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Sample records for control region sequence

  1. Analysis of Mitochondrial Control Region Using Sanger Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ballard, David

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is an established forensic tool and has been used extensively to aid with both the identification of human remains and evidence recovered from scenes of crime. The biology of mtDNA confers both advantages and disadvantages when using it as a tool for identification. It benefits from a high copy number, which facilitates analysis from samples with highly degraded DNA or trace amounts of DNA, but the maternal mode of inheritance restricts its power of discrimination. With Next Generation Sequencing being used in research and some forensic casework laboratories the scope of mtDNA analysis in forensic casework may expand in the near future. Currently, however, most casework laboratories rely on Sanger sequencing and an established method for analyzing the hypervariable sequence regions is described. PMID:27259738

  2. Mitochondrial control-region sequence variation in aboriginal Australians.

    PubMed Central

    van Holst Pellekaan, S; Frommer, M; Sved, J; Boettcher, B

    1998-01-01

    The mitochondrial D-loop hypervariable segment 1 (mt HVS1) between nucleotides 15997 and 16377 has been examined in aboriginal Australian people from the Darling River region of New South Wales (riverine) and from Yuendumu in central Australia (desert). Forty-seven unique HVS1 types were identified, varying at 49 nucleotide positions. Pairwise analysis by calculation of BEPPI (between population proportion index) reveals statistically significant structure in the populations, although some identical HVS1 types are seen in the two contrasting regions. mt HVS1 types may reflect more-ancient distributions than do linguistic diversity and other culturally distinguishing attributes. Comparison with sequences from five published global studies reveals that these Australians demonstrate greatest divergence from some Africans, least from Papua New Guinea highlanders, and only slightly more from some Pacific groups (Indonesian, Asian, Samoan, and coastal Papua New Guinea), although the HVS1 types vary at different nucleotide sites. Construction of a median network, displaying three main groups, suggests that several hypervariable nucleotide sites within the HVS1 are likely to have undergone mutation independently, making phylogenetic comparison with global samples by conventional methods difficult. Specific nucleotide-site variants are major separators in median networks constructed from Australian HVS1 types alone and for one global selection. The distribution of these, requiring extended study, suggests that they may be signatures of different groups of prehistoric colonizers into Australia, for which the time of colonization remains elusive. PMID:9463317

  3. Mitochondrial control-region sequence variation in aboriginal Australians.

    PubMed

    van Holst Pellekaan, S; Frommer, M; Sved, J; Boettcher, B

    1998-02-01

    The mitochondrial D-loop hypervariable segment 1 (mt HVS1) between nucleotides 15997 and 16377 has been examined in aboriginal Australian people from the Darling River region of New South Wales (riverine) and from Yuendumu in central Australia (desert). Forty-seven unique HVS1 types were identified, varying at 49 nucleotide positions. Pairwise analysis by calculation of BEPPI (between population proportion index) reveals statistically significant structure in the populations, although some identical HVS1 types are seen in the two contrasting regions. mt HVS1 types may reflect more-ancient distributions than do linguistic diversity and other culturally distinguishing attributes. Comparison with sequences from five published global studies reveals that these Australians demonstrate greatest divergence from some Africans, least from Papua New Guinea highlanders, and only slightly more from some Pacific groups (Indonesian, Asian, Samoan, and coastal Papua New Guinea), although the HVS1 types vary at different nucleotide sites. Construction of a median network, displaying three main groups, suggests that several hypervariable nucleotide sites within the HVS1 are likely to have undergone mutation independently, making phylogenetic comparison with global samples by conventional methods difficult. Specific nucleotide-site variants are major separators in median networks constructed from Australian HVS1 types alone and for one global selection. The distribution of these, requiring extended study, suggests that they may be signatures of different groups of prehistoric colonizers into Australia, for which the time of colonization remains elusive. PMID:9463317

  4. Homogeneity in mitochondrial DNA control region sequences in Swedish subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Tillmar, Andreas O; Coble, Michael D; Wallerström, Thomas; Holmlund, Gunilla

    2010-03-01

    In order to promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) testing in Sweden we have typed 296 Swedish males, which will serve as a Swedish mtDNA frequency database. The tested males were taken from seven geographically different regions representing the contemporary Swedish population. The complete mtDNA control region was typed and the Swedish population was shown to have high haplotype diversity with a random match probability of 0.5%. Almost 47% of the tested samples belonged to haplogroup H and further haplogroup comparison with worldwide populations clustered the Swedish mtDNA data together with other European populations. AMOVA analysis of the seven Swedish subregions displayed no significant maternal substructure in Sweden (F (ST) = 0.002). Our conclusion from this study is that the typed Swedish individuals serve as good representatives for a Swedish forensic mtDNA database. Some caution should, however, be taken for individuals from the northernmost part of Sweden (provinces of Norrbotten and Lapland) due to specific demographic conditions. Furthermore, our analysis of a small sample set of a Swedish Saami population confirmed earlier findings that the Swedish Saami population is an outlier among European populations.

  5. One-way sequencing of multiple amplicons from tandem repetitive mitochondrial DNA control region.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiawu; Fonseca, Dina M

    2011-10-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences not only exist abundantly in eukaryotic nuclear genomes, but also occur as tandem repeats in many animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control regions. Due to concerted evolution, these repetitive sequences are highly similar or even identical within a genome. When long repetitive regions are the targets of amplification for the purpose of sequencing, multiple amplicons may result if one primer has to be located inside the repeats. Here, we show that, without separating these amplicons by gel purification or cloning, directly sequencing the mitochondrial repeats with the primer outside repetitive region is feasible and efficient. We exemplify it by sequencing the mtDNA control region of the mosquito Aedes albopictus, which harbors typical large tandem DNA repeats. This one-way sequencing strategy is optimal for population surveys.

  6. Cetacean mitochondrial DNA control region: sequences of all extant baleen whales and two sperm whale species.

    PubMed

    Arnason, U; Gullberg, A; Widegren, B

    1993-09-01

    The sequence of the mitochondrial control region was determined in all 10 extant species commonly assigned to the suborder Mysticeti (baleen or whalebone whales) and to two odontocete (toothed whale) species (the sperm and the pygmy sperm whale). In the mysticetes, both the length and the sequence of the control region were very similar, with differences occurring primarily in the first approximately 160 bp of the 5' end of the L-strand of the region. There were marked differences between the mysticete and sperm whale sequences and also between the two sperm whales. The control region, less its variable portion, was used in a comparison including the 10 mysticete sequences plus the same region of an Antarctic minke whale specimen and the two sperm whales. The difference between the minke whales from the North Atlantic and the Antarctic was greater than that between any acknowledged species belonging to the same genus (Balaenoptera). The difference was similar to that between the families Balaenopteridae (rorquals) and Eschrichtiidae (gray whales). The findings suggest that the Antarctic minke whale should have a full species status, B. bonaerensis. Parsimony analysis separated the bowhead and the right whale (family Balaenidae) from all remaining mysticetes, including the pygmy right whale. The pygmy right whale is usually included in family Balaenidae. The analysis revealed a close relationship between the gray whale (family Eschrichtiidae) sequence and those of the rorquals (family Balaenopteridae). The gray whale was included in a clade together with the sei, Bryde's, fin, blue, and humpback whales. This clade was separated from the two minke whale types, which branched together.

  7. Sequence evolution in and around the mitochondrial control region in birds.

    PubMed

    Quinn, T W; Wilson, A C

    1993-10-01

    By cloning and sequencing 3.4 kilobases of snow goose mtDNA we found that the ND5 gene is followed by the genes for cytochrome b, tRNA(Thr), tRNA(Pro), ND6, tRNA(Glu), the control region, tRNA(Phe), and srRNA. This order is identical to that of chicken, quail, and duck mtDNA but differs from that of mammals and a frog (Xenopus). The mean extent of difference due to base substitution between goose and chicken is generally closer to the same comparison between rat and mouse but less than that between human and cow. For one of the nine regions compared (tRNA(Glu)), the bird differences appear to be anomalous, possibly implicating altered functional constraints. Within the control region, several short sequences common to mammals are also conserved in the birds. Comparison of the goose control region with that of quail and chicken suggests that a sequence element with similarity to CSB-1 duplicated once prior to the divergence of goose and chicken and again on the lineage leading to chicken. Between goose (or duck) and chicken there are four times more transversions at the third positions of fourfold-degenerate codons in mitochondrial than in nuclear genes. PMID:8308909

  8. Repetitive sequences in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx L.) mitochondrial DNA control region.

    PubMed

    Sindičić, Magda; Gomerčić, Tomislav; Galov, Ana; Polanc, Primož; Huber, Duro; Slavica, Alen

    2012-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (CR) of numerous species is known to include up to five different repetitive sequences (RS1-RS5) that are found at various locations, involving motifs of different length and extensive length heteroplasmy. Two repetitive sequences (RS2 and RS3) on opposite sides of mtDNA central conserved region have been described in domestic cat (Felis catus) and some other felid species. However, the presence of repetitive sequence RS3 has not been detected in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) yet. We analyzed mtDNA CR of 35 Eurasian lynx (L. lynx L.) samples to characterize repetitive sequences and to compare them with those found in other felid species. We confirmed the presence of 80 base pairs (bp) repetitive sequence (RS2) at the 5' end of the Eurasian lynx mtDNA CR L strand and for the first time we described RS3 repetitive sequence at its 3' end, consisting of an array of tandem repeats five to ten bp long. We found that felid species share similar RS3 repetitive pattern and fundamental repeat motif TACAC.

  9. Multiple independent transpositions of mitochondrial DNA control region sequences to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sorenson, M D; Fleischer, R C

    1996-12-24

    Transpositions of mtDNA sequences to the nuclear genome have been documented in a wide variety of individual taxa, but little is known about their taxonomic frequency or patterns of variation. We provide evidence of nuclear sequences homologous to the mtDNA control region in seven species of diving ducks (tribe Aythyini). Phylogenetic analysis places each nuclear sequence as a close relative of the mtDNA haplotypes of the specie(s) in which it occurs, indicating that they derive from six independent transposition events, all occurring within the last approximately 1.5 million years. Relative-rate tests and comparison of intraspecific variation in nuclear and mtDNA sequences confirm the expectation of a greatly reduced rate of evolution in the nuclear copies. By representing mtDNA haplotypes from ancestral populations, nuclear insertions may be valuable in some phylogenetic analyses, but they also confound the accurate determination of mtDNA sequences. In particular, our data suggest that the presumably nonfunctional but more slowly evolving nuclear sequences often will not be identifiable by changes incompatible with function and may be preferentially amplified by PCR primers based on mtDNA sequences from related taxa. PMID:8986794

  10. Rapid evolution of a heteroplasmic repetitive sequence in the mitochondrial DNA control region of carnivores.

    PubMed

    Hoelzel, A R; Lopez, J V; Dover, G A; O'Brien, S J

    1994-08-01

    We describe a repetitive DNA region at the 3' end of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region and compare it in 21 carnivore species representing eight carnivore families. The sequence and organization of the repetitive motifs can differ extensively between arrays; however, all motifs appear to be derived from the core motif "ACGT." Sequence data and Southern blot analysis demonstrate extensive heteroplasmy. The general form of the array is similar between heteroplasmic variants within an individual and between individuals within a species (varying primarily in the length of the array, though two clones from the northern elephant seal are exceptional). Within certain families, notably ursids, the array structure is also similar between species. Similarity between species was not apparent in other carnivore families, such as the mustelids, suggesting rapid changes in the organization and sequence of some arrays. The pattern of change seen within and between species suggests that a dominant mechanism involved in the evolution of these arrays is DNA slippage. A comparative analysis shows that the motifs that are being reiterated or deleted vary within and between arrays, suggesting a varying rate of DNA turnover. We discuss the evolutionary implications of the observed patterns of variation and extreme levels of heteroplasmy. PMID:7932782

  11. Genetic structure of Florida green turtle rookeries as indicated by mitochondrial DNA control region sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shamblin, Brian M.; Bagley, Dean A.; Ehrhart, Llewellyn M.; Desjardin, Nicole A.; Martin, R. Erik; Hart, Kristen M.; Naro-Maciel, Eugenia; Rusenko, Kirt; Stiner, John C.; Sobel, Debra; Johnson, Chris; Wilmers, Thomas; Wright, Laura J.; Nairn, Campbell J.

    2014-01-01

    Green turtle (Chelonia mydas) nesting has increased dramatically in Florida over the past two decades, ranking the Florida nesting aggregation among the largest in the Greater Caribbean region. Individual beaches that comprise several hundred kilometers of Florida’s east coast and Keys support tens to thousands of nests annually. These beaches encompass natural to highly developed habitats, and the degree of demographic partitioning among rookeries was previously unresolved. We characterized the genetic structure of ten Florida rookeries from Cape Canaveral to the Dry Tortugas through analysis of 817 base pair mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences from 485 nesting turtles. Two common haplotypes, CM-A1.1 and CM-A3.1, accounted for 87 % of samples, and the haplotype frequencies were strongly partitioned by latitude along Florida’s Atlantic coast. Most genetic structure occurred between rookeries on either side of an apparent genetic break in the vicinity of the St. Lucie Inlet that separates Hutchinson Island and Jupiter Island, representing the finest scale at which mtDNA structure has been documented in marine turtle rookeries. Florida and Caribbean scale analyses of population structure support recognition of at least two management units: central eastern Florida and southern Florida. More thorough sampling and deeper sequencing are necessary to better characterize connectivity among Florida green turtle rookeries as well as between the Florida nesting aggregation and others in the Greater Caribbean region.

  12. Control region sequences indicate that multiple externae represent multiple infections by Sacculina carcini (Cirripedia: Rhizocephala).

    PubMed

    Rees, David; Glenner, Henrik

    2014-08-01

    The rhizocephalan barnacle, Sacculina carcini, is a common parasite of the European shore crab, Carcinus maenas, in which it causes significant detrimental physical and behavioral modifications. In the vast majority of cases, the external portion of the parasite is present in the form of a single sac-like externa; in rare cases, double or even triple externae may occur on the same individual host. Here, we use a highly variable DNA marker, the mitochondrial control region (CR), to investigate whether multiple externae in S. carcini represent infection by multiple parasites or asexual cloning developed by a single parasite individual. Sequences for multiple externae from C. maenas hosts from the Danish inlet, Limfjorden, and from the mud flates at Roscoff, France, were compared. In almost all cases, double or triple externae from an individual host yielded different haplotypes. In the few cases where identical haplotypes were identified from externae on a multiple-infected host, this always represented the most commonly found haplotype in the population. This indicates that in Sacculina carcini, the presence of multiple externae on a single host reflects infection by different individual parasites. A haplotype network of CR sequences also suggests a degree of geographical partitioning, with no shared haplotypes between the Limfjorden and Roscoff. Our data represent the first complete CR sequences for a rhizocephalan, and a unique gene order was also revealed. Although the utility of CR sequences for population-level work must be investigated further, the CR has proved a simple to use and highly variable marker for studies of S. carcini and can easily be applied to a variety of studies in this important parasite. PMID:25473481

  13. Control region sequences indicate that multiple externae represent multiple infections by Sacculina carcini (Cirripedia: Rhizocephala)

    PubMed Central

    Rees, David; Glenner, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The rhizocephalan barnacle, Sacculina carcini, is a common parasite of the European shore crab, Carcinus maenas, in which it causes significant detrimental physical and behavioral modifications. In the vast majority of cases, the external portion of the parasite is present in the form of a single sac-like externa; in rare cases, double or even triple externae may occur on the same individual host. Here, we use a highly variable DNA marker, the mitochondrial control region (CR), to investigate whether multiple externae in S. carcini represent infection by multiple parasites or asexual cloning developed by a single parasite individual. Sequences for multiple externae from C. maenas hosts from the Danish inlet, Limfjorden, and from the mud flates at Roscoff, France, were compared. In almost all cases, double or triple externae from an individual host yielded different haplotypes. In the few cases where identical haplotypes were identified from externae on a multiple-infected host, this always represented the most commonly found haplotype in the population. This indicates that in Sacculina carcini, the presence of multiple externae on a single host reflects infection by different individual parasites. A haplotype network of CR sequences also suggests a degree of geographical partitioning, with no shared haplotypes between the Limfjorden and Roscoff. Our data represent the first complete CR sequences for a rhizocephalan, and a unique gene order was also revealed. Although the utility of CR sequences for population-level work must be investigated further, the CR has proved a simple to use and highly variable marker for studies of S. carcini and can easily be applied to a variety of studies in this important parasite. PMID:25473481

  14. Haplogroup Classification of Korean Cattle Breeds Based on Sequence Variations of mtDNA Control Region.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Seong-Su; Kim, Seung Chang; Choi, Seong-Bok; Kim, Su-Hyun; Lee, Chang Woo; Jung, Kyoung-Sub; Kim, Eun Sung; Choi, Young-Sun; Kim, Sung-Bok; Kim, Woo Hyun; Cho, Chang-Yeon

    2016-05-01

    Many studies have reported the frequency and distribution of haplogroups among various cattle breeds for verification of their origins and genetic diversity. In this study, 318 complete sequences of the mtDNA control region from four Korean cattle breeds were used for haplogroup classification. 71 polymorphic sites and 66 haplotypes were found in these sequences. Consistent with the genetic patterns in previous reports, four haplogroups (T1, T2, T3, and T4) were identified in Korean cattle breeds. In addition, T1a, T3a, and T3b sub-haplogroups were classified. In the phylogenetic tree, each haplogroup formed an independent cluster. The frequencies of T3, T4, T1 (containing T1a), and T2 were 66%, 16%, 10%, and 8%, respectively. Especially, the T1 haplogroup contained only one haplotype and a sample. All four haplogroups were found in Chikso, Jeju black and Hanwoo. However, only the T3 and T4 haplogroups appeared in Heugu, and most Chikso populations showed a partial of four haplogroups. These results will be useful for stable conservation and efficient management of Korean cattle breeds. PMID:26954229

  15. An application of control region sequence as a matrilineage marker for Elliot's pheasant of a zoo population.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ping-Ping; Fang, Sheng-Gou; Ding, Ping

    2005-01-01

    Control region sequence, an mtDNA marker, was usually used in phylogenesis analysis in species level or genetic structure study among populations. In this study, enlightened by its character of maternal heredity in vertebrates, we used control region sequence as a matrilineage marker for Elliot's pheasant (Syrmaticus ellioti) of Ningbo Zoo population. In Ningbo Zoo, 36 individuals of Elliot's pheasant were descendants from three female founders introduced in 1988. Three control region haplotypes (Ha, Hb, Hc) were identified by six variable nucleotide positions among the control region sequences over 36 individuals. The number of haplotypes was accorded with the number of female founders. Total 20 individuals (C04, C06, C08-11, C14, C20, C21, C23-29, C32, C34-36) shared haplotype a, while 12 individuals (C01, C05, C07, C12, C13, C16-19, C22, C30, C33) shared haplotype b and 4 individuals (C02, C03, C15, C31) shared haplotype c. Those individuals sharing the same haplotype were offspring from one female founder. In other words, there were three maternal lineages and the simple relationship among individuals was indicated. As a result, it seemed that the control region sequence was a useful marker for identification of matrilineage in this study. Meanwhile, the matrilineage information may be compensatory data if there were no any pedigree records in captive species for breeding management.

  16. Regulatory regions of two transport operons under nitrogen control: nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, C F; Ames, G F

    1982-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequences of the regulatory regions from two amino acid transport operons from Salmonella typhimurium: dhuA, which regulates the histidine transport operon, and argTr, which regulates argT, the gene encoding the lysine-arginine-ornithine-binding protein, LAO. The promoter for the histidine transport operon has been identified from the sequence change in the promoter-up mutation dhuA1. Neither regulatory region has any of the features typical of the regulatory regions of the amino acid biosynthetic operons, indicating that regulation of at least these transport genes does not involve a transcription attenuation mechanism. We have identified three interesting features, present in both of these sequences, which may be of importance in the regulation of these and other operons: a "stem-loop-foot" structure, a region of specific homology, and a mirror symmetry. The region of mirror symmetry may be a protein recognition site important is regulating expression of these and other operons in response to nitrogen availability. Mirror symmetry as a structure for DNA-protein interaction sites has not been proposed previously. PMID:7041112

  17. Controlled processing during sequencing.

    PubMed

    Thothathiri, Malathi; Rattinger, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Longstanding evidence has identified a role for the frontal cortex in sequencing within both linguistic and non-linguistic domains. More recently, neuropsychological studies have suggested a specific role for the left premotor-prefrontal junction (BA 44/6) in selection between competing alternatives during sequencing. In this study, we used neuroimaging with healthy adults to confirm and extend knowledge about the neural correlates of sequencing. Participants reproduced visually presented sequences of syllables and words using manual button presses. Items in the sequence were presented either consecutively or concurrently. Concurrent presentation is known to trigger the planning of multiple responses, which might compete with one another. Therefore, we hypothesized that regions involved in controlled processing would show greater recruitment during the concurrent than the consecutive condition. Whole-brain analysis showed concurrent > consecutive activation in sensory, motor and somatosensory cortices and notably also in rostral-dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. Region of interest analyses showed increased activation within left BA 44/6 and correlation between this region's activation and behavioral response times. Functional connectivity analysis revealed increased connectivity between left BA 44/6 and the posterior lobe of the cerebellum during the concurrent than the consecutive condition. These results corroborate recent evidence and demonstrate the involvement of BA 44/6 and other control regions when ordering co-activated representations.

  18. Controlled processing during sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Thothathiri, Malathi; Rattinger, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Longstanding evidence has identified a role for the frontal cortex in sequencing within both linguistic and non-linguistic domains. More recently, neuropsychological studies have suggested a specific role for the left premotor-prefrontal junction (BA 44/6) in selection between competing alternatives during sequencing. In this study, we used neuroimaging with healthy adults to confirm and extend knowledge about the neural correlates of sequencing. Participants reproduced visually presented sequences of syllables and words using manual button presses. Items in the sequence were presented either consecutively or concurrently. Concurrent presentation is known to trigger the planning of multiple responses, which might compete with one another. Therefore, we hypothesized that regions involved in controlled processing would show greater recruitment during the concurrent than the consecutive condition. Whole-brain analysis showed concurrent > consecutive activation in sensory, motor and somatosensory cortices and notably also in rostral-dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. Region of interest analyses showed increased activation within left BA 44/6 and correlation between this region’s activation and behavioral response times. Functional connectivity analysis revealed increased connectivity between left BA 44/6 and the posterior lobe of the cerebellum during the concurrent than the consecutive condition. These results corroborate recent evidence and demonstrate the involvement of BA 44/6 and other control regions when ordering co-activated representations. PMID:26578941

  19. Massively parallel sequencing of the entire control region and targeted coding region SNPs of degraded mtDNA using a simplified library preparation method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Young; Lee, Hwan Young; Oh, Se Yoon; Jung, Sang-Eun; Yang, In Seok; Lee, Yang-Han; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-05-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to forensic genetics is being explored by an increasing number of laboratories because of the potential of high-throughput sequencing for recovering genetic information from multiple markers and multiple individuals in a single run. A cumbersome and technically challenging library construction process is required for NGS. In this study, we propose a simplified library preparation method for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis that involves two rounds of PCR amplification. In the first-round of multiplex PCR, six fragments covering the entire mtDNA control region and 22 fragments covering interspersed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the coding region that can be used to determine global haplogroups and East Asian haplogroups were amplified using template-specific primers with read sequences. In the following step, indices and platform-specific sequences for the MiSeq(®) system (Illumina) were added by PCR. The barcoded library produced using this simplified workflow was successfully sequenced on the MiSeq system using the MiSeq Reagent Nano Kit v2. A total of 0.4 GB of sequences, 80.6% with base quality of >Q30, were obtained from 12 degraded DNA samples and mapped to the revised Cambridge Reference Sequence (rCRS). A relatively even read count was obtained for all amplicons, with an average coverage of 5200 × and a less than three-fold read count difference between amplicons per sample. Control region sequences were successfully determined, and all samples were assigned to the relevant haplogroups. In addition, enhanced discrimination was observed by adding coding region SNPs to the control region in in silico analysis. Because the developed multiplex PCR system amplifies small-sized amplicons (<250 bp), NGS analysis using the library preparation method described here allows mtDNA analysis using highly degraded DNA samples. PMID:26844917

  20. Modified midi- and mini-multiplex PCR systems for mitochondrial DNA control region sequence analysis in degraded samples.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Young; Lee, Hwan Young; Park, Sun Joo; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2013-05-01

    Two multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems (Midiplex and Miniplex) were developed for the amplification of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region, and the efficiencies of the multiplexes for amplifying degraded DNA were validated using old skeletal remains. The Midiplex system consisted of two multiplex PCRs to amplify six overlapping amplicons ranging in length from 227 to 267 bp. The Miniplex system consisted of three multiplex PCRs to amplify 10 overlapping short amplicons ranging in length from 142 to 185 bp. Most mtDNA control region sequences of several 60-year-old and 400-500-year-old skeletal remains were successfully obtained using both PCR systems and consistent with those previously obtained by monoplex amplification. The multiplex system consisting of smaller amplicons is effective for mtDNA sequence analyses of ancient and forensic degraded samples, saving time, cost, and the amount of DNA sample consumed during analysis.

  1. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the tubeworm Lamellibrachia satsuma and structural conservation in the mitochondrial genome control regions of Order Sabellida.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ajit Kumar; Kwon, Yong Min; Kang, Sung Gyun; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Kim, Sang-Jin

    2016-04-01

    The control region of the mitochondrial genomes shows high variation in conserved sequence organizations, which follow distinct evolutionary patterns in different species or taxa. In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Lamellibrachia satsuma from the cold-seep region of Kagoshima Bay, as a part of whole genome study and extensively studied the structural features and patterns of the control region sequences. We obtained 15,037 bp of mitochondrial genome using Illumina sequencing and identified the non-coding AT-rich region or control region (354 bp, AT=83.9%) located between trnH and trnR. We found 7 conserved sequence blocks (CSB), scattered throughout the control region of L. satsuma and other taxa of Annelida. The poly-TA stretches, which commonly form the stem of multiple stem-loop structures, are most conserved in the CSB-I and CSB-II regions. The mitochondrial genome of L. satsuma encodes a unique repetitive sequence in the control region, which forms a unique secondary structure in comparison to Lamellibrachia luymesi. Phylogenetic analyses of all protein-coding genes indicate that L. satsuma forms a monophyletic clade with L. luymesi along with other tubeworms found in cold-seep regions (genera: Lamellibrachia, Escarpia, and Seepiophila). In general, the control region sequences of Annelida could be aligned with certainty within each genus, and to some extent within the family, but with a higher rate of variation in conserved regions. PMID:26776396

  2. Sequencing Complex Genomic Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, Evan

    2009-05-28

    Evan Eichler, Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at the University of Washington, gives the May 28, 2009 keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM. Part 2 of 2

  3. Sequencing Complex Genomic Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, Evan

    2009-05-28

    Evan Eichler, Howard Hughes Medical Investigator at the University of Washington, gives the May 28, 2009 keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM. Part 1 of 2

  4. [Polymorphism and Genetic Structure of Microtus maximowiczii (Schrenck, 1858) (Rodentia, Cricetidae) from the Middle Amur River Region as Inferred from Sequencing of the mtDNA Control Region].

    PubMed

    Sheremetyeva, I N; Kartavtseva, I V; Frisman, L V; Vasil'eva, T V; Adnagulova, A V

    2015-10-01

    The genetic variability of the mitochondrial DNA control region sequences was estimated for the Maximowicz's vole Microtus maximowiczii from the Middle Amur River region located between the confluence of Amur River with Ussuri River and Zeya River. The species as a whole was characterized by a high level of genetic variability. For each individual sample, low nucleotide diversity was observed, except for two samples in which a more than twofold increase in this index was revealed. The presence of the contact zone of two genetically distinct populations in the area between Bira and Bidzhan rivers is suggested. PMID:27169230

  5. Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial DNA control region of ciscoes (genus Coregonus): Taxonomic implications for the Great Lakes species flock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Kent M.; Dorschner, Michael O.; Todd, Thomas N.; Phillips, Ruth B.

    1998-01-01

    Sequence variation in the control region (D-loop) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was examined to assess the genetic distinctiveness of the shortjaw cisco (Coregonus zenithicus). Individuals from within the Great Lakes Basin as well as inland lakes outside the basin were sampled. DNA fragments containing the entire D-loop were amplified by PCR from specimens ofC. zenithicus and the related species C. artedi, C. hoyi, C. kiyi, and C. clupeaformis. DNA sequence analysis revealed high similarity within and among species and shared polymorphism for length variants. Based on this analysis, the shortjaw cisco is not genetically distinct from other cisco species.

  6. Interpretation guidelines of mtDNA control region sequence electropherograms in forensic genetics.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Manuel Crespillo

    2012-01-01

    Forensic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis is a complementary technique to forensic nuclear DNA (nDNA) and trace evidence analysis. Its use has been accepted by the vast majority of courts of law around the world. However for the forensic community it is crucial to employ standardized methods and procedures to guaranty the quality of the results obtained in court. In this chapter, we describe the most important aspects regarding the interpretation and assessment of mtDNA analysis, and offer a simple guide which places particular emphasis on those aspects that can impact the final interpretation of the results. These include the criteria for authenticating a sequence excluding the contaminant origin, defining the quality of a sequence, editing procedure, alignment criteria for searching the databases, and the statistical evaluation of matches. It is not easy to establish a single guide to interpretation for mtDNA analysis; however, it is important to understand all variables that may in some way affect the final conclusion in the context of a forensic case. As a general rule, laboratories should be cautious before issuing the final conclusion of an mtDNA analysis, and consider any significant limitations regarding current understanding of specific aspects of the mtDNA molecule. PMID:22139669

  7. Possible antiviral effect of ciprofloxacin treatment on polyomavirus BK replication and analysis of non-coding control region sequences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Acute renal dysfunction (ARD) is a common complication in renal transplant recipients. Multiple factors contribute to ARD development, including acute rejection and microbial infections. Many viral infections after kidney transplantation result from reactivation of “latent” viruses in the host or from the graft, such as the human Polyomavirus BK (BKV). We report the case of a 39 year-old recipient of a 2nd kidney graft who experienced BKV reactivation after a second episode of acute humoral rejection. A 10-day treatment with the quinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin was administered with an increase of immunosuppressive therapy despite the active BKV replication. Real Time PCR analysis performed after treatment with ciprofloxacin, unexpectedly showed clearance of BK viremia and regression of BK viruria. During the follow-up, BK viremia persisted undetectable while viruria decreased further and disappeared after 3 months. BKV non-coding control region sequence analysis from all positive samples always showed the presence of archetypal sequences, with two single-nucleotide substitutions and one nucleotide deletion that, interestingly, were all representative of the subtype/subgroup I/b-1 we identified by the viral protein 1 sequencing analysis. We report the potential effect of the quinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin in the decrease of the BKV load in both blood and urine. PMID:24004724

  8. Possible antiviral effect of ciprofloxacin treatment on polyomavirus BK replication and analysis of non-coding control region sequences.

    PubMed

    Umbro, Ilaria; Anzivino, Elena; Tinti, Francesca; Zavatto, Assunta; Bellizzi, Anna; Rodio, Donatella Maria; Mancini, Carlo; Pietropaolo, Valeria; Mitterhofer, Anna Paola

    2013-01-01

    Acute renal dysfunction (ARD) is a common complication in renal transplant recipients. Multiple factors contribute to ARD development, including acute rejection and microbial infections. Many viral infections after kidney transplantation result from reactivation of "latent" viruses in the host or from the graft, such as the human Polyomavirus BK (BKV). We report the case of a 39 year-old recipient of a 2nd kidney graft who experienced BKV reactivation after a second episode of acute humoral rejection. A 10-day treatment with the quinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin was administered with an increase of immunosuppressive therapy despite the active BKV replication. Real Time PCR analysis performed after treatment with ciprofloxacin, unexpectedly showed clearance of BK viremia and regression of BK viruria. During the follow-up, BK viremia persisted undetectable while viruria decreased further and disappeared after 3 months.BKV non-coding control region sequence analysis from all positive samples always showed the presence of archetypal sequences, with two single-nucleotide substitutions and one nucleotide deletion that, interestingly, were all representative of the subtype/subgroup I/b-1 we identified by the viral protein 1 sequencing analysis.We report the potential effect of the quinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin in the decrease of the BKV load in both blood and urine.

  9. Possible antiviral effect of ciprofloxacin treatment on polyomavirus BK replication and analysis of non-coding control region sequences.

    PubMed

    Umbro, Ilaria; Anzivino, Elena; Tinti, Francesca; Zavatto, Assunta; Bellizzi, Anna; Rodio, Donatella Maria; Mancini, Carlo; Pietropaolo, Valeria; Mitterhofer, Anna Paola

    2013-01-01

    Acute renal dysfunction (ARD) is a common complication in renal transplant recipients. Multiple factors contribute to ARD development, including acute rejection and microbial infections. Many viral infections after kidney transplantation result from reactivation of "latent" viruses in the host or from the graft, such as the human Polyomavirus BK (BKV). We report the case of a 39 year-old recipient of a 2nd kidney graft who experienced BKV reactivation after a second episode of acute humoral rejection. A 10-day treatment with the quinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin was administered with an increase of immunosuppressive therapy despite the active BKV replication. Real Time PCR analysis performed after treatment with ciprofloxacin, unexpectedly showed clearance of BK viremia and regression of BK viruria. During the follow-up, BK viremia persisted undetectable while viruria decreased further and disappeared after 3 months.BKV non-coding control region sequence analysis from all positive samples always showed the presence of archetypal sequences, with two single-nucleotide substitutions and one nucleotide deletion that, interestingly, were all representative of the subtype/subgroup I/b-1 we identified by the viral protein 1 sequencing analysis.We report the potential effect of the quinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin in the decrease of the BKV load in both blood and urine. PMID:24004724

  10. Minding the gap: Frequency of indels in mtDNA control region sequence data and influence on population genetic analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearce, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Insertions and deletions (indels) result in sequences of various lengths when homologous gene regions are compared among individuals or species. Although indels are typically phylogenetically informative, occurrence and incorporation of these characters as gaps in intraspecific population genetic data sets are rarely discussed. Moreover, the impact of gaps on estimates of fixation indices, such as FST, has not been reviewed. Here, I summarize the occurrence and population genetic signal of indels among 60 published studies that involved alignments of multiple sequences from the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of vertebrate taxa. Among 30 studies observing indels, an average of 12% of both variable and parsimony-informative sites were composed of these sites. There was no consistent trend between levels of population differentiation and the number of gap characters in a data block. Across all studies, the average influence on estimates of ??ST was small, explaining only an additional 1.8% of among population variance (range 0.0-8.0%). Studies most likely to observe an increase in ??ST with the inclusion of gap characters were those with < 20 variable sites, but a near equal number of studies with few variable sites did not show an increase. In contrast to studies at interspecific levels, the influence of indels for intraspecific population genetic analyses of control region DNA appears small, dependent upon total number of variable sites in the data block, and related to species-specific characteristics and the spatial distribution of mtDNA lineages that contain indels. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Dissecting a locus control region: facilitation of enhancer function by extended enhancer-flanking sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Aronow, B J; Ebert, C A; Valerius, M T; Potter, S S; Wiginton, D A; Witte, D P; Hutton, J J

    1995-01-01

    Using transgenic mice, we have defined novel gene regulatory elements, termed "facilitators." These elements bilaterally flank, by up to 1 kb, a 200-bp T-cell-specific enhancer domain in the human adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene. Facilitators were essential for gene copy-proportional and integration site-independent reporter expression in transgenic thymocytes, but they had no effect on the enhancer in transfected T cells. Both segments were required. Individual segments had no activity. A lack of facilitator function caused positional susceptibility and prevented DNase I-hypersensitive site formation at the enhancer. The segments were required to be at opposed ends of the enhancer, and they could not be grouped together. Reversing the orientation of a facilitator segment caused a partial loss of function, suggesting involvement of a stereospecific chromatin structure. trans-acting factor access to enhancer elements was modeled by exposing nuclei to a restriction endonuclease. The enhancer domain was accessible to the 4-cutter DpnII in a tissue- and cell-type-specific fashion. However, unlike DNase I hypersensitivity and gene expression, accessibility to the endonuclease could occur without the facilitator segments, suggesting that an accessible chromatin domain is an intermediate state in the activational pathway. These results suggest that facilitators (i) are distinct from yet positionally constrained to the enhancer, (ii) participate in a chromatin structure transition that is necessary for the DNase I hypersensitivity and the transcriptional activating function of the enhancer, and (iii) act after cell-type-specific accessibility to the enhancer sequences is established by factors that do not require the facilitators to be present. PMID:7823928

  12. [Genetic variation of Manchurian pheasant (Phasianus colchicus pallasi Rotshild, 1903) inferred from mitochondrial DNA control region sequences].

    PubMed

    Kozyrenko, M M; Fisenko, P V; Zhuravlev, Iu N

    2009-04-01

    Sequence variation of the mitochondrial DNA control region was studied in Manchurian pheasants (Phasianus colchicus pallasi Rotshild, 1903) representing three geographic populations from the southern part of the Russian Far East. Extremely low population genetic differentiation (F(ST) = 0.0003) pointed to a very high gene exchange between the populations. Combination of such characters as high haplotype diversity (0.884 to 0.913), low nucleotide diversity (0.0016 to 0.0022), low R2 values (0.1235 to 0.1337), certain patterns of pairwise-difference distributions, and the absence of phylogenetic structure suggested that the phylogenetic history of Ph. C. pallasi included passing through a bottleneck with further expansion in the postglacial period. According to the data obtained, it was suggested that differentiation between the mitochondrial lineages started approximately 100 000 years ago.

  13. Constraining controls on carbonate sequences with high-resolution chronostratigraphy: Upper Miocene, Cabo de Gata region, SE Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, P.; Farr, M.R.; Franseen, E.K.; Goldstein, R.H.

    2001-01-01

    A high-resolution chronostratigraphy has been developed for Miocene shallow-water carbonate strata in the Cabo de Gata region of SE Spain for evaluation of local, regional and global factors that controlled platform architecture prior to and during the Messinian salinity crisis. Paleomagnetic data were collected from strata at three localities. Mean natural remanent magnetization (NRM) ranges between 1.53 ?? 10-8 and 5.2 ?? 10-3 Am2/kg. Incremental thermal and alternating field demagnetization isolated the characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM). Rock magnetic studies show that the dominant magnetic mineral is magnetite, but mixtures of magnetite and hematite occur. A composite chronostratigraphy was derived from five stratigraphic sections. Regional stratigraphic data, biostratigraphic data, and an 40Ar/39Ar date of 8.5 ?? 0.1 Ma, for an interbedded volcanic flow, place the strata in geomagnetic polarity Chrons C4r to C3r. Sequence-stratigraphic and diagenetic evidence indicate a major unconformity at the base of depositional sequence (DS)3 that contains a prograding reef complex, suggesting that approximately 250 000 yr of record (Subchrons C3Br.2r to 3Br.1r) are missing near the Messinian-Tortonian boundary. Correlation to the GPTS shows that the studied strata represent five third- to fourth-order DSs. Basal units are temperate to subtropical ramps (DS1A, DS1B, DS2); these are overlain by subtropical to tropical reefal platforms (DS3), which are capped by subtropical to tropical cyclic carbonates (Terminal Carbonate Complex, TCC). Correlation of the Cabo de Gata record to the Melilla area of Morocco, and the Sorbas basin of Spain indicate that early - Late Tortonian ramp strata from these areas are partially time-equivalent. Similar strata are extensively developed in the Western Mediterranean and likely were influenced by a cool climate or influx of nutrients during an overall rise in global sea-level. After ramp deposition, a sequence boundary (SB3) in

  14. The phylogeographical pattern and conservation of the Chinese cobra (Naja atra) across its range based on mitochondrial control region sequences.

    PubMed

    Lin, Long-Hui; Hua, Lei; Qu, Yan-Fu; Gao, Jian-Fang; Ji, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The vulnerable Chinese cobra (Naja atra) ranges from southeastern China south of the Yangtze River to northern Vietnam and Laos. Large mountain ranges and water bodies may influence the pattern of genetic diversity of this species. We sequenced the mitochondrial DNA control region (1029 bp) using 285 individuals collected from 23 localities across the species' range and obtained 18 sequences unique to Taiwan from GenBank for phylogenetic and population analysis. Two distinct clades were identified, one including haplotypes from the two westernmost localities (Hekou and Miyi) and the other including haplotypes from all sampling sites except Miyi. A strong population structure was found (Φst = 0.76, P<0.0001) with high haplotype diversity (h = 1.00) and low nucleotide diversity (π = 0.0049). The Luoxiao and Nanling Mountains act as historical geographical barriers limiting gene exchange. In the haplotype network there were two "star" clusters. Haplotypes from populations east of the Luoxiao Mountains were represented within one cluster and haplotypes from populations west of the mountain range within the other, with haplotypes from populations south of the Nanling Mountains in between. Lineage sorting between mainland and island populations is incomplete. It remains unknown as to how much adaptive differentiation there is between population groups or within each group. We caution against long-distance transfers within any group, especially when environmental differences are apparent. PMID:25184236

  15. The Phylogeographical Pattern and Conservation of the Chinese Cobra (Naja atra) across Its Range Based on Mitochondrial Control Region Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Long-Hui; Hua, Lei; Qu, Yan-Fu; Gao, Jian-Fang; Ji, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The vulnerable Chinese cobra (Naja atra) ranges from southeastern China south of the Yangtze River to northern Vietnam and Laos. Large mountain ranges and water bodies may influence the pattern of genetic diversity of this species. We sequenced the mitochondrial DNA control region (1029 bp) using 285 individuals collected from 23 localities across the species' range and obtained 18 sequences unique to Taiwan from GenBank for phylogenetic and population analysis. Two distinct clades were identified, one including haplotypes from the two westernmost localities (Hekou and Miyi) and the other including haplotypes from all sampling sites except Miyi. A strong population structure was found (Φst = 0.76, P<0.0001) with high haplotype diversity (h = 1.00) and low nucleotide diversity (π = 0.0049). The Luoxiao and Nanling Mountains act as historical geographical barriers limiting gene exchange. In the haplotype network there were two “star” clusters. Haplotypes from populations east of the Luoxiao Mountains were represented within one cluster and haplotypes from populations west of the mountain range within the other, with haplotypes from populations south of the Nanling Mountains in between. Lineage sorting between mainland and island populations is incomplete. It remains unknown as to how much adaptive differentiation there is between population groups or within each group. We caution against long-distance transfers within any group, especially when environmental differences are apparent. PMID:25184236

  16. Genetic variation and evolutionary demography of Fenneropenaeus chinensis populations, as revealed by the analysis of mitochondrial control region sequences.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiao Yu; Li, Yu Long; Shi, Wei; Kong, Jie

    2010-04-01

    Genetic variation and evolutionary demography of the shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis were investigated using sequence data of the complete mitochondrial control region (CR). Fragments of 993 bp of the CR were sequenced for 93 individuals from five localities over most of the species' range in the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea. There were 84 variable sites defining 68 haplotypes. Haplotype diversity levels were very high (0.95 ± 0.03-0.99 ± 0.02) in F. chinensis populations, whereas those of nucleotide diversity were moderate to low (0.66 ± 0.36%-0.84 ± 0.46%). Analysis of molecular variance and conventional population statistics (F(ST) ) revealed no significant genetic structure throughout the range of F. chinensis. Mismatch distribution, estimates of population parameters and neutrality tests revealed that the significant fluctuations and shallow coalescence of mtDNA genealogies observed were coincident with estimated demographic parameters and neutrality tests, in implying important past-population size fluctuations or range expansion. Isolation with Migration (IM) coalescence results suggest that F. chinensis, distributed along the coasts of northern China and the Korean Peninsula (about 1000 km apart), diverged recently, the estimated time-split being 12,800 (7,400-18,600) years ago.

  17. Population genetic diversity of the northern snakehead (Channa argus) in China based on the mitochondrial DNA control region and adjacent regions sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Aiguo; Zhuo, Xiaolei; Zou, Qing; Chen, Jintao; Zou, Jixing

    2015-06-01

    Genetic variation and population structure of northern snakehead (Channa argus) from eight locations in China were investigated using mitochondrial DNA control region and adjacent regions sequences. Sequence analysis showed that there were 105 haplotypes in 260 individuals, 48 unique haplotypes and 57 shared haplotypes, but no common haplotype shared by all populations. As a whole, the haplotype diversity was high (h=0.989), while the nucleotide diversity was low (π=0.00482). AMOVA analysis detected significant genetic differentiation among all eight populations (FST=0.328, p<0.01) and 66.17% of the total variance was resulted from intra-population differentiation. UPGMA analysis indicated that the eight populations could be divided into four major clusters, which was consistent with that the eight sampled locations were belonged to four isolated river systems. The neutrality and mismatch distribution tests suggested that the eight populations of C. argus in the sampling locations underwent recent population expansion. Among the eight populations, the Erhai Lake population may represent a unique genetic resource and therefore needs to be conserved. PMID:24724976

  18. Population genetic diversity of the northern snakehead (Channa argus) in China based on the mitochondrial DNA control region and adjacent regions sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Aiguo; Zhuo, Xiaolei; Zou, Qing; Chen, Jintao; Zou, Jixing

    2015-06-01

    Genetic variation and population structure of northern snakehead (Channa argus) from eight locations in China were investigated using mitochondrial DNA control region and adjacent regions sequences. Sequence analysis showed that there were 105 haplotypes in 260 individuals, 48 unique haplotypes and 57 shared haplotypes, but no common haplotype shared by all populations. As a whole, the haplotype diversity was high (h=0.989), while the nucleotide diversity was low (π=0.00482). AMOVA analysis detected significant genetic differentiation among all eight populations (FST=0.328, p<0.01) and 66.17% of the total variance was resulted from intra-population differentiation. UPGMA analysis indicated that the eight populations could be divided into four major clusters, which was consistent with that the eight sampled locations were belonged to four isolated river systems. The neutrality and mismatch distribution tests suggested that the eight populations of C. argus in the sampling locations underwent recent population expansion. Among the eight populations, the Erhai Lake population may represent a unique genetic resource and therefore needs to be conserved.

  19. Genetic relationships among some subspecies of the Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus L.), inferred from mitochondrial DNA control-region sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Clayton M.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Sage, George K.; Anderson, Clifford; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to successfully colonize and persist in diverse environments likely requires broad morphological and behavioral plasticity and adaptability, and this may partly explain why the Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) exhibits a large range of morphological characteristics across their global distribution. Regional and local differences within Peregrine Falcons were sufficiently variable that ∼75 subspecies have been described; many were subsumed, and currently 19 are generally recognized. We used sequence information from the control region of the mitochondrial genome to test for concordance between genetic structure and representatives of 12 current subspecies and from two areas where subspecies distributions overlap. Haplotypes were broadly shared among subspecies, and all geographic locales shared a widely distributed common haplotype (FalconCR2). Haplotypes were distributed in a star-like phylogeny, consistent with rapid expansion of a recently derived species, with observed genetic patterns congruent with incomplete lineage sorting and/or differential rates of evolution on morphology and neutral genetic characters. Hierarchical analyses of molecular variance did not uncover genetic partitioning at the continental level, despite strong population-level structure (FST = 0.228). Similar analyses found weak partitioning, albeit significant, among subspecies (FCT = 0.138). All reconstructions placed the hierofalcons' (Gyrfalcon [F. rusticolus] and Saker Falcon [F. cherrug]) haplotypes in a well-supported clade either basal or unresolved with respect to the Peregrine Falcon. In addition, haplotypes representing Taita Falcon (F. fasciinucha) were placed within the Peregrine Falcon clade.

  20. Inferring Invasion History of Red Swamp Crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) in China from Mitochondrial Control Region and Nuclear Intron Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhe; Guo, Xianwu; Chen, Liping; Bai, Xiaohui; Wei, Xinlan; Zhou, Xiaoyun; Huang, Songqian; Wang, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the dispersal pathways of an invasive species is useful for adopting the appropriate strategies to prevent and control its spread. However, these processes are exceedingly complex. So, it is necessary to apply new technology and collect representative samples for analysis. This study used Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) in combination with traditional genetic tools to examine extensive sample data and historical records to infer the invasion history of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, in China. The sequences of the mitochondrial control region and the proPOx intron in the nuclear genome of samples from 37 sites (35 in China and one each in Japan and the USA) were analyzed. The results of combined scenarios testing and historical records revealed a much more complex invasion history in China than previously believed. P. clarkii was most likely originally introduced into China from Japan from an unsampled source, and the species then expanded its range primarily into the middle and lower reaches and, to a lesser extent, into the upper reaches of the Changjiang River in China. No transfer was observed from the upper reaches to the middle and lower reaches of the Changjiang River. Human-mediated jump dispersal was an important dispersal pathway for P. clarkii. The results provide a better understanding of the evolutionary scenarios involved in the rapid invasion of P. clarkii in China. PMID:26132567

  1. The emerging tree of West Eurasian mtDNAs: a synthesis of control-region sequences and RFLPs.

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, V; Richards, M; Hickey, E; Vega, E; Cruciani, F; Guida, V; Scozzari, R; Bonné-Tamir, B; Sykes, B; Torroni, A

    1999-01-01

    Variation in the human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is now routinely described and used to infer the histories of peoples, by means of one of two procedures, namely, the assaying of RFLPs throughout the genome and the sequencing of parts of the control region (CR). Using 95 samples from the Near East and northwest Caucasus, we present an analysis based on both systems, demonstrate their concordance, and, using additional available information, present the most refined phylogeny to date of west Eurasian mtDNA. We describe and apply a nomenclature for mtDNA clusters. Hypervariable nucleotides are identified, and the relative mutation rates of the two systems are evaluated. We point out where ambiguities remain. The identification of signature mutations for each cluster leads us to apply a hierarchical scheme for determining the cluster composition of a sample of Berber speakers, previously analyzed only for CR variation. We show that the main indigenous North African cluster is a sister group to the most ancient cluster of European mtDNAs, from which it diverged approximately 50,000 years ago. PMID:9915963

  2. Inferring the phylogeny of disjunct populations of the azure-winged magpie Cyanopica cyanus from mitochondrial control region sequences.

    PubMed

    Fok, Koon Wah; Wade, Christopher M; Parkin, David T

    2002-08-22

    The azure-winged magpie (AWM), Cyanopica cyanus, is found in Asia and Iberia. This remarkable disjunct distribution has been variously explained by either the sixteenth-century introduction of birds into Iberia from the Far East, or by the loss of individuals from the central part of their range as a result of Pleistocene glaciations. We have used the mitochondrial control region to undertake a molecular phylogenetic analysis of the AWM, with sequences examined from individuals collected from across the current distribution range and incorporating representatives of all currently defined subspecies. The Western birds are genetically distinct from their Asian congeners and their divergence is basal in the phylogenetic tree. This indicates that the AWM is native to Iberia and not the result of a recent introduction from Asia. In Asia, two major mitochondrial DNA lineages were identified. These correspond to an Inland Asia group and a Pacific Seaboard group, and are separated topographically by the Da Hingan Ling mountains and the Yellow Sea. Molecular clock estimates suggest that these divergences are associated with Pleistocene glaciations. Furthermore, our data do not support the current classification of the AWM into 10 subspecies, as defined based on morphology and geographical distribution. PMID:12204127

  3. Sequence comparison in the crossover region of an oncogenic avian retrovirus recombinant and its nononcogenic parent: Genetic regions that control growth rate and oncogenic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Tsichlis, P.N.; Donehower, L.; Hager, G.; Zeller, N.; Malavarca, R.; Astrin, S.; Skalka, A.M.

    1982-11-01

    NTRE is an avian retrovirus recombinant of the endogeneous nononcogenic Rous-associated virus-0 (RAV-0) and the oncogenic, exogeneous, transformation-defective (td) Prague strain of Rous sarcoma virus B (td-PrRSV-B). Oligonucleotide mapping had shown that the recombinant virus is indistinguishable from its RAV-0 parent except for the 3'-end sequences, which were derived from td-PrRSV-B. However, the virus exhibits properties which are typical of an exogenous virus: it grows to high titers in tissue culture, and it is oncogenic in vivo. To accurately define the genetic region responsible for these properties, the authors determined the nucleotide sequences of the recombinant and its RAV-0 parent by using molecular clones of their DNA. These were compared with sequences already available for PrRSV-C, a virus closely related to the exogenous parent td-PrRSV-B. The results suggested that the crossover event which generated NTRE 7 took place in a region -501 to -401 nucleotides from the 3' end of the td-PrRSV parental genome and that sequences to the right of the recombination region were responsible for its growth properties and oncogenic potential. Since the exogenous-virus-specific sequences are expected to be missing from transformation-defective mutants of the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of RSV, which, like other exogeneous viruses, grow to high tiers in tissue culture and are oncogenic in vivo, the authors concluded that the growth properties and oncogenic potential of the exogeneous viruses are determined by sequences in the U3 region of the long terminal repeat. However, the authors propose that the exogeneous-virus-specific region may play a role in determining the oncogenic spectrum of a given oncogenic virus.

  4. A novel mRNA 3' untranslated region translational control sequence regulates Xenopus Wee1 mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi Ying; Charlesworth, Amanda; Byrd, Shannon M; Gregerson, Robert; MacNicol, Melanie C; MacNicol, Angus M

    2008-05-15

    Cell cycle progression during oocyte maturation requires the strict temporal regulation of maternal mRNA translation. The intrinsic basis of this temporal control has not been fully elucidated but appears to involve distinct mRNA 3' UTR regulatory elements. In this study, we identify a novel translational control sequence (TCS) that exerts repression of target mRNAs in immature oocytes of the frog, Xenopus laevis, and can direct early cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translational activation during oocyte maturation. The TCS is functionally distinct from the previously characterized Musashi/polyadenylation response element (PRE) and the cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE). We report that TCS elements exert translational repression in both the Wee1 mRNA 3' UTR and the pericentriolar material-1 (Pcm-1) mRNA 3' UTR in immature oocytes. During oocyte maturation, TCS function directs the early translational activation of the Pcm-1 mRNA. By contrast, we demonstrate that CPE sequences flanking the TCS elements in the Wee1 3' UTR suppress the ability of the TCS to direct early translational activation. Our results indicate that a functional hierarchy exists between these distinct 3' UTR regulatory elements to control the timing of maternal mRNA translational activation during oocyte maturation.

  5. Application of 16S rRNA, cytochrome b and control region sequences for understanding the phylogenetic relationships in Oryx species.

    PubMed

    Khan, H A; Arif, I A; Al Homaidan, A A; Al Farhan, A H

    2008-01-01

    The present study reports the application of mitochondrial markers for the molecular phylogeny of Oryx species, including the Arabian oryx (AO), scimitar-horned oryx (SHO) and plains oryx (PO), using the Addax as an outgroup. Sequences of three molecular markers, 16S rRNA, cytochrome b and a control region, for the above four taxa were aligned and the topologies of respective phylogenetic trees were compared. All these markers clearly differentiated the genus Addax from Oryx. However, for species-level grouping, while 16S rRNA and cytochrome b produced similar phylogeny (SHO grouped with PO), the control region grouped SHO with AO. Further studies are warranted to generate more sequencing data, apply multiple bioinformatics tools and to include relevant nuclear markers for phylogenetic analysis of Oryx species. PMID:19224456

  6. Quantitative controls on location and architecture of carbonate depositional sequences: upper miocene, cabo de gata region, se Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franseen, E.K.; Goldstein, R.H.; Farr, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    Sequence stratigraphy, pinning-point relative sea-level curves, and magnetostratigraphy provide the quantitative data necessary to understand how rates of sea-level change and different substrate paleoslopes are dominant controls on accumulation rate, carbonate depositional sequence location, and internal architecture. Five third-order (1-10 my) and fourth-order (0.1-1.0 my) upper Miocene carbonate depositional sequences (DS1A, DS1B, DS2, DS3, TCC) formed with superimposed higher-frequency sea-level cycles in an archipelago setting in SE Spain. Overall, our study indicates when areas of high substrate slope (> 15??) are in shallow water, independent of climate, the location and internal architecture of carbonate deposits are not directly linked to sea-level position but, instead, are controlled by location of gently sloping substrates and processes of bypass. In contrast, if carbonate sediments are generated where substrates of low slope ( 15.6 cm/ky to ??? 2 cm/ky and overall relative sea level rose at rates of 17-21.4 cm/ky. Higher frequency sea-level rates were about 111 to more than 260 cm/ky, producing onlapping, fining- (deepening-) upward cycles. Decreasing accumulation rates resulted from decreasing surface area for shallow-water sediment production, drowning of shallow-water substrates, and complex sediment dispersal related to the archipelago setting. Typical systems tract and parasequence development should not be expected in "bypass ramp" settings; facies of onlapping strata do not track base level and are likely to be significantly different compared to onlapping strata associated with coastal onlap. Basal and upper DS2 reef megabreccias (indicating the transition from cool to warmer climatic conditions) were eroded from steep upslope positions and redeposited downslope onto areas of gentle substrate during rapid sea-level falls (> 22.7 cm/ky) of short duration. Such rapid sea-level falls and presence of steep slopes are not conducive to formation of

  7. Quantitative controls on location and architecture of carbonate depositional sequences: Upper miocene, cabo de gata region, SE Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franseen, E.K.; Goldstein, R.H.; Farr, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    Sequence stratigraphy, pinning-point relative sea-level curves, and magnetostratigraphy provide the quantitative data necessary to understand how rates of sea-level change and different substrate paleoslopes are dominant controls on accumulation rate, carbonate depositional sequence location, and internal architecture. Five third-order (1-10 my) and fourth-order (0.1-1.0 my) upper Miocene carbonate depositional sequences (DS1A, DS1B, DS2, DS3, TCC) formed with superimposed higher-frequency sea-level cycles in an archipelago setting in SE Spain. Overall, our study indicates when areas of high substrate slope (> 15??) are in shallow water, independent of climate, the location and internal architecture of carbonate deposits are not directly linked to sea-level position but, instead, are controlled by location of gently sloping substrates and processes of bypass. In contrast, if carbonate sediments are generated where substrates of low slope ( 15.6 cm/ky to ??? 2 cm/ky and overall relative sea level rose at rates of 17-21.4 cm/ky. Higher frequency sea-level rates were about 111 to more than 260 cm/ky, producing onlapping, fining- (deepening-) upward cycles. Decreasing accumulation rates resulted from decreasing surface area for shallow-water sediment production, drowning of shallow-water substrates, and complex sediment dispersal related to the archipelago setting. Typical systems tract and parasequence development should not be expected in "bypass ramp" settings; facies of onlapping strata do not track base level and are likely to be significantly different compared to onlapping strata associated with coastal onlap. Basal and upper DS2 reef megabreccias (indicating the transition from cool to warmer climatic conditions) were eroded from steep upslope positions and redeposited downslope onto areas of gentle substrate during rapid sea-level falls (> 22.7 cm/ky) of short duration. Such rapid sea-level falls and presence of steep slopes are not conducive to formation of

  8. Genetic variation between two Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana) populations in the eastern China based on mitochondrial DNA control region sequences.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yongfang; Zhong, Lijing; Liu, Bofeng; Li, Jiayi; Ni, Qingyong; Xu, Huailiang

    2013-06-01

    Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana) is a threatened primate species endemic to China. Population genetic and phylogenetic analyses were conducted in 66 Tibetan individuals from Sichuan (SC), Huangshan (HS), and Fujian (FJ) based on a 477-bp fragment of mitochondrial DNA control region. Four new haplotypes were defined, and a relatively high level of genetic diversity was first observed in FJ populations (Hd = 0.7661). Notably, a continuous approximately 10 bp-fragment deletion was observed near the 5' end of the mtDNA control region of both HS and FJ populations when compared with that of SC population, and a sharing haplotype was found between the two populations, revealing a closer genetic relationship. However, significant genetic differentiation (FST = 0.8700) and more poor gene exchange (Nm < 1) had occurred among three populations. This study mainly provide a further insight into the genetic relationship between HS and FJ Tibetan macaque populations, but it may be necessary to carry out further study with extra samples from other locations in the geographic coverage of the two subspecies (M. thibetana pullus and M. thibetana huangshanensis).

  9. Genetic diversity in captive and wild Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) from Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea, based on mtDNA control region sequences.

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Thomas J; Dabek, Lisa; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta; Husband, Thomas P

    2009-05-01

    The Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) population is at a critical point for assessing long-term viability. This population, established from 19 genetically uncharacterized D. matschiei, has endured a founder effect because only four individuals contributed the majority of offspring. The highly variable mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region was sequenced for five of the female-founders by examining extant representatives of their maternal lineage and compared with wild (n = 13) and captive (n = 18) D. matschiei from Papua New Guinea (PNG). AZA female-founder D. matschiei control region haplotype diversity was low, compared with captive D. matschiei held in PNG. AZA D. matschiei have only two control region haplotypes because four out of five AZA female-founder D. matschiei had an identical sequence. Both AZA haplotypes were identified among the 17 wild and captive D. matschiei haplotypes from PNG. Genomic DNA extracted from wild D. matschiei fecal samples was a reliable source of mtDNA that could be used for a larger scale study. We recommend a nuclear DNA genetic analysis to more fully characterize AZA D. matschiei genetic diversity and to assist their Species Survival Plan((R)). An improved understanding of D. matschiei genetics will contribute substantially to the conservation of these unique animals both in captivity and the wild.

