pancreatic cancer tumor markers and ultimately new therapies and methods of prevention.

  20. Total pancreatectomy with islet cell transplantation vs intrathecal narcotic pump infusion for pain control in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mokadem, Mohamad; Noureddine, Lama; Howard, Thomas; McHenry, Lee; Sherman, Stuart; Fogel, Evan L; Watkins, James L; Lehman, Glen A

    2016-04-28

    To evaluate pain control in chronic pancreatitis patients who underwent total pancreatectomy with islet cell transplantation or intrathecal narcotic pump infusion. We recognized 13 patients who underwent intrathecal narcotic pump (ITNP) infusion and 57 patients who underwent total pancreatectomy with autologous islet cell transplantation (TP + ICT) for chronic pancreatitis (CP) pain control between 1998 and 2008 at Indiana University Hospital. All patients had already failed multiple other modalities for pain control and the decision to proceed with either intervention was made at the discretion of the patients and their treating physicians. All patients were evaluated retrospectively using a questionnaire inquiring about their pain control (using a 0-10 pain scale), daily narcotic dose usage, and hospital admission days for pain control before each intervention and during their last follow-up. All 13 ITNP patients and 30 available TP + ICT patients were evaluated. The mean age was approximately 40 years in both groups. The median duration of pain before intervention was 6 years and 7 years in the ITNP and TP + ICT groups, respectively. The median pain score dropped from 8 to 2.5 (on a scale of 0-10) in both groups on their last follow up. The median daily dose of narcotics also decreased from 393 mg equivalent of morphine sulfate to 8 mg in the ITNP group and from 300 mg to 40 mg in the TP + ICT group. No patient had diabetes mellitus (DM) before either procedure whereas 85% of those who underwent pancreatectomy were insulin dependent on their last evaluation despite ICT. ITNP and TP + ICT are comparable for pain control in patients with CP however with high incidence of DM among those who underwent TP + ICT. Prospective comparative studies and longer follow up are needed to better define treatment outcomes.

  1. Total pancreatectomy with islet cell transplantation vs intrathecal narcotic pump infusion for pain control in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mokadem, Mohamad; Noureddine, Lama; Howard, Thomas; McHenry, Lee; Sherman, Stuart; Fogel, Evan L; Watkins, James L; Lehman, Glen A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate pain control in chronic pancreatitis patients who underwent total pancreatectomy with islet cell transplantation or intrathecal narcotic pump infusion. METHODS: We recognized 13 patients who underwent intrathecal narcotic pump (ITNP) infusion and 57 patients who underwent total pancreatectomy with autologous islet cell transplantation (TP + ICT) for chronic pancreatitis (CP) pain control between 1998 and 2008 at Indiana University Hospital. All patients had already failed multiple other modalities for pain control and the decision to proceed with either intervention was made at the discretion of the patients and their treating physicians. All patients were evaluated retrospectively using a questionnaire inquiring about their pain control (using a 0-10 pain scale), daily narcotic dose usage, and hospital admission days for pain control before each intervention and during their last follow-up. RESULTS: All 13 ITNP patients and 30 available TP + ICT patients were evaluated. The mean age was approximately 40 years in both groups. The median duration of pain before intervention was 6 years and 7 years in the ITNP and TP + ICT groups, respectively. The median pain score dropped from 8 to 2.5 (on a scale of 0-10) in both groups on their last follow up. The median daily dose of narcotics also decreased from 393 mg equivalent of morphine sulfate to 8 mg in the ITNP group and from 300 mg to 40 mg in the TP + ICT group. No patient had diabetes mellitus (DM) before either procedure whereas 85% of those who underwent pancreatectomy were insulin dependent on their last evaluation despite ICT. CONCLUSION: ITNP and TP + ICT are comparable for pain control in patients with CP however with high incidence of DM among those who underwent TP + ICT. Prospective comparative studies and longer follow up are needed to better define treatment outcomes. PMID:27122666

  2. A TLR9 agonist promotes IL-22-dependent pancreatic islet allograft survival in type 1 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Deepak; Venkatasubramanian, Sambasivan; Cheekatla, Satyanarayana S; Paidipally, Padmaja; Welch, Elwyn; Tvinnereim, Amy R; Vankayalapati, Ramakrishna

    2016-12-16

    Pancreatic islet transplantation is a promising potential cure for type 1 diabetes (T1D). Islet allografts can survive long term in the liver parenchyma. Here we show that liver NK1.1(+) cells induce allograft tolerance in a T1D mouse model. The tolerogenic effects of NK1.1(+) cells are mediated through IL-22 production, which enhances allograft survival and increases insulin secretion. Increased expression of NKG2A by liver NK1.1(+) cells in islet allograft-transplanted mice is involved in the production of IL-22 and in the reduced inflammatory response to allografts. Vaccination of T1D mice with a CpG oligonucleotide TLR9 agonist (ODN 1585) enhances expansion of IL-22-producing CD3-NK1.1(+) cells in the liver and prolongs allograft survival. Our study identifies a role for liver NK1.1(+) cells, IL-22 and CpG oligonucleotides in the induction of tolerance to islet allografts in the liver parenchyma.

  3. A TLR9 agonist promotes IL-22-dependent pancreatic islet allograft survival in type 1 diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Deepak; Venkatasubramanian, Sambasivan; Cheekatla, Satyanarayana S.; Paidipally, Padmaja; Welch, Elwyn; Tvinnereim, Amy R.; Vankayalapati, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation is a promising potential cure for type 1 diabetes (T1D). Islet allografts can survive long term in the liver parenchyma. Here we show that liver NK1.1+ cells induce allograft tolerance in a T1D mouse model. The tolerogenic effects of NK1.1+ cells are mediated through IL-22 production, which enhances allograft survival and increases insulin secretion. Increased expression of NKG2A by liver NK1.1+ cells in islet allograft-transplanted mice is involved in the production of IL-22 and in the reduced inflammatory response to allografts. Vaccination of T1D mice with a CpG oligonucleotide TLR9 agonist (ODN 1585) enhances expansion of IL-22-producing CD3-NK1.1+ cells in the liver and prolongs allograft survival. Our study identifies a role for liver NK1.1+ cells, IL-22 and CpG oligonucleotides in the induction of tolerance to islet allografts in the liver parenchyma. PMID:27982034

  4. Small Molecule Kaempferol Promotes Insulin Sensitivity and Preserved Pancreatic β -Cell Mass in Middle-Aged Obese Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Alkhalidy, Hana; Moore, William; Zhang, Yanling; McMillan, Ryan; Wang, Aihua; Ali, Mostafa; Suh, Kyung-Shin; Zhen, Wei; Cheng, Zhiyong; Jia, Zhenquan; Hulver, Matthew; Liu, Dongmin

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance and a progressive decline in functional β-cell mass are hallmarks of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). Thus, searching for natural, low-cost compounds to target these two defects could be a promising strategy to prevent the pathogenesis of T2D. Here, we show that dietary intake of flavonol kaempferol (0.05% in the diet) significantly ameliorated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and circulating lipid profile, which were associated with the improved peripheral insulin sensitivity in middle-aged obese mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet. Kaempferol treatment reversed HF diet impaired glucose transport-4 (Glut4) and AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) expression in both muscle and adipose tissues from obese mice. In vitro, kaempferol increased lipolysis and prevented high fatty acid-impaired glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, AMPK activity, and Glut4 expression in skeletal muscle cells. Using another mouse model of T2D generated by HF diet feeding and low doses of streptozotocin injection, we found that kaempferol treatment significantly improved hyperglycemia, glucose tolerance, and blood insulin levels in obese diabetic mice, which are associated with the improved islet β-cell mass. These results demonstrate that kaempferol may be a naturally occurring anti-diabetic agent by improving peripheral insulin sensitivity and protecting against pancreatic β-cell dysfunction.

  5. Up-regulation of fatty acid synthase induced by EGFR/ERK activation promotes tumor growth in pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Yong; Yu, Yun; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Lin

    2015-08-07

    Lipid metabolism is dysregulated in many human diseases including atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes and cancers. Fatty acid synthase (FASN), a key lipogenic enzyme involved in de novo lipid biosynthesis, is significantly upregulated in multiple types of human cancers and associates with tumor progression. However, limited data is available to understand underlying biological functions and clinical significance of overexpressed FASN in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Here, upregulated FASN was more frequently observed in PDAC tissues compared with normal pancreas in a tissue microarray. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis revealed that high expression level of FASN resulted in a significantly poor prognosis of PDAC patients. Knockdown or inhibition of endogenous FASN decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis in HPAC and AsPC-1 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that EGFR/ERK signaling accounts for elevated FASN expression in PDAC as ascertained by performing siRNA assays and using specific pharmacological inhibitors. Collectively, our results indicate that FASN exhibits important roles in tumor growth and EGFR/ERK pathway is responsible for upregulated expression of FASN in PDAC. - Highlights: • Increased expression of FASN indicates a poor prognosis in PDAC. • Elevated FASN favors tumor growth in PDAC in vitro. • Activation of EGFR signaling contributes to elevated FASN expression.

