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Sample records for control region sequence

  1. Homogeneity in mitochondrial DNA control region sequences in Swedish subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Tillmar, Andreas O; Coble, Michael D; Wallerström, Thomas; Holmlund, Gunilla

    2010-03-01

    In order to promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) testing in Sweden we have typed 296 Swedish males, which will serve as a Swedish mtDNA frequency database. The tested males were taken from seven geographically different regions representing the contemporary Swedish population. The complete mtDNA control region was typed and the Swedish population was shown to have high haplotype diversity with a random match probability of 0.5%. Almost 47% of the tested samples belonged to haplogroup H and further haplogroup comparison with worldwide populations clustered the Swedish mtDNA data together with other European populations. AMOVA analysis of the seven Swedish subregions displayed no significant maternal substructure in Sweden (F (ST) = 0.002). Our conclusion from this study is that the typed Swedish individuals serve as good representatives for a Swedish forensic mtDNA database. Some caution should, however, be taken for individuals from the northernmost part of Sweden (provinces of Norrbotten and Lapland) due to specific demographic conditions. Furthermore, our analysis of a small sample set of a Swedish Saami population confirmed earlier findings that the Swedish Saami population is an outlier among European populations.

  2. Sequence analysis of the canine mitochondrial DNA control region from shed hair samples in criminal investigations.

    PubMed

    Berger, C; Berger, B; Parson, W

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, evidence from domestic dogs has increasingly been analyzed by forensic DNA testing. Especially, canine hairs have proved most suitable and practical due to the high rate of hair transfer occurring between dogs and humans. Starting with the description of a contamination-free sample handling procedure, we give a detailed workflow for sequencing hypervariable segments (HVS) of the mtDNA control region from canine evidence. After the hair material is lysed and the DNA extracted by Phenol/Chloroform, the amplification and sequencing strategy comprises the HVS I and II of the canine control region and is optimized for DNA of medium-to-low quality and quantity. The sequencing procedure is based on the Sanger Big-dye deoxy-terminator method and the separation of the sequencing reaction products is performed on a conventional multicolor fluorescence detection capillary electrophoresis platform. Finally, software-aided base calling and sequence interpretation are addressed exemplarily.

  3. DNA sequence variation in the mitochondrial control region of red-backed voles (Clethrionomys).

    PubMed

    Matson, C W; Baker, R J

    2001-08-01

    The complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region was sequenced for 71 individuals from five species of the rodent genus Clethrionomys both to understand patterns of variation and to explore the existence of previously described domains and other elements. Among species, the control region ranged from 942 to 971 bp in length. Our data were compatible with the proposal of three domains (extended terminal associated sequences [ETAS], central, conserved sequence blocks [CSB]) within the control region. The most conserved region in the control region was the central domain (12% of nucleotide positions variable), whereas in the ETAS and CSB domains, 22% and 40% of nucleotide positions were variable, respectively. Tandem repeats were encountered only in the ETAS domain of Clethrionomys rufocanus. This tandem repeat found in C. rufocanus was 24 bp in length and was located at the 5' end of the control region. Only two of the proposed CSB and ETAS elements appeared to be supported by our data; however, a "CSB1-like" element was also documented in the ETAS domain.

  4. Repetitive sequences in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx L.) mitochondrial DNA control region.

    PubMed

    Sindičić, Magda; Gomerčić, Tomislav; Galov, Ana; Polanc, Primož; Huber, Duro; Slavica, Alen

    2012-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (CR) of numerous species is known to include up to five different repetitive sequences (RS1-RS5) that are found at various locations, involving motifs of different length and extensive length heteroplasmy. Two repetitive sequences (RS2 and RS3) on opposite sides of mtDNA central conserved region have been described in domestic cat (Felis catus) and some other felid species. However, the presence of repetitive sequence RS3 has not been detected in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) yet. We analyzed mtDNA CR of 35 Eurasian lynx (L. lynx L.) samples to characterize repetitive sequences and to compare them with those found in other felid species. We confirmed the presence of 80 base pairs (bp) repetitive sequence (RS2) at the 5' end of the Eurasian lynx mtDNA CR L strand and for the first time we described RS3 repetitive sequence at its 3' end, consisting of an array of tandem repeats five to ten bp long. We found that felid species share similar RS3 repetitive pattern and fundamental repeat motif TACAC.

  5. Investigation of control region sequences of mtDNA in a Chinese Maonan population.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jing-Hua; Yao, Jun; Xing, Jia-Xin; Xuan, Jin-Feng; Wang, Bao-Jie; Ding, Mei

    2017-05-01

    DNA sequences in the control region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were investigated in 206 unrelated individuals living in Huanjiang Maonan Autonomous County in the People's Republic of China. DNA was extracted from blood-stained filter papers. Hypervariable regions, including HVI and HVII, were amplified and sequenced and sequences aligned and compared with the revised Cambridge sequence (rCRS). One hundred and seventy-two polymorphic sites were identified that defined 170 haplotypes. Of these, 143 were unique and 27 were shared by more than one individual. Genetic diversity was estimated to be 0.9977 (± 0.0008), and the random match probability was 0.71%. The proportions of macro-haplogroups R*, M*, N*, D, U, R0, L3*, and L* were 50.49%, 26.21%, 11.17%, 3.88%, 3.88%, 2.43%, 1.46%, and 0.49%, respectively. Additionally, phylogenetic comparison and principal component analysis (PCA) demonstrated that Chinese Maonans shared a close genetic relationship with the Gelao ethnic community in Laos and China. These results may be useful in future human genetic studies and forensic examinations.

  6. Repeated sequence homogenization between the control and pseudo-control regions in the mitochondrial genomes of the subfamily Aquilinae.

    PubMed

    Cadahía, Luis; Pinsker, Wilhelm; Negro, Juan José; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Urios, Vicente; Haring, Elisabeth

    2009-05-15

    In birds, the noncoding control region (CR) and its flanking genes are the only parts of the mitochondrial (mt) genome that have been modified by intragenomic rearrangements. In raptors, two noncoding regions are present: the CR has shifted to a new position with respect to the "ancestral avian gene order," whereas the pseudo-control region (PsiCR) is located at the original genomic position of the CR. As possible mechanisms for this rearrangement, duplication and transposition have been considered. During characterization of the mt gene order in Bonelli's eagle Hieraaetus fasciatus, we detected intragenomic sequence similarity between the two regions supporting the duplication hypothesis. We performed intra- and intergenomic sequence comparisons in H. fasciatus and other falconiform species to trace the evolution of the noncoding mtDNA regions in Falconiformes. We identified sections displaying different levels of similarity between the CR and PsiCR. On the basis of phylogenetic analyses, we outline an evolutionary scenario of the underlying mutation events involving duplication and homogenization processes followed by sporadic deletions. Apparently, homogenization may easily occur if sufficient sequence similarity between the CR and PsiCR exists. Moreover, homogenization itself allows perpetuation of this continued equalization, unless this process is stopped by deletion. The Pandionidae and the Aquilinae seem to be the only two lineages of Falconiformes where homology between both regionsis still detectable, whereas in other raptors no similarity was found so far. In these two lineages, the process of sequence degeneration may have slowed down by homogenization events retaining high sequence similarity at least in some sections.

  7. Genetic structure of Florida green turtle rookeries as indicated by mitochondrial DNA control region sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shamblin, Brian M.; Bagley, Dean A.; Ehrhart, Llewellyn M.; Desjardin, Nicole A.; Martin, R. Erik; Hart, Kristen M.; Naro-Maciel, Eugenia; Rusenko, Kirt; Stiner, John C.; Sobel, Debra; Johnson, Chris; Wilmers, Thomas; Wright, Laura J.; Nairn, Campbell J.

    2014-01-01

    Green turtle (Chelonia mydas) nesting has increased dramatically in Florida over the past two decades, ranking the Florida nesting aggregation among the largest in the Greater Caribbean region. Individual beaches that comprise several hundred kilometers of Florida’s east coast and Keys support tens to thousands of nests annually. These beaches encompass natural to highly developed habitats, and the degree of demographic partitioning among rookeries was previously unresolved. We characterized the genetic structure of ten Florida rookeries from Cape Canaveral to the Dry Tortugas through analysis of 817 base pair mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences from 485 nesting turtles. Two common haplotypes, CM-A1.1 and CM-A3.1, accounted for 87 % of samples, and the haplotype frequencies were strongly partitioned by latitude along Florida’s Atlantic coast. Most genetic structure occurred between rookeries on either side of an apparent genetic break in the vicinity of the St. Lucie Inlet that separates Hutchinson Island and Jupiter Island, representing the finest scale at which mtDNA structure has been documented in marine turtle rookeries. Florida and Caribbean scale analyses of population structure support recognition of at least two management units: central eastern Florida and southern Florida. More thorough sampling and deeper sequencing are necessary to better characterize connectivity among Florida green turtle rookeries as well as between the Florida nesting aggregation and others in the Greater Caribbean region.

  8. Characterization of mitochondrial control region in Merlucciidae: sequence variation and molecular phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Crous, Marta; Roldán, María I

    2015-06-12

    In order to describe the structure and evolution of Merlucciidae and related Gadiformes mitochondrial control region we analysed 470 bp of 31 taxa belonging to 28 different species. The general structure and conserved sequence blocks observed in Gadiformes mitochondrial control region are similar to those present in other teleost fishes. The length of this segment is variable among related species due to the presence of numerous indels at domain I. Domain II is the most conserved region with a high G content. The GTGGG-box is absent in all Merluccius and seven other Gadidae species. Several methods of phylogenetic analyses has revealed the monophyly of Gadiformes, Gadinae and Merlucciidae. Merlucciidae is most closely related to Gadidae. Within Merlucciidae, American and Euroafrican clades show similar levels of differentiation to those within Gadinae where Trisopterus and Micromesistius are sister taxa. Genetic distance values for Merluccius subspecies pairs are less than half of those between species, comparable to intra specific differentiation levels in marine fish species.

  9. Control region sequences indicate that multiple externae represent multiple infections by Sacculina carcini (Cirripedia: Rhizocephala)

    PubMed Central

    Rees, David; Glenner, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The rhizocephalan barnacle, Sacculina carcini, is a common parasite of the European shore crab, Carcinus maenas, in which it causes significant detrimental physical and behavioral modifications. In the vast majority of cases, the external portion of the parasite is present in the form of a single sac-like externa; in rare cases, double or even triple externae may occur on the same individual host. Here, we use a highly variable DNA marker, the mitochondrial control region (CR), to investigate whether multiple externae in S. carcini represent infection by multiple parasites or asexual cloning developed by a single parasite individual. Sequences for multiple externae from C. maenas hosts from the Danish inlet, Limfjorden, and from the mud flates at Roscoff, France, were compared. In almost all cases, double or triple externae from an individual host yielded different haplotypes. In the few cases where identical haplotypes were identified from externae on a multiple-infected host, this always represented the most commonly found haplotype in the population. This indicates that in Sacculina carcini, the presence of multiple externae on a single host reflects infection by different individual parasites. A haplotype network of CR sequences also suggests a degree of geographical partitioning, with no shared haplotypes between the Limfjorden and Roscoff. Our data represent the first complete CR sequences for a rhizocephalan, and a unique gene order was also revealed. Although the utility of CR sequences for population-level work must be investigated further, the CR has proved a simple to use and highly variable marker for studies of S. carcini and can easily be applied to a variety of studies in this important parasite. PMID:25473481

  10. Haplogroup Classification of Korean Cattle Breeds Based on Sequence Variations of mtDNA Control Region.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Seong-Su; Kim, Seung Chang; Choi, Seong-Bok; Kim, Su-Hyun; Lee, Chang Woo; Jung, Kyoung-Sub; Kim, Eun Sung; Choi, Young-Sun; Kim, Sung-Bok; Kim, Woo Hyun; Cho, Chang-Yeon

    2016-05-01

    Many studies have reported the frequency and distribution of haplogroups among various cattle breeds for verification of their origins and genetic diversity. In this study, 318 complete sequences of the mtDNA control region from four Korean cattle breeds were used for haplogroup classification. 71 polymorphic sites and 66 haplotypes were found in these sequences. Consistent with the genetic patterns in previous reports, four haplogroups (T1, T2, T3, and T4) were identified in Korean cattle breeds. In addition, T1a, T3a, and T3b sub-haplogroups were classified. In the phylogenetic tree, each haplogroup formed an independent cluster. The frequencies of T3, T4, T1 (containing T1a), and T2 were 66%, 16%, 10%, and 8%, respectively. Especially, the T1 haplogroup contained only one haplotype and a sample. All four haplogroups were found in Chikso, Jeju black and Hanwoo. However, only the T3 and T4 haplogroups appeared in Heugu, and most Chikso populations showed a partial of four haplogroups. These results will be useful for stable conservation and efficient management of Korean cattle breeds.

  11. Phylogenetic relationships of Australian and New Zealand feral pigs assessed by mitochondrial control region sequence and nuclear GPIP genotype.

    PubMed

    Gongora, Jaime; Fleming, Peter; Spencer, Peter B S; Mason, Richard; Garkavenko, Olga; Meyer, Johann-Nikolaus; Droegemueller, Cord; Lee, Jun Heon; Moran, Chris

    2004-11-01

    Pigs were introduced into Australia and New Zealand in the 18th and 19th centuries, with some establishing feral populations. With few records of pig introductions into these two countries, molecular phylogenetic analysis was used to assess their origins. Mitochondrial (mt) control region sequence and nuclear glucosephosphate isomerase pseudogene (GPIP) restriction fragments were used, as distinct European and Asian domestic pig and Wild Boar control region clades and GPIP genotypes can be recognised. Feral pig control region sequences clustered with either European or Asian domestic pig sequences and both Asian and European GPIP alleles were segregating. It was not possible to distinguish direct importation of Asian domestic animals into Australia and New Zealand from indirect introgression of Asian domestic sequences via Europe. However, the clustering of three feral control region sequences of pigs from northern Australia with Asian Wild Boar implies unrecorded introduction of Wild Boar or crossbred animals into Australia. However, two of these feral pigs had European GPIP alleles. In combination, analyses of control region and GPIP markers suggest that both European and Asian pigs have contributed in similar frequencies to the origins of Australian feral pigs.

  12. Identifications of captive and wild tilapia species existing in Hawaii by mitochondrial DNA control region sequence.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; Yang, Jinzeng

    2012-01-01

    The tilapia family of the Cichlidae includes many fish species, which live in freshwater and saltwater environments. Several species, such as O. niloticus, O. aureus, and O. mossambicus, are excellent for aquaculture because these fish are easily reproduced and readily adapt to diverse environments. Historically, tilapia species, including O. mossambicus, S. melanotheron, and O. aureus, were introduced to Hawaii many decades ago, and the state of Hawaii uses the import permit policy to prevent O. niloticus from coming into the islands. However, hybrids produced from O. niloticus may already be present in the freshwater and marine environments of the islands. The purpose of this study was to identify tilapia species that exist in Hawaii using mitochondrial DNA analysis. In this study, we analyzed 382 samples collected from 13 farm (captive) and wild tilapia populations in Oahu and the Hawaii Islands. Comparison of intraspecies variation between the mitochondrial DNA control region (mtDNA CR) and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene from five populations indicated that mtDNA CR had higher nucleotide diversity than COI. A phylogenetic tree of all sampled tilapia was generated using mtDNA CR sequences. The neighbor-joining tree analysis identified seven distinctive tilapia species: O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. niloticus, S. melanotheron, O. urolepies, T. redalli, and a hybrid of O. massambicus and O. niloticus. Of all the populations examined, 10 populations consisting of O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. urolepis, and O. niloticus from the farmed sites were relatively pure, whereas three wild populations showed some degree of introgression and hybridization. This DNA-based tilapia species identification is the first report that confirmed tilapia species identities in the wild and captive populations in Hawaii. The DNA sequence comparisons of mtDNA CR appear to be a valid method for tilapia species identification. The suspected tilapia hybrids that consist of O. niloticus

  13. Identifications of Captive and Wild Tilapia Species Existing in Hawaii by Mitochondrial DNA Control Region Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liang; Yang, Jinzeng

    2012-01-01

    Background The tilapia family of the Cichlidae includes many fish species, which live in freshwater and saltwater environments. Several species, such as O. niloticus, O. aureus, and O. mossambicus, are excellent for aquaculture because these fish are easily reproduced and readily adapt to diverse environments. Historically, tilapia species, including O. mossambicus, S. melanotheron, and O. aureus, were introduced to Hawaii many decades ago, and the state of Hawaii uses the import permit policy to prevent O. niloticus from coming into the islands. However, hybrids produced from O. niloticus may already be present in the freshwater and marine environments of the islands. The purpose of this study was to identify tilapia species that exist in Hawaii using mitochondrial DNA analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we analyzed 382 samples collected from 13 farm (captive) and wild tilapia populations in Oahu and the Hawaii Islands. Comparison of intraspecies variation between the mitochondrial DNA control region (mtDNA CR) and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene from five populations indicated that mtDNA CR had higher nucleotide diversity than COI. A phylogenetic tree of all sampled tilapia was generated using mtDNA CR sequences. The neighbor-joining tree analysis identified seven distinctive tilapia species: O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. niloticus, S. melanotheron, O. urolepies, T. redalli, and a hybrid of O. massambicus and O. niloticus. Of all the populations examined, 10 populations consisting of O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. urolepis, and O. niloticus from the farmed sites were relatively pure, whereas three wild populations showed some degree of introgression and hybridization. Conclusions/Significance This DNA-based tilapia species identification is the first report that confirmed tilapia species identities in the wild and captive populations in Hawaii. The DNA sequence comparisons of mtDNA CR appear to be a valid method for tilapia species

  14. An application of control region sequence as a matrilineage marker for Elliot's pheasant of a zoo population.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ping-Ping; Fang, Sheng-Gou; Ding, Ping

    2005-01-01

    Control region sequence, an mtDNA marker, was usually used in phylogenesis analysis in species level or genetic structure study among populations. In this study, enlightened by its character of maternal heredity in vertebrates, we used control region sequence as a matrilineage marker for Elliot's pheasant (Syrmaticus ellioti) of Ningbo Zoo population. In Ningbo Zoo, 36 individuals of Elliot's pheasant were descendants from three female founders introduced in 1988. Three control region haplotypes (Ha, Hb, Hc) were identified by six variable nucleotide positions among the control region sequences over 36 individuals. The number of haplotypes was accorded with the number of female founders. Total 20 individuals (C04, C06, C08-11, C14, C20, C21, C23-29, C32, C34-36) shared haplotype a, while 12 individuals (C01, C05, C07, C12, C13, C16-19, C22, C30, C33) shared haplotype b and 4 individuals (C02, C03, C15, C31) shared haplotype c. Those individuals sharing the same haplotype were offspring from one female founder. In other words, there were three maternal lineages and the simple relationship among individuals was indicated. As a result, it seemed that the control region sequence was a useful marker for identification of matrilineage in this study. Meanwhile, the matrilineage information may be compensatory data if there were no any pedigree records in captive species for breeding management.

  15. Complete mitochondrial control region sequences indicate a distinct variety of brown trout Salmo trutta in the Aral Sea.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, A M; Bright, D; Stevens, J R

    2009-04-01

    Complete sequencing of the mtDNA control region (CR) from five specimens of brown trout Salmo trutta from the Amu Darya River identified two novel haplotypes belonging to the Danubian lineage. This finding supports the long-standing hypothesis that brown trout in the Aral Sea represent a distinct genetic stock and also illustrates the benefits that complete sequencing of the CR can provide for elucidating phylogeographic relationships.

  16. Population genetics of shortnose sturgeon Acipenser brevirostrum based on mitochondrial DNA control region sequences.

    PubMed

    Grunwald, C; Stabile, J; Waldman, J R; Gross, R; Wirgin, I

    2002-10-01

    Shortnose sturgeon is an anadromous North American acipenserid that since 1973 has been designated as federally endangered in US waters. Historically, shortnose sturgeon occurred in as many as 19 rivers from the St. John River, NB, to the St. Johns River, FL, and these populations ranged in census size from 10(1) to 10(4), but little is known of their population structure or levels of gene flow. We used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequence analysis of a 440 bp portion of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region to address these issues and to compare haplotype diversity with population size. Twenty-nine mtDNA nucleotide-substitution haplotypes were revealed among 275 specimens from 11 rivers and estuaries. Additionally, mtDNA length variation (6 haplotypes) and heteroplasmy (2-5 haplotypes for some individuals) were found. Significant genetic differentiation (P < 0.05) of mtDNA nucleotide-substitution haplotypes and length-variant haplotypes was observed among populations from all rivers and estuaries surveyed with the exception of the Delaware River and Chesapeake Bay collections. Significant haplotype differentiation was even observed between samples from two rivers (Kennebec and Androscoggin) within the Kennebec River drainage. The absence of haplotype frequency differences between samples from the Delaware River and Chesapeake Bay reflects a probable current absence of spawning within the Chesapeake Bay system and immigration of fish from the adjoining Delaware River. Haplotypic diversity indices ranged between 0.817 and 0.641; no relationship (P > 0.05) was found between haplotype diversity and census size. Gene flow estimates among populations were often low (< 2.0), but were generally higher at the latitudinal extremes of their distribution. A moderate level of haplotype diversity and a high percentage (37.9%) of haplotypes unique to the northern, once-glaciated region suggests that northern populations survived the Pleistocene in a

  17. Investigation of mtDNA control region sequences in a Tibetan population sample from China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Ke; Yao, Jun; Han, Xuan; Ding, Mei; Pang, Hao; Wang, Bao-Jie; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial hypervariable region sequences including HVI and HVII (15,751-520) were investigated from 174 unrelated Tibetan individuals living in Tibet Autonomous Region in People's Republic of China. The resulted sequences were aligned and compared with revised Cambridge sequence (rCRS). This sequence variability rendered a high gene diversity value (0.9940 ± 0.0021) and a high random match probability (0.0118) was determined with PIC of 0.9882. Among a total of 174 samples, 217 polymorphic sites were identified, which defined 135 haplotypes. A total of 135 different haplotypes were detected, 113 of them were unique and 22 were shared. The most common haplogroup was M9a1a1c1b1 (16.09%), followed by A11 (6.32%), A (5.17%), R (4.60%), A15 (4.60%), and G3a1 (3.45). The proportions of macro-haplogroups M, N, and L were 54.60%, 42.53%, and 2.87%, respectively. By principal component analysis (PCA), there was no special cluster between Tibetans and other populations except that the structure of Tibetans closely resembled that of Uygur in component 2.

  18. Massively parallel sequencing of the entire control region and targeted coding region SNPs of degraded mtDNA using a simplified library preparation method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Young; Lee, Hwan Young; Oh, Se Yoon; Jung, Sang-Eun; Yang, In Seok; Lee, Yang-Han; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-05-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to forensic genetics is being explored by an increasing number of laboratories because of the potential of high-throughput sequencing for recovering genetic information from multiple markers and multiple individuals in a single run. A cumbersome and technically challenging library construction process is required for NGS. In this study, we propose a simplified library preparation method for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis that involves two rounds of PCR amplification. In the first-round of multiplex PCR, six fragments covering the entire mtDNA control region and 22 fragments covering interspersed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the coding region that can be used to determine global haplogroups and East Asian haplogroups were amplified using template-specific primers with read sequences. In the following step, indices and platform-specific sequences for the MiSeq(®) system (Illumina) were added by PCR. The barcoded library produced using this simplified workflow was successfully sequenced on the MiSeq system using the MiSeq Reagent Nano Kit v2. A total of 0.4 GB of sequences, 80.6% with base quality of >Q30, were obtained from 12 degraded DNA samples and mapped to the revised Cambridge Reference Sequence (rCRS). A relatively even read count was obtained for all amplicons, with an average coverage of 5200 × and a less than three-fold read count difference between amplicons per sample. Control region sequences were successfully determined, and all samples were assigned to the relevant haplogroups. In addition, enhanced discrimination was observed by adding coding region SNPs to the control region in in silico analysis. Because the developed multiplex PCR system amplifies small-sized amplicons (<250 bp), NGS analysis using the library preparation method described here allows mtDNA analysis using highly degraded DNA samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial DNA control region of ciscoes (genus Coregonus): taxonomic implications for the Great Lakes species flock.

    PubMed

    Reed, K M; Dorschner, M O; Todd, T N; Phillips, R B

    1998-09-01

    Sequence variation in the control region (D-loop) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was examined to assess the genetic distinctiveness of the shortjaw cisco (Coregonus zenithicus). Individuals from within the Great Lakes Basin as well as inland lakes outside the basin were sampled. DNA fragments containing the entire D-loop were amplified by PCR from specimens of C. zenithicus and the related species C. artedi, C. hoyi, C. kiyi, and C. clupeaformis. DNA sequence analysis revealed high similarity within and among species and shared polymorphism for length variants. Based on this analysis, the shortjaw cisco is not genetically distinct from other cisco species.

  20. DNA sequence variation in the mitochondrial control region of subterranean mole rats, Spalax ehrenbergi superspecies, in Israel.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Aurelio; Nevo, Eviatar; Saccone, Cecilia

    2003-04-01

    The complete mitochondrial control region was sequenced for 60 individuals representing different populations for each of the four species of the subterranean mole rat Spalax ehrenbergi superspecies in Israel: Spalax galili (2n = 52), S. golani (2n = 54), S. carmeli (2n = 58), and S. judaei (2n = 60). The control region of all species and populations is very similar both in length (979 to 983 bp) and in base composition. As in agreement with previous surveys on mitochondrial control regions on mammals, the mole rat control region can be divided into a central domain and two flanking domains, ETAS (extended termination associated sequences) and CSB (conserved sequence blocks). Along with the common conserved blocks found in these domains (ETAS1, ETAS2, CSB1, CSB2, and CSB3), we have also detected in all individuals an ETAS1-like and a CSB1-like element, both in the ETAS domain. The most conserved region was the central domain, followed by the CSB and ETAS domains, showing important differences in the four species analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis supported the existence of two clades. One clade contained individuals belonging to Spalax galili (2n = 52) and S. golani (2n = 54), separated in two different branches depending on the species. The other clade contained individuals belonging to S. carmeli (2n = 58) and S. judaei (2n = 60) mixed together, suggesting a more recent event of speciation. Within species we have observed a southward trend of increasing variability. These results have been explained as a consequence of the adaptation of the species to ecological factors such as aridity and temperature stresses.

  1. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the tubeworm Lamellibrachia satsuma and structural conservation in the mitochondrial genome control regions of Order Sabellida.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ajit Kumar; Kwon, Yong Min; Kang, Sung Gyun; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Kim, Sang-Jin

    2016-04-01

    The control region of the mitochondrial genomes shows high variation in conserved sequence organizations, which follow distinct evolutionary patterns in different species or taxa. In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Lamellibrachia satsuma from the cold-seep region of Kagoshima Bay, as a part of whole genome study and extensively studied the structural features and patterns of the control region sequences. We obtained 15,037 bp of mitochondrial genome using Illumina sequencing and identified the non-coding AT-rich region or control region (354 bp, AT=83.9%) located between trnH and trnR. We found 7 conserved sequence blocks (CSB), scattered throughout the control region of L. satsuma and other taxa of Annelida. The poly-TA stretches, which commonly form the stem of multiple stem-loop structures, are most conserved in the CSB-I and CSB-II regions. The mitochondrial genome of L. satsuma encodes a unique repetitive sequence in the control region, which forms a unique secondary structure in comparison to Lamellibrachia luymesi. Phylogenetic analyses of all protein-coding genes indicate that L. satsuma forms a monophyletic clade with L. luymesi along with other tubeworms found in cold-seep regions (genera: Lamellibrachia, Escarpia, and Seepiophila). In general, the control region sequences of Annelida could be aligned with certainty within each genus, and to some extent within the family, but with a higher rate of variation in conserved regions.

  2. Sequencing Complex Genomic Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, Evan

    2009-05-28

    Evan Eichler, Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at the University of Washington, gives the May 28, 2009 keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM. Part 1 of 2

  3. Sequencing Complex Genomic Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, Evan

    2009-05-28

    Evan Eichler, Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at the University of Washington, gives the May 28, 2009 keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM. Part 2 of 2

  4. Complete genomic sequence of a new Human polyomavirus 9 strain with an altered noncoding control region.

    PubMed

    Lednicky, John A; Butel, Janet S; Luetke, Maya C; Loeb, Julia C

    2014-12-01

    A complete Human polyomavirus 9 (HPyV9) genome, designated HPyV9 UF-1, was amplified by rolling circle DNA amplification from DNA extracted from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of an AIDS patient. The noncoding control (enhancer/promoter) region (NCCR) of HPyV9 UF-1 has one less AML-1a binding site and three more potential Sp1/GC box binding sites than the NCCRs of two previously described HPyV9 genomes. Nucleotide polymorphisms within the coding regions result in two amino acid differences in the deduced VP2 and VP3 proteins of HPyV9 UF-1 relative to those of the two previously described HPyV9 genomes. Exhaustive attempts to detect HPyV9 in DNA samples extracted from the PBMC of 40 healthy humans and 9 other AIDS patients were unsuccessful, highlighting the need for improved search strategies and optimal specimens for the detection of HPyV9 in humans.

  5. Population structure of the salamander Hynobius retardatus inferred from a partial sequence of the mitochondrial DNA control region.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Noriko; Hangui, Jun-ichi; Wakahara, Masami; Michimae, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    We investigated population structure of the salamander Hynobius retardatus in Hokkaido, Japan using partial sequences of the mitochondrial DNA control region (490 bp) from 105 individuals. The salamanders were collected from 28 localities representing the entire regional distribution of this species. Twenty different haplotypes distributed across three haplotype groups were identified. Group 1 was widely distributed in central, northern, and eastern Hokkaido, except Erimo; Groups 2 and 3 appeared exclusively in Erimo and southern Hokkaido, respectively. The genetic distance between the three groups was not very large, but the distributions of the groups never overlapped spatially, indicating a hierarchical population structure comprising three regional groups, which was also supported by analysis of molecular variance. The results suggest that the present population structure is affected by current genetic barriers, as well as by historical transitions of climate and landscape.

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Mormon cricket (Anabrus simplex: Tettigoniidae: Orthoptera) and an analysis of control region variability.

    PubMed

    Fenn, J D; Cameron, S L; Whiting, M F

    2007-04-01

    The Anabrus simplex is a swarming plague orthopteran found in western North America. The genome is 15 766 bp in length and genome organization follows the ancestral insect gene arrangement. atp6 lacked any readily identifiable stop codon. Examination of mRNA secondary structure for this gene suggested a stem/loop-mediated mRNA post-transcriptional processing to liberate a mature atp6 mRNA with a complete stop codon produced by polyadenylation. Comparison of similar protein with protein gene boundaries in other insect species reveal a general mechanism for mRNA excision and provide further supporting evidence for post-transcriptional mRNA processing in mitochondrial genomes. The A + T-rich region, or control region, was sequenced for 55 A. simplex individuals from 12 different populations. Variance studies between these individuals show that the A + T-rich region contains significant phylogenetic signal to be used in population studies.

  7. East Asian mtDNA haplogroup determination in Koreans: haplogroup-level coding region SNP analysis and subhaplogroup-level control region sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwan Young; Yoo, Ji-Eun; Park, Myung Jin; Chung, Ukhee; Kim, Chong-Youl; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2006-11-01

    The present study analyzed 21 coding region SNP markers and one deletion motif for the determination of East Asian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups by designing three multiplex systems which apply single base extension methods. Using two multiplex systems, all 593 Korean mtDNAs were allocated into 15 haplogroups: M, D, D4, D5, G, M7, M8, M9, M10, M11, R, R9, B, A, and N9. As the D4 haplotypes occurred most frequently in Koreans, the third multiplex system was used to further define D4 subhaplogroups: D4a, D4b, D4e, D4g, D4h, and D4j. This method allowed the complementation of coding region information with control region mutation motifs and the resultant findings also suggest reliable control region mutation motifs for the assignment of East Asian mtDNA haplogroups. These three multiplex systems produce good results in degraded samples as they contain small PCR products (101-154 bp) for single base extension reactions. SNP scoring was performed in 101 old skeletal remains using these three systems to prove their utility in degraded samples. The sequence analysis of mtDNA control region with high incidence of haplogroup-specific mutations and the selective scoring of highly informative coding region SNPs using the three multiplex systems are useful tools for most applications involving East Asian mtDNA haplogroup determination and haplogroup-directed stringent quality control.

  8. Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial DNA control region of ciscoes (genus Coregonus): Taxonomic implications for the Great Lakes species flock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Kent M.; Dorschner, Michael O.; Todd, Thomas N.; Phillips, Ruth B.

    1998-01-01

    Sequence variation in the control region (D-loop) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was examined to assess the genetic distinctiveness of the shortjaw cisco (Coregonus zenithicus). Individuals from within the Great Lakes Basin as well as inland lakes outside the basin were sampled. DNA fragments containing the entire D-loop were amplified by PCR from specimens ofC. zenithicus and the related species C. artedi, C. hoyi, C. kiyi, and C. clupeaformis. DNA sequence analysis revealed high similarity within and among species and shared polymorphism for length variants. Based on this analysis, the shortjaw cisco is not genetically distinct from other cisco species.

  9. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequence of the sea-firefly, Vargula hilgendorfii (Crustacea, Ostracoda) with duplicate control regions.

    PubMed

    Ogoh, Katsunori; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro

    2004-02-18

    The primary structure of the mitochondrial genome of the bioluminescent crustacean, Vargula hilgendorfii, the sea-firefly (Arthropoda, Crustacea, Ostracoda), has sequenced using the transposon Tn5. The genome (15,923 bp) contains the same 37 genes (two ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs, and 13 protein-coding genes) found in other Arthropoda. Interestingly, duplicate control regions (fragments of 778 and 855 bp) and triplicate short repeat sequences (fragments of 49 bp) occur. The AT composition of the protein-coding genes is lower than the published complete mitochondrial genomes within the Arthropoda. For gene arrangement, 13 transfer RNA genes and two protein-coding genes have moved and inserted directly or inversely relative to the typical Arthropoda order.

  10. Interpretation guidelines of mtDNA control region sequence electropherograms in forensic genetics.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Manuel Crespillo

    2012-01-01

    Forensic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis is a complementary technique to forensic nuclear DNA (nDNA) and trace evidence analysis. Its use has been accepted by the vast majority of courts of law around the world. However for the forensic community it is crucial to employ standardized methods and procedures to guaranty the quality of the results obtained in court. In this chapter, we describe the most important aspects regarding the interpretation and assessment of mtDNA analysis, and offer a simple guide which places particular emphasis on those aspects that can impact the final interpretation of the results. These include the criteria for authenticating a sequence excluding the contaminant origin, defining the quality of a sequence, editing procedure, alignment criteria for searching the databases, and the statistical evaluation of matches. It is not easy to establish a single guide to interpretation for mtDNA analysis; however, it is important to understand all variables that may in some way affect the final conclusion in the context of a forensic case. As a general rule, laboratories should be cautious before issuing the final conclusion of an mtDNA analysis, and consider any significant limitations regarding current understanding of specific aspects of the mtDNA molecule.

  11. Minding the gap: Frequency of indels in mtDNA control region sequence data and influence on population genetic analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearce, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Insertions and deletions (indels) result in sequences of various lengths when homologous gene regions are compared among individuals or species. Although indels are typically phylogenetically informative, occurrence and incorporation of these characters as gaps in intraspecific population genetic data sets are rarely discussed. Moreover, the impact of gaps on estimates of fixation indices, such as FST, has not been reviewed. Here, I summarize the occurrence and population genetic signal of indels among 60 published studies that involved alignments of multiple sequences from the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of vertebrate taxa. Among 30 studies observing indels, an average of 12% of both variable and parsimony-informative sites were composed of these sites. There was no consistent trend between levels of population differentiation and the number of gap characters in a data block. Across all studies, the average influence on estimates of ??ST was small, explaining only an additional 1.8% of among population variance (range 0.0-8.0%). Studies most likely to observe an increase in ??ST with the inclusion of gap characters were those with < 20 variable sites, but a near equal number of studies with few variable sites did not show an increase. In contrast to studies at interspecific levels, the influence of indels for intraspecific population genetic analyses of control region DNA appears small, dependent upon total number of variable sites in the data block, and related to species-specific characteristics and the spatial distribution of mtDNA lineages that contain indels. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Genetic identification of istiophorid larvae from the Gulf of Mexico based on the analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region sequences.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, J L; Alvarado Bremer, J R

    2017-03-01

    Assigning relative importance of spawning and nursery habitats for threatened and endangered teleosts, such as those seen in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM), relies on the proper identification of the early life-history stages of the species of concern. Here, sequencing a portion of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (CR) I as barcodes is recommended to identify istiophorid (billfish) larvae in the Atlantic Ocean because of its high resolution and the intrinsic value of the levels of genetic variation that can be extracted from these data. The universality of the primers employed here demonstrates their utility for not only the positive identification of istiophorids in the GoM, but for any larval teleost occurring in areas recognized as larval hotspots worldwide. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  13. [Genetic variation of Manchurian pheasant (Phasianus colchicus pallasi Rotshild, 1903) inferred from mitochondrial DNA control region sequences].

    PubMed

    Kozyrenko, M M; Fisenko, P V; Zhuravlev, Iu N

    2009-04-01

    Sequence variation of the mitochondrial DNA control region was studied in Manchurian pheasants (Phasianus colchicus pallasi Rotshild, 1903) representing three geographic populations from the southern part of the Russian Far East. Extremely low population genetic differentiation (F(ST) = 0.0003) pointed to a very high gene exchange between the populations. Combination of such characters as high haplotype diversity (0.884 to 0.913), low nucleotide diversity (0.0016 to 0.0022), low R2 values (0.1235 to 0.1337), certain patterns of pairwise-difference distributions, and the absence of phylogenetic structure suggested that the phylogenetic history of Ph. C. pallasi included passing through a bottleneck with further expansion in the postglacial period. According to the data obtained, it was suggested that differentiation between the mitochondrial lineages started approximately 100 000 years ago.

  14. Seven complete mitochondrial genome sequences of bushtits (Passeriformes, Aegithalidae, Aegithalos): the evolution pattern in duplicated control regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyang; Huang, Yuan; Liu, Nian; Yang, Jing; Lei, Fumin

    2015-06-01

    The control region (CR) of the mitochondrial DNA exhibits important functions in replication and transcription, and duplications of the CR have been reported in a wide range of animal groups. In most cases, concerted evolution is expected to explain the high similarity of duplicated CRs. In this paper, we present seven complete mitochondrial genome sequences from the bushtits (genus Aegithalos), in which we discovered two duplicated CRs, and try to survey the evolution pattern of these duplicated CRs. We also found that the duplicated CRs within one individual were almost identical, and variations were concentrated in two sections, one located between a poly-C site and a potential TAS (termination associated sequence) element, the other one located at the 3' end of the duplicated CRs. The phylogenetic analyses of paralogous CRs showed that the tree topology were depending on whether the two high variable regions at the upstream of TAS element and the 3'end of duplicated CRs: when they were concluded, the orthologous copies were closely related; when they were excluded, the paralogous copies in the same lineages were closely related. This may suggest the role of recombination in the evolution of duplicated CRs. Consequently, the recombination was detected, and the breakpoints were found at ∼120 bp (the upstream of the potential TAS element) and ∼1150 bp of the alignment of duplicated CRs. According to these results, we supposed that homologous recombination occurred between paralogous CRs from different mtDNA molecule was proposed as the most suitable mechanism for concerted evolution of the duplicated CRs, and the recombination took place in every replication cycle, so that most part of the duplicated regions remain identical within an individual, while the 5' and 3'end of the duplicated CRs were not involved in recombination, and evolved independently.

  15. Constraining controls on carbonate sequences with high-resolution chronostratigraphy: Upper Miocene, Cabo de Gata region, SE Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, P.; Farr, M.R.; Franseen, E.K.; Goldstein, R.H.

    2001-01-01

    A high-resolution chronostratigraphy has been developed for Miocene shallow-water carbonate strata in the Cabo de Gata region of SE Spain for evaluation of local, regional and global factors that controlled platform architecture prior to and during the Messinian salinity crisis. Paleomagnetic data were collected from strata at three localities. Mean natural remanent magnetization (NRM) ranges between 1.53 ?? 10-8 and 5.2 ?? 10-3 Am2/kg. Incremental thermal and alternating field demagnetization isolated the characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM). Rock magnetic studies show that the dominant magnetic mineral is magnetite, but mixtures of magnetite and hematite occur. A composite chronostratigraphy was derived from five stratigraphic sections. Regional stratigraphic data, biostratigraphic data, and an 40Ar/39Ar date of 8.5 ?? 0.1 Ma, for an interbedded volcanic flow, place the strata in geomagnetic polarity Chrons C4r to C3r. Sequence-stratigraphic and diagenetic evidence indicate a major unconformity at the base of depositional sequence (DS)3 that contains a prograding reef complex, suggesting that approximately 250 000 yr of record (Subchrons C3Br.2r to 3Br.1r) are missing near the Messinian-Tortonian boundary. Correlation to the GPTS shows that the studied strata represent five third- to fourth-order DSs. Basal units are temperate to subtropical ramps (DS1A, DS1B, DS2); these are overlain by subtropical to tropical reefal platforms (DS3), which are capped by subtropical to tropical cyclic carbonates (Terminal Carbonate Complex, TCC). Correlation of the Cabo de Gata record to the Melilla area of Morocco, and the Sorbas basin of Spain indicate that early - Late Tortonian ramp strata from these areas are partially time-equivalent. Similar strata are extensively developed in the Western Mediterranean and likely were influenced by a cool climate or influx of nutrients during an overall rise in global sea-level. After ramp deposition, a sequence boundary (SB3) in

  16. Genetic variation and evolutionary demography of Fenneropenaeus chinensis populations, as revealed by the analysis of mitochondrial control region sequences

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Genetic variation and evolutionary demography of the shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis were investigated using sequence data of the complete mitochondrial control region (CR). Fragments of 993 bp of the CR were sequenced for 93 individuals from five localities over most of the species' range in the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea. There were 84 variable sites defining 68 haplotypes. Haplotype diversity levels were very high (0.95 ± 0.03-0.99 ± 0.02) in F. chinensis populations, whereas those of nucleotide diversity were moderate to low (0.66 ± 0.36%-0.84 ± 0.46%). Analysis of molecular variance and conventional population statistics (FST ) revealed no significant genetic structure throughout the range of F. chinensis. Mismatch distribution, estimates of population parameters and neutrality tests revealed that the significant fluctuations and shallow coalescence of mtDNA genealogies observed were coincident with estimated demographic parameters and neutrality tests, in implying important past-population size fluctuations or range expansion. Isolation with Migration (IM) coalescence results suggest that F. chinensis, distributed along the coasts of northern China and the Korean Peninsula (about 1000 km apart), diverged recently, the estimated time-split being 12,800 (7,400-18,600) years ago. PMID:21637498

  17. The Phylogeographical Pattern and Conservation of the Chinese Cobra (Naja atra) across Its Range Based on Mitochondrial Control Region Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Long-Hui; Hua, Lei; Qu, Yan-Fu; Gao, Jian-Fang; Ji, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The vulnerable Chinese cobra (Naja atra) ranges from southeastern China south of the Yangtze River to northern Vietnam and Laos. Large mountain ranges and water bodies may influence the pattern of genetic diversity of this species. We sequenced the mitochondrial DNA control region (1029 bp) using 285 individuals collected from 23 localities across the species' range and obtained 18 sequences unique to Taiwan from GenBank for phylogenetic and population analysis. Two distinct clades were identified, one including haplotypes from the two westernmost localities (Hekou and Miyi) and the other including haplotypes from all sampling sites except Miyi. A strong population structure was found (Φst = 0.76, P<0.0001) with high haplotype diversity (h = 1.00) and low nucleotide diversity (π = 0.0049). The Luoxiao and Nanling Mountains act as historical geographical barriers limiting gene exchange. In the haplotype network there were two “star” clusters. Haplotypes from populations east of the Luoxiao Mountains were represented within one cluster and haplotypes from populations west of the mountain range within the other, with haplotypes from populations south of the Nanling Mountains in between. Lineage sorting between mainland and island populations is incomplete. It remains unknown as to how much adaptive differentiation there is between population groups or within each group. We caution against long-distance transfers within any group, especially when environmental differences are apparent. PMID:25184236

  18. Comparative phylogeography between the ermine Mustela erminea and the least weasel M. nivalis of Palaearctic and Nearctic regions, based on analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region sequences.

    PubMed

    Kurose, Naoko; Abramov, Alexei V; Masuda, Ryuichi

    2005-10-01

    Phylogeography of the ermine Mustela erminea and the least weasel M. nivalis from Palaearctic and Nearctic regions were investigated based on mitochondrial DNA control region sequences. Mustela erminea exhibited a very low level of genetic variation, and geographic structures among populations were unclear. This may indicate that M. erminea recently reoccupied a wide territory in Eurasia following the last glacial retreat. In comparison with M. erminea, genetic variations within and among populations of M. nivalis were much greater. Molecular phylogenetic relationships showed that two lineages of M. nivalis occurred in the Holarctic region: one spread from the Eurasian region to North America, and the other occurred in south-eastern Europe, the Caucasus and Central Asia. The results suggest either mitochondrial DNA introgression among populations of south-eastern Europe, the Caucasus and Central Asia, or ancestral polymorphisms remaining in those populations. Contrastive phylogeographic patterns between the two mustelid species could reflect differences of their migration histories in Eurasia after the last glacial age.

  19. Genetic relationships among some subspecies of the Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus L.), inferred from mitochondrial DNA control-region sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Clayton M.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Sage, George K.; Anderson, Clifford; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to successfully colonize and persist in diverse environments likely requires broad morphological and behavioral plasticity and adaptability, and this may partly explain why the Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) exhibits a large range of morphological characteristics across their global distribution. Regional and local differences within Peregrine Falcons were sufficiently variable that ∼75 subspecies have been described; many were subsumed, and currently 19 are generally recognized. We used sequence information from the control region of the mitochondrial genome to test for concordance between genetic structure and representatives of 12 current subspecies and from two areas where subspecies distributions overlap. Haplotypes were broadly shared among subspecies, and all geographic locales shared a widely distributed common haplotype (FalconCR2). Haplotypes were distributed in a star-like phylogeny, consistent with rapid expansion of a recently derived species, with observed genetic patterns congruent with incomplete lineage sorting and/or differential rates of evolution on morphology and neutral genetic characters. Hierarchical analyses of molecular variance did not uncover genetic partitioning at the continental level, despite strong population-level structure (FST = 0.228). Similar analyses found weak partitioning, albeit significant, among subspecies (FCT = 0.138). All reconstructions placed the hierofalcons' (Gyrfalcon [F. rusticolus] and Saker Falcon [F. cherrug]) haplotypes in a well-supported clade either basal or unresolved with respect to the Peregrine Falcon. In addition, haplotypes representing Taita Falcon (F. fasciinucha) were placed within the Peregrine Falcon clade.

  20. Inferring Invasion History of Red Swamp Crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) in China from Mitochondrial Control Region and Nuclear Intron Sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhe; Guo, Xianwu; Chen, Liping; Bai, Xiaohui; Wei, Xinlan; Zhou, Xiaoyun; Huang, Songqian; Wang, Weimin

    2015-06-29

    Identifying the dispersal pathways of an invasive species is useful for adopting the appropriate strategies to prevent and control its spread. However, these processes are exceedingly complex. So, it is necessary to apply new technology and collect representative samples for analysis. This study used Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) in combination with traditional genetic tools to examine extensive sample data and historical records to infer the invasion history of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, in China. The sequences of the mitochondrial control region and the proPOx intron in the nuclear genome of samples from 37 sites (35 in China and one each in Japan and the USA) were analyzed. The results of combined scenarios testing and historical records revealed a much more complex invasion history in China than previously believed. P. clarkii was most likely originally introduced into China from Japan from an unsampled source, and the species then expanded its range primarily into the middle and lower reaches and, to a lesser extent, into the upper reaches of the Changjiang River in China. No transfer was observed from the upper reaches to the middle and lower reaches of the Changjiang River. Human-mediated jump dispersal was an important dispersal pathway for P. clarkii. The results provide a better understanding of the evolutionary scenarios involved in the rapid invasion of P. clarkii in China.

  1. Inferring Invasion History of Red Swamp Crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) in China from Mitochondrial Control Region and Nuclear Intron Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhe; Guo, Xianwu; Chen, Liping; Bai, Xiaohui; Wei, Xinlan; Zhou, Xiaoyun; Huang, Songqian; Wang, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the dispersal pathways of an invasive species is useful for adopting the appropriate strategies to prevent and control its spread. However, these processes are exceedingly complex. So, it is necessary to apply new technology and collect representative samples for analysis. This study used Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) in combination with traditional genetic tools to examine extensive sample data and historical records to infer the invasion history of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, in China. The sequences of the mitochondrial control region and the proPOx intron in the nuclear genome of samples from 37 sites (35 in China and one each in Japan and the USA) were analyzed. The results of combined scenarios testing and historical records revealed a much more complex invasion history in China than previously believed. P. clarkii was most likely originally introduced into China from Japan from an unsampled source, and the species then expanded its range primarily into the middle and lower reaches and, to a lesser extent, into the upper reaches of the Changjiang River in China. No transfer was observed from the upper reaches to the middle and lower reaches of the Changjiang River. Human-mediated jump dispersal was an important dispersal pathway for P. clarkii. The results provide a better understanding of the evolutionary scenarios involved in the rapid invasion of P. clarkii in China. PMID:26132567

  2. Sequence-controlled polymers.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Jean-François; Ouchi, Makoto; Liu, David R; Sawamoto, Mitsuo

    2013-08-09

    Sequence-controlled polymers are macromolecules in which monomer units of different chemical nature are arranged in an ordered fashion. The most prominent examples are biological and have been studied and used primarily by molecular biologists and biochemists. However, recent progress in protein- and DNA-based nanotechnologies has shown the relevance of sequence-controlled polymers to nonbiological applications, including data storage, nanoelectronics, and catalysis. In addition, synthetic polymer chemistry has provided interesting routes for preparing nonnatural sequence-controlled polymers. Although these synthetic macromolecules do not yet compare in functional scope with their natural counterparts, they open up opportunities for controlling the structure, self-assembly, and macroscopic properties of polymer materials.

  3. Archetypal and rearranged sequences of human polyomavirus JC transcription control region in peripheral blood leukocytes and in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Ciappi, S; Azzi, A; De Santis, R; Leoncini, F; Sterrantino, G; Mazzotta, F; Mecocci, L

    1999-04-01

    Two forms of human polyomavirus JC (JCV) genome are known based upon the structure of the transcriptional control region (TCR) of the virus: the archetypal form, which is commonly detected in urine, and the rearranged form, which was first detected in brain tissue from progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) patients. The latter actually includes a group of TCR variants that, relative to the former, are characterized by various deletions and/or duplications. The aim of this study was to establish whether or not a correlation exists among the TCR type, the spreading of the virus within the host and its ability to cause PML. JCV TCR sequences from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from various groups of patients were compared. JCV with archetypal TCR was detected in CSF and PBL specimens from patients without neurological disorders or who eventually received a diagnosis of a non-PML neurological disorder. Rearranged TCR sequences were detected in all the CSF and PBL specimens from PML patients. The high similarity observed between the TCR structure detected in PBL and CSF specimens from individual patients could strengthen the hypothesis that PBL has a role in spreading JCV to the brain. Moreover, heterogeneous TCR patterns have been shown in individual PBL specimens from PML patients. This supports the hypothesis that, in PBL, JCV may replicate and undergo rearrangements of the TCR. The detection of JCV DNA by PCR in CSF independently from PML, although rare, could suggest that this assay is not sufficient for a virological diagnosis of PML. Further studies are required to assess the usefulness of quantitative assays or TCR typing in combination with PCR for diagnostic purposes.

  4. Dynamics and phylogenetic implications of MtDNA control region sequences in New World Jays (Aves: Corvidae).

    PubMed

    Saunders, M A; Edwards, S V

    2000-08-01

    To study the evolution of mtDNA and the intergeneric relationships of New World Jays (Aves: Corvidae), we sequenced the entire mitochondrial DNA control region (CR) from 21 species representing all genera of New World jays, an Old World jay, crows, and a magpie. Using maximum likelihood methods, we found that both the transition/transversion ratio (kappa) and among site rate variation (alpha) were higher in flanking domains I and II than in the conserved central domain and that the frequency of indels was highest in domain II. Estimates of kappa and alpha were much more influenced by the density of taxon sampling than by alternative optimal tree topologies. We implemented a successive approximation method incorporating these parameters into phylogenetic analysis. In addition we compared our study in detail to a previous study using cytochrome b and morphology to examine the effect of taxon sampling, evolutionary rates of genes, and combined data on tree resolution. We found that the particular weighting scheme used had no effect on tree topology and little effect on tree robustness. Taxon sampling had a significant effect on tree robustness but little effect on the topology of the best tree. The CR data set differed nonsignificantly from the tree derived from the cytochrome b/morphological data set primarily in the placement of the genus Gymnorhinus, which is near the base of the CR tree. However, contrary to conventional taxonomy, the CR data set suggested that blue and black jays (Cyanocorax sensu lato) might be paraphyletic and that the brown jay Psilorhinus (=Cyanocorax) morio is the sister group to magpie jays (Calocitta), a phylogenetic hypothesis that is likely as parsimonious with regard to nonmolecular characters as monophyly of Cyanocorax. The CR tree also suggests that the common ancestor of NWJs was likely a cooperative breeder. Consistent with recent systematic theory, our data suggest that DNA sequences with high substitution rates such as the CR may

  5. Inferring the phylogeny of disjunct populations of the azure-winged magpie Cyanopica cyanus from mitochondrial control region sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Fok, Koon Wah; Wade, Christopher M; Parkin, David T

    2002-01-01

    The azure-winged magpie (AWM), Cyanopica cyanus, is found in Asia and Iberia. This remarkable disjunct distribution has been variously explained by either the sixteenth-century introduction of birds into Iberia from the Far East, or by the loss of individuals from the central part of their range as a result of Pleistocene glaciations. We have used the mitochondrial control region to undertake a molecular phylogenetic analysis of the AWM, with sequences examined from individuals collected from across the current distribution range and incorporating representatives of all currently defined subspecies. The Western birds are genetically distinct from their Asian congeners and their divergence is basal in the phylogenetic tree. This indicates that the AWM is native to Iberia and not the result of a recent introduction from Asia. In Asia, two major mitochondrial DNA lineages were identified. These correspond to an Inland Asia group and a Pacific Seaboard group, and are separated topographically by the Da Hingan Ling mountains and the Yellow Sea. Molecular clock estimates suggest that these divergences are associated with Pleistocene glaciations. Furthermore, our data do not support the current classification of the AWM into 10 subspecies, as defined based on morphology and geographical distribution. PMID:12204127

  6. Sequence comparison in the crossover region of an oncogenic avian retrovirus recombinant and its nononcogenic parent: Genetic regions that control growth rate and oncogenic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Tsichlis, P.N.; Donehower, L.; Hager, G.; Zeller, N.; Malavarca, R.; Astrin, S.; Skalka, A.M.

    1982-11-01

    NTRE is an avian retrovirus recombinant of the endogeneous nononcogenic Rous-associated virus-0 (RAV-0) and the oncogenic, exogeneous, transformation-defective (td) Prague strain of Rous sarcoma virus B (td-PrRSV-B). Oligonucleotide mapping had shown that the recombinant virus is indistinguishable from its RAV-0 parent except for the 3'-end sequences, which were derived from td-PrRSV-B. However, the virus exhibits properties which are typical of an exogenous virus: it grows to high titers in tissue culture, and it is oncogenic in vivo. To accurately define the genetic region responsible for these properties, the authors determined the nucleotide sequences of the recombinant and its RAV-0 parent by using molecular clones of their DNA. These were compared with sequences already available for PrRSV-C, a virus closely related to the exogenous parent td-PrRSV-B. The results suggested that the crossover event which generated NTRE 7 took place in a region -501 to -401 nucleotides from the 3' end of the td-PrRSV parental genome and that sequences to the right of the recombination region were responsible for its growth properties and oncogenic potential. Since the exogenous-virus-specific sequences are expected to be missing from transformation-defective mutants of the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of RSV, which, like other exogeneous viruses, grow to high tiers in tissue culture and are oncogenic in vivo, the authors concluded that the growth properties and oncogenic potential of the exogeneous viruses are determined by sequences in the U3 region of the long terminal repeat. However, the authors propose that the exogeneous-virus-specific region may play a role in determining the oncogenic spectrum of a given oncogenic virus.

  7. Genetic diversity of the captive Asian tapir population in Thailand, based on mitochondrial control region sequence data and the comparison of its nucleotide structure with Brazilian tapir.

    PubMed

    Muangkram, Yuttamol; Amano, Akira; Wajjwalku, Worawidh; Pinyopummintr, Tanu; Thongtip, Nikorn; Kaolim, Nongnid; Sukmak, Manakorn; Kamolnorranath, Sumate; Siriaroonrat, Boripat; Tipkantha, Wanlaya; Maikaew, Umaporn; Thomas, Warisara; Polsrila, Kanda; Dongsaard, Kwanreaun; Sanannu, Saowaphang; Wattananorrasate, Anuwat

    2016-03-02

    The Asian tapir (Tapirus indicus) has been classified as Endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (2008). Genetic diversity data provide important information for the management of captive breeding and conservation of this species. We analyzed mitochondrial control region (CR) sequences from 37 captive Asian tapirs in Thailand. Multiple alignments of the full-length CR sequences sized 1268 bp comprised three domains as described in other mammal species. Analysis of 16 parsimony-informative variable sites revealed 11 haplotypes. Furthermore, the phylogenetic analysis using median-joining network clearly showed three clades correlated with our earlier cytochrome b gene study in this endangered species. The repetitive motif is located between first and second conserved sequence blocks, similar to the Brazilian tapir. The highest polymorphic site was located in the extended termination associated sequences domain. The results could be applied for future genetic management based in captivity and wild that shows stable populations.

  8. Application of 16S rRNA, cytochrome b and control region sequences for understanding the phylogenetic relationships in Oryx species.

    PubMed

    Khan, H A; Arif, I A; Al Homaidan, A A; Al Farhan, A H

    2008-12-16

    The present study reports the application of mitochondrial markers for the molecular phylogeny of Oryx species, including the Arabian oryx (AO), scimitar-horned oryx (SHO) and plains oryx (PO), using the Addax as an outgroup. Sequences of three molecular markers, 16S rRNA, cytochrome b and a control region, for the above four taxa were aligned and the topologies of respective phylogenetic trees were compared. All these markers clearly differentiated the genus Addax from Oryx. However, for species-level grouping, while 16S rRNA and cytochrome b produced similar phylogeny (SHO grouped with PO), the control region grouped SHO with AO. Further studies are warranted to generate more sequencing data, apply multiple bioinformatics tools and to include relevant nuclear markers for phylogenetic analysis of Oryx species.

  9. Molecular phylogeny for marine turtles based on sequences of the ND4-leucine tRNA and control regions of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Dutton, P H; Davis, S K; Guerra, T; Owens, D

    1996-06-01

    Marine turtles are divided into two families, the Dermochelyidae and the Cheloniidae. The majority of species are currently placed within the two tribes of the Cheloniidae, the Chelonini and the Carettini, but debate continues over generic and tribal affinities as well as species boundaries. We used nucleotide sequences (907 bp) from the ND4-LEU tRNA region and the control region (526 bp) of mitochondrial DNA to resolve areas of uncertainty in marine turtle (Chelonioidae) systematics. The ND4-LEU tRNA fragment was more conserved than the fragment from the control region, with sequence divergences ranging from 0.026 to 0.148 and 0.067 to 0.267, respectively. Parsimony analysis based only on the ND4-LEU tRNA data suggests that the hawksbill, Eretmochelys imbricata, lies within the tribe Carettni and is closely related to the genus Caretta, but could not resolve the position of the flatback, Natator depressus. A similar analysis based only on the control region sequence data suggested that N. depressus is affiliated with the Chelonini, but failed to resolve the position of E. imbricata and the loggerhead, Caretta caretta. In contrast to these results, the combination of both data sets with published cytochrome b data produced a phylogeny based on 1924 bp of sequence data which resolves the position of E. imbricata relative to Caretta and Lepidochelys and joins N. depressus as sister to the Carettini. Based on the molecular data, the Chelonini contains the Chelonia species, while the Carettini contains the remaining species of Cheloniidae. The control region sequence divergence between Pacific and Atlantic populations of the leatherback, Dermochelys coriacea, was relatively low (0.0081) when compared with the green turtle, Chelonia mydas (0.071-0.074). Atlantic and Pacific populations of Ch. mydas were found to be paraphyletic with respect to the black turtle, Ch. agassizi, suggesting that the current taxonomic designations within the Pacific Chelonia are questionable

  10. Evidence that the large noncoding sequence is the main control region of maternally and paternally transmitted mitochondrial genomes of the marine mussel (Mytilus spp.).

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Liqin; Kenchington, Ellen; Zouros, Eleftherios; Rodakis, George C

    2004-01-01

    Both the maternal (F-type) and paternal (M-type) mitochondrial genomes of the Mytilus species complex M. edulis/galloprovincialis contain a noncoding sequence between the l-rRNA and the tRNA(Tyr) genes, here called the large unassigned region (LUR). The LUR, which is shorter in M genomes, is capable of forming secondary structures and contains motifs of significant sequence similarity with elements known to have specific functions in the sea urchin and the mammalian control region. Such features are not present in other noncoding regions of the F or M Mytilus mtDNA. The LUR can be divided on the basis of indels and nucleotide variation in three domains, which is reminiscent of the tripartite structure of the mammalian control region. These features suggest that the LUR is the main control region of the Mytilus mitochondrial genome. The middle domain has diverged by only 1.5% between F and M genomes, while the average divergence over the whole molecule is approximately 20%. In contrast, the first domain is among the most divergent parts of the genome. This suggests that different parts of the LUR are under different selection constraints that are also different from those acting on the coding parts of the molecule. PMID:15238532

  11. Quantitative controls on location and architecture of carbonate depositional sequences: Upper miocene, cabo de gata region, SE Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franseen, E.K.; Goldstein, R.H.; Farr, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    Sequence stratigraphy, pinning-point relative sea-level curves, and magnetostratigraphy provide the quantitative data necessary to understand how rates of sea-level change and different substrate paleoslopes are dominant controls on accumulation rate, carbonate depositional sequence location, and internal architecture. Five third-order (1-10 my) and fourth-order (0.1-1.0 my) upper Miocene carbonate depositional sequences (DS1A, DS1B, DS2, DS3, TCC) formed with superimposed higher-frequency sea-level cycles in an archipelago setting in SE Spain. Overall, our study indicates when areas of high substrate slope (> 15??) are in shallow water, independent of climate, the location and internal architecture of carbonate deposits are not directly linked to sea-level position but, instead, are controlled by location of gently sloping substrates and processes of bypass. In contrast, if carbonate sediments are generated where substrates of low slope ( 15.6 cm/ky to ??? 2 cm/ky and overall relative sea level rose at rates of 17-21.4 cm/ky. Higher frequency sea-level rates were about 111 to more than 260 cm/ky, producing onlapping, fining- (deepening-) upward cycles. Decreasing accumulation rates resulted from decreasing surface area for shallow-water sediment production, drowning of shallow-water substrates, and complex sediment dispersal related to the archipelago setting. Typical systems tract and parasequence development should not be expected in "bypass ramp" settings; facies of onlapping strata do not track base level and are likely to be significantly different compared to onlapping strata associated with coastal onlap. Basal and upper DS2 reef megabreccias (indicating the transition from cool to warmer climatic conditions) were eroded from steep upslope positions and redeposited downslope onto areas of gentle substrate during rapid sea-level falls (> 22.7 cm/ky) of short duration. Such rapid sea-level falls and presence of steep slopes are not conducive to formation of

  12. Quantitative controls on location and architecture of carbonate depositional sequences: upper miocene, cabo de gata region, se Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franseen, E.K.; Goldstein, R.H.; Farr, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    Sequence stratigraphy, pinning-point relative sea-level curves, and magnetostratigraphy provide the quantitative data necessary to understand how rates of sea-level change and different substrate paleoslopes are dominant controls on accumulation rate, carbonate depositional sequence location, and internal architecture. Five third-order (1-10 my) and fourth-order (0.1-1.0 my) upper Miocene carbonate depositional sequences (DS1A, DS1B, DS2, DS3, TCC) formed with superimposed higher-frequency sea-level cycles in an archipelago setting in SE Spain. Overall, our study indicates when areas of high substrate slope (> 15??) are in shallow water, independent of climate, the location and internal architecture of carbonate deposits are not directly linked to sea-level position but, instead, are controlled by location of gently sloping substrates and processes of bypass. In contrast, if carbonate sediments are generated where substrates of low slope ( 15.6 cm/ky to ??? 2 cm/ky and overall relative sea level rose at rates of 17-21.4 cm/ky. Higher frequency sea-level rates were about 111 to more than 260 cm/ky, producing onlapping, fining- (deepening-) upward cycles. Decreasing accumulation rates resulted from decreasing surface area for shallow-water sediment production, drowning of shallow-water substrates, and complex sediment dispersal related to the archipelago setting. Typical systems tract and parasequence development should not be expected in "bypass ramp" settings; facies of onlapping strata do not track base level and are likely to be significantly different compared to onlapping strata associated with coastal onlap. Basal and upper DS2 reef megabreccias (indicating the transition from cool to warmer climatic conditions) were eroded from steep upslope positions and redeposited downslope onto areas of gentle substrate during rapid sea-level falls (> 22.7 cm/ky) of short duration. Such rapid sea-level falls and presence of steep slopes are not conducive to formation of

  13. High-quality mtDNA control region sequences from 680 individuals sampled across the Netherlands to establish a national forensic mtDNA reference database.