  10. A Novel SRP Recognition Sequence in the Homeostatic Control Region of Heat Shock Transcription Factor σ32

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Ryoji; Yura, Takashi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Dohmae, Naoshi; Mori, Hiroyuki; Akiyama, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock response (HSR) generally plays a major role in sustaining protein homeostasis. In Escherichia coli, the activity and amount of the dedicated transcription factor σ32 transiently increase upon heat shock. The initial induction is followed by chaperone-mediated negative feedback to inactivate and degrade σ32. Previous work reported that signal recognition particle (SRP)-dependent targeting of σ32 to the membrane is essential for feedback control, though how SRP recognizes σ32 remained unknown. Extensive photo- and disulfide cross-linking studies in vivo now reveal that the highly conserved regulatory region of σ32 that lacks a consecutive hydrophobic stretch interacts with the signal peptide-binding site of Ffh (the protein subunit of SRP). Importantly, the σ32–Ffh interaction observed was significantly affected by mutations in this region that compromise the feedback regulation, but not by deleting the DnaK/DnaJ chaperones. Homeostatic regulation of HSR thus requires a novel type of SRP recognition mechanism. PMID:27052372

  11. A Novel SRP Recognition Sequence in the Homeostatic Control Region of Heat Shock Transcription Factor σ32.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Ryoji; Yura, Takashi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Dohmae, Naoshi; Mori, Hiroyuki; Akiyama, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock response (HSR) generally plays a major role in sustaining protein homeostasis. In Escherichia coli, the activity and amount of the dedicated transcription factor σ(32) transiently increase upon heat shock. The initial induction is followed by chaperone-mediated negative feedback to inactivate and degrade σ(32). Previous work reported that signal recognition particle (SRP)-dependent targeting of σ(32) to the membrane is essential for feedback control, though how SRP recognizes σ(32) remained unknown. Extensive photo- and disulfide cross-linking studies in vivo now reveal that the highly conserved regulatory region of σ(32) that lacks a consecutive hydrophobic stretch interacts with the signal peptide-binding site of Ffh (the protein subunit of SRP). Importantly, the σ(32)-Ffh interaction observed was significantly affected by mutations in this region that compromise the feedback regulation, but not by deleting the DnaK/DnaJ chaperones. Homeostatic regulation of HSR thus requires a novel type of SRP recognition mechanism. PMID:27052372

  12. mtDNAmanager: a Web-based tool for the management and quality analysis of mitochondrial DNA control-region sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwan Young; Song, Injee; Ha, Eunho; Cho, Sung-Bae; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2008-01-01

    Background For the past few years, scientific controversy has surrounded the large number of errors in forensic and literature mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) data. However, recent research has shown that using mtDNA phylogeny and referring to known mtDNA haplotypes can be useful for checking the quality of sequence data. Results We developed a Web-based bioinformatics resource "mtDNAmanager" that offers a convenient interface supporting the management and quality analysis of mtDNA sequence data. The mtDNAmanager performs computations on mtDNA control-region sequences to estimate the most-probable mtDNA haplogroups and retrieves similar sequences from a selected database. By the phased designation of the most-probable haplogroups (both expected and estimated haplogroups), mtDNAmanager enables users to systematically detect errors whilst allowing for confirmation of the presence of clear key diagnostic mutations and accompanying mutations. The query tools of mtDNAmanager also facilitate database screening with two options of "match" and "include the queried nucleotide polymorphism". In addition, mtDNAmanager provides Web interfaces for users to manage and analyse their own data in batch mode. Conclusion The mtDNAmanager will provide systematic routines for mtDNA sequence data management and analysis via easily accessible Web interfaces, and thus should be very useful for population, medical and forensic studies that employ mtDNA analysis. mtDNAmanager can be accessed at . PMID:19014619

  13. Population structure and variation in red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) from the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coast of Florida as determined from mitochondrial DNA control region sequence.

    PubMed

    Garber, Amber F; Tringali, Michael D; Stuck, Kenneth C

    2004-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA control regions of red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) from the Gulf of Mexico (n = 140) and Atlantic coast of Florida (n = 35) were sequenced to generate a prestocking genetic baseline for planned stock enhancement. Intrasample haplotype and nucleotide diversities ranged from 0.94 to 1.00 and 1.8% to 2.5%, respectively. All population analyses were consistent with the hypothesis that red snapper constitute a single, panmictic population over the sampled range. A ubiquitous, predominant haplotype, shared by 23% of the specimens, appeared to be evolutionarily recent, in contrast to previous findings based on restriction fragment length polymorphism data. Tajima's D values were suggestive of a recent bottleneck. Mismatch distributions from Gulf samples were smooth and unimodal, characteristic of recent population expansion. However, the Atlantic sample exhibited a comparatively broader, possibly multimodal distribution, suggestive of a more stable population history. Additional control-region data may clarify potentially disparate demographic histories of Gulf and Atlantic snapper.

  14. Recombined sequences between the non-coding control regions of JC and BK viruses found in the urine of a renal transplantation patient.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Yu-Ching; Chen, Cheng-Hsu; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Fang, Chiung-Yao; Ou, Wei-Chih; Chen, Pei-Lain; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Lin, Mien-Chun; Chang, Deching; Wang, Meilin

    2012-12-01

    Kidney cells are the common host for JC virus (JCV) and BK virus (BKV). Reactivation of JCV and/or BKV in patients after organ transplantation, such as renal transplantation, may cause hemorrhagic cystitis and polyomavirus-associated nephropathy. Furthermore, JCV and BKV may be shed in the urine after reactivation in the kidney. Rearranged as well as archetypal non-coding control regions (NCCRs) of JCV and BKV have been frequently identified in human samples. In this study, three JC/BK recombined NCCR sequences were identified in the urine of a patient who had undergone renal transplantation. They were designated as JC-BK hybrids 1, 2, and 3. The three JC/BK recombinant NCCRs contain up-stream JCV as well as down-stream BKV sequences. Deletions of both JCV and BKV sequences were found in these recombined NCCRs. Recombination of DNA sequences between JCV and BKV may occur during co-infection due to the relatively high homology of the two viral genomes.

  15. Heteroplasmy, length and sequence variation in the mtDNA control regions of three percid fish species (Perca fluviatilis, Acerina cernua, Stizostedion lucioperca).

    PubMed Central

    Nesbø, C L; Arab, M O; Jakobsen, K S

    1998-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the control region and flanking tRNA genes of perch (Perca fluviatilis) mtDNA was determined. The organization of this region is similar to that of other vertebrates. A tandem array of 10-bp repeats, associated with length variation and heteroplasmy was observed in the 5' end. While the location of the array corresponds to that reported in other species, the length of the repeated unit is shorter than previously observed for tandem repeats in this region. The repeated sequence was highly similar to the Mt5 element which has been shown to specifically bind a putative D-loop DNA termination protein. Of 149 perch analyzed, 74% showed length variation heteroplasmy. Single-cell PCR on oocytes suggested that the high level of heteroplasmy is passively maintained by maternal transmission. The array was also observed in the two other percid species, ruffe (Acerina cernua) and zander (Stizostedion lucioperca). The array and the associated length variation heteroplasmy are therefore likely to be general features of percid mtDNAs. Among the perch repeats, the mutation pattern is consistent with unidirectional slippage, and statistical analyses supported the notion that the various haplotypes are associated with different levels of heteroplasmy. The variation in array length among and within species is ascribed to differences in predicted stability of secondary structures made between repeat units. PMID:9560404

  16. Population structure and genetic variability of six bar wrasse (Thallasoma hardwicki) in northern South China Sea revealed by mitochondrial control region sequences.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaolun Allen; Ablan, Maria Carmen Anonuevo; McManus, John Williams; Bell, Johann Diepernk; Tuan, Vo Si; Cabanban, Annadel Sarmiento; Shao, Kwang-Tsao

    2004-01-01

    The genetic relationships among northern South China Sea populations of the six bar wrasse (Thallasoma hardwicki) were investigated. Fish collected from the Solomon Islands were used for geographic comparison. In 1998 and 1999, a total of 100 fish were sampled from 6 localities of the northern South China Sea and 3 localities of the Solomon Islands. Genetic variations in DNA sequences were examined from the first hypervariable region (HVR-1) of the mitochondrial control region, as amplified by polymerase chain reaction. High levels of haplotypic diversity (h = 0.944 +/- 0.0016, pi = 0.0224 +/- 0.01171) in the HVR-1 region of the mitochondrial control region of T. hardwicki were detected. This yielded 94 haplotypes that exhibited a minimum spanning tree with a starburst structure, suggestive of a very recent origin for most haplotypes. Neutrality tests indicated that the pattern of genetic variability in T. hardwicki is consistent either with genetic hitchhiking by an advantageous mutation or with population expansion. Partitioning populations into coherent geographic groups divided the northern South China Sea samples (Phi(CT) = 0.0313, P < 0.001) into 3 major groups: a north-central group composed of northwestern Taiwan and northern Vietnam; a southwestern group containing southern Vietnam; and a southern group including the central Philippines. These results are in concordance with mesoscale boundaries proposed by allozyme markers, thus highlighting the importance of identifying transboundary units for the conservation and management of fisheries in the South China Sea.

  17. Development of a control region-based mtDNA SNaPshot™ selection tool, integrated into a mini amplicon sequencing method.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Natalie E C; de Vries, Gerda; Sijen, Titia

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis is regularly applied to forensic DNA samples with limited amounts of nuclear DNA (nDNA), such as hair shafts and bones. Generally, this mtDNA analysis involves examination of the hypervariable control region by Sanger sequencing of amplified products. When samples are severely degraded, small-sized amplicons can be applied and an earlier described mini-mtDNA method by Eichmann et al. [1] that accommodates ten mini amplicons in two multiplexes is found to be a very robust approach. However, in cases with large numbers of samples, like when searching for hairs with an mtDNA profile deviant from that of the victim, the method is time (and cost) consuming. Previously, Chemale et al. [2] described a SNaPshot™-based screening tool for a Brazilian population that uses standard-size amplicons for HVS-I and HVS-II. Here, we describe a similar tool adapted to the full control region and compatible with mini-mtDNA amplicons. Eighteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected based on their relative frequencies in a European population. They showed a high discriminatory power in a Dutch population (97.2%). The 18 SNPs are assessed in two SNaPshot™ multiplexes that pair to the two mini-mtDNA amplification multiplexes. Degenerate bases are included to limit allele dropout due to SNPs at primer binding site positions. Three SNPs provide haplogroup information. Reliability testing showed no differences with Sanger sequencing results. Since mini-mtSNaPshot screening uses only a small portion of the same PCR products used for Sanger sequencing, no additional DNA extract is consumed, which is forensically advantageous.

  18. Development of a control region-based mtDNA SNaPshot™ selection tool, integrated into a mini amplicon sequencing method.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Natalie E C; de Vries, Gerda; Sijen, Titia

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis is regularly applied to forensic DNA samples with limited amounts of nuclear DNA (nDNA), such as hair shafts and bones. Generally, this mtDNA analysis involves examination of the hypervariable control region by Sanger sequencing of amplified products. When samples are severely degraded, small-sized amplicons can be applied and an earlier described mini-mtDNA method by Eichmann et al. [1] that accommodates ten mini amplicons in two multiplexes is found to be a very robust approach. However, in cases with large numbers of samples, like when searching for hairs with an mtDNA profile deviant from that of the victim, the method is time (and cost) consuming. Previously, Chemale et al. [2] described a SNaPshot™-based screening tool for a Brazilian population that uses standard-size amplicons for HVS-I and HVS-II. Here, we describe a similar tool adapted to the full control region and compatible with mini-mtDNA amplicons. Eighteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected based on their relative frequencies in a European population. They showed a high discriminatory power in a Dutch population (97.2%). The 18 SNPs are assessed in two SNaPshot™ multiplexes that pair to the two mini-mtDNA amplification multiplexes. Degenerate bases are included to limit allele dropout due to SNPs at primer binding site positions. Three SNPs provide haplogroup information. Reliability testing showed no differences with Sanger sequencing results. Since mini-mtSNaPshot screening uses only a small portion of the same PCR products used for Sanger sequencing, no additional DNA extract is consumed, which is forensically advantageous. PMID:26976467

  19. Atypical regions in large genomic DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S. |; McPeek, M.S.; Speed, T.P.

    1994-07-19

    Large genomic DNA sequences contain regions with distinctive patterns of sequence organization. The authors describe a method using logarithms of probabilities based on seventh-order Markov chains to rapidly identify genomic sequences that do not resemble models of genome organization built from compilations of octanucleotide usage. Data bases have been constructed from Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA sequences of >1000 nt and human sequences of >10,000 nt. Atypical genes and clusters of genes have been located in bacteriophage, yeast, and primate DNA sequences. The authors consider criteria for statistical significance of the results, offer possible explanations for the observed variation in genome organization, and give additional applications of these methods in DNA sequence analysis.

  20. Fetal hemoglobin in sickle cell anemia: examination of phylogenetically conserved sequences within the locus control region but outside the cores of hypersensitive sites 2 and 3.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, M S; Steinberg, M H

    1997-08-01

    Regulatory elements linked to the beta-globin gene cluster modulates gamma-globin gene expression. The location of all of these elements and their mechanisms of action are still incompletely defined. Phylogenetically conserved DNA within the beta-globin gene cluster locus control region (LCR), but outside the core sequences of its hypersensitive sites (HS), were identified and we searched for any differences between HS 3 and HS 2, and HS 2 and HS 1, among patients with sickle cell anemia with different levels of Hb F who were homozygous for the common haplotypes. DNA was amplified with and without GC clamps, digested with restriction endonucleases, and examined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). We found limited fragment size diversity. However, the type of differences found and their distribution among haplotypes did not suggest that they represented distinctive changes that might explain the differential expression of the gamma-globin genes in sickle cell anemia.

  1. Classification and phylogeny of sika deer (Cervus nippon) subspecies based on the mitochondrial control region DNA sequence using an extended sample set.

    PubMed

    Ba, Hengxing; Yang, Fuhe; Xing, Xiumei; Li, Chunyi

    2015-06-01

    To further refine the classification and phylogeny of sika deer subspecies, the well-annotated sequences of the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of 13 sika deer subspecies from GenBank were downloaded, aligned and analyzed in this study. By reconstructing the phylogenetic tree with an extended sample set, the results revealed a split between Northern and Southern Mainland Asia/Taiwan lineages, and moreover, two subspecies, C.n.mantchuricus and C.n.hortulorum, were existed in Northern Mainland Asia. Unexpectedly, Dybowskii's sika deer that was thought to originate from Northern Mainland Asia joins the Southern Mainland Asia/Taiwan lineage. The genetic divergences were ranged from 2.1% to 4.7% between Dybowskii's sika deer and all the other established subspecies at the mtDNA sequence level, which suggests that the maternal lineage of uncertain sika subspecies in Europe had been maintained until today. This study also provides a better understanding for the classification, phylogeny and phylogeographic history of sika deer subspecies.

  2. mtDNA control-region sequence variation suggests multiple independent origins of an "Asian-specific" 9-bp deletion in sub-Saharan Africans.

    PubMed Central

    Soodyall, H.; Vigilant, L.; Hill, A. V.; Stoneking, M.; Jenkins, T.

    1996-01-01

    The intergenic COII/tRNA(Lys) 9-bp deletion in human mtDNA, which is found at varying frequencies in Asia, Southeast Asia, Polynesia, and the New World, was also found in 81 of 919 sub-Saharan Africans. Using mtDNA control-region sequence data from a subset of 41 individuals with the deletion, we identified 22 unique mtDNA types associated with the deletion in Africa. A comparison of the unique mtDNA types from sub-Saharan Africans and Asians with the 9-bp deletion revealed that sub-Saharan Africans and Asians have sequence profiles that differ in the locations and frequencies of variant sites. Both phylogenetic and mismatch-distribution analysis suggest that 9-bp deletion arose independently in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia and that the deletion has arisen more than once in Africa. Within Africa, the deletion was not found among Khoisan peoples and was rare to absent in western and southwestern African populations, but it did occur in Pygmy and Negroid populations from central Africa and in Malawi and southern African Bantu-speakers. The distribution of the 9-bp deletion in Africa suggests that the deletion could have arisen in central Africa and was then introduced to southern Africa via the recent "Bantu expansion." PMID:8644719

  3. Comparison of mitochondrial DNA control region sequence and microsatellite DNA analyses in estimating population structure and gene flow rates in Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wirgin, I.; Waldman, J.; Stabile, J.; Lubinski, B.; King, T.

    2002-01-01

    Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus is large, long-lived, and anadromous with subspecies distributed along the Atlantic (A. oxyrinchus oxyrinchus) and Gulf of Mexico (A. o. desotoi) coasts of North America. Although it is not certain if extirpation of some population units has occurred, because of anthropogenic influences abundances of all populations are low compared with historical levels. Informed management of A. oxyrinchus demands a detailed knowledge of its population structure, levels of genetic diversity, and likelihood to home to natal rivers. We compared the use of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequence and microsatellite nuclear DNA (nDNA) analyses in identifying the stock structure and homing fidelity of Atlantic and Gulf coast populations of A. oxyrinchus. The approaches were concordant in that they revealed moderate to high levels of genetic diversity and suggested that populations of Atlantic sturgeon are highly structured. At least six genetically distinct management units were detected using the two approaches among the rivers surveyed. Mitochondrial DNA sequences revealed a significant cline in haplotype diversity along the Atlantic coast with monomorphism observed in Canadian populations. High levels of nDNA diversity were also observed among populations along the Atlantic coast, including the two Canadian populations, probably resulting from the more rapid rate of mutational and evolutionary change at microsatellite loci. Estimates of gene flow among populations were similar between both approaches with the exception that because of mtDNA monomorphism in Canadian populations, gene flow estimates between them were unobtainable. Analyses of both genomes provided high resolution and confidence in characterizing the population structure of Atlantic sturgeon. Microsatellite analysis was particularly informative in delineating population structure in rivers that were recently glaciated and may prove diagnostic in rivers that are

  4. Mitochondrial sequences of Seriatopora corals show little agreement with morphology and reveal the duplication of a tRNA gene near the control region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flot, J.-F.; Licuanan, W. Y.; Nakano, Y.; Payri, C.; Cruaud, C.; Tillier, S.

    2008-12-01

    The taxonomy of corals of the genus Seriatopora has not previously been studied using molecular sequence markers. As a first step toward a re-evaluation of species boundaries in this genus, mitochondrial sequence variability was analyzed in 51 samples collected from Okinawa, New Caledonia, and the Philippines. Four clusters of sequences were detected that showed little concordance with species currently recognized on a morphological basis. The most likely explanation is that the skeletal characters used for species identification are highly variable (polymorphic or phenotypically plastic); alternative explanations include introgression/hybridization, or deep coalescence and the retention of ancestral mitochondrial polymorphisms. In all individuals sequenced, two copies of trnW were found on either side of the atp8 gene near the putative D-loop, a novel mitochondrial gene arrangement that may have arisen from a duplication of the trnW-atp8 region followed by a deletion of one atp8.

  5. A myriad of miRNA variants in control and Huntington’s disease brain regions detected by massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Martí, Eulàlia; Pantano, Lorena; Bañez-Coronel, Mónica; Llorens, Franc; Miñones-Moyano, Elena; Porta, Sílvia; Sumoy, Lauro; Ferrer, Isidre; Estivill, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that predominantly affects neurons of the forebrain. We have applied the Illumina massively parallel sequencing to deeply analyze the small RNA populations of two different forebrain areas, the frontal cortex (FC) and the striatum (ST) of healthy individuals and individuals with HD. More than 80% of the small-RNAs were annotated as microRNAs (miRNAs) in all samples. Deep sequencing revealed length and sequence heterogeneity (IsomiRs) for the vast majority of miRNAs. Around 80–90% of the miRNAs presented modifications in the 3′-terminus mainly in the form of trimming and/or as nucleotide addition variants, while the 5′-terminus of the miRNAs was specially protected from changes. Expression profiling showed strong miRNA and isomiR expression deregulation in HD, most being common to both FC and ST. The analysis of the upstream regulatory regions in co-regulated miRNAs suggests a role for RE1-Silencing Transcription Factor (REST) and P53 in miRNAs downregulation in HD. The putative targets of deregulated miRNAs and seed-region IsomiRs strongly suggest that their altered expression contributes to the aberrant gene expression in HD. Our results show that miRNA variability is a ubiquitous phenomenon in the adult human brain, which may influence gene expression in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:20591823

  6. Use of whole-genome sequencing to trace, control and characterize the regional expansion of extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing ST15 Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Kai; Lokate, Mariette; Deurenberg, Ruud H.; Tepper, Marga; Arends, Jan P.; Raangs, Erwin G. C.; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome; Grundmann, Hajo; Rossen, John W. A.; Friedrich, Alexander W.

    2016-01-01

    The study describes the transmission of a CTX-M-15-producing ST15 Klebsiella pneumoniae between patients treated in a single center and the subsequent inter-institutional spread by patient referral occurring between May 2012 and September 2013. A suspected epidemiological link between clinical K. pneumoniae isolates was supported by patient contact tracing and genomic phylogenetic analysis from May to November 2012. By May 2013, a patient treated in three institutions in two cities was involved in an expanding cluster caused by this high-risk clone (HiRiC) (local expansion, CTX-M-15 producing, and containing hypervirulence factors). A clone-specific multiplex PCR was developed for patient screening by which another patient was identified in September 2013. Genomic phylogenetic analysis including published ST15 genomes revealed a close homology with isolates previously found in the USA. Environmental contamination and lack of consistent patient screening were identified as being responsible for the clone dissemination. The investigation addresses the advantages of whole-genome sequencing in the early detection of HiRiC with a high propensity of nosocomial transmission and prolonged circulation in the regional patient population. Our study suggests the necessity for inter-institutional/regional collaboration for infection/outbreak management of K. pneumoniae HiRiCs. PMID:26864946

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Cynoglossus abbreviatus (Pleuronectiformes: Cynoglossidae) with control region translocation and tRNA-Gln gene inversion.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Gong, Li; Kong, Xiao-Yu

    2016-05-01

    Cynoglossus abbreviatus (Cynoglossidae, Soleoidei) is characterized by a bilaterally asymmetrical with both eyes on the left side. In this study, the complete mitogenome of this tongue sole has been reported for the first time. The gene order in C. abbreviatus mitogenome possesses a novel rearrangement like other tonguefish. The tRNA-Gln gene moves from the light strand to the heavy strand, accompanied by tRNA-Ile gene shuffling, leaving a large non-coding region (88 bp) between these two tRNAs. Additionally, the control region translocates to the place between ND1 and tRNA-Gln genes. The total length is 16,417 bp, with 30.9%, 29.5%, 24.9% and 14.7% for A, T, C and G, respectively (60.4% for AT content). These molecular data will provide useful information about the mechanism of gene reorganization in Cynoglossidae mitogenome and further phylogenetic study on Pleuronectiformes.

  8. Initiation of mammalian O-mannosylation in vivo is independent of a consensus sequence and controlled by peptide regions within and upstream of the alpha-dystroglycan mucin domain.

    PubMed

    Breloy, Isabelle; Schwientek, Tilo; Gries, Barbara; Razawi, Hanieh; Macht, Marcus; Albers, Christian; Hanisch, Franz-Georg

    2008-07-01

    To reveal insight into the initiation of mammalian O-mannosylation in vivo, recombinant glycosylation probes containing sections of human alpha-dystroglycan (hDG) were expressed in epithelial cell lines. We demonstrate that O-mannosylation within the mucin domain of hDG occurs preferentially at Thr/Ser residues that are flanked by basic amino acids. Protein O-mannosylation is independent of a consensus sequence, but strictly dependent on a peptide region located upstream of the mucin domain. This peptide region cannot be replaced by other N-terminal peptides, however, it is not sufficient to induce O-mannosylation on a structurally distinct mucin domain in hybrid constructs. The presented in vivo evidence for a more complex regulation of mammalian O-mannosylation contrasts with a recent in vitro study of O-mannosylation in human alpha-dystroglycan peptides indicating the existence of an 18-meric consensus sequence. We demonstrate in vivo that the entire region p377-417 is necessary and sufficient for O-mannosylation initiation of hDG, but not of MUC1 tandem repeats. The feature of a doubly controlled initiation process distinguishes mammalian O-mannosylation from other types of O-glycosylation, which are largely controlled by structural properties of the substrate positions and their local peptide environment.

  9. Time Separation Between Events in a Sequence: a Regional Property?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirwood, R.; Fitzenz, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    understand the rate controlling processes that determine such sequences per tectonic region and fluid/heat flow provinces.

  10. Realistic artificial DNA sequences as negative controls for computational genomics

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Juan; Smit, Arian F. A.; Hood, Leroy; Glusman, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    A common practice in computational genomic analysis is to use a set of ‘background’ sequences as negative controls for evaluating the false-positive rates of prediction tools, such as gene identification programs and algorithms for detection of cis-regulatory elements. Such ‘background’ sequences are generally taken from regions of the genome presumed to be intergenic, or generated synthetically by ‘shuffling’ real sequences. This last method can lead to underestimation of false-positive rates. We developed a new method for generating artificial sequences that are modeled after real intergenic sequences in terms of composition, complexity and interspersed repeat content. These artificial sequences can serve as an inexhaustible source of high-quality negative controls. We used artificial sequences to evaluate the false-positive rates of a set of programs for detecting interspersed repeats, ab initio prediction of coding genes, transcribed regions and non-coding genes. We found that RepeatMasker is more accurate than PClouds, Augustus has the lowest false-positive rate of the coding gene prediction programs tested, and Infernal has a low false-positive rate for non-coding gene detection. A web service, source code and the models for human and many other species are freely available at http://repeatmasker.org/garlic/. PMID:24803667

  11. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification.

    PubMed

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj

    2014-10-28

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions. PMID:25362284

  12. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj E-mail: rajc@andrew.cmu.edu

    2014-10-28

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions.

  13. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Chakrabarti, Raj

    2014-10-01

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions.

  14. [On the Population Genetic Portrait of Kaluga, Acipenser dauricus Georgi, 1775 Analysis of Sequence Variation in the Mitochondrial DNA Control Region].

    PubMed

    Shedko, S V; Miroshnichenko, I L; Nemkova, G A; Shedko, M B

    2015-09-01

    The variability of the mtDNA D-loop was examined in kaluga endemic to the Amur River, which is classified as critically endangered by the IUCN Red List of Threatened species. Sequencing of the D-loop fragment (819 bp) in 122 kaluga specimens collected in Lower Amur revealed 27 unique genotypes. The sample was characterized by a relatively low level of haplotypic (0.927) and nucleotide (0.0044) diversity. No considerable deviations from the neutral mutation model of DNA polymorphism were observed. Overall, the mismatch distribution patterns and the results of testing of simple demographic models (sudden demographic expansion and exponential population growth) pointed to a past increase in the number of kaluga sturgeons. According to the Bayesian skyline, the kaluga population doubled over the last two to three thousand years. The number of mature females in the modern kaluga population and the assessment of their long-term effective population size (Nef) are roughly at the same level (about three thousand individuals), which confirms the validity of assigning kaluga to the category of species on the brink of extinction. PMID:26606799

  15. Mitochondrial DNA control region variation in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Alshamali, Farida; Brandstätter, Anita; Zimmermann, Bettina; Parson, Walther

    2008-01-01

    249 entire mtDNA control region sequences were generated and analyzed in a population sample from Dubai, one of the seven United Arab Emirates. The control region was amplified in one piece and sequenced with different sequencing primers. Sequence evaluation was performed twice and validated by a third senior mtDNA scientist. Phylogenetic analyses were used for quality assurance purposes and for the determination of the haplogroup affiliation of the samples. Upon publication, the population data are going to be available in the EMPOP database (www.empop.org).

  16. Correlation approach to identify coding regions in DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ossadnik, S. M.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Havlin, S.; Mantegna, R. N.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, it was observed that noncoding regions of DNA sequences possess long-range power-law correlations, whereas coding regions typically display only short-range correlations. We develop an algorithm based on this finding that enables investigators to perform a statistical analysis on long DNA sequences to locate possible coding regions. The algorithm is particularly successful in predicting the location of lengthy coding regions. For example, for the complete genome of yeast chromosome III (315,344 nucleotides), at least 82% of the predictions correspond to putative coding regions; the algorithm correctly identified all coding regions larger than 3000 nucleotides, 92% of coding regions between 2000 and 3000 nucleotides long, and 79% of coding regions between 1000 and 2000 nucleotides. The predictive ability of this new algorithm supports the claim that there is a fundamental difference in the correlation property between coding and noncoding sequences. This algorithm, which is not species-dependent, can be implemented with other techniques for rapidly and accurately locating relatively long coding regions in genomic sequences.

  17. SeqControl: process control for DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chong, Lauren C; Albuquerque, Marco A; Harding, Nicholas J; Caloian, Cristian; Chan-Seng-Yue, Michelle; de Borja, Richard; Fraser, Michael; Denroche, Robert E; Beck, Timothy A; van der Kwast, Theodorus; Bristow, Robert G; McPherson, John D; Boutros, Paul C

    2014-10-01

    As high-throughput sequencing continues to increase in speed and throughput, routine clinical and industrial application draws closer. These 'production' settings will require enhanced quality monitoring and quality control to optimize output and reduce costs. We developed SeqControl, a framework for predicting sequencing quality and coverage using a set of 15 metrics describing overall coverage, coverage distribution, basewise coverage and basewise quality. Using whole-genome sequences of 27 prostate cancers and 26 normal references, we derived multivariate models that predict sequencing quality and depth. SeqControl robustly predicted how much sequencing was required to reach a given coverage depth (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.993), accurately classified clinically relevant formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples, and made predictions from as little as one-eighth of a sequencing lane (AUC = 0.967). These techniques can be immediately incorporated into existing sequencing pipelines to monitor data quality in real time. SeqControl is available at http://labs.oicr.on.ca/Boutros-lab/software/SeqControl/.

  18. The regions of sequence variation in caulimovirus gene VI.

    PubMed

    Sanger, M; Daubert, S; Goodman, R M

    1991-06-01

    The sequence of gene VI from figwort mosaic virus (FMV) clone x4 was determined and compared with that previously published for FMV clone DxS. Both clones originated from the same virus isolation, but the virus used to clone DxS was propagated extensively in a host of a different family prior to cloning whereas that used to clone x4 was not. Differences in the amino acid sequence inferred from the DNA sequences occurred in two clusters. An N-terminal conserved region preceded two regions of variation separated by a central conserved region. Variation in cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) gene VI sequences, all of which were derived from virus isolates from hosts from one host family, was similar to that seen in the FMV comparison, though the extent of variation was less. Alignment of gene VI domains from FMV and CaMV revealed regions of amino acid sequence identical in both viruses within the conserved regions. The similarity in the pattern of conserved and variable domains of these two viruses suggests common host-interactive functions in caulimovirus gene VI homologues, and possibly an analogy between caulimoviruses and certain animal viruses in the influence of the host on sequence variability of viral genes.

  19. Ballooning mode second stability region for sequences of tokamak equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, L.; Mark, J. W-K.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical study of several sequences of tokamak equilibria derived from two flux conserving sequences confirms the tendency of high n ideal MHD ballooning modes to stabilize for values of the plasma beta greater than a second critical beta, for sufficiently favorable equilibria. The major stabilizing effect of increasing the inverse rotational transform profile q(Psi) for equilibria with the same flux surface geometry is shown. The unstable region shifts toward larger shear d ln q/d ln ..gamma.. and the width of the region measured in terms of the poloidal beta or a pressure gradient parameter, for fixed shear, decreases. The smaller aspect ratio sequences are more sensitive to changes in q and have less stringent limits on the attainable value of the plasma beta in the high beta stable region. Finally, the disconnected mode approximation is shown to provide a reasonable description of the second high beta stability boundary.

  20. Rapid Evolution of Virus Sequences in Intrinsically Disordered Protein Regions

    PubMed Central

    Gitlin, Leonid; Hagai, Tzachi; LaBarbera, Anthony; Solovey, Mark; Andino, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Nodamura Virus (NoV) is a nodavirus originally isolated from insects that can replicate in a wide variety of hosts, including mammals. Because of their simplicity and ability to replicate in many diverse hosts, NoV, and the Nodaviridae in general, provide a unique window into the evolution of viruses and host-virus interactions. Here we show that the C-terminus of the viral polymerase exhibits extreme structural and evolutionary flexibility. Indeed, fewer than 10 positively charged residues from the 110 amino acid-long C-terminal region of protein A are required to support RNA1 replication. Strikingly, this region can be replaced by completely unrelated protein sequences, yet still produce a functional replicase. Structure predictions, as well as evolutionary and mutational analyses, indicate that the C-terminal region is structurally disordered and evolves faster than the rest of the viral proteome. Thus, the function of an intrinsically unstructured protein region can be independent of most of its primary sequence, conferring both functional robustness and sequence plasticity on the protein. Our results provide an experimental explanation for rapid evolution of unstructured regions, which enables an effective exploration of the sequence space, and likely function space, available to the virus. PMID:25502394

  1. Rapid evolution of virus sequences in intrinsically disordered protein regions.

    PubMed

    Gitlin, Leonid; Hagai, Tzachi; LaBarbera, Anthony; Solovey, Mark; Andino, Raul

    2014-12-01

    Nodamura Virus (NoV) is a nodavirus originally isolated from insects that can replicate in a wide variety of hosts, including mammals. Because of their simplicity and ability to replicate in many diverse hosts, NoV, and the Nodaviridae in general, provide a unique window into the evolution of viruses and host-virus interactions. Here we show that the C-terminus of the viral polymerase exhibits extreme structural and evolutionary flexibility. Indeed, fewer than 10 positively charged residues from the 110 amino acid-long C-terminal region of protein A are required to support RNA1 replication. Strikingly, this region can be replaced by completely unrelated protein sequences, yet still produce a functional replicase. Structure predictions, as well as evolutionary and mutational analyses, indicate that the C-terminal region is structurally disordered and evolves faster than the rest of the viral proteome. Thus, the function of an intrinsically unstructured protein region can be independent of most of its primary sequence, conferring both functional robustness and sequence plasticity on the protein. Our results provide an experimental explanation for rapid evolution of unstructured regions, which enables an effective exploration of the sequence space, and likely function space, available to the virus. PMID:25502394

  2. Kinetoplast DNA minicircles: regions of extensive sequence divergence.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, W O; Wirth, D F

    1987-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the kinetoplast minicircle DNA of Leishmania species exhibits species-specific sequence divergence and this observation has led to the development of a DNA probe-based diagnostic test for leishmaniasis. In the work reported here, we demonstrate that the minicircle is composed of three types of DNA sequences with differing specificities reflecting different rates of DNA sequence change. A library of cloned fragments of kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) from Leishmania mexicana amazonensis was prepared and the cloned subfragments were found to contain DNA sequences with different taxonomic specificities based on hybridization analysis with various species of Leishmania. Four groups of subfragments were found, those that hybridized with a large number of Leishmania sp. as well as sequences unique to the species, subspecies, or isolate. Analysis of nested deletions of a single, full-length minicircle demonstrates that these different taxonomic specificities are contained within a single minicircle. This implies that different regions of a single minicircle have DNA sequences that diverge at different rates. These sequences represent potentially valuable tools in diagnostic, epidemiologic, and ecological studies of leishmaniasis and provide the basis for a model of kDNA sequence evolution. Images PMID:3025880

  3. Regional association analysis delineates a sequenced chromosome region influencing antinutritive seed meal compounds in oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Snowdon, R J; Wittkop, B; Rezaidad, A; Hasan, M; Lipsa, F; Stein, A; Friedt, W

    2010-11-01

    This study describes the use of regional association analyses to delineate a sequenced region of a Brassica napus chromosome with a significant effect on antinutritive seed meal compounds in oilseed rape. A major quantitative trait locus (QTL) influencing seed colour, fibre content, and phenolic compounds was mapped to the same position on B. napus chromosome A9 in biparental mapping populations from two different yellow-seeded × black-seeded B. napus crosses. Sequences of markers spanning the QTL region identified synteny to a sequence contig from the corresponding chromosome A9 in Brassica rapa. Remapping of sequence-derived markers originating from the B. rapa sequence contig confirmed their position within the QTL. One of these markers also mapped to a seed colour and fibre QTL on the same chromosome in a black-seeded × black-seeded B. napus cross. Consequently, regional association analysis was performed in a genetically diverse panel of dark-seeded, winter-type oilseed rape accessions. For this we used closely spaced simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers spanning the sequence contig covering the QTL region. Correction for population structure was performed using a set of genome-wide SSR markers. The identification of QTL-derived markers with significant associations to seed colour, fibre content, and phenolic compounds in the association panel enabled the identification of positional and functional candidate genes for B. napus seed meal quality within a small segment of the B. rapa genome sequence.

  4. Analysis of sequence-dependent curvature in matrix attachment regions.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, J; Nomura, K

    2001-02-01

    Sequence-dependent DNA conformations of matrix attachment regions (MARs) available in a database were calculated using the wedge model, and compared with randomly chosen genes, promoters, enhancers and transposons. The MARs had a longer bent part and higher angle/helical turn than the other regions. It is known that some MAR sequences have A-tracts that cause DNA bending, and we also found many A-tracts in examined MARs. Furthermore, non-random and clustered distribution of A-tracts shown here gave further evidence of the importance of A-tracts for MAR conformations. These results suggest that DNAs of MARs have a characteristic conformation instead of conserved sequence.

  5. The Main Sequence of Explosive Solar Active Regions: Comparison of Emerging and Mature Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David; Moore, Ron

    2011-01-01

    For mature active regions, an active region s magnetic flux content determines the maximum free energy the active region can have. Most Large flares and CMEs occur in active regions that are near their free-energy limit. Active-region flare power radiated in the GOES 1-8 band increases steeply as the free-energy limit is approached. We infer that the free-energy limit is set by the rate of release of an active region s free magnetic energy by flares, CMEs and coronal heating balancing the maximum rate the Sun can put free energy into the active region s magnetic field. This balance of maximum power results in explosive active regions residing in a "mainsequence" in active-region (flux content, free energy content) phase space, which sequence is analogous to the main sequence of hydrogen-burning stars in (mass, luminosity) phase space.

  6. Segmentation and tracking of facial regions in color image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menser, Bernd; Wien, Mathias

    2000-05-01

    In this paper a new algorithm for joint detection and segmentation of human faces in color images sequence is presented. A skin probability image is generated using a model for skin color. Instead of a binary segmentation to detect skin regions, connected operators are used to analyze the skin probability image at different threshold levels. A hierarchical scheme of operators using shape and texture simplifies the skin probability image. For the remaining connected components, the likelihood of being a face is estimated using principal components analysis. To track a detected face region through the sequence, the connected component that represent the face in the previous frame is projected into the current frame. Using the projected segment as a marker, connected operators extract the actual face region from the skin probability image.

  7. Genetic differences between the endangered San Clemente Island loggerhead shrike Lanius ludovicianus mearnsi and two neighbouring subspecies demonstrated by mtDNA control region and cytochrome b sequence variation.

    PubMed

    Mundy, N I; Winchell, C S; Woodruff, D S

    1997-01-01

    We investigated mtDNA sequence variation in five populations of the loggerhead shrike Lanius ludovicianus, representing four subspecies, including the San Clemente logger-head shrike L. l. mearnsi, a critically endangered California Channel Island endemic. Variability in 200 bp of control region and 200 bp of cytochrome b was extremely low, and defined four haplotypes. Strong structure was apparent among all three southern California subspecies, including L. l. mearnsi, with one haplotype predominating in each subspecies. Although potential levels of gene flow between L. l. mearnsi and neighbouring populations are low, mtDNA data support field observations that some shrikes visit the island during winter but do not stay to breed, and suggest that these birds come from the mainland. The similarity in haplotypes between populations from Saskatchewan, Canada and those in southern California suggests post-glacial northern range expansion of the species. Our results confirm the evolutionary distinctiveness of L. l. mearnsi and justify continuing efforts for its conservation.

  8. Mutational analysis of intervening sequences connecting the binding sites for integration host factor, PepA, PurR, and RNA polymerase in the control region of the Escherichia coli carAB operon, encoding carbamoylphosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Devroede, Neel; Huysveld, Nadine; Charlier, Daniel

    2006-05-01

    Transcription of the carAB operon encoding the unique carbamoylphosphate synthase of Escherichia coli reflects the dual function of carbamoylphosphate in the biosynthesis of arginine and pyrimidine nucleotides. The tandem pair of promoters is regulated by various mechanisms depending on the needs of both pathways and the maintenance of a pyrimidine/purine nucleotide balance. Here we focus on the linker regions that impose the distribution of target sites for DNA-binding proteins involved in pyrimidine- and purine-specific repression of the upstream promoter P1. We introduced deletions and insertions, and combinations thereof, in four linkers connecting the binding sites for integration host factor (IHF), PepA, PurR, and RNA polymerase and studied the importance of phasing and spacing of the targets and the importance of the nucleotide sequence of the linkers. The two PepA binding sites must be properly aligned and separated with respect to each other and to the promoter for both pyrimidine- and purine-mediated repression. Similarly, the phasing and spacing of the IHF and PEPA2 sites are strictly constrained but only for pyrimidine-specific repression. The IHF target is even dispensable for purine-mediated regulation. Thus, a correct localization of PepA within the higher-order nucleoprotein complex is a prerequisite for the establishment of pyrimidine-mediated repression and for the coupling between purine- and pyrimidine-dependent regulation. Our data also suggest the existence of a novel cis-acting pyrimidine-specific regulatory target located around position -60. Finally, the analysis of a P1 derivative devoid of its control region has led to a reappraisal of the effect of excess adenine on P1 and has revealed that P1 has no need for a UP element.

  9. Climatic controls on Pennsylvanian sequences, United States

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, C.B.; Dulong, F.T.; Edgar, N.T.

    1996-08-01

    Temporal and spatial paleoclimate changes were primary controls on changes in sediment supply, both siliciclastic and chemical, in Pennsylvanian deposystems of the United States. Tectonic and eustatic processes, as well as climatically induced changes in sediment supply, controlled accommodation space and sequence stratigraphy within these deposystems. Interbasinal correlations of lithologies sensitive to climate, such as coeval paleosols, provide continental-scale records of climatic and eustatic conditions. Pennsylvanian bio- and lithostratigraphy are indicative of climate change at time scales that range from long-term (tens of millions of years) as Pangea formed and North America moved northward through the paleoequator, to intermediate-term hundred thousand year cycles controlled by orbital forcing, to very short-term events perhaps analogous to El Nino. Because of proximity to the humid tropics, the long-term climate of eastern basins of the United States was generally wetter than western basins. In the east, pluvial parts of climate cycles occur during low-stand events and are recorded by intense chemical weathering, high terrestrial organic productivity, restricted erosion, and siliciclastic sediment starvation. These conditions resulted in highly leached mineral paleosols (Ultisols) and coal beds (Histosols) of interbasinal extent. Drier parts of climate cycles in the east occurred during highstands of sea level when erosion and siliciclastic transport were maximum. In the western basins pluvial periods are generally indicated by shifts from eolian to fluvial and lacustrine sedimentary regimes in continental environments and from evaporate and carbonate to siliciclastic deposition, including black shale petroleum source rocks, in marine environments. Tectonics controlled basin development and glacial eustasy controlled sea level cycles. Climate, however, was the primary control on sediment supply and lithostratigraphy.

  10. An ongoing earthquake sequence near Dhaka, Bangladesh, from regional recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, M.; Mondal, D. R.; Akhter, S. H.; Kim, W.; Seeber, L.; Steckler, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquakes in and around the syntaxial region between the continent-continent collision of the Himalayan arc and oceanic subduction of the Sunda arc result primarily from the convergence of India and Eurasia-Sunda plates along two fronts. The northern front, the convergence of the Indian and Eurasian plates, has produced the Himalayas. The eastern front, the convergence of the Indian and Sunda plates, ranges from ocean-continent subduction at the Andaman Arc and Burma Arc, and transitions to continent-continent collision to the north at the Assam Syntaxis in northeast India. The India-Sunda convergence at the Burma Arc is extremely oblique. The boundary-normal convergence rate is ~17 mm/yr while the boundary-parallel rate is ~45 mm/yr including the well-known Sagaing strike-slip fault, which accommodates about half the shear component. This heterogeneous tectonic setting produces multiple earthquake sources that need to be considered when assessing seismic hazard and risk in this region. The largest earthquakes, just as in other subduction systems, are expected to be interplate events that occur on the low-angle megathrusts, such as the Mw 9.2 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake and the 1762 earthquake along the Arakan margin. These earthquakes are known to produce large damage over vast areas, but since they account for large fault motions they are relatively rare. The majority of current seismicity in the study area is intraplate. Most of the seismicity associated with the Burma Arc subduction system is in the down-going slab, including the shallow-dipping part below the megathrust flooring the accretionary wedge. The strike of the wedge is ~N-S and Dhaka lies at its outer limit. One particular source relevant to seismic risk in Dhaka is illuminated by a multi-year sequence of earthquakes in Bangladesh less than 100 km southeast of Dhaka. The population in Dhaka (now at least 15 million) has been increasing dramatically due to rapid urbanization. The vulnerability

  11. Sequence and single-base polymorphisms of the bovine alpha-lactalbumin 5'-flanking region.

    PubMed

    Bleck, G T; Bremel, R D

    1993-04-30

    The alpha-lactalbumin (alpha LA)-encoding gene is a potential quantitative trait locus in dairy animals. In cattle, the production of alpha LA is tightly coupled to the onset of lactation and it serves as a regulatory subunit of the enzyme responsible for lactose synthesis. Lactose is the major osmole controlling water movement in the mammary gland. To better understand the control of bovine alpha LA expression, the 5'-flanking region of a Holstein alpha LA gene was cloned and sequenced. The sequenced clone contains 1952 bp of 5'-flanking region and 66-bp of the protein-coding region. Three single-bp polymorphisms were identified within this region. These polymorphisms occur at positions +15, +21 and +54 relative to the mRNA transcription start point (tsp). The +15 and +21 variations occur in the region encoding the 5'-untranslated region of the mRNA-coding sequence. The +54 polymorphism is a silent mutation in the SP-coding region of the gene. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR, Cetus)-based screening method has been employed to analyze the genotype of cattle at the +15 position. A total of 501 randomly selected cattle from seven breeds were screened for this allele. Of these animals, only the Holstein breed of cattle was found to contain the +15 variation and it occurs at a gene frequency of 32%. Sequence comparisons were conducted between the 5'-flanking regions of the bovine-milk-protein encoding genes, alpha LA, beta-casein and alpha S1-casein, which are coordinately expressed. Regions of similarity extending to 350 bp in length were observed between these sequences.

  12. Hierarchical Control of Cognitive Processes: Switching Tasks in Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Darryl W.; Logan, Gordon D.

    2006-01-01

    Hierarchical control of cognitive processes was studied by examining the relationship between sequence- and task-level processing in the performance of explicit, memorized task sequences. In 4 experiments, switch costs in task-switching performance were perturbed by sequence initiation times that varied with sequence complexity, preparation time,…

  13. The uteroglobin gene region: hormonal regulation, repetitive elements and complete nucleotide sequence of the gene.

    PubMed Central

    Suske, G; Wenz, M; Cato, A C; Beato, M

    1983-01-01

    Differential uteroglobin induction represents an appropriate model for the molecular analysis of the mechanism by which steroid hormones control gene expression in mammals. We have analyzed the structure and hormonal regulation of a 35 Kb region of genomic DNA in which the uteroglobin gene is located. The complete sequence of 3,700 nucleotides including the uteroglobin gene and its flanking regions has been determined, and the limits of the gene established by S1 nuclease mapping. Several regions containing repeated sequences were mapped by blot hybridization, one of which is located within the large intron in the uteroglobin gene. Analysis of the RNAs extracted from endometrium, lung and liver, after treatment with estrogen and/or progesterone shows that within the 35 Kb region, the uteroglobin gene is the only DNA segment whose transcription into stable RNA is induced by progesterone. Images PMID:6304644

  14. Regional correlation of deposition sequences in the southern Mesozoic marine province, northwestern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Satterfield, J.I.; Oldow, J.S. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-04-01

    Strata of the Mesozoic marine province of a northwestern Nevada, deposited in subaerial to deep marine environment in a backarc basin, underwent severe deformation during the late Mesozoic. Restoration of stratigraphic relations among constituent volcanic, volcanogenic, carbonate, and continentally-derived siliciclastic rocks has been hampered by sparse biostratigraphic age control. Regional correlation of coeval facies is made possible by coupling depositional sequences with biostratigraphic control in the southwestern Gabbs Valley Range, the southern Shoshone Mountains, and the southern Clan Alpine Mountains, which serve as reference sections for Late Triassic and Early Jurassic ammonite zonation of western North America. Differentiation between regionally significant sequence boundaries and those of limited areal extent is possible only by linking the biostratigraphy and physical stratigraphic relations, such as abrupt vertical transitions in lithology corresponding to large facies changes. Physical stratigraphic relations alone are not adequate for correlation ad indicated by the diachronous initiation of Early to Middle( ) Jurassic deposition in half-graben basins (Dunlap Formation) which locally cloaks eustatically( ) controlled depositional sequences. Within these limitations, three regionally extensive sequences are recognized in the reference sections and have lower boundaries at the base of Upper Triassic shallow marine to deltaic carbonate-clastic rocks (Luning Formation) and at the base and within subtidal to offshore-marine carbonate and clastic rocks (Triassic and Jurassic Volcano Peak Group).

  15. Universal primers for amplification of the complete mitochondrial control region in marine fish species.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y Z; Xu, T J; Jin, X X; Tang, D; Wei, T; Sun, Y Y; Meng, F Q; Shi, G; Wang, R X

    2012-01-01

    Through multiple alignment analysis of mitochondrial tRNA-Thr and tRNA-Phe sequences from 161 fishes, new universal primers specially targeting the entire mitochondrial control region were designed. This new primer set successfully amplified the expected PCR products from various kinds of marine fish species, belonging to various families, and the amplified segments were confirmed to be the control region by sequencing. These primers provide a useful tool to study the control region diversity in economically important fish species, the possible mechanism of control region evolution, and the functions of the conserved motifs in the control region.

  16. The 5'-flanking regions of three pea legumin genes: comparison of the DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Lycett, G W; Croy, R R; Shirsat, A H; Richards, D M; Boulter, D

    1985-01-01

    Approximately 1200 nucleotides of sequence data from the promoter and 5'-flanking regions of each of three pea (Pisum sativum L.) legumin genes (legA, legB and legC) are presented. The promoter regions of all three genes were found to be identical including the "TATA box", and "CAAT box', and sequences showing homology to the SV40 enhancers. The legA sequence begins to diverge from the others about 300bp from the start codon, whereas the other two genes remain identical for another 550bp. The regions of partial homology exhibit deletions or insertions and some short, comparatively well conserved sequences. The significance of these features is discussed in terms of evolutionary mechanisms and their possible functional roles. The legC gene contains a region that may potentially form either of two mutually exclusive stem-loop structures, one of which has a stem 42bp long, which suggests that it could be fairly stable. We suggest that a mechanism of switching between such alternative structures may play some role in gene control or may represent the insertion of a transposable element. PMID:2997721

  17. Artificial Intelligence Controls Tape-Recording Sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuttke, Ursula M.; Otamura, Roy M.; Zottarelli, Lawrence J.

    1989-01-01

    Developmental expert-system computer program intended to schedule recording of large amounts of data on limited amount of magnetic tape. Schedules recording using two sets of rules. First set incorporates knowledge of locations for recording of new data. Second set incorporates knowledge about issuing commands to recorder. Designed primarily for use on Voyager Spacecraft, also applicable to planning and sequencing in industry.

  18. Time Sequence of Jupiter's Equatorial Region (Time Sets 2 & 4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Time sequence of Jupiter's equatorial region at 756 nanometers (nm). The mosaics cover an area of 34,000 kilometers by 22,000 kilometers and were taken ten hours (approximately one Jovian rotation) apart. The dark region near the center of the mosaic is an equatorial 'hotspot' similar to the Galileo Probe entry site. The near-infrared continuum filter shows the features of Jupiter's main visible cloud deck.

    Jupiter's atmospheric circulation is dominated by alternating jets of east/west (zonal) winds. The bands have different widths and wind speeds but have remained constant as long as telescopes and spacecraft have measured them. The top half of these mosaics lies within Jupiter's North Equatorial Belt, a westward (left) current. The bottom half shows part of the Equatorial Zone, a fast moving eastward current. The clouds near the hotspot are the fastest moving features in these mosaics, moving at about 100 meters per second, or 224 miles per hour.

    North is at the top. The mosaics cover latitudes 1 to 19 degrees and are centered at longitude 336 degrees West. The grid lines, fixed in longitude, mark 350 degrees west (on the left edge) with decreasing longitude lines marking every 5 degrees moving east (to the right). The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. These images were taken on December 17, 1996, at a range of 1.5 million kilometers by the Solid State Imaging system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  19. Iterative exponential growth of stereo- and sequence-controlled polymers.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Jonathan C; Ehrlich, Deborah J C; Gao, Angela X; Leibfarth, Frank A; Jiang, Yivan; Zhou, Erica; Jamison, Timothy F; Johnson, Jeremiah A

    2015-10-01

    Chemists have long sought sequence-controlled synthetic polymers that mimic nature's biopolymers, but a practical synthetic route that enables absolute control over polymer sequence and structure remains a key challenge. Here, we report an iterative exponential growth plus side-chain functionalization (IEG+) strategy that begins with enantiopure epoxides and facilitates the efficient synthesis of a family of uniform >3 kDa macromolecules of varying sequence and stereoconfiguration that are coupled to produce unimolecular polymers (>6 kDa) with sequences and structures that cannot be obtained using traditional polymerization techniques. Selective side-chain deprotection of three hexadecamers is also demonstrated, which imbues each compound with the ability to dissolve in water. We anticipate that these new macromolecules and the general IEG+ strategy will find broad application as a versatile platform for the scalable synthesis of sequence-controlled polymers.

  20. Intrusion Detection in Control Systems using Sequence Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, Mai; Onoda, Takashi

    Intrusion detection is considered effective in control systems. Sequences of the control application behavior observed in the communication, such as the order of the control device to be controlled, are important in control systems. However, most intrusion detection systems do not effectively reflect sequences in the application layer into the detection rules. In our previous work, we considered utilizing sequences for intrusion detection in control systems, and demonstrated the usefulness of sequences for intrusion detection. However, manually writing the detection rules for a large system can be difficult, so using machine learning methods becomes feasible. Also, in the case of control systems, there have been very few observed cyber attacks, so we have very little knowledge of the attack data that should be used to train the intrusion detection system. In this paper, we use an approach that combines CRF (Conditional Random Field) considering the sequence of the system, thus able to reflect the characteristics of control system sequences into the intrusion detection system, and also does not need the knowledge of attack data to construct the detection rules.

  1. Phaneorozoic sequence stratigraphy of Bolivia and adjacent regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sempere, T. )

    1993-02-01

    Phaneorozoic sequence stratigraphy of the Pacific margin of western South America, particularly the Bolivian section, has been completed and new interpretations and hypotheses have been proposed as a result of data analyses of this information. The Paleozoic margin was initially passive (late Cambrian-Llanvirn, [open quotes]Puna aulacogen[close quotes]), but became active during a middle Ordovician compressional episode. Most of late Cambrian to early Triassic Bolivian rocks are of marine origin, with dark shale units recording sea level rises, whereas middle Triassic to Recent rocks were mainly deposited in continental environments (except six restricted-marine ingressions in the late Cretaceous-Danian, and one in the late Miocene, all with hydrocarbon potential). A noteworthy similarity exists between the Devonian to Jurassic stratigraphies of Bolivia and the Parana basin, suggesting that Bolivia behaved as part of the Brazilian craton from late Cambrian to late Jurassic, when it was captured into the Pacific margin geotectonic system. Organic-rich units correlate with Paleozoic highstand deposits and younger ingressions. The Bolivian Phanerozoic strata is characterized by thick layers, partly due to middle Ordovician-Carboniferous and late Cretaceous-Cenozoic foreland basins. Paleozoic foreland geometries include northeastern onlaps and, potentially, stratigraphic traps. Hydrocarbon generation, migration and trapping mainly depended on Cenozoic structural loading and burial and on propagation of Andean deformation which are comprised of Paleozoic shale decollements. Precise knowledge of the evolution of the Phanerozoic geodynamic contexts and basin geometries through sedimentation and subsequent deformations is crucial for hydrocarbon exploration strategies in these regions.

  2. Automated manual transmission shift sequence controller

    DOEpatents

    Lawrie, Robert E.; Reed, Richard G.; Rausen, David J.

    2000-02-01

    A powertrain system for a hybrid vehicle. The hybrid vehicle includes a heat engine, such as a diesel engine, and an electric machine, which operates as both, an electric motor and an alternator, to power the vehicle. The hybrid vehicle also includes a manual-style transmission configured to operate as an automatic transmission from the perspective of the driver. The engine and the electric machine drive an input shaft which in turn drives an output shaft of the transmission. In addition to driving the transmission, the electric machine regulates the speed of the input shaft in order to synchronize the input shaft during either an upshift or downshift of the transmission by either decreasing or increasing the speed of the input shaft. When decreasing the speed of the input shaft, the electric motor functions as an alternator to produce electrical energy which may be stored by a storage device. Operation of the transmission is controlled by a transmission controller which receives input signals and generates output signals to control shift and clutch motors to effect smooth launch, upshift shifts, and downshifts of the transmission, so that the transmission functions substantially as an automatic transmission from the perspective of the driver, while internally substantially functioning as a manual transmission.