  6. Corydalis edulis Maxim. Promotes Insulin Secretion via the Activation of Protein Kinase Cs (PKCs) in Mice and Pancreatic β Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiao; Zhao, Yunfang; Lun, Qixing; Song, Yuelin; Shi, Shepo; Gu, Xiaopan; Pan, Bo; Qu, Changhai; Li, Jun; Tu, Pengfei

    2017-01-01

    Corydalis edulis Maxim., a widely grown plant in China, had been proposed for the treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this study, we found that C. edulis extract (CE) is protective against diabetes in mice. The treatment of hyperglycemic and hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E (ApoE)−/− mice with a high dose of CE reduced serum glucose by 28.84% and serum total cholesterol by 17.34% and increased insulin release. We also found that CE significantly enhanced insulin secretion in a glucose-independent manner in hamster pancreatic β cell (HIT-T15). Further investigation revealed that CE stimulated insulin exocytosis by a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent signaling pathway and that CE selectively activated novel protein kinase Cs (nPKCs) and atypical PKCs (aPKCs) but not conventional PKCs (cPKCs) in HIT-T15 cells. To the best of our knowledge, our study is the first to identify the PKC pathway as a direct target and one of the major mechanisms underlying the antidiabetic effect of CE. Given the good insulinotropic effect of this herbal medicine, CE is a promising agent for the development of new drugs for treating diabetes. PMID:28091547

  7. CD44v6-competent tumor exosomes promote motility, invasion and cancer-initiating cell marker expression in pancreatic and colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; von Au, Anja; Schnölzer, Martina; Hackert, Thilo; Zöller, Margot

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-initiating cells (CIC) account for metastatic spread, which may rely mostly on CIC exosomes (TEX) that affect host cells and can transfer CIC features into Non-CIC. The CIC marker CD44 variant isoform v6 (CD44v6) being known for metastasis-promotion, we elaborated in cells its contribution to migration and invasion and in TEX the tranfer of migratory and invasive capacity to Non-CIC, using a CD44v6 knockdown (CD44v6kd) as Non-CIC model. A CD44v6kd in human pancreatic and colorectal cancer (PaCa, CoCa) lines led to loss of CIC characteristics including downregulation of additional CIC markers, particularly Tspan8. This aggravated the loss of CD44v6-promoted motility and invasion. Loss of motility relies on the distorted cooperation of CD44v6 and Tspan8 with associated integrins and loss of invasiveness on reduced protease expression. These deficits, transferred into TEX, severely altered the CD44v6kd-TEX composition. As a consequence, unlike the CIC-TEX, CD44v6kd TEX were not taken up by CD44v6kd cells and CIC. The uptake of CIC-TEX was accompanied by partial correction of CIC marker and protease expression in CD44v6kd cells, which regained migratory, invasive and metastatic competence. CIC-TEX also fostered angiogenesis and expansion of myeloid cells, likely due to a direct impact of CIC-TEX on the host, which could be supported by reprogrammed CD44v6kd cells. Taken together, the striking loss of tumor progression by a CD44v6kd relies on the capacity of CD44v6 to cooperate with associating integrins and proteases and its promotion of additional CIC marker expression. The defects by a CD44v6kd are efficiently corrected upon CIC-TEX uptake. PMID:27419629

  8. CD44v6-competent tumor exosomes promote motility, invasion and cancer-initiating cell marker expression in pancreatic and colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; von Au, Anja; Schnölzer, Martina; Hackert, Thilo; Zöller, Margot

    2016-08-23

    Cancer-initiating cells (CIC) account for metastatic spread, which may rely mostly on CIC exosomes (TEX) that affect host cells and can transfer CIC features into Non-CIC. The CIC marker CD44 variant isoform v6 (CD44v6) being known for metastasis-promotion, we elaborated in cells its contribution to migration and invasion and in TEX the tranfer of migratory and invasive capacity to Non-CIC, using a CD44v6 knockdown (CD44v6kd) as Non-CIC model.A CD44v6kd in human pancreatic and colorectal cancer (PaCa, CoCa) lines led to loss of CIC characteristics including downregulation of additional CIC markers, particularly Tspan8. This aggravated the loss of CD44v6-promoted motility and invasion. Loss of motility relies on the distorted cooperation of CD44v6 and Tspan8 with associated integrins and loss of invasiveness on reduced protease expression. These deficits, transferred into TEX, severely altered the CD44v6kd-TEX composition. As a consequence, unlike the CIC-TEX, CD44v6kd TEX were not taken up by CD44v6kd cells and CIC. The uptake of CIC-TEX was accompanied by partial correction of CIC marker and protease expression in CD44v6kd cells, which regained migratory, invasive and metastatic competence. CIC-TEX also fostered angiogenesis and expansion of myeloid cells, likely due to a direct impact of CIC-TEX on the host, which could be supported by reprogrammed CD44v6kd cells.Taken together, the striking loss of tumor progression by a CD44v6kd relies on the capacity of CD44v6 to cooperate with associating integrins and proteases and its promotion of additional CIC marker expression. The defects by a CD44v6kd are efficiently corrected upon CIC-TEX uptake.

  9. Tropical chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Barman, K; Premalatha, G; Mohan, V

    2003-01-01

    Tropical chronic pancreatitis (TCP) is a juvenile form of chronic calcific non-alcoholic pancreatitis, seen almost exclusively in the developing countries of the tropical world. The classical triad of TCP consists of abdominal pain, steatorrhoea, and diabetes. When diabetes is present, the condition is called fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) which is thus a later stage of TCP. Some of the distinctive features of TCP are younger age at onset, presence of large intraductal calculi, more aggressive course of the disease, and a high susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic calculi are the hallmark for the diagnosis of TCP and in non-calcific cases ductal dilation on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, computed tomography, or ultrasound helps to identify the disease. Diabetes is usually quite severe and of the insulin requiring type, but ketosis is rare. Microvascular complications of diabetes occur as frequently as in type 2 diabetes but macrovascular complications are uncommon. Pancreatic enzyme supplements are used for relief of abdominal pain and reducing the symptoms related to steatorrhoea. Early diagnosis and better control of the endocrine and exocrine dysfunction could help to ensure better survival and improve the prognosis and quality of life of TCP patients. PMID:14654569

  10. Specific transduction and labeling of pancreatic ducts by targeted recombinant viral infusion into mouse pancreatic ducts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ping; Xiao, Xiangwei; El-Gohary, Yousef; Criscimanna, Angela; Prasadan, Krishna; Rymer, Christopher; Shiota, Chiyo; Wiersch, John; Gaffar, Iliana; Esni, Farzad; Gittes, George K

    2013-11-01

    Specific labeling of pancreatic ducts has proven to be quite difficult. Such labeling has been highly sought after because of the power it would confer to studies of pancreatic ductal carcinogenesis, as well as studies of the source of new insulin-producing β-cells. Cre-loxp recombination could, in theory, lineage-tag pancreatic ducts, but results have been conflicting, mainly due to low labeling efficiencies. Here, we achieved a high pancreatic duct labeling efficiency using a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) with a duct-specific sox9 promoter infused into the mouse common biliary/pancreatic duct. We saw rapid, diffuse duct-specific labeling, with 50 and 89% labeling in the pancreatic tail and head region, respectively. This highly specific labeling of ducts should greatly enhance our ability to study the role of pancreatic ducts in numerous aspects of pancreatic growth, development and function.

  11. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  12. Pancreatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sharf, B.; Bental, E.

    1971-01-01

    A 58 year old woman presenting with abdominal distress and a neuropsychiatric disturbance with evidence of focal neurological deficit is described. A diagnosis of pancreatic encephalopathy was made, and the patient was treated accordingly with pancreatic anti-enzymes. A survey of the literature is presented. Images PMID:5315218

  13. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Audrey; Herman, Joseph; Schulick, Rich; Hruban, Ralph H; Goggins, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patients’ management have also taken place. Evidence is beginning to show that screening first-degree relatives of individuals with several family members affected by pancreatic cancer can identify non-invasive precursors of this malignant disease. The incidence of and number of deaths caused by pancreatic tumours have been gradually rising, even as incidence and mortality of other common cancers have been declining. Despite developments in detection and management of pancreatic cancer, only about 4% of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localised to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Unfortunately, 80–85% of patients present with advanced unresectable disease. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer responds poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, we need to understand the biological mechanisms that contribute to development and progression of pancreatic tumours. In this Seminar we will discuss the most common and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:21620466

  14. Histone deacetylase class-I inhibition promotes epithelial gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells in a BRD4- and MYC-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vivek Kumar; Wegwitz, Florian; Kosinsky, Robyn Laura; Sen, Madhobi; Baumgartner, Roland; Wulff, Tanja; Siveke, Jens T; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Najafova, Zeynab; Kari, Vijayalakshmi; Kohlhof, Hella; Hessmann, Elisabeth; Johnsen, Steven A

    2017-03-27

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive cancer with a particularly dismal prognosis. Histone deacetylases (HDAC) are epigenetic modulators whose activity is frequently deregulated in various cancers including PDAC. In particular, class-I HDACs (HDAC 1, 2, 3 and 8) have been shown to play an important role in PDAC. In this study, we investigated the effects of the class I-specific HDAC inhibitor (HDACi) 4SC-202 in multiple PDAC cell lines in promoting tumor cell differentiation. We show that 4SC-202 negatively affects TGFβ signaling and inhibits TGFβ-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, 4SC-202 markedly induced p21 (CDKN1A) expression and significantly attenuated cell proliferation. Mechanistically, genome-wide studies revealed that 4SC-202-induced genes were enriched for Bromodomain-containing Protein-4 (BRD4) and MYC occupancy. BRD4, a well-characterized acetyllysine reader, has been shown to play a major role in regulating transcription of selected subsets of genes. Importantly, BRD4 and MYC are essential for the expression of a subgroup of genes induced by class-I HDACi. Taken together, our study uncovers a previously unknown role of BRD4 and MYC in eliciting the HDACi-mediated induction of a subset of genes and provides molecular insight into the mechanisms of HDACi action in PDAC.