    PubMed

    Chaitanya, Lakshmi; van Oven, Mannis; Brauer, Silke; Zimmermann, Bettina; Huber, Gabriela; Xavier, Catarina; Parson, Walther; de Knijff, Peter; Kayser, Manfred

    2016-03-01

    The use of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) for maternal lineage identification often marks the last resort when investigating forensic and missing-person cases involving highly degraded biological materials. As with all comparative DNA testing, a match between evidence and reference sample requires a statistical interpretation, for which high-quality mtDNA population frequency data are crucial. Here, we determined, under high quality standards, the complete mtDNA control-region sequences of 680 individuals from across the Netherlands sampled at 54 sites, covering the entire country with 10 geographic sub-regions. The complete mtDNA control region (nucleotide positions 16,024-16,569 and 1-576) was amplified with two PCR primers and sequenced with ten different sequencing primers using the EMPOP protocol. Haplotype diversity of the entire sample set was very high at 99.63% and, accordingly, the random-match probability was 0.37%. No population substructure within the Netherlands was detected with our dataset. Phylogenetic analyses were performed to determine mtDNA haplogroups. Inclusion of these high-quality data in the EMPOP database (accession number: EMP00666) will improve its overall data content and geographic coverage in the interest of all EMPOP users worldwide. Moreover, this dataset will serve as (the start of) a national reference database for mtDNA applications in forensic and missing person casework in the Netherlands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic variation between two Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana) populations in the eastern China based on mitochondrial DNA control region sequences.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yongfang; Zhong, Lijing; Liu, Bofeng; Li, Jiayi; Ni, Qingyong; Xu, Huailiang

    2013-06-01

    Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana) is a threatened primate species endemic to China. Population genetic and phylogenetic analyses were conducted in 66 Tibetan individuals from Sichuan (SC), Huangshan (HS), and Fujian (FJ) based on a 477-bp fragment of mitochondrial DNA control region. Four new haplotypes were defined, and a relatively high level of genetic diversity was first observed in FJ populations (Hd = 0.7661). Notably, a continuous approximately 10 bp-fragment deletion was observed near the 5' end of the mtDNA control region of both HS and FJ populations when compared with that of SC population, and a sharing haplotype was found between the two populations, revealing a closer genetic relationship. However, significant genetic differentiation (FST = 0.8700) and more poor gene exchange (Nm < 1) had occurred among three populations. This study mainly provide a further insight into the genetic relationship between HS and FJ Tibetan macaque populations, but it may be necessary to carry out further study with extra samples from other locations in the geographic coverage of the two subspecies (M. thibetana pullus and M. thibetana huangshanensis).

  15. Genetic diversity in captive and wild Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) from Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea, based on mtDNA control region sequences.

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Thomas J; Dabek, Lisa; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta; Husband, Thomas P

    2009-05-01

    The Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) population is at a critical point for assessing long-term viability. This population, established from 19 genetically uncharacterized D. matschiei, has endured a founder effect because only four individuals contributed the majority of offspring. The highly variable mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region was sequenced for five of the female-founders by examining extant representatives of their maternal lineage and compared with wild (n = 13) and captive (n = 18) D. matschiei from Papua New Guinea (PNG). AZA female-founder D. matschiei control region haplotype diversity was low, compared with captive D. matschiei held in PNG. AZA D. matschiei have only two control region haplotypes because four out of five AZA female-founder D. matschiei had an identical sequence. Both AZA haplotypes were identified among the 17 wild and captive D. matschiei haplotypes from PNG. Genomic DNA extracted from wild D. matschiei fecal samples was a reliable source of mtDNA that could be used for a larger scale study. We recommend a nuclear DNA genetic analysis to more fully characterize AZA D. matschiei genetic diversity and to assist their Species Survival Plan((R)). An improved understanding of D. matschiei genetics will contribute substantially to the conservation of these unique animals both in captivity and the wild.

  16. The complete nucleotide sequence of the lux regulon of Vibrio fischeri and the luxABN region of Photobacterium leiognathi and the mechanism of control of bacterial bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, T O; Devine, J H; Heckel, R C; Lin, J W; Shadel, G S

    1989-07-01

    We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of a 7622 base pair fragment of DNA from Vibrio fischeri strain ATCC7744 that contains all the information required to confer plasmid-borne, regulated bioluminescence upon strains of Escherichia coli. The lux regulon from V. fischeri consists of two divergently transcribed operons, L (left) and R (right), and at least seven genes, luxR (L operon) and luxICDABE (R operon) and the intervening control region. The luxA and luxB genes encode respectively the alpha and beta subunits of luciferase. The gene order luxCDABE seen in V. fischeri is the same as for V. harveyi. We have determined the sequence of the luxAB and flanking regions from Photobacterium leiognathi and have found upstream sequences homologous with luxC from the Vibrio species, but between luxB and luxE, there is an open reading frame encoding a protein of 227 amino acids (26,229 molecular weight) that is not found in this location in the Vibrio species. The amino terminal amino acid sequence of the encoded protein is nearly identical to that determined by O'Kane and Lee (University of Georgia) for the non-fluorescent flavoprotein from a closely related Photobacterium species (Dr Dennis O'Kane, personal communication). We have therefore designated this gene luxN. There is a 20-base inverted repeat ACCTGTAGGAxTCGTACAGGT, centred between bases 927 and 928 in the region between the two operons of V. fischeri. This region appears to fulfil two functions: it is critical for the LuxR protein to exert its effect and it is a consensus binding site for the E. coli LexA protein, a negative regulatory protein involved with the SOS response. There are sequences within the luxR coding region that appear to function in a cis-acting fashion to repress transcription from both the leftward and rightward promoters in the absence of the respective transcriptional activator proteins, thereby resulting in low basal levels of transcription. It now appears clear that there

  17. Helena, the hidden beauty: Resolving the most common West Eurasian mtDNA control region haplotype by massively parallel sequencing an Italian population sample.

    PubMed

    Bodner, Martin; Iuvaro, Alessandra; Strobl, Christina; Nagl, Simone; Huber, Gabriela; Pelotti, Susi; Pettener, Davide; Luiselli, Donata; Parson, Walther

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of mitochondrial (mt)DNA is a powerful tool in forensic genetics when nuclear markers fail to give results or maternal relatedness is investigated. The mtDNA control region (CR) contains highly condensed variation and is therefore routinely typed. Some samples exhibit an identical haplotype in this restricted range. Thus, they convey only weak evidence in forensic queries and limited phylogenetic information. However, a CR match does not imply that also the mtDNA coding regions are identical or samples belong to the same phylogenetic lineage. This is especially the case for the most frequent West Eurasian CR haplotype 263G 315.1C 16519C, which is observed in various clades within haplogroup H and occurs at a frequency of 3-4% in many European populations. In this study, we investigated the power of massively parallel complete mtGenome sequencing in 29 Italian samples displaying the most common West Eurasian CR haplotype - and found an unexpected high diversity. Twenty-eight different haplotypes falling into 19 described sub-clades of haplogroup H were revealed in the samples with identical CR sequences. This study demonstrates the benefit of complete mtGenome sequencing for forensic applications to enforce maximum discrimination, more comprehensive heteroplasmy detection, as well as highest phylogenetic resolution.

  18. Population structure and genetic variability of six bar wrasse (Thallasoma hardwicki) in northern South China Sea revealed by mitochondrial control region sequences.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaolun Allen; Ablan, Maria Carmen Anonuevo; McManus, John Williams; Bell, Johann Diepernk; Tuan, Vo Si; Cabanban, Annadel Sarmiento; Shao, Kwang-Tsao

    2004-01-01

    The genetic relationships among northern South China Sea populations of the six bar wrasse (Thallasoma hardwicki) were investigated. Fish collected from the Solomon Islands were used for geographic comparison. In 1998 and 1999, a total of 100 fish were sampled from 6 localities of the northern South China Sea and 3 localities of the Solomon Islands. Genetic variations in DNA sequences were examined from the first hypervariable region (HVR-1) of the mitochondrial control region, as amplified by polymerase chain reaction. High levels of haplotypic diversity (h = 0.944 +/- 0.0016, pi = 0.0224 +/- 0.01171) in the HVR-1 region of the mitochondrial control region of T. hardwicki were detected. This yielded 94 haplotypes that exhibited a minimum spanning tree with a starburst structure, suggestive of a very recent origin for most haplotypes. Neutrality tests indicated that the pattern of genetic variability in T. hardwicki is consistent either with genetic hitchhiking by an advantageous mutation or with population expansion. Partitioning populations into coherent geographic groups divided the northern South China Sea samples (Phi(CT) = 0.0313, P < 0.001) into 3 major groups: a north-central group composed of northwestern Taiwan and northern Vietnam; a southwestern group containing southern Vietnam; and a southern group including the central Philippines. These results are in concordance with mesoscale boundaries proposed by allozyme markers, thus highlighting the importance of identifying transboundary units for the conservation and management of fisheries in the South China Sea.

  19. Classification and phylogeny of sika deer (Cervus nippon) subspecies based on the mitochondrial control region DNA sequence using an extended sample set.

    PubMed

    Ba, Hengxing; Yang, Fuhe; Xing, Xiumei; Li, Chunyi

    2015-06-01

    To further refine the classification and phylogeny of sika deer subspecies, the well-annotated sequences of the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of 13 sika deer subspecies from GenBank were downloaded, aligned and analyzed in this study. By reconstructing the phylogenetic tree with an extended sample set, the results revealed a split between Northern and Southern Mainland Asia/Taiwan lineages, and moreover, two subspecies, C.n.mantchuricus and C.n.hortulorum, were existed in Northern Mainland Asia. Unexpectedly, Dybowskii's sika deer that was thought to originate from Northern Mainland Asia joins the Southern Mainland Asia/Taiwan lineage. The genetic divergences were ranged from 2.1% to 4.7% between Dybowskii's sika deer and all the other established subspecies at the mtDNA sequence level, which suggests that the maternal lineage of uncertain sika subspecies in Europe had been maintained until today. This study also provides a better understanding for the classification, phylogeny and phylogeographic history of sika deer subspecies.

  20. mtDNA control-region sequence variation suggests multiple independent origins of an "Asian-specific" 9-bp deletion in sub-Saharan Africans.

    PubMed Central

    Soodyall, H.; Vigilant, L.; Hill, A. V.; Stoneking, M.; Jenkins, T.

    1996-01-01

    The intergenic COII/tRNA(Lys) 9-bp deletion in human mtDNA, which is found at varying frequencies in Asia, Southeast Asia, Polynesia, and the New World, was also found in 81 of 919 sub-Saharan Africans. Using mtDNA control-region sequence data from a subset of 41 individuals with the deletion, we identified 22 unique mtDNA types associated with the deletion in Africa. A comparison of the unique mtDNA types from sub-Saharan Africans and Asians with the 9-bp deletion revealed that sub-Saharan Africans and Asians have sequence profiles that differ in the locations and frequencies of variant sites. Both phylogenetic and mismatch-distribution analysis suggest that 9-bp deletion arose independently in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia and that the deletion has arisen more than once in Africa. Within Africa, the deletion was not found among Khoisan peoples and was rare to absent in western and southwestern African populations, but it did occur in Pygmy and Negroid populations from central Africa and in Malawi and southern African Bantu-speakers. The distribution of the 9-bp deletion in Africa suggests that the deletion could have arisen in central Africa and was then introduced to southern Africa via the recent "Bantu expansion." PMID:8644719

  1. Mitochondrial DNA control region sequence variation suggests an independent origin of an {open_quotes}Asian-specific{close_quotes} 9-bp deletion in Africans

    SciTech Connect

    Soodyall, H.; Redd, A.; Vigilant

    1994-09-01

    The intergenic noncoding region between the cytochrome oxidase II and lysyl tRNA genes of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is associated with two tandemly arranged copies of a 9-bp sequence. A deletion of one of these repeats has been found at varying frequencies in populations of Asian descent, and is commonly referred to as an {open_quotes}Asian-specific{close_quotes} marker. We report here that the 9-bp deletion is also found at a frequency of 10.2% (66/649) in some indigenous African populations, with frequencies of 28.6% (20/70) in Pygmies, 26.6% (12/45) in Malawians and 15.4% (31/199) in southeastern Bantu-speaking populations. The deletion was not found in 123 Khoisan individuals nor in 209 western Bantu-speaking individuals, with the exception of 3 individuals from one group that was admixed with Pygmies. Sequence analysis of the two hypervariable segments of the mtDNA control region reveals that the types associated with the African 9-bp deletion are different from those found in Asian-derived populations with the deletion. Phylogenetic analysis separates the {open_quotes}African{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Asian{close_quotes} 9-bp deletion types into two different clusters which are statistically supported. Mismatch distributions based on the number of differences between pairs of mtDNA types are consistent with this separation. These findings strongly support the view that the 9-bp deletion originated independently in Africa and in Asia.

  2. Comparison of mitochondrial DNA control region sequence and microsatellite DNA analyses in estimating population structure and gene flow rates in Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wirgin, I.; Waldman, J.; Stabile, J.; Lubinski, B.; King, T.

    2002-01-01

    Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus is large, long-lived, and anadromous with subspecies distributed along the Atlantic (A. oxyrinchus oxyrinchus) and Gulf of Mexico (A. o. desotoi) coasts of North America. Although it is not certain if extirpation of some population units has occurred, because of anthropogenic influences abundances of all populations are low compared with historical levels. Informed management of A. oxyrinchus demands a detailed knowledge of its population structure, levels of genetic diversity, and likelihood to home to natal rivers. We compared the use of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequence and microsatellite nuclear DNA (nDNA) analyses in identifying the stock structure and homing fidelity of Atlantic and Gulf coast populations of A. oxyrinchus. The approaches were concordant in that they revealed moderate to high levels of genetic diversity and suggested that populations of Atlantic sturgeon are highly structured. At least six genetically distinct management units were detected using the two approaches among the rivers surveyed. Mitochondrial DNA sequences revealed a significant cline in haplotype diversity along the Atlantic coast with monomorphism observed in Canadian populations. High levels of nDNA diversity were also observed among populations along the Atlantic coast, including the two Canadian populations, probably resulting from the more rapid rate of mutational and evolutionary change at microsatellite loci. Estimates of gene flow among populations were similar between both approaches with the exception that because of mtDNA monomorphism in Canadian populations, gene flow estimates between them were unobtainable. Analyses of both genomes provided high resolution and confidence in characterizing the population structure of Atlantic sturgeon. Microsatellite analysis was particularly informative in delineating population structure in rivers that were recently glaciated and may prove diagnostic in rivers that are

  3. Mitochondrial sequences of Seriatopora corals show little agreement with morphology and reveal the duplication of a tRNA gene near the control region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flot, J.-F.; Licuanan, W. Y.; Nakano, Y.; Payri, C.; Cruaud, C.; Tillier, S.

    2008-12-01

    The taxonomy of corals of the genus Seriatopora has not previously been studied using molecular sequence markers. As a first step toward a re-evaluation of species boundaries in this genus, mitochondrial sequence variability was analyzed in 51 samples collected from Okinawa, New Caledonia, and the Philippines. Four clusters of sequences were detected that showed little concordance with species currently recognized on a morphological basis. The most likely explanation is that the skeletal characters used for species identification are highly variable (polymorphic or phenotypically plastic); alternative explanations include introgression/hybridization, or deep coalescence and the retention of ancestral mitochondrial polymorphisms. In all individuals sequenced, two copies of trnW were found on either side of the atp8 gene near the putative D-loop, a novel mitochondrial gene arrangement that may have arisen from a duplication of the trnW-atp8 region followed by a deletion of one atp8.

  4. The mitogenome of Gammarus duebeni (Crustacea Amphipoda): A new gene order and non-neutral sequence evolution of tandem repeats in the control region.

    PubMed

    Krebes, Lukas; Bastrop, Ralf

    2012-06-01

    We determined the complete mitogenome sequence of Gammarus duebeni (Peracarida, Amphipoda). The mitogenome is circular and has a length of 15,651bp. The content corresponds to typical mitogenomes of metazoans. The gene order and transcriptional polarity of the protein-coding genes is identical to the pancrustacean ground pattern. Six tRNA genes are rearranged, making the gene order unique. Thus it will bring forward the understanding of mitogenome evolution within the Peracarida, for which much more derived gene orders are known. We postulate that the gene string trnA-trnS1 (AGN)-trnN-trnE-trnR constitutes an apomorphic character for the Amphipoda. In contrast to the relatively large genome size, we found two extremely truncated rRNA genes. The rrnL gene is the shortest (986bp) reported up until now for crustaceans. A six-time imperfect tandem repeat was observed within the control region. The inferred deterministic pattern of variation between the repeat units makes it likely, that functional constraints play an important role in the evolutionary dynamics and extant appearance of the repeat array. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sequence polymorphism in the HLA-B promoter region

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Z.; Volgger, A.; Scholz, S.

    1995-04-01

    Transcription of major histocompatibility complex class I genes is controlled by the class I regulatory complex in the 5{prime} flanked region. To investigate the molecular basis of this region, we studied the polymorphism of the promoter of the HLA-B locus extending from the ATG transcription initiation signal to -284 base pairs (bp) which includes a number of cis-acting elements: interferon response sequence (IRS), enhancer A and enhancer B. Genomic DNA from 35 homozygous cell lines from the 10th International Histocompatibility Workshop and from eight heterozygous panel members was amplified using two primers designed to specifically amplify the HLA-B locus. The double-stranded polymerase chain reaction products were sequenced using the cycle sequencing technique and an ABI 373A automatic sequencer. Promoter sequences of thirty-one different HLA-B alleles were determined in this study. Within the 284 bp upstream of the ATG signal, base substitutions were observed in 23 different nucleotide positions. Our study shows a high degree of polymorphism of the HLA-B promoter region, but conserved sequences of the known cis-acting elements with the exception of enhancer B in which there are two base substitutions for B7 and B42 (position -93 and position -95). The 23 polymorphic sites can be grouped into 12 different HLA-B promoter types (groups A to M) for 31 HLA-B locus alleles. Some of the groups of alleles sharing the same promoter sequence such as, for example, group A with B51, B52, B53, and B35, might have been predicted on the basis of serological similarity and/or exon 2,3 sequence. In other groups, such as G (B18, B37, B27), it could not have been anticipated from serological experience that B18 and B27 carry the same promoter. Several sequencing errors were detected in the HLA-B promoter sequences published previously. 32 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. A myriad of miRNA variants in control and Huntington’s disease brain regions detected by massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Martí, Eulàlia; Pantano, Lorena; Bañez-Coronel, Mónica; Llorens, Franc; Miñones-Moyano, Elena; Porta, Sílvia; Sumoy, Lauro; Ferrer, Isidre; Estivill, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that predominantly affects neurons of the forebrain. We have applied the Illumina massively parallel sequencing to deeply analyze the small RNA populations of two different forebrain areas, the frontal cortex (FC) and the striatum (ST) of healthy individuals and individuals with HD. More than 80% of the small-RNAs were annotated as microRNAs (miRNAs) in all samples. Deep sequencing revealed length and sequence heterogeneity (IsomiRs) for the vast majority of miRNAs. Around 80–90% of the miRNAs presented modifications in the 3′-terminus mainly in the form of trimming and/or as nucleotide addition variants, while the 5′-terminus of the miRNAs was specially protected from changes. Expression profiling showed strong miRNA and isomiR expression deregulation in HD, most being common to both FC and ST. The analysis of the upstream regulatory regions in co-regulated miRNAs suggests a role for RE1-Silencing Transcription Factor (REST) and P53 in miRNAs downregulation in HD. The putative targets of deregulated miRNAs and seed-region IsomiRs strongly suggest that their altered expression contributes to the aberrant gene expression in HD. Our results show that miRNA variability is a ubiquitous phenomenon in the adult human brain, which may influence gene expression in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:20591823

  7. Use of whole-genome sequencing to trace, control and characterize the regional expansion of extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing ST15 Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kai; Lokate, Mariette; Deurenberg, Ruud H.; Tepper, Marga; Arends, Jan P.; Raangs, Erwin G. C.; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome; Grundmann, Hajo; Rossen, John W. A.; Friedrich, Alexander W.

    2016-01-01

    The study describes the transmission of a CTX-M-15-producing ST15 Klebsiella pneumoniae between patients treated in a single center and the subsequent inter-institutional spread by patient referral occurring between May 2012 and September 2013. A suspected epidemiological link between clinical K. pneumoniae isolates was supported by patient contact tracing and genomic phylogenetic analysis from May to November 2012. By May 2013, a patient treated in three institutions in two cities was involved in an expanding cluster caused by this high-risk clone (HiRiC) (local expansion, CTX-M-15 producing, and containing hypervirulence factors). A clone-specific multiplex PCR was developed for patient screening by which another patient was identified in September 2013. Genomic phylogenetic analysis including published ST15 genomes revealed a close homology with isolates previously found in the USA. Environmental contamination and lack of consistent patient screening were identified as being responsible for the clone dissemination. The investigation addresses the advantages of whole-genome sequencing in the early detection of HiRiC with a high propensity of nosocomial transmission and prolonged circulation in the regional patient population. Our study suggests the necessity for inter-institutional/regional collaboration for infection/outbreak management of K. pneumoniae HiRiCs. PMID:26864946

  8. Phylogeography of Chinese bamboo partridge, Bambusicola thoracica thoracica (Aves: Galliformes) in south China: inference from mitochondrial DNA control-region sequences.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zuhao; Liu, Naifa; Liang, Wei; Zhang, Yanyun; Liao, Xinjun; Ruan, Luzhang; Yang, Zhisong

    2010-07-01

    Chinese bamboo partridge (Bambusicola thoracica thoracica), an endemic subspecies of south China, distributes in mountainous areas that were affected by climate changes throughout the Pleistocene. We investigated the potential impact of cyclical Pleistocene climate changes on phylogeographic patterns using 1140 nucleotides of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control-region from 180 individuals sampled from 13 populations of the partridge. We found 50 haplotypes defined by 39 polymorphic positions. Phylogenetic analyses revealed two robustly supported clades. There was a significant genetic differentiation among the populations with little gene flow. Refugia were identified in the southwestern mountains and Luoxiao Mountains in China, implying that topographic complexity played a substantial role in providing suitable habitats for the partridge during cold periods. Results from the mismatch distribution and neutrality test analysis suggested a range expansion of the two clades. The mtDNA marker suggested the existence of a geographical structure among Chinese bamboo partridge populations, resulting from the synergistic affect of Pleistocene climatic variations. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pattern of genetic variation of yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco Richardso in Huaihe river and the Yangtze river revealed using mitochondrial DNA control region sequences.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Mingsong; Bao, Fangyin; Cui, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Genetic variability and population genetic structure of the yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco Richardso in the Huaihe river and the Yangtze river was examined with a 810-bp of the mitochondrial DNA control region. A total of 70 haplotypes were identified from 145 samples, which were characterized with high haplotype diversity (h = 0.9832 ± 0.0041) but low nucleotide diversity (π = 0.0415 ± 0.0201). The analysis of molecular variance and phylogenetic reconstructions detected significant geographic structure between Huaihe river and Yangtze with FST = 0.1183 (P = 0.0000). Neighbor-joining (NJ) phylogenetic analyses identified two distinct clades (bootstrap support 99 %). The medium joining network drawn using the complete data set was reticulated and also distinctly split the 70 haplotypes into two groups corresponding to those of the NJ tree. Departures from neutrality were not significant for the Huaihe river and the Yangtze river Pelteobagrus fulvidraco, concordant with the observed multimodal mismatch distributions (P > 0.05), which suggested that the effective size of this species has been large and stable for a long period. The question about the existence of significant genetic differentiation for Pelteobagrus fulvidraco in the Yangtze river and Huaihe river basins remains to be further studied with molecular nuclear markers and larger sample sizes from throughout the river basins.

  10. Time Separation Between Events in a Sequence: a Regional Property?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirwood, R.; Fitzenz, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    understand the rate controlling processes that determine such sequences per tectonic region and fluid/heat flow provinces.

  11. Intentional control and implicit sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Leonora; Shanks, David R

    2004-03-01

    Sequence knowledge acquired by repeated exposure to targets in a speeded localization task was studied in 3 experiments that sought to test A. Destrebecqz and A. Cleeremans's (2001, 2003) claim that, under certain circumstances, the expression of such sequence knowledge cannot be brought under intentional control. In Experiment 1 participants were trained on either a deterministic or a probabilistic sequence and then performed a free-generation test under either inclusion or exclusion instructions. Participants were found to be capable of both expressing (inclusion) and avoiding expressing (exclusion) sequence knowledge. These results were confirmed in Experiment 2 with a more exact replication of Destrebecqz and Cleeremans's methodology. In Experiment 3 participants performed a trial-by-trial generation test under both inclusion and exclusion conditions after a much longer period of training. All the findings are consistent with the proposal that information acquired during sequence learning is explicit in nature.

  12. Quality control of ion torrent sequencing library.

    PubMed

    Pop, Laura-Ancuţa; Puscas, Emil; Pileczki, Valentina; Cojocneanu-Petric, Roxana; Braicu, Cornelia; Achimas-Cadariu, Patriciu; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NSG) is an important method for gathering large amounts of sequencing data for different types of applications regarding the diagnosis and response to treatment of different diseases. An important step in the NGS process is the quality control of sequencing libraries, which can influence the yield and efficiency of the sequencing run. This study evaluated two different methods for library quality control, Agilent Bioanalyzer and qPCR, and showed that both methods can be used. However, as is the case with any analytical method, they have their limitations. The Agilent Bioanalyzer quantifies only the high quality libraries, but it underestimates their concentration, while qPCR also quantifies lower quality libraries, but it overestimates their concentration.

  13. Correlation approach to identify coding regions in DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ossadnik, S. M.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Mantegna, R. N.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, it was observed that noncoding regions of DNA sequences possess long-range power-law correlations, whereas coding regions typically display only short-range correlations. We develop an algorithm based on this finding that enables investigators to perform a statistical analysis on long DNA sequences to locate possible coding regions. The algorithm is particularly successful in predicting the location of lengthy coding regions. For example, for the complete genome of yeast chromosome III (315,344 nucleotides), at least 82% of the predictions correspond to putative coding regions; the algorithm correctly identified all coding regions larger than 3000 nucleotides, 92% of coding regions between 2000 and 3000 nucleotides long, and 79% of coding regions between 1000 and 2000 nucleotides. The predictive ability of this new algorithm supports the claim that there is a fundamental difference in the correlation property between coding and noncoding sequences. This algorithm, which is not species-dependent, can be implemented with other techniques for rapidly and accurately locating relatively long coding regions in genomic sequences.

  14. Correlation approach to identify coding regions in DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ossadnik, S. M.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Mantegna, R. N.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, it was observed that noncoding regions of DNA sequences possess long-range power-law correlations, whereas coding regions typically display only short-range correlations. We develop an algorithm based on this finding that enables investigators to perform a statistical analysis on long DNA sequences to locate possible coding regions. The algorithm is particularly successful in predicting the location of lengthy coding regions. For example, for the complete genome of yeast chromosome III (315,344 nucleotides), at least 82% of the predictions correspond to putative coding regions; the algorithm correctly identified all coding regions larger than 3000 nucleotides, 92% of coding regions between 2000 and 3000 nucleotides long, and 79% of coding regions between 1000 and 2000 nucleotides. The predictive ability of this new algorithm supports the claim that there is a fundamental difference in the correlation property between coding and noncoding sequences. This algorithm, which is not species-dependent, can be implemented with other techniques for rapidly and accurately locating relatively long coding regions in genomic sequences.

  15. The regions of sequence variation in caulimovirus gene VI.

    PubMed

    Sanger, M; Daubert, S; Goodman, R M

    1991-06-01

    The sequence of gene VI from figwort mosaic virus (FMV) clone x4 was determined and compared with that previously published for FMV clone DxS. Both clones originated from the same virus isolation, but the virus used to clone DxS was propagated extensively in a host of a different family prior to cloning whereas that used to clone x4 was not. Differences in the amino acid sequence inferred from the DNA sequences occurred in two clusters. An N-terminal conserved region preceded two regions of variation separated by a central conserved region. Variation in cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) gene VI sequences, all of which were derived from virus isolates from hosts from one host family, was similar to that seen in the FMV comparison, though the extent of variation was less. Alignment of gene VI domains from FMV and CaMV revealed regions of amino acid sequence identical in both viruses within the conserved regions. The similarity in the pattern of conserved and variable domains of these two viruses suggests common host-interactive functions in caulimovirus gene VI homologues, and possibly an analogy between caulimoviruses and certain animal viruses in the influence of the host on sequence variability of viral genes.

  16. SNPs occur in regions with less genomic sequence conservation.

    PubMed

    Castle, John C

    2011-01-01

    Rates of SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and cross-species genomic sequence conservation reflect intra- and inter-species variation, respectively. Here, I report SNP rates and genomic sequence conservation adjacent to mRNA processing regions and show that, as expected, more SNPs occur in less conserved regions and that functional regions have fewer SNPs. Results are confirmed using both mouse and human data. Regions include protein start codons, 3' splice sites, 5' splice sites, protein stop codons, predicted miRNA binding sites, and polyadenylation sites. Throughout, SNP rates are lower and conservation is higher at regulatory sites. Within coding regions, SNP rates are highest and conservation is lowest at codon position three and the fewest SNPs are found at codon position two, reflecting codon degeneracy for amino acid encoding. Exon splice sites show high conservation and very low SNP rates, reflecting both splicing signals and protein coding. Relaxed constraint on the codon third position is dramatically seen when separating exonic SNP rates based on intron phase. At polyadenylation sites, a peak of conservation and low SNP rate occurs from 30 to 17 nt preceding the site. This region is highly enriched for the sequence AAUAAA, reflecting the location of the conserved polyA signal. miRNA 3' UTR target sites are predicted incorporating interspecies genomic sequence conservation; SNP rates are low in these sites, again showing fewer SNPs in conserved regions. Together, these results confirm that SNPs, reflecting recent genetic variation, occur more frequently in regions with less evolutionarily conservation.

  17. Realistic artificial DNA sequences as negative controls for computational genomics

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Juan; Smit, Arian F. A.; Hood, Leroy; Glusman, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    A common practice in computational genomic analysis is to use a set of ‘background’ sequences as negative controls for evaluating the false-positive rates of prediction tools, such as gene identification programs and algorithms for detection of cis-regulatory elements. Such ‘background’ sequences are generally taken from regions of the genome presumed to be intergenic, or generated synthetically by ‘shuffling’ real sequences. This last method can lead to underestimation of false-positive rates. We developed a new method for generating artificial sequences that are modeled after real intergenic sequences in terms of composition, complexity and interspersed repeat content. These artificial sequences can serve as an inexhaustible source of high-quality negative controls. We used artificial sequences to evaluate the false-positive rates of a set of programs for detecting interspersed repeats, ab initio prediction of coding genes, transcribed regions and non-coding genes. We found that RepeatMasker is more accurate than PClouds, Augustus has the lowest false-positive rate of the coding gene prediction programs tested, and Infernal has a low false-positive rate for non-coding gene detection. A web service, source code and the models for human and many other species are freely available at http://repeatmasker.org/garlic/. PMID:24803667

  18. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj

    2014-10-01

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions.

  19. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj E-mail: rajc@andrew.cmu.edu

    2014-10-28

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions.

  20. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification.

    PubMed

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj

    2014-10-28

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions.

  1. Nucleotide sequence and transcriptional analysis of the flanking region of the gene (spb) for the trans-acting factor that controls light-mediated expression of the puf operon in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, H; Masuda, T; Nishimura, K; Shimada, H; Ohta, H; Shioi, Y; Takamiya, K

    1997-05-01

    We recently reported the existence of a trans-acting factor (SPB) in Rhodobacter sphaeroides that repressed the expression of the puf operon during illumination. SPB was somewhat homologous to HvrA of Rhodobacter capsulatus, but these proteins appear to have functionally different properties. We now report an analysis of the flanking region of spb in the genome of R.sphaeroides, and we show that spb is a positional counterpart of hvrA of R. capsulatus. The region directly downstream of spb was found to contain three genes, two of which were highly homologous to orf5 and ahcY in R. capsulatus. However, a gene corresponding to hvrB, which controls the expression of orf5 and ahcY in R. capsulatus, was absent in R. sphaeroides. The level of the transcript of ahcY did not change in cells grown under photosynthetic and by respiratory conditions. By contrast, orf5 was transcribed at a higher rate in photosynthetically grown cells under high-intensity light than under low-intensity light, indicating features of transcription different from those in R. capsulatus. A third gene, orf318, which was absent in the corresponding region of R. capsulatus, encoded an amino acid sequence that was significantly homologous to the consensus sequence of RfaI and RfaJ of E.coli, which are glycosyl transferases involved in the synthesis of lipopolysaccharide. orf318 was transcribed in the opposite direction to ahcY, and at only a low level, under all conditions tested.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA control region variation in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Alshamali, Farida; Brandstätter, Anita; Zimmermann, Bettina; Parson, Walther

    2008-01-01

    249 entire mtDNA control region sequences were generated and analyzed in a population sample from Dubai, one of the seven United Arab Emirates. The control region was amplified in one piece and sequenced with different sequencing primers. Sequence evaluation was performed twice and validated by a third senior mtDNA scientist. Phylogenetic analyses were used for quality assurance purposes and for the determination of the haplogroup affiliation of the samples. Upon publication, the population data are going to be available in the EMPOP database (www.empop.org).

  3. SeqControl: process control for DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chong, Lauren C; Albuquerque, Marco A; Harding, Nicholas J; Caloian, Cristian; Chan-Seng-Yue, Michelle; de Borja, Richard; Fraser, Michael; Denroche, Robert E; Beck, Timothy A; van der Kwast, Theodorus; Bristow, Robert G; McPherson, John D; Boutros, Paul C

    2014-10-01

    As high-throughput sequencing continues to increase in speed and throughput, routine clinical and industrial application draws closer. These 'production' settings will require enhanced quality monitoring and quality control to optimize output and reduce costs. We developed SeqControl, a framework for predicting sequencing quality and coverage using a set of 15 metrics describing overall coverage, coverage distribution, basewise coverage and basewise quality. Using whole-genome sequences of 27 prostate cancers and 26 normal references, we derived multivariate models that predict sequencing quality and depth. SeqControl robustly predicted how much sequencing was required to reach a given coverage depth (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.993), accurately classified clinically relevant formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples, and made predictions from as little as one-eighth of a sequencing lane (AUC = 0.967). These techniques can be immediately incorporated into existing sequencing pipelines to monitor data quality in real time. SeqControl is available at http://labs.oicr.on.ca/Boutros-lab/software/SeqControl/.

  4. Detecting selection in noncoding regions of nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wendy S W; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2004-01-01

    We present a maximum-likelihood method for examining the selection pressure and detecting positive selection in noncoding regions using multiple aligned DNA sequences. The rate of substitution in noncoding regions relative to the rate of synonymous substitution in coding regions is modeled by a parameter zeta. When a site in a noncoding region is evolving neutrally zeta = 1, while zeta > 1 indicates the action of positive selection, and zeta < 1 suggests negative selection. Using a combined model for the evolution of noncoding and coding regions, we develop two likelihood-ratio tests for the detection of selection in noncoding regions. Data analysis of both simulated and real viral data is presented. Using the new method we show that positive selection in viruses is acting primarily in protein-coding regions and is rare or absent in noncoding regions. PMID:15238543

  5. Ballooning mode second stability region for sequences of tokamak equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, L.; Mark, J. W-K.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical study of several sequences of tokamak equilibria derived from two flux conserving sequences confirms the tendency of high n ideal MHD ballooning modes to stabilize for values of the plasma beta greater than a second critical beta, for sufficiently favorable equilibria. The major stabilizing effect of increasing the inverse rotational transform profile q(Psi) for equilibria with the same flux surface geometry is shown. The unstable region shifts toward larger shear d ln q/d ln ..gamma.. and the width of the region measured in terms of the poloidal beta or a pressure gradient parameter, for fixed shear, decreases. The smaller aspect ratio sequences are more sensitive to changes in q and have less stringent limits on the attainable value of the plasma beta in the high beta stable region. Finally, the disconnected mode approximation is shown to provide a reasonable description of the second high beta stability boundary.

  6. SNPs Occur in Regions with Less Genomic Sequence Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Castle, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Rates of SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and cross-species genomic sequence conservation reflect intra- and inter-species variation, respectively. Here, I report SNP rates and genomic sequence conservation adjacent to mRNA processing regions and show that, as expected, more SNPs occur in less conserved regions and that functional regions have fewer SNPs. Results are confirmed using both mouse and human data. Regions include protein start codons, 3′ splice sites, 5′ splice sites, protein stop codons, predicted miRNA binding sites, and polyadenylation sites. Throughout, SNP rates are lower and conservation is higher at regulatory sites. Within coding regions, SNP rates are highest and conservation is lowest at codon position three and the fewest SNPs are found at codon position two, reflecting codon degeneracy for amino acid encoding. Exon splice sites show high conservation and very low SNP rates, reflecting both splicing signals and protein coding. Relaxed constraint on the codon third position is dramatically seen when separating exonic SNP rates based on intron phase. At polyadenylation sites, a peak of conservation and low SNP rate occurs from 30 to 17 nt preceding the site. This region is highly enriched for the sequence AAUAAA, reflecting the location of the conserved polyA signal. miRNA 3′ UTR target sites are predicted incorporating interspecies genomic sequence conservation; SNP rates are low in these sites, again showing fewer SNPs in conserved regions. Together, these results confirm that SNPs, reflecting recent genetic variation, occur more frequently in regions with less evolutionarily conservation. PMID:21674007

  7. Regional association analysis delineates a sequenced chromosome region influencing antinutritive seed meal compounds in oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Snowdon, R J; Wittkop, B; Rezaidad, A; Hasan, M; Lipsa, F; Stein, A; Friedt, W

    2010-11-01

    This study describes the use of regional association analyses to delineate a sequenced region of a Brassica napus chromosome with a significant effect on antinutritive seed meal compounds in oilseed rape. A major quantitative trait locus (QTL) influencing seed colour, fibre content, and phenolic compounds was mapped to the same position on B. napus chromosome A9 in biparental mapping populations from two different yellow-seeded × black-seeded B. napus crosses. Sequences of markers spanning the QTL region identified synteny to a sequence contig from the corresponding chromosome A9 in Brassica rapa. Remapping of sequence-derived markers originating from the B. rapa sequence contig confirmed their position within the QTL. One of these markers also mapped to a seed colour and fibre QTL on the same chromosome in a black-seeded × black-seeded B. napus cross. Consequently, regional association analysis was performed in a genetically diverse panel of dark-seeded, winter-type oilseed rape accessions. For this we used closely spaced simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers spanning the sequence contig covering the QTL region. Correction for population structure was performed using a set of genome-wide SSR markers. The identification of QTL-derived markers with significant associations to seed colour, fibre content, and phenolic compounds in the association panel enabled the identification of positional and functional candidate genes for B. napus seed meal quality within a small segment of the B. rapa genome sequence.

  8. The Main Sequence of Explosive Solar Active Regions: Comparison of Emerging and Mature Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron

    2011-01-01

    For mature active regions, an active region s magnetic flux content determines the maximum free energy the active region can have. Most Large flares and CMEs occur in active regions that are near their free-energy limit. Active-region flare power radiated in the GOES 1-8 band increases steeply as the free-energy limit is approached. We infer that the free-energy limit is set by the rate of release of an active region s free magnetic energy by flares, CMEs and coronal heating balancing the maximum rate the Sun can put free energy into the active region s magnetic field. This balance of maximum power results in explosive active regions residing in a "mainsequence" in active-region (flux content, free energy content) phase space, which sequence is analogous to the main sequence of hydrogen-burning stars in (mass, luminosity) phase space.

  9. SQUARE--determining reliable regions in sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Tress, Michael L; Graña, Osvaldo; Valencia, Alfonso

    2004-04-12

    The Server for Quick Alignment Reliability Evaluation (SQUARE) is a Web-based version of the method we developed to predict regions of reliably aligned residues in sequence alignments. Given an alignment between a query sequence and a sequence of known structure, SQUARE is able to predict which residues are reliably aligned. The server accesses a database of profiles of sequences of known three-dimensional structures in order to calculate the scores for each residue in the alignment. SQUARE produces a graphical output of the residue profile-derived alignment scores along with an indication of the reliability of the alignment. In addition, the scores can be compared against template secondary structure, conserved residues and important sites.

  10. Controls on sequence development and preservation offshore Namibia: Implications for sequence stratigraphic models and hydrocarbon prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Bagguley, J.G. ); Prosser, S. )

    1996-01-01

    Regional seismic interpretation of the passive margin offshore Namibia has enabled a sequence stratigraphic framework to be established for this previously under-studied region. Within this framework potential hydrocarbon plays, for example the location of source, seal and reservoir rocks can be pinpointed. The history of sequence stratigraphic models suggests that the passive margin offshore Namibia should provide an ideal setting for applying and testing sequence stratigraphic concepts. Results from this study however suggest that alongside the documented controls in sequence stratigraphy (i.e. tectonics, eustacy and sediment flux), additional factors act to influence sequence development and preservation along this margin. Detailed seismic interpretation of the post rift section of the Namibian margin has led to the identification of a member of erosional and depositional events; for example, charmers, canyons and slumps. Seismic facies analysis allows causative mechanisms to be inferred for the different geometries observed. In addition, the recognition of characteristic seismic facies enables reservoir and non-reservoir targets to be identified, thus aiding the prediction of potential hydrocarbon plays. Backstripping studies provide further information as to the evolution of the Namibian margin. For example, estimates can be made regarding changes in the rates of tectonics and sedimentation and the relative importance of these factors on the development of the margin can be assessed.

  11. Controls on sequence development and preservation offshore Namibia: Implications for sequence stratigraphic models and hydrocarbon prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Bagguley, J.G.; Prosser, S.

    1996-12-31

    Regional seismic interpretation of the passive margin offshore Namibia has enabled a sequence stratigraphic framework to be established for this previously under-studied region. Within this framework potential hydrocarbon plays, for example the location of source, seal and reservoir rocks can be pinpointed. The history of sequence stratigraphic models suggests that the passive margin offshore Namibia should provide an ideal setting for applying and testing sequence stratigraphic concepts. Results from this study however suggest that alongside the documented controls in sequence stratigraphy (i.e. tectonics, eustacy and sediment flux), additional factors act to influence sequence development and preservation along this margin. Detailed seismic interpretation of the post rift section of the Namibian margin has led to the identification of a member of erosional and depositional events; for example, charmers, canyons and slumps. Seismic facies analysis allows causative mechanisms to be inferred for the different geometries observed. In addition, the recognition of characteristic seismic facies enables reservoir and non-reservoir targets to be identified, thus aiding the prediction of potential hydrocarbon plays. Backstripping studies provide further information as to the evolution of the Namibian margin. For example, estimates can be made regarding changes in the rates of tectonics and sedimentation and the relative importance of these factors on the development of the margin can be assessed.

  12. Mutational analysis of intervening sequences connecting the binding sites for integration host factor, PepA, PurR, and RNA polymerase in the control region of the Escherichia coli carAB operon, encoding carbamoylphosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Devroede, Neel; Huysveld, Nadine; Charlier, Daniel

    2006-05-01

    Transcription of the carAB operon encoding the unique carbamoylphosphate synthase of Escherichia coli reflects the dual function of carbamoylphosphate in the biosynthesis of arginine and pyrimidine nucleotides. The tandem pair of promoters is regulated by various mechanisms depending on the needs of both pathways and the maintenance of a pyrimidine/purine nucleotide balance. Here we focus on the linker regions that impose the distribution of target sites for DNA-binding proteins involved in pyrimidine- and purine-specific repression of the upstream promoter P1. We introduced deletions and insertions, and combinations thereof, in four linkers connecting the binding sites for integration host factor (IHF), PepA, PurR, and RNA polymerase and studied the importance of phasing and spacing of the targets and the importance of the nucleotide sequence of the linkers. The two PepA binding sites must be properly aligned and separated with respect to each other and to the promoter for both pyrimidine- and purine-mediated repression. Similarly, the phasing and spacing of the IHF and PEPA2 sites are strictly constrained but only for pyrimidine-specific repression. The IHF target is even dispensable for purine-mediated regulation. Thus, a correct localization of PepA within the higher-order nucleoprotein complex is a prerequisite for the establishment of pyrimidine-mediated repression and for the coupling between purine- and pyrimidine-dependent regulation. Our data also suggest the existence of a novel cis-acting pyrimidine-specific regulatory target located around position -60. Finally, the analysis of a P1 derivative devoid of its control region has led to a reappraisal of the effect of excess adenine on P1 and has revealed that P1 has no need for a UP element.

  13. Drosophila melanogaster is polymorphic for a specific repeated (CATA) sequence in the regulatory region of hsp23.

    PubMed

    Frydenberg, J; Pierpaoli, M; Loeschcke, V

    1999-08-20

    To identify sequence variation associated with a selection response for heat tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster, we sequenced 1400bp of the heat shock protein 23 gene (hsp23) promoter region in four heat-selected and two control lines. The region was found to be variable for a specific (CATA) repeated sequence, and the sequence CTT seems to be a hot spot for mutation. The repeated tetranucleotide sequence was located in several short repeats scattered throughout the entire region. Similar variable repeats are also located downstream the of hsp23 gene in the intergenic region between hsp23 and hsp27. We detected nine different hsp23 alleles. Their frequencies in the selection and control lines seemed to be mainly determined by genetic drift. The function of the CATA repeats is not yet known, though these regions have homology to SAR elements located in the intergenic region between two hsp70 genes, suggesting a similar function.

  14. An ongoing earthquake sequence near Dhaka, Bangladesh, from regional recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, M.; Mondal, D. R.; Akhter, S. H.; Kim, W.; Seeber, L.; Steckler, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquakes in and around the syntaxial region between the continent-continent collision of the Himalayan arc and oceanic subduction of the Sunda arc result primarily from the convergence of India and Eurasia-Sunda plates along two fronts. The northern front, the convergence of the Indian and Eurasian plates, has produced the Himalayas. The eastern front, the convergence of the Indian and Sunda plates, ranges from ocean-continent subduction at the Andaman Arc and Burma Arc, and transitions to continent-continent collision to the north at the Assam Syntaxis in northeast India. The India-Sunda convergence at the Burma Arc is extremely oblique. The boundary-normal convergence rate is ~17 mm/yr while the boundary-parallel rate is ~45 mm/yr including the well-known Sagaing strike-slip fault, which accommodates about half the shear component. This heterogeneous tectonic setting produces multiple earthquake sources that need to be considered when assessing seismic hazard and risk in this region. The largest earthquakes, just as in other subduction systems, are expected to be interplate events that occur on the low-angle megathrusts, such as the Mw 9.2 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake and the 1762 earthquake along the Arakan margin. These earthquakes are known to produce large damage over vast areas, but since they account for large fault motions they are relatively rare. The majority of current seismicity in the study area is intraplate. Most of the seismicity associated with the Burma Arc subduction system is in the down-going slab, including the shallow-dipping part below the megathrust flooring the accretionary wedge. The strike of the wedge is ~N-S and Dhaka lies at its outer limit. One particular source relevant to seismic risk in Dhaka is illuminated by a multi-year sequence of earthquakes in Bangladesh less than 100 km southeast of Dhaka. The population in Dhaka (now at least 15 million) has been increasing dramatically due to rapid urbanization. The vulnerability

  15. Sequence analysis of tau 3'untranslated region and saitohin gene in sporadic progressive supranuclear palsy

    PubMed Central

    Ezquerra, M; Campdelacreu, J; Munoz, E; Oliva, R; Tolosa, E

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To search for genetic changes in the 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) of tau and adjacent sequence LOC147077, and in the coding region of STH in PSP patients. Methods: The study included 57 PSP patients and 83 healthy controls. The genetic analysis of each region was performed through sequencing. The Q7R polymorphism was studied through restriction enzyme and electrophoresis analysis. Results: No mutations were found in the regions analysed. The QQ genotype of the STH polymorphism was over-represented in participants with PSP (91.5%) compared with control subjects (47%) (p⩽0.00001). This genotype co-segregated with the H1/H1 haplotype in our PSP cases. Conclusions: Our results do not support a major role for the tau 3'UTR in PSP genetics. The QQ genotype of STH confers susceptibility for PSP and is in linkage disequilibrium with the H1/H1 haplotype. PMID:14707330

  16. Climatic controls on Pennsylvanian sequences, United States

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, C.B.; Dulong, F.T.; Edgar, N.T.

    1996-08-01

    Temporal and spatial paleoclimate changes were primary controls on changes in sediment supply, both siliciclastic and chemical, in Pennsylvanian deposystems of the United States. Tectonic and eustatic processes, as well as climatically induced changes in sediment supply, controlled accommodation space and sequence stratigraphy within these deposystems. Interbasinal correlations of lithologies sensitive to climate, such as coeval paleosols, provide continental-scale records of climatic and eustatic conditions. Pennsylvanian bio- and lithostratigraphy are indicative of climate change at time scales that range from long-term (tens of millions of years) as Pangea formed and North America moved northward through the paleoequator, to intermediate-term hundred thousand year cycles controlled by orbital forcing, to very short-term events perhaps analogous to El Nino. Because of proximity to the humid tropics, the long-term climate of eastern basins of the United States was generally wetter than western basins. In the east, pluvial parts of climate cycles occur during low-stand events and are recorded by intense chemical weathering, high terrestrial organic productivity, restricted erosion, and siliciclastic sediment starvation. These conditions resulted in highly leached mineral paleosols (Ultisols) and coal beds (Histosols) of interbasinal extent. Drier parts of climate cycles in the east occurred during highstands of sea level when erosion and siliciclastic transport were maximum. In the western basins pluvial periods are generally indicated by shifts from eolian to fluvial and lacustrine sedimentary regimes in continental environments and from evaporate and carbonate to siliciclastic deposition, including black shale petroleum source rocks, in marine environments. Tectonics controlled basin development and glacial eustasy controlled sea level cycles. Climate, however, was the primary control on sediment supply and lithostratigraphy.

  17. Sequence Analysis of the Direct Repeat Region in Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Caimi, Karina; Romano, Maria I.; Alito, Alicia; Zumarraga, Martin; Bigi, Fabiana; Cataldi, Angel

    2001-01-01

    Spoligotyping is a major tool for molecular typing of Mycobacterium bovis. This technique is based on the polymorphism of spacers that separate direct repeats (DRs) in the M. tuberculosis complex DR region. Numerous M. bovis strains show a lack of several spacers which appears as a gap in the spoligotyping pattern. To determine whether these gaps contain alternative spacers not included in the spoligotyping membrane, PCRs using primers that hybridize to the spacers adjacent to the gaps were performed. Comparing the sizes of products obtained by PCR with those deduced from spoligotyping patterns, fragments were selected and sequenced to look for alternative spacers. Upon analysis of the sequences, five alternative spacers were detected, although deletions of spacers are mainly responsible for the observed gaps. The alternative spacers, which are more frequent in M. bovis than in M. tuberculosis, may contribute to increased M. bovis differentiation. PMID:11230428

  18. Sequence and Architectural Control in Glycopolymer Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Abdouni, Yamin; Yilmaz, Gokhan; Becer, C Remzi

    2017-07-10

    Glycopolymers are synthetic-carbohydrate-containing materials capable of interacting and binding to specific targeting lectins, which are crucially important in many biologically active processes. Over the last decade, advances in synthetic chemistry and polymerization techniques have enabled the development of sequence and architecturally controlled glycopolymers for different types of bioapplications, such as drug delivery and release purposes, gene therapy, lectin-based biosensors, and much more in the future. These precision glycopolymers are able to mimic structural and functional features of the naturally existing glycocalyx. Furthermore, self-assembled glycopolymers could enhance specific and selective recognition properties on multivalent scaffolds in glycoscience. This mini-review will focus on production methods and recent advances in precision synthesis and self-assembly of glycopolymers. Additionally, possible contributions of single-chain folding in glycopolymers will be discussed as a future prospect. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Efficient Quantum Private Communication Based on Dynamic Control Code Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zheng-Wen; Feng, Xiao-Yi; Peng, Jin-Ye; Zeng, Gui-Hua; Qi, Jin

    2017-04-01

    Based on chaos and quantum properties, we propose a quantum private communication scheme with dynamic control code sequence. The initial sequence is obtained via chaotic systems, and the control code sequence is derived by grouping, XOR and extracting. A shift cycle algorithm is designed to enable the dynamic change of control code sequence. Analysis shows that transmission efficiency could reach 100 % with high dynamics and security.

  20. Efficient Quantum Private Communication Based on Dynamic Control Code Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zheng-Wen; Feng, Xiao-Yi; Peng, Jin-Ye; Zeng, Gui-Hua; Qi, Jin

    2016-12-01

    Based on chaos and quantum properties, we propose a quantum private communication scheme with dynamic control code sequence. The initial sequence is obtained via chaotic systems, and the control code sequence is derived by grouping, XOR and extracting. A shift cycle algorithm is designed to enable the dynamic change of control code sequence. Analysis shows that transmission efficiency could reach 100 % with high dynamics and security.

  1. High-throughput sequencing of human immunoglobulin variable regions with subtype identification.

    PubMed

    Schanz, Merle; Liechti, Thomas; Zagordi, Osvaldo; Miho, Enkelejda; Reddy, Sai T; Günthard, Huldrych F; Trkola, Alexandra; Huber, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The humoral immune response plays a critical role in controlling infection, and the rapid adaptation to a broad range of pathogens depends on a highly diverse antibody repertoire. The advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies in the past decade has enabled insights into this immense diversity. However, not only the variable, but also the constant region of antibodies determines their in vivo activity. Antibody isotypes differ in effector functions and are thought to play a defining role in elicitation of immune responses, both in natural infection and in vaccination. We have developed an Illumina MiSeq high-throughput sequencing protocol that allows determination of the human IgG subtype alongside sequencing full-length antibody variable heavy chain regions. We thereby took advantage of the Illumina procedure containing two additional short reads as identifiers. By performing paired-end sequencing of the variable regions and customizing one of the identifier sequences to distinguish IgG subtypes, IgG transcripts with linked information of variable regions and IgG subtype can be retrieved. We applied our new method to the analysis of the IgG variable region repertoire from PBMC of an HIV-1 infected individual confirmed to have serum antibody reactivity to the Membrane Proximal External Region (MPER) of gp41. We found that IgG3 subtype frequencies in the memory B cell compartment increased after halted treatment and coincided with increased plasma antibody reactivity against the MPER domain. The sequencing strategy we developed is not restricted to analysis of IgG. It can be adopted for any Ig subtyping and beyond that for any research question where phasing of distant regions on the same amplicon is needed.

  2. Hierarchical Control of Cognitive Processes: Switching Tasks in Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Darryl W.; Logan, Gordon D.

    2006-01-01

    Hierarchical control of cognitive processes was studied by examining the relationship between sequence- and task-level processing in the performance of explicit, memorized task sequences. In 4 experiments, switch costs in task-switching performance were perturbed by sequence initiation times that varied with sequence complexity, preparation time,…

  3. Evolution of Repeated Sequence Arrays in the D-Loop Region of Bat Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, G. S.; Mayer, F.; Kerth, G.; Petri, B.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region sequences from 41 species of bats representing 11 families revealed that repeated sequence arrays near the tRNA-Pro gene are present in all vespertilionine bats. Across 18 species tandem repeats varied in size from 78 to 85 bp and contained two to nine repeats. Heteroplasmy ranged from 15% to 63%. Fewer repeats among heteroplasmic than homoplasmic individuals in a species with up to nine repeats indicates selection may act against long arrays. A lower limit of two repeats and more repeats among heteroplasmic than homoplasmic individuals in two species with few repeats suggests length mutations are biased. Significant regressions of heteroplasmy, θ and π, on repeat number further suggest that repeat duplication rate increases with repeat number. Comparison of vespertilionine bat consensus repeats to mammal control region sequences revealed that tandem repeats of similar size, sequence and number also occur in shrews, cats and bighorn sheep. The presence of two conserved protein-binding sequences in all repeat units indicates that convergent evolution has occurred by duplication of functional units. We speculate that D-loop region tandem repeats may provide signal redundancy and a primitive repair mechanism in the event of somatic mutations to these binding sites. PMID:9215906

  4. Regional correlation of deposition sequences in the southern Mesozoic marine province, northwestern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Satterfield, J.I.; Oldow, J.S. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-04-01

    Strata of the Mesozoic marine province of a northwestern Nevada, deposited in subaerial to deep marine environment in a backarc basin, underwent severe deformation during the late Mesozoic. Restoration of stratigraphic relations among constituent volcanic, volcanogenic, carbonate, and continentally-derived siliciclastic rocks has been hampered by sparse biostratigraphic age control. Regional correlation of coeval facies is made possible by coupling depositional sequences with biostratigraphic control in the southwestern Gabbs Valley Range, the southern Shoshone Mountains, and the southern Clan Alpine Mountains, which serve as reference sections for Late Triassic and Early Jurassic ammonite zonation of western North America. Differentiation between regionally significant sequence boundaries and those of limited areal extent is possible only by linking the biostratigraphy and physical stratigraphic relations, such as abrupt vertical transitions in lithology corresponding to large facies changes. Physical stratigraphic relations alone are not adequate for correlation ad indicated by the diachronous initiation of Early to Middle( ) Jurassic deposition in half-graben basins (Dunlap Formation) which locally cloaks eustatically( ) controlled depositional sequences. Within these limitations, three regionally extensive sequences are recognized in the reference sections and have lower boundaries at the base of Upper Triassic shallow marine to deltaic carbonate-clastic rocks (Luning Formation) and at the base and within subtidal to offshore-marine carbonate and clastic rocks (Triassic and Jurassic Volcano Peak Group).

  5. The 5'-flanking regions of three pea legumin genes: comparison of the DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Lycett, G W; Croy, R R; Shirsat, A H; Richards, D M; Boulter, D

    1985-01-01

    Approximately 1200 nucleotides of sequence data from the promoter and 5'-flanking regions of each of three pea (Pisum sativum L.) legumin genes (legA, legB and legC) are presented. The promoter regions of all three genes were found to be identical including the "TATA box", and "CAAT box', and sequences showing homology to the SV40 enhancers. The legA sequence begins to diverge from the others about 300bp from the start codon, whereas the other two genes remain identical for another 550bp. The regions of partial homology exhibit deletions or insertions and some short, comparatively well conserved sequences. The significance of these features is discussed in terms of evolutionary mechanisms and their possible functional roles. The legC gene contains a region that may potentially form either of two mutually exclusive stem-loop structures, one of which has a stem 42bp long, which suggests that it could be fairly stable. We suggest that a mechanism of switching between such alternative structures may play some role in gene control or may represent the insertion of a transposable element. PMID:2997721

  6. Artificial Intelligence Controls Tape-Recording Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuttke, Ursula M.; Otamura, Roy M.; Zottarelli, Lawrence J.

    1989-01-01

    Developmental expert-system computer program intended to schedule recording of large amounts of data on limited amount of magnetic tape. Schedules recording using two sets of rules. First set incorporates knowledge of locations for recording of new data. Second set incorporates knowledge about issuing commands to recorder. Designed primarily for use on Voyager Spacecraft, also applicable to planning and sequencing in industry.

  7. Artificial Intelligence Controls Tape-Recording Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuttke, Ursula M.; Otamura, Roy M.; Zottarelli, Lawrence J.

    1989-01-01

    Developmental expert-system computer program intended to schedule recording of large amounts of data on limited amount of magnetic tape. Schedules recording using two sets of rules. First set incorporates knowledge of locations for recording of new data. Second set incorporates knowledge about issuing commands to recorder. Designed primarily for use on Voyager Spacecraft, also applicable to planning and sequencing in industry.

  8. Time Sequence of Jupiter's Equatorial Region (Time Sets 2 & 4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Time sequence of Jupiter's equatorial region at 756 nanometers (nm). The mosaics cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 22,000 kilometers and were taken ten hours (approximately one Jovian rotation) apart. The dark region near the center of the mosaic is an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the Galileo Probe entry site. The near-infrared continuum filter shows the features of Jupiter's main visible cloud deck.

    Jupiter's atmospheric circulation is dominated by alternating jets of east/west (zonal) winds. The bands have different widths and wind speeds but have remained constant as long as telescopes and spacecraft have measured them. The top half of these mosaics lies within Jupiter's North Equatorial Belt, a westward (left) current. The bottom half shows part of the Equatorial Zone, a fast moving eastward current. The clouds near the hotspot are the fastest moving features in these mosaics, moving at about 100 meters per second, or 224 miles per hour.

    North is at the top. The mosaics cover latitudes 1 to 19 degrees and are centered at longitude 336 degrees West. The grid lines, fixed in longitude, mark 350 degrees west (on the left edge) with decreasing longitude lines marking every 5 degrees moving east (to the right). The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. These images were taken on December 17, 1996, at a range of 1.5 million kilometers by the Solid State Imaging system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  9. Time Sequence of Jupiter's Equatorial Region (Time Sets 2 & 4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Time sequence of Jupiter's equatorial region at 756 nanometers (nm). The mosaics cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 22,000 kilometers and were taken ten hours (approximately one Jovian rotation) apart. The dark region near the center of the mosaic is an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the Galileo Probe entry site. The near-infrared continuum filter shows the features of Jupiter's main visible cloud deck.

    Jupiter's atmospheric circulation is dominated by alternating jets of east/west (zonal) winds. The bands have different widths and wind speeds but have remained constant as long as telescopes and spacecraft have measured them. The top half of these mosaics lies within Jupiter's North Equatorial Belt, a westward (left) current. The bottom half shows part of the Equatorial Zone, a fast moving eastward current. The clouds near the hotspot are the fastest moving features in these mosaics, moving at about 100 meters per second, or 224 miles per hour.

    North is at the top. The mosaics cover latitudes 1 to 19 degrees and are centered at longitude 336 degrees West. The grid lines, fixed in longitude, mark 350 degrees west (on the left edge) with decreasing longitude lines marking every 5 degrees moving east (to the right). The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. These images were taken on December 17, 1996, at a range of 1.5 million kilometers by the Solid State Imaging system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  10. The complementarity-determining region sequences in IgY antivenom hypervariable regions.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, David Gitirana; Fernandez, Jorge Hernandez; de Almeida, Claudia Maria Costa; da Silva, Claudia Letícia; Magnoli, Fabio Carlos; da Silva, Osmair Élder; da Silva, Wilmar Dias

    2017-08-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Development of IgY antibodies against anti-snake toxins endowed with highly lethal neutralizing activity" (da Rocha et al., 2017) [1]. Complementarity-determining region (CDR) sequences are variable antibody (Ab) sequences that respond with specificity, duration and strength to identify and bind to antigen (Ag) epitopes. B lymphocytes isolated from hens immunized with Bitis arietans (Ba) and anti-Crotalus durissus terrificus (Cdt) venoms and expressing high specificity, affinity and toxicity neutralizing antibody titers were used as DNA sources. The VLF1, CDR1, CDR2, VLR1 and CDR3 sequences were validated by BLASTp, and values corresponding to IgY VL and VH anti-Ba or anti-Cdt venoms were identified, registered [Gallus gallus IgY Fv Light chain (GU815099)/Gallus gallus IgY Fv Heavy chain (GU815098)] and used for molecular modeling of IgY scFv anti-Ba. The resulting CDR1, CDR2 and CDR3 sequences were combined to construct the three - dimensional structure of the Ab paratope.

  11. Colorectal Cancer Genetic Heterogeneity Delineated by Multi-Region Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rui; Xie, Zhen-Rong; Luo, Hua-You; Zeng, Yu-Jian; Xu, Yu; Wang, La-Mei; Kong, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Kun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) leads to an underestimation of the mutational landscape portrayed by a single needle biopsy and consequently affects treatment precision. The extent of colorectal cancer (CRC) genetic ITH is not well understood in Chinese patients. Thus, we conducted deep sequencing by using the OncoGxOne™ Plus panel, targeting 333 cancer-specific genes in multi-region biopsies of primary and liver metastatic tumors from three Chinese CRC patients. We determined that the extent of ITH varied among the three cases. On average, 65% of all the mutations detected were common within individual tumors. KMT2C aberrations and the NCOR1 mutation were the only ubiquitous events. Subsequent phylogenetic analysis showed that the tumors evolved in a branched manner. Comparison of the primary and metastatic tumors revealed that PPP2R1A (E370X), SETD2 (I1608V), SMAD4 (G382T), and AR splicing site mutations may be specific to liver metastatic cancer. These mutations might contribute to the initiation and progression of distant metastasis. Collectively, our analysis identified a substantial level of genetic ITH in CRC, which should be considered for personalized therapeutic strategies. PMID:27023146

  12. Rarity of DNA sequence alterations in the promoter region of the human androgen receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Cabral, D F; Santos, A; Ribeiro, M L; Mesquita, J C; Carvalho-Salles, A B; Hackel, C

    2004-12-01

    The human androgen receptor (AR) gene promoter lies in a GC-rich region containing two principal sites of transcription initiation and a putative Sp1 protein-binding site, without typical "TATA" and "CAAT" boxes. It has been suggested that mutations within the 5'untranslated region (5'UTR) may contribute to the development of prostate cancer by changing the rates of gene transcription and/or translation. In order to investigate this question, the aim of the present study was to search for the presence of mutations or polymorphisms at the AR-5'UTR in 92 prostate cancer patients, where histological diagnosis of adenocarcinoma was established in specimens obtained from transurethral resection or after prostatectomy. The AR-5'UTR was amplified by PCR from genomic DNA samples of the patients and of 100 healthy male blood donors, included as controls. Conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis was used for DNA sequence alteration screening. Only one band shift was detected in one individual from the blood donor group. Sequencing revealed a new single nucleotide deletion (T) in the most conserved portion of the promoter region at position +36 downstream from the transcription initiation site I. Although the effect of this specific mutation remains unknown, its rarity reveals the high degree of sequence conservation of the human androgen promoter region. Moreover, the absence of detectable variation within the critical 5'UTR in prostate cancer patients indicates a low probability of its involvement in prostate cancer etiology.