  3. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable regions using infrared fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Steffens, D L; Roy, R

    1998-06-01

    The non-coding region of the mitochondrial genome provides an attractive target for human forensic identification studies. Two hypervariable (HV) regions, each approximately 250-350 bp in length, contain the majority of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variability among different individuals. Various approaches to determine mtDNA sequence were evaluated utilizing highly sensitive infrared (IR) fluorescence detection. HV regions were amplified either together or separately and cycle-sequenced using a Thermo Sequenase protocol. An M13 universal primer sequence tail covalently attached to the 5' terminus of an amplification primer facilitated electrophoretic analysis and direct sequencing of the amplification products using IR detection. PMID:9631201

  4. Conserved sequences in both coding and 5' flanking regions of mammalian opal suppressor tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, K; Eden, F C; You, K H; O'Neill, V A; Hatfield, D

    1985-01-01

    The rabbit genome encodes an opal suppressor tRNA gene. The coding region is strictly conserved between the rabbit gene and the corresponding gene in the human genome. The rabbit opal suppressor gene contains the consensus sequence in the 3' internal control region but like the human and chicken genes, the rabbit 5' internal control region contains two additional nucleotides. The 5' flanking sequences of the rabbit and the human opal suppressor genes contain extensive regions of homology. A subset of these homologies is also present 5' to the chicken opal suppressor gene. Both the rabbit and the human genomes also encode a pseudogene. That of the rabbit lacks the 3' half of the coding region. Neither pseudogene has homologous regions to the 5' flanking regions of the genes. The presence of 5' homologies flanking only the transcribed genes and not the pseudogenes suggests that these regions may be regulatory control elements specifically involved in the expression of the eukaryotic opal suppressor gene. Moreover the strict conservation of coding sequences indicates functional importance for the opal suppressor tRNA genes. Images PMID:4022772

  5. Continuous Control of the Flow in Biochemical Pathways through 5′ Untranslated Region Sequence Modifications in mRNA Expressed from the Broad-Host-Range Promoter Pm ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lale, Rahmi; Berg, Laila; Stüttgen, Friederike; Netzer, Roman; Stafsnes, Marit; Brautaset, Trygve; Vee Aune, Trond Erik; Valla, Svein

    2011-01-01

    The inducible Pm promoter integrated into broad-host-range plasmid RK2 replicons can be fine-tuned continuously between the uninduced and maximally induced levels by varying the inducer concentrations. To lower the uninduced background level while still maintaining the inducibility for applications in, for example, metabolic engineering and synthetic (systems) biology, we report here the use of mutations in the Pm DNA region corresponding to the 5′ untranslated region of mRNA (UTR). Five UTR variants obtained by doped oligonucleotide mutagenesis and selection, apparently reducing the efficiency of translation, were all found to display strongly reduced uninduced expression of three different reporter genes (encoding β-lactamase, luciferase, and phosphoglucomutase) in Escherichia coli. The ratio between induced and uninduced expression remained the same or higher compared to cells containing a corresponding plasmid with the wild-type UTR. Interestingly, the UTR variants also displayed similar effects on expression when substituted for the native UTR in another and constitutive promoter, P1 (Pantitet), indicating a broad application potential of these UTR variants. Two of the selected variants were used to control the production of the C50 carotenoid sarcinaxanthin in an engineered strain of E. coli that produces the precursor lycopene. Sarcinaxanthin is produced in this particular strain by expressing three Micrococcus luteus derived genes from the promoter Pm. The results indicated that UTR variants can be used to eliminate sarcinaxanthin production under uninduced conditions, whereas cells containing the corresponding plasmid with a wild-type UTR produced ca. 25% of the level observed under induced conditions. PMID:21335387

  6. Deep sequencing of the MHC region in the Chinese population contributes to studies of complex disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fusheng; Cao, Hongzhi; Zuo, Xianbo; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Liu, Xiaomin; Xu, Ricong; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Yuanwei; Zheng, Xiaodong; Jin, Xin; Gao, Jinping; Mei, Junpu; Sheng, Yujun; Li, Qibin; Liang, Bo; Shen, Juan; Shen, Changbing; Jiang, Hui; Zhu, Caihong; Fan, Xing; Xu, Fengping; Yue, Min; Yin, Xianyong; Ye, Chen; Zhang, Cuicui; Liu, Xiao; Yu, Liang; Wu, Jinghua; Chen, Mengyun; Zhuang, Xuehan; Tang, Lili; Shao, Haojing; Wu, Longmao; Li, Jian; Xu, Yu; Zhang, Yijie; Zhao, Suli; Wang, Yu; Li, Ge; Xu, Hanshi; Zeng, Lei; Wang, Jianan; Bai, Mingzhou; Chen, Yanling; Chen, Wei; Kang, Tian; Wu, Yanyan; Xu, Xun; Zhu, Zhengwei; Cui, Yong; Wang, Zaixing; Yang, Chunjun; Wang, Peiguang; Xiang, Leihong; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Anping; Gao, Xinghua; Zhang, Furen; Xu, Jinhua; Zheng, Min; Zheng, Jie; Zhang, Jianzhong; Yu, Xueqing; Li, Yingrui; Yang, Sen; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Liu, Jianjun; Hammarström, Lennart; Sun, Liangdan; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-07-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region has been shown to be associated with numerous diseases. However, it remains a challenge to pinpoint the causal variants for these associations because of the extreme complexity of the region. We thus sequenced the entire 5-Mb MHC region in 20,635 individuals of Han Chinese ancestry (10,689 controls and 9,946 patients with psoriasis) and constructed a Han-MHC database that includes both variants and HLA gene typing results of high accuracy. We further identified multiple independent new susceptibility loci in HLA-C, HLA-B, HLA-DPB1 and BTNL2 and an intergenic variant, rs118179173, associated with psoriasis and confirmed the well-established risk allele HLA-C*06:02. We anticipate that our Han-MHC reference panel built by deep sequencing of a large number of samples will serve as a useful tool for investigating the role of the MHC region in a variety of diseases and thus advance understanding of the pathogenesis of these disorders. PMID:27213287

  7. Deep sequencing of the MHC region in the Chinese population contributes to studies of complex disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fusheng; Cao, Hongzhi; Zuo, Xianbo; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Liu, Xiaomin; Xu, Ricong; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Yuanwei; Zheng, Xiaodong; Jin, Xin; Gao, Jinping; Mei, Junpu; Sheng, Yujun; Li, Qibin; Liang, Bo; Shen, Juan; Shen, Changbing; Jiang, Hui; Zhu, Caihong; Fan, Xing; Xu, Fengping; Yue, Min; Yin, Xianyong; Ye, Chen; Zhang, Cuicui; Liu, Xiao; Yu, Liang; Wu, Jinghua; Chen, Mengyun; Zhuang, Xuehan; Tang, Lili; Shao, Haojing; Wu, Longmao; Li, Jian; Xu, Yu; Zhang, Yijie; Zhao, Suli; Wang, Yu; Li, Ge; Xu, Hanshi; Zeng, Lei; Wang, Jianan; Bai, Mingzhou; Chen, Yanling; Chen, Wei; Kang, Tian; Wu, Yanyan; Xu, Xun; Zhu, Zhengwei; Cui, Yong; Wang, Zaixing; Yang, Chunjun; Wang, Peiguang; Xiang, Leihong; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Anping; Gao, Xinghua; Zhang, Furen; Xu, Jinhua; Zheng, Min; Zheng, Jie; Zhang, Jianzhong; Yu, Xueqing; Li, Yingrui; Yang, Sen; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Liu, Jianjun; Hammarström, Lennart; Sun, Liangdan; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-07-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region has been shown to be associated with numerous diseases. However, it remains a challenge to pinpoint the causal variants for these associations because of the extreme complexity of the region. We thus sequenced the entire 5-Mb MHC region in 20,635 individuals of Han Chinese ancestry (10,689 controls and 9,946 patients with psoriasis) and constructed a Han-MHC database that includes both variants and HLA gene typing results of high accuracy. We further identified multiple independent new susceptibility loci in HLA-C, HLA-B, HLA-DPB1 and BTNL2 and an intergenic variant, rs118179173, associated with psoriasis and confirmed the well-established risk allele HLA-C*06:02. We anticipate that our Han-MHC reference panel built by deep sequencing of a large number of samples will serve as a useful tool for investigating the role of the MHC region in a variety of diseases and thus advance understanding of the pathogenesis of these disorders.

  8. Comparative analysis of complete mitochondrial DNA control region of four species of Strigiformes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bing; Ma, Fei; Sun, Yi; Li, Qing-Wei

    2006-11-01

    The sequence of the whole mitochondrial (mt) DNA control region (CR) of four species of Strigiformes was obtained. Length of the CR was 3,290 bp, 2,848 bp, 2,444 bp, and 1,771 bp for Asio flammeus, Asio otus, Athene noctua, and Strix aluco, respectively. Interestingly, the length of the control region was maximum in Asio flammeus among all the avian mtDNA control regions sequenced thus far. In addition, the base composition and organization of mtDNA CR of Asio flammeus were identical to those reported for other birds. On the basis of the differential frequencies of base substitutions, the CR may be divided two variable domains, I and III, and a central conserved domain, II. The 3' end of the CR contained many tandem repeats of varying lengths and repeat numbers. In Asio flammeus, the repeated sequences consisted of a 126 bp sequence that was repeated seven times and a 78 bp sequence that was repeated 14 times. In Asio otus, there were also two repeated sequences, namely a 127 bp sequence that was repeated eight times and a 78 bp sequence that was repeated six times. The control region of Athene noctua contained three sets of repeats: a 89 bp sequence that was repeated three times, a 77 bp sequence that was repeated four times, and a 71 bp sequence that was repeated six times. Strix aluco, however, had only one repeated sequence, a 78 bp sequence that was repeated five times. The results of this study seem to indicate that these tandem repeats may have resulted from slipped-strand mispairing during mtDNA replication. Moreover, there are many conserved motifs within the repeated units. These sequences could form stable stem-loop secondary structures, which suggests that these repeated sequences play an important role in regulating transcription and replication of the mitochondrial genome.

  9. On generalized fixed sequence procedures for controlling the FWER.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhiying; Guo, Wenge; Lynch, Gavin

    2015-12-30

    Testing a sequence of pre-ordered hypotheses to decide which of these can be rejected or accepted while controlling the familywise error rate (FWER) is of importance in many scientific studies such as clinical trials. In this paper, we first introduce a generalized fixed sequence procedure whose critical values are defined by using a function of the numbers of rejections and acceptances, and which allows follow-up hypotheses to be tested even if some earlier hypotheses are not rejected. We then construct the least favorable configuration for this generalized fixed sequence procedure and present a sufficient condition for the FWER control under arbitrary dependence. Based on the condition, we develop three new generalized fixed sequence procedures controlling the FWER under arbitrary dependence. We also prove that each generalized fixed sequence procedure can be described as a specific closed testing procedure. Through simulation studies and a clinical trial example, we compare the power performance of these proposed procedures with those of the existing FWER controlling procedures. Finally, when the pairwise joint distributions of the true null p-values are known, we further improve these procedures by incorporating pairwise correlation information while maintaining the control of the FWER. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Chronology of Eocene-Miocene sequences on the New Jersey shallow shelf: implications for regional, interregional, and global correlations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Browning, James V.; Miller, Kenneth G.; Sugarman, Peter J.; Barron, John; McCarthy, Francine M.G.; Kulhanek, Denise K.; Katz, Miriam E.; Feigenson, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 313 continuously cored and logged latest Eocene to early-middle Miocene sequences at three sites (M27, M28, and M29) on the inner-middle continental shelf offshore New Jersey, providing an opportunity to evaluate the ages, global correlations, and significance of sequence boundaries. We provide a chronology for these sequences using integrated strontium isotopic stratigraphy and biostratigraphy (primarily calcareous nannoplankton, diatoms, and dinocysts [dinoflagellate cysts]). Despite challenges posed by shallow-water sediments, age resolution is typically ±0.5 m.y. and in many sequences is as good as ±0.25 m.y. Three Oligocene sequences were sampled at Site M27 on sequence bottomsets. Fifteen early to early-middle Miocene sequences were dated at Sites M27, M28, and M29 across clinothems in topsets, foresets (where the sequences are thickest), and bottomsets. A few sequences have coarse (∼1 m.y.) or little age constraint due to barren zones; we constrain the age estimates of these less well dated sequences by applying the principle of superposition, i.e., sediments above sequence boundaries in any site are younger than the sediments below the sequence boundaries at other sites. Our age control provides constraints on the timing of deposition in the clinothem; sequences on the topsets are generally the youngest in the clinothem, whereas the bottomsets generally are the oldest. The greatest amount of time is represented on foresets, although we have no evidence for a correlative conformity. Our chronology provides a baseline for regional and interregional correlations and sea-level reconstructions: (1) we correlate a major increase in sedimentation rate precisely with the timing of the middle Miocene climate changes associated with the development of a permanent East Antarctic Ice Sheet; and (2) the timing of sequence boundaries matches the deep-sea oxygen isotopic record, implicating glacioeustasy as a major driver

  11. Sequence of the dog immunoglobulin alpha and epsilon constant region genes

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, M.; Selinger, D.; Mark, G.E.; Hollis, G.F.; Hickey, G.J.

    1995-03-01

    The immunoglobulin alpha (IGHAC) and epsilon (IGHEC) germline constant region genes were isolated from a dog liver genomic DNA library. Sequence analysis indicates that the dog IGHEC gene is encoded by four exons spread out over 1.7 kilobases (kb). The IGHAC sequence encompasses 1.5 kb and includes all three constant region coding exons. The complete exon/intron sequence of these genes is described. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. [Structure analysis of mtDNA control region of spotted halibut (Verasper variegatus) and its related species].

    PubMed

    He, Chong-Bo; Cao, Jie; Liu, Wei-Dong; Zhou, Zun-Chun; Ge, Long-Li; Gao, Xiang-Gang; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2007-07-01

    Spotted halibut (Verasper variegatus) is the only species of Genus Verasper in China. The fish was naturally distributed in Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea in northern China and Kyushu in Japan and in Korean sea area. Using PCR product direct sequencing, mitochondrial control region sequences of 24 individuals of spotted halibut was confirmed and analyzed. 4 control region haplotypes, resulting from length heteroplamy of the tandem repeat region, was obtained from these 24 fish. Sequence analysis demonstrated that there were four similar structures in the control region, i.e., extended terminal associated sequences (ETAS), central conserved sequence block (CSB), conserved sequence block (CSB), and repeat region, in V. moseri, Limanda ferruginea, Reinhardtius hippoglossoides, Heppoglossoides platessoides, Paralichthys olivaceous, Solea solea, S. senegalensis, and S. lascari. By comparing with other vertebrates, we found that there were similar repeated sequences immediately after the CSB-3 in all of the anuran species. PMID:17646149

  13. Modular sequence elements associated with origin regions in eukaryotic chromosomal DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Dobbs, D L; Shaiu, W L; Benbow, R M

    1994-01-01

    We have postulated that chromosomal replication origin regions in eukaryotes have in common clusters of certain modular sequence elements (Benbow, Zhao, and Larson, BioEssays 14, 661-670, 1992). In this study, computer analyses of DNA sequences from six origin regions showed that each contained one or more potential initiation regions consisting of a putative DUE (DNA unwinding element) aligned with clusters of SAR (scaffold associated region), and ARS (autonomously replicating sequence) consensus sequences, and pyrimidine tracts. The replication origins analyzed were from the following loci: Tetrahymena thermophila macronuclear rDNA gene, Chinese hamster ovary dihydrofolate reductase amplicon, human c-myc proto-oncogene, chicken histone H5 gene, Drosophila melanogaster chorion gene cluster on the third chromosome, and Chinese hamster ovary rhodopsin gene. The locations of putative initiation regions identified by the computer analyses were compared with published data obtained using diverse methods to map initiation sites. For at least four loci, the potential initiation regions identified by sequence analysis aligned with previously mapped initiation events. A consensus DNA sequence, WAWTTDDWWWDHWGWHMAWTT, was found within the potential initiation regions in every case. An additional 35 kb of combined flanking sequences from the six loci were also analyzed, but no additional copies of this consensus sequence were found. Images PMID:8041609

  14. Quality Control and Analysis of NGS RNA Sequencing Data.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Emma M; McManus, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptome sequencing, where RNA is isolated, converted to library of cDNA fragments, and sequenced using next-generation sequencing technology, has become the method of choice for the genome-wide characterization of mRNA levels. It offers a more accurate quantification of transcript levels than array-based methods, but also has the added benefit of allowing the discovery of novel gene/transcripts, alternative splice junctions, and novel RNAs. In addition, RNA sequencing may be used to investigate differential gene expression, allelic imbalance, eQTL mapping, RNA editing, RNA-protein interactions, and alternative splicing. A number of statistical methods and tools are available for differential expression analysis using RNA sequencing data and these are continually being developed and improved to handle more complex experimental designs. This chapter describes an example workflow for the quality control and analysis of raw RNA sequencing reads for the purposes of differential gene expression analysis, followed by pathway/enrichment analysis of significantly different genes. The methods and tools described are just one example of how this analysis can be conducted, but they can be applied to most standard RNA sequencing studies of differential gene expression. The methods covered are based on Illumina HiSeq single-end 50 bp reads. However, all programs used are capable of working with paired-end data, subsequent to minor adaptations.

  15. Intra-Genomic Internal Transcribed Spacer Region Sequence Heterogeneity and Molecular Diagnosis in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jingwei; Xu, Yingchun; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequencing is the most extensively used technology for accurate molecular identification of fungal pathogens in clinical microbiology laboratories. Intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity, which makes fungal identification based on direct sequencing of PCR products difficult, has rarely been reported in pathogenic fungi. During the process of performing ITS sequencing on 71 yeast strains isolated from various clinical specimens, direct sequencing of the PCR products showed ambiguous sequences in six of them. After cloning the PCR products into plasmids for sequencing, interpretable sequencing electropherograms could be obtained. For each of the six isolates, 10–49 clones were selected for sequencing and two to seven intra-genomic ITS copies were detected. The identities of these six isolates were confirmed to be Candida glabrata (n = 2), Pichia (Candida) norvegensis (n = 2), Candida tropicalis (n = 1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (n = 1). Multiple sequence alignment revealed that one to four intra-genomic ITS polymorphic sites were present in the six isolates, and all these polymorphic sites were located in the ITS1 and/or ITS2 regions. We report and describe the first evidence of intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity in four different pathogenic yeasts, which occurred exclusively in the ITS1 and ITS2 spacer regions for the six isolates in this study. PMID:26506340

  16. Intra-Genomic Internal Transcribed Spacer Region Sequence Heterogeneity and Molecular Diagnosis in Clinical Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jingwei; Xu, Yingchun; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-10-22

    Internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequencing is the most extensively used technology for accurate molecular identification of fungal pathogens in clinical microbiology laboratories. Intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity, which makes fungal identification based on direct sequencing of PCR products difficult, has rarely been reported in pathogenic fungi. During the process of performing ITS sequencing on 71 yeast strains isolated from various clinical specimens, direct sequencing of the PCR products showed ambiguous sequences in six of them. After cloning the PCR products into plasmids for sequencing, interpretable sequencing electropherograms could be obtained. For each of the six isolates, 10-49 clones were selected for sequencing and two to seven intra-genomic ITS copies were detected. The identities of these six isolates were confirmed to be Candida glabrata (n=2), Pichia (Candida) norvegensis (n=2), Candida tropicalis (n=1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (n=1). Multiple sequence alignment revealed that one to four intra-genomic ITS polymorphic sites were present in the six isolates, and all these polymorphic sites were located in the ITS1 and/or ITS2 regions. We report and describe the first evidence of intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity in four different pathogenic yeasts, which occurred exclusively in the ITS1 and ITS2 spacer regions for the six isolates in this study.

  17. Control of Task Sequences: What Is the Role of Language?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ulrich; Kleffner-Canucci, Killian; Kikumoto, Atsushi; Redford, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    It is almost a truism that language aids serial-order control through self-cuing of upcoming sequential elements. We measured speech onset latencies as subjects performed hierarchically organized task sequences while "thinking aloud" each task label. Surprisingly, speech onset latencies and response times (RTs) were highly synchronized,…

  18. Timing, Sequencing, and Executive Control in Repetitive Movement Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krampe, Ralf Th.; Mayr, Ulrich; Kliegl, Reinhold

    2005-01-01

    The authors demonstrate that the timing and sequencing of target durations require low-level timing and executive control. Sixteen young (M-sub(age) = 19 years) and 16 older (M-sub(age) = 70 years) adults participated in 2 experiments. In Experiment 1, individual mean-variance functions for low-level timing (isochronous tapping) and the sequencing…

  19. MAIN-SEQUENCE STAR POPULATIONS IN THE VIRGO OVERDENSITY REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.; Tisserand, P.; Willman, B.; Arimoto, N.; Okamoto, S.; Mateo, M.; Saviane, I.; Walsh, S.; Geha, M.; Jordan, A.; Zoccali, M.; Olszewski, E.; Walker, M.; Kroupa, P.

    2013-05-20

    We present deep color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) for two Subaru Suprime-Cam fields in the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS)/Virgo Overdensity (VOD) and compare them to a field centered on the highest concentration of Sagittarius (Sgr) Tidal Stream stars in the leading arm, Branch A of the bifurcation. A prominent population of main-sequence stars is detected in all three fields and can be traced as faint as g Almost-Equal-To 24 mag. Using theoretical isochrone fitting, we derive an age of 9.1{sup +1.0}{sub -1.1} Gyr, a median abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.70{sup +0.15}{sub -0.20} dex, and a heliocentric distance of 30.9 {+-} 3.0 kpc for the main sequence of the Sgr Stream Branch A. The dominant main-sequence populations in the two VSS/VOD fields ({Lambda}{sub Sun} Almost-Equal-To 265 Degree-Sign , B{sub Sun} Almost-Equal-To 13 Degree-Sign ) are located at a mean distance of 23.3 {+-} 1.6 kpc and have an age of {approx}8.2 Gyr, and an abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.67{sup +0.16}{sub -0.12} dex, similar to the Sgr Stream stars. These statistically robust parameters, derived from the photometry of 260 main-sequence stars, are also in good agreement with the age of the main population in the Sgr dwarf galaxy (8.0 {+-} 1.5 Gyr). They also agree with the peak in the metallicity distribution of 2-3 Gyr old M giants, [Fe/H] Almost-Equal-To -0.6 dex, in the Sgr north leading arm. We then compare the results from the VSS/VOD fields with the Sgr Tidal Stream model by Law and Majewski based on a triaxial Galactic halo shape that is empirically calibrated with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Sgr A-branch and Two Micron All Sky Survey M-giant stars. We find that the most prominent feature in the CMDs, the main-sequence population at 23 kpc, is not explained by the model. Instead the model predicts in these directions a low-density filamentary structure of Sgr debris stars at {approx}9 kpc and a slightly higher concentration of Sgr stars spread over a heliocentric distance range of 42-53 kpc. At best

  20. Analysis of the regions flanking the human insulin gene and sequence of an Alu family member.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, G I; Pictet, R; Rutter, W J

    1980-01-01

    The regions around the human insulin gene have been studied by heteroduplex, hybridization and sequence analysis. These studies indicated that there is a region of heterogeneous length located approximately 700 bp before the 5' end of the gene; and that the 19 kb of cloned DNA which includes the 1430 bp insulin gene as well as 5650 bp before and 11,500 bp after the gene is single copy sequence except for 500 bp located 6000 bp from the 3' end of the gene. This 500 bp segment contains a member of the Alu family of dispersed middle repetitive sequences as well as another less highly repeated homopolymeric segment. The sequence of this region was determined. This Alu repeat is bordered by 19 bp direct repeats and also contains an 83 bp sequence which is present twice. The regions flanking the human and rat I insulin genes were compared by heteroduplex analysis to localize homologous sequences in the flanking regions which could be involved in the regulation of insulin biosynthesis. The homology between the two genes is restricted to the region encoding preproinsulin and a short region of approximately 60 bp flanking the 5' side of the genes. Images PMID:6253909

  1. Comparative sequence analysis of a gene-dense region among closely related species of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Matsuo, Takashi; Nozawa, Masafumi; Shin-I, Tadasu; Kohara, Yuji; Aigaki, Toshiro

    2004-12-01

    Comparative sequence analysis among closely related species is essential for investigating the evolution of non-coding sequences, which evolve more rapidly than protein-coding sequences. We sequenced the cytogenetic map 56F10-16, a gene-dense region of D. simulans and D. sechellia, closely related species to D. melanogaster. About 57 kb of the genomic sequences containing 19 genes were annotated from each species according to the corresponding region of the D. melanogaster genome. The order and orientation of genes were perfectly conserved among the three species, and no transposable elements were found. The rate of nucleotide substitutions in the non-coding sequences was lower than that at the fourfold-degenerate sites, implying functional constraints in the non-coding regions. The sequence information from three closely related species, allowed us to estimate the insertions and the deletions that may have occurred in the lineages of D. simulans and D. sechellia using the D. melanogaster sequence as an outgroup. The number of deletions was twice that of insertions for the introns of D. simulans. More remarkably, the deletion outnumbered insertions by 7.5 times for the intergenic sequences of D. sechellia. These results suggest that the non-coding sequences have been shortened by deletion biases. However, the deletion bias was lower than that previously estimated for pseudogenes, suggesting that the non-coding sequences are already rich in functional elements, possibly involved in the regulation of gene expression including transcription and pre-mRNA processing. These features of non-coding sequences may be common to other gene-dense regions contributing to the compactness of the Drosophila genome.

  2. Biothems: Sequence stratigraphic units and their implications for regional tectono-stratigraphic interpretations

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, H.R. ); Frye, M.W. ); Couples, G.D. )

    1992-01-01

    Biothems are regional wedge- or lens-shaped bodies of strata that are bounded shelfward or cratonward by paleontologically recognizable unconformities; generally thicken on marine shelves, where they are typically conformable with underlying and overlying biothems; are commonly thinner or represent starved sequences further basinward; and in their most basinward extent, are either bounded by biostratigraphically recognizable unconformities or are conformable with underlying and overlying biothems. As recognized to date, biothems have a logical distribution of faunal and floral components, as well as facies groupings that represent internally consistent and logical sequences of depositional environments. A west-to-east transect within the North American Mississippian System which extends from the Basin and Range Province, across the Transcontinental Arch (TA), into the Anadarko Basin, was constructed to demonstrate the regional distribution and tectono-stratigraphic significance of biothems relative to the axis of the TA. The relationships portrayed on the transect, tied to an understanding of North American Mississippian paleogeography, imply that biothems deposited during relative highstand events on one flank of the TA are time-equivalent to biothems deposited during relative lowstand events on the opposite flank of the TA. This distribution is interpreted to have been controlled by intraplate tectonic events that formed piano key basins along the flanks of the TA. The spatial patterns of these basins are not consistent with published models of basin evolution. A further conclusion is that the lack of coincident, transgressive or regressive Mississippian biothems on either flank of the TA suggests that it is inadvisable to impose the Mississippi Valley-derived eustasy curve on western flank depositional sequences.

  3. Identification of a conserved sequence in the non-coding regions of many human genes.

    PubMed Central

    Donehower, L A; Slagle, B L; Wilde, M; Darlington, G; Butel, J S

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed a sequence of approximately 70 base pairs (bp) that shows a high degree of similarity to sequences present in the non-coding regions of a number of human and other mammalian genes. The sequence was discovered in a fragment of human genomic DNA adjacent to an integrated hepatitis B virus genome in cells derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue. When one of the viral flanking sequences was compared to nucleotide sequences in GenBank, more than thirty human genes were identified that contained a similar sequence in their non-coding regions. The sequence element was usually found once or twice in a gene, either in an intron or in the 5' or 3' flanking regions. It did not share any similarities with known short interspersed nucleotide elements (SINEs) or presently known gene regulatory elements. This element was highly conserved at the same position within the corresponding human and mouse genes for myoglobin and N-myc, indicating evolutionary conservation and possible functional importance. Preliminary DNase I footprinting data suggested that the element or its adjacent sequences may bind nuclear factors to generate specific DNase I hypersensitive sites. The size, structure, and evolutionary conservation of this sequence indicates that it is distinct from other types of short interspersed repetitive elements. It is possible that the element may have a cis-acting functional role in the genome. Images PMID:2536922

  4. Comparison of Exome and Genome Sequencing Technologies for the Complete Capture of Protein‐Coding Regions

    PubMed Central

    Lelieveld, Stefan H.; Spielmann, Malte; Mundlos, Stefan; Veltman, Joris A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT For next‐generation sequencing technologies, sufficient base‐pair coverage is the foremost requirement for the reliable detection of genomic variants. We investigated whether whole‐genome sequencing (WGS) platforms offer improved coverage of coding regions compared with whole‐exome sequencing (WES) platforms, and compared single‐base coverage for a large set of exome and genome samples. We find that WES platforms have improved considerably in the last years, but at comparable sequencing depth, WGS outperforms WES in terms of covered coding regions. At higher sequencing depth (95x–160x), WES successfully captures 95% of the coding regions with a minimal coverage of 20x, compared with 98% for WGS at 87‐fold coverage. Three different assessments of sequence coverage bias showed consistent biases for WES but not for WGS. We found no clear differences for the technologies concerning their ability to achieve complete coverage of 2,759 clinically relevant genes. We show that WES performs comparable to WGS in terms of covered bases if sequenced at two to three times higher coverage. This does, however, go at the cost of substantially more sequencing biases in WES approaches. Our findings will guide laboratories to make an informed decision on which sequencing platform and coverage to choose. PMID:25973577

  5. Isolation and sequencing of a putative promoter region of the murine G protein beta 1 subunit (GNB1) gene.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Junichi; Kitanaka, Nobue; Takemura, Motohiko; Wang, Xiao-Bing; Hembree, Cambria M; Goodman, Nancy L; Uhl, George R

    2002-02-01

    The expression of the heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein beta 1 subunit gene (GNB1) is regulated by psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamines. Since the up-regulation appears to be one of the candidate processes of sensitization, it is necessary to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanism of the GNB1 gene regulation for a better understanding the establishment of sensitization. In the present study, we describe the isolation and nucleotide sequence analysis of the GNB1 gene promoter region. We have isolated approximately 10 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the mouse of GNB1 gene and found potential elements involved in putative transcriptional control of the GNB1, such as AP1, AP2, Sp1, cyclic AMP response element, and nuclear factor kappa B recognition sites, within the sequences 0.3 kb upstream from the putative transcription start site. This region was highly rich in G + C content, but lacked TATA or CATT boxes. Comparing the nucleotide sequence of the cDNA clone with the human genome databases using the BLAST program a region containing putative exon 1 and promoter of the human GNB1 gene in chromosome 1 was found. The cloning and sequence analysis of an extensive portion of the 5'-flanking regulatory region of the GNB1 gene provides new insights into the factors involved in the regulation by psychostimulants of GNB1 expression. PMID:12180136

  6. Plasmonic Nanopores for Trapping, Controlling Displacement, and Sequencing of DNA.

    PubMed

    Belkin, Maxim; Chao, Shu-Han; Jonsson, Magnus P; Dekker, Cees; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2015-11-24

    With the aim of developing a DNA sequencing methodology, we theoretically examine the feasibility of using nanoplasmonics to control the translocation of a DNA molecule through a solid-state nanopore and to read off sequence information using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that high-intensity optical hot spots produced by a metallic nanostructure can arrest DNA translocation through a solid-state nanopore, thus providing a physical knob for controlling the DNA speed. Switching the plasmonic field on and off can displace the DNA molecule in discrete steps, sequentially exposing neighboring fragments of a DNA molecule to the pore as well as to the plasmonic hot spot. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from the exposed DNA fragments contains information about their nucleotide composition, possibly allowing the identification of the nucleotide sequence of a DNA molecule transported through the hot spot. The principles of plasmonic nanopore sequencing can be extended to detection of DNA modifications and RNA characterization.

  7. Automatic detection of regions of interest in complex video sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osberger, Wilfried M.; Rohaly, Ann M.

    2001-06-01

    Studies of visual attention and eye movements have shown that people generally attend to only a few areas in typical scenes. These areas are commonly referred to as regions of interest (ROIs). When scenes are viewed with the same context and motivation, these ROIs are often highly correlated amongst different people, motivating the development of computational models of visual attention. This paper describes a novel model of visual attention designed to provide an accurate and robust prediction of a viewer's locus of attention across a wide range of typical video content. The model has been calibrated and verified using data gathered in an experiment in which the eye movements of 24 viewers were recorded while viewing material form a large database of still and video scenes. Certain characteristics of the scene content, such as moving objects, people, foreground and centrally-located objects, were found to exert a strong influence on viewers' attention. The results of comparing model predictions to experimental data demonstrate a strong correlation between the predicted ROIs and viewers' fixations.

  8. Correcting sequencing errors in DNA coding regions using a dynamic programming approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Mural, R J; Uberbacher, E C

    1995-04-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for detecting and 'correcting' sequencing errors that occur in DNA coding regions. The types of sequencing errors addressed are insertions and deletions (indels) of DNA bases. The goal is to provide a capability which makes single-pass or low-redundancy sequence data more informative, reducing the need for high-redundancy sequencing for gene identification and characterization purposes. This would permit improved sequencing efficiency and reduce genome sequencing costs. The algorithm detects sequencing errors by discovering changes in the statistically preferred reading frame within a putative coding region and then inserts a number of 'neutral' bases at a perceived reading frame transition point to make the putative exon candidate frame consistent. We have implemented the algorithm as a front-end subsystem of the GRAIL DNA sequence analysis system to construct a version which is very error tolerant and also intend to use this as a testbed for further development of sequencing error-correction technology. Preliminary test results have shown the usefulness of this algorithm and also exhibited some of its weakness, providing possible directions for further improvement. On a test set consisting of 68 human DNA sequences with 1% randomly generated indels in coding regions, the algorithm detected and corrected 76% of the indels. The average distance between the position of an indel and the predicted one was 9.4 bases. With this subsystem in place, GRAIL correctly predicted 89% of the coding messages with 10% false message on the 'corrected' sequences, compared to 69% correctly predicted coding messages and 11% falsely predicted messages on the 'corrupted' sequences using standard GRAIL II method (version 1.2).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Research on the timing sequence control in large laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Wang, Lingfang; Wang, Chao; Tang, Ling; Chen, Ji; Zhang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    The timing sequence, between different pulses in SG-III laser facility, is controlled with three arbitrary waveform generators. The external clock and trigger are used to inhibit the timing jitter, which is provided by the synchronization system. Close-loop monitoring is used to make sure that the temporal phase can be recovered after reboot of the arbitrary waveform generator. The verification experiment shows that the three arbitrary waveform generators can work synchronously , which ensures the synchronization error control of the SG-III laser facility.

  10. Comparative analyses of multi-species sequences from targeted genomic regions.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J W; Touchman, J W; Blakesley, R W; Bouffard, G G; Beckstrom-Sternberg, S M; Margulies, E H; Blanchette, M; Siepel, A C; Thomas, P J; McDowell, J C; Maskeri, B; Hansen, N F; Schwartz, M S; Weber, R J; Kent, W J; Karolchik, D; Bruen, T C; Bevan, R; Cutler, D J; Schwartz, S; Elnitski, L; Idol, J R; Prasad, A B; Lee-Lin, S-Q; Maduro, V V B; Summers, T J; Portnoy, M E; Dietrich, N L; Akhter, N; Ayele, K; Benjamin, B; Cariaga, K; Brinkley, C P; Brooks, S Y; Granite, S; Guan, X; Gupta, J; Haghighi, P; Ho, S-L; Huang, M C; Karlins, E; Laric, P L; Legaspi, R; Lim, M J; Maduro, Q L; Masiello, C A; Mastrian, S D; McCloskey, J C; Pearson, R; Stantripop, S; Tiongson, E E; Tran, J T; Tsurgeon, C; Vogt, J L; Walker, M A; Wetherby, K D; Wiggins, L S; Young, A C; Zhang, L-H; Osoegawa, K; Zhu, B; Zhao, B; Shu, C L; De Jong, P J; Lawrence, C E; Smit, A F; Chakravarti, A; Haussler, D; Green, P; Miller, W; Green, E D

    2003-08-14

    The systematic comparison of genomic sequences from different organisms represents a central focus of contemporary genome analysis. Comparative analyses of vertebrate sequences can identify coding and conserved non-coding regions, including regulatory elements, and provide insight into the forces that have rendered modern-day genomes. As a complement to whole-genome sequencing efforts, we are sequencing and comparing targeted genomic regions in multiple, evolutionarily diverse vertebrates. Here we report the generation and analysis of over 12 megabases (Mb) of sequence from 12 species, all derived from the genomic region orthologous to a segment of about 1.8 Mb on human chromosome 7 containing ten genes, including the gene mutated in cystic fibrosis. These sequences show conservation reflecting both functional constraints and the neutral mutational events that shaped this genomic region. In particular, we identify substantial numbers of conserved non-coding segments beyond those previously identified experimentally, most of which are not detectable by pair-wise sequence comparisons alone. Analysis of transposable element insertions highlights the variation in genome dynamics among these species and confirms the placement of rodents as a sister group to the primates.

  11. Tracking TCRβ Sequence Clonotype Expansions during Antiviral Therapy Using High-Throughput Sequencing of the Hypervariable Region

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Mark W.; Hughes, Joseph; Wilkie, Gavin S.; Swann, Rachael; Barclay, Stephen T.; Mills, Peter R.; Patel, Arvind H.; Thomson, Emma C.; McLauchlan, John

    2016-01-01

    To maintain a persistent infection viruses such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) employ a range of mechanisms that subvert protective T cell responses. The suppression of antigen-specific T cell responses by HCV hinders efforts to profile T cell responses during chronic infection and antiviral therapy. Conventional methods of detecting antigen-specific T cells utilize either antigen stimulation (e.g., ELISpot, proliferation assays, cytokine production) or antigen-loaded tetramer staining. This limits the ability to profile T cell responses during chronic infection due to suppressed effector function and the requirement for prior knowledge of antigenic viral peptide sequences. Recently, high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies have been developed for the analysis of T cell repertoires. In the present study, we have assessed the feasibility of HTS of the TCRβ complementarity determining region (CDR)3 to track T cell expansions in an antigen-independent manner. Using sequential blood samples from HCV-infected individuals undergoing antiviral therapy, we were able to measure the population frequencies of >35,000 TCRβ sequence clonotypes in each individual over the course of 12 weeks. TRBV/TRBJ gene segment usage varied markedly between individuals but remained relatively constant within individuals across the course of therapy. Despite this stable TRBV/TRBJ gene segment usage, a number of TCRβ sequence clonotypes showed dramatic changes in read frequency. These changes could not be linked to therapy outcomes in the present study; however, the TCRβ CDR3 sequences with the largest fold changes did include sequences with identical TRBV/TRBJ gene segment usage and high junction region homology to previously published CDR3 sequences from HCV-specific T cells targeting the HLA-B*0801-restricted 1395HSKKKCDEL1403 and HLA-A*0101-restricted 1435ATDALMTGY1443 epitopes. The pipeline developed in this proof of concept study provides a platform for the design of future

  12. Hemispheric asymmetries and the control of motor sequences.

    PubMed

    Serrien, Deborah J; Sovijärvi-Spapé, Michiel M

    2015-04-15

    Sequencing of finger positions reflects a prototype of skilled behaviour. In order to perform sequencing, cognitive control supports the requirements and postural transitions. In this electroencephalography (EEG) study, we evaluate the effects of hand dominance and assess the neural correlates of unimanual and bimanual sequencing in left- and right-handers. The behavioural measurements provided an index of response planning (response time to first key press) and response execution (time between successive key presses, taps/s and percentage of correct responses), whereas the neural dynamics was determined by means of EEG coherence, expressing the functional connectivity between brain areas. Correlations between brain activity and behaviour were calculated for exploring the neural correlates that are functionally relevant for sequencing. Brain-behavioural correlations during response planning and execution revealed the significance of circuitry in the left hemisphere, underlining its significant role in the organisation of goal-directed behaviour. This lateralisation profile was independent of intrinsic constraints (hand dominance) and extrinsic demands (task requirements), suggesting essential higher-order computations in the left hemisphere. Overall, the observations highlight that the left hemisphere is specialised for sequential motor organisation in left- and right-handers, suggesting an endogenous hemispheric asymmetry for compound actions and the representation of skill; processes that can be separated from those that are involved in hand dominance. PMID:25617529

  13. Identification of novel Arabidopsis thaliana upstream open reading frames that control expression of the main coding sequences in a peptide sequence-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Ebina, Isao; Takemoto-Tsutsumi, Mariko; Watanabe, Shun; Koyama, Hiroaki; Endo, Yayoi; Kimata, Kaori; Igarashi, Takuya; Murakami, Karin; Kudo, Rin; Ohsumi, Arisa; Noh, Abdul Latif; Takahashi, Hiro; Naito, Satoshi; Onouchi, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Upstream open reading frames (uORFs) are often found in the 5′-leader regions of eukaryotic mRNAs and can negatively modulate the translational efficiency of the downstream main ORF. Although the effects of most uORFs are thought to be independent of their encoded peptide sequences, certain uORFs control translation of the main ORF in a peptide sequence-dependent manner. For genome-wide identification of such peptide sequence-dependent regulatory uORFs, exhaustive searches for uORFs with conserved amino acid sequences have been conducted using bioinformatic analyses. However, whether the conserved uORFs identified by these bioinformatic approaches encode regulatory peptides has not been experimentally determined. Here we analyzed 16 recently identified Arabidopsis thaliana conserved uORFs for the effects of their amino acid sequences on the expression of the main ORF using a transient expression assay. We identified five novel uORFs that repress main ORF expression in a peptide sequence-dependent manner. Mutational analysis revealed that, in four of them, the C-terminal region of the uORF-encoded peptide is critical for the repression of main ORF expression. Intriguingly, we also identified one exceptional sequence-dependent regulatory uORF, in which the stop codon position is not conserved and the C-terminal region is not important for the repression of main ORF expression. PMID:25618853

  14. Identification of Medically Important Yeast Species by Sequence Analysis of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Leaw, Shiang Ning; Chang, Hsien Chang; Sun, Hsiao Fang; Barton, Richard; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Chang, Tsung Chain

    2006-01-01

    Infections caused by yeasts have increased in previous decades due primarily to the increasing population of immunocompromised patients. In addition, infections caused by less common species such as Pichia, Rhodotorula, Trichosporon, and Saccharomyces spp. have been widely reported. This study extensively evaluated the feasibility of sequence analysis of the rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions for the identification of yeasts of clinical relevance. Both the ITS1 and ITS2 regions of 373 strains (86 species), including 299 reference strains and 74 clinical isolates, were amplified by PCR and sequenced. The sequences were compared to reference data available at the GenBank database by using BLAST (basic local alignment search tool) to determine if species identification was possible by ITS sequencing. Since the GenBank database currently lacks ITS sequence entries for some yeasts, the ITS sequences of type (or reference) strains of 15 species were submitted to GenBank to facilitate identification of these species. Strains producing discrepant identifications between the conventional methods and ITS sequence analysis were further analyzed by sequencing of the D1-D2 domain of the large-subunit rRNA gene for species clarification. The rates of correct identification by ITS1 and ITS2 sequence analysis were 96.8% (361/373) and 99.7% (372/373), respectively. Of the 373 strains tested, only 1 strain (Rhodotorula glutinis BCRC 20576) could not be identified by ITS2 sequence analysis. In conclusion, identification of medically important yeasts by ITS sequencing, especially using the ITS2 region, is reliable and can be used as an accurate alternative to conventional identification methods. PMID:16517841

  15. Correcting sequencing errors in DNA coding regions using a dynamic programming approach

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Mural, R.J.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1994-12-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for detecting and ``correcting`` sequencing errors that occur in DNA coding regions. The types of sequencing error addressed include insertions and deletions (indels) of DNA bases. The goal is to provide a capability which makes single-pass or low-redundancy sequence data more informative, reducing the need for high-redundancy sequencing for gene identification and characterization purposes. The algorithm detects sequencing errors by discovering changes in the statistically preferred reading frame within a putative coding region and then inserts a number of ``neutral`` bases at a perceived reading frame transition point to make the putative exon candidate frame consistent. The authors have implemented the algorithm as a front-end subsystem of the GRAIL DNA sequence analysis system to construct a version which is very error tolerant and also intend to use this as a testbed for further development of sequencing error-correction technology. On a test set consisting of 68 Human DNA sequences with 1% randomly generated indels in coding regions, the algorithm detected and corrected 76% of the indels. The average distance between the position of an indel and the predicted one was 9.4 bases. With this subsystem in place, GRAIL correctly predicted 89% of the coding messages with 10% false message on the ``corrected`` sequences, compared to 69% correctly predicted coding messages and 11% falsely predicted messages on the ``corrupted`` sequences using standard GRAIL II method. The method uses a dynamic programming algorithm, and runs in time and space linear to the size of the input sequence.

  16. Conserved sequence elements in the 5' region of the Ultrabithorax transcription unit

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, C. Deborah; Akam, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Clones homologous to the 5' region of the Ultrabithorax gene of Drosophila melanogaster have been isolated from D. pseudoobscura, D. funebris and Musca domestica. Regions that encode most of the Ubx protein have been sequenced in all three of these species, and the 5' upstream region has been sequenced in D. funebris to a point ˜1000 bases upstream of the probable mRNA start site. Here we compare these sequences with those described elsewhere for D. melanogaster. Deduced amino acid sequences of the Ubx protein show 8% (D. pseudoobscura), 15% (D. funebris) and 22% (M. domestica) divergence from D. melanogaster. However, these figures mask very different rates of evolution in different regions of the protein. A glycine-rich (`hinge') region is conserved in each of these species, although its length is variable. Comparison of D. funebris and D. melanogaster sequences in the long 5' untranslated leader region of the mRNA, and in the region immediately upstream of the start point of transcription, reveals tightly conserved elements embedded in an otherwise non-homologous sequence. These conserved elements include a 118-bp region that spans the mRNA start site, an internally repetitive (TAA)n region in the untranslated leader and a short repeated motif immediately upstream of the ATG codon that initiates the major open reading frame of the Ubx protein. Two other conserved elements were identified upstream of the transcription start site; both elements have structural features consistent with a role as recognition sites for regulatory proteins. ImagesFig. 2. PMID:16453766

  17. Organization and variation of the mitochondrial control region in two vulture species, Gypaetus barbatus and Neophron percnopterus.

    PubMed

    Roques, S; Godoy, J A; Negro, J J; Hiraldo, F

    2004-01-01

    We report the first entire mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences in two endangered vulture species, the bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) and the Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus). Results showed that the general organization of vulture control regions was very similar to other birds, with three distinct domains: a left variable domain (DI), a central conserved one (DII) including the F, E, D, and C boxes, and a right domain (DIII) containing the CSB1 sequence. However, due to the presence of long tandem repeats, vulture control regions differed from other avian control regions both in size and nucleotide composition. The Egyptian vulture control region was found to be the largest sequenced so far (2031 bp), due to the simultaneous presence of repeats in both DI (80 bp) and DIII (77 bp). Low variation was found in vulture control regions, particularly in G. barbatus, as the probable result of populations declines in the last few centuries.

  18. Organization and variation of the mitochondrial control region in two vulture species, Gypaetus barbatus and Neophron percnopterus.

    PubMed

    Roques, S; Godoy, J A; Negro, J J; Hiraldo, F

    2004-01-01

    We report the first entire mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences in two endangered vulture species, the bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) and the Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus). Results showed that the general organization of vulture control regions was very similar to other birds, with three distinct domains: a left variable domain (DI), a central conserved one (DII) including the F, E, D, and C boxes, and a right domain (DIII) containing the CSB1 sequence. However, due to the presence of long tandem repeats, vulture control regions differed from other avian control regions both in size and nucleotide composition. The Egyptian vulture control region was found to be the largest sequenced so far (2031 bp), due to the simultaneous presence of repeats in both DI (80 bp) and DIII (77 bp). Low variation was found in vulture control regions, particularly in G. barbatus, as the probable result of populations declines in the last few centuries. PMID:15247313

  19. An rRNA variable region has an evolutionarily conserved essential role despite sequence divergence.

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, R; Chen, L; Yao, M C

    1994-01-01

    Regions extremely variable in size and sequence occur at conserved locations in eukaryotic rRNAs. The functional importance of one such region was determined by gene reconstruction and replacement in Tetrahymena thermophila. Deletion of the D8 region of the large-subunit rRNA inactivates T. thermophila rRNA genes (rDNA): transformants containing only this type of rDNA are unable to grow. Replacement with an unrelated sequence of similar size or a variable region from a different position in the rRNA also inactivated the rDNA. Mutant rRNAs resulting from such constructs were present only in precursor forms, suggesting that these rRNAs are deficient in either processing or stabilization of the mature form. Replacement with D8 regions from three other organisms restored function, even though the sequences are very different. Thus, these D8 regions share an essential functional feature that is not reflected in their primary sequences. Similar tertiary structures may be the quality these sequences share that allows them to function interchangeably. Images PMID:8196658

  20. DNA Replication Control Is Linked to Genomic Positioning of Control Regions in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is in part controlled by three non-coding genomic sequences, DARS1, DARS2, and datA that modulate the activity of the initiator protein DnaA. The relative distance from oriC to the non-coding regions are conserved among E. coli species, despite large variations in genome size. Here we use a combination of i) site directed translocation of each region to new positions on the bacterial chromosome and ii) random transposon mediated translocation followed by culture evolution, to show genetic evidence for the importance of position. Here we provide evidence that the genomic locations of these regulatory sequences are important for cell cycle control and bacterial fitness. In addition, our work shows that the functionally redundant DARS1 and DARS2 regions play different roles in replication control. DARS1 is mainly involved in maintaining the origin concentration, whether DARS2 is also involved in maintaining single cell synchrony. PMID:27589233

  1. DNA Replication Control Is Linked to Genomic Positioning of Control Regions in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Krogfelt, Karen A; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is in part controlled by three non-coding genomic sequences, DARS1, DARS2, and datA that modulate the activity of the initiator protein DnaA. The relative distance from oriC to the non-coding regions are conserved among E. coli species, despite large variations in genome size. Here we use a combination of i) site directed translocation of each region to new positions on the bacterial chromosome and ii) random transposon mediated translocation followed by culture evolution, to show genetic evidence for the importance of position. Here we provide evidence that the genomic locations of these regulatory sequences are important for cell cycle control and bacterial fitness. In addition, our work shows that the functionally redundant DARS1 and DARS2 regions play different roles in replication control. DARS1 is mainly involved in maintaining the origin concentration, whether DARS2 is also involved in maintaining single cell synchrony. PMID:27589233

  2. A versatile computer-controlled biological stimulus sequencer.

    PubMed

    Boyechko, G; Bose, D

    1984-08-01

    A computer-controlled stimulus sequencer has been developed. This device can be controlled by several commonly available, inexpensive 8-bit microcomputers in which the address, data, and control lines are externally accessible. Although the Apple implementation has been described, a similar interface has also been devised for the Radio Shack Color Computer. The hardware relies on the Rockwell Versatile Interface Adapter (VIA) chip (which has two 16-bit timers capable of functioning as frequency dividers, event counters, or one-shots) and a 12-bit digital-to-analog converter (DAC) chip. This hardware combination, along with software written in Basic and machine language (stored in an EPROM for turn-key operation), allows creation of a large number of unique trains that can be chained together in any sequence. This is aided by storing the train characteristics economically in the computer memory and chaining different train parameters in a link-list. Several train parameters can be incremented or decremented manually by a pair of keys. The amplitude of the train can be changed manually or under program control. Once created, the trains can be edited on the run or deleted from the sequence. The device also generates a trigger pulse that can be referenced to any pulse in a train and can be used to pretrigger an oscilloscope. The software has provision for detecting an external signal, and this information can be used to modify train parameters. The interface is interrupt driven and therefore does not require continuous use of the Basic interpreter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Sequence analysis of the inversion region containing the pilin genes of Moraxella bovis.

    PubMed

    Fulks, K A; Marrs, C F; Stevens, S P; Green, M R

    1990-01-01

    Moraxella bovis EPP63 is able to produce two antigenically distinct pili called Q and I pili (previously called beta and alpha pili). Hybridization studies have shown that the transition between the types is due to inversion of a 2.1-kilobase segment of chromosomal DNA. We present the sequence of a 4.1-kilobase region of cloned DNA spanning the entire inversion region in orientation 1 (Q pilin expressed). Comparison of this sequence with the sequence of the polymerase chain reaction-amplified genomic DNA from orientation 2 (I pilin expressed) allows the site-specific region of recombination to be localized to a 26-base-pair region in which sequence similarity to the left inverted repeat of the Salmonella typhimurium hin system was previously noted. In addition, 50% sequence similarity was seen in a 60-base-pair segment of our sequence to the recombinational enhancer of bacteriophage P1, an inversion system related to the hin system of S. typhimurium. Finally, two open reading frames representing potential genes were identified.

  4. A strategy for sequence control in vinyl polymers via iterative controlled radical cyclization

    PubMed Central

    Hibi, Yusuke; Ouchi, Makoto; Sawamoto, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in sequence-controlled polymers toward advanced functional materials. However, control of side-chain order for vinyl polymers has been lacking feasibility in the field of polymer synthesis because of the inherent feature of chain-growth propagation. Here we show a general and versatile strategy to control sequence in vinyl polymers through iterative radical cyclization with orthogonally cleavable and renewable bonds. The proposed methodology employs a repetitive and iterative intramolecular cyclization via a radical intermediate in a one-time template with a radical-generating site at one end and an alkene end at the other, each of which is connected to a linker via independently cleavable and renewable bonds. The unique design specifically allowed control of radical addition reaction although inherent chain-growth intermediate (radical species) was used, as well as the iterative cycle and functionalization for resultant side chains, to lead to sequence-controlled vinyl polymers (or oligomers). PMID:26996881

  5. Characterization of Dermanyssus gallinae (Acarina: Dermanissydae) by sequence analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer regions.

    PubMed

    Potenza, L; Cafiero, M A; Camarda, A; La Salandra, G; Cucchiarini, L; Dachà, M

    2009-10-01

    In the present work mites previously identified as Dermanyssus gallinae De Geer (Acari, Mesostigmata) using morphological keys were investigated by molecular tools. The complete internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1), 5.8S ribosomal DNA, and ITS2 region of the ribosomal DNA from mites were amplified and sequenced to examine the level of sequence variations and to explore the feasibility of using this region in the identification of this mite. Conserved primers located at the 3'end of 18S and at the 5'start of 28S rRNA genes were used first, and amplified fragments were sequenced. Sequence analyses showed no variation in 5.8S and ITS2 region while slight intraspecific variations involving substitutions as well as deletions concentrated in the ITS1 region. Based on the sequence analyses a nested PCR of the ITS2 region followed by RFLP analyses has been set up in the attempt to provide a rapid molecular diagnostic tool of D. gallinae.

  6. Sequence Ready Characterization of the Pericentromeric Region of 19p12

    SciTech Connect

    Evan E. Eichler

    2006-08-31

    Current mapping and sequencing strategies have been inadequate within the proximal portion of 19p12 due, in part, to the presence of a recently expanded ZNF (zinc-finger) gene family and the presence of large (25-50 kb) inverted beta-satellite repeat structures which bracket this tandemly duplicated gene family. The virtual of absence of classically defined “unique” sequence within the region has hampered efforts to identify and characterize a suitable minimal tiling path of clones which can be used as templates required for finished sequencing of the region. The goal of this proposal is to develop and implement a novel sequence-anchor strategy to generate a contiguous BAC map of the most proximal portion of chromosome 19p12 for the purpose of complete sequence characterization. The target region will be an estimated 4.5 Mb of DNA extending from STS marker D19S450 (the beginning of the ZNF gene cluster) to the centromeric (alpha-satellite) junction of 19p11. The approach will entail 1) pre-selection of 19p12 BAC and cosmid clones (NIH approved library) utilizing both 19p12 -unique and 19p12-SPECIFIC repeat probes (Eichler et al., 1998); 2) the generation of a BAC/cosmid end-sequence map across the region with a density of one marker every 8kb; 3) the development of a second-generation of STS (sequence tagged sites) which will be used to identify and verify clonal overlap at the level of the sequence; 4) incorporation of these sequence-anchored overlapping clones into existing cosmid/BAC restriction maps developed at Livermore National Laboratory; and 5) validation of the organization of this region utilizing high-resolution FISH techniques (extended chromatin analysis) on monochromosomal 19 somatic cell hybrids and parental cell lines of source material. The data generated will be used in the selection of the most parsimonious tiling path of BAC clones to be sequenced as part of the JGI effort on chromosome 19 and should serve as a model for the sequence

  7. Analysis of tandem gene copies in maize chromosomal regions reconstructed from long sequence reads

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jiaqiang; Feng, Yaping; Kumar, Dibyendu; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Tingting; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Messing, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Haplotype variation not only involves SNPs but also insertions and deletions, in particular gene copy number variations. However, comparisons of individual genomes have been difficult because traditional sequencing methods give too short reads to unambiguously reconstruct chromosomal regions containing repetitive DNA sequences. An example of such a case is the protein gene family in maize that acts as a sink for reduced nitrogen in the seed. Previously, 41–48 gene copies of the alpha zein gene family that spread over six loci spanning between 30- and 500-kb chromosomal regions have been described in two Iowa Stiff Stalk (SS) inbreds. Analyses of those regions were possible because of overlapping BAC clones, generated by an expensive and labor-intensive approach. Here we used single-molecule real-time (Pacific Biosciences) shotgun sequencing to assemble the six chromosomal regions from the Non-Stiff Stalk maize inbred W22 from a single DNA sequence dataset. To validate the reconstructed regions, we developed an optical map (BioNano genome map; BioNano Genomics) of W22 and found agreement between the two datasets. Using the sequences of full-length cDNAs from W22, we found that the error rate of PacBio sequencing seemed to be less than 0.1% after autocorrection and assembly. Expressed genes, some with premature stop codons, are interspersed with nonexpressed genes, giving rise to genotype-specific expression differences. Alignment of these regions with those from the previous analyzed regions of SS lines exhibits in part dramatic differences between these two heterotic groups. PMID:27354512

  8. Applying programmable logic controllers to safety-related load sequencers

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, S.; Ruether, J.

    1994-12-31

    Commercial nuclear power plants, which are 1960s vintage, are in the process of upgrading their systems. With the aging of power plants, the reluctance to construct new plants, and the obsolescence of components, utilities are seeking to improve their equipment in order to reduce their operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. When upgrading existing obsolete systems, computer-based systems are obvious candidates for these upgrades. Among the many computer-based system options available, programmable logic controllers (PLCs) have seen a widespread use in the nuclear industry. Among the most popular candidate systems for digital upgrades using PLCs are load sequencers.

  9. Worldwide DNA sequence variation in a 10-kilobase noncoding region on human chromosome 22.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z; Jin, L; Fu, Y X; Ramsay, M; Jenkins, T; Leskinen, E; Pamilo, P; Trexler, M; Patthy, L; Jorde, L B; Ramos-Onsins, S; Yu, N; Li, W H

    2000-10-10

    Human DNA sequence variation data are useful for studying the origin, evolution, and demographic history of modern humans and the mechanisms of maintenance of genetic variability in human populations, and for detecting linkage association of disease. Here, we report worldwide variation data from a approximately 10-kilobase noncoding autosomal region. We identified 75 variant sites in 64 humans (128 sequences) and 463 variant sites among the human, chimpanzee, and orangutan sequences. Statistical tests suggested that the region is selectively neutral. The average nucleotide diversity (pi) across the region was 0.088% among all of the human sequences obtained, 0.085% among African sequences, and 0.082% among non-African sequences, supporting the view of a low nucleotide diversity ( approximately 0.1%) in humans. The comparable pi value in non-Africans to that in Africans indicates no severe bottleneck during the evolution of modern non-Africans; however, the possibility of a mild bottleneck cannot be excluded because non-Africans showed considerably fewer variants than Africans. The present and two previous large data sets all show a strong excess of low frequency variants in comparison to that expected from an equilibrium population, indicating a relatively recent population expansion. The mutation rate was estimated to be 1.15 x 10(-9) per nucleotide per year. Estimates of the long-term effective population size N(e) by various statistical methods were similar to those in other studies. The age of the most recent common ancestor was estimated to be approximately 1.29 million years ago among all of the sequences obtained and approximately 634,000 years ago among the non-African sequences, providing the first evidence from a noncoding autosomal region for ancient human histories, even among non-Africans.

  10. Structure-function studies of HIV-1: influence of long terminal repeat U3 region sequences on virus production.

    PubMed

    Velpandi, A; Nagashunmugam, T; Otsuka, T; Cartas, M; Srinivasan, A

    1992-06-01

    DNA sequence analyses of several human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolates revealed extensive genetic diversity in the env gene and, to a lesser extent, in other regions of the viral genome, including the long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences. Since the LTRs contain elements responsible for the control of transcription, the difference in the LTR region may play a crucial role in the overall replication rate of HIV. To evaluate the role of the LTR, we have constructed a number of infectious hybrid HIV molecular clones containing LTRs from different proviral DNAs linked to the body of the viral genome, and analyzed them in a transient expression system. Both parental and hybrid proviral DNAs were transfected into human rhabdomyosarcoma cells for monitoring virus production. Proviral DNA designate pZ6 (HIVZr6) showed a high level of virus in the medium of the transfected culture in comparison to the pHXB2 (HIVHTLV-III) and pARV (HIVSF-2) DNAs. Hybrid proviral DNAs containing viral genes from pZ6, linked to LTR U3 sequences of pHXB2 and pARV at the 5' end, showed virus production similar to the levels observed with pZ6. These results indicate that the extent of virus production does not correlate with the LTR U3 sequences, and may involve other regions of the viral genome.

  11. Nucleotide-sequence of a canine oral papillomavirus containing a long noncoding region.

    PubMed

    Isegawa, N; Ohta, M; Shirasawa, H; Tokita, H; Yamaura, A; Simizu, B

    1995-07-01

    The DNA genome of a canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) was completely sequenced and found to consist of 8607 base pairs, which were the longest of all known papillomaviruses (PVs). Its organization was similar to that of other PVs except that it lacked early gene 5 (E5) and possessed a unique long noncoding region (L-NCR) between the end of the early genes and the beginning of the late genes. COPV also possessed a short noncoding region (S-NCR) which contained a putative upper regulatory region (URR), which is commonly found in PVs. The L-NCR did not show any similarity to known PV DNAs nor other DNA sequences in the GenBank database. Nucleotide sequence analysis of COPV showed that it was closely related to human papillomavirus type 1 (HPV 1) and animal PVs associated with cutaneous lesions in rabbit, European elk, deer and cow as we reported previously. PMID:21552821

  12. Multiple independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications in the order Psittaciformes

    PubMed Central

    Schirtzinger, Erin E.; Tavares, Erika S.; Gonzales, Lauren A.; Eberhard, Jessica R.; Miyaki, Cristina Y.; Sanchez, Juan J.; Hernandez, Alexis; Müeller, Heinrich; Graves, Gary R.; Fleischer, Robert C.; Wright, Timothy F.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are generally thought to be under selection for compactness, due to their small size, consistent gene content, and a lack of introns or intergenic spacers. As more animal mitochondrial genomes are fully sequenced, rearrangements and partial duplications are being identified with increasing frequency, particularly in birds (Class Aves). In this study, we investigate the evolutionary history of mitochondrial control region states within the avian order Psittaciformes (parrots and cockatoos). To this aim, we reconstructed a comprehensive multi-locus phylogeny of parrots, used PCR of three diagnostic fragments to classify the mitochondrial control region state as single or duplicated, and mapped these states onto the phylogeny. We further sequenced 44 selected species to validate these inferences of control region state. Ancestral state reconstruction using a range of weighting schemes identified six independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications within Psittaciformes. Analysis of sequence data showed that varying levels of mitochondrial gene and tRNA homology and degradation were present within a given clade exhibiting duplications. Levels of divergence between control regions within an individual varied from 0–10.9% with the differences occurring mainly between 51 and 225 nucleotides 3′ of the goose hairpin in domain I. Further investigations into the fates of duplicated mitochondrial genes, the potential costs and benefits of having a second control region, and the complex relationship between evolutionary rates, selection, and time since duplication are needed to fully explain these patterns in the mitochondrial genome. PMID:22543055

  13. Structure of mitochondrial DNA control region of Pholis fangi and its phylogenetic implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Dianrong; Gao, Tianxiang

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the entire mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (CR) of Pholis fangi was amplified via polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequencing. The length of the mtDNA CR consensus sequence of P. fangi was 853 bp in length. In accordance with the recognition sites as were previously reported in fish species, the mtDNA CR sequence of P. fangi can be divided into 3 domains, i.e., the extended terminal associated sequence (ETAS), the central conserved sequence block (CSB), and the CSB domain. In addition, the following structures were identified in the mtDNA CR sequence of P. fangi: 2 ETASs in the ETAS domain (TAS and cTAS), 6 CSBs in the central CSB domain (CSB-F to CSB-A), and 3 CSBs in the CSB domain (CSB-1 to CSB-3). These demonstrated that the structure of the mtDNA CR of P. fangi was substantially different from those of most other fish species. The mtDNA CR sequence of P. fangi contained one conserved region from 656 bp to 815 bp. Similar to most other fish species, P. fangi has no tandem repeat sequences in its mtDNA CR sequence. Phylogenetic analysis based on the complete mtDNA CR sequences showed that there were no genetic differences within P. fangi populations of the same geographical origin and between P. fangi populations of different geographical origins.