  15. An increased expression of long non-coding RNA PANDAR promotes cell proliferation and inhibits cell apoptosis in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuehong; Feng, Enhang; Sun, Lifang; Jin, Wei; You, Yuhong; Yao, Yue; Xu, Yi

    2017-09-05

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most aggressive malignancies worldwide. Emerging evidence indicates that aberrantly expressed long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) act as imperative roles in tumorigenesis and progression. PANDAR (promoter of CDKN1A antisense DNA damage activated RNA) is a novel lncRNA that contributes to the development of various cancers. However, its clinical significance and potential effects on PDAC remains unknown. In the present study, qRT-PCR was performed to explore the expression levels of PANDAR in PDAC tissues and corresponding non-tumor tissues, the correlation between PANDAR expression and clinicopathological characteristics was also analyzed. The functional roles of lncRNA PANDAR in PDAC cells were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. The results indicated that PANDAR was aberrantly overexpressed in PDAC tissues and cell lines, and this overexpression was closely associated with tumor stage and vascular invasion in PDAC patients. Besides, silencing of PANDAR exerted tumor suppressive effect via reducing cell proliferation, colony-forming ability, inducing cell cycle G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis in PANC1 and Capan-2 cells. Further in vivo study confirmed the oncogenesis role of PANDAR in PDAC cells. Overall, our findings may help to develop a potential therapeutic target for the patients with PDAC. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Acid-suppressing drugs and gastroesophageal reflux disease as risk factors for acute pancreatitis--results from a Swedish Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Sundström, Anders; Blomgren, Kerstin; Alfredsson, Lars; Wiholm, Bengt-Erik

    2006-03-01

    To study risk factors for acute pancreatitis, here with emphasis on gastro-intestinal diseases and their treatments. Population based case-control study covering four areas in Sweden encompassing 2.2 million inhabitants. Included were 462 incident cases of acute pancreatitis aged 20-85 years, hospitalized from 1 January 1995-31 May 1998, and 1,781 unmatched controls randomly selected from the study base using a population register. Information was captured from medical records and structured telephone interviews. Current use of H(2) antagonists starting within 6 months of index-date was associated with acute pancreatitis with an adjusted OR of 4.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-15), and current use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) with an adjusted OR of 3.2 (95%CI 1.4-7.4). For both drug classes, the ORs tended to be higher at higher doses. Gastritis/gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) within the last 12 months not treated with PPIs or H(2)-antagonists and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) not treated with anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive drugs were associated with development of acute pancreatitis with adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 1.9 (95%CI 1.2-3.0) and 5.1 (95%CI 2.0-13) respectively. Current IBD without treatment and gastritis/GERD without treatment were found to be associated with increased risks to develop acute pancreatitis but the nature of the latter association needs to be further evaluated. On balance, we judge that the observed associations between current use of H(2)-antagonists and PPIs and increased risk of acute pancreatitis are unlikely to be explained by bias.

  17. Inflammation, autophagy, and obesity: common features in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gukovsky, Ilya; Li, Ning; Todoric, Jelena; Gukovskaya, Anna; Karin, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Inflammation and autophagy are cellular defense mechanisms. When these processes are deregulated (deficient or overactivated) they produce pathologic effects, such as oxidative stress, metabolic impairments, and cell death. Unresolved inflammation and disrupted regulation of autophagy are common features of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, obesity, a risk factor for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, promotes inflammation and inhibits or deregulates autophagy, creating an environment that facilitates the induction and progression of pancreatic diseases. However, little is known about how inflammation, autophagy, and obesity interact to promote exocrine pancreatic disorders. We review the roles of inflammation and autophagy, and their deregulation by obesity, in pancreatic diseases. We discuss the connections among disordered pathways and important areas for future research. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Long non-coding RNA CRNDE sponges miR-384 to promote proliferation and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells through upregulating IRS1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Pan, Jingen; Zhang, Lu; Wei, Yajun; Wang, Cheng

    2017-09-21

    Colorectal neoplasia differentially expressed (CRNDE), a vital cancer-related long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), has been brought to reports for playing quintessential functions in the growth and progression of several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the expression as well as the functional mechanisms of CRNDE in pancreatic cancer is not known so for. This study aimed at investigating the biological and clinical importance of CRNDE in human pancreatic cancer. The expression levels of CRNDE in pancreatic cancer tissues as well as cell lines were identified with the help of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Furthermore, the analysis of the relationship between CRNDE expression and clinicopathologic characteristics of patients with pancreatic cancer was also performed. Novel target of CRNDE was identified with the use of bioinformatics analysis and confirmed by a dual-luciferase reporter assay. Colorectal neoplasia differentially expressed was knocked down using siRNA in pancreatic cancer cells. Thereafter, cell proliferation, migration and invasion were examined. Tumour xenograft was created to explore the function of CRNDE in tumorigenesis in vivo. Upregulation of the expression of CRNDE was found in pancreatic cancer tissues as well as cell lines, in comparison with the adjacent non-tumour tissues and human pancreatic duct epithelial cells. High expression of CRNDE was correlated with poor clinicpathological characteristics and shorter overall survival. We identified miR-384 as a direct target for CRNDE. Moreover, the CRNDE knockdown considerably inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion not only in vitro but also in vivo. In addition, CRNDE positively regulated IRS1 expression through sponging miR-384. Colorectal neoplasia differentially expressed performed an oncogenic function in cell proliferation as well as metastasis of pancreatic cancer. Our results suggest that CRNDE is likely to serve as an efficient therapeutic approach in

  19. Necrotizing pancreatitis: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Bendersky, Victoria A; Mallipeddi, Mohan K; Perez, Alexander; Pappas, Theodore N

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common disease that can progress to gland necrosis, which imposes significant risk of morbidity and mortality. In general, the treatment for pancreatitis is a supportive therapy. However, there are several reasons to escalate to surgery or another intervention. This review discusses the pathophysiology as well as medical and interventional management of necrotizing pancreatitis. Current evidence suggests that patients are best served by delaying interventions for at least 4 weeks, draining as a first resort, and debriding recalcitrant tissue using minimally invasive techniques to promote or enhance postoperative recovery while reducing wound-related complications. PMID:27826206

  20. MicroRNA-222 Controls Human Pancreatic Cancer Cell Line Capan-2 Proliferation by P57 Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yingying; Wang, Yuqiong; Yang, Yuefeng; Liu, Jingqi; Song, Yang; Cao, Yan; Chen, Xiaoyu; Yang, Wenzhuo; Wang, Fei; Gao, Jun; Li, Zhaoshen; Yang, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most common cancers and has a poor prognosis due to late diagnosis and ineffective therapeutic multimodality. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) are a group of non-coding, small RNAs with active biological activities. In our investigation, human pancreatic cancer cell line Capan-2 were transfected with miR-222 mimics, inhibitors or their negative controls. Cell proliferation was assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), EdU incorporation assay and cell cycle determination by flow cytometry. MiR-222 and putative target gene expression levels including p27, p57 and PTEN were determined using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions and Western blotting. Our results showed that miR-222 could lead to increased vitality and proliferative rate of Capan-2 cells, and also higher S-phase and lower G1-phase of cell cycle. Further, we found p57 at protein level, but not p27 nor PTEN, was regulated by miR-222 in Capan-2 cells. Finally, we co-transfected miR-222 inhibitor and p57 si-RNA into Capan-2 cells, and found that proliferation-suppressing effects of miR-222 inhibitor on Capan-2 cells could be partially reversed by silencing p57. Our results indicate that miR-222 controls Capan-2 cell proliferation by targeting p57. This study provides a novel idea for developing effective therapeutic strategy for PC patients through inhibiting miR-222. PMID:26535064

  1. MicroRNA-222 Controls Human Pancreatic Cancer Cell Line Capan-2 Proliferation by P57 Targeting.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingying; Wang, Yuqiong; Yang, Yuefeng; Liu, Jingqi; Song, Yang; Cao, Yan; Chen, Xiaoyu; Yang, Wenzhuo; Wang, Fei; Gao, Jun; Li, Zhaoshen; Yang, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most common cancers and has a poor prognosis due to late diagnosis and ineffective therapeutic multimodality. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) are a group of non-coding, small RNAs with active biological activities. In our investigation, human pancreatic cancer cell line Capan-2 were transfected with miR-222 mimics, inhibitors or their negative controls. Cell proliferation was assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), EdU incorporation assay and cell cycle determination by flow cytometry. MiR-222 and putative target gene expression levels including p27, p57 and PTEN were determined using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions and Western blotting. Our results showed that miR-222 could lead to increased vitality and proliferative rate of Capan-2 cells, and also higher S-phase and lower G1-phase of cell cycle. Further, we found p57 at protein level, but not p27 nor PTEN, was regulated by miR-222 in Capan-2 cells. Finally, we co-transfected miR-222 inhibitor and p57 si-RNA into Capan-2 cells, and found that proliferation-suppressing effects of miR-222 inhibitor on Capan-2 cells could be partially reversed by silencing p57. Our results indicate that miR-222 controls Capan-2 cell proliferation by targeting p57. This study provides a novel idea for developing effective therapeutic strategy for PC patients through inhibiting miR-222.

  2. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  3. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kleeff, Jorg; Whitcomb, David C; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Esposito, Irene; Lerch, Markus M; Gress, Thomas; Mayerle, Julia; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Rebours, Vinciane; Akisik, Fatih; Muñoz, J Enrique Domínguez; Neoptolemos, John P

    2017-09-07

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a pathological fibro-inflammatory syndrome of the pancreas in individuals with genetic, environmental and/or other risk factors who develop persistent pathological responses to parenchymal injury or stress. Potential causes can include toxic factors (such as alcohol or smoking), metabolic abnormalities, idiopathic mechanisms, genetics, autoimmune responses and obstructive mechanisms. The pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis is fairly complex and includes acinar cell injury, acinar stress responses, duct dysfunction, persistent or altered inflammation, and/or neuro-immune crosstalk, but these mechanisms are not completely understood. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by ongoing inflammation of the pancreas that results in progressive loss of the endocrine and exocrine compartment owing to atrophy and/or replacement with fibrotic tissue. Functional consequences include recurrent or constant abdominal pain, diabetes mellitus (endocrine insufficiency) and maldigestion (exocrine insufficiency). Diagnosing early-stage chronic pancreatitis is challenging as changes are subtle, ill-defined and overlap those of other disorders. Later stages are characterized by variable fibrosis and calcification of the pancreatic parenchyma; dilatation, distortion and stricturing of the pancreatic ducts; pseudocysts; intrapancreatic bile duct stricturing; narrowing of the duodenum; and superior mesenteric, portal and/or splenic vein thrombosis. Treatment options comprise medical, radiological, endoscopic and surgical interventions, but evidence-based approaches are limited. This Primer highlights the major progress that has been made in understanding the pathophysiology, presentation, prevalence and management of chronic pancreatitis and its complications.