  13. Refining multiple sequence alignments with conserved core regions

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Saikat; Lanczycki, Christopher J.; Panchenko, Anna R.; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Thiessen, Paul A.; Bryant, Stephen H.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate multiple sequence alignments of proteins are very important to several areas of computational biology and provide an understanding of phylogenetic history of domain families, their identification and classification. This article presents a new algorithm, REFINER, that refines a multiple sequence alignment by iterative realignment of its individual sequences with the predetermined conserved core (block) model of a protein family. Realignment of each sequence can correct misalignments between a given sequence and the rest of the profile and at the same time preserves the family's overall block model. Large-scale benchmarking studies showed a noticeable improvement of alignment after refinement. This can be inferred from the increased alignment score and enhanced sensitivity for database searching using the sequence profiles derived from refined alignments compared with the original alignments. A standalone version of the program is available by ftp distribution () and will be incorporated into the next release of the Cn3D structure/alignment viewer. PMID:16707662

  14. Phaneorozoic sequence stratigraphy of Bolivia and adjacent regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sempere, T. )

    1993-02-01

    Phaneorozoic sequence stratigraphy of the Pacific margin of western South America, particularly the Bolivian section, has been completed and new interpretations and hypotheses have been proposed as a result of data analyses of this information. The Paleozoic margin was initially passive (late Cambrian-Llanvirn, [open quotes]Puna aulacogen[close quotes]), but became active during a middle Ordovician compressional episode. Most of late Cambrian to early Triassic Bolivian rocks are of marine origin, with dark shale units recording sea level rises, whereas middle Triassic to Recent rocks were mainly deposited in continental environments (except six restricted-marine ingressions in the late Cretaceous-Danian, and one in the late Miocene, all with hydrocarbon potential). A noteworthy similarity exists between the Devonian to Jurassic stratigraphies of Bolivia and the Parana basin, suggesting that Bolivia behaved as part of the Brazilian craton from late Cambrian to late Jurassic, when it was captured into the Pacific margin geotectonic system. Organic-rich units correlate with Paleozoic highstand deposits and younger ingressions. The Bolivian Phanerozoic strata is characterized by thick layers, partly due to middle Ordovician-Carboniferous and late Cretaceous-Cenozoic foreland basins. Paleozoic foreland geometries include northeastern onlaps and, potentially, stratigraphic traps. Hydrocarbon generation, migration and trapping mainly depended on Cenozoic structural loading and burial and on propagation of Andean deformation which are comprised of Paleozoic shale decollements. Precise knowledge of the evolution of the Phanerozoic geodynamic contexts and basin geometries through sedimentation and subsequent deformations is crucial for hydrocarbon exploration strategies in these regions.

  15. Linked control of syllable sequence and phonology in birdsong.

    PubMed

    Wohlgemuth, Melville J; Sober, Samuel J; Brainard, Michael S

    2010-09-29

    The control of sequenced behaviors, including human speech, requires that the brain coordinate the production of discrete motor elements with their concatenation into complex patterns. In birdsong, another sequential vocal behavior, the acoustic structure (phonology) of individual song elements, or "syllables," must be coordinated with the sequencing of syllables into a song. However, it is unknown whether syllable phonology is independent of the sequence in which a syllable is produced. We quantified interactions between phonology and sequence in Bengalese finch song by examining both convergent syllables, which can be preceded by at least two different syllables and divergent syllables, which can be followed by at least two different syllables. Phonology differed significantly based on the identity of the preceding syllable for 97% of convergent syllables and differed significantly with the identity of the upcoming syllable for 92% of divergent syllables. Furthermore, sequence-dependent phonological differences extended at least two syllables away from the convergent or divergent syllable. To determine whether these phenomena reflect differences in central control, we analyzed premotor neural activity in the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA). Activity associated with a syllable varied significantly depending on the sequence in which the syllable was produced, suggesting that sequence-dependent variations in premotor activity contribute to sequence-dependent differences in phonology. Moreover, these data indicate that RA activity could contribute to the sequencing of syllables. Together, these results suggest that, rather than being controlled independently, the sequence and phonology of birdsong are intimately related, as is the case for human speech.

  16. Iterative exponential growth of stereo- and sequence-controlled polymers.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Jonathan C; Ehrlich, Deborah J C; Gao, Angela X; Leibfarth, Frank A; Jiang, Yivan; Zhou, Erica; Jamison, Timothy F; Johnson, Jeremiah A

    2015-10-01

    Chemists have long sought sequence-controlled synthetic polymers that mimic nature's biopolymers, but a practical synthetic route that enables absolute control over polymer sequence and structure remains a key challenge. Here, we report an iterative exponential growth plus side-chain functionalization (IEG+) strategy that begins with enantiopure epoxides and facilitates the efficient synthesis of a family of uniform >3 kDa macromolecules of varying sequence and stereoconfiguration that are coupled to produce unimolecular polymers (>6 kDa) with sequences and structures that cannot be obtained using traditional polymerization techniques. Selective side-chain deprotection of three hexadecamers is also demonstrated, which imbues each compound with the ability to dissolve in water. We anticipate that these new macromolecules and the general IEG+ strategy will find broad application as a versatile platform for the scalable synthesis of sequence-controlled polymers.

  17. Iterative exponential growth of stereo- and sequence-controlled polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jonathan C.; Ehrlich, Deborah J. C.; Gao, Angela X.; Leibfarth, Frank A.; Jiang, Yivan; Zhou, Erica; Jamison, Timothy F.; Johnson, Jeremiah A.

    2015-10-01

    Chemists have long sought sequence-controlled synthetic polymers that mimic nature's biopolymers, but a practical synthetic route that enables absolute control over polymer sequence and structure remains a key challenge. Here, we report an iterative exponential growth plus side-chain functionalization (IEG+) strategy that begins with enantiopure epoxides and facilitates the efficient synthesis of a family of uniform >3 kDa macromolecules of varying sequence and stereoconfiguration that are coupled to produce unimolecular polymers (>6 kDa) with sequences and structures that cannot be obtained using traditional polymerization techniques. Selective side-chain deprotection of three hexadecamers is also demonstrated, which imbues each compound with the ability to dissolve in water. We anticipate that these new macromolecules and the general IEG+ strategy will find broad application as a versatile platform for the scalable synthesis of sequence-controlled polymers.

  18. Intrusion Detection in Control Systems using Sequence Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, Mai; Onoda, Takashi

    Intrusion detection is considered effective in control systems. Sequences of the control application behavior observed in the communication, such as the order of the control device to be controlled, are important in control systems. However, most intrusion detection systems do not effectively reflect sequences in the application layer into the detection rules. In our previous work, we considered utilizing sequences for intrusion detection in control systems, and demonstrated the usefulness of sequences for intrusion detection. However, manually writing the detection rules for a large system can be difficult, so using machine learning methods becomes feasible. Also, in the case of control systems, there have been very few observed cyber attacks, so we have very little knowledge of the attack data that should be used to train the intrusion detection system. In this paper, we use an approach that combines CRF (Conditional Random Field) considering the sequence of the system, thus able to reflect the characteristics of control system sequences into the intrusion detection system, and also does not need the knowledge of attack data to construct the detection rules.

  19. Dynamic MLC leaf sequencing for integrated linear accelerator control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Popple, Richard A.; Brezovich, Ivan A.

    2011-11-15

    closing leaf bank trajectories, the TrueBeam control system reduced the dose rate such that the leaf velocity was less than the maximum. Dose deviations relative to the 2.4 cm/s trajectory were less than 3%. For the conventional controller, the leaves repeatedly fell behind the planned positions until the beam hold threshold was reached, resulting in deviations of up to 19% relative to the 2.4 cm/s trajectory. For the two clinical fluence maps, reducing the planned dose rate reduced the dose in the zero fluence regions by 15% and 24% and increased the delivery time by 5 s and 14 s. No significant differences were noted in the high and intermediate dose regions measured using film. The DVHs for the head and neck plan showed a 10% reduction in cord dose for 20 MU/min relative to 600 MU/min sequencing dose rate, which was confirmed by measurement. No difference in target DVHs were observed. The reduction in cord dose increased total treatment time by 1.8 min. Conclusions: Leaf sequencing algorithms for integrated control systems should be modified to reflect the reduced importance of maximum leaf velocity for accurate dose delivery.

  20. An improved protocol for sequencing of repetitive genomic regions and structural variations using mutagenesis and next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Botond; Massingham, Tim; Stütz, Adrian M; Goldman, Nick

    2012-01-01

    The rise of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies has transformed de novo genome sequencing into an accessible research tool, but obtaining high quality eukaryotic genome assemblies remains a challenge, mostly due to the abundance of repetitive elements. These also make it difficult to study nucleotide polymorphism in repetitive regions, including certain types of structural variations. One solution proposed for resolving such regions is Sequence Assembly aided by Mutagenesis (SAM), which relies on the fact that introducing enough random mutations breaks the repetitive structure, making assembly possible. Sequencing many different mutated copies permits the sequence of the repetitive region to be inferred by consensus methods. However, this approach relies on molecular cloning in order to isolate and amplify individual mutant copies, making it hard to scale-up the approach for use in conjunction with high-throughput sequencing technologies. To address this problem, we propose NG-SAM, a modified version of the SAM protocol that relies on PCR and dilution steps only, coupled to a NGS workflow. NG-SAM therefore has the potential to be scaled-up, e.g. using emerging microfluidics technologies. We built a realistic simulation pipeline to study the feasibility of NG-SAM, and our results suggest that under appropriate experimental conditions the approach might be successfully put into practice. Moreover, our simulations suggest that NG-SAM is capable of reconstructing robustly a wide range of potential target sequences of varying lengths and repetitive structures.

  1. Automated manual transmission shift sequence controller

    DOEpatents

    Lawrie, Robert E.; Reed, Richard G.; Rausen, David J.

    2000-02-01

    A powertrain system for a hybrid vehicle. The hybrid vehicle includes a heat engine, such as a diesel engine, and an electric machine, which operates as both, an electric motor and an alternator, to power the vehicle. The hybrid vehicle also includes a manual-style transmission configured to operate as an automatic transmission from the perspective of the driver. The engine and the electric machine drive an input shaft which in turn drives an output shaft of the transmission. In addition to driving the transmission, the electric machine regulates the speed of the input shaft in order to synchronize the input shaft during either an upshift or downshift of the transmission by either decreasing or increasing the speed of the input shaft. When decreasing the speed of the input shaft, the electric motor functions as an alternator to produce electrical energy which may be stored by a storage device. Operation of the transmission is controlled by a transmission controller which receives input signals and generates output signals to control shift and clutch motors to effect smooth launch, upshift shifts, and downshifts of the transmission, so that the transmission functions substantially as an automatic transmission from the perspective of the driver, while internally substantially functioning as a manual transmission.

  2. Functional region prediction with a set of appropriate homologous sequences-an index for sequence selection by integrating structure and sequence information with spatial statistics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The detection of conserved residue clusters on a protein structure is one of the effective strategies for the prediction of functional protein regions. Various methods, such as Evolutionary Trace, have been developed based on this strategy. In such approaches, the conserved residues are identified through comparisons of homologous amino acid sequences. Therefore, the selection of homologous sequences is a critical step. It is empirically known that a certain degree of sequence divergence in the set of homologous sequences is required for the identification of conserved residues. However, the development of a method to select homologous sequences appropriate for the identification of conserved residues has not been sufficiently addressed. An objective and general method to select appropriate homologous sequences is desired for the efficient prediction of functional regions. Results We have developed a novel index to select the sequences appropriate for the identification of conserved residues, and implemented the index within our method to predict the functional regions of a protein. The implementation of the index improved the performance of the functional region prediction. The index represents the degree of conserved residue clustering on the tertiary structure of the protein. For this purpose, the structure and sequence information were integrated within the index by the application of spatial statistics. Spatial statistics is a field of statistics in which not only the attributes but also the geometrical coordinates of the data are considered simultaneously. Higher degrees of clustering generate larger index scores. We adopted the set of homologous sequences with the highest index score, under the assumption that the best prediction accuracy is obtained when the degree of clustering is the maximum. The set of sequences selected by the index led to higher functional region prediction performance than the sets of sequences selected by other sequence

  3. Functional region prediction with a set of appropriate homologous sequences--an index for sequence selection by integrating structure and sequence information with spatial statistics.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Wataru; Toh, Hiroyuki

    2012-05-29

    The detection of conserved residue clusters on a protein structure is one of the effective strategies for the prediction of functional protein regions. Various methods, such as Evolutionary Trace, have been developed based on this strategy. In such approaches, the conserved residues are identified through comparisons of homologous amino acid sequences. Therefore, the selection of homologous sequences is a critical step. It is empirically known that a certain degree of sequence divergence in the set of homologous sequences is required for the identification of conserved residues. However, the development of a method to select homologous sequences appropriate for the identification of conserved residues has not been sufficiently addressed. An objective and general method to select appropriate homologous sequences is desired for the efficient prediction of functional regions. We have developed a novel index to select the sequences appropriate for the identification of conserved residues, and implemented the index within our method to predict the functional regions of a protein. The implementation of the index improved the performance of the functional region prediction. The index represents the degree of conserved residue clustering on the tertiary structure of the protein. For this purpose, the structure and sequence information were integrated within the index by the application of spatial statistics. Spatial statistics is a field of statistics in which not only the attributes but also the geometrical coordinates of the data are considered simultaneously. Higher degrees of clustering generate larger index scores. We adopted the set of homologous sequences with the highest index score, under the assumption that the best prediction accuracy is obtained when the degree of clustering is the maximum. The set of sequences selected by the index led to higher functional region prediction performance than the sets of sequences selected by other sequence-based methods

  4. A Fast Algorithm for Exonic Regions Prediction in DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Saberkari, Hamidreza; Shamsi, Mousa; Heravi, Hamed; Sedaaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to introduce a fast method for gene prediction in DNA sequences based on the period-3 property in exons. First, the symbolic DNA sequences were converted to digital signal using the electron ion interaction potential method. Then, to reduce the effect of background noise in the period-3 spectrum, we used the discrete wavelet transform at three levels and applied it on the input digital signal. Finally, the Goertzel algorithm was used to extract period-3 components in the filtered DNA sequence. The proposed algorithm leads to decrease the computational complexity and hence, increases the speed of the process. Detection of small size exons in DNA sequences, exactly, is another advantage of the algorithm. The proposed algorithm ability in exon prediction was compared with several existing methods at the nucleotide level using: (i) specificity - sensitivity values; (ii) receiver operating curves (ROC); and (iii) area under ROC curve. Simulation results confirmed that the proposed method can be used as a promising tool for exon prediction in DNA sequences. PMID:24672762

  5. High sequence turnover in the regulatory regions of the developmental gene hunchback in insects.

    PubMed

    Hancock, J M; Shaw, P J; Bonneton, F; Dover, G A

    1999-02-01

    Extensive sequence analysis of the developmental gene hunchback and its 5' and 3' regulatory regions in Drosophila melanogaster, Drosophila virilis, Musca domestica, and Tribolium castaneum, using a variety of computer algorithms, reveals regions of high sequence simplicity probably generated by slippage-like mechanisms of turnover. No regions are entirely refractory to the action of slippage, although the density and composition of simple sequence motifs varies from region to region. Interestingly, the 5' and 3' flanking regions share short repetitive motifs despite their separation by the gene itself, and the motifs are different in composition from those in the exons and introns. Furthermore, there are high levels of conservation of motifs in equivalent orthologous regions. Detailed sequence analysis of the P2 promoter and DNA footprinting assays reveal that the number, orientation, sequence, spacing, and protein-binding affinities of the BICOID-binding sites varies between species and that the 'P2' promoter, the nanos response element in the 3' untranslated region, and several conserved boxes of sequence in the gene (e.g., the two zinc-finger regions) are surrounded by cryptically-simple-sequence DNA. We argue that high sequence turnover and genetic redundancy permit both the general maintenance of promoter functions through the establishment of coevolutionary (compensatory) changes in cis- and trans-acting genetic elements and, at the same time, the possibility of subtle changes in the regulation of hunchback in the different species.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region-1 sequence variation and phylogeny of the concolor gibbons, Nomascus.

    PubMed

    Monda, Keri; Simmons, Rachel E; Kressirer, Philipp; Su, Bing; Woodruff, David S

    2007-11-01

    The still little known concolor gibbons are represented by 14 taxa (five species, nine subspecies) distributed parapatrically in China, Myanmar, Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. To set the stage for a phylogeographic study of the genus we examined DNA sequences from the highly variable mitochondrial hypervariable region-1 (HVR-1 or control region) in 51 animals, mostly of unknown geographic provenance. We developed gibbon-specific primers to amplify mtDNA noninvasively and obtained >477 bp sequences from 38 gibbons in North American and European zoos and >159 bp sequences from ten Chinese museum skins. In hindsight, we believe these animals represent eight of the nine nominal subspecies and four of the five nominal species. Bayesian, maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony haplotype network analyses gave concordant results and show Nomascus to be monophyletic. Significant intraspecific variation within N. leucogenys (17 haplotypes) is comparable with that reported earlier in Hylobates lar and less than half the known interspecific pairwise distances in gibbons. Sequence data support the recognition of five species (concolor, leucogenys, nasutus, gabriellae and probably hainanus) and suggest that nasutus is the oldest and leucogenys, the youngest taxon. In contrast, the subspecies N. c. furvogaster, N. c. jingdongensis, and N. leucogenys siki, are not recognizable at this otherwise informative genetic locus. These results show that HVR-1 sequence is variable enough to define evolutionarily significant units in Nomascus and, if coupled with multilocus microsatellite or SNP genotyping, more than adequate to characterize their phylogeographic history. There is an urgent need to obtain DNA from gibbons of known geographic provenance before they are extirpated to facilitate the conservation genetic management of the surviving animals.

  7. Characterization and evolution of the mitochondrial DNA control region in Ranidae and their phylogenetic relationship.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z H; Tu, F Y

    2016-08-29

    The control region is considered to be one of the most variable parts of animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We compared the mtDNA control region from 37 species representing 14 genera and 4 subfamilies of Ranidae, to analyze the evolution of the control region and to determine their phylogenetic relationship. All the Ranidae species had a single control region, except four species that had two repeat regions. The control region spanned the region between the Cyt b and tRNAleu genes in most of the Ranidae species. The length of the control region sequences ranged from 1186 bp (Limnonectes bannaensis) to 6746 bp (Rana kunyuensis). The average genetic distances among the species varied from 1.94% (between R. chosenica and R. plancyi) to 113.25% (between Amolops ricketti and Euphlyctis hexadactylus). The alignment of three conserved sequence blocks was identified. However, conserved sequence boxes F to A were not found in Ranidae. A maximum likelihood method was used to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationship based on a general time reversible + gamma distribution model. The amount of A+T was higher than G+C across the whole control region. The phylogenetic tree grouped members of the respective subfamilies into separate clades, with the exception of Raninae. Our analysis supported that some genera, including Rana and Amolops, may be polyphyletic. Control region sequence is an effective molecular mark for Ranidae phylogenetic inference.

  8. Sequence polymorphism in a novel noncoding region of Pacific oyster mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Aranishi, Futoshi; Okimoto, Takane

    2005-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence polymorphism in a 641-bp novel major noncoding region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA-NC) of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas was analysed for 29 cultured individuals within the Goseong population. A total of 30 variable sites were detected, and the relative frequency of nucleotide alteration was determined to be 4.68. Alterations were mostly single nucleotide substitutions. Transition, transversion, both transition and transversion, and both transversion and nucleotide deletion were observed at 18, 9, 2 and 1 sites, respectively. Among 29 specimens, 22 haplotypes were identified, and pairwise genetic diversity of haplotypes was calculated to be 0.988 from multiple sequence substitutions using the two-parameter model. A phylogenetic tree, obtained for haplotypes by the neighbor-joining method, showed a single cluster of linkages. The cluster comprised 11 haplotypes associating with 14 specimens, while the other 11 haplotypes associating with 15 specimens were scattered. This mtDNA-NC presenting a high nucleotide sequence polymorphism is a potential mtDNA control region. It therefore can serve as a genetic marker for intraspecies phylogenetic analysis of the Pacific oyster and is more useful than the less polymorphic mtDNA coding genes.

  9. OrfPredictor: predicting protein-coding regions in EST-derived sequences

    PubMed Central

    Min, Xiang Jia; Butler, Gregory; Storms, Reginald; Tsang, Adrian

    2005-01-01

    OrfPredictor is a web server designed for identifying protein-coding regions in expressed sequence tag (EST)-derived sequences. For query sequences with a hit in BLASTX, the program predicts the coding regions based on the translation reading frames identified in BLASTX alignments, otherwise, it predicts the most probable coding region based on the intrinsic signals of the query sequences. The output is the predicted peptide sequences in the FASTA format, and a definition line that includes the query ID, the translation reading frame and the nucleotide positions where the coding region begins and ends. OrfPredictor facilitates the annotation of EST-derived sequences, particularly, for large-scale EST projects. OrfPredictor is available at . PMID:15980561

  10. DNA sequences of the cysK regions of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli and linkage of the cysK regions to ptsH.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, C R; Monroe, R S; Ward, K A; Kredich, N M

    1988-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences of the cysK regions of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli have been determined. A total of 3,812 and 2,595 nucleotides were sequenced from S. typhimurium and E. coli, respectively. Open reading frames of 323 codons were found in both species and were identified as those of cysK by comparison of deduced amino acid sequences with amino- and carboxyl-terminal amino acid analyses of the S. typhimurium cysK gene product O-acetylserine (thiol)-lyase A. The two cysK DNA sequences were 85% identical, and the deduced amino acid sequences were 96% identical. The major transcription initiation sites for cysK were found to be virtually identical in the two organisms, by using primer extension and S1 nuclease protection techniques. The -35 region corresponding to the major transcription start site was TTCCCC in S. typhimurium and TTCCGC in E. coli. The deviation of these sequences from the consensus sequence TTGACA may reflect the fact that cysK is subject to positive control and requires the cysB regulatory protein for expression. Sequences downstream of cysK were found to include ptsH and a portion of ptsI, thus establishing the exact relationship of cysK with these two genes. A 290-codon open reading frame, which may represent the cysZ gene, was identified upstream of cysK. Images PMID:3290198

  11. Linked control of syllable sequence and phonology in birdsong

    PubMed Central

    Wohlgemuth, Melville J.; Sober, Samuel J.; Brainard, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    The control of sequenced behaviors, including human speech, requires that the brain coordinate the production of discrete motor elements with their concatenation into complex patterns. In birdsong, another sequential vocal behavior, the acoustic structure (phonology) of individual song elements, or “syllables,” must be coordinated with the sequencing of syllables into a song. However, it is unknown whether syllable phonology is independent of the sequence in which a syllable is produced. We quantified interactions between phonology and sequence in Bengalese finch song by examining both convergent syllables, which can be preceded by at least two different syllables and divergent syllables, which can be followed by at least two different syllables. Phonology differed significantly based on the identity of the preceding syllable for 97% of convergent syllables and differed significantly with the identity of the upcoming syllable for 92% of divergent syllables. Furthermore, sequence-dependent phonological differences extended at least two syllables away from the convergent or divergent syllable. To determine whether these phenomena reflect differences in central control, we analyzed premotor neural activity in the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA). Activity associated with a syllable varied significantly depending on the sequence in which the syllable was produced, suggesting that sequence-dependent variations in premotor activity contribute to sequence-dependent differences in phonology. Moreover, these data indicate that RA activity could contribute to the sequencing of syllables. Together, these results suggest that rather than being controlled independently, the sequence and phonology of birdsong are intimately related, as is the case for human speech. PMID:20881112

  12. Chronology of Eocene-Miocene sequences on the New Jersey shallow shelf: implications for regional, interregional, and global correlations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Browning, James V.; Miller, Kenneth G.; Sugarman, Peter J.; Barron, John; McCarthy, Francine M.G.; Kulhanek, Denise K.; Katz, Miriam E.; Feigenson, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 313 continuously cored and logged latest Eocene to early-middle Miocene sequences at three sites (M27, M28, and M29) on the inner-middle continental shelf offshore New Jersey, providing an opportunity to evaluate the ages, global correlations, and significance of sequence boundaries. We provide a chronology for these sequences using integrated strontium isotopic stratigraphy and biostratigraphy (primarily calcareous nannoplankton, diatoms, and dinocysts [dinoflagellate cysts]). Despite challenges posed by shallow-water sediments, age resolution is typically ±0.5 m.y. and in many sequences is as good as ±0.25 m.y. Three Oligocene sequences were sampled at Site M27 on sequence bottomsets. Fifteen early to early-middle Miocene sequences were dated at Sites M27, M28, and M29 across clinothems in topsets, foresets (where the sequences are thickest), and bottomsets. A few sequences have coarse (∼1 m.y.) or little age constraint due to barren zones; we constrain the age estimates of these less well dated sequences by applying the principle of superposition, i.e., sediments above sequence boundaries in any site are younger than the sediments below the sequence boundaries at other sites. Our age control provides constraints on the timing of deposition in the clinothem; sequences on the topsets are generally the youngest in the clinothem, whereas the bottomsets generally are the oldest. The greatest amount of time is represented on foresets, although we have no evidence for a correlative conformity. Our chronology provides a baseline for regional and interregional correlations and sea-level reconstructions: (1) we correlate a major increase in sedimentation rate precisely with the timing of the middle Miocene climate changes associated with the development of a permanent East Antarctic Ice Sheet; and (2) the timing of sequence boundaries matches the deep-sea oxygen isotopic record, implicating glacioeustasy as a major driver

  13. Comparative analysis of complete mitochondrial DNA control region of four species of Strigiformes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bing; Ma, Fei; Sun, Yi; Li, Qing-Wei

    2006-11-01

    The sequence of the whole mitochondrial (mt) DNA control region (CR) of four species of Strigiformes was obtained. Length of the CR was 3,290 bp, 2,848 bp, 2,444 bp, and 1,771 bp for Asio flammeus, Asio otus, Athene noctua, and Strix aluco, respectively. Interestingly, the length of the control region was maximum in Asio flammeus among all the avian mtDNA control regions sequenced thus far. In addition, the base composition and organization of mtDNA CR of Asio flammeus were identical to those reported for other birds. On the basis of the differential frequencies of base substitutions, the CR may be divided two variable domains, I and III, and a central conserved domain, II. The 3' end of the CR contained many tandem repeats of varying lengths and repeat numbers. In Asio flammeus, the repeated sequences consisted of a 126 bp sequence that was repeated seven times and a 78 bp sequence that was repeated 14 times. In Asio otus, there were also two repeated sequences, namely a 127 bp sequence that was repeated eight times and a 78 bp sequence that was repeated six times. The control region of Athene noctua contained three sets of repeats: a 89 bp sequence that was repeated three times, a 77 bp sequence that was repeated four times, and a 71 bp sequence that was repeated six times. Strix aluco, however, had only one repeated sequence, a 78 bp sequence that was repeated five times. The results of this study seem to indicate that these tandem repeats may have resulted from slipped-strand mispairing during mtDNA replication. Moreover, there are many conserved motifs within the repeated units. These sequences could form stable stem-loop secondary structures, which suggests that these repeated sequences play an important role in regulating transcription and replication of the mitochondrial genome.

  14. Ultradeep sequencing of a human ultraconserved region reveals somatic and constitutional genomic instability.

    PubMed

    De Grassi, Anna; Segala, Cinzia; Iannelli, Fabio; Volorio, Sara; Bertario, Lucio; Radice, Paolo; Bernard, Loris; Ciccarelli, Francesca D

    2010-01-01

    Early detection of cancer-associated genomic instability is crucial, particularly in tumour types in which this instability represents the essential underlying mechanism of tumourigenesis. Currently used methods require the presence of already established neoplastic cells because they only detect clonal mutations. In principle, parallel sequencing of single DNA filaments could reveal the early phases of tumour initiation by detecting low-frequency mutations, provided an adequate depth of coverage and an effective control of the experimental error. We applied ultradeep sequencing to estimate the genomic instability of individuals with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). To overcome the experimental error, we used an ultraconserved region (UCR) of the human genome as an internal control. By comparing the mutability outside and inside the UCR, we observed a tendency of the ultraconserved element to accumulate significantly fewer mutations than the flanking segments in both neoplastic and nonneoplastic HNPCC samples. No difference between the two regions was detectable in cells from healthy donors, indicating that all three HNPCC samples have mutation rates higher than the healthy genome. This is the first, to our knowledge, direct evidence of an intrinsic genomic instability of individuals with heterozygous mutations in mismatch repair genes, and constitutes the proof of principle for the development of a more sensitive molecular assay of genomic instability.

  15. On generalized fixed sequence procedures for controlling the FWER.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhiying; Guo, Wenge; Lynch, Gavin

    2015-12-30

    Testing a sequence of pre-ordered hypotheses to decide which of these can be rejected or accepted while controlling the familywise error rate (FWER) is of importance in many scientific studies such as clinical trials. In this paper, we first introduce a generalized fixed sequence procedure whose critical values are defined by using a function of the numbers of rejections and acceptances, and which allows follow-up hypotheses to be tested even if some earlier hypotheses are not rejected. We then construct the least favorable configuration for this generalized fixed sequence procedure and present a sufficient condition for the FWER control under arbitrary dependence. Based on the condition, we develop three new generalized fixed sequence procedures controlling the FWER under arbitrary dependence. We also prove that each generalized fixed sequence procedure can be described as a specific closed testing procedure. Through simulation studies and a clinical trial example, we compare the power performance of these proposed procedures with those of the existing FWER controlling procedures. Finally, when the pairwise joint distributions of the true null p-values are known, we further improve these procedures by incorporating pairwise correlation information while maintaining the control of the FWER. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Fast discovery and visualization of conserved regions in DNA sequences using quasi-alignment.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Anurag; Hahsler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing techniques are producing enormous amounts of biological sequence data and analysis becomes a major computational problem. Currently, most analysis, especially the identification of conserved regions, relies heavily on Multiple Sequence Alignment and its various heuristics such as progressive alignment, whose run time grows with the square of the number and the length of the aligned sequences and requires significant computational resources. In this work, we present a method to efficiently discover regions of high similarity across multiple sequences without performing expensive sequence alignment. The method is based on approximating edit distance between segments of sequences using p-mer frequency counts. Then, efficient high-throughput data stream clustering is used to group highly similar segments into so called quasi-alignments. Quasi-alignments have numerous applications such as identifying species and their taxonomic class from sequences, comparing sequences for similarities, and, as in this paper, discovering conserved regions across related sequences. In this paper, we show that quasi-alignments can be used to discover highly similar segments across multiple sequences from related or different genomes efficiently and accurately. Experiments on a large number of unaligned 16S rRNA sequences obtained from the Greengenes database show that the method is able to identify conserved regions which agree with known hypervariable regions in 16S rRNA. Furthermore, the experiments show that the proposed method scales well for large data sets with a run time that grows only linearly with the number and length of sequences, whereas for existing multiple sequence alignment heuristics the run time grows super-linearly. Quasi-alignment-based algorithms can detect highly similar regions and conserved areas across multiple sequences. Since the run time is linear and the sequences are converted into a compact clustering model, we are able to

  17. Intra-Genomic Internal Transcribed Spacer Region Sequence Heterogeneity and Molecular Diagnosis in Clinical Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jingwei; Xu, Yingchun; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-10-22

    Internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequencing is the most extensively used technology for accurate molecular identification of fungal pathogens in clinical microbiology laboratories. Intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity, which makes fungal identification based on direct sequencing of PCR products difficult, has rarely been reported in pathogenic fungi. During the process of performing ITS sequencing on 71 yeast strains isolated from various clinical specimens, direct sequencing of the PCR products showed ambiguous sequences in six of them. After cloning the PCR products into plasmids for sequencing, interpretable sequencing electropherograms could be obtained. For each of the six isolates, 10-49 clones were selected for sequencing and two to seven intra-genomic ITS copies were detected. The identities of these six isolates were confirmed to be Candida glabrata (n=2), Pichia (Candida) norvegensis (n=2), Candida tropicalis (n=1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (n=1). Multiple sequence alignment revealed that one to four intra-genomic ITS polymorphic sites were present in the six isolates, and all these polymorphic sites were located in the ITS1 and/or ITS2 regions. We report and describe the first evidence of intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity in four different pathogenic yeasts, which occurred exclusively in the ITS1 and ITS2 spacer regions for the six isolates in this study.

  18. Intra-Genomic Internal Transcribed Spacer Region Sequence Heterogeneity and Molecular Diagnosis in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jingwei; Xu, Yingchun; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequencing is the most extensively used technology for accurate molecular identification of fungal pathogens in clinical microbiology laboratories. Intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity, which makes fungal identification based on direct sequencing of PCR products difficult, has rarely been reported in pathogenic fungi. During the process of performing ITS sequencing on 71 yeast strains isolated from various clinical specimens, direct sequencing of the PCR products showed ambiguous sequences in six of them. After cloning the PCR products into plasmids for sequencing, interpretable sequencing electropherograms could be obtained. For each of the six isolates, 10–49 clones were selected for sequencing and two to seven intra-genomic ITS copies were detected. The identities of these six isolates were confirmed to be Candida glabrata (n = 2), Pichia (Candida) norvegensis (n = 2), Candida tropicalis (n = 1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (n = 1). Multiple sequence alignment revealed that one to four intra-genomic ITS polymorphic sites were present in the six isolates, and all these polymorphic sites were located in the ITS1 and/or ITS2 regions. We report and describe the first evidence of intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity in four different pathogenic yeasts, which occurred exclusively in the ITS1 and ITS2 spacer regions for the six isolates in this study. PMID:26506340

  19. MAIN-SEQUENCE STAR POPULATIONS IN THE VIRGO OVERDENSITY REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.; Tisserand, P.; Willman, B.; Arimoto, N.; Okamoto, S.; Mateo, M.; Saviane, I.; Walsh, S.; Geha, M.; Jordan, A.; Zoccali, M.; Olszewski, E.; Walker, M.; Kroupa, P.

    2013-05-20

    We present deep color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) for two Subaru Suprime-Cam fields in the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS)/Virgo Overdensity (VOD) and compare them to a field centered on the highest concentration of Sagittarius (Sgr) Tidal Stream stars in the leading arm, Branch A of the bifurcation. A prominent population of main-sequence stars is detected in all three fields and can be traced as faint as g Almost-Equal-To 24 mag. Using theoretical isochrone fitting, we derive an age of 9.1{sup +1.0}{sub -1.1} Gyr, a median abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.70{sup +0.15}{sub -0.20} dex, and a heliocentric distance of 30.9 {+-} 3.0 kpc for the main sequence of the Sgr Stream Branch A. The dominant main-sequence populations in the two VSS/VOD fields ({Lambda}{sub Sun} Almost-Equal-To 265 Degree-Sign , B{sub Sun} Almost-Equal-To 13 Degree-Sign ) are located at a mean distance of 23.3 {+-} 1.6 kpc and have an age of {approx}8.2 Gyr, and an abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.67{sup +0.16}{sub -0.12} dex, similar to the Sgr Stream stars. These statistically robust parameters, derived from the photometry of 260 main-sequence stars, are also in good agreement with the age of the main population in the Sgr dwarf galaxy (8.0 {+-} 1.5 Gyr). They also agree with the peak in the metallicity distribution of 2-3 Gyr old M giants, [Fe/H] Almost-Equal-To -0.6 dex, in the Sgr north leading arm. We then compare the results from the VSS/VOD fields with the Sgr Tidal Stream model by Law and Majewski based on a triaxial Galactic halo shape that is empirically calibrated with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Sgr A-branch and Two Micron All Sky Survey M-giant stars. We find that the most prominent feature in the CMDs, the main-sequence population at 23 kpc, is not explained by the model. Instead the model predicts in these directions a low-density filamentary structure of Sgr debris stars at {approx}9 kpc and a slightly higher concentration of Sgr stars spread over a heliocentric distance range of 42-53 kpc. At best

  20. Main-Sequence Star Populations in the Virgo Overdensity Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.; Willman, B.; Tisserand, P.; Arimoto, N.; Okamoto, S.; Mateo, M.; Saviane, I.; Walsh, S.; Geha, M.; Jordán, A.; Olszewski, E.; Walker, M.; Zoccali, M.; Kroupa, P.

    2013-05-01

    We present deep color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) for two Subaru Suprime-Cam fields in the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS)/Virgo Overdensity (VOD) and compare them to a field centered on the highest concentration of Sagittarius (Sgr) Tidal Stream stars in the leading arm, Branch A of the bifurcation. A prominent population of main-sequence stars is detected in all three fields and can be traced as faint as g ≈ 24 mag. Using theoretical isochrone fitting, we derive an age of 9.1^{+1.0}_{-1.1} Gyr, a median abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.70^{+0.15}_{-0.20} dex, and a heliocentric distance of 30.9 ± 3.0 kpc for the main sequence of the Sgr Stream Branch A. The dominant main-sequence populations in the two VSS/VOD fields (Λ⊙ ≈ 265°, B ⊙ ≈ 13°) are located at a mean distance of 23.3 ± 1.6 kpc and have an age of ~8.2 Gyr, and an abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.67^{+0.16}_{-0.12} dex, similar to the Sgr Stream stars. These statistically robust parameters, derived from the photometry of 260 main-sequence stars, are also in good agreement with the age of the main population in the Sgr dwarf galaxy (8.0 ± 1.5 Gyr). They also agree with the peak in the metallicity distribution of 2-3 Gyr old M giants, [Fe/H] ≈-0.6 dex, in the Sgr north leading arm. We then compare the results from the VSS/VOD fields with the Sgr Tidal Stream model by Law & Majewski based on a triaxial Galactic halo shape that is empirically calibrated with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Sgr A-branch and Two Micron All Sky Survey M-giant stars. We find that the most prominent feature in the CMDs, the main-sequence population at 23 kpc, is not explained by the model. Instead the model predicts in these directions a low-density filamentary structure of Sgr debris stars at ~9 kpc and a slightly higher concentration of Sgr stars spread over a heliocentric distance range of 42-53 kpc. At best there is only marginal evidence for the presence of these populations in our data. Our findings then suggest that while there are

  1. Sequence of the WT1 upstream region including the Wit-1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Gessler, M. ); Bruns, G.A.P. )

    1993-08-01

    The Wilms tumor gene WT1 encodes a Cys[sub 2]His[sub 2]-type zinc finger protein that can bind DNA and function as a transcriptional regulator. The pathological spectrum of tumorigenesis and various developmental defects produced by different WT1 alteration suggests that WT1 controls a number of subsequent effector genes. To define the role of WT1 in these developmental processes it will be important to elucidate mechanisms that govern expression of WT1 itself. To facilitate mapping of the WT1 promoter region and 5[prime] control elements the authors have determined the sequence upstream of the WT1 transcription unit. This includes the Wit-1 gene that is transcribed in the opposite direction. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  2. [Structure analysis of mtDNA control region of spotted halibut (Verasper variegatus) and its related species].

    PubMed

    He, Chong-Bo; Cao, Jie; Liu, Wei-Dong; Zhou, Zun-Chun; Ge, Long-Li; Gao, Xiang-Gang; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2007-07-01

    Spotted halibut (Verasper variegatus) is the only species of Genus Verasper in China. The fish was naturally distributed in Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea in northern China and Kyushu in Japan and in Korean sea area. Using PCR product direct sequencing, mitochondrial control region sequences of 24 individuals of spotted halibut was confirmed and analyzed. 4 control region haplotypes, resulting from length heteroplamy of the tandem repeat region, was obtained from these 24 fish. Sequence analysis demonstrated that there were four similar structures in the control region, i.e., extended terminal associated sequences (ETAS), central conserved sequence block (CSB), conserved sequence block (CSB), and repeat region, in V. moseri, Limanda ferruginea, Reinhardtius hippoglossoides, Heppoglossoides platessoides, Paralichthys olivaceous, Solea solea, S. senegalensis, and S. lascari. By comparing with other vertebrates, we found that there were similar repeated sequences immediately after the CSB-3 in all of the anuran species.

  3. Bacteriorhodopsin: partial sequence of mRNA provides amino acid sequence in the precursor region.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S H; Majumdar, A; Dunn, R; Makabe, O; RajBhandary, U L; Khorana, H G; Ohtsuka, E; Tanaka, T; Taniyama, Y O; Ikehara, M

    1981-01-01

    mRNA for bacteriorhodopsin from Halobacterium halobium has been partially purified. By using this mRNA as template in the presence of reverse transcriptase RNA-dependent DNA nucleotidyltransferase and a 5'-[32P] synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide corresponding to amino acids 9-12 of bacteriorhodopsin as primer, we have isolated the major 5'-[32P]cDNA product, approximately 80 nucleotides long, and determined its sequence. Based on the cDNA sequence, the 5'-proximal sequence of bacteriorhodopsin mRNA is G-C-A-U-G-U-U-G-G-A-G-U-U-A-U-U-G-C-C-A-A-C-A-G-C-A-G-U-G-G-A-G-G-G-G-G-U-A-U-C -G-C-A-G-G-C-C-C-A-G-A-U-C-A-C-C-G-G-A-C-G-U-C-C-G. This includes the expected sequence for amino acids 1-8 and shows that bacteriorhodopsin is synthesized as a precursor that is at least 13 amino acids longer (Met-Leu-Glu-Leu-Leu-Pro-Thr-Ala-Val-Glu-Gly-Val-Ser) at the NH2 terminus. Agarose/urea gel electrophoresis of the partially purified mRNA showed several bands; of these, a major one hybridized with 5'-[32P]cDNA. These results suggest that the bacteriorhodopsin mRNA in the partially purified preparation is homogeneous in size and that it constitutes a substantial portion of the RNA preparation subjected to electrophoresis. Images PMID:6943548

  4. Temporal evolution of earthquake sequences (swarms) in the Central Volcanic Region, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, K. M.; Smith, E. G.; Savage, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    We examine the temporal evolution of earthquake sequences in the Central Volcanic Region of New Zealand as a step towards probabilistic modelling. We characterize 257 sequences with at least four events selected from the GeoNet earthquake catalog between 1987 and 2009 with an inferred completeness magnitude of 2.5. We categorize 14 as mainshock-aftershock (MS-AS), including four of the ten largest sequences. We analyze sequences by size (4 to 831 events), maximum magnitude (2.53 to 6.14), duration (minutes to 35 days), and other parameters including moment release with time, magnitude histories, inter-event time differences, and spatial relationships. In particular we closely examine the position and size of the maximum magnitude event and its relation to the size and development of each sequence. Sequences with mainshock magnitudes of M=5.0 or greater all have 100 or more earthquakes (5 sequences, including 3 MS-AS). Sequences with a mainshock magnitude below 3.0 have less than 20 earthquakes (60 sequences). We use average inter-event time differences to look at development of sequences in time. While there is variability between sequences they generally fit three basic patterns (Fig.). We have also searched for possible triggering of the sequences by large global (M=7.0+) and moderate New Zealand (M=6.0+) earthquakes. While some sequences follow large earthquakes closely in time, we cannot rule out the possibility that this timing is random. Average inter-event times are plotted against time normalized to sequence duration for three sequences A) classic MS-AS sequence with decaying rate (increasing inter-event time); B) swarm whose rate accelerates towards the end of the sequence (decreasing inter-event time); C) sharp increase in rate (decrease in inter-event time) followed by steady decrease (seen for both swarm type and some foreshock-MS-AS sequences).

  5. An unusual source of apparent mitochondrial heteroplasmy: duplicate mitochondrial control regions in Thalassarche albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Cathryn L; Double, Michael C; Trueman, John W H; Robinson, Anna; Cockburn, Andrew

    2005-10-01

    Molecular ecologists, in search of suitable molecular markers, frequently PCR-amplify regions of mitochondrial DNA from total DNA extracts. This approach, although common, is prone to the co-amplification of nuclear copies of transposed DNA sequences (numts), which can then generate apparent mitochondrial sequence heteroplasmy. In this study we describe the discovery of apparent mitochondrial sequence heteroplasmy in Thalassarche albatrosses but eliminate the possibility of true sequence heteroplasmy and numts and instead reveal the source of the apparent heteroplasmy to be a duplicated control region. The two control regions align easily but are not identical in sequence or in length. Comparisons of functionally significant conserved sequence blocks do not provide evidence of degeneration in either duplicate. Phylogenetic analyses of domain I of both control region copies in five Thalassarche species indicate that they are largely evolving in concert; however, a short section within them is clearly evolving independently. To our knowledge this is the first time contrasting evolutionary patterns have been reported for duplicate control regions. Available evidence suggests that this duplication may be taxonomically widespread, so the results presented here should be considered in future evolutionary studies targeting the control region of all Procellariiformes and potentially other closely related avian groups.

  6. Generation of control sequences for a pilot-disassembly system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliger, Guenther; Kim, Hyung-Ju; Keil, Thomas

    2002-02-01

    Closing the product and material cycles has emerged as a paradigm for industry in the 21st century. Disassembly plays a key role in a life cycle economy since it enables the recovery of resources. A partly automated disassembly system should adapt to a large variety of products and different degrees of devaluation. Also the amounts of products to be disassembled can vary strongly. To cope with these demands an approach to generate on-line disassembly control sequences will be presented. In order to react on these demands the technological feasibility is considered within a procedure for the generation of disassembly control sequences. Procedures are designed to find available and technologically feasible disassembly processes. The control system is formed by modularised and parameterised control units in the cell level within the entire control architecture. In the first development stage product and process analyses at the sample product washing machine were executed. Furthermore a generalized disassembly process was defined. Afterwards these processes were structured in primary and secondary functions. In the second stage the disassembly control at the technological level was investigated. Factors were the availability of the disassembly tools and the technological feasibility of the disassembly processes within the disassembly system. Technical alternative disassembly processes are determined as a result of availability of the tools and technological feasibility of processes. The fourth phase was the concept for the generation of the disassembly control sequences. The approach will be proved in a prototypical disassembly system.

  7. Repetitive sequences in the ITS1 region of ribosomal DNA in congeneric microphallid species (Trematoda: Digenea).

    PubMed

    Warberg, Rikke; Jensen, K Thomas; Frydenberg, Jane

    2005-11-01

    In searching for species-specific DNA sequences of microphallid species (Digenea, Trematoda) we examined the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) of three closely related species (Levinseniella group) hosted by mud snails (first intermediate host) and marine crustaceans (second intermediate host). In the ITS1 region we found consistent patterns of repeating sequences of 130 bp. Within each main repeat there was a varying number of subrepeats specific for each of the species. All repeats including subrepeats were identified by a similar starting sequence: 5'-CCTGTGG-3'. As this sequence has close resemblance to the chi sequence 5'-GCTGGTGG-3' found in phage lambda we speculate if it serves the same function as a recombination hotspot. Alternatively but less likely, it could be an inactive, mutational relic of a sequence that once served this purpose.

  8. The control of earthquake sequences on hillslope stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brain, Matthew J.; Rosser, Nick J.; Tunstall, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Earthquakes trigger landslides in mountainous regions. Recent research suggests that the stability of hillslopes during and after a large earthquake is influenced by legacy effects of previous seismic activity. However, the shear strength and strain response of ductile hillslope materials to sequences of earthquake ground shaking of varying character is poorly constrained, inhibiting our ability to fully explain the nature of earthquake-triggered landslides. We used geotechnical laboratory testing to simulate earthquake loading of hillslopes and to assess how different sequences of ground shaking influence hillslope stability prior to, during, and following an earthquake mainshock. Ground-shaking events prior to a mainshock that do not result in high landslide strain accumulation can increase bulk density and interparticle friction. This strengthens a hillslope, reducing landslide displacement during subsequent seismicity. By implication, landscapes in different tectonic settings will likely demonstrate different short- and long-term responses to single earthquakes due to differences in the magnitude, frequency, and sequencing of earthquakes.

  9. Analysis of the regions flanking the human insulin gene and sequence of an Alu family member.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, G I; Pictet, R; Rutter, W J

    1980-01-01

    The regions around the human insulin gene have been studied by heteroduplex, hybridization and sequence analysis. These studies indicated that there is a region of heterogeneous length located approximately 700 bp before the 5' end of the gene; and that the 19 kb of cloned DNA which includes the 1430 bp insulin gene as well as 5650 bp before and 11,500 bp after the gene is single copy sequence except for 500 bp located 6000 bp from the 3' end of the gene. This 500 bp segment contains a member of the Alu family of dispersed middle repetitive sequences as well as another less highly repeated homopolymeric segment. The sequence of this region was determined. This Alu repeat is bordered by 19 bp direct repeats and also contains an 83 bp sequence which is present twice. The regions flanking the human and rat I insulin genes were compared by heteroduplex analysis to localize homologous sequences in the flanking regions which could be involved in the regulation of insulin biosynthesis. The homology between the two genes is restricted to the region encoding preproinsulin and a short region of approximately 60 bp flanking the 5' side of the genes. Images PMID:6253909

  10. Control of Task Sequences: What Is the Role of Language?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ulrich; Kleffner-Canucci, Killian; Kikumoto, Atsushi; Redford, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    It is almost a truism that language aids serial-order control through self-cuing of upcoming sequential elements. We measured speech onset latencies as subjects performed hierarchically organized task sequences while "thinking aloud" each task label. Surprisingly, speech onset latencies and response times (RTs) were highly synchronized,…

  11. Control of Task Sequences: What Is the Role of Language?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ulrich; Kleffner-Canucci, Killian; Kikumoto, Atsushi; Redford, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    It is almost a truism that language aids serial-order control through self-cuing of upcoming sequential elements. We measured speech onset latencies as subjects performed hierarchically organized task sequences while "thinking aloud" each task label. Surprisingly, speech onset latencies and response times (RTs) were highly synchronized,…

  12. Ribosomal operon intergenic sequence region (ISR) heterogeneity in Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are closely related species that can not be distinguished by their 16S or 23S rRNA gene sequences. However, the intergenic sequence region (ISR) that is between the 16S and 23S genes is markedly different and characteristic for each species. A peculiarit...

  13. Comparison of Exome and Genome Sequencing Technologies for the Complete Capture of Protein-Coding Regions.

    PubMed

    Lelieveld, Stefan H; Spielmann, Malte; Mundlos, Stefan; Veltman, Joris A; Gilissen, Christian

    2015-08-01

    For next-generation sequencing technologies, sufficient base-pair coverage is the foremost requirement for the reliable detection of genomic variants. We investigated whether whole-genome sequencing (WGS) platforms offer improved coverage of coding regions compared with whole-exome sequencing (WES) platforms, and compared single-base coverage for a large set of exome and genome samples. We find that WES platforms have improved considerably in the last years, but at comparable sequencing depth, WGS outperforms WES in terms of covered coding regions. At higher sequencing depth (95x-160x), WES successfully captures 95% of the coding regions with a minimal coverage of 20x, compared with 98% for WGS at 87-fold coverage. Three different assessments of sequence coverage bias showed consistent biases for WES but not for WGS. We found no clear differences for the technologies concerning their ability to achieve complete coverage of 2,759 clinically relevant genes. We show that WES performs comparable to WGS in terms of covered bases if sequenced at two to three times higher coverage. This does, however, go at the cost of substantially more sequencing biases in WES approaches. Our findings will guide laboratories to make an informed decision on which sequencing platform and coverage to choose.

  14. Comparison of Exome and Genome Sequencing Technologies for the Complete Capture of Protein‐Coding Regions

    PubMed Central

    Lelieveld, Stefan H.; Spielmann, Malte; Mundlos, Stefan; Veltman, Joris A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT For next‐generation sequencing technologies, sufficient base‐pair coverage is the foremost requirement for the reliable detection of genomic variants. We investigated whether whole‐genome sequencing (WGS) platforms offer improved coverage of coding regions compared with whole‐exome sequencing (WES) platforms, and compared single‐base coverage for a large set of exome and genome samples. We find that WES platforms have improved considerably in the last years, but at comparable sequencing depth, WGS outperforms WES in terms of covered coding regions. At higher sequencing depth (95x–160x), WES successfully captures 95% of the coding regions with a minimal coverage of 20x, compared with 98% for WGS at 87‐fold coverage. Three different assessments of sequence coverage bias showed consistent biases for WES but not for WGS. We found no clear differences for the technologies concerning their ability to achieve complete coverage of 2,759 clinically relevant genes. We show that WES performs comparable to WGS in terms of covered bases if sequenced at two to three times higher coverage. This does, however, go at the cost of substantially more sequencing biases in WES approaches. Our findings will guide laboratories to make an informed decision on which sequencing platform and coverage to choose. PMID:25973577

  15. Identification of a conserved sequence in the non-coding regions of many human genes.

    PubMed Central

    Donehower, L A; Slagle, B L; Wilde, M; Darlington, G; Butel, J S

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed a sequence of approximately 70 base pairs (bp) that shows a high degree of similarity to sequences present in the non-coding regions of a number of human and other mammalian genes. The sequence was discovered in a fragment of human genomic DNA adjacent to an integrated hepatitis B virus genome in cells derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue. When one of the viral flanking sequences was compared to nucleotide sequences in GenBank, more than thirty human genes were identified that contained a similar sequence in their non-coding regions. The sequence element was usually found once or twice in a gene, either in an intron or in the 5' or 3' flanking regions. It did not share any similarities with known short interspersed nucleotide elements (SINEs) or presently known gene regulatory elements. This element was highly conserved at the same position within the corresponding human and mouse genes for myoglobin and N-myc, indicating evolutionary conservation and possible functional importance. Preliminary DNase I footprinting data suggested that the element or its adjacent sequences may bind nuclear factors to generate specific DNase I hypersensitive sites. The size, structure, and evolutionary conservation of this sequence indicates that it is distinct from other types of short interspersed repetitive elements. It is possible that the element may have a cis-acting functional role in the genome. Images PMID:2536922

  16. AlignMiner: a Web-based tool for detection of divergent regions in multiple sequence alignments of conserved sequences

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Multiple sequence alignments are used to study gene or protein function, phylogenetic relations, genome evolution hypotheses and even gene polymorphisms. Virtually without exception, all available tools focus on conserved segments or residues. Small divergent regions, however, are biologically important for specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction, genotyping, molecular markers and preparation of specific antibodies, and yet have received little attention. As a consequence, they must be selected empirically by the researcher. AlignMiner has been developed to fill this gap in bioinformatic analyses. Results AlignMiner is a Web-based application for detection of conserved and divergent regions in alignments of conserved sequences, focusing particularly on divergence. It accepts alignments (protein or nucleic acid) obtained using any of a variety of algorithms, which does not appear to have a significant impact on the final results. AlignMiner uses different scoring methods for assessing conserved/divergent regions, Entropy being the method that provides the highest number of regions with the greatest length, and Weighted being the most restrictive. Conserved/divergent regions can be generated either with respect to the consensus sequence or to one master sequence. The resulting data are presented in a graphical interface developed in AJAX, which provides remarkable user interaction capabilities. Users do not need to wait until execution is complete and can.even inspect their results on a different computer. Data can be downloaded onto a user disk, in standard formats. In silico and experimental proof-of-concept cases have shown that AlignMiner can be successfully used to designing specific polymerase chain reaction primers as well as potential epitopes for antibodies. Primer design is assisted by a module that deploys several oligonucleotide parameters for designing primers "on the fly". Conclusions AlignMiner can be used to reliably detect

  17. Analysis of the Cystic Fibrosis Lung Microbiota via Serial Illumina Sequencing of Bacterial 16S rRNA Hypervariable Regions

    PubMed Central

    Diaz Caballero, Julio; Fung, Pauline; Gong, Yunchen; Donaldson, Sylva L.; Yuan, Lijie; Keshavjee, Shaf; Zhang, Yu; Yau, Yvonne C. W.; Waters, Valerie J.; Tullis, D. Elizabeth; Hwang, David M.; Guttman, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The characterization of bacterial communities using DNA sequencing has revolutionized our ability to study microbes in nature and discover the ways in which microbial communities affect ecosystem functioning and human health. Here we describe Serial Illumina Sequencing (SI-Seq): a method for deep sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene using next-generation sequencing technology. SI-Seq serially sequences portions of the V5, V6 and V7 hypervariable regions from barcoded 16S rRNA amplicons using an Illumina short-read genome analyzer. SI-Seq obtains taxonomic resolution similar to 454 pyrosequencing for a fraction of the cost, and can produce hundreds of thousands of reads per sample even with very high multiplexing. We validated SI-Seq using single species and mock community controls, and via a comparison to cystic fibrosis lung microbiota sequenced using 454 FLX Titanium. Our control runs show that SI-Seq has a dynamic range of at least five orders of magnitude, can classify >96% of sequences to the genus level, and performs just as well as 454 and paired-end Illumina methods in estimation of standard microbial ecology diversity measurements. We illustrate the utility of SI-Seq in a pilot sample of central airway secretion samples from cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:23056217

  18. Unravelling the relationship between protein sequence and low-complexity regions entropies: Interactome implications.

    PubMed

    Martins, F; Gonçalves, R; Oliveira, J; Cruz-Monteagudo, M; Nieto-Villar, J M; Paz-y-Miño, C; Rebelo, I; Tejera, E

    2015-10-07

    Low-complexity regions are sub-sequences of biased composition in a protein sequence. The influence of these regions over protein evolution, specific functions and highly interactive capacities is well known. Although protein sequence entropy has been largely studied, its relationship with low-complexity regions and the subsequent effects on protein function remains unclear. In this work we propose a theoretical and empirical model integrating the sequence entropy with local complexity parameters. Our results indicate that the protein sequence entropy is related with the protein length, the entropies inside and outside the low-complexity regions as well as their number and average size. We found a small but significant increment in the sequence entropy of hubs proteins. In agreement with our theoretical model, this increment is highly dependent of the balance between the increment of protein length and average size of the low-complexity regions. Finally, our models and proteins analysis provide evidence supporting that modifications in the average size is more relevant in hubs proteins than changes in the number of low-complexity regions.

  19. Bar-coded, multiplexed sequencing of targeted DNA regions using the Illumina Genome Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Szelinger, Szabolcs; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Craig, David W

    2011-01-01

    To date, genome-wide association (GWA) studies, in which thousands of markers throughout the genome are simultaneously genotyped, have identified hundreds of loci underlying disease susceptibility. These regions typically span 5-100 kb, and resequencing efforts to identify potential functional variants within these loci represent the next logical step in the genetic characterization pipeline. Next-generation DNA sequencing technologies are, in principle, well-suited for this task, yet despite the massive sequencing capability afforded by these platforms, the present-day reality is that it remains difficult, time-consuming, and expensive to resequence large numbers of samples across moderately sized genomic regions. To address this obstacle, we developed a generalized framework for multiplexed resequencing of targeted regions of the human genome on the Illumina Genome Analyzer using degenerate, indexed DNA sequence barcodes ligated to fragmented DNA prior to sequencing. Using this method, the DNA of multiple individuals can be simultaneously sequenced at several regions. We find that achieving adequate coverage is one of the most important factors in the design of an experiment, but other key considerations include whether the objective is to discover genetic variants for genotyping later by a separate method, to genotype all identified variants by sequencing, or to exhaustively identify all common and rare variants in the region. Given the massive bandwidth of next-generation sequencing technologies and their low inherent throughput in terms of sequencing arrays per week, multiplexed sequencing using the barcoding approach offers a clear mechanism for focusing bandwidth to a smaller region across many more individuals or samples.

  20. Control of Task Sequences: What is the Role of Language?

    PubMed Central

    Mayr, Ulrich; Kleffner, Killian; Kikumoto, Atsushi; Redford, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    It is almost a truism that language aids serial-order control through self-cuing of upcoming sequential elements. We measured speech onset latencies as subjects performed hierarchically organized task sequences while "thinking aloud" each task label. Surprisingly, speech onset latencies and response times (RTs) were highly synchronized, a pattern that is not consistent with the hypothesis that speaking aids proactive retrieval of upcoming sequential elements during serial-order control. We also found that when instructed to do so, participants were able to speak task labels prior to presentation of response-relevant stimuli and that this substantially reduced RT signatures of retrieval—however at the cost of more sequencing errors. Thus, while proactive retrieval is possible in principle, in natural situations it seems to be prevented through a strong, "gestalt-like" tendency to synchronize speech and action. We suggest that this tendency may support context updating rather than proactive control. PMID:24274386

  1. Can unconscious knowledge allow control in sequence learning?

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiufang; Dienes, Zoltán; Fu, Xiaolan

    2010-03-01

    This paper investigates the conscious status of both the knowledge that an item is legal (judgment knowledge) and the knowledge of why it is legal (structural knowledge) in sequence learning. We compared ability to control use of knowledge (Process Dissociation Procedure) with stated awareness of the knowledge (subjective measures) as measures of the conscious status of knowledge. Experiment 1 showed that when people could control use of judgment knowledge they were indeed conscious of having that knowledge according to their own statements. Yet Experiment 2 showed that people could exert such control over the use of judgment knowledge when claiming they had no structural knowledge: i.e. conscious judgment knowledge could be based on unconscious structural knowledge. Further implicit learning research should be clear over whether judgment or structural knowledge is claimed to be unconscious as the two dissociate in sequence learning.

  2. Correcting sequencing errors in DNA coding regions using a dynamic programming approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Mural, R J; Uberbacher, E C

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for detecting and 'correcting' sequencing errors that occur in DNA coding regions. The types of sequencing errors addressed are insertions and deletions (indels) of DNA bases. The goal is to provide a capability which makes single-pass or low-redundancy sequence data more informative, reducing the need for high-redundancy sequencing for gene identification and characterization purposes. This would permit improved sequencing efficiency and reduce genome sequencing costs. The algorithm detects sequencing errors by discovering changes in the statistically preferred reading frame within a putative coding region and then inserts a number of 'neutral' bases at a perceived reading frame transition point to make the putative exon candidate frame consistent. We have implemented the algorithm as a front-end subsystem of the GRAIL DNA sequence analysis system to construct a version which is very error tolerant and also intend to use this as a testbed for further development of sequencing error-correction technology. Preliminary test results have shown the usefulness of this algorithm and also exhibited some of its weakness, providing possible directions for further improvement. On a test set consisting of 68 human DNA sequences with 1% randomly generated indels in coding regions, the algorithm detected and corrected 76% of the indels. The average distance between the position of an indel and the predicted one was 9.4 bases. With this subsystem in place, GRAIL correctly predicted 89% of the coding messages with 10% false message on the 'corrected' sequences, compared to 69% correctly predicted coding messages and 11% falsely predicted messages on the 'corrupted' sequences using standard GRAIL II method (version 1.2).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. The InDeVal insertion/deletion evaluation tool: a program for finding target regions in DNA sequences and for aiding in sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Stoneberg Holt, Sierra D; Holt, Jason A

    2004-10-29

    The program InDeVal was originally developed to help researchers find known regions of insertion/deletion activity (with the exception of isolated single-base indels) in newly determined Poaceae trnL-F sequences and compare them with 533 previously determined sequences. It is supplied with input files designed for this purpose. More broadly, the program is applicable for finding specific target regions (referred to as "variable regions") in DNA sequence. A variable region is any specific sequence fragment of interest, such as an indel region, a codon or codons, or sequence coding for a particular RNA secondary structure. InDeVal input is DNA sequence and a template file (sequence flanking each variable region). Additional files contain the variable regions and user-defined messages about the sequence found within them (e.g., taxa sharing each of the different indel patterns).Variable regions are found by determining the position of flanking sequence (referred to as "conserved regions") using the LPAM (Length-Preserving Alignment Method) algorithm. This algorithm was designed for InDeVal and is described here for the first time. InDeVal output is an interactive display of the analyzed sequence, broken into user-defined units. Once the user is satisfied with the organization of the display, the information can be exported to an annotated text file. InDeVal can find multiple variable regions simultaneously (28 indel regions in the Poaceae trnL-F files) and display user-selected messages specific to the sequence variants found. InDeVal output is designed to facilitate comparison between the analyzed sequence and previously evaluated sequence. The program's sensitivity to different levels of nucleotide and/or length variation in conserved regions can be adjusted. InDeVal is currently available for Windows in Additional file 1 or from http://www.sci.muni.cz/botany/elzdroje/indeval/.