  14. Novel duplication pattern of the mitochondrial control region in Cantor's Giant softshell turtle Pelochelys cantorii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-Cheng; Li, Wei; Zhao, Jian; Chen, Hai-Gang; Zhu, Xin-Ping

    2016-11-15

    Cantor's Giant Softshell Turtle, Pelochelys cantorii has become one of the most critically endangered species in the world. When comparative analyses of the P. cantorii complete mitochondrial genome sequences were conducted, we discovered a duplication of a segment of the control region in the mitochondrial genome of P. cantorii. The duplication is characterized by two copies of conserved sequence box 2 (CSB2) and CSB3 in a single control region. In contrast to previous reports of duplications involving the control regions of other animals, this particular pattern of duplications appears to be unique to P. cantorii. Copies of the CSB2 and CSB3 show many of the conserved sequence features typically found in mitochondrial control regions, and rare differences were found between the paralogous copies. Using the primer design principle of simple sequence repeats (SSR) and the reference sequence of the duplicated CSBs, specific primers were designed to amplify the duplicated CSBs. These primers were validated among different individuals and populations of P. cantorii. This unique duplication structure suggests the two copies of the CSB2 and CSB3 may have arisen through occasional tandem duplication and subsequent concerted evolution. PMID:27565702

  15. Fault fragment control in the 1997 Umbria-Marche, central Italy, Earthquake Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meghraoui, Mustapha; Bosi, Vittorio; Camelbeeck, Thierry

    The Umbria-Marche region in central Italy experienced a sequence of shallow earthquakes in late 1997, including three mainshocks on September 26th (Ms 5.5 and 5.9) and October 14th (Ms 5.5). This seismic sequence illustrates the relationships between small-scale active faults and moderate-magnitude earthquakes. We suggest that a small-scale active fault corresponds to a “fault fragment” and that it refers to the fault area required for producing a coseismic deformation at the ground surface. The seismic activity and related three mainshocks occurred along three fault fragments which total ∼25 km in length and show a listric geometry at depth. Fault fragments are laterally controlled by pre-existing transverse fold-and-thrust structures and may constitute a major component of the seismic strain release in active continental regions.

  16. Mitochondrial control region structure and single site heteroplasmy in the razorbill (Alca torda; Aves).

    PubMed

    Moum, T; Bakke, I

    2001-05-01

    The primary structure of the Alca torda mitochondrial control region was determined and conserved structural features were identified based on sequence comparisons to other bird species. In a population survey using control region analysis, five individuals were found to possess heteroplasmic point mutations at the variable 5' end of the control region. The pattern of variable nucleotide positions among individuals was compared to the distribution of heteroplasmic sites and the heteroplasmic condition was further characterised by a cloning procedure applied to two individuals which harboured one and two heteroplasmic point mutations, respectively. These results are in support of recent evidence that single site heteroplasmy may be more common than previously thought.

  17. Comparison of orthologous and paralogous DNA flanking the wheat high molecular weight glutenin genes: sequence conservation and divergence, transposon distribution, and matrix-attachment regions.

    PubMed

    Anderson, O D; Larka, L; Christoffers, M J; McCue, K F; Gustafson, J P

    2002-04-01

    Extended flanking DNA sequences were characterized for five members of the wheat high molecular weight (HMW) glutenin gene family to understand more of the structure, control, and evolution of these genes. Analysis revealed more sequence conservation among orthologous regions than between paralogous regions, with differences mainly owing to transposition events involving putative retrotransposons and several miniature inverted transposable elements (MITEs). Both gyspy-like long terminal repeat (LTR) and non-LTR retrotransposon sequences are represented in the flanking DNAs. One of the MITEs is a novel class, but another MITE is related to the maize Stowaway family and is widely represented in Triticeae express sequence tags (ESTs). Flanking DNA of the longest sequence, a 20 425-bp fragment including and surrounding the HMW-glutenin Bx7 gene, showed additional cereal gene-like sequences both immediately 5' and 3' to the HMW-glutenin coding region. The transcriptional activities of sequences related to these flanking putative genes and the retrotransposon-related regions were indicated by matches to wheat and other Triticeae ESTs. Predictive analysis of matrix-attachment regions (MARs) of the HMW glutenin and several alpha-, gamma-, and omega-gliadin flanking DNAs indicate potential MARs immediately flanking each of the genes. Matrix binding activity in the predicted regions was confirmed for two of the HMW-glutenin genes.

  18. Nucleotide sequence of the regulatory locus controlling expression of bacterial genes for bioluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Engebrecht, J; Silverman, M

    1987-01-01

    Production of light by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri and by recombinant hosts containing cloned lux genes is controlled by the density of the culture. Density-dependent regulation of lux gene expression has been shown to require a locus consisting of the luxR and luxI genes and two closely linked divergent promoters. As part of a genetic analysis to understand the regulation of bioluminescence, we have sequenced the region of DNA containing this control circuit. Open reading frames corresponding to luxR and luxI were identified; transcription start sites were defined by S1 nuclease mapping and sequences resembling promoter elements were located. Images PMID:3697093

  19. Evaluation of Protein A Gene Polymorphic Region DNA Sequencing for Typing of Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Shopsin, B.; Gomez, M.; Montgomery, S. O.; Smith, D. H.; Waddington, M.; Dodge, D. E.; Bost, D. A.; Riehman, M.; Naidich, S.; Kreiswirth, B. N.

    1999-01-01

    Three hundred and twenty isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were typed by DNA sequence analysis of the X region of the protein A gene (spa). spa typing was compared to both phenotypic and molecular techniques for the ability to differentiate and categorize S. aureus strains into groups that correlate with epidemiological information. Two previously characterized study populations were examined. A collection of 59 isolates (F. C. Tenover, R. Arbeit, G. Archer, J. Biddle, S. Byrne, R. Goering, G. Hancock, G. A. Hébert, B. Hill, R. Hollis, W. R. Jarvis, B. Kreiswirth, W. Eisner, J. Maslow, L. K. McDougal, J. M. Miller, M. Mulligan, and M. A. Pfaller, J. Clin. Microbiol. 32:407–415, 1994) from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was used to test for the ability to discriminate outbreak from epidemiologically unrelated strains. A separate collection of 261 isolates form a multicenter study (R. B. Roberts, A. de Lencastre, W. Eisner, E. P. Severina, B. Shopsin, B. N. Kreiswirth, and A. Tomasz, J. Infect. Dis. 178:164–171, 1998) of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in New York City (NYC) was used to compare the ability of spa typing to group strains along clonal lines to that of the combination of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization. In the 320 isolates studied, spa typing identified 24 distinct repeat types and 33 different strain types. spa typing distinguished 27 of 29 related strains and did not provide a unique fingerprint for 4 unrelated strains from the four outbreaks of the CDC collection. In the NYC collection, spa typing provided a clonal assignment for 185 of 195 strains within the five major groups previously described. spa sequencing appears to be a highly effective rapid typing tool for S. aureus that, despite some expense of specificity, has significant advantages in terms of speed, ease of use, ease of interpretation, and standardization among laboratories. PMID:10523551

  20. Functional analysis and nucleotide sequence of the promoter region of the murine hck gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lock, P; Stanley, E; Holtzman, D A; Dunn, A R

    1990-01-01

    The structure and function of the promoter region and exon 1 of the murine hck gene have been characterized in detail. RNase protection analysis has established that hck transcripts initiate from heterogeneous start sites located within the hck gene. Fusion gene constructs containing hck 5'-flanking sequences and the bacterial Neor gene have been introduced into the hematopoietic cell lines FDC-P1 and WEHI-265 by using a self-inactivating retroviral vector. The transcriptional start sites of the fusion gene are essentially identical to those of the endogenous hck gene. Analysis of infected WEHI-265 cell lines treated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reveals a 3- to 5-fold elevation in the levels of endogenous hck mRNA and a 1.4- to 2.6-fold increase in the level of Neor fusion gene transcripts, indicating that hck 5'-flanking sequences are capable of conferring LPS responsiveness on the Neor gene. The 5'-flanking region of the hck gene contains sequences similar to an element which is thought to be involved in the LPS responsiveness of the class II major histocompatibility gene A alpha k. A subset of these sequences are also found in the 5'-flanking regions of other LPS-responsive genes. Moreover, this motif is related to the consensus binding sequence of NF-kappa B, a transcription factor which is known to be regulated by LPS. Images PMID:2388619

  1. Translational control by lysine-encoding A-rich sequences

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Laura L.; Pavlovic-Djuranovic, Slavica; Koutmou, Kristin S.; Green, Rachel; Szczesny, Pawel; Djuranovic, Sergej

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression involves a wide array of cellular mechanisms that control the abundance of the RNA or protein products of that gene. We describe a gene regulatory mechanism that is based on polyadenylate [poly(A)] tracks that stall the translation apparatus. We show that creating longer or shorter runs of adenosine nucleotides, without changes in the amino acid sequence, alters the protein output and the stability of mRNA. Sometimes, these changes result in the production of an alternative “frameshifted” protein product. These observations are corroborated using reporter constructs and in the context of recombinant gene sequences. About 2% of genes in the human genome may be subject to this uncharacterized yet fundamental form of gene regulation. The potential pool of regulated genes encodes many proteins involved in nucleic acid binding. We hypothesize that the genes we identify are part of a large network whose expression is fine-tuned by poly(A) tracks, and we provide a mechanism through which synonymous mutations may influence gene expression in pathological states. PMID:26322332

  2. Nucleotide sequence of the transcriptional initiation region of the yeast GAL7 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Nogi, Y; Fukasawa, T

    1983-01-01

    The GAL7 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes Gal-1-P uridylyl transferase, the second enzyme of Leloir pathway for the galactose catabolism. We have determined the sequence of 1003 base pairs surrounding and upstream of the transcriptional initiation site of the GAL7 gene. The region sequenced also encompasses the 3' end of GAL10 gene. The 5' end of GAL7 mRNA was determined on the DNA sequence by the S1 nuclease- and exonuclease VII mapping, which is located 21 to 22 base pairs upstream from the translation initiating ATG codon. The primary structure of the GAL7 5' flanking region has many features common to those of multicellular eukaryotic genes. The 3' end of GAL10 mRNA was also determined by the mapping technique with the single-strand specific nucleases to be about 600 base pairs upstream from the 5' end of GAL7 mRNA. Images PMID:6324089

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 LTR TATA and TAR region sequences required for transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J A; Harrich, D; Soultanakis, E; Wu, F; Mitsuyasu, R; Gaynor, R B

    1989-03-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 LTR is regulated at the transcriptional level by both cellular and viral proteins. Using HeLa cell extracts, multiple regions of the HIV LTR were found to serve as binding sites for cellular proteins. An untranslated region binding protein UBP-1 has been purified and fractions containing this protein bind to both the TAR and TATA regions. To investigate the role of cellular proteins binding to both the TATA and TAR regions and their potential interaction with other HIV DNA binding proteins, oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis of both these regions was performed followed by DNase I footprinting and transient expression assays. In the TATA region, two direct repeats TC/AAGC/AT/AGCTGC surround the TATA sequence. Mutagenesis of both of these direct repeats or of the TATA sequence interrupted binding over the TATA region on the coding strand, but only a mutation of the TATA sequence affected in vivo assays for tat-activation. In addition to TAR serving as the site of binding of cellular proteins, RNA transcribed from TAR is capable of forming a stable stem-loop structure. To determine the relative importance of DNA binding proteins as compared to secondary structure, oligonucleotide-directed mutations in the TAR region were studied. Local mutations that disrupted either the stem or loop structure were defective in gene expression. However, compensatory mutations which restored base pairing in the stem resulted in complete tat-activation. This indicated a significant role for the stem-loop structure in HIV gene expression. To determine the role of TAR binding proteins, mutations were constructed which extensively changed the primary structure of the TAR region, yet left stem base pairing, stem energy and the loop sequence intact. These mutations resulted in decreased protein binding to TAR DNA and defects in tat-activation, and revealed factor binding specifically to the loop DNA sequence. Further mutagenesis which inverted

  4. POLYMORPHISM IN THE CODING REGION SEQUENCE OF GDF8 GENE IN INDIAN SHEEP.

    PubMed

    Pothuraju, M; Mishra, S K; Kumar, S N; Mohamed, N F; Kataria, R S; Yadav, D K; Arora, R

    2015-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to identify polymorphism in the coding sequence of GDF8gene across indigenous meat type sheep breeds. A 1647 bp sequence was generated, encompassing 208 bp of the 5'UTR, 1128 bp of coding region (exon1, 2 and 3) as well as 311 bp of 3'UTR. The sheep and goat GDF8 gene sequences were observed to be highly conserved as compared to cattle, buffalo, horse and pig. Several nucleotide variations were observed across coding sequence of GDF8 gene in Indian sheep. Three polymorphic sites were identified in the 5'UTR, one in exon 1 and one in the exon 2 regions. Both SNPs in the exonic region were found to be non-synonymous. The mutations c.539T > G and c.821T > A discovered in this study in the exon 1 and exon 2, respectively, have not been previously reported. The information generated provides preliminary indication of the functional diversity present in Indian sheep at the coding region of GDF8gene. The novel as well as the previously reported SNPs discovered in the Indian sheep warrant further analysis to see whether they affect the phenotype. Future studies will need to establish the affect of reported SNPs in the expression of the GDF8 gene in Indian sheep population. PMID:26845859

  5. Ancient conserved regions in new gene sequences and the protein databases

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.; Hillier, L.; Waterston, R. ); Lipman, D.; States, D.; Claverie, J.M. )

    1993-03-19

    Sets of new gene sequences from human, nematode, and yeast were compared with each other and with a set of Escherichia coli genes in order to detect ancient evolutionarily conserved regions (ACRs) in the encoded proteins. Nearly all of the ACRs so identified were found to be homologous to sequences in the protein databases. This suggests that currently known proteins may already include representatives of most ACRs and that new sequences not similar to any database sequence are unlikely to contain ACRs. Preliminary analyses indicate that moderately expressed genes may be more likely to contain ACRs than rarely expressed genes. It is estimated that there are fewer than 900 ACRs in all. 20 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Sequence analysis of bacterial artificial chromosome clones from the apospory-specific genomic region of Pennisetum and Cenchrus.

    PubMed

    Conner, Joann A; Goel, Shailendra; Gunawan, Gunawati; Cordonnier-Pratt, Marie-Michele; Johnson, Virgil Ed; Liang, Chun; Wang, Haiming; Pratt, Lee H; Mullet, John E; DeBarry, Jeremy; Yang, Lixing; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Klein, Patricia E; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2008-07-01

    Apomixis, asexual reproduction through seed, is widespread among angiosperm families. Gametophytic apomixis in Pennisetum squamulatum and Cenchrus ciliaris is controlled by the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR), which is highly conserved and macrosyntenic between these species. Thirty-two ASGR bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) isolated from both species and one ASGR-recombining BAC from P. squamulatum, which together cover approximately 2.7 Mb of DNA, were used to investigate the genomic structure of this region. Phrap assembly of 4,521 high-quality reads generated 1,341 contiguous sequences (contigs; 730 from the ASGR and 30 from the ASGR-recombining BAC in P. squamulatum, plus 580 from the C. ciliaris ASGR). Contigs containing putative protein-coding regions unrelated to transposable elements were identified based on protein similarity after Basic Local Alignment Search Tool X analysis. These putative coding regions were further analyzed in silico with reference to the rice (Oryza sativa) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) genomes using the resources at Gramene (www.gramene.org) and Phytozome (www.phytozome.net) and by hybridization against sorghum BAC filters. The ASGR sequences reveal that the ASGR (1) contains both gene-rich and gene-poor segments, (2) contains several genes that may play a role in apomictic development, (3) has many classes of transposable elements, and (4) does not exhibit large-scale synteny with either rice or sorghum genomes but does contain multiple regions of microsynteny with these species. PMID:18508959

  7. AT-rich region and repeated sequences - the essential elements of replication origins of bacterial replicons.

    PubMed

    Rajewska, Magdalena; Wegrzyn, Katarzyna; Konieczny, Igor

    2012-03-01

    Repeated sequences are commonly present in the sites for DNA replication initiation in bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic replicons. Those motifs are usually the binding places for replication initiation proteins or replication regulatory factors. In prokaryotic replication origins, the most abundant repeated sequences are DnaA boxes which are the binding sites for chromosomal replication initiation protein DnaA, iterons which bind plasmid or phage DNA replication initiators, defined motifs for site-specific DNA methylation, and 13-nucleotide-long motifs of a not too well-characterized function, which are present within a specific region of replication origin containing higher than average content of adenine and thymine residues. In this review, we specify methods allowing identification of a replication origin, basing on the localization of an AT-rich region and the arrangement of the origin's structural elements. We describe the regularity of the position and structure of the AT-rich regions in bacterial chromosomes and plasmids. The importance of 13-nucleotide-long repeats present at the AT-rich region, as well as other motifs overlapping them, was pointed out to be essential for DNA replication initiation including origin opening, helicase loading and replication complex assembly. We also summarize the role of AT-rich region repeated sequences for DNA replication regulation.

  8. Auditory sequence processing reveals evolutionarily conserved regions of frontal cortex in macaques and humans

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Benjamin; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Sun, Li; Hunter, David; Dick, Frederic; Smith, Kenny; Thiele, Alexander; Griffiths, Timothy D.; Marslen-Wilson, William D.; Petkov, Christopher I.

    2015-01-01

    An evolutionary account of human language as a neurobiological system must distinguish between human-unique neurocognitive processes supporting language and evolutionarily conserved, domain-general processes that can be traced back to our primate ancestors. Neuroimaging studies across species may determine whether candidate neural processes are supported by homologous, functionally conserved brain areas or by different neurobiological substrates. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging in Rhesus macaques and humans to examine the brain regions involved in processing the ordering relationships between auditory nonsense words in rule-based sequences. We find that key regions in the human ventral frontal and opercular cortex have functional counterparts in the monkey brain. These regions are also known to be associated with initial stages of human syntactic processing. This study raises the possibility that certain ventral frontal neural systems, which play a significant role in language function in modern humans, originally evolved to support domain-general abilities involved in sequence processing. PMID:26573340

  9. Distribution of trinucleotide repeat sequences across a 2 Mbp region containing the Huntington's disease gene.

    PubMed

    Hummerich, H; Baxendale, S; Mott, R; Kirby, S F; MacDonald, M E; Gusella, J; Lehrach, H; Bates, G P

    1994-01-01

    The recent observation that the mutation underlying a number of genetic diseases including fragile sites, FRAXA and FRAXE (associated with mental retardation), myotonic dystrophy, spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease), Huntington's disease and spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 are caused by the expansion of a trinucleotide repeat sequence will lead to interest in the identification of such sequences in regions related to other diseases. We report here the identification of all ten classes of trinucleotide repeats within a 2 Mbp region of 4p16.3 containing the Huntington's disease (HD) gene. Fifty one triplet repeats were identified and localised on a high resolution restriction map of a cosmid contig covering this region. This included the triplet repeat (CAG)n, which has subsequently been shown to be expanded in Huntington's disease patients.

  10. Intra-tumor Heterogeneity in Localized Lung Adenocarcinomas Delineated by Multi-region Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Junya; Zhang, Jianhua; Wedge, David C.; Song, Xingzhi; Zhang, Jiexin; Seth, Sahil; Chow, Chi-Wan; Cao, Yu; Gumbs, Curtis; Gold, Kathryn A.; Kalhor, Neda; Little, Latasha; Mahadeshwar, Harshad; Moran, Cesar; Protopopov, Alexei; Sun, Huandong; Tang, Jiabin; Wu, Xifeng; Ye, Yuanqing; William, William N.; Lee, Jack J.; Heymach, John V.; Hong, Waun Ki; Swisher, Stephen; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Futreal, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Cancers are composed of populations of cells with distinct molecular and phenotypic features, a phenomenon termed intra-tumor heterogeneity (ITH). ITH in lung cancers has not been well studied. We applied multi-region whole exome sequencing (WES) on 11 localized lung adenocarcinomas. All tumors showed clear evidence of ITH. On average, 76% of all mutations and 20/21 known cancer gene mutations were identified in all regions of individual tumors suggesting single-region sequencing may be adequate to identify the majority of known cancer gene mutations in localized lung adenocarcinomas. With a median follow-up of 21 months post-surgery, 3 patients have relapsed and all 3 patients had significantly larger fractions of subclonal mutations in their primary tumors than patients without relapse. These data indicate larger subclonal mutation fraction may be associated with increased likelihood of postsurgical relapse in patients with localized lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:25301631

  11. Modes of Executive Control in Sequence Learning: From Stimulus-Based to Plan-Based Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tubau, Elisabet; Hommel, Bernhard; Lopez-Moliner, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The authors argue that human sequential learning is often but not always characterized by a shift from stimulus- to plan-based action control. To diagnose this shift, they manipulated the frequency of 1st-order transitions in a repeated manual left-right sequence, assuming that performance is sensitive to frequency-induced biases under stimulus-…

  12. Analysis of mixtures using next generation sequencing of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable regions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hanna; Erlich, Henry A.; Calloway, Cassandra D.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To apply massively parallel and clonal sequencing (next generation sequencing or NGS) to the analysis of forensic mixed samples. Methods A duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable regions I/II (HVI/HVII) was developed for NGS analysis on the Roche 454 GS Junior instrument. Eight sets of multiplex identifier-tagged 454 fusion primers were used in a combinatorial approach for amplification and deep sequencing of up to 64 samples in parallel. Results This assay was shown to be highly sensitive for sequencing limited DNA amounts ( ~ 100 mtDNA copies) and analyzing contrived and biological mixtures with low level variants ( ~ 1%) as well as “complex” mixtures (≥3 contributors). PCR artifact “hybrid” sequences generated by jumping PCR or template switching were observed at a low level (<2%) in the analysis of mixed samples but could be eliminated by reducing the PCR cycle number. Conclusion This study demonstrates the power of NGS technologies targeting the mtDNA HVI/HVII regions for analysis of challenging forensic samples, such as mixtures and specimens with limited DNA. PMID:26088845

  13. The Monitoring and Control of Task Sequences in Human and Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Desrochers, Theresa M.; Burk, Diana C.; Badre, David; Sheinberg, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Our ability to plan and execute a series of tasks leading to a desired goal requires remarkable coordination between sensory, motor, and decision-related systems. Prefrontal cortex (PFC) is thought to play a central role in this coordination, especially when actions must be assembled extemporaneously and cannot be programmed as a rote series of movements. A central component of this flexible behavior is the moment-by-moment allocation of working memory and attention. The ubiquity of sequence planning in our everyday lives belies the neural complexity that supports this capacity, and little is known about how frontal cortical regions orchestrate the monitoring and control of sequential behaviors. For example, it remains unclear if and how sensory cortical areas, which provide essential driving inputs for behavior, are modulated by the frontal cortex during these tasks. Here, we review what is known about moment-to-moment monitoring as it relates to visually guided, rule-driven behaviors that change over time. We highlight recent human work that shows how the rostrolateral prefrontal cortex (RLPFC) participates in monitoring during task sequences. Neurophysiological data from monkeys suggests that monitoring may be accomplished by neurons that respond to items within the sequence and may in turn influence the tuning properties of neurons in posterior sensory areas. Understanding the interplay between proceduralized or habitual acts and supervised control of sequences is key to our understanding of sequential task execution. A crucial bridge will be the use of experimental protocols that allow for the examination of the functional homology between monkeys and humans. We illustrate how task sequences may be parceled into components and examined experimentally, thereby opening future avenues of investigation into the neural basis of sequential monitoring and control. PMID:26834581

  14. Regions of the polytene chromosomes of Drosophila virilis carrying multiple dispersed p Dv 111 DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Gubenko, I.S.; Evgen'ev, M.B.

    1986-09-01

    The cloned sequences of p Dv 111 DNA hybridized in situ with more than 170 regions of Drosophila virilis salivary gland chromosomes. Comparative autoradiography of in situ hybridization and the nature of pulse /sup 3/H-thymidine and /sup 3/H-deoxycytidine incorporation into the polytene chromosomes of D. virilis at the puparium formation stage showed that the hybridization sites of p Dv 111 are distributed not only in the heterochromatic regions but also in the euchromatic regions of the chromosomes that are not late replicating. Two distinct bands of hybridization of p Dv 111 /sup 3/H-DNA were observed in the region of the heat shock puff 20CD. The regions of the distal end of chromosome 2, in which breaks appeared during radiation-induced chromosomal rearrangements, hybridized with the p Dv 111 DNA.

  15. Nucleotide sequence of the hypervariable region of the human C2 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z.B.; Volanakis, J.V. )

    1991-03-15

    It has been previously suggested that the multiallelic Bam H1/Sst I RFLPs of the human C2 gene arose through deletion/insertion of a tandemly-repeated minisatellite region. In this study the authors subcloned and sequenced the Sst I polymorphic fragment of the b haplotype of the C2 gene. This restriction fragment is 2,450 bp long and maps 1,550 bp 3{prime} of exon 3. Its nucleotide sequence is characterized by the presence of at least 4 different repeated regions varying in size from 18 to 58 bp. One of these regions starting at position 1,413 is 48 bp long and is repeated five times. The first 3 repeats are in tandem and are separated by 72 bp from two additional tandem repeats. Sequence homology among the 5 repeats ranges between 93 and 98%. Eighty three percent of the nucleotides of the repeated-region are G or C. It seems likely that this nucleotide repeat resulted in the multiallelic RFLPs through a mechanism of unequal recombination or replication slippage.

  16. Upstream regulatory regions required to stabilize binding to the TATA sequence in an adenovirus early promoter.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J; Wu, F; Gaynor, R

    1987-10-26

    Of the five early adenovirus promoters, the early region 3 (E3) promoter is one of the most strongly induced by the E1A protein. To identify cellular proteins involved in both the basal and E1A-induced transcriptional regulation of the E3 promoter, DNase I footprinting using partially purified Hela cell extracts was performed. Four regions of the E3 promoter serve as binding domains for cellular proteins. These regions are found between -156 to -179 (site IV), -83 to -103 (site III), -47 to -67 (site II), and -16 to -37 (site I), relative to the start of transcription. Examination of the DNA sequences in each binding domain suggests that site III likely serves as a binding site for activator protein 1 (AP-1), site II for the cyclic AMP regulatory element binding protein (CREB), and site I for a TATA binding factor. The factors binding to either site II or III were sufficient to stabilize binding to the TATA sequence (site I). Mutagenesis studies indicated that both sites II and III, in addition to site I, are needed for complete basal and E1A-induced transcription. These results suggest that multiple cellular factors are involved in both the basal and E1A-induced transcriptional regulation of the E3 promoter, and that either of two upstream regions are capable of stabilizing factor binding to the TATA sequence.

  17. DFLpred: High-throughput prediction of disordered flexible linker regions in protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanchi; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Disordered flexible linkers (DFLs) are disordered regions that serve as flexible linkers/spacers in multi-domain proteins or between structured constituents in domains. They are different from flexible linkers/residues because they are disordered and longer. Availability of experimentally annotated DFLs provides an opportunity to build high-throughput computational predictors of these regions from protein sequences. To date, there are no computational methods that directly predict DFLs and they can be found only indirectly by filtering predicted flexible residues with predictions of disorder. Results: We conceptualized, developed and empirically assessed a first-of-its-kind sequence-based predictor of DFLs, DFLpred. This method outputs propensity to form DFLs for each residue in the input sequence. DFLpred uses a small set of empirically selected features that quantify propensities to form certain secondary structures, disordered regions and structured regions, which are processed by a fast linear model. Our high-throughput predictor can be used on the whole-proteome scale; it needs <1 h to predict entire proteome on a single CPU. When assessed on an independent test dataset with low sequence-identity proteins, it secures area under the receiver operating characteristic curve equal 0.715 and outperforms existing alternatives that include methods for the prediction of flexible linkers, flexible residues, intrinsically disordered residues and various combinations of these methods. Prediction on the complete human proteome reveals that about 10% of proteins have a large content of over 30% DFL residues. We also estimate that about 6000 DFL regions are long with ≥30 consecutive residues. Availability and implementation: http://biomine.ece.ualberta.ca/DFLpred/. Contact: lkurgan@vcu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307636

  18. Modulated Binding of SATB1, a Matrix Attachment Region Protein, to the AT-Rich Sequence Flanking the Major Breakpoint Region of BCL2

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Meera; Liu, Wen-Man; DiCroce, Patricia A.; Posner, Aleza; Zheng, Jian; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi; Krontiris, Theodore G.

    2000-01-01

    The t(14,18) chromosomal translocation that occurs in human follicular lymphoma constitutively activates the BCL2 gene and disrupts control of apoptosis. Interestingly, 70% of the t(14,18) translocations are confined to three 15-bp clusters positioned within a 150-bp region (major breakpoint region or [MBR]) in the untranslated portion of terminal exon 3. We analyzed DNA-protein interactions in the MBR, as these may play some role in targeting the translocation to this region. An 87-bp segment (87MBR) immediately 3′ to breakpoint cluster 3 was essential for DNA-protein interaction monitored with mobility shift assays. We further delineated a core binding region within 87MBR: a 33-bp, very AT-rich sequence highly conserved between the human and mouse BCL2 gene (37MBR). We have purified and identified one of the core factors as the matrix attachment region (MAR) binding protein, SATB1, which is known to bind to AT-rich sequences with a high propensity to unwind. Additional factors in nuclear extracts, which we have not yet characterized further, increased SATB1 affinity for the 37MBR target four- to fivefold. Specific binding activity within 37MBR displayed cell cycle regulation in Jurkat T cells, while levels of SATB1 remained constant throughout the cell cycle. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo binding of SATB1 to the MBR, strongly suggesting the BCL2 major breakpoint region is a MAR. We discuss the potential consequences of our observations for both MBR fragility and regulatory function. PMID:10629043

  19. Nonessential region of bacteriophage P4: DNA sequence, transcription, gene products, and functions.

    PubMed Central

    Ghisotti, D; Finkel, S; Halling, C; Dehò, G; Sironi, G; Calendar, R

    1990-01-01

    We sequenced the leftmost 2,640 base pairs of bacteriophage P4 DNA, thus completing the sequence of the 11,627-base-pair P4 genome. The newly sequenced region encodes three nonessential genes, which are called gop, beta, and cII (in order, from left to right). The gop gene product kills Escherichia coli when the beta protein is absent; the gop and beta genes are transcribed rightward from the same promoter. The cII gene is transcribed leftward to a rho-independent terminator. Mutation of this terminator creates a temperature-sensitive phenotype, presumably owing to a defect in expression of the beta gene. Images PMID:2403440

  20. Brain regions and genes affecting postural control.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, R; Strazielle, C

    2007-01-01

    Postural control is integrated in all facets of motor commands. The role of cortico-subcortical pathways underlying postural control, including cerebellum and its afferents (climbing, mossy, and noradrenergic fibers), basal ganglia, motor thalamus, and parieto-frontal neocortex has been identified in animal models, notably through the brain lesion technique in rats and in mice with spontaneous and induced mutations. These studies are complemented by analyses of the factors underlying postural deficiencies in patients with cerebellar atrophy. With the gene deletion technique in mice, specific genes expressed in cerebellum encoding glutamate receptors (Grid2 and Grm1) and other molecules (Prkcc, Cntn6, Klf9, Syt4, and En2) have also been shown to affect postural control. In addition, transgenic mouse models of the synucleinopathies and of Huntington's disease cause deficiencies of motor coordination resembling those of patients with basal ganglia damage.

  1. Sequence stratigraphic and tectonic controls on Shannon incised-valley distribution, Hartzog Draw, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.D.; Van Wagoner, J.C.; Jennette, D.C.

    1996-12-31

    The Upper Cretaceous Shannon Sandstone in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming is interpreted as stacked tidal bars infilling northwest-southeast trending incised valleys. The Shannon Sandstone can be subdivided into 3 sequences: Copenhagen Blue, Crimson Red, and Canary Yellow. The Copenhagen Blue sequence boundary is a regional unconformity at the base of the Shannon Sandstone marked by distal tidal-bar deposits resting on offshore mudstones of the Cody. The overlying Crimson Red sequence is the main reservoir interval at Hartzog Draw and is composed of proximal tidal-bar deposits. The highly erosional Canary Yellow sequence boundary forms the trap at Hartzog Draw by juxtaposing the reservoir sandstones of the Crimson Red sequence with the overlying offshore mudstones of the Canary Yellow sequence. The Shannon Sandstone is therefore an erosional remnant of originally more extensive tide-dominated deltas deposited within northwest-southeast trending incised valleys. The orientation and distribution of the Shannon incised valleys is the result of the interplay between tectonics and eustacy. During lowstand incised valley development the orientation of fluvial systems incising the shelf was strongly controlled by pre-existing northwest-southeast trending structural elements in the basin. During the subsequent sea-level rise the shoreline backstepped in a landward direction. The shoreline also gradually rotated from an east-west orientation during the lowstand to a north-south orientation during the highstand systems tract. Ultimately the highstand shorelines were located over 160 kms landward of the lowstand shorelines and oriented subparallel to the lowstand incised valleys.

  2. Sequence stratigraphic and tectonic controls on Shannon incised-valley distribution, Hartzog Draw, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.D.; Van Wagoner, J.C.; Jennette, D.C. )

    1996-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Shannon Sandstone in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming is interpreted as stacked tidal bars infilling northwest-southeast trending incised valleys. The Shannon Sandstone can be subdivided into 3 sequences: Copenhagen Blue, Crimson Red, and Canary Yellow. The Copenhagen Blue sequence boundary is a regional unconformity at the base of the Shannon Sandstone marked by distal tidal-bar deposits resting on offshore mudstones of the Cody. The overlying Crimson Red sequence is the main reservoir interval at Hartzog Draw and is composed of proximal tidal-bar deposits. The highly erosional Canary Yellow sequence boundary forms the trap at Hartzog Draw by juxtaposing the reservoir sandstones of the Crimson Red sequence with the overlying offshore mudstones of the Canary Yellow sequence. The Shannon Sandstone is therefore an erosional remnant of originally more extensive tide-dominated deltas deposited within northwest-southeast trending incised valleys. The orientation and distribution of the Shannon incised valleys is the result of the interplay between tectonics and eustacy. During lowstand incised valley development the orientation of fluvial systems incising the shelf was strongly controlled by pre-existing northwest-southeast trending structural elements in the basin. During the subsequent sea-level rise the shoreline backstepped in a landward direction. The shoreline also gradually rotated from an east-west orientation during the lowstand to a north-south orientation during the highstand systems tract. Ultimately the highstand shorelines were located over 160 kms landward of the lowstand shorelines and oriented subparallel to the lowstand incised valleys.

  3. Tubulin sequence region beta 155-174 is involved in binding exchangeable guanosine triphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Hesse, J.; Thierauf, M.; Ponstingl, H.

    1987-11-15

    Assembly-competent microtubule protein was directly photoaffinity labeled with (alpha-/sup 32/P)guanosine triphosphate by UV irradiation. The labeled tubulin was digested with trypsin. The radioactive fragments were isolated and sequenced, revealing beta-tubulin residues 155-174 to be the major labeled region. An antibody to a synthetic peptide comprising residues beta 154-165 inhibits GTP incorporation and tubulin polymerization.

  4. Regional distant sequence homology between amylases, alpha-glucosidases and transglucanosylases.

    PubMed

    Svensson, B

    1988-03-28

    Amylases possess short, conserved regions near functional side chains. Sequence comparison extends this relationship to comprise a maltase and a cyclodextrin glucanotransferase. Similarity also exists with intestinal sucrase-isomaltase and fungal glucoamylase near identified essential carboxyl groups. Homology between COOH-terminal regions of glucoamylase and cyclodextrin glucanotranserase may indicate raw-starch binding areas. It is suggested that amylases, alpha-glucosidases, and transglucanosylases acting on 1,4- and 1,6-alpha-glucosidic linkages share key structural features in the active centres.

  5. A sequence motif enriched in regions bound by the Drosophila dosage compensation complex

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In Drosophila melanogaster, dosage compensation is mediated by the action of the dosage compensation complex (DCC). How the DCC recognizes the fly X chromosome is still poorly understood. Characteristic sequence signatures at all DCC binding sites have not hitherto been found. Results In this study, we compare the known binding sites of the DCC with oligonucleotide profiles that measure the specificity of the sequences of the D. melanogaster X chromosome. We show that the X chromosome regions bound by the DCC are enriched for a particular type of short, repetitive sequences. Their distribution suggests that these sequences contribute to chromosome recognition, the generation of DCC binding sites and/or the local spreading of the complex. Comparative data indicate that the same sequences may be involved in dosage compensation in other Drosophila species. Conclusions These results offer an explanation for the wild-type binding of the DCC along the Drosophila X chromosome, contribute to delineate the forces leading to the establishment of dosage compensation and suggest new experimental approaches to understand the precise biochemical features of the dosage compensation system. PMID:20226017

  6. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Li, Wei; Xia, Yingying; Wang, Chongzhi; Tang, Y Tom; Guo, Wenying; Li, Jinliang; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yepeng; Hu, Juan; Zhen, Hefu; Zhang, Xiandong; Chen, Chao; Shi, Yujian; Li, Lin; Cao, Hongzhi; Du, Hongli; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and uniparental disomy (UPD) are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS), is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs). In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information. PMID:25919136

  7. A Comprehensive, Automatically Updated Fungal ITS Sequence Dataset for Reference-Based Chimera Control in Environmental Sequencing Efforts.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, R Henrik; Tedersoo, Leho; Ryberg, Martin; Kristiansson, Erik; Hartmann, Martin; Unterseher, Martin; Porter, Teresita M; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Walker, Donald M; de Sousa, Filipe; Gamper, Hannes Andres; Larsson, Ellen; Larsson, Karl-Henrik; Kõljalg, Urmas; Edgar, Robert C; Abarenkov, Kessy

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region is the most commonly chosen genetic marker for the molecular identification of fungi in environmental sequencing and molecular ecology studies. Several analytical issues complicate such efforts, one of which is the formation of chimeric-artificially joined-DNA sequences during PCR amplification or sequence assembly. Several software tools are currently available for chimera detection, but rely to various degrees on the presence of a chimera-free reference dataset for optimal performance. However, no such dataset is available for use with the fungal ITS region. This study introduces a comprehensive, automatically updated reference dataset for fungal ITS sequences based on the UNITE database for the molecular identification of fungi. This dataset supports chimera detection throughout the fungal kingdom and for full-length ITS sequences as well as partial (ITS1 or ITS2 only) datasets. The performance of the dataset on a large set of artificial chimeras was above 99.5%, and we subsequently used the dataset to remove nearly 1,000 compromised fungal ITS sequences from public circulation. The dataset is available at http://unite.ut.ee/repository.php and is subject to web-based third-party curation.

  8. Sequence determination of a new parrot bornavirus-5 strain in Japan: implications of clade-specific sequence diversity in the regions interacting with host factors.

    PubMed

    Komorizono, Ryo; Makino, Akiko; Horie, Masayuki; Honda, Tomoyuki; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the genome sequence of a new parrot bornavirus-5 (PaBV-5) detected in Eclectus roratus was determined. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the genus Bornavirus is divided into three major clades and that PaBV-5 belongs to clade 2, which contains avian viruses that exhibit infectivity to mammalian cells. Sequence comparisons of the regions known to interact with host factors indicated that the clade 2 avian viruses possess sequences intermediate between the clade 1 mammalian viruses and the clade 3 avian viruses, suggesting that the identified regions might contribute to the differences in virological properties between the three clades. PMID:27166599

  9. Distribution bias of the sequence matching between exons and introns in exon joint and EJC binding region in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Li, Hong; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Yan; Zhou, Deliang

    2015-01-01

    We propose a mechanism that there are matching relations between mRNA sequences and corresponding post-spliced introns, and introns play a significant role in the process of gene expression. In order to reveal the sequence matching features, Smith-Waterman local alignment method is used on C. elegans mRNA sequences to obtain optimal matched segments between exon-exon sequences and their corresponding introns. Distribution characters of matching frequency on exon-exon sequences and sequence characters of optimal matched segments are studied. Results show that distributions of matching frequency on exon-exon junction region have obvious differences, and the exon boundary is revealed. Distributions of the length and matching rate of optimal matched segments are consistent with sequence features of siRNA and miRNA. The optimal matched segments have special sequence characters compared with their host sequences. As for the first introns and long introns, matching frequency values of optimal matched segments with high GC content, rich CG dinucleotides and high λCG values show the minimum distribution in exon junction complex (EJC) binding region. High λCG values in optimal matched segments are main characters in distinguishing EJC binding region. Results indicate that EJC and introns have competitive and cooperative relations in the process of combining on protein coding sequences. Also intron sequences and protein coding sequences do have concerted evolution relations.

  10. Divergence of human [alpha]-chain constant region gene sequences: A novel recombinant [alpha]2 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Chintalacharuvu, K. R.; Morrison, S.L. ); Raines, M. )

    1994-06-01

    IgA is the major Ig synthesized in humans and provides the first line of defense at the mucosal surfaces. The constant region of IgA heavy chain is encoded by the [alpha] gene on chromosome 14. Previous studies have indicated the presence of two [alpha] genes, [alpha]1 and [alpha]2 existing in two allotypic forms, [alpha]2 m(1) and [alpha]2 m(2). Here the authors report the cloning and complete nucleotide sequence determination of a novel human [alpha] gene. Nucleotide sequence comparison with the published [alpha] sequences suggests that the gene arose as a consequence of recombination or gene conversion between the two [alpha]2 alleles. The authors have expressed the gene as a chimeric protein in myeloma cells indicating that it encodes a functional protein. The novel IgA resembles IgA2 m(2) in that disulfide bonds link H and L chains. This novel recombinant gene provides insights into the mechanisms of generation of different constant regions and suggests that within human populations, multiple alleles of [alpha] may be present providing IgAs of different structures.

  11. Face processing regions are sensitive to distinct aspects of temporal sequence in facial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Reinl, Maren; Bartels, Andreas

    2014-11-15

    Facial movement conveys important information for social interactions, yet its neural processing is poorly understood. Computational models propose that shape- and temporal sequence sensitive mechanisms interact in processing dynamic faces. While face processing regions are known to respond to facial movement, their sensitivity to particular temporal sequences has barely been studied. Here we used fMRI to examine the sensitivity of human face-processing regions to two aspects of directionality in facial movement trajectories. We presented genuine movie recordings of increasing and decreasing fear expressions, each of which were played in natural or reversed frame order. This two-by-two factorial design matched low-level visual properties, static content and motion energy within each factor, emotion-direction (increasing or decreasing emotion) and timeline (natural versus artificial). The results showed sensitivity for emotion-direction in FFA, which was timeline-dependent as it only occurred within the natural frame order, and sensitivity to timeline in the STS, which was emotion-direction-dependent as it only occurred for decreased fear. The occipital face area (OFA) was sensitive to the factor timeline. These findings reveal interacting temporal sequence sensitive mechanisms that are responsive to both ecological meaning and to prototypical unfolding of facial dynamics. These mechanisms are temporally directional, provide socially relevant information regarding emotional state or naturalness of behavior, and agree with predictions from modeling and predictive coding theory. PMID:25132020

  12. The Signal Sequence Coding Region Promotes Nuclear Export of mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Palazzo, Alexander F; Springer, Michael; Shibata, Yoko; Lee, Chung-Sheng; Dias, Anusha P; Rapoport, Tom A

    2007-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, most mRNAs are exported from the nucleus by the transcription export (TREX) complex, which is loaded onto mRNAs after their splicing and capping. We have studied in mammalian cells the nuclear export of mRNAs that code for secretory proteins, which are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane by hydrophobic signal sequences. The mRNAs were injected into the nucleus or synthesized from injected or transfected DNA, and their export was followed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. We made the surprising observation that the signal sequence coding region (SSCR) can serve as a nuclear export signal of an mRNA that lacks an intron or functional cap. Even the export of an intron-containing natural mRNA was enhanced by its SSCR. Like conventional export, the SSCR-dependent pathway required the factor TAP, but depletion of the TREX components had only moderate effects. The SSCR export signal appears to be characterized in vertebrates by a low content of adenines, as demonstrated by genome-wide sequence analysis and by the inhibitory effect of silent adenine mutations in SSCRs. The discovery of an SSCR-mediated pathway explains the previously noted amino acid bias in signal sequences and suggests a link between nuclear export and membrane targeting of mRNAs. PMID:18052610

  13. Conserved elements in the 3' untranslated region of flavivirus RNAs and potential cyclization sequences.

    PubMed

    Hahn, C S; Hahn, Y S; Rice, C M; Lee, E; Dalgarno, L; Strauss, E G; Strauss, J H

    1987-11-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone after reverse transcription of the genomic RNA of Asibi yellow fever virus whose structure suggests it was formed by self-priming from a 3'-terminal hairpin of 87 nucleotides in the genomic RNA. We have also isolated a clone from cDNA made to Murray Valley encephalitis virus RNA that also appears to have arisen by self-priming from a 3'-terminal structure very similar or identical to that of yellow fever. In addition, 3'-terminal sequencing of the S1 strain of dengue 2 RNA shows that this RNA is also capable of forming a 3'-terminal hairpin of 79 nucleotides. Furthermore, we have identified two 20-nucleotide sequence elements which are present in the 3' untranslated region of all three viruses; one of these sequence elements is repeated in Murray Valley encephalitis and dengue 2 RNA but not in yellow fever RNA. In all three viruses, which represent the three major serological subgroups of the mosquito-borne flaviviruses, the 3'-proximal conserved sequence element, which is found immediately adjacent to the potential 3'-terminal hairpin, is complementary to another conserved domain near the 5' end of the viral RNAs, suggesting that flavivirus RNAs can cyclize (calculated delta G less than -11 kcal; 1 kcal = 4.184 kJ).

  14. Nucleotide sequences of the 3' terminal region of onion yellow dwarf virus isolates from Allium plants in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsuneyoshi, T; Ikeda, Y; Sumi, S

    1997-01-01

    The 2032 nucleotide sequence of the 3' terminal region of onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV) isolated from Allium wakegi, bearing the genes for viral coat protein (CP) and a truncated RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, has been determined. Respective homologies of the nucleotide sequence in the corresponding region and the deduced amino acid sequence of CP with the equivalents of leek yellow stripe virus (LYSV) from garlic were 68.0 and 59.3%. Variation in the nucleotide sequence is concentrated in the boundary region between the putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene and the CP gene as well as in the 3' noncoding region. These sequence divergencies, including the deletion of 79 nucleotides, resulted both in alterations to the amino acid sequence and the absence of 28 amino acid residues in the amino terminal region of OYDV CP in comparison with LYSV CP. In addition, the length of the 3' noncoding sequence of OYDV was one-third that of LYSV. Comparison of the 3' terminal 1197 nucleotides sequence of OYDV with sequences of the respective cDNAs cloned by RT-PCR directly from the total RNA of infected Allium plants that included two varieties of A. fistulosum, "Wakenegi" and "Shimonita-negi", and A. chinense, showed 90.7% overall identities, even though they have long been cultivated in locally restricted area in Japan. These findings appear to suggest that a single strain of OYDV invaded Japanese Allium plants long ago and spread throughout them. PMID:9354273

  15. Epigenetic discordance at imprinting control regions in twins.

    PubMed

    Ollikainen, Miina; Craig, Jeffrey M

    2011-06-01

    Imprinting control regions are differentially methylated in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner and this methylation state is inherited through the germline. These regions control parent-specific monoallelic expression of their target genes. Genetically identical organisms show considerable variation in their epigenomes owing to environmental and stochastic influences creating fluctuations in phenotype. Monozygotic twin pairs discordant for imprinting disorders due to epigenetic changes at imprinting control regions are an example of phenotypic variation caused by extreme variations of the epigenome. Here, we discuss the within-pair epigenetic discordance at imprinted loci, both in phenotypically concordant and discordant monozygotic twin pairs. PMID:22122339

  16. Identification of Novel Transcribed Regions in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Using RNA-Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingwen; Vesterlund, Liselotte; Kere, Juha; Jiao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as a model organism to investigate vertebrate development and human genetic diseases. However, the zebrafish genome annotation is still ongoing and incomplete, and there are still new gene transcripts to be found. With the introduction of massive parallel sequencing, whole transcriptome studies became possible. In the present study, we aimed to discover novel transcribed regions (NTRs) using developmental transcriptome data from RNA sequencing. In order to achieve this, we developed an in-house bioinformatics pipeline for NTR discovery. Using the pipeline, we detected 152 putative NTRs that at the time of discovery were not annotated in Ensembl and NCBI gene database. Four randomly selected NTRs were successfully validated using RT-PCR, and expression profiles of 10 randomly selected NTRs were evaluated using qRT-PCR. The identification of these 152 NTRs provide new information for zebrafish genome annotation as well as new candidates for studies of zebrafish gene function. PMID:27462902

  17. Genomic imprinting controls matrix attachment regions in the Igf2 gene.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michaël; Hagège, Hélène; Murrell, Adele; Brunel, Claude; Reik, Wolf; Cathala, Guy; Forné, Thierry

    2003-12-01

    Genomic imprinting at the Igf2/H19 locus originates from allele-specific DNA methylation, which modifies the affinity of some proteins for their target sequences. Here, we show that AT-rich DNA sequences located in the vicinity of previously characterized differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of the imprinted Igf2 gene are conserved between mouse and human. These sequences have all the characteristics of matrix attachment regions (MARs), which are known as versatile regulatory elements involved in chromatin structure and gene expression. Combining allele-specific nuclear matrix binding assays and real-time PCR quantification, we show that retention of two of these Igf2 MARs (MAR0 and MAR2) in the nuclear matrix fraction depends on the tissue and is specific to the paternal allele. Furthermore, on this allele, the Igf2 MAR2 is functionally linked to the neighboring DMR2 while, on the maternal allele, it is controlled by the imprinting-control region. Our work clearly demonstrates that genomic imprinting controls matrix attachment regions in the Igf2 gene.

  18. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of Three Veroniceae Species (Plantaginaceae): Comparative Analysis and Highly Divergent Regions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyoung Su; Chung, Myong Gi; Park, SeonJoo

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies of Veronica and related genera were weakly supported by molecular and paraphyletic taxa. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Veronica nakaiana and the related species Veronica persica and Veronicastrum sibiricum. The chloroplast genome length of V. nakaiana, V. persica, and V. sibiricum ranged from 150,198 bp to 152,930 bp. A total of 112 genes comprising 79 protein coding genes, 29 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes were observed in three chloroplast genomes. The total number of SSRs was 48, 51, and 53 in V. nakaiana, V. persica, and V. sibiricum, respectively. Two SSRs (10 bp of AT and 12 bp of AATA) were observed in the same regions (rpoC2 and ndhD) in three chloroplast genomes. A comparison of coding genes and non-coding regions between V. nakaiana and V. persica revealed divergent sites, with the greatest variation occurring petD-rpoA region. The complete chloroplast genome sequence information regarding the three Veroniceae will be helpful for elucidating Veroniceae phylogenetic relationships. PMID:27047524

  19. Comparative Sequence Analysis of the Sorghum Rph Region and the Maize Rp1 Resistance Gene Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Wusirika; Emberton, John; SanMiguel, Phillip; Ogden, Matthew; Llaca, Victor; Messing, Joachim; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.

    2002-01-01

    A 268-kb chromosomal segment containing sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) genes that are orthologous to the maize (Zea mays) Rp1 disease resistance (R) gene complex was sequenced. A region of approximately 27 kb in sorghum was found to contain five Rp1 homologs, but most have structures indicating that they are not functional. In contrast, maize inbred B73 has 15 Rp1 homologs in two nearby clusters of 250 and 300 kb. As at maize Rp1, the cluster of R gene homologs is interrupted by the presence of several genes that appear to have no resistance role, but these genes were different from the ones found within the maize Rp1 complex. More than 200 kb of DNA downstream from the sorghum Rp1-orthologous R gene cluster was sequenced and found to contain many duplicated and/or truncated genes. None of the duplications currently exist as simple tandem events, suggesting that numerous rearrangements were required to generate the current genomic structure. Four truncated genes were observed, including one gene that appears to have both 5′ and 3′ deletions. The maize Rp1 region is also unusually enriched in truncated genes. Hence, the orthologous maize and sorghum regions share numerous structural features, but all involve events that occurred independently in each species. The data suggest that complex R gene clusters are unusually prone to frequent internal and adjacent chromosomal rearrangements of several types. PMID:12481055

  20. The organisation of repetitive sequences in the pericentromeric region of human chromosome 10.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M S; Slijepcevic, P; Ponder, B A

    1993-12-25

    Three satellite DNA families are present in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 10; the alpha satellite and two 5 bp satellite families defined here as satellites 2 and 3. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) demonstrates that these sequences are organised into five discrete arrays which are linked within a region of approximately 5.3 Megabases (Mb) of DNA. The alpha satellite is largely confined to a 2.2 Mb array which is flanked on its p arm side by two 100-150 kb satellite 3 arrays and on its q arm side by a 900 kb satellite 2 array and a further 320 kb satellite 3 array. This linear order is corroborated by fluorescent in situ hybridisation analyses. In total, these arrays account for 3.6 Mb of DNA in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 10. These data provide both physical information on sequences which may be involved in centromere function and a map across the centromere which has the potential to link yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contigs currently being developed on both arms of this chromosome.

  1. Analysis of the sequence and gene products of the transfer region of the F sex factor.

    PubMed Central

    Frost, L S; Ippen-Ihler, K; Skurray, R A

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation results in the transfer of DNA of either plasmid or chromosomal origin between microorganisms. Transfer begins at a defined point in the DNA sequence, usually called the origin of transfer (oriT). The capacity of conjugative DNA transfer is a property of self-transmissible plasmids and conjugative transposons, which will mobilize other plasmids and DNA sequences that include a compatible oriT locus. This review will concentrate on the genes required for bacterial conjugation that are encoded within the transfer region (or regions) of conjugative plasmids. One of the best-defined conjugation systems is that of the F plasmid, which has been the paradigm for conjugation systems since it was discovered nearly 50 years ago. The F transfer region (over 33 kb) contains about 40 genes, arranged contiguously. These are involved in the synthesis of pili, extracellular filaments which establish contact between donor and recipient cells; mating-pair stabilization; prevention of mating between similar donor cells in a process termed surface exclusions; DNA nicking and transfer during conjugation; and the regulation of expression of these functions. This review is a compendium of the products and other features found in the F transfer region as well as a discussion of their role in conjugation. While the genetics of F transfer have been described extensively, the mechanism of conjugation has proved elusive, in large part because of the low levels of expression of the pilus and the numerous envelope components essential for F plasmid transfer. The advent of molecular genetic techniques has, however, resulted in considerable recent progress. This summary of the known properties of the F transfer region is provided in the hope that it will form a useful basis for future comparison with other conjugation systems. PMID:7915817

  2. Transcribed sequences of the Escherichia coli btuB gene control its expression and regulation by vitamin B12.

    PubMed Central

    Lundrigan, M D; Köster, W; Kadner, R J

    1991-01-01

    The Escherichia coli btuB gene product is an outer membrane protein required for the active transport of vitamin B12 and other cobalamins. Synthesis of BtuB is repressed when cells are grown in the presence of cobalamins. Mapping of the 5' end of the btuB transcript revealed that a 240-nucleotide transcribed leader precedes the coding sequence. Point mutations causing increased expression under repressing conditions were isolated by use of a btuB-lacZ gene fusion. Mutations at many sites within the leader region affected btuB-lacZ regulation, whereas some base changes upstream of the start of transcription affected the absolute level of expression but not its repressibility. Analysis of btuB-phoA gene fusions and btuB-lacZ operon and gene fusions of various lengths showed that sequences within the btuB coding region (between nucleotides +250 and +350) had to be present for proper expression and transcriptional regulation. Sequences within the leader region (up to +250) conferred regulation of translational fusions. These results indicate that btuB expression is controlled at both the transcriptional and translational levels and that different but possibly overlapping sequences in the transcribed region, including the coding region for the transport protein itself, mediate these two modes of regulation. Images PMID:1847525

  3. Delta sequences in the 5' non-coding region of yeast tRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Gafner, Jürg; Robertis, Eddy M.De; Philippsen, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Two so far undetected tRNA genes were found close to delta (δ) sequences at the sup4 locus on chromosome X in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The two genes were identified from their abundant transcription products in frog oocytes. Hybridisation experiments allowed the mapping of the transcripts in cloned DNA and DNA sequence analysis revealed the presence of one AGGtRNAArg and one GACtRNAAsp gene. tRNAAsp genes with sequences similar or identical to GACtRNAAsp exist in 14-16 copies per haploid yeast genome, whereas only one copy was detected for AGGtRNAArg. In vivo labelling of total yeast tRNA with 32P followed by hybridisation revealed that the unique AGGtRNAArg gene is transcribed in S. cerevisiae. δ sequences are present 120 bp upstream from the first coding nucleotide in the case of AGGtRNAArg, 80 bp in the case of GACtRNAAsp and 405 bp in the case of the known UACtRNATyr (sup4) gene. δ sequences, as part of Ty elements or alone, were also found by other investigators at similar distances upstream of the mRNA start in mutant alleles of protein-coding yeast genes. Although protein-coding genes are transcribed by RNA polymerase II and tRNA genes by RNA polymerase III, the 5' non-coding region of both types of genes could conceivably have a peculiar DNA or chromatin structure used as preferred landing sites by transposable elements. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:16453444

  4. An exploration of the sequence of a 2.9-Mb region of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster: The Adh region

    SciTech Connect

    Ashburner, M.; Misra, S.; Roote, J.; Lewis, S.E.; Blazej, R.; Davis, T.; Doyle, C.; Galle, R.; George, R.; Harris, N.; Hartzell, G.; Harvey, D.; Hong, L.; Houston, K.; Hoskins, R.; Johnson, G.; Martin, C.; Moshrefi, A.; Palazzolo, M.; Reese, M.G.; Spradling, A.; Tsang, G.; Wan, K.; Whitelaw, K.; Kimmel, B.; Celniker, S.; Rubin, G.M.

    1999-03-24

    A contiguous sequence of nearly 3 Mb from the genome of Drosophila melanogaster has been sequenced from a series of overlapping P1 and BAC clones. This region covers 69 chromosome polytene bands on chromosome arm 2L, including the genetically well-characterized

  5. Quality Control Test for Sequence-Phenotype Assignments

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Maria Teresa Lara; Rosario, Pablo Benjamín Leon; Luna-Nevarez, Pablo; Gamez, Alba Savin; Martínez-del Campo, Ana; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Relating a gene mutation to a phenotype is a common task in different disciplines such as protein biochemistry. In this endeavour, it is common to find false relationships arising from mutations introduced by cells that may be depurated using a phenotypic assay; yet, such phenotypic assays may introduce additional false relationships arising from experimental errors. Here we introduce the use of high-throughput DNA sequencers and statistical analysis aimed to identify incorrect DNA sequence-phenotype assignments and observed that 10–20% of these false assignments are expected in large screenings aimed to identify critical residues for protein function. We further show that this level of incorrect DNA sequence-phenotype assignments may significantly alter our understanding about the structure-function relationship of proteins. We have made available an implementation of our method at http://bis.ifc.unam.mx/en/software/chispas. PMID:25700273

  6. Kinematic Distances of Pre-main Sequence Stars in the Lupus Star-Forming Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, P. A. B.; Teixeira, R.; Ducourant, C.; Bertout, C.

    2014-06-01

    The problem of the determination of distances has always played a central role in astronomy. However, little recent progress has been made in the distance determination of faint young stellar objects such as pre-main sequence (PMS) stars. Many of the PMS stars were neither observed by the Hipparcos satellite due to their magnitude nor have any trigonometric parallax measured from the ground due to their distance. Here we investigate the kinematic properties of the Lupus moving group with the primary objective of deriving individual parallaxes for each group member of this star-forming region.

  7. A genome walking strategy for the identification of nucleotide sequences adjacent to known regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailong; Yao, Ting; Cai, Mei; Xiao, Xiuqing; Ding, Xuezhi; Xia, Liqiu

    2013-02-01

    To identify the transposon insertion sites in a soil actinomycete, Saccharopolyspora spinosa, a genome walking approach, termed SPTA-PCR, was developed. In SPTA-PCR, a simple procedure consisting of TA cloning and a high stringency PCR, following the single primer-mediated, randomly-primed PCR, can eliminate non-target DNA fragments and obtain target fragments specifically. Using SPTA-PCR, the DNA sequence adjacent to the highly conserved region of lectin coding gene in onion plant, Allium chinense, was also cloned. PMID:23108875

  8. [Variability of the mtDNA Control Region in Goose Anser albifrons Scopoli, 1769].