  4. Theranostic Nanoparticles with Controlled Release of Gemcitabine for Targeted Therapy and MRI of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gee Young; Qian, Wei Ping; Wang, Liya; Wang, Yongqiang Andrew; Staley, Charles A.; Satpathy, Minati; Nie, Shuming; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2013-01-01

    The tumor stroma in human cancers significantly limits the delivery of therapeutic agents into cancer cells. To develop an effective therapeutic approach overcoming the physical barrier of the stroma, we engineered urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR)-targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying gemcitabine (Gem) as a chemotherapy drug for targeted delivery into uPAR-expressing tumor and stromal cells. The uPAR-targeted nanoparticle construct, ATF-IONP-Gem, was prepared by conjugating IONPs with the amino-terminal fragment (ATF) peptide of the receptor-binding domain of uPA, a natural ligand of uPAR, and Gem via a lysosomally cleavable tetrapeptide linker. These theranostic nanoparticles enable intracellular release of Gem following receptor-mediated endocytosis of ATF-IONP-Gem into tumor cells, and also allow in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of tumors. Our results demonstrated the pH- and lysosomal enzyme-dependent release of gemcitabine, preventing the drug from enzymatic degradation. Systemic administrations of ATF-IONP-Gem significantly inhibited the growth of orthotopic human pancreatic cancer xenografts in nude mice. With MRI contrast enhancement by IONPs, we detected the presence of IONPs in the residual tumor lesions following the treatment, suggesting the possibility of monitoring drug delivery and assessing drug resistant tumors by MRI. The theranostic ATF-IONP-Gem nanoparticle has great potential for the development of targeted therapeutic and imaging approaches that are capable of overcoming the tumor stromal barrier, thus enhancing the therapeutic effect of nanoparticle drugs on pancreatic cancers. PMID:23402593

  5. Pancreaticogastrostomy is superior to pancreaticojejunostomy for prevention of pancreatic fistula after pancreaticoduodenectomy: an updated meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Menahem, Benjamin; Guittet, Lydia; Mulliri, Andrea; Alves, Arnaud; Lubrano, Jean

    2015-05-01

    To review prospective randomized controlled trials to determine whether pancreaticogastrostomy (PG) or pancreaticojejunostomy (PJ) is associated with lower risks of mortality and pancreatic fistula after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). Previous studies comparing reconstruction by PG and PJ reported conflicting results regarding the relative risks of mortality and pancreatic fistula after these procedures. MEDLINE, the Cochrane Trials Register, and EMBASE were searched for prospective randomized controlled trials comparing PG and PJ after PD, published up to November 2013. Meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.0. Seven trials were selected, including 562 patients who underwent PG and 559 who underwent PJ. The pancreatic fistula rate was significantly lower in the PG group than in the PJ group (63/562, 11.2% vs 84/559, 18.7%; odds ratio = 0.53; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.75; P = 0.0003). The overall mortality rate was 3.7% (18/489) in the PG group and 3.9% (19/487) in the PJ group (P = 0.68). The biliary fistula rate was significantly lower in the PG group than in the PJ group (8/400, 2.0% vs 19/392, 4.8%; odds ratio = 0.42; 95% confidence interval, 0.18-0.93; P = 0.03). In PD, reconstruction by PG is associated with lower postoperative pancreatic and biliary fistula rates.

  6. Cadmium exposure and risk of pancreatic cancer: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies and case-control studies among individuals without occupational exposure history

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng; Xun, Pengcheng; Nishijo, Muneko; Sekikawa, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly types of cancer for both genders. Classified as a human carcinogen, cadmium has been related to diverse cancers. However, the association between cadmium exposure and the risk of pancreatic cancer is still unclear. We quantitatively reviewed the observational studies on the association of cadmium exposure with pancreatic cancer risk among individuals without occupational exposure history published through July 2014 in PubMed by using a fixed–effects model. Four prospective cohort studies (112,934 participants with 335 events) and two case-control studies (177 cases and 539 controls) were identified. The summarized relative risk (RR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) was 2.05 (95% CI=1.58 – 2.66), comparing the highest to the lowest category of cadmium exposure. This positive association persisted in men (RR=1.78; 95% CI=1.04 – 3.05), but not in women (RR=1.02; 95% CI=0.63 – 1.65). Further research is needed to provide more solid evidence on the association of cadmium exposure with pancreatic cancer risk and to elucidate the underlying biological mechanism of the potential gender difference. PMID:26423282

  7. Cadmium exposure and risk of pancreatic cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies and case-control studies among individuals without occupational exposure history.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Xun, Pengcheng; Nishijo, Muneko; Sekikawa, Akira; He, Ka

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly types of cancer for both genders. Classified as a human carcinogen, cadmium has been related to diverse cancers. However, the association between cadmium exposure and the risk of pancreatic cancer is still unclear. We quantitatively reviewed the observational studies on the association of cadmium exposure with pancreatic cancer risk among individuals without occupational exposure history published through July 2014 in PubMed by using a fixed-effect model. Four prospective cohort studies (112,934 participants with 335 events) and two case-control studies (177 cases and 539 controls) were identified. The summarized relative risk (RR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) was 2.05 (95% CI = 1.58-2.66), comparing the highest to the lowest category of cadmium exposure. This positive association persisted in men (RR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.04-3.05) but not in women (RR = 1.02, 95% CI = 0.63-1.65). Further research is needed to provide more solid evidence on the association of cadmium exposure with pancreatic cancer risk and to elucidate the underlying biological mechanism of the potential gender difference.

  8. [Promoting sustainable behavior change in body weight control].

    PubMed

    Camolas, José; Santos, Osvaldo; Moreira, Pedro; do Carmo, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    There is a wide acknowledgement of obesity as a relevant clinical entity. Such relevance can be inferred by the huge worldwide amount of research and related health promotion and clinical efforts. Though the evidence sustains some cues for the therapeutic success, the overall long-term effectiveness of obesity treatment tends to be not so satisfactory. Scientific literature is not unequivocal in key areas of nutritional intervention, such as the magnitude of caloric restriction, proportion of macronutrients, meal frequency, among others. The same applies to the area of physical activity recommendation for weight control. As a correlate of this scenario of incertitude, there is a proliferation of interventions and there is a clear need to integrate the scientific and clinical evidence. This paper presents a narrative literature review of key issues of clinical practice in obesity, regarding a set of actions that, in the overall, have as main purpose the promotion of reduction and/or control of body weight. The role of the health professional is highlighted as a facilitator of acquisition of habits that favor weight control, by integrating the professional's scientific knowledge with the patient's readiness for and capacity to change.

  9. The nuclear hormone receptor family member NR5A2 controls aspects of multipotent progenitor cell formation and acinar differentiation during pancreatic organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Michael A.; Swift, Galvin H.; Hoang, Chinh Q.; Deering, Tye G.; Masui, Toshi; Lee, Youn-Kyoung; Xue, Jumin; MacDonald, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor NR5A2 is necessary for the stem-like properties of the epiblast of the pre-gastrulation embryo and for cellular and physiological homeostasis of endoderm-derived organs postnatally. Using conditional gene inactivation, we show that Nr5a2 also plays crucial regulatory roles during organogenesis. During the formation of the pancreas, Nr5a2 is necessary for the expansion of the nascent pancreatic epithelium, for the subsequent formation of the multipotent progenitor cell (MPC) population that gives rise to pre-acinar cells and bipotent cells with ductal and islet endocrine potential, and for the formation and differentiation of acinar cells. At birth, the NR5A2-deficient pancreas has defects in all three epithelial tissues: a partial loss of endocrine cells, a disrupted ductal tree and a >90% deficit of acini. The acinar defects are due to a combination of fewer MPCs, deficient allocation of those MPCs to pre-acinar fate, disruption of acinar morphogenesis and incomplete acinar cell differentiation. NR5A2 controls these developmental processes directly as well as through regulatory interactions with other pancreatic transcriptional regulators, including PTF1A, MYC, GATA4, FOXA2, RBPJL and MIST1 (BHLHA15). In particular, Nr5a2 and Ptf1a establish mutually reinforcing regulatory interactions and collaborate to control developmentally regulated pancreatic genes by binding to shared transcriptional regulatory regions. At the final stage of acinar cell development, the absence of NR5A2 affects the expression of Ptf1a and its acinar specific partner Rbpjl, so that the few acinar cells that form do not complete differentiation. Nr5a2 controls several temporally distinct stages of pancreatic development that involve regulatory mechanisms relevant to pancreatic oncogenesis and the maintenance of the exocrine phenotype. PMID:25063451

  10. Historical controls for metastatic pancreatic cancer: benchmarks for planning and analyzing single-arm phase II trials.

    PubMed

    Philip, Philip A; Chansky, Kari; LeBlanc, Michael; Rubinstein, Lawrence; Seymour, Lesley; Ivy, S Percy; Alberts, Steven R; Catalano, Paul J; Crowley, John

    2014-08-15

    We compiled and analyzed a database of cooperative group trials in advanced pancreatic cancer to develop historical benchmarks for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Such benchmarks are essential for evaluating new therapies in a single-arm setting. The analysis included patients with untreated metastatic pancreatic cancer receiving regimens that included gemcitabine, between 1995 and 2005. Prognostic baseline factors were selected by their significance in Cox regression analysis. Outlier trial arms were identified by comparing individual 6-month OS and PFS rates against the entire group. The dataset selected for the generation of OS and PFS benchmarks was then tested for intertrial arm variability using a logistic-normal model with the selected baseline prognostic factors as fixed effects and the individual trial arm as a random effect. A total of 1,132 cases from eight trials qualified. Performance status and sex were independently significant for OS, and performance status was prognostic for PFS. Outcomes for one trial (NCCTG-034A) were significantly different from the other trial arms. When this trial was excluded, the remaining trial arms were homogeneous for OS and PFS outcomes after adjusting for performance status and sex. Benchmark values for 6-month OS and PFS are reported along with a method for using these values in future study design and analysis. The benchmark survival values were generated from a dataset that was homogeneous between trials. The benchmarks can be used to enable single-arm phase II trials using a gemcitabine platform, especially under certain circumstances. Such circumstances might be when a randomized control arm is not practically feasible, an early signal of activity of an experimental agent is being explored such as in expansion cohorts of phase I studies, and in patients who are not candidates for combination cytotoxic therapy. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnose pancreatitis include: Fecal fat test Increased serum amylase level Increased serum lipase level Serum trypsinogen Tests ... medicines Fluids given through a vein (IV) Stopping food or fluid by mouth to limit the activity ...