  4. The InDeVal insertion/deletion evaluation tool: a program for finding target regions in DNA sequences and for aiding in sequence comparison

    PubMed Central

    Stoneberg Holt, Sierra D; Holt, Jason A

    2004-01-01

    Background The program InDeVal was originally developed to help researchers find known regions of insertion/deletion activity (with the exception of isolated single-base indels) in newly determined Poaceae trnL-F sequences and compare them with 533 previously determined sequences. It is supplied with input files designed for this purpose. More broadly, the program is applicable for finding specific target regions (referred to as "variable regions") in DNA sequence. A variable region is any specific sequence fragment of interest, such as an indel region, a codon or codons, or sequence coding for a particular RNA secondary structure. Results InDeVal input is DNA sequence and a template file (sequence flanking each variable region). Additional files contain the variable regions and user-defined messages about the sequence found within them (e.g., taxa sharing each of the different indel patterns). Variable regions are found by determining the position of flanking sequence (referred to as "conserved regions") using the LPAM (Length-Preserving Alignment Method) algorithm. This algorithm was designed for InDeVal and is described here for the first time. InDeVal output is an interactive display of the analyzed sequence, broken into user-defined units. Once the user is satisfied with the organization of the display, the information can be exported to an annotated text file. Conclusions InDeVal can find multiple variable regions simultaneously (28 indel regions in the Poaceae trnL-F files) and display user-selected messages specific to the sequence variants found. InDeVal output is designed to facilitate comparison between the analyzed sequence and previously evaluated sequence. The program's sensitivity to different levels of nucleotide and/or length variation in conserved regions can be adjusted. InDeVal is currently available for Windows in Additional file 1 or from . PMID:15516260

  5. DNA sequence of the mat2,3 region of Schizosaccharomyces kambucha shares high homology with the corresponding sequence from Sz. pombe.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurjeet; Klar, Amar J S

    2003-11-01

    To define conserved sequences for mat1 imprinting and silencing of the mat2,3 region of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we determined the DNA sequence of the cognate region (mat2,3 region) of another fission yeast, Sz. kambucha, a yeast species isolated from Kambucha tea mix. The entire mat2,3 region shows more than 98% identity between the two species. Sequence similarity is even higher (99.3%) for mating-type cassettes; deduced amino acid sequences of three of the four Mat peptides (Pi, Pc and Mi) are identical between the two species, while the fourth (Mc) has a single amino acid polymorphism. Comparison of the sequence motif of the imprint site essential for mat1 switching shows that mat-P of Sz. kambucha has a sequence identical to the conserved motif present in Sz. pombe. However, this sequence motif of nine bases differs by one base for mat-M of Sz. kambucha. The sequence of the K region shows about 98% identity between the two species, with the cenH region showing 98.3% homology. Thus, the arrangement of the mat2,3 region in both yeasts is conserved and shows 1-2% nucleotide sequence variation throughout the region. The DNA sequence of the mat2,3 region from Sz. kambucha has been submitted to GenBank under Accession No. AY271822. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Subtelomeric regions of yeast chromosomes contain a 36 base-pair tandemly repeated sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, H; Haber, J E

    1984-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of a region of DNA derived from the end of one chromosome of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Inspection of the sequence reveals the presence of 12 tandem direct repeats, each 36 nucleotides long and having nearly identical sequence. Each 36 base-pair repeat can be further subdivided into three tandem sub-repeats of a similar 12 base-pair sequence. Analysis of total genomic yeast DNA from several strains by Southern hybridization suggests that the number of tandem 36 base-pair repeat units may vary from approximately 8 to 25 among different telomeric regions. Differences in the number of repeats may have arisen by unequal crossing over between them. Furthermore, the finding that the pattern of bases at multiple variable positions within the repeat unit is not random suggests that these regions may undergo gene conversion events that render them homogeneous. Images PMID:6091055

  7. Intraspecific nucleotide sequence differences in the major noncoding region of human mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Horai, S; Hayasaka, K

    1990-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences of the major noncoding region of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from 95 human placentas have been determined. These sequences include at least a 482-bp-long region encompassing most of the D-loop-forming region. Comparisons of these sequences with those previously determined have revealed remarkable features of nucleotide substitutions and insertion/deletion events. The nucleotide diversity among the sequences is estimated as 1.45%, which is three- to fourfold higher than the corresponding value estimated from restriction-enzyme analysis of whole mtDNA genome. A hypervariable region has also been defined. In this 14-bp region, 17 different sequences were detected. More than 97% of the base changes are transitions. A significantly nonrandom distribution of nucleotide substitutions and sequence length variations were also noted. The phylogenetic analysis indicates that diversity among the negroids is much larger than that among the caucasoids or the mongoloids. In fact, part of the negroids first diverged from other humans in the phylogenetic tree. A striking finding in the phylogenetic analysis is that the mongoloids can be separated into two distinct groups. Divergence of part of the mongoloids follows the earliest divergence of part of the negroids. The remainder of the mongoloids subsequently diverged together with the caucasoids. This observation confirmed our earlier study, which clearly demonstrated, by the restriction-enzyme analysis, existence of two distinct groups in the Japanese. Images Figure 3 PMID:2316527

  8. Plasmonic Nanopores for Trapping, Controlling Displacement, and Sequencing of DNA

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of developing a DNA sequencing methodology, we theoretically examine the feasibility of using nanoplasmonics to control the translocation of a DNA molecule through a solid-state nanopore and to read off sequence information using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that high-intensity optical hot spots produced by a metallic nanostructure can arrest DNA translocation through a solid-state nanopore, thus providing a physical knob for controlling the DNA speed. Switching the plasmonic field on and off can displace the DNA molecule in discrete steps, sequentially exposing neighboring fragments of a DNA molecule to the pore as well as to the plasmonic hot spot. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from the exposed DNA fragments contains information about their nucleotide composition, possibly allowing the identification of the nucleotide sequence of a DNA molecule transported through the hot spot. The principles of plasmonic nanopore sequencing can be extended to detection of DNA modifications and RNA characterization. PMID:26401685

  9. Correcting sequencing errors in DNA coding regions using a dynamic programming approach

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Mural, R.J.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1994-12-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for detecting and ``correcting`` sequencing errors that occur in DNA coding regions. The types of sequencing error addressed include insertions and deletions (indels) of DNA bases. The goal is to provide a capability which makes single-pass or low-redundancy sequence data more informative, reducing the need for high-redundancy sequencing for gene identification and characterization purposes. The algorithm detects sequencing errors by discovering changes in the statistically preferred reading frame within a putative coding region and then inserts a number of ``neutral`` bases at a perceived reading frame transition point to make the putative exon candidate frame consistent. The authors have implemented the algorithm as a front-end subsystem of the GRAIL DNA sequence analysis system to construct a version which is very error tolerant and also intend to use this as a testbed for further development of sequencing error-correction technology. On a test set consisting of 68 Human DNA sequences with 1% randomly generated indels in coding regions, the algorithm detected and corrected 76% of the indels. The average distance between the position of an indel and the predicted one was 9.4 bases. With this subsystem in place, GRAIL correctly predicted 89% of the coding messages with 10% false message on the ``corrected`` sequences, compared to 69% correctly predicted coding messages and 11% falsely predicted messages on the ``corrupted`` sequences using standard GRAIL II method. The method uses a dynamic programming algorithm, and runs in time and space linear to the size of the input sequence.

  10. Identification of Medically Important Yeast Species by Sequence Analysis of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Leaw, Shiang Ning; Chang, Hsien Chang; Sun, Hsiao Fang; Barton, Richard; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Chang, Tsung Chain

    2006-01-01

    Infections caused by yeasts have increased in previous decades due primarily to the increasing population of immunocompromised patients. In addition, infections caused by less common species such as Pichia, Rhodotorula, Trichosporon, and Saccharomyces spp. have been widely reported. This study extensively evaluated the feasibility of sequence analysis of the rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions for the identification of yeasts of clinical relevance. Both the ITS1 and ITS2 regions of 373 strains (86 species), including 299 reference strains and 74 clinical isolates, were amplified by PCR and sequenced. The sequences were compared to reference data available at the GenBank database by using BLAST (basic local alignment search tool) to determine if species identification was possible by ITS sequencing. Since the GenBank database currently lacks ITS sequence entries for some yeasts, the ITS sequences of type (or reference) strains of 15 species were submitted to GenBank to facilitate identification of these species. Strains producing discrepant identifications between the conventional methods and ITS sequence analysis were further analyzed by sequencing of the D1-D2 domain of the large-subunit rRNA gene for species clarification. The rates of correct identification by ITS1 and ITS2 sequence analysis were 96.8% (361/373) and 99.7% (372/373), respectively. Of the 373 strains tested, only 1 strain (Rhodotorula glutinis BCRC 20576) could not be identified by ITS2 sequence analysis. In conclusion, identification of medically important yeasts by ITS sequencing, especially using the ITS2 region, is reliable and can be used as an accurate alternative to conventional identification methods. PMID:16517841

  11. Mapping of retrotransposon sequences in the unstable region surrounding the spinal muscular atrophy locus in 5q13

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, M.J.; Nesbit, M.A.; Theodosiou, A.M.

    1995-05-20

    The mutation that underlies the autosomal recessive disorder spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is located on chromosome 5q13. Recent studies show that SMA patients frequently have deletions and rearrangements in this region compared to normal controls. During the isolation of candidate cDNAs for the disease, the authors identified a sequence that shows high homology to the THE-1 retrotransposon gene family. Using YAC fragmentation techniques, they have refined the localization of this sequence to the domain known to show instability in SMA patients. The implication of these results for the mechanism of the mutation in SMA is discussed. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Control sites in the sequence at the beginning of T7 gene 1.

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, D J

    1979-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the fragment Hind.30, 378 bases long, from the beginning of gene 1 of T7 is presented. It contains the C promoter, two in vitro transcriptional terminator sites and a sequence of 171 bases which probably codes for the N terminus of the T7 RNA polymerase. The sequence also codes for the RNase III cleavage site before gene 1. The overlaps with the transcriptional terminators, The RNA transcript of the sequence about the terminators can be arranged in a set of alternative double-stranded hairpin structures. It is suggested that conversion between these structures may have a role in termination; this may be influenced by interactions with ribosomes and RNase III. The region of the C promoter between genes 0.7 and 1 thus contains several sites which may be involved in the control of transcription and translation. Images PMID:493111

  13. SUBGROUPS OF AMINO ACID SEQUENCES IN THE VARIABLE REGIONS OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS*

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Bruce A.; Pflumm, Mollie N.; User, Urs Rutisha; Edelman, Gerald M.

    1969-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the first 133 residues of the heavy (γ) chain from a human γG immunoglobulin (He) has been determined. This γ-chain is identical in Gm type to that of protein Eu, the complete sequence of which has been reported. Comparison of the two sequences substantiates the previous suggestion that there are subgroups of variable regions of heavy chains. The variable region of Eu has been assigned to subgroup I and that of He to subgroup II; on the other hand, the constant regions of the two proteins appear to be identical. Comparison of the sequence of the heavy chain of He with the heavy chain sequences determined in other laboratories suggests that the variable region of subgroup II is at least 118 residues long. The nature and distribution of amino acid variations in this heavy chain subgroup resemble those observed in light chain subgroups. These studies provide evidence that the translocation hypothesis applies to heavy as well as to light chains, viz., genes for variable regions (V) are somatically translocated to genes for constant regions (C) to form complete VC structural genes. Images PMID:5264153

  14. The size and sequence organization of the centromeric region of arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 5.

    PubMed

    Kumekawa, N; Hosouchi, T; Tsuruoka, H; Kotani, H

    2000-12-31

    We have determined the size of the centromeric region of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 5, which corresponds to the genetically defined centromere by Copenhaver et al. (Science, 286, 2468-2474, 1999) on the basis of restriction analysis. As a large clone gap was present in the previously constructed contig map of the centromeric region, the restriction map of this region was constructed using Asc I, Not I, Apa I and Pme I and genomic DNA from a hypomethylated strain. The size of the centromeric region finally estimated by combination with the sequence data of cloned regions at both sides was 4.35 megabases (Mb). This value is over 2 Mb longer than those estimated in our previous work and also by Copenhaver et al. Combing this centromeric region with the physical map previously constructed, the entire length of chromosome 5 becomes 31 Mb. Although the internal moiety of the centromeric region has not been sequenced yet because of extremely high repetition, the result of sequence analysis from both sides toward the inside strongly suggests that the centromeric region is composed of the central 2.9-Mb domain consisting of mainly 180-bp repeats and Athila retrotransposons and flanking regions containing various types of transposons. On the basis of these observations, a structural model for the centromeric region is discussed.

  15. Sequence analysis of the inversion region containing the pilin genes of Moraxella bovis.

    PubMed Central

    Fulks, K A; Marrs, C F; Stevens, S P; Green, M R

    1990-01-01

    Moraxella bovis EPP63 is able to produce two antigenically distinct pili called Q and I pili (previously called beta and alpha pili). Hybridization studies have shown that the transition between the types is due to inversion of a 2.1-kilobase segment of chromosomal DNA. We present the sequence of a 4.1-kilobase region of cloned DNA spanning the entire inversion region in orientation 1 (Q pilin expressed). Comparison of this sequence with the sequence of the polymerase chain reaction-amplified genomic DNA from orientation 2 (I pilin expressed) allows the site-specific region of recombination to be localized to a 26-base-pair region in which sequence similarity to the left inverted repeat of the Salmonella typhimurium hin system was previously noted. In addition, 50% sequence similarity was seen in a 60-base-pair segment of our sequence to the recombinational enhancer of bacteriophage P1, an inversion system related to the hin system of S. typhimurium. Finally, two open reading frames representing potential genes were identified. PMID:2403542

  16. Sequence analysis of the inversion region containing the pilin genes of Moraxella bovis.

    PubMed

    Fulks, K A; Marrs, C F; Stevens, S P; Green, M R

    1990-01-01

    Moraxella bovis EPP63 is able to produce two antigenically distinct pili called Q and I pili (previously called beta and alpha pili). Hybridization studies have shown that the transition between the types is due to inversion of a 2.1-kilobase segment of chromosomal DNA. We present the sequence of a 4.1-kilobase region of cloned DNA spanning the entire inversion region in orientation 1 (Q pilin expressed). Comparison of this sequence with the sequence of the polymerase chain reaction-amplified genomic DNA from orientation 2 (I pilin expressed) allows the site-specific region of recombination to be localized to a 26-base-pair region in which sequence similarity to the left inverted repeat of the Salmonella typhimurium hin system was previously noted. In addition, 50% sequence similarity was seen in a 60-base-pair segment of our sequence to the recombinational enhancer of bacteriophage P1, an inversion system related to the hin system of S. typhimurium. Finally, two open reading frames representing potential genes were identified.

  17. Structural organization of the mitochondrial DNA control region in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Dueñas, Juan C Rondan; Gardenal, Cristina N; Llinás, Guillermo Albrieu; Panzetta-Dutari, Graciela M

    2006-08-01

    The complete A+T - rich region of Aedes aegypti mitochondrial DNA has been cloned and sequenced. In Argentinean populations of the species, a polymorphism in the length of the amplified fragment was observed. Nucleotide sequence comparison of the shortest and longest A+T - rich amplified fragments detected revealed the presence of 2 types of tandemly repeated blocks. The size variation observed in natural populations is mainly due to the presence of a variable number of a 181 bp tandem repeat unit, located toward the 12S rRNA gene end. The size of the longest A+T - rich region was of 2070 bp, representing the largest control sequence reported for any mosquito species. Few relevant short blocks of primary-sequence similarity conserved in the control region of mosquitoes and other insects were detected scattered throughout the whole region. Five putative stem-loop secondary structures were found, one of them flanked by conserved sequences described in other insects. Our results suggest that there are no universal models of structure-function relations in the control region of insect mtDNA. In addition, we identified a short A+T - rich variable segment in the Ae. aegyti control region that would be suitable for population genetic studies.

  18. Evaluation of exome variants using the Ion Proton Platform to sequence error-prone regions

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byung Joo; Seo, Myung Eui; Kim, Ju Han

    2017-01-01

    The Ion Proton sequencer from Thermo Fisher accurately determines sequence variants from target regions with a rapid turnaround time at a low cost. However, misleading variant-calling errors can occur. We performed a systematic evaluation and manual curation of read-level alignments for the 675 ultrarare variants reported by the Ion Proton sequencer from 27 whole-exome sequencing data but that are not present in either the 1000 Genomes Project and the Exome Aggregation Consortium. We classified positive variant calls into 393 highly likely false positives, 126 likely false positives, and 156 likely true positives, which comprised 58.2%, 18.7%, and 23.1% of the variants, respectively. We identified four distinct error patterns of variant calling that may be bioinformatically corrected when using different strategies: simplicity region, SNV cluster, peripheral sequence read, and base inversion. Local de novo assembly successfully corrected 201 (38.7%) of the 519 highly likely or likely false positives. We also demonstrate that the two sequencing kits from Thermo Fisher (the Ion PI Sequencing 200 kit V3 and the Ion PI Hi-Q kit) exhibit different error profiles across different error types. A refined calling algorithm with better polymerase may improve the performance of the Ion Proton sequencing platform. PMID:28742110

  19. Identification of a conserved sequence in the non-coding regions of many human genes

    SciTech Connect

    Donehower, L.A.; Slagle, B.L.; Wilde, M.; Darlington, G.; Butel, J.S. )

    1989-01-25

    The authors have analyzed a sequence of approximately 70 base pairs (bp) that shows a high degree of similarity to sequences present in the non-coding regions of a number of human and other mammalian genes. The sequence was discovered in a fragment of human genomic DNA adjacent to an integrated hepatitis B virus genome in cells derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue. When one of the viral flanking sequences was compared to nucleotide sequences in GenBank, more than thirty human genes were identified that contained a similar sequence in their non-coding regions. This element was highly conserved at the same position within the corresponding human and mouse genes for myoglobin and N-myc, indicating evolutionary conservation and possible functional importance. Preliminary DNase I footprinting data suggested that the element or its adjacent sequences may bind nuclear factors to generate specific DNase I hypersensitive sites. The size, structure, and evolutionary conservation of this sequence indicates that it is distinct from other types of short interspersed repetitive elements. It is possible that the element may have a cis-acting functional role in the genome.

  20. Characterization of Dermanyssus gallinae (Acarina: Dermanissydae) by sequence analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer regions.

    PubMed

    Potenza, L; Cafiero, M A; Camarda, A; La Salandra, G; Cucchiarini, L; Dachà, M

    2009-10-01

    In the present work mites previously identified as Dermanyssus gallinae De Geer (Acari, Mesostigmata) using morphological keys were investigated by molecular tools. The complete internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1), 5.8S ribosomal DNA, and ITS2 region of the ribosomal DNA from mites were amplified and sequenced to examine the level of sequence variations and to explore the feasibility of using this region in the identification of this mite. Conserved primers located at the 3'end of 18S and at the 5'start of 28S rRNA genes were used first, and amplified fragments were sequenced. Sequence analyses showed no variation in 5.8S and ITS2 region while slight intraspecific variations involving substitutions as well as deletions concentrated in the ITS1 region. Based on the sequence analyses a nested PCR of the ITS2 region followed by RFLP analyses has been set up in the attempt to provide a rapid molecular diagnostic tool of D. gallinae.

  1. Nucleotide sequence of the rrnG ribosomal RNA promoter region of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, W F; Squires, C; Squires, C L

    1982-01-01

    The primary structure of the promoter region for a ribosomal RNA transcription unit (rrnG) of Escherichia coli K12 has been determined. The sequence was obtained from 1 1.5 kbp EcoRI fragment derived from the hybrid plasmid pLC23-30. This fragment contains 455 bp preceding P1 of the rrnG promoter region and 674 bp of the rrnG 16S RNA gene. The sequence before the rrnG promoter region contains an open reading frame (ORF-BG) followed by a possible hairpin structure that resembles other known transcription terminators. The sequence of the rrnG promoter region is similar but not identical to that of rrnA and rrnB. Several minor differences between the sequences of the 16S RNA genes of rrnG and rrnB were also noted. In addition, sequences were found that could generate special structures involving the promoter regions of rrn loci. Such structures are described and their possible involvement in the regulation of ribosomal RNA synthesis is discussed. PMID:6285294

  2. Sequence Ready Characterization of the Pericentromeric Region of 19p12

    SciTech Connect

    Evan E. Eichler

    2006-08-31

    Current mapping and sequencing strategies have been inadequate within the proximal portion of 19p12 due, in part, to the presence of a recently expanded ZNF (zinc-finger) gene family and the presence of large (25-50 kb) inverted beta-satellite repeat structures which bracket this tandemly duplicated gene family. The virtual of absence of classically defined “unique” sequence within the region has hampered efforts to identify and characterize a suitable minimal tiling path of clones which can be used as templates required for finished sequencing of the region. The goal of this proposal is to develop and implement a novel sequence-anchor strategy to generate a contiguous BAC map of the most proximal portion of chromosome 19p12 for the purpose of complete sequence characterization. The target region will be an estimated 4.5 Mb of DNA extending from STS marker D19S450 (the beginning of the ZNF gene cluster) to the centromeric (alpha-satellite) junction of 19p11. The approach will entail 1) pre-selection of 19p12 BAC and cosmid clones (NIH approved library) utilizing both 19p12 -unique and 19p12-SPECIFIC repeat probes (Eichler et al., 1998); 2) the generation of a BAC/cosmid end-sequence map across the region with a density of one marker every 8kb; 3) the development of a second-generation of STS (sequence tagged sites) which will be used to identify and verify clonal overlap at the level of the sequence; 4) incorporation of these sequence-anchored overlapping clones into existing cosmid/BAC restriction maps developed at Livermore National Laboratory; and 5) validation of the organization of this region utilizing high-resolution FISH techniques (extended chromatin analysis) on monochromosomal 19 somatic cell hybrids and parental cell lines of source material. The data generated will be used in the selection of the most parsimonious tiling path of BAC clones to be sequenced as part of the JGI effort on chromosome 19 and should serve as a model for the sequence

  3. Analysis of tandem gene copies in maize chromosomal regions reconstructed from long sequence reads.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiaqiang; Feng, Yaping; Kumar, Dibyendu; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Tingting; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Messing, Joachim

    2016-07-19

    Haplotype variation not only involves SNPs but also insertions and deletions, in particular gene copy number variations. However, comparisons of individual genomes have been difficult because traditional sequencing methods give too short reads to unambiguously reconstruct chromosomal regions containing repetitive DNA sequences. An example of such a case is the protein gene family in maize that acts as a sink for reduced nitrogen in the seed. Previously, 41-48 gene copies of the alpha zein gene family that spread over six loci spanning between 30- and 500-kb chromosomal regions have been described in two Iowa Stiff Stalk (SS) inbreds. Analyses of those regions were possible because of overlapping BAC clones, generated by an expensive and labor-intensive approach. Here we used single-molecule real-time (Pacific Biosciences) shotgun sequencing to assemble the six chromosomal regions from the Non-Stiff Stalk maize inbred W22 from a single DNA sequence dataset. To validate the reconstructed regions, we developed an optical map (BioNano genome map; BioNano Genomics) of W22 and found agreement between the two datasets. Using the sequences of full-length cDNAs from W22, we found that the error rate of PacBio sequencing seemed to be less than 0.1% after autocorrection and assembly. Expressed genes, some with premature stop codons, are interspersed with nonexpressed genes, giving rise to genotype-specific expression differences. Alignment of these regions with those from the previous analyzed regions of SS lines exhibits in part dramatic differences between these two heterotic groups.

  4. Quality Control of the Traditional Patent Medicine Yimu Wan Based on SMRT Sequencing and DNA Barcoding.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jing; Xu, Zhichao; Xin, Tianyi; Shi, Linchun; Song, Jingyuan

    2017-01-01

    Substandard traditional patent medicines may lead to global safety-related issues. Protecting consumers from the health risks associated with the integrity and authenticity of herbal preparations is of great concern. Of particular concern is quality control for traditional patent medicines. Here, we establish an effective approach for verifying the biological composition of traditional patent medicines based on single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing and DNA barcoding. Yimu Wan (YMW), a classical herbal prescription recorded in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia, was chosen to test the method. Two reference YMW samples were used to establish a standard method for analysis, which was then applied to three different batches of commercial YMW samples. A total of 3703 and 4810 circular-consensus sequencing (CCS) reads from two reference and three commercial YMW samples were mapped to the ITS2 and psbA-trnH regions, respectively. Moreover, comparison of intraspecific genetic distances based on SMRT sequencing data with reference data from Sanger sequencing revealed an ITS2 and psbA-trnH intergenic spacer that exhibited high intraspecific divergence, with the sites of variation showing significant differences within species. Using the CCS strategy for SMRT sequencing analysis was adequate to guarantee the accuracy of identification. This study demonstrates the application of SMRT sequencing to detect the biological ingredients of herbal preparations. SMRT sequencing provides an affordable way to monitor the legality and safety of traditional patent medicines.

  5. Identification of genomic regions associated with female fertility in Danish Jersey using whole genome sequence data.

    PubMed

    Höglund, Johanna K; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Lund, Mogens S; Sahana, Goutam

    2015-06-03

    Female fertility is an important trait in cattle breeding programs. In the Nordic countries selection is based on a fertility index (FTI). The fertility index is a weighted combination of four female fertility traits estimated breeding values for number of inseminations per conception (AIS), 56-day non-return rate (NRR), number of days from first to last insemination (IFL), and number of days between calving and first insemination (ICF). The objective of this study was to identify associations between sequence variants and fertility traits in Jersey cattle based on 1,225 Jersey sires from Denmark with official breeding values for female fertility traits. The association analyses were carried out in two steps: first the cattle genome was scanned for quantitative trait loci using a sire model for FTI using imputed whole genome sequence variants; second the significant quantitative trait locus regions were re-analyzed using a linear mixed model (animal model) for both FTI and its component traits AIS, NRR, IFL and ICF. The underlying traits were analyzed separately for heifers (first parity cows) and cows (later parity cows) for AIS, NRR, and IFL. In the first step 6 QTL were detected for FTI: one QTL on each of BTA7, BTA20, BTA23, BTA25, and two QTL on BTA9 (QTL9-1 and QTL9-2). In the second step, ICF showed association with the QTL regions on BTA7, QTL9-2 QTL2 on BTA9, and BTA25, AIS for cows on BTA20 and BTA23, AIS for heifers on QTL9-2 on BTA9, IFL for cows on BTA20, BTA23 and BTA25, IFL for heifers on BTA7 and QTL9-2 on BTA9, NRR for heifers on BTA7 and BTA23, and NRR for cows on BTA23. The genome wide association study presented here revealed 6 genomic regions associated with FTI. Screening these 6 QTL regions for the underlying female fertility traits revealed that different female fertility traits showed associations with different subsets of the individual FTI QTL peaks. The result of this study contributed to a better insight into the genetic control of FTI

  6. Genomic shotgun array: a procedure linking large-scale DNA sequencing with regional transcript mapping.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling-Hui; Li, Jian-Chiuan; Lin, Yung-Feng; Lin, Chung-Yen; Chen, Chung-Yung; Tsai, Shih-Feng

    2004-02-11

    To facilitate transcript mapping and to investigate alterations in genomic structure and gene expression in a defined genomic target, we developed a novel microarray-based method to detect transcriptional activity of the human chromosome 4q22-24 region. Loss of heterozygosity of human 4q22-24 is frequently observed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). One hundred and eighteen well-characterized genes have been identified from this region. We took previously sequenced shotgun subclones as templates to amplify overlapping sequences for the genomic segment and constructed a chromosome-region-specific microarray. Using genomic DNA fragments as probes, we detected transcriptional activity from within this region among five different tissues. The hybridization results indicate that there are new transcripts that have not yet been identified by other methods. The existence of new transcripts encoded by genes in this region was confirmed by PCR cloning or cDNA library screening. The procedure reported here allows coupling of shotgun sequencing with transcript mapping and, potentially, detailed analysis of gene expression and chromosomal copy of the genomic sequence for the putative HCC tumor suppressor gene(s) in the 4q candidate region.

  7. Organization and variation of the mitochondrial control region in two vulture species, Gypaetus barbatus and Neophron percnopterus.

    PubMed

    Roques, S; Godoy, J A; Negro, J J; Hiraldo, F

    2004-01-01

    We report the first entire mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences in two endangered vulture species, the bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) and the Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus). Results showed that the general organization of vulture control regions was very similar to other birds, with three distinct domains: a left variable domain (DI), a central conserved one (DII) including the F, E, D, and C boxes, and a right domain (DIII) containing the CSB1 sequence. However, due to the presence of long tandem repeats, vulture control regions differed from other avian control regions both in size and nucleotide composition. The Egyptian vulture control region was found to be the largest sequenced so far (2031 bp), due to the simultaneous presence of repeats in both DI (80 bp) and DIII (77 bp). Low variation was found in vulture control regions, particularly in G. barbatus, as the probable result of populations declines in the last few centuries.

  8. Optimized control of multistate quantum systems by composite pulse sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Genov, G. T.; Vitanov, N. V.; Torosov, B. T.

    2011-12-15

    We introduce a technique for derivation of high-fidelity composite pulse sequences for two types of multistate quantum systems: systems with the SU(2) and Morris-Shore dynamic symmetries. For the former type, we use the Majorana decomposition to reduce the dynamics to an effective two-state system, which allows us to find the propagator analytically and use the pool of available composite pulses for two-state systems. For the latter type of multistate systems, we use the Morris-Shore decomposition, which reduces the multistate dynamics to a set of two-state systems. We present examples which demonstrate that the multistate composite sequences open a variety of possibilities for coherent control of quantum systems with multiple states.

  9. Inter-ethnic polymorphism of the beta-globin gene locus control region (LCR) in sickle-cell anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Périchon, B; Ragusa, A; Lapouméroulie, C; Romand, A; Moi, P; Ikuta, T; Labie, D; Elion, J; Krishnamoorthy, R

    1993-06-01

    Sequence polymorphisms within the 5'HS2 segment of human locus control region is described among sickle cell anemia patients. Distinct polymorphic patterns of a simple sequence repeat are observed in strong linkage disequilibrium with each of the five major beta s haplotypes. Potential functional relevance of this polymorphic region in globin gene expression is discussed.

  10. PrDOS: prediction of disordered protein regions from amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takashi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2007-07-01

    PrDOS is a server that predicts the disordered regions of a protein from its amino acid sequence (http://prdos.hgc.jp). The server accepts a single protein amino acid sequence, in either plain text or FASTA format. The prediction system is composed of two predictors: a predictor based on local amino acid sequence information and one based on template proteins. The server combines the results of the two predictors and returns a two-state prediction (order/disorder) and a disorder probability for each residue. The prediction results are sent by e-mail, and the server also provides a web-interface to check the results.

  11. DNA Replication Control Is Linked to Genomic Positioning of Control Regions in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is in part controlled by three non-coding genomic sequences, DARS1, DARS2, and datA that modulate the activity of the initiator protein DnaA. The relative distance from oriC to the non-coding regions are conserved among E. coli species, despite large variations in genome size. Here we use a combination of i) site directed translocation of each region to new positions on the bacterial chromosome and ii) random transposon mediated translocation followed by culture evolution, to show genetic evidence for the importance of position. Here we provide evidence that the genomic locations of these regulatory sequences are important for cell cycle control and bacterial fitness. In addition, our work shows that the functionally redundant DARS1 and DARS2 regions play different roles in replication control. DARS1 is mainly involved in maintaining the origin concentration, whether DARS2 is also involved in maintaining single cell synchrony. PMID:27589233

  12. Prediction of flexible/rigid regions from protein sequences using k-spaced amino acid pairs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke; Kurgan, Lukasz A; Ruan, Jishou

    2007-01-01

    Background Traditionally, it is believed that the native structure of a protein corresponds to a global minimum of its free energy. However, with the growing number of known tertiary (3D) protein structures, researchers have discovered that some proteins can alter their structures in response to a change in their surroundings or with the help of other proteins or ligands. Such structural shifts play a crucial role with respect to the protein function. To this end, we propose a machine learning method for the prediction of the flexible/rigid regions of proteins (referred to as FlexRP); the method is based on a novel sequence representation and feature selection. Knowledge of the flexible/rigid regions may provide insights into the protein folding process and the 3D structure prediction. Results The flexible/rigid regions were defined based on a dataset, which includes protein sequences that have multiple experimental structures, and which was previously used to study the structural conservation of proteins. Sequences drawn from this dataset were represented based on feature sets that were proposed in prior research, such as PSI-BLAST profiles, composition vector and binary sequence encoding, and a newly proposed representation based on frequencies of k-spaced amino acid pairs. These representations were processed by feature selection to reduce the dimensionality. Several machine learning methods for the prediction of flexible/rigid regions and two recently proposed methods for the prediction of conformational changes and unstructured regions were compared with the proposed method. The FlexRP method, which applies Logistic Regression and collocation-based representation with 95 features, obtained 79.5% accuracy. The two runner-up methods, which apply the same sequence representation and Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Naïve Bayes classifiers, obtained 79.2% and 78.4% accuracy, respectively. The remaining considered methods are characterized by accuracies below 70

  13. Telomeric (TTAGGG)n sequences are associated with nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) in the wood lemming.

    PubMed

    Liu, W S; Fredga, K

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of the (TTAGGG)n telomeric sequence was studied in chromosomes of the wood lemming, Myopus schisticolor, by fluorescence in-situ hybridization. As expected, the hybridization signals were observed at telomeres of all chromosomes. However, quite a number of interstitial telomeric sites were present in the pericentric heterochromatic regions. Consistent strong hybridization signals were also seen at one terminus of chromosomes 5, 7 and 12--15. By post-hybridization G-banding and silver-staining, the large blocks of the telomeric sequences on chromosomes 5 and 12 were localized to nucleolus organizer regions (NORs).

  14. DNA Sequence Analysis of SLC26A5, Encoding Prestin, in a Patient-Control Cohort: Identification of Fourteen Novel DNA Sequence Variations

    PubMed Central

    Minor, Jacob S.; Tang, Hsiao-Yuan; Pereira, Fred A.; Alford, Raye Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Background Prestin, encoded by the gene SLC26A5, is a transmembrane protein of the cochlear outer hair cell (OHC). Prestin is required for the somatic electromotile activity of OHCs, which is absent in OHCs and causes severe hearing impairment in mice lacking prestin. In humans, the role of sequence variations in SLC26A5 in hearing loss is less clear. Although prestin is expected to be required for functional human OHCs, the clinical significance of reported putative mutant alleles in humans is uncertain. Methodology/Principal Findings To explore the hypothesis that SLC26A5 may act as a modifier gene, affecting the severity of hearing loss caused by an independent etiology, a patient-control cohort was screened for DNA sequence variations in SLC26A5 using sequencing and allele specific methods. Patients in this study carried known pathogenic or controversial sequence variations in GJB2, encoding Connexin 26, or confirmed or suspected sequence variations in SLC26A5; controls included four ethnic populations. Twenty-three different DNA sequence variations in SLC26A5, 14 of which are novel, were observed: 4 novel sequence variations were found exclusively among patients; 7 novel sequence variations were found exclusively among controls; and, 12 sequence variations, 3 of which are novel, were found in both patients and controls. Twenty-one of the 23 DNA sequence variations were located in non-coding regions of SLC26A5. Two coding sequence variations, both novel, were observed only in patients and predict a silent change, p.S434S, and an amino acid substitution, p.I663V. In silico analysis of the p.I663V amino acid variation suggested this variant might be benign. Using Fisher's exact test, no statistically significant difference was observed between patients and controls in the frequency of the identified DNA sequence variations. Haplotype analysis using HaploView 4.0 software revealed the same predominant haplotype in patients and controls and derived haplotype blocks

  15. Regional Changes in the Sequence of Cotton Leaf Curl Multan Betasatellite

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Sohail; Tahir, Muhammad Nouman; Baloch, Ghulam Rasool; Javaid, Shaista; Khan, Ali Qaiser; Amin, Imran; Briddon, Rob W.; Mansoor, Shahid

    2014-01-01

    Cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD) in Pakistan and northwestern India is caused by monopartite begomoviruses in association with an essential, disease-specific satellite, Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite (CLCuMB). Following a recent upsurge in CLCuD problems in Sindh province (southern Pakistan), sequences of clones of CLCuMB were obtained from Sindh and Punjab province (central Pakistan), where CLCuD has been a problem since the mid-1980s. The sequences were compared to all sequences of CLCuMB available in the databases. Analysis of the sequences shows extensive sequence variation in CLCuMB, most likely resulting from recombination. The range of sequence variants differ between Sindh, the Punjab and northwestern India. The possible significance of the findings with respect to movement of the CLCuD between the three regions is discussed. Additionally, the lack of sequence variation within the only coding sequence of CLCuMB suggests that the betasatellite is not involved in resistance breaking which became a problem after 2001 in the Punjab and subsequently also in northwestern India. PMID:24859342

  16. SAG-QC: quality control of single amplified genome information by subtracting non-target sequences based on sequence compositions.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Toru; Mori, Tetsushi; Yamagishi, Keisuke; Takeyama, Haruko

    2017-03-04

    Whole genome amplification techniques have enabled the analysis of unexplored genomic information by sequencing of single-amplified genomes (SAGs). Whole genome amplification of single bacteria is currently challenging because contamination often occurs in experimental processes. Thus, to increase the confidence in the analyses of sequenced SAGs, bioinformatics approaches that identify and exclude non-target sequences from SAGs are required. Since currently reported approaches utilize sequence information in public databases, they have limitations when new strains are the targets of interest. Here, we developed a software SAG-QC that identify and exclude non-target sequences independent of database. In our method, "no template control" sequences acquired during WGA were used. We calculated the probability that a sequence was derived from contaminants by comparing k-mer compositions with the no template control sequences. Based on the results of tests using simulated SAG datasets, the accuracy of our method for predicting non-target sequences was higher than that of currently reported techniques. Subsequently, we applied our tool to actual SAG datasets and evaluated the accuracy of the predictions. Our method works independently of public sequence information for distinguishing SAGs from non-target sequences. This method will be effective when employed against SAG sequences of unexplored strains and we anticipate that it will contribute to the correct interpretation of SAGs.

  17. A strategy for sequence control in vinyl polymers via iterative controlled radical cyclization

    PubMed Central

    Hibi, Yusuke; Ouchi, Makoto; Sawamoto, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in sequence-controlled polymers toward advanced functional materials. However, control of side-chain order for vinyl polymers has been lacking feasibility in the field of polymer synthesis because of the inherent feature of chain-growth propagation. Here we show a general and versatile strategy to control sequence in vinyl polymers through iterative radical cyclization with orthogonally cleavable and renewable bonds. The proposed methodology employs a repetitive and iterative intramolecular cyclization via a radical intermediate in a one-time template with a radical-generating site at one end and an alkene end at the other, each of which is connected to a linker via independently cleavable and renewable bonds. The unique design specifically allowed control of radical addition reaction although inherent chain-growth intermediate (radical species) was used, as well as the iterative cycle and functionalization for resultant side chains, to lead to sequence-controlled vinyl polymers (or oligomers). PMID:26996881

  18. Structure of the mitochondrial DNA control region of the sinipercine fishes and their phylogenetic relationship.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jin-Liang; Wang, Wei-Wei; Li, Si-Fa; Cai, Wan-Qi

    2006-09-01

    The mitochondrial DNA control region of Siniperca chuatsi, S. kneri, S. scherzeri, S. obscura, S. undulata, Coreosiniperca roulei and Coreoperca whiteheadi were amplified by PCR amplification and directly sequenced. The mtDNA control region of the sinipercine fishes could be separated into three domains, namely, the terminal associated sequence domain, the central conserved sequence domain and the conserved sequence block domain. The extended terminal associated sequence (ETAS), three conserved sequence blocks (CSB-F, CSB-E, CSB-D) in the central conserved sequence domain and three conserved sequence blocks (CSB1, CSB2, CSB3) in the conserved sequence block domain were also identified. The phylogenetic relationships among these sinipercine fishes were constructed through neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony methods using Percidae and Serranidae as outgroups. Results showed that sinipercine fishes were a monophyletic group, with Siniperca forming one group, and Coreoperca forming another group. Coreosiniperca roulei did not form an independent group but was merged into the genus Siniperca. Thus it should be renamed as Siniperca roulei.

  19. Systematic Dissection of the Sequence Determinants of Gene 3’ End Mediated Expression Control

    PubMed Central

    Lubliner, Shai; Regev, Ifat; Lotan-Pompan, Maya; Yakhini, Zohar; Segal, Eran

    2015-01-01

    The 3’end genomic region encodes a wide range of regulatory process including mRNA stability, 3’ end processing and translation. Here, we systematically investigate the sequence determinants of 3’ end mediated expression control by measuring the effect of 13,000 designed 3’ end sequence variants on constitutive expression levels in yeast. By including a high resolution scanning mutagenesis of more than 200 native 3’ end sequences in this designed set, we found that most mutations had only a mild effect on expression, and that the vast majority (~90%) of strongly effecting mutations localized to a single positive TA-rich element, similar to a previously described 3’ end processing efficiency element, and resulted in up to ten-fold decrease in expression. Measurements of 3’ UTR lengths revealed that these mutations result in mRNAs with aberrantly long 3’UTRs, confirming the role for this element in 3’ end processing. Interestingly, we found that other sequence elements that were previously described in the literature to be part of the polyadenylation signal had a minor effect on expression. We further characterize the sequence specificities of the TA-rich element using additional synthetic 3’ end sequences and show that its activity is sensitive to single base pair mutations and strongly depends on the A/T content of the surrounding sequences. Finally, using a computational model, we show that the strength of this element in native 3’ end sequences can explain some of their measured expression variability (R = 0.41). Together, our results emphasize the importance of efficient 3’ end processing for endogenous protein levels and contribute to an improved understanding of the sequence elements involved in this process. PMID:25875337

  20. Comparison of orthologous and paralogous DNA flanking the wheat high molecular weight glutenin genes: sequence conservation and divergence, transposon distribution, and matrix-attachment regions.

    PubMed

    Anderson, O D; Larka, L; Christoffers, M J; McCue, K F; Gustafson, J P

    2002-04-01

    Extended flanking DNA sequences were characterized for five members of the wheat high molecular weight (HMW) glutenin gene family to understand more of the structure, control, and evolution of these genes. Analysis revealed more sequence conservation among orthologous regions than between paralogous regions, with differences mainly owing to transposition events involving putative retrotransposons and several miniature inverted transposable elements (MITEs). Both gyspy-like long terminal repeat (LTR) and non-LTR retrotransposon sequences are represented in the flanking DNAs. One of the MITEs is a novel class, but another MITE is related to the maize Stowaway family and is widely represented in Triticeae express sequence tags (ESTs). Flanking DNA of the longest sequence, a 20 425-bp fragment including and surrounding the HMW-glutenin Bx7 gene, showed additional cereal gene-like sequences both immediately 5' and 3' to the HMW-glutenin coding region. The transcriptional activities of sequences related to these flanking putative genes and the retrotransposon-related regions were indicated by matches to wheat and other Triticeae ESTs. Predictive analysis of matrix-attachment regions (MARs) of the HMW glutenin and several alpha-, gamma-, and omega-gliadin flanking DNAs indicate potential MARs immediately flanking each of the genes. Matrix binding activity in the predicted regions was confirmed for two of the HMW-glutenin genes.

  1. Analysis of the primary sequence and microtubule-binding region of the Drosophila 205K MAP

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    We have sequenced cDNA clones encoding the Drosophila 205K microtubule- associated protein (MAP), a protein that may be the species specific homologue of mammalian MAP4. The peptide sequence deduced from the longest open-reading frame reveals a hydrophilic protein, which has basic and acidic regions that are similar in organization to mammalian MAP2. Using truncated forms of the 205K MAP, a 232-amino acid region could be defined that is necessary for microtubule binding. The amino acid sequence of this region shares no similarity with the binding motif of MAP2 or tau. We also analyzed several embryonic cDNA clones, which show the existence of differentially spliced mRNAs. Finally, we identified several potential protein kinase target sequences. One of these is distal to the microtubule-binding site and fits the phosphorylation consensus sequence of proteins phosphorylated by the mitosis specific protein kinase cdc2. Our data suggest that the 205K MAP uses a microtubule-binding motif unlike that found in other MAPs, and also raise the possibility that the activities of the 205K MAP may be regulated by alternative splicing and phosphorylation. PMID:1703540

  2. Hypervariable Region 1 Sequence Stability during Hepatitis C Virus Replication in Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Stuart C.; Mao, Qing; Lanford, Robert E.; Bassett, Suzanne; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Wang, Yu-Ming; Thomas, David L.

    2000-01-01

    The putative envelope 2 (E2) gene of hepatitis C virus (HCV) contains a highly variable region referred to as hypervariable region 1 (HVR1). We hypothesized that this genetic variability is driven by immune selection pressure, rather than representing the accumulation of random mutations in a region with relatively little functional constraint. To test this hypothesis, we examined the E2 sequence of a human inoculum that was passaged through eight chimpanzees, which appear to have a replicative rate (opportunity for chance mutation) similar to that of humans. Acute-phase plasma samples from a human (the inoculum) and six of eight serially infected chimpanzees were studied. For each, 33 cloned cDNAs were examined by a combined heteroduplex–single-stranded conformational polymorphism assay to assess quasispecies complexity and optimize selection of clones with unique gel shift patterns (clonotypes) for sequencing. The sequence diversity of HCV was significantly lower in the chimpanzees than in the humans, and during eight serial passages there was no change in the sequence of the majority clonotype from each animal examined. Similarly, the rates of protein sequence altering (nonsynonymous) substitution were lower in the chimpanzees than in the humans. These findings demonstrate that nonsynonymous mutations indicate selection pressure rather than being an incidental result of HCV replication. PMID:10708420

  3. Nucleotide sequence of the 3'-terminal region of potato virus YN RNA.

    PubMed

    van der Vlugt, R; Allefs, S; de Haan, P; Goldbach, R

    1989-01-01

    The sequence of the 3'-terminal 1611 nucleotides of the genome of the tobacco veinal necrosis strain of potato virus Y (PVYN) was determined. The sequence revealed an open reading frame of 1285 nucleotides, of which the start was not identified, and an untranslated region of 316 nucleotides upstream of a poly(A) tract. Comparison of the open reading frame with the amino-terminal sequence of the viral coat protein enabled mapping of the start of the coat protein at amino acid -267, and indicated that maturation of this protein requires proteolytic processing from a larger polyprotein precursor at a glutamine/glycine dipeptide sequence. The coat protein of PVYN displayed significant (51 to 63%) sequence homology to the coat proteins of four other potyviruses, tobacco etch virus, tobacco vein mottling virus, plum pox virus and sugarcane mosaic virus. Even higher sequence homology (91%) was detected with the coat protein of a fifth potyvirus, pepper mottle virus (PeMV). This homology was of the same level as found between the coat proteins of PVYN and a second strain of this virus, PVYD. Since, moreover, PVYN and PeMV were the only potyviruses displaying homology in the 3'-terminal, non-translated regions of their genomes, we conclude that PeMV should be regarded as a strain of PVY.

  4. Sequences of human immunoglobulin switch regions: implications for recombination and transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, F C; Brooker, J S; Camerini-Otero, R D

    1990-01-01

    We have sequenced the entire human S mu and S gamma 4 immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch regions, and have also completed the sequence of human S epsilon. S mu is composed predominantly of GAGCT and GGGCT pentameric repeats, with these units also being found in S epsilon at a much lower density. S mu-S gamma 4 matches are infrequent, but S gamma 4 contains a cluster of repeated sequences similar to units in mouse gamma switch sites and unrelated to the S mu repeats, suggesting that S mu-S gamma homology is not important in mu-gamma switching. We examined our epsilon and gamma 4 sequences for features that could regulate production of 'sterile' transcripts preceding switch recombination. There is an Evolutionarily Conserved Sequence (ECS) upstream from the human and mouse S epsilon regions that overlaps and extends 5' to the start sites for human and mouse epsilon sterile transcripts. Similarly, an ECS upstream from S gamma 4 is homologous to a mouse sequence that overlaps and extends 5' to the start sites for mouse gamma 2b sterile transcripts. The epsilon and gamma 4 conserved segments contain potential Interferon Stimulable Response Elements (ISRE's) that are identical between human epsilon and gamma 4. PMID:2124350

  5. Evaluation of Protein A Gene Polymorphic Region DNA Sequencing for Typing of Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Shopsin, B.; Gomez, M.; Montgomery, S. O.; Smith, D. H.; Waddington, M.; Dodge, D. E.; Bost, D. A.; Riehman, M.; Naidich, S.; Kreiswirth, B. N.

    1999-01-01

    Three hundred and twenty isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were typed by DNA sequence analysis of the X region of the protein A gene (spa). spa typing was compared to both phenotypic and molecular techniques for the ability to differentiate and categorize S. aureus strains into groups that correlate with epidemiological information. Two previously characterized study populations were examined. A collection of 59 isolates (F. C. Tenover, R. Arbeit, G. Archer, J. Biddle, S. Byrne, R. Goering, G. Hancock, G. A. Hébert, B. Hill, R. Hollis, W. R. Jarvis, B. Kreiswirth, W. Eisner, J. Maslow, L. K. McDougal, J. M. Miller, M. Mulligan, and M. A. Pfaller, J. Clin. Microbiol. 32:407–415, 1994) from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was used to test for the ability to discriminate outbreak from epidemiologically unrelated strains. A separate collection of 261 isolates form a multicenter study (R. B. Roberts, A. de Lencastre, W. Eisner, E. P. Severina, B. Shopsin, B. N. Kreiswirth, and A. Tomasz, J. Infect. Dis. 178:164–171, 1998) of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in New York City (NYC) was used to compare the ability of spa typing to group strains along clonal lines to that of the combination of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization. In the 320 isolates studied, spa typing identified 24 distinct repeat types and 33 different strain types. spa typing distinguished 27 of 29 related strains and did not provide a unique fingerprint for 4 unrelated strains from the four outbreaks of the CDC collection. In the NYC collection, spa typing provided a clonal assignment for 185 of 195 strains within the five major groups previously described. spa sequencing appears to be a highly effective rapid typing tool for S. aureus that, despite some expense of specificity, has significant advantages in terms of speed, ease of use, ease of interpretation, and standardization among laboratories. PMID:10523551

  6. Structure of mitochondrial DNA control region of Pholis fangi and its phylogenetic implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Dianrong; Gao, Tianxiang

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the entire mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (CR) of Pholis fangi was amplified via polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequencing. The length of the mtDNA CR consensus sequence of P. fangi was 853 bp in length. In accordance with the recognition sites as were previously reported in fish species, the mtDNA CR sequence of P. fangi can be divided into 3 domains, i.e., the extended terminal associated sequence (ETAS), the central conserved sequence block (CSB), and the CSB domain. In addition, the following structures were identified in the mtDNA CR sequence of P. fangi: 2 ETASs in the ETAS domain (TAS and cTAS), 6 CSBs in the central CSB domain (CSB-F to CSB-A), and 3 CSBs in the CSB domain (CSB-1 to CSB-3). These demonstrated that the structure of the mtDNA CR of P. fangi was substantially different from those of most other fish species. The mtDNA CR sequence of P. fangi contained one conserved region from 656 bp to 815 bp. Similar to most other fish species, P. fangi has no tandem repeat sequences in its mtDNA CR sequence. Phylogenetic analysis based on the complete mtDNA CR sequences showed that there were no genetic differences within P. fangi populations of the same geographical origin and between P. fangi populations of different geographical origins.

  7. Multiple independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications in the order Psittaciformes

    PubMed Central

    Schirtzinger, Erin E.; Tavares, Erika S.; Gonzales, Lauren A.; Eberhard, Jessica R.; Miyaki, Cristina Y.; Sanchez, Juan J.; Hernandez, Alexis; Müeller, Heinrich; Graves, Gary R.; Fleischer, Robert C.; Wright, Timothy F.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are generally thought to be under selection for compactness, due to their small size, consistent gene content, and a lack of introns or intergenic spacers. As more animal mitochondrial genomes are fully sequenced, rearrangements and partial duplications are being identified with increasing frequency, particularly in birds (Class Aves). In this study, we investigate the evolutionary history of mitochondrial control region states within the avian order Psittaciformes (parrots and cockatoos). To this aim, we reconstructed a comprehensive multi-locus phylogeny of parrots, used PCR of three diagnostic fragments to classify the mitochondrial control region state as single or duplicated, and mapped these states onto the phylogeny. We further sequenced 44 selected species to validate these inferences of control region state. Ancestral state reconstruction using a range of weighting schemes identified six independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications within Psittaciformes. Analysis of sequence data showed that varying levels of mitochondrial gene and tRNA homology and degradation were present within a given clade exhibiting duplications. Levels of divergence between control regions within an individual varied from 0–10.9% with the differences occurring mainly between 51 and 225 nucleotides 3′ of the goose hairpin in domain I. Further investigations into the fates of duplicated mitochondrial genes, the potential costs and benefits of having a second control region, and the complex relationship between evolutionary rates, selection, and time since duplication are needed to fully explain these patterns in the mitochondrial genome. PMID:22543055

  8. Variation in the sequence and modification state of the human insulin gene flanking regions.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, A; Dull, T J; Gray, A; Philips, J A; Peter, S

    1982-04-10

    The nucleotide sequence of a highly repetitive sequence region upstream from the human insulin gene is reported. The length of this region varies between alleles in the population, and appears to be stably transmitted to the next generation in a Mendelian fashion. There is no significant correlation between the length of this sequence and two types of diabetes mellitus. We observe variation in the cleavability of a BglI recognition site downstream from the human insulin gene, which is probably due to variable nucleotide modification. This presumed modification state appears not to be inherited, and varies between tissues within an individual and between individuals for a given tissue. Both alleles in a given tissue DNA sample are modified to the same extent.

  9. POLYMORPHISM IN THE CODING REGION SEQUENCE OF GDF8 GENE IN INDIAN SHEEP.

    PubMed

    Pothuraju, M; Mishra, S K; Kumar, S N; Mohamed, N F; Kataria, R S; Yadav, D K; Arora, R

    2015-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to identify polymorphism in the coding sequence of GDF8gene across indigenous meat type sheep breeds. A 1647 bp sequence was generated, encompassing 208 bp of the 5'UTR, 1128 bp of coding region (exon1, 2 and 3) as well as 311 bp of 3'UTR. The sheep and goat GDF8 gene sequences were observed to be highly conserved as compared to cattle, buffalo, horse and pig. Several nucleotide variations were observed across coding sequence of GDF8 gene in Indian sheep. Three polymorphic sites were identified in the 5'UTR, one in exon 1 and one in the exon 2 regions. Both SNPs in the exonic region were found to be non-synonymous. The mutations c.539T > G and c.821T > A discovered in this study in the exon 1 and exon 2, respectively, have not been previously reported. The information generated provides preliminary indication of the functional diversity present in Indian sheep at the coding region of GDF8gene. The novel as well as the previously reported SNPs discovered in the Indian sheep warrant further analysis to see whether they affect the phenotype. Future studies will need to establish the affect of reported SNPs in the expression of the GDF8 gene in Indian sheep population.

  10. Probabilistic Characterization of Simultaneous Nerve Impulse Sequences Controlling Dipteran Flight

    PubMed Central

    Wyman, Robert

    1965-01-01

    A probabilistic method of analysis of spike trains is presented which provides a complete statistical description of spike sequences and allows the elucidation of some of the properties of the neural interconnections producing the output patterns. The flight motor system of the blowfly, Calliphora terraenovae, is analyzed by this method. Individual motor units show large, non-serially correlated, cycle-to-cycle variations in frequency superimposed upon long term frequency trends. These trends are apparently not generated by averaging the cycle-to-cycle variations in input excitation over a long time period. The different motor units share the same short term input excitation and the excitation causing long term trends. Units in different muscles show no preferred phase or latency relationships; they maintain similar frequencies but their phases drift through all possible values. Frequency control without phase control may be accomplished by shared excitation with a total input frequency many times the output frequency. Units in the same muscle maintain strong phase relationships. Constant phase relationships during variations in frequency may, among other models, be due to reciprocal inhibition or a common linearly rising input. Sensory feedback cannot account for the degree of phase or frequency regulation shown. Thus central patterning of the output sequence is necessary, as in the locust, and the two flight systems can be considered as integradable evolutionary variations. PMID:5861702

  11. Role of DNA sequence in chromatin remodeling and the formation of nucleosome-free regions.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Yahli; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D

    2014-11-15

    AT-rich DNA is concentrated in the nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) associated with transcription start sites of most genes. We tested the hypothesis that AT-rich DNA engenders NFR formation by virtue of its rigidity and consequent exclusion of nucleosomes. We found that the AT-rich sequences present in many NFRs have little effect on the stability of nucleosomes. Rather, these sequences facilitate the removal of nucleosomes by the RSC chromatin remodeling complex. RSC activity is stimulated by AT-rich sequences in nucleosomes and inhibited by competition with AT-rich DNA. RSC may remove NFR nucleosomes without effect on adjacent ORF nucleosomes. Our findings suggest that many NFRs are formed and maintained by an active mechanism involving the ATP-dependent removal of nucleosomes rather than a passive mechanism due to the intrinsic instability of nucleosomes on AT-rich DNA sequences. © 2014 Lorch et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  12. Regional localization of DNA sequences on chromosome 21 using somatic cell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Van Keuren, M L; Watkins, P C; Drabkin, H A; Jabs, E W; Gusella, J F; Patterson, D

    1986-01-01

    We have used a panel of Chinese hamster X human somatic cell hybrids, each containing various portions of chromosome 21 as the only detectable human chromosome component, for regional mapping of cloned, chromosome 21-derived DNA sequences. Thirty unique and very low-repeat sequences were mapped to the short arm and three sections of the long arm. Three unique sequences map to the proximal part of the terminal band 21q22.3, and five to the distal part of this band. Some of these may represent parts of gene sequences that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of Down syndrome, as 21q22 is the area required to be present in triplicate for the full clinical picture. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3014865

  13. Novel duplication pattern of the mitochondrial control region in Cantor's Giant softshell turtle Pelochelys cantorii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-Cheng; Li, Wei; Zhao, Jian; Chen, Hai-Gang; Zhu, Xin-Ping

    2016-11-15

    Cantor's Giant Softshell Turtle, Pelochelys cantorii has become one of the most critically endangered species in the world. When comparative analyses of the P. cantorii complete mitochondrial genome sequences were conducted, we discovered a duplication of a segment of the control region in the mitochondrial genome of P. cantorii. The duplication is characterized by two copies of conserved sequence box 2 (CSB2) and CSB3 in a single control region. In contrast to previous reports of duplications involving the control regions of other animals, this particular pattern of duplications appears to be unique to P. cantorii. Copies of the CSB2 and CSB3 show many of the conserved sequence features typically found in mitochondrial control regions, and rare differences were found between the paralogous copies. Using the primer design principle of simple sequence repeats (SSR) and the reference sequence of the duplicated CSBs, specific primers were designed to amplify the duplicated CSBs. These primers were validated among different individuals and populations of P. cantorii. This unique duplication structure suggests the two copies of the CSB2 and CSB3 may have arisen through occasional tandem duplication and subsequent concerted evolution.

  14. Exploring the reasons for the large density of triplex-forming oligonucleotide target sequences in the human regulatory regions

    PubMed Central

    Goñi, Josep Ramon; Vaquerizas, Juan Manuel; Dopazo, Joaquin; Orozco, Modesto

    2006-01-01

    Background DNA duplex sequences that can be targets for triplex formation are highly over-represented in the human genome, especially in regulatory regions. Results Here we studied using bioinformatics tools several properties of triplex target sequences in an attempt to determine those that make these sequences so special in the genome. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that the unique physical properties of these sequences make them particularly suitable as "separators" between protein-recognition sites in the promoter region. PMID:16566817

  15. Region 5 Toxic Substances Control Act Producers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This dataset represents the query results from the Envirofacts database for facilities known as Chemical Manufacturers, Processors and Formulators (MPFs) with TSCA identification numbers located in Region 5.

  16. Sequence analysis of the hypervariable region in hmtp210 of Avibacterium paragallinarum

    PubMed Central

    ARAYA-HIDALGO, Edward; GUTIÉRREZ-JIMÉNEZ, Cristina; CHAVES-RAMÍREZ, Mónica; SUÁREZ-ESQUIVEL, Marcela; GUZMÁN-VERRI, Caterina; BARQUERO-CALVO, Elías

    2017-01-01

    The hmtp210 gene of Avibacterium paragallinarum, the causative agent of infectious coryza, encodes an outer-membrane hemagglutinin (HA) that plays an essential role in pathogenicity. A hypervariable region within this HA, which is highly antigenic, is proposed as a candidate for recombinant vaccine production. Nonetheless, little is known about its genetic variability. We performed sequencing analysis of the hmtp210 hypervariable region in 16 clinical isolates from Costa Rica and compared them with 4 vaccine strains and the hmtp210 sequences available in public databases. Except for isolate ApCR12, all isolates showed high identity with reference vaccine strains 0083 and H18. Better genetic characterization of the hypervariable region of hmtp210 is necessary to develop better immunogenic strategies and improved molecular typing methods. PMID:28552860

  17. Cerebrospinal-fluid-derived immunoglobulin G of different multiple sclerosis patients shares mutated sequences in complementarity determining regions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vaibhav; Stoop, Marcel P; Stingl, Christoph; Luitwieler, Ronald L; Dekker, Lennard J; van Duijn, Martijn M; Kreft, Karim L; Luider, Theo M; Hintzen, Rogier Q

    2013-12-01

    B lymphocytes play a pivotal role in multiple sclerosis pathology, possibly via both antibody-dependent and -independent pathways. Intrathecal immunoglobulin G in multiple sclerosis is produced by clonally expanded B-cell populations. Recent studies indicate that the complementarity determining regions of immunoglobulins specific for certain antigens are frequently shared between different individuals. In this study, our main objective was to identify specific proteomic profiles of mutated complementarity determining regions of immunoglobulin G present in multiple sclerosis patients but absent in healthy controls. To achieve this objective, we purified immunoglobulin G from the cerebrospinal fluid of 29 multiple sclerosis patients and 30 healthy controls and separated the corresponding heavy and light chains via SDS-PAGE. Subsequently, bands were excised, trypsinized, and measured with high-resolution mass spectrometry. We sequenced 841 heavy and 771 light chain variable region peptides. We observed 24 heavy and 26 light chain complementarity determining regions that were solely present in a number of multiple sclerosis patients. Using stringent criteria for the identification of common peptides, we found five complementarity determining regions shared in three or more patients and not in controls. Interestingly, one complementarity determining region with a single mutation was found in six patients. Additionally, one other patient carrying a similar complementarity determining region with another mutation was observed. In addition, we found a skew in the κ-to-λ ratio and in the usage of certain variable heavy regions that was previously observed at the transcriptome level. At the protein level, cerebrospinal fluid immunoglobulin G shares common characteristics in the antigen binding region among different multiple sclerosis patients. The indication of a shared fingerprint may indicate common antigens for B-cell activation.

  18. Caraparu virus (group C Orthobunyavirus): sequencing and phylogenetic analysis based on the conserved region 3 of the RNA polymerase gene.

    PubMed

    de Brito Magalhães, Cintia Lopes; Quinan, Bárbara Resende; Novaes, Renata Franco Vianna; dos Santos, João Rodrigues; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Bonjardim, Cláudio Antônio; Ferreira, Paulo César Peregrino

    2007-12-01

    Here, for the first time, we report the nucleotide sequence of Caraparu virus (CARV) L segment and the analysis of the RNA polymerase region 3 encoded by this segment. The 1,404 bp nucleotide sequence shares the highest identity with Bunyamwera, La Crosse, Oropouche, and Akabane virus sequences. The amino acid sequence was deduced and aligned with sequences from members of the Bunyaviridae family and used for phylogenetic analysis. The CARV clustered in the Orthobunyavirus genus. The premotif A and motifs A-E are present in the region 3 of the Bunyaviridae family, were also conserved in CARV L protein, as well as other conserved regions among Orthobunyavirus genus.

  19. [Identification of mutations associated with coronary artery lesion susceptibility in Kawasaki disease by targeted enrichment of genomic region sequencing technique].

    PubMed

    Zhu, D Y; Song, S R; Xie, L J; Qiu, F; Yang, J; Xiao, T T; Huang, M

    2017-07-02

    Objective: To screen and identify the mutations in Kawasaki disease by targeted enrichment of genomic region sequencing technique and investigate susceptibility genes associated with coronary artery lesion. Method: This was a case-control study.A total of 114 patients diagnosed as Kawasaki disease treated in Shanghai Children's Hospital between December 2015 and November 2016 were studied and another 45 healthy children who were physically examined in outpatient department were enrolled as control group. Patients were divided into two groups based on the results of echocardiogram. Peripheral venous blood was obtained from patients and controls. Genomic DNA was extracted. SeqCap EZ Choice libraries were prepared by targeted enrichment of genomic region technology. Then the libraries were sequenced to identify susceptibility genes associated with coronary artery lesion in patients diagnosed as Kawasaki disease.Susceptible genes were identified by Burden test, Pearson chi-square test or Fisher's exact probability test. Result: There was statistically significant difference in TNFRSF11B(rs2073618)G>C(p.N3K)mutation and GG/GC/CC genotype between Kawasaki disease group and control group(χ(2)=15.52, P=0.00). There was statistically significant difference in TNFRSF13B(rs34562254)C>T(p.P251L)mutation(χ(2)=10.40, P=0.01)and LEFTY1(rs360057)T>G(p.D322A)mutation(χ(2)=8.505, P=0.01)between patients with coronary artery lesions and those without. Conclusion: Targeted enrichment of genomic region sequencing technology can be used to do primary screening for the susceptible genes associated with coronary artery lesions in Chinese Kawasaki patients and may provide theoretical basis for larger sample investigation of risk prediction score standard in Kawasaki disease.

  20. Regions of the polytene chromosomes of Drosophila virilis carrying multiple dispersed p Dv 111 DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Gubenko, I.S.; Evgen'ev, M.B.