    PubMed

    Volkovsky, D V; Fisenko, P V; Gerasimov, Yu N; Zhuravlev, Yu N

    2016-03-01

    Sequence variation of the mtDNA (D loop) control region was examined in greater white-fronted goose Anser albifrons Scopoli, 1769 individuals (n = 71). The obtained sequences were compared with those from the NCBI GenBank database. The high level of similarity of the sample from Primorye (A. albifrons) with the sample from Japan (A. a. frontalis) at the level of molecular variation, genetic distance, phylogenetic reconstruction, and haplotype network was demonstrated. A hypothesis on the ways of spring goose migration in the Far East was made. It was confirmed that white-fronted geese wintering in Japan fly to their breeding grounds through Kamchatka. PMID:27281856

  9. A compendium of human mitochondrial DNA control region: development of an international standard forensic database.

    PubMed

    Miller, K W; Budowle, B

    2001-06-01

    A compendium of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region types has been constructed. This updated compilation indexes over 10,000 population-specific mtDNA nucleotide sequences in a standardized format. The sequences represent mtDNA types from the Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM) mtDNA database and from the public literature. The SWGDAM data are considered to be of higher quality than the public data, particularly for counting the number of times a particular haplotype has been observed. PMID:11387646

  10. 40 CFR 81.112 - Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.112 Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Carolina) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region: Region 1. 81.107Greenwood Intrastate Air Quality Control Region: Region 2....

  11. Identification and mapping of expressed genes, simple sequence repeats and transposable elements in centromeric regions of rice chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hiroshi; Ito, Kazue; Wu, Jianzhong; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Katayose, Yuichi; Sasaki, Takuji; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2006-12-31

    The genomic sequences derived from rice centromeric regions were analyzed to facilitate the comprehensive understanding of the rice genome. A rice centromere-specific satellite sequence, RCS2/TrsD/CentO, was used to screen P1-derived artificial chromosome (PAC) and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) genomic libraries derived from Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica cultivar Nipponbare. Physical maps of the centromeric regions were constructed by DNA fingerprinting methods and the aligned clones were analyzed by end sequencing. BLAST analysis revealed the composition of genes, centromeric satellites and other repetitive elements, such as RIRE7/CRR, RIRE8, Squiq, Anaconda, CACTA and miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements. Fiber-fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis also indicated the presence of distinct clusters of RCS2/TrsD/CentO satellite interspersed with other elements, instead of a long homogeneous region. Several expressed genes, sequences representative of ancestral organellar insertions, relatively long simple sequence repeats (SSRs), and sequences corresponding to 5S and 45S ribosomal RNA genes were also identified. Thirty-one gene sequences showed high-similarity to rice full-length cDNA sequences that had not been matched to the published rice genome sequence in silico. These results suggest the presence of expressed genes within and around the clusters of RCS2/TrsD/CentO satellites in unsequenced centromeric regions of the rice chromosomes.

  12. Characterization of mitochondrial control region, two intergenic spacers and tRNAs of Zaprionus indianus (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    da Silva, Norma Machado; de Souza Dias, Aline; da Silva Valente, Vera Lúcia; Valiati, Victor Hugo

    2009-12-01

    The control region in insects is the major noncoding region in animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and is responsible for a large part of the variation in the DNA sequence and size of the genome of this organelle. In this study, the mtDNA control region, two intergenic spacers and tRNA genes of a Zaprionus indianus strain were cloned, sequenced and compared with other Drosophila species. The overall A+T content in the Z. indianus control region is 94.3%, and a comparison with other Drosophila species demonstrated that the most conserved region appears to be the 420 base pairs nearest to the tRNA(ile), similar to the findings of other authors. We also describe conserved sequence blocks, including a poly-T involved in the replication process of Drosophila mtDNA; a putative secondary structure also involved in the replication process and repeated sequences. tRNA(ile) sequence demonstrated the greatest variability when the tRNA sequences of species were compared.

  13. Contamination-controlled high-throughput whole genome sequencing for influenza A viruses using the MiSeq sequencer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Kai; Lee, Chun Kiat; Tang, Julian Wei-Tze; Loh, Tze Ping; Koay, Evelyn Siew-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Accurate full-length genomic sequences are important for viral phylogenetic studies. We developed a targeted high-throughput whole genome sequencing (HT-WGS) method for influenza A viruses, which utilized an enzymatic cleavage-based approach, the Nextera XT DNA library preparation kit, for library preparation. The entire library preparation workflow was adapted for the Sentosa SX101, a liquid handling platform, to automate this labor-intensive step. As the enzymatic cleavage-based approach generates low coverage reads at both ends of the cleaved products, we corrected this loss of sequencing coverage at the termini by introducing modified primers during the targeted amplification step to generate full-length influenza A sequences with even coverage across the whole genome. Another challenge of targeted HTS is the risk of specimen-to-specimen cross-contamination during the library preparation step that results in the calling of false-positive minority variants. We included an in-run, negative system control to capture contamination reads that may be generated during the liquid handling procedures. The upper limits of 99.99% prediction intervals of the contamination rate were adopted as cut-off values of contamination reads. Here, 148 influenza A/H3N2 samples were sequenced using the HTS protocol and were compared against a Sanger-based sequencing method. Our data showed that the rate of specimen-to-specimen cross-contamination was highly significant in HTS. PMID:27624998

  14. Contamination-controlled high-throughput whole genome sequencing for influenza A viruses using the MiSeq sequencer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Kai; Lee, Chun Kiat; Tang, Julian Wei-Tze; Loh, Tze Ping; Koay, Evelyn Siew-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Accurate full-length genomic sequences are important for viral phylogenetic studies. We developed a targeted high-throughput whole genome sequencing (HT-WGS) method for influenza A viruses, which utilized an enzymatic cleavage-based approach, the Nextera XT DNA library preparation kit, for library preparation. The entire library preparation workflow was adapted for the Sentosa SX101, a liquid handling platform, to automate this labor-intensive step. As the enzymatic cleavage-based approach generates low coverage reads at both ends of the cleaved products, we corrected this loss of sequencing coverage at the termini by introducing modified primers during the targeted amplification step to generate full-length influenza A sequences with even coverage across the whole genome. Another challenge of targeted HTS is the risk of specimen-to-specimen cross-contamination during the library preparation step that results in the calling of false-positive minority variants. We included an in-run, negative system control to capture contamination reads that may be generated during the liquid handling procedures. The upper limits of 99.99% prediction intervals of the contamination rate were adopted as cut-off values of contamination reads. Here, 148 influenza A/H3N2 samples were sequenced using the HTS protocol and were compared against a Sanger-based sequencing method. Our data showed that the rate of specimen-to-specimen cross-contamination was highly significant in HTS. PMID:27624998

  15. A General Approach to Sequence-Controlled Polymers Using Macrocyclic Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A new and general strategy for the synthesis of sequence-defined polymers is described that employs relay metathesis to promote the ring opening polymerization of unstrained macrocyclic structures. Central to this approach is the development of a small molecule “polymerization trigger” which when coupled with a diverse range of sequence-defined units allows for the controlled, directional synthesis of sequence controlled polymers. PMID:26053158

  16. Sequence stratigraphic control on prolific HC reservoir development, Southwest Iran

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasemi, Y.; Kondroud, K.N.

    2008-01-01

    An important carbonate formation in the Persian Gulf and the onshore oil fields of Southwest Iran is the Lowermost Cretaceous Fahliyan formation. The formation in Darkhowain field consists of unconformity-bounded depositional sequences containing prolific hydrocarbon reservoirs of contrasting origin. Located in the high stand systems tract (HST) of the lower sequence encompassing over 200m of oil column are the most prolific reservoir. Another reservoir is over 80m thick consisting of shallowing-upward cycles that are best developed within the transgressive systems tract of the upper sequence. Vertical facies distribution and their paleobathymetry and geophysical log signatures of the Fahliyan formation in the Darkhowain platform reveal the presence of two unconformity-bounded depositional sequences in Vail et al., Van Wagoner et al., and Sarg. The Fahliyan formation mainly consists of platform carbonates composed of restricted bioclastic lime mudstone to packstone of the platform interior, Lithocodium boundstone or ooid-intraclast-bioclast grainstone of the high energy platform margin and the bioclast packstone to lime mudstone related to the off-platform setting.

  17. RNA Replication from the Simian Virus 5 Antigenomic Promoter Requires Three Sequence-Dependent Elements Separated by Sequence-Independent Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael A.; Murphy, Susan K.; Parks, Griffith D.

    2001-01-01

    We have previously shown for the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5) that a functional promoter for RNA replication requires proper spacing between two discontinuous elements: a 19-base segment at the 3′ terminus (conserved region I [CRI]) and an 18-base internal region (CRII) that is contained within the coding region of the L protein gene. In the work described here, we have used a reverse-genetics system to determine if the 53-base segment between CRI and CRII contains additional sequence-specific signals required for optimal replication or if this segment functions solely as a sequence-independent spacer region. A series of copyback defective interfering minigenome analogs were constructed to contain substitutions of nonviral sequences in place of bases 21 to 72 of the antigenomic promoter, and the relative level of RNA replication was measured by Northern blot analysis. The results from our mutational analysis indicate that in addition to CRI and CRII, optimal replication from the SV5 antigenomic promoter requires a third sequence-dependent element located 51 to 66 bases from the 3′ end of the RNA. Minigenome RNA replication was not affected by changes in the either the position of this element in relation to CRI and CRII or the predicted hexamer phase of NP encapsidation. Thus, optimal RNA replication from the SV5 antigenomic promoter requires three sequence-dependent elements, CRI, CRII and bases 51 to 66. PMID:11264390

  18. HYBRIDCHECK: software for the rapid detection, visualization and dating of recombinant regions in genome sequence data.

    PubMed

    Ward, Ben J; van Oosterhout, Cock

    2016-03-01

    HYBRIDCHECK is a software package to visualize the recombination signal in large DNA sequence data set, and it can be used to analyse recombination, genetic introgression, hybridization and horizontal gene transfer. It can scan large (multiple kb) contigs and whole-genome sequences of three or more individuals. HYBRIDCHECK is written in the r software for OS X, Linux and Windows operating systems, and it has a simple graphical user interface. In addition, the r code can be readily incorporated in scripts and analysis pipelines. HYBRIDCHECK implements several ABBA-BABA tests and visualizes the effects of hybridization and the resulting mosaic-like genome structure in high-density graphics. The package also reports the following: (i) the breakpoint positions, (ii) the number of mutations in each introgressed block, (iii) the probability that the identified region is not caused by recombination and (iv) the estimated age of each recombination event. The divergence times between the donor and recombinant sequence are calculated using a JC, K80, F81, HKY or GTR correction, and the dating algorithm is exceedingly fast. By estimating the coalescence time of introgressed blocks, it is possible to distinguish between hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting. HYBRIDCHECK is libré software and it and its manual are free to download from http://ward9250.github.io/HybridCheck/. PMID:26394708

  19. HYBRIDCHECK: software for the rapid detection, visualization and dating of recombinant regions in genome sequence data.

    PubMed

    Ward, Ben J; van Oosterhout, Cock

    2016-03-01

    HYBRIDCHECK is a software package to visualize the recombination signal in large DNA sequence data set, and it can be used to analyse recombination, genetic introgression, hybridization and horizontal gene transfer. It can scan large (multiple kb) contigs and whole-genome sequences of three or more individuals. HYBRIDCHECK is written in the r software for OS X, Linux and Windows operating systems, and it has a simple graphical user interface. In addition, the r code can be readily incorporated in scripts and analysis pipelines. HYBRIDCHECK implements several ABBA-BABA tests and visualizes the effects of hybridization and the resulting mosaic-like genome structure in high-density graphics. The package also reports the following: (i) the breakpoint positions, (ii) the number of mutations in each introgressed block, (iii) the probability that the identified region is not caused by recombination and (iv) the estimated age of each recombination event. The divergence times between the donor and recombinant sequence are calculated using a JC, K80, F81, HKY or GTR correction, and the dating algorithm is exceedingly fast. By estimating the coalescence time of introgressed blocks, it is possible to distinguish between hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting. HYBRIDCHECK is libré software and it and its manual are free to download from http://ward9250.github.io/HybridCheck/.

  20. DNA sequence of immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region gene in thyroid lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Miwa, H; Takakuwa, T; Nakatsuka, S; Tomita, Y; Matsuzuka, F; Aozasa, K

    2001-10-01

    Patho-epidemiological studies have shown that thyroid lymphoma (TL) develops in thyroid affected by chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLTH). CLTH is categorized as an organ-specific autoimmune disease, in which activated B-lymphocytes secrete a number of autoantibodies. Because antigenic stimulation might be involved in the pathogenesis of TL, the variable region in heavy chain (V(H)) genes was characterized in 13 cases with TL and 3 with CLTH. Clonal rearrangement of the V(H) gene was found in 11 cases of TL, and cloning study with sequencing of complimentary determining region (CDR) 3 revealed the presence of a major clone in 4. Three of the 4 cases used V(H) 3 gene, with the homologous germline gene of V3-30 in two cases and VH26 in one case. A biased usage of V(H) 3 and V(H) 4 genes with the homologous germline gene of VH26 in V(H) 3 gene was reported previously in cases with CLTH. A high level of somatic mutation (1-21%, average 12%) with non-random distribution of replacement and silent mutations was accumulated in all cases. The frequency of the occurrence of minor clones ranged from 29-44% per case, indicating the presence of on-going mutation. DNA sequencing of immunoglobulin V(H) gene suggests that TL develops among activated lymphoid cells in CLTH at the germinal center stage under antigen selection. PMID:11676854

  1. Genetic diversity of Saccharum spontaneum from geographical regions of China assessed by simple sequence repeats.

    PubMed

    Fan, L N; Deng, H H; Luo, Q W; He, H Y; Li, Y; Wang, Q N; Huang, Z X; Wu, J T; Li, Q W; Liu, S M; Qi, Y W

    2013-11-26

    Saccharum spontaneum is the most variable wild relative of sugarcane with potential for use in sugarcane improvement programs. In order to help preserve and exploit this species, 152 accessions from eight major geographical regions in China, including Hainan, Guangdong, Guangxi, Yunnan, Sichuan, Guizhou, Fujian, and Jiangxi provinces, were investigated by analyzing 20 simple sequence repeats (SSRs), including 11 genomic SSRs (gSSRs) and nine SSRs developed from expressed sequence tags (EST-SSRs). A total of 454 alleles were generated by the 20 SSRs, with 295 and 159 alleles detected by gSSRs and EST-SSRs respectively. The Mantel test showed significant correlation between genetic matrixes among the studied accessions revealed by gSSRs versus EST-SSRs, although the average polymorphism of EST-SSRs (17.7) was much lower than that of gSSRs (26.8). Among the eight provinces, collections from Guizhou were the most diverse and those from Guangdong were the most distinct. Clustering analysis and principal component analysis accordantly classified the accessions into four groups, which were "Southwest group", "Hainan group", "Guangdong group", and "Guangxi group", based on the geographical origin of the major accessions in each group, demonstrating that geographical factors play an important role in the pattern of genetic structure of Chinese S. spontaneum. As two (Guizhou and Yunnan) of the three provinces with highest genetic diversity are located in southwest China, we concluded that southwest China is the region with the highest genetic diversity of S. spontaneum.

  2. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Indonesia Solanaceae based on DNA sequences of internal transcribed spacer region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Topik; Priyandoko, Didik; Islami, Dina Karina; Wardiny, Putri Yunitha

    2016-02-01

    Solanaceae is one of largest family in Angiosperm group with highly diverse in morphological character. In Indonesia, this group of plant is very popular due to its usefulness as food, ornamental and medicinal plants. However, investigation on phylogenetic relationship among the member of this family in Indonesia remains less attention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phylogenetics relationship of the family especially distributed in Indonesia. DNA sequences of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of 19 species of Solanaceae and three species of outgroup, which belongs to family Convolvulaceae, Apocynaceae, and Plantaginaceae, were isolated, amplified, and sequenced. Phylogenetic tree analysis based on parsimony method was conducted with using data derived from the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2, separately, and the combination of all. Results indicated that the phylogenetic tree derived from the combined data established better pattern of relationship than separate data. Thus, three major groups were revealed. Group 1 consists of tribe Datureae, Cestreae, and Petunieae, whereas group 2 is member of tribe Physaleae. Group 3 belongs to tribe Solaneae. The use of the ITS region as a molecular markers, in general, support the global Solanaceae relationship that has been previously reported.

  3. Earthquake sequence in East Vrancea crustal region (Romania): source characteristics and seismotectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Emilia; Borleanu, Felix; Otilia Placinta, Anica; Popa, Mihaela; Radulian, Mircea; Moldovan, Iren Adelina

    2016-04-01

    The goal of the paper is to investigate the crustal earthquake sequence generated in the East Vrancea crustal zone at the end of 2014 (22 November 2014). The main shock, occurred on 22 November 2014, 19:14 (45.860N, 27.160E, h = 39 km, ML = 5.7), is the greatest instrumentally recorded earthquake produced in this region. The aftershocks are unusually small for the sequences characterizing the Vrancea foredeep area (around 200 events with magnitude below 2). The largest aftershocks were recorded on 7 December 2015 (ML = 4.4) and 19 January 2015 (ML = 3.8). We apply cross-correlation analysis together with empirical Green's function (EGF) deconvolution and spectral ratios techniques to optimise the source parameters determination. At the same time we applied inversion techniques to retrieve the moment tensor solution for the largest shocks. For EGF and spectral ratios applications, we associated to the main event many co-located aftershocks (2.0 ≤ ML ≤ 4.4), selected according to the requirements for empirical Green's functions. The source parameters are estimated as mean values for all the available earthquake pairs. Source scaling properties and focal mechanism are investigated and discussed in terms of the regional seismotectonics and comparatively with the source scaling relationships for the Vrancea intermediate-depth earthquakes.

  4. Bilingualism alters brain functional connectivity between "control" regions and "language" regions: Evidence from bimodal bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Li, Le; Abutalebi, Jubin; Zou, Lijuan; Yan, Xin; Liu, Lanfang; Feng, Xiaoxia; Wang, Ruiming; Guo, Taomei; Ding, Guosheng

    2015-05-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have revealed that bilingualism induces both structural and functional neuroplasticity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the left caudate nucleus (LCN), both of which are associated with cognitive control. Since these "control" regions should work together with other language regions during language processing, we hypothesized that bilingualism may also alter the functional interaction between the dACC/LCN and language regions. Here we tested this hypothesis by exploring the functional connectivity (FC) in bimodal bilinguals and monolinguals using functional MRI when they either performed a picture naming task with spoken language or were in resting state. We found that for bimodal bilinguals who use spoken and sign languages, the FC of the dACC with regions involved in spoken language (e.g. the left superior temporal gyrus) was stronger in performing the task, but weaker in the resting state as compared to monolinguals. For the LCN, its intrinsic FC with sign language regions including the left inferior temporo-occipital part and right inferior and superior parietal lobules was increased in the bilinguals. These results demonstrate that bilingual experience may alter the brain functional interaction between "control" regions and "language" regions. For different control regions, the FC alters in different ways. The findings also deepen our understanding of the functional roles of the dACC and LCN in language processing. PMID:25858600

  5. Bilingualism alters brain functional connectivity between "control" regions and "language" regions: Evidence from bimodal bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Li, Le; Abutalebi, Jubin; Zou, Lijuan; Yan, Xin; Liu, Lanfang; Feng, Xiaoxia; Wang, Ruiming; Guo, Taomei; Ding, Guosheng

    2015-05-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have revealed that bilingualism induces both structural and functional neuroplasticity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the left caudate nucleus (LCN), both of which are associated with cognitive control. Since these "control" regions should work together with other language regions during language processing, we hypothesized that bilingualism may also alter the functional interaction between the dACC/LCN and language regions. Here we tested this hypothesis by exploring the functional connectivity (FC) in bimodal bilinguals and monolinguals using functional MRI when they either performed a picture naming task with spoken language or were in resting state. We found that for bimodal bilinguals who use spoken and sign languages, the FC of the dACC with regions involved in spoken language (e.g. the left superior temporal gyrus) was stronger in performing the task, but weaker in the resting state as compared to monolinguals. For the LCN, its intrinsic FC with sign language regions including the left inferior temporo-occipital part and right inferior and superior parietal lobules was increased in the bilinguals. These results demonstrate that bilingual experience may alter the brain functional interaction between "control" regions and "language" regions. For different control regions, the FC alters in different ways. The findings also deepen our understanding of the functional roles of the dACC and LCN in language processing.

  6. MiRNA Expression Profile for the Human Gastric Antrum Region Using Ultra-Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hamoy, Igor G.; Darnet, Sylvain; Burbano, Rommel; Khayat, André; Gonçalves, André Nicolau; Alencar, Dayse O.; Cruz, Aline; Magalhães, Leandro; Araújo Jr., Wilson; Silva, Artur; Santos, Sidney; Demachki, Samia; Assumpção, Paulo; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are small non-coding nucleotide sequences that regulate gene expression. These structures are fundamental to several biological processes, including cell proliferation, development, differentiation and apoptosis. Identifying the expression profile of microRNAs in healthy human gastric antrum mucosa may help elucidate the miRNA regulatory mechanisms of the human stomach. Methodology/Principal Findings A small RNA library of stomach antrum tissue was sequenced using high-throughput SOLiD sequencing technology. The total read count for the gastric mucosa antrum region was greater than 618,000. After filtering and aligning using with MirBase, 148 mature miRNAs were identified in the gastric antrum tissue, totaling 3,181 quality reads; 63.5% (2,021) of the reads were concentrated in the eight most highly expressed miRNAs (hsa-mir-145, hsa-mir-29a, hsa-mir-29c, hsa-mir-21, hsa-mir-451a, hsa-mir-192, hsa-mir-191 and hsa-mir-148a). RT-PCR validated the expression profiles of seven of these highly expressed miRNAs and confirmed the sequencing results obtained using the SOLiD platform. Conclusions/Significance In comparison with other tissues, the antrum’s expression profile was unique with respect to the most highly expressed miRNAs, suggesting that this expression profile is specific to stomach antrum tissue. The current study provides a starting point for a more comprehensive understanding of the role of miRNAs in the regulation of the molecular processes of the human stomach. PMID:24647245

  7. Variable Genome Sequences of the Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Regulatory Region Isolated from an Infected Mouse Tissue Viral Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Libbey, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    The murine pneumotropic virus genome, isolated from an infected murine tissue homogenate, was sequenced to completion. The lungs, liver, spleen, and kidneys were the source of the tissue homogenate in order to mirror the heterogeneity of the virus population in vivo. The regulatory region sequence was found to be highly variable. PMID:27231357

  8. A sequence-based hybrid predictor for identifying conformationally ambivalent regions in proteins

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Proteins are dynamic macromolecules which may undergo conformational transitions upon changes in environment. As it has been observed in laboratories that protein flexibility is correlated to essential biological functions, scientists have been designing various types of predictors for identifying structurally flexible regions in proteins. In this respect, there are two major categories of predictors. One category of predictors attempts to identify conformationally flexible regions through analysis of protein tertiary structures. Another category of predictors works completely based on analysis of the polypeptide sequences. As the availability of protein tertiary structures is generally limited, the design of predictors that work completely based on sequence information is crucial for advances of molecular biology research. Results In this article, we propose a novel approach to design a sequence-based predictor for identifying conformationally ambivalent regions in proteins. The novelty in the design stems from incorporating two classifiers based on two distinctive supervised learning algorithms that provide complementary prediction powers. Experimental results show that the overall performance delivered by the hybrid predictor proposed in this article is superior to the performance delivered by the existing predictors. Furthermore, the case study presented in this article demonstrates that the proposed hybrid predictor is capable of providing the biologists with valuable clues about the functional sites in a protein chain. The proposed hybrid predictor provides the users with two optional modes, namely, the high-sensitivity mode and the high-specificity mode. The experimental results with an independent testing data set show that the proposed hybrid predictor is capable of delivering sensitivity of 0.710 and specificity of 0.608 under the high-sensitivity mode, while delivering sensitivity of 0.451 and specificity of 0.787 under the high

  9. Spliced synthetic genes as internal controls in RNA sequencing experiments.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Simon A; Chen, Wendy Y; Wong, Ted; Deveson, Ira W; Blackburn, James; Andersen, Stacey B; Nielsen, Lars K; Mattick, John S; Mercer, Tim R

    2016-09-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) can be used to assemble spliced isoforms, quantify expressed genes and provide a global profile of the transcriptome. However, the size and diversity of the transcriptome, the wide dynamic range in gene expression and inherent technical biases confound RNA-seq analysis. We have developed a set of spike-in RNA standards, termed 'sequins' (sequencing spike-ins), that represent full-length spliced mRNA isoforms. Sequins have an entirely artificial sequence with no homology to natural reference genomes, but they align to gene loci encoded on an artificial in silico chromosome. The combination of multiple sequins across a range of concentrations emulates alternative splicing and differential gene expression, and it provides scaling factors for normalization between samples. We demonstrate the use of sequins in RNA-seq experiments to measure sample-specific biases and determine the limits of reliable transcript assembly and quantification in accompanying human RNA samples. In addition, we have designed a complementary set of sequins that represent fusion genes arising from rearrangements of the in silico chromosome to aid in cancer diagnosis. RNA sequins provide a qualitative and quantitative reference with which to navigate the complexity of the human transcriptome. PMID:27502218

  10. Retroviral sequence located in border region of short unique region and short terminal repeat of Md5 strain of Marek's disease virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Endoh, D; Ito, M; Cho, K O; Kon, Y; Morimura, T; Hayashi, M; Kuwabara, M

    1998-02-01

    A 246-base pair (bp) retroviral sequence, which was homologous to a long terminal repeat of avian erythroblastosis virus (AEV), was detected and cloned from Md5 strain (Md5) of Marek's disease virus type 1 (MDV1) by representational difference analysis (RDA). The retroviral sequence was thought to be located in the border region of short unique region (U(s) and short terminal repeat (TRs), but did not exist in the border region of U(s) and the inverted short repeat (IRs) of the Md5 genome. A cloned fragment of the US/TRs border region of the Md5 genome showed a construction of U-E'-R-U'-E-TRs with the regions designated as follows: E, expanded TRs reported by Jones et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 90, 3855, 1993]; E', a partial copy of the expanded TRs; R, the retroviral sequence detected in Md5 genome; U, TRs-end sequence of U(s); U', a partial copy of TRs-end sequence of U(s). The sequence unit indicated as E'-R-U' was thought to be heterogeneously repeated in the Md5 genome. Since this retroviral sequence reportedly did not exist in the original stock of Md5, the retroviral sequence is thought to be inserted in the Md5 genome without experimental co-infection of avian cells with retrovirus and MDV1. These results suggest that RDA could be useful for the detection of retroviral sequences in the herpesvirus genome.

  11. Improved subtilisin YaB production in Bacillus subtilis using engineered synthetic expression control sequences.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jyh-Perng; Yeh, Chuan-Mei; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2006-12-13

    Alkaline elastase YaB, a favorable meat tenderizer, is an extracellular subtilisin-type protease produced by wild strain alkalophilic Bacillus YaB. The gene ale coding for subtilisin YaB with its own expression control sequence has been cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis, but at levels much lower than in the parental strain Bacillus YaB. This study investigates the influence of various expression control sequences including expression control sequences of cdd and veg from B. subtilis, a synthetic expression control sequence (SECS), and engineered synthetic expression control sequences (engineered SECSs) on the expression of subtilisin YaB in B. subtilis. The engineered SECSs were generated by using the Polymerase Chain Reaction; their UP element, Shine-Dargarno (SD) sequence, or both were different from those of the native SECS. The expression efficiencies of SECS and engineered SECSs were higher than those of expression control sequences of ale, cdd, and veg. Substitution of the SD sequence of SECS resulted in higher expression of subtilisin YaB than substitution of the UP element, whereas combined substitution of both gave the highest expression. These results demonstrate that engineering of SECSs is an approach for improving subtilisin YaB production in B. subtilis. Moreover, it is suggested that these enginnered SECSs could potentially be used to express homologous and heterologous proteins in B. subtilis at high level. PMID:17147425

  12. Sequence comparisons in the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with emphasis on regions of likely homology with sequences in the Rossmann fold in the methionyl and tyrosyl enzymes.

    PubMed

    Walker, E J; Jeffrey, P D

    1988-02-01

    Amino acid sequences of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases specific for 12 different amino acids have now been published. Differences in origin at the species and organelle level result in 20 distinct sequences being available for comparison. Some of these were compared in small groups as they were determined and, although some homologies were detected, it was generally concluded that there was surprisingly little sequence homology in this functionally related group of enzymes. We have made comparisons of all of the available sequences by using a combination of computer and manual alignment methods and knowledge of the sequences in the Rossmann fold region of methionyl-tRNA synthetase from E. coli and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from B. stearothermophilus, enzymes whose three-dimensional structures have been described. It emerges that all of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase sequences thus examined show considerable homology with each other over at least parts of this region, some over virtually all of it. We conclude that a great deal more similarity than had previously been suspected exists in these proteins. In particular, the alignments we have made strongly imply the existence of a mononucleotide binding site of the Rossmann fold configuration in all of the synthetases compared. PMID:3283733

  13. The regional costs and benefits of acid rain control

    SciTech Connect

    Berkman, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    Congress recently enacted acid rain control legislation as part of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments following a decade-long debate among disparate regional interests. Although Congress succeeded in drafting a law acceptable to all regions, the regional costs and benefits of the legislation remain uncertain. The research presented here attempts to estimate the regional costs and benefits and the economic impacts of acid rain controls. These estimates are made using a modeling system composed of econometric, linear programming and input-output models. The econometric and linear programming components describe markets for electricity and coal. The outputs of these components including capital investment, electricity demand, and coal production are taken as exogenous inputs by a multiregional input-output model. The input-output model produces estimates of changes in final demand, gross output, and employment. The utility linear programming model also predicts sulfur dioxide emissions (an acid-rain precursor). According to model simulations, the costs of acid rain control exceed the benefits for many regions including several regions customarily thought to be the major beneficiaries of acid rain control such as New England.

  14. Pre-main-sequence population in NGC 1893 region: X-ray properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, A. K.; Samal, M. R.; Yadav, Ram Kesh; Richichi, Andrea; Lata, Sneh; Pandey, J. C.; Ojha, D. K.; Chen, W. P.

    2014-05-01

    Continuing the attempt to understand the properties of the stellar content in the young cluster NGC 1893 we have carried out a comprehensive multi-wavelength study of the region. The present study focuses on the X-ray properties of T-Tauri Stars (TTSs) in the NGC 1893 region. We found a correlation between the X-ray luminosity, LX, and the stellar mass (in the range 0.2-2.0 M) of TTSs in the NGC 1893 region, similar to those reported in some other young clusters, however the value of the power-law slope obtained in the present study (∼0.9) for NGC 1893 is smaller than those (∼1.4-3.6) reported in the case of TMC, ONC, IC 348 and Chameleon star forming regions. However, the slope in the case of Class III sources (Weak line TTSs) is found to be comparable to that reported in the case of NGC 6611 (∼1.1). It is found that the presence of circumstellar disks has no influence on the X-ray emission. The X-ray luminosity for both CTTSs and WTTSs is found to decrease systematically with age (in the range ∼0.4-5 Myr). The decrease of the X-ray luminosity of TTSs (slope ∼-0.6) in the case of NGC 1893 seems to be faster than observed in the case of other star-forming regions (slope -0.2 to -0.5). There is indication that the sources having relatively large NIR excess have relatively lower LX values. TTSs in NGC 1893 do not follow the well established X-ray activity - rotation relation as in the case of main-sequence stars.

  15. Automatic sequencing and control of Space Station airlock operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himel, Victor; Abeles, Fred J.; Auman, James; Tqi, Terry O.

    1989-01-01

    Procedures that have been developed as part of the NASA JSC-sponsored pre-prototype Checkout, Servicing and Maintenance (COSM) program for pre- and post-EVA airlock operations are described. This paper addresses the accompanying pressure changes in the airlock and in the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Additionally, the paper focuses on the components that are checked out, and includes the step-by-step sequences to be followed by the crew, the required screen displays and prompts that accompany each step, and a description of the automated processes that occur.

  16. Sequence variation of the rDNA ITS regions within and between anastomosis groups in Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Kuninaga, S; Natsuaki, T; Takeuchi, T; Yokosawa, R

    1997-09-01

    Sequence analysis of the rDNA region containing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and the 5.8s rDNA coding sequence was used to evaluate the genetic diversity of 45 isolates within and between anastomosis groups (AGs) in Rhizoctonia solani. The 5.8s rDNA sequence was completely conserved across all the AGs examined, whereas the ITS rDNA sequence was found to be highly variable among isolates. The sequence homology in the ITS regions was above 96% for isolates of the same subgroup, 66-100% for isolates of different subgroups within an AG, and 55-96% for isolates of different AGs. In neighbor-joining trees based on distances derived from ITS-5.8s rDNA sequences, subgroups IA, IB and IC within AG-1 and subgroups HG-I and HG-II within AG-4 were placed on statistically significant branches as assessed by bootstrap analysis. These results suggest that sequence analysis of ITS rDNA regions of R. solani may be a valuable tool for identifying AG subgroups of biological significance.

  17. Characterization of AFLP Sequences From Regions of Maize B Chromosome Defined by 12 B-10L Translocations

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shu-Fen; Lin, Yao-Pin; Lin, Bor-yaw

    2005-01-01

    Maize B chromosome sequences have been previously cloned by microdissection, and all are proven to be highly repetitive, to be homologous to the normal complement, and to show no similarity to any published gene other than mobile elements. In this study, we isolated sequences from defined B regions. The strategy involved identification and then mapping of AFLP-derived B fragments before cloning. Of 14 B AFLPs, 13 were mapped by 12 B-10L translocations: 3 around the centromeric knob region, 3 in the proximal euchromatic, 1 around the border of proximal euchromatic and distal heterochromatic, and 6 in the distal heterochromatic region of the B long arm. The AFLP fragments were cloned and sequenced. Analogous to the microdissected sequences, all sequences were repetitive, and all but two were highly homologous to the A chromosomes. FISH signals of all but three clones appeared in pachytene B as well as in somatic A and B chromosomes. None of these clones exhibits identity to any published gene. Six clones displayed homology to two centromeric BACs, four to sequences of chromosomes 3, 4, 7, and 10, four to retrotransposons, and three to no sequence deposited in GenBank. Furthermore, flanking regions of two highly B-specific clones were characterized, showing extension of a B-exclusive nature. The possibility of the presence of novel B repeat(s) is discussed. PMID:15489531

  18. Opportunistic DNA Recombination With Epstein-Barr Virus at Sites of Control Region Rearrangements Mediating JC Virus Neurovirulence.

    PubMed

    Wortman, Margaret J; Lundberg, Patric S; Dagdanova, Ayuna V; Venkataraman, Pranav; Daniel, Dianne C; Johnson, Edward M

    2016-05-01

    We document a unique DNA recombination between polyomavirus JC (JC virus [JCV]) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) at sequences of JCV found infecting the brain. Archetype JCV is present in bone marrow and uroepithelial cells of most adults. During immunosuppression, JCV can infect the brain, causing a demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Rearrangements in the archetype noncoding control region are necessary for neurovirulence. Two NCCR deletions and a duplication occur at sequences of homology with EBV, present latently in B cells, which may be coinfected with both viruses. Recombination between JCV and EBV occurs in B lymphoblasts at a sequence essential for JCV neurovirulence and in cerebrospinal fluid of immunosuppressed patients with multiple sclerosis, those susceptible to progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Interviral recombination is a model for conferring advantages on JCV in the brain. It can alter a critical noncoding control region sequence and potentially facilitate use of EBV DNA abilities to transfer among different cell types.

  19. Controlling the orbital sequence in individual Cu-phthalocyanine molecules.

    PubMed

    Uhlmann, C; Swart, I; Repp, J

    2013-02-13

    We report on the controlled change of the energetic ordering of molecular orbitals. Negatively charged copper(II)phthalocyanine on NaCl/Cu(100) undergoes a Jahn-Teller distortion that lifts the degeneracy of two frontier orbitals. The energetic order of the levels can be controlled by Au and Ag atoms in the vicinity of the molecule. As only one of the states is occupied, the control of the energetic order is accompanied by bistable changes of the charge distribution inside the molecule, rendering it a bistable switch.

  20. Isolation of expressed sequences from the region commonly deleted in Velo-cardio-facial syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Sirotkin, H.; Morrow, B.; DasGupta, R.

    1994-09-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is a relatively common autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by cleft palate, cardiac abnormalities, learning disabilities and a characteristic facial dysmorphology. Most VCFS patients have interstitial deletions of 22q11 of 1-2 mb. In an effort to isolate the gene(s) responsible for VCFS we have utilized a hybrid selection protocol to recover expressed sequences from three non-overlapping YACs comprising almost 1 mb of the commonly deleted region. Total yeast genomic DNA or isolated YAC DNA was immobilized on Hybond-N filters, blocked with yeast and human ribosomal and human repetitive sequences and hybridized with a mixture of random primed short fragment cDNA libraries. Six human short fragment libraries derived from total fetus, fetal brain, adult brain, testes, thymus and spleen have been used for the selections. Short fragment cDNAs retained on the filter were passed through a second round of selection and cloned into lambda gt10. cDNAs shown to originate from the YACs and from chromosome 22 are being used to isolate full length cDNAs. Three genes known to be present on these YACs, catechol-O-methyltransferase, tuple 1 and clathrin heavy chain have been recovered. Additionally, a gene related to the murine p120 gene and a number of novel short cDNAs have been isolated. The role of these genes in VCFS is being investigated.

  1. Human immunoglobulin subclasses. Partial amino acid sequence of the constant region of a γ4 chain

    PubMed Central

    Pink, J. R. L.; Buttery, S. H.; De Vries, G. M.; Milstein, C.

    1970-01-01

    The heavy chain of a human myeloma protein (Vin) belonging to the γ4 subclass was subjected to tryptic digestion after reduction and carboxymethylation. Cyanogen bromide fragments were also prepared and all 19 tryptic peptides that account for one of them (the Fc-like fragment) were studied. Selected peptic peptides were isolated and provided evidence for the order of 15 of the tryptic peptides. In addition the sequence of two large peptic peptides derived from two sections of the molecule including all the interchain bridges is presented. Comparison with published data on other chains allows us to propose a sequence of γ4 chains that extends from just before the presumed starting point of the invariable region (at about residue 113) to the C-terminal end of the chain (approx. residue 446), except for a section of about 50 residues. The results of the comparison suggest that the immunoglobulin subclasses have a recent independent evolutionary origin in different species. Implications for complement fixation and for the evolutionary origin of antibody diversity are also discussed. PMID:4192699

  2. Partial sequence of MAP2 in the region of a shared epitope with Alzheimer neurofibrillary tangles.

    PubMed

    Kosik, K S; Orecchio, L D; Bakalis, S; Duffy, L; Neve, R L

    1988-08-01

    A 3.3-kilobase DNA complementary to human microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) was sequenced by the dideoxy method. The 3' end terminates at an internal EcoRI site before the polyA tail. Due to the arrangement of the cDNA insert in the lambda gt11 vector, the MAP2 fragment is not fused to beta-galactosidase when expressed. The Chou Fasman algorithm for the initial 58 amino acids from the first in-frame methionine predicts an alpha helix. Beyond this point, a series of turns is predicted until amino acid 160. The frequent presence of basic residues in proximity to serines or threonines is consistent with multiple phosphorylation sites. The minimum specificity determinant for Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase is repeated 13 times. The sequence of a region containing a MAP2 epitope that is shared with the Alzheimer neurofibrillary tangle was determined by DNase treatment of the cDNA and antibody selecting the small resultant clones in a lambda gt11 sublibrary. Likewise, a MAP2 epitope that is not shared with the neurofibrillary tangle also has been located. Both epitopes are in the projection portion of the molecule. A bovine MAP2 cyanogen bromide fragment, which contains the epitope shared with the neurofibrillary tangle, is partially insoluble under aqueous conditions, probably due to the aggregation of oppositely charged residues. Thus, rapid cleavage of MAP2 to small peptides is probably necessary in vivo to prevent the aggregation of larger cleavage fragments.

  3. Three-stage quality control strategies for DNA re-sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; Ye, Fei; Sheng, Quanghu; Clark, Travis; Samuels, David C

    2014-11-01

    Advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have greatly improved our ability to detect genomic variants for biomedical research. In particular, NGS technologies have been recently applied with great success to the discovery of mutations associated with the growth of various tumours and in rare Mendelian diseases. The advance in NGS technologies has also created significant challenges in bioinformatics. One of the major challenges is quality control of the sequencing data. In this review, we discuss the proper quality control procedures and parameters for Illumina technology-based human DNA re-sequencing at three different stages of sequencing: raw data, alignment and variant calling. Monitoring quality control metrics at each of the three stages of NGS data provides unique and independent evaluations of data quality from differing perspectives. Properly conducting quality control protocols at all three stages and correctly interpreting the quality control results are crucial to ensure a successful and meaningful study.

  4. Region based Brain Computer Interface for a home control application.

    PubMed

    Akman Aydin, Eda; Bay, Omer Faruk; Guler, Inan

    2015-08-01

    Environment control is one of the important challenges for disabled people who suffer from neuromuscular diseases. Brain Computer Interface (BCI) provides a communication channel between the human brain and the environment without requiring any muscular activation. The most important expectation for a home control application is high accuracy and reliable control. Region-based paradigm is a stimulus paradigm based on oddball principle and requires selection of a target at two levels. This paper presents an application of region based paradigm for a smart home control application for people with neuromuscular diseases. In this study, a region based stimulus interface containing 49 commands was designed. Five non-disabled subjects were attended to the experiments. Offline analysis results of the experiments yielded 95% accuracy for five flashes. This result showed that region based paradigm can be used to select commands of a smart home control application with high accuracy in the low number of repetitions successfully. Furthermore, a statistically significant difference was not observed between the level accuracies.

  5. Bacteriophage Nf DNA region controlling late transcription: structural and functional homology with bacteriophage phi 29.

    PubMed

    Nuez, B; Salas, M

    1993-06-25

    The putative region for the control of late transcription of the Bacillus subtilis phage Nf has been identified by DNA sequence homology with the equivalent region of the evolutionary related phage phi 29. A similar arrangement of early and late promoters has been detected in the two phages, suggesting that viral transcription could be regulated in a similar way at late times of the infection. Transcription of late genes requires the presence of a viral early protein, gpF in phage Nf and p4 in phage phi 29, being the latter known to bind to a DNA region located upstream from the phage phi 29 late promoter. We have identified a DNA region located upstream from the putative late promoter of phage Nf that is probably involved in binding protein gpF. Furthermore, we show that the phage phi 29 protein p4 is able to bind to this region and activate transcription from the phage Nf putative late promoter. Sequence alignment has also revealed the existence of significant internal homology between the two early promoters contained in this region of each phage.

  6. Sequencing the hypervariable regions of human mitochondrial DNA using massively parallel sequencing: Enhanced data acquisition for DNA samples encountered in forensic testing.

    PubMed

    Davis, Carey; Peters, Dixie; Warshauer, David; King, Jonathan; Budowle, Bruce

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA testing is a useful tool in the analysis of forensic biological evidence. In cases where nuclear DNA is damaged or limited in quantity, the higher copy number of mitochondrial genomes available in a sample can provide information about the source of a sample. Currently, Sanger-type sequencing (STS) is the primary method to develop mitochondrial DNA profiles. This method is laborious and time consuming. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) can increase the amount of information obtained from mitochondrial DNA samples while improving turnaround time by decreasing the numbers of manipulations and more so by exploiting high throughput analyses to obtain interpretable results. In this study 18 buccal swabs, three different tissue samples from five individuals, and four bones samples from casework were sequenced at hypervariable regions I and II using STS and MPS. Sample enrichment for STS and MPS was PCR-based. Library preparation for MPS was performed using Nextera® XT DNA Sample Preparation Kit and sequencing was performed on the MiSeq™ (Illumina, Inc.). MPS yielded full concordance of base calls with STS results, and the newer methodology was able to resolve length heteroplasmy in homopolymeric regions. This study demonstrates short amplicon MPS of mitochondrial DNA is feasible, can provide information not possible with STS, and lays the groundwork for development of a whole genome sequencing strategy for degraded samples.

  7. In search of coding and non-coding regions of DNA sequences based on balanced estimation of diffusion entropy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Wenqing; Yang, Huijie

    2016-01-01

    Identification of coding regions in DNA sequences remains challenging. Various methods have been proposed, but these are limited by species-dependence and the need for adequate training sets. The elements in DNA coding regions are known to be distributed in a quasi-random way, while those in non-coding regions have typical similar structures. For short sequences, these statistical characteristics cannot be extracted correctly and cannot even be detected. This paper introduces a new way to solve the problem: balanced estimation of diffusion entropy (BEDE).

  8. The 2007 Sumatra seismic sequence revealed by a regional seismic network in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, M.; Inoue, H.; Kumagai, H.; Yamashina, T.; Sunarjo; Fauzi; Suhardjono

    2007-12-01

    distributed in a region extending about 300 km along the subduction zone of the Indo-Australian Plate. The depths of aftershocks range from 15 to 60 km. In the off-Bengkulu region, the earthquakes with M8 or above occurred in 1381, 1608 and 1833, approximately every 230 years. Now 174 years have been passed since the last event in 1833. We did not experience M8 class earthquakes during the last 210 years in the off-Padang region, which is to the north of off-Bengkulu. The off-Padang region corresponds to a seismic gap between the source regions of the 2007 Sumatra seismic sequence and M8.7 Nias earthquake on March 2005. The sequence of the M8.4, M8.0, and M6.8 earthquakes moving towards the northwest from off-Bengkulu in the 2007 seismic activity suggests the imminency of a large earthquake off Padang. We have been deploying broadband seismograph networks in Indonesia, including JISNET, by an international cooperation among Indonesia, Germany, China, and Japan, aiming at improving the capabilities to monitor seismic activity and tsunami generation in Indonesia. The seismic networks are now in operation, and totally 150 seismic stations will be installed by the end of 2008. Seismic monitoring based on these regional networks would contribute to early notification of a large earthquake anticipated to occur in the off-Padang region.

  9. Chromosome 16-specific repetitive DNA sequences that map to chromosomal regions known to undergo breakage/rearrangement in leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Stallings, R L; Doggett, N A; Okumura, K; Ward, D C

    1992-06-01

    Human chromosome 16-specific low-abundance repetitive (CH16LAR) DNA sequences have been identified during the course of constructing a physical map of this chromosome. At least three CH16LAR sequences exist and they are interspersed, in small clusters, over four regions that constitute more than 5% of the chromosome. CH16LAR sequences were observed in one unusually large cosmid contig (number 55), where the ordering of clones was difficult because these sequences led to false overlaps between noncontiguous clones. Contig 55 contains 78 clones, or approximately 2% of all the clones contained within the present cosmid contig physical map. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of multiple clones, including cosmid and YAC contig 55 clones, mapped the four CH16LAR-rich regions to bands p13, p12, p11, and q22. These regions are of biological interest since the pericentric inversion and the interhomologue translocation breakpoints commonly found in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) subtype M4 fall within these bands. Sequence analysis of a 2.2-kb HindIII fragment from a cosmid containing a CH16LAR sequence indicated that one of the CH16LAR elements is similar to a minisatellite sequence in that the core repeat is only 40 bp in length. Additional characterization of other repetitive elements is in progress.

  10. An action plan for tobacco control at regional level.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R; Brown, J S; Hodgson, P; Kyle, D; Reed, D; Wallace, B

    1999-07-01

    Smoking is the single biggest preventable cause of death in the UK; killing over 120 000 people each year, contributing to inequalities in health, exacerbating and causing poverty. Smoking has increased steadily among children since 1988 and more recently, among young adults. The current context in the UK is highly favourable for introducing comprehensive tobacco control measures. This paper summarises a regional action plan for tobacco control. Actions at district and regional levels are outlined to establish a comprehensive local tobacco control framework and complement national tobacco control measures. Measures include: a 'SWOT' analysis of current activity; systematic monitoring of smoking prevalence, attitudes to smoking, and the impact of tobacco control interventions; provision of effective smoking cessation support to a minimum standard throughout the health service; increased coverage of smoke-free public places and workplaces; enforcement of legislation on illegal sales to children and against smuggling and selling illegally imported tobacco; paid and unpaid mass media campaigns; and systematic lobbying for fiscal and legislative measures. One of the key components of the plan is the introduction of evidence-based tobacco control strategies at district levels. These should include a performance framework with clear organisational and managerial accountability and employ a co-ordinated, multiagency, partnership approach. Priority groups should be identified. Strategies should seek to engage the public to build support for tobacco control measures. Sufficient time, staff, resources and training must be allocated to tobacco control work and progress towards objectives monitored.

  11. An action plan for tobacco control at regional level.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R; Brown, J S; Hodgson, P; Kyle, D; Reed, D; Wallace, B

    1999-07-01

    Smoking is the single biggest preventable cause of death in the UK; killing over 120 000 people each year, contributing to inequalities in health, exacerbating and causing poverty. Smoking has increased steadily among children since 1988 and more recently, among young adults. The current context in the UK is highly favourable for introducing comprehensive tobacco control measures. This paper summarises a regional action plan for tobacco control. Actions at district and regional levels are outlined to establish a comprehensive local tobacco control framework and complement national tobacco control measures. Measures include: a 'SWOT' analysis of current activity; systematic monitoring of smoking prevalence, attitudes to smoking, and the impact of tobacco control interventions; provision of effective smoking cessation support to a minimum standard throughout the health service; increased coverage of smoke-free public places and workplaces; enforcement of legislation on illegal sales to children and against smuggling and selling illegally imported tobacco; paid and unpaid mass media campaigns; and systematic lobbying for fiscal and legislative measures. One of the key components of the plan is the introduction of evidence-based tobacco control strategies at district levels. These should include a performance framework with clear organisational and managerial accountability and employ a co-ordinated, multiagency, partnership approach. Priority groups should be identified. Strategies should seek to engage the public to build support for tobacco control measures. Sufficient time, staff, resources and training must be allocated to tobacco control work and progress towards objectives monitored. PMID:10483077

  12. Sole and stable RNA duplexes of G-rich sequences located in the 5'-untranslated region of protooncogenes.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sarika; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2010-08-24

    Guanine- (G-) rich nucleic acid sequences can form four-stranded structures called G-quadruplexes. It is widely held that the formation of a G-quadruplex in RNA is more feasible than in DNA because of the lack of a complementary strand in mRNA. Here, we analyzed sequences of 5'-untranslated regions of protooncogenes and surprisingly found that these regions showed an enrichment of not only guanine (G) but also cytosine (C) nucleotides. Since neighboring cytosine- (C-) rich regions can affect the formation and stability of a G-quadruplex structure, we further investigated the properties of DNA and RNA structures of G-rich and GC-rich regions. We selected typical GC-rich RNA sequences from protooncogenes and corresponding DNA sequences and investigated their structures. It was found that the GC-rich RNA sequences formed stable A-form duplexes as their major structure independent of the surrounding conditions, including the presence of different cations (Na(+), K(+), or Li(+)) or molecular crowding with 40 wt % poly(ethylene glycol) with an average molecular mass of 200 Da although there are a few exceptions in which only a combination of K(+) and molecular crowding induced a G-quadruplex structure of an extremely G-rich RNA sequence. In contrast, structural polymorphisms involving duplexes, G-quadruplexes, and i-motifs were observed for GC-rich DNA sequences depending on the surrounding factors. These results demonstrate the considerable structural and functional differences in GC-rich sequences of the genome (DNA) and transcriptosome (mRNA) with respect to the nucleic acid backbone. Moreover, it was suggested that structural study for a G-rich RNA sequence should be carried out under cell-mimicking condition where K(+) and crowding cosolutes exist.

  13. Sequence Variation in Superoxide Dismutase Gene of Toxoplasma gondii among Various Isolates from Different Hosts and Geographical Regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Cao, Aiping; Li, Xun; Zhao, Qunli; Liu, Yuan; Cong, Hua; He, Shenyi; Zhou, Huaiyu

    2015-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa, can infect all warm-blooded vertebrates, including humans, livestock, and marine mammals. The aim of this study was to investigate whether superoxide dismutase (SOD) of T. gondii can be used as a new marker for genetic study or a potential vaccine candidate. The partial genome region of the SOD gene was amplified and sequenced from 10 different T. gondii isolates from different parts of the world, and all the sequences were examined by PCR-RFLP, sequence analysis, and phylogenetic reconstruction. The results showed that partial SOD gene sequences ranged from 1,702 bp to 1,712 bp and A + T contents varied from 50.1% to 51.1% among all examined isolates. Sequence alignment analysis identified total 43 variable nucleotide positions, and these results showed that 97.5% sequence similarity of SOD gene among all examined isolates. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these SOD sequences were not an effective molecular marker for differential identification of T. gondii strains. The research demonstrated existence of low sequence variation in the SOD gene among T. gondii strains of different genotypes from different hosts and geographical regions. PMID:26174817

  14. An analytic study of near terminal area optimal sequencing and flow control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, S. K.; Straeter, T. A.; Hogge, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Optimal flow control and sequencing of air traffic operations in the near terminal area are discussed. The near terminal area model is based on the assumptions that the aircraft enter the terminal area along precisely controlled approach paths and that the aircraft are segregated according to their near terminal area performance. Mathematical models are developed to support the optimal path generation, sequencing, and conflict resolution problems.

  15. Targeting of c-myc and beta-globin coding sequences to cytoskeletal-bound polysomes by c-myc 3' untranslated region.

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, J; Campbell, G; Piechaczyk, M; Blanchard, J M

    1994-01-01

    The influence of the 3' untranslated region on mRNA localization was investigated by measuring the distribution of myc, beta-globin and hybrid myc-globin mRNAs between free, cytoskeletal-bound and membrane-bound polysomes in cells transfected with either control or chimeric gene constructs. c-myc sequences and beta-globin-coding sequences linked to the myc 3' untranslated region were present at greatest enrichment in cytoskeletal-bound polysomes. beta-Globin mRNA and myc-coding sequences linked to the beta-globin 3' untranslated region were recovered largely in the free polysomes. In situ hybridization confirmed that replacement of the c-myc 3' untranslated region by that of globin caused a relocalization of the mRNA. The results suggest that mRNA localization in differentiated eukaryotic cells depends on a mechanism that involves directional information in the 3' untranslated region of mRNAs. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8129712

  16. D0 Silicon Strip Detector Upgrade Project SVX Sequencer Controller Board

    SciTech Connect

    Utes, M.; /Fermilab

    2001-05-29

    The Sequencer Controller boards are 9U by 340mm circuit boards that will reside in slot 1 of each of eight Sequencer crates in the D0 detector platform. The primary purpose is to control the Sequencers during data acquisition based on trigger information from the D0 Trigger Framework. Functions and features are as follows: (1) Receives the Serial Command Link (SCL) from the D0 Trigger System and controls the operation of the Sequencers by forming a custom serial control link (NRZ/Clock) which is distributed individually to each Sequencer via the 11 Backplane; (2) Controllable delays adjust NRZ control link phasing to compensate for the various cable-length delays between the Sequencers and SVX chips, delay control is common for slots 2-11, and for slots 12-21 of the crate; (3) Each NRZ control link is phase controlled so that commands reach each Sequencer in a given half-crate simultaneously, i.e., the link is compensated for backplane propagation delays; (4) External communication via MIL-STD-1553; (5) Stand-alone operation via 1553 trigger commands in absence of an SCL link; (6) 1553-writeable register for triggering a laser, etc. followed by an acquisition cycle; (7) TTL front panel input to trigger an acquisition cycle, e.g. from a scintillator; (8) Synch Trig, Veto, Busy and Preamp Reset TTL outputs on front panel LEMOs; (9) On-board 53.104 MHz oscillator for stand-alone operation; (10) 1553 or SCL-triggerable Cal-inject cycle; (11) Front-panel inputs to accept NRZ/Clock link from the VRB Controller; (12) Front panel displays and LEDs show the board status at a glance; and (13) In-system programmable EPLDs are programmed via Altera's 'Byteblaster'.

  17. Using Mach threads to control DSN operational sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urista, Juan

    1993-01-01

    The Link Monitor and Control Operator Assistant prototype (LMCOA) is a state-of-the-art, semiautomated monitor and control system based on an object-oriented design. The purpose of the LMCOA prototyping effort is to both investigate new technology (such as artificial intelligence) to support automation and to evaluate advances in information systems toward developing systems that take advantage of the technology. The emergence of object-oriented design methodology has enabled a major change in how software is designed and developed. This paper describes how the object-oriented approach was used to design and implement the LMCOA and the results of operational testing. The LMCOA is implemented on a NeXT workstation using the Mach operating system and the Objective-C programming language.

  18. KSHV MicroRNA Sequence Analysis and KS Risk in an European AIDS-KS Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Vickie; Martró, Elisa; Labo, Nazzarena; Ray, Alex; Wang, Dian; Mbisa, Georginia; Bagni, Rachel K.; Volfovsky, Natalia; Casabona, Jordi; Whitby, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Background We recently identified polymorphisms in KSHV encoded microRNA (miRNA) sequences from clinical subjects. Here, we examine whether any of these may contribute to KS risk in a European AIDS-KS case control study. Methods KSHV viral load in peripheral blood was determined by real-time quantitative PCR. Samples that had detectable viral loads were used to amplify the 2.8 kbp microRNA encoding region plus a 646 bp fragment of the K12/T0.7 gene. Additionally, we characterized an 840 bp fragment of the K1 gene to determine KSHV subtypes. Results KSHV viral DNA was detected in PBMC of 49.6% cases and 6.8% controls and viral loads tended to be higher in cases. Sequences from the miRNA encoding regions were conserved overall but distinct polymorphisms were detected some of which occurred in pri-miRNAs, pre-miRNAs or mature miRNAs. Conclusions Patients with Kaposi’s sarcoma were more likely to have detectable viral loads than controls without disease. Despite high conservation in KSHV miRNA encoded sequences, polymorphisms were observed including some that have been previously reported. Some polymorphisms could affect mature miRNA processing and appear to be associated with KS risk. PMID:20715927

  19. Tectonically controlled Quaternary intracontinental fluvial sequence development in the Nyírség-Pannonian Basin, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püspöki, Z.; Demeter, G.; Tóth-Makk, Á.; Kozák, M.; Dávid, Á.; Virág, M.; Kovács-Pálffy, P.; Kónya, P.; Gyuricza, Gy.; Kiss, J.; McIntosh, R. W.; Forgács, Z.; Buday, T.; Kovács, Z.; Gombos, T.; Kummer, I.

    2013-01-01

    The Quaternary fluvial succession of the Nyírség (NE Hungary), a proximal sub-basin of 4000 km2 in the intracontinental Pannonian Basin, was studied based on log facies analysis. Regional mapping of sequences was established by analysis of fully cored boreholes and high scale local correlations in densely drilled areas. The age of the sequences was determined by correlating the magnetic susceptibility (MS) record of the fully cored boreholes with that of the reference Hungarian boreholes dated paleomagnetically (Dévaványa-1 and Vésztő-1 in Cooke et al., 1979). To give the Hungarian data global perspective they were correlated to the MS curve of the Chinese Loess (Ding et al., 2005) that are in turn correlated with the Marine Isotope Record (Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005; Gibbard and Cohen, 2008). The ages of the mapped sequence boundaries are 2.62, 2.26, 2.12, 1.22, 1.04, 0.58 and 0.34 Ma respectively and can be related to the transitions from cool to warm conditions. Regional unconformities at 2.26-2.12, 1.22 and 0.58 Ma also coincide with activity maxima of the radiometrically dated Quaternary volcanism. This high frequency of climatically controlled erosive sequence boundaries in the structurally active periods indicates that the sedimentary record of climatic erosion is better expressed in times when structural changes generate instability in the drainage network. The occurrence of packages of regional unconformities in relation to volcanic activity enables the geochronological dating of episodes in the Quaternary compression of the Carpathian-Pannonian region. The role of tectonic control on the climatically induced changes in the drainage network has been explained by a structural development model based on seismic, gravity and magnetic data. The changes in the local paleohydrology were triggered by a compression related elevation of the basement and the associated occurrence of a local transtension-related subsidence.