  12. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... mg/dL Injury to the pancreas from an accident Other causes include: After certain procedures used to ... pressure Rapid heart rate Rapid breathing (respiratory) rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes ...

  13. Pancreatitis - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... an organ or bone marrow transplant Cystic fibrosis Crohn disease and other disorders when the body's immune system ... lab tests to check the release of pancreatic enzymes. These include tests to check the: Blood amylase ...

  14. Pancreatic cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cell the cancer develops in. Examples include: Adenocarcinoma, the most common type of pancreatic cancer Other ... idea of what to expect. Treatment Treatment for adenocarcinoma depends on the stage of the tumor. Surgery ...

  15. Pancreatic abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... high. Possible Complications Complications may include: Multiple abscesses Sepsis When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your ... 2016:chap 144. Read More Abscess Pancreatic pseudocyst Sepsis Review Date 10/27/2015 Updated by: Subodh ...

  16. Hydrocarbon exposure, pancreatitis, and bile acids.

    PubMed Central

    Hotz, P; Pilliod, J; Bourgeois, R; Boillat, M A

    1990-01-01

    The data on hydrocarbon induced pancreatitis are conflicting. This question was therefore studied in a non-selected population exposed to hydrocarbons and in "formerly" exposed workers. Neither the past clinical history nor the pancreatic tests provided any evidence for a causal relation between exposure and pancreatitis. No signs of hydrocarbon induced liver damage were seen either. As a healthy worker effect cannot be totally excluded, however, a case-control study in a group of patients suffering from non-alcohol induced pancreatitis could give useful indications for finally excluding the possibility of pancreatitis being induced by hydrocarbons. PMID:2271391

  17. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zavoral, Miroslav; Minarikova, Petra; Zavada, Filip; Salek, Cyril; Minarik, Marek

    2011-01-01

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma, and Peutz–Jeghers and Lynch syndromes. Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:21734801

  18. Promoting effect of arachidonic acid supplementation on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced pancreatic acinar cell hyperplasia in young Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Uehara, Norihisa; Kimura, Ayako; Emoto, Yuko; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Yuri, Takashi; Takada, Hideho; Moriguchi, Toru; Hamazaki, Tomohito; Tsubura, Airo

    2013-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is naturally found in human breast milk. AA, together with docosahexaenoic acid, is commonly added as a functional food ingredient to commercial infant formula worldwide, in accordance with the international standard of Codex Alimentarius. However, few studies have been performed that are concerned with the possible carcinogenic effects of AA supplementation during neonatal life. The effect of dietary AA supplementation in dams, during gestation and lactation, was investigated in N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced preneoplastic lesions in the exocrine pancreas of young Lewis rats. Dams were fed either an AA (2.0% AA) or a basal (<0.01% AA) diet. On postnatal day 0 (at birth), male and female pups received a single intraperitoneal injection of either 35 mg/kg MNU or vehicle. The morphology and proliferating activity of the exocrine pancreas were examined by proliferative cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry 7, 14, 21, 28 and/or 60 days post-MNU. Histopathologically, acinar cell hyperplasia (ACH) occurred in the MNU-treated groups 60 days after MNU injection, irrespecitive of whether the rats had been fed an AA diet. Morphometrically, the number and area of ACH per 1 mm(2) in MNU-treated rats increased significantly in the AA diet-fed rats, compared with basal diet-fed rats. The number of proliferative cell nuclear antigen-positive acinar cells in both the normal and hyperplastic areas of MNU-treated rats increased significantly in the AA diet-fed rats. In conclusion, providing dams with an AA-rich diet during gestation and lactation promotes MNU-induced pancreatic ACH in young Lewis rats.

  19. Long non-coding RNA CCAT1 that can be activated by c-Myc promotes pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and migration

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qiuyun; Zhou, Xinfeng; Xia, Qing; Shen, Jia; Yan, Jia; Zhu, Jiuting; Li, Xiang; Shu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potential role of lncRNA CCAT1 in the progression of pancreatic cancer (PC) and to reveal its possible molecular mechanism. The expression of CCAT1 was analyzed in PC tissues and their adjacent normal tissues from patients diagnosed with PC and in two pancreas cancer cell lines, namely PANC-1 and Aspc-1 using real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blot, respectively. The effects of CCAT1 expression on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and migration were analyzed using MTT assay, flow cytometry, and transwell assay, respectively. The effects of c-Myc expression on the expression of CCAT1 and E-box were also analyzed using RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, respectively. The results showed that CCAT1 was highly expressed in PC tissues compared to the adjacent tissues (P<0.01) and was also overexpressed in PANC-1 and Aspc-1 cells (P<0.05). The silencing of CCAT1 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and migration (P<0.05), arrested cell cycle at G0/G1 stage, and decreased cyclin D1 expression (P<0.05). An increased expression of c-Myc was observed in the PC tissues compared to the adjacent tissues. We found that suppression of c-Myc altered CCAT1 expression by targeting its promoter at E-box. This study demonstrated that c-Myc-activated CCAT1 may contribute to tumorigenesis and metastasis of PC, which may serve as a potential target for the therapy of PC. PMID:28078015

  20. Promoting effect of arachidonic acid supplementation on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced pancreatic acinar cell hyperplasia in young Lewis rats

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIZAWA, KATSUHIKO; UEHARA, NORIHISA; KIMURA, AYAKO; EMOTO, YUKO; KINOSHITA, YUICHI; YURI, TAKASHI; TAKADA, HIDEHO; MORIGUCHI, TORU; HAMAZAKI, TOMOHITO; TSUBURA, AIRO

    2013-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is naturally found in human breast milk. AA, together with docosahexaenoic acid, is commonly added as a functional food ingredient to commercial infant formula worldwide, in accordance with the international standard of Codex Alimentarius. However, few studies have been performed that are concerned with the possible carcinogenic effects of AA supplementation during neonatal life. The effect of dietary AA supplementation in dams, during gestation and lactation, was investigated in N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced preneoplastic lesions in the exocrine pancreas of young Lewis rats. Dams were fed either an AA (2.0% AA) or a basal (<0.01% AA) diet. On postnatal day 0 (at birth), male and female pups received a single intraperitoneal injection of either 35 mg/kg MNU or vehicle. The morphology and proliferating activity of the exocrine pancreas were examined by proliferative cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry 7, 14, 21, 28 and/or 60 days post-MNU. Histopathologically, acinar cell hyperplasia (ACH) occurred in the MNU-treated groups 60 days after MNU injection, irrespecitive of whether the rats had been fed an AA diet. Morphometrically, the number and area of ACH per 1 mm2 in MNU-treated rats increased significantly in the AA diet-fed rats, compared with basal diet-fed rats. The number of proliferative cell nuclear antigen-positive acinar cells in both the normal and hyperplastic areas of MNU-treated rats increased significantly in the AA diet-fed rats. In conclusion, providing dams with an AA-rich diet during gestation and lactation promotes MNU-induced pancreatic ACH in young Lewis rats. PMID:23255898

  1. Cortactin promotes exosome secretion by controlling branched actin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Seema; Hoshino, Daisuke; Hong, Nan Hyung; Seiki, Motoharu; Tyska, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that influence cellular behavior and enhance cancer aggressiveness by carrying bioactive molecules. The mechanisms that regulate exosome secretion are poorly understood. Here, we show that the actin cytoskeletal regulatory protein cortactin promotes exosome secretion. Knockdown or overexpression of cortactin in cancer cells leads to a respective decrease or increase in exosome secretion, without altering exosome cargo content. Live-cell imaging revealed that cortactin controls both trafficking and plasma membrane docking of multivesicular late endosomes (MVEs). Regulation of exosome secretion by cortactin requires binding to the branched actin nucleating Arp2/3 complex and to actin filaments. Furthermore, cortactin, Rab27a, and coronin 1b coordinately control stability of cortical actin MVE docking sites and exosome secretion. Functionally, the addition of purified exosomes to cortactin-knockdown cells rescued defects of those cells in serum-independent growth and invasion. These data suggest a model in which cortactin promotes exosome secretion by stabilizing cortical actin-rich MVE docking sites. PMID:27402952

  2. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  3. Vegetable and fruit intake and pancreatic cancer in a population-based case-control study in the San Francisco bay area.

    PubMed

    Chan, June M; Wang, Furong; Holly, Elizabeth A

    2005-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most devastating and rapidly fatal cancers, yet little is known about the primary cause and prevention of this disease. We conducted a population-based case-control study to investigate the association between vegetables and fruits and pancreatic cancer. Between 1995 and 1999, 532 cases and 1,701 age- and sex-matched controls completed direct interviews using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. No proxy interviews were conducted. We observed inverse associations between consumption of total and specific vegetables and fruits and the risk of pancreatic cancer. The odds ratio and 95% confidence interval for the highest versus the lowest quartile of total vegetable intake was 0.45 (0.32-0.62), trend P < 0.0001; and for total fruits and fruit juice was 0.72 (0.54-0.98), trend P = 0.06. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the highest versus the lowest quartile of specific vegetables and fruits were: 0.63 (0.47-0.83) for dark leafy vegetables, 0.76 (0.56-1.0) for cruciferous vegetables, 0.59 (0.43-0.81) for yellow vegetables, 0.56 (0.41-0.76) for carrots, 0.51 (0.38-0.70) for beans, 0.46 (0.33-0.63) for onions and garlic, and 0.78 (0.58-1.0) for citrus fruits and juice. Compared with less than five servings per day of total vegetables and fruits combined, the risk of pancreatic cancer was 0.49 (0.36-0.68) for more than nine servings per day. These results suggest that increasing vegetable and fruit consumption, already recommended for the prevention of several other chronic diseases, may impart some protection against developing pancreatic cancer.