    1986-09-01

    The cloned sequences of p Dv 111 DNA hybridized in situ with more than 170 regions of Drosophila virilis salivary gland chromosomes. Comparative autoradiography of in situ hybridization and the nature of pulse /sup 3/H-thymidine and /sup 3/H-deoxycytidine incorporation into the polytene chromosomes of D. virilis at the puparium formation stage showed that the hybridization sites of p Dv 111 are distributed not only in the heterochromatic regions but also in the euchromatic regions of the chromosomes that are not late replicating. Two distinct bands of hybridization of p Dv 111 /sup 3/H-DNA were observed in the region of the heat shock puff 20CD. The regions of the distal end of chromosome 2, in which breaks appeared during radiation-induced chromosomal rearrangements, hybridized with the p Dv 111 DNA.

  1. Translational control by lysine-encoding A-rich sequences

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Laura L.; Pavlovic-Djuranovic, Slavica; Koutmou, Kristin S.; Green, Rachel; Szczesny, Pawel; Djuranovic, Sergej

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression involves a wide array of cellular mechanisms that control the abundance of the RNA or protein products of that gene. We describe a gene regulatory mechanism that is based on polyadenylate [poly(A)] tracks that stall the translation apparatus. We show that creating longer or shorter runs of adenosine nucleotides, without changes in the amino acid sequence, alters the protein output and the stability of mRNA. Sometimes, these changes result in the production of an alternative “frameshifted” protein product. These observations are corroborated using reporter constructs and in the context of recombinant gene sequences. About 2% of genes in the human genome may be subject to this uncharacterized yet fundamental form of gene regulation. The potential pool of regulated genes encodes many proteins involved in nucleic acid binding. We hypothesize that the genes we identify are part of a large network whose expression is fine-tuned by poly(A) tracks, and we provide a mechanism through which synonymous mutations may influence gene expression in pathological states. PMID:26322332

  2. Digital Sequences and a Time Reversal-Based Impact Region Imaging and Localization Method

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Qian, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    To reduce time and cost of damage inspection, on-line impact monitoring of aircraft composite structures is needed. A digital monitor based on an array of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) is developed to record the impact region of impacts on-line. It is small in size, lightweight and has low power consumption, but there are two problems with the impact alarm region localization method of the digital monitor at the current stage. The first one is that the accuracy rate of the impact alarm region localization is low, especially on complex composite structures. The second problem is that the area of impact alarm region is large when a large scale structure is monitored and the number of PZTs is limited which increases the time and cost of damage inspections. To solve the two problems, an impact alarm region imaging and localization method based on digital sequences and time reversal is proposed. In this method, the frequency band of impact response signals is estimated based on the digital sequences first. Then, characteristic signals of impact response signals are constructed by sinusoidal modulation signals. Finally, the phase synthesis time reversal impact imaging method is adopted to obtain the impact region image. Depending on the image, an error ellipse is generated to give out the final impact alarm region. A validation experiment is implemented on a complex composite wing box of a real aircraft. The validation results show that the accuracy rate of impact alarm region localization is approximately 100%. The area of impact alarm region can be reduced and the number of PZTs needed to cover the same impact monitoring region is reduced by more than a half. PMID:24084123

  3. Digital sequences and a time reversal-based impact region imaging and localization method.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Qian, Weifeng

    2013-10-01

    To reduce time and cost of damage inspection, on-line impact monitoring of aircraft composite structures is needed. A digital monitor based on an array of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) is developed to record the impact region of impacts on-line. It is small in size, lightweight and has low power consumption, but there are two problems with the impact alarm region localization method of the digital monitor at the current stage. The first one is that the accuracy rate of the impact alarm region localization is low, especially on complex composite structures. The second problem is that the area of impact alarm region is large when a large scale structure is monitored and the number of PZTs is limited which increases the time and cost of damage inspections. To solve the two problems, an impact alarm region imaging and localization method based on digital sequences and time reversal is proposed. In this method, the frequency band of impact response signals is estimated based on the digital sequences first. Then, characteristic signals of impact response signals are constructed by sinusoidal modulation signals. Finally, the phase synthesis time reversal impact imaging method is adopted to obtain the impact region image. Depending on the image, an error ellipse is generated to give out the final impact alarm region. A validation experiment is implemented on a complex composite wing box of a real aircraft. The validation results show that the accuracy rate of impact alarm region localization is approximately 100%. The area of impact alarm region can be reduced and the number of PZTs needed to cover the same impact monitoring region is reduced by more than a half.

  4. A replication-time-controlling sequence element in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Vishnu P; Dubey, Dharani D

    2017-08-01

    Eukaryotic replication origins are highly variable in their activity and replication timing. The nature and role of cis-acting regulatory sequences that control chromosomal replication timing is not well defined. In the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a 200-bp late-replication-enforcing element (LRE), has been shown to enforce late replication of ARS elements in plasmids. Here, we show that a short (133-bp) fragment of the LRE (shLRE) is required for causing late replication of adjoining origins in its native as well as in an ectopic early-replicating chromosomal location. Active from both sides of an early-replicating origin, the shLRE is a bona fide cis-acting regulatory element that imposes late replication timing in the chromosome.

  5. Polymorphisms in the control region of mitochondrial DNA associated with elite Japanese athlete status.

    PubMed

    Mikami, E; Fuku, N; Takahashi, H; Ohiwa, N; Pitsiladis, Y P; Higuchi, M; Kawahara, T; Tanaka, M

    2013-10-01

    The control region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) contains the main regulatory elements for mtDNA replication and transcription. Certain polymorphisms in this region would, therefore, contribute to elite athletic performance, because mitochondrial function is one of determinants of physical performance. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of polymorphisms in this region on elite athlete status by sequencing the mtDNA control region. Subjects comprised 185 elite Japanese athletes who had represented Japan at international competitions (i.e., 100 endurance/middle-power athletes: EMA; 85 sprint/power athletes: SPA), and 672 Japanese controls (CON). The mtDNA control region was analyzed by direct sequencing. Frequency differences of polymorphisms (minor allele frequency ≥ 0.05) in the mtDNA control region between EMA, SPA, and CON were examined. EMA displayed excess of three polymorphisms [m.152T>C, m.514(CA)n repeat (n ≥ 5), and poly-C stretch at m.568-573 (C ≥ 7)] compared with CON. On the other hand, SPA showed greater frequency of the m.204T>C polymorphism compared with CON. In addition, none of the SPA had m.16278C>T polymorphism, whereas the frequencies of this polymorphism in CON and EMA were 8.3% and 10.0%, respectively. These findings imply that several polymorphisms detected in the control region of mtDNA may influence physical performance probably in a functional manner.

  6. Sequence breakpoints in the aflatoxin biosynthesis gene cluster and flanking regions in nonaflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus isolates.

    PubMed

    Chang, Perng-Kuang; Horn, Bruce W; Dorner, Joe W

    2005-11-01

    Aspergillus flavus populations are genetically diverse. Isolates that produce either, neither, or both aflatoxins and cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) are present in the field. We investigated defects in the aflatoxin gene cluster in 38 nonaflatoxigenic A. flavus isolates collected from southern United States. PCR assays using aflatoxin-gene-specific primers grouped these isolates into eight (A-H) deletion patterns. Patterns C, E, G, and H, which contain 40 kb deletions, were examined for their sequence breakpoints. Pattern C has one breakpoint in the cypA 3' untranslated region (UTR) and another in the verA coding region. Pattern E has a breakpoint in the amdA coding region and another in the ver1 5'UTR. Pattern G contains a deletion identical to the one found in pattern C and has another deletion that extends from the cypA coding region to one end of the chromosome as suggested by the presence of telomeric sequence repeats, CCCTAATGTTGA. Pattern H has a deletion of the entire aflatoxin gene cluster from the hexA coding region in the sugar utilization gene cluster to the telomeric region. Thus, deletions in the aflatoxin gene cluster among A. flavus isolates are not rare, and the patterns appear to be diverse. Genetic drift may be a driving force that is responsible for the loss of the entire aflatoxin gene cluster in nonaflatoxigenic A. flavus isolates when aflatoxins have lost their adaptive value in nature.

  7. Complex Genotype Mixtures Analyzed by Deep Sequencing in Two Different Regions of Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Andrea; Gregori, Josep; Homs, Maria; Tabernero, David; Gonzalez, Carolina; Quer, Josep; Blasi, Maria; Casillas, Rosario; Nieto, Leonardo; Riveiro-Barciela, Mar; Esteban, Rafael; Buti, Maria; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses the presence and outcome of genotype mixtures in the polymerase/surface and X/preCore regions of the HBV genome in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Thirty samples from ten chronic hepatitis B patients were included. The polymerase/surface and X/preCore regions were analyzed by deep sequencing (UDPS) in the first available sample at diagnosis, a pre-treatment sample, and a sample while under treatment. HBV genotype was determined by phylogenesis. Quasispecies complexity was evaluated by mutation frequency and nucleotide diversity. The polymerase/surface and X/preCore regions were validated for genotyping from 113 GenBank reference sequences. UDPS yielded a median of 10,960 sequences per sample (IQR 16,645) in the polymerase/surface region and 11,595 sequences per sample (IQR 14,682) in X/preCore. Genotype mixtures were more common in X/preCore (90%) than in polymerase/surface (30%) (p<0.001). On X/preCore genotyping, all samples were genotype A, whereas polymerase/surface yielded genotypes A (80%), D (16.7%), and F (3.3%) (p = 0.036). Genotype changes in polymerase/surface were observed in four patients during natural quasispecies dynamics and in two patients during treatment. There were no genotype changes in X/preCore. Quasispecies complexity was higher in X/preCore than in polymerase/surface (p = 0.004). The results provide evidence of genotype mixtures and differential genotype proportions in the polymerase/surface and X/preCore regions. The genotype dynamics in HBV infection and the different patterns of quasispecies complexity in the HBV genome suggest a new paradigm for HBV genotype classification.

  8. Complex Genotype Mixtures Analyzed by Deep Sequencing in Two Different Regions of Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Homs, Maria; Tabernero, David; Gonzalez, Carolina; Quer, Josep; Blasi, Maria; Casillas, Rosario; Nieto, Leonardo; Riveiro-Barciela, Mar; Esteban, Rafael; Buti, Maria; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses the presence and outcome of genotype mixtures in the polymerase/surface and X/preCore regions of the HBV genome in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Thirty samples from ten chronic hepatitis B patients were included. The polymerase/surface and X/preCore regions were analyzed by deep sequencing (UDPS) in the first available sample at diagnosis, a pre-treatment sample, and a sample while under treatment. HBV genotype was determined by phylogenesis. Quasispecies complexity was evaluated by mutation frequency and nucleotide diversity. The polymerase/surface and X/preCore regions were validated for genotyping from 113 GenBank reference sequences. UDPS yielded a median of 10,960 sequences per sample (IQR 16,645) in the polymerase/surface region and 11,595 sequences per sample (IQR 14,682) in X/preCore. Genotype mixtures were more common in X/preCore (90%) than in polymerase/surface (30%) (p<0.001). On X/preCore genotyping, all samples were genotype A, whereas polymerase/surface yielded genotypes A (80%), D (16.7%), and F (3.3%) (p = 0.036). Genotype changes in polymerase/surface were observed in four patients during natural quasispecies dynamics and in two patients during treatment. There were no genotype changes in X/preCore. Quasispecies complexity was higher in X/preCore than in polymerase/surface (p = 0.004). The results provide evidence of genotype mixtures and differential genotype proportions in the polymerase/surface and X/preCore regions. The genotype dynamics in HBV infection and the different patterns of quasispecies complexity in the HBV genome suggest a new paradigm for HBV genotype classification. PMID:26714168

  9. Spider minor ampullate silk proteins contain new repetitive sequences and highly conserved non-silk-like "spacer regions".

    PubMed

    Colgin, M A; Lewis, R V

    1998-03-01

    Spider minor ampullate silk is a strong non-elastic deformably stretchable silk used in web formation. This silk from Nephila clavipes is composed of two proteins, MiSp 1 and 2, whose transcripts are 9.5 and 7.5 kb, respectively, as determined by Northern blots. Both MiSp proteins are organized into a predominantly repetitive region and a small nonrepetitive carboxy terminal region. These highly repetitive regions are composed mainly of glycine and alanine, but also contain tyrosine, glutamine, and arginine. The sequences are mainly GGX and GA repeats. The repetitive regions are interrupted by nonrepetitive serine-rich spacer regions. Although the sequences of the spacer regions differ from the repetitive regions, sequences of the spacers from different regions of the proteins are nearly identical. The sequence differences between major and minor ampullate silks may explain the differing mechanical properties of the fibers.

  10. Hydraulic fracturing and the Crooked Lake Sequences: Insights gleaned from regional seismic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Ryan; Stern, Virginia; Novakovic, Mark; Atkinson, Gail; Gu, Yu Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Within central Alberta, Canada, a new sequence of earthquakes has been recognized as of 1 December 2013 in a region of previous seismic quiescence near Crooked Lake, ~30 km west of the town of Fox Creek. We utilize a cross-correlation detection algorithm to detect more than 160 events to the end of 2014, which is temporally distinguished into five subsequences. This observation is corroborated by the uniqueness of waveforms clustered by subsequence. The Crooked Lake Sequences have come under scrutiny due to its strong temporal correlation (>99.99%) to the timing of hydraulic fracturing operations in the Duvernay Formation. We assert that individual subsequences are related to fracturing stimulation and, despite adverse initial station geometry, double-difference techniques allow us to spatially relate each cluster back to a unique horizontal well. Overall, we find that seismicity in the Crooked Lake Sequences is consistent with first-order observations of hydraulic fracturing induced seismicity.

  11. Local generation of multineuronal spike sequences in the hippocampal CA1 region

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Eran; Roux, Lisa; Eichler, Ronny; Buzsáki, György

    2015-01-01

    Sequential activity of multineuronal spiking can be observed during theta and high-frequency ripple oscillations in the hippocampal CA1 region and is linked to experience, but the mechanisms underlying such sequences are unknown. We compared multineuronal spiking during theta oscillations, spontaneous ripples, and focal optically induced high-frequency oscillations (“synthetic” ripples) in freely moving mice. Firing rates and rate modulations of individual neurons, and multineuronal sequences of pyramidal cell and interneuron spiking, were correlated during theta oscillations, spontaneous ripples, and synthetic ripples. Interneuron spiking was crucial for sequence consistency. These results suggest that participation of single neurons and their sequential order in population events are not strictly determined by extrinsic inputs but also influenced by local-circuit properties, including synapses between local neurons and single-neuron biophysics. PMID:26240336

  12. EPA Optimal Corrosion Control Treatment Regional Training Workshops

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is hosting face-to-face regional training workshops throughout 2016-2017 on optimal corrosion control treatment (OCCT). These will be held at each of the Regions and is intended for primacy agency staff and technical assistance providers.

  13. Mitochondrial genome of Pogona vitticepes (Reptilia; Agamidae): control region duplication and the origin of Australasian agamids.

    PubMed

    Amer, Sayed A M; Kumazawa, Yoshinori

    2005-02-14

    The complete mitochondrial DNA sequence for an Australian agamid Pogona vitticepes was determined. Twenty-two tRNA genes, two rRNA genes, thirteen protein-coding genes, and two control regions were identified in this mitochondrial genome. The second control region was inserted between NADH dehydrogenase subunits 5 and 6 genes. The duplication of the control region was found in all Australasian agamids examined and was not found in other Asian or African taxa. The two control regions had nearly identical sequences within species but they were divergent among species, suggesting their concerted sequence evolution. Phylogenetic analyses including divergence time estimation without assuming the molecular clock suggested that the duplication of the control region occurred on a lineage leading to the Australasian agamids 25-45 million years ago after their divergence from a Southeast Asian Physignathus cocincinus. Our finding thus supports the recent dispersal origin of Australasian agamids in connection with plate tectonic movement of Australia to the proximity of Southeast Asia.

  14. Regulation and targeting of recombination in extrachromosomal substrates carrying immunoglobulin switch region sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, H; Maizels, N

    1994-01-01

    We have used extrachromosomal substrates carrying immunoglobulin heavy-chain S mu and S gamma 3 switch region sequences to study activation and targeting of recombination by a transcriptional enhancer element. Substrates are transiently introduced into activated primary murine B cells, in which recombination involving S-region sequences deletes a conditionally lethal marker, and recombination is measured by transformation of Escherichia coli in the second step of the assay. Previously we found that as many as 25% of replicated substrates recombined during 40-h transfection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated primary cells and that efficient recombination was dependent on the presence of S-region sequences as well as a transcriptional activator region in the constructs (H. Leung and N. Maizels, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89:4154-4158, 1992). Here we show that recombination of the switch substrates is threefold more efficient in LPS-cultured primary B cells than in the T-cell line EL4; the activities responsible for switch substrate recombination thus appear to be more abundant or more active in cells which can carry out chromosomal switch recombination. We test the role of the transcriptional activator region and show that the immunoglobulin heavy-chain intron enhancer (E mu) alone stimulates recombination as well as E mu combined with a heavy-chain promoter and that mutations that diminish enhancer-dependent transcription 500-fold diminish recombinational activation less than 2-fold. These observations suggest that the enhancer stimulates recombination by a mechanism that does not depend on transcript production or that is insensitive to the level of transcript production over a very broad range. Furthermore, we find that E mu stimulates recombination when located either upstream or downstream of S mu but that the position of the recombinational activator does affect the targeting of recombination junctions, suggesting that the relatively imprecise targeting of

  15. Allopolyploidy in Fragariinae (Rosaceae): comparing four DNA sequence regions, with comments on classification.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Magnus; Töpel, Mats; Eriksen, Bente; Nylander, Johan A A; Eriksson, Torsten

    2009-05-01

    Potential events of allopolyploidy may be indicated by incongruences between separate phylogenies based on plastid and nuclear gene sequences. We sequenced two plastid regions and two nuclear ribosomal regions for 34 ingroup taxa in Fragariinae (Rosaceae), and six outgroup taxa. We found five well supported incongruences that might indicate allopolyploidy events. The incongruences involved Aphanes arvensis, Potentilla miyabei, Potentilla cuneata, Fragaria vesca/moschata, and the Drymocallis clade. We evaluated the strength of conflict and conclude that allopolyploidy may be hypothesised in the four first cases. Phylogenies were estimated using Bayesian inference and analyses were evaluated using convergence diagnostics. Taxonomic implications are discussed for genera such as Alchemilla, Sibbaldianthe, Chamaerhodos, Drymocallis and Fragaria, and for the monospecific Sibbaldiopsis and Potaninia that are nested inside other genera. Two orphan Potentilla species, P. miyabei and P. cuneata are placed in Fragariinae. However, due to unresolved topological incongruences they are not reclassified in any genus.

  16. [Nucleotide sequence of HLA-DQA1 promoter region (QAP) in a lung cancer patient].

    PubMed

    Qiu, C; Zhou, W; Song, C

    1996-06-01

    The HLA-DQA1 allele and nucleotide sequence of HLA-DQA1 promoter region (QAP) in a patient with IDDM complicated lung cancer have been identified by PCR/SSCP, PCR/SSCP and PCR/sequencing. The results showed that: (1) All of the lung cancer patient and his family members carried HLA-DQA1* 0301/0501 alleles. (2) a single base substitution G-->A at position -155 and deletion CAA at position -161 to -163 occurred in the patient. These results suggest that the mutation of HLA-DQA1 promoter region may modulate HLA-DQA1 gene expression by trans-acting factors binding to variant cis-acting elements and may be responsible for pathogenesis of lung cancer.

  17. Escherichia coli σ70 senses sequence and conformation of the promoter spacer region

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shivani S.; Typas, Athanasios; Hengge, Regine; Grainger, David C.

    2011-01-01

    In bacteria, promoter identification by RNA polymerase is mediated by a dissociable σ factor. The housekeeping σ70 factor of Escherichia coli recognizes two well characterized DNA sequence elements, known as the ‘−10’ and ‘−35’ hexamers. These elements are separated by ‘spacer’ DNA, the sequence of which is generally considered unimportant. Here, we use a combination of bioinformatics, genetics and biochemistry to show that σ70 can sense the sequence and conformation of the promoter spacer region. Our data illustrate how alterations in spacer region sequence can increase promoter activity. This stimulatory effect requires σ70 side chain R451, which is located in close proximity to the non-template strand at promoter position −18. Conversely, R451 is not required to mediate transcriptional stimulation by improvement of the −10 element. Mutation of σ70 residue R451, which is highly conserved, results in reduced growth rate, consistent with a central role in promoter recognition. PMID:21398630

  18. γδ T cells response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in pulmonary tuberculosis patients using preponderant complementary determinant region 3 sequence

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xueyan; Han, Xiqin; Li, Liang; Zhao, Zhendong

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: The unique immunological functions of γδ T lymphocytes to contribute immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis attracted interest of researchers. However, little is known about the specificity of γδ Τ cell in tuberculosis patients and the lack of exact tuberculosis antigen recognized by γδ T cells limited its application. The analysis of complementary determinant region (CDR)3 sequence characteristic in γδ T cells of tuberculosis patients would contribute to understand the distribution specificity of γδ T cell. In present study, we investigated the diversity of the γ9/δ2 T cell immunorepertoire and analysed the specificity of the expressed CDR3 in pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Methods: The total RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cell of 50 pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 10 healthy controls was extracted. The polymerase chain reaction was used to specifically amplify the CDR3 region of γ9 and δ2 chain. The PCR products were ligated into the pGEM-T easy vector. The plasmid DNA was sequenced using the ABI3700 and the T7 primer. Results: Our findings showed that predominant CDR3 sequence of δ2 chain in pulmonary tuberculosis patients was CACDTLVSTDKLIFGKG. The sequence specifically exists in almost all pulmonary tuberculosis patients. The conserved hydrophobic acid residue in 97 positions is present in the γδ T cell reactive to M. tuberculosis. The length of δ2 CDR3 in pulmonary tuberculosis patients has no relation with the disease progress. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results suggest that γδ T cells appear to use CDR3 sequence to recognise M. tuberculosis antigen. γδ T cells reactive to M. tuberculosis were diverse and polyclonal. PMID:21985819

  19. Modes of Executive Control in Sequence Learning: From Stimulus-Based to Plan-Based Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tubau, Elisabet; Hommel, Bernhard; Lopez-Moliner, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The authors argue that human sequential learning is often but not always characterized by a shift from stimulus- to plan-based action control. To diagnose this shift, they manipulated the frequency of 1st-order transitions in a repeated manual left-right sequence, assuming that performance is sensitive to frequency-induced biases under stimulus-…

  20. Modes of Executive Control in Sequence Learning: From Stimulus-Based to Plan-Based Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tubau, Elisabet; Hommel, Bernhard; Lopez-Moliner, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The authors argue that human sequential learning is often but not always characterized by a shift from stimulus- to plan-based action control. To diagnose this shift, they manipulated the frequency of 1st-order transitions in a repeated manual left-right sequence, assuming that performance is sensitive to frequency-induced biases under stimulus-…

  1. A report on identification of sequence polymorphism in barcode region of six commercially important Cymbopogon species.

    PubMed

    Bishoyi, Ashok Kumar; Kavane, Aarti; Sharma, Anjali; Geetha, K A

    2017-02-01

    CYMBOPOGON: is an important member of grass family Poaceae, cultivated for essential oils which have greater medicinal and industrial value. Taxonomic identification of Cymbopogon species is determined mainly by morphological markers, odour of essential oils and concentration of bioactive compounds present in the oil matrices which are highly influenced by environment. Authenticated molecular marker based taxonomical identification is also lacking in the genus; hence effort was made to evaluate potential DNA barcode loci in six commercially important Cymbopogon species for their individual discrimination and authentication at the species level. Four widely used DNA barcoding regions viz., ITS 1 & ITS 2 spacers, matK, psbA-trnH and rbcL were taken for the study. Gene sequences of the same or related genera of the concerned loci were mined from NCBI domain and primers were designed and validated for barcode loci amplification. Out of the four loci studied, sequences from matK and ITS spacer loci revealed 0.46% and 5.64% nucleotide sequence diversity, respectively whereas the other two loci i.e., psbA-trnH and rbcL showed 100% sequence homology. The newly developed primers can be used for barcode loci amplification in the genus Cymbopogon. The identified Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms from the studied sequences may be used as barcodes for the six Cymbopogon species. The information generated can also be utilized for barcode development of the genus by including more number of Cymbopgon species in future.

  2. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenying; Li, Jinliang; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yepeng; Hu, Juan; Zhen, Hefu; Zhang, Xiandong; Chen, Chao; Shi, Yujian; Li, Lin; Cao, Hongzhi; Du, Hongli; Li, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and uniparental disomy (UPD) are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS), is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs). In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information. PMID:25919136

  3. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Li, Wei; Xia, Yingying; Wang, Chongzhi; Tang, Y Tom; Guo, Wenying; Li, Jinliang; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yepeng; Hu, Juan; Zhen, Hefu; Zhang, Xiandong; Chen, Chao; Shi, Yujian; Li, Lin; Cao, Hongzhi; Du, Hongli; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and uniparental disomy (UPD) are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS), is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs). In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information.

  4. A sequence motif enriched in regions bound by the Drosophila dosage compensation complex

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In Drosophila melanogaster, dosage compensation is mediated by the action of the dosage compensation complex (DCC). How the DCC recognizes the fly X chromosome is still poorly understood. Characteristic sequence signatures at all DCC binding sites have not hitherto been found. Results In this study, we compare the known binding sites of the DCC with oligonucleotide profiles that measure the specificity of the sequences of the D. melanogaster X chromosome. We show that the X chromosome regions bound by the DCC are enriched for a particular type of short, repetitive sequences. Their distribution suggests that these sequences contribute to chromosome recognition, the generation of DCC binding sites and/or the local spreading of the complex. Comparative data indicate that the same sequences may be involved in dosage compensation in other Drosophila species. Conclusions These results offer an explanation for the wild-type binding of the DCC along the Drosophila X chromosome, contribute to delineate the forces leading to the establishment of dosage compensation and suggest new experimental approaches to understand the precise biochemical features of the dosage compensation system. PMID:20226017

  5. Sequence analysis of 21 genes located in the Kartagener syndrome linkage region on chromosome 15q.

    PubMed

    Geremek, Maciej; Schoenmaker, Frederieke; Zietkiewicz, Ewa; Pogorzelski, Andrzej; Diehl, Scott; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witt, Michal

    2008-06-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare genetic disorder, which shows extensive genetic heterogeneity and is mostly inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. There are four genes with a proven pathogenetic role in PCD. DNAH5 and DNAI1 are involved in 28 and 10% of PCD cases, respectively, while two other genes, DNAH11 and TXNDC3, have been identified as causal in one PCD family each. We have previously identified a 3.5 cM (2.82 Mb) region on chromosome 15q linked to Kartagener syndrome (KS), a subtype of PCD characterized by the randomization of body organ positioning. We have now refined the KS candidate region to a 1.8 Mb segment containing 18 known genes. The coding regions of these genes and three neighboring genes were subjected to sequence analysis in seven KS probands, and we were able to identify 60 single nucleotide sequence variants, 35 of which resided in mRNA coding sequences. However, none of the variations alone could explain the occurrence of the disease in these patients.

  6. The Monitoring and Control of Task Sequences in Human and Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Desrochers, Theresa M.; Burk, Diana C.; Badre, David; Sheinberg, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Our ability to plan and execute a series of tasks leading to a desired goal requires remarkable coordination between sensory, motor, and decision-related systems. Prefrontal cortex (PFC) is thought to play a central role in this coordination, especially when actions must be assembled extemporaneously and cannot be programmed as a rote series of movements. A central component of this flexible behavior is the moment-by-moment allocation of working memory and attention. The ubiquity of sequence planning in our everyday lives belies the neural complexity that supports this capacity, and little is known about how frontal cortical regions orchestrate the monitoring and control of sequential behaviors. For example, it remains unclear if and how sensory cortical areas, which provide essential driving inputs for behavior, are modulated by the frontal cortex during these tasks. Here, we review what is known about moment-to-moment monitoring as it relates to visually guided, rule-driven behaviors that change over time. We highlight recent human work that shows how the rostrolateral prefrontal cortex (RLPFC) participates in monitoring during task sequences. Neurophysiological data from monkeys suggests that monitoring may be accomplished by neurons that respond to items within the sequence and may in turn influence the tuning properties of neurons in posterior sensory areas. Understanding the interplay between proceduralized or habitual acts and supervised control of sequences is key to our understanding of sequential task execution. A crucial bridge will be the use of experimental protocols that allow for the examination of the functional homology between monkeys and humans. We illustrate how task sequences may be parceled into components and examined experimentally, thereby opening future avenues of investigation into the neural basis of sequential monitoring and control. PMID:26834581

  7. Controlling the bond scission sequence of oxygenates for energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stottlemyer, Alan L.

    intermediates was observed on the Pt and Pt/WC surfaces. For CH3OH decomposition, DFT calculations suggested that the bond scission sequence could be controlled using monolayer coverage of Pt on WC. The Ni/Pt bimetallic system was studied as an example for using oxygenates as a hydrogen source. There are two well characterized surface structures for the Ni/Pt system: the surface configuration, in which the Ni atoms reside primarily on the surface of the Pt bulk, and the subsurface configuration, in which the second atomic layer is enriched in Ni atoms and the surface is enriched in Pt atoms. These configurations are denoted NiPtPt and PtNiPt, respectively. DFT results revealed that trends established for the Ni/Pt(111) system extend to the Ni/Pt(100) analogue. TPD studies revealed that the NiPtPt surface was more active for oxygenate reforming than the Pt or PtNiPt surfaces. HREELS confirmed the presence of strongly bound reaction intermediates, including aldehyde-like species, and suggested that the first decomposition step was likely O-H bond scission. Thus, the binding energies of the deprotonated reaction intermediates are important parameters in controlling the decomposition pathways of oxygenates. These studies have demonstrated that the bond scission sequence of oxygenate decomposition can be controlled using bimetallic and transition metal carbide catalysts. While this study has focused on oxygenate decomposition for energy applications, the principles and methodology applied herein are universally applicable to the development of novel and marketable value-added products. The value in such a methodology is in the combination of both calculations to predict catalytic and chemical properties, and experiments to fine-tune theoretical predictions.

  8. Screening of nucleotide variations in genomic sequences encoding charged protein regions in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Belmabrouk, Sabrine; Kharrat, Najla; Abdelhedi, Rania; Ben Ayed, Amine; Benmarzoug, Riadh; Rebai, Ahmed

    2017-08-08

    Studying genetic variation distribution in proteins containing charged regions, called charge clusters (CCs), is of great interest to unravel their functional role. Charge clusters are 20 to 75 residue segments with high net positive charge, high net negative charge, or high total charge relative to the overall charge composition of the protein. We previously developed a bioinformatics tool (FCCP) to detect charge clusters in proteomes and scanned the human proteome for the occurrence of CCs. In this paper we investigate the genetic variations in the human proteins harbouring CCs. We studied the coding regions of 317 positively charged clusters and 1020 negatively charged ones previously detected in human proteins. Results revealed that coding parts of CCs are richer in sequence variants than their corresponding genes, full mRNAs, and exonic + intronic sequences and that these variants are predominately rare (Minor allele frequency < 0.005). Furthermore, variants occurring in the coding parts of positively charged regions of proteins are more often pathogenic than those occurring in negatively charged ones. Classification of variants according to their types showed that substitution is the major type followed by Indels (Insertions-deletions). Concerning substitutions, it was found that within clusters of both charges, the charged amino acids were the greatest loser groups whereas polar residues were the greatest gainers. Our findings highlight the prominent features of the human charged regions from the DNA up to the protein sequence which might provide potential clues to improve the current understanding of those charged regions and their implication in the emergence of diseases.

  9. Improved sequence-based prediction of disordered regions with multilayer fusion of multiple information sources

    PubMed Central

    Mizianty, Marcin J.; Stach, Wojciech; Chen, Ke; Kedarisetti, Kanaka Durga; Disfani, Fatemeh Miri; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Intrinsically disordered proteins play a crucial role in numerous regulatory processes. Their abundance and ubiquity combined with a relatively low quantity of their annotations motivate research toward the development of computational models that predict disordered regions from protein sequences. Although the prediction quality of these methods continues to rise, novel and improved predictors are urgently needed. Results: We propose a novel method, named MFDp (Multilayered Fusion-based Disorder predictor), that aims to improve over the current disorder predictors. MFDp is as an ensemble of 3 Support Vector Machines specialized for the prediction of short, long and generic disordered regions. It combines three complementary disorder predictors, sequence, sequence profiles, predicted secondary structure, solvent accessibility, backbone dihedral torsion angles, residue flexibility and B-factors. Our method utilizes a custom-designed set of features that are based on raw predictions and aggregated raw values and recognizes various types of disorder. The MFDp is compared at the residue level on two datasets against eight recent disorder predictors and top-performing methods from the most recent CASP8 experiment. In spite of using training chains with ≤25% similarity to the test sequences, our method consistently and significantly outperforms the other methods based on the MCC index. The MFDp outperforms modern disorder predictors for the binary disorder assignment and provides competitive real-valued predictions. The MFDp's outputs are also shown to outperform the other methods in the identification of proteins with long disordered regions. Availability: http://biomine.ece.ualberta.ca/MFDp.html Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Contact: lkurgan@ece.ualberta.ca PMID:20823312

  10. A Comprehensive, Automatically Updated Fungal ITS Sequence Dataset for Reference-Based Chimera Control in Environmental Sequencing Efforts.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, R Henrik; Tedersoo, Leho; Ryberg, Martin; Kristiansson, Erik; Hartmann, Martin; Unterseher, Martin; Porter, Teresita M; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Walker, Donald M; de Sousa, Filipe; Gamper, Hannes Andres; Larsson, Ellen; Larsson, Karl-Henrik; Kõljalg, Urmas; Edgar, Robert C; Abarenkov, Kessy

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region is the most commonly chosen genetic marker for the molecular identification of fungi in environmental sequencing and molecular ecology studies. Several analytical issues complicate such efforts, one of which is the formation of chimeric-artificially joined-DNA sequences during PCR amplification or sequence assembly. Several software tools are currently available for chimera detection, but rely to various degrees on the presence of a chimera-free reference dataset for optimal performance. However, no such dataset is available for use with the fungal ITS region. This study introduces a comprehensive, automatically updated reference dataset for fungal ITS sequences based on the UNITE database for the molecular identification of fungi. This dataset supports chimera detection throughout the fungal kingdom and for full-length ITS sequences as well as partial (ITS1 or ITS2 only) datasets. The performance of the dataset on a large set of artificial chimeras was above 99.5%, and we subsequently used the dataset to remove nearly 1,000 compromised fungal ITS sequences from public circulation. The dataset is available at http://unite.ut.ee/repository.php and is subject to web-based third-party curation.

  11. Distribution bias of the sequence matching between exons and introns in exon joint and EJC binding region in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Li, Hong; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Yan; Zhou, Deliang

    2015-01-07

    We propose a mechanism that there are matching relations between mRNA sequences and corresponding post-spliced introns, and introns play a significant role in the process of gene expression. In order to reveal the sequence matching features, Smith-Waterman local alignment method is used on C. elegans mRNA sequences to obtain optimal matched segments between exon-exon sequences and their corresponding introns. Distribution characters of matching frequency on exon-exon sequences and sequence characters of optimal matched segments are studied. Results show that distributions of matching frequency on exon-exon junction region have obvious differences, and the exon boundary is revealed. Distributions of the length and matching rate of optimal matched segments are consistent with sequence features of siRNA and miRNA. The optimal matched segments have special sequence characters compared with their host sequences. As for the first introns and long introns, matching frequency values of optimal matched segments with high GC content, rich CG dinucleotides and high λCG values show the minimum distribution in exon junction complex (EJC) binding region. High λCG values in optimal matched segments are main characters in distinguishing EJC binding region. Results indicate that EJC and introns have competitive and cooperative relations in the process of combining on protein coding sequences. Also intron sequences and protein coding sequences do have concerted evolution relations.

  12. Automatic identification of highly conserved family regions and relationships in genome wide datasets including remote protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Tunca; Karaçalı, Bilge

    2013-01-01

    Identifying shared sequence segments along amino acid sequences generally requires a collection of closely related proteins, most often curated manually from the sequence datasets to suit the purpose at hand. Currently developed statistical methods are strained, however, when the collection contains remote sequences with poor alignment to the rest, or sequences containing multiple domains. In this paper, we propose a completely unsupervised and automated method to identify the shared sequence segments observed in a diverse collection of protein sequences including those present in a smaller fraction of the sequences in the collection, using a combination of sequence alignment, residue conservation scoring and graph-theoretical approaches. Since shared sequence fragments often imply conserved functional or structural attributes, the method produces a table of associations between the sequences and the identified conserved regions that can reveal previously unknown protein families as well as new members to existing ones. We evaluated the biological relevance of the method by clustering the proteins in gold standard datasets and assessing the clustering performance in comparison with previous methods from the literature. We have then applied the proposed method to a genome wide dataset of 17793 human proteins and generated a global association map to each of the 4753 identified conserved regions. Investigations on the major conserved regions revealed that they corresponded strongly to annotated structural domains. This suggests that the method can be useful in predicting novel domains on protein sequences.

  13. The control region of the metH gene of Salmonella typhimurium LT2: an atypical met promoter.

    PubMed

    Urbanowski, M L; Stauffer, G V

    1988-12-15

    The control region of the Salmonella typhimurium metH gene was sequenced and the transcription start point was determined by S1 nuclease mapping experiments. Activation of the metH gene by the metR gene product was shown to occur at the level of transcription. The translation start site was determined by amino acid sequence analysis of the amino terminus of a chimeric Met-Lac fusion protein encoded by a metH-lacZ gene fusion. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the metH promoter region showed that two sequence elements, present in the promoters of all other met biosynthetic genes thus far examined, are not present in the metH promoter region, namely, the repeated MetJ repressor recognition sequence 5'-AGACGTCT-3' and a highly conserved sequence 5'-TGGA----TAAAC-3' of unknown function.

  14. Sequencing human mitochondrial hypervariable region II as a molecular fingerprint for environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Vikram; DeBry, Ronald W; Boccelli, Dominic L; Wendell, David

    2014-09-16

    To protect environmental water from human fecal contamination, authorities must be able to unambiguously identify the source of the contamination. Current identification methods focus on tracking fecal bacteria associated with the human gut, but many of these bacterial indicators also thrive in the environment and in other mammalian hosts. Mitochondrial DNA could solve this problem by serving as a human-specific marker for fecal contamination. Here we show that the human mitochondrial hypervariable region II can function as a molecular fingerprint for human contamination in an urban watershed impacted by combined sewer overflows. We present high-throughput sequencing analysis of hypervariable region II for spatial resolution of the contaminated sites and assessment of the population diversity of the impacting regions. We propose that human mitochondrial DNA from public waste streams may serve as a tool for identifying waste sources definitively, analyzing population diversity, and conducting other anthropological investigations.

  15. Face processing regions are sensitive to distinct aspects of temporal sequence in facial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Reinl, Maren; Bartels, Andreas

    2014-11-15

    Facial movement conveys important information for social interactions, yet its neural processing is poorly understood. Computational models propose that shape- and temporal sequence sensitive mechanisms interact in processing dynamic faces. While face processing regions are known to respond to facial movement, their sensitivity to particular temporal sequences has barely been studied. Here we used fMRI to examine the sensitivity of human face-processing regions to two aspects of directionality in facial movement trajectories. We presented genuine movie recordings of increasing and decreasing fear expressions, each of which were played in natural or reversed frame order. This two-by-two factorial design matched low-level visual properties, static content and motion energy within each factor, emotion-direction (increasing or decreasing emotion) and timeline (natural versus artificial). The results showed sensitivity for emotion-direction in FFA, which was timeline-dependent as it only occurred within the natural frame order, and sensitivity to timeline in the STS, which was emotion-direction-dependent as it only occurred for decreased fear. The occipital face area (OFA) was sensitive to the factor timeline. These findings reveal interacting temporal sequence sensitive mechanisms that are responsive to both ecological meaning and to prototypical unfolding of facial dynamics. These mechanisms are temporally directional, provide socially relevant information regarding emotional state or naturalness of behavior, and agree with predictions from modeling and predictive coding theory.

  16. Molecular typing of isolates of Rickettsia rickettsii by use of DNA sequencing of variable intergenic regions.

    PubMed

    Karpathy, Sandor E; Dasch, Gregory A; Eremeeva, Marina E

    2007-08-01

    Rickettsia rickettsii, the causative agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, is found throughout the Americas, where it is associated with different animal reservoirs and tick vectors. No molecular typing system currently exists to allow for the robust differentiation of isolates of R. rickettsii. Analysis of eight completed genome sequences of rickettsial species revealed a high degree of sequence conservation within the coding regions of chromosomes in the genus. Intergenic regions between coding sequences should be under less selective pressure to maintain this conservation and thus should exhibit greater nucleotide polymorphisms. Utilizing these polymorphisms, we developed a molecular typing system that allows for the genetic differentiation of isolates of R. rickettsii. This typing system was applied to a collection of 38 different isolates collected from humans, animals, and tick vectors from different geographic locations. Serotypes 364D, from Dermacentor occidentalis ticks, and Hlp, from Haemaphysalis leporispalustris ticks, appear to be distinct genotypes that may not belong to the species R. rickettsii. We were also able to differentiate 36 historical isolates of R. rickettsii into three different phylogenetic clades containing seven different genotypes. This differentiation correlated well, but not perfectly, with the geographic origin and likely tick vectors associated with the isolates. The few apparent typing discrepancies found suggest that the molecular ecology of R. rickettsii needs more investigation.

  17. The signal sequence coding region promotes nuclear export of mRNA.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Alexander F; Springer, Michael; Shibata, Yoko; Lee, Chung-Sheng; Dias, Anusha P; Rapoport, Tom A

    2007-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, most mRNAs are exported from the nucleus by the transcription export (TREX) complex, which is loaded onto mRNAs after their splicing and capping. We have studied in mammalian cells the nuclear export of mRNAs that code for secretory proteins, which are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane by hydrophobic signal sequences. The mRNAs were injected into the nucleus or synthesized from injected or transfected DNA, and their export was followed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. We made the surprising observation that the signal sequence coding region (SSCR) can serve as a nuclear export signal of an mRNA that lacks an intron or functional cap. Even the export of an intron-containing natural mRNA was enhanced by its SSCR. Like conventional export, the SSCR-dependent pathway required the factor TAP, but depletion of the TREX components had only moderate effects. The SSCR export signal appears to be characterized in vertebrates by a low content of adenines, as demonstrated by genome-wide sequence analysis and by the inhibitory effect of silent adenine mutations in SSCRs. The discovery of an SSCR-mediated pathway explains the previously noted amino acid bias in signal sequences and suggests a link between nuclear export and membrane targeting of mRNAs.

  18. Concerted evolution of duplicated mitochondrial control regions in three related seabird species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many population genetic and phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) assume that mitochondrial genomes do not undergo recombination. Recently, concerted evolution of duplicated mitochondrial control regions has been documented in a range of taxa. Although the molecular mechanism that facilitates concerted evolution is unknown, all proposed mechanisms involve mtDNA recombination. Results Here, we document a duplication of a large region (cytochrome b, tRNAThr, tRNAPro, ND6, tRNAGlu and the control region) in the mitochondrial genome of three related seabird species. To investigate the evolution of duplicate control regions, we sequenced both control region copies (CR1 and CR2) from 21 brown (Sula leucogaster), 21 red-footed (S. sula) and 21 blue-footed boobies (S. nebouxii). Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the duplicated control regions are predominantly evolving in concert; however, approximately 51 base pairs at the 5' end of CR1 and CR2 exhibited a discordant phylogenetic signal and appeared to be evolving independently. Conclusions Both the structure of the duplicated region and the conflicting phylogenetic signals are remarkably similar to a pattern found in Thalassarche albatrosses, which are united with boobies in a large clade that includes all procellariiform and most pelecaniform seabirds. Therefore we suggest that concerted evolution of duplicated control regions either is taxonomically widespread within seabirds, or that it has evolved many times. PMID:20074358

  19. Sequences controlling histone H4 mRNA abundance.

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, O; Bleecker, G C; Heintz, N

    1987-01-01

    The post-transcriptional regulation of histone mRNA abundance is manifest both by accumulation of histone mRNA during the S phase, and by the rapid degradation of mature histone mRNA following the inhibition of DNA synthesis. We have constructed a comprehensive series of substitution mutants within a human H4 histone gene, introduced them into the mouse L cell genome, and analyzed their effects on the post-transcriptional control of the H4 mRNA. Our results demonstrate that most of the H4 mRNA is dispensable for proper regulation of histone mRNA abundance. However, recognition of the 3' terminus of the mature H4 mRNA is critically important for regulating its cytoplasmic half-life. Thus, this region of the mRNA functions both in the nucleus as a signal for proper processing of the mRNA terminus, and in the cytoplasm as an essential element in the control of mRNA stability. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3608993

  20. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of Three Veroniceae Species (Plantaginaceae): Comparative Analysis and Highly Divergent Regions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyoung Su; Chung, Myong Gi; Park, SeonJoo

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies of Veronica and related genera were weakly supported by molecular and paraphyletic taxa. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Veronica nakaiana and the related species Veronica persica and Veronicastrum sibiricum. The chloroplast genome length of V. nakaiana, V. persica, and V. sibiricum ranged from 150,198 bp to 152,930 bp. A total of 112 genes comprising 79 protein coding genes, 29 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes were observed in three chloroplast genomes. The total number of SSRs was 48, 51, and 53 in V. nakaiana, V. persica, and V. sibiricum, respectively. Two SSRs (10 bp of AT and 12 bp of AATA) were observed in the same regions (rpoC2 and ndhD) in three chloroplast genomes. A comparison of coding genes and non-coding regions between V. nakaiana and V. persica revealed divergent sites, with the greatest variation occurring petD-rpoA region. The complete chloroplast genome sequence information regarding the three Veroniceae will be helpful for elucidating Veroniceae phylogenetic relationships. PMID:27047524

  1. Increased sequence coverage through combined targeting of variant and conserved epitopes correlates with control of HIV replication.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, Justine; Kim, Moon; Carlson, Jonathan M; Heckerman, David; Czartoski, Julie; Migueles, Stephen A; Maenza, Janine; McElrath, M Juliana; Mullins, James I; Frahm, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in the development of an HIV vaccine is that of contending with the extensive sequence variability found in circulating viruses. Induction of HIV-specific T-cell responses targeting conserved regions and induction of HIV-specific T-cell responses recognizing a high number of epitope variants have both been proposed as strategies to overcome this challenge. We addressed the ability of cytotoxic T lymphocytes from 30 untreated HIV-infected subjects with and without control of virus replication to recognize all clade B Gag sequence variants encoded by at least 5% of the sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory HIV database (1,300 peptides) using gamma interferon and interleukin-2 (IFN-γ/IL-2) FluoroSpot analysis. While targeting of conserved regions was similar in the two groups (P = 0.47), we found that subjects with control of virus replication demonstrated marginally lower recognition of Gag epitope variants than subjects with normal progression (P = 0.05). In viremic controllers and progressors, we found variant recognition to be associated with viral load (r = 0.62, P = 0.001). Interestingly, we show that increased overall sequence coverage, defined as the overall proportion of HIV database sequences targeted through the Gag-specific repertoire, is inversely associated with viral load (r = -0.38, P = 0.03). Furthermore, we found that sequence coverage, but not variant recognition, correlated with increased recognition of a panel of clade B HIV founder viruses (r = 0.50, P = 0.004). We propose sequence coverage by HIV Gag-specific immune responses as a possible correlate of protection that may contribute to control of virus replication. Additionally, sequence coverage serves as a valuable measure by which to evaluate the protective potential of future vaccination strategies.

  2. Rare and Coding Region Genetic Variants Associated With Risk of Ischemic Stroke: The NHLBI Exome Sequence Project.

    PubMed

    Auer, Paul L; Nalls, Mike; Meschia, James F; Worrall, Bradford B; Longstreth, W T; Seshadri, Sudha; Kooperberg, Charles; Burger, Kathleen M; Carlson, Christopher S; Carty, Cara L; Chen, Wei-Min; Cupples, L Adrienne; DeStefano, Anita L; Fornage, Myriam; Hardy, John; Hsu, Li; Jackson, Rebecca D; Jarvik, Gail P; Kim, Daniel S; Lakshminarayan, Kamakshi; Lange, Leslie A; Manichaikul, Ani; Quinlan, Aaron R; Singleton, Andrew B; Thornton, Timothy A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Peters, Ulrike; Rich, Stephen S

    2015-07-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the third leading cause of years of life lost. Genetic factors contribute to stroke prevalence, and candidate gene and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified variants associated with ischemic stroke risk. These variants often have small effects without obvious biological significance. Exome sequencing may discover predicted protein-altering variants with a potentially large effect on ischemic stroke risk. To investigate the contribution of rare and common genetic variants to ischemic stroke risk by targeting the protein-coding regions of the human genome. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) analyzed approximately 6000 participants from numerous cohorts of European and African ancestry. For discovery, 365 cases of ischemic stroke (small-vessel and large-vessel subtypes) and 809 European ancestry controls were sequenced; for replication, 47 affected sibpairs concordant for stroke subtype and an African American case-control series were sequenced, with 1672 cases and 4509 European ancestry controls genotyped. The ESP's exome sequencing and genotyping started on January 1, 2010, and continued through June 30, 2012. Analyses were conducted on the full data set between July 12, 2012, and July 13, 2013. Discovery of new variants or genes contributing to ischemic stroke risk and subtype (primary analysis) and determination of support for protein-coding variants contributing to risk in previously published candidate genes (secondary analysis). We identified 2 novel genes associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke: a protein-coding variant in PDE4DIP (rs1778155; odds ratio, 2.15; P = 2.63 × 10(-8)) with an intracellular signal transduction mechanism and in ACOT4 (rs35724886; odds ratio, 2.04; P = 1.24 × 10(-7)) with a fatty acid metabolism; confirmation of PDE4DIP was observed in affected sibpair families with large-vessel stroke

  3. Regional Control of Chromosome Segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lagage, Valentine

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome segregation in bacteria occurs concomitantly with DNA replication, and the duplicated regions containing the replication origin oriC are generally the first to separate and migrate to their final specific location inside the cell. In numerous bacterial species, a three-component partition machinery called the ParABS system is crucial for chromosome segregation. This is the case in the gammaproteobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, where impairing the ParABS system is very detrimental for growth, as it increases the generation time and leads to the formation of anucleate cells and to oriC mispositioning inside the cell. In this study, we investigate in vivo the ParABS system in P. aeruginosa. Using chromatin immuno-precipitation coupled with high throughput sequencing, we show that ParB binds to four parS site located within 15 kb of oriC in vivo, and that this binding promotes the formation of a high order nucleoprotein complex. We show that one parS site is enough to prevent anucleate cell formation, therefore for correct chromosome segregation. By displacing the parS site from its native position on the chromosome, we demonstrate that parS is the first chromosomal locus to be separated upon DNA replication, which indicates that it is the site of force exertion of the segregation process. We identify a region of approximatively 650 kb surrounding oriC in which the parS site must be positioned for chromosome segregation to proceed correctly, and we called it “competence zone” of the parS site. Mutant strains that have undergone specific genetic rearrangements allow us to propose that the distance between oriC and parS defines this “competence zone”. Implications for the control of chromosome segregation in P. aeruginosa are discussed. PMID:27820816

  4. Sequence analysis of mtDNA COI barcode region revealed three haplotypes within Culex pipiens assemblage.

    PubMed

    Koosha, Mona; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali; Sedaghat, Mohammad Mehdi; Vatandoost, Hassan; Azari-Hamidian, Shahyad; Abai, Mohammad Reza; Hanafi-Bojd, Ahmad Ali; Mohtarami, Fatemeh

    2017-10-01

    Members of the Culex (Culex) pipiens assemblage are known vectors of deadly encephalitides, periodic filariasis, and West Nile virus throughout the world. However, members of this assemblage are morphologically indistinguishable or hard to distinguish and play distinct roles in transmission of the diseases. The current study aimed to provide further evidence on utility of the two most popular nuclear (ITS2-rDNA) and mitochondrial (COI barcode region) genetic markers to identify members of the assemblage. Culex pipiens assemblage specimens from different climate zones of Iran were collected and identified to species level based on morphological characteristics. Nucleotide sequences of the loci for the specimens plus available data in the GenBank were analyzed to find species specific genetic structures useful for diagnosis purposes. ITS2 region was highly divergent within species or populations suggesting lack of consistency as a reliable molecular marker. In contrast, sequence analysis of 710 bp of COI gene revealed three fixed haplotypes named here "C, T, H" within the assemblage which can be distinguished by HaeIII and AluI enzymes. There were a correlation between the haplotypes and the world climate regions, where the haplotypes H/T and C are present mainly in temperate and tropical regions of the world, respectively. In the New world, Australia, and Japan only haplotype H is found. In conjunction between tropical and temperate regions such Iran, China, and Turkey, a mix of C/H or C/H/T are present. Although, the haplotypes are not strictly species-specific, however, Cx. quinquefasciatus was mainly of haplotype C. Due to the lack of mating barrier and questionable taxonomic situation of the complex members, the mentioned haplotypes in combination with other morphological and molecular characters might be used to address the genetic structure of the studied populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. An exploration of the sequence of a 2.9-Mb region of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster: The Adh region

    SciTech Connect

    Ashburner, M.; Misra, S.; Roote, J.; Lewis, S.E.; Blazej, R.; Davis, T.; Doyle, C.; Galle, R.; George, R.; Harris, N.; Hartzell, G.; Harvey, D.; Hong, L.; Houston, K.; Hoskins, R.; Johnson, G.; Martin, C.; Moshrefi, A.; Palazzolo, M.; Reese, M.G.; Spradling, A.; Tsang, G.; Wan, K.; Whitelaw, K.; Kimmel, B.; Celniker, S.; Rubin, G.M.

    1999-03-24

    A contiguous sequence of nearly 3 Mb from the genome of Drosophila melanogaster has been sequenced from a series of overlapping P1 and BAC clones. This region covers 69 chromosome polytene bands on chromosome arm 2L, including the genetically well-characterized

  6. [Role of university hospitals in regional infection control network].

    PubMed

    Kayaba, Hiroyuki; Saito, Norihiro; Yamamoto, Ayako; Tsutaya, Shoji; Akimoto, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Masahiko; Inoue, Fumio; Kondo, Jun; Akahira, Emi; Tachibana, Naoki; Okamura, Yuji; Takahashi, Shiori; Kojima, Keiya; Tamazawa, Naoki; Hayakari, Makoto

    2013-08-01

    Activities and the understanding of infection control in healthcare facilities have improved in the past decade since a certification system for medical personnel, such as infection control nurse and infection control doctor, were introduced in Japan. These specialists are distributed among tertiary general hospitals, while many small and mid-scale hospitals have no infection control specialists. In 2012, the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare launched a new strategy for further improvement of infection control by supporting a regional network of infection control activities. Through the infection control network, small or mid-scaled hospitals can utilize infection control specialists in tertiary general hospitals, enter educational programs on infection control and consult in cases of nosocomial infection outbreaks. As part of the regional infection control network, we established an information network system, named ReNICS, to share the bacteriological test results of the hospitals in Akita prefecture. ReNICS offers epidemiological data on bacteria identified in the region. We can identify the spread of multi-drug resistant bacteria and can roughly estimate the quality of infection control activities in each facility. As a similar information network is being prepared in Hirosaki University Hospital Infection Control Center in Aomori, a prefecture neighboring Akita, we discussed the roles of university hospitals for a regional infection control network.

  7. Melting temperature highlights functionally important RNA structure and sequence elements in yeast mRNA coding regions.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fei; Frishman, Dmitrij

    2017-03-07

    Secondary structure elements in the coding regions of mRNAs play an important role in gene expression and regulation, but distinguishing functional from non-functional structures remains challenging. Here we investigate the dependence of sequence-structure relationships in the coding regions on temperature based on the recent PARTE data by Wan et al. Our main finding is that the regions with high and low thermostability (high Tm and low Tm regions) are under evolutionary pressure to preserve RNA secondary structure and primary sequence, respectively. Sequences of low Tm regions display a higher degree of evolutionary conservation compared to high Tm regions. Low Tm regions are under strong synonymous constraint, while high Tm regions are not. These findings imply that high Tm regions contain thermo-stable functionally important RNA structures, which impose relaxed evolutionary constraint on sequence as long as the base-pairing patterns remain intact. By contrast, low thermostability regions contain single-stranded functionally important conserved RNA sequence elements accessible for binding by other molecules. We also find that theoretically predicted structures of paralogous mRNA pairs become more similar with growing temperature, while experimentally measured structures tend to diverge, which implies that the melting pathways of RNA structures cannot be fully captured by current computational approaches.

  8. Minimal intraspecific variation in the sequence of the transcribed spacer regions of the ribosomal DNA of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush).

    PubMed

    Zhuo, L; Sajdak, S L; Phillips, R B

    1994-08-01

    Intraspecific variation in the sequence of the transcribed spacer regions of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in lake trout was examined by restriction mapping and sequencing of these regions amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. The length of the first internal transcribed spacer region (ITS-1) was 566 bases and the second internal transcribed spacer region (ITS-2) was 368 bases in lake trout. When the 1.4-kb region including the ITS-1, the 5.8S coding region, and the ITS-2 was amplified from 12 individuals from four populations and digested with eight different enzymes only one intraindividual polymorphism was found that occurred in each population. When the amplified ITS-1 region was sequenced from an additional 10 individuals from five populations, no interindividual variation was found in the sequence. A 6-kb portion of the rDNA repeat unit including 1.6 kb of the 18S coding region, the 5' external spacer region (5' ETS), and part of the adjacent intergenic spacer was cloned and a restriction map was prepared for these regions in lake trout. No intraspecific variation was found in the region adjacent to the 18S rDNA, which includes the 5' ETS, although intraspecific and intraindividual length variation was found in the intergenic spacer region 3-6 kb from the 18S. Sequencing of a 609-b segment of the 5' ETS adjacent to the 18S coding region revealed the presence of two 41-b repeats. The 198-b sequence between the repeats had some similarity to the 18S coding region of other fishes. Primers were designed for amplification of 559 b of the 5' ETS using the polymerase chain reaction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Multiplicity study of young pre-main sequence stars in the Lupus star-forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Nikolaus; Mugrauer, Markus; Schmidt, Tobias O. B.; Neuhaeuser, Ralph; Ginski, Christian

    2013-07-01

    We have conducted a high contrast imaging search for (sub)stellar companions among 63 young pre-main sequence stars in the Lupus star forming region, using the adaptive optics imager NACO at UT4 of the ESO Paranal observatory. We detected faint co-moving companions around our targets at angular separations between about 0.1 up to several arc seconds (binaries and triple systems). Some of these companions are in the sub stellar mass regime, according to their apparent near infrared photometry at the distance of the Lupus star forming region (about 140pc). We give a progress report to our long-term project, still in execution with the follow-up spectroscopy of detected substellar companion-candidates, and present some first results.

  10. Epigenetic discordance at imprinting control regions in twins.

    PubMed

    Ollikainen, Miina; Craig, Jeffrey M

    2011-06-01

    Imprinting control regions are differentially methylated in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner and this methylation state is inherited through the germline. These regions control parent-specific monoallelic expression of their target genes. Genetically identical organisms show considerable variation in their epigenomes owing to environmental and stochastic influences creating fluctuations in phenotype. Monozygotic twin pairs discordant for imprinting disorders due to epigenetic changes at imprinting control regions are an example of phenotypic variation caused by extreme variations of the epigenome. Here, we discuss the within-pair epigenetic discordance at imprinted loci, both in phenotypically concordant and discordant monozygotic twin pairs.

  11. [Discrimination of psychoactive fungi (commonly called "magic mushrooms") based on the DNA sequence of the internal transcribed spacer region].

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Takuro; Shirota, Osamu; Kawahara, Nobuo; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Makino, Yukiko; Goda, Yukihiro

    2003-02-01

    'Magic mushrooms' (MMs) are psychoactive fungi containing the hallucinogenic compounds, psilocin (1) and psilocybin (2). Since June 6, 2002, these fungi have been regulated by the Narcotics and Psychotropics Control Law in Japan. Because there are many kinds of MMs and they are sold even as dry powders in local markets, it is very difficult to identify the original species of the MMs by morphological observation. Therefore, we investigated the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region in the ribosomal RNA gene of MMs obtained in Japanese markets to classify them by a genetic approach. Based on the size and nucleotide sequence of the ITS region amplified by PCR, tested MMs were classified into 6 groups. Furthermore, a comparison of the DNA sequences of the MMs with those of authentic samples or with those found in the databases (GenBank, EMBL and DDBJ) made it possible to identify the species of tested MMs. Analysis by LC revealed that psilocin (1) was contained at the highest level in Panaeolus cyanescens among the MMs, but was absent in the Amanita species.

  12. Effects on RNAi of the tight structure, sequence and position of the targeted region

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinari, Koichi; Miyagishi, Makoto; Taira, Kazunari

    2004-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene-silencing phenomenon that involves the double-stranded RNA-mediated cleavage of mRNA, and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can cause RNAi in mammalian cells. There have been many attempts to clarify the mechanism of RNAi, but information about the relationship between the sequence and structure, in particular, a tight structure, of the target RNA and the activities of siRNAs are limited. In the present study, we examined this relationship by introducing the TAR element, which adopts a very stable secondary structure, at different positions within target RNAs. Our results suggested that the activities of siRNAs were affected by the tight stem–loop structure of TAR. In contrast, the position of the target within the mRNA, the binding of the Tat protein to the TAR, and the location of the target within a translated or a noncoding region had only marginal effects on RNAi. When the target sequence was placed in two different orientations, only one orientation had a significant effect on the activities of siRNA, demonstrating that the presence of certain nucleotides at some specific positions was favorable for RNAi. Systematic analysis of 47 different sites within 47 plasmids under identical conditions indicated that it is the target sequence itself, rather than its location, that is the major determinant of siRNA activity. PMID:14762201

  13. Identification, N-terminal region sequencing and similarity analysis of differentially expressed proteins in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Cunha, A F; Sousa, M V; Silva, S P; Jesuíno, R S; Soares, C M; Felipe, M S

    1999-04-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the causal agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, which is a systemic mycosis in Latin America. This human pathogen is a dimorphic fungus existing as mycelium (26 degrees C) and in infected tissues as a yeast form (36 degrees C). The in vitro differentiation process is reversible and dependent on temperature shift. In the present study, the total proteins from both forms of P. brasiliensis (isolate Pb01) were analysed by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Differentially expressed proteins were identified. Two of these proteins, PbM46 (mycelium) and PbY20 (yeast), were submitted to automated protein sequencing of their N-terminal regions. The 15 amino acid residue sequence of PbM46, AITKIFALKVYDSSG, is similar to enolases from several sources, and specially those from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (80%) and Candida albicans (67%), when compared to the NR database at NCBI using the BLASTP program. The 34 amino acid residue sequence of PbY20, APKIAIVFYSLYGHIQKLAEAQKKGIEAAGGTAD, could probably represent an allergen protein since it is very similar (90%) to the minor allergen protein of Alternaria alternata and 82% similar to the allergen protein of Cladosporium herbarum. This comparative analysis of proteins from mycelium and yeast forms has allowed the identification and characterization of differentially expressed proteins, probably related to differential gene expression in P. brasiliensis.

  14. HYBRIDCHECK: software for the rapid detection, visualization and dating of recombinant regions in genome sequence data.

    PubMed

    Ward, Ben J; van Oosterhout, Cock

    2016-03-01

    HYBRIDCHECK is a software package to visualize the recombination signal in large DNA sequence data set, and it can be used to analyse recombination, genetic introgression, hybridization and horizontal gene transfer. It can scan large (multiple kb) contigs and whole-genome sequences of three or more individuals. HYBRIDCHECK is written in the r software for OS X, Linux and Windows operating systems, and it has a simple graphical user interface. In addition, the r code can be readily incorporated in scripts and analysis pipelines. HYBRIDCHECK implements several ABBA-BABA tests and visualizes the effects of hybridization and the resulting mosaic-like genome structure in high-density graphics. The package also reports the following: (i) the breakpoint positions, (ii) the number of mutations in each introgressed block, (iii) the probability that the identified region is not caused by recombination and (iv) the estimated age of each recombination event. The divergence times between the donor and recombinant sequence are calculated using a JC, K80, F81, HKY or GTR correction, and the dating algorithm is exceedingly fast. By estimating the coalescence time of introgressed blocks, it is possible to distinguish between hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting. HYBRIDCHECK is libré software and it and its manual are free to download from http://ward9250.github.io/HybridCheck/.

  15. RNA Replication from the Simian Virus 5 Antigenomic Promoter Requires Three Sequence-Dependent Elements Separated by Sequence-Independent Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael A.; Murphy, Susan K.; Parks, Griffith D.