  20. The mitochondrial control region of Cervidae: evolutionary patterns and phylogenetic content.

    PubMed

    Douzery, E; Randi, E

    1997-11-01

    The mitochondrial control region (CR) sequence, also known as the D-loop, has been determined for six Cervidae (Artiodactyla, Ruminantia): the red and fallow deers (subfamily Cervinae), the brocket deer and two roe deers (subfamily Odocoileinae), and the Chinese water deer (Hydropotinae). These new sequences have been aligned with available cervid and bovid orthologues. Comparative analyses indicate that the 5'-peripheral domain exhibits a 75-bp length polymorphism near sequences associated with the termination of the H-strand replication. The New World Odocoileinae possess the longest cervid CR due to the presence of an additional 47-bp tandem repeat, located in the 3'-peripheral domain, downstream of the initiation site for H-strand replication (OH) and the first conserved sequence block (CSB-1). This insertion represents a duplication spanning the OH to CSB-1 region and constitutes an exclusive synapomorphy for New World Odocoileinae. Phylogenetic analyses of the complete CR support the paraphyly of antlered deers due to the nesting of the antlerless Hydropotes within Odocoileinae. Capreolus is the closest relative of Hydropotes, and the divergence of this Old World Odocoileinae clade may have occurred between 8.7 and 10.4 MYA. The conserved central domain of CR can be aligned across ungulates and indicates the Pecora monophyly, their close association with cetaceans, and the earlier emergence of suiformes.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of Theileria annulata and identification of 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions sequences variants in apparently healthy buffaloes and cattle in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Kasib; He, Lan; Hussain, Altaf; Azam, Sabita; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Wang, Li-Xia; Zhang, Qing-Li; Hu, Min; Zhou, Yan-Qin; Zhao, Junlong

    2013-01-01

    A molecular epidemiological survey was conducted to determine the prevalence of piroplasms in buffaloes and cattle from Sheikhupura and Okara districts of Punjab, Pakistan using reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay. The genetic diversity within 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions sequences of various obtained Theileria species (spp.) was also investigated. Briefly, 102 blood samples from buffaloes and cattle in the study districts were collected on blood collection cards and brought to the laboratory. DNA was extracted; the V4 hypervariable region of 18S rRNA was amplified and analyzed using RLB. Out of total samples analyzed, 61 (59.8%) were hybridized with Babesia/Theileria (B/T) genus-specific probe. Only one species of piroplasm was detected in buffaloes and cattle in study districts, i.e. Theileria (T.) annulata. Six samples only hybridized with B/T genus-specific and Theileria genus-specific probes but not with any species-specific probe indicating the presence of novel species or variants. The sequences of 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions of these six samples revealed the presence of T. annulata variants as confirmed through sequence identity estimation and phylogenetic analyses. Meanwhile, an unexpected sequence variation was observed within the 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions sequences of T. annulata identified in the present study. This is the first report on the simultaneous detection of species of piroplasms infecting buffaloes and cattle in Pakistan and molecular characterization of T. annulata 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions. The present study may address the new insights into the epidemiology of theileriosis which will help researches in designing control strategies and developing various molecular diagnostic tools at national level.

  2. An exploration of the sequence of a 2.9-Mb region of the genome of Drosophila melanogaster: the Adh region.

    PubMed Central

    Ashburner, M; Misra, S; Roote, J; Lewis, S E; Blazej, R; Davis, T; Doyle, C; Galle, R; George, R; Harris, N; Hartzell, G; Harvey, D; Hong, L; Houston, K; Hoskins, R; Johnson, G; Martin, C; Moshrefi, A; Palazzolo, M; Reese, M G; Spradling, A; Tsang, G; Wan, K; Whitelaw, K; Celniker, S

    1999-01-01

    A contiguous sequence of nearly 3 Mb from the genome of Drosophila melanogaster has been sequenced from a series of overlapping P1 and BAC clones. This region covers 69 chromosome polytene bands on chromosome arm 2L, including the genetically well-characterized "Adh region." A computational analysis of the sequence predicts 218 protein-coding genes, 11 tRNAs, and 17 transposable element sequences. At least 38 of the protein-coding genes are arranged in clusters of from 2 to 6 closely related genes, suggesting extensive tandem duplication. The gene density is one protein-coding gene every 13 kb; the transposable element density is one element every 171 kb. Of 73 genes in this region identified by genetic analysis, 49 have been located on the sequence; P-element insertions have been mapped to 43 genes. Ninety-five (44%) of the known and predicted genes match a Drosophila EST, and 144 (66%) have clear similarities to proteins in other organisms. Genes known to have mutant phenotypes are more likely to be represented in cDNA libraries, and far more likely to have products similar to proteins of other organisms, than are genes with no known mutant phenotype. Over 650 chromosome aberration breakpoints map to this chromosome region, and their nonrandom distribution on the genetic map reflects variation in gene spacing on the DNA. This is the first large-scale analysis of the genome of D. melanogaster at the sequence level. In addition to the direct results obtained, this analysis has allowed us to develop and test methods that will be needed to interpret the complete sequence of the genome of this species.Before beginning a Hunt, it is wise to ask someone what you are looking for before you begin looking for it. Milne 1926 PMID:10471707

  3. Inhibition of pepsin by analogues of pepsinogen-(1-12)-peptide with substitutions in the 4-7 sequence region.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, B M; Lewitt, M; Pham, C

    1983-01-01

    Derivatives of the 1-12 sequence of pig pepsinogen were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. The three derivatives contain substitutions in the 4-7 region of the 1-12 sequence. Glycine was used to replace the hydrophobic residues -Val-Pro-Leu-Val- in pairs. After cleavage and purification, the synthetic peptides were compared with a synthetic peptide of the native sequence, prepared at the same time, with respect to their ability to inhibit the pepsin-catalysed clotting of milk. Inhibitory potency, determined from plots of percentage inhibition versus concentration of synthetic peptide, is inversely correlated with the substitution of glycine residues for the hydrophobic residues. Therefore the equilibrium inhibition of pepsin by these peptides is dominated by the hydrophobic nature of the 4-7 sequence region. PMID:6405735

  4. Identification of conserved genomic regions and variation therein amongst Cetartiodactyla species using next generation sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Next Generation Sequencing has created an opportunity to genetically characterize an individual both inexpensively and comprehensively. In earlier work produced in our collaboration [1], it was demonstrated that, for animals without a reference genome, their Next Generation Sequence data ...

  5. Cenozoic prograding sequences of the Antarctic continental margin - What balance between structural and eustatic control

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, A.K. ); Barrett, P. ); Hinz, K. ); Stagg, H. ); Traube, V. )

    1990-05-01

    Multichannel seismic reflection profiles across the Antarctic continental margin commonly reveal prograding sedimentary sequences that are bounded by unconformities. These sequences are as much as 5 km thick and, where sampled, are composed entirely of late Eocene( )-early Oligocene and younger glacial rocks. On nonpolar margins, prograding sequences generally are attributed to relative changes in sea level, sediment supply, and tectonism. Around Antarctica, ice sheets have also been important in controlling the geometry and location of prograding sequences. The Antarctic sequences may provide a proximal record of major Cenozoic ice volume changes and related sea level changes not obtainable from low-latitude continental shelves. Presently, the Antarctic record is poorly known because of limited core data. Two categories of prograding (P) and aggrading (A) sigmoidal sequences are observed around Antarctica: (1) P sequences that build principally outward (common) and (2) AP sequences that build largely upward and outward (less common). P sequences may result principally from grounded ice sheets, and AP sequences from open-marine basinal processes. Major rift embayments of Antarctica (e.g., eastern Ross Sea eastern Weddell Sea Lambert graben Wilkes basin) are also pathways for major ice movement. In general, most areas with P sequences lie within or adjacent to Mesozoic or older rift embayment, whereas the primary area with AP sequences (eastern Ross Sea) lies within a likely Cenozoic rift embayment. The Pacific side of the Antarctic Peninsula where Cenozoic ice sheets and Cenozoic tectonism have been active, is also marked by a P sequence. Scientific drilling on the Antarctic continental shelf has recovered openwater glacial deposits (Ross Sea) as well as glacial diamicts that were deposited beneath and in front of grounded glacier ice (Ross Sea and Prydz Bay).

  6. Sequence of the 3'-noncoding and adjacent coding regions of human gamma-globin mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Poon, R; Kan, Y W; Boyer, H W

    1978-01-01

    In cloning human fetal globin cDNA in bacterial plasmids, we obtained a recombinant which contained a fragment of gammg-globin cDNA corresponding to the region from amino acid 99 to the poly A. We determined a sequence of 169 nucleotides which included the complete 3' non-coding region of the gamma-globin mRNA. The codon for amino acid 136 was GCA, indicating that this cloned fragment was derived from the Agamma-globin gene. In conjunction with the surrounding sequences, the GCA codon provides the Agamma-species with a unique CTGCAG hexanucleotide that is recognized by the restriction enzyme Pst I. The 3'-untranslated region of the gamma-globin mRNA consists of 90 nucleotides, and shares little homology with that of the human beta-globin mRNA. As in other mammalian mRNAs, a symmetrical sequence and the hexanucleotide AAUAAA are present. Images PMID:318163

  7. KorB protein of promiscuous plasmid RP4 recognizes inverted sequence repetitions in regions essential for conjugative plasmid transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Balzer, D; Ziegelin, G; Pansegrau, W; Kruft, V; Lanka, E

    1992-01-01

    We have constructed a RP4 KorB overproducing strain and purified the protein to near homogeneity. KorB is a DNA binding protein recognizing defined palindromic 13-bp sequences (TTTAGCSGCTAAA). Inverted sequence repetitions of this type, designated OB, are present on RP4 12 times. OB-sequences are localized in replication and maintenance regions as well as in the regions Tra1 and Tra2 essential for conjugative transfer. All sites found in Tra regions by computer search act as targets for specific binding of KorB protein. KorB-DNA complexes were detected by DNA fragment retardation assay using polyacrylamide gels. The 13-bp symmetric arrangement of the consensus OB-sequence constitutes the core for binding KorB protein since any truncation of this sequence prevents complex assembly or leads to a considerable destabilization of the KorB-DNA complexes. A hydroxyl radical footprint analysis demonstrated complex formation of KorB with the OB-sequence directly and suggests the presence of an unusual DNA structure within the nucleoprotein complex. Images PMID:1579485

  8. Complete genome sequence of Deltapapillomavirus 4 (bovine papillomavirus 2) from a bovine papillomavirus lesion in Amazon Region, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Daudt, Cíntia; da Silva, Flavio RC; Cibulski, Samuel P; Weber, Matheus N; Mayer, Fabiana Q; Varela, Ana Paula M; Roehe, Paulo M; Canal, Cláudio W

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of bovine papillomavirus 2 (BPV2) from Brazilian Amazon Region was determined using multiple-primed rolling circle amplification followed by Illumina sequencing. The genome is 7,947 bp long, with 45.9% GC content. It encodes seven early (E1, E2,E4, E5, E6,E7, and E8) and two late (L1 and L2) genes. The complete genome of a BPV2 can help in future studies since this BPV type is highly reported worldwide although the lack of complete genome sequences available. PMID:27074259

  9. Complete genome sequence of Deltapapillomavirus 4 (bovine papillomavirus 2) from a bovine papillomavirus lesion in Amazon Region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Daudt, Cíntia; Silva, Flavio R C da; Cibulski, Samuel P; Weber, Matheus N; Mayer, Fabiana Q; Varela, Ana Paula M; Roehe, Paulo M; Canal, Cláudio W

    2016-04-01

    The complete genome sequence of bovine papillomavirus 2 (BPV2) from Brazilian Amazon Region was determined using multiple-primed rolling circle amplification followed by Illumina sequencing. The genome is 7,947 bp long, with 45.9% GC content. It encodes seven early (E1, E2,E4, E5, E6,E7, and E8) and two late (L1 and L2) genes. The complete genome of a BPV2 can help in future studies since this BPV type is highly reported worldwide although the lack of complete genome sequences available.

  10. Sequencing of 15 622 gene-bearing BACs clarifies the gene-dense regions of the barley genome.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Amatriaín, María; Lonardi, Stefano; Luo, MingCheng; Madishetty, Kavitha; Svensson, Jan T; Moscou, Matthew J; Wanamaker, Steve; Jiang, Tao; Kleinhofs, Andris; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Wise, Roger P; Stein, Nils; Ma, Yaqin; Rodriguez, Edmundo; Kudrna, Dave; Bhat, Prasanna R; Chao, Shiaoman; Condamine, Pascal; Heinen, Shane; Resnik, Josh; Wing, Rod; Witt, Heather N; Alpert, Matthew; Beccuti, Marco; Bozdag, Serdar; Cordero, Francesca; Mirebrahim, Hamid; Ounit, Rachid; Wu, Yonghui; You, Frank; Zheng, Jie; Simková, Hana; Dolezel, Jaroslav; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Duma, Denisa; Altschmied, Lothar; Blake, Tom; Bregitzer, Phil; Cooper, Laurel; Dilbirligi, Muharrem; Falk, Anders; Feiz, Leila; Graner, Andreas; Gustafson, Perry; Hayes, Patrick M; Lemaux, Peggy; Mammadov, Jafar; Close, Timothy J

    2015-10-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) possesses a large and highly repetitive genome of 5.1 Gb that has hindered the development of a complete sequence. In 2012, the International Barley Sequencing Consortium released a resource integrating whole-genome shotgun sequences with a physical and genetic framework. However, because only 6278 bacterial artificial chromosome (BACs) in the physical map were sequenced, fine structure was limited. To gain access to the gene-containing portion of the barley genome at high resolution, we identified and sequenced 15 622 BACs representing the minimal tiling path of 72 052 physical-mapped gene-bearing BACs. This generated ~1.7 Gb of genomic sequence containing an estimated 2/3 of all Morex barley genes. Exploration of these sequenced BACs revealed that although distal ends of chromosomes contain most of the gene-enriched BACs and are characterized by high recombination rates, there are also gene-dense regions with suppressed recombination. We made use of published map-anchored sequence data from Aegilops tauschii to develop a synteny viewer between barley and the ancestor of the wheat D-genome. Except for some notable inversions, there is a high level of collinearity between the two species. The software HarvEST:Barley provides facile access to BAC sequences and their annotations, along with the barley-Ae. tauschii synteny viewer. These BAC sequences constitute a resource to improve the efficiency of marker development, map-based cloning, and comparative genomics in barley and related crops. Additional knowledge about regions of the barley genome that are gene-dense but low recombination is particularly relevant. PMID:26252423

  11. Sequencing of 15 622 gene-bearing BACs clarifies the gene-dense regions of the barley genome.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Amatriaín, María; Lonardi, Stefano; Luo, MingCheng; Madishetty, Kavitha; Svensson, Jan T; Moscou, Matthew J; Wanamaker, Steve; Jiang, Tao; Kleinhofs, Andris; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Wise, Roger P; Stein, Nils; Ma, Yaqin; Rodriguez, Edmundo; Kudrna, Dave; Bhat, Prasanna R; Chao, Shiaoman; Condamine, Pascal; Heinen, Shane; Resnik, Josh; Wing, Rod; Witt, Heather N; Alpert, Matthew; Beccuti, Marco; Bozdag, Serdar; Cordero, Francesca; Mirebrahim, Hamid; Ounit, Rachid; Wu, Yonghui; You, Frank; Zheng, Jie; Simková, Hana; Dolezel, Jaroslav; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Duma, Denisa; Altschmied, Lothar; Blake, Tom; Bregitzer, Phil; Cooper, Laurel; Dilbirligi, Muharrem; Falk, Anders; Feiz, Leila; Graner, Andreas; Gustafson, Perry; Hayes, Patrick M; Lemaux, Peggy; Mammadov, Jafar; Close, Timothy J

    2015-10-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) possesses a large and highly repetitive genome of 5.1 Gb that has hindered the development of a complete sequence. In 2012, the International Barley Sequencing Consortium released a resource integrating whole-genome shotgun sequences with a physical and genetic framework. However, because only 6278 bacterial artificial chromosome (BACs) in the physical map were sequenced, fine structure was limited. To gain access to the gene-containing portion of the barley genome at high resolution, we identified and sequenced 15 622 BACs representing the minimal tiling path of 72 052 physical-mapped gene-bearing BACs. This generated ~1.7 Gb of genomic sequence containing an estimated 2/3 of all Morex barley genes. Exploration of these sequenced BACs revealed that although distal ends of chromosomes contain most of the gene-enriched BACs and are characterized by high recombination rates, there are also gene-dense regions with suppressed recombination. We made use of published map-anchored sequence data from Aegilops tauschii to develop a synteny viewer between barley and the ancestor of the wheat D-genome. Except for some notable inversions, there is a high level of collinearity between the two species. The software HarvEST:Barley provides facile access to BAC sequences and their annotations, along with the barley-Ae. tauschii synteny viewer. These BAC sequences constitute a resource to improve the efficiency of marker development, map-based cloning, and comparative genomics in barley and related crops. Additional knowledge about regions of the barley genome that are gene-dense but low recombination is particularly relevant.

  12. Multiple Comparison Analysis of Two New Genomic Sequences of ILTV Strains from China with Other Strains from Different Geographic Regions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Kong, Congcong; Wang, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    To date, twenty complete genome sequences of ILTV strains have been published in GenBank, including one strain from China, and nineteen strains from Australian and the United States. To investigate the genomic information on ILTVs from different geographic regions, two additional individual complete genome sequences of WG and K317 strains from China were determined. The genomes of WG and K317 strains were 153,505 and 153,639 bp in length, respectively. Alignments performed on the amino acid sequences of the twelve glycoproteins showed that 13 out of 116 mutational sites were present only among the Chinese strain WG and the Australian strains SA2 and A20. The phylogenetic tree analysis suggested that the WG strain established close relationships with the Australian strain SA2. The recombination events were detected and confirmed in different subregions of the WG strain with the sequences of SA2 and K317 strains as parental. In this study, two new complete genome sequences of Chinese ILTV strains were used in comparative analysis with other complete genome sequences of ILTV strains from China, the United States, and Australia. The analysis of genome comparison, phylogenetic trees, and recombination events showed close relationships among the Chinese strain WG and the Australian strains SA2. The information of the two new complete genome sequences from China will help to facilitate the analysis of phylogenetic relationships and the molecular differences among ILTV strains from different geographic regions.

  13. Multiple Comparison Analysis of Two New Genomic Sequences of ILTV Strains from China with Other Strains from Different Geographic Regions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Kong, Congcong; Wang, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    To date, twenty complete genome sequences of ILTV strains have been published in GenBank, including one strain from China, and nineteen strains from Australian and the United States. To investigate the genomic information on ILTVs from different geographic regions, two additional individual complete genome sequences of WG and K317 strains from China were determined. The genomes of WG and K317 strains were 153,505 and 153,639 bp in length, respectively. Alignments performed on the amino acid sequences of the twelve glycoproteins showed that 13 out of 116 mutational sites were present only among the Chinese strain WG and the Australian strains SA2 and A20. The phylogenetic tree analysis suggested that the WG strain established close relationships with the Australian strain SA2. The recombination events were detected and confirmed in different subregions of the WG strain with the sequences of SA2 and K317 strains as parental. In this study, two new complete genome sequences of Chinese ILTV strains were used in comparative analysis with other complete genome sequences of ILTV strains from China, the United States, and Australia. The analysis of genome comparison, phylogenetic trees, and recombination events showed close relationships among the Chinese strain WG and the Australian strains SA2. The information of the two new complete genome sequences from China will help to facilitate the analysis of phylogenetic relationships and the molecular differences among ILTV strains from different geographic regions. PMID:26186451

  14. Characterization and Sequence Variation in the rDNA Region of Six Nematode Species of the Genus Longidorus (Nematoda)

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, F.; Reyes, A.; Grunder, J.; Kunz, P.; Agostinelli, A.; De Giorgi, C.; Lamberti, F.

    2004-01-01

    Total DNA was isolated from individual nematodes of the species Longidorus helveticus, L. macrosoma, L. arthensis, L. profundorum, L. elongatus, and L. raskii collected in Switzerland. The ITS region and D1-D2 expansion segments of the 26S rDNA were amplified and cloned. The sequences obtained were aligned in order to investigate sequence diversity and to infer the phylogenetic relationships among the six Longidorus species. D1-D2 sequences were more conserved than the ITS sequences that varied widely in primary structure and length, and no consensus was observed. Phylogenetic analyses using the neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods were performed with three different sequence data sets: ITS1-ITS2, 5.8S-D1-D2, and combining ITS1-ITS2+5.8S-D1-D2 sequences. All multiple alignments yielded similar basic trees supporting the existence of the six species established using morphological characters. These sequence data also provided evidence that the different regions of the rDNA are characterized by different evolution rates and by different factors associated with the generation of extreme size variation. PMID:19262800

  15. Rationally Designing Aptamer Sequences with Reduced Affinity for Controlled Sensor Performance

    PubMed Central

    Schoukroun-Barnes, Lauren R.; White, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    The relative ease of predicting the secondary structure of nucleic acid sequences lends itself to the design of sequences to perform desired functions. Here, we combine the utility of nucleic acid aptamers with predictable control over the secondary structure to rationally design sequences with controlled affinity towards a target analyte when employed as the recognition element in an electrochemical sensor. Specifically, we present a method to modify an existing high-gain aptamer sequence to create sequences that, when employed in an electrochemical, aptamer-based sensor, exhibit reduced affinity towards a small molecule analyte tobramycin. Sensors fabricated with the high-gain parent sequence saturate at concentrations much below the therapeutic window for tobramycin (7–18 µM). Accordingly, the rationale behind modifying this high-gain sequence to reduce binding affinity was to tune sensor performance for optimal sensitivity in the therapeutic window. Using secondary structure predictions and analysis of the NMR structure of an aminoglycoside RNA aptamer bound to tobramycin, we are able to successfully modify the aptamer sequence to tune the dissociation constants of electrochemical aptamer-based sensors between 0.17 and 3 µM. The guidelines we present represent a general strategy to lessening binding affinity of sensors employing aptamer-modified electrodes. PMID:25835184

  16. Structural Control on South Napa Earthquake Sequence and Its Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenheim, V. E.; Graymer, R. W.; Jachens, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Potential-field data indicate that the M6.0 South Napa earthquake and its aftershocks were influenced by complex structure among the West Napa-Carneros-Pinole-Franklin faults system. The West Napa and Carneros faults, although considered to be minor Quaternary players within the San Andreas fault system, are major faults that in part bound the Mayacamas Mountains, an uplifted block of Mesozoic basement between Sonoma and Napa Valleys, and that produce prominent potential-field gradients. These two faults may account for as much as 30-50 km of right-lateral offset since ~6 Ma based on offset magnetic anomalies, length of pull-apart basins, and correlation of Neogene units. Uplift of the block may be Quaternary in age because gravels found to the west of the range contain clasts of 2.8 Ma obsidian derived from the east of the range. The southern extent of the South Napa earthquake rupture and seismicity is bounded on the west by the north end of a pull-apart basin between the Carneros and Pinole faults reflected in gravity data. The prominent gravity and magnetic gradients associated with the West Napa fault weaken where mapped traces of the fault begin to splay at the southern extent of Mesozoic and Paleogene outcrops. This region also encompasses multiple linear north-northwest-trending features identified in UAVSAR and is where the Carneros and West Napa faults are closest at the surface. We suggest that the interaction of these two faults not only affects the South Napa earthquake, but also influenced the extent of seismicity following the 2000 Yountville earthquake as well as the diffuse zone of seismicity generally confined between these two faults as they curve northwestward towards the southern end of the Maacama fault. Damage produced by the South Napa and Yountville earthquakes may have been focused by the 2-3 km-deep basin beneath the city of Napa, concentrated not over the deepest parts of the basin, but rather along the periphery or over an intra

  17. Characterizing regions in the human genome unmappable by next-generation-sequencing at the read length of 1000 bases.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentian; Freudenberg, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Repetitive and redundant regions of a genome are particularly problematic for mapping sequencing reads. In the present paper, we compile a list of the unmappable regions in the human genome based on the following definition: hypothetical reads with length 1 kb which cannot be uniquely mapped with zero-mismatch alignment for the described regions, considering both the forward and reverse strand. The respective collection of unmappable regions covers 0.77% of the sequence of human autosomes and 8.25% of the sex chromosomes in the reference genome GRCh37/hg19 (overall 1.23%). Not surprisingly, our unmappable regions overlap greatly with segmental duplication, transposable elements, and structural variants. About 99.8% of bases in our unmappable regions are part of either segmental duplication or transposable elements and 98.3% overlap structural variant annotations. Notably, some of these regions overlap units with important biological functions, including 4% of protein-coding genes. In contrast, these regions have zero intersection with the ultraconserved elements, very low overlap with microRNAs, tRNAs, pseudogenes, CpG islands, tandem repeats, microsatellites, sensitive non-coding regions, and the mapping blacklist regions from the ENCODE project.

  18. Assessment of potential jaw-tracking advantage using control point sequences of VMAT planning.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-in; Park, Jong Min; Park, So-Yeon; Choi, Chang Heon; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2014-03-06

    This study aims to evaluate the potential jaw-tracking advantage using control point sequences of volume volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning. VMAT plans for patients with prostate and head and neck (H&N) cancers were converted into new static arc (SA) plans. The SA plan consisted of a series of static fields at each control point of the VMAT plan. All other machine parameters of the SA plan were perfectly identical to those of the original VMAT plan. The jaw-tracking static arc (JTSA) plans were generated with fields that closed the jaws of each SA field into the multileaf collimators (MLCs) aperture. The dosimetric advantages of JTSA over SA were evaluated in terms of a dose-volume histogram (DVH) of organ at risk (OAR) after renormalizing both plans to make the same target coverage. Both plans were delivered to the MatriXX-based COMPASS system for 3D volume dose verification. The average jaw size reduction of the JTSA along the X direction was 3.1 ± 0.9 cm for prostate patients and 6.9 ± 1.9 cm for H&N patients. For prostate patients, the organs far from the target showed larger sparing (3.7%-8.1% on average) in JTSA than the organs adjacent to the target (1.1%-1.5%). For the H&N plans, the mean dose reductions for all organs ranged from 4.3% to 11.9%. The dose reductions were more significant in the dose regions of D80, D90, and D95 than the dose regions of D5, D10, and D20 for all patients. Likewise, the deliverability and reproducibility of jaw-tracking plan were validated. The measured dosimetric advantage of JTSA over SA coincided with the calculated one above.

  19. Tandem repeats and heteroplasmy in the mitochondrial DNA control region of the loggerhead shrike (Lanius ludovicianus).

    PubMed

    Mundy, N I; Winchell, C S; Woodruff, D S

    1996-01-01

    We report the presence of a 128 bp tandem repeat in the mitochondrial control region of the loggerhead shrike (Aves: Lanius ludovicianus). All individuals examined had either two or three copies of the repeat or were heteroplasmic for two and three copies. This is the first direct demonstration of a tandem repeat associated with heteroplasmy in the control region of a bird. A novel model for repeat duplication, which involves an inverted repeat located adjacent to the tandemly repeated sequence, is presented. Individuals with three repeats are absent from the endangered population of San Clemente loggerhead shrike in southern California, suggesting that the island endemic has a small effective population size and that there is insignificant gene flow from the adjacent mainland.

  20. Definition of regulatory sequence elements in the promoter region and the first intron of the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene.

    PubMed

    Storbeck, C J; Sabourin, L A; Waring, J D; Korneluk, R G

    1998-04-10

    Myotonic dystrophy is the most common inherited adult neuromuscular disorder with a global frequency of 1/8000. The genetic defect is an expanding CTG trinucleotide repeat in the 3'-untranslated region of the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene. We present the in vitro characterization of cis regulatory elements controlling transcription of the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene in myoblasts and fibroblasts. The region 5' to the initiating ATG contains no consensus TATA or CCAAT box. We have mapped two transcriptional start sites by primer extension. Deletion constructs from this region fused to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene revealed only subtle muscle specific cis elements. The strongest promoter activity mapped to a 189-base pair fragment. This sequence contains a conserved GC box to which the transcription factor Sp1 binds. Reporter gene constructs containing a 2-kilobase pair first intron fragment of the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene enhances reporter activity up to 6-fold in the human rhabdomyosarcoma myoblast cell line TE32 but not in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Co-transfection of a MyoD expression vector with reporter constructs containing the first intron into 10 T1/2 fibroblasts resulted in a 10-20-fold enhancement of expression. Deletion analysis of four E-box elements within the first intron reveal that these elements contribute to enhancer activity similarly in TE32 myoblasts and 10 T1/2 fibroblasts. These data suggest that E-boxes within the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase first intron mediate interactions with upstream promoter elements to up-regulate transcription of this gene in myoblasts.

  1. Assessment of the nucleotide sequence variability in the bovine T-cell receptor alpha delta joining gene region.

    PubMed

    Fries, R; Ewald, D; Thaller, G; Buitkamp, J

    2001-05-01

    The sequence of 2,193 nucleotides from the bovine T-cell receptor alpha/delta joining gene region (TCRADJ) was determined and compared with the corresponding human and murine sequences. The identity was 75.3% for the comparison of the Bos taurus vs. the Homo sapiens sequence and 63.8% for the Bos taurus vs. the Mus musculus sequence. This comparison permitted the identification of the putatively functional elements within the bovine sequence. Direct sequencing of 2,110 nucleotides in nine animals revealed 12 variable sites. Estimates, based on direct sequencing in three Holstein Friesian animals, for the two measures of sequence variability, nucleotide polymorphism (u) and nucleotide diversity (p), were 0.00050 (60.00036) and 0.00077 (60.00056), respectively. The test statistic, Tajima's D, for the comparison of the two measures indicates that the difference between u and p is close to significance (P < 0.05), suggesting the possibility of selective forces acting on the studied genomic region. Allelic variation at 5 of the 12 variable sites was analysed in 359 animals (48 Anatolian Black, 56 Braunvieh, 115 Fleckvieh, 47 Holstein Friesian, 50 Simmental and 43 Pinzgauer) using the oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) in combination with the enzyme linked immunoabsorbant assay (ELISA). Nine unambiguous haplotypes could be derived based on animals with a maximum of one heterozygous site. Four to seven haplotypes were present in the different breeds. When taking into account the frequencies of the haplotypes in the different breeds, especially in Anatolian Black, an ancestral cattle population, we could establish the likely phylogenetic relationships of the haplotypes. Such haplotype trees are the basis for cladistic candidate gene analysis. Our study demonstrates that the systematic search of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is useful for analysing all aspects of variability of a given genomic region.

  2. Supramolecular polymerization of a prebiotic nucleoside provides insights into the creation of sequence-controlled polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Rangel, E.; Vallejo, E.; Sanchez-Castillo, Ariadna; James Cleaves, H., II; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Pan, Minghu; Maksymovych, Petro; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of a nucleoside on Au(111) was studied to ascertain whether polymerization on well-defined substrates constitutes a promising approach for making sequence-controlled polymers. Scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory were used to investigate the self-assembly on Au(111) of (RS)-N9-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)adenine (DHPA), a plausibly prebiotic nucleoside analog of adenosine. It is found that DHPA molecules self-assemble into a hydrogen-bonded polymer that grows almost exclusively along the herringbone reconstruction pattern, has a two component sequence that is repeated over hundreds of nanometers, and is erasable with electron-induced excitation. Although the sequence is simple, more complicated ones are envisioned if two or more nucleoside types are combined. Because polymerization occurs on a substrate in a dry environment, the success of each combination can be gauged with high-resolution imaging and accurate modeling techniques. These characteristics make nucleoside self-assembly on a substrate an attractive approach for designing sequence-controlled polymers. Further, by choosing plausibly prebiotic nucleosides, insights may be provided into how nature created the first sequence-controlled polymers capable of storing information. Such insights, in turn, can inspire new ways of synthesizing sequence-controlled polymers.

  3. Supramolecular polymerization of a prebiotic nucleoside provides insights into the creation of sequence-controlled polymers

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Jun; Bonnesen, Peter V; Rangel, E.; Vallejo, E.; Sanchez-Castillo, Ariadna; Cleaves, II, H. James; Baddorf, Arthur P; Sumpter, Bobby G; Pan, Minghu; Maksymovych, Petro; et al

    2016-01-04

    The self-assembly of a nucleoside on Au(111) was studied to ascertain whether polymerization on well-defined substrates constitutes a promising approach for making sequence-controlled polymers. Scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory were used to investigate the self-assembly on Au(111) of (RS)-N9-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)adenine (DHPA), a plausibly prebiotic nucleoside analog of adenosine. It is found that DHPA molecules self-assemble into a hydrogen-bonded polymer that grows almost exclusively along the herringbone reconstruction pattern, has a two component sequence that is repeated over hundreds of nanometers, and is erasable with electron-induced excitation. Although the sequence is simple, more complicated ones are envisioned if two ormore » more nucleoside types are combined. Because polymerization occurs on a substrate in a dry environment, the success of each combination can be gauged with high-resolution imaging and accurate modeling techniques. The resulting characteristics make nucleoside self-assembly on a substrate an attractive approach for designing sequence-controlled polymers. Moreover, by choosing plausibly prebiotic nucleosides, insights may be provided into how nature created the first sequence-controlled polymers capable of storing information. Such insights, in turn, can inspire new ways of synthesizing sequence-controlled polymers.« less

  4. Supramolecular polymerization of a prebiotic nucleoside provides insights into the creation of sequence-controlled polymers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Bonnesen, Peter V; Rangel, E; Vallejo, E; Sanchez-Castillo, Ariadna; James Cleaves Ii, H; Baddorf, Arthur P; Sumpter, Bobby G; Pan, Minghu; Maksymovych, Petro; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of a nucleoside on Au(111) was studied to ascertain whether polymerization on well-defined substrates constitutes a promising approach for making sequence-controlled polymers. Scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory were used to investigate the self-assembly on Au(111) of (RS)-N(9)-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)adenine (DHPA), a plausibly prebiotic nucleoside analog of adenosine. It is found that DHPA molecules self-assemble into a hydrogen-bonded polymer that grows almost exclusively along the herringbone reconstruction pattern, has a two component sequence that is repeated over hundreds of nanometers, and is erasable with electron-induced excitation. Although the sequence is simple, more complicated ones are envisioned if two or more nucleoside types are combined. Because polymerization occurs on a substrate in a dry environment, the success of each combination can be gauged with high-resolution imaging and accurate modeling techniques. These characteristics make nucleoside self-assembly on a substrate an attractive approach for designing sequence-controlled polymers. Further, by choosing plausibly prebiotic nucleosides, insights may be provided into how nature created the first sequence-controlled polymers capable of storing information. Such insights, in turn, can inspire new ways of synthesizing sequence-controlled polymers. PMID:26725380

  5. Supramolecular polymerization of a prebiotic nucleoside provides insights into the creation of sequence-controlled polymers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Rangel, E.; Vallejo, E.; Sanchez-Castillo, Ariadna; James Cleaves II, H.; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Pan, Minghu; Maksymovych, Petro; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of a nucleoside on Au(111) was studied to ascertain whether polymerization on well-defined substrates constitutes a promising approach for making sequence-controlled polymers. Scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory were used to investigate the self-assembly on Au(111) of (RS)-N9-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)adenine (DHPA), a plausibly prebiotic nucleoside analog of adenosine. It is found that DHPA molecules self-assemble into a hydrogen-bonded polymer that grows almost exclusively along the herringbone reconstruction pattern, has a two component sequence that is repeated over hundreds of nanometers, and is erasable with electron-induced excitation. Although the sequence is simple, more complicated ones are envisioned if two or more nucleoside types are combined. Because polymerization occurs on a substrate in a dry environment, the success of each combination can be gauged with high-resolution imaging and accurate modeling techniques. These characteristics make nucleoside self-assembly on a substrate an attractive approach for designing sequence-controlled polymers. Further, by choosing plausibly prebiotic nucleosides, insights may be provided into how nature created the first sequence-controlled polymers capable of storing information. Such insights, in turn, can inspire new ways of synthesizing sequence-controlled polymers. PMID:26725380

  6. Emerging infectious diseases in southeast Asia: regional challenges to control.

    PubMed

    Coker, Richard J; Hunter, Benjamin M; Rudge, James W; Liverani, Marco; Hanvoravongchai, Piya

    2011-02-12

    Southeast Asia is a hotspot for emerging infectious diseases, including those with pandemic potential. Emerging infectious diseases have exacted heavy public health and economic tolls. Severe acute respiratory syndrome rapidly decimated the region's tourist industry. Influenza A H5N1 has had a profound effect on the poultry industry. The reasons why southeast Asia is at risk from emerging infectious diseases are complex. The region is home to dynamic systems in which biological, social, ecological, and technological processes interconnect in ways that enable microbes to exploit new ecological niches. These processes include population growth and movement, urbanisation, changes in food production, agriculture and land use, water and sanitation, and the effect of health systems through generation of drug resistance. Southeast Asia is home to about 600 million people residing in countries as diverse as Singapore, a city state with a gross domestic product (GDP) of US$37,500 per head, and Laos, until recently an overwhelmingly rural economy, with a GDP of US$890 per head. The regional challenges in control of emerging infectious diseases are formidable and range from influencing the factors that drive disease emergence, to making surveillance systems fit for purpose, and ensuring that regional governance mechanisms work effectively to improve control interventions. PMID:21269678

  7. Emerging infectious diseases in southeast Asia: regional challenges to control.

    PubMed

    Coker, Richard J; Hunter, Benjamin M; Rudge, James W; Liverani, Marco; Hanvoravongchai, Piya

    2011-02-12

    Southeast Asia is a hotspot for emerging infectious diseases, including those with pandemic potential. Emerging infectious diseases have exacted heavy public health and economic tolls. Severe acute respiratory syndrome rapidly decimated the region's tourist industry. Influenza A H5N1 has had a profound effect on the poultry industry. The reasons why southeast Asia is at risk from emerging infectious diseases are complex. The region is home to dynamic systems in which biological, social, ecological, and technological processes interconnect in ways that enable microbes to exploit new ecological niches. These processes include population growth and movement, urbanisation, changes in food production, agriculture and land use, water and sanitation, and the effect of health systems through generation of drug resistance. Southeast Asia is home to about 600 million people residing in countries as diverse as Singapore, a city state with a gross domestic product (GDP) of US$37,500 per head, and Laos, until recently an overwhelmingly rural economy, with a GDP of US$890 per head. The regional challenges in control of emerging infectious diseases are formidable and range from influencing the factors that drive disease emergence, to making surveillance systems fit for purpose, and ensuring that regional governance mechanisms work effectively to improve control interventions.

  8. INSTRUCTIONAL CONFERENCE ON THE THEORY OF STOCHASTIC PROCESSES: Controlled random sequences and Markov chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushkevich, A. A.; Chitashvili, R. Ya

    1982-12-01

    CONTENTSIntroduction Chapter I. Foundations of the general theory of controlled random sequences and Markov chains with the expected reward criterion § 1. Controlled random sequences, Markov chains, and models § 2. Necessary and sufficient conditions for optimality § 3. The Bellman equation for the value function and the existence of (ε-) optimal strategies Chapter II. Some problems in the theory of controlled homogeneous Markov chains § 4. Description of the solutions of the Bellman equation, a characterization of the value function, and the Bellman operator § 5. Sufficiency of stationary strategies in homogeneous Markov models § 6. The lexicographic Bellman equation References

  9. Sequencing the GRHL3 Coding Region Reveals Rare Truncating Mutations and a Common Susceptibility Variant for Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate.

    PubMed

    Mangold, Elisabeth; Böhmer, Anne C; Ishorst, Nina; Hoebel, Ann-Kathrin; Gültepe, Pinar; Schuenke, Hannah; Klamt, Johanna; Hofmann, Andrea; Gölz, Lina; Raff, Ruth; Tessmann, Peter; Nowak, Stefanie; Reutter, Heiko; Hemprich, Alexander; Kreusch, Thomas; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Braumann, Bert; Reich, Rudolf; Schmidt, Gül; Jäger, Andreas; Reiter, Rudolf; Brosch, Sibylle; Stavusis, Janis; Ishida, Miho; Seselgyte, Rimante; Moore, Gudrun E; Nöthen, Markus M; Borck, Guntram; Aldhorae, Khalid A; Lace, Baiba; Stanier, Philip; Knapp, Michael; Ludwig, Kerstin U

    2016-04-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without cleft palate (nsCL/P) and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO) are the most frequent subphenotypes of orofacial clefts. A common syndromic form of orofacial clefting is Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) where individuals have CL/P or CPO, often but not always associated with lower lip pits. Recently, ∼5% of VWS-affected individuals were identified with mutations in the grainy head-like 3 gene (GRHL3). To investigate GRHL3 in nonsyndromic clefting, we sequenced its coding region in 576 Europeans with nsCL/P and 96 with nsCPO. Most strikingly, nsCPO-affected individuals had a higher minor allele frequency for rs41268753 (0.099) than control subjects (0.049; p = 1.24 × 10(-2)). This association was replicated in nsCPO/control cohorts from Latvia, Yemen, and the UK (pcombined = 2.63 × 10(-5); ORallelic = 2.46 [95% CI 1.6-3.7]) and reached genome-wide significance in combination with imputed data from a GWAS in nsCPO triads (p = 2.73 × 10(-9)). Notably, rs41268753 is not associated with nsCL/P (p = 0.45). rs41268753 encodes the highly conserved p.Thr454Met (c.1361C>T) (GERP = 5.3), which prediction programs denote as deleterious, has a CADD score of 29.6, and increases protein binding capacity in silico. Sequencing also revealed four novel truncating GRHL3 mutations including two that were de novo in four families, where all nine individuals harboring mutations had nsCPO. This is important for genetic counseling: given that VWS is rare compared to nsCPO, our data suggest that dominant GRHL3 mutations are more likely to cause nonsyndromic than syndromic CPO. Thus, with rare dominant mutations and a common risk variant in the coding region, we have identified an important contribution for GRHL3 in nsCPO. PMID:27018475

  10. Sequencing the GRHL3 Coding Region Reveals Rare Truncating Mutations and a Common Susceptibility Variant for Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Mangold, Elisabeth; Böhmer, Anne C.; Ishorst, Nina; Hoebel, Ann-Kathrin; Gültepe, Pinar; Schuenke, Hannah; Klamt, Johanna; Hofmann, Andrea; Gölz, Lina; Raff, Ruth; Tessmann, Peter; Nowak, Stefanie; Reutter, Heiko; Hemprich, Alexander; Kreusch, Thomas; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Braumann, Bert; Reich, Rudolf; Schmidt, Gül; Jäger, Andreas; Reiter, Rudolf; Brosch, Sibylle; Stavusis, Janis; Ishida, Miho; Seselgyte, Rimante; Moore, Gudrun E.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Borck, Guntram; Aldhorae, Khalid A.; Lace, Baiba; Stanier, Philip; Knapp, Michael; Ludwig, Kerstin U.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without cleft palate (nsCL/P) and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO) are the most frequent subphenotypes of orofacial clefts. A common syndromic form of orofacial clefting is Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) where individuals have CL/P or CPO, often but not always associated with lower lip pits. Recently, ∼5% of VWS-affected individuals were identified with mutations in the grainy head-like 3 gene (GRHL3). To investigate GRHL3 in nonsyndromic clefting, we sequenced its coding region in 576 Europeans with nsCL/P and 96 with nsCPO. Most strikingly, nsCPO-affected individuals had a higher minor allele frequency for rs41268753 (0.099) than control subjects (0.049; p = 1.24 × 10−2). This association was replicated in nsCPO/control cohorts from Latvia, Yemen, and the UK (pcombined = 2.63 × 10−5; ORallelic = 2.46 [95% CI 1.6–3.7]) and reached genome-wide significance in combination with imputed data from a GWAS in nsCPO triads (p = 2.73 × 10−9). Notably, rs41268753 is not associated with nsCL/P (p = 0.45). rs41268753 encodes the highly conserved p.Thr454Met (c.1361C>T) (GERP = 5.3), which prediction programs denote as deleterious, has a CADD score of 29.6, and increases protein binding capacity in silico. Sequencing also revealed four novel truncating GRHL3 mutations including two that were de novo in four families, where all nine individuals harboring mutations had nsCPO. This is important for genetic counseling: given that VWS is rare compared to nsCPO, our data suggest that dominant GRHL3 mutations are more likely to cause nonsyndromic than syndromic CPO. Thus, with rare dominant mutations and a common risk variant in the coding region, we have identified an important contribution for GRHL3 in nsCPO. PMID:27018475

  11. The Effect of Joint Control Training on the Acquisition and Durability of a Sequencing Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGraaf, Allison; Schlinger, Henry D., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Gutierrez (2006) experimentally demonstrated the effects of joint control and particularly the role of response mediation in the sequencing behavior of adults using an unfamiliar language. The purpose of the current study was to replicate and extend the procedures used by Gutierrez by comparing the effects of joint control training with the…

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of the Quality Control Strain Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus ATCC 25923

    PubMed Central

    Treangen, Todd J.; Maybank, Rosslyn A.; Enke, Sana; Friss, Mary Beth; Diviak, Lynn F.; Karaolis, David K. R.; Koren, Sergey; Ondov, Brian; Phillippy, Adam M.; Bergman, Nicholas H.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus ATCC 25923 is commonly used as a control strain for susceptibility testing to antibiotics and as a quality control strain for commercial products. We present the completed genome sequence for the strain, consisting of the chromosome and a 27.5-kb plasmid. PMID:25377701

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of the Quality Control Strain Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus ATCC 25923.

    PubMed

    Treangen, Todd J; Maybank, Rosslyn A; Enke, Sana; Friss, Mary Beth; Diviak, Lynn F; Karaolis, David K R; Koren, Sergey; Ondov, Brian; Phillippy, Adam M; Bergman, Nicholas H; Rosovitz, M J

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus ATCC 25923 is commonly used as a control strain for susceptibility testing to antibiotics and as a quality control strain for commercial products. We present the completed genome sequence for the strain, consisting of the chromosome and a 27.5-kb plasmid. PMID:25377701

  14. Control of bootstrap current in the pedestal region of tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K. C.; Lai, A. L.

    2013-12-15

    The high confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas in the pedestal region of tokamaks are characterized by steep gradient of the radial electric field, and sonic poloidal U{sub p,m} flow that consists of poloidal components of the E×B flow and the plasma flow velocity that is parallel to the magnetic field B. Here, E is the electric field. The bootstrap current that is important for the equilibrium, and stability of the pedestal of H-mode plasmas is shown to have an expression different from that in the conventional theory. In the limit where ‖U{sub p,m}‖≫ 1, the bootstrap current is driven by the electron temperature gradient and inductive electric field fundamentally different from that in the conventional theory. The bootstrap current in the pedestal region can be controlled through manipulating U{sub p,m} and the gradient of the radial electric. This, in turn, can control plasma stability such as edge-localized modes. Quantitative evaluations of various coefficients are shown to illustrate that the bootstrap current remains finite when ‖U{sub p,m}‖ approaches infinite and to provide indications how to control the bootstrap current. Approximate analytic expressions for viscous coefficients that join results in the banana and plateau-Pfirsch-Schluter regimes are presented to facilitate bootstrap and neoclassical transport simulations in the pedestal region.

  15. The human growth hormone gene is regulated by a multicomponent locus control region

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Cooke, N.E.; Liebhaber, S.A.; Monks, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes research involving the five-member human growth hormone (hGH)/chorionic somatomammotropin (hCS) gene cluster and its expression in the placenta. The results indicate that interactions among multiple elements are required to restrict hGH transcription to the pituitary and generate appropriate levels of expression in the mouse genome. In addition, the results suggest a role for shared and unique regulatory sequences in locus control region-mediated expression of the hGH/hCS gene cluster in the pituitary and possibly the placenta. 67 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Rapid evaluation and quality control of next generation sequencing data with FaQCs

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Chien -Chi; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that parallelize the sequencing process and produce thousands to millions, or even hundreds of millions of sequences in a single sequencing run, have revolutionized genomic and genetic research. Because of the vagaries of any platform's sequencing chemistry, the experimental processing, machine failure, and so on, the quality of sequencing reads is never perfect, and often declines as the read is extended. These errors invariably affect downstream analysis/application and should therefore be identified early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly process large volumes of data, and which improves upon previous solutions to monitor the quality and remove poor quality data from sequencing runs. Both the speed of processing and the memory footprint of storing all required information have been optimized via algorithmic and parallel processing solutions. The trimmed output compared side-by-side with the original data is part of the automated PDF output. We show how this tool can help data analysis by providing a few examples, including an increased percentage of reads recruited to references, improved single nucleotide polymorphism identification as well as de novo sequence assembly metrics. Conclusion: FaQCs combines several features of currently available applications into a single, user-friendly process, and includes additional unique capabilities such as filtering the PhiX control sequences, conversion of FASTQ formats, and multi-threading. The original data and trimmed summaries are reported within a variety of graphics and reports, providing a simple way to do data quality control and assurance.

  17. Rapid evaluation and quality control of next generation sequencing data with FaQCs

    DOE PAGES

    Lo, Chien -Chi; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that parallelize the sequencing process and produce thousands to millions, or even hundreds of millions of sequences in a single sequencing run, have revolutionized genomic and genetic research. Because of the vagaries of any platform's sequencing chemistry, the experimental processing, machine failure, and so on, the quality of sequencing reads is never perfect, and often declines as the read is extended. These errors invariably affect downstream analysis/application and should therefore be identified early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly processmore » large volumes of data, and which improves upon previous solutions to monitor the quality and remove poor quality data from sequencing runs. Both the speed of processing and the memory footprint of storing all required information have been optimized via algorithmic and parallel processing solutions. The trimmed output compared side-by-side with the original data is part of the automated PDF output. We show how this tool can help data analysis by providing a few examples, including an increased percentage of reads recruited to references, improved single nucleotide polymorphism identification as well as de novo sequence assembly metrics. Conclusion: FaQCs combines several features of currently available applications into a single, user-friendly process, and includes additional unique capabilities such as filtering the PhiX control sequences, conversion of FASTQ formats, and multi-threading. The original data and trimmed summaries are reported within a variety of graphics and reports, providing a simple way to do data quality control and assurance.« less

  18. Sequence-based definition of eight short tandem repeat loci located within the HLA-region in an Austrian population.

    PubMed

    Dauber, Eva-Maria; Wenda, Sabine; Schwartz-Jungl, Elisabeth Maria; Glock, Barbara; Mayr, Wolfgang R

    2015-01-01

    Sequenced allelic ladders are a prerequisite for reliable genotyping of short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphisms and consistent results across instrument platforms. For eight STR-loci located on the short arm of chromosome 6 (6p21.3), a sequenced based nomenclature was established according to international recommendations. Publicly available reference DNA samples were sequenced enabling interested laboratories to construct their own allelic ladders. Three tetrameric (D6S2691, D6S2678, DQIV), one trimeric (D6S2906) and four dimeric repeat loci (D6S2972, D6S2792, D6S2789, D6S273) were investigated. Apart from the very complex sequence structure at the DQIV locus, three loci showed a compound and four loci a simple repeat pattern. In the flanking regions of some loci additional single nucleotide and insertion/deletion polymorphisms occurred as well as sequence polymorphisms within the repeat region of alleles with the same length. In an Austrian Caucasoid population sample (n=293) between eight and 22 alleles were found. No significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectations was observed, the power of discrimination ranged from 0.826 to 0.978. The loci cover the HLA-coding region from HLA-A to HLA-DQB1 and can be used for a better definition of HLA haplotypes for population and disease association studies, recombination point mapping, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation as well as for identity and relationship testing. PMID:25450788

  19. Sequence-based definition of eight short tandem repeat loci located within the HLA-region in an Austrian population.

    PubMed

    Dauber, Eva-Maria; Wenda, Sabine; Schwartz-Jungl, Elisabeth Maria; Glock, Barbara; Mayr, Wolfgang R

    2015-01-01

    Sequenced allelic ladders are a prerequisite for reliable genotyping of short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphisms and consistent results across instrument platforms. For eight STR-loci located on the short arm of chromosome 6 (6p21.3), a sequenced based nomenclature was established according to international recommendations. Publicly available reference DNA samples were sequenced enabling interested laboratories to construct their own allelic ladders. Three tetrameric (D6S2691, D6S2678, DQIV), one trimeric (D6S2906) and four dimeric repeat loci (D6S2972, D6S2792, D6S2789, D6S273) were investigated. Apart from the very complex sequence structure at the DQIV locus, three loci showed a compound and four loci a simple repeat pattern. In the flanking regions of some loci additional single nucleotide and insertion/deletion polymorphisms occurred as well as sequence polymorphisms within the repeat region of alleles with the same length. In an Austrian Caucasoid population sample (n=293) between eight and 22 alleles were found. No significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectations was observed, the power of discrimination ranged from 0.826 to 0.978. The loci cover the HLA-coding region from HLA-A to HLA-DQB1 and can be used for a better definition of HLA haplotypes for population and disease association studies, recombination point mapping, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation as well as for identity and relationship testing.

  20. Re-sequencing regions of the ovine Y chromosome in domestic and wild sheep reveals novel paternal haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Meadows, J R S; Kijas, J W

    2009-02-01

    The male-specific region of the ovine Y chromosome (MSY) remains poorly characterized, yet sequence variants from this region have the potential to reveal the wild progenitor of domestic sheep or examples of domestic and wild paternal introgression. The 5' promoter region of the sex-determining gene SRY was re-sequenced using a subset of wild sheep including bighorn (Ovis canadensis), thinhorn (Ovis dalli spp.), urial (Ovis vignei), argali (Ovis ammon), mouflon (Ovis musimon) and domestic sheep (Ovis aries). Seven novel SNPs (oY2-oY8) were revealed; these were polymorphic between but not within species. Re-sequencing and fragment analysis was applied to the MSY microsatellite SRYM18. It contains a complex compound repeat structure and sequencing of three novel size fragments revealed that a pentanucleotide element remained fixed, whilst a dinucleotide element displayed variability within species. Comparison of the sequence between species revealed that urial and argali sheep grouped more closely to the mouflon and domestic breeds than the pachyceriforms (bighorn and thinhorn). SNP and microsatellite data were combined to define six previously undetected haplotypes. Analysis revealed the mouflon as the only species to share a haplotype with domestic sheep, consistent with its status as a feral domesticate that has undergone male-mediated exchange with domestic animals. A comparison of the remaining wild species and domestic sheep revealed that O. aries is free from signatures of wild sheep introgression.

  1. Antibody responses to hepatitis C virus hypervariable region 1: evidence for cross-reactivity and immune-mediated sequence variation.

    PubMed

    Mondelli, M U; Cerino, A; Lisa, A; Brambilla, S; Segagni, L; Cividini, A; Bissolati, M; Missale, G; Bellati, G; Meola, A; Bruniercole, B; Nicosia, A; Galfrè, G; Silini, E

    1999-08-01

    Sequence heterogeneity of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is unevenly distributed along the genome, and maximal variation is confined to a short sequence of the HCV second envelope glycoprotein (E2), designated hypervariable region 1 (HVR1), whose biological function is still undefined. We prospectively studied serological responses to synthetic oligopeptides derived from HVR1 sequences of patients with acute and chronic HCV infection obtained at baseline and after a defined follow-up period. Extensive serological cross-reactivity for unrelated HVR1 peptides was observed in the majority of the patients. Antibody response was restricted to the IgG1 isotype and was focused on the carboxyterminal end of the HVR1 region. Cross-reactive antibodies could be readily elicited following immunization of mice with multiple antigenic peptides carrying HVR1 sequences derived from our patients. The vigor and heterogeneity of cross-reactive antibody responses were significantly higher in patients with chronic hepatitis compared with those with acute hepatitis and in patients infected with HCV type 2 compared with patients infected with other viral genotypes (predominantly type 1), which suggest that higher time-related HVR1 sequence diversification previously described for type 2 may result from immune selection. The finding of a statistically significant correlation between HVR1 sequence variation, and intensity, and cross-reactivity of humoral immune responses provided stronger evidence in support of the contention that HCV variant selection is driven by the host's immune pressure.

  2. Phylogeny of Populus (Salicaceae) based on nucleotide sequences of chloroplast TRNT-TRNF region and nuclear rDNA.

    PubMed

    Hamzeh, Mona; Dayanandan, Selvadurai

    2004-09-01

    The species of the genus Populus, collectively known as poplars, are widely distributed over the northern hemisphere and well known for their ecological, economical, and evolutionary importance. The extensive interspecific hybridization and high morphological diversity in this group pose difficulties in identifying taxonomic units for comparative evolutionary studies and systematics. To understand the evolutionary relationships among poplars and to provide a framework for biosystematic classification, we reconstructed a phylogeny of the genus Populus based on nucleotide sequences of three noncoding regions of the chloroplast DNA (intron of trnL and intergenic regions of trnT-trnL and trnL-trnF) and ITS1 and ITS2 of the nuclear rDNA. The resulting phylogenetic trees showed polyphyletic relationships among species in the sections Tacamahaca and Aigeiros. Based on chloroplast DNA sequence data, P. nigra had a close affinity to species of section Populus, whereas nuclear DNA sequence data suggested a close relationship between P. nigra and species of the section Aigeiros, suggesting a possible hybrid origin for P. nigra. Similarly, the chloroplast DNA sequences of P. tristis and P. szechuanica were similar to that of the species of section Aigeiros, while the nuclear sequences revealed a close affinity to species of the section Tacamahaca, suggesting a hybrid origin for these two Asiatic balsam poplars. The incongruence between phylogenetic trees based on nuclear- and chloroplast-DNA sequence data suggests a reticulate evolution in the genus Populus.

  3. Sox2 regulatory region 2 sequence works as a DNA nuclear targeting sequence enhancing the efficiency of an exogenous gene expression in ES cells

    SciTech Connect

    Funabashi, Hisakage; Takatsu, Makoto; Saito, Mikako; Matsuoka, Hideaki

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} SV40-DTS worked as a DTS in ES cells as well as other types of cells. {yields} Sox2 regulatory region 2 worked as a DTS in ES cells and thus was termed as SRR2-DTS. {yields} SRR2-DTS was suggested as an ES cell-specific DTS. -- Abstract: In this report, the effects of two DNA nuclear targeting sequence (DTS) candidates on the gene expression efficiency in ES cells were investigated. Reporter plasmids containing the simian virus 40 (SV40) promoter/enhancer sequence (SV40-DTS), a DTS for various types of cells but not being reported yet for ES cells, and the 81 base pairs of Sox2 regulatory region 2 (SRR2) where two transcriptional factors in ES cells, Oct3/4 and Sox2, are bound (SRR2-DTS), were introduced into cytoplasm in living cells by femtoinjection. The gene expression efficiencies of each plasmid in mouse insulinoma cell line MIN6 cells and mouse ES cells were then evaluated. Plasmids including SV40-DTS and SRR2-DTS exhibited higher gene expression efficiency comparing to plasmids without these DTSs, and thus it was concluded that both sequences work as a DTS in ES cells. In addition, it was suggested that SRR2-DTS works as an ES cell-specific DTS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to confirm the function of DTSs in ES cells.

  4. Organ donation quality control in Abruzzo region (Italy).

    PubMed

    Parzanese, I; Maccarone, D; Caniglia, L; Pisani, F; Laurenzi, C; Famulari, A

    2006-05-01

    Abruzzo is a region in central Italy with a population of 1,262,392. Within this region there are 13 hospitals with intensive care units, four of which have neurosurgical units. The Regional Centre for Transplants in L'Aquila is notified of encephalic deaths in hospitals in Abruzzo and Molise and coordinates organ retrieval and transplantation. Organ donation is a process that involves a whole series of professionals who, operating in a sequential manner in each hospital, make possible the use of a cadaveric organ to give life to a person or improve the quality of life of a patient on a waiting list. Quality control procedures were introduced in 2001 and involve all of the hospitals in the region with intensive care units. The system for quality control was computerized in 2004 and is used in the four hospitals with neurosurgical units (type A hospitals) and in the 13 hospitals without (type B hospitals); the different types of deaths (cause of death, age, etc) are also analyzed with this system. One of the aims of this system is to discover the theoretical donation capacity, taking as benchmark values those resulting from the regional average and those published in international literature, and noting any shortcomings. It has emerged that donor identification is well organized and efficient and this is thanks to a concerted effort that has been made to overcome technical and organizational problems connected to donor detection and donor maintenance during the 6 hours of legal observation. The high percentage of opposition to organ removal, despite the fall registered in the first half of this year (2005), is still above the national average and still remains a critical point in the organ donation process.

  5. Tumorigenic poxviruses: genomic organization and DNA sequence of the telomeric region of the Shope fibroma virus genome.

    PubMed

    Upton, C; DeLange, A M; McFadden, G

    1987-09-01

    Shope fibroma virus (SFV), a tumorigenic poxvirus, has a 160-kb linear double-stranded DNA genome and possesses terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of 12.4 kb. The DNA sequence of the terminal 5.5 kb of the viral genome is presented and together with previously published sequences completes the entire sequence of the SFV TIR. The terminal 400-bp region contains no major open reading frames (ORFs) but does possess five related imperfect palindromes. The remaining 5.1 kb of the sequence contains seven tightly clustered and tandemly oriented ORFs, four larger than 100 amino acids in length (T1, T2, T4, and T5) and three smaller ORFs (T3A, T3B, and T3C). All are transcribed toward the viral hairpin and almost all possess the consensus sequence TTTTTNT near their 3' ends which has been implicated for the transcription termination of vaccinia virus early genes. Searches of the published DNA database revealed no sequences with significant homology with this region of the SFV genome but when the protein database was searched with the translation products of ORFs T1-T5 it was found that the N-terminus of the putative T4 polypeptide is closely related to the signal sequence of the hemagglutinin precursor from influenza A virus, suggesting that the T4 polypeptide may be secreted from SFV-infected cells. Examination of other SFV ORFs shows that T1 and T2 also possess signal-like hydrophobic amino acid stretches close to their N-termini. The protein database search also revealed that the putative T2 protein has significant homology to the insulin family of polypeptides. In terms of sequence repetitions, seven tandemly repeated copies of the hexanucleotide ATTGTT and three flanking regions of dyad symmetry were detected, all in ORF T3C. A search for palindromic sequences also revealed two clusters, one in ORF T3A/B and a second in ORF T2. ORF T2 harbors five short sequence domains, each of which consists of a 6-bp short palindrome and a 10- to 18-bp larger palindrome. The

  6. Complex repetitive arrangements of gene sequence in the candidate region of the spinal muscular atrophy gene in 5q13

    SciTech Connect

    Theodosiou, A.M.; Nesbit, A.M.; Daniels, R.J.; Campbell, L.; Francis, M.J.; Christodoulou, Z.; Morrison, K.E.; Davies, K.E. |

    1994-12-01

    Childhood-onset proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a heritable neurological disorder, which has been mapped by genetic linkage analysis to chromosome 5q13, in the interval between markers D5S435 and D5S557. Here, we present gene sequences that have been isolated from this interval, several of which show sequence homologies to exons of {beta}-glucuronidase. These gene sequences are repeated several times across the candidate region and are also present on chromosome 5p. The arrangement of these repetitive gene motifs is polymorphic between individuals. The high degree of variability observed may have some influence on the expression of the genes in the region. Since SMA is not inherited as a classical autosomal recessive disease, novel genomic rearrangements arising from aberrant recombination events between the complex repeats may be associated with the phenotype observed.