  4. Minimally invasive 'step-up approach' versus maximal necrosectomy in patients with acute necrotising pancreatitis (PANTER trial): design and rationale of a randomised controlled multicenter trial [ISRCTN38327949

    PubMed Central

    Besselink, Marc GH; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B; Boermeester, Marja A; Bollen, Thomas L; Buskens, Erik; Dejong, Cornelis HC; van Eijck, Casper HJ; van Goor, Harry; Hofker, Sijbrand S; Lameris, Johan S; van Leeuwen, Maarten S; Ploeg, Rutger J; van Ramshorst, Bert; Schaapherder, Alexander FM; Cuesta, Miguel A; Consten, Esther CJ; Gouma, Dirk J; van der Harst, Erwin; Hesselink, Eric J; Houdijk, Lex PJ; Karsten, Tom M; van Laarhoven, Cees JHM; Pierie, Jean-Pierre EN; Rosman, Camiel; Bilgen, Ernst Jan Spillenaar; Timmer, Robin; van der Tweel, Ingeborg; de Wit, Ralph J; Witteman, Ben JM; Gooszen, Hein G

    2006-01-01

    Background The initial treatment of acute necrotizing pancreatitis is conservative. Intervention is indicated in patients with (suspected) infected necrotizing pancreatitis. In the Netherlands, the standard intervention is necrosectomy by laparotomy followed by continuous postoperative lavage (CPL). In recent years several minimally invasive strategies have been introduced. So far, these strategies have never been compared in a randomised controlled trial. The PANTER study (PAncreatitis, Necrosectomy versus sTEp up appRoach) was conceived to yield the evidence needed for a considered policy decision. Methods/design 88 patients with (suspected) infected necrotizing pancreatitis will be randomly allocated to either group A) minimally invasive 'step-up approach' starting with drainage followed, if necessary, by videoscopic assisted retroperitoneal debridement (VARD) or group B) maximal necrosectomy by laparotomy. Both procedures are followed by CPL. Patients will be recruited from 20 hospitals, including all Dutch university medical centres, over a 3-year period. The primary endpoint is the proportion of patients suffering from postoperative major morbidity and mortality. Secondary endpoints are complications, new onset sepsis, length of hospital and intensive care stay, quality of life and total (direct and indirect) costs. To demonstrate that the 'step-up approach' can reduce the major morbidity and mortality rate from 45 to 16%, with 80% power at 5% alpha, a total sample size of 88 patients was calculated. Discussion The PANTER-study is a randomised controlled trial that will provide evidence on the merits of a minimally invasive 'step-up approach' in patients with (suspected) infected necrotizing pancreatitis. PMID:16606471

  5. Pancreatic cancer, inflammation, and microbiome.

    PubMed

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Pushalkar, Smruti; Saxena, Deepak; Miller, George

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. No effective screening methods exist, and available treatment modalities do not effectively treat the disease. Inflammatory conditions such as pancreatitis represent a well-known risk factor for pancreatic cancer development. Yet only in the past 2 decades has pancreatic cancer been recognized as an inflammation-driven cancer, and the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenic role of inflammation are beginning to be explored in detail. A substantial amount of preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that bacteria are likely to influence this process by activating immune receptors and perpetuating cancer-associated inflammation. The recent explosion of investigations of the human microbiome have highlighted how perturbations of commensal bacterial populations can promote inflammation and promote disease processes, including carcinogenesis. The elucidation of the interplay between inflammation and microbiome in the context of pancreatic carcinogenesis will provide novel targets for intervention to prevent and treat pancreatic cancer more efficiently. Further studies toward this direction are urgently needed.

  6. Phosphorylation of Rab-coupling protein by LMTK3 controls Rab14-dependent EphA2 trafficking to promote cell:cell repulsion.

    PubMed

    Gundry, Christine; Marco, Sergi; Rainero, Elena; Miller, Bryan; Dornier, Emmanuel; Mitchell, Louise; Caswell, Patrick T; Campbell, Andrew D; Hogeweg, Anna; Sansom, Owen J; Morton, Jennifer P; Norman, Jim C

    2017-03-15

    The Rab GTPase effector, Rab-coupling protein (RCP) is known to promote invasive behaviour in vitro by controlling integrin and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) trafficking, but how RCP influences metastasis in vivo is unclear. Here we identify an RTK of the Eph family, EphA2, to be a cargo of an RCP-regulated endocytic pathway which controls cell:cell repulsion and metastasis in vivo. Phosphorylation of RCP at Ser(435) by Lemur tyrosine kinase-3 (LMTK3) and of EphA2 at Ser(897) by Akt are both necessary to promote Rab14-dependent (and Rab11-independent) trafficking of EphA2 which generates cell:cell repulsion events that drive tumour cells apart. Genetic disruption of RCP or EphA2 opposes cell:cell repulsion and metastasis in an autochthonous mouse model of pancreatic adenocarcinoma-whereas conditional knockout of another RCP cargo, α5 integrin, does not suppress pancreatic cancer metastasis-indicating a role for RCP-dependent trafficking of an Eph receptor to drive tumour dissemination in vivo.

  7. Phosphorylation of Rab-coupling protein by LMTK3 controls Rab14-dependent EphA2 trafficking to promote cell:cell repulsion

    PubMed Central

    Gundry, Christine; Marco, Sergi; Rainero, Elena; Miller, Bryan; Dornier, Emmanuel; Mitchell, Louise; Caswell, Patrick T.; Campbell, Andrew D.; Hogeweg, Anna; Sansom, Owen J.; Morton, Jennifer P.; Norman, Jim C.

    2017-01-01

    The Rab GTPase effector, Rab-coupling protein (RCP) is known to promote invasive behaviour in vitro by controlling integrin and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) trafficking, but how RCP influences metastasis in vivo is unclear. Here we identify an RTK of the Eph family, EphA2, to be a cargo of an RCP-regulated endocytic pathway which controls cell:cell repulsion and metastasis in vivo. Phosphorylation of RCP at Ser435 by Lemur tyrosine kinase-3 (LMTK3) and of EphA2 at Ser897 by Akt are both necessary to promote Rab14-dependent (and Rab11-independent) trafficking of EphA2 which generates cell:cell repulsion events that drive tumour cells apart. Genetic disruption of RCP or EphA2 opposes cell:cell repulsion and metastasis in an autochthonous mouse model of pancreatic adenocarcinoma—whereas conditional knockout of another RCP cargo, α5 integrin, does not suppress pancreatic cancer metastasis—indicating a role for RCP-dependent trafficking of an Eph receptor to drive tumour dissemination in vivo. PMID:28294115

  8. PDX:PBX complexes are required for normal proliferation of pancreatic cells during development.

    PubMed

    Dutta, S; Gannon, M; Peers, B; Wright, C; Bonner-Weir, S; Montminy, M

    2001-01-30

    The homeobox factor PDX-1 is a key regulator of pancreatic morphogenesis and glucose homeostasis; targeted disruption of the PDX-1 gene leads to pancreatic agenesis in pdx-1(-/-) homozygotes. Pdx-1 heterozygotes develop normally, but they display glucose intolerance in adulthood. Like certain other homeobox proteins, PDX-1 contains a consensus FPWMK motif that promotes heterodimer formation with the ubiquitous homeodomain protein PBX. To evaluate the importance of PDX-1:PBX complexes in pancreatic morphogenesis and glucose homeostasis, we expressed either wild-type or PBX interaction defective PDX-1 transgenes under control of the PDX-1 promoter. Both wild-type and mutant PDX-1 transgenes corrected glucose intolerance in pdx-1 heterozygotes. The wild-type PDX-1 transgene rescued the development of all pancreatic lineages in pdx-1(-/-) animals, and these mice survived to adulthood. In contrast, pancreata from pdx-1(-/-) mice expressing the mutant PDX-1 transgene were hypoplastic, and these mice died within 3 weeks of birth from pancreatic insufficiency. All pancreatic cell types were observed in pdx-1(-/-) mice expressing the mutant PDX-1 transgene; but the islets were smaller, and increased numbers of islet hormone-positive cells were noted within the ductal epithelium. These results indicate that PDX-1:PBX complexes are dispensable for glucose homeostasis and for differentiation of stem cells into ductal, endocrine, and acinar lineages; but they are essential for expansion of these populations during development.

  9. Class IA phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in pancreatic β cells controls insulin secretion by multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kazuma; Ueki, Kohjiro; Takahashi, Noriko; Hashimoto, Shinji; Okamoto, Masayuki; Awazawa, Motoharu; Okazaki, Yukiko; Ohsugi, Mitsuru; Inabe, Kazunori; Umehara, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Masashi; Kakei, Masafumi; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Luo, Ji; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Kahn, C Ronald; Kasai, Haruo; Cantley, Lewis C; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2010-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance and pancreatic β cell dysfunction, the latter possibly caused by a defect in insulin signaling in β cells. Inhibition of class IA phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), using a mouse model lacking the pik3r1 gene specifically in β cells and the pik3r2 gene systemically (βDKO mouse), results in glucose intolerance and reduced insulin secretion in response to glucose. β cells of βDKO mice had defective exocytosis machinery due to decreased expression of soluble N-ethylmaleimide attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex proteins and loss of cell-cell synchronization in terms of Ca(2+) influx. These defects were normalized by expression of a constitutively active form of Akt in the islets of βDKO mice, preserving insulin secretion in response to glucose. The class IA PI3K pathway in β cells in vivo is important in the regulation of insulin secretion and may be a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes.