    2001-01-01

    We have previously shown for the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5) that a functional promoter for RNA replication requires proper spacing between two discontinuous elements: a 19-base segment at the 3′ terminus (conserved region I [CRI]) and an 18-base internal region (CRII) that is contained within the coding region of the L protein gene. In the work described here, we have used a reverse-genetics system to determine if the 53-base segment between CRI and CRII contains additional sequence-specific signals required for optimal replication or if this segment functions solely as a sequence-independent spacer region. A series of copyback defective interfering minigenome analogs were constructed to contain substitutions of nonviral sequences in place of bases 21 to 72 of the antigenomic promoter, and the relative level of RNA replication was measured by Northern blot analysis. The results from our mutational analysis indicate that in addition to CRI and CRII, optimal replication from the SV5 antigenomic promoter requires a third sequence-dependent element located 51 to 66 bases from the 3′ end of the RNA. Minigenome RNA replication was not affected by changes in the either the position of this element in relation to CRI and CRII or the predicted hexamer phase of NP encapsidation. Thus, optimal RNA replication from the SV5 antigenomic promoter requires three sequence-dependent elements, CRI, CRII and bases 51 to 66. PMID:11264390

  16. Linker scanning mutagenesis of the 5'-flanking region of the mouse beta-major-globin gene: sequence requirements for transcription in erythroid and nonerythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Charnay, P; Mellon, P; Maniatis, T

    1985-06-01

    We analyzed the sequences required for transcription of the mouse beta-major-globin gene by introducing deletion and linker scanning mutations into the 5'-flanking region and then studying the effects of these mutations on beta-globin gene transcription in a HeLa cell transient expression assay or after stable introduction into mouse erythroleukemia cells. Consistent with earlier studies, we found that three distinct regions upstream from the RNA capping site are required for efficient beta-globin gene transcription in HeLa cells: the ATA box located 30 base pairs upstream from the mRNA capping site (-30), the CCAAT box located at -75, and the distal sequence element CCACACCC located at -90. In the ATA and CAAT box regions, the sequences necessary for efficient transcription extend beyond the limits of the canonical sequences. Mutations in the sequences located between the three transcriptional control elements do not significantly affect transcription in HeLa cells. Although the promoter defined in HeLa cell transfection experiments is also required for efficient transcription in mouse erythroleukemia cells, none of the mutations tested affects the regulation of beta-globin gene transcription during mouse erythroleukemia cell differentiation. Thus, DNA sequences downstream from the mRNA cap site appear to be sufficient for the regulation of beta-globin gene expression during the differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia cells in culture.

  17. Timing and Sequence of Brain Activity in Top-Down Control of Visual-Spatial Attention

    PubMed Central

    Grent-‘t-Jong, Tineke; Woldorff, Marty G

    2007-01-01

    Recent brain imaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have implicated a frontal-parietal network in the top-down control of attention. However, little is known about the timing and sequence of activations within this network. To investigate these timing questions, we used event-related electrical brain potentials (ERPs) and a specially designed visual-spatial attentional-cueing paradigm, which were applied as part of a multi-methodological approach that included a closely corresponding event-related fMRI study using an identical paradigm. In the first 400 ms post cue, attention-directing and control cues elicited similar general cue-processing activity, corresponding to the more lateral subregions of the frontal-parietal network identified with the fMRI. Following this, the attention-directing cues elicited a sustained negative-polarity brain wave that was absent for control cues. This activity could be linked to the more medial frontal–parietal subregions similarly identified in the fMRI as specifically involved in attentional orienting. Critically, both the scalp ERPs and the fMRI-seeded source modeling for this orienting-related activity indicated an earlier onset of frontal versus parietal contribution (∼400 versus ∼700 ms). This was then followed (∼800–900 ms) by pretarget biasing activity in the region-specific visual-sensory occipital cortex. These results indicate an activation sequence of key components of the attentional-control brain network, providing insight into their functional roles. More specifically, these results suggest that voluntary attentional orienting is initiated by medial portions of frontal cortex, which then recruit medial parietal areas. Together, these areas then implement biasing of region-specific visual-sensory cortex to facilitate the processing of upcoming visual stimuli. PMID:17199410

  18. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Indonesia Solanaceae based on DNA sequences of internal transcribed spacer region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Topik; Priyandoko, Didik; Islami, Dina Karina; Wardiny, Putri Yunitha

    2016-02-01

    Solanaceae is one of largest family in Angiosperm group with highly diverse in morphological character. In Indonesia, this group of plant is very popular due to its usefulness as food, ornamental and medicinal plants. However, investigation on phylogenetic relationship among the member of this family in Indonesia remains less attention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phylogenetics relationship of the family especially distributed in Indonesia. DNA sequences of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of 19 species of Solanaceae and three species of outgroup, which belongs to family Convolvulaceae, Apocynaceae, and Plantaginaceae, were isolated, amplified, and sequenced. Phylogenetic tree analysis based on parsimony method was conducted with using data derived from the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2, separately, and the combination of all. Results indicated that the phylogenetic tree derived from the combined data established better pattern of relationship than separate data. Thus, three major groups were revealed. Group 1 consists of tribe Datureae, Cestreae, and Petunieae, whereas group 2 is member of tribe Physaleae. Group 3 belongs to tribe Solaneae. The use of the ITS region as a molecular markers, in general, support the global Solanaceae relationship that has been previously reported.

  19. Polymorphic simple sequence repeat regions in chloroplast genomes: applications to the population genetics of pines.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, W; Morgante, M; McDevitt, R; Vendramin, G G; Rafalski, J A

    1995-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), consisting of tandemly repeated multiple copies of mono-, di-, tri-, or tetranucleotide motifs, are ubiquitous in eukaryotic genomes and are frequently used as genetic markers, taking advantage of their length polymorphism. We have examined the polymorphism of such sequences in the chloroplast genomes of plants, by using a PCR-based assay. GenBank searches identified the presence of several (dA)n.(dT)n mononucleotide stretches in chloroplast genomes. A chloroplast (cp) SSR was identified in three pine species (Pinus contorta, Pinus sylvestris, and Pinus thunbergii) 312 bp upstream of the psbA gene. DNA amplification of this repeated region from 11 pine species identified nine length variants. The polymorphic amplified fragments were isolated and the DNA sequence was determined, confirming that the length polymorphism was caused by variation in the length of the repeated region. In the pines, the chloroplast genome is transmitted through pollen and this PCR assay may be used to monitor gene flow in this genus. Analysis of 305 individuals from seven populations of Pinus leucodermis Ant. revealed the presence of four variants with intrapopulational diversities ranging from 0.000 to 0.629 and an average of 0.320. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of cpDNA on the same populations previously failed to detect any variation. Population subdivision based on cpSSR was higher (Gst = 0.22, where Gst is coefficient of gene differentiation) than that revealed in a previous isozyme study (Gst = 0.05). We anticipate that SSR loci within the chloroplast genome should provide a highly informative assay for the analysis of the genetic structure of plant populations. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7644491

  20. Sequence Level Analysis of Recently Duplicated Regions in the Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] Genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A single recessive gene, rxp, on linkage group (LG) D2 controls bacterial leaf pustule resistance in soybean. Markers linked to rxp were used to develop BAC contigs spanning the Rxp region. We identified two homoeologous contigs (GmA and GmA’) composed of five bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC...

  1. MiRNA Expression Profile for the Human Gastric Antrum Region Using Ultra-Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hamoy, Igor G.; Darnet, Sylvain; Burbano, Rommel; Khayat, André; Gonçalves, André Nicolau; Alencar, Dayse O.; Cruz, Aline; Magalhães, Leandro; Araújo Jr., Wilson; Silva, Artur; Santos, Sidney; Demachki, Samia; Assumpção, Paulo; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are small non-coding nucleotide sequences that regulate gene expression. These structures are fundamental to several biological processes, including cell proliferation, development, differentiation and apoptosis. Identifying the expression profile of microRNAs in healthy human gastric antrum mucosa may help elucidate the miRNA regulatory mechanisms of the human stomach. Methodology/Principal Findings A small RNA library of stomach antrum tissue was sequenced using high-throughput SOLiD sequencing technology. The total read count for the gastric mucosa antrum region was greater than 618,000. After filtering and aligning using with MirBase, 148 mature miRNAs were identified in the gastric antrum tissue, totaling 3,181 quality reads; 63.5% (2,021) of the reads were concentrated in the eight most highly expressed miRNAs (hsa-mir-145, hsa-mir-29a, hsa-mir-29c, hsa-mir-21, hsa-mir-451a, hsa-mir-192, hsa-mir-191 and hsa-mir-148a). RT-PCR validated the expression profiles of seven of these highly expressed miRNAs and confirmed the sequencing results obtained using the SOLiD platform. Conclusions/Significance In comparison with other tissues, the antrum’s expression profile was unique with respect to the most highly expressed miRNAs, suggesting that this expression profile is specific to stomach antrum tissue. The current study provides a starting point for a more comprehensive understanding of the role of miRNAs in the regulation of the molecular processes of the human stomach. PMID:24647245

  2. Mechanisms controlling the complete accretionary beach state sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubarbier, Benjamin; Castelle, Bruno; Ruessink, Gerben; Marieu, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    Accretionary downstate beach sequence is a key element of observed nearshore morphological variability along sandy coasts. We present and analyze the first numerical simulation of such a sequence using a process-based morphodynamic model that solves the coupling between waves, depth-integrated currents, and sediment transport. The simulation evolves from an alongshore uniform barred beach (storm profile) to an almost featureless shore-welded terrace (summer profile) through the highly alongshore variable detached crescentic bar and transverse bar/rip system states. A global analysis of the full sequence allows determining the varying contributions of the different hydro-sedimentary processes. Sediment transport driven by orbital velocity skewness is critical to the overall onshore sandbar migration, while gravitational downslope sediment transport acts as a damping term inhibiting further channel growth enforced by rip flow circulation. Accurate morphological diffusivity and inclusion of orbital velocity skewness opens new perspectives in terms of morphodynamic modeling of real beaches.

  3. Control of Integrated Task Sequences Shapes Components of Reaching.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Priya; Whitall, Jill; Kagerer, Florian A

    2016-01-01

    Reaching toward an object usually consists of a sequence of elemental actions. Using a reaching task sequence, the authors investigated how task elements of that sequence affected feedforward and feedback components of the reaching phase of the movement. Nine right-handed adults performed, with their dominant and nondominant hands, 4 tasks of different complexities: a simple reaching task; a reach-to-grasp task; a reach-to-grasp and lift object task; and a reach-to-grasp, lift, and place object task. Results showed that in the reach-to-grasp and lift object task more time was allocated to the feedforward component of the reach phase, while latency between the task elements decreased. We also found between-hand differences, supporting previous findings of increased efficiency of processing planning-related information in the preferred hand. The presence of task-related modifications supports the concept of contextual effects when planning a movement.

  4. Quality Control Test for Sequence-Phenotype Assignments

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Maria Teresa Lara; Rosario, Pablo Benjamín Leon; Luna-Nevarez, Pablo; Gamez, Alba Savin; Martínez-del Campo, Ana; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Relating a gene mutation to a phenotype is a common task in different disciplines such as protein biochemistry. In this endeavour, it is common to find false relationships arising from mutations introduced by cells that may be depurated using a phenotypic assay; yet, such phenotypic assays may introduce additional false relationships arising from experimental errors. Here we introduce the use of high-throughput DNA sequencers and statistical analysis aimed to identify incorrect DNA sequence-phenotype assignments and observed that 10–20% of these false assignments are expected in large screenings aimed to identify critical residues for protein function. We further show that this level of incorrect DNA sequence-phenotype assignments may significantly alter our understanding about the structure-function relationship of proteins. We have made available an implementation of our method at http://bis.ifc.unam.mx/en/software/chispas. PMID:25700273

  5. Primers are designed for amplification and direct sequencing of ITS region of rDNA from Myxomycetes.

    PubMed

    Martín, María P; Lado, Carlos; Johansen, Steinar

    2003-01-01

    Four new primers were designed, based on comparison of Physarum polycephalum sequences retrieved from Genbank (primers PHYS-5 and PHYS-4) and our own sequences (primers PHYS-3 and PHYS-2), to amplify the ITS regions of rDNA, including the 5.8S gene segment from Lamproderma species. Sequencing analysis shows that Lamproderma contains ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 regions of approximately 900 bp, which is similar in size to most eukaryotes. However, the corresponding region in another common myxomycete, Fuligo septica, is more than 2000 bp due to the presence of large direct-repeat motifs in ITS1. Myxomycete rDNA ITS regions are interesting both as phylogenetic markers in taxonomic studies and as model sequences for molecular evolution.

  6. Transcription control region within the protein-coding portion of adenovirus E1A genes.

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, T F; Arvidson, D N; Tyau, E S; Dunsworth-Browne, M; Berk, A J

    1984-01-01

    A single-base deletion within the protein-coding region of the adenovirus type 5 early region 1A (E1A) genes, 399 bases downstream from the transcription start site, depresses transcription to 2% of the wild-type rate. Complementation studies demonstrated that this was due to two effects of the mutation: first, inactivation of an E1A protein, causing a reduction by a factor of 5; second, a defect which acts in cis to depress E1A mRNA and nuclear RNA concentrations by a factor of 10. A larger deletion within the protein-coding region of E1A which overlaps the single-base deletion produces the same phenotype. In contrast, a linker insertion which results in a similar truncated E1A protein does not produce the cis-acting defect in E1A transcription. These results demonstrate that a critical cis-acting transcription control region occurs within the protein coding sequence in adenovirus type 5 E1A. The single-base deletion occurs in a sequence which shows extensive homology with a sequence from the enhancer regions of simian virus 40 and polyomavirus. This region is not required for E1A transcription during the late phase of infection. Images PMID:6334230

  7. Contamination-controlled high-throughput whole genome sequencing for influenza A viruses using the MiSeq sequencer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Kai; Lee, Chun Kiat; Tang, Julian Wei-Tze; Loh, Tze Ping; Koay, Evelyn Siew-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Accurate full-length genomic sequences are important for viral phylogenetic studies. We developed a targeted high-throughput whole genome sequencing (HT-WGS) method for influenza A viruses, which utilized an enzymatic cleavage-based approach, the Nextera XT DNA library preparation kit, for library preparation. The entire library preparation workflow was adapted for the Sentosa SX101, a liquid handling platform, to automate this labor-intensive step. As the enzymatic cleavage-based approach generates low coverage reads at both ends of the cleaved products, we corrected this loss of sequencing coverage at the termini by introducing modified primers during the targeted amplification step to generate full-length influenza A sequences with even coverage across the whole genome. Another challenge of targeted HTS is the risk of specimen-to-specimen cross-contamination during the library preparation step that results in the calling of false-positive minority variants. We included an in-run, negative system control to capture contamination reads that may be generated during the liquid handling procedures. The upper limits of 99.99% prediction intervals of the contamination rate were adopted as cut-off values of contamination reads. Here, 148 influenza A/H3N2 samples were sequenced using the HTS protocol and were compared against a Sanger-based sequencing method. Our data showed that the rate of specimen-to-specimen cross-contamination was highly significant in HTS. PMID:27624998

  8. 40 CFR 81.112 - Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.112 Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Carolina) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region: Region 1. 81.107Greenwood Intrastate Air Quality Control Region: Region 2....

  9. 40 CFR 81.112 - Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.112 Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Carolina) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region: Region 1. 81.107Greenwood Intrastate Air Quality Control Region: Region 2....

  10. 40 CFR 81.112 - Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.112 Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Carolina) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region: Region 1. 81.107Greenwood Intrastate Air Quality Control Region: Region 2....

  11. 40 CFR 81.112 - Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.112 Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Carolina) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region: Region 1. 81.107Greenwood Intrastate Air Quality Control Region: Region 2. 81...

  12. An evaluation of methods to test predefined genomic regions for differential methylation in bisulfite sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Hebestreit, Katja

    2016-09-01

    In the biology of tissue development and diseases, DNA methylation plays an important role. For a deeper understanding, it is crucial to accurately compare DNA methylation patterns between groups of samples representing different conditions. A widely used method to investigate DNA methylation in the CpG context is bisulfite sequencing, which produces data on the single-nucleotide scale. While there are benefits to analyzing CpG sites on a basepair level, there are both biological and statistical reasons to test entire genomic regions for differential methylation. However, the analysis of DNA methylation is hampered by the lack of best practice standards. Here, we compared multiple approaches for testing predefined genomic regions for differential DNA methylation in bisulfite sequencing data. Nine methods were evaluated: BiSeq, COHCAP, Goeman's Global Test, Limma, methylKit/eDMR, RADMeth and three log-linear regression approaches with different distribution assumptions. We applied these methods to simulated data and determined their sensitivity and specificity. This revealed performance differences, which were also seen when applied to real data. Methods that first test single CpG sites and then test regions based on transformed CpG-wise P-values performed better than methods that summarize methylation levels or raw reads. Interestingly, smoothing of methylation levels had a negligible impact. In particular, Global Test, BiSeq and RADMeth/z-test outperformed the other methods we evaluated, providing valuable guidance for more accurate analysis of DNA methylation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Characterization of mitochondrial control region, two intergenic spacers and tRNAs of Zaprionus indianus (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    da Silva, Norma Machado; de Souza Dias, Aline; da Silva Valente, Vera Lúcia; Valiati, Victor Hugo

    2009-12-01

    The control region in insects is the major noncoding region in animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and is responsible for a large part of the variation in the DNA sequence and size of the genome of this organelle. In this study, the mtDNA control region, two intergenic spacers and tRNA genes of a Zaprionus indianus strain were cloned, sequenced and compared with other Drosophila species. The overall A+T content in the Z. indianus control region is 94.3%, and a comparison with other Drosophila species demonstrated that the most conserved region appears to be the 420 base pairs nearest to the tRNA(ile), similar to the findings of other authors. We also describe conserved sequence blocks, including a poly-T involved in the replication process of Drosophila mtDNA; a putative secondary structure also involved in the replication process and repeated sequences. tRNA(ile) sequence demonstrated the greatest variability when the tRNA sequences of species were compared.

  14. A fungal mock community control for amplicon sequencing experiments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The field of microbial ecology has been profoundly advanced by the ability to profile the composition of complex microbial communities by means of high throughput amplicon sequencing of marker genes amplified directly from environmental genomic DNA extracts. However, it has become increasingly clear...

  15. Sequence stratigraphic control on prolific HC reservoir development, Southwest Iran

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasemi, Y.; Kondroud, K.N.

    2008-01-01

    An important carbonate formation in the Persian Gulf and the onshore oil fields of Southwest Iran is the Lowermost Cretaceous Fahliyan formation. The formation in Darkhowain field consists of unconformity-bounded depositional sequences containing prolific hydrocarbon reservoirs of contrasting origin. Located in the high stand systems tract (HST) of the lower sequence encompassing over 200m of oil column are the most prolific reservoir. Another reservoir is over 80m thick consisting of shallowing-upward cycles that are best developed within the transgressive systems tract of the upper sequence. Vertical facies distribution and their paleobathymetry and geophysical log signatures of the Fahliyan formation in the Darkhowain platform reveal the presence of two unconformity-bounded depositional sequences in Vail et al., Van Wagoner et al., and Sarg. The Fahliyan formation mainly consists of platform carbonates composed of restricted bioclastic lime mudstone to packstone of the platform interior, Lithocodium boundstone or ooid-intraclast-bioclast grainstone of the high energy platform margin and the bioclast packstone to lime mudstone related to the off-platform setting.

  16. Effective Characterisation of the Complete Orang-Utan Mitochondrial DNA Control Region, in the Face of Persistent Focus in Many Taxa on Shorter Hypervariable Regions

    PubMed Central

    Galdikas, Biruté M. F.

    2016-01-01

    The hypervariable region I (HVRI) is persistently used to discern haplotypes, to distinguish geographic subpopulations, and to infer taxonomy in a range of organisms. Numerous studies have highlighted greater heterogeneity elsewhere in the mitochondrial DNA control region, however–particularly, in some species, in other understudied hypervariable regions. To assess the abundance and utility of such potential variations in orang-utans, we characterised 36 complete control-region haplotypes, of which 13 were of Sumatran and 23 of Bornean maternal ancestry, and compared polymorphisms within these and within shorter HVRI segments predominantly analysed in prior phylogenetic studies of Sumatran (~385 bp) and Bornean (~323 bp) orang-utans. We amplified the complete control region in a single PCR that proved successful even with highly degraded, non-invasive samples. By using species-specific primers to produce a single large amplicon (~1600 bp) comprising flanking coding regions, our method also serves to better avoid amplification of nuclear mitochondrial insertions (numts). We found the number, length and position of hypervariable regions is inconsistent between orang-utan species, and that prior definitions of the HVRI were haphazard. Polymorphisms occurring outside the predominantly analysed segments were phylogeographically informative in isolation, and could be used to assign haplotypes to comparable clades concordant with geographic subpopulations. The predominantly analysed segments could discern only up to 76% of all haplotypes, highlighting the forensic utility of complete control-region sequences. In the face of declining sequencing costs and our proven application to poor-quality DNA extracts, we see no reason to ever amplify only specific ‘hypervariable regions’ in any taxa, particularly as their lengths and positions are inconsistent and cannot be reliably defined–yet this strategy predominates widely. Given their greater utility and consistency, we

  17. Bilingualism alters brain functional connectivity between "control" regions and "language" regions: Evidence from bimodal bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Li, Le; Abutalebi, Jubin; Zou, Lijuan; Yan, Xin; Liu, Lanfang; Feng, Xiaoxia; Wang, Ruiming; Guo, Taomei; Ding, Guosheng

    2015-05-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have revealed that bilingualism induces both structural and functional neuroplasticity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the left caudate nucleus (LCN), both of which are associated with cognitive control. Since these "control" regions should work together with other language regions during language processing, we hypothesized that bilingualism may also alter the functional interaction between the dACC/LCN and language regions. Here we tested this hypothesis by exploring the functional connectivity (FC) in bimodal bilinguals and monolinguals using functional MRI when they either performed a picture naming task with spoken language or were in resting state. We found that for bimodal bilinguals who use spoken and sign languages, the FC of the dACC with regions involved in spoken language (e.g. the left superior temporal gyrus) was stronger in performing the task, but weaker in the resting state as compared to monolinguals. For the LCN, its intrinsic FC with sign language regions including the left inferior temporo-occipital part and right inferior and superior parietal lobules was increased in the bilinguals. These results demonstrate that bilingual experience may alter the brain functional interaction between "control" regions and "language" regions. For different control regions, the FC alters in different ways. The findings also deepen our understanding of the functional roles of the dACC and LCN in language processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Phylogenetic relationships in subfamily Tillandsioideae (Bromeliaceae) based on DNA sequence data from seven plastid regions.

    PubMed

    Barfuss, Michael H J; Samuel, Rosabelle; Till, Walter; Stuessy, Tod F

    2005-02-01

    Molecular phylogenetic studies of seven plastid DNA regions were used to resolve circumscriptions at generic and infrageneric levels in subfamily Tillandsioideae of Bromeliaceae. One hundred and ten tillandsioid samples were analyzed, encompassing 10 genera, 104 species, and two cultivars. Two species of Bromelioideae, eight species of the polymorphic Pitcairnioideae, and two species of Rapateaceae were selected as outgroups. Parsimony analysis was based on sequence variation of five noncoding (partial 5' and 3' trnK intron, rps16 intron, trnL intron, trnL-trnF intergenic spacer, atpB-rbcL intergenic spacer) and two coding plastid regions (rbcL and matK). Phylogenetic analyses of individual regions produced congruent, but mostly weakly supported or unresolved clades. Results of the combined data set, however, clearly show that subfamily Tillandsioideae is monophyletic. The earliest divergence separates a lineage comprised of Glomeropitcairnia and Catopsis from the "core" tillandsioids. In their present circumscriptions, genera Vriesea and Tillandsia, and their subgenera or sections, as well as Guzmania and Mezobromelia, are poly- and/or paraphyletic. Genera Alcantarea, Werauhia, Racinaea, and Viridantha appear monophyletic, but separation of these from Vriesea and Tillandsia makes the remainder paraphyletic. Nevertheless, Tillandsioideae separates into four main clades, which are proposed as tribes, viz., Catopsideae, Glomeropitcairnieae, Vrieseeae, and Tillandsieae.

  19. Intraspecific rearrangement of duplicated mitochondrial control regions in the Luzon Tarictic Hornbill Penelopides manillae (Aves: Bucerotidae).

    PubMed

    Sammler, Svenja; Ketmaier, Valerio; Havenstein, Katja; Tiedemann, Ralph

    2013-12-01

    Philippine hornbills of the genera Aceros and Penelopides (Bucerotidae) are known to possess a large tandemly duplicated fragment in their mitochondrial genome, whose paralogous parts largely evolve in concert. In the present study, we surveyed the two distinguishable duplicated control regions in several individuals of the Luzon Tarictic Hornbill Penelopides manillae, compare their characteristics within and across individuals, and report on an intraspecific mitochondrial gene rearrangement found in one single specimen, i.e., an interchange between the two control regions. To our knowledge, this is the first observation of two distinct mitochondrial genome rearrangements within a bird species. We briefly discuss a possible evolutionary mechanism responsible for this pattern, and highlight potential implications for the application of control region sequences as a marker in population genetics and phylogeography.

  20. Nucleotide sequence of the internal transcribed spacers and 5.8S region of ribosomal DNA in Pinus pinea L.

    PubMed

    Marrocco, R; Gelati, M T; Maggini, F

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) belonging to different ribosomal RNA genes from Pinus pinea are reported. The analyzed ITS1 can be distinguished on the basis of their length, being one 2631 bp and the other 271 bp long. Nucleotide comparison of these regions did not show appreciable sequence homology. The larger ITS1 contains five tandem arranged subrepeats with size ranging between 219 bp and 237 bp. The nucleotide sequence of the 5.8S and the ITS2 regions belonging to the larger ribosomal RNA gene are also reported.

  1. Identification of fungi based on the nucleotide sequence homology of their internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region.

    PubMed

    Narutaki, Shoji; Takatori, Kosuke; Nishimura, Hidekatsu; Terashima, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Tsuguo

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we examined the identification of fungi based on the sequence homology of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region. A newly designed primer pair could amplify the target region of all 42 strains tested. The PCR products were sequenced and the sequence homologies were searched by BLAST. It was demonstrated that this method is a reliable identification method at the genus or species level. At present, available databases are still insufficient to identify some fungi, but with the accumulation of further data in the ITS1 database, this method will be available for the identification of fungi.

  2. Multi-perspective quality control of Illumina exome sequencing data using QC3.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; Zhao, Shilin; Sheng, Quanhu; Ye, Fei; Li, Jiang; Lehmann, Brian; Pietenpol, Jennifer; Samuels, David C; Shyr, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have greatly improved our ability to detect genomic variants for biomedical research. The advance in NGS technologies has also created significant challenges in bioinformatics. One of the major challenges is the quality control of sequencing data. There has been heavy focus on performing raw data quality control. In order to correctly interpret the quality of the DNA sequencing data, however, proper quality control should be conducted at all stages of DNA sequencing data analysis: raw data, alignment, and variant detection. We designed QC3, a quality control tool aimed at those three major stages of DNA sequencing. QC3 monitors quality control metrics at each stage of NGS data and provides unique and independent evaluations of the data quality from different perspectives. QC3 offers unique features such as detection of batch effect and cross contamination. QC3 and its source code are freely downloadable at https://github.com/slzhao/QC3.

  3. Holocene fire activity in the Carpathian region: regional climate vs. local controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florescu, Gabriela; Feurdean, Angelica

    2015-04-01

    Introduction. Fire drives significant changes in ecosystem structure and function, diversity, species evolution, biomass dynamics and atmospheric composition. Palaeodata and model-based studies have pointed towards a strong connection between fire activity, climate, vegetation and people. Nevertheless, the relative importance of these factors appears to be strongly variable and a better understanding of these factors and their interaction needs a thorough investigation over multiple spatial (local to global) and temporal (years to millennia) scales. In this respect, sedimentary charcoal, associated with other proxies of climate, vegetation and human impact, represents a powerful tool of investigating changes in past fire activity, especially in regions with scarce fire dataset such as the CE Europe. Aim. To increase the spatial and temporal coverage of charcoal records and facilitate a more critical examination of the patterns, drivers and consequences of biomass burning over multiple spatial and temporal scales in CE Europe, we have investigated 6 fossil sequences in the Carpathian region (northern Romania). These are located in different geographical settings, in terms of elevation, vegetation composition, topography and land-use. Specific questions are: i) determine trends in timing and magnitude of fire activity, as well as similarities and differences between elevations; ii) disentangle the importance of regional from local controls in fire activity; iii) evaluate ecological consequences of fire on landscape composition, structure and diversity. Methods. We first determine the recent trends in fire activity (the last 150 years) from charcoal data and compare them with instrumental records of temperature, precipitation, site history and topography for a better understanding of the relationship between sedimentary charcoal and historical fire activity. We then statistically quantify centennial to millennial trends in fire activity (frequency, magnitude) based on

  4. swDMR: A Sliding Window Approach to Identify Differentially Methylated Regions Based on Whole Genome Bisulfite Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qianzhi; Liu, Qi; Chen, BingYu; Huang, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is a widespread epigenetic modification that plays an essential role in gene expression through transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. The emergence of whole genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) represents an important milestone in the detection of DNA methylation. Characterization of differential methylated regions (DMRs) is fundamental as well for further functional analysis. In this study, we present swDMR (http://sourceforge.net/projects/swdmr/) for the comprehensive analysis of DMRs from whole genome methylation profiles by a sliding window approach. It is an integrated tool designed for WGBS data, which not only implements accessible statistical methods to perform hypothesis test adapted to two or more samples without replicates, but false discovery rate was also controlled by multiple test correction. Downstream analysis tools were also provided, including cluster, annotation and visualization modules. In summary, based on WGBS data, swDMR can produce abundant information of differential methylated regions. As a convenient and flexible tool, we believe swDMR will bring us closer to unveil the potential functional regions involved in epigenetic regulation. PMID:26176536

  5. Automatic and Controlled Processing of Sequences of Events.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    visual counterpart that examines attention mechanisms devised by studies done in the auditory modality should also change in both space and time . In...that had been consistently mapped over a long period of time would tend to subjectively "pop out" of the display. Possibly, attention was...focus attention to naturalistic events a (events that change in time and space) and compared it to results found in Sequences of Events Page 9 auditory

  6. Rice pseudomolecule-anchored cross-species DNA sequence alignments indicate regional genomic variation in expressed sequence conservation

    PubMed Central

    Armstead, Ian; Huang, Lin; King, Julie; Ougham, Helen; Thomas, Howard; King, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Background Various methods have been developed to explore inter-genomic relationships among plant species. Here, we present a sequence similarity analysis based upon comparison of transcript-assembly and methylation-filtered databases from five plant species and physically anchored rice coding sequences. Results A comparison of the frequency of sequence alignments, determined by MegaBLAST, between rice coding sequences in TIGR pseudomolecules and annotations vs 4.0 and comprehensive transcript-assembly and methylation-filtered databases from Lolium perenne (ryegrass), Zea mays (maize), Hordeum vulgare (barley), Glycine max (soybean) and Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) was undertaken. Each rice pseudomolecule was divided into 10 segments, each containing 10% of the functionally annotated, expressed genes. This indicated a correlation between relative segment position in the rice genome and numbers of alignments with all the queried monocot and dicot plant databases. Colour-coded moving windows of 100 functionally annotated, expressed genes along each pseudomolecule were used to generate 'heat-maps'. These revealed consistent intra- and inter-pseudomolecule variation in the relative concentrations of significant alignments with the tested plant databases. Analysis of the annotations and derived putative expression patterns of rice genes from 'hot-spots' and 'cold-spots' within the heat maps indicated possible functional differences. A similar comparison relating to ancestral duplications of the rice genome indicated that duplications were often associated with 'hot-spots'. Conclusion Physical positions of expressed genes in the rice genome are correlated with the degree of conservation of similar sequences in the transcriptomes of other plant species. This relative conservation is associated with the distribution of different sized gene families and segmentally duplicated loci and may have functional and evolutionary implications. PMID:17708759

  7. Isolation of expressed sequences from the region commonly deleted in Velo-cardio-facial syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Sirotkin, H.; Morrow, B.; DasGupta, R.

    1994-09-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is a relatively common autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by cleft palate, cardiac abnormalities, learning disabilities and a characteristic facial dysmorphology. Most VCFS patients have interstitial deletions of 22q11 of 1-2 mb. In an effort to isolate the gene(s) responsible for VCFS we have utilized a hybrid selection protocol to recover expressed sequences from three non-overlapping YACs comprising almost 1 mb of the commonly deleted region. Total yeast genomic DNA or isolated YAC DNA was immobilized on Hybond-N filters, blocked with yeast and human ribosomal and human repetitive sequences and hybridized with a mixture of random primed short fragment cDNA libraries. Six human short fragment libraries derived from total fetus, fetal brain, adult brain, testes, thymus and spleen have been used for the selections. Short fragment cDNAs retained on the filter were passed through a second round of selection and cloned into lambda gt10. cDNAs shown to originate from the YACs and from chromosome 22 are being used to isolate full length cDNAs. Three genes known to be present on these YACs, catechol-O-methyltransferase, tuple 1 and clathrin heavy chain have been recovered. Additionally, a gene related to the murine p120 gene and a number of novel short cDNAs have been isolated. The role of these genes in VCFS is being investigated.

  8. Seismic velocity structure in the source region of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake sequence, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shito, Azusa; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Ohkura, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Shinichi; Okada, Tomomi; Miyamachi, Hiroki; Kosuga, Masahiro; Maeda, Yuta; Yoshimi, Masayuki; Asano, Youichi; Okubo, Makoto

    2017-08-01

    We investigate seismic wave velocity structure and spatial distribution of the seismicity in the source region of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake sequence. A one-dimensional mean velocity shows that the seismogenic zone has a high-velocity and low-Vp/Vs ratio relative to the average velocity structure of Kyushu Island. This indicates that the crust is relatively strong, capable of sustaining sufficiently high strain energy to facilitate two large (Mj > 6.5) earthquakes in close proximity to one another in rapid succession. Three-dimensional tomography of the seismogenic zone around the source of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake sequence yields Vp = 6 km/s and Vs = 3.5 km/s. Most large-displacement areas (asperities) of the Mj 7.3 event overlap with the seismogenic zone and the overlying surface layer. Aftershock seismicity is distributed deeper than the conventional seismogenic zone, which suggests decreased strength due to fluids or increased stress, both caused by coseismic slip.

  9. Genomic Sequence Analysis of Fugu rubripes CFTR and Flanking Genes in a 60 kb Region Conserving Synteny with 800 kb of Human Chromosome 7

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Heather; Taylor, Martin S.; Doherty, Ann; Boyd, A. Christopher; Porteous, David J.

    2000-01-01

    To define control elements that regulate tissue-specific expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), we have sequenced 60 kb of genomic DNA from the puffer fish Fugu rubripes (Fugu) that includes the CFTR gene. This region of the Fugu genome shows conservation of synteny with 800-kb sequence of the human genome encompassing the WNT2, CFTR, Z43555, and CBP90 genes. Additionally, the genomic structure of each gene is conserved. In a multiple sequence alignment of human, mouse, and Fugu, the putative WNT2 promoter sequence is shown to contain highly conserved elements that may be transcription factor or other regulatory binding sites. We have found two putative ankyrin repeat-containing genes that flank the CFTR gene. Overall sequence analysis suggests conservation of intron/exon boundaries between Fugu and human CFTR and revealed extensive homology between functional protein domains. However, the immediate 5′ regions of human and Fugu CFTR are highly divergent with few conserved sequences apart from those resembling diminished cAMP response elements (CRE) and CAAT box elements. Interestingly, the polymorphic polyT tract located upstream of exon 9 is present in human and Fugu but absent in mouse. Similarly, an intron 1 and intron 9 element common to human and Fugu is absent in mouse. The euryhaline killifish CFTR coding sequence is highly homologous to the Fugu sequence, suggesting that upregulation of CFTR in that species in response to salinity may be regulated transcriptionally. [The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession no. AJ271361, for the combined cosmids 159C9, 146H13, 6M15, and 145M20.] PMID:10958637

  10. The regional costs and benefits of acid rain control

    SciTech Connect

    Berkman, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    Congress recently enacted acid rain control legislation as part of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments following a decade-long debate among disparate regional interests. Although Congress succeeded in drafting a law acceptable to all regions, the regional costs and benefits of the legislation remain uncertain. The research presented here attempts to estimate the regional costs and benefits and the economic impacts of acid rain controls. These estimates are made using a modeling system composed of econometric, linear programming and input-output models. The econometric and linear programming components describe markets for electricity and coal. The outputs of these components including capital investment, electricity demand, and coal production are taken as exogenous inputs by a multiregional input-output model. The input-output model produces estimates of changes in final demand, gross output, and employment. The utility linear programming model also predicts sulfur dioxide emissions (an acid-rain precursor). According to model simulations, the costs of acid rain control exceed the benefits for many regions including several regions customarily thought to be the major beneficiaries of acid rain control such as New England.

  11. Effect of sequence context at stop codons on efficiency of reinitiation in GCN4 translational control.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, C M; Hinnebusch, A G

    1994-01-01

    Translational control of the GCN4 gene involves two short open reading frames in the mRNA leader (uORF1 and uORF4) that differ greatly in the ability to allow reinitiation at GCN4 following their own translation. The low efficiency of reinitiation characteristic of uORF4 can be reconstituted in a hybrid element in which the last codon of uORF1 and 10 nucleotides 3' to its stop codon (the termination region) are substituted with the corresponding nucleotides from uORF4. To define the features of these 13 nucleotides that determine their effects on reinitiation, we separately randomized the sequence of the third codon and termination region of the uORF1-uORF4 hybrid and selected mutant alleles with the high-level reinitiation that is characteristic of uORF1. The results indicate that many different A+U-rich triplets present at the third codon of uORF1 can overcome the inhibitory effect of the termination region derived from uORF4 on the efficiency of reinitiation at GCN4. Efficient reinitiation is not associated with codons specifying a particular amino acid or isoacceptor tRNA. Similarly, we found that a diverse collection of A+U-rich sequences present in the termination region of uORF1 could restore efficient reinitiation at GCN4 in the presence of the third codon derived from uORF4. To explain these results, we propose that reinitiation can be impaired by stable base pairing between nucleotides flanking the uORF1 stop codon and either the tRNA which pairs with the third codon, the rRNA, or sequences located elsewhere in GCN4 mRNA. We suggest that these interactions delay the resumption of scanning following peptide chain termination at the uORF and thereby lead to ribosome dissociation from the mRNA. Images PMID:8264629

  12. In search of coding and non-coding regions of DNA sequences based on balanced estimation of diffusion entropy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Wenqing; Yang, Huijie

    2016-01-01

    Identification of coding regions in DNA sequences remains challenging. Various methods have been proposed, but these are limited by species-dependence and the need for adequate training sets. The elements in DNA coding regions are known to be distributed in a quasi-random way, while those in non-coding regions have typical similar structures. For short sequences, these statistical characteristics cannot be extracted correctly and cannot even be detected. This paper introduces a new way to solve the problem: balanced estimation of diffusion entropy (BEDE).

  13. Automatic sequencing and control of Space Station airlock operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himel, Victor; Abeles, Fred J.; Auman, James; Tqi, Terry O.

    1989-01-01

    Procedures that have been developed as part of the NASA JSC-sponsored pre-prototype Checkout, Servicing and Maintenance (COSM) program for pre- and post-EVA airlock operations are described. This paper addresses the accompanying pressure changes in the airlock and in the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Additionally, the paper focuses on the components that are checked out, and includes the step-by-step sequences to be followed by the crew, the required screen displays and prompts that accompany each step, and a description of the automated processes that occur.

  14. Automatic sequencing and control of Space Station airlock operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himel, Victor; Abeles, Fred J.; Auman, James; Tqi, Terry O.

    1989-01-01

    Procedures that have been developed as part of the NASA JSC-sponsored pre-prototype Checkout, Servicing and Maintenance (COSM) program for pre- and post-EVA airlock operations are described. This paper addresses the accompanying pressure changes in the airlock and in the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Additionally, the paper focuses on the components that are checked out, and includes the step-by-step sequences to be followed by the crew, the required screen displays and prompts that accompany each step, and a description of the automated processes that occur.

  15. Rapid profiling of the antigen regions recognized by serum antibodies using massively parallel sequencing of antigen-specific libraries.

    PubMed

    Domina, Maria; Lanza Cariccio, Veronica; Benfatto, Salvatore; D'Aliberti, Deborah; Venza, Mario; Borgogni, Erica; Castellino, Flora; Biondo, Carmelo; D'Andrea, Daniel; Grassi, Luigi; Tramontano, Anna; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for techniques capable of identifying the antigenic epitopes targeted by polyclonal antibody responses during deliberate or natural immunization. Although successful, traditional phage library screening is laborious and can map only some of the epitopes. To accelerate and improve epitope identification, we have employed massive sequencing of phage-displayed antigen-specific libraries using the Illumina MiSeq platform. This enabled us to precisely identify the regions of a model antigen, the meningococcal NadA virulence factor, targeted by serum antibodies in vaccinated individuals and to rank hundreds of antigenic fragments according to their immunoreactivity. We found that next generation sequencing can significantly empower the analysis of antigen-specific libraries by allowing simultaneous processing of dozens of library/serum combinations in less than two days, including the time required for antibody-mediated library selection. Moreover, compared with traditional plaque picking, the new technology (named Phage-based Representation OF Immuno-Ligand Epitope Repertoire or PROFILER) provides superior resolution in epitope identification. PROFILER seems ideally suited to streamline and guide rational antigen design, adjuvant selection, and quality control of newly produced vaccines. Furthermore, this method is also susceptible to find important applications in other fields covered by traditional quantitative serology.

  16. Characterization of HIV type 1 envelope sequence among viral isolates circulating in the northern region of Colombia, South America.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, José-Luis; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Palacio, Lucy; Peñuela, Martha; Hernández, Robin; Lemay, Guy; Cervantes-Acosta, Guillermo

    2012-12-01

    To characterize human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) strains circulating in the Northern region of Colombia in South America, sequences of the viral envelope C2V3C3 region were obtained from patients with different high-risk practices. Close to 60% of the sequences were predicted to belong to macrophage-tropic viruses, according to the positions of acidic amino acids and putative N-linked glycosylation sites. This is in agreement with the fact that most of the patients were recently diagnosed individuals. Phylogenic analysis then allowed assignment of all 35 samples to subtype B viruses. This same subtype was found in previous studies carried out in other Colombian regions. This study thus expands previous analyses with previously missing data from the Northern region of the country. The number and the length of the sequences examined also help to provide a clearer picture of the prevailing situation of the present HIV epidemics in this country.

  17. Early regional LGM (MIS 3) reflected in Central European Loess-Paleosol Sequences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoeller, Ludwig; Fuchs, Markus

    2014-05-01

    The age of the "Brandenburg Phase", representing the regional LGM in Northern Germany and Poland, has been under debate. Evidence was found recently by OSL dating that it occurred during late MIS 3. In a new loess profile in the famous quarry of Nußloch south of Heidelberg (Germany) an exceptionally thick (6 m) loess-paleosol sequence (LPS) starts with a boreal brown soil regionally known as "Lohne soil", which terminates the Middle Pleniglacial LPS, according to classical stratigraphies. This paleosol is overlain by loess beds interbedding with weakly developed tundra-gley soils of typically Upper Pleniglacial habitus. Mean OSL ages from quartz fine and middle grains range between ca. 29 ka and ca. 35 ka in this part of the section which is much thicker than in previously studied corresponding parts of the loess stratigraphy at the Nußloch site. Our surprising dating results are, however, supported by recently dated loess beds in the Central European corridor between the ice margin of the Brandenburg Phase and the Northern Alpine LGM terminal moraines. Paleoenvironmental reconstructions point to cold but rather humid climatic conditions favouring rapid ice advance. We, thus, hypothesize that the rapid advance of Scandinavian ice into northern Central Europe which may have occurred ca. 10 ka prior to the global LGM, is reflected in some well-preserved Central European loess sections covering the last glacial cycle.

  18. Source characteristics of the seismic sequences in the Eastern Carpathians foredeep region (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Emilia; Radulian, Mircea

    2001-08-01

    The source parameters and scaling properties for two seismic areas (Vrâncioaia and Râmnicu Sărat) of the Carpathians Mountains foredeep, adjacent to the Vrancea seismic region, are analyzed by standard time and frequency domain methods and empirical Green's function deconvolution. The study area is characterized by distinct shallow seismicity clusters with small and moderate-size earthquakes ( M<5). The digital short-period and broad-band waveforms recorded by the Romanian seismic network are considered. The analysis of the retrieved source parameters possibly outlines a heterogeneous faulting process. A significant difference in the stress drop value is emphasized between Vrâncioaia and Râmnicu Sărat earthquakes, which is assumed to be ascribed to differences in the local seismotectonics and reology. Our paper shows the efficiency of the empirical Green's function deconvolution in eliminating the instrument, path and site effects for the earthquake sequences in the Râmnicu Sărat region. The apparent source time function is generally well constrained, as demonstrated by our tests using in parallel both, appropriate Green's functions of different sizes, and instruments with different frequency bandwidth.

  19. Isolation and identification of a novel tandemly repeated DNA sequence in the centromeric region of human chromosome 8.

    PubMed

    Lin, C C; Sasi, R; Lee, C; Fan, Y S; Court, D

    1993-05-01

    EcoRI subclones, designated as 50E1 and 50E4, were independently obtained from a cosmid clone previously mapped to the centromeric region of human chromosome 8. Southern blot hybridization analyses suggested that both subclones contain repetitive DNA sequences different from the chromosome 8 specific alphoid DNA. DNA sequence analysis of the 704 bp insert of 50E1 and the 1,962 bp insert of 50E4 revealed that both inserts contained tandemly repeated units of approximately 220 bp. Fluorescence in situ hybridization studies confirmed these two subclones to be specifically located on the centromeric region of chromosome 8. A 220 bp consensus sequence, derived from nine monomeric repeats, showed no significant homology to alphoid consensus sequences or to other currently known human centromeric DNA sequence. Furthermore, no significant homology was found with any other DNA sequence deposited in the EMBL or GenBank databases, indicating that this chromosome 8 specific repetitive DNA sequence is novel. From slot blot experiments it was estimated that 0.013% of the human genome comprises 1,750 of these monomeric repeats, residing on the centromeric region of chromosome 8 in tandem array(s).

  20. Culture-independent sequence analysis of Chlamydia trachomatis in urogenital specimens identifies regions of recombination and in-patient sequence mutations.

    PubMed

    Putman, Timothy E; Suchland, Robert J; Ivanovitch, John D; Rockey, Daniel D

    2013-10-01

    A culture-independent genome sequencing approach was developed and used to examine genomic variability in Chlamydia trachomatis-positive specimens that were collected from patients in the Seattle, WA, USA, area. The procedure is based on an immunomagnetic separation approach with chlamydial LPS-specific mAbs, followed by DNA purification and total DNA amplification, and subsequent Illumina-based sequence analysis. Quality of genome sequencing was independent of the total number of inclusion-forming units determined for the sample and the amount of non-chlamydial DNA in the Illumina libraries. A geographically and temporally linked clade of isolates was identified with evidence of several different regions of recombination and variable ompA sequence types, suggesting that recombination is common within outbreaks. Culture-independent sequence analysis revealed a linkage pattern at two nucleotide positions that was unique to the genomes of isolates from patients, but not in C. trachomatis recombinants generated in vitro. These data demonstrated that culture-independent sequence analysis can be used to rapidly and inexpensively collect genome data from patients infected by C. trachomatis, and that this approach can be used to examine genomic variation within this species.

  1. Sequence Variation in Superoxide Dismutase Gene of Toxoplasma gondii among Various Isolates from Different Hosts and Geographical Regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Cao, Aiping; Li, Xun; Zhao, Qunli; Liu, Yuan; Cong, Hua; He, Shenyi; Zhou, Huaiyu

    2015-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa, can infect all warm-blooded vertebrates, including humans, livestock, and marine mammals. The aim of this study was to investigate whether superoxide dismutase (SOD) of T. gondii can be used as a new marker for genetic study or a potential vaccine candidate. The partial genome region of the SOD gene was amplified and sequenced from 10 different T. gondii isolates from different parts of the world, and all the sequences were examined by PCR-RFLP, sequence analysis, and phylogenetic reconstruction. The results showed that partial SOD gene sequences ranged from 1,702 bp to 1,712 bp and A + T contents varied from 50.1% to 51.1% among all examined isolates. Sequence alignment analysis identified total 43 variable nucleotide positions, and these results showed that 97.5% sequence similarity of SOD gene among all examined isolates. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these SOD sequences were not an effective molecular marker for differential identification of T. gondii strains. The research demonstrated existence of low sequence variation in the SOD gene among T. gondii strains of different genotypes from different hosts and geographical regions.

  2. Controlling the orbital sequence in individual Cu-phthalocyanine molecules.

    PubMed

    Uhlmann, C; Swart, I; Repp, J

    2013-02-13

    We report on the controlled change of the energetic ordering of molecular orbitals. Negatively charged copper(II)phthalocyanine on NaCl/Cu(100) undergoes a Jahn-Teller distortion that lifts the degeneracy of two frontier orbitals. The energetic order of the levels can be controlled by Au and Ag atoms in the vicinity of the molecule. As only one of the states is occupied, the control of the energetic order is accompanied by bistable changes of the charge distribution inside the molecule, rendering it a bistable switch.

  3. An Integrated Tool to Study MHC Region: Accurate SNV Detection and HLA Genes Typing in Human MHC Region Using Targeted High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Xu, Yinyin; Liang, Dequan; Gao, Peng; Sun, Yepeng; Gifford, Benjamin; D’Ascenzo, Mark; Liu, Xiaomin; Tellier, Laurent C. A. M.; Yang, Fang; Tong, Xin; Chen, Dan; Zheng, Jing; Li, Weiyang; Richmond, Todd; Xu, Xun; Wang, Jun; Li, Yingrui

    2013-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is one of the most variable and gene-dense regions of the human genome. Most studies of the MHC, and associated regions, focus on minor variants and HLA typing, many of which have been demonstrated to be associated with human disease susceptibility and metabolic pathways. However, the detection of variants in the MHC region, and diagnostic HLA typing, still lacks a coherent, standardized, cost effective and high coverage protocol of clinical quality and reliability. In this paper, we presented such a method for the accurate detection of minor variants and HLA types in the human MHC region, using high-throughput, high-coverage sequencing of target regions. A probe set was designed to template upon the 8 annotated human MHC haplotypes, and to encompass the 5 megabases (Mb) of the extended MHC region. We deployed our probes upon three, genetically diverse human samples for probe set evaluation, and sequencing data show that ∼97% of the MHC region, and over 99% of the genes in MHC region, are covered with sufficient depth and good evenness. 98% of genotypes called by this capture sequencing prove consistent with established HapMap genotypes. We have concurrently developed a one-step pipeline for calling any HLA type referenced in the IMGT/HLA database from this target capture sequencing data, which shows over 96% typing accuracy when deployed at 4 digital resolution. This cost-effective and highly accurate approach for variant detection and HLA typing in the MHC region may lend further insight into immune-mediated diseases studies, and may find clinical utility in transplantation medicine research. This one-step pipeline is released for general evaluation and use by the scientific community. PMID:23894464

  4. Characterization of EBV Promoters and Coding Regions by Sequencing PCR-Amplified DNA Fragments.

    PubMed

    Szenthe, Kalman; Bánáti, Ferenc

    2017-01-01

    DNA sequencing approaches originally developed in two directions, the chemical degradation method and the chain-termination method. The latter one became more widespread and a huge amount of sequencing data including whole genome sequences accumulated, based on the use of capillary sequencer systems and the application of a modified chain-termination method which proved to be relatively easy, fast, and reliable. In addition, relatively long, up to 1000 bp sequences could be obtained with a single read with high per-base accuracy. Although the recent appearance of next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) technologies enabled high-throughput and low cost analysis of DNA, the modified chain-terminating methods are often applied in research until now. In the following, we shall present the application of capillary sequencing for the sequence characterization of viral genomes in case of partial and whole genome sequencing, and demonstrate it on the BARF1 promoter of Epstein Barr virus (EBV).

  5. Mitochondrial DNA control region polymorphism in the population of Alagoas state, north-eastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Adriana B G; da Silva, Luiz Antonio F; Azevedo, Dalmo A; Balbino, Valdir Q; Mauricio-da-Silva, Luiz

    2008-01-01

    The sequences of the two hypervariable (HV) segments of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region were determined in 167 randomly selected, unrelated individuals living in the state of Alagoas, north-eastern Brazil. One hundred and forty-five different haplotypes, associated with 139 variable positions, were determined. More than 95% of the mtDNA sequences could be allocated to specific mtDNA haplogroups according to the mutational motifs. Length heteroplasmy in the C-stretch HV1 and HV2 regions was observed in 22 and 11%, respectively, of the population sample. The genetic diversity was estimated to be 0.9975 and the probability of two random individuals presenting identical mtDNA haplotypes was 0.0084. The most frequent haplotype was shared by six individuals. All sequences showed high-quality values and phantom mutations were not detected. The diversity revealed in the mitochondrial control region indicates the importance of this locus for forensic casework and population studies within Alagoas, Brazil.

  6. Internal transcribed spacer region sequence heterogeneity in Rhizopus microsporus: implications for molecular diagnosis in clinical microbiology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Leung, Shui-Yee; To, Kelvin K W; Chan, Jasper F W; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Cheng, Vincent C C; Lau, Susanna K P; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2010-01-01

    Although internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequence heterogeneity has been reported in a few fungal species, it has very rarely been reported in pathogenic fungi and has never been described in Mucorales, causes of the highly fatal mucormycosis. In a recent outbreak investigation of intestinal mucormycosis due to Rhizopus microsporus infection in patients with hematological malignancies, PCR of the ITS of four of the 28 R. microsporus strains, P11, P12, D3-1, and D4-1, showed thick bands at about 700 bp. Direct sequencing of the purified bands showed frequent double peaks along all of the sequence traces and occasional triple peaks for P12, D3-1, and D4-1. The thick bands of the four R. microsporus strains were purified and cloned. Sequencing of 10 clones for each strain revealed two different ITS sequences for P11 and three different ITS sequences for P12, D3-1, and D4-1. Variations in ITS sequence among the different ribosomal DNA (rDNA) operons in the same strain were observed in only ITS1 and ITS2 and not the 5.8S rDNA region. One copy of P11, P12, and D4-1, respectively, and one copy of P11, P12, D3-1, and D4-1, respectively, showed identical sequences. This represents the first evidence of ITS sequence heterogeneity in Mucorales. ITS sequence heterogeneity is an obstacle to molecular identification and genotyping of fungi in clinical microbiology laboratories. When thick bands and double peaks are observed during PCR sequencing of a gene target, such a strain should be sent to reference laboratories proficient in molecular technologies for further identification and/or genotyping.

  7. Application of Sequence Control Injection in Modified Design of Car Front Bumper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wang; Guodong, Chen; Jiling, Bu; Bin, Zhou

    2014-08-01

    In view of lightweight and cost reduction, a bumper has been redesigned, which results in weld lines during the manufacture. For that, a new method of sequence control technology is introduced. The simulation results with the new method and the traditional method were compared. The results showed that the weld lines were removed, and at the same time, the injection balance was better and the injection pressure was decreased by using the sequence control technology. The sequence control technology is of great practical significance to bumper manufacturing.

  8. Three-stage quality control strategies for DNA re-sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; Ye, Fei; Sheng, Quanghu; Clark, Travis; Samuels, David C

    2014-11-01

    Advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have greatly improved our ability to detect genomic variants for biomedical research. In particular, NGS technologies have been recently applied with great success to the discovery of mutations associated with the growth of various tumours and in rare Mendelian diseases. The advance in NGS technologies has also created significant challenges in bioinformatics. One of the major challenges is quality control of the sequencing data. In this review, we discuss the proper quality control procedures and parameters for Illumina technology-based human DNA re-sequencing at three different stages of sequencing: raw data, alignment and variant calling. Monitoring quality control metrics at each of the three stages of NGS data provides unique and independent evaluations of data quality from differing perspectives. Properly conducting quality control protocols at all three stages and correctly interpreting the quality control results are crucial to ensure a successful and meaningful study.

  9. Three-stage quality control strategies for DNA re-sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fei; Sheng, Quanghu; Clark, Travis; Samuels, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have greatly improved our ability to detect genomic variants for biomedical research. In particular, NGS technologies have been recently applied with great success to the discovery of mutations associated with the growth of various tumours and in rare Mendelian diseases. The advance in NGS technologies has also created significant challenges in bioinformatics. One of the major challenges is quality control of the sequencing data. In this review, we discuss the proper quality control procedures and parameters for Illumina technology–based human DNA re-sequencing at three different stages of sequencing: raw data, alignment and variant calling. Monitoring quality control metrics at each of the three stages of NGS data provides unique and independent evaluations of data quality from differing perspectives. Properly conducting quality control protocols at all three stages and correctly interpreting the quality control results are crucial to ensure a successful and meaningful study. PMID:24067931

  10. An exploration of the sequence of a 2.9-Mb region of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster: the Adh region.

    PubMed Central

    Ashburner, M; Misra, S; Roote, J; Lewis, S E; Blazej, R; Davis, T; Doyle, C; Galle, R; George, R; Harris, N; Hartzell, G; Harvey, D; Hong, L; Houston, K; Hoskins, R; Johnson, G; Martin, C; Moshrefi, A; Palazzolo, M; Reese, M G; Spradling, A; Tsang, G; Wan, K; Whitelaw, K; Celniker, S

    1999-01-01

    A contiguous sequence of nearly 3 Mb from the genome of Drosophila melanogaster has been sequenced from a series of overlapping P1 and BAC clones. This region covers 69 chromosome polytene bands on chromosome arm 2L, including the genetically well-characterized "Adh region." A computational analysis of the sequence predicts 218 protein-coding genes, 11 tRNAs, and 17 transposable element sequences. At least 38 of the protein-coding genes are arranged in clusters of from 2 to 6 closely related genes, suggesting extensive tandem duplication. The gene density is one protein-coding gene every 13 kb; the transposable element density is one element every 171 kb. Of 73 genes in this region identified by genetic analysis, 49 have been located on the sequence; P-element insertions have been mapped to 43 genes. Ninety-five (44%) of the known and predicted genes match a Drosophila EST, and 144 (66%) have clear similarities to proteins in other organisms. Genes known to have mutant phenotypes are more likely to be represented in cDNA libraries, and far more likely to have products similar to proteins of other organisms, than are genes with no known mutant phenotype. Over 650 chromosome aberration breakpoints map to this chromosome region, and their nonrandom distribution on the genetic map reflects variation in gene spacing on the DNA. This is the first large-scale analysis of the genome of D. melanogaster at the sequence level. In addition to the direct results obtained, this analysis has allowed us to develop and test methods that will be needed to interpret the complete sequence of the genome of this species.Before beginning a Hunt, it is wise to ask someone what you are looking for before you begin looking for it. Milne 1926 PMID:10471707

  11. Automated region of interest analysis of dynamic Ca2+ signals in image sequences

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Michael; Qian, Xun; Charbel, Chimène; Ledoux, Jonathan; Parker, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+ signals are commonly measured using fluorescent Ca2+ indicators and microscopy techniques, but manual analysis of Ca2+ measurements is time consuming and subject to bias. Automated region of interest (ROI) detection algorithms have been employed for identification of Ca2+ signals in one-dimensional line scan images, but currently there is no process to integrate acquisition and analysis of ROIs within two-dimensional time lapse image sequences. Therefore we devised a novel algorithm for rapid ROI identification and measurement based on the analysis of best-fit ellipses assigned to signals within noise-filtered image sequences. This algorithm was implemented as a plugin for ImageJ software (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD). We evaluated the ability of our algorithm to detect synthetic Gaussian signal pulses embedded in background noise. The algorithm placed ROIs very near to the center of a range of signal pulses, resulting in mean signal amplitude measurements of 99.06 ± 4.11% of true amplitude values. As a practical application, we evaluated both agonist-induced Ca2+ responses in cultured endothelial cell monolayers, and subtle basal endothelial Ca2+ dynamics in opened artery preparations. Our algorithm enabled comprehensive measurement of individual and localized cellular responses within cultured cell monolayers. It also accurately identified characteristic Ca2+ transients, or Ca2+ pulsars, within the endothelium of intact mouse mesenteric arteries and revealed the distribution of this basal Ca2+ signal modality to be non-Gaussian with respect to amplitude, duration, and spatial spread. We propose that large-scale statistical evaluations made possible by our algorithm will lead to a more efficient and complete characterization of physiologic Ca2+-dependent signaling. PMID:22538238

  12. Bacteriophage Nf DNA region controlling late transcription: structural and functional homology with bacteriophage phi 29.

    PubMed

    Nuez, B; Salas, M

    1993-06-25

    The putative region for the control of late transcription of the Bacillus subtilis phage Nf has been identified by DNA sequence homology with the equivalent region of the evolutionary related phage phi 29. A similar arrangement of early and late promoters has been detected in the two phages, suggesting that viral transcription could be regulated in a similar way at late times of the infection. Transcription of late genes requires the presence of a viral early protein, gpF in phage Nf and p4 in phage phi 29, being the latter known to bind to a DNA region located upstream from the phage phi 29 late promoter. We have identified a DNA region located upstream from the putative late promoter of phage Nf that is probably involved in binding protein gpF. Furthermore, we show that the phage phi 29 protein p4 is able to bind to this region and activate transcription from the phage Nf putative late promoter. Sequence alignment has also revealed the existence of significant internal homology between the two early promoters contained in this region of each phage.

  13. Inhibition of pepsin by analogues of pepsinogen-(1-12)-peptide with substitutions in the 4-7 sequence region.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, B M; Lewitt, M; Pham, C

    1983-01-01

    Derivatives of the 1-12 sequence of pig pepsinogen were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. The three derivatives contain substitutions in the 4-7 region of the 1-12 sequence. Glycine was used to replace the hydrophobic residues -Val-Pro-Leu-Val- in pairs. After cleavage and purification, the synthetic peptides were compared with a synthetic peptide of the native sequence, prepared at the same time, with respect to their ability to inhibit the pepsin-catalysed clotting of milk. Inhibitory potency, determined from plots of percentage inhibition versus concentration of synthetic peptide, is inversely correlated with the substitution of glycine residues for the hydrophobic residues. Therefore the equilibrium inhibition of pepsin by these peptides is dominated by the hydrophobic nature of the 4-7 sequence region. PMID:6405735

  14. Sequence analysis of dolphin ferritin H and L subunits and possible iron-dependent translational control of dolphin ferritin gene

    PubMed Central

    Takaesu, Azusa; Watanabe, Kiyotaka; Takai, Shinji; Sasaki, Yukako; Orino, Koichi

    2008-01-01

    Background Iron-storage protein, ferritin plays a central role in iron metabolism. Ferritin has dual function to store iron and segregate iron for protection of iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species. Tissue ferritin is composed of two kinds of subunits (H: heavy chain or heart-type subunit; L: light chain or liver-type subunit). Ferritin gene expression is controlled at translational level in iron-dependent manner or at transcriptional level in iron-independent manner. However, sequencing analysis of marine mammalian ferritin subunits has not yet been performed fully. The purpose of this study is to reveal cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of cetacean ferritin H and L subunits, and demonstrate the possibility of expression of these subunits, especially H subunit, by iron. Methods Sequence analyses of cetacean ferritin H and L subunits were performed by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragments from cDNAs generated via reverse transcription-PCR of leukocyte total RNA prepared from blood samples of six different dolphin species (Pseudorca crassidens, Lagenorhynchus obliquidens, Grampus griseus, Globicephala macrorhynchus, Tursiops truncatus, and Delphinapterus leucas). The putative iron-responsive element sequence in the 5'-untranslated region of the six different dolphin species was revealed by direct sequencing of PCR fragments obtained using leukocyte genomic DNA. Results Dolphin H and L subunits consist of 182 and 174 amino acids, respectively, and amino acid sequence identities of ferritin subunits among these dolphins are highly conserved (H: 99–100%, (99→98) ; L: 98–100%). The conserved 28 bp IRE sequence was located -144 bp upstream from the initiation codon in the six different dolphin species. Conclusion These results indicate that six different dolphin species have conserved ferritin sequences, and suggest that these genes are iron-dependently expressed. PMID:18954429

  15. Molecular epidemiology of Theileria annulata and identification of 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions sequences variants in apparently healthy buffaloes and cattle in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Kasib; He, Lan; Hussain, Altaf; Azam, Sabita; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Wang, Li-Xia; Zhang, Qing-Li; Hu, Min; Zhou, Yan-Qin; Zhao, Junlong

    2013-01-01

    A molecular epidemiological survey was conducted to determine the prevalence of piroplasms in buffaloes and cattle from Sheikhupura and Okara districts of Punjab, Pakistan using reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay. The genetic diversity within 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions sequences of various obtained Theileria species (spp.) was also investigated. Briefly, 102 blood samples from buffaloes and cattle in the study districts were collected on blood collection cards and brought to the laboratory. DNA was extracted; the V4 hypervariable region of 18S rRNA was amplified and analyzed using RLB. Out of total samples analyzed, 61 (59.8%) were hybridized with Babesia/Theileria (B/T) genus-specific probe. Only one species of piroplasm was detected in buffaloes and cattle in study districts, i.e. Theileria (T.) annulata. Six samples only hybridized with B/T genus-specific and Theileria genus-specific probes but not with any species-specific probe indicating the presence of novel species or variants. The sequences of 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions of these six samples revealed the presence of T. annulata variants as confirmed through sequence identity estimation and phylogenetic analyses. Meanwhile, an unexpected sequence variation was observed within the 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions sequences of T. annulata identified in the present study. This is the first report on the simultaneous detection of species of piroplasms infecting buffaloes and cattle in Pakistan and molecular characterization of T. annulata 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions. The present study may address the new insights into the epidemiology of theileriosis which will help researches in designing control strategies and developing various molecular diagnostic tools at national level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Size Sequencing as a Window on Executive Control in Children with Autism and Asperger's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGonigle-Chalmers, Margaret; Bodner, Kimberly; Fox-Pitt, Alicia; Nicholson, Laura

    2008-01-01

    A study is reported in which size sequencing on a touch screen is used as a measure of executive control in 20 high-functioning children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The data show a significant and age-independent effect of the length of sequence that can be executed without errors by these children, in comparison with a chronologically…

  17. Sequencing of the intergenic 16S-23S rRNA spacer (ITS) region of Mollicutes species and their identification using microarray-based assay and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Volokhov, Dmitriy V; George, Joseph; Liu, Sue X; Ikonomi, Pranvera; Anderson, Christine; Chizhikov, Vladimir

    2006-08-01

    We have completed sequencing the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region of most known Mycoplasma , Acholeplasma , Ureaplasma , Mesoplasma , and Spiroplasma species. Analysis of the sequence data revealed a significant interspecies variability and low intraspecies polymorphism of the ITS region among Mollicutes . This finding enabled the application of a combined polymerase chain reaction-microarray technology for identifying Mollicutes species. The microarray included individual species-specific oligonucleotide probes for characterizing human Mollicutes species and other species known to be common cell line contaminants. Evaluation of the microarray was conducted using multiple, previously characterized, Mollicutes species. The microarray analysis of the samples used demonstrated a highly specific assay, which is capable of rapid and accurate discrimination among Mollicutes species.