  7. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a unique near-terminal region of the tumorigenic poxvirus, Shope fibroma virus.

    PubMed

    Massung, R F; McFadden, G; Moyer, R W

    1992-11-01

    Shope fibroma virus (SFV), a tumorigenic poxvirus, has a DNA genome of approximately 160 kb. Previous DNA sequence analysis of SFV has been mainly limited to the terminal inverted repetitions (about 12 kb at each end of the genome) and immediately adjacent regions. We have sequenced a 4 kb fragment located approximately 20 kb from the right-terminal hairpin. Within this region three complete and two partial open reading frames (ORFs) have been identified. Each of the putative polypeptides has sequence similarity to one or more previously identified poxvirus or cellular proteins, with homology to protein kinases, erythrocyte ankyrin and a vaccinia virus virulence-related protein (ORF N1L). The potential significance of these gene products with regard to the phenotype of SFV is discussed.

  8. Three Ingredients for Improved Global Aftershock Forecasts: Tectonic Region, Time-Dependent Catalog Incompleteness, and Inter-Sequence Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. T.; Hardebeck, J.; Felzer, K. R.; Michael, A. J.; van der Elst, N.

    2015-12-01

    Following a large earthquake, seismic hazard can be orders of magnitude higher than the long-term average as a result of aftershock triggering. Due to this heightened hazard, there is a demand from emergency managers and the public for rapid, authoritative, and reliable aftershock forecasts. In the past, USGS aftershock forecasts following large, global earthquakes have been released on an ad-hoc basis with inconsistent methods, and in some cases, aftershock parameters adapted from California. To remedy this, we are currently developing an automated aftershock product that will generate more accurate forecasts based on the Reasenberg and Jones (Science, 1989) method. To better capture spatial variations in aftershock productivity and decay, we estimate regional aftershock parameters for sequences within the Garcia et al. (BSSA, 2012) tectonic regions. We find that regional variations for mean aftershock productivity exceed a factor of 10. The Reasenberg and Jones method combines modified-Omori aftershock decay, Utsu productivity scaling, and the Gutenberg-Richter magnitude distribution. We additionally account for a time-dependent magnitude of completeness following large events in the catalog. We generalize the Helmstetter et al. (2005) equation for short-term aftershock incompleteness and solve for incompleteness levels in the global NEIC catalog following large mainshocks. In addition to estimating average sequence parameters within regions, we quantify the inter-sequence parameter variability. This allows for a more complete quantification of the forecast uncertainties and Bayesian updating of the forecast as sequence-specific information becomes available.

  9. Molecular cloning and sequence determination of the genomic regions encoding protease and genome-linked protein of three picornaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, G; Rosenwirth, B; Bauer, E; Seifert, J M; Werner, F J; Besemer, J

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the degree of similarity between picornavirus proteases, we cloned the genomic cDNAs of an enterovirus, echovirus 9 (strain Barty), and two rhinoviruses, serotypes 1A and 14LP, and determined the nucleotide sequence of the region which, by analogy to poliovirus, encodes the protease. The nucleotide sequence of the region encoding the genome-linked protein VPg, immediately adjacent to the protease, was also determined. Comparison of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences with other available picornavirus sequences showed remarkable homology in proteases and among VPgs. Three highly conserved peptide regions were identified in the protease; one of these is specific for human picornaviruses and has no obvious counterpart in encephalomyocarditis virus, foot-and-mouth disease virus, or cowpea mosaic virus proteases. Within the other two peptide regions two conserved amino acids, Cys 147 and His 161, could be the reactive residues of the active site. We used a statistical method to predict certain features of the secondary structures, such as alpha helices, beta sheets, and turns, and found many of these conformations to be conserved. The hydropathy profiles of the compared proteases were also strikingly similar. Thus, the proteases of human picornaviruses very probably have a similar three-dimensional structure. Images PMID:3512851

  10. Relativistic oscillator strengths of the rubidium isoelectronic sequence in the vicinity of the d orbital collapse region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migdalek, J.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of valence–core electron local and nonlocal exchange and valence–core electron correlation (core polarization) on oscillator strengths is studied along the Rb isoelectronic sequence in the vicinity of the d orbital collapse region using model potential and Dirac–Fock methods.

  11. Cloning and genomic nucleotide sequence of the matrix attachment region binding protein from the halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-Ju; Wang, Tian-Yun; Wang, Ya-Feng; Yang, Rui; Li, Zhao-Xi

    2013-07-01

    In our previous study, the sequence of a matrix attachment region binding protein (MBP) cDNA was cloned from the unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina. However, the nucleotide sequence of this gene has not been reported so far. In this paper, the nucleotide sequence of MBP was cloned and characterized, and its gene copy number was determined. The MBP nucleotide sequence is 5641 bp long, and interrupted by 12 introns ranging from 132 to 562 bp. All the introns in the D. salina MBP gene have orthodox splice sites, exhibiting GT at the 5' end and AG at the 3' end. Southern blot analysis showed that MBP only has one copy in the D. salina genome. PMID:22961592

  12. Cloning and genomic nucleotide sequence of the matrix attachment region binding protein from the halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-Ju; Wang, Tian-Yun; Wang, Ya-Feng; Yang, Rui; Li, Zhao-Xi

    2013-07-01

    In our previous study, the sequence of a matrix attachment region binding protein (MBP) cDNA was cloned from the unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina. However, the nucleotide sequence of this gene has not been reported so far. In this paper, the nucleotide sequence of MBP was cloned and characterized, and its gene copy number was determined. The MBP nucleotide sequence is 5641 bp long, and interrupted by 12 introns ranging from 132 to 562 bp. All the introns in the D. salina MBP gene have orthodox splice sites, exhibiting GT at the 5' end and AG at the 3' end. Southern blot analysis showed that MBP only has one copy in the D. salina genome.

  13. The promoter region of the arg3 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: nucleotide sequence and regulation in an arg3-lacZ gene fusion.

    PubMed

    Crabeel, M; Huygen, R; Cunin, R; Glansdorff, N

    1983-01-01

    We have determined the DNA sequence for the 5' end of the arg3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including part of the coding region and the 200 nucleotides immediately upstream. A promoter-deletion mutant was found to have lost all of the sequence lying normally in front of the gene except for the 33 nucleotides preceding the AUG codon. The role of the 5' domain in initiation and regulation of arg3 transcription was assessed by a gene fusion experiment. The Escherichia coli lacZ gene, was truncated of the eight amino-terminal codons substituted in vitro, on a 2mu plasmid, for the carboxy-terminal and 3'-flanking regions of arg3, leaving only the first 19 proximal codons and approximately 1600 nucleotides of the region preceding arg3 on the yeast chromosome. The fused gene was expressed in phase and was still submitted to the two mechanisms regulating the wild-type arg3 gene: the general, probably transcriptional control of amino acid biosynthesis and the specific, apparently post-transcriptional control mediated by the products of the argR genes. These results suggest a determining role for the 5' end portion of the arg3 messenger in the specific arginine-mediated control mechanism. PMID:11894927

  14. SNPs in putative regulatory regions identified by human mouse comparative sequencing and transcription factor binding site data

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Poulabi; Bahlo, Melanie; Schwartz, Jody R.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Houston, Kathryn A.; Dubchak, Inna; Speed, Terence P.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-01-01

    Genome wide disease association analysis using SNPs is being explored as a method for dissecting complex genetic traits and a vast number of SNPs have been generated for this purpose. As there are cost and throughput limitations of genotyping large numbers of SNPs and statistical issues regarding the large number of dependent tests on the same data set, to make association analysis practical it has been proposed that SNPs should be prioritized based on likely functional importance. The most easily identifiable functional SNPs are coding SNPs (cSNPs) and accordingly cSNPs have been screened in a number of studies. SNPs in gene regulatory sequences embedded in noncoding DNA are another class of SNPs suggested for prioritization due to their predicted quantitative impact on gene expression. The main challenge in evaluating these SNPs, in contrast to cSNPs is a lack of robust algorithms and databases for recognizing regulatory sequences in noncoding DNA. Approaches that have been previously used to delineate noncoding sequences with gene regulatory activity include cross-species sequence comparisons and the search for sequences recognized by transcription factors. We combined these two methods to sift through mouse human genomic sequences to identify putative gene regulatory elements and subsequently localized SNPs within these sequences in a 1 Megabase (Mb) region of human chromosome 5q31, orthologous to mouse chromosome 11 containing the Interleukin cluster.

  15. Genetic Diversity of Toxoplasma gondii Strains from Different Hosts and Geographical Regions by Sequence Analysis of GRA20 Gene.

    PubMed

    Ning, Hong-Rui; Huang, Si-Yang; Wang, Jin-Lei; Xu, Qian-Ming; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a eukaryotic parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa, which infects all warm-blood animals, including humans. In the present study, we examined sequence variation in dense granule 20 (GRA20) genes among T. gondii isolates collected from different hosts and geographical regions worldwide. The complete GRA20 genes were amplified from 16 T. gondii isolates using PCR, sequence were analyzed, and phylogenetic reconstruction was analyzed by maximum parsimony (MP) and maximum likelihood (ML) methods. The results showed that the complete GRA20 gene sequence was 1,586 bp in length among all the isolates used in this study, and the sequence variations in nucleotides were 0-7.9% among all strains. However, removing the type III strains (CTG, VEG), the sequence variations became very low, only 0-0.7%. These results indicated that the GRA20 sequence in type III was more divergence. Phylogenetic analysis of GRA20 sequences using MP and ML methods can differentiate 2 major clonal lineage types (type I and type III) into their respective clusters, indicating the GRA20 gene may represent a novel genetic marker for intraspecific phylogenetic analyses of T. gondii. PMID:26174830

  16. Individual human hair mitochondrial DNA control region heteroplasmy proportions in mothers and children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingxue; Boles, Richard G

    2006-02-01

    Due to maternal inheritance, lack of recombination and a high polymorphic density, the mtDNA control region hypervariable (HV) regions are well suited for forensic identification using a maternal relative as the known sample. This analysis can be performed in hair, however, heteroplasmy in this tissue is not rare and can result in an apparent sequence mismatch that complicates this application. There is little data comparing mother and child mtDNA-CR heteroplasmic proportions in hair. In this study, we assayed four hairs per individual in 26 mother-child pairs by TTGE for heteroplasmy across HV1. Single nucleotide heteroplasmy was detected in seven families, and in four families at least two hairs were heteroplasmic. In each of the latter families, sequencing and PCR-RFLP confirmed single nucleotide heteroplasmy in proportions of the variant ranging from < or =10 to > or =90% in the mothers, with far less variability in their children. Sequencing alone would have revealed apparent homoplasmic differences at one nucleotide in these families, possibly resulting in an 'inconclusive' verdict for relatedness of child and mother. However, mother-child heteroplasmic variability did not exceed intra-individual variability in the mothers alone.

  17. Translational control by 5'-untranslated regions of eukaryotic mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Hinnebusch, Alan G; Ivanov, Ivaylo P; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2016-06-17

    The eukaryotic 5' untranslated region (UTR) is critical for ribosome recruitment to the messenger RNA (mRNA) and start codon choice and plays a major role in the control of translation efficiency and shaping the cellular proteome. The ribosomal initiation complex is assembled on the mRNA via a cap-dependent or cap-independent mechanism. We describe various mechanisms controlling ribosome scanning and initiation codon selection by 5' upstream open reading frames, translation initiation factors, and primary and secondary structures of the 5'UTR, including particular sequence motifs. We also discuss translational control via phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2, which is implicated in learning and memory, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer.

  18. Translational control by 5'-untranslated regions of eukaryotic mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Hinnebusch, Alan G; Ivanov, Ivaylo P; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2016-06-17

    The eukaryotic 5' untranslated region (UTR) is critical for ribosome recruitment to the messenger RNA (mRNA) and start codon choice and plays a major role in the control of translation efficiency and shaping the cellular proteome. The ribosomal initiation complex is assembled on the mRNA via a cap-dependent or cap-independent mechanism. We describe various mechanisms controlling ribosome scanning and initiation codon selection by 5' upstream open reading frames, translation initiation factors, and primary and secondary structures of the 5'UTR, including particular sequence motifs. We also discuss translational control via phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2, which is implicated in learning and memory, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. PMID:27313038

  19. Regional seismic stratigraphy and controls on the Quaternary evolution of the Cape Hatteras region of the Atlantic passive margin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mallinson, D.J.; Culver, S.J.; Riggs, S.R.; Thieler, E.R.; Foster, D.; Wehmiller, J.; Farrell, K.M.; Pierson, J.

    2010-01-01

    Seismic and core data, combined with amino acid racemization and strontium-isotope age data, enable the definition of the Quaternary stratigraphic framework and recognition of geologic controls on the development of the modern coastal system of North Carolina, U.S.A. Seven regionally continuous high amplitude reflections are defined which bound six seismic stratigraphic units consisting of multiple regionally discontinuous depositional sequences and parasequence sets, and enable an understanding of the evolution of this margin. Data reveal the progressive eastward progradation and aggradation of the Quaternary shelf. The early Pleistocene inner shelf occurs at a depth of ca. 20-40 m beneath the western part of the modern estuarine system (Pamlico Sound). A mid- to outer shelf lowstand terrace (also early Pleistocene) with shelf sand ridge deposits comprising parasequence sets within a transgressive systems tract, occurs at a deeper level (ca. 45-70 m) beneath the modern barrier island system (the Outer Banks) and northern Pamlico Sound. Seismic and foraminiferal paleoenvironmental data from cores indicate the occurrence of lowstand strandplain shoreline deposits on the early to middle Pleistocene shelf. Middle to late Pleistocene deposits occur above a prominent unconformity and marine flooding surface that truncates underlying units, and contain numerous filled fluvial valleys that are incised into the early and middle Pleistocene deposits. The stratigraphic framework suggests margin progradation and aggradation modified by an increase in the magnitude of sea-level fluctuations during the middle to late Pleistocene, expressed as falling stage, lowstand, transgressive and highstand systems tracts. Thick stratigraphic sequences occur within the middle Pleistocene section, suggesting the occurrence of high capacity fluvial point sources debouching into the area from the west and north. Furthermore, the antecedent topography plays a significant role in the evolution

  20. Sequence analysis of the omp2 region of Chlamydia psittaci strain GPIC: structural and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Hsia, R C; Bavoil, P M

    1996-10-17

    The nucleotide sequence of a 3.1-kb genomic DNA fragment carrying the omp3, omp2 and srp gene homologs from Chlamydia psittaci strain GPIC was determined. A comparative analysis of the GPIC sequence with other chlamydial omp2-linked sequences reveals highly conserved omp3 and omp2 upstream sequences across species, suggesting a unified mechanism of transcription regulation. In contrast, the omp2-srp intergenic segment, which encompasses hypothetical srp transcriptional initiation sites, is relatively less conserved in length and in sequence. Examination of the predicted translation products reveals a high degree of homology within Omp3 and Omp2 across species, with the notable exception of the N-terminal fifth of Omp2. Although the latter segment displays relatively high interspecies sequence variation, it includes a smaller segment, whose high positive charge density is conserved across species, suggesting a conserved structure/function. In contrast to Omp2 and Omp3, a comparative analysis of the predicted amino acid (aa) sequence of the srp product reveals high homology within species, but relatively little across species. A 38-aa segment near the C-terminus of Srp, whose sequence is 64% identical between C. psittaci GPIC and C. trachomatis, is partially truncated in C. psittaci 6BC.

  1. 40 CFR 81.106 - Greenville-Spartanburg Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.106 Section 81.106 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.106 Greenville-Spartanburg Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Greenville-Spartanburg Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Carolina) consists of the...

  2. 40 CFR 81.101 - Metropolitan Dubuque Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.101 Section 81.101 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.101 Metropolitan Dubuque Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Dubuque Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Illinois-Iowa-Wisconsin) consists of...

  3. 40 CFR 81.117 - Southeast Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.117 Section 81.117 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.117 Southeast Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southeast Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  4. 40 CFR 81.116 - Northern Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.116 Section 81.116 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.116 Northern Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Northern Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  5. 40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section 81.79 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79 Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Tulsa Intrastate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Northeastern Oklahoma...

  6. 40 CFR 81.89 - Metropolitan Cheyenne Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.89 Section 81.89 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.89 Metropolitan Cheyenne Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Cheyenne Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Wyoming) consists of the territorial...

  7. 40 CFR 81.115 - Northwest Nevada Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.115 Section 81.115 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.115 Northwest Nevada Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Northwest Nevada Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  8. 40 CFR 81.98 - Burlington-Keokuk Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.98 Section 81.98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.98 Burlington-Keokuk Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Burlington-Keokuk Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Illinois-Iowa) is revised to consist of...

  9. 40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81.123 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123 Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  10. 40 CFR 81.118 - Southwest Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.118 Section 81.118 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.118 Southwest Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southwest Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  11. 40 CFR 81.97 - Southwest Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.97 Section 81.97 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.97 Southwest Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southwest Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  12. 40 CFR 81.119 - Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.119 Section 81.119 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.119 Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed...

  13. 40 CFR 81.104 - Central Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.104 Section 81.104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.104 Central Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Central Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed...

  14. 40 CFR 81.87 - Metropolitan Boise Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.87 Section 81.87 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.87 Metropolitan Boise Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Boise Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Idaho) consists of the territorial area...

  15. Single nucleotide polymorphism mining and nucleotide sequence analysis of Mx1 gene in exonic regions of Japanese quail

    PubMed Central

    Niraj, Diwesh Kumar; Kumar, Pushpendra; Mishra, Chinmoy; Narayan, Raj; Bhattacharya, Tarun Kumar; Shrivastava, Kush; Bhushan, Bharat; Tiwari, Ashok Kumar; Saxena, Vishesh; Sahoo, Nihar Ranjan; Sharma, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Aim: An attempt has been made to study the Myxovirus resistant (Mx1) gene polymorphism in Japanese quail. Materials and Methods: In the present, investigation four fragments viz. Fragment I of 185 bp (Exon 3 region), Fragment II of 148 bp (Exon 5 region), Fragment III of 161 bp (Exon 7 region), and Fragment IV of 176 bp (Exon 13 region) of Mx1 gene were amplified and screened for polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism technique in 170 Japanese quail birds. Results: Out of the four fragments, one fragment (Fragment II) was found to be polymorphic. Remaining three fragments (Fragment I, III, and IV) were found to be monomorphic which was confirmed by custom sequencing. Overall nucleotide sequence analysis of Mx1 gene of Japanese quail showed 100% homology with common quail and more than 80% homology with reported sequence of chicken breeds. Conclusion: The Mx1 gene is mostly conserved in Japanese quail. There is an urgent need of comprehensive analysis of other regions of Mx1 gene along with its possible association with the traits of economic importance in Japanese quail. PMID:27047057

  16. Sequence analysis of the vir-region from Agrobacterium tumefaciens octopine Ti plasmid pTi15955.

    PubMed

    Schrammeijer, B; Beijersbergen, A; Idler, K B; Melchers, L S; Thompson, D V; Hooykaas, P J

    2000-06-01

    The nucleotide sequence of 42 775 bp of the vir-region from the Agrobacterium tumefaciens octopine Ti plasmid pTi15955 is reported here. Although the nucleotide sequences of several parts of this region from this or closely related plasmids have been published previously, the present work establishes for the first time the complete arrangement of all the essential virulence genes and their intergenic regions of an octopine Ti plasmid. The disruption of some of the intergenic areas by insertion (IS) elements is typical for the octopine Ti plasmids. Several new ORFs were identified, including ORFs immediately downstream of virD4 and virE2, which probably represent new genes involved in virulence. PMID:10948245

  17. Identification and mapping of DNA binding proteins target sequences in long genomic regions by two-dimensional EMSA.

    PubMed

    Chernov, Igor P; Akopov, Sergey B; Nikolaev, Lev G; Sverdlov, Eugene D

    2006-07-01

    Specific binding of nuclear proteins, in particular transcription factors, to target DNA sequences is a major mechanism of genome functioning and gene expression regulation in eukaryotes. Therefore, identification and mapping specific protein target sites (PTS) is necessary for understanding genomic regulation. Here we used a novel two-dimensional electrophoretic mobility shift assay (2D-EMSA) procedure for identification and mapping of 52 PTS within a 563-kb human genome region located between the FXYD5 and TZFP genes. The PTS occurred with approximately equal frequency within unique and repetitive genomic regions. PTS belonging to unique sequences tended to group together within gene introns and close to their 5' and 3' ends, whereas PTS located within repeats were evenly distributed between transcribed and intragenic regions. PMID:16869519

  18. Evolution of vertebrate IgM: complete amino acid sequence of the constant region of Ambystoma mexicanum mu chain deduced from cDNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Fellah, J S; Wiles, M V; Charlemagne, J; Schwager, J

    1992-10-01

    cDNA clones coding for the constant region of the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) mu heavy immunoglobulin chain were selected from total spleen RNA, using a cDNA polymerase chain reaction technique. The specific 5'-end primer was an oligonucleotide homologous to the JH segment of Xenopus laevis mu chain. One of the clones, JHA/3, corresponded to the complete constant region of the axolotl mu chain, consisting of a 1362-nucleotide sequence coding for a polypeptide of 454 amino acids followed in 3' direction by a 179-nucleotide untranslated region and a polyA+ tail. The axolotl C mu is divided into four typical domains (C mu 1-C mu 4) and can be aligned with the Xenopus C mu with an overall identity of 56% at the nucleotide level. Percent identities were particularly high between C mu 1 (59%) and C mu 4 (71%). The C-terminal 20-amino acid segment which constitutes the secretory part of the mu chain is strongly homologous to the equivalent sequences of chondrichthyans and of other tetrapods, including a conserved N-linked oligosaccharide, the penultimate cysteine and the C-terminal lysine. The four C mu domains of 13 vertebrate species ranging from chondrichthyans to mammals were aligned and compared at the amino acid level. The significant number of mu-specific residues which are conserved into each of the four C mu domains argues for a continuous line of evolution of the vertebrate mu chain. This notion was confirmed by the ability to reconstitute a consistent vertebrate evolution tree based on the phylogenic parsimony analysis of the C mu 4 sequences. PMID:1382992

  19. On controlling force and time in rhythmic movement sequences: the effect of stress location.

    PubMed

    Semjen, A; Garcia-Colera, A; Requin, J

    1984-01-01

    Accentuation involves modulation of motor intensity. It differentiates a movement from others within a motor sequence. Does the serial position of the accent characterize the whole sequence as a particular response? How are the control of time and force coordinated in the motor sequence? Subjects produced sequences of four fingertaps on a key. Time of onset and force of each tap were recorded. Tapping rate was imposed by a string of four clicks delivered at 180-msec intervals before each trial. A flashed digit served as go signal. It indicated to the subject which of the four taps had to be tapped stronger (stress +) or weaker (stress -) than all the others. These conditions were run in separate series. Reaction time (RT) of the sequence increased when the number of equally likely locations of the stress increased from 2 to 4. RT was also longer under the stress - than under the stress + condition. Tapping intervals were longer before and after the stressed tap than elsewhere in the series. The first and last intervals tended to be longer than the second one. These effects were the same under both stress conditions. The RT data indicate that the motor sequence is identified as a particular response before it starts. Timing is partly force-independent, but is modulated by central processes that control force.

  20. On Sequence Learning Models: Open-loop Control Not Strictly Guided by Hick’s Law

    PubMed Central

    Pavão, Rodrigo; Savietto, Joice P.; Sato, João R.; Xavier, Gilberto F.; Helene, André F.

    2016-01-01

    According to the Hick’s law, reaction times increase linearly with the uncertainty of target stimuli. We tested the generality of this law by measuring reaction times in a human sequence learning protocol involving serial target locations which differed in transition probability and global entropy. Our results showed that sigmoid functions better describe the relationship between reaction times and uncertainty when compared to linear functions. Sequence predictability was estimated by distinct statistical predictors: conditional probability, conditional entropy, joint probability and joint entropy measures. Conditional predictors relate to closed-loop control models describing that performance is guided by on-line access to past sequence structure to predict next location. Differently, joint predictors relate to open-loop control models assuming global access of sequence structure, requiring no constant monitoring. We tested which of these predictors better describe performance on the sequence learning protocol. Results suggest that joint predictors are more accurate than conditional predictors to track performance. In conclusion, sequence learning is better described as an open-loop process which is not precisely predicted by Hick’s law. PMID:26975409

  1. Using Regional Moment Tensors to Constrain Earthquake Processes following the 2010 Darfield and 2011 Canterbury New Zealand Earthquake Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, M. W.; Furlong, K. P.; Herrmann, R. B.; Benz, H.

    2011-12-01

    We model regional broadband data from the South Island of New Zealand to determine regional moment tensor solutions for the mainshock and selected aftershocks of the M7.0, 3 September 2011, M6.1, 21 February 2011 and M6.0 13 June 2011 earthquakes that occurred near Christchurch, New Zealand. Arrival time picks from both the local and regional strong motion and broadband data were used to determine preliminary earthquake locations using a previously published South Island velocity model. Rayleigh and Love surface wave dispersion measurements were then made from selected events to refine the velocity model in order to better match the predominantly large regional surface waves. RMT solutions were computed using the procedures of Herrmann et al. (2011). In total, we computed RMT solutions for 82 events in the magnitude range of Mw3.5-7.0. Although the crustal faulting behavior in the region has been argued to reflect a complex interaction of strike slip and thrust faulting, the dominant faulting style in the sequence is right-lateral, strike-slip (75 events), with nodal planes striking west-east to southwest-northeast. There are only five purely reverse mechanisms, at the western end of the sequence, in the vicinity of the Harper Hills blind thrust. The main Mw 7.0 rupture shows both local small-scale stepovers and one larger (~ 5-10 km width) right stepover near 172.40°E. Although we expect normal faulting associated with this larger stepover, during the first month after the main shock we observe only two normal fault mechanisms and 13 strike slip (inferred E-W right-lateral) events in the stepover region, and since that time, the sense of faulting has been dominated by right-lateral, strike-slip events, perhaps indicating a sequence of short E-W fault segments in the region. The February and June 2011 events occurred along the same trend at the eastern end of the sequence, and show similar strike slip mechanisms to the majority of events to the west, but the

  2. Whole-genome sequencing reveals small genomic regions of introgression in an introduced crater lake population of threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kohta; Miyagi, Ryutaro; Mori, Seiichi; Takahashi, Aya; Makino, Takashi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Kitano, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Invasive species pose a major threat to biological diversity. Although introduced populations often experience population bottlenecks, some invasive species are thought to be originated from hybridization between multiple populations or species, which can contribute to the maintenance of high genetic diversity. Recent advances in genome sequencing enable us to trace the evolutionary history of invasive species even at whole-genome level and may help to identify the history of past hybridization that may be overlooked by traditional marker-based analysis. Here, we conducted whole-genome sequencing of eight threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) individuals, four from a recently introduced crater lake population and four of the putative source population. We found that both populations have several small genomic regions with high genetic diversity, which resulted from introgression from a closely related species (Gasterosteus nipponicus). The sizes of the regions were too small to be detected with traditional marker-based analysis or even some reduced-representation sequencing methods. Further amplicon sequencing revealed linkage disequilibrium around an introgression site, which suggests the possibility of selective sweep at the introgression site. Thus, interspecies introgression might predate introduction and increase genetic variation in the source population. Whole-genome sequencing of even a small number of individuals can therefore provide higher resolution inference of history of introduced populations. PMID:27069575

  3. Phylogenetic relations of humans and African apes from DNA sequences in the Psi eta-globin region

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, M.M.; Slightom, J.L.; Goodman, M.

    1987-10-16

    Sequences from the upstream and downstream flanking DNA regions of the Psi eta-globin locus in Pan troglodytes (common chimpanzee), Gorilla gorilla (gorilla), and Pongo pygmaeus (orangutan, the closest living relative to Homo, Pan, and Gorilla) provided further data for evaluating the phylogenetic relations of humans and African apes. These newly sequenced orthologs (an additional 4.9 kilobase pairs (kbp) for each species) were combined with published Psi eta-gene sequences and then compared to the same orthologous stretch (a continuous 7.1-kbp region) available for humans. Phylogenetic analysis of these nucleotide sequences by the parsimony method indicated (i) that human and chimpanzee are more closely related to each other than either is to gorilla and (ii) that the slowdown in the rate of sequence evolution evident in higher primates is especially pronounced in humans. These results indicate that features unique to African apes (but not to humans) are primitive and that even local molecular clocks should be applied with caution.

  4. Whole-genome sequencing reveals small genomic regions of introgression in an introduced crater lake population of threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kohta; Miyagi, Ryutaro; Mori, Seiichi; Takahashi, Aya; Makino, Takashi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Kitano, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Invasive species pose a major threat to biological diversity. Although introduced populations often experience population bottlenecks, some invasive species are thought to be originated from hybridization between multiple populations or species, which can contribute to the maintenance of high genetic diversity. Recent advances in genome sequencing enable us to trace the evolutionary history of invasive species even at whole-genome level and may help to identify the history of past hybridization that may be overlooked by traditional marker-based analysis. Here, we conducted whole-genome sequencing of eight threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) individuals, four from a recently introduced crater lake population and four of the putative source population. We found that both populations have several small genomic regions with high genetic diversity, which resulted from introgression from a closely related species (Gasterosteus nipponicus). The sizes of the regions were too small to be detected with traditional marker-based analysis or even some reduced-representation sequencing methods. Further amplicon sequencing revealed linkage disequilibrium around an introgression site, which suggests the possibility of selective sweep at the introgression site. Thus, interspecies introgression might predate introduction and increase genetic variation in the source population. Whole-genome sequencing of even a small number of individuals can therefore provide higher resolution inference of history of introduced populations.

  5. Peptide maps and N-terminal sequences of polypeptides from early region 1A of human adenovirus 5.

    PubMed Central

    Downey, J F; Evelegh, C M; Branton, P E; Bayley, S T

    1984-01-01

    Experiments exploring the reasons for a multiplicity of products from early region 1A of adenovirus 5 are described. Labeled early region 1A products from wild-type virus were synthesized in infected cells and in a cell-free system programmed with mRNA from infected cells, immunoprecipitated specifically with an antipeptide serum, E1A-C1, directed against the C-terminal sequence of E1A products, and separated by gel electrophoresis. Two-dimensional maps of [35S]methionine-labeled peptides were consistent with antigens of 52,000 daltons (52K) and 48.5K being from the 13S mRNA and antigens of 50K, 45K, and 35K from the 12S mRNA. Partial N-terminal sequences of 52K, 50K, 48.5K, and 45K synthesized in vitro showed that each of these antigens was initiated at the predicted ATG at nucleotide 560 in the DNA sequence. These results eliminate multiple initiation sites and proteolytic cleavage at the N-terminal end as sources of antigen diversity. Peptide maps and N-terminal sequences were obtained in a similar way for E1A products from the Ad5 deletion mutant dl1504, which lacks the normal initiator codon. As predicted, these polypeptides are initiated at the next ATG, 15 codons downstream in the wild-type sequence. These results are discussed in relation to Kozak's ribosomal scanning model. Images PMID:6699947

  6. HIV-1 intrapatient sequence diversity in the immunogenic V3 region

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, B.; Myers, G.; Wolinsky, S.; Kunstman, K.; Levy, R.; Furtado, M.; Otto, P.; Haynes, B.

    1991-11-12

    The third hypervariable domain (V3) of the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) envelope protein (env) can serve as an epitope for potent type-specific neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) -- thus short peptides predicted on the most commonly found variants of the antigenic tip of the V3 loop have been considered as potential candidates for an HIV peptide vaccine. To evaluate the extent of intrapatient variation in the immunogenic crest of the V3 loop, sequence sets were analyzed from individuals for whom multiple V3 sequences were available. Several strategies for selecting the best sets of hexapeptides to represent the variable tip of the V3 loop were considered and their effectiveness was evaluated by comparing them with the sequence sets from individuals. Most individuals carried at least one, and frequently many, variants that did not match any of the sequences from among the ten most common hexapeptides. Intrapatient viral sequence variation was increased by including sequences derived from brain biopsy specimens as well as from blood. Additionally, sequences obtained from brain specimens of different individuals had common elements which were not conserved in the corresponding blood samples, suggesting that certain amino acids in the V3 loop may be requisite for viral propagation in the CNS.

  7. Global control and regional elimination of measles, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    2013-01-18

    Widespread use of measles vaccine since 1980 has led to a substantial decline in global measles morbidity and mortality; measles elimination has been achieved and sustained in the World Health Organization (WHO) Region of the Americas (AMR) since 2002. In 2010, the World Health Assembly established three milestones for measles eradication to be reached by 2015: 1) increase routine coverage with the first dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV1) for children aged 1 year to ≥90% nationally and ≥80% in every district or equivalent administrative unit; 2) reduce and maintain annual measles incidence to <5 cases per million; and 3) reduce measles mortality by 95% from the 2000 estimate. The Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP) includes monitoring progress toward achievement of goals to reduce or eliminate measles in four WHO regions by 2015 and five WHO regions by 2020. This report updates the previous report and describes progress in global control and regional elimination of measles during 2000-2011. Estimated global MCV1 coverage increased from 72% in 2000 to 84% in 2011, and the number of countries providing a second dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV2) through routine services increased from 97 (50%) in 2000 to 141 (73%) in 2011. During 2000-2011, annual reported measles incidence decreased 65%, from 146 to 52 cases per 1 million population, and estimated measles deaths decreased 71%, from 542,000 to 158,000. However, during 2010-2011, measles incidence increased, and large outbreaks of measles were reported in multiple countries. To resume progress toward achieving regional measles elimination targets, national governments and partners are urged to ensure that measles elimination efforts receive high priority and adequate resources.

  8. Acquisition, Extinction, Recovery, and Reversal of Different Response Sequences Under Conditional Control by Nicotine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Troisi, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    Complex voluntary behaviors occur in sequence. Eight rats were trained in an operant procedure that used nicotine and non-drug (saline) states as interoceptive cues that signaled which of two behavioral sequences led to food reward. The distal and proximal responses in the chain were always maintained on variable interval 30-sec and fixed ratio-1 schedules, respectively, and rate differences between the responses were used as the dependent variable. Extinction and reversal training was conducted. Distal response rates were significantly greater than proximal response rates during training, testing, extinction, and reversal learning. These data suggest that (a) nicotine can establish interoceptive control over different response sequences, and (b) extinction of one response sequence may be state-dependent. The clinical relevance of extinction of complex behavioral repertoires such as drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior that are evoked by specific interoceptive cues is addressed in regard to drug abuse treatment and relapse. PMID:24837654

  9. Myeloma Ig heavy chain V region sequences reveal prior antigenic selection and marked somatic mutation but no intraclonal diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Vescio, R.A.; Cao, J.; Hong, C.H.

    1995-09-01

    The IgV{sub H} region sequence in 48 patients with multiple myeloma (MM) was analyzed to characterize the malignant cell of origin. The sequences were obtained after amplification of bone marrow cDNA by using V{sub H} family-specific and C{sub H} primers, then compared with either directly sequenced patient germ-line or published V{sub H} gene sequences to assay for somatic mutation. Because somatic hypermutation of the V{sub H} gene occurs late in B cell development, its presence has been helpful in determining the cell of origin in other B cell malignancies. Overall, a median of 8.2% of the nucleotides had evidence of substitution within each V{sub H} gene sequence (range = 2.7% to 16.5%), which is more prevalent than in any other reported tumor type. Strong evidence of prior antigenic selection pressure was also evident. The ratio of nucleotide substitutions that resulted in amino acid replacement was significantly higher in the complementarity-determining region than in the framework region (3.25 vs. 1.56, respectively; p < 0.00005). No V{sub H} gene intraclonal diversity was noted, despite sequencing multiple clones (3-16) from each patient, nor was there evidence of further V{sub H} gene somatic mutation over the course of three patients` disease. These findings strongly imply that the malignant clone in MM evolves from a cell late in B cell development. 63 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. IgG variable region and VH CDR3 diversity in unimmunized mice analyzed by massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin; Panavas, Tadas; Thys, Kim; Aerssens, Jeroen; Naso, Michael; Fisher, Jamie; Rycyzyn, Michael; Sweet, Raymond W

    2014-02-01

    Most antigen-specific mouse antibodies have been derived by hybridoma technology, predominantly through use of the Balb/c strain. Much of the Balb/c germline repertoire of variable genes (V regions) is known. However, there is little information about the background expressed repertoire of IgG antibodies in mice, which reflects the baseline against which antigen-specific antibodies are generated through immunization. To assess this baseline repertoire, RNA was isolated from splenic B-cells enriched for expression of IgG from three mice. The RNA was individually amplified with three distinct PCR primer sets for comprehensive recovery of the heavy and light chain variable regions. Each PCR product was independently subjected to deep sequencing using 454 pyro-sequencing technology and analysed for redundancy, open reading frame, germline representation, and CDR3 sequence of the heavy chain variable region (VH CDR3) within and across the primer sets and mice. A highly skewed abundance of heavy and light chain variable gene usage was observed for all three primers in all three mice. While showing considerable overlap, there were differences among these profiles indicative of primer bias and animal-to-animal variation. VH CDR3 sequences were likewise highly skewed indicating that the heavy chain genes profiles substantially reflected individual antibodies. This observation was confirmed through analysis of randomly selected complete heavy chain variable sequences. However, there was very little redundancy in VH CDR3 sequences across the different mice. We conclude that the background IgG repertoire in young, unimmunized mice is highly skewed within individual mice and is diverse among them, a pattern similar to that observed in highly immunized mice.

  11. Sequence analysis of the breakpoint regions of an X;5 translocation in a female with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Bakel, I. van; Holt, S.; Craig, I.

    1995-08-01

    X;autosome translocations in females with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) provide an opportunity to study the mechanisms responsible for chromosomal rearrangements that occur in the germ line. We describe here a detailed molecular analysis of the translocation breakpoints of an X;autosome reciprocal translocation, t(X;5) (p21;q31.1), in a female with DMD. Cosmid clones that contained the X-chromosome breakpoint region were identified, and subclones that hybridized to the translocation junction fragment in restriction digests of the patient`s DNA were isolated and sequenced. Primers designed from the X-chromosomal sequence were used to obtain the junction fragments on the der(X) and the der(5) by inverse PCR. The resultant clones were also cloned and sequenced, and this information used to isolate the chromosome 5 breakpoint region. Comparison of the DNA sequences of the junction fragments with those of the breakpoint regions on chromosomes X and 5 revealed that the translocation arose by nonhomologous recombination with an imprecise reciprocal exchange. Four and six base pairs of unknown origin are inserted at the exchange points of the der(X) and der(5), respectively, and three nucleotides are deleted from the X-chromosome sequence. Two features were found that may have played a role in the generation of the translocation. These were (1) a repeat motif with an internal homopyrimidine stretch 10 bp upstream from the X-chromosome breakpoint and (2) a 9-bp sequence of 78% homology located near the breakpoints on chromosomes 5 and X. 32 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. A simple method to control over-alignment in the MAFFT multiple sequence alignment program

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Kazutaka; Standley, Daron M.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: We present a new feature of the MAFFT multiple alignment program for suppressing over-alignment (aligning unrelated segments). Conventional MAFFT is highly sensitive in aligning conserved regions in remote homologs, but the risk of over-alignment is recently becoming greater, as low-quality or noisy sequences are increasing in protein sequence databases, due, for example, to sequencing errors and difficulty in gene prediction. Results: The proposed method utilizes a variable scoring matrix for different pairs of sequences (or groups) in a single multiple sequence alignment, based on the global similarity of each pair. This method significantly increases the correctly gapped sites in real examples and in simulations under various conditions. Regarding sensitivity, the effect of the proposed method is slightly negative in real protein-based benchmarks, and mostly neutral in simulation-based benchmarks. This approach is based on natural biological reasoning and should be compatible with many methods based on dynamic programming for multiple sequence alignment. Availability and implementation: The new feature is available in MAFFT versions 7.263 and higher. http://mafft.cbrc.jp/alignment/software/ Contact: katoh@ifrec.osaka-u.ac.jp Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153688

  13. Comparative mitochondrial genomics of snakes: extraordinary substitution rate dynamics and functionality of the duplicate control region

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi J; Castoe, Todd A; Austin, Christopher C; Burbrink, Frank T; Herron, Matthew D; McGuire, Jimmy A; Parkinson, Christopher L; Pollock, David D

    2007-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial genomes of snakes are characterized by an overall evolutionary rate that appears to be one of the most accelerated among vertebrates. They also possess other unusual features, including short tRNAs and other genes, and a duplicated control region that has been stably maintained since it originated more than 70 million years ago. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of evolutionary dynamics in snake mitochondrial genomes to better understand the basis of these extreme characteristics, and to explore the relationship between mitochondrial genome molecular evolution, genome architecture, and molecular function. We sequenced complete mitochondrial genomes from Slowinski's corn snake (Pantherophis slowinskii) and two cottonmouths (Agkistrodon piscivorus) to complement previously existing mitochondrial genomes, and to provide an improved comparative view of how genome architecture affects molecular evolution at contrasting levels of divergence. Results We present a Bayesian genetic approach that suggests that the duplicated control region can function as an additional origin of heavy strand replication. The two control regions also appear to have different intra-specific versus inter-specific evolutionary dynamics that may be associated with complex modes of concerted evolution. We find that different genomic regions have experienced substantial accelerated evolution along early branches in snakes, with different genes having experienced dramatic accelerations along specific branches. Some of these accelerations appear to coincide with, or subsequent to, the shortening of various mitochondrial genes and the duplication of the control region and flanking tRNAs. Conclusion Fluctuations in the strength and pattern of selection during snake evolution have had widely varying gene-specific effects on substitution rates, and these rate accelerations may have been functionally related to unusual changes in genomic architecture. The among-lineage and

  14. Mitochondrial DNA control region analysis of three ethnic groups in the Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Jankova-Ajanovska, Renata; Zimmermann, Bettina; Huber, Gabriela; Röck, Alexander W; Bodner, Martin; Jakovski, Zlatko; Janeska, Biljana; Duma, Aleksej; Parson, Walther

    2014-11-01

    A total of 444 individuals representing three ethnic groups (Albanians, Turks and Romanies) in the Republic of Macedonia were sequenced in the mitochondrial control region. The mtDNA haplogroup composition differed between the three groups. Our results showed relatively high frequencies of haplogroup H12 in Albanians (8.8%) and less in Turks (3.3%), while haplogroups M5a1 and H7a1a were dominant in Romanies (13.7% and 10.3%, respectively) but rare in the former two. This highlights the importance of regional sampling for forensic mtDNA databasing purposes. These population data will be available on EMPOP under accession numbers EMP00644 (Albanians), EMP00645 (Romanies) and EMP00646 (Turks).

  15. Mitochondrial DNA control region analysis of three ethnic groups in the Republic of Macedonia

    PubMed Central

    Jankova-Ajanovska, Renata; Zimmermann, Bettina; Huber, Gabriela; Röck, Alexander W.; Bodner, Martin; Jakovski, Zlatko; Janeska, Biljana; Duma, Aleksej; Parson, Walther

    2014-01-01

    A total of 444 individuals representing three ethnic groups (Albanians, Turks and Romanies) in the Republic of Macedonia were sequenced in the mitochondrial control region. The mtDNA haplogroup composition differed between the three groups. Our results showed relatively high frequencies of haplogroup H12 in Albanians (8.8%) and less in Turks (3.3%), while haplogroups M5a1 and H7a1a were dominant in Romanies (13.7% and 10.3%, respectively) but rare in the former two. This highlights the importance of regional sampling for forensic mtDNA databasing purposes. These population data will be available on EMPOP under accession numbers EMP00644 (Albanians), EMP00645 (Romanies) and EMP00646 (Turks). PMID:25051224

  16. Development of a SCAR (sequence-characterised amplified region) marker for acid resistance-related gene in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Wen; Li, Kai; Yang, Shi-Ling; Tian, Shu-Fen; He, Ling

    2015-03-01

    A sequence characterised amplified region marker was developed to determine an acid resistance-related gene in Lactobacillus plantarum. A random amplified polymorphic DNA marker named S116-680 was reported to be closely related to the acid resistance of the strains. The DNA band corresponding to this marker was cloned and sequenced with the induction of specific designed PCR primers. The results of PCR test helped to amplify a clear specific band of 680 bp in the tested acid-resistant strains. S116-680 marker would be useful to explore the acid-resistant mechanism of L. plantarum and to screen desirable malolactic fermentation strains.

  17. 40 CFR 81.88 - Billings Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.88 Billings Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Billings Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Montana) has been renamed the Billings Intrastate Air Quality Control... to by Montana authorities as follows: Sec. 481.168Great Falls Intrastate Air Quality Control...

  18. Complete sequence of the Rous sarcoma virus env gene: identification of structural and functional regions of its product.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, E; Hill, E; Hardwick, M; Bhown, A; Schwartz, D E; Tizard, R

    1983-01-01

    The amino-terminal amino acid sequences of gp85 and gp37, the envelope glycoproteins of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), were determined. Alignment of these sequences with the amino acid sequence predicted from the complete nucleotide sequence of the Prague strain of RSV, subgroup C (PR-C), has allowed us to delineate the env gene-coding region of this virus. The coding sequences for gp85 and gp37 have been placed in an open reading frame that extends from nucleotide 5045 to nucleotide 6862 and predict sizes of 341 amino acids (36,962 molecular weight) for gp85 and 198 amino acids (21,566 molecular weight) for gp37. Carbohydrate makes a significant contribution to the observed molecular weights of these polypeptides--the amino acid sequence contains 14 potential glycosylation sites (Asn-X-Ser/Thr) in gp85 and two in gp37. Experiments aimed at estimating the number of carbohydrate side chains yielded results consistent with most or all of these sites being occupied. Although an initiation codon is located early (codon 4) in the open reading frame, it is likely that splicing yields an mRNA on which translation initiates at the same AUG as that of the gag gene to produce a nascent polypeptide in which gp85 is preceded by a 62-amino-acid-long leader peptide. This leader contains the hydrophobic sequence (signal sequence) necessary for translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum and is completely removed from the env gene product during translation. The polyprotein precursor, Pr95env, is cleaved to gp85 and gp37 at the carboxyl side of the basic sequence:-Arg-Arg-Lys-Arg-. gp85 is attached through a disulphide linkage to gp37, and although the positions of the cysteines involved in this linkage are not known, the presence of a 27-amino-acid-long hydrophobic region at the carboxy-terminus of gp37 is consistent with its role as a membrane anchor for the viral glycoprotein complex. The location of host range variable regions with respect to the possible tertiary structure of

  19. [Sequence of the ITS region of nuclear ribosomal DNA(nrDNA) in Xinjiang wild Dianthus and its phylogenetic relationship].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Cai, You-Ming; Zhuge, Qiang; Zou, Hui-Yu; Huang, Min-Ren

    2002-06-01

    Xinjiang is a center of distribution and differentiation of genus Dianthus in China, and has a great deal of species resources. The sequences of ITS region (including ITS-1, 5.8S rDNA and ITS-2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA from 8 species of genus Dianthus wildly distributed in Xinjiang were determined by direct sequencing of PCR products. The result showed that the size of the ITS of Dianthus is from 617 to 621 bp, and the length variation is only 4 bp. There are very high homogeneous (97.6%-99.8%) sequences between species, and about 80% homogeneous sequences between genus Dianthus and outgroup. The sequences of ITS in genus Dianthus are relatively conservative. In general, there are more conversion than transition in the variation sites among genus Dianthus. The conversion rates are relatively high, and the ratios of conversion/transition are 1.0-3.0. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences the species of Dianthus in China would be divided into three sections. There is a distant relationship between sect. Barbulatum Williams and sect. Dianthus and between sect. Barbulatum Williams and sect. Fimbriatum Williams, and there is a close relationship between sect. Dianthus and sect. Fimbriatum Williams. From the phylogenetic tree of ITS it was found that the origin of sect. Dianthusis is earlier than that of sect. Fimbriatum Williams and sect. Barbulatum Williams.

  20. Structure and variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTRs) of the mitochondrial control region in mitten crab Eriocheir (Crustacean: Brachyura).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daizhen; Ding, Ge; Wang, Guangyue; Tang, Boping; Sun, Hongying

    2011-11-01

    Mitochondrial control region was called "A + T-rich" region in invertebrate. In the study, the general organization of control region in mitten crab was divided into two major domains: high variable segment and conserved segment. Four conserved blocks (CSB1, CSB2, CSB3 and CSB4) and two tandem repeat sequences (RT1 and RT2) were defined in control region. There were 116 polymorphic sites and 84 parsimony information sites in 571 aligned sites of the high variable segment adjacent "tRNA-Gln", in which 58 stable variable sites were defined between E. j. sinensis and E. j. hepuensis. Conserved domain contained more than two similar repeat units, and length polymorphism of control region was due to the number difference between the two repeat units (RT1 and RT2). And length polymorphism was a common phenomenon for tandem repeat in control region in the study. Furthermore, a novel result showed the core nucleotide of RT2 in control region tandem repeat was C in E. j. hepuensis, but G in E. j. sinensis. It might be a rapid and cost-effective measure of seedlings differentiation in aquaculture.

  1. Widespread Differential Expression of Coding Region and 3' UTR Sequences in Neurons and Other Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kocabas, Arif; Duarte, Terence; Kumar, Saranya; Hynes, Mary A

    2015-12-16

    Mature messenger RNAs (mRNAs) consist of coding sequence (CDS) and 5' and 3' UTRs, typically expected to show similar abundance within a given neuron. Examining mRNA from defined neurons, we unexpectedly show extremely common unbalanced expression of cognate 3' UTR and CDS sequences; many genes show high 3' UTR relative to CDS, others show high CDS to 3' UTR. In situ hybridization (19 of 19 genes) shows a broad range of 3' UTR-to-CDS expression ratios across neurons and tissues. Ratios may be spatially graded or change with developmental age but are consistent across animals. Further, for two genes examined, a 3' UTR-to-CDS ratio above a particular threshold in any given neuron correlated with reduced or undetectable protein expression. Our findings raise questions about the role of isolated 3' UTR sequences in regulation of protein expression and highlight the importance of separately examining 3' UTR and CDS sequences in gene expression analyses.

  2. The complete coding region sequence of river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) SRY gene.

    PubMed

    Parma, Pietro; Feligini, Maria; Greppi, Gianfranco; Enne, Giuseppe

    2004-02-01

    The Y-linked SRY gene is responsible for testis determination in mammals. Mutations in this gene can lead to XY Gonadal Dysgenesis, an abnormal sexual phenotype described in humans, cattle, horses and river buffalo. We report here the complete river buffalo SRY sequence in order to enable the genetic diagnosis of this disease. The SRY sequence was also used to confirm the evolutionary divergence time between cattle and river buffalo 10 million years ago.

  3. Sequence variation of koala retrovirus transmembrane protein p15E among koalas from different geographic regions.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yasuko; McCallister, Chelsea; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Helgen, Kristofer M; Greenwood, Alex D; Roca, Alfred L

    2015-01-15

    The koala retrovirus (KoRV), which is transitioning from an exogenous to an endogenous form, has been associated with high mortality in koalas. For other retroviruses, the envelope protein p15E has been considered a candidate for vaccine development. We therefore examined proviral sequence variation of KoRV p15E in a captive Queensland and three wild southern Australian koalas. We generated 163 sequences with intact open reading frames, which grouped into 39 distinct haplotypes. Sixteen distinct haplotypes comprising 139 of the sequences (85%) coded for the same polypeptide. Among the remaining 23 haplotypes, 22 were detected only once among the sequences, and each had 1 or 2 non-synonymous differences from the majority sequence. Several analyses suggested that p15E was under purifying selection. Important epitopes and domains were highly conserved across the p15E sequences and in previously reported exogenous KoRVs. Overall, these results support the potential use of p15E for KoRV vaccine development.

  4. Sequence variation of koala retrovirus transmembrane protein p15E among koalas from different geographic regions.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yasuko; McCallister, Chelsea; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Helgen, Kristofer M; Greenwood, Alex D; Roca, Alfred L

    2015-01-15

    The koala retrovirus (KoRV), which is transitioning from an exogenous to an endogenous form, has been associated with high mortality in koalas. For other retroviruses, the envelope protein p15E has been considered a candidate for vaccine development. We therefore examined proviral sequence variation of KoRV p15E in a captive Queensland and three wild southern Australian koalas. We generated 163 sequences with intact open reading frames, which grouped into 39 distinct haplotypes. Sixteen distinct haplotypes comprising 139 of the sequences (85%) coded for the same polypeptide. Among the remaining 23 haplotypes, 22 were detected only once among the sequences, and each had 1 or 2 non-synonymous differences from the majority sequence. Several analyses suggested that p15E was under purifying selection. Important epitopes and domains were highly conserved across the p15E sequences and in previously reported exogenous KoRVs. Overall, these results support the potential use of p15E for KoRV vaccine development. PMID:25462343

  5. Identification of Lactobacillus Isolates from the Gastrointestinal Tract, Silage, and Yoghurt by 16S-23S rRNA Gene Intergenic Spacer Region Sequence Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Tannock, G. W.; Tilsala-Timisjarvi, A.; Rodtong, S.; Ng, J.; Munro, K.; Alatossava, T.

    1999-01-01

    Lactobacillus isolates were identified by PCR amplification and sequencing of the region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes (spacer region). The sequences obtained from the isolates were compared to those of reference strains held in GenBank. A similarity of 97.5% or greater was considered to provide identification. To check the reliability of the method, the V2-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced in the case of isolates whose spacer region sequences were less than 99% similar to that of a reference strain. Confirmation of identity was obtained in all instances. Spacer region sequencing provided rapid and accurate identification of Lactobacillus isolates obtained from gastrointestinal, yoghurt, and silage samples. It had an advantage over 16S V2-V3 sequence comparisons because it distinguished between isolates of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus. PMID:10473450

  6. Conserved nucleotide sequences in the open reading frame and 3' untranslated region of selenoprotein P mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, K E; Lloyd, R S; Burk, R F

    1993-01-01

    Rat liver selenoprotein P contains 10 selenocysteine residues in its primary structure (deduced). It is the only selenoprotein characterized to date that has more than one selenocysteine residue. Selenoprotein P cDNA has been cloned from human liver and heart cDNA libraries and sequenced. The open reading frames are identical and contain a signal peptide, indicating that the protein is secreted by both organs and is therefore not exclusively produced in the liver. Ten selenocysteine residues (deduced) are present. Comparison of the open reading frame of the human cDNA with the rat cDNA reveals a 69% identity of the nucleotide sequence and 72% identity of the deduced amino acid sequence. Two regions in the 3' untranslated portion have high conservation between human and rat. Each of these regions contains a predicted stable stem-loop structure similar to the single stem-loop structures reported in 3' untranslated regions of type I iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase and glutathione peroxidase. The stem-loop structure of type I iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase has been shown to be necessary for incorporation of the selenocysteine residue at the UGA codon. Because only two stem-loop structures are present in the 3' untranslated region of selenoprotein P mRNA, it can be concluded that a separate stem-loop structure is not required for each selenocysteine residue. Images PMID:8421687

  7. Exploring the diploid wheat ancestral A genome through sequence comparison at the high-molecular-weight glutenin locus region.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lingli; Huo, Naxin; Wang, Yi; Deal, Karin; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Daowen; Anderson, Olin D; Gu, Yong Qiang

    2012-12-01

    The polyploid nature of hexaploid wheat (T. aestivum, AABBDD) often represents a great challenge in various aspects of research including genetic mapping, map-based cloning of important genes, and sequencing and accurately assembly of its genome. To explore the utility of ancestral diploid species of polyploid wheat, sequence variation of T. urartu (A(u)A(u)) was analyzed by comparing its 277-kb large genomic region carrying the important Glu-1 locus with the homologous regions from the A genomes of the diploid T. monococcum (A(m)A(m)), tetraploid T. turgidum (AABB), and hexaploid T. aestivum (AABBDD). Our results revealed that in addition to a high degree of the gene collinearity, nested retroelement structures were also considerably conserved among the A(u) genome and the A genomes in polyploid wheats, suggesting that the majority of the repetitive sequences in the A genomes of polyploid wheats originated from the diploid A(u) genome. The difference in the compared region between A(u) and A is mainly caused by four differential TE insertion and two deletion events between these genomes. The estimated divergence time of A genomes calculated on nucleotide substitution rate in both shared TEs and collinear genes further supports the closer evolutionary relationship of A to A(u) than to A(m). The structure conservation in the repetitive regions promoted us to develop repeat junction markers based on the A(u) sequence for mapping the A genome in hexaploid wheat. Eighty percent of these repeat junction markers were successfully mapped to the corresponding region in hexaploid wheat, suggesting that T. urartu could serve as a useful resource for developing molecular markers for genetic and breeding studies in hexaploid wheat.

  8. Regional species pools control community saturation in lake phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Ptacnik, Robert; Andersen, Tom; Brettum, Pål; Lepistö, Liisa; Willén, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Recent research has highlighted that positive biodiversity–ecosystem functioning relationships hold for all groups of organisms, including microbes. Yet, we still lack understanding regarding the drivers of microbial diversity, in particular, whether diversity of microbial communities is a matter of local factors, or whether metacommunities are of similar importance to what is known from higher organisms. Here, we explore the driving forces behind spatial variability in lake phytoplankton diversity in Fennoscandia. While phytoplankton biovolume is best predicted by local phosphorus concentrations, phytoplankton diversity (measured as genus richness, G) only showed weak correlations with local concentrations of total phosphorus. By estimating spatial averages of total phosphorus concentrations on various scales from an independent, spatially representative lake survey, we found that close to 70 per cent of the variability in local phytoplankton diversity can be explained by regionally averaged phosphorus concentrations on a scale between 100 and 400 km. Thus, the data strongly indicate the existence of metacommunities on this scale. Furthermore, we show a strong dependency between lake productivity and spatial community turnover. Thus, regional productivity affects beta-diversity by controlling spatial community turnover, resulting in scale-dependent productivity-diversity relationships. As an illustration of the interaction between local and regional processes in shaping microbial diversity, our results offer both empirical support and a plausible mechanism for the existence of common scaling rules in both the macrobial and the microbial worlds. We argue that awareness of regional species pools in phytoplankton and other unicellular organisms may critically improve our understanding of ecosystems and their susceptibility to anthropogenic stressors. PMID:20630887

  9. Global control and regional elimination of measles, 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    Perry, Robert T; Gacic-Dobo, Marta; Dabbagh, Alya; Mulders, Mick N; Strebel, Peter M; Okwo-Bele, Jean-Marie; Rota, Paul A; Goodson, James L

    2014-02-01

    In 2010, the World Health Assembly established three milestones toward global measles eradication to be reached by 2015: 1) increase routine coverage with the first dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV1) for children aged 1 year to ≥90% nationally and ≥80% in every district, 2) reduce and maintain annual measles incidence at <5 cases per million, and 3) reduce measles mortality by 95% from the 2000 estimate. After the adoption by member states of the South-East Asia Region (SEAR) of the goal of measles elimination by 2020, elimination goals have been set by member states of all six World Health Organization (WHO) regions, and reaching measles elimination in four WHO regions by 2015 is an objective of the Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP). This report updates the previous report for 2000-2011 and describes progress toward global control and regional elimination of measles during 2000-2012. During this period, increases in routine MCV coverage, plus supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) reaching 145 million children in 2012, led to a 77% decrease worldwide in reported measles annual incidence, from 146 to 33 per million population, and a 78% decline in estimated annual measles deaths, from 562,400 to 122,000. Compared with a scenario of no vaccination, an estimated 13.8 million deaths were prevented by measles vaccination during 2000-2012. Achieving the 2015 targets and elimination goals will require countries and their partners to raise the visibility of measles elimination and make substantial and sustained additional investments in strengthening health systems.

  10. Complete mitochondrial genome of endangered Yellow-shouldered Amazon (Amazona barbadensis): two control region copies in parrot species of the Amazona genus.

    PubMed

    Urantowka, Adam Dawid; Hajduk, Kacper; Kosowska, Barbara

    2013-08-01

    Amazona barbadensis is an endangered species of parrot living in northern coastal Venezuela and in several Caribbean islands. In this study, we sequenced full mitochondrial genome of the considered species. The total length of the mitogenome was 18,983 bp and contained 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, duplicated control region, and degenerate copies of ND6 and tRNA (Glu) genes. High degree of identity between two copies of control region suggests their coincident evolution and functionality. Comparative analysis of both the control region sequences from four Amazona species revealed their 89.1% identity over a region of 1300 bp and indicates the presence of distinctive parts of two control region copies.