  10. Human Pancreatic β Cell lncRNAs Control Cell-Specific Regulatory Networks.

    PubMed

    Akerman, Ildem; Tu, Zhidong; Beucher, Anthony; Rolando, Delphine M Y; Sauty-Colace, Claire; Benazra, Marion; Nakic, Nikolina; Yang, Jialiang; Wang, Huan; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Moran, Ignasi; Garcia-Hurtado, Javier; Castro, Natalia; Gonzalez-Franco, Roser; Stewart, Andrew F; Bonner, Caroline; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Berney, Thierry; Groop, Leif; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Pattou, Francois; Argmann, Carmen; Schadt, Eric; Ravassard, Philippe; Ferrer, Jorge

    2017-02-07

    Recent studies have uncovered thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human pancreatic β cells. β cell lncRNAs are often cell type specific and exhibit dynamic regulation during differentiation or upon changing glucose concentrations. Although these features hint at a role of lncRNAs in β cell gene regulation and diabetes, the function of β cell lncRNAs remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the function of β cell-specific lncRNAs and transcription factors using transcript knockdowns and co-expression network analysis. This revealed lncRNAs that function in concert with transcription factors to regulate β cell-specific transcriptional networks. We further demonstrate that the lncRNA PLUTO affects local 3D chromatin structure and transcription of PDX1, encoding a key β cell transcription factor, and that both PLUTO and PDX1 are downregulated in islets from donors with type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance. These results implicate lncRNAs in the regulation of β cell-specific transcription factor networks.

  11. Feedback control of growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis of pancreatic endocrine progenitors in an epithelial plexus niche

    PubMed Central

    Bankaitis, Eric D.; Bechard, Matthew E.; Wright, Christopher V.E.

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian pancreas, endocrine cells undergo lineage allocation upon emergence from a bipotent duct/endocrine progenitor pool, which resides in the “trunk epithelium.” Major questions remain regarding how niche environments are organized within this epithelium to coordinate endocrine differentiation with programs of epithelial growth, maturation, and morphogenesis. We used EdU pulse-chase and tissue-reconstruction approaches to analyze how endocrine progenitors and their differentiating progeny are assembled within the trunk as it undergoes remodeling from an irregular plexus of tubules to form the eventual mature, branched ductal arbor. The bulk of endocrine progenitors is maintained in an epithelial “plexus state,” which is a transient intermediate during epithelial maturation within which endocrine cell differentiation is continually robust and surprisingly long-lived. Within the plexus, local feedback effects derived from the differentiating and delaminating endocrine cells nonautonomously regulate the flux of endocrine cell birth as well as proliferative growth of the bipotent cell population using Notch-dependent and Notch-independent influences, respectively. These feedback effects in turn maintain the plexus state to ensure prolonged allocation of endocrine cells late into gestation. These findings begin to define a niche-like environment guiding the genesis of the endocrine pancreas and advance current models for how differentiation is coordinated with the growth and morphogenesis of the developing pancreatic epithelium. PMID:26494792

  12. Diabetes and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Burney, Saira; Irfan, Khadija; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Masud, Faisal

    2014-07-28

    Research suggests a possible link between type 2 diabetes and several malignancies. Animal models have shown that hyperinsulinemic state underlying diabetes promotes tumor formation through stimulation of insulin-IGF-1 pathway; a possible role of inflammation is also proposed. One such link which has been under considerable study for years is that between diabetes and pancreatic cancer. Although epidemiological evidence points towards a reciprocal link between the two, the cause-effect relationship still remains unclear. This link was the subject of a large German epidemiological study presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2014 (Abstract #1604), which underscored the link between diabetes and some cancers. Schmidt et al. performed a retrospective database analysis over a 12 year period and reported an increased risk of certain types of cancer in diabetic patients. The most significant association (HR 2.17) was found for pancreatic cancer. Given the high mortality of pancreatic cancer, prevention through timely screening could play an important role in improving prognosis. Older subjects with recent-onset diabetes represent a high-risk group and hence are potential targets for pancreatic cancer screening thereby enabling its early diagnosis at a curable stage.

  13. Balanced Tiam1-rac1 and RhoA drives proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xingjun; Wang, Min; Jiang, Jianxin; Xie, Chengchen; Peng, Feng; Li, Xu; Tian, Rui; Qin, Renyi

    2013-03-01

    Tiam1 is a rac1-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor, and Tiam1-rac1 is involved in a number of cellular processes. Rac1 and RhoA act as molecular switches that cycle between GTP- and GDP-bound states to balance the activities of rac1 and RhoA. The downregulation of rac1 activity leads to upregulation of RhoA activity, which promotes invasion and migration of pancreatic cancers cells. At present, however, the role of Tiam1-rac1 and RhoA in pancreatic cancers is not fully understood. We found that Tiam1 was upregulated in pancreatic cancers and was significantly expressed in tumors without lymph node involvement or distant metastasis compared with cancers where there was involvement. Although Tiam1-rac1 signaling promoted pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth via the Wnt signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo, inhibiting Tiam1-rac1 signaling did not prolong the overall survival time in vivo. This provided evidence that there was a balance between rac1 and RhoA activities in pancreatic cancers. Furthermore, only the combined inhibition of Tiam1-rac1 and RhoA had a beneficial effect on the growth of pancreatic cancers in vivo. Taken together, these results suggest that the progression of pancreatic tumors is partially controlled by the balance between Tiam1-rac1 and RhoA.

  14. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-12

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  15. Lack of association between the pancreatitis risk allele CEL-HYB and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Koji; Yu, Jun; Suenaga, Masaya; Fesharakizadeh, Shahriar; Tamura, Koji; Almario, Jose Alejandro Navarro; Brant, Aaron; Borges, Michael; Siddiqui, Abdulrehman; Datta, Lisa; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Hruban, Ralph H; Klein, Alison Patricia; Goggins, Michael

    2017-02-07

    CEL-HYB is a hybrid allele that arose from a crossover between the 3' end of the Carboxyl ester lipase (CEL) gene and the nearby CEL pseudogene (CELP) and was recently identified as a risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Since chronic pancreatitis is a risk factor for the development of pancreatic cancer, we compared the prevalence of the CEL-HYB allele in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma to spousal controls and disease controls. The CEL-HYB allele was detected using Sanger and next generation sequencing. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of the CEL-HYB allele between cases with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma compared to controls; 2.6% (22/850) vs. 1.8% (18/976) (p=0.35). CEL-HYB carriers were not more likely to report a history of pancreatitis. Patients with pancreatic cancer are not more likely than controls to be carriers of the CEL-HYB allele.

  16. Peer Positive Social Control and Men's Health-Promoting Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Houle, Janie; Meunier, Sophie; Coulombe, Simon; Mercerat, Coralie; Gaboury, Isabelle; Tremblay, Gilles; de Montigny, Francine; Cloutier, Lyne; Roy, Bernard; Auger, Nathalie; Lavoie, Brigitte

    2017-09-01

    Men are generally thought to be less inclined to take care of their health. To date, most studies about men's health have focused on deficits in self-care and difficulties in dealing with this sphere of their life. The present study reframes this perspective, using a salutogenic strengths-based approach and seeking to identify variables that influence men to take care of their health, rather than neglect it. This study focuses on the association between peer positive social control and men's health behaviors, while controlling for other important individual and social determinants (sociodemographic characteristics, health self-efficacy, home neighborhood, spousal positive social control, and the restrictive emotionality norm). In a mixed-method study, 669 men answered a self-reported questionnaire, and interviews were conducted with a maximum variation sample of 31 men. Quantitative results indicated that, even after controlling for sociodemographic variables and other important factors, peer positive social control was significantly associated with the six health behaviors measured in the study (health responsibility, nutrition, physical activity, interpersonal relations, stress management, and spirituality). Interview results revealed that peer positive social control influenced men's health behaviors through three different mechanisms: shared activity, being inspired, and serving as a positive role model for others. In summary, friends and coworkers could play a significant role in promoting various health behaviors among adult men in their daily life. Encouraging men to socialize and discuss health, and capitalizing on healthy men as role models appear to be effective ways to influence health behavior adoption among this specific population.

  17. Towards Evidence-Based, Quality-Controlled Health Promotion: The Dutch Recognition System for Health Promotion Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brug, Johannes; van Dale, Djoeke; Lanting, Loes; Kremers, Stef; Veenhof, Cindy; Leurs, Mariken; van Yperen, Tom; Kok, Gerjo

    2010-01-01

    Registration or recognition systems for best-practice health promotion interventions may contribute to better quality assurance and control in health promotion practice. In the Netherlands, such a system has been developed and is being implemented aiming to provide policy makers and professionals with more information on the quality and…

  18. Cytotoxin-Associated Gene A-Negative Strains of Helicobacter pylori as a Potential Risk Factor of Pancreatic Cancer: A Meta-Analysis Based on Nested Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin-Zu; Wang, Rui; Chen, Hai-Ning; Hu, Jian-Kun

    2015-11-01

    Risk of pancreatic cancer between Helicobacter pylori infected and noninfected persons is controversial, and therefore a meta-analysis was performed. PubMed was searched up to September 2014. Only population-based nested case-control studies comparing the serological prevalence of Helicobacter pylori between pancreatic cancer cases and cancer-free controls were eligible. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for pancreatic cancer risk between Helicobacter pylori infected and noninfected persons were estimated. Five eligible nested case-control studies were included, with 1446 pancreatic cancer cases and 2235 cancer-free controls. On the whole, the proportion of pancreatic cancer cases among those infected with Helicobacter pylori was not significant different from those noninfected (OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.65-1.50; P = 0.96). Likewise, seropositivity of cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) showed nonsignificant association with pancreatic cancer (OR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.65-1.30; P = 0.63). The CagA-positive virulent strains of Helicobacter pylori did not increase the risk of pancreatic cancer (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.50-1.89; P = 0.93). However, CagA-negative nonvirulent strains of Helicobacter pylori had a significant increased risk for pancreatic cancer (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.11-1.96; P = 0.008). The CagA-negative non-virulent strains of Helicobacter pylori may be a potential risk factor of pancreatic cancer. High-quality prospective large-scaled studies are required for more conclusive results.