  18. Improved Detection of Rhinoviruses by Nucleic Acid Sequence-Based Amplification after Nucleotide Sequence Determination of the 5′ Noncoding Regions of Additional Rhinovirus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Loens, K.; Ieven, M.; Ursi, D.; de Laat, C.; Sillekens, P.; Oudshoorn, P.; Goossens, H.

    2003-01-01

    The isothermal nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) system was applied for the detection of rhinoviruses using primers targeted at the 5′ noncoding region (5′ NCR) of the viral genome. The nucleotide sequence of the 5′ NCRs of 34 rhinovirus isolates was determined to map the most conserved regions and design more appropriate primers and probes. The assay amplified RNA extracted from 30 rhinovirus reference strains and 88 rhinovirus isolates, it did not amplify RNA from 49 enterovirus isolates and other respiratory viruses. The assay allows one to discriminate between group A and B rhinoviruses. Sensitivities for the detection of group B and group A rhinoviruses was 20 and 200 50% tissue culture infective doses, respectively. PMID:12734236

  19. Identification of conserved genomic regions and variation therein amongst Cetartiodactyla species using next generation sequencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background Next Generation Sequencing has created an opportunity to genetically characterize an individual both inexpensively and comprehensively. In earlier work produced in our collaboration [1], it was demonstrated that, for animals without a reference genome, their Next Generation Sequence data ...

  20. Highly conserved intragenic HSV-2 sequences: Results from next-generation sequencing of HSV-2 UL and US regions from genital swabs collected from 3 continents.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Christine; Magaret, Amalia; Roychoudhury, Pavitra; Greninger, Alexander L; Cheng, Anqi; Diem, Kurt; Fitzgibbon, Matthew P; Huang, Meei-Li; Selke, Stacy; Lingappa, Jairam R; Celum, Connie; Jerome, Keith R; Wald, Anna; Koelle, David M

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the variability in circulating herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genomic sequences is critical to the development of HSV-2 vaccines. Genital lesion swabs containing ≥ 10(7)log10 copies HSV DNA collected from Africa, the USA, and South America underwent next-generation sequencing, followed by K-mer based filtering and de novo genomic assembly. Sites of heterogeneity within coding regions in unique long and unique short (UL_US) regions were identified. Phylogenetic trees were created using maximum likelihood reconstruction. Among 46 samples from 38 persons, 1468 intragenic base-pair substitutions were identified. The maximum nucleotide distance between strains for concatenated UL_US segments was 0.4%. Phylogeny did not reveal geographic clustering. The most variable proteins had non-synonymous mutations in < 3% of amino acids. Unenriched HSV-2 DNA can undergo next-generation sequencing to identify intragenic variability. The use of clinical swabs for sequencing expands the information that can be gathered directly from these specimens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nucleotide sequence and analysis of the 58.3 to 65.5-kb early region of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed Central

    Valerie, K; Stevens, J; Lynch, M; Henderson, E E; de Riel, J K

    1986-01-01

    The complete 7.2-kb nucleotide sequence from the 58.3 to 65.5-kb early region of bacteriophage T4 has been determined by Maxam and Gilbert sequencing. Computer analysis revealed at least 20 open reading frames (ORFs) within this sequence. All major ORFs are transcribed from the left strand, suggesting that they are expressed early during infection. Among the ORFs, we have identified the ipIII, ipII, denV and tk genes. The ORFs are very tightly spaced, even overlapping in some instances, and when ORF interspacing occurs, promoter-like sequences can be implicated. Several of the sequences preceding the ORFs, in particular those at ipIII, ipII, denV, and orf61.9, can potentially form stable stem-loop structures. PMID:3024113

  2. Nucleotide sequence of the capsid protein gene and 3' non-coding region of papaya mosaic virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Abouhaidar, M G

    1988-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of cDNA clones corresponding to the 3' OH end of papaya mosaic virus RNA have been determined. The 3'-terminal sequence obtained was 900 nucleotides in length, excluding the poly(A) tail, and contained an open reading frame capable of giving rise to a protein of 214 amino acid residues with an Mr of 22930. This protein was identified as the viral capsid protein. The 3' non-coding region of PMV genome RNA was about 121 nucleotides long [excluding the poly(A) tail] and homologous to the complementary sequence of the non-coding region at the 5' end of PMV RNA. A long open reading frame was also found in the predicted 5' end region of the negative strand.

  3. Structural features of the murine dihydrofolate reductase transcription termination region: identification of a conserved DNA sequence element.

    PubMed Central

    Frayne, E G; Kellems, R E

    1986-01-01

    Structural features of the transcription termination region for the mouse dihydrofolate reductase gene have been determined and compared with those of several other known termination regions for protein coding genes. A common feature identified among these termination regions was the presence of a 20 bp consensus DNA sequence element (ATCAGAATATAGGAAAGTAGCAAT). The results imply that the 20 bp consensus DNA sequence element is important for signaling RNA polymerase II transcription termination at least in the several vertebrate species investigated. Furthermore, the results suggest that for the dhfr gene and possibly for other genes in mice as well, the potential termination consensus sequence can exist as part of a long interspersed repetitive DNA element. Images PMID:3714472

  4. Nucleotide sequence from the coding region of rabbit β-globin messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Proudfoot, N.J.

    1976-01-01

    A sequence of 89 nucleotides from rabbit β-globin mRNA has been determined and is shown to code for residues 107 to 137 of the β-globin protein. In addition, a sequence heterogeneity has been identified within this 89 nucleotide long sequence which corresponds to a known polymorphic variant of rabbit β-globin. Images PMID:61580

  5. The next generation of target capture technologies - large DNA fragment enrichment and sequencing determines regional genomic variation of high complexity.

    PubMed

    Dapprich, Johannes; Ferriola, Deborah; Mackiewicz, Kate; Clark, Peter M; Rappaport, Eric; D'Arcy, Monica; Sasson, Ariella; Gai, Xiaowu; Schug, Jonathan; Kaestner, Klaus H; Monos, Dimitri

    2016-07-09

    The ability to capture and sequence large contiguous DNA fragments represents a significant advancement towards the comprehensive characterization of complex genomic regions. While emerging sequencing platforms are capable of producing several kilobases-long reads, the fragment sizes generated by current DNA target enrichment technologies remain a limiting factor, producing DNA fragments generally shorter than 1 kbp. The DNA enrichment methodology described herein, Region-Specific Extraction (RSE), produces DNA segments in excess of 20 kbp in length. Coupling this enrichment method to appropriate sequencing platforms will significantly enhance the ability to generate complete and accurate sequence characterization of any genomic region without the need for reference-based assembly. RSE is a long-range DNA target capture methodology that relies on the specific hybridization of short (20-25 base) oligonucleotide primers to selected sequence motifs within the DNA target region. These capture primers are then enzymatically extended on the 3'-end, incorporating biotinylated nucleotides into the DNA. Streptavidin-coated beads are subsequently used to pull-down the original, long DNA template molecules via the newly synthesized, biotinylated DNA that is bound to them. We demonstrate the accuracy, simplicity and utility of the RSE method by capturing and sequencing a 4 Mbp stretch of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Our results show an average depth of coverage of 164X for the entire MHC. This depth of coverage contributes significantly to a 99.94 % total coverage of the targeted region and to an accuracy that is over 99.99 %. RSE represents a cost-effective target enrichment method capable of producing sequencing templates in excess of 20 kbp in length. The utility of our method has been proven to generate superior coverage across the MHC as compared to other commercially available methodologies, with the added advantage of producing longer sequencing

  6. Complete genome sequence of Deltapapillomavirus 4 (bovine papillomavirus 2) from a bovine papillomavirus lesion in Amazon Region, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Daudt, Cíntia; da Silva, Flavio RC; Cibulski, Samuel P; Weber, Matheus N; Mayer, Fabiana Q; Varela, Ana Paula M; Roehe, Paulo M; Canal, Cláudio W

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of bovine papillomavirus 2 (BPV2) from Brazilian Amazon Region was determined using multiple-primed rolling circle amplification followed by Illumina sequencing. The genome is 7,947 bp long, with 45.9% GC content. It encodes seven early (E1, E2,E4, E5, E6,E7, and E8) and two late (L1 and L2) genes. The complete genome of a BPV2 can help in future studies since this BPV type is highly reported worldwide although the lack of complete genome sequences available. PMID:27074259

  7. An action plan for tobacco control at regional level.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R; Brown, J S; Hodgson, P; Kyle, D; Reed, D; Wallace, B

    1999-07-01

    Smoking is the single biggest preventable cause of death in the UK; killing over 120 000 people each year, contributing to inequalities in health, exacerbating and causing poverty. Smoking has increased steadily among children since 1988 and more recently, among young adults. The current context in the UK is highly favourable for introducing comprehensive tobacco control measures. This paper summarises a regional action plan for tobacco control. Actions at district and regional levels are outlined to establish a comprehensive local tobacco control framework and complement national tobacco control measures. Measures include: a 'SWOT' analysis of current activity; systematic monitoring of smoking prevalence, attitudes to smoking, and the impact of tobacco control interventions; provision of effective smoking cessation support to a minimum standard throughout the health service; increased coverage of smoke-free public places and workplaces; enforcement of legislation on illegal sales to children and against smuggling and selling illegally imported tobacco; paid and unpaid mass media campaigns; and systematic lobbying for fiscal and legislative measures. One of the key components of the plan is the introduction of evidence-based tobacco control strategies at district levels. These should include a performance framework with clear organisational and managerial accountability and employ a co-ordinated, multiagency, partnership approach. Priority groups should be identified. Strategies should seek to engage the public to build support for tobacco control measures. Sufficient time, staff, resources and training must be allocated to tobacco control work and progress towards objectives monitored.

  8. Sequencing of 15 622 gene-bearing BACs clarifies the gene-dense regions of the barley genome.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Amatriaín, María; Lonardi, Stefano; Luo, MingCheng; Madishetty, Kavitha; Svensson, Jan T; Moscou, Matthew J; Wanamaker, Steve; Jiang, Tao; Kleinhofs, Andris; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Wise, Roger P; Stein, Nils; Ma, Yaqin; Rodriguez, Edmundo; Kudrna, Dave; Bhat, Prasanna R; Chao, Shiaoman; Condamine, Pascal; Heinen, Shane; Resnik, Josh; Wing, Rod; Witt, Heather N; Alpert, Matthew; Beccuti, Marco; Bozdag, Serdar; Cordero, Francesca; Mirebrahim, Hamid; Ounit, Rachid; Wu, Yonghui; You, Frank; Zheng, Jie; Simková, Hana; Dolezel, Jaroslav; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Duma, Denisa; Altschmied, Lothar; Blake, Tom; Bregitzer, Phil; Cooper, Laurel; Dilbirligi, Muharrem; Falk, Anders; Feiz, Leila; Graner, Andreas; Gustafson, Perry; Hayes, Patrick M; Lemaux, Peggy; Mammadov, Jafar; Close, Timothy J

    2015-10-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) possesses a large and highly repetitive genome of 5.1 Gb that has hindered the development of a complete sequence. In 2012, the International Barley Sequencing Consortium released a resource integrating whole-genome shotgun sequences with a physical and genetic framework. However, because only 6278 bacterial artificial chromosome (BACs) in the physical map were sequenced, fine structure was limited. To gain access to the gene-containing portion of the barley genome at high resolution, we identified and sequenced 15 622 BACs representing the minimal tiling path of 72 052 physical-mapped gene-bearing BACs. This generated ~1.7 Gb of genomic sequence containing an estimated 2/3 of all Morex barley genes. Exploration of these sequenced BACs revealed that although distal ends of chromosomes contain most of the gene-enriched BACs and are characterized by high recombination rates, there are also gene-dense regions with suppressed recombination. We made use of published map-anchored sequence data from Aegilops tauschii to develop a synteny viewer between barley and the ancestor of the wheat D-genome. Except for some notable inversions, there is a high level of collinearity between the two species. The software HarvEST:Barley provides facile access to BAC sequences and their annotations, along with the barley-Ae. tauschii synteny viewer. These BAC sequences constitute a resource to improve the efficiency of marker development, map-based cloning, and comparative genomics in barley and related crops. Additional knowledge about regions of the barley genome that are gene-dense but low recombination is particularly relevant.

  9. Characterization and Sequence Variation in the rDNA Region of Six Nematode Species of the Genus Longidorus (Nematoda)

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, F.; Reyes, A.; Grunder, J.; Kunz, P.; Agostinelli, A.; De Giorgi, C.; Lamberti, F.

    2004-01-01

    Total DNA was isolated from individual nematodes of the species Longidorus helveticus, L. macrosoma, L. arthensis, L. profundorum, L. elongatus, and L. raskii collected in Switzerland. The ITS region and D1-D2 expansion segments of the 26S rDNA were amplified and cloned. The sequences obtained were aligned in order to investigate sequence diversity and to infer the phylogenetic relationships among the six Longidorus species. D1-D2 sequences were more conserved than the ITS sequences that varied widely in primary structure and length, and no consensus was observed. Phylogenetic analyses using the neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods were performed with three different sequence data sets: ITS1-ITS2, 5.8S-D1-D2, and combining ITS1-ITS2+5.8S-D1-D2 sequences. All multiple alignments yielded similar basic trees supporting the existence of the six species established using morphological characters. These sequence data also provided evidence that the different regions of the rDNA are characterized by different evolution rates and by different factors associated with the generation of extreme size variation. PMID:19262800

  10. Multiple Comparison Analysis of Two New Genomic Sequences of ILTV Strains from China with Other Strains from Different Geographic Regions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Kong, Congcong; Wang, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    To date, twenty complete genome sequences of ILTV strains have been published in GenBank, including one strain from China, and nineteen strains from Australian and the United States. To investigate the genomic information on ILTVs from different geographic regions, two additional individual complete genome sequences of WG and K317 strains from China were determined. The genomes of WG and K317 strains were 153,505 and 153,639 bp in length, respectively. Alignments performed on the amino acid sequences of the twelve glycoproteins showed that 13 out of 116 mutational sites were present only among the Chinese strain WG and the Australian strains SA2 and A20. The phylogenetic tree analysis suggested that the WG strain established close relationships with the Australian strain SA2. The recombination events were detected and confirmed in different subregions of the WG strain with the sequences of SA2 and K317 strains as parental. In this study, two new complete genome sequences of Chinese ILTV strains were used in comparative analysis with other complete genome sequences of ILTV strains from China, the United States, and Australia. The analysis of genome comparison, phylogenetic trees, and recombination events showed close relationships among the Chinese strain WG and the Australian strains SA2. The information of the two new complete genome sequences from China will help to facilitate the analysis of phylogenetic relationships and the molecular differences among ILTV strains from different geographic regions.

  11. Polymorphism in the bovine BOLA-DRB3 upstream regulatory regions detected through PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ripoli, M V; Peral-García, P; Dulout, F N; Giovambattista, G

    2004-09-15

    In the present work, we describe through polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and DNA sequencing the polymorphism within the URR-BoLA-DRB3 in 15 cattle breeds. In total, seven PCR-SSCP defined alleles were detected. The alignment of studied sequences showed six polymorphic sites (four transitions, one transversion and one deletion) in the interconsensus regions of the BoLA-DRB3 upstream regulatory region (URR), while the consensus boxes were invariant. Five out of six detected polymorphic sites were of one nucleotide substitution in the interconsensus regions. It is expected that these mutations do not affect significantly the level of expression. In contrast, the deletion observed in the sequence between CCAAT and TATA boxes could have some effect on affinity interactions between the promoter region and the transcription factors. The URR-BoLA-DRB3 DNA analyzed sequences showed moderate level of nucleotide diversity, high level of identity among them and were grouped in the same clade in the phylogenetic tree. In addition, the phylogenetic tree, the similarity analysis and the sequence structure confirmed that the fragment analyzed in this study corresponds to the URR-BoLA-DRB3. The functional role of the observed polymorphic sites among the regulatory motifs in bovine needs to be analyzed and confirmed by means of gene expression assays.

  12. Sequence-controlled methacrylic multiblock copolymers via sulfur-free RAFT emulsion polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelis, Nikolaos G.; Anastasaki, Athina; Nurumbetov, Gabit; Truong, Nghia P.; Nikolaou, Vasiliki; Shegiwal, Ataulla; Whittaker, Michael R.; Davis, Thomas P.; Haddleton, David M.

    2016-10-01

    Translating the precise monomer sequence control achieved in nature over macromolecular structure (for example, DNA) to whole synthetic systems has been limited due to the lack of efficient synthetic methodologies. So far, chemists have only been able to synthesize monomer sequence-controlled macromolecules by means of complex, time-consuming and iterative chemical strategies such as solid-state Merrifield-type approaches or molecularly dissolved solution-phase systems. Here, we report a rapid and quantitative synthesis of sequence-controlled multiblock polymers in discrete stable nanoscale compartments via an emulsion polymerization approach in which a vinyl-terminated macromolecule is used as an efficient chain-transfer agent. This approach is environmentally friendly, fully translatable to industry and thus represents a significant advance in the development of complex macromolecule synthesis, where a high level of molecular precision or monomer sequence control confers potential for molecular targeting, recognition and biocatalysis, as well as molecular information storage.

  13. Sequence-controlled methacrylic multiblock copolymers via sulfur-free RAFT emulsion polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelis, Nikolaos G.; Anastasaki, Athina; Nurumbetov, Gabit; Truong, Nghia P.; Nikolaou, Vasiliki; Shegiwal, Ataulla; Whittaker, Michael R.; Davis, Thomas P.; Haddleton, David M.

    2017-02-01

    Translating the precise monomer sequence control achieved in nature over macromolecular structure (for example, DNA) to whole synthetic systems has been limited due to the lack of efficient synthetic methodologies. So far, chemists have only been able to synthesize monomer sequence-controlled macromolecules by means of complex, time-consuming and iterative chemical strategies such as solid-state Merrifield-type approaches or molecularly dissolved solution-phase systems. Here, we report a rapid and quantitative synthesis of sequence-controlled multiblock polymers in discrete stable nanoscale compartments via an emulsion polymerization approach in which a vinyl-terminated macromolecule is used as an efficient chain-transfer agent. This approach is environmentally friendly, fully translatable to industry and thus represents a significant advance in the development of complex macromolecule synthesis, where a high level of molecular precision or monomer sequence control confers potential for molecular targeting, recognition and biocatalysis, as well as molecular information storage.

  14. Transcriptome sequencing of purple petal spot region in tree peony reveals differentially expressed anthocyanin structural genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanzhao; Cheng, Yanwei; Ya, Huiyuan; Xu, Shuzhen; Han, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    The pigmented cells in defined region of a petal constitute the petal spots. Petal spots attract pollinators and are found in many angiosperm families. Several cultivars of tree peony contain a single red or purple spot at the base of petal that makes the flower more attractive for the ornamental market. So far, the understanding of the molecular mechanism of spot formation is inadequate. In this study, we sequenced the transcriptome of the purple spot and the white non-spot of tree peony flower. We assembled and annotated 67,892 unigenes. Comparative analyses of the two transcriptomes showed 1,573 differentially expressed genes, among which 933 were up-regulated, and 640 were down-regulated in the purple spot. Subsequently, we examined four anthocyanin structural genes, including PsCHS, PsF3′H, PsDFR, and PsANS, which expressed at a significantly higher level in the purple spot than in the white non-spot. We further validated the digital expression data using quantitative real-time PCR. Our result uncovered transcriptome variance between the spot and non-spot of tree peony flower, and revealed that the co-expression of four anthocyanin structural genes was responsible for spot pigment in tree peony. The data will further help to unravel the genetic mechanism of peony flower spot formation. PMID:26583029

  15. Using Mach threads to control DSN operational sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urista, Juan

    1993-01-01

    The Link Monitor and Control Operator Assistant prototype (LMCOA) is a state-of-the-art, semiautomated monitor and control system based on an object-oriented design. The purpose of the LMCOA prototyping effort is to both investigate new technology (such as artificial intelligence) to support automation and to evaluate advances in information systems toward developing systems that take advantage of the technology. The emergence of object-oriented design methodology has enabled a major change in how software is designed and developed. This paper describes how the object-oriented approach was used to design and implement the LMCOA and the results of operational testing. The LMCOA is implemented on a NeXT workstation using the Mach operating system and the Objective-C programming language.

  16. Characterizing regions in the human genome unmappable by next-generation-sequencing at the read length of 1000 bases.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentian; Freudenberg, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Repetitive and redundant regions of a genome are particularly problematic for mapping sequencing reads. In the present paper, we compile a list of the unmappable regions in the human genome based on the following definition: hypothetical reads with length 1 kb which cannot be uniquely mapped with zero-mismatch alignment for the described regions, considering both the forward and reverse strand. The respective collection of unmappable regions covers 0.77% of the sequence of human autosomes and 8.25% of the sex chromosomes in the reference genome GRCh37/hg19 (overall 1.23%). Not surprisingly, our unmappable regions overlap greatly with segmental duplication, transposable elements, and structural variants. About 99.8% of bases in our unmappable regions are part of either segmental duplication or transposable elements and 98.3% overlap structural variant annotations. Notably, some of these regions overlap units with important biological functions, including 4% of protein-coding genes. In contrast, these regions have zero intersection with the ultraconserved elements, very low overlap with microRNAs, tRNAs, pseudogenes, CpG islands, tandem repeats, microsatellites, sensitive non-coding regions, and the mapping blacklist regions from the ENCODE project.

  17. The parvovirus H-1 NS2 protein affects viral gene expression through sequences in the 3' untranslated region.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Rhode, S L

    1993-05-01

    We reported previously that an NS2 null mutant of parvovirus H-1 (H-1SA) was capable of lytic growth in human and hamster cells, but not in rat cells (Li and Rhode, 1991). The host-range phenotype of H-1SA was also manifested in newborn rats and was associated with a reduction of viral protein synthesis to about 10% of wild-type virus and an absence of virions in cultured rat fibroblasts. However, the H-1SA mRNAs for NS1 and capsid proteins, R1 and R3, accumulated to wild-type levels and translated well with a cell free rabbit reticulocyte lysate. These results indicate that NS2 plays an important role in the regulation of viral protein synthesis in rat cells in vivo and in vitro, but NS2 is largely dispensable in other types of cells, such as human and hamster cells. To analyze whether the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTR) of viral RNA are involved in the regulation by NS2, the viral VP2 gene was replaced by a reporter gene, firefly luciferase, in a plasmid clone of viral sequences and the protein synthesis under the control of P38 was evaluated by luciferase assay. Cells were transfected with luciferase expressing plasmids and subsequently infected with wild-type H-1 or H-1SA. We were able to mimic the defect in expression that we observed in cultured cells and animals with virus infection. Luciferase activity in H- 1SA-infected rat cells was about 10-fold lower than that in H-1-infected rat cells, but only 2-fold lower or less in H-1SA-infected human cells and hamster cells compared to wild-type H-1. These results are consistent with our previous data that NS2 has a host-range phenotype in the natural host of H-1, the rat. Deletion of 5' UTR sequences from P38 transcripts reduced the overall P38-luc expression but expression was NS2 independent, whereas deletion of the terminal 3' UTR sequences of viral RNA reduced NS2-dependent expression in rat cells. These results suggest that the regulation of viral protein synthesis by NS2 depends on RNA sequences in the

  18. An analytic study of near terminal area optimal sequencing and flow control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, S. K.; Straeter, T. A.; Hogge, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Optimal flow control and sequencing of air traffic operations in the near terminal area are discussed. The near terminal area model is based on the assumptions that the aircraft enter the terminal area along precisely controlled approach paths and that the aircraft are segregated according to their near terminal area performance. Mathematical models are developed to support the optimal path generation, sequencing, and conflict resolution problems.

  19. Tectonically controlled Quaternary intracontinental fluvial sequence development in the Nyírség-Pannonian Basin, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püspöki, Z.; Demeter, G.; Tóth-Makk, Á.; Kozák, M.; Dávid, Á.; Virág, M.; Kovács-Pálffy, P.; Kónya, P.; Gyuricza, Gy.; Kiss, J.; McIntosh, R. W.; Forgács, Z.; Buday, T.; Kovács, Z.; Gombos, T.; Kummer, I.

    2013-01-01

    The Quaternary fluvial succession of the Nyírség (NE Hungary), a proximal sub-basin of 4000 km2 in the intracontinental Pannonian Basin, was studied based on log facies analysis. Regional mapping of sequences was established by analysis of fully cored boreholes and high scale local correlations in densely drilled areas. The age of the sequences was determined by correlating the magnetic susceptibility (MS) record of the fully cored boreholes with that of the reference Hungarian boreholes dated paleomagnetically (Dévaványa-1 and Vésztő-1 in Cooke et al., 1979). To give the Hungarian data global perspective they were correlated to the MS curve of the Chinese Loess (Ding et al., 2005) that are in turn correlated with the Marine Isotope Record (Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005; Gibbard and Cohen, 2008). The ages of the mapped sequence boundaries are 2.62, 2.26, 2.12, 1.22, 1.04, 0.58 and 0.34 Ma respectively and can be related to the transitions from cool to warm conditions. Regional unconformities at 2.26-2.12, 1.22 and 0.58 Ma also coincide with activity maxima of the radiometrically dated Quaternary volcanism. This high frequency of climatically controlled erosive sequence boundaries in the structurally active periods indicates that the sedimentary record of climatic erosion is better expressed in times when structural changes generate instability in the drainage network. The occurrence of packages of regional unconformities in relation to volcanic activity enables the geochronological dating of episodes in the Quaternary compression of the Carpathian-Pannonian region. The role of tectonic control on the climatically induced changes in the drainage network has been explained by a structural development model based on seismic, gravity and magnetic data. The changes in the local paleohydrology were triggered by a compression related elevation of the basement and the associated occurrence of a local transtension-related subsidence.

  20. Sequence-specific binding of glucocorticoid receptor to MTV DNA at sites within and upstream of the transcribed region.

    PubMed

    Payvar, F; DeFranco, D; Firestone, G L; Edgar, B; Wrange, O; Okret, S; Gustafsson, J A; Yamamoto, K R

    1983-12-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor protein stimulates transcription initiation within murine mammary tumor virus (MTV) DNA sequences in vivo, and interacts selectively with MTV DNA in vitro. We mapped and compared five regions of MTV DNA that are bound specifically by purified receptor; one resides upstream of the transcription start site, and the others are distributed within transcribed sequences between 4 and 8 kb from the initiation site. Each region contains at least two strong binding sites for receptor, which itself appears to be a tetramer of 94,000 dalton hormone-binding subunits. Three of the five binding regions contain nine nuclease footprints that lack extensive homology, although a family of related octanucleotides can be discerned. Receptor interacts with the different regions with similar efficiencies, suggesting that receptor affinity for upstream and internal regions may differ by less than one order of magnitude. Moreover, each region appears to be bound independent of the others. A restriction fragment containing four footprint sequences from one of the regions has previously been shown to act in vivo as a receptor-dependent transcriptional enhancer element, implying that the binding sites detected in vitro may be biologically functional.

  1. Tracing the potential planet-forming regions around seven pre-main-sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schegerer, A. A.; Wolf, S.; Hummel, C. A.; Quanz, S. P.; Richichi, A.

    2009-07-01

    Aims: We investigate the nature of the innermost regions with radii of several AUs of seven circumstellar disks around pre-main-sequence stars, T Tauri stars in particular. Our object sample contains disks apparently at various stages of their evolution. Both single stars and spatially resolved binaries are considered. In particular, we search for inner disk gaps as proposed for several young stellar objects (YSOs). When analyzing the underlying dust population in the atmosphere of circumstellar disks, the shape of the 10 μm feature should additionally be investigated. Methods: We performed interferometric observations in N band (8-13 μm) with the Mid-Infrared Interferometric Instrument (MIDI) at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) using baseline lengths of between 54 m and 127 m. The data analysis is based on radiative-transfer simulations using the Monte Carlo code MC3D by modeling simultaneously the spectral energy distribution (SED), N band spectra, and interferometric visibilities. Correlated and uncorrelated N band spectra are compared to investigate the radial distribution of the dust composition of the disk atmosphere. Results: Spatially resolved mid-infrared (MIR) emission was detected in all objects. For four objects (DR Tau, RU Lup, S CrA N, and S CrA S), the observed N band visibilities and corresponding SEDs could be simultaneously simulated using a parameterized active disk-model. For the more evolved objects of our sample, HD 72106 and HBC 639, a purely passive disk-model provides the closest fit. The visibilities inferred for the source RU Lup allow the presence of an inner disk gap. For the YSO GW Ori, one of two visibility measurements could not be simulated by our modeling approach. All uncorrelated spectra reveal the 10 μm silicate emission feature. In contrast to this, some correlated spectra of the observations of the more evolved objects do not show this feature, indicating a lack of small silicates in the inner versus the outer

  2. From parallel sequence representations to calligraphic control: a conspiracy of neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Daniel

    2004-10-01

    Calligraphic writing presents many challenges for motor control, including: learning and recall of stroke sequences; critical timing of stroke onsets and durations; fine control of grip and contact forces; and letterform invariance under size scaling, which entails fine control of stroke directions and amplitudes during recruitment and derecruitment of musculoskeletal degrees of freedom. Experimental and computational studies in behavioral neuroscience have progressed toward explaining the learning, planning, and control exercised in tasks that share features with calligraphic writing and drawing. This article highlights component operations ranging from parallel sequence representations to fine force control. Treated in succession are: competitive queuing models of sequence representation, performance, learning, and recall; letter size scaling and motor equivalence; cursive handwriting models in which sensory-motor transformations are performed by circuits that learn inverse differential kinematic mappings; and fine-grained control of timing and transient forces by circuit models that learn to solve inverse dynamics problems.

  3. Agrobacterium T-DNA integration in Arabidopsis is correlated with DNA sequence compositions that occur frequently in gene promoter regions.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Richard G; Zhang, Ke; Tatarinova, Tatiana; Troukhan, Max; Kwok, Shing F; Drais, Josh; Klinger, Kevin; Orejudos, Francis; Macy, Kimberly; Bhakta, Amit; Burns, James; Subramanian, Gopal; Donson, Jonathan; Flavell, Richard; Feldmann, Kenneth A

    2005-10-01

    Mobile insertion elements such as transposons and T-DNA generate useful genetic variation and are important tools for functional genomics studies in plants and animals. The spectrum of mutations obtained in different systems can be highly influenced by target site preferences inherent in the mechanism of DNA integration. We investigated the target site preferences of Agrobacterium T-DNA insertions in the chromosomes of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The relative frequencies of insertions in genic and intergenic regions of the genome were calculated and DNA composition features associated with the insertion site flanking sequences were identified. Insertion frequencies across the genome indicate that T-strand integration is suppressed near centromeres and rDNA loci, progressively increases towards telomeres, and is highly correlated with gene density. At the gene level, T-DNA integration events show a statistically significant preference for insertion in the 5' and 3' flanking regions of protein coding sequences as well as the promoter region of RNA polymerase I transcribed rRNA gene repeats. The increased insertion frequencies in 5' upstream regions compared to coding sequences are positively correlated with gene expression activity and DNA sequence composition. Analysis of the relationship between DNA sequence composition and gene activity further demonstrates that DNA sequences with high CG-skew ratios are consistently correlated with T-DNA insertion site preference and high gene expression. The results demonstrate genomic and gene-specific preferences for T-strand integration and suggest that DNA sequences with a pronounced transition in CG- and AT-skew ratios are preferred targets for T-DNA integration.

  4. Genetic variation among the Mapuche Indians from the Patagonian region of Argentina: mitochondrial DNA sequence variation and allele frequencies of several nuclear genes.

    PubMed

    Ginther, C; Corach, D; Penacino, G A; Rey, J A; Carnese, F R; Hutz, M H; Anderson, A; Just, J; Salzano, F M; King, M C

    1993-01-01

    DNA samples from 60 Mapuche Indians, representing 39 maternal lineages, were genetically characterized for (1) nucleotide sequences of the mtDNA control region; (2) presence or absence of a nine base duplication in mtDNA region V; (3) HLA loci DRB1 and DQA1; (4) variation at three nuclear genes with short tandem repeats; and (5) variation at the polymorphic marker D2S44. The genetic profile of the Mapuche population was compared to other Amerinds and to worldwide populations. Two highly polymorphic portions of the mtDNA control region, comprising 650 nucleotides, were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and directly sequenced. The 39 maternal lineages were defined by two or three generation families identified by the Mapuches. These 39 lineages included 19 different mtDNA sequences that could be grouped into four classes. The same classes of sequences appear in other Amerinds from North, Central, and South American populations separated by thousands of miles, suggesting that the origin of the mtDNA patterns predates the migration to the Americas. The mtDNA sequence similarity between Amerind populations suggests that the migration throughout the Americas occurred rapidly relative to the mtDNA mutation rate. HLA DRB1 alleles 1602 and 1402 were frequent among the Mapuches. These alleles also occur at high frequency among other Amerinds in North and South America, but not among Spanish, Chinese or African-American populations. The high frequency of these alleles throughout the Americas, and their specificity to the Americas, supports the hypothesis that Mapuches and other Amerind groups are closely related.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Tectonics - The primary control on sequence stratigraphy: A countervailing view

    SciTech Connect

    Sloss, L.L. )

    1990-11-01

    Students of sedimentary basins remain convinced that continents and their margins are subject to a tectonic evolution of rising and subsiding elements and that these control relative sea level and the distribution of sedimentary environments. Proof of this control lies in the details of basin fills but the expression of such proof in a form readily acceptable by the vocal community of doubters has been difficult in the face of the seemingly incontrovertible influence of eustasy. No amount of exhortation and arm waving has been helpful; what is needed is a different approach, preferably one provided with the cloak of credibility conferred by quantitative measures. Isopach maps constructed from thickness data produced by outcrop study, drilling, and stratigraphically interpreted depth sections are widely available. Digitization of isopach maps of successive stratigraphic units produces a mass of properly quantitative data amenable to synthesis in terms of time-variable changes in the geometry and rates of subsidence of individual basins. Consideration of these data leads to confirmation of the important part played by tectonics in basin evolution, including relative sea levels and the transgression and progradation of strandlines and depositional environments. What remains to be identified is a viable mechanism capable of accommodating interregional and intercontinental synchrony of tectonic activity.

  6. Optimal control design of turbo spin‐echo sequences with applications to parallel‐transmit systems

    PubMed Central

    Hoogduin, Hans; Hajnal, Joseph V.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; Luijten, Peter R.; Malik, Shaihan J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The design of turbo spin‐echo sequences is modeled as a dynamic optimization problem which includes the case of inhomogeneous transmit radiofrequency fields. This problem is efficiently solved by optimal control techniques making it possible to design patient‐specific sequences online. Theory and Methods The extended phase graph formalism is employed to model the signal evolution. The design problem is cast as an optimal control problem and an efficient numerical procedure for its solution is given. The numerical and experimental tests address standard multiecho sequences and pTx configurations. Results Standard, analytically derived flip angle trains are recovered by the numerical optimal control approach. New sequences are designed where constraints on radiofrequency total and peak power are included. In the case of parallel transmit application, the method is able to calculate the optimal echo train for two‐dimensional and three‐dimensional turbo spin echo sequences in the order of 10 s with a single central processing unit (CPU) implementation. The image contrast is maintained through the whole field of view despite inhomogeneities of the radiofrequency fields. Conclusion The optimal control design sheds new light on the sequence design process and makes it possible to design sequences in an online, patient‐specific fashion. Magn Reson Med 77:361–373, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine PMID:26800383

  7. Population genomic sequencing of Coccidioides fungi reveals recent hybridization and transposon control.

    PubMed

    Neafsey, Daniel E; Barker, Bridget M; Sharpton, Thomas J; Stajich, Jason E; Park, Daniel J; Whiston, Emily; Hung, Chiung-Yu; McMahan, Cody; White, Jared; Sykes, Sean; Heiman, David; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Abouelleil, Amr; Aftuck, Lynne; Bessette, Daniel; Brown, Adam; FitzGerald, Michael; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, J Pendexter; Priest, Margaret; Orbach, Marc J; Galgiani, John N; Kirkland, Theo N; Cole, Garry T; Birren, Bruce W; Henn, Matthew R; Taylor, John W; Rounsley, Steven D

    2010-07-01

    We have sequenced the genomes of 18 isolates of the closely related human pathogenic fungi Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii to more clearly elucidate population genomic structure, bringing the total number of sequenced genomes for each species to 10. Our data confirm earlier microsatellite-based findings that these species are genetically differentiated, but our population genomics approach reveals that hybridization and genetic introgression have recently occurred between the two species. The directionality of introgression is primarily from C. posadasii to C. immitis, and we find more than 800 genes exhibiting strong evidence of introgression in one or more sequenced isolates. We performed PCR-based sequencing of one region exhibiting introgression in 40 C. immitis isolates to confirm and better define the extent of gene flow between the species. We find more coding sequence than expected by chance in the introgressed regions, suggesting that natural selection may play a role in the observed genetic exchange. We find notable heterogeneity in repetitive sequence composition among the sequenced genomes and present the first detailed genome-wide profile of a repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) process distinctly different from what has been observed in Neurospora. We identify promiscuous HLA-I and HLA-II epitopes in both proteomes and discuss the possible implications of introgression and population genomic data for public health and vaccine candidate prioritization. This study highlights the importance of population genomic data for detecting subtle but potentially important phenomena such as introgression.

  8. Sequencing the GRHL3 Coding Region Reveals Rare Truncating Mutations and a Common Susceptibility Variant for Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Mangold, Elisabeth; Böhmer, Anne C.; Ishorst, Nina; Hoebel, Ann-Kathrin; Gültepe, Pinar; Schuenke, Hannah; Klamt, Johanna; Hofmann, Andrea; Gölz, Lina; Raff, Ruth; Tessmann, Peter; Nowak, Stefanie; Reutter, Heiko; Hemprich, Alexander; Kreusch, Thomas; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Braumann, Bert; Reich, Rudolf; Schmidt, Gül; Jäger, Andreas; Reiter, Rudolf; Brosch, Sibylle; Stavusis, Janis; Ishida, Miho; Seselgyte, Rimante; Moore, Gudrun E.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Borck, Guntram; Aldhorae, Khalid A.; Lace, Baiba; Stanier, Philip; Knapp, Michael; Ludwig, Kerstin U.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without cleft palate (nsCL/P) and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO) are the most frequent subphenotypes of orofacial clefts. A common syndromic form of orofacial clefting is Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) where individuals have CL/P or CPO, often but not always associated with lower lip pits. Recently, ∼5% of VWS-affected individuals were identified with mutations in the grainy head-like 3 gene (GRHL3). To investigate GRHL3 in nonsyndromic clefting, we sequenced its coding region in 576 Europeans with nsCL/P and 96 with nsCPO. Most strikingly, nsCPO-affected individuals had a higher minor allele frequency for rs41268753 (0.099) than control subjects (0.049; p = 1.24 × 10−2). This association was replicated in nsCPO/control cohorts from Latvia, Yemen, and the UK (pcombined = 2.63 × 10−5; ORallelic = 2.46 [95% CI 1.6–3.7]) and reached genome-wide significance in combination with imputed data from a GWAS in nsCPO triads (p = 2.73 × 10−9). Notably, rs41268753 is not associated with nsCL/P (p = 0.45). rs41268753 encodes the highly conserved p.Thr454Met (c.1361C>T) (GERP = 5.3), which prediction programs denote as deleterious, has a CADD score of 29.6, and increases protein binding capacity in silico. Sequencing also revealed four novel truncating GRHL3 mutations including two that were de novo in four families, where all nine individuals harboring mutations had nsCPO. This is important for genetic counseling: given that VWS is rare compared to nsCPO, our data suggest that dominant GRHL3 mutations are more likely to cause nonsyndromic than syndromic CPO. Thus, with rare dominant mutations and a common risk variant in the coding region, we have identified an important contribution for GRHL3 in nsCPO. PMID:27018475

  9. Cenozoic prograding sequences of the Antarctic continental margin - What balance between structural and eustatic control

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, A.K. ); Barrett, P. ); Hinz, K. ); Stagg, H. ); Traube, V. )

    1990-05-01

    Multichannel seismic reflection profiles across the Antarctic continental margin commonly reveal prograding sedimentary sequences that are bounded by unconformities. These sequences are as much as 5 km thick and, where sampled, are composed entirely of late Eocene( )-early Oligocene and younger glacial rocks. On nonpolar margins, prograding sequences generally are attributed to relative changes in sea level, sediment supply, and tectonism. Around Antarctica, ice sheets have also been important in controlling the geometry and location of prograding sequences. The Antarctic sequences may provide a proximal record of major Cenozoic ice volume changes and related sea level changes not obtainable from low-latitude continental shelves. Presently, the Antarctic record is poorly known because of limited core data. Two categories of prograding (P) and aggrading (A) sigmoidal sequences are observed around Antarctica: (1) P sequences that build principally outward (common) and (2) AP sequences that build largely upward and outward (less common). P sequences may result principally from grounded ice sheets, and AP sequences from open-marine basinal processes. Major rift embayments of Antarctica (e.g., eastern Ross Sea eastern Weddell Sea Lambert graben Wilkes basin) are also pathways for major ice movement. In general, most areas with P sequences lie within or adjacent to Mesozoic or older rift embayment, whereas the primary area with AP sequences (eastern Ross Sea) lies within a likely Cenozoic rift embayment. The Pacific side of the Antarctic Peninsula where Cenozoic ice sheets and Cenozoic tectonism have been active, is also marked by a P sequence. Scientific drilling on the Antarctic continental shelf has recovered openwater glacial deposits (Ross Sea) as well as glacial diamicts that were deposited beneath and in front of grounded glacier ice (Ross Sea and Prydz Bay).

  10. Sequence-based definition of eight short tandem repeat loci located within the HLA-region in an Austrian population.

    PubMed

    Dauber, Eva-Maria; Wenda, Sabine; Schwartz-Jungl, Elisabeth Maria; Glock, Barbara; Mayr, Wolfgang R

    2015-01-01

    Sequenced allelic ladders are a prerequisite for reliable genotyping of short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphisms and consistent results across instrument platforms. For eight STR-loci located on the short arm of chromosome 6 (6p21.3), a sequenced based nomenclature was established according to international recommendations. Publicly available reference DNA samples were sequenced enabling interested laboratories to construct their own allelic ladders. Three tetrameric (D6S2691, D6S2678, DQIV), one trimeric (D6S2906) and four dimeric repeat loci (D6S2972, D6S2792, D6S2789, D6S273) were investigated. Apart from the very complex sequence structure at the DQIV locus, three loci showed a compound and four loci a simple repeat pattern. In the flanking regions of some loci additional single nucleotide and insertion/deletion polymorphisms occurred as well as sequence polymorphisms within the repeat region of alleles with the same length. In an Austrian Caucasoid population sample (n=293) between eight and 22 alleles were found. No significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectations was observed, the power of discrimination ranged from 0.826 to 0.978. The loci cover the HLA-coding region from HLA-A to HLA-DQB1 and can be used for a better definition of HLA haplotypes for population and disease association studies, recombination point mapping, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation as well as for identity and relationship testing.

  11. Re-sequencing regions of the ovine Y chromosome in domestic and wild sheep reveals novel paternal haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Meadows, J R S; Kijas, J W

    2009-02-01

    The male-specific region of the ovine Y chromosome (MSY) remains poorly characterized, yet sequence variants from this region have the potential to reveal the wild progenitor of domestic sheep or examples of domestic and wild paternal introgression. The 5' promoter region of the sex-determining gene SRY was re-sequenced using a subset of wild sheep including bighorn (Ovis canadensis), thinhorn (Ovis dalli spp.), urial (Ovis vignei), argali (Ovis ammon), mouflon (Ovis musimon) and domestic sheep (Ovis aries). Seven novel SNPs (oY2-oY8) were revealed; these were polymorphic between but not within species. Re-sequencing and fragment analysis was applied to the MSY microsatellite SRYM18. It contains a complex compound repeat structure and sequencing of three novel size fragments revealed that a pentanucleotide element remained fixed, whilst a dinucleotide element displayed variability within species. Comparison of the sequence between species revealed that urial and argali sheep grouped more closely to the mouflon and domestic breeds than the pachyceriforms (bighorn and thinhorn). SNP and microsatellite data were combined to define six previously undetected haplotypes. Analysis revealed the mouflon as the only species to share a haplotype with domestic sheep, consistent with its status as a feral domesticate that has undergone male-mediated exchange with domestic animals. A comparison of the remaining wild species and domestic sheep revealed that O. aries is free from signatures of wild sheep introgression.

  12. The siRNA Non-seed Region and Its Target Sequences Are Auxiliary Determinants of Off-Target Effects

    PubMed Central

    Kamola, Piotr J.; Nakano, Yuko; Takahashi, Tomoko; Wilson, Paul A.; Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool for post-transcriptional gene silencing. However, the siRNA guide strand may bind unintended off-target transcripts via partial sequence complementarity by a mechanism closely mirroring micro RNA (miRNA) silencing. To better understand these off-target effects, we investigated the correlation between sequence features within various subsections of siRNA guide strands, and its corresponding target sequences, with off-target activities. Our results confirm previous reports that strength of base-pairing in the siRNA seed region is the primary factor determining the efficiency of off-target silencing. However, the degree of downregulation of off-target transcripts with shared seed sequence is not necessarily similar, suggesting that there are additional auxiliary factors that influence the silencing potential. Here, we demonstrate that both the melting temperature (Tm) in a subsection of siRNA non-seed region, and the GC contents of its corresponding target sequences, are negatively correlated with the efficiency of off-target effect. Analysis of experimentally validated miRNA targets demonstrated a similar trend, indicating a putative conserved mechanistic feature of seed region-dependent targeting mechanism. These observations may prove useful as parameters for off-target prediction algorithms and improve siRNA ‘specificity’ design rules. PMID:26657993

  13. Structural Control on South Napa Earthquake Sequence and Its Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenheim, V. E.; Graymer, R. W.; Jachens, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Potential-field data indicate that the M6.0 South Napa earthquake and its aftershocks were influenced by complex structure among the West Napa-Carneros-Pinole-Franklin faults system. The West Napa and Carneros faults, although considered to be minor Quaternary players within the San Andreas fault system, are major faults that in part bound the Mayacamas Mountains, an uplifted block of Mesozoic basement between Sonoma and Napa Valleys, and that produce prominent potential-field gradients. These two faults may account for as much as 30-50 km of right-lateral offset since ~6 Ma based on offset magnetic anomalies, length of pull-apart basins, and correlation of Neogene units. Uplift of the block may be Quaternary in age because gravels found to the west of the range contain clasts of 2.8 Ma obsidian derived from the east of the range. The southern extent of the South Napa earthquake rupture and seismicity is bounded on the west by the north end of a pull-apart basin between the Carneros and Pinole faults reflected in gravity data. The prominent gravity and magnetic gradients associated with the West Napa fault weaken where mapped traces of the fault begin to splay at the southern extent of Mesozoic and Paleogene outcrops. This region also encompasses multiple linear north-northwest-trending features identified in UAVSAR and is where the Carneros and West Napa faults are closest at the surface. We suggest that the interaction of these two faults not only affects the South Napa earthquake, but also influenced the extent of seismicity following the 2000 Yountville earthquake as well as the diffuse zone of seismicity generally confined between these two faults as they curve northwestward towards the southern end of the Maacama fault. Damage produced by the South Napa and Yountville earthquakes may have been focused by the 2-3 km-deep basin beneath the city of Napa, concentrated not over the deepest parts of the basin, but rather along the periphery or over an intra

  14. Molecular genetics of herpes simplex virus: Demonstration of regions of obligatory and nonobligatory identity within diploid regions of the genome by sequence replacement and insertion

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, David M.; Ruyechan, William T.; Roizman, Bernard; Halliburton, Ian W.

    1978-01-01

    The DNAs of herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and 2 consist of two components, L and S, each composed of unique sequences bracketed by inverted repeats. In this study we have probed the structure of the reiterated regions of the S component in marker rescue experiments involving transfection of cells with mixtures of intact HSV-1 mutant viral DNA and individual DNA fragments generated by restriction endonuclease digestion of wild-type HSV-1 or HSV-2 DNAs. The results were as follows: (i) HSV is diploid for the wild-type sequences that rescue two temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants. DNA fragments from both reiterated regions of the S component of HSV-1(F) DNA can rescue tsLB2 and tsD mutants. (ii) Identity of the entire reiterated sequence at both ends of S is not obligatory because only one end of the S component of wild phenotype virus HSV-1(1061) rescues tsD even though both ends rescue tsLB2. (iii) Genes in both reiterated sequences can be expressed. We produced, by marker rescue experiments, recombinants with heterotypic ends of the S component, and these specified corresponding polypeptides characteristic of both HSV-1 and HSV-2. (iv) The reiterated sequences of the S component may contain a region of obligatory identity. Thus, several recombinant clones produced by rescue with HSV-2 DNA contained identical HSV-2 DNA insertions within both reiterated regions of the HSV-1 S component. Consistent with this conclusion, the termini of the S component in the heterodiploids described in iii were identical by restriction enzyme analysis. (v) The observation that HSV DNA can be expanded by at least 5 × 106 by means of insertion in the S component suggests that it can be a vehicle for exogenous DNA. Images PMID:211508

  15. Tumorigenic poxviruses: genomic organization and DNA sequence of the telomeric region of the Shope fibroma virus genome.

    PubMed

    Upton, C; DeLange, A M; McFadden, G

    1987-09-01

    Shope fibroma virus (SFV), a tumorigenic poxvirus, has a 160-kb linear double-stranded DNA genome and possesses terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of 12.4 kb. The DNA sequence of the terminal 5.5 kb of the viral genome is presented and together with previously published sequences completes the entire sequence of the SFV TIR. The terminal 400-bp region contains no major open reading frames (ORFs) but does possess five related imperfect palindromes. The remaining 5.1 kb of the sequence contains seven tightly clustered and tandemly oriented ORFs, four larger than 100 amino acids in length (T1, T2, T4, and T5) and three smaller ORFs (T3A, T3B, and T3C). All are transcribed toward the viral hairpin and almost all possess the consensus sequence TTTTTNT near their 3' ends which has been implicated for the transcription termination of vaccinia virus early genes. Searches of the published DNA database revealed no sequences with significant homology with this region of the SFV genome but when the protein database was searched with the translation products of ORFs T1-T5 it was found that the N-terminus of the putative T4 polypeptide is closely related to the signal sequence of the hemagglutinin precursor from influenza A virus, suggesting that the T4 polypeptide may be secreted from SFV-infected cells. Examination of other SFV ORFs shows that T1 and T2 also possess signal-like hydrophobic amino acid stretches close to their N-termini. The protein database search also revealed that the putative T2 protein has significant homology to the insulin family of polypeptides. In terms of sequence repetitions, seven tandemly repeated copies of the hexanucleotide ATTGTT and three flanking regions of dyad symmetry were detected, all in ORF T3C. A search for palindromic sequences also revealed two clusters, one in ORF T3A/B and a second in ORF T2. ORF T2 harbors five short sequence domains, each of which consists of a 6-bp short palindrome and a 10- to 18-bp larger palindrome. The

  16. Complex repetitive arrangements of gene sequence in the candidate region of the spinal muscular atrophy gene in 5q13

    SciTech Connect

    Theodosiou, A.M.; Nesbit, A.M.; Daniels, R.J.; Campbell, L.; Francis, M.J.; Christodoulou, Z.; Morrison, K.E.; Davies, K.E. |

    1994-12-01

    Childhood-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a heritable neurological disorder, which has been mapped by genetic linkage analysis to chromosome 5q13, in the interval between markers D5S435 and D5S557. Here, we present gene sequences that have been isolated from this interval, several of which show sequence homologies to exons of {beta}-glucuronidase. These gene sequences are repeated several times across the candidate region and are also present on chromosome 5p. The arrangement of these repetitive gene motifs is polymorphic between individuals. The high degree of variability observed may have some influence on the expression of the genes in the region. Since SMA is not inherited as a classical autosomal recessive disease, novel genomic rearrangements arising from aberrant recombination events between the complex repeats may be associated with the phenotype observed.

  17. Protein engineering of selected residues from conserved sequence regions of a novel Anoxybacillus α-amylase

    PubMed Central

    Ranjani, Velayudhan; Janeček, Štefan; Chai, Kian Piaw; Shahir, Shafinaz; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Kian Mau

    2014-01-01

    The α-amylases from Anoxybacillus species (ASKA and ADTA), Bacillus aquimaris (BaqA) and Geobacillus thermoleovorans (GTA, Pizzo and GtamyII) were proposed as a novel group of the α-amylase family GH13. An ASKA yielding a high percentage of maltose upon its reaction on starch was chosen as a model to study the residues responsible for the biochemical properties. Four residues from conserved sequence regions (CSRs) were thus selected, and the mutants F113V (CSR-I), Y187F and L189I (CSR-II) and A161D (CSR-V) were characterised. Few changes in the optimum reaction temperature and pH were observed for all mutants. Whereas the Y187F (t1/2 43 h) and L189I (t1/2 36 h) mutants had a lower thermostability at 65°C than the native ASKA (t1/2 48 h), the mutants F113V and A161D exhibited an improved t1/2 of 51 h and 53 h, respectively. Among the mutants, only the A161D had a specific activity, kcat and kcat/Km higher (1.23-, 1.17- and 2.88-times, respectively) than the values determined for the ASKA. The replacement of the Ala-161 in the CSR-V with an aspartic acid also caused a significant reduction in the ratio of maltose formed. This finding suggests the Ala-161 may contribute to the high maltose production of the ASKA. PMID:25069018

  18. New Virus Genome Sequences of the Guama Serogroup (Genus Orthobunyavirus, Family Bunyaviridae), Isolated in the Brazilian Amazon Region

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Márcio R. T.; Medeiros, Daniele B. A.; da Silva, Sandro Patroca; Lima, Clayton P. S.; Inada, Davi T.; Cardoso, Jedson F.; Vianez, João L. S. G.; Rodrigues, Sueli Guerreiro; Vasconcelos, Pedro F. C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This is the first announcement of two nearly complete viral genome sequences belonging to the Guama serogroup (genus Orthobunyavirus, family Bunyaviridae) isolated in the Brazilian Amazon region: Mirim virus (MIRV; BEAN7722) and Ananindeua virus (ANUV; BEAN109303). PMID:28254992

  19. Three Ingredients for Improved Global Aftershock Forecasts: Tectonic Region, Time-Dependent Catalog Incompleteness, and Inter-Sequence Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. T.; Hardebeck, J.; Felzer, K. R.; Michael, A. J.; van der Elst, N.

    2015-12-01

    Following a large earthquake, seismic hazard can be orders of magnitude higher than the long-term average as a result of aftershock triggering. Due to this heightened hazard, there is a demand from emergency managers and the public for rapid, authoritative, and reliable aftershock forecasts. In the past, USGS aftershock forecasts following large, global earthquakes have been released on an ad-hoc basis with inconsistent methods, and in some cases, aftershock parameters adapted from California. To remedy this, we are currently developing an automated aftershock product that will generate more accurate forecasts based on the Reasenberg and Jones (Science, 1989) method. To better capture spatial variations in aftershock productivity and decay, we estimate regional aftershock parameters for sequences within the Garcia et al. (BSSA, 2012) tectonic regions. We find that regional variations for mean aftershock productivity exceed a factor of 10. The Reasenberg and Jones method combines modified-Omori aftershock decay, Utsu productivity scaling, and the Gutenberg-Richter magnitude distribution. We additionally account for a time-dependent magnitude of completeness following large events in the catalog. We generalize the Helmstetter et al. (2005) equation for short-term aftershock incompleteness and solve for incompleteness levels in the global NEIC catalog following large mainshocks. In addition to estimating average sequence parameters within regions, we quantify the inter-sequence parameter variability. This allows for a more complete quantification of the forecast uncertainties and Bayesian updating of the forecast as sequence-specific information becomes available.

  20. Identification and verification of hybridoma-derived monoclonal antibody variable region sequences using recombinant DNA technology and mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibody engineering requires the identification of antigen binding domains or variable regions (VR) unique to each antibody. It is the VR that define the unique antigen binding properties and proper sequence identification is essential for functional evaluation and performance of recombinant antibo...

  1. Cloning and genomic nucleotide sequence of the matrix attachment region binding protein from the halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-Ju; Wang, Tian-Yun; Wang, Ya-Feng; Yang, Rui; Li, Zhao-Xi

    2013-07-01

    In our previous study, the sequence of a matrix attachment region binding protein (MBP) cDNA was cloned from the unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina. However, the nucleotide sequence of this gene has not been reported so far. In this paper, the nucleotide sequence of MBP was cloned and characterized, and its gene copy number was determined. The MBP nucleotide sequence is 5641 bp long, and interrupted by 12 introns ranging from 132 to 562 bp. All the introns in the D. salina MBP gene have orthodox splice sites, exhibiting GT at the 5' end and AG at the 3' end. Southern blot analysis showed that MBP only has one copy in the D. salina genome.

  2. Efficient optimal decomposition of a sequence into disjoint regions, each matched to some template in an inventory.

    PubMed

    Sankoff, D

    1992-10-01

    Given an amino acid sequence, we discuss how to find efficiently an optimal set of disjoint regions (substrings, domains, modules, etc.), each of which can be matched to some element of a predefined inventory containing, for example, consensus sequences, protosequences, or protein family profiles. A two-stage approach to sequence decomposition, consisting of the detection of all acceptable matches followed by the construction of an optimal subset of compatible matches, leads to computational difficulties. When the problem is reformulated in terms of network comparisons, it can be solved in time quadratic in the length of the sequence and linear with the number of templates in the inventory, by a single pass of a dynamic programming algorithm. This method has the advantage that the criterion for acceptable matches can be relaxed without materially affecting computing time. Except under special conditions it is more efficient than previous segmentation methods based on dynamic programming.

  3. Roles of infection control nurses in regional hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kananitaya, Thamolwan; Senarat, Wilawan; Moongtui, Wanchai; Tantisiriwat, Warapot; Danchaivijitr, Somwang

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate the roles of infection control nurses (ICNs) in regional hospitals and to detect problems, obstacles in practice and needs for support. A descriptive study by interview and questionnaire survey of 16 ICNs from regional hospitals appling for HA. From February to April 2002, a study by interview and questionnaires was done in 16 ICNs from 10 regional hospitals applying for HA. Most of the ICNs practised IC roles according to HA criteria except for hospital employee health, NI surveillance and research. The major problems and obstacles included the lack of IC positions, inadequate ICNs, lack of support from hospital administrative personnel, too heavy work load, lack of: IC experts, budget for IC, equipment, IC research data and education material. The present study suggested that roles of ICNs in hospital employee health, NI surveillance and research were inadequate because of the lack of full time ICNs, too heavy a work load, lack of: IC consultants supply and administrative support.

  4. Sequence and analysis of the human ABL gene, the BCR gene, and regions involved in the Philadelphia chromosomal translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Burian, D.; Clifton, S.W.; Crabtree, J.

    1995-05-01

    The complete human BCR gene (152j-141 nt) on chromosome 22 and greater than 80% of the human ABL gene (179-512 nt) on chromosome 9 have been sequenced from mapped cosmid and plasmid clones via a shotgun strategy. Because these two chromosomes are translocated with breakpoints within the BCR and ABL genes in Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias, knowledge of these sequences also might provide insight into the validity of various theories of chromosomal rearrangements. Comparison of these genes with their cDNA sequences reveal the positions of 23 BCR exons and putative alternative BCR first and second exons, as well as the common ABL exons 2-11, respectively. Additionally, these regions include the alternative ABL first exons 1b and 1a, a new gene 5` to the first ABL exon, and an open reading frame with homology to an EST within the BCR fourth intron. Further analysis reveals an Alu homology of 38.83 and 39.35% for the BCR and ABL genes, respectively, with other repeat elements present to a lesser extent. Four new Philadelphia chromosome translocation breakpoints from chronic myelogenous leukemia patients also were sequenced, and the positions of these and several other previously sequenced breakpoints now have been mapped precisely, although no consistent breakpoint features immediately were apparent. Comparative analysis of genomic sequences encompassing the murine homologues to the human ABL exons 1b and 1a, as well as regions encompassing the ABL exons 2 and 3, reveals that although there is a high degree of homology in their corresponding exons and promoter regions, these two vertebrate species show a striking lack of homology outside these regions. 122 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Genetic Diversity of Toxoplasma gondii Strains from Different Hosts and Geographical Regions by Sequence Analysis of GRA20 Gene.

    PubMed

    Ning, Hong-Rui; Huang, Si-Yang; Wang, Jin-Lei; Xu, Qian-Ming; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a eukaryotic parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa, which infects all warm-blood animals, including humans. In the present study, we examined sequence variation in dense granule 20 (GRA20) genes among T. gondii isolates collected from different hosts and geographical regions worldwide. The complete GRA20 genes were amplified from 16 T. gondii isolates using PCR, sequence were analyzed, and phylogenetic reconstruction was analyzed by maximum parsimony (MP) and maximum likelihood (ML) methods. The results showed that the complete GRA20 gene sequence was 1,586 bp in length among all the isolates used in this study, and the sequence variations in nucleotides were 0-7.9% among all strains. However, removing the type III strains (CTG, VEG), the sequence variations became very low, only 0-0.7%. These results indicated that the GRA20 sequence in type III was more divergence. Phylogenetic analysis of GRA20 sequences using MP and ML methods can differentiate 2 major clonal lineage types (type I and type III) into their respective clusters, indicating the GRA20 gene may represent a novel genetic marker for intraspecific phylogenetic analyses of T. gondii.

  6. SNPs in putative regulatory regions identified by human mouse comparative sequencing and transcription factor binding site data

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Poulabi; Bahlo, Melanie; Schwartz, Jody R.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Houston, Kathryn A.; Dubchak, Inna; Speed, Terence P.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-01-01

    Genome wide disease association analysis using SNPs is being explored as a method for dissecting complex genetic traits and a vast number of SNPs have been generated for this purpose. As there are cost and throughput limitations of genotyping large numbers of SNPs and statistical issues regarding the large number of dependent tests on the same data set, to make association analysis practical it has been proposed that SNPs should be prioritized based on likely functional importance. The most easily identifiable functional SNPs are coding SNPs (cSNPs) and accordingly cSNPs have been screened in a number of studies. SNPs in gene regulatory sequences embedded in noncoding DNA are another class of SNPs suggested for prioritization due to their predicted quantitative impact on gene expression. The main challenge in evaluating these SNPs, in contrast to cSNPs is a lack of robust algorithms and databases for recognizing regulatory sequences in noncoding DNA. Approaches that have been previously used to delineate noncoding sequences with gene regulatory activity include cross-species sequence comparisons and the search for sequences recognized by transcription factors. We combined these two methods to sift through mouse human genomic sequences to identify putative gene regulatory elements and subsequently localized SNPs within these sequences in a 1 Megabase (Mb) region of human chromosome 5q31, orthologous to mouse chromosome 11 containing the Interleukin cluster.

  7. Emerging infectious diseases in southeast Asia: regional challenges to control.

    PubMed

    Coker, Richard J; Hunter, Benjamin M; Rudge, James W; Liverani, Marco; Hanvoravongchai, Piya

    2011-02-12

    Southeast Asia is a hotspot for emerging infectious diseases, including those with pandemic potential. Emerging infectious diseases have exacted heavy public health and economic tolls. Severe acute respiratory syndrome rapidly decimated the region's tourist industry. Influenza A H5N1 has had a profound effect on the poultry industry. The reasons why southeast Asia is at risk from emerging infectious diseases are complex. The region is home to dynamic systems in which biological, social, ecological, and technological processes interconnect in ways that enable microbes to exploit new ecological niches. These processes include population growth and movement, urbanisation, changes in food production, agriculture and land use, water and sanitation, and the effect of health systems through generation of drug resistance. Southeast Asia is home to about 600 million people residing in countries as diverse as Singapore, a city state with a gross domestic product (GDP) of US$37,500 per head, and Laos, until recently an overwhelmingly rural economy, with a GDP of US$890 per head. The regional challenges in control of emerging infectious diseases are formidable and range from influencing the factors that drive disease emergence, to making surveillance systems fit for purpose, and ensuring that regional governance mechanisms work effectively to improve control interventions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Two structurally distinct {kappa}B sequence motifs cooperatively control LPS-induced KC gene transcription in mouse macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmori, Y.; Fukumoto, S.; Hamilton, T.A.

    1995-10-01

    The mouse KC gene is an {alpha}-chemokine gene whose transcription is induced in mononuclear phagocytes by LPS. DNA sequences necessary for transcriptional control of KC by LPS were identified in the region flanking the transcription start site. Transient transfection analysis in macrophages using deletion mutants of a 1.5-kb sequence placed in front of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene identified an LPS-responsive region between residues -104 and +30. This region contained two {kappa}B sequence motifs. The first motif (position -70 to -59, {kappa}B1) is highly conserved in all three human GRO genes and in the mouse macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) gene. The second {kappa}B motif (position -89 to -78, {kappa}B2) was conserved only between the mouse and the rat KC genes. Consistent with previous reports, the highly conserved {kappa}B site ({kappa}B1) was essential for LPS inducibility. Surprisingly, the distal {kappa}B site ({kappa}B2) was also necessary for optimal response; mutation of either {kappa}B site markedly reduced sensitivity to LPS in RAW264.7 cells and to TNF-{alpha} in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Although both {kappa}B1 and {kappa}B2 sequences were able to bind members of the Rel homology family, including NF{kappa}B1 (P50), RelA (65), and c-Rel, the {kappa}B1 site bound these factors with higher affinity and functioned more effectively than the {kappa}B2 site in a heterologous promoter. These findings demonstrate that transcriptional control of the KC gene requires cooperation between two {kappa}B sites and is thus distinct from that of the three human GRO genes and the mouse MIP-2 gene. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  9. The complete mitochondrial genome of bighead croaker, Collichthys niveatus (Perciformes, Sciaenidae): structure of control region and phylogenetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tian-Jun; Cheng, Yuan-Zhi; Sun, Yue-Na; Shi, Ge; Wang, Ri-Xin

    2011-10-01

    Sciaenidae is a diverse, commercially important family. To understand the phylogenetic position of Collichthys niveatus in this family, we present its complete mitochondrial genome sequence. The genome is 16469 bp in length and contains 37 mitochondrial genes (13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 22 transfer RNA genes) and a control region (CR) as in other bony fishes. Further sequencing for the complete control region was performed on Collichthys lucida. Although the conserved sequence domains such as extend termination associated sequence (ETAS) and conserved sequence block domains (CSB-1, CSB-2 and CSB-3) are recognized in the control region of the two congeneric species, the typical central conserved blocks (CSB-F, CSB-E and CSB-D) could not be detected, while they are found in Miichthys miiuy and Cynoscion acoupa of Sciaenidae and other Percoidei fishes. Phylogenetic analyses do not support the monophyly of Pseudosciaeniae, which is against with the morphological results. C. niveatus is most closely related to Larimichthys polyactis, and Collichthys and Larimichthys may be merged into one genus, based on the current datasets.

  10. The influence of focused-attention meditation states on the cognitive control of sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Chan, Russell W; Immink, Maarten A; Lushington, Kurt

    2017-10-01

    Cognitive control processes influence how motor sequence information is utilised and represented. Since cognitive control processes are shared amongst goal-oriented tasks, motor sequence learning and performance might be influenced by preceding cognitive tasks such as focused-attention meditation (FAM). Prior to a serial reaction time task (SRTT), participants completed either a single-session of FAM, a single-session of FAM followed by delay (FAM+) or no meditation (CONTROL). Relative to CONTROL, FAM benefitted performance in early, random-ordered blocks. However, across subsequent sequence learning blocks, FAM+ supported the highest levels of performance improvement resulting in superior performance at the end of the SRTT. Performance following FAM+ demonstrated greater reliance on embedded sequence structures than FAM. These findings illustrate that increased top-down control immediately after FAM biases the implementation of stimulus-based planning. Introduction of a delay following FAM relaxes top-down control allowing for implementation of response-based planning resulting in sequence learning benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Control of bootstrap current in the pedestal region of tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K. C.; Lai, A. L.

    2013-12-15

    The high confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas in the pedestal region of tokamaks are characterized by steep gradient of the radial electric field, and sonic poloidal U{sub p,m} flow that consists of poloidal components of the E×B flow and the plasma flow velocity that is parallel to the magnetic field B. Here, E is the electric field. The bootstrap current that is important for the equilibrium, and stability of the pedestal of H-mode plasmas is shown to have an expression different from that in the conventional theory. In the limit where ‖U{sub p,m}‖≫ 1, the bootstrap current is driven by the electron temperature gradient and inductive electric field fundamentally different from that in the conventional theory. The bootstrap current in the pedestal region can be controlled through manipulating U{sub p,m} and the gradient of the radial electric. This, in turn, can control plasma stability such as edge-localized modes. Quantitative evaluations of various coefficients are shown to illustrate that the bootstrap current remains finite when ‖U{sub p,m}‖ approaches infinite and to provide indications how to control the bootstrap current. Approximate analytic expressions for viscous coefficients that join results in the banana and plateau-Pfirsch-Schluter regimes are presented to facilitate bootstrap and neoclassical transport simulations in the pedestal region.

  12. Supramolecular polymerization of a prebiotic nucleoside provides insights into the creation of sequence-controlled polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Bonnesen, Peter V; Rangel, E.; Vallejo, E.; Sanchez-Castillo, Ariadna; Cleaves, II, H. James; Baddorf, Arthur P; Sumpter, Bobby G; Pan, Minghu; Maksymovych, Petro; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A

    2016-01-04

    The self-assembly of a nucleoside on Au(111) was studied to ascertain whether polymerization on well-defined substrates constitutes a promising approach for making sequence-controlled polymers. Scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory were used to investigate the self-assembly on Au(111) of (RS)-N9-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)adenine (DHPA), a plausibly prebiotic nucleoside analog of adenosine. It is found that DHPA molecules self-assemble into a hydrogen-bonded polymer that grows almost exclusively along the herringbone reconstruction pattern, has a two component sequence that is repeated over hundreds of nanometers, and is erasable with electron-induced excitation. Although the sequence is simple, more complicated ones are envisioned if two or more nucleoside types are combined. Because polymerization occurs on a substrate in a dry environment, the success of each combination can be gauged with high-resolution imaging and accurate modeling techniques. The resulting characteristics make nucleoside self-assembly on a substrate an attractive approach for designing sequence-controlled polymers. Moreover, by choosing plausibly prebiotic nucleosides, insights may be provided into how nature created the first sequence-controlled polymers capable of storing information. Such insights, in turn, can inspire new ways of synthesizing sequence-controlled polymers.

  13. Supramolecular polymerization of a prebiotic nucleoside provides insights into the creation of sequence-controlled polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Rangel, E.; Vallejo, E.; Sanchez-Castillo, Ariadna; James Cleaves, H., II; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Pan, Minghu; Maksymovych, Petro; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of a nucleoside on Au(111) was studied to ascertain whether polymerization on well-defined substrates constitutes a promising approach for making sequence-controlled polymers. Scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory were used to investigate the self-assembly on Au(111) of (RS)-N9-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)adenine (DHPA), a plausibly prebiotic nucleoside analog of adenosine. It is found that DHPA molecules self-assemble into a hydrogen-bonded polymer that grows almost exclusively along the herringbone reconstruction pattern, has a two component sequence that is repeated over hundreds of nanometers, and is erasable with electron-induced excitation. Although the sequence is simple, more complicated ones are envisioned if two or more nucleoside types are combined. Because polymerization occurs on a substrate in a dry environment, the success of each combination can be gauged with high-resolution imaging and accurate modeling techniques. These characteristics make nucleoside self-assembly on a substrate an attractive approach for designing sequence-controlled polymers. Further, by choosing plausibly prebiotic nucleosides, insights may be provided into how nature created the first sequence-controlled polymers capable of storing information. Such insights, in turn, can inspire new ways of synthesizing sequence-controlled polymers.

  14. Supramolecular polymerization of a prebiotic nucleoside provides insights into the creation of sequence-controlled polymers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Rangel, E.; Vallejo, E.; Sanchez-Castillo, Ariadna; James Cleaves II, H.; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Pan, Minghu; Maksymovych, Petro; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of a nucleoside on Au(111) was studied to ascertain whether polymerization on well-defined substrates constitutes a promising approach for making sequence-controlled polymers. Scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory were used to investigate the self-assembly on Au(111) of (RS)-N9-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)adenine (DHPA), a plausibly prebiotic nucleoside analog of adenosine. It is found that DHPA molecules self-assemble into a hydrogen-bonded polymer that grows almost exclusively along the herringbone reconstruction pattern, has a two component sequence that is repeated over hundreds of nanometers, and is erasable with electron-induced excitation. Although the sequence is simple, more complicated ones are envisioned if two or more nucleoside types are combined. Because polymerization occurs on a substrate in a dry environment, the success of each combination can be gauged with high-resolution imaging and accurate modeling techniques. These characteristics make nucleoside self-assembly on a substrate an attractive approach for designing sequence-controlled polymers. Further, by choosing plausibly prebiotic nucleosides, insights may be provided into how nature created the first sequence-controlled polymers capable of storing information. Such insights, in turn, can inspire new ways of synthesizing sequence-controlled polymers. PMID:26725380

  15. Supramolecular polymerization of a prebiotic nucleoside provides insights into the creation of sequence-controlled polymers

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Jun; Bonnesen, Peter V; Rangel, E.; ...

    2016-01-04

    The self-assembly of a nucleoside on Au(111) was studied to ascertain whether polymerization on well-defined substrates constitutes a promising approach for making sequence-controlled polymers. Scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory were used to investigate the self-assembly on Au(111) of (RS)-N9-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)adenine (DHPA), a plausibly prebiotic nucleoside analog of adenosine. It is found that DHPA molecules self-assemble into a hydrogen-bonded polymer that grows almost exclusively along the herringbone reconstruction pattern, has a two component sequence that is repeated over hundreds of nanometers, and is erasable with electron-induced excitation. Although the sequence is simple, more complicated ones are envisioned if two ormore » more nucleoside types are combined. Because polymerization occurs on a substrate in a dry environment, the success of each combination can be gauged with high-resolution imaging and accurate modeling techniques. The resulting characteristics make nucleoside self-assembly on a substrate an attractive approach for designing sequence-controlled polymers. Moreover, by choosing plausibly prebiotic nucleosides, insights may be provided into how nature created the first sequence-controlled polymers capable of storing information. Such insights, in turn, can inspire new ways of synthesizing sequence-controlled polymers.« less

  16. Complete mitochondrial genome of the frillneck lizard (Chlamydosaurus kingii, Reptilia; Agamidae), another squamate with two control regions.

    PubMed

    Ujvari, Beata; Madsen, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    Using PCR, the complete mitochondrial genome was sequenced in three frillneck lizards (Chlamydosaurus kingii). The mitochondria spanned over 16,761bp. As in other vertebrates, two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and 13 protein coding genes were identified. However, similar to some other squamate reptiles, two control regions (CRI and CRII) were identified, spanning 801 and 812 bp, respectively. Our results were compared with another Australian member of the family Agamidae, the bearded dragon (Pogana vitticeps). The overall base composition of the light-strand sequence largely mirrored that observed in P vitticeps. Furthermore, similar to P. vitticeps, we observed an insertion 801 bp long between the ND5 and ND6 genes. However, in contrast to P vitticeps we did not observe a conserved sequence block III region. Based on a comparison among the three frillneck lizards, we also present data on the proportion of variable sites within the major mitochondrial regions.

  17. Construction of a yeast artificial chromosome contig spanning the pseudoautosomal region and isolation of 25 new sequence-tagged sites

    SciTech Connect

    Slim, R. Laboratoire de Cytogenetique et Genetique Oncologiques, Villejuif ); Le Paslier, D.; Ougen, P.; Billault, A.; Cohen, D. ); Compain, S.; Levilliers, J.; Mintz, L.; Weissenbach, J.; Petit, C. )

    1993-06-01

    Thirty-one yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) from the human pseudoautosomal region were identified by a combination of sequence-tagged site (STS) screenings and colony hybridizations, using a subtelomeric interspersed repetitive element mapping predominantly to the pseudoautosomal region. Twenty-five new pseudoautosomal STSs were generated, of which 4 detected restriction fragment length polymorphisms. A total of 33 STSs were used to assemble the 31 YACs into a single contiguous set of overlapping DNA fragments spanning at least 2.3 megabases of the pseudoautosomal region. In addition, four pseudoautosomal genes including hydroxyindole O-methyltransferase have been positioned on this set of fragments. 48 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. Distinct patterns of simple sequence repeats and GC distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of primate genomes.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wen-Hua; Yan, Chao-Chao; Li, Wu-Jiao; Jiang, Xue-Mei; Li, Guang-Zhou; Zhang, Xiu-Yue; Hu, Ting-Zhang; Li, Jing; Yue, Bi-Song

    2016-09-16

    As the first systematic examination of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and guanine-cytosine (GC) distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of ten primates, our study showed that SSRs and GC displayed nonrandom distribution for both intragenic and intergenic regions, suggesting that they have potential roles in transcriptional or translational regulation. Our results suggest that the majority of SSRs are distributed in non-coding regions, such as the introns, TEs, and intergenic regions. In these primates, trinucleotide perfect (P) SSRs were the most abundant repeats type in the 5'UTRs and CDSs, whereas, mononucleotide P-SSRs were the most in the intron, 3'UTRs, TEs, and intergenic regions. The GC-contents varied greatly among different intragenic and intergenic regions: 5'UTRs > CDSs > 3'UTRs > TEs > introns > intergenic regions, and high GC-content was frequently distributed in exon-rich regions. Our results also showed that in the same intragenic and intergenic regions, the distribution of GC-contents were great similarity in the different primates. Tri- and hexanucleotide P-SSRs had the most GC-contents in the 5'UTRs and CDSs, whereas mononucleotide P-SSRs had the least GC-contents in the six genomic regions of these primates. The most frequent motifs for different length varied obviously with the different genomic regions.

  19. Distinct patterns of simple sequence repeats and GC distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of primate genomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wu-Jiao; Jiang, Xue-Mei; Li, Guang-Zhou; Zhang, Xiu-Yue; Hu, Ting-Zhang; Li, Jing; Yue, Bi-Song

    2016-01-01

    As the first systematic examination of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and guanine-cytosine (GC) distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of ten primates, our study showed that SSRs and GC displayed nonrandom distribution for both intragenic and intergenic regions, suggesting that they have potential roles in transcriptional or translational regulation. Our results suggest that the majority of SSRs are distributed in non-coding regions, such as the introns, TEs, and intergenic regions. In these primates, trinucleotide perfect (P) SSRs were the most abundant repeats type in the 5′UTRs and CDSs, whereas, mononucleotide P-SSRs were the most in the intron, 3′UTRs, TEs, and intergenic regions. The GC-contents varied greatly among different intragenic and intergenic regions: 5′UTRs > CDSs > 3′UTRs > TEs > introns > intergenic regions, and high GC-content was frequently distributed in exon-rich regions. Our results also showed that in the same intragenic and intergenic regions, the distribution of GC-contents were great similarity in the different primates. Tri- and hexanucleotide P-SSRs had the most GC-contents in the 5′UTRs and CDSs, whereas mononucleotide P-SSRs had the least GC-contents in the six genomic regions of these primates. The most frequent motifs for different length varied obviously with the different genomic regions. PMID:27644032

  20. Sequence Analysis of Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clones from the Apospory-Specific Genomic Region of Pennisetum and Cenchrus1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Joann A.; Goel, Shailendra; Gunawan, Gunawati; Cordonnier-Pratt, Marie-Michele; Johnson, Virgil Ed; Liang, Chun; Wang, Haiming; Pratt, Lee H.; Mullet, John E.; DeBarry, Jeremy; Yang, Lixing; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Klein, Patricia E.; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2008-01-01

    Apomixis, asexual reproduction through seed, is widespread among angiosperm families. Gametophytic apomixis in Pennisetum squamulatum and Cenchrus ciliaris is controlled by the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR), which is highly conserved and macrosyntenic between these species. Thirty-two ASGR bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) isolated from both species and one ASGR-recombining BAC from P. squamulatum, which together cover approximately 2.7 Mb of DNA, were used to investigate the genomic structure of this region. Phrap assembly of 4,521 high-quality reads generated 1,341 contiguous sequences (contigs; 730 from the ASGR and 30 from the ASGR-recombining BAC in P. squamulatum, plus 580 from the C. ciliaris ASGR). Contigs containing putative protein-coding regions unrelated to transposable elements were identified based on protein similarity after Basic Local Alignment Search Tool X analysis. These putative coding regions were further analyzed in silico with reference to the rice (Oryza sativa) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) genomes using the resources at Gramene (www.gramene.org) and Phytozome (www.phytozome.net) and by hybridization against sorghum BAC filters. The ASGR sequences reveal that the ASGR (1) contains both gene-rich and gene-poor segments, (2) contains several genes that may play a role in apomictic development, (3) has many classes of transposable elements, and (4) does not exhibit large-scale synteny with either rice or sorghum genomes but does contain multiple regions of microsynteny with these species. PMID:18508959

  1. The Effect of Joint Control Training on the Acquisition and Durability of a Sequencing Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGraaf, Allison; Schlinger, Henry D., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Gutierrez (2006) experimentally demonstrated the effects of joint control and particularly the role of response mediation in the sequencing behavior of adults using an unfamiliar language. The purpose of the current study was to replicate and extend the procedures used by Gutierrez by comparing the effects of joint control training with the…

  2. Learner Control of Instructional Sequencing Within an Adaptive Tutorial CAI Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Robert J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    This study was designed to test effects of a specified degree of learner control over the sequencing of instructional materials in a self contained tutorial CAI course in COBOL programming. Findings describe contributions and interactions of learner controlled variables with respect to instructional effectiveness and efficiency. (RAO)

  3. Learner Control of Instructional Sequencing within an Adaptive Tutorial CAI Environment. Technical Report 75-7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Robert J.; And Others

    A study to test the effects of learner control of the sequencing of instructional tasks when using computer-assisted instruction (CAI) systems is described. Using a series of CAI modules to teach the COBOL programing language to military personnel, students were able to control various aspects of their learning environment. Among the research…

  4. Full-genome sequences of hepatitis B virus subgenotype D3 isolates from the Brazilian Amazon Region.

    PubMed

    Spitz, Natália; Mello, Francisco Ca; Araujo, Natalia Motta

    2015-02-13

    The Brazilian Amazon Region is a highly endemic area for hepatitis B virus (HBV). However, little is known regarding the genetic variability of the strains circulating in this geographical region. Here, we describe the first full-length genomes of HBV isolated in the Brazilian Amazon Region; these genomes are also the first complete HBV subgenotype D3 genomes reported for Brazil. The genomes of the five Brazilian isolates were all 3,182 base pairs in length and the isolates were classified as belonging to subgenotype D3, subtypes ayw2 (n = 3) and ayw3 (n = 2). Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the Brazilian sequences are not likely to be closely related to European D3 sequences. Such results will contribute to further epidemiological and evolutionary studies of HBV.

  5. Full-genome sequences of hepatitis B virus subgenotype D3 isolates from the Brazilian Amazon Region.

    PubMed

    Spitz, Natália; Mello, Francisco C A; Araujo, Natalia Motta

    2015-02-01

    The Brazilian Amazon Region is a highly endemic area for hepatitis B virus (HBV). However, little is known regarding the genetic variability of the strains circulating in this geographical region. Here, we describe the first full-length genomes of HBV isolated in the Brazilian Amazon Region; these genomes are also the first complete HBV subgenotype D3 genomes reported for Brazil. The genomes of the five Brazilian isolates were all 3,182 base pairs in length and the isolates were classified as belonging to subgenotype D3, subtypes ayw2 (n = 3) and ayw3 (n = 2). Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the Brazilian sequences are not likely to be closely related to European D3 sequences. Such results will contribute to further epidemiological and evolutionary studies of HBV.

  6. Genome-wide profiling of untranslated regions by paired-end ditag sequencing reveals unexpected transcriptome complexity in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ya-Ni; Lai, Deng-Pan; Ooi, Hong Sain; Shen, Ting-Ting; Kou, Yao; Tian, Jing; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Shao, Zhifeng; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2015-02-01

    The identification of structural and functional elements encoded in a genome is a challenging task. Although the transcriptome of budding yeast has been extensively analyzed, the boundaries and untranslated regions of yeast genes remain elusive. To address this least-explored field of yeast genomics, we performed a transcript profiling analysis through paired-end ditag (PET) approach coupled with deep sequencing. With 562,133 PET sequences we accurately defined the boundaries and untranslated regions of 3,409 ORFs, suggesting many yeast genes have multiple transcription start sites (TSSs). We also identified 85 previously uncharacterized transcripts either in intergenic regions or from the opposite strand of reported genomic features. Furthermore, our data revealed the extensive 3' end heterogeneity of yeast genes and identified a novel putative motif for polyadenylation. Our results indicate the yeast transcriptome is more complex than expected. This study would serve as an invaluable resource for elucidating the regulation and evolution of yeast genes.

  7. The human growth hormone gene is regulated by a multicomponent locus control region

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Cooke, N.E.; Liebhaber, S.A.; Monks, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes research involving the five-member human growth hormone (hGH)/chorionic somatomammotropin (hCS) gene cluster and its expression in the placenta. The results indicate that interactions among multiple elements are required to restrict hGH transcription to the pituitary and generate appropriate levels of expression in the mouse genome. In addition, the results suggest a role for shared and unique regulatory sequences in locus control region-mediated expression of the hGH/hCS gene cluster in the pituitary and possibly the placenta. 67 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Rapid evaluation and quality control of next generation sequencing data with FaQCs

    DOE PAGES

    Lo, Chien -Chi; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that parallelize the sequencing process and produce thousands to millions, or even hundreds of millions of sequences in a single sequencing run, have revolutionized genomic and genetic research. Because of the vagaries of any platform's sequencing chemistry, the experimental processing, machine failure, and so on, the quality of sequencing reads is never perfect, and often declines as the read is extended. These errors invariably affect downstream analysis/application and should therefore be identified early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly processmore » large volumes of data, and which improves upon previous solutions to monitor the quality and remove poor quality data from sequencing runs. Both the speed of processing and the memory footprint of storing all required information have been optimized via algorithmic and parallel processing solutions. The trimmed output compared side-by-side with the original data is part of the automated PDF output. We show how this tool can help data analysis by providing a few examples, including an increased percentage of reads recruited to references, improved single nucleotide polymorphism identification as well as de novo sequence assembly metrics. Conclusion: FaQCs combines several features of currently available applications into a single, user-friendly process, and includes additional unique capabilities such as filtering the PhiX control sequences, conversion of FASTQ formats, and multi-threading. The original data and trimmed summaries are reported within a variety of graphics and reports, providing a simple way to do data quality control and assurance.« less

  9. Rapid evaluation and quality control of next generation sequencing data with FaQCs

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Chien -Chi; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that parallelize the sequencing process and produce thousands to millions, or even hundreds of millions of sequences in a single sequencing run, have revolutionized genomic and genetic research. Because of the vagaries of any platform's sequencing chemistry, the experimental processing, machine failure, and so on, the quality of sequencing reads is never perfect, and often declines as the read is extended. These errors invariably affect downstream analysis/application and should therefore be identified early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly process large volumes of data, and which improves upon previous solutions to monitor the quality and remove poor quality data from sequencing runs. Both the speed of processing and the memory footprint of storing all required information have been optimized via algorithmic and parallel processing solutions. The trimmed output compared side-by-side with the original data is part of the automated PDF output. We show how this tool can help data analysis by providing a few examples, including an increased percentage of reads recruited to references, improved single nucleotide polymorphism identification as well as de novo sequence assembly metrics. Conclusion: FaQCs combines several features of currently available applications into a single, user-friendly process, and includes additional unique capabilities such as filtering the PhiX control sequences, conversion of FASTQ formats, and multi-threading. The original data and trimmed summaries are reported within a variety of graphics and reports, providing a simple way to do data quality control and assurance.

  10. Sequence-Controlled Polymers with Furan-Protected Maleimide as a Latent Monomer.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuxuan; Zhang, Liuqiao; Gu, Xue; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Nianchen; Zhang, Zhengbiao; Zhu, Xiulin

    2017-02-20

    Herein, a novel methodology for preparing sequence-controlled polymers is illustrated by using a latent monomer, furan protected maleimide (FMI). At 110 °C, FMI is deprotected by retro Diels-Alder (rDA) reaction, and the released MI is immediately involved in the cross-polymerization with styrene (St) to deliver heterosegments. At 40 °C the rDA reaction does not proceed, therefore homo-poly(styrene) segments are produced. By implementing programmable temperature changes during polymerization of St and FMI, "living" polymers with tailored a sequence are created. A ternary copolymerization produces complex sequences as designed. Alkynyl-functionalized FMI, used as a latent monomer, leads to the desirable placement of functional groups along the polymer chain. This latent-monomer-based strategy opens a new avenue for fabricating sequence-controlled polymers.

  11. HIV-1 intrapatient sequence diversity in the immunogenic V3 region

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, B.; Myers, G.; Wolinsky, S.; Kunstman, K.; Levy, R.; Furtado, M.; Otto, P.; Haynes, B.

    1991-11-12

    The third hypervariable domain (V3) of the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) envelope protein (env) can serve as an epitope for potent type-specific neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) -- thus short peptides predicted on the most commonly found variants of the antigenic tip of the V3 loop have been considered as potential candidates for an HIV peptide vaccine. To evaluate the extent of intrapatient variation in the immunogenic crest of the V3 loop, sequence sets were analyzed from individuals for whom multiple V3 sequences were available. Several strategies for selecting the best sets of hexapeptides to represent the variable tip of the V3 loop were considered and their effectiveness was evaluated by comparing them with the sequence sets from individuals. Most individuals carried at least one, and frequently many, variants that did not match any of the sequences from among the ten most common hexapeptides. Intrapatient viral sequence variation was increased by including sequences derived from brain biopsy specimens as well as from blood. Additionally, sequences obtained from brain specimens of different individuals had common elements which were not conserved in the corresponding blood samples, suggesting that certain amino acids in the V3 loop may be requisite for viral propagation in the CNS.

  12. HIV-1 intrapatient sequence diversity in the immunogenic V3 region

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, B.; Myers, G. ); Wolinsky, S.; Kunstman, K.; Levy, R.; Furtado, M.; Otto, P. . Medical School); Haynes, B. . Dept. of Medicine)

    1991-11-12

    The third hypervariable domain (V3) of the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) envelope protein (env) can serve as an epitope for potent type-specific neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) -- thus short peptides predicted on the most commonly found variants of the antigenic tip of the V3 loop have been considered as potential candidates for an HIV peptide vaccine. To evaluate the extent of intrapatient variation in the immunogenic crest of the V3 loop, sequence sets were analyzed from individuals for whom multiple V3 sequences were available. Several strategies for selecting the best sets of hexapeptides to represent the variable tip of the V3 loop were considered and their effectiveness was evaluated by comparing them with the sequence sets from individuals. Most individuals carried at least one, and frequently many, variants that did not match any of the sequences from among the ten most common hexapeptides. Intrapatient viral sequence variation was increased by including sequences derived from brain biopsy specimens as well as from blood. Additionally, sequences obtained from brain specimens of different individuals had common elements which were not conserved in the corresponding blood samples, suggesting that certain amino acids in the V3 loop may be requisite for viral propagation in the CNS.

  13. Using Regional Moment Tensors to Constrain Earthquake Processes following the 2010 Darfield and 2011 Canterbury New Zealand Earthquake Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, M. W.; Furlong, K. P.; Herrmann, R. B.; Benz, H.

    2011-12-01

    We model regional broadband data from the South Island of New Zealand to determine regional moment tensor solutions for the mainshock and selected aftershocks of the M7.0, 3 September 2011, M6.1, 21 February 2011 and M6.0 13 June 2011 earthquakes that occurred near Christchurch, New Zealand. Arrival time picks from both the local and regional strong motion and broadband data were used to determine preliminary earthquake locations using a previously published South Island velocity model. Rayleigh and Love surface wave dispersion measurements were then made from selected events to refine the velocity model in order to better match the predominantly large regional surface waves. RMT solutions were computed using the procedures of Herrmann et al. (2011). In total, we computed RMT solutions for 82 events in the magnitude range of Mw3.5-7.0. Although the crustal faulting behavior in the region has been argued to reflect a complex interaction of strike slip and thrust faulting, the dominant faulting style in the sequence is right-lateral, strike-slip (75 events), with nodal planes striking west-east to southwest-northeast. There are only five purely reverse mechanisms, at the western end of the sequence, in the vicinity of the Harper Hills blind thrust. The main Mw 7.0 rupture shows both local small-scale stepovers and one larger (~ 5-10 km width) right stepover near 172.40°E. Although we expect normal faulting associated with this larger stepover, during the first month after the main shock we observe only two normal fault mechanisms and 13 strike slip (inferred E-W right-lateral) events in the stepover region, and since that time, the sense of faulting has been dominated by right-lateral, strike-slip events, perhaps indicating a sequence of short E-W fault segments in the region. The February and June 2011 events occurred along the same trend at the eastern end of the sequence, and show similar strike slip mechanisms to the majority of events to the west, but the

  14. Tandem repeats and length variation in the mitochondrial DNA control region of Epirrita autumnata (Lepidoptera: Geometridae).

    PubMed

    Snäll, N; Huoponen, K; Savontaus, M L; Ruohomäki, K

    2002-10-01

    The organization of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (CR) of the autumnal moth, Epirrita autumnata, is described. The E. autumnata CR presents a distinct type of lepidopteran CR with domains of non-repetitive and repetitive sequences. The CRs show considerable length variation owing to a variable number of short approximately 29-bp sequence blocks that are repeated between 6 and 14 times in tandem. The organization of such a tandem array is unique among the insect CRs examined so far. Furthermore, the E. autumnata CR, which may reach 1075 bp in length, is considerably longer than previously reported lepidopteran CRs, which reach 311-499 bp in length. Like other lepidopteran CRs, the E. autumnata CR contains two long homopolymer runs that may be involved in mtDNA replication and (or) transcription.

  15. Phylogenetic relations of humans and African apes from DNA sequences in the Psi eta-globin region

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, M.M.; Slightom, J.L.; Goodman, M.

    1987-10-16

    Sequences from the upstream and downstream flanking DNA regions of the Psi eta-globin locus in Pan troglodytes (common chimpanzee), Gorilla gorilla (gorilla), and Pongo pygmaeus (orangutan, the closest living relative to Homo, Pan, and Gorilla) provided further data for evaluating the phylogenetic relations of humans and African apes. These newly sequenced orthologs (an additional 4.9 kilobase pairs (kbp) for each species) were combined with published Psi eta-gene sequences and then compared to the same orthologous stretch (a continuous 7.1-kbp region) available for humans. Phylogenetic analysis of these nucleotide sequences by the parsimony method indicated (i) that human and chimpanzee are more closely related to each other than either is to gorilla and (ii) that the slowdown in the rate of sequence evolution evident in higher primates is especially pronounced in humans. These results indicate that features unique to African apes (but not to humans) are primitive and that even local molecular clocks should be applied with caution.

  16. Phylogenetic relationship of Turkish Apis mellifera subspecies based on sequencing of mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase I region.

    PubMed

    Özdil, F; İlhan, F

    2012-04-27

    Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation can be used to infer honey bee evolutionary relationships. We examined DNA sequence diversity in the cytochrome C oxidase I (COI or Cox1) gene segment of the mitochondrial genome in 112 samples of Apis mellifera from 15 different populations in Turkey. Six novel haplotypes were found for the COI gene segment. There were eight variable sites in the COI gene, although only three were parsimony-informative sites. The mean pairwise genetic distance was 0.3% for the COI gene segment. Neighbor-joining (NJ) trees of the COI gene segment were constructed with the published sequences of A. mellifera haplotypes that are available in GenBank; the genetic variation was compared among the different honeybee haplotypes. The NJ dendogram based on the COI sequences available in GenBank showed that Eastern European races were clustered together, whereas the Mellifera and Iberian haplotypes were clustered far apart. The haplotypes found in this study were clustered together with A. mellifera ligustica and some of the Greek honey bees (accession Nos. GU056169 and GU056170) found in NCBI GenBank database. This study expands the knowledge about the mitochondrial COI region and presents the first comprehensive sequence analysis of this region in Turkish honeybees.

  17. Analysis of the Escherichia coli genome VI: DNA sequence of the region from 92.8 through 100 minutes.

    PubMed Central

    Burland, V; Plunkett, G; Sofia, H J; Daniels, D L; Blattner, F R

    1995-01-01

    The 338.5 kb of the Escherichia coli genome described here together with previously described segments bring the total of contiguous finished sequence of this genome to > 1 Mb. Of 319 open reading frames (ORFs) found in this 338.5 kb segment, 147 (46%) are potential new genes. The positions of several genes which had been previously located here by mapping or partial sequencing have been confirmed. Several ORFs have functions suggested by similarities to other characterised genes but cannot be assigned with certainty. Fifteen of the ORFs of unknown function had been previously sequenced. Eight transfer RNAs are encoded in the region and there are two grey holes in which no features were found. The attachment site for phage P4 and three insertion sequences were located. The region was also analysed for chi sites, bend sites, REP elements and other repeats. A computer search identified potential promoters and tentative transcription units were assigned. The occurrence of the rare tetramer CTAG was analysed in 1.6 Mb of contiguous E.coli sequence. Hypotheses addressing the rarity and distribution of CTAG are discussed. PMID:7610040

  18. Extensive sequence variation in the 3′ untranslated region of the KRAS gene in lung and ovarian cancer cases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minlee; Chen, Xiaowei; Chin, Lena J; Paranjape, Trupti; Speed, William C; Kidd, Kenneth K; Zhao, Hongyu; Weidhaas, Joanne B; Slack, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    While cancer is a serious health issue, there are very few genetic biomarkers that predict predisposition, prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment response. Recently, sequence variations that disrupt microRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation of genes have been shown to be associated with many human diseases, including cancer. In an early example, a variant at one particular single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a let-7 miRNA complementary site in the 3′ untranslated region (3′ UTR) of the KRAS gene was associated with risk and outcome of various cancers. The KRAS oncogene is an important regulator of cellular proliferation, and is frequently mutated in cancers. To discover additional sequence variants in the 3′ UTR of KRAS with the potential as genetic biomarkers, we resequenced the complete region of the 3′ UTR of KRAS in multiple non-small cell lung cancer and epithelial ovarian cancer cases either by Sanger sequencing or capture enrichment followed by high-throughput sequencing. Here we report a comprehensive list of sequence variations identified in cases, with some potentially dysregulating expression of KRAS by altering putative miRNA complementary sites. Notably, rs712, rs9266, and one novel variant may have a functional role in regulation of KRAS by disrupting complementary sites of various miRNAs, including let-7 and miR-181. PMID:24552817

  19. Sequence analysis of the breakpoint regions of an X;5 translocation in a female with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Bakel, I. van; Holt, S.; Craig, I.

    1995-08-01

    X;autosome translocations in females with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) provide an opportunity to study the mechanisms responsible for chromosomal rearrangements that occur in the germ line. We describe here a detailed molecular analysis of the translocation breakpoints of an X;autosome reciprocal translocation, t(X;5) (p21;q31.1), in a female with DMD. Cosmid clones that contained the X-chromosome breakpoint region were identified, and subclones that hybridized to the translocation junction fragment in restriction digests of the patient`s DNA were isolated and sequenced. Primers designed from the X-chromosomal sequence were used to obtain the junction fragments on the der(X) and the der(5) by inverse PCR. The resultant clones were also cloned and sequenced, and this information used to isolate the chromosome 5 breakpoint region. Comparison of the DNA sequences of the junction fragments with those of the breakpoint regions on chromosomes X and 5 revealed that the translocation arose by nonhomologous recombination with an imprecise reciprocal exchange. Four and six base pairs of unknown origin are inserted at the exchange points of the der(X) and der(5), respectively, and three nucleotides are deleted from the X-chromosome sequence. Two features were found that may have played a role in the generation of the translocation. These were (1) a repeat motif with an internal homopyrimidine stretch 10 bp upstream from the X-chromosome breakpoint and (2) a 9-bp sequence of 78% homology located near the breakpoints on chromosomes 5 and X. 32 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. IgG variable region and VH CDR3 diversity in unimmunized mice analyzed by massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin; Panavas, Tadas; Thys, Kim; Aerssens, Jeroen; Naso, Michael; Fisher, Jamie; Rycyzyn, Michael; Sweet, Raymond W

    2014-02-01

    Most antigen-specific mouse antibodies have been derived by hybridoma technology, predominantly through use of the Balb/c strain. Much of the Balb/c germline repertoire of variable genes (V regions) is known. However, there is little information about the background expressed repertoire of IgG antibodies in mice, which reflects the baseline against which antigen-specific antibodies are generated through immunization. To assess this baseline repertoire, RNA was isolated from splenic B-cells enriched for expression of IgG from three mice. The RNA was individually amplified with three distinct PCR primer sets for comprehensive recovery of the heavy and light chain variable regions. Each PCR product was independently subjected to deep sequencing using 454 pyro-sequencing technology and analysed for redundancy, open reading frame, germline representation, and CDR3 sequence of the heavy chain variable region (VH CDR3) within and across the primer sets and mice. A highly skewed abundance of heavy and light chain variable gene usage was observed for all three primers in all three mice. While showing considerable overlap, there were differences among these profiles indicative of primer bias and animal-to-animal variation. VH CDR3 sequences were likewise highly skewed indicating that the heavy chain genes profiles substantially reflected individual antibodies. This observation was confirmed through analysis of randomly selected complete heavy chain variable sequences. However, there was very little redundancy in VH CDR3 sequences across the different mice. We conclude that the background IgG repertoire in young, unimmunized mice is highly skewed within individual mice and is diverse among them, a pattern similar to that observed in highly immunized mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Combining microarray-based genomic selection (MGS) with the Illumina Genome Analyzer platform to sequence diploid target regions.

    PubMed

    Okou, David T; Locke, Adam E; Steinberg, Karyn M; Hagen, Katie; Athri, Prashanth; Shetty, Amol C; Patel, Viren; Zwick, Michael E

    2009-09-01

    Novel methods of targeted sequencing of unique regions from complex eukaryotic genomes have generated a great deal of excitement, but critical demonstrations of these methods efficacy with respect to diploid genotype calling and experimental variation are lacking. To address this issue, we optimized microarray-based genomic selection (MGS) for use with the Illumina Genome Analyzer (IGA). A set of 202 fragments (304 kb total) contained within a 1.7 Mb genomic region on human chromosome X were MGS/IGA sequenced in ten female HapMap samples generating a total of 2.4 GB of DNA sequence. At a minimum coverage threshold of 5X, 93.9% of all bases and 94.9% of segregating sites were called, while 57.7% of bases (57.4% of segregating sites) were called at a 50X threshold. Data accuracy at known segregating sites was 98.9% at 5X coverage, rising to 99.6% at 50X coverage. Accuracy at homozygous sites was 98.7% at 5X sequence coverage and 99.5% at 50X coverage. Although accuracy at heterozygous sites was modestly lower, it was still over 92% at 5X coverage and increased to nearly 97% at 50X coverage. These data provide the first demonstration that MGS/IGA sequencing can generate the very high quality sequence data necessary for human genetics research. All sequences generated in this study have been deposited in NCBI Short Read Archive (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Traces/sra, Accession # SRA007913).

  2. Human ribosomal RNA gene: nucleotide sequence of the transcription initiation region and comparison of three mammalian genes.

    PubMed Central

    Financsek, I; Mizumoto, K; Mishima, Y; Muramatsu, M

    1982-01-01

    The transcription initiation site of the human ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) was located by using the single-strand specific nuclease protection method and by determining the first nucleotide of the in vitro capped 45S preribosomal RNA. The sequence of 1,211 nucleotides surrounding the initiation site was determined. The sequenced region was found to consist of 75% G and C and to contain a number of short direct and inverted repeats and palindromes. By comparison of the corresponding initiation regions of three mammalian species, several conserved sequences were found upstream and downstream from the transcription starting point. Two short A + T-rich sequences are present on human, mouse, and rat ribosomal RNA genes between the initiation site and 40 nucleotides upstream, and a C + T cluster is located at a position around -60. At and downstream from the initiation site, a common sequence, T-AG-C-T-G-A-C-A-C-G-C-T-G-T-C-C-T-CT-T, was found in the three genes from position -1 through +18. The strong conservation of these sequences suggests their functional significance in rDNA. The S1 nuclease protection experiments with cloned rDNA fragments indicated the presence in human 45S RNA of molecules several hundred nucleotides shorter than the supposed primary transcript. The first 19 nucleotides of these molecules appear identical--except for one mismatch--to the nucleotide sequence of the 5' end of a supposed early processing product of the mouse 45S RNA. Images PMID:6954460

  3. Underreporting of fatal cases to a regional poison control center.

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, P D; Kearney, T E; Olson, K R

    1995-01-01

    We assessed fatal drug overdose and poisoning case surveillance by a regional poison control center, comparing it with medical examiner determinations of death by poisoning over the same 2-year period and from the same catchment area. We studied 358 fatal cases of poisoning or drug overdose reported by a medical examiner and 10 fatal cases of poisoning or drug overdose reported by a poison control center, analyzing demographics and other case-associated factors with with possible successful poison control center case surveillance. Of the medical examiner cases, 245 (68%) were prehospital deaths. Of the remaining 113 emergency department or hospital cases, only 5 (4.4%) were also reported to the poison control center. Compared with cases involving illicit drugs, other narcotics, and sedative drugs, those that involved other prescription drugs (relative odds, 30.6; 95% confidence interval, 2.7 to 351) and over-the-counter products and other substances (odds ratio, 18.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.4 to 257) were significantly more likely to be reported to the poison control center. Most fatal cases of poisoning and drug overdose are not detected through poison control center surveillance. For prevention and treatment, health planners and policy makers should recognize the implications of case underreporting. PMID:7618309

  4. Regional seismic stratigraphy and controls on the Quaternary evolution of the Cape Hatteras region of the Atlantic passive margin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mallinson, D.J.; Culver, S.J.; Riggs, S.R.; Thieler, E.R.; Foster, D.; Wehmiller, J.; Farrell, K.M.; Pierson, J.

    2010-01-01

    Seismic and core data, combined with amino acid racemization and strontium-isotope age data, enable the definition of the Quaternary stratigraphic framework and recognition of geologic controls on the development of the modern coastal system of North Carolina, U.S.A. Seven regionally continuous high amplitude reflections are defined which bound six seismic stratigraphic units consisting of multiple regionally discontinuous depositional sequences and parasequence sets, and enable an understanding of the evolution of this margin. Data reveal the progressive eastward progradation and aggradation of the Quaternary shelf. The early Pleistocene inner shelf occurs at a depth of ca. 20-40 m beneath the western part of the modern estuarine system (Pamlico Sound). A mid- to outer shelf lowstand terrace (also early Pleistocene) with shelf sand ridge deposits comprising parasequence sets within a transgressive systems tract, occurs at a deeper level (ca. 45-70 m) beneath the modern barrier island system (the Outer Banks) and northern Pamlico Sound. Seismic and foraminiferal paleoenvironmental data from cores indicate the occurrence of lowstand strandplain shoreline deposits on the early to middle Pleistocene shelf. Middle to late Pleistocene deposits occur above a prominent unconformity and marine flooding surface that truncates underlying units, and contain numerous filled fluvial valleys that are incised into the early and middle Pleistocene deposits. The stratigraphic framework suggests margin progradation and aggradation modified by an increase in the magnitude of sea-level fluctuations during the middle to late Pleistocene, expressed as falling stage, lowstand, transgressive and highstand systems tracts. Thick stratigraphic sequences occur within the middle Pleistocene section, suggesting the occurrence of high capacity fluvial point sources debouching into the area from the west and north. Furthermore, the antecedent topography plays a significant role in the evolution

  5. Investigation into length heteroplasmy in the mitochondrial DNA control region after treatment with bisulfite.

    PubMed

    Lee, James Chun-I; Tsai, Li-Chin; Yu, Yu-Jen; Lin, Chun-Yen; Linacre, Adrian; Hsieh, Hsing-Mei

    2016-04-01

    We report on a method to analyze length heteroplasmy within the human mitochondrial genome in which there are polycytosine [poly(C)] stretches. These poly(C) tracts induce heteroplasmy with the resultant inherent problems of accurate sequence designations. In this study, 20 samples that exhibited length heteroplasmy due to variation in the C-tracts within hypervariable region I (HVI) were treated with bisulfite, and one or more cytosine bases in these C-tracts were converted randomly to uracil. This resulted in an accurate sequence designation for nearly all samples. The only exceptions in which the DNA sequence could still not be determined occurred when there was total conversion, or a lack of conversion, of the cytosine bases. Replicate tests on the same samples showed that individual cytosine bases were randomly converted to uracil. This simple method was useful for investigating length heteroplasmy due to 16189C and 310C transitions in the mitochondrial-DNA control region. It is valuable for medical and forensic investigations.

  6. The complete coding region sequence of river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) SRY gene.

    PubMed

    Parma, Pietro; Feligini, Maria; Greppi, Gianfranco; Enne, Giuseppe

    2004-02-01

    The Y-linked SRY gene is responsible for testis determination in mammals. Mutations in this gene can lead to XY Gonadal Dysgenesis, an abnormal sexual phenotype described in humans, cattle, horses and river buffalo. We report here the complete river buffalo SRY sequence in order to enable the genetic diagnosis of this disease. The SRY sequence was also used to confirm the evolutionary divergence time between cattle and river buffalo 10 million years ago.

  7. Sequence variation of the 16S to 23S rRNA spacer region in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Christensen, H; Møller, P L; Vogensen, F K; Olsen, J E

    2000-01-01

    The possibility for identification of Salmonella enterica serotypes by sequence analysis of the 16S to 23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer was investigated by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA from all operons simultaneously in a collection of 25 strains of 18 different serotypes of S. enterica, and by sequencing individual cloned operons from a single strain. It was only possible to determine the first 117 bases upstream from the 23S rRNA gene by direct sequencing because of variation between the rrn operons. Comparison of sequences from this region allowed separation of only 15 out of the 18 serotypes investigated and was not specific even at the subspecies level of S. enterica. To determine the differences between internal transcribed spacers in more detail, the individual rrn operons of strain JEO 197, serotype IV 43:z4,z23:-, were cloned and sequenced. The strain contained four short internal transcribed spacer fragments of 382-384 bases in length, which were 98.4-99.7% similar to each other and three long fragments of 505 bases with 98.0-99.8% similarity. The study demonstrated a higher degree of interbacterial variation than intrabacterial variation between operons for serotypes of S. enterica.

  8. RNA sequencing of transcriptomes in human brain regions: protein-coding and non-coding RNAs, isoforms and alleles.

    PubMed

    Webb, Amy; Papp, Audrey C; Curtis, Amanda; Newman, Leslie C; Pietrzak, Maciej; Seweryn, Michal; Handelman, Samuel K; Rempala, Grzegorz A; Wang, Daqing; Graziosa, Erica; Tyndale, Rachel F; Lerman, Caryn; Kelsoe, John R; Mash, Deborah C; Sadee, Wolfgang

    2015-11-23

    We used RNA sequencing to analyze transcript profiles of ten autopsy brain regions from ten subjects. RNA sequencing techniques were designed to detect both coding and non-coding RNA, splice isoform composition, and allelic expression. Brain regions were selected from five subjects with a documented history of smoking and five non-smokers. Paired-end RNA sequencing was performed on SOLiD instruments to a depth of >40 million reads, using linearly amplified, ribosomally depleted RNA. Sequencing libraries were prepared with both poly-dT and random hexamer primers to detect all RNA classes, including long non-coding (lncRNA), intronic and intergenic transcripts, and transcripts lacking poly-A tails, providing additional data not previously available. The study was designed to generate a database of the complete transcriptomes in brain region for gene network analyses and discovery of regulatory variants. Of 20,318 protein coding and 18,080 lncRNA genes annotated from GENCODE and lncipedia, 12 thousand protein coding and 2 thousand lncRNA transcripts were detectable at a conservative threshold. Of the aligned reads, 52 % were exonic, 34 % intronic and 14 % intergenic. A majority of protein coding genes (65 %) was expressed in all regions, whereas ncRNAs displayed a more restricted distribution. Profiles of RNA isoforms varied across brain regions and subjects at multiple gene loci, with neurexin 3 (NRXN3) a prominent example. Allelic RNA ratios deviating from unity were identified in > 400 genes, detectable in both protein-coding and non-coding genes, indicating the presence of cis-acting regulatory variants. Mathematical modeling was used to identify RNAs stably expressed in all brain regions (serving as potential markers for normalizing expression levels), linked to basic cellular functions. An initial analysis of differential expression analysis between smokers and nonsmokers implicated a number of genes, several previously associated with nicotine exposure. RNA

  9. Sequence variation of koala retrovirus transmembrane protein p15E among koalas from different geographic regions.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yasuko; McCallister, Chelsea; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Helgen, Kristofer M; Greenwood, Alex D; Roca, Alfred L

    2015-01-15

    The koala retrovirus (KoRV), which is transitioning from an exogenous to an endogenous form, has been associated with high mortality in koalas. For other retroviruses, the envelope protein p15E has been considered a candidate for vaccine development. We therefore examined proviral sequence variation of KoRV p15E in a captive Queensland and three wild southern Australian koalas. We generated 163 sequences with intact open reading frames, which grouped into 39 distinct haplotypes. Sixteen distinct haplotypes comprising 139 of the sequences (85%) coded for the same polypeptide. Among the remaining 23 haplotypes, 22 were detected only once among the sequences, and each had 1 or 2 non-synonymous differences from the majority sequence. Several analyses suggested that p15E was under purifying selection. Important epitopes and domains were highly conserved across the p15E sequences and in previously reported exogenous KoRVs. Overall, these results support the potential use of p15E for KoRV vaccine development.

  10. Sequence variation of koala retrovirus transmembrane protein p15E among koalas from different geographic regions

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Yasuko; McCallister, Chelsea; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Greenwood, Alex D.; Roca, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    The koala retrovirus (KoRV), which is transitioning from an exogenous to an endogenous form, has been associated with high mortality in koalas. For other retroviruses, the envelope protein p15E has been considered a candidate for vaccine development. We therefore examined proviral sequence variation of KoRV p15E in a captive Queensland and three wild southern Australian koalas. We generated 163 sequences with intact open reading frames, which grouped into 39 distinct haplotypes. Sixteen distinct haplotypes comprising 139 of the sequences (85%) coded for the same polypeptide. Among the remaining 23 haplotypes, 22 were detected only once among the sequences, and each had 1 or 2 non-synonymous differences from the majority sequence. Several analyses suggested that p15E was under purifying selection. Important epitopes and domains were highly conserved across the p15E sequences and in previously reported exogenous KoRVs. Overall, these results support the potential use of p15E for KoRV vaccine development. PMID:25462343

  11. Functional dissection of the mouse tyrosinase locus control region identifies a new putative boundary activity

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Patricia; Martínez, Antonio; Regales, Lucía; Lavado, Alfonso; García-Díaz, Angel; Alonso, Ángel; Busturia, Ana; Montoliu, Lluís

    2003-01-01

    Locus control regions (LCRs) are complex high-order chromatin structures harbouring several regulatory elements, including enhancers and boundaries. We have analysed the mouse tyrosinase LCR functions, in vitro, in cell lines and, in vivo, in transgenic mice and flies. The LCR-core (2.1 kb), located at –15 kb and carrying a previously described tissue-specific DNase I hypersensitive site, operates as a transcriptional enhancer that efficiently transactivates heterologous promoters in a cell-specific orientation-independent manner. Furthermore, we have investigated the boundary activity of these sequences in transgenic animals and cells. In mice, the LCR fragment (3.7 kb) rescued a weakly expressed reference construct that displays position effects. In Drosophila, the LCR fragment and its core insulated the expression of a white minigene reporter construct from chromosomal position effects. In cells, sequences located 5′ from the LCR-core displayed putative boundary activities. We have obtained genomic sequences surrounding the LCR fragment and found a LINE1 repeated element at 5′. In B16 melanoma and L929 fibroblast mouse cells, this element was found heavily methylated, supporting the existence of putative boundary elements that could prevent the spreading of condensed chromatin from the LINE1 sequences into the LCR fragment, experimentally shown to be in an open chromatin structure. PMID:14576318

  12. Functional dissection of the mouse tyrosinase locus control region identifies a new putative boundary activity.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Patricia; Martínez, Antonio; Regales, Lucía; Lavado, Alfonso; García-Díaz, Angel; Alonso, Angel; Busturia, Ana; Montoliu, Lluís

    2003-11-01

    Locus control regions (LCRs) are complex high-order chromatin structures harbouring several regulatory elements, including enhancers and boundaries. We have analysed the mouse tyrosinase LCR functions, in vitro, in cell lines and, in vivo, in transgenic mice and flies. The LCR-core (2.1 kb), located at -15 kb and carrying a previously described tissue-specific DNase I hypersensitive site, operates as a transcriptional enhancer that efficiently transactivates heterologous promoters in a cell-specific orientation-independent manner. Furthermore, we have investigated the boundary activity of these sequences in transgenic animals and cells. In mice, the LCR fragment (3.7 kb) rescued a weakly expressed reference construct that displays position effects. In Drosophila, the LCR fragment and its core insulated the expression of a white minigene reporter construct from chromosomal position effects. In cells, sequences located 5' from the LCR-core displayed putative boundary activities. We have obtained genomic sequences surrounding the LCR fragment and found a LINE1 repeated element at 5'. In B16 melanoma and L929 fibroblast mouse cells, this element was found heavily methylated, supporting the existence of putative boundary elements that could prevent the spreading of condensed chromatin from the LINE1 sequences into the LCR fragment, experimentally shown to be in an open chromatin structure.

  13. Sox2 regulatory region 2 sequence works as a DNA nuclear targeting sequence enhancing the efficiency of an exogenous gene expression in ES cells.

    PubMed

    Funabashi, Hisakage; Takatsu, Makoto; Saito, Mikako; Matsuoka, Hideaki

    2010-10-01

    In this report, the effects of two DNA nuclear targeting sequence (DTS) candidates on the gene expression efficiency in ES cells were investigated. Reporter plasmids containing the simian virus 40 (SV40) promoter/enhancer sequence (SV40-DTS), a DTS for various types of cells but not being reported yet for ES cells, and the 81 base pairs of Sox2 regulatory region 2 (SRR2) where two transcriptional factors in ES cells, Oct3/4 and Sox2, are bound (SRR2-DTS), were introduced into cytoplasm in living cells by femtoinjection. The gene expression efficiencies of each plasmid in mouse insulinoma cell line MIN6 cells and mouse ES cells were then evaluated. Plasmids including SV40-DTS and SRR2-DTS exhibited higher gene expression efficiency comparing to plasmids without these DTSs, and thus it was concluded that both sequences work as a DTS in ES cells. In addition, it was suggested that SRR2-DTS works as an ES cell-specific DTS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to confirm the function of DTSs in ES cells.

  14. Exploring the diploid wheat ancestral A genome through sequence comparison at the high-molecular-weight glutenin locus region.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lingli; Huo, Naxin; Wang, Yi; Deal, Karin; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Daowen; Anderson, Olin D; Gu, Yong Qiang

    2012-12-01

    The polyploid nature of hexaploid wheat (T. aestivum, AABBDD) often represents a great challenge in various aspects of research including genetic mapping, map-based cloning of important genes, and sequencing and accurately assembly of its genome. To explore the utility of ancestral diploid species of polyploid wheat, sequence variation of T. urartu (A(u)A(u)) was analyzed by comparing its 277-kb large genomic region carrying the important Glu-1 locus with the homologous regions from the A genomes of the diploid T. monococcum (A(m)A(m)), tetraploid T. turgidum (AABB), and hexaploid T. aestivum (AABBDD). Our results revealed that in addition to a high degree of the gene collinearity, nested retroelement structures were also considerably conserved among the A(u) genome and the A genomes in polyploid wheats, suggesting that the majority of the repetitive sequences in the A genomes of polyploid wheats originated from the diploid A(u) genome. The difference in the compared region between A(u) and A is mainly caused by four differential TE insertion and two deletion events between these genomes. The estimated divergence time of A genomes calculated on nucleotide substitution rate in both shared TEs and collinear genes further supports the closer evolutionary relationship of A to A(u) than to A(m). The structure conservation in the repetitive regions promoted us to develop repeat junction markers based on the A(u) sequence for mapping the A genome in hexaploid wheat. Eighty percent of these repeat junction markers were successfully mapped to the corresponding region in hexaploid wheat, suggesting that T. urartu could serve as a useful resource for developing molecular markers for genetic and breeding studies in hexaploid wheat.

  15. Nucleotide sequences at the boundaries between gene and insertion regions in the rDNA of Drosophilia melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Dawid, I B; Rebbert, M L

    1981-10-10

    Ribosomal RNA genes interrupted by type 1 insertions of 1 kb and 0.5 kb have been sequenced through the insertion region and compared with an uninterrupted gene. The 0.5 kb insertion is flanked by a duplication of a 14 bp segment that is present once in the uninterrupted gene; the 1 kb insertion is flanked by a duplication of 11 of these 14 bp. Short insertions are identical in their entire length to downstream regions of long insertions. No internal repeats occur in the insertion. The presence of target site duplications suggests that type 1 insertions arose by the introduction of transposable elements into rDNA. Short sequence homologies between the upstream ends of the insertions and the 28S' boundaries of the rRNA coding region suggest that short type 1 insertions may have arisen by recombination from longer insertions. We have sequenced both boundaries of two molecules containing type 2 insertions and the upstream boundary of a third; the points of interruption at the upstream boundary (28S' site) differ from each other in steps of 2 bp. Between the boundary in the 0.5 kb type 1 insertion and the type 2 boundaries there are distances of 74, 76, and 78 bp. At the downstream boundary (28S'' site) the two sequenced type 2 insertions are identical. The rRNA coding region of one molecule extends across the insertion without deletion or duplication, but a 2 bp deletion in the RNA coding region is present in the second molecule. Stretches of 13 or 22 adenine residues occur at the downstream (28S'') end of the two type 2 insertions.

  16. Using Mendelian inheritance errors as quality control criteria in whole genome sequencing data set

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although the technical and analytic complexity of whole genome sequencing is generally appreciated, best practices for data cleaning and quality control have not been defined. Family based data can be used to guide the standardization of specific quality control metrics in nonfamily based data. Given the low mutation rate, Mendelian inheritance errors are likely as a result of erroneous genotype calls. Thus, our goal was to identify the characteristics that determine Mendelian inheritance errors. To accomplish this, we used chromosome 3 whole genome sequencing family based data from the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18. Mendelian inheritance errors were provided as part of the GAW18 data set. Additionally, for binary variants we calculated Mendelian inheritance errors using PLINK. Based on our analysis, nonbinary single-nucleotide variants have an inherently high number of Mendelian inheritance errors. Furthermore, in binary variants, Mendelian inheritance errors are not randomly distributed. Indeed, we identified 3 Mendelian inheritance error peaks that were enriched with repetitive elements. However, these peaks can be lessened with the inclusion of a single filter from the sequencing file. In summary, we demonstrated that erroneous sequencing calls are nonrandomly distributed across the genome and quality control metrics can dramatically reduce the number of mendelian inheritance errors. Appropriate quality control will allow optimal use of genetic data to realize the full potential of whole genome sequencing. PMID:25519373

  17. Identification of Lactobacillus isolates from the gastrointestinal tract, silage, and yoghurt by 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer region sequence comparisons.

    PubMed

    Tannock, G W; Tilsala-Timisjarvi, A; Rodtong, S; Ng, J; Munro, K; Alatossava, T

    1999-09-01

    Lactobacillus isolates were identified by PCR amplification and sequencing of the region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes (spacer region). The sequences obtained from the isolates were compared to those of reference strains held in GenBank. A similarity of 97.5% or greater was considered to provide identification. To check the reliability of the method, the V2-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced in the case of isolates whose spacer region sequences were less than 99% similar to that of a reference strain. Confirmation of identity was obtained in all instances. Spacer region sequencing provided rapid and accurate identification of Lactobacillus isolates obtained from gastrointestinal, yoghurt, and silage samples. It had an advantage over 16S V2-V3 sequence comparisons because it distinguished between isolates of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus.

  18. Genetic variability among Hymenolepis nana isolates from different geographical regions in China revealed by sequence analysis of three mitochondrial genes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tian; Gao, De-Zhen; Zhu, Wei-Ning; Fang, Su-Fang; Chen, Ning; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Liu, Guo-Hua; Lin, Rui-Qing

    2016-11-01

    Hymenolepis nana is a common tapeworm that parasitizes in the small intestine of rodent animals and humans. The present study examined the sequence diversity of three mitochondrial (mt) genes namely NADH dehydrogenase subunits 5 (nad5), small subunit ribosomal RNA (rrnS), and ATPase subunit 6 (atp6) of H. nana from mice in different geographical regions of China. A part of the nad5 (pnad5), complete rrnS and atp6 genes were amplified separately from individual H. nana isolates using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and then sequenced. The sequences of pnad5, rrnS, and atp6 were 710 bp, 704-711 bp, and 516 bp in length, respectively. The A + T contents of the sequences were 70.1-73.5% (pnad5), 70.1-71.7% (rrnS), and 76.6-77.9% (atp6). Sequence variation within H. nana was 0-1.4% for atp6, 0-1.7% for rrnS, and 0-0.7% for pnad5. The inter-specific sequence differences between H. nana and Hymenolepis diminuta were significantly higher, which was 31.6-31.7% (pnad5), 16.1-17.6% (rrnS), and 26.5-27.1% (atp6). Phylogenetic analysis based on the combined three sequences using the maximum parsimony (MP) method supported that H. nana is a species complex or "cryptic" species. These findings demonstrated clearly the usefulness of the three mtDNA sequences for population genetics and systematic studies of H. nana of human and animal health significance.

  19. 40 CFR 81.242 - Pecos-Permian Basin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.242 Pecos-Permian Basin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Pecos-Permian Basin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New Mexico) consists of the territorial area... Quality Control Region. 81.242 Section 81.242 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  20. 40 CFR 81.240 - Northeastern Plains Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.240 Northeastern Plains Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Northeastern Plains Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New Mexico) consists of the territorial area... Quality Control Region. 81.240 Section 81.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  1. 40 CFR 81.239 - Upper Rio Grande Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.239 Upper Rio Grande Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Upper Rio Grande Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New Mexico) consists of the... Quality Control Region. 81.239 Section 81.239 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  2. 40 CFR 81.77 - Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.77 Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region. The Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region...

  3. 40 CFR 81.77 - Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region... Control Regions § 81.77 Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region. The Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region... delimited): The entire Commonwealth of Puerto Rico: Puerto Rico and surrounding islands, Vieques and...

  4. 40 CFR 81.77 - Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region... Control Regions § 81.77 Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region. The Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region... delimited): The entire Commonwealth of Puerto Rico: Puerto Rico and surrounding islands, Vieques and...

  5. 40 CFR 81.77 - Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region... Control Regions § 81.77 Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region. The Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region... delimited): The entire Commonwealth of Puerto Rico: Puerto Rico and surrounding islands, Vieques and...

  6. 40 CFR 81.77 - Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region... Control Regions § 81.77 Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region. The Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region... delimited): The entire Commonwealth of Puerto Rico: Puerto Rico and surrounding islands, Vieques and...

  7. 40 CFR 81.90 - Androscoggin Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.90 Section 81.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.90 Androscoggin Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Androscoggin Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Maine-New Hampshire) consists of the...

  8. 40 CFR 81.89 - Metropolitan Cheyenne Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.89 Section 81.89 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.89 Metropolitan Cheyenne Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Cheyenne Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Wyoming) consists of the territorial...

  9. 40 CFR 81.119 - Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.119 Section 81.119 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.119 Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed...

  10. 40 CFR 81.120 - Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.120 Section 81.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.120 Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed...

  11. 40 CFR 81.87 - Metropolitan Boise Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.87 Section 81.87 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.87 Metropolitan Boise Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Boise Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Idaho) consists of the territorial area...

  12. 40 CFR 81.118 - Southwest Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.118 Section 81.118 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.118 Southwest Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southwest Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  13. 40 CFR 81.122 - Mississippi Delta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.122 Section 81.122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.122 Mississippi Delta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Mississippi Delta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  14. 40 CFR 81.119 - Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.119 Section 81.119 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.119 Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed...

  15. 40 CFR 81.116 - Northern Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.116 Section 81.116 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.116 Northern Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Northern Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  16. 40 CFR 81.90 - Androscoggin Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.90 Section 81.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.90 Androscoggin Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Androscoggin Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Maine-New Hampshire) consists of the...

  17. 40 CFR 81.98 - Burlington-Keokuk Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.98 Section 81.98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.98 Burlington-Keokuk Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Burlington-Keokuk Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Illinois-Iowa) is revised to consist of...

  18. 40 CFR 81.98 - Burlington-Keokuk Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.98 Section 81.98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.98 Burlington-Keokuk Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Burlington-Keokuk Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Illinois-Iowa) is revised to consist of...

  19. 40 CFR 81.116 - Northern Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.116 Section 81.116 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.116 Northern Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Northern Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  20. 40 CFR 81.78 - Metropolitan Portland Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.78 Section 81.78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.78 Metropolitan Portland Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Portland Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Maine) consists of the territorial...

  1. 40 CFR 81.119 - Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.119 Section 81.119 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.119 Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed...

  2. 40 CFR 81.120 - Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.120 Section 81.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.120 Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed...

  3. 40 CFR 81.106 - Greenville-Spartanburg Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.106 Section 81.106 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.106 Greenville-Spartanburg Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Greenville-Spartanburg Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Carolina) consists of the...

  4. 40 CFR 81.90 - Androscoggin Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.90 Section 81.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.90 Androscoggin Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Androscoggin Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Maine-New Hampshire) consists of the...

  5. 40 CFR 81.101 - Metropolitan Dubuque Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.101 Section 81.101 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.101 Metropolitan Dubuque Interstate Air Quality Contr