  11. First complete genome sequence of a capsicum chlorosis tospovirus isolate from Australia with an unusually large S RNA intergenic region.

    PubMed

    Widana Gamage, Shirani; Persley, Denis M; Higgins, Colleen M; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2015-03-01

    The first complete genome sequence of capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV) from Australia was determined using a combination of Illumina HiSeq RNA and Sanger sequencing technologies. Australian CaCV had a tripartite genome structure like other CaCV isolates. The large (L) RNA was 8913 nucleotides (nt) in length and contained a single open reading frame (ORF) of 8634 nt encoding a predicted RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) in the viral-complementary (vc) sense. The medium (M) and small (S) RNA segments were 4846 and 3944 nt in length, respectively, each containing two non-overlapping ORFs in ambisense orientation, separated by intergenic regions (IGR). The M segment contained ORFs encoding the predicted non-structural movement protein (NSm; 927 nt) and precursor of glycoproteins (GP; 3366 nt) in the viral sense (v) and vc strand, respectively, separated by a 449-nt IGR. The S segment coded for the predicted nucleocapsid (N) protein (828 nt) and non-structural suppressor of silencing protein (NSs; 1320 nt) in the vc and v strand, respectively. The S RNA contained an IGR of 1663 nt, being the largest IGR of all CaCV isolates sequenced so far. Comparison of the Australian CaCV genome with complete CaCV genome sequences from other geographic regions showed highest sequence identity with a Taiwanese isolate. Genome sequence comparisons and phylogeny of all available CaCV isolates provided evidence for at least two highly diverged groups of CaCV isolates that may warrant re-classification of AIT-Thailand and CP-China isolates as unique tospoviruses, separate from CaCV.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA variation and phylogenetic relationships among five tuna species based on sequencing of D-loop region.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Girish; Kocour, Martin; Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan

    2016-05-01

    In order to assess the DNA sequence variation and phylogenetic relationship among five tuna species (Auxis thazard, Euthynnus affinis, Katsuwonus pelamis, Thunnus tonggol, and T. albacares) out of all four tuna genera, partial sequences of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop region were analyzed. The estimate of intra-specific sequence variation in studied species was low, ranging from 0.027 to 0.080 [Kimura's two parameter distance (K2P)], whereas values of inter-specific variation ranged from 0.049 to 0.491. The longtail tuna (T. tonggol) and yellowfin tuna (T. albacares) were found to share a close relationship (K2P = 0.049) while skipjack tuna (K. pelamis) was most divergent studied species. Phylogenetic analysis using Maximum-Likelihood (ML) and Neighbor-Joining (NJ) methods supported the monophyletic origin of Thunnus species. Similarly, phylogeny of Auxis and Euthynnus species substantiate the monophyly. However, results showed a distinct origin of K. pelamis from genus Thunnus as well as Auxis and Euthynnus. Thus, the mtDNA D-loop region sequence data supports the polyphyletic origin of tuna species. PMID:25329285

  13. Evidence on primate phylogeny from epsilon-globin gene sequences and flanking regions.

    PubMed

    Porter, C A; Sampaio, I; Schneider, H; Schneider, M P; Czelusniak, J; Goodman, M

    1995-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among various primate groups were examined based on sequences of epsilon-globin genes. epsilon-globin genes were sequenced from five species of strepsirhine primates. These sequences were aligned and compared with other known primate epsilon-globin sequences, including data from two additional strepsirhine species, one species of tarsier, 19 species of New World monkeys (representing all extant genera), and five species of catarrhines. In addition, a 2-kb segment upstream of the epsilon-globin gene was sequenced in two of the five strepsirhines examined. This upstream sequence was aligned with five other species of primates for which data are available in this segment. Domestic rabbit and goat were used as outgroups. This analysis supports the monophyly of order Primates but does not support the traditional prosimian grouping of tarsiers, lorisoids, and lemuroids; rather it supports the sister grouping of tarsiers and anthropoids into Haplorhini and the sister grouping of lorisoids and lemuroids into Strepsirhini. The mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) and dwarf lemur (Cheirogaleus medius) appear to be most closely related to each other, forming a clade with the lemuroids, and are probably not closely related to the lorisoids, as suggested by some morphological studies. Analysis of the epsilon-globin data supports the hypothesis that the aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis) shares a sister-group relationship with other Malagasy strepsirhines (all being classified as lemuroids). Relationships among ceboids agree with findings from a previous epsilon-globin study in which fewer outgroup taxa were employed. Rates of molecular evolution were higher in lorisoids than in lemuroids. PMID:7714911

  14. Interactions of two large antiviral polyamides with the long control region of HPV16.

    PubMed

    Vasilieva, Elena; Niederschulte, Jacquelyn; Song, Yang; Harris, George Davis; Koeller, Kevin J; Liao, Puhong; Bashkin, James K; Dupureur, Cynthia M

    2016-08-01

    PA1 and PA25 are large hairpin polyamides that are effective in nearly eliminating HPV16 episomes (DNA) in cell culture, and PA25 has broad spectrum activity against three cancer-causing forms of HPV (Edwards, T. G., Koeller, K. J., Slomczynska, U., Fok, K., Helmus, M., Bashkin, J. K., Fisher, C., Antiviral Res. 91 (2011) 177-186). Described here are the interactions of these PAs with sequences in the long control region (LCR) of HPV16 (7348-122). Using an FeEDTA conjugate of PA1 (designed to recognize 5'-W2GW7-3'; W = A or T), 34 affinity cleavage (AC) patterns were detected for this fragment. These sites can be rationalized with sequences featuring perfect, single, double, triple and quadruple mismatches. Quantitative DNase I footprinting analysis indicates that perfect sites bind PA1 with Kds between 0.7 and 2.2 nM. Kds for single, double, triple and quadruple mismatch sites range from 1-3 nM-20 nM. Using AC and EDTA conjugates, we report that unlike smaller 8-ring hairpin PAs, introduction of a chiral turn in this large polyamide has no effect on binding orientation (forward vs. reverse). Despite its design to recognize 5'-W2GW5GW4-3' via two Im residues, a motif not represented in this HPV sequence, a PA25-EDTA conjugate yielded 31 affinity cleavage sites on the region. Low nM Kds for PA25 without EDTA indicates a high tolerance for triple and quadruple mismatches. While there is extensive coverage of the sequence examined, AC cleavage patterns for the two PAs show discrete binding events and do not overlap significantly. This indicates that within the context of A/T rich sequences, these PAs do not recognize a simple shared sequence-related feature of the DNA. These insights continue to inform the complex nature of large hairpin PA-DNA interactions and antiviral behavior.

  15. Interactions of two large antiviral polyamides with the long control region of HPV16.

    PubMed

    Vasilieva, Elena; Niederschulte, Jacquelyn; Song, Yang; Harris, George Davis; Koeller, Kevin J; Liao, Puhong; Bashkin, James K; Dupureur, Cynthia M

    2016-08-01

    PA1 and PA25 are large hairpin polyamides that are effective in nearly eliminating HPV16 episomes (DNA) in cell culture, and PA25 has broad spectrum activity against three cancer-causing forms of HPV (Edwards, T. G., Koeller, K. J., Slomczynska, U., Fok, K., Helmus, M., Bashkin, J. K., Fisher, C., Antiviral Res. 91 (2011) 177-186). Described here are the interactions of these PAs with sequences in the long control region (LCR) of HPV16 (7348-122). Using an FeEDTA conjugate of PA1 (designed to recognize 5'-W2GW7-3'; W = A or T), 34 affinity cleavage (AC) patterns were detected for this fragment. These sites can be rationalized with sequences featuring perfect, single, double, triple and quadruple mismatches. Quantitative DNase I footprinting analysis indicates that perfect sites bind PA1 with Kds between 0.7 and 2.2 nM. Kds for single, double, triple and quadruple mismatch sites range from 1-3 nM-20 nM. Using AC and EDTA conjugates, we report that unlike smaller 8-ring hairpin PAs, introduction of a chiral turn in this large polyamide has no effect on binding orientation (forward vs. reverse). Despite its design to recognize 5'-W2GW5GW4-3' via two Im residues, a motif not represented in this HPV sequence, a PA25-EDTA conjugate yielded 31 affinity cleavage sites on the region. Low nM Kds for PA25 without EDTA indicates a high tolerance for triple and quadruple mismatches. While there is extensive coverage of the sequence examined, AC cleavage patterns for the two PAs show discrete binding events and do not overlap significantly. This indicates that within the context of A/T rich sequences, these PAs do not recognize a simple shared sequence-related feature of the DNA. These insights continue to inform the complex nature of large hairpin PA-DNA interactions and antiviral behavior. PMID:27155361

  16. Gap Closing/Finishing by Targeted Genomic Region Enrichment and Sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Kanwar; Froula, Jeff; Trice, Hope; Pennacchio, Len A.; Chen, Feng

    2010-05-27

    Gap Closing/Finishing of draft genome assemblies is a labor and cost intensive process where several rounds of repetitious amplification and sequencing are required. Here we demonstrate a high throughput procedure where custom primers flanking gaps in draft genomes are designed. Primer libraries containing up to 4,000 unique pairs in independent droplets are merged with a fragmented genomic template. From this millions of picoliter scale droplets are formed, each one being the functional equivalent of an individual PCR reaction. The PCR products are concatenated and sequenced by Illumina which is then assembled and used for gap closure. Here we present an overall experimental strategy, primer design algorithm and initial results.

  17. A Systems Approach towards an Intelligent and Self-Controlling Platform for Integrated Continuous Reaction Sequences**

    PubMed Central

    Ingham, Richard J; Battilocchio, Claudio; Fitzpatrick, Daniel E; Sliwinski, Eric; Hawkins, Joel M; Ley, Steven V

    2015-01-01

    Performing reactions in flow can offer major advantages over batch methods. However, laboratory flow chemistry processes are currently often limited to single steps or short sequences due to the complexity involved with operating a multi-step process. Using new modular components for downstream processing, coupled with control technologies, more advanced multi-step flow sequences can be realized. These tools are applied to the synthesis of 2-aminoadamantane-2-carboxylic acid. A system comprising three chemistry steps and three workup steps was developed, having sufficient autonomy and self-regulation to be managed by a single operator. PMID:25377747

  18. Pulse-controlled quantum gate sequences on a strongly coupled qubit chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frydrych, Holger; Marthaler, Michael; Alber, Gernot

    2015-12-01

    We propose a selective dynamical decoupling scheme on a chain of permanently coupled qubits with XX-type interactions, which is capable of dynamically suppressing any coupling in the chain by applying sequences of local pulses to the individual qubits. We demonstrate that high-fidelity single- and two-qubit gates can be achieved by this procedure and that sequences of gates can be implemented by this pulse control alone. We discuss the applicability and physical limitations of our model specifically for strongly coupled superconducting flux qubits. Since dynamically modifying the couplings between flux qubits is challenging, they are a natural candidate for our approach.

  19. Pulse-controlled quantum gate sequences on a strongly coupled qubit chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frydrych, Holger; Marthaler, Michael; Alber, Gernot

    2015-05-01

    We propose a selective dynamical decoupling scheme on a chain of permanently coupled qubits, which is capable of dynamically suppressing any coupling in the chain by applying sequences of local pulses to the individual qubits. We demonstrate how this pulse control can be used to implement the two-qubit CNS gate on any two neighboring qubits. A sequence of these CNS gates is then applied on the chain to entangle all the qubits in a GHZ state. We find that high entanglement fidelities can be achieved as long as the total number of coupled qubits is not too large.

  20. Challenges in DNA motion control and sequence readout using nanopore devices

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Spencer; Wanunu, Meni

    2016-01-01

    Nanopores are being hailed as a potential next-generation DNA sequencer that could provide cheap, high-throughput DNA analysis. In this review we present a detailed summary of the various sensing techniques being investigated for use in DNA sequencing and mapping applications. A crucial impasse to the success of nanopores as a reliable DNA analysis tool is the fast and stochastic nature of DNA translocation. We discuss the incorporation of biological motors to step DNA through a pore base-by-base, as well as the many experimental modifications attempted for the purpose of slowing and controlling DNA transport. PMID:25642629

  1. Murine candidate bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis susceptibility genes identified by gene expression and sequence analysis of linkage regions

    PubMed Central

    Haston, C; Tomko, T; Godin, N; Kerckhoff, L; Hallett, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary fibrosis is a complex disease for which the predisposing genetic variants remain unknown. In a prior study, susceptibility to bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis was mapped to loci Blmpf1 and Blmpf2 on chromosomes 17 and 11, respectively, in a C57BL/6J (B6, susceptible) and C3Hf/KAM (C3H, resistant) mouse cross. Methods: Herein, the genetic basis of bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis was investigated in an approach combining gene expression and sequencing data with previously mapped linkage intervals. Results: In this study, gene expression analysis with microarrays revealed 1892 genes or ESTs (expressed sequence tags) to be differentially expressed between bleomycin treated B6 and C3H mice and 67 of these genetic elements map to Blmpf1 or Blmpf2. This group included genes involved in an oxidative stress response, in apoptosis, and in immune regulation. A comparison of the B6 and C3H sequence, for Blmpf1 and Blmpf2, made using the NCBI database and available C3H sequence, revealed approximately 35% of the genes in these regions contain non-synonymous coding sequence changes. An assessment of genotype/phenotype correlation among other inbred strains revealed 36% of these B6/C3H sequence variations predict for the known bleomycin induced fibrosis susceptibility of the DBA (susceptible) and A/J (resistant) mouse strains. Conclusions: Combining genomics approaches of differential gene expression and sequence variation potentially identifies approximately 5% the linked genes as fibrosis susceptibility candidate genes in this mouse cross. PMID:15937080

  2. Sequence specificity of viral end DNA binding by HIV-1 integrase reveals critical regions for protein-DNA interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, D; Craigie, R

    1998-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase specifically recognizes and cleaves viral end DNA during the initial step of retroviral integration. The protein and DNA determinants of the specificity of viral end DNA binding have not been clearly identified. We have used mutational analysis of the viral end LTR sequence, in vitro selection of optimal viral end sequences, and specific photocrosslinking to identify regions of integrase that interact with specific bases in the LTR termini. The results highlight the involvement of the disordered loop of the integrase core domain, specifically residues Q148 and Y143, in binding to the terminal portion of the viral DNA ends. Additionally, we have identified positions upstream in the LTR termini which interact with the C-terminal domain of integrase, providing evidence for the role of that domain in stabilization of viral DNA binding. Finally, we have located a region centered 12 bases from the viral DNA terminus which appears essential for viral end DNA binding in the presence of magnesium, but not in the presence of manganese, suggesting a differential effect of divalent cations on sequence-specific binding. These results help to define important regions of contact between integrase and viral DNA, and assist in the formulation of a molecular model of this vital interaction. PMID:9755183

  3. Controls on Extreme Droughts and Adaptation Strategies in Semiarid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, B. R.; Cook, C.; Fernando, D. N.; LeBlanc, M.

    2012-12-01

    Increasing vulnerability to droughts with reduced per capita water storage, particularly in semiarid regions, underscores the need for predictive understanding of drought controls and development of adaptation strategies for water resources management. In this study we evaluate causes of major droughts in southwest and southcentral US (California and Texas) and southeast Australia (Murray Darling Basin). Impacts of climate cycles (ENSO, PDO, AMO, NAO, IOD) and atmospheric circulation on drought initiation and persistence are examined. Effects of drought on surface water reservoir storage, groundwater storage, irrigation, and crop production are compared. Adaptation strategies being evaluated include water transfers among sectors, particularly from irrigated agriculture to other groups, increasing storage using managed aquifer recharge, water reuse, and development of new water sources (e.g. seawater desalination). It is critical to develop a broad portfolio of water sources to increase resilience to future droughts.

  4. 40 CFR 81.77 - Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.77 Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region. The Puerto Rico Air Quality Control...

  5. 40 CFR 81.77 - Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.77 Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region. The Puerto Rico Air Quality Control...

  6. 40 CFR 81.77 - Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.77 Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region. The Puerto Rico Air Quality Control...

  7. Factors controlling the regional distribution of vanadium in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Although the ingestion of vanadium (V) in drinking water may have possible adverse health effects, there have been relatively few studies of V in groundwater. Given the importance of groundwater as a source of drinking water in many areas of the world, this study examines the potential sources and geochemical processes that control the distribution of V in groundwater on a regional scale. Potential sources of V to groundwater include dissolution of V rich rocks, and waste streams from industrial processes. Geochemical processes such as adsorption/desorption, precipitation/dissolution, and chemical transformations control V concentrations in groundwater. Based on thermodynamic data and laboratory studies, V concentrations are expected to be highest in samples collected from oxic and alkaline groundwater. However, the extent to which thermodynamic data and laboratory results apply to the actual distribution of V in groundwater is not well understood. More than 8400 groundwater samples collected in California were used in this study. Of these samples, high (> or = 50 μg/L) and moderate (25 to 49 μg/L) V concentrations were most frequently detected in regions where both source rock and favorable geochemical conditions occurred. The distribution of V concentrations in groundwater samples suggests that significant sources of V are mafic and andesitic rock. Anthropogenic activities do not appear to be a significant contributor of V to groundwater in this study. High V concentrations in groundwater samples analyzed in this study were almost always associated with oxic and alkaline groundwater conditions, which is consistent with predictions based on thermodynamic data.

  8. Whole genome sequence analyses of Xylella fastidiosa PD strains from different geographical regions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome sequences were determined for two Pierce’s disease (PD) causing Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) strains, one from Florida and one from Taiwan. The Florida strain was ATCC 35879, the type of strain used as a standard reference for related taxonomy research. By contrast, the Taiwan strain used was only...

  9. [Comparison of sequences of the hemagglutinin gene and phylogenetical analysis of H9 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from some regions in China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongqi; Cheng, Jian; Peng, Daxin; Jia, Lijun; Zhang, Rukuan; Liu, Xiufan

    2002-06-01

    In order to explore the genetic mutaions of the hemagglutinin(HA) gene and the law of molecular epidemiology of H9 subtype avian influenza viruses in China, 23 H9 subtype avian influenza viruses(AIVs) were isolated from 12 provinces of China in recent years. Their nucleotide sequences of cDNA of HA gene were determined by RT-PCR and sequencing. Their nucleotide and putaive amino acid sequences homology was compared. The results showed that their nucleotide sequence homology was from 94.1% to 100% and that amino acid sequence homology was 95.4% to 100%. The sequences of the HA gene of these isolates were analyzed and compared with that of another 8 isolates from reference. The similedty indicated that HK170499 isolated from Hong Kong was close to the 2 isolates of Japan. And of the 31 isolates with complete HA gene sequences there were 5 isolates, HA gene of which were loss of one potelltial glycosylation site, which were CKGS199, CKTJ196, CKT296, CKSH300 and CKBJ197. Then 1098 nucleotide regions (bases 55 to 1,152) of HA gene of 23 isolates in this study were analyzed phylogenetically and compared with sequences from 31 H9 subtype viruses available in the GenBank database. Although considerable variation at the cleavage sites of the different viruses was observed, giving 10 different amino acid motits, none had multiple basic amino acids that correlate with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) isolates. Examination of amino acid sequences involved in repeptor binding site(RBS) revealed that the amino acid residue at position 191 characteristically distributed in the 54 isolates, that is, this amino acid residue of the isolates of mainland China and several Hong Kong strains was Asn(N) and that of the others was His(H). And the 141 143 amino acid residues, involved in forming the potential glycosylation sites, had the similary characteristic distribution with the 191aa position. The isolates with Asn-191. excluding CKBJ197, had NVS in the position 141aa143aa

  10. Phylogeographic study of brown trout from Serbia, based on mitochondrial DNA control region analysis

    PubMed Central

    Marić, Saša; Sušnik, Simona; Simonović, Predrag; Snoj, Aleš

    2006-01-01

    In order to illuminate the phylogeography of brown trout (Salmo trutta) populations in the Balkan state of Serbia, the 561 bp 5'-end of mtDNA control region of 101 individuals originating from upland tributaries of the Danubian, Aegean and Adriatic drainages were sequenced and compared to corresponding brown trout sequences obtained in previous studies. Among 15 haplotypes found, 14 were considered native, representing the Danubian and Adriatic lineages of the brown trout, while one haplotype (ATcs1), found only in two individuals originating from two stocked rivers, corresponded to the Atlantic lineage and was considered introduced. Native haplotypes exhibited a strong geographic pattern of distribution: the Danubian haplotypes were strictly confined to the Danubian drainage, while the Adriatic haplotypes dominated in the Aegean and Adriatic drainages; most of the total molecular variance (69%) was attributed to differences among the drainages. Phylogenetic reconstruction, supplemented with seven haplotypes newly described in this study, suggested a sister position of the Atlantic-Danubian and Adriatic-Mediterranean-marmoratus ("southern") phylogenetic group, and pointed to the existence of a distinct clade, detected within the "southern" group. The data obtained confirmed our expectation of the existence of high genetic diversity in Balkan trout populations, and we recommend more widespread surveys covering trout stocks from the region. PMID:16790230

  11. Research on the Quaternary fluvial geomorphological surface sequence of the foreland region in southern Longmen Shan, eastern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dawei; Zhang, Shimin; Li, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Research on the complex structure of the Longmen Shan foreland is of great significance for understanding the tectonism of the eastern Tibetan Plateau. Therefore, using field survey of abandoned alluvial fans that developed during the middle Pleistocene and the terraces of the modern Qingyi River, a geomorphological surface sequence for the foreland region was established to study the tectonic surface processes. We know that the deformations of river terraces can serve as foundations for the study of tectonic activity. Because the Qingyi River ran through the foreland region in the south range of Longmen Shan, it is an appropriate research area and was adopted to solve these problems. However, in the humid temperate region, the terraces are strongly eroded and hardly retain continuous morphological surfaces. In addition, no marker horizons are available that can be utilized to restrain the corresponding relationships among terraces at the same level. To solve these problems, high-precision field measurements of the terraces and alluvial fan were made, and a series of long cross sections were acquired to determine the spatial relationships between the geomorphological surfaces; moreover, based on major element tests and grain size analyses, we found that the sediments of the geomorphological surfaces at all levels had favorable corresponding relationships. Using those specific analyses of geomorphological surfaces and sediments, a geomorphological surface sequence was derived for the foreland region. The surface sequence can be employed to study the tectonism of the foreland region over larger spatial and temporal ranges rather than using the limited modern terraces. In addition, after the ages of the geomorphological surfaces at various levels were further tested, the evolution of Qingyi River especially its two migrations since the middle Pleistocene in the foreland was determined.

  12. Synthesis, structure, and properties of α,β-linked oligothiazoles with controlled sequence.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Takuya; Imamura, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Kyohei; Kimura, Yuka; Katao, Shohei; Hashimoto, Yuichiro; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2014-10-13

    α,β-Linked oligothiazoles with head-to-tail connectivity are presented as a new family of helical scaffolds. Combinations of palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions at the 5- and 4-positions of 2-phenylthiazole led to the synthesis of oligo(2-phenylthiazoles) with ortho linkages with a variety of defined sequences. The secondary structures of the α,β-linked oligo(2-phenylthiazoles) showed a clear dependence on their sequences. X-ray crystallography of the trimer, tetramer, and hexamer with head-to-tail connection revealed the formation of a helical structure, which was stabilized by a combination of intramolecular forces, including interheteroatom (S⋅⋅⋅N), CH-π, and π-π interactions. The introduction of a chiral end-group successfully led to the induction of chirality into the helical conformations. Programmable sequences for controlled geometries and photofunctions have been demonstrated through the manifold connection pathways in α,β-linked oligothiazoles.

  13. Identification of clustered YY1 binding sites in Imprinting Control Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J D; Hinz, A; Bergmann, A; Huang, J; Ovcharenko, I; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-04-19

    Mammalian genomic imprinting is regulated by Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) that are usually associated with tandem arrays of transcription factor binding sites. In the current study, the sequence features derived from a tandem array of YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR (differentially methylated region) led us to identify three additional clustered YY1 binding sites, which are also localized within the DMRs of Xist, Tsix, and Nespas. These regions have been shown to play a critical role as ICRs for the regulation of surrounding genes. These ICRs have maintained a tandem array of YY1 binding sites during mammalian evolution. The in vivo binding of YY1 to these regions is allele-specific and only to the unmethylated active alleles. Promoter/enhancer assays suggest that a tandem array of YY1 binding sites function as a potential orientation-dependent enhancer. Insulator assays revealed that the enhancer-blocking activity is detected only in the YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR but not in the YY1 binding sites of other DMRs. Overall, our identification of three additional clustered YY1 binding sites in imprinted domains suggests a significant role for YY1 in mammalian genomic imprinting.

  14. An electrooculogram-based binary saccade sequence classification (BSSC) technique for augmentative communication and control.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Johnalan; Burke, Edward; Condron, James

    2009-01-01

    In the field of assistive technology, the electrooculogram (EOG) can be used as a channel of communication and the basis of a man-machine interface. For many people with severe motor disabilities, simple actions such as changing the TV channel require assistance. This paper describes a method of detecting saccadic eye movements and the use of a saccade sequence classification algorithm to facilitate communication and control. Saccades are fast eye movements that occurs when a person's gaze jumps from one fixation point to another. The classification is based on pre-defined sequences of saccades, guided by a static visual template (e.g. a page or poster). The template, consisting of a table of symbols each having a clearly identifiable fixation point, is situated within view of the user. To execute a particular command, the user moves his or her gaze through a pre-defined path of eye movements. This results in a well-formed sequence of saccades which are translated into a command if a match is found in a library of predefined sequences. A coordinate transformation algorithm is applied to each candidate sequence of recorded saccades to mitigate the effect of changes in the user's position and orientation relative to the visual template. Upon recognition of a saccade sequence from the library, its associated command is executed. A preliminary experiment in which two subjects were instructed to perform a series of command sequences consisting of 8 different commands are presented in the final sections. The system is also shown to be extensible to facilitate convenient text entry via an alphabetic visual template. PMID:19965222

  15. The human growth hormone gene is regulated by a multicomponent locus control region.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, B K; Monks, B R; Liebhaber, S A; Cooke, N E

    1995-01-01

    The five-member human growth hormone (hGH)/chorionic somatomammotropin (hCS) gene cluster encodes the pituitary-specific hGH-N gene and four highly related genes (hGH-V, hCS-A, hCS-B, and hCS-L) that are expressed only in the placenta. When the hGH-N or hCS-A gene, together with all previously identified cis-acting regulatory sequences, was integrated into the mouse genome, it was expressed only sporadically and at low levels in the transgenic target organs. DNase I mapping of chromatin from expressing and nonexpressing cell types was used to identify a pituitary-specific set of DNase I-hypersensitive sites (HS) and a set of HS common to both the pituitary and placenta, centered approximately 15 and 30 kb 5' of hGH-N, respectively. When contained on a cosmid insert in their native genomic configuration, these HS consistently directed high-level, pituitary-specific expression of hGH-N in transgenic mice and appeared to define a locus control region required for hGH-N expression. Individually, each set of HS was able to mediate position-independent hGH-N expression in the pituitary but demonstrated loss of physiologic control and loss of tissue specificity. The gene-proximal set of HS contained a potent enhancer activity in the pituitary, while the more distal set appeared to function primarily to establish site-of-integration independence. These data indicate that synergistic interactions among multiple elements are required to restrict hGH-N transcription to the pituitary and generate appropriate levels of expression. In addition, these results suggest a role for both shared and unique regulatory sequences in locus control region-mediated expression of the hGH/hCS gene cluster in the pituitary and possibly the placenta. PMID:8524268

  16. Three ingredients for Improved global aftershock forecasts: Tectonic region, time-dependent catalog incompleteness, and inter-sequence variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, Morgan T.; Van Der Elst, Nicholas; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.; Felzer, Karen; Michael, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Following a large earthquake, seismic hazard can be orders of magnitude higher than the long‐term average as a result of aftershock triggering. Because of this heightened hazard, emergency managers and the public demand rapid, authoritative, and reliable aftershock forecasts. In the past, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) aftershock forecasts following large global earthquakes have been released on an ad hoc basis with inconsistent methods, and in some cases aftershock parameters adapted from California. To remedy this, the USGS is currently developing an automated aftershock product based on the Reasenberg and Jones (1989) method that will generate more accurate forecasts. To better capture spatial variations in aftershock productivity and decay, we estimate regional aftershock parameters for sequences within the García et al. (2012) tectonic regions. We find that regional variations for mean aftershock productivity reach almost a factor of 10. We also develop a method to account for the time‐dependent magnitude of completeness following large events in the catalog. In addition to estimating average sequence parameters within regions, we develop an inverse method to estimate the intersequence parameter variability. This allows for a more complete quantification of the forecast uncertainties and Bayesian updating of the forecast as sequence‐specific information becomes available.

  17. A single nucleotide polymorphism and sequence analysis of CSN1S1 gene promoter region in Chinese Bos grunniens (yak).

    PubMed

    Bai, W L; Yin, R H; Dou, Q L; Yang, J C; Zhao, S J; Ma, Z J; Yin, R L; Luo, G B; Zhao, Z H

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the polymorphism of the CSN1S1 gene promoter region in 4 Chinese yak breeds, and compare the yak CSN1S1 gene promoter region sequences with other ruminants. A Polymerase Chain Reaction-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism protocol was developed for rapid genotyping of the yak CSN1S1 gene. One hundred fifty-eight animals from 4 Chinese yak breeds were genotyped at the CSN1S1 locus using the protocol developed. A single nucleotide polymorphism of the CSN1S1 gene promoter region has been identified in all yak breeds investigated. The polymorphism consists of a single nucleotide substitution G-->A at position 386 of the CSN1S1 gene promoter region, resulting in two alleles named, respectively, G(386) and A(386), based on the nucleotide at position 386. The allele G(386) was found to be more common in the animals investigated. The corresponding nucleotide sequences in GenBank of yak (having the same nucleotides as allele G(386) in this study), bovine, water buffalo, sheep, and goat had similarity of 99.68%, 99.35%, 97.42%, 95.14%, and 94.19%, respectively, with the yak allele A(386.).

  18. Population and forensic genetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA control region variation from six major provinces in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung Beom; Kim, Ki Cheol; Kim, Wook

    2015-07-01

    We generated complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences from 704 unrelated individuals residing in six major provinces in Korea. In addition to our earlier survey of the distribution of mtDNA haplogroup variation, a total of 560 different haplotypes characterized by 271 polymorphic sites were identified, of which 473 haplotypes were unique. The gene diversity and random match probability were 0.9989 and 0.0025, respectively. According to the pairwise comparison of the 704 control region sequences, the mean number of pairwise differences between individuals was 13.47±6.06. Based on the result of mtDNA control region sequences, pairwise FST genetic distances revealed genetic homogeneity of the Korean provinces on a peninsular level, except in samples from Jeju Island. This result indicates there may be a need to formulate a local mtDNA database for Jeju Island, to avoid bias in forensic parameter estimates caused by genetic heterogeneity of the population. Thus, the present data may help not only in personal identification but also in determining maternal lineages to provide an expanded and reliable Korean mtDNA database. These data will be available on the EMPOP database via accession number EMP00661.

  19. Genome Sequences of 11 Brucella abortus Isolates from Persistently Infected Italian Regions.

    PubMed

    Garofolo, Giuliano; Foster, Jeffrey T; Drees, Kevin; Zilli, Katiuscia; Platone, Ilenia; Ancora, Massimo; Cammà, Cesare; De Massis, Fabrizio; Calistri, Paolo; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Bovine brucellosis, typically caused by Brucella abortus, has been eradicated from much of the developed world. However, the disease remains prevalent in southern Italy, persisting as a public and livestock health concern. We report here the whole-genome sequences of 11 isolates from cattle (Bos taurus) and water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) that are representative of the current genetic diversity of B. abortus lineages circulating in Italy. PMID:26679575

  20. Genome Sequences of 11 Brucella abortus Isolates from Persistently Infected Italian Regions

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Jeffrey T.; Drees, Kevin; Zilli, Katiuscia; Platone, Ilenia; Ancora, Massimo; Cammà, Cesare; De Massis, Fabrizio; Calistri, Paolo; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Bovine brucellosis, typically caused by Brucella abortus, has been eradicated from much of the developed world. However, the disease remains prevalent in southern Italy, persisting as a public and livestock health concern. We report here the whole-genome sequences of 11 isolates from cattle (Bos taurus) and water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) that are representative of the current genetic diversity of B. abortus lineages circulating in Italy. PMID:26679575

  1. Genome Sequences of 11 Brucella abortus Isolates from Persistently Infected Italian Regions.

    PubMed

    Garofolo, Giuliano; Foster, Jeffrey T; Drees, Kevin; Zilli, Katiuscia; Platone, Ilenia; Ancora, Massimo; Cammà, Cesare; De Massis, Fabrizio; Calistri, Paolo; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta

    2015-12-17

    Bovine brucellosis, typically caused by Brucella abortus, has been eradicated from much of the developed world. However, the disease remains prevalent in southern Italy, persisting as a public and livestock health concern. We report here the whole-genome sequences of 11 isolates from cattle (Bos taurus) and water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) that are representative of the current genetic diversity of B. abortus lineages circulating in Italy.

  2. Patterns of sequence divergence and evolution of the S orthologous regions between Asian and African cultivated rice species.

    PubMed

    Guyot, Romain; Garavito, Andrea; Gavory, Frédérick; Samain, Sylvie; Tohme, Joe; Ghesquière, Alain; Lorieux, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    A strong postzygotic reproductive barrier separates the recently diverged Asian and African cultivated rice species, Oryza sativa and O. glaberrima. Recently a model of genetic incompatibilities between three adjacent loci: S(1)A, S(1) and S(1)B (called together the S(1) regions) interacting epistatically, was postulated to cause the allelic elimination of female gametes in interspecific hybrids. Two candidate factors for the S(1) locus (including a putative F-box gene) were proposed, but candidates for S(1)A and S(1)B remained undetermined. Here, to better understand the basis of the evolution of regions involved in reproductive isolation, we studied the genic and structural changes accumulated in the S(1) regions between orthologous sequences. First, we established an 813 kb genomic sequence in O. glaberrima, covering completely the S(1)A, S(1) and the majority of the S(1)B regions, and compared it with the orthologous regions of O. sativa. An overall strong structural conservation was observed, with the exception of three isolated regions of disturbed collinearity: (1) a local invasion of transposable elements around a putative F-box gene within S(1), (2) the multiple duplication and subsequent divergence of the same F-box gene within S(1)A, (3) an interspecific chromosomal inversion in S(1)B, which restricts recombination in our O. sativa×O. glaberrima crosses. Beside these few structural variations, a uniform conservative pattern of coding sequence divergence was found all along the S(1) regions. Hence, the S(1) regions have undergone no drastic variation in their recent divergence and evolution between O. sativa and O. glaberrima, suggesting that a small accumulation of genic changes, following a Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller (BDM) model, might be involved in the establishment of the sterility barrier. In this context, genetic incompatibilities involving the duplicated F-box genes as putative candidates, and a possible strengthening step involving the

  3. Patterns of Sequence Divergence and Evolution of the S1 Orthologous Regions between Asian and African Cultivated Rice Species

    PubMed Central

    Gavory, Frédérick; Samain, Sylvie; Tohme, Joe; Ghesquière, Alain; Lorieux, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    A strong postzygotic reproductive barrier separates the recently diverged Asian and African cultivated rice species, Oryza sativa and O. glaberrima. Recently a model of genetic incompatibilities between three adjacent loci: S1A, S1 and S1B (called together the S1 regions) interacting epistatically, was postulated to cause the allelic elimination of female gametes in interspecific hybrids. Two candidate factors for the S1 locus (including a putative F-box gene) were proposed, but candidates for S1A and S1B remained undetermined. Here, to better understand the basis of the evolution of regions involved in reproductive isolation, we studied the genic and structural changes accumulated in the S1 regions between orthologous sequences. First, we established an 813 kb genomic sequence in O. glaberrima, covering completely the S1A, S1 and the majority of the S1B regions, and compared it with the orthologous regions of O. sativa. An overall strong structural conservation was observed, with the exception of three isolated regions of disturbed collinearity: (1) a local invasion of transposable elements around a putative F-box gene within S1, (2) the multiple duplication and subsequent divergence of the same F-box gene within S1A, (3) an interspecific chromosomal inversion in S1B, which restricts recombination in our O. sativa×O. glaberrima crosses. Beside these few structural variations, a uniform conservative pattern of coding sequence divergence was found all along the S1 regions. Hence, the S1 regions have undergone no drastic variation in their recent divergence and evolution between O. sativa and O. glaberrima, suggesting that a small accumulation of genic changes, following a Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller (BDM) model, might be involved in the establishment of the sterility barrier. In this context, genetic incompatibilities involving the duplicated F-box genes as putative candidates, and a possible strengthening step involving the chromosomal inversion might participate to

  4. 40 CFR 81.88 - Billings Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air...: Region II. 481.169Helena Intrastate Air Quality Control Region: Region IV. 481.170Miles City...

  5. 40 CFR 81.88 - Billings Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air...: Region II. 481.169Helena Intrastate Air Quality Control Region: Region IV. 481.170Miles City...

  6. Helicobacter pylori cagA Promoter Region Sequences Influence CagA Expression and Interleukin 8 Secretion.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rui M; Pinto-Ribeiro, Ines; Wen, Xiaogang; Marcos-Pinto, Ricardo; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Carneiro, Fátima; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2016-02-15

    Heterogeneity at the Helicobacter pylori cagA gene promoter region has been linked to variation in CagA expression and gastric histopathology. Here, we characterized the cagA promoter and expression in 46 H. pylori strains from Portugal. Our results confirm the relationship between cagA promoter region variation and protein expression originally observed in strains from Colombia. We observed that individuals with intestinal metaplasia were all infected with H. pylori strains containing a specific cagA motif. Additionally, we provided novel functional evidence that strain-specific sequences in the cagA promoter region and CagA expression levels influence interleukin 8 secretion by the host gastric epithelial cells.

  7. Polymorphism of the 5' terminal region of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) RNA: incidence of three sequence types in isolates of different origin and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Ayllón, M A; López, C; Navas-Castillo, J; Garnsey, S M; Guerri, J; Flores, R; Moreno, P

    2001-01-01

    Sequences of the 5' terminal region of the genomic RNA from eight isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) were previously classified into three types (I, II and III), with intragroup sequence identity higher than 88% and intergroup sequence identity as low as 44%. Sequencing of an additional 58 cDNA clones from 15 virus isolates showed that all sequences could be unequivocally assigned to one of the three types previously established. The relative frequency of each sequence type was assessed in 57 CTV isolates of different geographic origin and pathogenic characteristics by RT-PCR with sets of type-specific primers using CTV dsRNA as template. None of the isolates yielded amplification of the type I or II sequences alone, but in 19 of them type III sequences were the only amplification product detected. Within isolates containing more than one sequence type, eight had type II and III sequences, 11 had type I and III sequences, and 19 had sequences of the three types. Isolates containing only type III sequences caused only mild to moderate symptoms in Mexican lime, an indicator species for most CTV isolates, whereas isolates causing stem pitting in sweet orange an/or grapefruit, generally contained sequences type II. None of the sequence types could be traced to a precise geographic area, as all types were detected in isolates from at least nine of the 12 countries from which samples were taken. PMID:11266215

  8. Comparative In silico Study of Sex-Determining Region Y (SRY) Protein Sequences Involved in Sex-Determining

    PubMed Central

    Vakili Azghandi, Masoume; Nasiri, Mohammadreza; Shamsa, Ali; Jalali, Mohsen; Shariati, Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The SRY gene (SRY) provides instructions for making a transcription factor called the sex-determining region Y protein. The sex-determining region Y protein causes a fetus to develop as a male. In this study, SRY of 15 spices included of human, chimpanzee, dog, pig, rat, cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep, horse, zebra, frog, urial, dolphin and killer whale were used for determine of bioinformatic differences. Methods: Nucleotide sequences of SRY were retrieved from the NCBI databank. Bioinformatic analysis of SRY is done by CLC Main Workbench version 5.5 and ClustalW (http:/www.ebi.ac.uk/clustalw/) and MEGA6 softwares. Results: The multiple sequence alignment results indicated that SRY protein sequences from Orcinus orca (killer whale) and Tursiopsaduncus (dolphin) have least genetic distance of 0.33 in these 15 species and are 99.67% identical at the amino acid level. Homosapiens and Pantroglodytes (chimpanzee) have the next lowest genetic distance of 1.35 and are 98.65% identical at the amino acid level. Conclusion: These findings indicate that the SRY proteins are conserved in the 15 species, and their evolutionary relationships are similar. PMID:27536700

  9. Sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region reveals a novel clade of Ichthyophonus sp. from rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, C.; Purcell, M.K.; Gregg, J.L.; LaPatra, S.E.; Winton, J.R.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    The mesomycetozoean parasite Ichthyophonus hoferi is most commonly associated with marine fish hosts but also occurs in some components of the freshwater rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss aquaculture industry in Idaho, USA. It is not certain how the parasite was introduced into rainbow trout culture, but it might have been associated with the historical practice of feeding raw, ground common carp Cyprinus carpio that were caught by commercial fisherman. Here, we report a major genetic division between west coast freshwater and marine isolates of Ichthyophonus hoferi. Sequence differences were not detected in 2 regions of the highly conserved small subunit (18S) rDNA gene; however, nucleotide variation was seen in internal transcribed spacer loci (ITS1 and ITS2), both within and among the isolates. Intra-isolate variation ranged from 2.4 to 7.6 nucleotides over a region consisting of ~740 bp. Majority consensus sequences from marine/anadromous hosts differed in only 0 to 3 nucleotides (99.6 to 100% nucleotide identity), while those derived from freshwater rainbow trout had no nucleotide substitutions relative to each other. However, the consensus sequences between isolates from freshwater rainbow trout and those from marine/anadromous hosts differed in 13 to 16 nucleotides (97.8 to 98.2% nucleotide identity).

  10. Genome-Based Identification of Active Prophage Regions by Next Generation Sequencing in Bacillus licheniformis DSM13

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, Robert; Rodríguez, David Pintor; Hollensteiner, Jacqueline; Dietrich, Sascha; Leimbach, Andreas; Hoppert, Michael; Liesegang, Heiko; Volland, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Prophages are viruses, which have integrated their genomes into the genome of a bacterial host. The status of the prophage genome can vary from fully intact with the potential to form infective particles to a remnant state where only a few phage genes persist. Prophages have impact on the properties of their host and are therefore of great interest for genomic research and strain design. Here we present a genome- and next generation sequencing (NGS)-based approach for identification and activity evaluation of prophage regions. Seven prophage or prophage-like regions were identified in the genome of Bacillus licheniformis DSM13. Six of these regions show similarity to members of the Siphoviridae phage family. The remaining region encodes the B. licheniformis orthologue of the PBSX prophage from Bacillus subtilis. Analysis of isolated phage particles (induced by mitomycin C) from the wild-type strain and prophage deletion mutant strains revealed activity of the prophage regions BLi_Pp2 (PBSX-like), BLi_Pp3 and BLi_Pp6. In contrast to BLi_Pp2 and BLi_Pp3, neither phage DNA nor phage particles of BLi_Pp6 could be visualized. However, the ability of prophage BLi_Pp6 to generate particles could be confirmed by sequencing of particle-protected DNA mapping to prophage locus BLi_Pp6. The introduced NGS-based approach allows the investigation of prophage regions and their ability to form particles. Our results show that this approach increases the sensitivity of prophage activity analysis and can complement more conventional approaches such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PMID:25811873

  11. Molecular identification of isolated fungi from unopened containers of greek yogurt by DNA sequencing of internal transcribed spacer region.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Jacobs, Emily; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil

    2014-06-25

    In our previous study, we described the development of an internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1 sequencing method, and used this protocol in species-identification of isolated fungi collected from the manufacturing areas of a compounding company known to have caused the multistate fungal meningitis outbreak in the United States. In this follow-up study, we have analyzed the unopened vials of Greek yogurt from the recalled batch to determine the possible cause of microbial contamination in the product. A total of 15 unopened vials of Greek yogurt belonging to the recalled batch were examined for the detection of fungi in these samples known to cause foodborne illness following conventional microbiological protocols. Fungi were isolated from all of the 15 Greek yogurt samples analyzed. The isolated fungi were genetically typed by DNA sequencing of PCR-amplified ITS1 region of rRNA gene. Analysis of data confirmed all of the isolated fungal isolates from the Greek yogurt to be Rhizomucor variabilis. The generated ITS1 sequences matched 100% with the published sequences available in GenBank. In addition, these yogurt samples were also tested for the presence of five types of bacteria (Salmonella, Listeria, Staphylococcus, Bacillus and Escherichia coli) causing foodborne disease in humans, and found negative for all of them.

  12. Construction and use of chimeric SPR/phi 3T DNA methyltransferases in the definition of sequence recognizing enzyme regions.

    PubMed Central

    Balganesh, T S; Reiners, L; Lauster, R; Noyer-Weidner, M; Wilke, K; Trautner, T A

    1987-01-01

    Multispecific DNA methyltransferases (Mtases) of temperate Bacillus subtilis phages SPR and phi 3T methylate the internal cytosine of the sequence GGCC. They differ in their capacity to methylate additional sequences. These are CCGG and CC(A/T)GG in SPR and GCNGC in phi 3T. Introducing unique restriction sites at equivalent locations within the two genes facilitated the construction of chimeric genes. These expressed Mtase activity at a level comparable to that of the parental genes. The methylation specificity of chimeric enzymes was correlated with the location of chimeric fusions. This analysis, which also included the use of mutant genes, showed that domains involved in the recognition of target sequences unique to each enzyme [CCGG, CC(A/T)GG or GCNGC] are represented by the central non-conserved parts of the proteins, whilst recognition of the sequence (GGCC), which is a target for both enzymes, is determined by an adjacent conserved region. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2828032

  13. Molecular Identification of Isolated Fungi from Unopened Containers of Greek Yogurt by DNA Sequencing of Internal Transcribed Spacer Region

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Irshad M.; Jacobs, Emily; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    In our previous study, we described the development of an internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1 sequencing method, and used this protocol in species-identification of isolated fungi collected from the manufacturing areas of a compounding company known to have caused the multistate fungal meningitis outbreak in the United States. In this follow-up study, we have analyzed the unopened vials of Greek yogurt from the recalled batch to determine the possible cause of microbial contamination in the product. A total of 15 unopened vials of Greek yogurt belonging to the recalled batch were examined for the detection of fungi in these samples known to cause foodborne illness following conventional microbiological protocols. Fungi were isolated from all of the 15 Greek yogurt samples analyzed. The isolated fungi were genetically typed by DNA sequencing of PCR-amplified ITS1 region of rRNA gene. Analysis of data confirmed all of the isolated fungal isolates from the Greek yogurt to be Rhizomucor variabilis. The generated ITS1 sequences matched 100% with the published sequences available in GenBank. In addition, these yogurt samples were also tested for the presence of five types of bacteria (Salmonella, Listeria, Staphylococcus, Bacillus and Escherichia coli) causing foodborne disease in humans, and found negative for all of them. PMID:25438008

  14. Cloning, sequencing, and functional analysis of the 5'-flanking region of the rat 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid/dihydrodiol dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    Lin, H K; Penning, T M

    1995-09-15

    Rat liver 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid/dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (3 alpha-HSD/DD) is a member of the aldo-keto reductase gene superfamily. It displays high constitutive expression and inactivates circulating steroid hormones and suppresses the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon anti- and syn-diol-epoxides (ultimate carcinogens). To elucidate mechanisms responsible for constitutive expression of the 3 alpha-HSD/DD gene a rat genomic library obtained from adult Sprague-Dawley female liver (HaeIII partial digest) was screened, using a probe corresponding to the 5'-end of the cDNA (-15 to +250), and a 15.8-kb genomic clone was isolated. Sequencing revealed that 6.3 kb contained exon 1 (+16 to +138 bp) plus additional introns and exons. The transcription start site (+1) was located by primer extension analysis, and the initiation codon, ATG, was located at +55 bp. The remaining 9.5 kb represented the 5'-flanking region of the rat 3 alpha-HSD/DD gene. A 1.6-kb fragment of this region was sequenced. A TATTTAA sequence (TATA box) was found at 33 bp upstream from the major transcription start site. cis-acting elements responsible for the constitutive expression of the rat 3 alpha-HSD/DD gene were located on the 5'-flanking region by transient transfection of reporter-gene (chloramphenicol acetyl transferase, CAT) constructs into human hepatoma cells (HepG2). CAT assays identified the basal promoter between (-199 and +55 bp), the presence of a proximal enhancer (-498 to -199 bp) which stimulated CAT activity 6-fold, the existence of a powerful silencer (-755 to -498 bp), and a strong distal enhancer (-4.0 to -2.0 kb) which increased CAT activity by 20-40-fold. A computer search of available consensus sequences for trans-acting factors revealed that a cluster of Oct-sites were uniquely located in the silencer region. Using the negative response element (-797 to -498 bp) as a probe and nuclear extracts from HepG2 cells, three bands were identified by gel mobility shift

  15. Special structure of mitochondrial DNA control region and phylogenetic relationship among individuals of the black rockfish, Sebastes schlegelii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xiumei; Song, Na; Gao, Tianxiang

    2013-04-01

    This study deals with the structure of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (CR) of the black rockfish, Sebastes schlegelii. Two termination-associated sequences (TASs), two complementary termination-associated sequences (cTASs), and conserved sequence block (CSB), such as CSB-F, CSB-E, CSB-D, CSB1, CSB2, and CSB3, were detected in S. schlegelii. The results indicated that the structures of these blocks are similar to most marine fishes, but it is special that there are two TASs and two cTASs in the CR of S. schlegelii. One conserved region was found from 450 bp to the end of the CR, which is also a special feature of S. schlegelii. All sequences of CSB1, CSB2, and CSB3 blocks are the consensus among different individuals, which is quite different from most vertebrates. In addition, the complete mtDNA CR sequences and the first 449 bp of the CR are used to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of S. schlegelii. The phylogenetic trees show a lack of genetic structure among individuals. This study also indicated a signal that the genetic diversity might be similar between the wild and cultured individuals, which may be helpful to the fisheries management. PMID:23072475

  16. Controlled ribonucleotide tailing of cDNA ends (CRTC) by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase: a new approach in PCR-mediated analysis of mRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, W M; Mueller, M W

    1996-05-01

    Controlled ribonucleotide tailing of cDNA ends (CRTC) by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase is a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated technique that was developed to facilitate cloning and direct sequence analysis of complete 5'-terminal unknown coding regions of rare RNA molecules. In contrast with standard tailing protocols using dNTPs as the substrate, ribo-tailing of cDNA ends is easily controllable, self-limited (from two to four rNMP incorporations) and highly efficient (>98%). By virtue of the homopolymeric ribo-tail, the modified cDNA is anchored to the 3' overhang of a double-stranded DNA-adaptor in a T4 DNA ligase-dependent ligation. PCR amplification, mediated by two sequence-specific primers, yields the desired unique product suitable for cloning and dideoxy-sequencing.

  17. 40 CFR 81.59 - Cumberland-Keyser Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.59 Cumberland-Keyser Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Cumberland-Keyser Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Maryland-West Virginia) has been revised to...

  18. 40 CFR 81.16 - Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.16 Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Colorado) consists of the territorial...

  19. 40 CFR 81.43 - Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.43 Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Michigan) consists of the territorial...

  20. 40 CFR 81.49 - Southeast Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.49 Southeast Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southeast Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region is redesignated to consist of the territorial...

  1. 40 CFR 81.62 - Northeast Mississippi Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.62 Northeast Mississippi Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Alabama-Mississippi-Tennessee Interstate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the...

  2. 40 CFR 81.24 - Niagara Frontier Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.24 Niagara Frontier Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Niagara Frontier Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New York) consists of the territorial...

  3. 40 CFR 81.28 - Metropolitan Baltimore Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.28 Metropolitan Baltimore Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Baltimore Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Maryland) consists of the territorial...

  4. 40 CFR 81.34 - Metropolitan Dayton Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.34 Metropolitan Dayton Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Dayton Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  5. 40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Central Oklahoma...

  6. 40 CFR 81.14 - Metropolitan Chicago Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.14 Metropolitan Chicago Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Chicago Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Illinois-Indiana) is revised to consist of...

  7. 40 CFR 81.19 - Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.19 Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Massachusetts) consists of the territorial...

  8. 40 CFR 81.59 - Cumberland-Keyser Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.59 Cumberland-Keyser Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Cumberland-Keyser Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Maryland-West Virginia) has been revised to...

  9. 40 CFR 81.75 - Metropolitan Charlotte Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.75 Metropolitan Charlotte Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Charlotte Interstate Air Quality Control Region (North Carolina-South Carolina) has been...

  10. 40 CFR 81.44 - Metropolitan Memphis Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.44 Metropolitan Memphis Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Memphis Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Arkansas-Mississippi-Tennessee) consists of...

  11. 40 CFR 81.31 - Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.31 Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Rhode Island-Massachusetts) consists of...

  12. 40 CFR 81.14 - Metropolitan Chicago Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.14 Metropolitan Chicago Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Chicago Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Illinois-Indiana) is revised to consist of...

  13. 40 CFR 81.30 - Southeastern Wisconsin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.30 Southeastern Wisconsin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Milwaukee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Wisconsin) has been renamed the...

  14. 40 CFR 81.75 - Metropolitan Charlotte Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.75 Metropolitan Charlotte Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Charlotte Interstate Air Quality Control Region (North Carolina-South Carolina) has been...

  15. 40 CFR 81.24 - Niagara Frontier Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.24 Niagara Frontier Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Niagara Frontier Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New York) consists of the territorial...

  16. 40 CFR 81.34 - Metropolitan Dayton Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.34 Metropolitan Dayton Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Dayton Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  17. 40 CFR 81.59 - Cumberland-Keyser Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.59 Cumberland-Keyser Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Cumberland-Keyser Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Maryland-West Virginia) has been revised to...

  18. 40 CFR 81.62 - Northeast Mississippi Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.62 Northeast Mississippi Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Alabama-Mississippi-Tennessee Interstate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the...

  19. 40 CFR 81.30 - Southeastern Wisconsin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.30 Southeastern Wisconsin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Milwaukee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Wisconsin) has been renamed the...

  20. 40 CFR 81.19 - Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.19 Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Massachusetts) consists of the territorial...

  1. 40 CFR 81.31 - Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.31 Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Rhode Island-Massachusetts) consists of...

  2. 40 CFR 81.34 - Metropolitan Dayton Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.34 Metropolitan Dayton Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Dayton Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  3. 40 CFR 81.44 - Metropolitan Memphis Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.44 Metropolitan Memphis Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Memphis Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Arkansas-Mississippi-Tennessee) consists of...

  4. 40 CFR 81.14 - Metropolitan Chicago Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.14 Metropolitan Chicago Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Chicago Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Illinois-Indiana) is revised to consist of...

  5. 40 CFR 81.19 - Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.19 Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Massachusetts) consists of the territorial...

  6. 40 CFR 81.28 - Metropolitan Baltimore Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.28 Metropolitan Baltimore Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Baltimore Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Maryland) consists of the territorial...

  7. 40 CFR 81.23 - Southwest Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.23 Southwest Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southwest Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region is redesignated to consist of the...

  8. 40 CFR 81.62 - Northeast Mississippi Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.62 Northeast Mississippi Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Alabama-Mississippi-Tennessee Interstate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the...

  9. 40 CFR 81.16 - Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.16 Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Colorado) consists of the territorial...

  10. 40 CFR 81.20 - Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.20 Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana) is revised to consist...

  11. 40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Central Oklahoma...

  12. 40 CFR 81.43 - Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.43 Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Michigan) consists of the territorial...

  13. 40 CFR 81.49 - Southeast Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.49 Southeast Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southeast Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region is redesignated to consist of the territorial...

  14. 40 CFR 81.16 - Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.16 Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Colorado) consists of the territorial...

  15. 40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Central Oklahoma...

  16. 40 CFR 81.31 - Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.31 Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Rhode Island-Massachusetts) consists of...

  17. 40 CFR 81.23 - Southwest Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.23 Southwest Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southwest Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region is redesignated to consist of the...

  18. 40 CFR 81.75 - Metropolitan Charlotte Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.75 Metropolitan Charlotte Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Charlotte Interstate Air Quality Control Region (North Carolina-South Carolina) has been...

  19. 40 CFR 81.23 - Southwest Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.23 Southwest Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southwest Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region is redesignated to consist of the...

  20. 40 CFR 81.34 - Metropolitan Dayton Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.34 Metropolitan Dayton Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Dayton Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  1. 40 CFR 81.20 - Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.20 Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana) is revised to consist...

  2. 40 CFR 81.44 - Metropolitan Memphis Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.44 Metropolitan Memphis Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Memphis Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Arkansas-Mississippi-Tennessee) consists of...

  3. 40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Central Oklahoma...

  4. 40 CFR 81.23 - Southwest Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.23 Southwest Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southwest Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region is redesignated to consist of the...

  5. 40 CFR 81.49 - Southeast Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.49 Southeast Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southeast Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region is redesignated to consist of the territorial...

  6. 40 CFR 81.59 - Cumberland-Keyser Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.59 Cumberland-Keyser Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Cumberland-Keyser Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Maryland-West Virginia) has been revised to...

  7. 40 CFR 81.48 - Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.48 Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Vermont-New York) has been revised to consist of...

  8. 40 CFR 81.31 - Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.31 Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Rhode Island-Massachusetts) consists of...

  9. 40 CFR 81.19 - Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.19 Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Massachusetts) consists of the territorial...

  10. 40 CFR 81.41 - Metropolitan Birmingham Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.41 Metropolitan Birmingham Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Birmingham Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Alabama) has been revised to consist of...

  11. 40 CFR 81.41 - Metropolitan Birmingham Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.41 Metropolitan Birmingham Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Birmingham Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Alabama) has been revised to consist of...

  12. 40 CFR 81.16 - Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.16 Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Colorado) consists of the territorial...

  13. 40 CFR 81.48 - Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.48 Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Vermont-New York) has been revised to consist of...

  14. 40 CFR 81.48 - Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.48 Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Vermont-New York) has been revised to consist of...

  15. 40 CFR 81.20 - Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.20 Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana) is revised to consist...

  16. 40 CFR 81.44 - Metropolitan Memphis Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.44 Metropolitan Memphis Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Memphis Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Arkansas-Mississippi-Tennessee) consists of...

  17. 40 CFR 81.41 - Metropolitan Birmingham Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.41 Metropolitan Birmingham Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Birmingham Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Alabama) has been revised to consist of...

  18. 40 CFR 81.41 - Metropolitan Birmingham Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.41 Metropolitan Birmingham Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Birmingham Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Alabama) has been revised to consist of...

  19. 40 CFR 81.28 - Metropolitan Baltimore Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.28 Metropolitan Baltimore Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Baltimore Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Maryland) consists of the territorial...

  20. 40 CFR 81.43 - Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.43 Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Michigan) consists of the territorial...

  1. 40 CFR 81.34 - Metropolitan Dayton Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.34 Metropolitan Dayton Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Dayton Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  2. 40 CFR 81.43 - Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.43 Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Michigan) consists of the territorial...

  3. 40 CFR 81.30 - Southeastern Wisconsin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.30 Southeastern Wisconsin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Milwaukee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Wisconsin) has been renamed the...

  4. 40 CFR 81.14 - Metropolitan Chicago Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.14 Metropolitan Chicago Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Chicago Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Illinois-Indiana) is revised to consist of...

  5. 40 CFR 81.20 - Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.20 Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana) is revised to consist...

  6. 40 CFR 81.30 - Southeastern Wisconsin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.30 Southeastern Wisconsin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Milwaukee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Wisconsin) has been renamed the...

  7. 40 CFR 81.24 - Niagara Frontier Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.24 Niagara Frontier Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Niagara Frontier Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New York) consists of the territorial...

  8. 40 CFR 81.44 - Metropolitan Memphis Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.44 Metropolitan Memphis Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Memphis Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Arkansas-Mississippi-Tennessee) consists of...

  9. 40 CFR 81.14 - Metropolitan Chicago Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.14 Metropolitan Chicago Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Chicago Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Illinois-Indiana) is revised to consist of...

  10. 40 CFR 81.59 - Cumberland-Keyser Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.59 Cumberland-Keyser Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Cumberland-Keyser Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Maryland-West Virginia) has been revised to...

  11. 40 CFR 81.24 - Niagara Frontier Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.24 Niagara Frontier Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Niagara Frontier Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New York) consists of the territorial...

  12. 40 CFR 81.20 - Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.20 Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana) is revised to consist...

  13. 40 CFR 81.19 - Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.19 Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Massachusetts) consists of the territorial...

  14. 40 CFR 81.31 - Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.31 Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Rhode Island-Massachusetts) consists of...

  15. 40 CFR 81.30 - Southeastern Wisconsin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.30 Southeastern Wisconsin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Milwaukee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Wisconsin) has been renamed the...

  16. 40 CFR 81.48 - Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.48 Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Vermont-New York) has been revised to consist of...

  17. 40 CFR 81.49 - Southeast Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.49 Southeast Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southeast Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region is redesignated to consist of the territorial...

  18. 40 CFR 81.24 - Niagara Frontier Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.24 Niagara Frontier Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Niagara Frontier Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New York) consists of the territorial...

  19. 40 CFR 81.16 - Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.16 Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Colorado) consists of the territorial...

  20. 40 CFR 81.43 - Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.43 Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Michigan) consists of the territorial...