  19. Pancreatic β-cell identity, glucose sensing and the control of insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Guy A; Pullen, Timothy J; Hodson, David J; Martinez-Sanchez, Aida

    2015-03-01

    Insulin release from pancreatic β-cells is required to maintain normal glucose homoeostasis in man and many other animals. Defective insulin secretion underlies all forms of diabetes mellitus, a disease currently reaching epidemic proportions worldwide. Although the destruction of β-cells is responsible for Type 1 diabetes (T1D), both lowered β-cell mass and loss of secretory function are implicated in Type 2 diabetes (T2D). Emerging results suggest that a functional deficiency, involving de-differentiation of the mature β-cell towards a more progenitor-like state, may be an important driver for impaired secretion in T2D. Conversely, at least in rodents, reprogramming of islet non-β to β-cells appears to occur spontaneously in models of T1D, and may occur in man. In the present paper, we summarize the biochemical properties which define the 'identity' of the mature β-cell as a glucose sensor par excellence. In particular, we discuss the importance of suppressing a group of 11 'disallowed' housekeeping genes, including Ldha and the monocarboxylate transporter Mct1 (Slc16a1), for normal nutrient sensing. We then survey the changes in the expression and/or activity of β-cell-enriched transcription factors, including FOXO1, PDX1, NKX6.1, MAFA and RFX6, as well as non-coding RNAs, which may contribute to β-cell de-differentiation and functional impairment in T2D. The relevance of these observations for the development of new approaches to treat T1D and T2D is considered.

  20. Sensing and Sensibility: Single-Islet-based Quality Control Assay of Cryopreserved Pancreatic Islets with Functionalized Hydrogel Microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wanyu; Shu, Zhiquan; Gao, Dayong; Shen, Amy Q

    2016-01-21

    Despite decades of research and clinical studies of islet transplantations, finding simple yet reliable islet quality assays that correlate accurately with in vivo potency is still a major challenge, especially for real-time and single-islet-based quality assessment. Herein, proof-of-concept studies of a cryopreserved microcapsule-based quality control assays are presented for single islets. Individual rat pancreatic islets and fluorescent oxygen-sensitive dye (FOSD) are encapsulated in alginate hydrogel microcapsules via a microfluidic device. To test the susceptibility of the microcapsules and the FOSD to cryopreservation, the islet microcapsules containing FOSD are cryopreserved and the islet functionalities (adenosine triphosphate, static insulin release measurement, and oxygen consumption rate) are assessed after freezing and thawing steps. The cryopreserved islet capsules with FOSD remain functional after encapsulation and freezing/thawing procedures, validating a simple yet reliable individual-islet-based quality control method for the entire islet processing procedure prior to transplantation. This work also demonstrates that the functionality of cryopreserved islets can be improved by introducing trehalose into the routinely used cryoprotectant dimethyl sulfoxide. The functionalized alginate hydrogel microcapsules with embedded FOSD and optimized cryopreservation protocol presented in this work serve as a versatile islet quality assay and offer tremendous promise for tackling existing challenges in islet transplantation procedures.

  1. Heterogeneity of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Lung metastasis show better prognosis than liver metastasis—a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Claire, Decoster; Marine, Gilabert; Aurélie, Autret; Olivier, Turrini; Sandrine, Oziel-Taieb; Flora, Poizat; Marc, Giovannini; Patrice, Viens; Juan, Iovanna; Jean-Luc, Raoul

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is grim, with a median overall survival of under 1 year. In our clinical practice, we observed a few cases of isolated lung metastases from PDAC with unusually long outcomes. We compared these cases in a case-control study of lung-only vs. liver-only metastases from PDAC. From our database, we found 37 cases of lung-only metastases and paired them with 37 cases of liver-only metastases by age, tumor location and treatment. The lung-only group differed significantly from the liver-only group with respect to the following parameters: female predominance, more metachronous cases, fewer nodules per patient, and smaller increases in tumor markers. Local invasion parameters (i.e., arterial or venous involvement) were not significantly different. The outcomes were significantly different, with a median overall survival from the occurrence of metastases of 20.8 vs. 9.1 months and a median progression-free survival of 11 vs. 3.5 months. In conclusion, this case-control study seemed to confirm that lung-only PDAC metastases have prognoses different from those of liver-only metastases. A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying these differences will help identify abnormalities associated with tumor aggressiveness. PMID:27286454

  2. Gut microbiota promote hematopoiesis to control bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Arya; Yáñez, Alberto; Price, Jeremy G; Chow, Andrew; Merad, Miriam; Goodridge, Helen S; Mazmanian, Sarkis K

    2014-03-12

    The commensal microbiota impacts specific immune cell populations and their functions at peripheral sites, such as gut mucosal tissues. However, it remains unknown whether gut microbiota control immunity through regulation of hematopoiesis at primary immune sites. We reveal that germ-free mice display reduced proportions and differentiation potential of specific myeloid cell progenitors of both yolk sac and bone marrow origin. Homeostatic innate immune defects may lead to impaired early responses to pathogens. Indeed, following systemic infection with Listeria monocytogenes, germ-free and oral-antibiotic-treated mice display increased pathogen burden and acute death. Recolonization of germ-free mice with a complex microbiota restores defects in myelopoiesis and resistance to Listeria. These findings reveal that gut bacteria direct innate immune cell development via promoting hematopoiesis, contributing to our appreciation of the deep evolutionary connection between mammals and their microbiota.

  3. Promotion of Healthy Weight-Control Practices in Young Athletes.

    PubMed

    Carl, Rebecca L; Johnson, Miriam D; Martin, Thomas J

    2017-09-01

    Children and adolescents may participate in sports that favor a particular body type. Some sports, such as gymnastics, dance, and distance running, emphasize a slim or lean physique for aesthetic or performance reasons. Participants in weight-class sports, such as wrestling and martial arts, may attempt weight loss so they can compete at a lower weight class. Other sports, such as football and bodybuilding, highlight a muscular physique; young athletes engaged in these sports may desire to gain weight and muscle mass. This clinical report describes unhealthy methods of weight loss and gain as well as policies and approaches used to curb these practices. The report also reviews healthy strategies for weight loss and weight gain and provides recommendations for pediatricians on how to promote healthy weight control in young athletes. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Treatment with Combination of Mithramycin A and Tolfenamic Acid Promotes Degradation of Sp1 Protein and Synergistic Antitumor Activity in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhiliang; Gao, Yong; Wang, Liwei; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Jun; Le, Xiangdong; Wei, Daoyan; Yao, James C.; Chang, David Z.; Huang, Suyun; Xie, Keping

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies showed that both mithramycin (MIT) and tolfenamic acid (TA) inhibits the activity of the transcription factor Sp1. In the present study, we sought to determine whether treatment with a combination of these two compounds has a synergistic effect on Sp1 activity and pancreatic cancer growth and their underlying mechanisms. In xenograft mouse models of human pancreatic cancer, treatment with MIT and TA produced dose-dependent antitumor activity, and significant antitumor activity of either compound alone was directly associated with systemic side effects as determined according to overall weight loss. However, combination treatment with nontoxic doses of TA and MIT produced synergistic antitumor activity, whereas treatment with a nontoxic dose of either compound alone did not have a discernible antitumor effect. The synergistic therapeutic effects of MIT and TA correlated directly with synergistic antiproliferation and antiangiogenesis in vitro. Moreover, treatment with the combination of TA and MIT resulted in Sp1 protein degradation, leading to drastic downregulation of Sp1 and vascular endothelial growth factor protein expression. Our data demonstrated that Sp1 is a critical target of TA and MIT in human pancreatic cancer therapy. Further studies should be performed to determine the impact of existing pancreatic cancer therapy regimens on Sp1 signaling in tumors and normal pancreatic tissue and the ability of Sp1-targeting strategies to modify these responses and improve upon these regimens. PMID:20086170

  5. Targeting of metastasis-promoting tumor-associated fibroblasts and modulation of pancreatic tumor-associated stroma with a carboxymethylcellulose-docetaxel nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Ernsting, Mark J; Hoang, Bryan; Lohse, Ines; Undzys, Elijus; Cao, Pinjiang; Do, Trevor; Gill, Bethany; Pintilie, Melania; Hedley, David; Li, Shyh-Dar

    2015-05-28

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas are characterized by the desmoplastic reaction, a dense fibrous stroma that has been shown to be supportive of tumor cell growth, invasion, and metastasis, and has been associated with resistance to chemotherapy and reduced patient survival. Here, we investigated targeted depletion of stroma for pancreatic cancer therapy via taxane nanoparticles. Cellax-DTX polymer is a conjugate of docetaxel (DTX), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and acetylated carboxymethylcellulose, a construct which condenses into well-defined 120nm particles in an aqueous solution, and is suitable for intravenous injection. We examined Cellax-DTX treatment effects in highly stromal primary patient-derived pancreatic cancer xenografts and in a metastatic PAN02 mouse model of pancreatic cancer, focusing on specific cellular interactions in the stroma, pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis. Greater than 90% of Cellax-DTX particles accumulate in smooth muscle actin (SMA) positive cancer-associated fibroblasts which results in long-term depletion of this stromal cell population, an effect not observed with Nab-paclitaxel (Nab-PTX). The reduction in stromal density leads to a >10-fold increase in tumor perfusion, reduced tumor weight and a reduction in metastasis. Consentingly, Cellax-DTX treatment increased survival when compared to treatment with gemcitabine or Nab-PTX in a metastatic PAN02 mouse model. Cellax-DTX nanoparticles interact with the tumor-associated stroma, selectively interacting with and depleting SMA positive cells and macrophage, effects of which are associated with significant changes in tumor progression and metastasis.

  6. Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Hasan B.

    2013-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the promotion process in an academic medical center. A description of different promotional tracks, tenure and endowed chairs, and the process of submitting an application is provided. Finally, some practical advice about developing skills and attributes that can help with academic growth and promotion is dispensed. PMID:24436683

  7. [Acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Hecker, M; Mayer, K; Askevold, I; Collet, P; Weigand, M A; Krombach, G A; Padberg, W; Hecker, A

    2014-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially fatal disease with individually differing expression of systemic involvement. For this reason early diagnosis with subsequent risk stratification is essential in the clinical management of this frequent gastroenterological disorder. Severe forms of acute pancreatitis occur in approximately 20 % of cases often requiring intensive care monitoring and interdisciplinary therapeutic approaches. In the acute phase adequate fluid replacement and sufficient analgesic therapy is of major therapeutic importance. Concerning the administration of antibiotics and the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis a change in paradigms could be observed in recent years. Furthermore, endoscopic, radiological or surgical interventions can be necessary depending on the severity of the disease and potential complications.

  8. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríg